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Sample records for polymerization promoting protein

  1. Tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (TPPP1): A DNA-damage induced microtubule regulatory gene.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Alice; Bernard, Ora

    2013-11-01

    The eukaryotic cell cycle relies heavily on the mechanical forces vested by the dynamic rearrangement of the microtubule (MT) network. Tubulin Polymerization promoting Protein 1 (TPPP1) alters MT dynamics by driving MT polymerization as well as stabilization, via increasing MT acetylation. It increases MT rigidity, which results in reduced cell proliferation through downregulation of G1/S-phase and mitosis to G1-phase cell cycle transitioning. In this communication, we provide further evidence that TPPP1 may be an important regulator of genomic homeostasis. Our preliminary data show that long-term TPPP1 overexpression reduces cell viability via induction of apoptotic cell death pathways. Moreover, induction of DNA-damage results in increased TPPP1 expression, which is inhibited in the absence of expression of the tumor suppressor p53.

  2. Protein specific polymeric immunomicrospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Small, round, bio-compatible microspheres capable of covalently bonding proteins and having a uniform diameter below about 3500 A are prepared by substantially instantaneously initiating polymerization of an aqueous emulsion containing no more than 35% total monomer including an acrylic monomer substituted with a covalently bondable group such as hydroxyl, amino or carboxyl and a minor amount of a cross-linking agent.

  3. Caspase-11 and caspase-1 differentially modulate actin polymerization via RhoA and Slingshot proteins to promote bacterial clearance

    PubMed Central

    Caution, Kyle; Gavrilin, Mikhail A.; Tazi, Mia; Kanneganti, Apurva; Layman, Daniel; Hoque, Sheshadri; Krause, Kathrin; Amer, Amal O.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that include members of the NOD-like receptor family and caspase-1. Caspase-1 is required for the fusion of the Legionella vacuole with lysosomes. Caspase-11, independently of the inflammasome, also promotes phagolysosomal fusion. However, it is unclear how these proteases alter intracellular trafficking. Here, we show that caspase-11 and caspase-1 function in opposing manners to phosphorylate and dephosphorylate cofilin, respectively upon infection with Legionella. Caspase-11 targets cofilin via the RhoA GTPase, whereas caspase-1 engages the Slingshot phosphatase. The absence of either caspase-11 or caspase-1 maintains actin in the polymerized or depolymerized form, respectively and averts the fusion of pathogen-containing vacuoles with lysosomes. Therefore, caspase-11 and caspase-1 converge on the actin machinery with opposing effects to promote vesicular trafficking. PMID:26686473

  4. Gold-promoted styrene polymerization.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Juan; Hormigo, A Jesús; de Frémont, Pierre; Nolan, Steven P; Díaz-Requejo, M Mar; Pérez, Pedro J

    2008-02-14

    Styrene can be polymerized at room temperature in the presence of equimolar mixtures of the gold(III) complexes (NHC)AuBr3 (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene ligand) and NaBAr'4, in the first example of a gold-induced olefin polymerization reaction.

  5. Tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (Tppp1) phosphorylation by Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (rock) and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) inhibits microtubule dynamics to increase cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Alice V; Gamell, Cristina; Suryadinata, Randy; Sarcevic, Boris; Bernard, Ora

    2013-03-15

    Tubulin polymerization promoting protein 1 (Tppp1) regulates microtubule (MT) dynamics via promoting MT polymerization and inhibiting histone deacetylase 6 (Hdac6) activity to increase MT acetylation. Our results reveal that as a consequence, Tppp1 inhibits cell proliferation by delaying the G1/S-phase and the mitosis to G1-phase transitions. We show that phosphorylation of Tppp1 by Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (Rock) prevents its Hdac6 inhibitory activity to enable cells to enter S-phase. Whereas, our analysis of the role of Tppp1 during mitosis revealed that inhibition of its MT polymerizing and Hdac6 regulatory activities were necessary for cells to re-enter the G1-phase. During this investigation, we also discovered that Tppp1 is a novel Cyclin B/Cdk1 (cyclin-dependent kinase) substrate and that Cdk phosphorylation of Tppp1 inhibits its MT polymerizing activity. Overall, our results show that dual Rock and Cdk phosphorylation of Tppp1 inhibits its regulation of the cell cycle to increase cell proliferation.

  6. Elevated Glucose Levels Promote Contractile and Cytoskeletal Gene Expression in Vascular Smooth Muscle via Rho/Protein Kinase C and Actin Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hien, Tran Thi; Turczyńska, Karolina M; Dahan, Diana; Ekman, Mari; Grossi, Mario; Sjögren, Johan; Nilsson, Johan; Braun, Thomas; Boettger, Thomas; Garcia-Vaz, Eliana; Stenkula, Karin; Swärd, Karl; Gomez, Maria F; Albinsson, Sebastian

    2016-02-12

    Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This is in part attributed to the effects of hyperglycemia on vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In diabetic animal models, hyperglycemia results in hypercontractility of vascular smooth muscle possibly due to increased activation of Rho-kinase. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regulation of contractile smooth muscle markers by glucose and to determine the signaling pathways that are activated by hyperglycemia in smooth muscle cells. Microarray, quantitative PCR, and Western blot analyses revealed that both mRNA and protein expression of contractile smooth muscle markers were increased in isolated smooth muscle cells cultured under high compared with low glucose conditions. This effect was also observed in hyperglycemic Akita mice and in diabetic patients. Elevated glucose activated the protein kinase C and Rho/Rho-kinase signaling pathways and stimulated actin polymerization. Glucose-induced expression of contractile smooth muscle markers in cultured cells could be partially or completely repressed by inhibitors of advanced glycation end products, L-type calcium channels, protein kinase C, Rho-kinase, actin polymerization, and myocardin-related transcription factors. Furthermore, genetic ablation of the miR-143/145 cluster prevented the effects of glucose on smooth muscle marker expression. In conclusion, these data demonstrate a possible link between hyperglycemia and vascular disease states associated with smooth muscle contractility.

  7. Protein encapsulation in polymeric microneedles by photolithography

    PubMed Central

    Kochhar, Jaspreet Singh; Zou, Shui; Chan, Sui Yung; Kang, Lifeng

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent interest in biocompatible polymeric microneedles for the delivery of biomolecules has propelled considerable interest in fabrication of microneedles. It is important that the fabrication process is feasible for drug encapsulation and compatible with the stability of the drug in question. Moreover, drug encapsulation may offer the advantage of higher drug loading compared with other technologies, such as drug coating. Methods and results In this study, we encapsulated a model protein drug, namely, bovine serum albumin, in polymeric microneedles by photolithography. Drug distribution within the microneedle array was found to be uniform. The encapsulated protein retained its primary, secondary, and tertiary structural characteristics. In vitro release of the encapsulated protein showed that almost all of the drug was released into phosphate buffered saline within 6 hours. The in vitro permeation profile of encapsulated bovine serum albumin through rat skin was also tested and shown to resemble the in vitro release profile, with an initial release burst followed by a slow release phase. The cytotoxicity of the microneedles without bovine serum albumin was tested in three different cell lines. High cell viabilities were observed, demonstrating the innocuous nature of the microneedles. Conclusion The microneedle array can potentially serve as a useful drug carrier for proteins, peptides, and vaccines. PMID:22787403

  8. Formin-mediated actin polymerization promotes Salmonella invasion.

    PubMed

    Truong, Dorothy; Brabant, Danielle; Bashkurov, Mikhail; Wan, Leo C K; Braun, Virginie; Heo, Won Do; Meyer, Tobias; Pelletier, Laurence; Copeland, John; Brumell, John H

    2013-12-01

    Salmonella invade host cells using Type 3 secreted effectors, which modulate host cellular targets to promote actin rearrangements at the cell surface that drive bacterial uptake. The Arp2/3 complex contributes to Salmonella invasion but is not essential, indicating other actin regulatory factors are involved. Here, we show a novel role for FHOD1, a formin family member, in Salmonella invasion. FHOD1 and Arp2/3 occupy distinct microdomains at the invasion site and control distinct aspects of membrane protrusion formation. FHOD1 is phosphorylated during infection and this modification is required for promoting bacterial uptake by host cells. ROCK II, but not ROCK I, is recruited to the invasion site and is required for FHOD1 phosphorylation and for Salmonella invasion. Together, our studies revealan important phospho-dependent FHOD1 actin polymerization pathway in Salmonella invasion.

  9. Entropy-driven polymerization of ribgrass virus protein.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, R A; Lauffer, M A

    1985-04-01

    Holmes ribgrass virus (HRV), because of serological results, is regarded as a distantly related strain of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). HRV protein differs substantially in amino acid sequence from TMV protein, especially in that it contains one histidine residue and three methionine residues, compared to none of either for TMV protein. Ultracentrifugation and hydrogen ion titration data on HRV protein, similar to those obtained previously for the early stage polymerization of TMV and E66 proteins, demonstrated some similarities and more distinct differences from those of the other two proteins. The major similarities are that the early polymerization of HRV protein is entropy driven and the first major polymerized product is a 20 S component, presumably a double disk or two-turn helix, as in the case of the other proteins. The major differences are that the unpolymerized HRV protein sediments at 3 S rather than at the 4 S for the others; it is presumably a dimer of the polypeptide chain. The enthalpy of polymerization per mole of A protein, delta H*, is 18,400 cal for HRV protein, compared to about 30,000 for TMV protein. One mol of H+ ion/mol HRV A protein, compared to 1.5 for TMV and E66 proteins, is bound during polymerization to the 20 S state. Contrasted with the other proteins, very little if any electrical work contribution was detected for the HRV protein. A major difference was found in hydrogen ion titration. Unpolymerized HRV protein binds hydrogen ions significantly in the unpolymerized A protein state, unlike the A proteins from the other two viruses.

  10. Polymeric assembly of gluten proteins in an aqueous ethanol solvent.

    PubMed

    Dahesh, Mohsen; Banc, Amélie; Duri, Agnès; Morel, Marie-Hélène; Ramos, Laurence

    2014-09-25

    The supramolecular organization of wheat gluten proteins is largely unknown due to the intrinsic complexity of this family of proteins and their insolubility in water. We fractionate gluten in a water/ethanol mixture (50/50 v/v) and obtain a protein extract which is depleted in gliadin, the monomeric part of wheat gluten proteins, and enriched in glutenin, the polymeric part of wheat gluten proteins. We investigate the structure of the proteins in the solvent used for extraction over a wide range of concentration, by combining X-ray scattering and multiangle static and dynamic light scattering. Our data show that, in the ethanol/water mixture, the proteins display features characteristic of flexible polymer chains in a good solvent. In the dilute regime, the proteins form very loose structures of characteristic size 150 nm, with an internal dynamics which is quantitatively similar to that of branched polymer coils. In more concentrated regimes, data highlight a hierarchical structure with one characteristic length scale of the order of a few nm, which displays the scaling with concentration expected for a semidilute polymer in good solvent, and a fractal arrangement at a much larger length scale. This structure is strikingly similar to that of polymeric gels, thus providing some factual knowledge to rationalize the viscoelastic properties of wheat gluten proteins and their assemblies.

  11. Interfacial polymerization for colorimetric labeling of protein expression in cells.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Jacob L; Sheldon, Phillip R; Hoversten, Liv J; Romero, Gabriela; Balasubramaniam, Vivek; Berron, Brad J

    2014-01-01

    Determining the location of rare proteins in cells typically requires the use of on-sample amplification. Antibody based recognition and enzymatic amplification is used to produce large amounts of visible label at the site of protein expression, but these techniques suffer from the presence of nonspecific reactivity in the biological sample and from poor spatial control over the label. Polymerization based amplification is a recently developed alternative means of creating an on-sample amplification for fluorescence applications, while not suffering from endogenous labels or loss of signal localization. This manuscript builds upon polymerization based amplification by developing a stable, archivable, and colorimetric mode of amplification termed Polymer Dye Labeling. The basic concept involves an interfacial polymer grown at the site of protein expression and subsequent staining of this polymer with an appropriate dye. The dyes Evans Blue and eosin were initially investigated for colorimetric response in a microarray setting, where both specifically stained polymer films on glass. The process was translated to the staining of protein expression in human dermal fibroblast cells, and Polymer Dye Labeling was specific to regions consistent with desired protein expression. The labeling is stable for over 200 days in ambient conditions and is also compatible with modern mounting medium.

  12. Block copolymer adhesion promoters via ring-opening metathesis polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Kent, Michael S.; Saunders, Randall

    1997-01-01

    Coupling agents based on functionalized block copolymers for bonding thermoset polymers to solid materials. These are polymers which possess at least two types of functional groups, one which is able to attach to and react with solid surfaces, and another which can react with a thermoset resin, which are incorporated as pendant groups in monomers distributed in blocks (typically two) along the backbone of the chain. The block copolymers in this invention are synthesized by living ring-opening metathesis polymerization.

  13. Tubulin-G protein interactions involve microtubule polymerization domains

    SciTech Connect

    Nan Wang; Rasenick, M.M. )

    1991-11-12

    It has been suggested that elements of the cytoskeleton contribute to the signal transduction process and that they do so in association with one or more members of the signal-transducing G protein family. Relatively high-affinity binding between dimeric tubulin and the {alpha} subunits of G{sub s} and G{sub i1} has also been reported. Tubulin molecules, which exist in solution as {alpha}{beta} dimers, have binding domains for microtubule-associated proteins as well as for other tubulin dimers. This study represents an attempt to ascertain whether the association between G proteins and tubulin occurs at one of these sites. Removal of the binding site for MAP2 and tau from tubulin by subtilisin proteolysis did not influence the association of tubulin with G protein, as demonstrated in overlay studies with ({sup 125}I)tubulin. However, ring structures formed from subtilisin-treated tubulin were incapable of effecting such inhibition. Stable G protein-tubulin complexes were formed, and these were separated from free tubulin by Octyl-Sepharose chromatography. Using this methodology, it was demonstrated that assembled microtubules bound G protein quite weakly compared with tubulin dimers. The {alpha} subunit of G{sub i1} and, to a lesser extent, that of G{sub o} were demonstrated to inhibit microtubule polymerization. In aggregate, these data suggest that dimeric tubulin binds to the {alpha} subunits of G protein at the sites where it binds to other tubulin dimers during microtubule polymerization. Interaction with signal-transducing G proteins, thus, might represent a role for tubulin dimers which is independent of microtubule formation.

  14. Block copolymer adhesion promoters via ring-opening metathesis polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Kent, M.S.; Saunders, R.

    1997-02-18

    Coupling agents are disclosed based on functionalized block copolymers for bonding thermoset polymers to solid materials. These are polymers which possess at least two types of functional groups, one which is able to attach to and react with solid surfaces, and another which can react with a thermoset resin, which are incorporated as pendant groups in monomers distributed in blocks (typically two) along the backbone of the chain. The block copolymers in this invention are synthesized by living ring-opening metathesis polymerization. 18 figs.

  15. Electrospray deposition in vacuum as method to create functionally active protein immobilization on polymeric substrates.

    PubMed

    Fornari, Enzo; Roberts, Clive J; Temperton, Robert H; O'Shea, James N

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate in this work the deposition of a large biological molecule (fibronectin) on polymeric substrates in a high vacuum environment using an electrospray deposition system. Fibronectin was deposited and its distribution and structure investigated and retention of function (ability to promote cell adhesion) on return to liquid environment is shown. AFM was used to monitor changes in the morphology of the surface before and after fibronectin deposition, whilst the biological activity of the deposited protein is assessed through a quantitative analysis of the biomolecular adhesion and migration of fibroblast cells to the modified surfaces. For the first time we have demonstrated that using high vacuum electrospray deposition it is possible to deposit large protein molecules on polymeric surfaces whilst maintaining the protein activity. The deposition of biological molecules such as proteins with the retention of their activity onto clean well-controlled surfaces under vacuum condition, offers the possibility for future studies utilizing high resolution vacuum based techniques at the atomic and molecular scale providing a greater understanding of protein-surface interface behaviour of relevance to a wide range of applications such as in sensors, diagnostics and tissue engineering.

  16. Effect of dipolar ions on the entropy-driven polymerization of tobacco mosaic virus protein.

    PubMed

    Lauffer, M A; Shalaby, R A

    1985-11-01

    The effect of the dipolar ions, glycine, glycylglycine, and glycylglycylglycine on the polymerization of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) protein has been studied by the methods of light scattering and ultracentrifugation. All three dipolar ions promote polymerization. The major reaction in the early stage is transition from the 4 S to the 20 S state. As in the absence of dipolar ions, the polymerization is enhanced by an increase in temperature; it is endothermic and therefore entropy-driven. The effect of the dipolar ions can be understood in terms of their action as salting-out agents; they increase the activity coefficient of TMV A protein, the 4 S material, and thus shift the equilibrium toward the 20 S state. The salting-out constants, K, for the reaction in 0.10 ionic strength phosphate buffer at pH 6.7 was found by the light scattering method to be 1.6 for glycine, 2.5 for glycylglycine, and 2.5 for glycylglycylglycine. A value of 2.7 was obtained by the ultracentrifugation method for glycylglycine in phosphate buffer at 0.1 ionic strength and pH 6.8 at 10 degrees C. For both glycine and glycylglycine, K increases when the ionic strength of the phosphate buffer is decreased. This result suggests that electrolytes decrease the activity coefficient of the dipolar ions, a salting-in phenomenon. However, the salting-in constants evaluated from these results are substantially higher than those previously determined by solubility measurements. The effect of glycine and glycylglycine on polymerization was studied at pH values between 6.2 and 6.8. The effectiveness of both dipolar ions is approximately 50% greater at pH 6.8 than at pH 6.2. The variation of the extent of polymerization with pH in the presence of the dipolar ions is consistent with the interpretation that approximately one hydrogen ion is bound for half of the polypeptide units in the polymerized A protein.

  17. Protein adsorption resistance of PVP-modified polyurethane film prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Huihui; Qian, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Lan, Minbo

    2016-02-01

    An anti-fouling surface of polyurethane (PU) film grafted with Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) was prepared through surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). And the polymerization time was investigated to obtain PU films with PVP brushes of different lengths. The surface properties and protein adsorption of modified PU films were evaluated. The results showed that the hydrophilicity of PU-PVP films were improved with the increase of polymerization time, which was not positive correlation with the surface roughness due to the brush structure. Additionally, the protein resistance performance was promoted when prolonging the polymerization time. The best antifouling PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced the adsoption level of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and brovin serum fibrinogen (BFG) by 93.4%, 68.3%, 85.6%, respectively, compared to the unmodified PU film. The competitive adsorption of three proteins indicated that LYS preferentially adsorbed on the modified PU film, while BFG had the lowest adsorption selectivity. And the amount of BFG on PU-PVP (6.0 h) film reduced greatly to 0.08 μg/cm2, which was almost one-tenth of its adsorption from the single-protein system. Presented results suggested that both hydrophilicity and surface roughness might be the important factors in all cases of protein adsorption, and the competitive or selective adsorption might be related to the size of the proteins, especially on the non-charged films.

  18. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level.

    PubMed

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-in

    2016-02-14

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces.

  19. Ascertaining effects of nanoscale polymeric interfaces on competitive protein adsorption at the individual protein level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng; Xie, Tian; Ravensbergen, Kristina; Hahm, Jong-In

    2016-02-01

    With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those occurring in a competitive adsorption environment. Complex sequences of adhesion events in competitive adsorption involving multicomponent protein systems have been extensively investigated, but our understanding is still limited primarily to macroscopic adhesion onto chemically simple surfaces. We examine the competitive adsorption behavior from a binary protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen at the single protein level. We subsequently evaluate a series of adsorption and displacement processes occurring on both the macroscopic homopolymer and nanoscopic diblock copolymer surfaces, while systematically varying the protein concentration and incubation time. We identify the similarities and dissimilarities in competitive protein adsorption behavior between the two polymeric surfaces, the former presenting chemical uniformity at macroscale versus the latter exhibiting periodic nanointerfaces of chemically alternating polymeric segments. We then present our novel experimental finding of a large increase in the nanointerface-engaged residence time of the initially bound proteins and further explain the origin of this phenomenon manifested on nanoscale diblock copolymer surfaces. The outcomes of this study may provide timely insight into nanoscale competitive protein adsorption that is much needed in designing bioimplant and tissue engineering materials. In addition, the fundamental understanding gained from this study can be beneficial for the development of highly miniaturized biodevices and biomaterials fabricated by using nanoscale polymeric materials and interfaces.With the recent development of biomaterials and biodevices with reduced dimensionality, it is critical to comprehend protein adhesion processes to nanoscale solid surfaces, especially those

  20. Disposable polymeric cryogel bioreactor matrix for therapeutic protein production.

    PubMed

    Jain, Era; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-05-01

    Low cost and high efficiency make disposable bioreactors feasible for small-scale therapeutic development and initial clinical trials. We have developed a cryogel-based disposable bioreactor matrix, which has been used for production of protein therapeutics such as urokinase and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The protocol discusses the application of a cryogel bioreactor for mAb production. Cryogels composed of either polyacrylamide (PAAm) coupled to gelatin or semi-interpenetrating PAAm-chitosan are synthesized by free-radical polymerization at -12 °C. Hybridoma cells are immobilized over the cryogel bioreactor and incubated for 48 h. Medium is circulated thereafter at 0.2 ml min(-1) and bioreactors can be run continuously for 60 d. The cryogel-based packed-bed bioreactor can be formulated as a monolith or as beads; it also has an efficiency four times what can be obtained using a tissue-culture flask, a high surface-to-volume ratio and effective nutrient transport. After incubation, the bioreactor setup will take about 60 min using a pre-prepared sterilized cryogel.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a polymerized prion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bao-Yuan; Chang, Jui-Yoa

    2002-01-01

    A polymerized form of recombinant mouse prion protein (mPrP) domain 23-231 [mPrP-(23-231)], designated mPrP-z, was generated at acidic pH (pH 2-5) in the presence of selected concentrations of denaturant (2 M guanidinium chloride or 5 M urea). This isoform of mPrP is stable in acidic solution after removal of denaturant. It can be isolated and purified using reversed-phase HPLC or size-exclusion HPLC. mPrP-z bears structural properties that partially resemble those of scrapie prion. Unlike the native mPrP-(23-231) (mPrP-N), mPrP-z exhibits a high content of beta-sheet structure, as shown by CD spectroscopy, and exists as an oligomer with an approximate molecular mass of 340000 Da, as measured by light scattering. However, similarly to mPrP-N, mPrP-z contains the intact disulphide bond and is sensitive to digestion by proteinase K. PMID:11988079

  2. A chaperonin as protein nanoreactor for atom-transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Renggli, Kasper; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Urbani, Raphael; Pfohl, Thomas; Bruns, Nico

    2014-01-27

    The group II chaperonin thermosome (THS) from the archaea Thermoplasma acidophilum is reported as nanoreactor for atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). A copper catalyst was entrapped into the THS to confine the polymerization into this protein cage. THS possesses pores that are wide enough to release polymers into solution. The nanoreactor favorably influenced the polymerization of N-isopropyl acrylamide and poly(ethylene glycol)methylether acrylate. Narrowly dispersed polymers with polydispersity indices (PDIs) down to 1.06 were obtained in the protein nanoreactor, while control reactions with a globular protein-catalyst conjugate only yielded polymers with PDIs above 1.84. PMID:24459061

  3. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein – Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Carolina W.; Saab, Sérgio C.; Iulek, Jorge; Etto, Rafael M.; Steffens, Maria B. R.; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Stanage, Tyler; Keck, James L.; Cox, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA). HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. Our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament. PMID:27447485

  4. Structural and Functional Studies of H. seropedicae RecA Protein - Insights into the Polymerization of RecA Protein as Nucleoprotein Filament.

    PubMed

    Leite, Wellington C; Galvão, Carolina W; Saab, Sérgio C; Iulek, Jorge; Etto, Rafael M; Steffens, Maria B R; Chitteni-Pattu, Sindhu; Stanage, Tyler; Keck, James L; Cox, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial RecA protein plays a role in the complex system of DNA damage repair. Here, we report the functional and structural characterization of the Herbaspirillum seropedicae RecA protein (HsRecA). HsRecA protein is more efficient at displacing SSB protein from ssDNA than Escherichia coli RecA protein. HsRecA also promotes DNA strand exchange more efficiently. The three dimensional structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP complex has been solved to 1.7 Å resolution. HsRecA protein contains a small N-terminal domain, a central core ATPase domain and a large C-terminal domain, that are similar to homologous bacterial RecA proteins. Comparative structural analysis showed that the N-terminal polymerization motif of archaeal and eukaryotic RecA family proteins are also present in bacterial RecAs. Reconstruction of electrostatic potential from the hexameric structure of HsRecA-ADP/ATP revealed a high positive charge along the inner side, where ssDNA is bound inside the filament. The properties of this surface may explain the greater capacity of HsRecA protein to bind ssDNA, forming a contiguous nucleoprotein filament, displace SSB and promote DNA exchange relative to EcRecA. Our functional and structural analyses provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of polymerization of bacterial RecA as a helical nucleoprotein filament. PMID:27447485

  5. Protein transfer through polyacrylamide hydrogel membranes polymerized in lyotropic phases.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Michael J; Hall, Geoff; Gee, Sarah; Xie, Li

    2004-01-01

    A way to control the average pore size in cross-linked polyacrylamide-based membranes is by altering the ratio of cross-linker to acylamide monomer. Larger pore sizes are prepared with a minimum amount of cross-linker, resulting in membranes that are mechanically weak and have short lifetimes. The aim of this study was to prepare cross-linked polyacrylamide membranes with large pore sizes and with good mechanical integrity. The methodology was to carry out the polymerization in a template, formed from the self-aggregation of surfactant. Two surfactant templates were used, and their pore size was examined with proteins of different sizes. The surfactants chosen for this study were sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, ionic surfactant) and TERIC BL8 (nonionic surfactant), both of which have very different aggregation properties. The data showed that at 10% and greater of TERIC BL8, a very different and open gel structure is formed, in which the pore size was significantly increased. SDS seemed to have little effect on the pore size. The data suggests that the gel structures for both surfactants up to 4% (w/v) are similar and micellular, because SDS is known to favor a micelle structure. Above 4% (w/v), TERIC BL8 then goes through a change in its lyotropic phase, thus, producing membranes of a large pore size. In conclusion, the pore size and gel structure of polyacrylamide hydrogel membranes can be significantly increased using TERIC BL8 (nonionic) surfactant. This allows large-pore-size membranes with a high cross-link density and consequently high mechanical strength to be prepared for the separation of large biomolecules. PMID:15360267

  6. An investigation on the analytical potential of polymerized liposomes bound to lanthanide ions for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marina; Roy, Bidhan C; Goicoechea, Héctor; Campiglia, Andres D; Mallik, Sanku

    2004-09-01

    We present a promising approach to protein sensing based on Eu3+ ions incorporated into polymerized liposomes. The sensitization of Eu3+ is accomplished with 5-aminosalicylic acid, which provides energy transfer for a stable reference signal and a wide wavelength excitation range free from protein interference. The lipophilic character of polymerized liposomes provides the appropriate platform for protein interaction with the lanthanide ion. Quantitative analysis is based on the linear relationship between the luminescence signal of Eu3+ and protein concentration. Because no spectral shift of the lanthanide luminescence is observed upon protein interaction, qualitative analysis is based on the luminescence lifetime of polymerized liposomes. This parameter, which changes significantly upon protein-liposome interaction, follows a well-behaved single-exponential decay that might be useful for protein identification. PMID:15327334

  7. Enzyme-mediated polymerization inside engineered protein cages.

    PubMed

    Frey, Raphael; Hayashi, Takahiro; Hilvert, Donald

    2016-08-16

    Engineered variants of the capsid-forming enzyme lumazine synthase, AaLS, were used as nanoreactors for an enzyme-mediated polymerization. Oxidation of 3,3-diaminobenzidine (DAB) by the engineered ascorbate peroxidase APEX2 encapsulated in AaLS capsids resulted in templated formation of polyDAB-capsid nanoparticles of homogeneous size and shape. PMID:27484787

  8. Novel Polymeric Scaffolds Using Protein Microbubbles as Porogen and Growth Factor Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ashwin; Thevenot, Paul; Dey, Jagannath; Shen, Jinhui; Sun, Man-Wu; Yang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds prepared by conventional techniques like salt leaching and phase separation are greatly limited by their poor biomolecule-delivery abilities. Conventional methods of incorporation of various growth factors, proteins, and/or peptides on or in scaffold materials via different crosslinking and conjugation techniques are often tedious and may affect scaffold's physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. To overcome such deficiencies, a novel two-step porous scaffold fabrication procedure has been created in which bovine serum albumin microbubbles (henceforth MB) were used as porogen and growth factor carriers. Polymer solution mixed with MB was phase separated and then lyophilized to create porous scaffold. MB scaffold triggered substantially lesser inflammatory responses than salt-leached and conventional phase-separated scaffolds in vivo. Most importantly, the same technique was used to produce insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)–eluting porous scaffolds, simply by incorporating IGF-1–loaded MB (MB-IGF-1) with polymer solution before phase separation. In vitro such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds were able to promote cell growth to a much greater extent than scaffold soaked in IGF-1, confirming the bioactivity of the released IGF-1. Further, such MB-IGF-1 scaffolds elicited IGF-1–specific collagen production in the surrounding tissue in vivo. This novel growth factor–eluting scaffold fabrication procedure can be used to deliver a range of single or combination of bioactive biomolecules to substantially promote cell growth and function in degradable scaffold. PMID:19327002

  9. Polymeric human Fc-fusion proteins with modified effector functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhaiel, David N. A.; Czajkowsky, Daniel M.; Andersen, Jan Terje; Shi, Jianguo; El-Faham, Marwa; Doenhoff, Michael; McIntosh, Richard S.; Sandlie, Inger; He, Jianfeng; Hu, Jun; Shao, Zhifeng; Pleass, Richard J.

    2011-10-01

    The success of Fc-fusion bio-therapeutics has spurred the development of other Fc-fusion products for treating and/or vaccinating against a range of diseases. We describe a method to modulate their function by converting them into well-defined stable polymers. This strategy resulted in cylindrical hexameric structures revealed by tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). Polymeric Fc-fusions were significantly less immunogenic than their dimeric or monomeric counterparts, a result partly owing to their reduced ability to interact with critical Fc-receptors. However, in the absence of the fusion partner, polymeric IgG1-Fc molecules were capable of binding selectively to FcγRs, with significantly increased affinity owing to their increased valency, suggesting that these reagents may prove of immediate utility in the development of well-defined replacements for intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. Overall, these findings establish an effective IgG Fc-fusion based polymeric platform with which the therapeutic and vaccination applications of Fc-fusion immune-complexes can now be explored.

  10. Hydrophilic crosslinked-polymeric surface capable of effective suppression of protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamon, Yuri; Inoue, Naoko; Mihara, Erika; Kitayama, Yukiya; Ooya, Tooru; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the nonspecific adsorption of proteins towards three hydrophilic crosslinked-polymeric thin layers prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization using N,N‧-methylenebisacrylamide, 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl-[N-(2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]phosphorylcholine (MMPC), or 6,6‧-diacryloyl-trehalose crosslinkers. Protein binding experiments were performed by surface plasmon resonance with six proteins of different pI values including α-lactalbumin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), myoglobin, ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, and lysozyme in buffer solution at pH 7.4. All of the obtained crosslinked-polymeric thin layers showed low nonspecific adsorption of negatively charged proteins at pH 7.4 such as α-lactalbumin, BSA, and myoglobin. Nonspecific adsorption of positively charged proteins including ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, and lysozyme was the lowest for poly(MMPC). These results suggest poly(MMPC) can effectively reduce nonspecific adsorption of a wide range of proteins that are negatively or positively charged at pH 7.4. MMPC is a promising crosslinker for a wide range of polymeric materials requiring low nonspecific protein binding.

  11. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis. PMID:25664724

  12. Yersinia effector YopO uses actin as bait to phosphorylate proteins that regulate actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei Lin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Robinson, Robert C

    2015-03-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species evade host immune systems through the injection of Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) into phagocytic cells. One Yop, YopO, also known as YpkA, induces actin-filament disruption, impairing phagocytosis. Here we describe the X-ray structure of Yersinia enterocolitica YopO in complex with actin, which reveals that YopO binds to an actin monomer in a manner that blocks polymerization yet allows the bound actin to interact with host actin-regulating proteins. SILAC-MS and biochemical analyses confirm that actin-polymerization regulators such as VASP, EVL, WASP, gelsolin and the formin diaphanous 1 are directly sequestered and phosphorylated by YopO through formation of ternary complexes with actin. This leads to a model in which YopO at the membrane sequesters actin from polymerization while using the bound actin as bait to recruit, phosphorylate and misregulate host actin-regulating proteins to disrupt phagocytosis.

  13. Proteomic profiling of microbial transglutaminase-induced polymerization of milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, J F; Pan, P H

    2012-02-01

    Microbial transglutaminase (MTGase)-induced polymerization of individual milk proteins during incubation was investigated using a proteomics-based approach. The addition of MTGase (0.25-2.0 units/mL) caused the milk proteins to polymerize after a 3-h incubation period. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE analysis showed that the total intensities of the protein bands that corresponded to α(S)-casein, β-casein, and κ-casein decreased from 8,245.6, 6,677.2, and 586.6 arbitrary units to 1,911.7, 0.0, and 66.2 arbitrary units, respectively. Components with higher molecular weights were observed, and the intensity of these proteins increased after 3h of incubation. These results support that inter- or intramolecular crosslinking occurred in the casein proteins of MTGase-treated milk. Two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis indicated that isomers of β-casein, κ-casein, a fraction of serum albumin, α(S1)-casein, α(S2)-casein, β-lactoglobulin, and α-lactalbumin in the milk were polymerized following incubation with MTGase. In addition, MTGase-induced polymerization occurred earlier for β-casein and κ-casein isomers than for other milk proteins.

  14. Interaction of double-stranded DNA with polymerized PprA protein from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Motoyasu; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Rumi; Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay; Kuroki, Ryota

    2014-10-01

    Pleiotropic protein promoting DNA repair A (PprA) is a key protein that facilitates the extreme radioresistance of Deinococcus radiodurans. To clarify the role of PprA in the radioresistance mechanism, the interaction between recombinant PprA expressed in Escherichia coli with several double-stranded DNAs (i.e., super coiled, linear, or nicked circular dsDNA) was investigated. In a gel-shift assay, the band shift of supercoiled pUC19 DNA caused by the binding of PprA showed a bimodal distribution, which was promoted by the addition of 1 mM Mg, Ca, or Sr ions. The dissociation constant of the PprA-supercoiled pUC19 DNA complex, calculated from the relative portions of shifted bands, was 0.6 μM with Hill coefficient of 3.3 in the presence of 1 mM Mg acetate. This indicates that at least 281 PprA molecules are required to saturate a supercoiled pUC19 DNA, which is consistent with the number (280) of bound PprA molecules estimated by the UV absorption of the PprA-pUC19 complex purified by gel filtration. This saturation also suggests linear polymerization of PprA along the dsDNA. On the other hand, the bands of linear dsDNA and nicked circular dsDNA that eventually formed PprA complexes did not saturate, but created larger molecular complexes when the PprA concentration was >1.3 μM. This result implies that DNA-bound PprA aids association of the termini of damaged DNAs, which is regulated by the concentration of PprA. These findings are important for the understanding of the mechanism underlying effective DNA repair involving PprA. PMID:25044036

  15. Interaction of double-stranded DNA with polymerized PprA protein from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Motoyasu; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Rumi; Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay; Kuroki, Ryota

    2014-10-01

    Pleiotropic protein promoting DNA repair A (PprA) is a key protein that facilitates the extreme radioresistance of Deinococcus radiodurans. To clarify the role of PprA in the radioresistance mechanism, the interaction between recombinant PprA expressed in Escherichia coli with several double-stranded DNAs (i.e., super coiled, linear, or nicked circular dsDNA) was investigated. In a gel-shift assay, the band shift of supercoiled pUC19 DNA caused by the binding of PprA showed a bimodal distribution, which was promoted by the addition of 1 mM Mg, Ca, or Sr ions. The dissociation constant of the PprA-supercoiled pUC19 DNA complex, calculated from the relative portions of shifted bands, was 0.6 μM with Hill coefficient of 3.3 in the presence of 1 mM Mg acetate. This indicates that at least 281 PprA molecules are required to saturate a supercoiled pUC19 DNA, which is consistent with the number (280) of bound PprA molecules estimated by the UV absorption of the PprA-pUC19 complex purified by gel filtration. This saturation also suggests linear polymerization of PprA along the dsDNA. On the other hand, the bands of linear dsDNA and nicked circular dsDNA that eventually formed PprA complexes did not saturate, but created larger molecular complexes when the PprA concentration was >1.3 μM. This result implies that DNA-bound PprA aids association of the termini of damaged DNAs, which is regulated by the concentration of PprA. These findings are important for the understanding of the mechanism underlying effective DNA repair involving PprA.

  16. Polymerization of tobacco mosaic virus protein without and with hydrogen ion binding.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, R A; Lauffer, M A

    1983-05-01

    When tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) protein is polymerized at pH values above 7 in unbuffered solutions, either by raising temperature at constant ionic strength or by increasing ionic strength at constant temperature, a 20 S component is formed having bound only the very small amount of H+ ion supplied by the unpolymerized protein. When hydrogen ion is added by titration during polymerization so as to keep pH constant, as would occur automatically if a buffer were present, a 20 S component is formed with one H+ ion bound each for half of the subunits. Thus, a 20 S form with and a 20 S form without bound H+ ion exist. Furthermore, the 20 S form without bound H+ ion binds H+ ion when supplied by titration to produce a 20 S form with the same amount of bound H+ ion as when H+ ion is supplied during the polymerization.

  17. Recent Advances in Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: A Special Emphasis on Polymeric Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Patel, Mitesh; Yang, Xiaoyan; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and peptides are widely indicated in many diseased states. Parenteral route is the most commonly employed method of administration for therapeutic proteins and peptides. However, requirement of frequent injections due to short in vivo half-life results in poor patient compliance. Non-invasive drug delivery routes such as nasal, transdermal, pulmonary, and oral offer several advantages over parenteral administration. Intrinsic physicochemical properties and low permeability across biological membrane limit protein delivery via non-invasive routes. One of the strategies to improve protein and peptide absorption is by delivering through nanostructured delivery carriers. Among nanocarriers, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) have demonstrated significant advantages over other delivery systems. This article summarizes the application of polymeric NPs for protein and peptide drug delivery following oral, nasal, pulmonary, parenteral, transdermal, and ocular administrations. PMID:25106908

  18. Advances in Polymer and Polymeric Nanostructures for Protein Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    González-Toro, Daniella C.; Thayumanavan, S.

    2013-01-01

    Linear polymers have been considered the best molecular structures for the formation of efficient protein conjugates due to their biological advantages, synthetic convenience and ease of functionalization. In recent years, much attention has been dedicated to develop synthetic strategies that produce the most control over protein conjugation utilizing linear polymers as scaffolds. As a result, different conjugate models, such as semitelechelic, homotelechelic, heterotelechelic and branched or star polymer conjugates, have been obtained that take advantage of these well-controlled synthetic strategies. Development of protein conjugates using nanostructures and the formation of said nanostructures from protein-polymer bioconjugates are other areas in the protein bioconjugation field. Although several polymer-protein technologies have been developed from these discoveries, few review articles have focused on the design and function of these polymers and nanostructures. This review will highlight some recent advances in protein-linear polymer technologies that employ protein covalent conjugation and successful protein-nanostructure bioconjugates (covalent conjugation as well) that have shown great potential for biological applications. PMID:24058205

  19. Polymerization and nucleic acid-binding properties of human L1 ORF1 protein.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Kathryn E; Hickman, Alison B; Jones, Charles E; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Furano, Anthony V

    2012-01-01

    The L1 (LINE 1) retrotransposable element encodes two proteins, ORF1p and ORF2p. ORF2p is the L1 replicase, but the role of ORF1p is unknown. Mouse ORF1p, a coiled-coil-mediated trimer of ∼42-kDa monomers, binds nucleic acids and has nucleic acid chaperone activity. We purified human L1 ORF1p expressed in insect cells and made two findings that significantly advance our knowledge of the protein. First, in the absence of nucleic acids, the protein polymerizes under the very conditions (0.05 M NaCl) that are optimal for high (∼1 nM)-affinity nucleic acid binding. The non-coiled-coil C-terminal half mediates formation of the polymer, an active conformer that is instantly resolved to trimers, or multimers thereof, by nucleic acid. Second, the protein has a biphasic effect on mismatched double-stranded DNA, a proxy chaperone substrate. It protects the duplex from dissociation at 37°C before eventually melting it when largely polymeric. Therefore, polymerization of ORF1p seemingly affects its interaction with nucleic acids. Additionally, polymerization of ORF1p at its translation site could explain the heretofore-inexplicable phenomenon of cis preference-the favored retrotransposition of the actively translated L1 transcript, which is essential for L1 survival. PMID:21937507

  20. The effect of polymer surface modification on polymer-protein interaction via interfacial polymerization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Membrane separation is an important processing technology used for separating food ingredients and fractionating value-added components from food processing by-products. Long-term performance of polymeric membranes in food protein processing is impeded by formation of fouled layers on the membrane ...

  1. Pearling instability of membrane tubes driven by curved proteins and actin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelerčič, U.; Gov, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    Membrane deformation inside living cells is crucial for the proper shaping of various intracellular organelles and is necessary during the fission/fusion processes that allow membrane recycling and transport (e.g. endocytosis). Proteins that induce membrane curvature play a key role in such processes, mostly by adsorbing to the membrane and forming a scaffold that deforms the membrane according to the curvature of the proteins. In this paper we explore the possibility of membrane tube destabilization through a pearling mechanism enabled by the combined effects of the adsorbed curved proteins and the actin polymerization that they recruit. The pearling instability can serve as the initiation for fission of the tube into vesicles. We find that adsorbed curved proteins are more likely to stabilize the tubes, while the actin polymerization can provide the additional constrictive force needed for the robust instability. We discuss the relevance of the theoretical results to in vivo and in vitro experiments.

  2. Electrochemical deposition and surface-initiated RAFT polymerization: protein and cell-resistant PPEGMEMA polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Tria, Maria Celeste R; Grande, Carlos David T; Ponnapati, Ramakrishna R; Advincula, Rigoberto C

    2010-12-13

    This paper introduces a novel and versatile method of grafting protein and cell-resistant poly(poly ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) (PPEGMEMA) brushes on conducting Au surface. The process started with the electrochemical deposition and full characterization of an electro-active chain transfer agent (CTA) on the Au surface. The electrochemical behavior of the CTA was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) while the deposition and stability of the CTA on the surface were confirmed by ellipsometry, contact angle, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The capability of the electrodeposited CTA to mediate surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (SI-RAFT) polymerization on both the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA; model polymer) and PPEGMEMA brushes was demonstrated by the increase in thicknesses of the films after polymerization. Contact angles also decreased with the incorporation of the more hydrophilic brushes. Significant changes in the morphologies of the films before and after polymerization were also observed with atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses. Furthermore, XPS results showed an increase in the O 1s peak intensity relative to C 1s after polymerizations, which confirmed the grafting of polyethyleneglycol (PEG) bearing brushes. The ability of the PPEGMEMA-modified Au surface to resist nonspecific adhesion of proteins and cells was monitored and confirmed by XPS, ellipsometry, contact angle, AFM, and fluorescence imaging. The new method presented has potential application as robust protein and cell-resistant coatings for electrically conducting electrodes and biomedical devices.

  3. Protein- and Peptide-Modified Synthetic Polymeric Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Ohm D.; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents an overview on biohybrid approaches of integrating the structural and functional features of proteins and peptides with synthetic polymers and the resulting unique properties in such hybrids, with a focus on bioresponsive/bioactive systems with biomaterials applications. The review is divided in two broad sections. First, we describe several examples of biohybrids produced by combining versatile synthetic polymers with proteins/enzymes and drugs that have resulted in (1) hybrid materials based on responsive polymers, (2) responsive hydrogels based on enzyme-catalyzed reactions, protein–protein interactions and protein–drug sensing, and (3) dynamic hydrogels based on conformational changes of a protein. Next, we present hybrids produced by combining synthetic polymers with peptides, classified based on the properties of the peptide domain: (1) peptides with different conformations, such as α-helical, coiled-coil, and β-sheet; (2) peptides derived from structural protein domains such as silk, elastin, titin, and collagen; and (3) peptides with other biofunctional properties such as cell-binding domains and enzyme-recognized degradation domains. PMID:20091878

  4. Ethyl acetate extract from marine sponge Hyattella cribriformis exhibit potent anticancer activity by promoting tubulin polymerization as evidenced mitotic arrest and induction of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Annamalai, Pazhanimuthu; Thayman, Malini; Rajan, Sowmiya; Raman, Lakshmi Sundaram; Ramasubbu, Sankar; Perumal, Pachiappan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Marine sponges are important sources of bioactive compounds. Objective: This study investigated the anticancer properties of Hyattella cribriformis ethyl acetate (EA) fraction in various cancer and normal cell lines. Materials and Methods: anticancer assay was carried out in 15 cell lines to evaluate the anticancer potential of the EA fraction. Impact on cell cycle distribution was determined using flow cytometry. The fraction was investigated for interfering microtubules assembly in both in vitro and cellular assay. Further studies were conducted to determine the fraction induced cell death (apoptosis) using calcein/propidium iodide dual staining, activated caspase-3 and phosphorylation of Bcl-2 protein at Ser70. DNA fragmentation assay was performed to confirm the apoptosis. Results: EA fraction exhibited potent inhibition of cancer cell growth and resulted in 50% growth inhibition (GI50) of 0.27 μg/mL in A673 cell line. Sarcoma (MG-63, Saos-2) and ovarian (SK-OV-3 and OVCAR-3) cancer cell lines also showed superior anticancer activity GI50 of 1.0 μg/mL. Colon and breast cancer cell lines exhibited moderate GI compare other cancer cell lines and normal human lung fibroblast showed GI50 of 15.6 μg/mL. EA fraction showed potent G2/M phase arrest in A673 cell line and induced apoptosis at 48 h exposure. EA fraction promoted microtubule polymerization in tubulin polymerization assay and increased level of polymerized tubulin in the HeLa cells. Fraction induced the activation of caspase-3 and phosphorylation of Bcl-2 anti-apoptotic protein. Fraction induced DNA fragmentation in HeLa cells as evidence of apoptosis. Conclusion: Marine sponge H. cribriformis EA fraction exhibited potent anticancer activity through tubulin polymerization and induction of apoptosis. PMID:25829774

  5. Enhanced protein retention on poly(caprolactone) via surface initiated polymerization of acrylamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuhao; Cai, Mengtan; He, Liu; Luo, Xianglin

    2016-01-01

    To enhance the biocompatibility or extend the biomedical application of poly(caprolactone) (PCL), protein retention on PCL surface is often required. In this study, poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) brushes were grown from PCL surface via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and served as a protein-capturing platform. Grafted PAAm was densely packed on surface and exhibited superior protein retention ability. Captured protein was found to be resistant to washing under detergent environment. Furthermore, protein structure after being captured was investigated by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and the CD spectra verified that secondary structure of captured proteins was maintained, indicating no denaturation of protein happened for retention process.

  6. Autophagy promotes DNA-protein crosslink clearance.

    PubMed

    Mu, Haibo; Liu, Qianjin; Niu, Hong; Wang, Dongdong; Tang, Jiangjiang; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-02-01

    Toxic DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) can result from exposure to radiation or chemotherapeutic agents. DPCs can also accumulate during aging or stress. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying clearance of DPCs remain largely unknown. Here, we have identified an important role of autophagy in the processing of DPCs induced by three representative agents: formaldehyde, a chemical used widely in industry; UV light; and camptothecin, a cytotoxic anticancer drug. Autophagy inhibitors, 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or chloroquine (CQ), promoted the accumulation of DPCs in damaged cells and injured organs. siRNA-mediated silencing of Atg5 or Atg7, two essential components for the formation of the autophagosome, gave similar results. In contrast, the autophagy inducer rapamycin (RAP) attenuated DPCs in vitro and in vivo. Our findings reveal the importance of autophagy in controlling the level of DPCs, and may open up a new avenue for understanding the formation and clearance of this detrimental DNA adduct. PMID:26921017

  7. A reverse transcriptase-related protein mediates phage resistance and polymerizes untemplated DNA in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Villion, Manuela; Semper, Cameron; Coros, Colin; Moineau, Sylvain; Zimmerly, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Reverse transcriptases (RTs) are RNA-dependent DNA polymerases that usually function in the replication of selfish DNAs such as retrotransposons and retroviruses. Here, we have biochemically characterized a RT-related protein, AbiK, which is required for abortive phage infection in the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis. In vitro, AbiK does not exhibit the properties expected for an RT, but polymerizes long DNAs of ‘random’ sequence, analogous to a terminal transferase. Moreover, the polymerized DNAs appear to be covalently attached to the AbiK protein, presumably because an amino acid serves as a primer. Mutagenesis experiments indicate that the polymerase activity resides in the RT motifs and is essential for phage resistance in vivo. These results establish a novel biochemical property and a non-replicative biological role for a polymerase. PMID:21676997

  8. Head-to-tail polymerization of coagulin, a clottable protein of the horseshoe crab.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, H; Nose, T; Muta, T; Iwanaga, S; Shimohigashi, Y; Kawabata, S

    2000-11-10

    A clottable protein coagulogen of the horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus is proteolytically converted into an insoluble coagulin gel through non-covalent self-polymerization. Here we identified binding sites for the polymerization. A tryptic fragment, derived from the coagulin polymer chemically cross-linked by a bifunctional cross-linker, was isolated. Amino acid sequence analysis indicated that the fragment consists of two peptides cross-linked between Lys(85) and Lys(156). The two lysine residues are oppositely located at the head and tail regions of the elongated molecule separated by a much greater distance than the length of the cross-linker, which suggests that the cross-linking occurs intermolecularly. Based on the x-ray structural analysis, exposure of a hydrophobic cove on the head in response to the release of peptide C has been postulated (Bergner, A., Oganessyan, V., Muta, T., Iwanaga, S., Typke, D., Huber, R., and Bode, W. (1996) EMBO J. 15, 6789-6797). An octapeptide containing Tyr(136), which occupies the tail end of coagulin, was found to inhibit the polymerization. Replacement of Tyr(136) of the peptide with Ala resulted in loss of the inhibitory activity. These results indicated that the polymerization of coagulin proceeds through the interaction between the newly exposed hydrophobic cove on the head and the wedge-shaped hydrophobic tail. PMID:10948203

  9. Polymerization of a single protein of the pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica into needles punctures eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hoiczyk, Egbert; Blobel, Günter

    2001-01-01

    A number of pathogenic, Gram-negative bacteria are able to secrete specific proteins across three membranes: the inner and outer bacterial membrane and the eukaryotic plasma membrane. In the pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica, the primary structure of the secreted proteins as well as of the components of the secretion machinery, both plasmid-encoded, is known. However, the mechanism of protein translocation is largely unknown. Here we show that Y. enterocolitica polymerizes a 6-kDa protein of the secretion machinery into needles that are able to puncture the eukaryotic plasma membrane. These needles form a conduit for the transport of specific proteins from the bacterial to the eukaryotic cytoplasm, where they exert their cytotoxic activity. In negatively stained electron micrographs, the isolated needles were 60–80 nm long and 6–7 nm wide and contained a hollow center of about 2 nm. Our data indicate that it is the polymerization of the 6-kDa protein into these needles that provides the force to perforate the eukaryotic plasma membrane. PMID:11287645

  10. Chemical potential measurements of deoxyhemoglobin S polymerization. Determination of the phase diagram of an assembling protein.

    PubMed

    Prouty, M S; Schechter, A N; Parsegian, V A

    1985-08-01

    We have used the "osmotic stress" method to determine the phase diagram of deoxyhemoglobin S polymerization. This method involves equilibration, through a semipermeable membrane, of the protein with solutions of inert polymers of known osmotic pressure. With deoxyhemoglobin A and S solutions, in which we have demonstrated achievement of equilibrium, plots of osmotic pressure versus concentration initially agree closely with the results of other methods of measurement of colligative properties. However, once the known solubility value is exceeded for the deoxyhemoglobin S solutions at various temperatures, there is a rapid rise in hemoglobin concentration over a narrow osmotic pressure range and then a more gradual increase in concentration. We believe that these two regions correspond, respectively, to the onset of the polymerization process, and of subsequent continuing growth and compression or alignment of polymer. We derive the thermodynamic values for these processes and show that the behavior of the deoxyhemoglobin S system is analogous to the phase transition for a simple chemical system. These results are relevant to understanding the intracellular polymerization of deoxyhemoglobin S in sickle cell disease, and these concepts are applicable to other protein assembly systems.

  11. Ion Channel Mimetic Chronopotentiometric Polymeric Membrane Ion Sensor for Surface Confined Protein Detection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yida

    2008-01-01

    The operation of ion channel sensors is mimicked with functionalized polymeric membrane electrodes, using a surface confined affinity reaction to impede the electrochemically imposed ion transfer kinetics of a marker ion. A membrane surface biotinylated by covalent attachment to the polymeric backbone is used here to bind to the protein avidin as a model system. The results indicate that the protein accumulates on the ion-selective membrane surface, partially blocking the current induced ion transfer across the membrane/aqueous sample interface, and subsequently decreases the potential jump in the so-called super-Nernstian step that is characteristic of a surface depletion of the marker ion. The findings suggest that such a potential drop could be utilized to measure the concentration of protein in the sample. Because the sensitivity of protein sensing is dependent on the effective blocking of the active surface area, it can be improved with a hydrophilic nanopore membrane applied on top of the biotinylated ion-selective membrane surface. Based on cyclic voltammetry characterization, the nanoporous membrane electrodes can indeed be understood as a recessed nanoelectrode array. The results show that the measuring range for protein sensing on nanopore electrodes is shifted to lower concentrations by more than one order of magnitude, which is explained with the reduction of surface area by the nanopore membrane and the related more effective hemispherical diffusion pattern. PMID:19067579

  12. A Steric Antagonism of Actin Polymerization by a Salmonella Virulence Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Margarit,S.; Davidson, W.; Frego, L.; Stebbins, F.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella spp. require the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of the SpvB protein for intracellular growth and systemic virulence. SpvB covalently modifies actin, causing cytoskeletal disruption and apoptosis. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of SpvB, and we show by mass spectrometric analysis that SpvB modifies actin at Arg177, inhibiting its ATPase activity. We also describe two crystal structures of SpvB-modified, polymerization-deficient actin. These structures reveal that ADP-ribosylation does not lead to dramatic conformational changes in actin, suggesting a model in which this large family of toxins inhibits actin polymerization primarily through steric disruption of intrafilament contacts.

  13. A method to tune the shape of protein-encapsulated polymeric microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alteriis, Renato De; Vecchione, Raffaele; Attanasio, Chiara; Gregorio, Maria De; Porzio, Massimiliano; Battista, Edmondo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2015-07-01

    Protein encapsulation technologies of polymeric microspheres currently in use have been optimized to effectively protect their “protein cargo” from inactivation occurring in biological environments, preserving its bioactivity during release up to several weeks. The scenario of protein delivery would greatly benefit by strategies enabling the production of non-spherical particles. Herein we report an easy and effective stamp-based method to produce poly-lactic-glycolic-acid (PLGA) microparticles encapsulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) of different shapes. We demonstrate that PLGA microspheres can be deformed at room temperature exploiting solvent/non-solvent plasticization in order to preserve the properties of the starting microspheres. This gentle method allows the production of shaped particles that provide a prolonged release of VEGF in active form, as verified by an angiogenic assay. The retention of the biological activity of an extremely labile molecule, i.e. VEGF, lets us hypothesize that a wide variety of drug and protein encapsulated polymeric microspheres can be processed using this method.

  14. A new type of highly polymerized yolk protein from the cochineal insect Dactylopius confusus.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, R; Engler, D L; Bartnek, F; Van Antwerpen, R; Bluestein, H A; Gilkey, J C; Yepiz-Plascencia, G M

    1996-01-01

    A female specific protein was isolated from eggs and female hemolymph of cochineal insects, using density gradient ultracentrifugation, ammonium sulfate precipitation, and size exclusion column chromatography. The protein was found to consist of four different subunits with apparent molecular weights (Mr) 45,000, 49,000, 53,000, and 56,000, respectively. All four subunits were found to be glycosylated; no association of lipids was detected. Size exclusion column chromatography and non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that the native yolk protein exists as large polymers. Electron microscopy showed that these molecules are long, helical ribbons of variable size which are found in both hemolymph and eggs. Using cryo-electron microscopy, it was shown that the ribbons were 14.6 +/- 1.5 nm wide; the helix they form has a repeat distance of 104.9 +/- 11.3 nm and a diameter of 42.1 +/- 5 nm. A clear substructure of the ribbons was recognized. The newly identified protein is the major yolk protein of Dactylopius confusus and no other proteins resembling the more familiar vitellins of other insect species were detected. Moreover, the D. confusus yolk protein appears to be unique both in its subunit structure and in its polymerizing qualities. Thus, the cochineal yolk protein (CYP) is suggested to represent a new type of insect yolk protein. PMID:8742825

  15. Polymerization of SDS-PAGE gel by gamma irradiation and its use for characterization by electrophoresis of a protein [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jin-Hee; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Lim, Sang-Yong; Lee, Ho-Joon; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2005-12-01

    An SDS-PAGE gel strip was polymerized using a gamma irradiation process and used for electrophoresis. The relative mobility (Rf) and resolution of marker proteins were determined. Polymerization was induced by gamma irradiation in an acrylamide and N'-methylene bisacrylamide mixture with and without the polymerization initiators, ammonium persulfate (APS) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED). The calibration curves of log 10 molecular weight of the protein versus the distance of the migration showed higher correlations in the gamma irradiated gel than in that of the APS-TEMED polymerized control. The Rf value of the protein was increased in the gel polymerized by gamma-irradiation.

  16. Competitive protein adsorption to soft polymeric layers: binary mixtures and comparison to theory.

    PubMed

    Oberle, Michael; Yigit, Cemil; Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano; Dzubiella, Joachim; Ballauff, Matthias

    2015-02-19

    Nanoparticles immersed in biological fluids readily adsorb proteins. The protein corona thus generated on the surface of the particles largely determines their biological fate. Since biological fluids, e.g., blood plasma, contain a large number of proteins, competitive adsorption must be considered. We study the competitive adsorption of lysozyme, cytochrome c, papain, and RNase A onto a soft charged polymeric layer. The experimental data of binary protein mixtures are compared to a theoretical model taking into account electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between the proteins and the network. The interactions between bound proteins are modeled within a second virial approximation. The model possesses full generality and can be applied to the adsorption of an arbitrary number of protein types. The parameters describing the adsorption of a single protein type are obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), while the competitive adsorption of a binary mixture is studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. The competitive adsorption can be predicted from the data related to the adsorption of the single types without adjustable parameters.

  17. Promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Wu, J. H. David; Newcomb, Michael

    2012-11-13

    The present invention relates to an inducible and a high expression nucleic acid promoter isolated from Clostridium thermocellum. These promoters are useful for directing expression of a protein or polypeptide encoded by a nucleic acid molecule operably associated with the nucleic acid promoters. The present invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs including the C. thermocellum promoters, and expression vectors and hosts containing such nucleic acid constructs. The present invention also relates to protein isolated from Clostridium thermocellum, including a repressor protein. The present invention also provides methods of using the isolated promoters and proteins from Clostridium thermocellum, including methods for directing inducible in vitro and in vivo expression of a protein or polypeptide in a host, and methods of producing ethanol from a cellulosic biomass.

  18. Biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant function by polymeric nanoparticles: role of surfactant protein B and C.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-11-01

    The current study investigated the mechanisms involved in the process of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by polymeric nanoparticles (NP). The minimal surface tension of diverse synthetic surfactants was monitored in the presence of bare and surface-decorated (i.e. poloxamer 407) sub-100 nm poly(lactide) NP. Moreover, the influence of NP on surfactant composition (i.e. surfactant protein (SP) content) was studied. Dose-elevations of SP advanced the biophysical activity of the tested surfactant preparation. Surfactant-associated protein C supplemented phospholipid mixtures (PLM-C) were shown to be more susceptible to biophysical inactivation by bare NP than phospholipid mixture supplemented with surfactant protein B (PLM-B) and PLM-B/C. Surfactant function was hindered owing to a drastic depletion of the SP content upon contact with bare NP. By contrast, surface-modified NP were capable of circumventing unwanted surfactant inhibition. Surfactant constitution influences the extent of biophysical inhibition by polymeric NP. Steric shielding of the NP surface minimizes unwanted NP-surfactant interactions, which represents an option for the development of surfactant-compatible nanomedicines.

  19. Reversible Interactions of Proteins with Mixed Shell Polymeric Micelles: Tuning the Surface Hydrophobic/Hydrophilic Balance toward Efficient Artificial Chaperones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianzu; Song, Yiqing; Sun, Pingchuan; An, Yingli; Zhang, Zhenkun; Shi, Linqi

    2016-03-22

    Molecular chaperones can elegantly fine-tune its hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance to assist a broad spectrum of nascent polypeptide chains to fold properly. Such precious property is difficult to be achieved by chaperone mimicking materials due to limited control of their surface characteristics that dictate interactions with unfolded protein intermediates. Mixed shell polymeric micelles (MSPMs), which consist of two kinds of dissimilar polymeric chains in the micellar shell, offer a convenient way to fine-tune surface properties of polymeric nanoparticles. In the current work, we have fabricated ca. 30 kinds of MSPMs with finely tunable hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface properties. We investigated the respective roles of thermosensitive and hydrophilic polymeric chains in the thermodenaturation protection of proteins down to the molecular structure. Although the three kinds of thermosensitive polymers investigated herein can form collapsed hydrophobic domains on the micellar surface, we found distinct capability to capture and release unfolded protein intermediates, due to their respective affinity for proteins. Meanwhile, in terms of the hydrophilic polymeric chains in the micellar shell, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) excels in assisting unfolded protein intermediates to refold properly via interacting with the refolding intermediates, resulting in enhanced chaperone efficiency. However, another hydrophilic polymer-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) severely deteriorates the chaperone efficiency of MSPMs, due to its protein-resistant properties. Judicious combination of thermosensitive and hydrophilic chains in the micellar shell lead to MSPM-based artificial chaperones with optimal efficacy.

  20. Osmotic effects of protein polymerization: analysis of volume changes in sickle cell anemia red cells following deoxy-hemoglobin S polymerization.

    PubMed

    Lew, V L; Bookchin, R M

    1991-05-01

    Polymerization-depolymerization of proteins within cells and subcellular organelles may have powerful osmotic effects. As a model to study these we analyzed the predicted volume changes following hemoglobin (Hb) S polymerization in sickle cell anemia (SS) red cells with different initial volumes. The theoretical analysis predicted that dehydrated SS red cells may sustain large polymerization-induced volume shifts whose direction would depend on whether or not small solutes were excluded from polymer-associated water. Experiments with SS cells from promptly fractionated venous blood showed oxygenation-induced swelling, maximal in the densest cells, in support of nonexclusion models. The predicted extent of cell dehydration on polymerization was strongly influenced by factors such as the dilution of residual soluble Hb and the increased osmotic contribution of Hb in cells dehydrated by salt loss, largely overlooked in the past. The osmotic effects of polymer formation may thus play an important part in microcirculatory infarction by dense SS cells, as they become even denser and stiffer during deoxygenation in the capillaries. PMID:1875401

  1. Polymeric biomaterials for nerve regeneration applications: From promoting cellular organization to the delivery of bioactive molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Rivera, Roberto L.

    Thousands of new cases of injury to the central nervous system (CNS) occur each year in the USA and all over the world. However, despite recent advances, at present there is no cure for the resulting paraplegia or quadriplegia. This research is directed towards engineering biomaterial platforms to promote cellular organization at the surface of polymer scaffolds that will be conducive to proper regeneration of injured CNS. In addition, the formulation of a delivery system for neuroactive molecules using polymer-based materials will be evaluated to establish its potential to treat CNS disorders. Initial studies involved the chemical modification of an electrospun nonwoven matrix of nanofibers with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). Nanofibers alone up-regulated FGF-2, albeit to a lesser extent than nanofibers covalently modified with FGF-2. These results underscore the importance of both surface topography and growth factor presentation on cellular function. Moreover, that FGF-2 modified nanofibrillar scaffolds may demonstrate utility in tissue engineering applications for replacement and regeneration of damaged tissue following CNS injury or disease. Subsequent research efforts focused on a novel micropatterning technique called microscale plasma-initiated patterning (microPIP). This patterning method uses a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp to selectively protect regions of an underlying substrate from oxygen plasma treatment resulting in hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions. FGF-2 and laminin-1 were applied to an electrospun polyamide nanofibrillar matrix following plasma treatment. In this work it, was possible to demonstrate that textured surfaces, such as nanofibrillar scaffolds, can be micropatterned to provide external chemical cues for cellular organization. Finally, a microsphere system capable of encapsulating proteins while minimizing the mechanisms of protein degradation and providing a controlled release was investigated. Microspheres were comprised of

  2. Stimuli-Responsive Polymeric Systems for Controlled Protein and Peptide Delivery: Future Implications for Ocular Delivery.

    PubMed

    Mahlumba, Pakama; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins and peptides have become notable in the drug delivery arena for their compatibility with the human body as well as their high potency. However, their biocompatibility and high potency does not negate the existence of challenges resulting from physicochemical properties of proteins and peptides, including large size, short half-life, capability to provoke immune responses and susceptibility to degradation. Various delivery routes and delivery systems have been utilized to improve bioavailability, patient acceptability and reduce biodegradation. The ocular route remains of great interest, particularly for responsive delivery of macromolecules due to the anatomy and physiology of the eye that makes it a sensitive and complex environment. Research in this field is slowly gaining attention as this could be the breakthrough in ocular drug delivery of macromolecules. This work reviews stimuli-responsive polymeric delivery systems, their use in the delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides as well as examples of proteins and peptides used in the treatment of ocular disorders. Stimuli reviewed include pH, temperature, enzymes, light, ultrasound and magnetic field. In addition, it discusses the current progress in responsive ocular drug delivery. Furthermore, it explores future prospects in the use of stimuli-responsive polymers for ocular delivery of proteins and peptides. Stimuli-responsive polymers offer great potential in improving the delivery of ocular therapeutics, therefore there is a need to consider them in order to guarantee a local, sustained and ideal delivery of ocular proteins and peptides, evading tissue invasion and systemic side-effects. PMID:27483234

  3. Nucleocapsid protein structures from orthobunyaviruses reveal insight into ribonucleoprotein architecture and RNA polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Antonio; Tanner, Sian J.; Walter, Cheryl T.; Dent, Kyle C.; Shepherd, Dale A.; Wu, Weining; Matthews, Susan V.; Hiscox, Julian A.; Green, Todd J.; Luo, Ming; Elliott, Richard M.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Ranson, Neil A.; Barr, John N.; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    All orthobunyaviruses possess three genome segments of single-stranded negative sense RNA that are encapsidated with the virus-encoded nucleocapsid (N) protein to form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, which is uncharacterized at high resolution. We report the crystal structure of both the Bunyamwera virus (BUNV) N–RNA complex and the unbound Schmallenberg virus (SBV) N protein, at resolutions of 3.20 and 2.75 Å, respectively. Both N proteins crystallized as ring-like tetramers and exhibit a high degree of structural similarity despite classification into different orthobunyavirus serogroups. The structures represent a new RNA-binding protein fold. BUNV N possesses a positively charged groove into which RNA is deeply sequestered, with the bases facing away from the solvent. This location is highly inaccessible, implying that RNA polymerization and other critical base pairing events in the virus life cycle require RNP disassembly. Mutational analysis of N protein supports a correlation between structure and function. Comparison between these crystal structures and electron microscopy images of both soluble tetramers and authentic RNPs suggests the N protein does not bind RNA as a repeating monomer; thus, it represents a newly described architecture for bunyavirus RNP assembly, with implications for many other segmented negative-strand RNA viruses. PMID:23595147

  4. Polymeric hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 5A nanocapsules induce intrahepatic antigen-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Fichter, Michael; Piradashvili, Keti; Pietrzak-Nguyen, Anette; Pretsch, Leah; Kuhn, Gabor; Strand, Susanne; Knuf, Markus; Zepp, Fred; Wurm, Frederik R; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Gehring, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    Targeting antigen combined with adjuvants to hepatic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is essential for the induction of intrahepatic T cellular immunity controlling and resolving viral infections of the liver. Intravenous injection of antigen-loaded nanoparticles is a promising approach for the delivery of antigens to liver APCs. Accordingly, polymeric nanocapsules (NCs) synthesized exclusively of hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) and the adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) adsorbed to the nanocapsule surface were developed. Aim of the present study was the evaluation of the in vitro and in vivo behavior of MPLA-functionalized NS5A-NCs regarding the interaction with liver dendritic cells (DCs) and the potential to induce intrahepatic immune responses in a mouse model. Maturation of DCs was significantly increased by application of NS5A+MPLA-NCs compared to non-functionalized NS5A-NCs promoting a vigorous expression of CD40, CD80, CD86 and a strong secretion of the Th1-related cytokine IL-12. NS5A-NCs were preferentially deposited in DCs and Kupffer cells residing in the liver after intravenous administration. Immunization with NS5A-NCs induced intrahepatic antigen-specific CD4(+) T cellular immune responses determined by the secretion of IFNγ and IL-2. Furthermore, supplementation with MPLA induced significant levels of NS5A-specific antibodies. The application of polymeric nanocapsules synthesized exclusively out of antigen avoids the risk of unintended side effects caused by additional carrier substances. Functionalization with adjuvants like MPLA and the efficient targeting to liver-resident APCs inherits the potential for application of antigen nanocapsules in further vaccination approaches against pathogens affecting the liver. PMID:27614817

  5. Dual amyloid domains promote differential functioning of the chaplin proteins during Streptomyces aerial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Capstick, David S.; Jomaa, Ahmad; Hanke, Chistopher; Ortega, Joaquin; Elliot, Marie A.

    2011-01-01

    The chaplin proteins are functional amyloids found in the filamentous Streptomyces bacteria. These secreted proteins are required for the aerial development of Streptomyces coelicolor, and contribute to an intricate rodlet ultrastructure that decorates the surfaces of aerial hyphae and spores. S. coelicolor encodes eight chaplin proteins. Previous studies have revealed that only three of these proteins (ChpC, ChpE, and ChpH) are necessary for promoting aerial development, and of these three, ChpH is the primary developmental determinant. Here, we show that the model chaplin, ChpH, contains two amyloidogenic domains: one in the N terminus and one in the C terminus of the mature protein. These domains have different polymerization properties as determined using fluorescence spectroscopy, secondary structure analyses, and electron microscopy. We coupled these in vitro assays with in vivo genetic studies to probe the connection between ChpH amyloidogenesis and its biological function. Using mutational analyses, we demonstrated that both N- and C-terminal amyloid domains of ChpH were required for promoting aerial hypha formation, while the N-terminal domain was dispensable for assembly of the rodlet ultrastructure. These results suggest that there is a functional differentiation of the dual amyloid domains in the chaplin proteins. PMID:21628577

  6. The cyclization and polymerization of bacterially expressed proteins using modified self-splicing inteins.

    PubMed

    Evans, T C; Benner, J; Xu, M Q

    1999-06-25

    Mini-inteins derived from Synechocystis sp. (Ssp DnaB intein) and Mycobacterium xenopi (Mxe GyrA intein) that have been modified to cleave peptide bonds at their C and N termini, respectively, were cloned in-frame to the N and C termini of a target protein. Peptide bond cleavage of the modified inteins generated an N-terminal cysteine and a C-terminal thioester on the same protein. These complementary reactive groups underwent intra- or intermolecular condensation to generate circular or polymeric protein species with a new peptide bond at the site of ligation. Three cyclic peptides, BBP, an organ specific localization peptide; RGD, an inhibitor of platelet aggregation; and CDR-H3/C2, which inhibits HIV-1 replication, were isolated using the two-intein system. BBP, RGD, and CDR-H3/C2 had masses of 977.1, 1119.9, and 2098.6 g/mol, respectively, as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption-time of flight mass spectrometry, which agreed well with the values of 977.2, 1120.3, and 2098.3 g/mol, respectively, predicted for the cyclic species. This system was used to cyclize proteins as large as 395 amino acids. Furthermore, multimers of thioredoxin were formed upon concentration of the reactive species, indicating the potential to form novel biomaterials based on fibrous proteins.

  7. Separation of proteins by cation-exchange sequential injection chromatography using a polymeric monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Masini, Jorge Cesar

    2016-02-01

    Since sequential injection chromatography (SIC) emerged in 2003, it has been used for separation of small molecules in diverse samples, but separations of high molar mass compounds such as proteins have not yet been described. In the present work a poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (GMA-co-EDMA) monolithic column was prepared by free radical polymerization inside a 2.1-mm-i.d. activated fused silica-lined stainless steel tubing and modified with iminodiacetic acid (IDA). The column was prepared from a mixture of 24% GMA, 16% EDMA, 20% cyclohexanol, and 40% 1-dodecanol (all% as w/w) containing 1% of azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) (in relation to monomers). Polymerization was done at 60 °C for 24 h. The polymer was modified with 1.0 M IDA (in 2 M Na2CO3, pH 10.5) at 80 °C for 16 h. Separation of myoglobin, ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, and lysozyme was achieved at pH 7.0 (20 mM KH2PO4/K2HPO4) using a salt gradient (NaCl). Myoglobin was not retained, and the other proteins were separated by a gradient of NaCl created inside the holding coil (4 m of 0.8-mm-i.d. PTFE tubing) by sequential aspiration of 750 and 700 μL of 0.2 and 0.1 M NaCl, respectively. As the flow was reversed toward the column (5 μL s(-1)) the interdispersion of these solutions created a reproducible gradient which separated the proteins in 10 min, with the following order of retention: ribonuclease A < cytochrome C < lysozyme. The elution order was consistent with a cation-exchange mechanism as the retention increased with the isoelectric points.

  8. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  9. The fabrication of superlow protein absorption zwitterionic coating by electrochemically mediated atom transfer radical polymerization and its application.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yichuan; Yang, Guang; Liang, Bo; Fang, Lu; Ma, Guanglong; Zhu, Qin; Chen, Shengfu; Ye, Xuesong

    2015-02-01

    A well-controllable electrochemically mediated surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (e-siATRP) method for the fabrication of superlow protein absorption zwitterionic hydrogel coatings based on poly(sulbetaine methacrylate) (pSBMA) was developed in this work. The effects of the electric condition on polymerization as well as its antifouling performances both in vitro and in vivo were also investigated. Different potentials (-0.08 V, -0.15 V and -0.22 V) and polymerization times (from 8 to 48 h) were chosen to study the polymerization procedure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize the properties of the polymer layers. Ellipsometry measurements showed that a higher potential provided faster polymerization and thicker polymer layers; however, the protein absorption experiments showed that the best polymerization condition was under a constant potential of -0.15 V and 32 h, under which the protein absorption was 0.8% in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (compared to a bare gold electrode). The electrodes with a pSBMA coating effectively deduced the current sensitivity decay both in undiluted serum and in vivo. The usage of the commercially available polymerization monomer of SBMA, the simple convenient synthesis process regardless of the presence of oxygen and the excellent controllability of e-siATRP make it a very promising and universal technique in the preparation of zwitterionic polymer coatings, especially in the development of biocompatible material for implantable devices such as neural and biosensor electrodes. PMID:25463508

  10. Controlled Radical Polymerization as an Enabling Approach for the Next Generation of Protein-Polymer Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Pelegri-O'Day, Emma M; Maynard, Heather D

    2016-09-20

    Protein-polymer conjugates are unique constructs that combine the chemical properties of a synthetic polymer chain with the biological properties of a biomacromolecule. This often leads to improved stabilities, solubilities, and in vivo half-lives of the resulting conjugates, and expands the range of applications for the proteins. However, early chemical methods for protein-polymer conjugation often required multiple polymer modifications, which were tedious and low yielding. To solve these issues, work in our laboratory has focused on the development of controlled radical polymerization (CRP) techniques to improve synthesis of protein-polymer conjugates. Initial efforts focused on the one-step syntheses of protein-reactive polymers through the use of functionalized initiators and chain transfer agents. A variety of functional groups such as maleimide and pyridyl disulfide could be installed with high end-group retention, which could then react with protein functional groups through mild and biocompatible chemistries. While this grafting to method represented a significant advance in conjugation technique, purification and steric hindrance between large biomacromolecules and polymer chains often led to low conjugation yields. Therefore, a grafting from approach was developed, wherein a polymer chain is grown from an initiating site on a functionalized protein. These conjugates have demonstrated improved homogeneity, characterization, and easier purification, while maintaining protein activity. Much of this early work utilizing CRP techniques focused on polymers made up of biocompatible but nonfunctional monomer units, often containing oligoethylene glycol meth(acrylate) or N-isopropylacrylamide. These branched polymers have significant advantages compared to the historically used linear poly(ethylene glycols) including decreased viscosities and thermally responsive behavior, respectively. Recently, we were motivated to use CRP techniques to develop polymers with

  11. Controlled Radical Polymerization as an Enabling Approach for the Next Generation of Protein-Polymer Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Pelegri-O'Day, Emma M; Maynard, Heather D

    2016-09-20

    Protein-polymer conjugates are unique constructs that combine the chemical properties of a synthetic polymer chain with the biological properties of a biomacromolecule. This often leads to improved stabilities, solubilities, and in vivo half-lives of the resulting conjugates, and expands the range of applications for the proteins. However, early chemical methods for protein-polymer conjugation often required multiple polymer modifications, which were tedious and low yielding. To solve these issues, work in our laboratory has focused on the development of controlled radical polymerization (CRP) techniques to improve synthesis of protein-polymer conjugates. Initial efforts focused on the one-step syntheses of protein-reactive polymers through the use of functionalized initiators and chain transfer agents. A variety of functional groups such as maleimide and pyridyl disulfide could be installed with high end-group retention, which could then react with protein functional groups through mild and biocompatible chemistries. While this grafting to method represented a significant advance in conjugation technique, purification and steric hindrance between large biomacromolecules and polymer chains often led to low conjugation yields. Therefore, a grafting from approach was developed, wherein a polymer chain is grown from an initiating site on a functionalized protein. These conjugates have demonstrated improved homogeneity, characterization, and easier purification, while maintaining protein activity. Much of this early work utilizing CRP techniques focused on polymers made up of biocompatible but nonfunctional monomer units, often containing oligoethylene glycol meth(acrylate) or N-isopropylacrylamide. These branched polymers have significant advantages compared to the historically used linear poly(ethylene glycols) including decreased viscosities and thermally responsive behavior, respectively. Recently, we were motivated to use CRP techniques to develop polymers with

  12. The β2 clamp in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA polymerase III αβ2ε replicase promotes polymerization and reduces exonuclease activity

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shoujin; Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Hongtai; Fleming, Joy; Yang, Weiqiang; Wang, Shihua; Wei, Wenjing; Zhou, Jie; Zhu, Guofeng; Deng, Jiaoyu; Hou, Jian; Zhou, Ying; Lin, Shiqiang; Zhang, Xian-En; Bi, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerase III (DNA pol III) is a multi-subunit replication machine responsible for the accurate and rapid replication of bacterial genomes, however, how it functions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) requires further investigation. We have reconstituted the leading-strand replication process of the Mtb DNA pol III holoenzyme in vitro, and investigated the physical and functional relationships between its key components. We verify the presence of an αβ2ε polymerase-clamp-exonuclease replicase complex by biochemical methods and protein-protein interaction assays in vitro and in vivo and confirm that, in addition to the polymerase activity of its α subunit, Mtb DNA pol III has two potential proofreading subunits; the α and ε subunits. During DNA replication, the presence of the β2 clamp strongly promotes the polymerization of the αβ2ε replicase and reduces its exonuclease activity. Our work provides a foundation for further research on the mechanism by which the replication machinery switches between replication and proofreading and provides an experimental platform for the selection of antimicrobials targeting DNA replication in Mtb. PMID:26822057

  13. Growth Factors Polymerized Within Fibrin Hydrogel Promote Amylase Production in Parotid Cells

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Andrew D.; Nelson, Joel W.; Leigh, Noel J.; Duffey, Michael E.; Lei, Pedro; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2013-01-01

    Salivary gland cell differentiation has been a recurring challenge for researchers as primary salivary cells show a loss of phenotype in culture. Particularly, parotid cells show a marked decrease in amylase expression, the loss of tight junction organization and proper cell function. Previously, Matrigel has been used successfully as an extracellular matrix; however, it is not practical for in vivo applications as it is tumorigenic. An alternative method could rely on the use of fibrin hydrogel (FH), which has been used extensively in biomedical engineering applications ranging from cardiovascular tissue engineering to wound-healing experiments. Although several groups have examined the effects of a three-dimensional (3D) environment on salivary cell cultures, little is known about the effects of FH on salivary cell cultures. The current study developed a 3D cell culture model to support parotid gland cell differentiation using a combination of FH and growth factor-reduced Matrigel (GFR-MG). Furthermore, FH polymerized with a combination of EGF and IGF-1 induced formation of 3D spheroids capable of amylase expression and an agonist-induced increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in salivary cells. These studies represent an initial step toward the construction of an artificial salivary gland to restore salivary gland dysfunction. This is necessary to reduce xerostomia in patients with compromised salivary function. PMID:23594102

  14. Dye-promoted precipitation of serum proteins. Mechanism and application.

    PubMed

    Birkenmeier, G; Kopperschläger, G

    1991-11-01

    Immobilized dyes have been used primarily for purification of nucleotide dependent enzymes and proteins from plasma and other sources. Due to their low costs, high protein binding capacity and resistance to degradation dyes bear the potential as ligand for affinity separation of proteins on a large scale. In this paper dyes have been used for precipitation of proteins. Using albumin, prealbumin, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein and immunoglobulin G as model proteins we could demonstrate that dye-promoted precipitation depends on several factors which include the structure of the dye, the pH of the solution, the dye/protein molar ratio and the intrinsic properties of the proteins. It revealed that most of the dyes tested were endowed with the precipitating potential. The efficacy of precipitation was found to increase with the complexity of the dye structure. However, the amount of a dye required for total precipitation was found to be different for a given protein. Electrostatic as well as hydrophobic forces are involved in the mechanism of precipitation. It was demonstrated that by optimizing the conditions, mixtures of proteins can be resolved by dye-promoted precipitation. The high sensitivity of the reaction offers the possibility of using this method for rapid concentration of very diluted protein solutions. PMID:1367693

  15. Highly permeable polymeric membranes based on the incorporation of the functional water channel protein Aquaporin Z

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish; Grzelakowski, Mariusz; Zilles, Julie; Clark, Mark; Meier, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    The permeability and solute transport characteristics of amphiphilic triblock-polymer vesicles containing the bacterial water-channel protein Aquaporin Z (AqpZ) were investigated. The vesicles were made of a block copolymer with symmetric poly-(2-methyloxazoline)-poly-(dimethylsiloxane)-poly-(2-methyloxazoline) (PMOXA15-PDMS110-PMOXA15) repeat units. Light-scattering measurements on pure polymer vesicles subject to an outwardly directed salt gradient in a stopped-flow apparatus indicated that the polymer vesicles were highly impermeable. However, a large enhancement in water productivity (permeability per unit driving force) of up to ≈800 times that of pure polymer was observed when AqpZ was incorporated. The activation energy (Ea) of water transport for the protein-polymer vesicles (3.4 kcal/mol) corresponded to that reported for water-channel-mediated water transport in lipid membranes. The solute reflection coefficients of glucose, glycerol, salt, and urea were also calculated, and indicated that these solutes are completely rejected. The productivity of AqpZ-incorporated polymer membranes was at least an order of magnitude larger than values for existing salt-rejecting polymeric membranes. The approach followed here may lead to more productive and sustainable water treatment membranes, whereas the variable levels of permeability obtained with different concentrations of AqpZ may provide a key property for drug delivery applications. PMID:18077364

  16. Phase transitions of multivalent proteins can promote clustering of membrane receptors

    PubMed Central

    Banjade, Sudeep; Rosen, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Clustering of proteins into micrometer-sized structures at membranes is observed in many signaling pathways. Most models of clustering are specific to particular systems, and relationships between physical properties of the clusters and their molecular components are not well understood. We report biochemical reconstitution on supported lipid bilayers of protein clusters containing the adhesion receptor Nephrin and its cytoplasmic partners, Nck and N-WASP. With Nephrin attached to the bilayer, multivalent interactions enable these proteins to polymerize on the membrane surface and undergo two-dimensional phase separation, producing micrometer-sized clusters. Dynamics and thermodynamics of the clusters are modulated by the valencies and affinities of the interacting species. In the presence of the Arp2/3 complex, the clusters assemble actin filaments, suggesting that clustering of regulatory factors could promote local actin assembly at membranes. Interactions between multivalent proteins could be a general mechanism for cytoplasmic adaptor proteins to organize membrane receptors into micrometer-scale signaling zones. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04123.001 PMID:25321392

  17. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  18. Curcumin inhibits HIV-1 by promoting Tat protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amjad; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat is an intrinsically unfolded protein playing a pivotal role in viral replication by associating with TAR region of viral LTR. Unfolded proteins are degraded by 20S proteasome in an ubiquitin independent manner. Curcumin is known to activate 20S proteasome and promotes the degradation of intrinsically unfolded p53 tumor suppressor protein. Since HIV-1 Tat protein is largerly unfolded, we hypothesized that Tat may also be targeted through this pathway. Curcumin treated Tat transfected HEK-293T cells showed a dose and time dependent degradation of Tat protein. Contrary to this HIV-1 Gag which is a properly folded protein, remained unaffected with curcumin. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that curcumin treatment did not affect Tat gene transcription. Curcumin increased the rate of Tat protein degradation as shown by cycloheximide (CHX) chase assay. Degradation of the Tat protein is accomplished through proteasomal pathway as proteasomal inhibitor MG132 blocked Tat degradation. Curcumin also decreased Tat mediated LTR promoter transactivation and inhibited virus production from HIV-1 infected cells. Taken together our study reveals a novel observation that curcumin causes potent degradation of Tat which may be one of the major mechanisms behind its anti HIV activity. PMID:27283735

  19. Role of non-prolamin proteins and low molecular weight redox agents in protein folding and polymerization in wheat grains and influence on baking quality parameters.

    PubMed

    Osipova, Svetlana V; Permyakova, Marina D; Permyakov, Aleksey V

    2012-12-12

    The various enzyme systems and low molecular weight (LMW) redox agents are related to the folding and polymerization of prolamins in the ripening wheat grains and the formation of baking quality. Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) and cyclophylins accelerate "correct" folding of prolamins, which is most likely necessary for the subsequent formation of the macromolecular structure of the gluten protein matrix. PDIs are also involved in the polymerization of prolamins, catalyzing the oxidation of protein sulfhydryl groups. Molecular chaperone binding BiP protein facilitates folding of prolamins, with its role increasing in the stressful conditions. Reducing systems of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, LMW redox pairs GSH/GSSG and Asc/DHAsc, thiol oxidases, and lipoxygenases (LOXs) regulate redox balance and the rate of polymerization of prolamins at the different stages of grain ripening. Additionally, LOX is probably involved in the protein-starch-lipid interactions between the starch granule and the protein matrix, mediated by puroindolines, determining the formation of grain texture. It is assumed that the high variability of baking quality in different environmental conditions is due to the interaction of labile enzyme systems with the storage proteins in the developing wheat caryopsis.

  20. Evaluation of a combined drug-delivery system for proteins assembled with polymeric nanoparticles and porous microspheres; characterization and protein integrity studies.

    PubMed

    Alcalá-Alcalá, Sergio; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Lima-Muñoz, Enrique J; Piñón-Segundo, Elizabeth; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2015-07-15

    This work presents an evaluation of the adsorption/infiltration process in relation to the loading of a model protein, α-amylase, into an assembled biodegradable polymeric system, free of organic solvents and made up of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA). Systems were assembled in a friendly aqueous medium by adsorbing and infiltrating polymeric nanoparticles into porous microspheres. These assembled systems are able to load therapeutic amounts of the drug through adsorption of the protein onto the large surface area characteristic of polymeric nanoparticles. The subsequent infiltration of nanoparticles adsorbed with the protein into porous microspheres enabled the controlled release of the protein as a function of the amount of infiltrated nanoparticles, since the surface area available on the porous structure is saturated at different levels, thus modifying the protein release rate. Findings were confirmed by both the BET technique (N2 isotherms) and in vitro release studies. During the adsorption process, the pH of the medium plays an important role by creating an environment that favors adsorption between the surfaces of the micro- and nano-structures and the protein. Finally, assays of α-amylase activity using 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl-α-D-maltotrioside (CNP-G3) as the substrate and the circular dichroism technique confirmed that when this new approach was used no conformational changes were observed in the protein after release.

  1. Evaluation of a combined drug-delivery system for proteins assembled with polymeric nanoparticles and porous microspheres; characterization and protein integrity studies.

    PubMed

    Alcalá-Alcalá, Sergio; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Lima-Muñoz, Enrique J; Piñón-Segundo, Elizabeth; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2015-07-15

    This work presents an evaluation of the adsorption/infiltration process in relation to the loading of a model protein, α-amylase, into an assembled biodegradable polymeric system, free of organic solvents and made up of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) acid (PLGA). Systems were assembled in a friendly aqueous medium by adsorbing and infiltrating polymeric nanoparticles into porous microspheres. These assembled systems are able to load therapeutic amounts of the drug through adsorption of the protein onto the large surface area characteristic of polymeric nanoparticles. The subsequent infiltration of nanoparticles adsorbed with the protein into porous microspheres enabled the controlled release of the protein as a function of the amount of infiltrated nanoparticles, since the surface area available on the porous structure is saturated at different levels, thus modifying the protein release rate. Findings were confirmed by both the BET technique (N2 isotherms) and in vitro release studies. During the adsorption process, the pH of the medium plays an important role by creating an environment that favors adsorption between the surfaces of the micro- and nano-structures and the protein. Finally, assays of α-amylase activity using 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl-α-D-maltotrioside (CNP-G3) as the substrate and the circular dichroism technique confirmed that when this new approach was used no conformational changes were observed in the protein after release. PMID:25936624

  2. TALE factors poise promoters for activation by Hox proteins.

    PubMed

    Choe, Seong-Kyu; Ladam, Franck; Sagerström, Charles G

    2014-01-27

    Hox proteins form complexes with TALE cofactors from the Pbx and Prep/Meis families to control transcription, but it remains unclear how Hox:TALE complexes function. Examining a Hoxb1b:TALE complex that regulates zebrafish hoxb1a transcription, we find maternally deposited TALE proteins at the hoxb1a promoter already during blastula stages. These TALE factors recruit histone-modifying enzymes to promote an active chromatin profile at the hoxb1a promoter and also recruit RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and P-TEFb. However, in the presence of TALE factors, RNAPII remains phosphorylated on serine 5 and hoxb1a transcription is inefficient. By gastrula stages, Hoxb1b binds together with TALE factors to the hoxb1a promoter. This triggers P-TEFb-mediated transitioning of RNAPII to the serine 2-phosphorylated form and efficient hoxb1a transcription. We conclude that TALE factors access promoters during early embryogenesis to poise them for activation but that Hox proteins are required to trigger efficient transcription.

  3. Poly(4-vinylpyridine): a polymeric ligand for mixed-mode protein chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanying; Sun, Yan

    2014-12-19

    Poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) was proposed for use as a polymeric ligand of mixed-mode chromatography (MMC) of proteins. P4VP has linear hydrophobic chains with ionizable pyridyl groups in its backbone. The polymer was coupled onto Sepharose FF gel at a pyridyl group density of 190 μmol/mL (FF-P4VP-190) by the substitution reaction of pyridyl amines with brominated Sepharose gel. Thereby the immobilized ligand possesses the intrinsic hydrophobic nature as well as the newly obtained electrostatic interaction properties endowed from the substituted positively charged pyridyl amines. The pore size distribution was measured by inverse size exclusion chromatography, and the results revealed that P4VP formed a three-dimensional layer on the matrix surface with a maximum layer depth of 4.2 nm. The adsorption isotherms of γ-globulin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) to FF-P4VP-190 were determined under varying pH values and salt concentrations to provide insights into the adsorption properties of the medium. It was found that the adsorption capacity of γ-globulin and BSA both presented an increase with pH increasing from 8.0 to 9.0. Moreover, FF-P4VP-190 exhibited stronger adsorption for BSA than γ-globulin. The higher affinity for BSA might be attributed to its more net negative charges. Protein adsorption capacities to FF-P4VP-190 decreased with increasing NaCl concentration, but still manifested moderate levels at high salt concentration such as 75 mg/mL for γ-globulin and 14 mg/mL for BSA at 0.5 mol/L NaCl and pH 9.0. The capacity decreases with increasing ionic strength, indicating the dominant role of electrostatic interactions, while the moderate capacity values at 0.5 mol/L NaCl confirmed the presence of salt-tolerant feature of FF-P4VP-190, making it function as an MMC material. Column chromatography was conducted to investigate protein elution behavior. Efficient protein recovery was achieved at mild elution conditions such as pH 4.0 for γ-globulin and pH 4

  4. Poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL)-polymeric micelle hybrid sheets for the incorporation and release of hydrophilic proteins.

    PubMed

    Anzai, Ryosuke; Murakami, Yoshihiko

    2015-03-01

    Sheets have several advantages over conventional gel- or particle-type drug carriers. Sheets have several notable attributes: sheets' size and shape are easily adjustable, sheets are highly accessible in surgery, and sheets have a large contact area relative to drug-targeting sites. However, it is difficult to incorporate hydrophilic proteins into hydrophobic sheets and to release the proteins over the long term in a sustained manner. In the present study, we show that "poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL)-polymeric micelle hybrid sheets" can be used for the incorporation and release of hydrophilic proteins. Polymeric micelles (i.e., spaces that can incorporate hydrophilic compounds) are, in this study, uniformly dispersed in hydrophobic and biocompatible biomaterial sheet. We have clarified that the composition of block copolymer, methoxy-terminated poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (CH3O-PEG-b-PCL), can affect two variables: the stability of w/o emulsion and the release properties of the resulting sheets, by means of visual qualitative observations, newly developed quantitative analyses (advanced fractal analysis, advanced FD) based on deviation of the fractal dimension (FD), and release experiments. We clarified that the release behavior of BSA was affected by the composition of the block copolymers and the resulting emulsion. The results obtained in this paper show that the hydrophobic sheets in which polymeric micelles providing hydrophilic spaces were dispersed could be an effective platform for incorporating and releasing hydrophilic proteins. PMID:25723105

  5. Microencapsulation of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM using polymerized whey proteins as wall material.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yujun; Zheng, Zhe; Zhang, Tiehua; Hendricks, Gregory; Guo, Mingruo

    2016-09-01

    Survivability of probiotics in foods is essential for developing functional food containing probiotics. We investigated polymerized whey protein (PWP)-based microencapsulation process which is developed for protecting probiotics like Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and compared with the method using sodium alginate (SA). The entrapment rate was 89.3 ± 4.8% using PWP, while it was 73.2 ± 1.4% for SA. The microencapsulated NCFM by PWP and SA were separately subjected to digestion juices and post-fermentation storage of fermented cows' and goats' milk using the encapsulated culture. The log viable count of NCFM in PWP-based microencapsulation was 4.56, compared with that of 4.26 in SA-based ones and 3.13 for free culture. Compared with using SA as wall material, PWP was more effective in protecting probiotic. Microencapsulation of L. acidophilus NCFM using PWP as wall material can be exploited in the development of fermented dairy products with better survivability of probiotic organism. PMID:27309796

  6. Protein-Nanocrystal Conjugates Support a Single Filament Polymerization Model in R1 Plasmid Segregation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Charina L.; Claridge, Shelley A.; Garner, Ethan C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2008-07-15

    To ensure inheritance by daughter cells, many low-copy number bacterial plasmids, including the R1 drug-resistance plasmid, encode their own DNA segregation systems. The par operon of plasmid R1 directs construction of a simple spindle structure that converts free energy of polymerization of an actin-like protein, ParM, into work required to move sister plasmids to opposite poles of rod-shaped cells. The structures of individual components have been solved, but little is known about the ultrastructure of the R1 spindle. To determine the number of ParM filaments in a minimal R1 spindle, we used DNA-gold nanocrystal conjugates as mimics of the R1 plasmid. Wefound that each end of a single polar ParM filament binds to a single ParR/parC-gold complex, consistent with the idea that ParM filaments bind in the hollow core of the ParR/parC ring complex. Our results further suggest that multifilament spindles observed in vivo are associated with clusters of plasmidssegregating as a unit.

  7. Proteolytic cleavage of polymeric tau protein by caspase-3: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Jarero-Basulto, Jose J; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Mena, Raul; Kristofikova, Zdena; Ripova, Daniela; Perry, George; Binder, Lester I; Garcia-Sierra, Francisco

    2013-12-01

    Truncated tau protein at Asp(421) is associated with neurofibrillary pathology in Alzheimer disease (AD); however, little is known about its presence in the form of nonfibrillary aggregates. Here, we report immunohistochemical staining of the Tau-C3 antibody, which recognizes Asp(421)-truncated tau, in a group of AD cases with different extents of cognitive impairment. In the hippocampus, we found distinct nonfibrillary aggregates of Asp(421)-truncated tau. Unlike Asp(421)-composed neurofibrillary tangles, however, these nonfibrillary pathologies did not increase significantly with respect to the Braak staging and, therefore, make no significant contribution to cognitive impairment. On the other hand, despite in vitro evidence that caspase-3 cleaves monomeric tau at Asp(421), to date, this truncation has not been demonstrated to be executed by this protease in polymeric tau entities. We determined that Asp(421) truncation can be produced by caspase-3 in oligomeric and multimeric complexes of recombinant full-length tau in isolated native tau filaments in vitro and in situ in neurofibrillary tangles analyzed in fresh brain slices from AD cases. Our data suggest that generation of this pathologic Asp(421) truncation of tau in long-lasting fibrillary structures may produce further permanent toxicity for neurons in the brains of patients with AD.

  8. Adaptable Lipid Matrix Promotes Protein-Protein Association in Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey S; Polyansky, Anton A; Fleck, Markus; Volynsky, Pavel E; Efremov, Roman G

    2015-09-01

    The cell membrane is "stuffed" with proteins, whose transmembrane (TM) helical domains spontaneously associate to form functionally active complexes. For a number of membrane receptors, a modulation of TM domains' oligomerization has been shown to contribute to the development of severe pathological states, thus calling for detailed studies of the atomistic aspects of the process. Despite considerable progress achieved so far, several crucial questions still remain: How do the helices recognize each other in the membrane? What is the driving force of their association? Here, we assess the dimerization free energy of TM helices along with a careful consideration of the interplay between the structure and dynamics of protein and lipids using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in the hydrated lipid bilayer for three different model systems - TM fragments of glycophorin A, polyalanine and polyleucine peptides. We observe that the membrane driven association of TM helices exhibits a prominent entropic character, which depends on the peptide sequence. Thus, a single TM peptide of a given composition induces strong and characteristic perturbations in the hydrophobic core of the bilayer, which may facilitate the initial "communication" between TM helices even at the distances of 20-30 Å. Upon tight helix-helix association, the immobilized lipids accommodate near the peripheral surfaces of the dimer, thus disturbing the packing of the surrounding. The dimerization free energy of the modeled peptides corresponds to the strength of their interactions with lipids inside the membrane being the lowest for glycophorin A and similarly higher for both homopolymers. We propose that the ability to accommodate lipid tails determines the dimerization strength of TM peptides and that the lipid matrix directly governs their association. PMID:26575933

  9. Cooperativity among secretory IgA, the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, and the gut microbiota promotes host-microbial mutualism.

    PubMed

    Kaetzel, Charlotte S

    2014-12-01

    Secretory IgA (SIgA) antibodies in the intestinal tract form the first line of antigen-specific immune defense, preventing access of pathogens as well as commensal microbes to the body proper. SIgA is transported into external secretions by the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). Evidence is reported here that the gut microbiota regulates production of SIgA and pIgR, which act together to regulate the composition and activity of the microbiota. SIgA in the intestinal mucus layer helps to maintain spatial segregation between the microbiota and the epithelial surface without compromising the metabolic activity of the microbes. Products shed by members of the microbial community promote production of SIgA and pIgR by activating pattern recognition receptors on host epithelial and immune cells. Maternal SIgA in breast milk provides protection to newborn mammals until the developing intestinal immune system begins to produce its own SIgA. Disruption of the SIgA-pIgR-microbial triad can increase the risk of infectious, allergic and inflammatory diseases of the intestine.

  10. 4-Dimethylaminopyridine promoted interfacial polymerization between hyperbranched polyesteramide and trimesoyl chloride for preparing ultralow-pressure reverse osmosis composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jiaxu; Lin, Saisai; Song, Shuqin; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Huanlin

    2013-07-24

    We have presented a concept of ultralow-pressure reverse osmosis membrane based on hyperbranched polyesteramide through interfacial reaction promoted by pyridine derivate. In this strategy, a key catalyst of 4-dimethylaminopyridine, which can both eliminate the steric hindrance of acyl transfer reaction and facilitate the phase transfer in interfacial polymerization, is adopted to drive the formation of a thin film composite membrane from the hyperbranched polyesteramide and trimesoyl chloride. The results of the characterization demonstrate that a dense, rough, and hydrophilic active layer with a thickness of about 100 nm is formed when the 4-dimethylaminopyridine catalyst is used. The salt rejections for Na2SO4, NaCl, and MgSO4 of the as-prepared composite membrane are higher than 92%, especially for Na2SO4 with 98% rejection. The water fluxes reach about 30-40 L·m(-2)·h(-1) even at an operation pressure of 0.6 MPa. The membrane exhibits good chlorine-resistance ability but poor resistance abilities to acidic and alkaline solutions in the physical-chemical stability experiment. It is also found that the resultant membrane possesses excellent separation performance for PEG-200, showing a promising way to separate small organic molecules from water.

  11. Promoting protein crystallization using a plate with simple geometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui-Qing; Yin, Da-Chuan; Liu, Yong-Ming; Lu, Qin-Qin; He, Jin; Liu, Yue

    2014-03-01

    Increasing the probability of obtaining protein crystals in crystallization screening is always an important goal for protein crystallography. In this paper, a new method called the cross-diffusion microbatch (CDM) method is presented, which aims to efficiently promote protein crystallization and increase the chance of obtaining protein crystals. In this method, a very simple crystallization plate was designed in which all crystallization droplets are in one sealed space, so that a variety of volatile components from one droplet can diffuse into any other droplet via vapour diffusion. Crystallization screening and reproducibility tests indicate that this method could be a potentially powerful technique in practical protein crystallization screening. It can help to obtain crystals with higher probability and at a lower cost, while using a simple and easy procedure.

  12. An Artificial Reaction Promoter Modulates Mitochondrial Functions via Chemically Promoting Protein Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Yutaka; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Hotta, Kohji; Ariga, Katsuhiko; Oka, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation, which modulates protein function, is an important process in intracellular signalling. In mitochondria, protein acetylation regulates a number of enzymatic activities and, therefore, modulates mitochondrial functions. Our previous report showed that tributylphosphine (PBu3), an artificial reaction promoter that promotes acetylransfer reactions in vitro, also promotes the reaction between acetyl-CoA and an exogenously introduced fluorescent probe in mitochondria. In this study, we demonstrate that PBu3 induces the acetylation of mitochondrial proteins and a decrease in acetyl-CoA concentration in PBu3-treated HeLa cells. This indicates that PBu3 can promote the acetyltransfer reaction between acetyl-CoA and mitochondrial proteins in living cells. PBu3-induced acetylation gradually reduced mitochondrial ATP concentrations in HeLa cells without changing the cytoplasmic ATP concentration, suggesting that PBu3 mainly affects mitochondrial functions. In addition, pyruvate, which is converted into acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and transiently increases ATP concentrations in the absence of PBu3, elicited a further decrease in mitochondrial ATP concentrations in the presence of PBu3. Moreover, the application and removal of PBu3 reversibly alternated mitochondrial fragmentation and elongation. These results indicate that PBu3 enhances acetyltransfer reactions in mitochondria and modulates mitochondrial functions in living cells. PMID:27374857

  13. Redox agents and N-ethylmaleimide affect protein polymerization during laboratory scale dry pasta production and cooking.

    PubMed

    Bruneel, Charlotte; Buggenhout, Joke; Lagrain, Bert; Brijs, Kristof; Delcour, Jan A

    2016-04-01

    Durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) semolina gluten proteins consist of monomeric gliadin and polymeric glutenin and determine the quality of pasta products made therefrom. During pasta drying, glutenin starts polymerizing already below 60 °C (65% relative humidity (RH)), whereas gliadin only is incorporated in the protein network at temperatures exceeding 68 °C (68% RH) through thiol (SH)/disulfide (SS) exchange reactions. Removal of free SH groups in glutenin by adding 2.3 μmol KBrO3 or KIO3 per g dry matter semolina protein (g protein) or 13.8 μmol N-ethylmaleimide/g protein reduces gliadin-glutenin cross-linking during pasta drying and/or cooking and yields cooked pasta of high quality. Introducing free SH groups by adding 13.8 μmol glutathione/g protein increases gliadin-glutenin cross-linking during pasta processing, resulting in cooked pasta of lower quality. We hypothesize that too much gliadin incorporation in the glutenin network during pasta processing tightens the protein network and results in lower cooking quality.

  14. Functional analysis of bipartite begomovirus coat protein promoter sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Lacatus, Gabriela; Sunter, Garry

    2008-06-20

    We demonstrate that the AL2 gene of Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV) activates the CP promoter in mesophyll and acts to derepress the promoter in vascular tissue, similar to that observed for Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV). Binding studies indicate that sequences mediating repression and activation of the TGMV and CaLCuV CP promoter specifically bind different nuclear factors common to Nicotiana benthamiana, spinach and tomato. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrates that TGMV AL2 can interact with both sequences independently. Binding of nuclear protein(s) from different crop species to viral sequences conserved in both bipartite and monopartite begomoviruses, including TGMV, CaLCuV, Pepper golden mosaic virus and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus suggests that bipartite begomoviruses bind common host factors to regulate the CP promoter. This is consistent with a model in which AL2 interacts with different components of the cellular transcription machinery that bind viral sequences important for repression and activation of begomovirus CP promoters.

  15. Optimal Hydrophobicity in Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization-Based Protein Mimics Required for siRNA Internalization.

    PubMed

    deRonde, Brittany M; Posey, Nicholas D; Otter, Ronja; Caffrey, Leah M; Minter, Lisa M; Tew, Gregory N

    2016-06-13

    Exploring the role of polymer structure for the internalization of biologically relevant cargo, specifically siRNA, is of critical importance to the development of improved delivery reagents. Herein, we report guanidinium-rich protein transduction domain mimics (PTDMs) based on a ring-opening metathesis polymerization scaffold containing tunable hydrophobic moieties that promote siRNA internalization. Structure-activity relationships using Jurkat T cells and HeLa cells were explored to determine how the length of the hydrophobic block and the hydrophobic side chain compositions of these PTDMs impacted siRNA internalization. To explore the hydrophobic block length, two different series of diblock copolymers were synthesized: one series with symmetric block lengths and one with asymmetric block lengths. At similar cationic block lengths, asymmetric and symmetric PTDMs promoted siRNA internalization in the same percentages of the cell population regardless of the hydrophobic block length; however, with 20 repeat units of cationic charge, the asymmetric block length had greater siRNA internalization, highlighting the nontrivial relationships between hydrophobicity and overall cationic charge. To further probe how the hydrophobic side chains impacted siRNA internalization, an additional series of asymmetric PTDMs was synthesized that featured a fixed hydrophobic block length of five repeat units that contained either dimethyl (dMe), methyl phenyl (MePh), or diphenyl (dPh) side chains and varied cationic block lengths. This series was further expanded to incorporate hydrophobic blocks consisting of diethyl (dEt), diisobutyl (diBu), and dicyclohexyl (dCy) based repeat units to better define the hydrophobic window for which our PTDMs had optimal activity. High-performance liquid chromatography retention times quantified the relative hydrophobicities of the noncationic building blocks. PTDMs containing the MePh, diBu, and dPh hydrophobic blocks were shown to have superior

  16. Conjugation of Hyaluronic Acid onto Surfaces via the Interfacial Polymerization of Dopamine to Prevent Protein Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renliang; Liu, Xia; Ye, Huijun; Su, Rongxin; Qi, Wei; Wang, Libing; He, Zhimin

    2015-11-10

    A versatile, convenient, and cost-effective method that can be used for grafting antifouling materials onto different surfaces is highly desirable in many applications. Here, we report the one-step fabrication of antifouling surfaces via the polymerization of dopamine and the simultaneous deposition of anionic hyaluronic acid (HA) on Au substrates. The water contact angle of the Au surfaces decreased from 84.9° to 24.8° after the attachment of a highly uniform polydopamine (PDA)/HA hybrid film. The results of surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that the Au-PDA/HA surfaces adsorbed proteins from solutions of bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, β-lactoglobulin, fibrinogen, and soybean milk in ultralow or low amounts (4.8-31.7 ng/cm(2)). The hydrophilicity and good antifouling performance of the PDA/HA surfaces is attributable to the HA chains that probably attached onto their upper surface via hydrogen bonding between PDA and HA. At the same time, the electrostatic repulsion between PDA and HA probably prevents the aggregation of PDA, resulting in the formation of a highly uniform PDA/HA hybrid film with the HA chains (with a stretched structure) on the upper surface. We also developed a simple method for removing this PDA/HA film and recycling the Au substrates by using an aqueous solution of NaOH as the hydrolyzing agent. The Au surface remained undamaged, and a PDA/HA film could be redeposited on the surface, with the surface exhibiting good antifouling performance even after 10 such cycles. Finally, it was found that this grafting method is applicable to other substrates, including epoxy resins, polystyrene, glass, and steel, owing to the strong adhesion of PDA with these substrates.

  17. Self-Assembled DNA Hydrogel Based on Enzymatically Polymerized DNA for Protein Encapsulation and Enzyme/DNAzyme Hybrid Cascade Reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Binbin; He, Kaiyu; Zhu, Rong; Liu, Zhuoliang; Zeng, Shu; Huang, Yan; Nie, Zhou; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2016-09-01

    DNA hydrogel is a promising biomaterial for biological and medical applications due to its native biocompatibility and biodegradability. Herein, we provide a novel, versatile, and cost-effective approach for self-assembly of DNA hydrogel using the enzymatically polymerized DNA building blocks. The X-shaped DNA motif was elongated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) to form the building blocks, and hybridization between dual building blocks via their complementary TdT-polymerized DNA tails led to gel formation. TdT polymerization dramatically reduced the required amount of original DNA motifs, and the hybridization-mediated cross-linking of building blocks endows the gel with high mechanical strength. The DNA hydrogel can be applied for encapsulation and controllable release of protein cargos (for instance, green fluorescent protein) due to its enzymatic responsive properties. Moreover, this versatile strategy was extended to construct a functional DNAzyme hydrogel by integrating the peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme into DNA motifs. Furthermore, a hybrid cascade enzymatic reaction system was constructed by coencapsulating glucose oxidase and β-galactosidase into DNAzyme hydrogel. This efficient cascade reaction provides not only a potential method for glucose/lactose detection by naked eye but also a promising modular platform for constructing a multiple enzyme or enzyme/DNAzyme hybrid system. PMID:27526861

  18. Ampakines promote spine actin polymerization, long-term potentiation, and learning in a mouse model of Angelman Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baudry, Michel; Kramar, Eniko; Xu, Xiaobo; Zadran, Homera; Moreno, Stephanie; Lynch, Gary; Gall, Christine; Bi, Xiaoning

    2012-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder largely due to abnormal maternal expression of the UBE3A gene leading to the deletion of E6-associated protein. AS subjects have severe cognitive impairments for which there are no therapeutic interventions. Mouse models (knockouts of the maternal Ube3a gene: ‘AS mice’) of the disorder have substantial deficits in long-term potentiation (LTP) and learning. Here we report a clinically plausible pharmacological treatment that ameliorates both deficits. AS mice were injected ip twice daily for 5 days with vehicle or the ampakine CX929; drugs of this type enhance fast EPSCs by positively modulating AMPA receptors. Theta burst stimulation (TBS) produced a normal enhancement of field EPSPs in hippocampal slices prepared from vehicle-treated AS mice but LTP decreased steadily to baseline; however, LTP in slices from ampakine-treated AS mice stabilized at levels found in wild-type controls. TBS-induced actin polymerization within dendritic spines, an essential event for stabilizing LTP, was severely impaired in slices from vehicle-treated AS mice but not in those from ampakine-treated AS mice. Long-term memory scores in a fear conditioning paradigm were reduced by 50% in vehicle-treated AS mice but were comparable to values for littermate controls in the ampakine-treated AS mice. We propose that AS is associated with a profound defect in activity-driven spine cytoskeletal reorganization, resulting in a loss of the synaptic plasticity required for the encoding of long-term memory. Notably, the spine abnormality along with the LTP and learning impairments can be reduced by a minimally invasive drug treatment. PMID:22525571

  19. Interplay between chaperones and protein disorder promotes the evolution of protein networks.

    PubMed

    Pechmann, Sebastian; Frydman, Judith

    2014-06-01

    Evolution is driven by mutations, which lead to new protein functions but come at a cost to protein stability. Non-conservative substitutions are of interest in this regard because they may most profoundly affect both function and stability. Accordingly, organisms must balance the benefit of accepting advantageous substitutions with the possible cost of deleterious effects on protein folding and stability. We here examine factors that systematically promote non-conservative mutations at the proteome level. Intrinsically disordered regions in proteins play pivotal roles in protein interactions, but many questions regarding their evolution remain unanswered. Similarly, whether and how molecular chaperones, which have been shown to buffer destabilizing mutations in individual proteins, generally provide robustness during proteome evolution remains unclear. To this end, we introduce an evolutionary parameter λ that directly estimates the rate of non-conservative substitutions. Our analysis of λ in Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Homo sapiens sequences reveals how co- and post-translationally acting chaperones differentially promote non-conservative substitutions in their substrates, likely through buffering of their destabilizing effects. We further find that λ serves well to quantify the evolution of intrinsically disordered proteins even though the unstructured, thus generally variable regions in proteins are often flanked by very conserved sequences. Crucially, we show that both intrinsically disordered proteins and highly re-wired proteins in protein interaction networks, which have evolved new interactions and functions, exhibit a higher λ at the expense of enhanced chaperone assistance. Our findings thus highlight an intricate interplay of molecular chaperones and protein disorder in the evolvability of protein networks. Our results illuminate the role of chaperones in enabling protein evolution, and underline the importance of the cellular

  20. Interplay between Chaperones and Protein Disorder Promotes the Evolution of Protein Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pechmann, Sebastian; Frydman, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Evolution is driven by mutations, which lead to new protein functions but come at a cost to protein stability. Non-conservative substitutions are of interest in this regard because they may most profoundly affect both function and stability. Accordingly, organisms must balance the benefit of accepting advantageous substitutions with the possible cost of deleterious effects on protein folding and stability. We here examine factors that systematically promote non-conservative mutations at the proteome level. Intrinsically disordered regions in proteins play pivotal roles in protein interactions, but many questions regarding their evolution remain unanswered. Similarly, whether and how molecular chaperones, which have been shown to buffer destabilizing mutations in individual proteins, generally provide robustness during proteome evolution remains unclear. To this end, we introduce an evolutionary parameter λ that directly estimates the rate of non-conservative substitutions. Our analysis of λ in Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Homo sapiens sequences reveals how co- and post-translationally acting chaperones differentially promote non-conservative substitutions in their substrates, likely through buffering of their destabilizing effects. We further find that λ serves well to quantify the evolution of intrinsically disordered proteins even though the unstructured, thus generally variable regions in proteins are often flanked by very conserved sequences. Crucially, we show that both intrinsically disordered proteins and highly re-wired proteins in protein interaction networks, which have evolved new interactions and functions, exhibit a higher λ at the expense of enhanced chaperone assistance. Our findings thus highlight an intricate interplay of molecular chaperones and protein disorder in the evolvability of protein networks. Our results illuminate the role of chaperones in enabling protein evolution, and underline the importance of the cellular

  1. Bacterial promoter repression by DNA looping without protein-protein binding competition.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nicole A; Greiner, Alexander M; Peters, Justin P; Maher, L James

    2014-05-01

    The Escherichia coli lactose operon provides a paradigm for understanding gene control by DNA looping where the lac repressor (LacI) protein competes with RNA polymerase for DNA binding. Not all promoter loops involve direct competition between repressor and RNA polymerase. This raises the possibility that positioning a promoter within a tightly constrained DNA loop is repressive per se, an idea that has previously only been considered in vitro. Here, we engineer living E. coli bacteria to measure repression due to promoter positioning within such a tightly constrained DNA loop in the absence of protein-protein binding competition. We show that promoters held within such DNA loops are repressed ∼100-fold, with up to an additional ∼10-fold repression (∼1000-fold total) dependent on topological positioning of the promoter on the inner or outer face of the DNA loop. Chromatin immunoprecipitation data suggest that repression involves inhibition of both RNA polymerase initiation and elongation. These in vivo results show that gene repression can result from tightly looping promoter DNA even in the absence of direct competition between repressor and RNA polymerase binding. PMID:24598256

  2. Ezrin regulates microvillus morphogenesis by promoting distinct activities of Eps8 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zwaenepoel, Ingrid; Naba, Alexandra; Menezes Lyra Da Cunha, Marcel; Del Maestro, Laurence; Formstecher, Etienne; Louvard, Daniel; Arpin, Monique

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms that regulate actin filament polymerization resulting in the morphogenesis of the brush border microvilli in epithelial cells remain unknown. Eps8, the prototype of a family of proteins capable of capping and bundling actin filaments, has been shown to bundle the microvillar actin filaments. We report that Eps8L1a, a member of the Eps8 family and a novel ezrin-interacting partner, controls microvillus length through its capping activity. Depletion of Eps8L1a leads to the formation of long microvilli, whereas its overexpression has the opposite effect. We demonstrate that ezrin differentially modulates the actin-capping and -bundling activities of Eps8 and Eps8L1a during microvillus assembly. Coexpression of ezrin with Eps8 promotes the formation of membrane ruffles and tufts of microvilli, whereas expression of ezrin and Eps8L1a induces the clustering of actin-containing structures at the cell surface. These distinct morphological changes are neither observed when a mutant of ezrin defective in its binding to Eps8/Eps8L1a is coexpressed with Eps8 or Eps8L1a nor observed when ezrin is expressed with mutants of Eps8 or Eps8L1a defective in the actin-bundling or -capping activities, respectively. Our data show a synergistic effect of ezrin and Eps8 proteins in the assembly and organization of actin microvillar filaments. PMID:22262457

  3. Titanium Dioxide Photocatalytic Polymerization of Acrylamide for Gel Electrophoresis (TIPPAGE) of Proteins and Structural Identification by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenyang; Yuan, Zhiwei; Huang, Lulu; Kang, Jie; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) coupled with mass spectrometry has been well established for separating, identifying and quantifying protein mixtures from cell lines, tissues or other biological samples. The copolymerization process of acrylamide and bis-acrylamide is the key to mastering this powerful technique. In general, this is a vinyl addition reaction initiated by free radical-generating reagents such as ammonium persulfate (APS) and tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) under basic pH and degassing experimental condition. We report herein a photocatalytic polymerization approach that is based on photo-generated hydroxyl radicals with nanoparticles of titanium dioxide. It was shown that the polymerization process is greatly accelerated in acidic condition when ultraviolet light shots on the gel solution containing TiO2 nanoparticles without degassing. This feature makes it very useful in preparing Triton X-100 acid urea (TAU) gel that has been developed for separating basic proteins such as histones and variants in acidic experimental condition. Additionally, the presence of titanium dioxide in the gel not only improves mechanistic property of gels but also changes the migration pattern of different proteins that have different affinities to titanium dioxide. PMID:26865351

  4. Titanium Dioxide Photocatalytic Polymerization of Acrylamide for Gel Electrophoresis (TIPPAGE) of Proteins and Structural Identification by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyang; Yuan, Zhiwei; Huang, Lulu; Kang, Jie; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-02-11

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) coupled with mass spectrometry has been well established for separating, identifying and quantifying protein mixtures from cell lines, tissues or other biological samples. The copolymerization process of acrylamide and bis-acrylamide is the key to mastering this powerful technique. In general, this is a vinyl addition reaction initiated by free radical-generating reagents such as ammonium persulfate (APS) and tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) under basic pH and degassing experimental condition. We report herein a photocatalytic polymerization approach that is based on photo-generated hydroxyl radicals with nanoparticles of titanium dioxide. It was shown that the polymerization process is greatly accelerated in acidic condition when ultraviolet light shots on the gel solution containing TiO2 nanoparticles without degassing. This feature makes it very useful in preparing Triton X-100 acid urea (TAU) gel that has been developed for separating basic proteins such as histones and variants in acidic experimental condition. Additionally, the presence of titanium dioxide in the gel not only improves mechanistic property of gels but also changes the migration pattern of different proteins that have different affinities to titanium dioxide.

  5. Highly protein-resistant coatings and suspension cell culture thereon from amphiphilic block copolymers prepared by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Kazutoshi; Kubota, Kazuomi; Takada, Tetsuo; Mahara, Saori

    2014-06-01

    Novel amphiphilic block copolymers composed of hydrophobic (poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate): M) and hydrophilic (poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide): D) segments were synthesized by living radical polymerization: a reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Two types of amphiphilic block copolymers, triblock (MDM) and 4-arm block ((MD)4) copolymers with specific compositions (D/M = (750-1500)/250), were prepared by a versatile one-pot synthesis. These copolymers show good adhesion to various types of substrates (e.g., polystyrene, polycarbonate, polypropylene, Ti, and glass), and the surface coating showed high protein repellency and a low contact angle for water, regardless of the substrate. The two opposing characteristics of high protein repellency and good substrate adhesion were achieved by the combined effects of the molecular architecture of the block copolymers, the high molecular weight, and the characteristics of each segment, that is, low protein adsorption capability of both segments and low glass transition temperature of the hydrophobic segment. Further, a polystyrene dish coated with the MDM block copolymer could be sterilized by γ-ray irradiation and used as a good substrate for a suspension cell culture that exhibits low cell adhesion and good cell growth. PMID:24773089

  6. Titanium Dioxide Photocatalytic Polymerization of Acrylamide for Gel Electrophoresis (TIPPAGE) of Proteins and Structural Identification by Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyang; Yuan, Zhiwei; Huang, Lulu; Kang, Jie; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-01-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) coupled with mass spectrometry has been well established for separating, identifying and quantifying protein mixtures from cell lines, tissues or other biological samples. The copolymerization process of acrylamide and bis-acrylamide is the key to mastering this powerful technique. In general, this is a vinyl addition reaction initiated by free radical-generating reagents such as ammonium persulfate (APS) and tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) under basic pH and degassing experimental condition. We report herein a photocatalytic polymerization approach that is based on photo-generated hydroxyl radicals with nanoparticles of titanium dioxide. It was shown that the polymerization process is greatly accelerated in acidic condition when ultraviolet light shots on the gel solution containing TiO2 nanoparticles without degassing. This feature makes it very useful in preparing Triton X-100 acid urea (TAU) gel that has been developed for separating basic proteins such as histones and variants in acidic experimental condition. Additionally, the presence of titanium dioxide in the gel not only improves mechanistic property of gels but also changes the migration pattern of different proteins that have different affinities to titanium dioxide. PMID:26865351

  7. Highly protein-resistant coatings and suspension cell culture thereon from amphiphilic block copolymers prepared by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Kazutoshi; Kubota, Kazuomi; Takada, Tetsuo; Mahara, Saori

    2014-06-01

    Novel amphiphilic block copolymers composed of hydrophobic (poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate): M) and hydrophilic (poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide): D) segments were synthesized by living radical polymerization: a reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Two types of amphiphilic block copolymers, triblock (MDM) and 4-arm block ((MD)4) copolymers with specific compositions (D/M = (750-1500)/250), were prepared by a versatile one-pot synthesis. These copolymers show good adhesion to various types of substrates (e.g., polystyrene, polycarbonate, polypropylene, Ti, and glass), and the surface coating showed high protein repellency and a low contact angle for water, regardless of the substrate. The two opposing characteristics of high protein repellency and good substrate adhesion were achieved by the combined effects of the molecular architecture of the block copolymers, the high molecular weight, and the characteristics of each segment, that is, low protein adsorption capability of both segments and low glass transition temperature of the hydrophobic segment. Further, a polystyrene dish coated with the MDM block copolymer could be sterilized by γ-ray irradiation and used as a good substrate for a suspension cell culture that exhibits low cell adhesion and good cell growth.

  8. Titanium Dioxide Photocatalytic Polymerization of Acrylamide for Gel Electrophoresis (TIPPAGE) of Proteins and Structural Identification by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenyang; Yuan, Zhiwei; Huang, Lulu; Kang, Jie; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2016-02-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) coupled with mass spectrometry has been well established for separating, identifying and quantifying protein mixtures from cell lines, tissues or other biological samples. The copolymerization process of acrylamide and bis-acrylamide is the key to mastering this powerful technique. In general, this is a vinyl addition reaction initiated by free radical-generating reagents such as ammonium persulfate (APS) and tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED) under basic pH and degassing experimental condition. We report herein a photocatalytic polymerization approach that is based on photo-generated hydroxyl radicals with nanoparticles of titanium dioxide. It was shown that the polymerization process is greatly accelerated in acidic condition when ultraviolet light shots on the gel solution containing TiO2 nanoparticles without degassing. This feature makes it very useful in preparing Triton X-100 acid urea (TAU) gel that has been developed for separating basic proteins such as histones and variants in acidic experimental condition. Additionally, the presence of titanium dioxide in the gel not only improves mechanistic property of gels but also changes the migration pattern of different proteins that have different affinities to titanium dioxide.

  9. The enamel protein amelotin is a promoter of hydroxyapatite mineralization.

    PubMed

    Abbarin, Nastaran; San Miguel, Symone; Holcroft, James; Iwasaki, Kengo; Ganss, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Amelotin (AMTN) is a recently discovered protein that is specifically expressed during the maturation stage of dental enamel formation. It is localized at the interface between the enamel surface and the apical surface of ameloblasts. AMTN knock-out mice have hypomineralized enamel, whereas transgenic mice overexpressing AMTN have a compact but disorganized enamel hydroxyapatite (HA) microstructure, indicating a possible involvement of AMTN in regulating HA mineralization directly. In this study, we demonstrated that recombinant human (rh) AMTN dissolved in a metastable buffer system, based on light scattering measurements, promotes HA precipitation. The mineral precipitates were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. Colloidal gold immunolabeling of AMTN in the mineral deposits showed that protein molecules were associated with HA crystals. The binding affinity of rh-AMTN to HA was found to be comparable to that of amelogenin, the major protein of the forming enamel matrix. Overexpression of AMTN in mouse calvaria cells also increased the formation of calcium deposits in the culture medium. Overexpression of AMTN during the secretory stage of enamel formation in vivo resulted in rapid and uncontrolled enamel mineralization. Site-specific mutagenesis of the potential serine phosphorylation motif SSEEL reduced the in vitro mineral precipitation to less than 25%, revealing that this motif is important for the HA mineralizing function of the protein. A synthetic short peptide containing the SSEEL motif was only able to facilitate mineralization in its phosphorylated form ((P)S(P) SEEL), indicating that this motif is necessary but not sufficient for the mineralizing properties of AMTN. These findings demonstrate that AMTN has a direct influence on biomineralization by promoting HA mineralization and suggest a critical role for AMTN in the formation of the compact aprismatic enamel surface layer during the maturation

  10. Beyond Rab GTPases Legionella activates the small GTPase Ran to promote microtubule polymerization, pathogen vacuole motility, and infection.

    PubMed

    Hilbi, Hubert; Rothmeier, Eva; Hoffmann, Christine; Harrison, Christopher F

    2014-01-01

    Legionella spp. are amoebae-resistant environmental bacteria that replicate in free-living protozoa in a distinct compartment, the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV). Upon transmission of Legionella pneumophila to the lung, the pathogens employ an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to grow in LCVs within alveolar macrophages, thus triggering a severe pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. LCV formation is a complex and robust process, which requires the bacterial Icm/Dot type IV secretion system and involves the amazing number of 300 different translocated effector proteins. LCVs interact with the host cell's endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking pathway. Accordingly, in a proteomics approach as many as 12 small Rab GTPases implicated in endosomal and secretory vesicle trafficking were identified and validated as LCV components. Moreover, the small GTPase Ran and its effector protein RanBP1 have been found to decorate the pathogen vacuole. Ran regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, spindle assembly, and cytokinesis, as well as the organization of non-centrosomal microtubules. In L. pneumophila-infected amoebae or macrophages, Ran and RanBP1 localize to LCVs, and the small GTPase is activated by the Icm/Dot substrate LegG1. Ran activation by LegG1 leads to microtubule stabilization and promotes intracellular pathogen vacuole motility and bacterial growth, as well as chemotaxis and migration of Legionella-infected cells.

  11. Multi-protein delivery by nanodiamonds promotes bone formation.

    PubMed

    Moore, L; Gatica, M; Kim, H; Osawa, E; Ho, D

    2013-11-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE(®) for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  12. Multi-protein Delivery by Nanodiamonds Promotes Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, L.; Gatica, M.; Kim, H.; Osawa, E.; Ho, D.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are well-studied regulators of cartilage and bone development that have been Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the promotion of bone formation in certain procedures. BMPs are seeing more use in oral and maxillofacial surgeries because of recent FDA approval of InFUSE® for sinus augmentation and localized alveolar ridge augmentation. However, the utility of BMPs in medical and dental applications is limited by the delivery method. Currently, BMPs are delivered to the surgical site by the implantation of bulky collagen sponges. Here we evaluate the potential of detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) as a delivery vehicle for BMP-2 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Nanodiamonds are biocompatible, 4- to 5-nm carbon nanoparticles that have previously been used to deliver a wide variety of molecules, including proteins and peptides. We find that both BMP-2 and bFGF are readily loaded onto NDs by physisorption, forming a stable colloidal solution, and are triggered to release in slightly acidic conditions. Simultaneous delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF by ND induces differentiation and proliferation in osteoblast progenitor cells. Overall, we find that NDs provide an effective injectable alternative for the delivery of BMP-2 and bFGF to promote bone formation. PMID:24045646

  13. Tumor promotion by caspase-resistant retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Borges, Helena L; Bird, Jeff; Wasson, Katherine; Cardiff, Robert D; Varki, Nissi; Eckmann, Lars; Wang, Jean Y J

    2005-10-25

    The retinoblastoma (RB) protein regulates cell proliferation and cell death. RB is cleaved by caspase during apoptosis. A mutation of the caspase-cleavage site in the RB C terminus has been made in the mouse Rb-1 locus; the resulting Rb-MI mice are resistant to endotoxin-induced apoptosis in the intestine. The Rb-MI mice do not exhibit increased tumor incidence, because the MI mutation does not disrupt the Rb tumor suppressor function. In this study, we show that Rb-MI can promote the formation of colonic adenomas in the p53-null genetic background. Consistent with this tumor phenotype, Rb-MI reduces colorectal epithelial apoptosis and ulceration caused by dextran sulfate sodium. By contrast, Rb-MI does not affect the lymphoma phenotype of p53-null mice, in keeping with its inability to protect thymocytes and splenocytes from apoptosis. The Rb-MI protein is expressed and phosphorylated in the tumors, thereby inactivating its growth suppression function. These results suggest that RB tumor suppressor function, i.e., inhibition of proliferation, is inactivated by phosphorylation, whereas RB tumor promoting function, i.e., inhibition of apoptosis, is inactivated by caspase cleavage. PMID:16227443

  14. Chondroitin sulfate and epidermal growth factor immobilization after plasma polymerization: a versatile anti-apoptotic coating to promote healing around stent grafts.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Cindy; Ruiz, Juan-Carlos; Lequoy, Pauline; Hébert, Marie-Josée; De Crescenzo, Gregory; Wertheimer, Michael R; Lerouge, Sophie

    2012-06-01

    Bioactive coatings constitute an interesting approach to enhance healing around implants, such as stent-grafts used in endovascular aneurysm repair. Three different plasma techniques, namely NH₃ plasma functionalization and atmospheric- or low-pressure plasma polymerization, are compared to create amino groups and covalently bind CS and EGF bioactive molecules on PET. The latter presents the greatest potential. CS + EGF coating is shown to strongly decrease cell apoptosis and cell depletion in serum-free medium, while increasing cell growth compared to unmodified PET. This versatile biomimetic coating holds promise in promoting vascular repair around stent-grafts, where resistance to apoptosis is a key issue.

  15. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Zavada, Scott R; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes--catalytic proteins--owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol-ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  16. Dopamine signaling promotes the xenobiotic stress response and protein homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kishore K; Matlack, Tarmie L; Rongo, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    Multicellular organisms encounter environmental conditions that adversely affect protein homeostasis (proteostasis), including extreme temperatures, toxins, and pathogens. It is unclear how they use sensory signaling to detect adverse conditions and then activate stress response pathways so as to offset potential damage. Here, we show that dopaminergic mechanosensory neurons in C. elegans release the neurohormone dopamine to promote proteostasis in epithelia. Signaling through the DA receptor DOP-1 activates the expression of xenobiotic stress response genes involved in pathogenic resistance and toxin removal, and these genes are required for the removal of unstable proteins in epithelia. Exposure to a bacterial pathogen (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) results in elevated removal of unstable proteins in epithelia, and this enhancement requires DA signaling. In the absence of DA signaling, nematodes show increased sensitivity to pathogenic bacteria and heat-shock stress. Our results suggest that dopaminergic sensory neurons, in addition to slowing down locomotion upon sensing a potential bacterial feeding source, also signal to frontline epithelia to activate the xenobiotic stress response so as to maintain proteostasis and prepare for possible infection. PMID:27261197

  17. Mutations of tau protein in frontotemporal dementia promote aggregation of paired helical filaments by enhancing local beta-structure.

    PubMed

    von Bergen, M; Barghorn, S; Li, L; Marx, A; Biernat, J; Mandelkow, E M; Mandelkow, E

    2001-12-21

    The microtubule-associated protein tau is a natively unfolded protein in solution, yet it is able to polymerize into the ordered paired helical filaments (PHF) of Alzheimer's disease. In the splice isoforms lacking exon 10, this process is facilitated by the formation of beta-structure around the hexapeptide motif PHF6 ((306)VQIVYK(311)) encoded by exon 11. We have investigated the structural requirements for PHF polymerization in the context of adult tau isoforms containing four repeats (including exon 10). In addition to the PHF6 motif there exists a related PHF6* motif ((275)VQIINK(280)) in the repeat encoded by the alternatively spliced exon 10. We show that this PHF6* motif also promotes aggregation by the formation of beta-structure and that there is a cross-talk between the two hexapeptide motifs during PHF aggregation. We also show that two of the tau mutations found in hereditary frontotemporal dementias, DeltaK280 and P301L, have a much stronger tendency for PHF aggregation which correlates with their high propensity for beta-structure around the hexapeptide motifs.

  18. Lytic Promoters Express Protein during Herpes Simplex Virus Latency

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Tiffany A.; Tscharke, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has provided the prototype for viral latency with previously well-defined acute or lytic and latent phases. More recently, the deep quiescence of HSV latency has been questioned with evidence that lytic genes can be transcribed in this state. However, to date the only evidence that these transcripts might be translated has come from immunological studies that show activated T cells persist in the nervous system during latency. Here we use a highly sensitive Cre-marking model to show that lytic and latent phases are less clearly defined in two significant ways. First, around half of the HSV spread leading to latently infected sites occurred beyond the initial acute infection and second, we show direct evidence that lytic promoters can drive protein expression during latency. PMID:27348812

  19. Optimization of Landscape Phage Fusion Protein-Modified Polymeric PEG-PE Micelles for Improved Breast Cancer Cell Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Amphiphilic landscape phage fusion proteins with high affinity and selectivity towards breast cancer MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7) cells self-assemble with polymeric PEG-PE conjugates to form mixed micelles (phage-micelles) capable of cancer cell-targeted delivery of poorly-soluble drugs. While the PEG corona provides the stability and longevity to the micelles, its presence is a potential steric difficulties for the interaction of phage fusion protein with cell surface targets. We attempted to address this problem by controlling the length of the PEG block and the phage fusion protein quantity, selecting the optimal ones to produce a reasonable retention of the targeting affinity and selectivity of the MCF-7-specific phage fusion protein. Three PEG-PE conjugates with different PEG lengths were used to construct phage- and plain-micelles, followed by FACS analysis of the effect of the PEG length on their binding affinity and selectivity towards target MCF-7 cells using either a MCF-7 cell monoculture or a cell co-culture model composed of target cancer MCF-7 cells and non-target, non-cancer C166 cells expressing GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein). Both, the length of PEG and quantity of phage fusion protein had a profound impact on the targetability of the phage-micelles. Phage-micelles prepared with PEG2k-PE achieved a desirable binding affinity and selectivity. Incorporation of a minimal concentration of phage protein, up to 0.5%, produced maximal targeting efficiency towards MCF-7 cells. Overall, phage-micelles with PEG2k-PE and 0.5% of phage protein represent the optimal formulation for targeting towards breast cancer cells. PMID:26451274

  20. Harmine promotes osteoblast differentiation through bone morphogenetic protein signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yonezawa, Takayuki; Lee, Ji-Won; Hibino, Ayaka; Asai, Midori; Hojo, Hironori; Cha, Byung-Yoon; Teruya, Toshiaki; Nagai, Kazuo; Chung, Ung-Il; Yagasaki, Kazumi; and others

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Harmine promotes the activity and mRNA expression of ALP. {yields} Harmine enhances the expressions of osteocalcin mRNA and protein. {yields} Harmine induces osteoblastic mineralization. {yields} Harmine upregulates the mRNA expressions of BMPs, Runx2 and Osterix. {yields} BMP signaling pathways are involved in the actions of harmine. -- Abstract: Bone mass is regulated by osteoblast-mediated bone formation and osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. We previously reported that harmine, a {beta}-carboline alkaloid, inhibits osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of harmine on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. Harmine promoted alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in MC3T3-E1 cells without affecting their proliferation. Harmine also increased the mRNA expressions of the osteoblast marker genes ALP and Osteocalcin. Furthermore, the mineralization of MC3T3-E1 cells was enhanced by treatment with harmine. Harmine also induced osteoblast differentiation in primary calvarial osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2 cells. Structure-activity relationship studies using harmine-related {beta}-carboline alkaloids revealed that the C3-C4 double bond and 7-hydroxy or 7-methoxy group of harmine were important for its osteogenic activity. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist noggin and its receptor kinase inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 attenuated harmine-promoted ALP activity. In addition, harmine increased the mRNA expressions of Bmp-2, Bmp-4, Bmp-6, Bmp-7 and its target gene Id1. Harmine also enhanced the mRNA expressions of Runx2 and Osterix, which are key transcription factors in osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, BMP-responsive and Runx2-responsive reporters were activated by harmine treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that harmine enhances osteoblast differentiation probably by inducing the expressions of

  1. Actin-related protein 2/3 complex-based actin polymerization is critical for male fertility.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Kwon, W S; Rahman, M S; Yoon, S J; Park, Y J; Pang, M G

    2015-09-01

    The actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex is critical for regulation of actin polymerization, which is associated with sperm motility and capacitation status. However, the function of the Arp2/3 complex in male fertility has not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the role of the Arp2/3 complex in different processes in spermatozoa and its consequences on fertilization and early embryonic development. In this in vitro study, mouse spermatozoa were incubated with different concentrations (10, 100, and 500 μm) of CK-636, an Arp2/3 complex antagonist. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex by high concentrations (100 and 500 μm) of CK-636 induced hyper-activated motility and acrosomal reaction, whereas intracellular calcium and tyrosine phosphorylation levels in spermatozoa were inhibited. Moreover, exposure of spermatozoa to the highest concentration of CK-636 reduced fertilization and embryo development. Interestingly, fertilization was significantly increased after treatment with 100 μm CK-636, whereas embryonic development was significantly decreased. Therefore, we conclude that the Arp2/3 complex plays a decisive role in regulation of sperm function and male fertility via actin polymerization. We anticipate that the Arp2/3 complex may have clinical application as marker for male fertility and male contraceptive targeting.

  2. alpha2-Adrenoceptor stimulation promotes actin polymerization and focal adhesion in 3T3F442A and BFC-1beta preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Bétuing, S; Daviaud, D; Valet, P; Bouloumié, A; Lafontan, M; Saulnier-Blache, J S

    1996-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that in white fat cell precursors alpha2-adrenoceptor stimulation lead to the phosphorylation of p44 and p42 mitogen-activated protein kinases and an increase in cell number. Regulation of cell adhesion and cell cytoskeleton plays a crucial role in the control of cell growth by various growth factors. Here, we report that in mouse 3T3F442A preadipocytes expressing 2500 fmol/mg protein of the human alpha2C10-adrenoceptor (alpha2AF2 cells), alpha2-adrenergic stimulation rapidly restored the spreading of cells previously retracted by serum withdrawal. This effect was pertussis toxin sensitive and was blocked by pretreatment of the cells with dihydrocytochalasin B (a blocker of actin polymerization), genistein (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor), or agents that increase cell cAMP content. Spreading was accompanied by cell membrane ruffling, formation of lamelipodia and filipodia, appearance of focal adhesion plaques, and induction of actin stress fibers. alpha2-Adrenergic stimulation also lead to a rapid Gi- and actin-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of the pp125 focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as well as of the p42 and p44 mitogen-activated protein kinases. alpha2-Adrenergic-dependent spreading and FAK and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation were also observed in 3T3F442A preadipocytes permanently expressing 20 fmol/mg protein of the human alpha2C10-adrenoceptor (alpha2AF3 cells) as well as in BFC-1beta preadipocytes, which constitutively express 25 fmol/mg protein of mouse alpha2A-adrenoceptors. In BFC-1beta preadipocytes, alpha2-adrenergic-dependent spreading and pp125FAK phosphorylation were counteracted by beta-adrenergic stimulation. Our results suggest that alpha2-adrenergic control of actin polymerization and focal adhesion assembly could play a crucial role in the regulation of preadipocyte growth by the sympathetic nervous system.

  3. Generation of an Artificial Double Promoter for Protein Expression in Bacillus subtilis through a Promoter Trap System

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mingming; Zhang, Weiwei; Ji, Shengyue; Cao, Pinghua; Chen, Yulin; Zhao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is an attractive host for production of recombinant proteins. Promoters and expression plasmid backbones have direct impacts on the efficiency of gene expression. To screen and isolate strong promoters, a promoter trap vector pShuttleF was developed in this study. Using the vector, approximately 1000 colonies containing likely promoters from Bacillus licheniformis genomic DNA were obtained. Amongst them, pShuttle-09 exhibited the highest β-Gal activities in both Escherichia coli and B. subtilis. The activity of pShuttle-09 in B. subtilis was eight times of that of the P43 promoter, a commonly used strong promoter for B. subtilis. A sequence analysis showed that pShuttle-09 contained PluxS and truncated luxS in-frame fused with the reporter gene as well as another fragment upstream of PluxS containing a putative promoter. This putative promoter was a hybrid promoter and its β-Gal activity was higher than PluxS. Reconstructing the hybrid promoter from pShuttle-09 to PlapS further improved the β-Gal production by 60%. The usefulness of our promoter trap system is likely due to random shuffling and recombination of DNA fragments and adoption of a rapid and high-throughput screening. Thus, our data provide additional evidence to support the concept of using a promoter trap system to create new promoters. PMID:23409173

  4. Parathyroid hormone-related protein promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Ardura, Juan Antonio; Rayego-Mateos, Sandra; Rámila, David; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Esbrit, Pedro

    2010-02-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important process that contributes to renal fibrogenesis. TGF-beta1 and EGF stimulate EMT. Recent studies suggested that parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) promotes fibrogenesis in the damaged kidney, apparently dependent on its interaction with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but whether it also interacts with TGF-beta and EGF to modulate EMT is unknown. Here, PTHrP(1-36) increased TGF-beta1 in cultured tubuloepithelial cells and TGF-beta blockade inhibited PTHrP-induced EMT-related changes, including upregulation of alpha-smooth muscle actin and integrin-linked kinase, nuclear translocation of Snail, and downregulation of E-cadherin and zonula occludens-1. PTHrP(1-36) also induced EGF receptor (EGFR) activation; inhibition of protein kinase C and metalloproteases abrogated this activation. Inhibition of EGFR activation abolished these EMT-related changes, the activation of ERK1/2, and upregulation of TGF-beta1 and VEGF by PTHrP(1-36). Moreover, inhibition of ERK1/2 blocked EMT induced by either PTHrP(1-36), TGF-beta1, EGF, or VEGF. In vivo, obstruction of mouse kidneys led to changes consistent with EMT and upregulation of TGF-beta1 mRNA, p-EGFR protein, and PTHrP. Taken together, these data suggest that PTHrP, TGF-beta, EGF, and VEGF might cooperate through activation of ERK1/2 to induce EMT in renal tubuloepithelial cells.

  5. Parathyroid Hormone–Related Protein Promotes Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Ardura, Juan Antonio; Rayego-Mateos, Sandra; Rámila, David; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important process that contributes to renal fibrogenesis. TGF-β1 and EGF stimulate EMT. Recent studies suggested that parathyroid hormone–related protein (PTHrP) promotes fibrogenesis in the damaged kidney, apparently dependent on its interaction with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but whether it also interacts with TGF-β and EGF to modulate EMT is unknown. Here, PTHrP(1-36) increased TGF-β1 in cultured tubuloepithelial cells and TGF-β blockade inhibited PTHrP-induced EMT-related changes, including upregulation of α-smooth muscle actin and integrin-linked kinase, nuclear translocation of Snail, and downregulation of E-cadherin and zonula occludens-1. PTHrP(1-36) also induced EGF receptor (EGFR) activation; inhibition of protein kinase C and metalloproteases abrogated this activation. Inhibition of EGFR activation abolished these EMT-related changes, the activation of ERK1/2, and upregulation of TGF-β1 and VEGF by PTHrP(1-36). Moreover, inhibition of ERK1/2 blocked EMT induced by either PTHrP(1-36), TGF-β1, EGF, or VEGF. In vivo, obstruction of mouse kidneys led to changes consistent with EMT and upregulation of TGF-β1 mRNA, p-EGFR protein, and PTHrP. Taken together, these data suggest that PTHrP, TGF-β, EGF, and VEGF might cooperate through activation of ERK1/2 to induce EMT in renal tubuloepithelial cells. PMID:19959711

  6. Monitoring Protein Fouling on Polymeric Membranes Using Ultrasonic Frequency-Domain Reflectometry

    PubMed Central

    Kujundzic, Elmira; Greenberg, Alan R.; Fong, Robin; Hernandez, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Novel signal-processing protocols were used to extend the in situ sensitivity of ultrasonic frequency-domain reflectometry (UFDR) for real-time monitoring of microfiltration (MF) membrane fouling during protein purification. Different commercial membrane materials, with a nominal pore size of 0.2 μm, were challenged using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and amylase as model proteins. Fouling induced by these proteins was observed in flat-sheet membrane filtration cells operating in a laminar cross-flow regime. The detection of membrane-associated proteins using UFDR was determined by applying rigorous statistical methodology to reflection spectra of ultrasonic signals obtained during membrane fouling. Data suggest that the total power reflected from membrane surfaces changes in response to protein fouling at concentrations as low as 14 μg/cm2, and results indicate that ultrasonic spectra can be leveraged to detect and monitor protein fouling on commercial MF membranes. PMID:24957732

  7. Prion Protein Promotes Kidney Iron Uptake via Its Ferrireductase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Swati; Tripathi, Ajai; Qian, Juan; Beserra, Amber; Suda, Srinivas; McElwee, Matthew; Turner, Jerrold; Hopfer, Ulrich; Singh, Neena

    2015-01-01

    Brain iron-dyshomeostasis is an important cause of neurotoxicity in prion disorders, a group of neurodegenerative conditions associated with the conversion of prion protein (PrPC) from its normal conformation to an aggregated, PrP-scrapie (PrPSc) isoform. Alteration of iron homeostasis is believed to result from impaired function of PrPC in neuronal iron uptake via its ferrireductase activity. However, unequivocal evidence supporting the ferrireductase activity of PrPC is lacking. Kidney provides a relevant model for this evaluation because PrPC is expressed in the kidney, and ∼370 μg of iron are reabsorbed daily from the glomerular filtrate by kidney proximal tubule cells (PT), requiring ferrireductase activity. Here, we report that PrPC promotes the uptake of transferrin (Tf) and non-Tf-bound iron (NTBI) by the kidney in vivo and mainly NTBI by PT cells in vitro. Thus, uptake of 59Fe administered by gastric gavage, intravenously, or intraperitoneally was significantly lower in PrP-knock-out (PrP−/−) mouse kidney relative to PrP+/+ controls. Selective in vivo radiolabeling of plasma NTBI with 59Fe revealed similar results. Expression of exogenous PrPC in immortalized PT cells showed localization on the plasma membrane and intracellular vesicles and increased transepithelial transport of 59Fe-NTBI and to a smaller extent 59Fe-Tf from the apical to the basolateral domain. Notably, the ferrireductase-deficient mutant of PrP (PrPΔ51–89) lacked this activity. Furthermore, excess NTBI and hemin caused aggregation of PrPC to a detergent-insoluble form, limiting iron uptake. Together, these observations suggest that PrPC promotes retrieval of iron from the glomerular filtrate via its ferrireductase activity and modulates kidney iron metabolism. PMID:25572394

  8. Polymerization degrees, molecular weights and protein-binding affinities of condensed tannin fractions from a Leucaena leucocephala hybrid.

    PubMed

    Saminathan, Mookiah; Tan, Hui Yin; Sieo, Chin Chin; Abdullah, Norhani; Wong, Clemente Michael Vui Ling; Abdulmalek, Emilia; Ho, Yin Wan

    2014-01-01

    Condensed tannins (CTs) form insoluble complexes with proteins and are able to protect them from degradation, which could lead to rumen bypass proteins. Depending on their degrees of polymerization (DP) and molecular weights, CT fractions vary in their capability to bind proteins. In this study, purified condensed tannins (CTs) from a Leucaena leucocephala hybrid were fractionated into five different molecular weight fractions. The structures of the CT fractions were investigated using 13C-NMR. The DP of the CT fractions were determined using a modified vanillin assay and their molecular weights were determined using Q-TOF LC-MS. The protein-binding affinities of the respective CT fractions were determined using a protein precipitation assay. The DP of the five CT fractions (fractions F1-F5) measured by the vanillin assay in acetic acid ranged from 4.86 to 1.56. The 13C-NMR results showed that the CT fractions possessed monomer unit structural heterogeneity. The number-average molecular weights (Mn) of the different fractions were 1265.8, 1028.6, 652.2, 562.2, and 469.6 for fractions F1, F2, F3, F4, and F5, respectively. The b values representing the CT quantities needed to bind half of the maximum precipitable bovine serum albumin increased with decreasing molecular weight--from fraction F1 to fraction F5 with values of 0.216, 0.295, 0.359, 0.425, and 0.460, respectively. This indicated that higher molecular weight fractions of CTs from L. leucocephala have higher protein-binding affinities than those with lower molecular weights. PMID:24927368

  9. Polymeric Nanoparticles Amenable to Simultaneous Installation of Exterior Targeting and Interior Therapeutic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xi; Wu, Jun; Shan, Wei; Tao, Wei; Zhao, Lili; Lim, Jong-Min; D'Ortenzio, Mathew; Karnik, Rohit; Huang, Yuan; Shi, Jinjun; Farokhzad, Omid C

    2016-03-01

    Effective delivery of therapeutic proteins is a formidable challenge. Herein, using a unique polymer family with a wide-ranging set of cationic and hydrophobic features, we developed a novel nanoparticle (NP) platform capable of installing protein ligands on the particle surface and simultaneously carrying therapeutic proteins inside by a self-assembly procedure. The loaded therapeutic proteins (e.g., insulin) within the NPs exhibited sustained and tunable release, while the surface-coated protein ligands (e.g., transferrin) were demonstrated to alter the NP cellular behaviors. In vivo results revealed that the transferrin-coated NPs can effectively be transported across the intestinal epithelium for oral insulin delivery, leading to a notable hypoglycemic response.

  10. Integrin β4 regulates SPARC protein to promote invasion.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Kristin D; Shearstone, Jeffrey R; Maddula, V S R Krishna; Seligmann, Bruce E; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2012-03-23

    The α6β4 integrin (referred to as "β4" integrin) is a receptor for laminins that promotes carcinoma invasion through its ability to regulate key signaling pathways and cytoskeletal dynamics. An analysis of published Affymetrix GeneChip data to detect downstream effectors involved in β4-mediated invasion of breast carcinoma cells identified SPARC, or secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine. This glycoprotein has been shown to play an important role in matrix remodeling and invasion. Our analysis revealed that manipulation of β4 integrin expression and signaling impacted SPARC expression and that SPARC facilitates β4-mediated invasion. Expression of β4 in β4-deficient cells reduced the expression of a specific microRNA (miR-29a) that targets SPARC and impedes invasion. In cells that express endogenous β4, miR-29a expression is low and β4 ligation facilitates the translation of SPARC through a TOR-dependent mechanism. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that β4 can regulate SPARC expression and that SPARC is an effector of β4-mediated invasion. They also highlight a potential role for specific miRNAs in executing the functions of integrins.

  11. Succination of thiol groups in adipose tissue proteins in diabetes: succination inhibits polymerization and secretion of adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Frizzell, Norma; Rajesh, Mathur; Jepson, Matthew J; Nagai, Ryoji; Carson, James A; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Baynes, John W

    2009-09-18

    S-(2-Succinyl)cysteine (2SC) is formed by reaction of the Krebs cycle intermediate fumarate with cysteine residues in protein, a process termed succination of protein. Both fumarate and succination of proteins are increased in adipocytes cultured in high glucose medium (Nagai, R., Brock, J. W., Blatnik, M., Baatz, J. E., Bethard, J., Walla, M. D., Thorpe, S. R., Baynes, J. W., and Frizzell, N. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 34219-34228). We show here that succination of protein is also increased in epididymal, mesenteric, and subcutaneous adipose tissue of diabetic (db/db) mice and that adiponectin is a major target for succination in both adipocytes and adipose tissue. Cys-39, which is involved in cross-linking of adiponectin monomers to form trimers, was identified as a key site of succination of adiponectin in adipocytes. 2SC was detected on two of seven monomeric forms of adiponectin immunoprecipitated from adipocytes and epididymal adipose tissue. Based on densitometry, 2SC-adiponectin accounted for approximately 7 and 8% of total intracellular adiponectin in cells and tissue, respectively. 2SC was found only in the intracellular, monomeric forms of adiponectin and was not detectable in polymeric forms of adiponectin in cell culture medium or plasma. We conclude that succination of adiponectin blocks its incorporation into trimeric and higher molecular weight, secreted forms of adiponectin. We propose that succination of proteins is a biomarker of mitochondrial stress and accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates in adipose tissue in diabetes and that succination of adiponectin may contribute to the decrease in plasma adiponectin in diabetes.

  12. Combining polymers with the functionality of proteins: new concepts for atom transfer radical polymerization, nanoreactors and damage self-reporting materials.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Nico; Lörcher, Samuel; Makyła, Katarzyna; Pollarda, Jonas; Renggli, Kasper; Spulber, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are macromolecules with a great diversity of functions. By combining these biomolecules with polymers, exciting opportunities for new concepts in polymer sciences arise. This highlight exemplifies the aforementioned with current research results of our group. We review our discovery that the proteins horseradish peroxidase and hemoglobin possess ATRPase activity, i.e. they catalyze atom transfer radical polymerizations. Moreover, a permeabilization method for polymersomes is presented, where the photo-reaction of an α-hydroxyalkylphenone with block copolymer vesicles yields enzyme-containing nanoreactors. A further intriguing possibility to obtain functional nanoreactors is to enclose a polymerization catalyst into the thermosome, a protein cage from the family of chaperonins. Last but not least, fluorescent proteins are discussed as mechanoresponsive molecular sensors that report microdamages within fiber-reinforced composite materials.

  13. Self-assembling polymeric nanoparticles for enhanced intra-articular anti-inflammatory protein delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmire, Rachel Elisabeth

    Osteoarthritis (OA) affects 26 million Americans, or approximately 14% of the adult population. The incidence of OA is predicted to dramatically increase in the next 20 years as the US grows older and the rate of obesity continues to increase. There are currently no clinical interventions that cure OA. Current biomaterial delivery systems exhibit several limitations. First, most drug-delivery particles are hydrophobic, which is not optimal for hydrophilic protein encapsulation. Second, hydrophobic particles, such as PLGA, could cause wear damage to the already-fragile OA cartilage structure. Additionally, these particles usually suffer from non-specific protein adsorption, which causes increased phagocytosis and can lead to increased inflammation. New therapies that increase the effectiveness of OA treatments or reverse OA disease progression will greatly decrease the economic costs and individual pain associated with this disease. The goal of this thesis was to develop a new drug-delivering material to deliver anti-inflammatory protein for treating OA. Our central hypothesis for this work is that a controlled release/presentation system will more effectively deliver anti-inflammatory protein therapies to the OA joint. The primary goal of this work was to synthesize a block copolymer that could self-assemble into injectable, sub-micron-scale particles and would allow an anti-inflammatory protein, IL-1ra, to be tethered to its surface for efficient protein delivery. The block copolymer incorporated an oligo-ethylene monomer for tissue compatibility and non-fouling behavior, a 4-nitrophenol group for efficient protein tethering, and cyclohexyl methacrylate, a hydrophobic monomer, for particle stability. We engineered the copolymer and tested it in both in vitro culture experiments and an in vivo model to evaluate protein retention in the knee joint. The rationale for this project was that the rational design and synthesis of a new drug- and protein

  14. Nuclear pore protein NUP88 activates anaphase-promoting complex to promote aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Ryan M; Jeganathan, Karthik B; Cao, Xiuqi; van Deursen, Jan M

    2016-02-01

    The nuclear pore complex protein NUP88 is frequently elevated in aggressive human cancers and correlates with reduced patient survival; however, it is unclear whether and how NUP88 overexpression drives tumorigenesis. Here, we show that mice overexpressing NUP88 are cancer prone and form intestinal tumors. To determine whether overexpression of NUP88 drives tumorigenesis, we engineered transgenic mice with doxycycline-inducible expression of Nup88. Surprisingly, NUP88 overexpression did not alter global nuclear transport, but was a potent inducer of aneuploidy and chromosomal instability. We determined that NUP88 and the nuclear transport factors NUP98 and RAE1 comprise a regulatory network that inhibits premitotic activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). When overexpressed, NUP88 sequesters NUP98-RAE1 away from APC/CCDH1, triggering proteolysis of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), a tumor suppressor and multitasking mitotic kinase. Premitotic destruction of PLK1 disrupts centrosome separation, causing mitotic spindle asymmetry, merotelic microtubule-kinetochore attachments, lagging chromosomes, and aneuploidy. These effects were replicated by PLK1 insufficiency, indicating that PLK1 is responsible for the mitotic defects associated with NUP88 overexpression. These findings demonstrate that the NUP88-NUP98-RAE1-APC/CCDH1 axis contributes to aneuploidy and suggest that it may be deregulated in the initiating stages of a broad spectrum of human cancers. PMID:26731471

  15. Nuclear pore protein NUP88 activates anaphase-promoting complex to promote aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Naylor, Ryan M.; Jeganathan, Karthik B.; Cao, Xiuqi; van Deursen, Jan M.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex protein NUP88 is frequently elevated in aggressive human cancers and correlates with reduced patient survival; however, it is unclear whether and how NUP88 overexpression drives tumorigenesis. Here, we show that mice overexpressing NUP88 are cancer prone and form intestinal tumors. To determine whether overexpression of NUP88 drives tumorigenesis, we engineered transgenic mice with doxycycline-inducible expression of Nup88. Surprisingly, NUP88 overexpression did not alter global nuclear transport, but was a potent inducer of aneuploidy and chromosomal instability. We determined that NUP88 and the nuclear transport factors NUP98 and RAE1 comprise a regulatory network that inhibits premitotic activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). When overexpressed, NUP88 sequesters NUP98-RAE1 away from APC/CCDH1, triggering proteolysis of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), a tumor suppressor and multitasking mitotic kinase. Premitotic destruction of PLK1 disrupts centrosome separation, causing mitotic spindle asymmetry, merotelic microtubule-kinetochore attachments, lagging chromosomes, and aneuploidy. These effects were replicated by PLK1 insufficiency, indicating that PLK1 is responsible for the mitotic defects associated with NUP88 overexpression. These findings demonstrate that the NUP88-NUP98-RAE1-APC/CCDH1 axis contributes to aneuploidy and suggest that it may be deregulated in the initiating stages of a broad spectrum of human cancers. PMID:26731471

  16. Protein adsorption on novel acrylamido-based polymeric ion-exchangers. III. Salt concentration effects and elution behavior.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A K; Carta, G

    2001-09-28

    The effect of salt concentration on the adsorption and desorption of BSA has been determined for a polymeric anion-exchanger based on acrylamido monomers. The material investigated possesses a high adsorption capacity at low salt concentration and the bound protein can be recovered quantitatively at high salt concentrations. The effects of salt on adsorption and desorption rates were evaluated from batch and shallow-bed experiments, and a model was developed to describe the data quantitatively. The adsorption capacity decreases as the salt concentration is increased, but both adsorption and desorption rates increase at higher salt concentrations. The predictability of the behavior of columns packed with this material was examined by comparing model predictions and experimental results obtained in laboratory columns. In general, a good agreement was obtained between predicted and experimental breakthrough and elution profiles, especially in shorter columns. Thus, the model allows a prediction of the effects of column length, mobile phase flow-rate, protein feed concentration, and salt concentration on dynamic capacity, productivity, and on the concentration of product fractions. PMID:11681582

  17. A FRET-based method for monitoring septin polymerization and binding of septin-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Booth, E A; Thorner, J

    2016-01-01

    Much about septin function has been inferred from in vivo studies using mainly genetic methods, and much of what we know about septin organization has been obtained through examination of static structures in vitro primarily by electron microscopy. Deeper mechanistic insight requires real-time analysis of the dynamics of the assembly of septin-based structures and how other proteins associate with them. We describe here a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based approach for measuring in vitro the rate and extent of filament formation from septin complexes, binding of other proteins to septin structures, and the apparent affinities of these interactions. FRET is particularly well suited for interrogating protein-protein interactions, especially on a rapid timescale; the spectral change provides an unambiguous indication of whether two elements within the system under study are associating and serves as a molecular-level "ruler" because it is very sensitive to the separation between the donor and acceptor fluorophores over biologically relevant distances (≤10nm). The necessary procedures involve generation of appropriate cysteine-less and single cysteine-containing septin variants, expression and purification of the heterooctameric complexes containing them, efficient labeling of the purified complexes with desired fluorophores, fluorimetric measurement of FRET, and appropriate safeguards and controls in data acquisition and analysis. Our methods can be used to interrogate the effects of buffer conditions, small molecules, and septin-binding proteins on septin filament assembly or stability; determine the effect of alternative septin subunits, mutational alterations, or posttranslational modifications on assembly; and, delineate the location of septin-binding proteins. PMID:27473902

  18. Localized surface plasmon resonance nanosensing of C-reactive protein with poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted gold nanoparticles prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Yukiya; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-06-01

    Highly sensitive and selective protein nanosensing based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on which polymerized specific ligands were grafted as an artificial protein recognition layer for the target protein were demonstrated. As a model, optical nanosensing for C-reactive protein (CRP), a known biomarker for chronic inflammation that predicts the risk of arteriosclerosis or heart attacks, was achieved by measuring the shift of LSPR spectra derived from the change of permittivity of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted AuNPs (PMPC-g-AuNPs) upon interacting with CRP, in which the PMPC-g-AuNPs layer were grafted on AuNPs by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). This nanosensing system was effective even for detecting CRP concentrations in a human serum solution diluted to 1% (w/w), at which point a limit of detection was ~50 ng/mL and nonspecific adsorption of other proteins was negligible. The nanosensing system using specific ligand-grafted AuNPs has several strengths, such as low preparation cost, avoiding the need for expensive instruments, no necessary complex pretreatments, and high stability, because it does not contain biobased molecules. We believe this novel synthetic route for protein nanosensors, composed of AuNPs and a polymerized specific ligand utilizing surface-initiated controlled/living radical polymerization, will provide a foundation for the design and synthesis of nanosensors targeting various other biomarker proteins, paving the way for future advances in the field of biosensing.

  19. Promotion of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling by Tetraspanins and Glycosphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Szymczak, Lindsey C.; Aydin, Taner; Yun, Sijung; Constas, Katharine; Schaeffer, Arielle; Ranjan, Sinthu; Kubba, Saad; Alam, Emad; McMahon, Devin E.; He, Jingpeng; Shwartz, Neta; Tian, Chenxi; Plavskin, Yevgeniy; Lindy, Amanda; Dad, Nimra Amir; Sheth, Sunny; Amin, Nirav M.; Zimmerman, Stephanie; Liu, Dennis; Schwarz, Erich M.; Smith, Harold; Krause, Michael W.; Liu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) belong to the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of secreted molecules. BMPs play essential roles in multiple developmental and homeostatic processes in metazoans. Malfunction of the BMP pathway can cause a variety of diseases in humans, including cancer, skeletal disorders and cardiovascular diseases. Identification of factors that ensure proper spatiotemporal control of BMP signaling is critical for understanding how this pathway is regulated. We have used a unique and sensitive genetic screen to identify the plasma membrane-localized tetraspanin TSP-21 as a key new factor in the C. elegans BMP-like “Sma/Mab” signaling pathway that controls body size and postembryonic M lineage development. We showed that TSP-21 acts in the signal-receiving cells and genetically functions at the ligand-receptor level. We further showed that TSP-21 can associate with itself and with two additional tetraspanins, TSP-12 and TSP-14, which also promote Sma/Mab signaling. TSP-12 and TSP-14 can also associate with SMA-6, the type I receptor of the Sma/Mab pathway. Finally, we found that glycosphingolipids, major components of the tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, are required for Sma/Mab signaling. Our findings suggest that the tetraspanin-enriched membrane microdomains are important for proper BMP signaling. As tetraspanins have emerged as diagnostic and prognostic markers for tumor progression, and TSP-21, TSP-12 and TSP-14 are all conserved in humans, we speculate that abnormal BMP signaling due to altered expression or function of certain tetraspanins may be a contributing factor to cancer development. PMID:25978409

  20. Polymeric microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Walt, David R.; Mandal, Tarun K.; Fleming, Michael S.

    2004-04-13

    The invention features core-shell microsphere compositions, hollow polymeric microspheres, and methods for making the microspheres. The microspheres are characterized as having a polymeric shell with consistent shell thickness.

  1. Impact by condensed tannins with different mean degrees of polymerization on protein precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Condensed tannins (CTs) isolated from white clover (Trifolium repens) flowers and big trefoil (Lotus pedunculatus) leaves were evaluated in precipitation studies with bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and alfalfa leaf protein (ALF). The CTs were of similar compositions, but differed in the...

  2. Energetics of Polymerization: A Contribution to an Understanding of Protein Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedmann, Herbert C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the various ways that textbooks treat the energetics of protein synthesis. Offers an approach to explaining the phenomenon by emphasizing the ordering aspects of the process. Describes the participation of compounds such as ATP and GTP in the ordering process. (TW)

  3. Ubiquitin promoter-terminator cassette promotes genetically stable expression of the taste-modifying protein miraculin in transgenic lettuce.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Tadayoshi; Shohael, Abdullah Mohammad; Kim, You-Wang; Yano, Megumu; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    Lettuce is a commercially important leafy vegetable that is cultivated worldwide, and it is also a target crop for plant factories. In this study, lettuce was selected as an alternative platform for recombinant miraculin production because of its fast growth, agronomic value, and wide availability. The taste-modifying protein miraculin is a glycoprotein extracted from the red berries of the West African native shrub Richadella dulcifica. Because of its limited natural availability, many attempts have been made to produce this protein in suitable alternative hosts. We produced transgenic lettuce with miraculin gene driven either by the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette from lettuce or a 35S promoter/nos terminator cassette. Miraculin gene expression and miraculin accumulation in both cassettes were compared by quantitative real-time PCR analysis, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression level of the miraculin gene and protein in transgenic lettuce was higher and more genetically stable in the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette than in the 35S promoter/nos terminator cassette. These results demonstrated that the ubiquitin promoter/terminator cassette is an efficient platform for the genetically stable expression of the miraculin protein in lettuce and hence this platform is of benefit for recombinant miraculin production on a commercial scale. PMID:21830129

  4. A FRET-based method for monitoring septin polymerization and binding of septin-associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Booth, E.A.; Thorner, J.

    2016-01-01

    Much about septin function has been inferred from in vivo studies using mainly genetic methods, and much of what we know about septin organization has been obtained through examination of static structures in vitro primarily by electron microscopy. Deeper mechanistic insight requires real-time analysis of the dynamics of the assembly of septin-based structures and how other proteins associate with them. We describe here a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based approach for measuring in vitro the rate and extent of filament formation from septin complexes, binding of other proteins to septin structures, and the apparent affinities of these interactions. FRET is particularly well suited for interrogating protein–protein interactions, especially on a rapid timescale; the spectral change provides an unambiguous indication of whether two elements within the system under study are associating and serves as a molecular-level “ruler” because it is very sensitive to the separation between the donor and acceptor fluorophores over biologically relevant distances (≤ 10 nm). The necessary procedures involve generation of appropriate cysteine-less and single cysteine-containing septin variants, expression and purification of the heterooctameric complexes containing them, efficient labeling of the purified complexes with desired fluorophores, fluorimetric measurement of FRET, and appropriate safeguards and controls in data acquisition and analysis. Our methods can be used to interrogate the effects of buffer conditions, small molecules, and septin-binding proteins on septin filament assembly or stability; determine the effect of alternative septin subunits, mutational alterations, or posttranslational modifications on assembly; and, delineate the location of septin-binding proteins. PMID:27473902

  5. Isolation, characterization and evaluation of the Pichia pastoris sorbitol dehydrogenase promoter for expression of heterologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Periyasamy, Sankar; Govindappa, Nagaraj; Sreenivas, Suma; Sastry, Kedarnath

    2013-11-01

    Sorbitol is used as a non-repressive carbon source to develop fermentation process for Mut(s) recombinant clones obtained using the AOX1 promoter in Pichia pastoris. Sorbitol dehydrogenase is an enzyme in the carbohydrate metabolism that catalyzes reduction of D-fructose into D-sorbitol in the presence of NADH. The small stretch of 211bps upstream region of sorbitol dehydrogenase coding gene has all the promoter elements like CAAT box, GC box, etc. It is able to promote protein production under repressive as well as non-repressive carbon sources. In this study, the strength of the sorbitol dehydrogenase promoter was evaluated by expression of two heterologous proteins: human serum albumin and erythrina trypsin inhibitor. Sorbitol dehydrogenase promoter allowed constitutive expression of recombinant proteins in all carbon sources that were tested to grow P. pastoris and showed activity similar to GAP promoter. The sorbitol dehydrogenase promoter was active in all the growth phases of the P. pastoris.

  6. The synthesis of magnetic lysozyme-imprinted polymers by means of distillation-precipitation polymerization for selective protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiali; Zhang, Xihao; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-02-01

    A protein imprinting approach for the synthesis of core-shell structure nanoparticles with a magnetic core and molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) shell was developed using a simple distillation-precipitation polymerization method. In this work, Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were first synthesized through a solvothermal method and then were conveniently surface-modified with 3-(methacryloyloxy)propyltrimethoxylsilane as anchor molecules to donate vinyl groups. Next a high-density MIP shell was coated onto the surface of the magnetic nanoparticles by the copolymerization of functional monomer acrylamide (AAm), cross-linking agent N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA), the initiator azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN), and protein in acetonitrile heated at reflux. The morphology, adsorption, and recognition properties of the magnetic molecularly imprinted nanoparticles were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and rebinding experiments. The resulting MIP showed a high adsorption capacity (104.8 mg g(-1)) and specific recognition (imprinting factor=7.6) to lysozyme (Lyz). The as-prepared Fe3O4@Lyz-MIP nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 320 nm were coated with an MIP shell that was 20 nm thick, which enabled Fe3O4@Lyz-MIP to easily reach adsorption equilibrium. The high magnetization saturation (40.35 emu g(-1)) endows the materials with the convenience of magnetic separation under an external magnetic field and allows them to be subsequently reused. Furthermore, Fe3O4@Lyz-MIP could selectively extract a target protein from real egg-white samples under an external magnetic field. PMID:24203562

  7. The synthesis of magnetic lysozyme-imprinted polymers by means of distillation-precipitation polymerization for selective protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jiali; Zhang, Xihao; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-02-01

    A protein imprinting approach for the synthesis of core-shell structure nanoparticles with a magnetic core and molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) shell was developed using a simple distillation-precipitation polymerization method. In this work, Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were first synthesized through a solvothermal method and then were conveniently surface-modified with 3-(methacryloyloxy)propyltrimethoxylsilane as anchor molecules to donate vinyl groups. Next a high-density MIP shell was coated onto the surface of the magnetic nanoparticles by the copolymerization of functional monomer acrylamide (AAm), cross-linking agent N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA), the initiator azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN), and protein in acetonitrile heated at reflux. The morphology, adsorption, and recognition properties of the magnetic molecularly imprinted nanoparticles were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and rebinding experiments. The resulting MIP showed a high adsorption capacity (104.8 mg g(-1)) and specific recognition (imprinting factor=7.6) to lysozyme (Lyz). The as-prepared Fe3O4@Lyz-MIP nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 320 nm were coated with an MIP shell that was 20 nm thick, which enabled Fe3O4@Lyz-MIP to easily reach adsorption equilibrium. The high magnetization saturation (40.35 emu g(-1)) endows the materials with the convenience of magnetic separation under an external magnetic field and allows them to be subsequently reused. Furthermore, Fe3O4@Lyz-MIP could selectively extract a target protein from real egg-white samples under an external magnetic field.

  8. Effects of proteins on absorption by the rat of iron from polymeric and low-molecular-weight iron species

    SciTech Connect

    Berner, L.; Miller, D.

    1986-03-05

    To examine effects of proteins on Fe absorption from polymeric ferric hydroxides (polys) or low-molecular-weight complexes (LMW Fe), 2 studies were conducted. First, anemic rats were given /sup 59/Fe-labeled polys or LMW Fe in the presence and absence of pepsin-digested soy protein isolate, casein, and BSA. The doses were introduced into ligated duodenal segments for 1 hr. Uptake into the carcass of /sup 59/Fe from polys was doubled in the presence of BSA (7.8 vs 16.1%, p < .05) while casein and soy had no effect (5.5 and 6.5%). Absorption of /sup 59/Fe from LMW Fe was 7X greater than from polys; BSA and casein had no effect but soy depressed Fe uptake by almost 50% (57.4 vs 35.5%, p < .05). The second experiment repeated the first except that the proteins were not pepsin-digested and the doses were given by gastric intubation. All Fe, whether from polys or LMW Fe, was highly available (although in vitro digestions reveal that polys are not depolymerized to a large degree under simulated stomach conditions). Soy depressed Fe uptake from both sources (92.9 vs. 81.6%, LMW Fe and 85.4 vs 73.7%, polys) while casein and BSA had no effect. These results show: (1) BSA can depolymerize polys in the rat duodenum, thus enhancing absorption; (2) soy isolate generally depressed Fe uptake; and (3) the rat stomach appears to have an exceptional capacity for equalizing Fe sources.

  9. Microfluidics-assisted engineering of polymeric microcapsules with high encapsulation efficiency for protein drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pessi, Jenni; Santos, Hélder A; Miroshnyk, Inna; JoukoYliruusi; Weitz, David A; Mirza, Sabiruddin

    2014-09-10

    In this study, microfluidic technology was employed to develop protein formulations. The microcapsules were produced with a biphasic flow to create water-oil-water (W/O/W) double emulsion droplets with ultrathin shells. Optimized microcapsule formulations containing 1% (w/w) bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the inner phase were prepared with poly(vinyl alcohol), polycaprolactone and polyethylene glycol. All the particles were found to be intact and with a particle size of 23-47 μm. Furthermore, the particles were monodisperse, non-porous and stable up to 4 weeks. The encapsulation efficiency of BSA in the microcapsules was 84%. The microcapsules released 30% of their content within 168 h. This study demonstrates that microfluidics is a powerful technique for engineering formulations for therapeutic proteins.

  10. Promotion of tribological and hydrophobic properties of a coating on TPE substrates by atmospheric plasma-polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainz-García, Elisa; Alba-Elías, Fernando; Múgica-Vidal, Rodolfo; Pantoja-Ruiz, Mariola

    2016-05-01

    Thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) are used in the automotive sealing industry with the objective of producing anti-friction and hydrophobic components. At present, the anti-friction property is achieved by the electrostatic flocking, which sometimes produces an irregular coating. Therefore, this paper's objective is the promotion of adhesion of an anti-friction (based on the silane aminopropyltriethoxysilane-APTES-) and hydrophobic (based on the fluorinated precursor 1-perfluorohexene-PFH-) coating by the adhesion promoter, APTES. Different mixtures of APTES and PFH have been applied to a TPE substrate by an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ) system with Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) in order to determine the optimal mixture of precursors. The main difficulty in this work lies in the hydrophilic character of APTES and the low adhesion of the fluorinated coatings. The sample coated with a mixture of 50% APTES and 50% PFH (A50P50) was found to be the best one to satisfy both properties at the same time, despite not having the highest dynamic water contact angle (WCA) or the lowest friction coefficient.

  11. Insights into the variability of nucleated amyloid polymerization by a minimalistic model of stochastic protein assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugène, Sarah; Xue, Wei-Feng; Robert, Philippe; Doumic, Marie

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid aggregates is an important biological phenomenon associated with human diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid fibrils also have potential applications in nano-engineering of biomaterials. The kinetics of amyloid assembly show an exponential growth phase preceded by a lag phase, variable in duration as seen in bulk experiments and experiments that mimic the small volumes of cells. Here, to investigate the origins and the properties of the observed variability in the lag phase of amyloid assembly currently not accounted for by deterministic nucleation dependent mechanisms, we formulate a new stochastic minimal model that is capable of describing the characteristics of amyloid growth curves despite its simplicity. We then solve the stochastic differential equations of our model and give mathematical proof of a central limit theorem for the sample growth trajectories of the nucleated aggregation process. These results give an asymptotic description for our simple model, from which closed form analytical results capable of describing and predicting the variability of nucleated amyloid assembly were derived. We also demonstrate the application of our results to inform experiments in a conceptually friendly and clear fashion. Our model offers a new perspective and paves the way for a new and efficient approach on extracting vital information regarding the key initial events of amyloid formation.

  12. Paclitaxel-Loaded Polymeric Micelles Modified with MCF-7 Cell-Specific Phage Protein: Enhanced Binding to Target Cancer Cells and Increased Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric micelles are used as pharmaceutical carriers to increase solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Different ligands are used to prepare targeted polymeric micelles. Earlier, we developed the method for use of specific landscape phage fusion coat proteins as targeted delivery ligands and demonstrated the efficiency of this approach with doxorubicin-loaded PEGylated liposomes. Here, we describe a MCF-7 cell-specific micellar formulation self-assembled from the mixture of the micelle-forming amphiphilic polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) conjugate, MCF-7-specific landscape phage fusion coat protein, and the hydrophobic drug paclitaxel. These micelles demonstrated a very low CMC value and specific binding to target cells. Using an in vitro co-culture model, FACS analysis, and fluorescence microscopy we showed that MCF-7 targeted phage micelles preferential bound to target cells compared to non-target cells. As a result, targeted paclitaxel-loaded phage micelles demonstrated a significantly higher cytotoxicity towards target MCF-7 cells than free drug or non-targeted micelle formulations, but failed to show such a differential toxicity towards non-target C166 cells. Overall, cancer cell-specific phage proteins identified from phage display peptide libraries can serve as targeting ligands (“substitute antibody”) for polymeric micelle-based pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:20518562

  13. Response gene to complement 32 protein promotes macrophage phagocytosis via activation of protein kinase C pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rui; Zhang, Gui; Chen, Shi-You

    2014-08-15

    Macrophage phagocytosis plays an important role in host defense. The molecular mechanism, especially factors regulating the phagocytosis, however, is not completely understood. In the present study, we found that response gene to complement 32 (RGC-32) is an important regulator of phagocytosis. Although RGC-32 is induced and abundantly expressed in macrophage during monocyte-macrophage differentiation, RGC-32 appears not to be important for this process because RGC-32-deficient bone marrow progenitor can normally differentiate to macrophage. However, both peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages with RGC-32 deficiency exhibit significant defects in phagocytosis, whereas RGC-32-overexpressed macrophages show increased phagocytosis. Mechanistically, RGC-32 is recruited to macrophage membrane where it promotes F-actin assembly and the formation of phagocytic cups. RGC-32 knock-out impairs F-actin assembly. RGC-32 appears to interact with PKC to regulate PKC-induced phosphorylation of F-actin cross-linking protein myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that RGC-32 is a novel membrane regulator for macrophage phagocytosis.

  14. Multistage skin tumor promotion: involvement of a protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Mamrack, M.; Slaga, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    Current information suggests that chemical carcinogenesis is a multistep process with one of the best studied models in this regard being the two-stage carcinogenesis system using mouse skin. The effects of several carcinogens and tumor promoters in various sequences of application were studied to examine the nature of the process. The actions of several tumor inhibitors were compared. (ACR)

  15. Methods for promoting wound healing and muscle regeneration with the cell signaling protein Nell1

    SciTech Connect

    Culiat, Cymbeline T.

    2011-03-22

    The present invention provides methods for promoting wound healing and treating muscle atrophy in a mammal in need. The method comprises administering to the mammal a Nell1 protein or a Nell1 nucleic acid molecule.

  16. Methods for promoting wound healing and muscle regeneration with the cell signaling protein Nell1

    SciTech Connect

    Culiat, Cymbeline T

    2014-11-04

    The present invention provides methods for promoting wound healing and treating muscle atrophy in a mammal in need. The method comprises administering to the mammal a Nell1 protein or a Nell1 nucleic acid molecule.

  17. Protein modifications induced in mouse epidermis by potent and weak tumor-promoting hyperplasiogenic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, K.G.; Stephenson, K.B.; Slaga, T.J.

    1982-10-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to compare the changes in mouse epidermal proteins induced by the potent tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), by the moderate promoter mechanical abrasion, and by the weakly promoting hyperplasiogenic agents mezerein and ethylphenylpropiolate. Evidence is presented which indicates that TPA caused many changes in the epidermal protein profiles especially related to the keratins which are the major differentiation product of the epidermis. The criteria used for the identification of the keratins were extractability, isoelectric points, molecular weights, filament formation in vitro, immunological cross-reactivity, amino acid composition, and peptide mapping. Several other protein changes were evident in the more soluble epidermal proteins which were also prominent in the newborn epidermis. Mezerein and abrasion produced protein changes similar to those induced by TPA. Ethylphenylpropiolate-induced protein modifications not only occurred at later times compared with either mezerein or TPA but also were less in magnitude. However, although many of the protein modifications induced by TPA appear to be associated with the hyperplasiogenic properties of TPA, the major difference between a potent promoter like TPA and a weak promoter like ethylphenylpropiolate appeared to be related to the magnitude of the response and the time of appearance of the protein changes.

  18. Prefoldin Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Cytosolic Proteins with Missense Mutations by Maintaining Substrate Solubility.

    PubMed

    Comyn, Sophie A; Young, Barry P; Loewen, Christopher J; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-07-01

    Misfolded proteins challenge the ability of cells to maintain protein homeostasis and can accumulate into toxic protein aggregates. As a consequence, cells have adopted a number of protein quality control pathways to prevent protein aggregation, promote protein folding, and target terminally misfolded proteins for degradation. In this study, we employed a thermosensitive allele of the yeast Guk1 guanylate kinase as a model misfolded protein to investigate degradative protein quality control pathways. We performed a flow cytometry based screen to identify factors that promote proteasomal degradation of proteins misfolded as the result of missense mutations. In addition to the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1, we identified the prefoldin chaperone subunit Gim3 as an important quality control factor. Whereas the absence of GIM3 did not impair proteasomal function or the ubiquitination of the model substrate, it led to the accumulation of the poorly soluble model substrate in cellular inclusions that was accompanied by delayed degradation. We found that Gim3 interacted with the Guk1 mutant allele and propose that prefoldin promotes the degradation of the unstable model substrate by maintaining the solubility of the misfolded protein. We also demonstrated that in addition to the Guk1 mutant, prefoldin can stabilize other misfolded cytosolic proteins containing missense mutations. PMID:27448207

  19. Prefoldin Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Cytosolic Proteins with Missense Mutations by Maintaining Substrate Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Young, Barry P.; Loewen, Christopher J.; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded proteins challenge the ability of cells to maintain protein homeostasis and can accumulate into toxic protein aggregates. As a consequence, cells have adopted a number of protein quality control pathways to prevent protein aggregation, promote protein folding, and target terminally misfolded proteins for degradation. In this study, we employed a thermosensitive allele of the yeast Guk1 guanylate kinase as a model misfolded protein to investigate degradative protein quality control pathways. We performed a flow cytometry based screen to identify factors that promote proteasomal degradation of proteins misfolded as the result of missense mutations. In addition to the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1, we identified the prefoldin chaperone subunit Gim3 as an important quality control factor. Whereas the absence of GIM3 did not impair proteasomal function or the ubiquitination of the model substrate, it led to the accumulation of the poorly soluble model substrate in cellular inclusions that was accompanied by delayed degradation. We found that Gim3 interacted with the Guk1 mutant allele and propose that prefoldin promotes the degradation of the unstable model substrate by maintaining the solubility of the misfolded protein. We also demonstrated that in addition to the Guk1 mutant, prefoldin can stabilize other misfolded cytosolic proteins containing missense mutations. PMID:27448207

  20. Identification of maize embryo-preferred promoters suitable for high-level heterologous protein production.

    PubMed

    Streatfield, Stephen J; Bray, Jeffrey; Love, Robert T; Horn, Michael E; Lane, Jeffrey R; Drees, Carol F; Egelkrout, Erin M; Howard, John A

    2010-01-01

    The production of heterologous proteins in plants at levels consistent with commercialization of protein products requires molecular tools to ensure high-level transgene expression. The identification of strong promoters, preferably specific to the target expression tissue, is a focus for improving foreign protein yields using transgenic cereals as a production system. Thus, there is a requirement for strong embryo preferred monocot promoters. We obtained the sequences of 500 randomly selected maize cDNA clones to determine gene expression profiles in embryo tissues at multiple stages during development. Promoters corresponding to the most abundant clones were identified and isolated. These promoters were fused to the b-glucuronidase reporter and their tissue specificity and developmental expression characteristics assessed in transgenic maize. All of the isolated promoters tested drove transgene expression predominantly in the embryo and were most active late in embryogenesis during storage protein deposition. One of the most active promoters assessed by transgene expression was associated with the globulin-1 protein. Sequence identified here extended approximately 1.6 kb distal to the previously identified extent of the globulin-1 promoter, and this additional sequence boosted expression over two-fold. The extended globulin-1 promoter sequence isolated in this study has the potential for driving transgene expression at higher levels than those previously reported for cereals. Also, other highly active embryo promoters identified here offer opportunities to express multiple foreign proteins simultaneously at high levels in embryo tissues, while avoiding concerns over gene silencing due to the repeated use of a single promoter. PMID:21844671

  1. Study of protein modifications induced by phorbol ester tumor promoters in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, K.G.

    1981-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the phorbol ester tumor promoter 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced any specific changes in mouse epidermal proteins using the high resolution technique of two-dimensional electrophoresis. To accomplish this goal of determining the specificity and possibly the stage in promotion with which these protein changes were associated, epidermal proteins were analyzed (1) after treatment of adult mouse epidermis with several weakly promoting hyperplasiogenic agents, (2) following treatment with TPA in combination with various inhibitors of tumor promotion, (3) in basal kerotinocytes isolated from adult epidermis following treatment with TPA or several weakly promoting agents, and (4) during an initiation-promotion experiment. Evidence was found which indicated that the potent tumor promoter TPA as well as the weakly promoting hyperplasiogenic agents, mezerein, ethylphenylpropiolate (EPP), and mechanical abrasion, induced similar modifications of epidermal proteins, particularly among the keratins. These keratin modifications progressed with time following treatment resulting in a keratin pattern which resembled that of newborn epidermis.

  2. SR protein kinases promote splicing of nonconsensus introns.

    PubMed

    Lipp, Jesse J; Marvin, Michael C; Shokat, Kevan M; Guthrie, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorylation of the spliceosome is essential for RNA splicing, yet how and to what extent kinase signaling affects splicing have not been defined on a genome-wide basis. Using a chemical genetic approach, we show in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that the SR protein kinase Dsk1 is required for efficient splicing of introns with suboptimal splice sites. Systematic substrate mapping in fission yeast and human cells revealed that SRPKs target evolutionarily conserved spliceosomal proteins, including the branchpoint-binding protein Bpb1 (SF1 in humans), by using an RXXSP consensus motif for substrate recognition. Phosphorylation of SF1 increases SF1 binding to introns with nonconsensus splice sites in vitro, and mutation of such sites to consensus relieves the requirement for Dsk1 and phosphorylated Bpb1 in vivo. Modulation of splicing efficiency through kinase signaling pathways may allow tuning of gene expression in response to environmental and developmental cues. PMID:26167880

  3. Phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins related to the last steps of assembly and export of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sara B; Mota, Rita; Vieira, Cristina P; Vieira, Jorge; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Many cyanobacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with particular characteristics (e.g. anionic nature and presence of sulfate) that make them suitable for industrial processes such as bioremediation of heavy metals or thickening, suspending or emulsifying agents. Nevertheless, their biosynthetic pathway(s) are still largely unknown, limiting their utilization. In this work, a phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins putatively involved in the assembly and export of EPS in cyanobacteria was performed. Our results demonstrated that most strains harbor genes encoding proteins related to the three main pathways: Wzy-, ABC transporter-, and Synthase-dependent, but often not the complete set defining one pathway. Multiple gene copies are mainly correlated to larger genomes, and the strains with reduced genomes (e.g. the clade of marine unicellular Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), seem to have lost most of the EPS-related genes. Overall, the distribution of the different genes/proteins within the cyanobacteria phylum raises the hypothesis that cyanobacterial EPS production may not strictly follow one of the pathways previously characterized. Moreover, for the proteins involved in EPS polymerization, amino acid patterns were defined and validated constituting a novel and robust tool to identify proteins with similar functions and giving a first insight to which polymer biosynthesis they are related to.

  4. Atom transfer radical polymerization to fabricate monodisperse poly[glycidyl methacrylate-co-poly (ethylene glycol) methacrylate] microspheres and its application for protein affinity purification.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ling; Shi, Zhuan Zhuan; Li, Chang Ming

    2015-09-01

    Poly[glycidyl methacrylate-co-poly (ethylene glycol) methacrylate] microspheres for the first time were successfully synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) method at room temperature. The co-polymerization approach was investigated to delicately control the microsphere morphology and size-distribution by reaction conditions including solvent percentage, monomer loading and rotation speed. The results show that the average size of the microspheres is ∼5.7 μm with coexistence of epoxy, hydroxyl and ether groups, which provide plentiful functional sites for protein anchoring. The mechanism of the microsphere formation is proposed. The microsphere successfully demonstrates its unique application for affinity purification of proteins, in which the functional epoxy group facilitates a simple and efficient protein covalent immobilization to purify immunoglobulin G on the microspheres, while the hydrophilic poly (ethylene glycol) motif can repulse nonspecific protein adsorption for good specificity. This microspheres can be used in broad protein biosensors due to their abundant functional groups and high surface to volume ratio.

  5. Phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins related to the last steps of assembly and export of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Sara B.; Mota, Rita; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-10-01

    Many cyanobacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with particular characteristics (e.g. anionic nature and presence of sulfate) that make them suitable for industrial processes such as bioremediation of heavy metals or thickening, suspending or emulsifying agents. Nevertheless, their biosynthetic pathway(s) are still largely unknown, limiting their utilization. In this work, a phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins putatively involved in the assembly and export of EPS in cyanobacteria was performed. Our results demonstrated that most strains harbor genes encoding proteins related to the three main pathways: Wzy-, ABC transporter-, and Synthase-dependent, but often not the complete set defining one pathway. Multiple gene copies are mainly correlated to larger genomes, and the strains with reduced genomes (e.g. the clade of marine unicellular Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), seem to have lost most of the EPS-related genes. Overall, the distribution of the different genes/proteins within the cyanobacteria phylum raises the hypothesis that cyanobacterial EPS production may not strictly follow one of the pathways previously characterized. Moreover, for the proteins involved in EPS polymerization, amino acid patterns were defined and validated constituting a novel and robust tool to identify proteins with similar functions and giving a first insight to which polymer biosynthesis they are related to.

  6. Phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins related to the last steps of assembly and export of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sara B.; Mota, Rita; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Many cyanobacteria produce extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) with particular characteristics (e.g. anionic nature and presence of sulfate) that make them suitable for industrial processes such as bioremediation of heavy metals or thickening, suspending or emulsifying agents. Nevertheless, their biosynthetic pathway(s) are still largely unknown, limiting their utilization. In this work, a phylum-wide analysis of genes/proteins putatively involved in the assembly and export of EPS in cyanobacteria was performed. Our results demonstrated that most strains harbor genes encoding proteins related to the three main pathways: Wzy-, ABC transporter-, and Synthase-dependent, but often not the complete set defining one pathway. Multiple gene copies are mainly correlated to larger genomes, and the strains with reduced genomes (e.g. the clade of marine unicellular Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus), seem to have lost most of the EPS-related genes. Overall, the distribution of the different genes/proteins within the cyanobacteria phylum raises the hypothesis that cyanobacterial EPS production may not strictly follow one of the pathways previously characterized. Moreover, for the proteins involved in EPS polymerization, amino acid patterns were defined and validated constituting a novel and robust tool to identify proteins with similar functions and giving a first insight to which polymer biosynthesis they are related to. PMID:26437902

  7. Effect of microfiltration concentration factor on serum protein removal from skim milk using spiral-wound polymeric membranes.

    PubMed

    Beckman, S L; Barbano, D M

    2013-10-01

    Our objective was to determine the effect of concentration factor (CF) on the removal of serum protein (SP) from skim milk during microfiltration (MF) at 50 °C using a 0.3-μm-pore-size spiral-wound (SW) polymeric polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane. Pasteurized (72°C for 16 s) skim milk was MF (50 °C) at 3 CF (1.50, 2.25, and 3.00×), each on a separate day of processing starting with skim milk. Two phases of MF were used at each CF, with an initial startup-stabilization phase (40 min in full recycle mode) to achieve the desired CF, followed by a steady-state phase (90-min feed-and-bleed with recycle) where data was collected. The experiment was replicated 3 times, and SP removal from skim milk was quantified at each CF. System pressures, flow rates, CF, and fluxes were monitored during the 90-min run. Permeate flux increased (12.8, 15.3, and 19.0 kg/m(2) per hour) with decreasing CF from 3.00 to 1.50×, whereas fouled water flux did not differ among CF, indicating that the effect of membrane fouling on hydraulic resistance of the membrane was similar at all CF. However, the CF used when microfiltering skim milk (50°C) with a 0.3-μm polymeric SW PVDF membrane did affect the percentage of SP removed. As CF increased from 1.50 to 3.00×, the percentage of SP removed from skim milk increased from 10.56 to 35.57%, in a single stage bleed-and-feed MF system. Percentage SP removal from skim milk was lower than the theoretical value. Rejection of SP during MF of skim milk with SW PVDF membranes was caused by fouling of the membrane, not by the membrane itself and differences in the foulant characteristic among CF influenced SP rejection more than it influenced hydraulic resistance. We hypothesize that differences in the conditions near the surface of the membrane and within the pores during the first few minutes of processing, when casein micelles pass through the membrane, influenced the rejection of SP because more pore size narrowing and plugging occurred at

  8. Junction Protein Shrew-1 Influences Cell Invasion and Interacts with Invasion-promoting Protein CD147

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Alexander; Ruonala, Mika; Jakob, Viktor; Suthaus, Jan; Boles, Eckhard; Wouters, Fred

    2007-01-01

    Shrew-1 was previously isolated from an endometriotic cell line in our search for invasion-associated genes. It proved to be a membrane protein that targets to the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells, interacting with E-cadherin–catenin complexes of adherens junctions. Paradoxically, the existence of adherens junctions is incompatible with invasion. To investigate whether shrew-1 can indeed influence cellular invasion, we overexpressed it in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. This resulted in enhanced invasiveness, accompanied by an increased matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 level in the supernatant, raising the question about the role of shrew-1 in this process. Logic suggested we looked for an interaction with CD147, a known promoter of invasiveness and MMP activity. Indeed, genetics-based, biochemical, and microscopy experiments revealed shrew-1– and CD147-containing complexes in invasive endometriotic cells and an interaction in epithelial cells, which was stronger in MCF7 tumor cells, but weaker in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. In contrast to the effect mediated by overexpression, small interfering RNA-mediated down-regulation of either shrew-1 or CD147 in HeLa cells decreased invasiveness without affecting the proliferation behavior of HeLa cells, but the knockdown cells displayed decreased motility. Altogether, our results imply that shrew-1 has a function in the regulation of cellular invasion, which may involve its interaction with CD147. PMID:17267690

  9. Unconventional secretion of misfolded proteins promotes adaptation to proteasome dysfunction in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Gu; Takahama, Shokichi; Zhang, Guofeng; Tomarev, Stanislav I; Ye, Yihong

    2016-07-01

    To safeguard proteomic integrity, cells rely on the proteasome to degrade aberrant polypeptides, but it is unclear how cells remove defective proteins that have escaped degradation owing to proteasome insufficiency or dysfunction. Here we report a pathway termed misfolding-associated protein secretion, which uses the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated deubiquitylase USP19 to preferentially export aberrant cytosolic proteins. Intriguingly, the catalytic domain of USP19 possesses an unprecedented chaperone activity, allowing recruitment of misfolded proteins to the ER surface for deubiquitylation. Deubiquitylated cargos are encapsulated into ER-associated late endosomes and secreted to the cell exterior. USP19-deficient cells cannot efficiently secrete unwanted proteins, and grow more slowly than wild-type cells following exposure to a proteasome inhibitor. Together, our findings delineate a protein quality control (PQC) pathway that, unlike degradation-based PQC mechanisms, promotes protein homeostasis by exporting misfolded proteins through an unconventional protein secretion process. PMID:27295555

  10. scyllo-Inositol promotes robust mutant Huntingtin protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Aaron Y; Lan, Cynthia P; Hasan, Salwa; Brown, Mary E; McLaurin, Joanne

    2014-02-01

    Huntington disease is characterized by neuronal aggregates and inclusions containing polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin protein and peptide fragments (polyQ-Htt). We have used an established cell-based assay employing a PC12 cell line overexpressing truncated exon 1 of Htt with a 103-residue polyQ expansion that yields polyQ-Htt aggregates to investigate the fate of polyQ-Htt-drug complexes. scyllo-Inositol is an endogenous inositol stereoisomer known to inhibit accumulation and toxicity of the amyloid-β peptide and α-synuclein. In light of these properties, we investigated the effect of scyllo-inositol on polyQ-Htt accumulation. We show that scyllo-inositol lowered the number of visible polyQ-Htt aggregates and robustly decreased polyQ-Htt protein abundance without concomitant cellular toxicity. We found that scyllo-inositol-induced polyQ-Htt reduction was by rescue of degradation pathways mediated by the lysosome and by the proteasome but not autophagosomes. The rescue of degradation pathways was not a direct result of scyllo-inositol on the lysosome or proteasome but due to scyllo-inositol-induced reduction in mutant polyQ-Htt protein levels.

  11. Protein-DNA interactions in the promoter region of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene in human neocortex.

    PubMed

    Lukiw, W J; Rogaev, E I; Wong, L; Vaula, G; McLachlan, D R; St George Hyslop, P

    1994-03-01

    We have investigated protein-DNA interactions in the proximal promoter of the human amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene in temporal lobe neocortical nuclei isolated from control and Alzheimer disease (AD) affected brains. We report that the human APP 5' promoter sequence from -203 to +55 bp, which has been previously reported to contain essential regulatory elements for APP gene transcription, lies in a deoxyribonuclease I, micrococcal nuclease- and restriction endonuclease-sensitive, G+C-rich nucleosome-free gap flanked both 5' and 3' by typical nucleosome structures. As analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, this extended internucleosomal linker DNA is heavily occupied by nuclear protein factors, and interacts differentially with nuclear protein extracts obtained from HeLa and human brain neocortical nuclei. This suggests that the chromatin conformation of the APP gene promoter may vary in different cell types, and may correlate with differences in APP gene expression. Human recombinant transcription factors AP1, SP1 and TFIID (but not AP2 or brain histones H1, H2B and H4) interact with the -203 to +55 bp of the human APP promoter sequence. Only minor differences were observed in the chromatin structure of the immediate APP promoter between non-AD and AD affected neocortical nuclei, suggesting either that post-transcriptional processes, or that regulatory elements lying elsewhere in the APP gene may be important in the aberrant accumulation of the APP gene product.

  12. The role of protein kinase C in cell surface signal transduction and tumour promotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizuka, Yasutomi

    1984-04-01

    Protein kinase C has a crucial role in signal transduction for a variety of biologically active substances which activate cellular functions and proliferation. When cells are stimulated, protein kinase C is transiently activated by diacylglycerol which is produced in the membrane during the signal-induced turnover of inositol phospholipids. Tumour-promoting phorbol esters, when intercalated into the cell membrane, may substitute for diacylglycerol and permanently activate protein kinase C. The enzyme probably serves as a receptor for the tumour promoters. Further exploration of the roles of this enzyme may provide clues for understanding the mechanism of cell growth and differentiation.

  13. Development of high-productivity, strong cation-exchange adsorbers for protein capture by graft polymerization from membranes with different pore sizes

    PubMed Central

    Chenette, Heather C.S.; Robinson, Julie R.; Hobley, Eboni; Husson, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the surface modification of macroporous membranes using ATRP (atom transfer radical polymerization) to create cation-exchange adsorbers with high protein binding capacity at high product throughput. The work is motivated by the need for a more economical and rapid capture step in downstream processing of protein therapeutics. Membranes with three reported nominal pore sizes (0.2, 0.45, 1.0 μm) were modified with poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate, potassium salt) tentacles, to create a high density of protein binding sites. A special formulation was used in which the monomer was protected by a crown ether to enable surface-initiated ATRP of this cationic polyelectrolyte. Success with modification was supported by chemical analysis using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and indirectly by measurement of pure water flux as a function of polymerization time. Uniformity of modification within the membranes was visualized with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Static and dynamic binding capacities were measured using lysozyme protein to allow comparisons with reported performance data for commercial cation-exchange materials. Dynamic binding capacities were measured for flow rates ranging from 13 to 109 column volumes (CV)/min. Results show that this unique ATRP formulation can be used to fabricate cation-exchange membrane adsorbers with dynamic binding capacities as high as 70 mg/mL at a throughput of 100 CV/min and unprecedented productivity of 300 mg/mL/min. PMID:23175597

  14. Lamellipodin promotes actin assembly by clustering Ena/VASP proteins and tethering them to actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Scott D; Mullins, R Dyche

    2015-01-01

    Enabled/Vasodilator (Ena/VASP) proteins promote actin filament assembly at multiple locations, including: leading edge membranes, focal adhesions, and the surface of intracellular pathogens. One important Ena/VASP regulator is the mig-10/Lamellipodin/RIAM family of adaptors that promote lamellipod formation in fibroblasts and drive neurite outgrowth and axon guidance in neurons. To better understand how MRL proteins promote actin network formation we studied the interactions between Lamellipodin (Lpd), actin, and VASP, both in vivo and in vitro. We find that Lpd binds directly to actin filaments and that this interaction regulates its subcellular localization and enhances its effect on VASP polymerase activity. We propose that Lpd delivers Ena/VASP proteins to growing barbed ends and increases their polymerase activity by tethering them to filaments. This interaction represents one more pathway by which growing actin filaments produce positive feedback to control localization and activity of proteins that regulate their assembly.

  15. Genome-wide promoter binding profiling of protein phosphatase-1 and its major nuclear targeting subunits.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, Toon; Görnemann, Janina; Verbinnen, Iris; Boens, Shannah; Beullens, Monique; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-07-13

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a key regulator of transcription and is targeted to promoter regions via associated proteins. However, the chromatin binding sites of PP1 have never been studied in a systematic and genome-wide manner. Methylation-based DamID profiling in HeLa cells has enabled us to map hundreds of promoter binding sites of PP1 and three of its major nuclear interactors, i.e. RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS. Our data reveal that the α, β and γ isoforms of PP1 largely bind to distinct subsets of promoters and can also be differentiated by their promoter binding pattern. PP1β emerged as the major promoter-associated isoform and shows an overlapping binding profile with PNUTS at dozens of active promoters. Surprisingly, most promoter binding sites of PP1 are not shared with RepoMan, NIPP1 or PNUTS, hinting at the existence of additional, largely unidentified chromatin-targeting subunits. We also found that PP1 is not required for the global chromatin targeting of RepoMan, NIPP1 and PNUTS, but alters the promoter binding specificity of NIPP1. Our data disclose an unexpected specificity and complexity in the promoter binding of PP1 isoforms and their chromatin-targeting subunits. PMID:25990731

  16. NPF motifs in the vaccinia virus protein A36 recruit intersectin-1 to promote Cdc42:N-WASP-mediated viral release from infected cells.

    PubMed

    Snetkov, Xenia; Weisswange, Ina; Pfanzelter, Julia; Humphries, Ashley C; Way, Michael

    2016-01-01

    During its egress, vaccinia virus transiently recruits AP-2 and clathrin after fusion with the plasma membrane. This recruitment polarizes the viral protein A36 beneath the virus, enhancing actin polymerization and the spread of infection. We now demonstrate that three NPF motifs in the C-terminus of A36 recruit AP-2 and clathrin by interacting directly with the Epsin15 homology domains of Eps15 and intersectin-1. A36 is the first identified viral NPF motif containing protein shown to interact with endocytic machinery. Vaccinia still induces actin tails in the absence of the A36 NPF motifs. Their loss, however, reduces the cell-to-cell spread of vaccinia. This is due to a significant reduction in virus release from infected cells, as the lack of intersectin-1 recruitment leads to a loss of Cdc42 activation, impairing N-WASP-driven Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization. Our results suggest that initial A36-mediated virus release plays a more important role than A36-driven super-repulsion in promoting the cell-to-cell spread of vaccinia. PMID:27670116

  17. Cytomegalovirus immediate early proteins promote stemness properties in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Soroceanu, Liliana; Matlaf, Lisa; Khan, Sabeena; Akhavan, Armin; Singer, Eric; Bezrookove, Vladimir; Decker, Stacy; Ghanny, Saleena; Hadaczek, Piotr; Bengtsson, Henrik; Ohlfest, John; Luciani-Torres, Maria-Gloria; Harkins, Lualhati; Perry, Arie; Guo, Hong; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Cobbs, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive human brain tumor. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediate early (IE) proteins that are endogenously expressed in GBM cells are strong viral transactivators with onconcogenic properties. Here, we show how HCMV IE are preferentially expressed in glioma stem-like cells (GSC), where they co-localize with the other GBM stemness markers, CD133, Nestin, and Sox2. In patient-derived GSC that are endogenously infected with HCMV, attenuating IE expression by an RNA-i-based strategy, was sufficient to inhibit tumorsphere formation, Sox2 expression, cell cycle progression, and cell survival. Conversely, HCMV infection of HMCV-negative GSC elicited robust self-renewal and proliferation of cells that could be partially reversed by IE attenuation. In HCMV-positive GSC, IE attenuation induced a molecular program characterized by enhanced expression of mesenchymal markers and pro-inflammatory cytokines, resembling the therapeutically-resistant GBM phenotype. Mechanistically, HCMV/IE regulation of Sox2 occurred via inhibition of miRNA-145, a negative regulator of Sox2 protein expression. In a spontaneous mouse model of glioma, ectopic expression of the IE1 gene (UL123) specifically increased Sox2 and Nestin levels in the IE1-positive tumors, upregulating stemness and proliferation markers in vivo. Similarly, human GSC infected with the HCMV strain Towne but not the IE1-deficient strain CR208 showed enhanced growth as tumorspheres and intracranial tumor xenografts, compared to mock-infected human GSC. Overall, our findings offer new mechanistic insights into how HCMV/IE control stemness properties in glioblastoma cells. PMID:26239477

  18. Cellular or viral protein binding to a cytomegalovirus promoter transcription initiation site: effects on transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Macias, M P; Huang, L; Lashmit, P E; Stinski, M F

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that the IE2 protein of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) represses its own synthesis by binding to the major immediate-early promoter (M. P. Macias and M. F. Stinski, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:707-711, 1993). The binding of a viral protein (IE2) and a cellular protein in the region of the transcription start site was investigated by site-specific mutational analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The viral protein and the cellular protein require different but adjacent core DNA sequence elements for binding. In situ chemical footprinting analysis of DNA-protein interactions with purified CMV IE2 protein or HeLa cell nuclear extracts demonstrated binding sites that overlap the transcription start site. The IE2 protein footprint was between bp -15 and +2, relative to the transcription start site, and the cellular protein was between bp -16 and +7. The ability of the unknown human cellular protein of approximately 150 kDa to bind the CMV major immediate-early promoter correlates with an increase in the level of transcription efficiency. Mutations in the core DNA sequence element for cellular protein binding significantly reduced the level of in vitro transcription efficiency. Mutations upstream and downstream of the core sequence moderately reduced the transcription efficiency level. Negative autoregulation of the CMV promoter by the viral IE2 protein may involve both binding to the DNA template and interference with the function of a cellular protein that binds to the transcription start site and enhances transcription efficiency. PMID:8648697

  19. Correlation of MGMT promoter methylation status with gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Uno, Miyuki; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; Moura, Ricardo Pereira; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Cabrera, Hector Navarro; Begnami, Marcos; Rosemberg, Sérgio; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: 1) To correlate the methylation status of the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter to its gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma and 2) to determine the most reliable method for using MGMT to predict the response to adjuvant therapy in patients with glioblastoma. BACKGROUND: The MGMT gene is epigenetically silenced by promoter hypermethylation in gliomas, and this modification has emerged as a relevant predictor of therapeutic response. METHODS: Fifty-one cases of glioblastoma were analyzed for MGMT promoter methylation by methylation-specific PCR and pyrosequencing, gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: MGMT promoter methylation was found in 43.1% of glioblastoma by methylation-specific PCR and 38.8% by pyrosequencing. A low level of MGMT gene expression was correlated with positive MGMT promoter methylation (p = 0.001). However, no correlation was found between promoter methylation and MGMT protein expression (p = 0.297). The mean survival time of glioblastoma patients submitted to adjuvant therapy was significantly higher among patients with MGMT promoter methylation (log rank = 0.025 by methylation-specific PCR and 0.004 by pyrosequencing), and methylation was an independent predictive factor that was associated with improved prognosis by multivariate analysis. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: MGMT promoter methylation status was a more reliable predictor of susceptibility to adjuvant therapy and prognosis of glioblastoma than were MGMT protein or gene expression levels. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing methods were both sensitive methods for determining MGMT promoter methylation status using DNA extracted from frozen tissue. PMID:22012047

  20. Zwitterionic sulfobetaine-grafted poly(vinylidene fluoride) membrane surface with stably anti-protein-fouling performance via a two-step surface polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Bi, Qiu-Yan; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Xiao-Lin

    2012-03-01

    A zwitterionic polymer, poly(3-(methacryloylamino) propyl-dimethyl-(3-sulfopropyl) ammonium hydroxide) (poly(MPDSAH)) was successfully grafted in high density from the surface of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) hollow fiber membrane via a two-step polymerization. Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (poly(HEMA)) chains were firstly grafted from outside surface of PVDF membrane through atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) to provide the initiation sites for subsequent cerium (Ce (IV))-induced graft copolymerization of polyMPDSAH in the presence of N,N'-ethylene bisacrylamide (EBAA) as a cross-linking agent. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that the EBAA could stimulate zwitterionic polymers grafting onto the membrane surface. The dense poly(MPDSAH) layers on the PVDF membrane surface were revealed by the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mechanical property of PVDF membrane was improved by the zwitterionic surface layers. The gravimetry results indicated the grafting amount increased to 520 μg/cm2 for a copolymerization time of more than 3 h. Static and dynamic water contact angle measurements showed that the surface hydrophilicity of the PVDF membranes was significantly enhanced. As the grafting amount reached 513 μg cm-2, the value of contact angle dropped to 22.1° and the amount of protein adsorption decreased to zero. The cyclic experiments for BSA solution filtration demonstrated that the extent of protein fouling was significantly reduced and most of the fouling was reversible. The grafted polymer layer on the PVDF membrane showed a good stability during the membrane cleaning process. The experimental results concluded a good prospect in obtaining the sulfobetaine-modified PVDF membranes with high mechanical strength, good anti-protein-fouling performance, and long-term stability via the two-step polymerization.

  1. Heterologous expression and purification of biologically active domains 3 and 4 of human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor and its interaction with choline binding protein A of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Venables, Luanne; Govender, Sharlene; Oosthuizen, Vaughan

    2013-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, one of the common causes of pneumonia, colonises the epithelium via the interaction between a choline binding protein of S. pneumoniae and the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). One of the functions of pIgR is to mediate the transcytosis of polymeric immunoglobulins from the basolateral to the apical surface of epithelial cells. S. pneumoniae invades human epithelial cells by exploiting the transcytosis machinery. Due to an increase in the prevalence of antibiotic resistant strains of S. pneumoniae, and the limitations and expense of the vaccines available, extensive research may provide insights into the potential of new therapeutic regimes. This study investigated the potential of pIgR domains as an alternative non-antibiotic immune therapy for treating pneumonia. The aim was to determine the binding affinity of recombinant D3D4 protein, the domains of pIgR responsible for binding S. pneumoniae, to recombinant R1R2 repeat domains of choline binding protein A of S. pneumoniae. Biologically active recombinant D3D4 was produced in Escherichia coli using a gel filtration chromatography refolding method, a novel approach for the refolding of pIgR domains, after the purification of inclusion bodies using nickel affinity chromatography. Surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy showed that purified recombinant D3D4 binds recombinant R1R2 with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 3.36×10(-7)M. PMID:23973337

  2. Centriolar satellites assemble centrosomal microcephaly proteins to recruit CDK2 and promote centriole duplication.

    PubMed

    Kodani, Andrew; Yu, Timothy W; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Jayaraman, Divya; Johnson, Tasha L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Sztriha, Lāszló; Partlow, Jennifer N; Kim, Hanjun; Krup, Alexis L; Dammermann, Alexander; Krogan, Nevan J; Walsh, Christopher A; Reiter, Jeremy F

    2015-01-01

    Primary microcephaly (MCPH) associated proteins CDK5RAP2, CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 colocalize at the centrosome. We found that they interact to promote centriole duplication and form a hierarchy in which each is required to localize another to the centrosome, with CDK5RAP2 at the apex, and CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 at sequentially lower positions. MCPH proteins interact with distinct centriolar satellite proteins; CDK5RAP2 interacts with SPAG5 and CEP72, CEP152 with CEP131, WDR62 with MOONRAKER, and CEP63 with CEP90 and CCDC14. These satellite proteins localize their cognate MCPH interactors to centrosomes and also promote centriole duplication. Consistent with a role for satellites in microcephaly, homozygous mutations in one satellite gene, CEP90, may cause MCPH. The satellite proteins, with the exception of CCDC14, and MCPH proteins promote centriole duplication by recruiting CDK2 to the centrosome. Thus, centriolar satellites build a MCPH complex critical for human neurodevelopment that promotes CDK2 centrosomal localization and centriole duplication. PMID:26297806

  3. Centriolar satellites assemble centrosomal microcephaly proteins to recruit CDK2 and promote centriole duplication

    PubMed Central

    Kodani, Andrew; Yu, Timothy W; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Jayaraman, Divya; Johnson, Tasha L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Sztriha, Lāszló; Partlow, Jennifer N; Kim, Hanjun; Krup, Alexis L; Dammermann, Alexander; Krogan, Nevan J; Walsh, Christopher A; Reiter, Jeremy F

    2015-01-01

    Primary microcephaly (MCPH) associated proteins CDK5RAP2, CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 colocalize at the centrosome. We found that they interact to promote centriole duplication and form a hierarchy in which each is required to localize another to the centrosome, with CDK5RAP2 at the apex, and CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 at sequentially lower positions. MCPH proteins interact with distinct centriolar satellite proteins; CDK5RAP2 interacts with SPAG5 and CEP72, CEP152 with CEP131, WDR62 with MOONRAKER, and CEP63 with CEP90 and CCDC14. These satellite proteins localize their cognate MCPH interactors to centrosomes and also promote centriole duplication. Consistent with a role for satellites in microcephaly, homozygous mutations in one satellite gene, CEP90, may cause MCPH. The satellite proteins, with the exception of CCDC14, and MCPH proteins promote centriole duplication by recruiting CDK2 to the centrosome. Thus, centriolar satellites build a MCPH complex critical for human neurodevelopment that promotes CDK2 centrosomal localization and centriole duplication. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07519.001 PMID:26297806

  4. Centriolar satellites assemble centrosomal microcephaly proteins to recruit CDK2 and promote centriole duplication.

    PubMed

    Kodani, Andrew; Yu, Timothy W; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Jayaraman, Divya; Johnson, Tasha L; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Sztriha, Lāszló; Partlow, Jennifer N; Kim, Hanjun; Krup, Alexis L; Dammermann, Alexander; Krogan, Nevan J; Walsh, Christopher A; Reiter, Jeremy F

    2015-08-22

    Primary microcephaly (MCPH) associated proteins CDK5RAP2, CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 colocalize at the centrosome. We found that they interact to promote centriole duplication and form a hierarchy in which each is required to localize another to the centrosome, with CDK5RAP2 at the apex, and CEP152, WDR62 and CEP63 at sequentially lower positions. MCPH proteins interact with distinct centriolar satellite proteins; CDK5RAP2 interacts with SPAG5 and CEP72, CEP152 with CEP131, WDR62 with MOONRAKER, and CEP63 with CEP90 and CCDC14. These satellite proteins localize their cognate MCPH interactors to centrosomes and also promote centriole duplication. Consistent with a role for satellites in microcephaly, homozygous mutations in one satellite gene, CEP90, may cause MCPH. The satellite proteins, with the exception of CCDC14, and MCPH proteins promote centriole duplication by recruiting CDK2 to the centrosome. Thus, centriolar satellites build a MCPH complex critical for human neurodevelopment that promotes CDK2 centrosomal localization and centriole duplication.

  5. PPAR-β/δ activation promotes phospholipid transfer protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chehaibi, Khouloud; Cedó, Lídia; Metso, Jari; Palomer, Xavier; Santos, David; Quesada, Helena; Naceur Slimane, Mohamed; Wahli, Walter; Julve, Josep; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel; Jauhiainen, Matti; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles

    2015-03-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-β/δ has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for treating dyslipidemia, including beneficial effects on HDL cholesterol (HDL-C). In the current study, we determined the effects of the PPAR-β/δ agonist GW0742 on HDL composition and the expression of liver HDL-related genes in mice and cultured human cells. The experiments were carried out in C57BL/6 wild-type, LDL receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice and PPAR-β/δ-deficient mice treated with GW0742 (10mg/kg/day) or a vehicle solution for 14 days. GW0742 upregulated liver phospholipid transfer protein (Pltp) gene expression and increased serum PLTP activity in mice. When given to wild-type mice, GW0742 significantly increased serum HDL-C and HDL phospholipids; GW0742 also raised serum potential to generate preβ-HDL formation. The GW0742-mediated effects on liver Pltp expression and serum enzyme activity were completely abolished in PPAR-β/δ-deficient mice. GW0742 also stimulated PLTP mRNA expression in mouse J774 macrophages, differentiated human THP-1 macrophages and human hepatoma Huh7. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a common transcriptional upregulation by GW0742-activated PPAR-β/δ of Pltp expression in cultured cells and in mouse liver resulting in enhanced serum PLTP activity. Our results also indicate that PPAR-β/δ activation may modulate PLTP-mediated preβ-HDL formation and macrophage cholesterol efflux.

  6. Targeting of a histone acetyltransferase domain to a promoter enhances protein expression levels in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kwaks, T H J; Sewalt, R G A B; van Blokland, R; Siersma, T J; Kasiem, M; Kelder, A; Otte, A P

    2005-01-12

    Silencing of transfected genes in mammalian cells is a fundamental problem that probably involves the (in)accessibility status of chromatin. A potential solution to this problem is to provide a cell with protein factors that make the chromatin of a promoter more open or accessible for transcription. We tested this by targeting such proteins to different promoters. We found that targeting the p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain to strong viral or cellular promoters is sufficient to result in higher expression levels of a reporter protein. In contrast, targeting the chromatin-remodeling factor Brahma does not result in stable, higher protein expression levels. The long-term effects of the targeted p300HAT domain on protein expression levels are positively reinforced, when also anti-repressor elements are applied to flank the reporter construct. These elements were previously shown to be potent blockers of chromatin-associated repressors. The simultaneous application of the targeted p300HAT domain and anti-repressor elements conveys long-term stability to protein expression. Whereas no copy number dependency is achieved by targeting of the p300HAT domain alone, copy number dependency is improved when anti-repressor elements are included. We conclude that targeting of protein domains such as HAT domains helps to facilitate expression of transfected genes in mammalian cells. However, the simultaneous application of other genomic elements such as the anti-repressor elements prevents silencing more efficiently.

  7. The human cut homeodomain protein represses transcription from the c-myc promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Dufort, D; Nepveu, A

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the c-myc promoter have shown that efficient transcription initiation at the P2 start site as well as the block to elongation of transcription require the presence of the ME1a1 protein binding site upstream of the P2 TATA box. Following fractionation by size exclusion chromatography, three protein-ME1a1 DNA complexes, a, b, and c, were detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. A cDNA encoding a protein present in complex c was isolated by screening of an expression library with an ME1a1 DNA probe. This cDNA was found to encode the human homolog of the Drosophila Cut homeodomain protein. The bacterially expressed human Cut (hu-Cut) protein bound to the ME1a1 site, and antibodies against hu-Cut inhibited the ME1a1 binding activity c in nuclear extracts. In cotransfection experiments, the hu-Cut protein repressed transcription from the c-myc promoter, and this repression was shown to be dependent on the presence of the ME1a1 site. Using a reporter construct with a heterologous promoter, we found that c-myc exon 1 sequences were also necessary, in addition to the ME1a1 site, for repression by Cut. Taken together, these results suggest that the human homolog of the Drosophila Cut homeodomain protein is involved in regulation of the c-myc gene. Images PMID:8196661

  8. The molecular organization of the beta-sheet region in Corneous beta-proteins (beta-keratins) of sauropsids explains its stability and polymerization into filaments.

    PubMed

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Eckhart, Leopold; Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    The hard corneous material of avian and reptilian scales, claws, beak and feathers is mainly derived from the presence of proteins formerly known as beta-keratins but now termed Corneous beta-proteins of sauropsids to distinguish them from keratins, which are members of the intermediate filament protein family. The modeling of the conserved 34 amino acid residues long central beta-sheet region of Corneous beta-proteins using an ab initio protein folding and structure prediction algorithm indicates that this region is formed by four antiparallel beta-sheets. Molecular dynamic simulations and Molecular Mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA) analysis showed that the disposition of polar and apolar amino acids within the beta-region gives rise to an amphipathic core whose stability is further increased, especially in an aqueous environment, by the association into a dimer due to apolar interactions and specific amino-acid interactions. The dimers in turn polymerize into a 3nm thick linear beta-filament due to van der Waals and hydrogen-bond interactions. It is suggested that once this nuclear core of anti-parallel sheets evolved in the genome of a reptilian ancestor of the extant reptiles and birds about 300 millions years ago, new properties emerged in the corneous material forming scales, claws, beaks and feathers in these amniotes based on the tendency of these unique corneous proteins to form stable filaments different from keratin intermediate filaments or sterical structures formed by other corneous proteins so far known.

  9. The inhibition of IGF-1 signaling promotes proteostasis by enhancing protein aggregation and deposition.

    PubMed

    Moll, Lorna; Ben-Gedalya, Tziona; Reuveni, Hadas; Cohen, Ehud

    2016-04-01

    The discovery that the alteration of aging by reducing the activity of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) cascade protects nematodes and mice from neurodegeneration-linked, toxic protein aggregation (proteotoxicity) raises the prospect that IIS inhibitors bear therapeutic potential to counter neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, we reported that NT219, a highly efficient IGF-1 signaling inhibitor, protects model worms from the aggregation of amyloid β peptide and polyglutamine peptides that are linked to the manifestation of Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases, respectively. Here, we employed cultured cell systems to investigate whether NT219 promotes protein homeostasis (proteostasis) in mammalian cells and to explore its underlying mechanisms. We found that NT219 enhances the aggregation of misfolded prion protein and promotes its deposition in quality control compartments known as "aggresomes." NT219 also elevates the levels of certain molecular chaperones but, surprisingly, reduces proteasome activity and impairs autophagy. Our findings show that IGF-1 signaling inhibitors in general and NT219 in particular can promote proteostasis in mammalian cells by hyperaggregating hazardous proteins, thereby bearing the potential to postpone the onset and slow the progression of neurodegenerative illnesses in the elderly.-Moll, L., Ben-Gedalya, T., Reuveni, H., Cohen, E. The inhibition of IGF-1 signaling promotes proteostasis by enhancing protein aggregation and deposition. PMID:26722006

  10. Preparation of a thick polymer brush layer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization and analysis of protein adsorption resistance.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuuki; Onodera, Yuya; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a thick polymer brush layer composed of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)) and assess its resistance to protein adsorption from the dissolved state of poly(MPC) chains in an aqueous condition. The thick poly(MPC) brush layer was prepared through the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of MPC with a free initiator from an initiator-immobilized substrate at given [Monomer]/[Free initiator] ratios. The ellipsometric thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layers could be controlled by the polymerization degree of the poly(MPC) chains. The thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer in an aqueous medium was larger than that in air, and this tendency became clearer when the polymerization degree of the poly(MPC) increased. The maximum thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer in an aqueous medium was around 110 nm. The static air contact angle of the poly(MPC) brush layer in water indicated a reasonably hydrophilic nature, which was independent of the thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer at the surface. This result occurred because the hydrated state of the poly(MPC) chains is not influenced by the environment surrounding them. Finally, as measured with a quartz crystal microbalance, the amount of protein adsorbed from a fetal bovine serum solution (10% in phosphate-buffered saline) on the original substrate was 420 ng/cm(2). However, the poly(MPC) brush layer reduced this value dramatically to less than 50 ng/cm(2). This effect was independent of the thickness of the poly(MPC) brush layer for thicknesses between 20 nm and about 110 nm. These results indicated that the surface covered with a poly(MPC) brush layer is a promising platform to avoid biofouling and could also be applied to analyze the reactions of biological molecules with a high signal/noise ratio.

  11. Surface density of the Hendra G protein modulates Hendra F protein-promoted membrane fusion: role for Hendra G protein trafficking and degradation.

    PubMed

    Whitman, Shannon D; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2007-07-01

    Hendra virus, like most paramyxoviruses, requires both a fusion (F) and attachment (G) protein for promotion of cell-cell fusion. Recent studies determined that Hendra F is proteolytically processed by the cellular protease cathepsin L after endocytosis. This unique cathepsin L processing results in a small percentage of Hendra F on the cell surface. To determine how the surface densities of the two Hendra glycoproteins affect fusion promotion, we performed experiments that varied the levels of glycoproteins expressed in transfected cells. Using two different fusion assays, we found a marked increase in fusion when expression of the Hendra G protein was increased, with a 1:1 molar ratio of Hendra F:G on the cell surface resulting in optimal membrane fusion. Our results also showed that Hendra G protein levels are modulated by both more rapid protein turnover and slower protein trafficking than is seen for Hendra F.

  12. Surface density of the Hendra G protein modulates Hendra F protein-promoted membrane fusion: Role for Hendra G protein trafficking and degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, Shannon D.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2007-07-05

    Hendra virus, like most paramyxoviruses, requires both a fusion (F) and attachment (G) protein for promotion of cell-cell fusion. Recent studies determined that Hendra F is proteolytically processed by the cellular protease cathepsin L after endocytosis. This unique cathepsin L processing results in a small percentage of Hendra F on the cell surface. To determine how the surface densities of the two Hendra glycoproteins affect fusion promotion, we performed experiments that varied the levels of glycoproteins expressed in transfected cells. Using two different fusion assays, we found a marked increase in fusion when expression of the Hendra G protein was increased, with a 1:1 molar ratio of Hendra F:G on the cell surface resulting in optimal membrane fusion. Our results also showed that Hendra G protein levels are modulated by both more rapid protein turnover and slower protein trafficking than is seen for Hendra F.

  13. DNA damage promotes Herpes Simplex Virus-1 protein expression in a neuroblastoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Volcy, Ketna; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2013-01-01

    Although the induction of the cellular DNA damage response by Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection of epithelial cells in tissue culture promotes productive infection, there has been no experimental observation of the effect of the cellular DNA damage response on HSV-1 infection in vivo or in neuronal derived cell lines in tissue culture. Thus, it has been speculated that the lack of cellular DNA damage induction during infection of neurons may promote latency in these cells. This work examines the profile of HSV-1 promoter induction and protein expression, in the absence or presence of infection; using cellular DNA damage inducing topoisomerase inhibitors (Camptothecin and Etoposide) on a neuroblastoma cell line (C1300) in which HSV-1 infection fails to induce the DNA damage response. In the absence of infection, a plasmid expressing the immediate early ICP0 promoter was the most induced by the DNA damage drug treatments compared to the early (RR) and late (VP16) gene promoters. Similarly, drug treatment of C1300 cells infected with HSV-1 virus showed enhanced protein expression for ICP0, but not ICP4 and VP16 proteins. However, when the cells were infected with a HSV-1 virus defective in the immediate early gene trans-activator VP16 (in814) and treated with the DNA damaging drugs, there was enhanced expression of immediate early and late HSV-1 proteins. Although, viral infection of the neuroblastoma cell alone did not induce DNA damage, cellular DNA damage induced by drug treatments facilitated viral promoter induction and viral protein expression. This implicates a mechanism by which HSV-1 viral genes in a quiescent or latent state may become induced by cellular DNA damage in neuronal cells to facilitate productive infection. PMID:23354549

  14. Production and purification of polymerization-competent HIV-1 capsid protein p24 (CA) in NiCo21(DE3) Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV genome is packaged and organized in a conical capsid, which is made up of ~1,500 copies of the viral capsid protein p24 (CA). Being a primary structural component and due to its critical roles in both late and early stages of the HIV replication cycle, CA has attracted increased interest as a drug discovery target in recent years. Drug discovery studies require large amounts of highly pure and biologically active protein. It is therefore desirable to establish a simple and reproducible process for efficient production of HIV-1 CA. Result In this work, 6-His-tagged wild type CA from HIV-1 (NL4.3) was expressed in rare tRNA-supplemented NiCo21(DE3) Escherichia coli, and its production was studied in shake flask culture condition of expression. Influences of various key cultivation parameters were examined to identify optimal conditions for HIV-1 CA production. It was found that a culture temperature of 22°C and induction with 0.05 mM IPTG at the early stage of growth were ideal, leading to a maximum biomass yield when grown in Super broth supplemented with 1% glucose. With optimized culture conditions, a final biomass concentration of ~27.7 g L-1 (based on optical density) was obtained in 12 hours post-induction, leading to a yield of about ~170 mg L-1 HIV-1 CA. A two-step purification strategy (chitin beads + IMAC) was employed, which efficiently removed metal affinity resin-binding bacterial proteins that contaminate recombinant His-tagged protein preparation, and resulted in highly pure HIV-1 CA. The purified protein was capable of polymerization when tested in an in vitro polymerization assay. Conclusions By using this optimized expression and purification procedure, milligram amounts of highly pure and polymerization-competent recombinant HIV-1 CA can be produced at the lab-scale and thus used for further biochemical studies. PMID:24304876

  15. Integration of bacterial expansin-like proteins into cellulosome promotes the cellulose degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Cui, Zhenling; Song, Xiangfei; Liu, Ya-Jun; Cui, Qiu; Feng, Yingang

    2016-03-01

    Cellulosomes are multi-enzyme complexes assembled by cellulases and hemicellulases through dockerin-cohesin interactions, which are the most efficient system for the degradation of lignocellulosic resources in nature. Recent genomic analysis of a cellulosome-producing anaerobe Clostridium clariflavum DSM 19732 revealed that two expansin-like proteins, Clocl_1298 and Clocl_1862, contain a dockerin module, which suggests that they are components of the cellulosome. Bacterial expansin-like proteins do not have hydrolytic activities, but can facilitate the degradation of cellulosic biomass via synergistic effects with cellulases. In this study, the synergistic effect of the expansin-like proteins with both native and designer cellulosomes was investigated. The free expansin-like proteins, including expansin-like domains of Clocl_1298 and Clocl_1862, as well as a well-studied bacterial expansin-like protein BsEXLX1 from Bacillus subtilis, promoted the cellulose degradation by native cellulosomes, indicating the cellulosomal expansin-like proteins have the synergistic function. When they were integrated into a trivalent designer cellulosome, the synergistic effect was further amplified. The sequence and structure analyses indicated that these cellulosomal expansin-like proteins share the conserved functional mechanism with other bacterial expansin-like proteins. These results indicated that non-catalytic expansin-like proteins in the cellulosome can enhance the activity of the cellulosome in lignocellulose degradation. The involvement of functional expansin-like proteins in the cellulosome also implies new physiological functions of bacterial expansin-like proteins and cellulosomes.

  16. Discovery of a super-strong promoter enables efficient production of heterologous proteins in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Haifeng; Meng, Hengkai; Zhu, Yan; Bao, Guanhui; Zhang, Yanping; Li, Yin; Ma, Yanhe

    2014-03-28

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryotes that play important roles in the global carbon cycle. Recently, engineered cyanobacteria capable of producing various small molecules from CO2 have been developed. However, cyanobacteria are seldom considered as factories for producing proteins, mainly because of the lack of efficient strong promoters. Here, we report the discovery and verification of a super-strong promoter P(cpc560), which contains two predicted promoters and 14 predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). Using P(cpc560), functional proteins were produced at a level of up to 15% of total soluble protein in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. 6803, a level comparable to that produced in Escherichia coli. We demonstrated that the presence of multiple TFBSs in P(cpc560) is crucial for its promoter strength. Genetically transformable cyanobacteria neither have endotoxins nor form inclusion bodies; therefore, P(cpc560) opens the possibility to use cyanobacteria as alternative hosts for producing heterogeneous proteins from CO2 and inorganic nutrients.

  17. A common set of nuclear factors bind to promoter elements regulated by the retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Udvadia, A J; Rogers, K T; Horowitz, J M

    1992-09-01

    A 30-base pair element within the c-fos promoter, termed the RCE (retinoblastoma control element), has previously been shown to be the target of transcriptional regulation by the product of the retinoblastoma (Rb) gene. We have identified three nuclear proteins [retinoblastoma control proteins (RCPs)] that complex with this promoter element in vitro. The Rb gene does not appear to encode the RCPs as the expression of Rb in vivo does not correlate with RCE-RCP complex formation in vitro. A single binding site for the RCPs within the c-fos RCE was identified, and the nucleotides required for protein-DNA complex formation were defined. Similar sequences are found in the promoters of two additional genes that are regulated by Rb (c-myc and TGF-beta 1), and binding assays demonstrate that the RCPs also interact with these elements. Linkage of the c-fos RCE to the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter led to a 4-fold stimulation of expression in transient transfection assays. Mutations within the RCP binding site that abrogate stable interaction of the RCPs with the RCE in vitro block RCE transcriptional activity in vivo. Our results suggest a role for the RCPs in RCE-dependent transcription and the regulation of transcription by the Rb protein. PMID:1419910

  18. An OmpA-Like Protein from Acinetobacter spp. Stimulates Gastrin and Interleukin-8 Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Ofori-Darko, Ernest; Zavros, Yana; Rieder, Gabriele; Tarlé, Susan A.; Van Antwerp, Mary; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial overgrowth in the stomach may occur under conditions of diminished or absent acid secretion. Under these conditions, secretion of the hormone gastrin is elevated. Alternatively, bacterial factors may directly stimulate gastrin. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that mice colonized for 2 months with a mixed bacterial culture of opportunistic pathogens showed an increase in serum gastrin. To examine regulation of gene expression by bacterial proteins, stable transformants of AGS cells expressing gastrin or interleukin-8 (IL-8) promoters were cocultured with live organisms. Both whole-cell sonicates and a heat-stable fraction were also coincubated with the cells. A level of 108 organisms per ml stimulated both the gastrin and IL-8 promoters. Heat-stable proteins prepared from these bacterial sonicates stimulated the promoter significantly more than the live organism or unheated sonicates. A 38-kDa heat-stable protein stimulating the gastrin and IL-8 promoters was cloned and found to be an OmpA-related protein. Immunoblotting using antibody to the OmpA-like protein identified an Acinetobacter sp. as the bacterial species that expressed this protein and colonized the mouse stomach. Moreover, reintubation of mice with a pure culture of the Acinetobacter sp. caused gastritis. We conclude that bacterial colonization of the stomach may increase serum gastrin levels in part through the ability of the bacteria to produce OmpA-like proteins that directly stimulate gastrin and IL-8 gene expression. These results implicate OmpA-secreting bacteria in the activation of gastrin gene expression and raise the possibility that a variety of organisms may contribute to the increase in serum gastrin and subsequent epithelial cell proliferation in the hypochlorhydric stomach. PMID:10816525

  19. SecA Alone Can Promote Protein Translocation and Ion Channel Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ying-hsin; Zhang, Hao; Lin, Bor-ruei; Cui, Ningren; Na, Bing; Yang, Hsiuchin; Jiang, Chun; Sui, Sen-fang; Tai, Phang C.

    2011-01-01

    SecA is an essential component of the Sec-dependent protein translocation pathway across cytoplasmic membranes in bacteria. Escherichia coli SecA binds to cytoplasmic membranes at SecYEG high affinity sites and at phospholipid low affinity sites. It has been widely viewed that SecYEG functions as the essential protein-conducting channel through which precursors cross the membranes in bacterial Sec-dependent pathways, and that SecA functions as a motor to hydrolyze ATP in translocating precursors through SecYEG channels. We have now found that SecA alone can promote precursor translocation into phospholiposomes. Moreover, SecA-liposomes elicit ionic currents in Xenopus oocytes. Patch-clamp recordings further show that SecA alone promotes signal peptide- or precursor-dependent single channel activity. These activities were observed with the functional SecA at about 1–2 μm. The results show that SecA alone is sufficient to promote protein translocation into liposomes and to elicit ionic channel activity at the phospholipids low affinity binding sites, thus indicating that SecA is able to form the protein-conducting channels. Even so, such SecA-liposomes are less efficient than those with a full complement of Sec proteins, and lose the signal-peptide proofreading function, resembling the effects of PrlA mutations. Addition of purified SecYEG restores the signal peptide specificity and increases protein translocation and ion channel activities. These data show that SecA can promote protein translocation and ion channel activities both when it is bound to lipids at low affinity sites and when it is bound to SecYEG with high affinity. The latter of the two interactions confers high efficiency and specificity. PMID:22033925

  20. Activated protein C prevents inflammation yet stimulates angiogenesis to promote cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Christopher J; Xue, Meilang; Thompson, Patrick; Davey, Ross A; Whitmont, Kaley; Smith, Susan; Buisson-Legendre, Nathalie; Sztynda, Tamara; Furphy, Louise J; Cooper, Alan; Sambrook, Philip; March, Lyn

    2005-01-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is a serine protease that plays a central role in physiological anticoagulation, and has more recently been shown to be a potent anti-inflammatory mediator. Using cultured human cells, we show here that APC up-regulates the angiogenic promoters matrix metalloproteinase-2 in skin fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells, vascular endothelial growth factor in keratinocytes and fibroblasts, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in fibroblasts. In the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay, APC promoted the granulation/remodeling phases of wound healing by markedly stimulating angiogenesis as well as promoting reepithelialization. In a full-thickness rat skin-healing model, a single topical application of APC enhanced wound healing compared to saline control. APC-treated wounds had markedly more blood vessels on day 7 and a significantly lower infiltration of neutrophils at days 4 and 7. The broad spectrum matrix metallo-proteinase, GM6001, prevented the ability of APC to promote wound healing. In summary, our results show that APC promotes cutaneous wound healing via a complex mechanism involving stimulation of angiogenesis and inhibition of inflammation. These unique properties of APC make it an attractive therapeutic agent to promote the healing of chronic wounds. PMID:15953048

  1. Tobacco arabinogalactan protein NtEPc can promote banana (Musa AAA) somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shu, H; Xu, L; Li, Z; Li, J; Jin, Z; Chang, S

    2014-12-01

    Banana is an important tropical fruit worldwide. Parthenocarpy and female sterility made it impossible to improve banana varieties through common hybridization. Genetic transformation for banana improvement is imperative. But the low rate that banana embryogenic callus was induced made the transformation cannot be performed in many laboratories. Finding ways to promote banana somatic embryogenesis is critical for banana genetic transformation. After tobacco arabinogalactan protein gene NtEPc was transformed into Escherichia coli (DE3), the recombinant protein was purified and filter-sterilized. A series of the sterilized protein was added into tissue culture medium. It was found that the number of banana immature male flowers developing embryogenic calli increased significantly in the presence of NtEPc protein compared with the effect of the control medium. Among the treatments, explants cultured on medium containing 10 mg/l of NtEPc protein had the highest chance to develop embryogenic calli. The percentage of lines that developed embryogenic calli on this medium was about 12.5 %. These demonstrated that NtEPc protein can be used to promote banana embryogenesis. This is the first paper that reported that foreign arabinogalactan protein (AGP) could be used to improve banana somatic embryogenesis. PMID:25227688

  2. Tobacco arabinogalactan protein NtEPc can promote banana (Musa AAA) somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shu, H; Xu, L; Li, Z; Li, J; Jin, Z; Chang, S

    2014-12-01

    Banana is an important tropical fruit worldwide. Parthenocarpy and female sterility made it impossible to improve banana varieties through common hybridization. Genetic transformation for banana improvement is imperative. But the low rate that banana embryogenic callus was induced made the transformation cannot be performed in many laboratories. Finding ways to promote banana somatic embryogenesis is critical for banana genetic transformation. After tobacco arabinogalactan protein gene NtEPc was transformed into Escherichia coli (DE3), the recombinant protein was purified and filter-sterilized. A series of the sterilized protein was added into tissue culture medium. It was found that the number of banana immature male flowers developing embryogenic calli increased significantly in the presence of NtEPc protein compared with the effect of the control medium. Among the treatments, explants cultured on medium containing 10 mg/l of NtEPc protein had the highest chance to develop embryogenic calli. The percentage of lines that developed embryogenic calli on this medium was about 12.5 %. These demonstrated that NtEPc protein can be used to promote banana embryogenesis. This is the first paper that reported that foreign arabinogalactan protein (AGP) could be used to improve banana somatic embryogenesis.

  3. Evidence Supports the Use of Soy Protein to Promote Cardiometabolic Health and Muscle Development.

    PubMed

    Paul, Greg; Mendelson, Garry J

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of adequate amounts of dietary protein can help individuals maintain a healthy body composition, especially when combined with resistance exercise and during weight loss. It is well established that dietary protein intake supports muscle development and helps reduce loss of lean body mass during weight loss. Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of soy protein intake for promoting fat loss while preserving muscle mass and supporting lean body mass gains. In fact, soy protein and animal-based proteins both support weight loss and weight maintenance equally as part of an energy-restricted diet; however, soy protein offers additional cardiometabolic advantages. Key teaching points: Soy protein is a high-quality, plant-based protein that can be consumed throughout the life span. More human clinical studies have been conducted to assess the cholesterol-lowering effects of soy protein than any other cholesterol-lowering food ingredient. Ingestion of proteins with unique and complementary characteristics like soy, whey, and casein helps resistance-trained individuals achieve significant muscle growth. Recent research supports the efficacy of consuming a combination of soy, whey, and casein after resistance exercise to extend the time period that muscle building occurs. PMID:26400436

  4. Heterologous expression of Translocated promoter region protein, Tpr, identified as a transcription factor from Rattus norvegicus.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shivani; Yadav, Sunita Kumari; Dixit, Aparna

    2011-05-01

    Our earlier studies have demonstrated that the 35 kDa isoform of Translocated promoter region protein (Tpr) of Rattus norvegicus was able to augment c-jun transcription efficiently. Identification of direct targets that may in part downregulate c-jun transcription might prove to be an ideal target to curtail the proliferation of normal cells under pathophysiological conditions. In order to evaluate its potential as a pharmaceutical target, the protein must be produced and purified in sufficiently high yields. In the present study, we report the high level expression of Tpr protein of R. norvegicus employing heterologous host, Escherichia coli, to permit its structural characterization in great detail. We here demonstrate that the Tpr protein was expressed in soluble form and approximately 90 mg/L of the purified protein at the shake flask level could be achieved to near homogeneity using single step-metal chelate affinity chromatography. The amino acid sequence of the protein was confirmed by mass spectroscopic analysis. The highly unstable and disordered Tpr protein was imparted structural and functional stability by the addition of glycerol and it has been shown that the natively unfolded Tpr protein retains DNA binding ability under these conditions only. Thus, the present study emphasizes the significance of an efficient prokaryotic system, which results in a high level soluble expression of a DNA binding protein of eukaryotic origin. Thus, the present strategy employed for purification of the R. norvegicus Tpr protein bypasses the need for the tedious expression strategies associated with the eukaryotic expression systems.

  5. Evidence Supports the Use of Soy Protein to Promote Cardiometabolic Health and Muscle Development.

    PubMed

    Paul, Greg; Mendelson, Garry J

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of adequate amounts of dietary protein can help individuals maintain a healthy body composition, especially when combined with resistance exercise and during weight loss. It is well established that dietary protein intake supports muscle development and helps reduce loss of lean body mass during weight loss. Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of soy protein intake for promoting fat loss while preserving muscle mass and supporting lean body mass gains. In fact, soy protein and animal-based proteins both support weight loss and weight maintenance equally as part of an energy-restricted diet; however, soy protein offers additional cardiometabolic advantages. Key teaching points: Soy protein is a high-quality, plant-based protein that can be consumed throughout the life span. More human clinical studies have been conducted to assess the cholesterol-lowering effects of soy protein than any other cholesterol-lowering food ingredient. Ingestion of proteins with unique and complementary characteristics like soy, whey, and casein helps resistance-trained individuals achieve significant muscle growth. Recent research supports the efficacy of consuming a combination of soy, whey, and casein after resistance exercise to extend the time period that muscle building occurs.

  6. Neural regeneration protein is a novel chemoattractive and neuronal survival-promoting factor

    SciTech Connect

    Gorba, Thorsten; Bradoo, Privahini; Antonic, Ana; Marvin, Keith; Liu, Dong-Xu; Lobie, Peter E.; Reymann, Klaus G.; Gluckman, Peter D.; Sieg, Frank . E-mail: fsieg@neurenpharma.com

    2006-10-01

    Neurogenesis and neuronal migration are the prerequisites for the development of the central nervous system. We have identified a novel rodent gene encoding for a neural regeneration protein (NRP) with an activity spectrum similar to the chemokine stromal-derived factor (SDF)-1, but with much greater potency. The Nrp gene is encoded as a forward frameshift to the hypothetical alkylated DNA repair protein AlkB. The predicted protein sequence of NRP contains domains with homology to survival-promoting peptide (SPP) and the trefoil protein TFF-1. The Nrp gene is first expressed in neural stem cells and expression continues in glial lineages. Recombinant NRP and NRP-derived peptides possess biological activities including induction of neural migration and proliferation, promotion of neuronal survival, enhancement of neurite outgrowth and promotion of neuronal differentiation from neural stem cells. NRP exerts its effect on neuronal survival by phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 and Akt kinases, whereas NRP stimulation of neural migration depends solely on p44/42 MAP kinase activity. Taken together, the expression profile of Nrp, the existence in its predicted protein structure of domains with similarities to known neuroprotective and migration-inducing factors and the high potency of NRP-derived synthetic peptides acting in femtomolar concentrations suggest it to be a novel gene of relevance in cellular and developmental neurobiology.

  7. Pineapple translation factor SUI1 and ribosomal protein L36 promoters drive constitutive transgene expression patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Koia, Jonni; Moyle, Richard; Hendry, Caroline; Lim, Lionel; Botella, José Ramón

    2013-03-01

    The availability of a variety of promoter sequences is necessary for the genetic engineering of plants, in basic research studies and for the development of transgenic crops. In this study, the promoter and 5' untranslated regions of the evolutionally conserved protein translation factor SUI1 gene and ribosomal protein L36 gene were isolated from pineapple and sequenced. Each promoter was translationally fused to the GUS reporter gene and transformed into the heterologous plant system Arabidopsis thaliana. Both the pineapple SUI1 and L36 promoters drove GUS expression in all tissues of Arabidopsis at levels comparable to the CaMV35S promoter. Transient assays determined that the pineapple SUI1 promoter also drove GUS expression in a variety of climacteric and non-climacteric fruit species. Thus the pineapple SUI1 and L36 promoters demonstrate the potential for using translation factor and ribosomal protein genes as a source of promoter sequences that can drive constitutive transgene expression patterns.

  8. Uniform accumulation of recombinant miraculin protein in transgenic tomato fruit using a fruit-ripening-specific E8 promoter.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Tadayoshi; Kim, You-Wang; Kato, Kazuhisa; Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    The E8 promoter, a tomato fruit-ripening-specific promoter, and the CaMV 35S promoter, a constitutive promoter, were used to express the miraculin gene encoding the taste-modifying protein in tomato. The accumulation of miraculin protein and mRNA was compared among transgenic tomatoes expressing the miraculin gene driven by these promoters. Recombinant miraculin protein predominantly accumulated in transgenic tomato lines using the E8 promoter (E8-MIR) only at the red fruit stage. The accumulations were almost uniform among all fruit tissues. When the 35S promoter (35S-MIR) was used, miraculin accumulation in the exocarp was much higher than in other tissues, indicating that the miraculin accumulation pattern can be regulated by using different types of promoters. We also discuss the potential of the E8-MIR lines for practical use. PMID:21359850

  9. The innate immune protein calprotectin promotes Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wakeman, Catherine A.; Moore, Jessica L.; Noto, Michael J.; Zhang, Yaofang; Singleton, Marc D.; Prentice, Boone M.; Gilston, Benjamin A.; Doster, Ryan S.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Chazin, Walter J.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms form biofilms containing differentiated cell populations. To determine factors driving differentiation, we herein visualize protein and metal distributions within Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms using imaging mass spectrometry. These in vitro experiments reveal correlations between differential protein distribution and metal abundance. Notably, zinc- and manganese-depleted portions of the biofilm repress the production of anti-staphylococcal molecules. Exposure to calprotectin (a host protein known to sequester metal ions at infectious foci) recapitulates responses occurring within metal-deplete portions of the biofilm and promotes interaction between P. aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Consistent with these results, the presence of calprotectin promotes co-colonization of the murine lung, and polymicrobial communities are found to co-exist in calprotectin-enriched airspaces of a cystic fibrosis lung explant. These findings, which demonstrate that metal fluctuations are a driving force of microbial community structure, have clinical implications because of the frequent occurrence of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus co-infections. PMID:27301800

  10. Intramembrane proteolysis promotes trafficking of hepatitis C virus core protein to lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    McLauchlan, John; Lemberg, Marius K; Hope, Graham; Martoglio, Bruno

    2002-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major causative pathogen associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The virus has a positive-sense RNA genome encoding a single polyprotein with the virion components located in the N-terminal portion. During biosynthesis of the polyprotein, an internal signal sequence between the core protein and the envelope protein E1 targets the nascent polypeptide to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane for translocation of E1 into the ER. Following membrane insertion, the signal sequence is cleaved from E1 by signal peptidase. Here we provide evidence that after cleavage by signal peptidase, the signal peptide is further processed by the intramembrane-cleaving protease SPP that promotes the release of core protein from the ER membrane. Core protein is then free for subsequent trafficking to lipid droplets. This study represents an example of a potential role for intramembrane proteolysis in the maturation of a viral protein. PMID:12145199

  11. Poxviruses Encode a Reticulon-Like Protein that Promotes Membrane Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, Karl J.; Bisht, Himani; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Hyun, Seong-In; Hansen, Bryan T.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Hinshaw, Jenny E.; Moss, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Poxviruses are enveloped DNA viruses that replicate within the cytoplasm. The first viral structures are crescents and spherical particles with a lipoprotein membrane bilayer thought to be derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We determined that A17, a conserved viral transmembrane protein essential for crescent formation, forms homo-oligomers and shares topological features with cellular reticulon-like proteins, which promote membrane curvature and contribute to the tubular structure of the ER. When the purified A17 protein was incorporated into liposomes, 25 nm diameter vesicles and tubules formed at low and high A17 concentrations, respectively. In addition, intracellular expression of A17, in the absence of other viral structural proteins, transformed the ER into aggregated 3-dimensional tubular networks. We suggest that A17 is a viral reticulon-like protein that contributes to curvature during biogenesis of the poxvirus membrane. PMID:26923595

  12. Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor on the C-reactive protein promoter.

    PubMed

    Voleti, Bhavya; Hammond, David J; Thirumalai, Avinash; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a plasma protein of the innate immune system, is produced by hepatocytes. A critical regulatory region (-42 to -57) on the CRP promoter contains binding site for the IL-6-activated transcription factor C/EBPβ. The IL-1β-activated transcription factor NF-κB binds to a κB site located nearby (-63 to -74). The κB site overlaps an octamer motif (-59 to -66) which is the binding site for the constitutively active transcription factor Oct-1. Oct-1 is known to function both as a transcriptional repressor and as an activator depending upon the promoter context. Also, Oct-1 can regulate gene expression either by binding directly to the promoter or by interacting with other transcription factors bound to the promoter. The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of Oct-1 in regulating CRP expression. In luciferase transactivation assays, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression in Hep3B cells. Deletion of the Oct-1 site from the promoter drastically reduced the cytokine response because the κB site was altered as a consequence of deleting the Oct-1 site. Surprisingly, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited the residual (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. Similarly, deletion of the Oct-1 site reduced the induction of CRP expression in response to overexpressed C/EBPβ, and overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited C/EBPβ-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. We conclude that Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of CRP expression and it does so by occupying its cognate site on the promoter and also via other transcription factors by an as yet undefined mechanism.

  13. High mobility group nucleosome-binding family proteins promote astrocyte differentiation of neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Motoshi; Lanjakornsiripan, Darin; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Yusuke; Ogata, Toru; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2014-11-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the mammalian brain and are important for the functions of the central nervous system. Although previous studies have shown that the STAT signaling pathway or its regulators promote the generation of astrocytes from multipotent neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the developing mammalian brain, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the astrocytic fate decision have still remained largely unclear. Here, we show that the high mobility group nucleosome-binding (HMGN) family proteins, HMGN1, 2, and 3, promote astrocyte differentiation of NPCs during brain development. HMGN proteins were expressed in NPCs, Sox9(+) glial progenitors, and GFAP(+) astrocytes in perinatal and adult brains. Forced expression of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs in cultures or in the late embryonic neocortex increased the generation of astrocytes at the expense of neurons. Conversely, knockdown of either HMGN1, 2, or 3 in NPCs suppressed astrocyte differentiation and promoted neuronal differentiation. Importantly, overexpression of HMGN proteins did not induce the phosphorylation of STAT3 or activate STAT reporter genes. In addition, HMGN family proteins did not enhance DNA demethylation and acetylation of histone H3 around the STAT-binding site of the gfap promoter. Moreover, knockdown of HMGN family proteins significantly reduced astrocyte differentiation induced by gliogenic signal ciliary neurotrophic factor, which activates the JAK-STAT pathway. Therefore, we propose that HMGN family proteins are novel chromatin regulatory factors that control astrocyte fate decision/differentiation in parallel with or downstream of the JAK-STAT pathway through modulation of the responsiveness to gliogenic signals. PMID:25069414

  14. Role of Ingested Amino Acids and Protein in the Promotion of Resistance Exercise-Induced Muscle Protein Anabolism.

    PubMed

    Reidy, Paul T; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2016-02-01

    The goal of this critical review is to comprehensively assess the evidence for the molecular, physiologic, and phenotypic skeletal muscle responses to resistance exercise (RE) combined with the nutritional intervention of protein and/or amino acid (AA) ingestion in young adults. We gathered the literature regarding the translational response in human skeletal muscle to acute exposure to RE and protein/AA supplements and the literature describing the phenotypic skeletal muscle adaptation to RE and nutritional interventions. Supplementation of protein/AAs with RE exhibited clear protein dose-dependent effects on translational regulation (protein synthesis) through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, which was most apparent through increases in p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation, compared with postexercise recovery in the fasted or carbohydrate-fed state. These acute findings were critically tested via long-term exposure to RE training (RET) and protein/AA supplementation, and it was determined that a diminishing protein/AA supplement effect occurs over a prolonged exposure stimulus after exercise training. Furthermore, we found that protein/AA supplements, combined with RET, produced a positive, albeit minor, effect on the promotion of lean mass growth (when assessed in >20 participants/treatment); a negligible effect on muscle mass; and a negligible to no additional effect on strength. A potential concern we discovered was that the majority of the exercise training studies were underpowered in their ability to discern effects of protein/AA supplementation. Regardless, even when using optimal methodology and large sample sizes, it is clear that the effect size for protein/AA supplementation is low and likely limited to a subset of individuals because the individual variability is high. With regard to nutritional intakes, total protein intake per day, rather than protein timing or quality, appears to be more of a factor on

  15. EspF Interacts with Nucleation-Promoting Factors To Recruit Junctional Proteins into Pedestals for Pedestal Maturation and Disruption of Paracellular Permeability ▿

    PubMed Central

    Peralta-Ramírez, Janneth; Hernandez, J. Manuel; Manning-Cela, Rebeca; Luna-Muñoz, José; Garcia-Tovar, Carlos; Nougayréde, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria subvert normal host cell processes by delivering effector proteins which mimic eukaryotic functions directly into target cells. EspF is a multifunctional protein injected into host cells by attaching and effacing pathogens, but its mechanism of action is not understood completely. In silico analyses of EspF revealed two key motifs: proline-rich domains and PDZ domain binding motifs. Such functional domains may allow EspF to act as an actin nucleation-promoting factor by mimicking host proteins. In agreement with these predictions, we found that EspF from rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (E22) participates in the regulation of actin polymerization by binding to a complex of proteins at the tight junctions (TJ). EspF bound to actin and profilin throughout the course of infection. However, after 2 h of infection, EspF also bound to the neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and to the Arp2/3, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), and ZO-2 proteins. Moreover, EspF caused occludin, claudin, ZO-1, and ZO-2 redistribution and loss of transepithelial electrical resistance, suggesting that actin sequestration by EspF may cause local actin depolymerization leading to EspF-induced TJ disruption. Furthermore, EspF caused recruitment of these TJ proteins into the pedestals. An E22 strain lacking EspF did not cause TJ disruption and pedestals were smaller than those induced by the wild-type strain. Additionally, the pedestals were located mainly in the TJ. The overexpression of EspF caused bigger pedestals located along the length of the cells. Thus, actin sequestration by EspF allows the recruitment of junctional proteins into the pedestals, leading to the maturation of actin pedestals and the disruption of paracellular permeability. PMID:18559425

  16. Poly(oligo(ethylene glycol)acrylamide) brushes by surface initiated polymerization: effect of macromonomer chain length on brush growth and protein adsorption from blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Janzen, Johan; Le, Yevgeniya; Kainthan, Rajesh K; Brooks, Donald E

    2009-04-01

    Three hydrolytically stable polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-based N-substituted acrylamide macromonomers, methoxypolyethyleneglycol (350) acrylamide (MPEG350Am) methoxypolyethyleneglycol (750) acrylamide(MPEG750Am) and methoxypolyethyleneglycol (2000)acrylamide (MPEG2000Am) with increasing PEG chain length were synthesized. Surface-initiated aqueous atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) using CuCl/1,1,4,7,10,10-hexamethyl triethylene tetramine (HMTETA) catalyst was utilized to generate dense polymer brushes from these monomers via an ester linker group on the surface of model polystyrene (PS) particles. The molecular weight, hydrodynamic thickness, and graft densities of the grafted polymer layers were controlled by changing the reaction parameters of monomer concentration, addition of Cu(II)Cl2, and sodium chloride. The graft densities of surface-grafted brushes decreased with increasing PEG macromonomer chain length, 350 > 750 > 2000, under similar experimental conditions. The molecular weight of grafts increased with increase in monomer concentration, and only selected conditions produced narrow distributed polymer chains. The molecular weight of grafted polymer chains differs significantly to those formed in solution. The hydrodynamic thicknesses of the grafted polymer layers were fitted to the Daoud and Cotton model (DCM) for brush height on spherical surfaces. The results show that the size of the pendent groups on the polymer chains has a profound effect on the hydrodynamic thickness of the brush for a given degree of polymerization. The new PEG-based surfaces show good protection against nonspecific protein adsorption from blood plasma compared to the bare surface. Protein adsorption decreased with increasing surface density of grafted polymer chains. Poly(MPEG750Am) brushes were more effective in preventing protein adsorption than poly(MPEG350Am) even at low graft densities, presumably due to the increase in PEG content in the grafted layer. PMID:19708153

  17. Differential expression and ligand binding indicate alternative functions for zebrafish polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) and a family of pIgR-like (PIGRL) proteins.

    PubMed

    Kortum, Amanda N; Rodriguez-Nunez, Ivan; Yang, Jibing; Shim, Juyoung; Runft, Donna; O'Driscoll, Marci L; Haire, Robert N; Cannon, John P; Turner, Poem M; Litman, Ronda T; Kim, Carol H; Neely, Melody N; Litman, Gary W; Yoder, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    The polymeric immunoglobulin (Ig) receptor (pIgR) is an integral transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an important role in the mammalian immune response by transporting soluble polymeric Igs across mucosal epithelial cells. Single pIgR genes, which are expressed in lymphoid organs including mucosal tissues, have been identified in several teleost species. A single pigr gene has been identified on zebrafish chromosome 2 along with a large multigene family consisting of 29 pigr-like (PIGRL) genes. Full-length transcripts from ten different PIGRL genes that encode secreted and putative inhibitory membrane-bound receptors have been characterized. Although PIGRL and pigr transcripts are detected in immune tissues, only PIGRL transcripts can be detected in lymphoid and myeloid cells. In contrast to pIgR which binds Igs, certain PIGRL proteins bind phospholipids. PIGRL transcript levels are increased after infection with Streptococcus iniae, suggesting a role for PIGRL genes during bacterial challenge. Transcript levels of PIGRL genes are decreased after infection with Snakehead rhabdovirus, suggesting that viral infection may suppress PIGRL function.

  18. Two distinct promoter architectures centered on dynamic nucleosomes control ribosomal protein gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Britta; Kubik, Slawomir; Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Victoria; Dénervaud, Nicolas; Jacquet, Philippe; Ozkan, Burak; Rougemont, Jacques; Maerkl, Sebastian J.; Naef, Félix

    2014-01-01

    In yeast, ribosome production is controlled transcriptionally by tight coregulation of the 138 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). RPG promoters display limited sequence homology, and the molecular basis for their coregulation remains largely unknown. Here we identify two prevalent RPG promoter types, both characterized by upstream binding of the general transcription factor (TF) Rap1 followed by the RPG-specific Fhl1/Ifh1 pair, with one type also binding the HMG-B protein Hmo1. We show that the regulatory properties of the two promoter types are remarkably similar, suggesting that they are determined to a large extent by Rap1 and the Fhl1/Ifh1 pair. Rapid depletion experiments allowed us to define a hierarchy of TF binding in which Rap1 acts as a pioneer factor required for binding of all other TFs. We also uncovered unexpected features underlying recruitment of Fhl1, whose forkhead DNA-binding domain is not required for binding at most promoters, and Hmo1, whose binding is supported by repeated motifs. Finally, we describe unusually micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-sensitive nucleosomes at all RPG promoters, located between the canonical +1 and −1 nucleosomes, which coincide with sites of Fhl1/Ifh1 and Hmo1 binding. We speculate that these “fragile” nucleosomes play an important role in regulating RPG transcriptional output. PMID:25085421

  19. KLHL40 deficiency destabilizes thin filament proteins and promotes nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ankit; O'Rourke, Jason; Long, Chengzu; Doering, Jonathan; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Bezprozvannaya, Svetlana; Nelson, Benjamin R; Beetz, Nadine; Li, Lin; Chen, She; Laing, Nigel G; Grange, Robert W; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2014-08-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a congenital myopathy that can result in lethal muscle dysfunction and is thought to be a disease of the sarcomere thin filament. Recently, several proteins of unknown function have been implicated in NM, but the mechanistic basis of their contribution to disease remains unresolved. Here, we demonstrated that loss of a muscle-specific protein, kelch-like family member 40 (KLHL40), results in a nemaline-like myopathy in mice that closely phenocopies muscle abnormalities observed in KLHL40-deficient patients. We determined that KLHL40 localizes to the sarcomere I band and A band and binds to nebulin (NEB), a protein frequently implicated in NM, as well as a putative thin filament protein, leiomodin 3 (LMOD3). KLHL40 belongs to the BTB-BACK-kelch (BBK) family of proteins, some of which have been shown to promote degradation of their substrates. In contrast, we found that KLHL40 promotes stability of NEB and LMOD3 and blocks LMOD3 ubiquitination. Accordingly, NEB and LMOD3 were reduced in skeletal muscle of both Klhl40-/- mice and KLHL40-deficient patients. Loss of sarcomere thin filament proteins is a frequent cause of NM; therefore, our data that KLHL40 stabilizes NEB and LMOD3 provide a potential basis for the development of NM in KLHL40-deficient patients. PMID:24960163

  20. Effects of gene dosage, promoters, and substrates on unfolded protein stress of recombinant Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hohenblum, Hubertus; Gasser, Brigitte; Maurer, Michael; Borth, Nicole; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2004-02-20

    The expression of heterologous proteins may exert severe stress on the host cells at different levels. Depending on the specific features of the product, different steps may be rate-limiting. For the secretion of recombinant proteins from yeast cells, folding and disulfide bond formation were identified as rate-limiting in several cases and the induction of the chaperone BiP (binding protein) is described. During the development of Pichia pastoris strains secreting human trypsinogen, a severe limitation of the amount of secreted product was identified. Strains using either the AOX1 or the GAP promoter were compared at different gene copy numbers. With the constitutive GAP promoter, no effect on the expression level was observed, whereas with the inducible AOX1 promoter an increase of the copy number above two resulted in a decrease of expression. To identify whether part of the product remained in the cells, lysates were fractionated and significant amounts of the product were identified in the insoluble fraction containing the endoplasmic reticulum, while the soluble cytosolic fraction contained product only in clones using the GAP promoter. An increase of BiP was observed upon induction of expression, indicating that the intracellular product fraction exerts an unfolded protein response in the host cells. A strain using the GAP promoter was grown both on glucose and methanol and trypsinogen was identified in the insoluble fractions of both cultures, but only in the soluble fraction of the glucose grown cultures, indicating that the amounts and distribution of intracellularly retained product depends on the culture conditions, especially the carbon source. PMID:14755554

  1. The synaptonemal complex protein, Zip1, promotes the segregation of nonexchange chromosomes at meiosis I

    PubMed Central

    Newnham, Louise; Jordan, Philip; Rockmill, Beth; Roeder, G. Shirleen; Hoffmann, Eva

    2009-01-01

    Crossing over establishes connections between homologous chromosomes that promote their proper segregation at the first meiotic division. However, there exists a backup system to ensure the correct segregation of those chromosome pairs that fail to cross over. We have found that, in budding yeast, a mutation eliminating the synaptonemal complex protein, Zip1, increases the meiosis I nondisjunction rate of nonexchange chromosomes (NECs). The centromeres of NECs become tethered during meiotic prophase, and this tethering is disrupted by the zip1 mutation. Furthermore, the Zip1 protein often colocalizes to the centromeres of the tethered chromosomes, suggesting that Zip1 plays a direct role in holding NECs together. Zip3, a protein involved in the initiation of synaptonemal complex formation, is also important for NEC segregation. In the absence of Zip3, both the tethering of NECs and the localization of Zip1 to centromeres are impaired. A mutation in the MAD3 gene, which encodes a component of the spindle checkpoint, also increases the nondisjunction of NECs. Together, the zip1 and mad3 mutations have an additive effect, suggesting that these proteins act in parallel pathways to promote NEC segregation. We propose that Mad3 promotes the segregation of NECs that are not tethered by Zip1 at their centromeres. PMID:20080752

  2. Lamellipodin promotes actin assembly by clustering Ena/VASP proteins and tethering them to actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Scott D; Mullins, R Dyche

    2015-01-01

    Enabled/Vasodilator (Ena/VASP) proteins promote actin filament assembly at multiple locations, including: leading edge membranes, focal adhesions, and the surface of intracellular pathogens. One important Ena/VASP regulator is the mig-10/Lamellipodin/RIAM family of adaptors that promote lamellipod formation in fibroblasts and drive neurite outgrowth and axon guidance in neurons. To better understand how MRL proteins promote actin network formation we studied the interactions between Lamellipodin (Lpd), actin, and VASP, both in vivo and in vitro. We find that Lpd binds directly to actin filaments and that this interaction regulates its subcellular localization and enhances its effect on VASP polymerase activity. We propose that Lpd delivers Ena/VASP proteins to growing barbed ends and increases their polymerase activity by tethering them to filaments. This interaction represents one more pathway by which growing actin filaments produce positive feedback to control localization and activity of proteins that regulate their assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06585.001 PMID:26295568

  3. Efficient expression of protein coding genes from the murine U1 small nuclear RNA promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, J S; Sethna, M; Ramamurthy, L; Gowen, S A; Samulski, R J; Marzluff, W F

    1996-01-01

    Few promoters are active at high levels in all cells. Of these, the majority encode structural RNAs transcribed by RNA polymerases I or III and are not accessible for the expression of proteins. An exception are the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) transcribed by RNA polymerase II. Although snRNA biosynthesis is unique and thought not to be compatible with synthesis of functional mRNA, we have tested these promoters for their ability to express functional mRNAs. We have used the murine U1a and U1b snRNA gene promoters to express the Escherichia coli lacZ gene and the human alpha-globin gene from either episomal or integrated templates by transfection, or infection into a variety of mammalian cell types. Equivalent expression of beta-galactosidase was obtained from < 250 nucleotides of 5'-flanking sequence containing the complete promoter of either U1 snRNA gene or from the 750-nt cytomegalovirus promoter and enhancer regions. The mRNA was accurately initiated at the U1 start site, efficiently spliced and polyadenylylated, and localized to polyribosomes. Recombinant adenovirus containing the U1b-lacZ chimeric gene transduced and expressed beta-galactosidase efficiently in human 293 cells and airway epithelial cells in culture. Viral vectors containing U1 snRNA promoters may be an attractive alternative to vectors containing viral promoters for persistent high-level expression of therapeutic genes or proteins. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8799116

  4. Structural insights into de novo actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Summary Many cellular functions depend on rapid and localized actin polymerization/depolymerization. Yet, the de novo polymerization of actin in cells is kinetically unfavorable because of the instability of polymerization intermediates (small actin oligomers) and the actions of actin monomer binding proteins. Cells use filament nucleation and elongation factors to initiate and sustain polymerization. Structural biology is beginning to shed light on the diverse mechanisms by which these unrelated proteins initiate polymerization, undergo regulation, and mediate the transition of monomeric actin onto actin filaments. A prominent role is played by the W domain, which in some of these proteins occurs in tandem repeats that recruit multiple actin subunits. Pro-rich regions are also abundant and mediate the binding of profilin-actin complexes, which are the main source of polymerization competent actin in cells. Filament nucleation and elongation factors frequently interact with Rho family GTPases, which relay signals from membrane receptors to regulate actin cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:20096561

  5. Preparation of Cation-Exchange Particle Designed for High-Speed Collection of Proteins by Radiation-Induced Graft Polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Yuta; Shimoda, Yuichi; Umeno, Daisuke; Saito, Kyoichi; Furumoto, Goro; Shirataki, Hironobu; Shinohara, Naoyuki; Kubota, Noboru

    A cation-exchange polymer brush was immobilized onto a polyethylene-based particle with an average diameter of 35 μm by radiation-induced graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and subsequent sulfonation with sodium sulfite. A lysozyme solution was forced to flow through a bed (height 2 cm, cross-sectional area 0.61 cm2) charged with the resultant cation-exchange particles at a space velocity ranging from 500 to 2300 h-1. From a viewpoint of equilibrium binding capacity and elution percentage of lysozyme, the dose of electron beam and the degree of GMA grafting were optimized to be 200 kGy and 100%, respectively. The bed exhibited a constant dynamic binding capacity of lysozyme 14 mg⁄mL irrespective of space velocity due to negligible diffusional mass-transfer resistance.

  6. Identification and Analysis of Regulatory Elements in Porcine Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Gene Promoter.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qianhui; Wang, Yaxian; Wang, Huayan

    2015-10-27

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) is secreted by the mammalian oocytes and is indispensable for ovarian follicular development, ovulation, and fertility. To determine the regulation mechanism of BMP15 gene, the regulatory sequence of porcine BMP15 was investigated in this study. The cloned BMP15 promoter retains the cell-type specificity, and is activated in cells derived from ovarian tissue. The luciferase assays in combination with a series of deletion of BMP15 promoter sequence show that the -427 to -376 bp region of BMP15 promoter is the primary regulatory element, in which there are a number of transcription factor binding sites, including LIM homeobox 8 (LHX8), newborn ovary homeobox gene (NOBOX), and paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 1 (PITX1). Determination of tissue-specific expression reveals that LHX8, but not PITX1 and NOBOX, is exclusively expressed in pig ovary tissue and is translocated into the cell nuclei. Overexpression of LHX8 in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells could significantly promote BMP15 promoter activation. This study confirms a key regulatory element that is located in the proximal region of BMP15 promoter and is regulated by the LHX8 factor.

  7. Promoter Identification and Transcription Analysis of Penicillin-Binding Protein Genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae R6

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Katharina; Pipo, Julia; Schweizer, Inga; Hakenbeck, Regine

    2016-01-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are membrane-associated enzymes, which are involved in the last two steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, and some of them are key players in cell division. Furthermore, they are targets of β-lactams, the most widely used antibiotics. Nevertheless, very little is known about the expression and regulation of PBP genes. Using transcriptional mapping, we now determined the promoter regions of PBP genes from the laboratory strain Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 and examined the expression profile of these six promoters. The extended −10 region is highly conserved and complies with a σA-type promoter consensus sequence. In contrast, the −35 region is poorly conserved, indicating the possibility for differential PBP regulation. All PBP promoters were constitutively expressed and highly active during the exponential and early stationary growth phase. However, the individual expression of PBP promoters varied approximately fourfold, with pbp1a being the highest and pbp3 the lowest. Furthermore, the deletion of one nucleotide in the spacer region of the PBP3 promoter reduced pbp3 expression ∼10-fold. The addition of cefotaxime above the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) did not affect PBP expression in the penicillin-sensitive R6 strain. No evidence for regulation of S. pneumoniae PBP genes was obtained. PMID:27409661

  8. Identification and Analysis of Regulatory Elements in Porcine Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Gene Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qianhui; Wang, Yaxian; Wang, Huayan

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) is secreted by the mammalian oocytes and is indispensable for ovarian follicular development, ovulation, and fertility. To determine the regulation mechanism of BMP15 gene, the regulatory sequence of porcine BMP15 was investigated in this study. The cloned BMP15 promoter retains the cell-type specificity, and is activated in cells derived from ovarian tissue. The luciferase assays in combination with a series of deletion of BMP15 promoter sequence show that the −427 to −376 bp region of BMP15 promoter is the primary regulatory element, in which there are a number of transcription factor binding sites, including LIM homeobox 8 (LHX8), newborn ovary homeobox gene (NOBOX), and paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 1 (PITX1). Determination of tissue-specific expression reveals that LHX8, but not PITX1 and NOBOX, is exclusively expressed in pig ovary tissue and is translocated into the cell nuclei. Overexpression of LHX8 in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells could significantly promote BMP15 promoter activation. This study confirms a key regulatory element that is located in the proximal region of BMP15 promoter and is regulated by the LHX8 factor. PMID:26516845

  9. Production and properties of health-promoting proteins and peptides from bovine colostrum and milk.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, H J

    2013-01-01

    The high nutritive value and diverse functional properties of milk proteins are well known. Beyond these qualities, milk proteins have attracted growing scientific and commercial interest as a source of biologically active molecules. Such proteins are found in abundance in colostrum which is the initial milk secreted by mammalian species during late pregnancy and the first few days after birth of the offspring. The best characterized colostrum-based bioactive proteins include alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase and growth factors. All of them can nowadays be enriched and purified on an industrial scale from bovine colostral whey or cheese whey. These native proteins exhibit a wide range of biological activities that are known to affect the digestive function, metabolic responses to absorbed nutrients, growth and development of organs and disease resistance. Also, some of these proteins may prove beneficial in reduction of the risks of chronic human diseases reflected by the metabolic syndrome. It is speculated that such potentially beneficial effects are partially attributed to bioactive peptides derived from intact proteins. These peptides can be liberated during gastrointestinal digestion or fermentation of milk by starter cultures. The efficacy of a few peptides has been established in animal and human studies and the number of commercial products supplemented with specific milk peptides is envisaged to increase on global markets. Bovine colostrum appears as a highly potential source of biologically active native proteins and peptide fractions for inclusion as health-promoting ingredients in various food applications. PMID:24200017

  10. Proneural proteins Achaete and Scute associate with nuclear actin to promote formation of external sensory organs.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yun-Ling; Chen, Yu-Ju; Chang, Yi-Jie; Yeh, Hsiao-Fong; Huang, Yi-Chun; Pi, Haiwei

    2014-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proneural proteins promote neurogenesis through transcriptional regulation. Although much is known about the tissue-specific regulation of proneural gene expression, how proneural proteins interact with transcriptional machinery to activate downstream target genes is less clear. Drosophila proneural proteins Achaete (Ac) and Scute (Sc) induce external sensory organ formation by activating neural precursor gene expression. Through co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometric analyses, we found that nuclear but not cytoplasmic actin associated with the Ac and Sc proteins in Drosophila S2 cells. Daughterless (Da), the common heterodimeric partner of Drosophila bHLH proteins, was observed to associate with nuclear actin through proneural proteins. A yeast two-hybrid assay revealed that the binding specificity between actin and Ac or Sc was conserved in yeast nuclei without the presence of additional Drosophila factors. We further show that actin is required in external sensory organ formation. Reduction in actin gene activity impaired proneural-protein-dependent expression of the neural precursor genes, as well as formation of neural precursors. Furthermore, increased nuclear actin levels, obtained by expression of nucleus-localized actin, elevated Ac-Da-dependent gene transcription as well as Ac-mediated external sensory organ formation. Taken together, our in vivo and in vitro observations suggest a novel link for actin in proneural-protein-mediated transcriptional activation and neural precursor differentiation.

  11. Aberrant Glycosylation of Plasma Proteins in Severe Preeclampsia Promotes Monocyte Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Kazanjian, Avedis A.; Tinnemore, Deborah; Gafken, Philip R.; Ogata, Yuko; Napolitano, Peter G.; Stallings, Jonathan D.; Ippolito, Danielle L.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation of plasma proteins increases during pregnancy. Our objectives were to investigate an anti-inflammatory role of these proteins in normal pregnancies and determine whether aberrant protein glycosylation promotes monocyte adhesion in preeclampsia. Plasma was prospectively collected from nonpregnant controls and nulliparous patients in all 3 trimesters. Patients were divided into cohorts based on the applicable postpartum diagnosis. U937 monocytes were preconditioned with enzymatically deglycosylated plasma, and monocyte adhesion to endothelial cell monolayers was quantified by spectrophotometry. Plasma from nonpregnant controls, first trimester normotensives, and first trimester patients with mild preeclampsia inhibited monocyte–endothelial cell adhesion (P < .05), but plasma from first trimester patients with severe preeclampsia and second and third trimester normotensives did not. Deglycosylating plasma proteins significantly increased adhesion in all the cohorts. These results support a role of plasma glycoprotein interaction in monocyte–endothelial cell adhesion and could suggest a novel therapeutic target for severe preeclampsia. PMID:23757314

  12. PROMOT: a FORTRAN program to scan protein sequences against a library of known motifs.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, M J

    1991-04-01

    Information about the three-dimensional structure or function of a newly determined protein sequence can be obtained if the protein is found to contain a characterized motif or pattern of residues. Recently a database (PROSITE) has been established that contains 337 known motifs encoded as a list of allowed residue types at specific positions along the sequence. PROMOT is a FORTRAN computer program that takes a protein sequence and examines if it contains any of the motifs in PROSITE. The program also extends the definitions of patterns beyond those used in PROSITE to provide a simple, yet flexible, method to scan either a PROSITE or a user-defined pattern against a protein sequence database.

  13. Phage phi 29 regulatory protein p4 stabilizes the binding of the RNA polymerase to the late promoter in a process involving direct protein-protein contacts.

    PubMed

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1992-12-01

    Transcription from the late promoter, PA3, of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 is activated by the viral regulatory protein p4. A kinetic analysis of the activation process has revealed that the role of protein p4 is to stabilize the binding of RNA polymerase to the promoter as a closed complex without significantly affecting further steps of the initiation process. Electrophoretic band-shift assays performed with a DNA fragment spanning only the protein p4 binding site showed that RNA polymerase could efficiently retard the complex formed by protein p4 bound to the DNA. Similarly, when a DNA fragment containing only the RNA polymerase-binding region of PA3 was used, p4 greatly stimulated the binding of RNA polymerase to the DNA. These results strongly suggest that p4 and RNA polymerase contact each other at the PA3 promoter. In the light of current knowledge of the p4 activation mechanism, we propose that direct contacts between the two proteins participate in the activation process.

  14. Zinc-Induced Polymerization of Killer-Cell Ig-like Receptor into Filaments Promotes Its Inhibitory Function at Cytotoxic Immunological Synapses.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Rajagopalan, Sumati; Sarkar, Pabak; Dorward, David W; Peterson, Mary E; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Guillermier, Christelle; Steinhauser, Matthew L; Vogel, Steven S; Long, Eric O

    2016-04-01

    The inhibitory function of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) that bind HLA-C and block activation of human natural killer (NK) cells is dependent on zinc. We report that zinc induced the assembly of soluble KIR into filamentous polymers, as detected by electron microscopy, which depolymerized after zinc chelation. Similar KIR filaments were isolated from lysates of cells treated with zinc, and membrane protrusions enriched in zinc were detected on whole cells by scanning electron microscopy and imaging mass spectrometry. Two independent mutations in the extracellular domain of KIR, away from the HLA-C binding site, impaired zinc-driven polymerization and inhibitory function. KIR filaments formed spontaneously, without the addition of zinc, at functional inhibitory immunological synapses of NK cells with HLA-C(+) cells. Adding to the recent paradigm of signal transduction through higher order molecular assemblies, zinc-induced polymerization of inhibitory KIR represents an unusual mode of signaling by a receptor at the cell surface.

  15. A biodegradable polymeric system for peptide-protein delivery assembled with porous microspheres and nanoparticles, using an adsorption/infiltration process.

    PubMed

    Alcalá-Alcalá, Sergio; Urbán-Morlán, Zaida; Aguilar-Rosas, Irene; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2013-01-01

    A biodegradable polymeric system is proposed for formulating peptides and proteins. The systems were assembled through the adsorption of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles onto porous, biodegradable microspheres by an adsorption/infiltration process with the use of an immersion method. The peptide drug is not involved in the manufacturing of the nanoparticles or in obtaining the microspheres; thus, contact with the organic solvent, interfaces, and shear forces required for the process are prevented during drug loading. Leuprolide acetate was used as the model peptide, and poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was used as the biodegradable polymer. Leuprolide was adsorbed onto different amounts of PLGA nanoparticles (25 mg/mL, 50 mg/mL, 75 mg/mL, and 100 mg/mL) in a first stage; then, these were infiltrated into porous PLGA microspheres (100 mg) by dipping the structures into a microsphere suspension. In this way, the leuprolide was adsorbed onto both surfaces (ie, nanoparticles and microspheres). Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed the formation of a nanoparticle film on the porous microsphere surface that becomes more continuous as the amount of infiltrated nanoparticles increases. The adsorption efficiency and release rate are dependent on the amount of adsorbed nanoparticles. As expected, a greater adsorption efficiency (~95%) and a slower release rate were seen (~20% of released leuprolide in 12 hours) when a larger amount of nanoparticles was adsorbed (100 mg/mL of nanoparticles). Leuprolide acetate begins to be released immediately when there are no infiltrated nanoparticles, and 90% of the peptide is released in the first 12 hours. In contrast, the systems assembled in this study released less than 44% of the loaded drug during the same period of time. The observed release profiles denoted a Fickian diffusion that fit Higuchi's model (t(1/2)). The manufacturing process presented here may be useful as a potential alternative for formulating

  16. The transcription factor ATF2 promotes melanoma metastasis by suppressing protein fucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Eric; Feng, Yongmei; Claps, Giuseppina; Fukuda, Michiko N.; Perlina, Ally; Donn, Dylan; Jilaveanu, Lucia; Kluger, Harriet; Freeze, Hudson H.; Ronai, Ze’ev A.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most lethal skin cancers worldwide, primarily because of its propensity to metastasize. Thus, the elucidation of mechanisms that govern metastatic propensity is urgently needed. We found that protein kinase Cε (PKCε)–mediated activation of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) controls the migratory and invasive behaviors of melanoma cells. PKCε-dependent phosphorylation of ATF2 promoted its transcriptional repression of the gene encoding fucokinase (FUK), which mediates the fucose salvage pathway and thus global cellular protein fucosylation. In primary melanocytes and cell lines representing early-stage melanoma, the abundance of PKCε-phosphorylated ATF2 was low, thereby enabling the expression of FUK and cellular protein fucosylation, which promoted cellular adhesion and reduced motility. In contrast, increased expression of the gene encoding PKCε and abundance of phosphorylated, transcriptionally active ATF2 were observed in advanced-stage melanomas and correlated with decreased FUK expression, decreased cellular protein fucosylation, attenuated cell adhesion, and increased cell motility. Restoring fucosylation in mice either by dietary fucose supplementation or by genetic manipulation of murine Fuk expression attenuated primary melanoma growth, increased the number of intratumoral natural killer cells, and decreased distal metastasis in murine isograft models. Tumor microarray analysis of human melanoma specimens confirmed reduced fucosylation in metastatic tumors and a better prognosis for primary melanomas that had high abundance of fucosylation. Thus, inhibiting PKCε or ATF2 or increasing protein fucosylation in tumor cells may improve clinical outcome in melanoma patients. PMID:26645581

  17. Ets-1 facilitates nuclear entry of NFAT proteins and their recruitment to the IL-2 promoter.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Hsiao-Wei; Tai, Tzong-Shyuan; Tseng, William; Chang, Hui-Hsin; Grenningloh, Roland; Miaw, Shi-Chuen; Ho, I-Cheng

    2013-09-24

    E26 transformation-specific sequence 1 (Ets-1), the prototype of the ETS family of transcription factors, is critical for the expression of IL-2 by murine Th cells; however, its mechanism of action is still unclear. Here we show that Ets-1 is also essential for optimal production of IL-2 by primary human Th cells. Although Ets-1 negatively regulates the expression of Blimp1, a known suppressor of IL-2 expression, ablation of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1) does not rescue the expression of IL-2 by Ets-1-deficient Th cells. Instead, Ets-1 physically and functionally interacts with the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and is required for the recruitment of NFAT to the IL-2 promoter. In addition, Ets-1 is located in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of resting Th cells. Nuclear Ets-1 quickly exits the nucleus in response to calcium-dependent signals and competes with NFAT proteins for binding to protein components of noncoding RNA repressor of NFAT complex (NRON), which serves as a cytoplasmic trap for phosphorylated NFAT proteins. This nuclear exit of Ets-1 precedes rapid nuclear entry of NFAT and Ets-1 deficiency results in impaired nuclear entry, but not dephosphorylation, of NFAT proteins. Thus, Ets-1 promotes the expression of IL-2 by modulating the activity of NFAT.

  18. Golgi protein 73 activation of MMP-13 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Jin, Di; Tao, Jun; Li, Dan; Wang, Yanan; Li, Li; Hu, Zhongdong; Zhou, Zhenzhen; Chang, Xiuli; Qu, Chunfeng; Zhang, Hongbing

    2015-10-20

    Golgi Protein 73 (GP73) is a serum biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), however its role in HCC is not clear. We report that GP73 promotes cell invasion, the hallmark of malignancy, through the upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13). GP73 enhances MMP-13 expression through cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB)-mediated transcription activation. Levels of GP73 and MMP-13 are increased and positively correlated in human HCC tissues. Augmented MMP-13 potentiates HCC cell metastasis. Thus, the GP73-CREB-MMP-13 axis potentiates cancer cell invasion and may be a target for HCC treatment. PMID:26378022

  19. Golgi protein 73 activation of MMP-13 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Wang, Yanan; Li, Li; Hu, Zhongdong; Zhou, Zhenzhen; Chang, Xiuli; Qu, Chunfeng; Zhang, Hongbing

    2015-01-01

    Golgi Protein 73 (GP73) is a serum biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), however its role in HCC is not clear. We report that GP73 promotes cell invasion, the hallmark of malignancy, through the upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13). GP73 enhances MMP-13 expression through cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB)-mediated transcription activation. Levels of GP73 and MMP-13 are increased and positively correlated in human HCC tissues. Augmented MMP-13 potentiates HCC cell metastasis. Thus, the GP73-CREB-MMP-13 axis potentiates cancer cell invasion and may be a target for HCC treatment. PMID:26378022

  20. The promoter of filamentation (POF1) protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an ATPase involved in the protein quality control process

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The gene YCL047C, which has been renamed promoter of filamentation gene (POF1), has recently been described as a cell component involved in yeast filamentous growth. The objective of this work is to understand the molecular and biological function of this gene. Results Here, we report that the protein encoded by the POF1 gene, Pof1p, is an ATPase that may be part of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein quality control pathway. According to the results, Δpof1 cells showed increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, heat shock and protein unfolding agents, such as dithiothreitol and tunicamycin. Besides, the overexpression of POF1 suppressed the sensitivity of Δpct1, a strain that lacks a gene that encodes a phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, to heat shock. In vitro analysis showed, however, that the purified Pof1p enzyme had no cytidylyltransferase activity but does have ATPase activity, with catalytic efficiency comparable to other ATPases involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation of proteins (ERAD). Supporting these findings, co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed a physical interaction between Pof1p and Ubc7p (an ubiquitin conjugating enzyme) in vivo. Conclusions Taken together, the results strongly suggest that the biological function of Pof1p is related to the regulation of protein degradation. PMID:22204397

  1. Interaction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha and beta with the rat caeruloplasmin gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Bingle, C D; Fleming, R E; Gitlin, J D

    1993-01-01

    To determine the mechanisms of expression of the rat caeruloplasmin gene, the promoter region was analysed by DNAase I footprinting. Using nuclear extract from rat liver, a prominent site of protein-DNA interaction was detected from -93 to -48 upstream of the caeruloplasmin gene transcription start and sequence analysis of this region revealed three potential CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) consensus elements. Mobility-shift analysis using an oligonucleotide encoding this region identified specific binding of proteins from rat liver nuclear extract, and some of these complexes were supershifted using antisera to the C/EBP alpha and beta family members. Mobility-shift studies using a polypeptide encoding the DNA-binding domain of C/EBP alpha also revealed a specific interaction with this region of the caeruloplasmin promoter, and DNAase I footprinting using this polypeptide protected the identical region from -93 to -48. Co-transfection of expression plasmids encoding C/EBP alpha or a related leucine-zipper factor D-binding protein (DBP) revealed a C/EBP-specific increase in reporter gene activity in HepG2 cells transfected with caeruloplasmin-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase containing the -93 to -48 region. A similar result was obtained when these constructs were co-transfected into mouse L cells which were shown not to express the endogenous caeruloplasmin gene. Taken together, these data indicate a role for C/EBP alpha and beta in mediating transcription from the caeruloplasmin gene promoter and suggest that this region of the promoter is not responsible for tissue-specific expression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8373362

  2. Recombination-stable multimeric green fluorescent protein for characterization of weak promoter outputs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Knuf, Christoph; Förster, Jochen; Sommer, Morten O A

    2015-12-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are widely used for visualization of proteins to track localization and expression dynamics. However, phenotypically important processes can operate at too low expression levels for routine detection, i.e. be overshadowed by autofluorescence noise. While GFP functions well in translational fusions, the use of tandem GFPs to amplify fluorescence signals is currently avoided in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and many other microorganisms due to the risk of loop-out by direct-repeat recombination. We increased GFP fluorescence by translationally fusing three different GFP variants, yeast-enhanced GFP, GFP+ and superfolder GFP to yield a sequence-diverged triple GFP molecule 3vGFP with 74-84% internal repeat identity. Unlike a single GFP, the brightness of 3vGFP allowed characterization of a weak promoter in S. cerevisiae. Utilizing 3vGFP, we further engineered a less leaky Cu(2+)-inducible promoter based on CUP1. The basal expression level of the new promoter was approximately 61% below the wild-type CUP1 promoter, thus expanding the absolute range of Cu(2+)-based gene control. The stability of 3vGFP towards direct-repeat recombination was assayed in S. cerevisiae cultured for 25 generations under strong and slightly toxic expression after which only limited reduction in fluorescence was detectable. Such non-recombinogenic GFPs can help quantify intracellular responses operating a low copy number in recombination-prone organisms.

  3. TACC3 is a microtubule plus end-tracking protein that promotes axon elongation and also regulates microtubule plus end dynamics in multiple embryonic cell types.

    PubMed

    Nwagbara, Belinda U; Faris, Anna E; Bearce, Elizabeth A; Erdogan, Burcu; Ebbert, Patrick T; Evans, Matthew F; Rutherford, Erin L; Enzenbacher, Tiffany B; Lowery, Laura Anne

    2014-11-01

    Microtubule plus end dynamics are regulated by a conserved family of proteins called plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs). It is unclear how various +TIPs interact with each other and with plus ends to control microtubule behavior. The centrosome-associated protein TACC3, a member of the transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) domain family, has been implicated in regulating several aspects of microtubule dynamics. However, TACC3 has not been shown to function as a +TIP in vertebrates. Here we show that TACC3 promotes axon outgrowth and regulates microtubule dynamics by increasing microtubule plus end velocities in vivo. We also demonstrate that TACC3 acts as a +TIP in multiple embryonic cell types and that this requires the conserved C-terminal TACC domain. Using high-resolution live-imaging data on tagged +TIPs, we show that TACC3 localizes to the extreme microtubule plus end, where it lies distal to the microtubule polymerization marker EB1 and directly overlaps with the microtubule polymerase XMAP215. TACC3 also plays a role in regulating XMAP215 stability and localizing XMAP215 to microtubule plus ends. Taken together, our results implicate TACC3 as a +TIP that functions with XMAP215 to regulate microtubule plus end dynamics.

  4. Genomic structure, gene expression, and promoter analysis of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 7

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Hsin-Hsin; Chang, Ming-Shi; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Huang, Jin-Ding

    2002-03-15

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) subfamily transporters associated with anticancer drug efflux are attributed to the multidrug-resistance of cancer cells. The genomic organization of human multidrug resistance-associated protein 7 (MRP7) was identified. The human MRP7 gene, consisting of 22 exons and 21 introns, greatly differs from other members of the human MRP subfamily. A splicing variant of human MRP7, MRP7A, expressed in most human tissues, was also characterized. The 1.93-kb promoter region of MRP7 was isolated and shown to support luciferase activity at a level 4- to 5-fold greater than that of the SV40 promoter. Basal MRP7 gene expression was regulated by 2 regions in the 5-flanking region at 1,780 1,287 bp, and at 611 to 208 bp. In Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, MRP7 promoter activity was increased by 226 percent by genotoxic 2-acetylaminofluorene and 347 percent by the histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A. The protein was expressed in the membrane fraction of transfected MDCK cells.

  5. The effect of polymer surface modification on polymer-protein interaction via interfacial polymerization and hydrophilic polymer grafting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein membrane separation is prone to fouling on the membrane surface resulting from protein adsorption onto the surface. Surface modification of synthetic membranes is one way to reduce fouling. We investigated surface modification of polyethersulfone (PES) as a way of improving hydrophilicity ...

  6. Coxiella burnetii Effector Proteins That Localize to the Parasitophorous Vacuole Membrane Promote Intracellular Replication

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Charles L.; Beare, Paul A.; Voth, Daniel E.; Howe, Dale; Cockrell, Diane C.; Bastidas, Robert J.; Valdivia, Raphael H.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii directs biogenesis of a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that acquires host endolysosomal components. Formation of a PV that supports C. burnetii replication requires a Dot/Icm type 4B secretion system (T4BSS) that delivers bacterial effector proteins into the host cell cytosol. Thus, a subset of T4BSS effectors are presumed to direct PV biogenesis. Recently, the PV-localized effector protein CvpA was found to promote C. burnetii intracellular growth and PV expansion. We predict additional C. burnetii effectors localize to the PV membrane and regulate eukaryotic vesicle trafficking events that promote pathogen growth. To identify these vacuolar effector proteins, a list of predicted C. burnetii T4BSS substrates was compiled using bioinformatic criteria, such as the presence of eukaryote-like coiled-coil domains. Adenylate cyclase translocation assays revealed 13 proteins were secreted in a Dot/Icm-dependent fashion by C. burnetii during infection of human THP-1 macrophages. Four of the Dot/Icm substrates, termed Coxiella vacuolar protein B (CvpB), CvpC, CvpD, and CvpE, labeled the PV membrane and LAMP1-positive vesicles when ectopically expressed as fluorescently tagged fusion proteins. C. burnetii ΔcvpB, ΔcvpC, ΔcvpD, and ΔcvpE mutants exhibited significant defects in intracellular replication and PV formation. Genetic complementation of the ΔcvpD and ΔcvpE mutants rescued intracellular growth and PV generation, whereas the growth of C. burnetii ΔcvpB and ΔcvpC was rescued upon cohabitation with wild-type bacteria in a common PV. Collectively, these data indicate C. burnetii encodes multiple effector proteins that target the PV membrane and benefit pathogen replication in human macrophages. PMID:25422265

  7. Promoter and signal sequence from filamentous fungus can drive recombinant protein production in the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Aravind; Sukumaran, Rajeev K

    2014-08-01

    Cross-recognition of promoters from filamentous fungi in yeast can have important consequences towards developing fungal expression systems, especially for the rapid evaluation of their efficacy. A truncated 510bp inducible Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (cbh1) promoter was tested for the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Kluyveromyces lactis after disrupting its native β-galactosidase (lac4) promoter. The efficiency of the CBH1 secretion signal was also evaluated by fusing it to the lac4 promoter of the yeast, which significantly increased the secretion of recombinant protein in K. lactis compared to the native α-mating factor secretion signal. The fungal promoter is demonstrated to have potential to drive heterologous protein production in K. lactis; and the small sized T. reesei cbh1 secretion signal can mediate the protein secretion in K. lactis with high efficiency. PMID:24661814

  8. The pseudorabies immediate early protein stimulates in vitro transcription by facilitating TFIID: promoter interactions.

    PubMed

    Abmayr, S M; Workman, J L; Roeder, R G

    1988-05-01

    The pseudorabies virus immediate early (IE) protein, partially purified from infected HeLa cells, stimulated transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II and associated factors in HeLa nuclear extracts. This stimulation was maximal at low template concentrations, where the basal level of transcription was also low. In an analysis of the limitations on transcription under these conditions, it was found that transcription could be increased drastically not only by IE addition but also by (1) the addition of nonpromoter-containing DNA, which titrated nonspecific DNA-binding proteins in the crude nuclear extract, and (2) preincubation of the template with either the nuclear extract (in the absence of Mg2+) or with the TATA box-binding factor, TFIID. These results suggest that in the absence of IE, nonspecific DNA-binding proteins competed with TFIID for binding to the promoter, thus making TFIID: promoter interactions limiting for transcription. The stimulation of transcription effected by IE was essentially the same as that observed following preassociation of TFIID with the template or by titration of nonspecific DNA-binding proteins. Moreover, the presence of IE under the latter conditions did not stimulate transcription further. These observations strongly suggest that all of these manipulations affected the same limiting step and, thus, that IE accentuated the rate or extent of formation of a preinitiation complex involving the TATA factor, rather than subsequent initiation or elongation steps.

  9. A liver stress-endocrine nexus promotes metabolic integrity during dietary protein dilution.

    PubMed

    Maida, Adriano; Zota, Annika; Sjøberg, Kim A; Schumacher, Jonas; Sijmonsma, Tjeerd P; Pfenninger, Anja; Christensen, Marie M; Gantert, Thomas; Fuhrmeister, Jessica; Rothermel, Ulrike; Schmoll, Dieter; Heikenwälder, Mathias; Iovanna, Juan L; Stemmer, Kerstin; Kiens, Bente; Herzig, Stephan; Rose, Adam J

    2016-09-01

    Dietary protein intake is linked to an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Although dietary protein dilution (DPD) can slow the progression of some aging-related disorders, whether this strategy affects the development and risk for obesity-associated metabolic disease such as T2D is unclear. Here, we determined that DPD in mice and humans increases serum markers of metabolic health. In lean mice, DPD promoted metabolic inefficiency by increasing carbohydrate and fat oxidation. In nutritional and polygenic murine models of obesity, DPD prevented and curtailed the development of impaired glucose homeostasis independently of obesity and food intake. DPD-mediated metabolic inefficiency and improvement of glucose homeostasis were independent of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), but required expression of liver-derived fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) in both lean and obese mice. FGF21 expression and secretion as well as the associated metabolic remodeling induced by DPD also required induction of liver-integrated stress response-driven nuclear protein 1 (NUPR1). Insufficiency of select nonessential amino acids (NEAAs) was necessary and adequate for NUPR1 and subsequent FGF21 induction and secretion in hepatocytes in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that DPD promotes improved glucose homeostasis through an NEAA insufficiency-induced liver NUPR1/FGF21 axis. PMID:27548521

  10. Extracellular Matrix Protein-Coated Scaffolds Promote the Reversal of Diabetes After Extrahepatic Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Salvay, David M.; Rives, Christopher B.; Zhang, Xiaomin; Chen, Fei; Kaufman, Dixon B.; Lowe, William L.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2008-01-01

    Background The survival and function of transplanted pancreatic islets is limited, owing in part to disruption of islet-matrix attachments during the isolation procedure. Using polymer scaffolds as a platform for islet transplantation, we investigated the hypothesis that replacement of key extracellular matrix components known to surround islets in vivo would improve graft function at an extrahepatic implantation site. Methods Microporous polymer scaffolds fabricated from copolymers of lactide and glycolide were adsorbed with collagen IV, fibronectin, laminin-332 or serum proteins before seeding with 125 mouse islets. Islet-seeded scaffolds were then implanted onto the epididymal fat pad of syngeneic mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Nonfasting glucose levels, weight gain, response to glucose challenges, and histology were used to assess graft function for 10 months after transplantation. Results Mice transplanted with islets seeded onto scaffolds adsorbed with collagen IV achieved euglycemia fastest and their response to glucose challenge was similar to normal mice. Fibronectin and laminin similarly promoted euglycemia, yet required more time than collagen IV and less time than serum. Histopathological assessment of retrieved grafts demonstrated that coating scaffolds with specific extracellular matrix proteins increased total islet area in the sections and vessel density within the transplanted islets, relative to controls. Conclusions Extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed to microporous scaffolds can enhance the function of transplanted islets, with collagen IV maximizing graft function relative to the other proteins tested. These scaffolds enable the creation of well-defined microenvironments that promote graft efficacy at extrahepatic sites. PMID:18497687

  11. Promoters from genes for plastid proteins possess regions with different sensitivities toward red and blue light.

    PubMed Central

    Lübberstedt, T; Bolle, C E; Sopory, S; Flieger, K; Herrmann, R G; Oelmüller, R

    1994-01-01

    The light-regulated expression of eight nuclear-encoded genes for plastid proteins from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) (RBCS-1 and CAB-1; ATPC and ATPD, encoding the subunits gamma and delta of the ATP synthase; PC and FNR; PSAD and PSAF, encoding the subunits II and III of photosystem I reaction center) was analyzed with promoter/beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene fusions in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana plumbaginifolia) seedlings and mature plants under standardized light and growth conditions. Unique response patterns were found for each of these promoters. GUS activities differed more than 30-fold. Strong promoters were found for the PC and PSAD genes. On the other hand, the ATPC promoter was relatively weak. Expression of the CAB/GUS gene fusion in etiolated material was at the detection limit; all other chimeric genes were expressed in the dark as well. Light stimulation of GUS activities ranged from 3- (FNR promoter) to more than 100-fold (CAB-1 promoter). The FNR promoter responded only to red light (RL) and not significantly to blue light (BL), whereas the PC promoter contained regions with different sensitivities toward RL and BL. Furthermore, different RNA accumulation kinetics were observed for the PSAF, CAB, FNR, and PC promoter/GUS gene fusions during de-etiolation, which, at least in the case of the PSAF gene, differed from the regulation of the corresponding endogenous genes in spinach and tobacco. The results suggest either that not all cis elements determining light-regulated and quantitative expression are present on the spinach promoter fragments used or that the spinach cis-regulatory elements respond differently to the host (tobacco) regulatory pathway(s). Furthermore, as in tobacco, but not in spinach, the trans-gene hardly responds to single light pulses that operate through phytochrome. Taken together, the results suggest that the genes have been independently translocated from the organelle to the nucleus during phylogeny

  12. RecA protein promotes the regression of stalled replication forks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Robu, M E; Inman, R B; Cox, M M

    2001-07-17

    Replication forks are halted by many types of DNA damage. At the site of a leading-strand DNA lesion, forks may stall and leave the lesion in a single-strand gap. Fork regression is the first step in several proposed pathways that permit repair without generating a double-strand break. Using model DNA substrates designed to mimic one of the known structures of a fork stalled at a leading-strand lesion, we show here that RecA protein of Escherichia coli will promote a fork regression reaction in vitro. The regression process exhibits an absolute requirement for ATP hydrolysis and is enhanced when dATP replaces ATP. The reaction is not affected by the inclusion of the RecO and R proteins. We present this reaction as one of several potential RecA protein roles in the repair of stalled and/or collapsed replication forks in bacteria. PMID:11459955

  13. Gadd45a Protein Promotes Skeletal Muscle Atrophy by Forming a Complex with the Protein Kinase MEKK4*♦

    PubMed Central

    Bullard, Steven A.; Seo, Seongjin; Schilling, Birgit; Dyle, Michael C.; Dierdorff, Jason M.; Ebert, Scott M.; DeLau, Austin D.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Adams, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a serious and highly prevalent condition that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Previous work found that skeletal muscle atrophy involves an increase in skeletal muscle Gadd45a expression, which is necessary and sufficient for skeletal muscle fiber atrophy. However, the direct mechanism by which Gadd45a promotes skeletal muscle atrophy was unknown. To address this question, we biochemically isolated skeletal muscle proteins that associate with Gadd45a as it induces atrophy in mouse skeletal muscle fibers in vivo. We found that Gadd45a interacts with multiple proteins in skeletal muscle fibers, including, most prominently, MEKK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase that was not previously known to play a role in skeletal muscle atrophy. Furthermore, we found that, by forming a complex with MEKK4 in skeletal muscle fibers, Gadd45a increases MEKK4 protein kinase activity, which is both sufficient to induce skeletal muscle fiber atrophy and required for Gadd45a-mediated skeletal muscle fiber atrophy. Together, these results identify a direct biochemical mechanism by which Gadd45a induces skeletal muscle atrophy and provide new insight into the way that skeletal muscle atrophy occurs at the molecular level. PMID:27358404

  14. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus envelope protein ion channel activity promotes virus fitness and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Torres, Jose L; DeDiego, Marta L; Verdiá-Báguena, Carmina; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Regla-Nava, Jose A; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Alcaraz, Antonio; Torres, Jaume; Aguilella, Vicente M; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-05-01

    Deletion of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) envelope (E) gene attenuates the virus. E gene encodes a small multifunctional protein that possesses ion channel (IC) activity, an important function in virus-host interaction. To test the contribution of E protein IC activity in virus pathogenesis, two recombinant mouse-adapted SARS-CoVs, each containing one single amino acid mutation that suppressed ion conductivity, were engineered. After serial infections, mutant viruses, in general, incorporated compensatory mutations within E gene that rendered active ion channels. Furthermore, IC activity conferred better fitness in competition assays, suggesting that ion conductivity represents an advantage for the virus. Interestingly, mice infected with viruses displaying E protein IC activity, either with the wild-type E protein sequence or with the revertants that restored ion transport, rapidly lost weight and died. In contrast, mice infected with mutants lacking IC activity, which did not incorporate mutations within E gene during the experiment, recovered from disease and most survived. Knocking down E protein IC activity did not significantly affect virus growth in infected mice but decreased edema accumulation, the major determinant of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to death. Reduced edema correlated with lung epithelia integrity and proper localization of Na+/K+ ATPase, which participates in edema resolution. Levels of inflammasome-activated IL-1β were reduced in the lung airways of the animals infected with viruses lacking E protein IC activity, indicating that E protein IC function is required for inflammasome activation. Reduction of IL-1β was accompanied by diminished amounts of TNF and IL-6 in the absence of E protein ion conductivity. All these key cytokines promote the progression of lung damage and ARDS pathology. In conclusion, E protein IC activity represents a new determinant for SARS-CoV virulence. PMID:24788150

  15. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  16. HyCCAPP as a tool to characterize promoter DNA-protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Guillen-Ahlers, Hector; Rao, Prahlad K; Levenstein, Mark E; Kennedy-Darling, Julia; Perumalla, Danu S; Jadhav, Avinash Y L; Glenn, Jeremy P; Ludwig-Kubinski, Amy; Drigalenko, Eugene; Montoya, Maria J; Göring, Harald H; Anderson, Corianna D; Scalf, Mark; Gildersleeve, Heidi I S; Cole, Regina; Greene, Alexandra M; Oduro, Akua K; Lazarova, Katarina; Cesnik, Anthony J; Barfknecht, Jared; Cirillo, Lisa A; Gasch, Audrey P; Shortreed, Michael R; Smith, Lloyd M; Olivier, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Currently available methods for interrogating DNA-protein interactions at individual genomic loci have significant limitations, and make it difficult to work with unmodified cells or examine single-copy regions without specific antibodies. In this study, we describe a physiological application of the Hybridization Capture of Chromatin-Associated Proteins for Proteomics (HyCCAPP) methodology we have developed. Both novel and known locus-specific DNA-protein interactions were identified at the ENO2 and GAL1 promoter regions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and revealed subgroups of proteins present in significantly different levels at the loci in cells grown on glucose versus galactose as the carbon source. Results were validated using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Overall, our analysis demonstrates that HyCCAPP is an effective and flexible technology that does not require specific antibodies nor prior knowledge of locally occurring DNA-protein interactions and can now be used to identify changes in protein interactions at target regions in the genome in response to physiological challenges.

  17. Conserved interdomain linker promotes phase separation of the multivalent adaptor protein Nck

    PubMed Central

    Banjade, Sudeep; Wu, Qiong; Mittal, Anuradha; Peeples, William B.; Pappu, Rohit V.; Rosen, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    The organization of membranes, the cytosol, and the nucleus of eukaryotic cells can be controlled through phase separation of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Collective interactions of multivalent molecules mediated by modular binding domains can induce gelation and phase separation in several cytosolic and membrane-associated systems. The adaptor protein Nck has three SRC-homology 3 (SH3) domains that bind multiple proline-rich segments in the actin regulatory protein neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) and an SH2 domain that binds to multiple phosphotyrosine sites in the adhesion protein nephrin, leading to phase separation. Here, we show that the 50-residue linker between the first two SH3 domains of Nck enhances phase separation of Nck/N-WASP/nephrin assemblies. Two linear motifs within this element, as well as its overall positively charged character, are important for this effect. The linker increases the driving force for self-assembly of Nck, likely through weak interactions with the second SH3 domain, and this effect appears to promote phase separation. The linker sequence is highly conserved, suggesting that the sequence determinants of the driving forces for phase separation may be generally important to Nck functions. Our studies demonstrate that linker regions between modular domains can contribute to the driving forces for self-assembly and phase separation of multivalent proteins. PMID:26553976

  18. Interplay between unfolded protein response and autophagy promotes tumor drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    YAN, MING-MING; NI, JIANG-DONG; SONG, DEYE; DING, MULIANG; HUANG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in the quality control of secreted protein via promoting the correct folding of nascent protein and mediating the degradation of unfolded or misfolded protein, namely ER-associated degradation. When the unfolded or misfolded proteins are abundant, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is elicited, an adaptive signaling cascade from the ER to the nucleus, which restores the homeostatic functions of the ER. Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process where cellular long-lived proteins and damaged organelles are engulfed and degraded for recycling to maintain homeostasis. The UPR and autophagy occur simultaneously and are involved in pathological processes, including tumorigenesis, chemoresistance of malignancies and neurodegeneration. Accumulative data has indicated that the UPR may induce autophagy and that autophagy is able to alleviate the UPR. However, the detailed mechanism of interplay between autophagy and UPR remains to be fully understood. The present review aimed to depict the core pathways of the two processes and to elucidate how autophagy and UPR are regulated. Moreover, the review also discusses the molecular mechanism of crosstalk between the UPR and autophagy and their roles in malignant survival and drug resistance. PMID:26622781

  19. Promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity in corn microsomal membranes by calcium and protein phosphorylation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paliyath, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    Regulation of the activity of beta-glucan synthase was studied using microsomal preparations from corn coleoptiles. The specific activity as measured by the incorporation of glucose from uridine diphospho-D-[U-14C]glucose varied between 5 to 15 pmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. Calcium promoted beta-glucan synthase activity and the promotion was observed at free calcium concentrations as low as 1 micromole. Kinetic analysis of substrate-velocity curve showed an apparent Km of 1.92 x 10(-4) M for UDPG. Calcium increased the Vmax from 5.88 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 in the absence of calcium to 9.52 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 and 1.66 x 10(-6) mol liter-1 min-1 in the presence of 0.5 mM and 1 mM calcium, respectively. The Km values remained the same under these conditions. Addition of ATP further increased the activity above the calcium-promoted level. Sodium fluoride, a phosphoprotein phosphatase inhibitor, promoted glucan synthase activity indicating that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are involved in the regulation of the enzyme activity. Increasing the concentration of sodium fluoride from 0.25 mM to 10 mM increased glucan synthase activity five-fold over the + calcium + ATP control. Phosphorylation of membrane proteins also showed a similar increase under these conditions. Calmodulin, in the presence of calcium and ATP stimulated glucan synthase activity substantially, indicating that calmodulin could be involved in the calcium-dependent phosphorylation and promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity. The role of calcium in mediating auxin action is discussed.

  20. Leader of the Capsid Protein in Feline Calicivirus Promotes Replication of Norwalk Virus in Cell Culture▿

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kyeong-Ok; George, David W.; Patton, John B.; Green, Kim Y.; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.

    2008-01-01

    The inability to grow human noroviruses in cell culture has greatly impeded the studies of their pathogenesis and immunity. Vesiviruses, in the family Caliciviridae, grow efficiently in cell culture and encode a unique protein in the subgenomic region designated as leader of the capsid protein (LC). We hypothesized that LC might be associated with the efficient replication of vesiviruses in cell culture and promote the replication of human norovirus in cells. To test this hypothesis, a recombinant plasmid was engineered in which the LC region of feline calicivirus (FCV) was placed under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter (pCI-LC) so that the LC protein could be provided in trans to replicating calicivirus genomes bearing a reporter gene. We constructed pNV-GFP, a recombinant plasmid containing a full-length NV genome with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the place of VP1. The transfection of pNV-GFP in MVA-T7-infected cells produced few GFP-positive cells detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry analysis. When pNV-GFP was cotransfected with pCI-LC in MVA-T7-infected cells, we observed an increase in the number of GFP-positive cells (ca. 3% of the whole-cell population). Using this cotransfection method with mutagenesis study, we identified potential cis-acting elements at the start of subgenomic RNA and the 3′ end of NV genome for the virus replication. We conclude that LC may be a viral factor which promotes the replication of NV in cells, which could provide a clue to growing the fastidious human noroviruses in cell culture. PMID:18632864

  1. HIV-1 Tat protein promotes formation of more-processive elongation complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, R A; Sharp, P A

    1991-01-01

    The Tat protein of HIV-1 trans-activates transcription in vitro in a cell-free extract of HeLa nuclei. Quantitative analysis of the efficiency of elongation revealed that a majority of the elongation complexes generated by the HIV-1 promoter were not highly processive and terminated within the first 500 nucleotides. Tat trans-activation of transcription from the HIV-1 promoter resulted from an increase in processive character of the elongation complexes. More specifically, the analysis suggests that there exist two classes of elongation complexes initiating from the HIV promoter: a less-processive form and a more-processive form. Addition of purified Tat protein was found to increase the abundance of the more-processive class of elongation complex. The purine nucleoside analog, 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) inhibits transcription in this reaction by decreasing the efficiency of elongation. Surprisingly, stimulation of transcription elongation by Tat was preferentially inhibited by the addition of DRB. Images PMID:1756726

  2. Neural Cell Adhesion Protein CNTN1 Promotes the Metastatic Progression of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Judy; Ojo, Diane; Kapoor, Anil; Lin, Xiaozeng; Pinthus, Jehonathan H; Aziz, Tariq; Bismar, Tarek A; Wei, Fengxiang; Wong, Nicholas; De Melo, Jason; Cutz, Jean-Claude; Major, Pierre; Wood, Geoffrey; Peng, Hao; Tang, Damu

    2016-03-15

    Prostate cancer metastasis is the main cause of disease-related mortality. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying prostate cancer metastasis is critical for effective therapeutic intervention. In this study, we performed gene-expression profiling of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSC) derived from DU145 human prostate cancer cells to identify factors involved in metastatic progression. Our studies revealed contactin 1 (CNTN1), a neural cell adhesion protein, to be a prostate cancer-promoting factor. CNTN1 knockdown reduced PCSC-mediated tumor initiation, whereas CNTN1 overexpression enhanced prostate cancer cell invasion in vitro and promoted xenograft tumor formation and lung metastasis in vivo. In addition, CNTN1 overexpression in DU145 cells and corresponding xenograft tumors resulted in elevated AKT activation and reduced E-cadherin (CDH1) expression. CNTN1 expression was not readily detected in normal prostate glands, but was clearly evident on prostate cancer cells in primary tumors and lymph node and bone metastases. Tumors from 637 patients expressing CNTN1 were associated with prostate cancer progression and worse biochemical recurrence-free survival following radical prostatectomy (P < 0.05). Collectively, our findings demonstrate that CNTN1 promotes prostate cancer progression and metastasis, prompting further investigation into the mechanisms that enable neural proteins to become aberrantly expressed in non-neural malignancies.

  3. Hypoxia promotes drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells via activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Changfu; Zhang, Qiao; Yu, Tao; Sun, Shudong; Wang, Wenjun; Liu, Guangyao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Drug resistance has been recognized to be a major obstacle to the chemotherapy for osteosarcoma. And the potential importance of hypoxia as a target to reverse drug resistance in osteosarcoma has been indicated, though the mechanism underlining such role is not clarified. The present study aims to investigate the role of hypoxia in the drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells via activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. Experimental design We investigated the promotion of the resistance to doxorubicin of osteosarcoma MG-63 and U2-os cells in vitro, and then determined the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)α and HIF-1β, the activation and regulatory role of AMPK in the osteosarcoma U2-os cells which were treated with doxorubicin under hypoxia. Results It was demonstrated that hypoxia significantly reduced the sensitivity of MG-63 and U2-os cells to doxorubicin, indicating an inhibited viability reduction and a reduced apoptosis promotion. And such reduced sensitivity was not associated with HIF-1α, though it was promoted by hypoxia in U2-os cells. Interestingly, the AMPK signaling was significantly promoted by hypoxia in the doxorubicin-treated U2-os cells, with a marked upregulation of phosphorylated AMPK (Thr 172) and phosphorylated acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) (Ser 79), which were sensitive to the AMPK activator, AICAR and the AMPK inhibitor, Compound C. Moreover, the promoted AMPK activity by AICAR or the downregulated AMPK activity by Compound C significantly reduced or promoted the sensitivity of U2-os cells to doxorubicin. Conclusion The present study confirmed the AMPK signaling activation in the doxorubicin-treated osteosarcoma cells, in response to hypoxia, and the chemical upregulation or downregulation of AMPK signaling reduced or increased the chemo-sensitivity of osteosarcoma U2-os cells in vitro. Our study implies that AMPK inhibition might be a effective strategy to sensitize osteocarcoma cells to chemotherapy. PMID

  4. Zinc-Induced Polymerization of Killer-Cell Ig-like Receptor into Filaments Promotes Its Inhibitory Function at Cytotoxic Immunological Synapses.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Rajagopalan, Sumati; Sarkar, Pabak; Dorward, David W; Peterson, Mary E; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Guillermier, Christelle; Steinhauser, Matthew L; Vogel, Steven S; Long, Eric O

    2016-04-01

    The inhibitory function of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) that bind HLA-C and block activation of human natural killer (NK) cells is dependent on zinc. We report that zinc induced the assembly of soluble KIR into filamentous polymers, as detected by electron microscopy, which depolymerized after zinc chelation. Similar KIR filaments were isolated from lysates of cells treated with zinc, and membrane protrusions enriched in zinc were detected on whole cells by scanning electron microscopy and imaging mass spectrometry. Two independent mutations in the extracellular domain of KIR, away from the HLA-C binding site, impaired zinc-driven polymerization and inhibitory function. KIR filaments formed spontaneously, without the addition of zinc, at functional inhibitory immunological synapses of NK cells with HLA-C(+) cells. Adding to the recent paradigm of signal transduction through higher order molecular assemblies, zinc-induced polymerization of inhibitory KIR represents an unusual mode of signaling by a receptor at the cell surface. PMID:27058785

  5. DNA affinity labeling of adenovirus type 2 upstream promoter sequence-binding factors identifies two distinct proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Safer, B.; Cohen, R.B.; Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    A rapid affinity labeling procedure with enhanced specificity was developed to identify DNA-binding proteins. /sup 32/P was first introduced at unique phosphodiester bonds within the DNA recognition sequence. UV light-dependent cross-linking of pyrimidines to amino acid residues in direct contact at the binding site, followed by micrococcal nuclease digestion, resulted in the transfer of /sup 32/P to only those specific protein(s) which recognized the binding sequence. This method was applied to the detection and characterization of proteins that bound to the upstream promoter sequence (-50 to -66) of the human adenovirus type 2 major late promoter. We detected two distinct proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 116,000 that interacted with this promoter element. The two proteins differed significantly in their chromatographic and cross-linking behaviors.

  6. Effects of protein molecular weight on the intrinsic material properties and release kinetics of wet spun polymeric microfiber delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Lavin, Danya M; Zhang, Linda; Furtado, Stacia; Hopkins, Richard A; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Wet spun microfibers have great potential for the design of multifunctional controlled release scaffolds. Understanding aspects of drug delivery and mechanical strength, specific to protein molecular weight, may aid in the optimization and development of wet spun fiber platforms. This study investigated the intrinsic material properties and release kinetics of poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) wet spun microfibers encapsulating proteins with varying molecular weights. A cryogenic emulsion technique developed in our laboratory was used to encapsulate insulin (5.8 kDa), lysozyme (14.3 kDa) and bovine serum albumin (BSA, 66.0 kDa) within wet spun microfibers (~100 μm). Protein loading was found to significantly influence mechanical strength and drug release kinetics of PLGA and PLLA microfibers in a molecular-weight-dependent manner. BSA encapsulation resulted in the most significant decrease in strength and ductility for both PLGA and PLLA microfibers. Interestingly, BSA-loaded PLGA microfibers had a twofold increase (8±2 MPa to 16±1 MPa) in tensile strength and a fourfold increase (3±1% to 12±6%) in elongation until failure in comparison to PLLA microfibers. PLGA and PLLA microfibers exhibited prolonged protein release up to 63 days in vitro. Further analysis with the Korsmeyer-Peppas kinetic model determined that the mechanism of protein release was dependent on Fickian diffusion. These results emphasize the critical role protein molecular weight has on the properties of wet spun filaments, highlighting the importance of designing small molecular analogues to replace growth factors with large molecular weights.

  7. N-Acetylglucosaminylation of Serine-Aspartate Repeat Proteins Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Thomer, Lena; Becker, Samuel; Emolo, Carla; Quach, Austin; Kim, Hwan Keun; Rauch, Sabine; Anderson, Mark; LeBlanc, James F.; Schneewind, Olaf; Faull, Kym F.; Missiakas, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus secretes products that convert host fibrinogen to fibrin and promote its agglutination with fibrin fibrils, thereby shielding bacteria from immune defenses. The agglutination reaction involves ClfA (clumping factor A), a surface protein with serine-aspartate (SD) repeats that captures fibrin fibrils and fibrinogen. Pathogenic staphylococci express several different SD proteins that are modified by two glycosyltransferases, SdgA and SdgB. Here, we characterized three genes of S. aureus, aggA, aggB (sdgA), and aggC (sdgB), and show that aggA and aggC contribute to staphylococcal agglutination with fibrin fibrils in human plasma. We demonstrate that aggB (sdgA) and aggC (sdgB) are involved in GlcNAc modification of the ClfA SD repeats. However, only sdgB is essential for GlcNAc modification, and an sdgB mutant is defective in the pathogenesis of sepsis in mice. Thus, GlcNAc modification of proteins promotes S. aureus replication in the bloodstream of mammalian hosts. PMID:24344128

  8. KNL1 facilitates phosphorylation of outer kinetochore proteins by promoting Aurora B kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Caldas, Gina V.; DeLuca, Keith F.

    2013-01-01

    Aurora B kinase phosphorylates kinetochore proteins during early mitosis, increasing kinetochore–microtubule (MT) turnover and preventing premature stabilization of kinetochore–MT attachments. Phosphorylation of kinetochore proteins during late mitosis is low, promoting attachment stabilization, which is required for anaphase onset. The kinetochore protein KNL1 recruits Aurora B–counteracting phosphatases and the Aurora B–targeting factor Bub1, yet the consequences of KNL1 depletion on Aurora B phospho-regulation remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the KNL1 N terminus is essential for Aurora B activity at kinetochores. This region of KNL1 is also required for Bub1 kinase activity at kinetochores, suggesting that KNL1 promotes Aurora B activity through Bub1-mediated Aurora B targeting. However, ectopic targeting of Aurora B to kinetochores does not fully rescue Aurora B activity in KNL1-depleted cells, suggesting KNL1 influences Aurora B activity through an additional pathway. Our findings establish KNL1 as a requirement for Aurora B activity at kinetochores and for wild-type kinetochore–MT attachment dynamics. PMID:24344188

  9. Transcriptional Activation of the Interleukin-2 Promoter by Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bergqvist, Anders; Rice, Charles M.

    2001-01-01

    Most patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) become chronic carriers. Viruses that efficiently establish persistent infections must have effective ways of evading host defenses. In the case of HCV, little is known about how chronic infections are established or maintained. Besides hepatocytes, several reports suggest that HCV can infect T and B lymphocytes. Since T cells are essential for viral clearance, direct or indirect effects of HCV on T-cell function could influence the outcome of infection. Given that T-cell growth and differentiation require the cytokine interleukin 2 (IL-2), we asked whether HCV might modulate synthesis of IL-2. Portions of the HCV polyprotein were expressed in Jurkat cells under a variety of conditions. We found that the highly conserved HCV core protein, in combination with other stimuli, was able to dramatically activate transcription from the IL-2 promoter. The carboxy-terminal hydrophobic portion of the core protein was required for this activity. Activation was dependent on nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), occurred in cells deficient in the tyrosine kinase p56lck, and could be blocked by addition of cyclosporin A and by depletion of calcium. These results suggest that the HCV core protein can activate transcription of the IL-2 promoter through the NFAT pathway. This novel activity may have consequences for T-cell development and establishment of persistent infections. PMID:11134290

  10. MALAT1 promotes colorectal cancer cell proliferation/migration/invasion via PRKA kinase anchor protein 9.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min-Hui; Hu, Zhi-Yan; Xu, Chuan; Xie, Lin-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Shi-You; Li, Zu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the 3' end of metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is involved in colorectal cancer (CRC) cell proliferation and migration/invasion in vitro. The role and mechanism of MALAT1 in CRC metastasis in vivo, however, remain largely unknown. In the present study, we found that MALAT1 was up-regulated in human primary CRC tissues with lymph node metastasis. Overexpression of MALAT1 via RNA activation promoted CRC cell proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro, and stimulated tumor growth and metastasis in mice in vivo. Conversely, knockdown of MALAT1 inhibited CRC tumor growth and metastasis. MALAT1 regulated at least 243 genes in CRC cells in a genome-wide expression profiling. Among these genes, PRKA kinase anchor protein 9 (AKAP-9) was significantly up-regulated at both mRNA and protein levels. AKAP-9 was highly expressed in CRC cells with metastatic potential and human primary CRC tissues with lymph node metastasis, but not in normal cells or tissues. Importantly, knockdown of AKAP-9 blocked MALAT1-mediated CRC cell proliferation, migration and invasion. These data indicate that MALAT1 may promote CRC tumor development via its target protein AKAP-9.

  11. KNL1 facilitates phosphorylation of outer kinetochore proteins by promoting Aurora B kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Gina V; DeLuca, Keith F; DeLuca, Jennifer G

    2013-12-23

    Aurora B kinase phosphorylates kinetochore proteins during early mitosis, increasing kinetochore–microtubule (MT) turnover and preventing premature stabilization of kinetochore–MT attachments. Phosphorylation of kinetochore proteins during late mitosis is low, promoting attachment stabilization, which is required for anaphase onset. The kinetochore protein KNL1 recruits Aurora B–counteracting phosphatases and the Aurora B–targeting factor Bub1, yet the consequences of KNL1 depletion on Aurora B phospho-regulation remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the KNL1 N terminus is essential for Aurora B activity at kinetochores. This region of KNL1 is also required for Bub1 kinase activity at kinetochores, suggesting that KNL1 promotes Aurora B activity through Bub1-mediated Aurora B targeting. However, ectopic targeting of Aurora B to kinetochores does not fully rescue Aurora B activity in KNL1-depleted cells, suggesting KNL1 influences Aurora B activity through an additional pathway. Our findings establish KNL1 as a requirement for Aurora B activity at kinetochores and for wild-type kinetochore–MT attachment dynamics.

  12. Myocardial Reloading after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-08-19

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. Mortality after ECMO remains high.Cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown and may impact recovery. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Fourteen immature piglets (7.8-15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8 hour-ECMO (UNLOAD) and post-wean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused [2-13C]-pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]-L-leucine, as a tracer of amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis into the coronary artery. RELOAD showed marked elevations in myocardial oxygen consumption above baseline and UNLOAD. Pyruvate uptake was markedly increased though RELOAD decreased pyruvate contribution to oxidative CAC metabolism.RELOAD also increased absolute concentrations of all CAC intermediates, while maintaining or increasing 13C-molar percent enrichment. RELOAD also significantly increased cardiac fractional protein synthesis rates by >70% over UNLOAD. Conclusions: RELOAD produced high energy metabolic requirement and rebound protein synthesis. Relative pyruvate decarboxylation decreased with RELOAD while promoting anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation and amino acid incorporation into protein rather than to the CAC for oxidation. These perturbations may serve as therapeutic targets to improve contractile function after ECMO.

  13. The Stress Granule Protein G3BP1 Recruits Protein Kinase R To Promote Multiple Innate Immune Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Lucas C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic storage sites containing translationally silenced mRNPs that can be released to resume translation after stress subsides. We previously showed that poliovirus 3C proteinase cleaves the SG-nucleating protein G3BP1, blocking the ability of cells to form SGs late in infection. Many other viruses also target G3BP1 and inhibit SG formation, but the reasons why these functions evolved are unclear. Previously, we also showed a link between G3BP1-induced SGs and protein kinase R (PKR)-mediated translational control, but the mechanism of PKR interplay with SG and the antiviral consequences are unknown. Here, we show that G3BP1 exhibits antiviral activity against several enteroviruses, whereas truncated G3BP1 that cannot form SGs does not. G3BP1-induced SGs are linked to activation of innate immune transcriptional responses through NF-κB and JNK. The G3BP1-induced SGs also recruit PKR and other antiviral proteins. We show that the PXXP domain within G3BP1 is essential for the recruitment of PKR to SGs, for eIF2α phosphorylation driven by PKR, and for nucleating SGs of normal composition. We also show that deletion of the PXXP domain in G3BP1 compromises its antiviral activity. These findings tie PKR activation to its recruitment to SGs by G3BP1 and indicate that G3BP1 promotes innate immune responses at both the transcriptional and translational levels and integrates cellular stress responses and innate immunity. IMPORTANCE Stress granules appear during virus infection, and their importance is not well understood. Previously, it was assumed that they were nonfunctional artifacts associated with cellular stress. PKR is a well-known antiviral protein; however, its regulation in cells is not well understood. Our work links cellular stress granules with activation of PKR and other innate immune pathways through the activity of G3BP1, a critical stress granule component. The ability of stress granules and G3BP1 to activate PKR and

  14. Protein precipitation behavior of condensed tannins from Lotus pedunculatus and Trifolium repens with different mean degrees of polymerization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The precipitation of bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYS), and alfalfa leaf protein (ALF) by two large- and two medium-sized condensed tannin (CT) fractions of similar flavan-3-ol subunit composition is described. CT fractions isolated from white clover flowers and big trefoil leaves exhibited...

  15. MGMT promoter methylation and correlation with protein expression in primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Toffolatti, L; Scquizzato, E; Cavallin, S; Canal, F; Scarpa, M; Stefani, P M; Gherlinzoni, F; Dei Tos, A P

    2014-11-01

    The O (6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) gene encodes for a DNA repairing enzyme of which silencing by promoter methylation is involved in brain tumorigenesis. MGMT promoter methylation represents a favorable prognostic factor and has been associated with a better response to alkylating agents in glioma and systemic lymphoma. Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare and aggressive extranodal malignant lymphoma. The current standard of care, based on high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy, has improved prognosis but outcome remains poor for a majority of patients. Therapeutic progress in this field is conditioned by limited biological and molecular knowledge about the disease. Temozolomide has recently emerged as an alternative option for PCNSL treatment. We aimed to analyze the MGMT gene methylation status in a series of 24 PCNSLs, to investigate the relationship between methylation status of the gene and immunohistochemical expression of MGMT protein and to evaluate the possible prognostic significance of these biomarkers. Our results confirm that methylation of the MGMT gene and loss of MGMT protein are frequent events in these lymphomas (54 % of our cases) and suggest that they are gender and age related. MGMT methylation showed high correlation with loss of protein expression (concordance correlation coefficient = -0.49; Fisher exact test: p < 0.01), different from what has been observed in other brain tumors. In the subgroup of ten patients who received high dose chemotherapy, the presence of methylated MGMT promoter (n = 4), seems to be associated with a prolonged overall survival (>60 months in three of four patients). The prognostic significance of these molecular markers in PCNSL needs to be further studied in groups of patients treated in a homogeneous way.

  16. EP4 Receptor-Associated Protein in Microglia Promotes Inflammation in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Risako; Higuchi, Sei; Nakatsuji, Masato; Yasui, Mika; Ikedo, Taichi; Nagata, Manabu; Yokode, Masayuki; Minami, Manabu

    2016-08-01

    Microglial cells play a key role in neuronal damage in neurodegenerative disorders. Overactivated microglia induce detrimental neurotoxic effects through the excess production of proinflammatory cytokines. However, the mechanisms of microglial activation are poorly understood. We focused on prostaglandin E2 type 4 receptor-associated protein (EPRAP), which suppresses macrophage activation. We demonstrated that EPRAP exists in microglia in the brain. Furthermore, EPRAP-deficient mice displayed less microglial accumulation, and intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 mRNA in the brains of EPRAP-deficient mice. Consistently, EPRAP-deficient microglia showed a marked decrease in the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 induced by LPS treatment compared with wild-type controls. In addition, EPRAP deficiency decreased microglial activation and neuronal cell death induced by intraventricular injection of kainic acid. EPRAP deficiency impaired the LPS-induced phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in microglia. The phosphorylation levels of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4-which phosphorylates c-jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-were also decreased in EPRAP-deficient microglia after LPS stimulation. Although EPRAP in macrophages plays a role in the attenuation of inflammation, EPRAP promotes proinflammatory activation of microglia through mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4-mediated signaling and may be key to the deteriorating neuronal damage brought on by brain inflammation. PMID:27315781

  17. Characterization of the highly active fragment of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter for recombinant protein expression in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chaomin; Zheng, Liesheng; Zhu, Jihong; Chen, Liguo; Ma, Aimin

    2015-03-01

    Developing efficient native promoters is important for improving recombinant protein expression by fungal genetic engineering. The promoter region of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene in Pleurotus ostreatus (Pogpd) was isolated and optimized by upstream truncation. The activities of these promoters with different lengths were further confirmed by fluorescence, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. A truncated Pogpd-P2 fragment (795 bp) drove enhanced green fluorescence protein (egfp) gene expression in P. ostreatus much more efficiently than full-length Pogpd-P1. Further truncating Pogpd-P2 to 603, 403 and 231 bp reduced the eGFP expression significantly. However, the 403-bp fragment between -356 bp and the start codon was the minimal but sufficient promoter element for eGFP expression. Compact native promoters for genetic engineering of P. ostreatus were successfully developed and validated in this study. This will broaden the preexisting repertoire of fungal promoters for biotechnology application. PMID:25743073

  18. Multiple tandem promoters of the major outer membrane protein gene (omp1) of Chlamydia psittaci.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y; Zhang, Y X; Manning, D S; Caldwell, H D

    1990-09-01

    The transcription of omp1, the gene encoding the major outer membrane protein, was studied for two strains of Chlamydia psittaci, guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) and mouse pneumonitis (Mn). The transcriptional initiation sites for the omp1 of each strain were mapped by S1 nuclease and primer extension analyses. Three different sizes of omp1 transcripts were observed for GPIC and four were observed for Mn. The production of these transcripts appeared to be the consequence of multiple tandem promoters. The order in which the omp1 RNA transcripts appeared during the growth cycle of the C. psittaci strains was found to differ from that of C. trachomatis.

  19. A biodegradable polymeric system for peptide–protein delivery assembled with porous microspheres and nanoparticles, using an adsorption/infiltration process

    PubMed Central

    Alcalá-Alcalá, Sergio; Urbán-Morlán, Zaida; Aguilar-Rosas, Irene; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2013-01-01

    A biodegradable polymeric system is proposed for formulating peptides and proteins. The systems were assembled through the adsorption of biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles onto porous, biodegradable microspheres by an adsorption/infiltration process with the use of an immersion method. The peptide drug is not involved in the manufacturing of the nanoparticles or in obtaining the microspheres; thus, contact with the organic solvent, interfaces, and shear forces required for the process are prevented during drug loading. Leuprolide acetate was used as the model peptide, and poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) was used as the biodegradable polymer. Leuprolide was adsorbed onto different amounts of PLGA nanoparticles (25 mg/mL, 50 mg/mL, 75 mg/mL, and 100 mg/mL) in a first stage; then, these were infiltrated into porous PLGA microspheres (100 mg) by dipping the structures into a microsphere suspension. In this way, the leuprolide was adsorbed onto both surfaces (ie, nanoparticles and microspheres). Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed the formation of a nanoparticle film on the porous microsphere surface that becomes more continuous as the amount of infiltrated nanoparticles increases. The adsorption efficiency and release rate are dependent on the amount of adsorbed nanoparticles. As expected, a greater adsorption efficiency (~95%) and a slower release rate were seen (~20% of released leuprolide in 12 hours) when a larger amount of nanoparticles was adsorbed (100 mg/mL of nanoparticles). Leuprolide acetate begins to be released immediately when there are no infiltrated nanoparticles, and 90% of the peptide is released in the first 12 hours. In contrast, the systems assembled in this study released less than 44% of the loaded drug during the same period of time. The observed release profiles denoted a Fickian diffusion that fit Higuchi’s model (t1/2). The manufacturing process presented here may be useful as a potential alternative for formulating

  20. Vegan proteins may reduce risk of cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease by promoting increased glucagon activity.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1999-12-01

    Amino acids modulate the secretion of both insulin and glucagon; the composition of dietary protein therefore has the potential to influence the balance of glucagon and insulin activity. Soy protein, as well as many other vegan proteins, are higher in non-essential amino acids than most animal-derived food proteins, and as a result should preferentially favor glucagon production. Acting on hepatocytes, glucagon promotes (and insulin inhibits) cAMP-dependent mechanisms that down-regulate lipogenic enzymes and cholesterol synthesis, while up-regulating hepatic LDL receptors and production of the IGF-I antagonist IGFBP-1. The insulin-sensitizing properties of many vegan diets--high in fiber, low in saturated fat--should amplify these effects by down-regulating insulin secretion. Additionally, the relatively low essential amino acid content of some vegan diets may decrease hepatic IGF-I synthesis. Thus, diets featuring vegan proteins can be expected to lower elevated serum lipid levels, promote weight loss, and decrease circulating IGF-I activity. The latter effect should impede cancer induction (as is seen in animal studies with soy protein), lessen neutrophil-mediated inflammatory damage, and slow growth and maturation in children. In fact, vegans tend to have low serum lipids, lean physiques, shorter stature, later puberty, and decreased risk for certain prominent 'Western' cancers; a vegan diet has documented clinical efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. Low-fat vegan diets may be especially protective in regard to cancers linked to insulin resistance--namely, breast and colon cancer--as well as prostate cancer; conversely, the high IGF-I activity associated with heavy ingestion of animal products may be largely responsible for the epidemic of 'Western' cancers in wealthy societies. Increased phytochemical intake is also likely to contribute to the reduction of cancer risk in vegans. Regression of coronary stenoses has been documented during low-fat vegan diets

  1. Vegan proteins may reduce risk of cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular disease by promoting increased glucagon activity.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1999-12-01

    Amino acids modulate the secretion of both insulin and glucagon; the composition of dietary protein therefore has the potential to influence the balance of glucagon and insulin activity. Soy protein, as well as many other vegan proteins, are higher in non-essential amino acids than most animal-derived food proteins, and as a result should preferentially favor glucagon production. Acting on hepatocytes, glucagon promotes (and insulin inhibits) cAMP-dependent mechanisms that down-regulate lipogenic enzymes and cholesterol synthesis, while up-regulating hepatic LDL receptors and production of the IGF-I antagonist IGFBP-1. The insulin-sensitizing properties of many vegan diets--high in fiber, low in saturated fat--should amplify these effects by down-regulating insulin secretion. Additionally, the relatively low essential amino acid content of some vegan diets may decrease hepatic IGF-I synthesis. Thus, diets featuring vegan proteins can be expected to lower elevated serum lipid levels, promote weight loss, and decrease circulating IGF-I activity. The latter effect should impede cancer induction (as is seen in animal studies with soy protein), lessen neutrophil-mediated inflammatory damage, and slow growth and maturation in children. In fact, vegans tend to have low serum lipids, lean physiques, shorter stature, later puberty, and decreased risk for certain prominent 'Western' cancers; a vegan diet has documented clinical efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. Low-fat vegan diets may be especially protective in regard to cancers linked to insulin resistance--namely, breast and colon cancer--as well as prostate cancer; conversely, the high IGF-I activity associated with heavy ingestion of animal products may be largely responsible for the epidemic of 'Western' cancers in wealthy societies. Increased phytochemical intake is also likely to contribute to the reduction of cancer risk in vegans. Regression of coronary stenoses has been documented during low-fat vegan diets

  2. The histone chaperone protein Nucleosome Assembly Protein-1 (hNAP-1) binds HIV-1 Tat and promotes viral transcription

    PubMed Central

    Vardabasso, Chiara; Manganaro, Lara; Lusic, Marina; Marcello, Alessandro; Giacca, Mauro

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite the large amount of data available on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HIV-1 transcription, crucial information is still lacking about the interplay between chromatin conformation and the events that regulate initiation and elongation of viral transcription. During transcriptional activation, histone acetyltransferases and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes cooperate with histone chaperones in altering chromatin structure. In particular, human Nucleosome Assembly Protein-1 (hNAP-1) is known to act as a histone chaperone that shuttles histones H2A/H2B into the nucleus, assembles nucleosomes and promotes chromatin fluidity, thereby affecting transcription of several cellular genes. Results Using a proteomic screening, we identified hNAP-1 as a novel cellular protein interacting with HIV-1 Tat. We observed that Tat specifically binds hNAP1, but not other members of the same family of factors. Binding between the two proteins required the integrity of the basic domain of Tat and of two separable domains of hNAP-1 (aa 162–290 and 290–391). Overexpression of hNAP-1 significantly enhanced Tat-mediated activation of the LTR. Conversely, silencing of the protein decreased viral promoter activity. To explore the effects of hNAP-1 on viral infection, a reporter HIV-1 virus was used to infect cells in which hNAP-1 had been either overexpressed or knocked-down. Consistent with the gene expression results, these two treatments were found to increase and inhibit viral infection, respectively. Finally, we also observed that the overexpression of p300, a known co-activator of both Tat and hNAP-1, enhanced hNAP-1-mediated transcriptional activation as well as its interaction with Tat. Conclusion Our study reveals that HIV-1 Tat binds the histone chaperone hNAP-1 both in vitro and in vivo and shows that this interaction participates in the regulation of Tat-mediated activation of viral gene expression. PMID:18226242

  3. Transcriptionally active immediate-early protein of pseudorabies virus binds to specific sites on class II gene promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Cromlish, W A; Abmayr, S M; Workman, J L; Horikoshi, M; Roeder, R G

    1989-01-01

    In the presence of partially purified pseudorabies virus immediate-early protein, multiple sites of DNase I protection were observed on the adenovirus major late and human hsp 70 promoters. Southwestern (DNA-protein blot) analysis demonstrated that the immediate-early protein bound directly to the sequences contained in these sites. These sequences share only limited homology, differ in their affinities for the immediate-early protein, and are located at different positions on these two promoters. In addition, the site-specific binding of a temperature-sensitive immediate-early protein was eliminated by the same heat treatment which eliminates its transcriptional activating function, whereas the binding of the wild-type protein was unaffected by heat treatment. Thus, site-specific binding requires a functionally active immediate-early protein. Furthermore, immediate-early-protein-dependent in vitro transcription from the major late promoter was preferentially inhibited by oligonucleotides which are homologous to the high-affinity binding sites on the major late or hsp 70 promoters. These observations suggest that transcriptional stimulation by the immediate-early protein involves binding to cis-acting elements. Images PMID:2539489

  4. Three SAUR proteins SAUR76, SAUR77 and SAUR78 promote plant growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Hao-Wei; Li, Qing-Tian; Tao, Jian-Jun; Bian, Xiao-Hua; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene perceived by a family of five receptors regulates many developmental processes in Arabidopsis. Here we conducted the yeast two-hybrid assay to screen for additional unidentified proteins that interact with subfamily II ethylene receptor ETR2. Three SAUR proteins, named SAUR76, 77 and 78, were identified to associate with both ETR2 and EIN4 in different assays. Interaction of SAUR76 and SAUR78 with ETR2 was further verified by co-immunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays. Expressions of SAUR76-78 are induced by auxin and ethylene treatments. Compared with wild type, SAUR-overexpressing plants exhibit reduced ethylene sensitivity, while SAUR-RNAi lines exhibit enhanced ethylene sensitivity. Overexpressing the three SAURs partially complements the phenotype of subfamily II ethylene receptor loss-of-function double mutant etr2-3ein4-4, which has increased ethylene response and small cotyledon and rosette. saur76 mutation partially suppresses the reduced ethylene sensitivity of etr2-2. SAUR76/78 proteins are regulated by 26S proteasome system and larger tag increases their protein stability. These findings suggest that SAUR76-78 may affect ethylene receptor signaling and promote plant growth in Arabidopsis. PMID:26207341

  5. The protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 promotes D2-like dopamine receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Likhite, Neah; Jackson, Christopher A; Liang, Mao-Shih; Krzyzanowski, Michelle C; Lei, Pedro; Wood, Jordan F; Birkaya, Barbara; Michaels, Kerry L; Andreadis, Stelios T; Clark, Stewart D; Yu, Michael C; Ferkey, Denise M

    2015-11-10

    Protein arginine methylation regulates diverse functions of eukaryotic cells, including gene expression, the DNA damage response, and circadian rhythms. We showed that arginine residues within the third intracellular loop of the human D2 dopamine receptor, which are conserved in the DOP-3 receptor in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, were methylated by protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5). By mutating these arginine residues, we further showed that their methylation enhanced the D2 receptor-mediated inhibition of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in cultured human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells. Analysis of prmt-5-deficient worms indicated that methylation promoted the dopamine-mediated modulation of chemosensory and locomotory behaviors in C. elegans through the DOP-3 receptor. In addition to delineating a previously uncharacterized means of regulating GPCR (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptor) signaling, these findings may lead to the development of a new class of pharmacological therapies that modulate GPCR signaling by changing the methylation status of these key proteins. PMID:26554819

  6. A bacterial virulence protein promotes pathogenicity by inhibiting the bacterium's own F1Fo ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jin; Pontes, Mauricio H; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2013-07-01

    Several intracellular pathogens, including Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, require the virulence protein MgtC to survive within macrophages and to cause a lethal infection in mice. We now report that, unlike secreted virulence factors that target the host vacuolar ATPase to withstand phagosomal acidity, the MgtC protein acts on Salmonella's own F1Fo ATP synthase. This complex couples proton translocation to ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and is required for virulence. We establish that MgtC interacts with the a subunit of the F1Fo ATP synthase, hindering ATP-driven proton translocation and NADH-driven ATP synthesis in inverted vesicles. An mgtC null mutant displays heightened ATP levels and an acidic cytoplasm, whereas mgtC overexpression decreases ATP levels. A single amino acid substitution in MgtC that prevents binding to the F1Fo ATP synthase abolishes control of ATP levels and attenuates pathogenicity. MgtC provides a singular example of a virulence protein that promotes pathogenicity by interfering with another virulence protein.

  7. Nitrite promotes protein carbonylation and Strecker aldehyde formation in experimental fermented sausages: are both events connected?

    PubMed

    Villaverde, A; Ventanas, J; Estévez, M

    2014-12-01

    The role played by curing agents (nitrite, ascorbate) on protein oxidation and Strecker aldehyde formation is studied. To fulfill this objective, increasing concentrations of nitrite (0, 75 and 150ppm) and ascorbate (0, 250 and 500ppm) were added to sausages subjected to a 54day drying process. The concurrence of intense proteolysis, protein carbonylation and formation of Strecker aldehydes during processing of sausages suggests that α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AAS) and γ-glutamic semialdehyde (GGS) may be implicated in the formation of Strecker aldehydes. The fact that nitrite (150ppm, ingoing amount) significantly promoted the formation of protein carbonyls at early stages of processing and the subsequent formation of Strecker aldehydes provides strength to this hypothesis. Ascorbate (125 and 250ppm) controlled the overall extent of protein carbonylation in sausages without declining the formation of Strecker aldehydes. These results may contribute to understanding the chemistry fundamentals of the positive influence of nitrite on the flavor and overall acceptability of cured muscle foods.

  8. PAK proteins and YAP-1 signalling downstream of integrin beta-1 in myofibroblasts promote liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Katherine; Pritchett, James; Llewellyn, Jessica; Mullan, Aoibheann F.; Athwal, Varinder S.; Dobie, Ross; Harvey, Emma; Zeef, Leo; Farrow, Stuart; Streuli, Charles; Henderson, Neil C.; Friedman, Scott L.; Hanley, Neil A.; Piper Hanley, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis due to extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion from myofibroblasts complicates many chronic liver diseases causing scarring and organ failure. Integrin-dependent interaction with scar ECM promotes pro-fibrotic features. However, the pathological intracellular mechanism in liver myofibroblasts is not completely understood, and further insight could enable therapeutic efforts to reverse fibrosis. Here, we show that integrin beta-1, capable of binding integrin alpha-11, regulates the pro-fibrotic phenotype of myofibroblasts. Integrin beta-1 expression is upregulated in pro-fibrotic myofibroblasts in vivo and is required in vitro for production of fibrotic ECM components, myofibroblast proliferation, migration and contraction. Serine/threonine-protein kinase proteins, also known as P21-activated kinase (PAK), and the mechanosensitive factor, Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP-1) are core mediators of pro-fibrotic integrin beta-1 signalling, with YAP-1 capable of perpetuating integrin beta-1 expression. Pharmacological inhibition of either pathway in vivo attenuates liver fibrosis. PAK protein inhibition, in particular, markedly inactivates the pro-fibrotic myofibroblast phenotype, limits scarring from different hepatic insults and represents a new tractable therapeutic target for treating liver fibrosis. PMID:27535340

  9. Protein Mass-Modulated Effects in the Catalytic Mechanism of Dihydrofolate Reductase: Beyond Promoting Vibrations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The role of fast protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis has been of great interest in the past decade. Recent “heavy enzyme” studies demonstrate that protein mass-modulated vibrations are linked to the energy barrier for the chemical step of catalyzed reactions. However, the role of fast dynamics in the overall catalytic mechanism of an enzyme has not been addressed. Protein mass-modulated effects in the catalytic mechanism of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR) are explored by isotopic substitution (13C, 15N, and non-exchangeable 2H) of the wild-type ecDHFR (l-DHFR) to generate a vibrationally perturbed “heavy ecDHFR” (h-DHFR). Steady-state, pre-steady-state, and ligand binding kinetics, intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEint) on the chemical step, and thermal unfolding experiments of both l- and h-DHFR show that the altered protein mass affects the conformational ensembles and protein–ligand interactions, but does not affect the hydride transfer at physiological temperatures (25–45 °C). Below 25 °C, h-DHFR shows altered transition state (TS) structure and increased barrier-crossing probability of the chemical step compared with l-DHFR, indicating temperature-dependent protein vibrational coupling to the chemical step. Protein mass-modulated vibrations in ecDHFR are involved in TS interactions at cold temperatures and are linked to dynamic motions involved in ligand binding at physiological temperatures. Thus, mass effects can affect enzymatic catalysis beyond alterations in promoting vibrations linked to chemistry. PMID:24820793

  10. Vaccinia virus protein N2 is a nuclear IRF3 inhibitor that promotes virulence.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Brian J; Benfield, Camilla T O; Ren, Hongwei; Lee, Vivian H; Frazer, Gordon L; Strnadova, Pavla; Sumner, Rebecca P; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2013-09-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) expresses many proteins that are non-essential for virus replication but promote virulence by inhibiting components of the host immune response to infection. These immunomodulators include a family of proteins that have, or are predicted to have, a structure related to the B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 protein. Five members of the VACV Bcl-2 family (N1, B14, A52, F1 and K7) have had their crystal structure solved, others have been characterized and a function assigned (C6, A46), and others are predicted to be Bcl-2 proteins but are uncharacterized hitherto (N2, B22, C1). Data presented here show that N2 is a nuclear protein that is expressed early during infection and inhibits the activation of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)3. Consistent with its nuclear localization, N2 inhibits IRF3 downstream of the TANK-binding kinase (TBK)-1 and after IRF3 translocation into the nucleus. A mutant VACV strain Western Reserve lacking the N2L gene (vΔN2) showed normal replication and spread in cultured cells compared to wild-type parental (vN2) and revertant (vN2-rev) viruses, but was attenuated in two murine models of infection. After intranasal infection, the vΔN2 mutant induced lower weight loss and signs of illness, and virus was cleared more rapidly from the infected tissue. In the intradermal model of infection, vΔN2 induced smaller lesions that were resolved more rapidly. In summary, the N2 protein is an intracellular virulence factor that inhibits IRF3 activity in the nucleus.

  11. The Membrane Protein LasM Promotes the Culturability of Legionella pneumophila in Water

    PubMed Central

    Li, Laam; Faucher, Sébastien P.

    2016-01-01

    The water-borne pathogen Legionella pneumophila (Lp) strongly expresses the lpg1659 gene in water. This gene encodes a hypothetical protein predicted to be a membrane protein using in silico analysis. While no conserved domains were identified in Lpg1659, similar proteins are found in many Legionella species and other aquatic bacteria. RT-qPCR showed that lpg1659 is positively regulated by the alternative sigma factor RpoS, which is essential for Lp to survive in water. These observations suggest an important role of this novel protein in the survival of Lp in water. Deletion of lpg1659 did not affect cell morphology, membrane integrity or tolerance to high temperature. Moreover, lpg1659 was dispensable for growth of Lp in rich medium, and during infection of the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and of THP-1 human macrophages. However, deletion of lpg1659 resulted in an early loss of culturability in water, while over-expression of this gene promoted the culturability of Lp. Therefore, these results suggest that lpg1659 is required for Lp to maintain culturability, and possibly long-term survival, in water. Since the loss of culturability observed in the absence of Lpg1659 was complemented by the addition of trace metals into water, this membrane protein is likely a transporter for acquiring essential trace metal for maintaining culturability in water and potentially in other metal-deprived conditions. Given its role in the survival of Lp in water, Lpg1659 was named LasM for Legionella aquatic survival membrane protein. PMID:27734007

  12. Translationally controlled tumor protein supplemented chitosan modified glass ionomer cement promotes osteoblast proliferation and function.

    PubMed

    Sangsuwan, Jiraporn; Wanichpakorn, Supreya; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) supplemented in a novel glass ionomer cement (BIO-GIC) on normal human osteoblasts (NHost cells). BIO-GIC was a glass ionomer cement (GIC) modified by adding chitosan and albumin to promote the release of TCTP. NHost cells were seeded on specimens of GIC, GIC+TCTP, BIO-GIC and BIO-GIC+TCTP. Cell proliferation was determined by BrdU assay. It was found that BIO-GIC+TCTP had significantly higher proliferation of cells than other specimens. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and osteopontin (OPN) gene expressions assessed by quantitative real time PCR and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were used to determine cell differentiation. Bone cell function was investigated by calcium deposition using alizarin assay. Both BMP-2 and OPN gene expressions of cells cultured on specimens with added TCTP increased gradually up-regulation after day 1 and reached the highest on day 3 then down-regulation on day 7. The ALP activity of cells cultured on BIO-GIC+TCTP for 7 days and calcium content after 14 days were significantly higher than other groups. BIO-GIC+TCTP can promote osteoblast cells proliferation, differentiation and function.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum heat shock protein gp96 maintains liver homeostasis and promotes hepatocellular carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rachidi, Saleh; Sun, Shaoli; Wu, Bill X; Jones, Elizabeth; Drake, Richard R.; Ogretmen, Besim; Cowart, Ashley; Clarke, Christopher J.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Chiosis, Gabriela; Liu, Bei; Li, Zihai

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims gp96, or grp94, is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) heat shock protein 90 paralog which acts as a protein chaperone and plays an important role in ER homeostasis. Previous work has demonstrated its role in ER stress, Wnt and integrin signaling, calcium homeostasis and others, which are vital processes in oncogenesis. However, the cancer-intrinsic function of gp96 remains controversial. Methods We studied the roles of gp96 in liver biology in mice via an albumin promoter-driven cre recombinase-mediated disruption of gp96 gene, hsp90b1. The impact of gp96 status on hepatic carcinogenesis in response to diethyl-nitrosoamine (DENA) was probed. The roles of gp96 on human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC) were also examined pharmacologically with a targeted gp96 inhibitor. Results We demonstrated that gp96 maintains liver development and hepatocyte function in vivo, and its loss genetically promotes adaptive accumulation of long chain ceramides, accompanied by steatotic regeneration of residual gp96+ hepatocytes. The need for compensatory expansion of gp96+ cells in the gp96− background predisposes mice to develop carcinogen-induced hepatic hyperplasia and cancer from gp96+ but not gp96− hepatocytes. We also found that genetic and pharmacological inhibition of gp96 in human HCCs perturbs multiple growth signals, and attenuates their proliferation and expansion. Conclusions gp96 is a pro-oncogenic chaperone, and is an attractive therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:25463537

  14. Reverse genetics for peste-des-petits-ruminants virus (PPRV): promoter and protein specificities.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Dalan; Chard, Louisa S; Dash, Pradyot; Barrett, Tom; Banyard, Ashley C

    2007-06-01

    Peste-des-petits-ruminants virus (PPRV) (family Paramyxoviridae, genus Morbillivirus) causes an acute febrile illness in sheep and goats resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in infected herds. The paramyxoviruses all have negative sense, non-segmented RNA genomes and their host range and pathogenic determinants have been extensively studied using reverse genetics. This technology also enables a more rational approach to be taken with respect to vaccine design. In order to initiate this type of work for PPRV we constructed a PPRV minigenome and studied its expression in transfected cells. As for other morbilliviruses, the minimum requirements for minigenome rescue were shown to be the cis-acting elements of the genome (GP) and antigenome (AGP) promoters as well as the three trans-acting helper proteins N (nucleocapsid), P (phosphoprotein) and L (large polymerase). Homologous PPRV helper proteins were compared to their heterologous analogues from the closely related rinderpest virus (RPV) and heterologous minigenome rescue was found to be a much less efficient process. By engineering two GP/AGP chimeric minigenomes we also identified differences between the two viruses in the specific interactions between the promoters and the transcriptase/replicase complexes. The PPRV minigenome was also shown not to strictly comply with the "rule of six"in vitro. PMID:17350130

  15. Tripartite motif containing 28 (TRIM28) promotes breast cancer metastasis by stabilizing TWIST1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chunli; Cheng, Jingliang; Zhou, Boxv; Zhu, Li; Khan, Md. Asaduzzaman; He, Tao; Zhou, Sufang; He, Jian; Lu, Xiaoling; Chen, Hanchun; Zhang, Dianzheng; Zhao, Yongxiang; Fu, Junjiang

    2016-01-01

    TRIM28 regulates its target genes at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Here we report that a TRIM28-TWIST1-EMT axis exists in breast cancer cells and TRIM28 promotes breast cancer metastasis by stabilizing TWIST1 and subsequently enhancing EMT. We find that TRIM28 is highly expressed in both cancer cell lines and advanced breast cancer tissues, and the levels of TRIM28 and TWIST1 are positively correlated with the aggressiveness of breast carcinomas. Overexpression and depletion of TRIM28 up- and down-regulates the protein, but not the mRNA levels of TWIST1, respectively, suggesting that TRIM28 upregulates TWIST1 post-transcriptionally. Overexpression of TRIM28 in breast cancer cell line promotes cell migration and invasion. Knockdown of TRIM28 reduces the protein level of TWIST1 with concurrent upregulation of E-cadherin and downregulation of N-cadherin and consequently inhibits cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, Immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays demonstrated that TRIM28 interacts with TWIST1 directly and this interaction is presumed to protect TWIST1 from degradation. Our study revealed a novel mechanism in breast cancer cells that TRIM28 enhances metastasis by stabilizing TWIST1, suggesting that targeting TRIM28 could be an efficacious strategy in breast cancer treatment. PMID:27412325

  16. A promoter probe plasmid based on green fluorescent protein : a strategy for studying meningococcal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Webb, S A; Langford, P R; Kroll, J S

    2001-01-01

    Many bacterial genes are regulated in an environment-responsive fashion, and from the perspective of a pathogen, the host represents just another environment. Many genes that contribute to virulence are differentially expressed in response to host environments that they encounter during colonization and invasion (1). Recognition of this has led to the development of selection or reporter systems that utilize the increased activity of promoters during growth in vivo to identify genes that are selectively expressed during infection, and, thus, may contribute to the infection process (2-5). One of these techniques, differential fluorescence induction (2,3), involves the use of a promoter-probe plasmid that utilizes a variant of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as its reporter. The technique has been used successfully to identify novel Salmonella typhimurium genes that are selectively expressed following exposure to acid environments (3) and during infection of macrophages (2). GFP reporter systems have also been used to evaluate in vivo gene expression in other organisms including Staphylococcus aureus (6), Listeria monocytogenes (7), and Mycobacterium marinum (8). This chapter describes the use of the GFP-promoter-probe plasmid, pJSK411, which is suitable for the evaluation of differential gene expression in Neisseria meningitidis (Fig.1). Fig. 1. Map of pJSK411 demonstrating restriction sites within the multiple cloning site. The binding site for the 401 US primer overlies the XhoI site and the 41 1DS primer binding site lies within the coding region of GFPmut3.

  17. Endothelial protein kinase MAP4K4 promotes vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Roth Flach, Rachel J.; Skoura, Athanasia; Matevossian, Anouch; Danai, Laura V.; Zheng, Wei; Cortes, Christian; Bhattacharya, Samit K.; Aouadi, Myriam; Hagan, Nana; Yawe, Joseph C.; Vangala, Pranitha; Menendez, Lorena Garcia; Cooper, Marcus P.; Fitzgibbons, Timothy P.; Buckbinder, Leonard; Czech, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Signalling pathways that control endothelial cell (EC) permeability, leukocyte adhesion and inflammation are pivotal for atherosclerosis initiation and progression. Here we demonstrate that the Sterile-20-like mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase 4 (MAP4K4), which has been implicated in inflammation, is abundantly expressed in ECs and in atherosclerotic plaques from mice and humans. On the basis of endothelial-specific MAP4K4 gene silencing and gene ablation experiments in Apoe−/− mice, we show that MAP4K4 in ECs markedly promotes Western diet-induced aortic macrophage accumulation and atherosclerotic plaque development. Treatment of Apoe−/− and Ldlr−/− mice with a selective small-molecule MAP4K4 inhibitor also markedly reduces atherosclerotic lesion area. MAP4K4 silencing in cultured ECs attenuates cell surface adhesion molecule expression while reducing nuclear localization and activity of NFκB, which is critical for promoting EC activation and atherosclerosis. Taken together, these results reveal that MAP4K4 is a key signalling node that promotes immune cell recruitment in atherosclerosis. PMID:26688060

  18. Repression of the Drosophila proliferating-cell nuclear antigen gene promoter by zerknuellt protein

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Hirose, Fumiko; Nishida, Yasuyoshi; Matsukage, Akio )

    1991-10-01

    A 631-bp fragment containing the 5{prime}-flanking region of the Drosophila melanogaster proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene was placed upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene of a CAT vector. A transient expression assay of CAT activity in Drosophila Kc cells transfected with this plasmid and a set of 5{prime}-deletion derivatives revealed that the promoter function resided within a 192-bp region. Cotransfection with a zerknuellt (zen)-expressing plasmid specifically repressed CAT expression. However, cotransfection with expression plasmids for a nonfunctional zen mutation, even skipped, or bicoid showed no significant effect on CAT expression. RNase protection analysis revealed that the repression by zen was at the transcription step. The target sequence of zen was mapped within the 34-bp region of the PCNA gene promoter, even though it lacked zen protein-binding sites. Transgenic flies carrying the PCNA gene regulatory region fused with lacZ were established. These results indicate that zen indirectly represses PCNA gene expression, probably by regulating the expression of some transcription factor(s) that binds to the PCNA gene promoter.

  19. Promoter analysis of the membrane protein gp64 gene of the cellular slime mold Polysphondylium pallidum.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, N; Fukuzawa, M; Saito, T; Sakaitani, T; Ochiai, H

    1999-10-28

    We cloned a genomic fragment of the membrane protein gp64 gene of the cellular slime mold Polysphondylium pallidum by inverse PCR. Primer extension analysis identified a major transcription start site 65 bp upstream of the translation start codon. The promoter region of the gp64 gene contains sequences homologous to a TATA box at position -47 to -37 and to an initiator (Inr, PyPyCAPyPyPyPy) at position -3 to +5 from the transcription start site. Successively truncated segments of the promoter were tested for their ability to drive expression of the beta-galactosidase reporter gene in transformed cells; also the difference in activity between growth conditions was compared. The results indicated that there are two positive vegetative regulatory elements extending between -187 and -62 bp from the transcription start site of the gp64 promoter; also their activity was two to three times higher in the cells grown with bacteria in shaken suspension than in the cells grown in an axenic medium. PMID:10542319

  20. DMA Modulus as a Screening Parameter for Compatibility of Polymeric Containment Materials with Various Solutions for use in Space Shuttle Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles Doug; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Protein crystals are grown in microgravity experiments inside the Space Shuttle during orbit. Such crystals are basically grown in a five-component system containing a salt, buffer, polymer, organic and water. During these experiments, a number of different polymeric containment materials must be compatible with up to hundreds of different PCG solutions in various concentrations for durations up to 180 days. When such compatibility experiments are performed at NASA/MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) simultaneously on containment material samples immersed in various solutions in vials, the samples are rather small out of necessity. DMA4 modulus was often used as the primary screening parameter for such small samples as a pass/fail criterion for incompatibility issues. In particular, the TA Instruments DMA 2980 film tension clamp was used to test rubber O-rings as small in I.D. as 0.091 in. by cutting through the cross-section at one place, then clamping the stretched linear cord stock at each end. The film tension clamp was also used to successfully test short length samples of medical/surgical grade tubing with an O.D. of 0.125 in.

  1. Supramolecular polymerization: Living it up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würthner, Frank

    2014-03-01

    Protein fibril formation is involved in many human diseases and thus has been mechanistically elucidated in the context of understanding -- and in turn treating -- them. This biological phenomenon has now also inspired the design of a supramolecular system that undergoes living polymerization.

  2. Centrobin-centrosomal protein 4.1-associated protein (CPAP) interaction promotes CPAP localization to the centrioles during centriole duplication.

    PubMed

    Gudi, Radhika; Zou, Chaozhong; Dhar, Jayeeta; Gao, Qingshen; Vasu, Chenthamarakshan

    2014-05-30

    Centriole duplication is the process by which two new daughter centrioles are generated from the proximal end of preexisting mother centrioles. Accurate centriole duplication is important for many cellular and physiological events, including cell division and ciliogenesis. Centrosomal protein 4.1-associated protein (CPAP), centrosomal protein of 152 kDa (CEP152), and centrobin are known to be essential for centriole duplication. However, the precise mechanism by which they contribute to centriole duplication is not known. In this study, we show that centrobin interacts with CEP152 and CPAP, and the centrobin-CPAP interaction is critical for centriole duplication. Although depletion of centrobin from cells did not have an effect on the centriolar levels of CEP152, it caused the disappearance of CPAP from both the preexisting and newly formed centrioles. Moreover, exogenous expression of the CPAP-binding fragment of centrobin also caused the disappearance of CPAP from both the preexisting and newly synthesized centrioles, possibly in a dominant negative manner, thereby inhibiting centriole duplication and the PLK4 overexpression-mediated centrosome amplification. Interestingly, exogenous overexpression of CPAP in the centrobin-depleted cells did not restore CPAP localization to the centrioles. However, restoration of centrobin expression in the centrobin-depleted cells led to the reappearance of centriolar CPAP. Hence, we conclude that centrobin-CPAP interaction is critical for the recruitment of CPAP to procentrioles to promote the elongation of daughter centrioles and for the persistence of CPAP on preexisting mother centrioles. Our study indicates that regulation of CPAP levels on the centrioles by centrobin is critical for preserving the normal size, shape, and number of centrioles in the cell.

  3. Proteins dominate in the surface layers formed on materials exposed to extracellular polymeric substances from bacterial cultures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Wikieł, Agata J; Dall'Agnol, Leonardo T; Eloy, Pierre; Genet, Michel J; Moura, José J G; Sand, Wolfgang; Dupont-Gillain, Christine C; Rouxhet, Paul G

    2016-01-01

    The chemical compositions of the surface conditioning layers formed by different types of solutions (from isolated EPS to whole culture media), involving different bacterial strains relevant for biocorrosion were compared, as they may influence the initial step in biofilm formation. Different substrata (polystyrene, glass, steel) were conditioned and analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Peak decomposition and assignment were validated by correlations between independent spectral data and the ubiquitous presence of organic contaminants on inorganic substrata was taken into account. Proteins or peptides were found to be a major constituent of all conditioning layers and polysaccharides were not present in appreciable concentrations; the proportion of nitrogen which may be due to DNA was lower than 15%. There was no significant difference between the compositions of the adlayers formed from different conditioning solutions, except for the adlayers produced with tightly bound EPS extracted from D. alaskensis.

  4. Activating enhancer-binding protein-2α induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression and promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lijun; Xie, Fangyun; Sun, Rui; Wang, Jingshu; Li, Wenbin; Liu, Tianze; Xiao, Yao; Yu, Wendan; Guo, Wei; Xiong, Yuqing; Qiu, Huijuan; Kang, Tiebang; Huang, Wenlin; Zhao, Chong; Deng, Wuguo

    2015-01-01

    Activating enhancer-binding protein-2α (AP-2α) regulates the expression of many cancer-related genes. Here, we demonstrated a novel mechanism by which AP-2α up-regulated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression to promote the growth of nasopharyngeal carcinomas (NPCs). High expression of AP-2α in NPC cell lines and tumor tissues from NPC patients was detected and significantly correlated with COX-2 expression. Overexpression of AP-2α and COX-2 in tumor tissues was associated with advanced tumor stage, clinical progression, and short survival of patients with NPCs. Knockdown of AP-2α by siRNA markedly inhibited COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in NPC cells. Exogenous expression of AP-2α up-regulated the COX-2 and PGE2. Knockdown of AP-2α also significantly suppressed cell proliferation in NPC cells in vitro and tumor growth in a NPC xenograft mouse model. Moreover, we found that p300 played an important role in the AP-2α/COX-2 pathway. AP-2α could co-localize and interact with p300 in NPC cells. Overexpression of the p300, but not its histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain deletion mutant, promoted the acetylation of AP-2α and its binding on the COX-2 promoter, thereby up-regulated COX-2 expression. Our results indicate that AP-2α activates COX-2 expression to promote NPC growth and suggest that the AP-2α/COX-2 signaling is a potential therapeutic target for NPC treatment. PMID:25669978

  5. Promoter activity of Tat at steps subsequent to TATA-binding protein recruitment.

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, H; Lis, J T; Jeang, K T

    1997-01-01

    Artificial recruitment of TATA-binding protein (TBP) to many eukaryotic promoters bypasses DNA-bound activator function. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat is an unconventional activator that up-regulates transcription from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) through binding to a nascent RNA sequence, TAR. Because this LTR and its cognate activator have atypical features compared to a standard RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) transcriptional unit, the precise limiting steps for HIV-1 transcription and how Tat resolves these limitations remain incompletely understood. We thus constructed human TBP fused to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4 to determine whether recruitment of TBP is one rate-limiting step in HIV-1 LTR transcription and whether Tat functions to recruit TBP. As a control, we compared the activity of the adenovirus E1b promoter. Our findings indicate that TBP tethering to the E1b promoter fully effected transcription to the same degree achievable with the potent GAL4-VP16 activator. By contrast, TBP recruitment to the HIV-1 LTR, although necessary for conferring Tat responsiveness, did not bypass a physical need for Tat in achieving activated transcription. These results document that the HIV-1 and the E1b promoters are transcriptionally limited at different steps; the major rate-limiting step for E1b is recruitment of TBP, while activation of the HIV-1 LTR requires steps in addition to TBP recruitment. We suggest that Tat acts to accelerate rate-limiting steps after TBP recruitment. PMID:9372921

  6. Glutathione Peroxidase 7 Utilizes Hydrogen Peroxide Generated by Ero1α to Promote Oxidative Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihui; Niu, Yingbo; Sitia, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Ero1 flavoproteins catalyze oxidative folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), consuming oxygen and generating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The ER-localized glutathione peroxidase 7 (GPx7) shows protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-dependent peroxidase activity in vitro. Our work aims at identifying the physiological role of GPx7 in the Ero1α/PDI oxidative folding pathway and at dissecting the reaction mechanisms of GPx7. Results: Our data show that GPx7 can utilize Ero1α-produced H2O2 to accelerate oxidative folding of substrates both in vitro and in vivo. H2O2 oxidizes Cys57 of GPx7 to sulfenic acid, which can be resolved by Cys86 to form an intramolecular disulfide bond. Both the disulfide form and sulfenic acid form of GPx7 can oxidize PDI for catalyzing oxidative folding. GPx7 prefers to interact with the a domain of PDI, and intramolecular cooperation between the two redox-active sites of PDI increases the activity of the Ero1α/GPx7/PDI triad. Innovation: Our in vitro and in vivo evidence provides mechanistic insights into how cells consume potentially harmful H2O2 while optimizing oxidative protein folding via the Ero1α/GPx7/PDI triad. Cys57 can promote PDI oxidation in two ways, and Cys86 emerges as a novel noncanonical resolving cysteine. Conclusion: GPx7 promotes oxidative protein folding, directly utilizing Ero1α-generated H2O2 in the early secretory compartment. Thus, the Ero1α/GPx7/PDI triad generates two disulfide bonds and two H2O molecules at the expense of a single O2 molecule. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 545–556. PMID:23919619

  7. Deltex1 promotes protein kinase Cθ degradation and sustains Casitas B-lineage lymphoma expression.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Sheng; Hsiao, Huey-Wen; Wu, Pei-Jung; Liu, Wen-Hsien; Lai, Ming-Zong

    2014-08-15

    The generation of T cell anergy is associated with upregulation of ubiquitin E3 ligases including Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl-b), Itch, gene related to anergy in lymphocyte, and deltex1 (DTX1). These E3 ligases attenuate T cell activation by targeting to signaling molecules. For example, Cbl-b and Itch promote the degradation of protein kinase Cθ (PKCθ) and phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) in anergic Th1 cells. How these anergy-associated E3 ligases coordinate during T cell anergy remains largely unknown. In the current study, we found that PKCθ and PLC-γ1 are also downregulated by DTX1. DTX1 interacted with PKCθ and PLC-γ1 and stimulated the degradation of PKCθ and PLC-γ1. T cell anergy-induced proteolysis of PKCθ was prevented in Dtx1(-/-) T cells, supporting the essential role of DTX1 in PKCθ downregulation. Similar to Cbl-b and Itch, DTX1 promoted monoubiquitination of PKCθ. Proteasome inhibitor did not inhibit DTX1-directed PKCθ degradation, but instead DTX1 directed the relocalization of PKCθ into the lysosomal pathway. In addition, DTX1 interacted with Cbl-b and increased the protein levels of Cbl-b. We further demonstrated the possibility that, through the downregulation of PKCθ, DTX1 prevented PKCθ-induced Cbl-b degradation and increased Cbl-b protein stability. Our results suggest the coordination between E3 ligases during T cell anergy; DTX1 acts with Cbl-b to assure a more extensive silencing of PKCθ, whereas DTX1-mediated PKCθ degradation further stabilizes Cbl-b.

  8. Vaccinia virus protein C4 inhibits NF-κB activation and promotes virus virulence.

    PubMed

    Ember, Stuart W J; Ren, Hongwei; Ferguson, Brian J; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2012-10-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) strain Western Reserve protein C4 has been characterized and its function and contribution to virus virulence assessed. Bioinformatic analysis showed that C4 is conserved in six orthopoxvirus species and shares 43 % amino acid identity with VACV protein C16, a known virulence factor. A recombinant VACV expressing a C-terminally tagged version of C4 showed that, like C16, this 37 kDa protein is expressed early during infection and localizes to both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Functional assays using a firefly luciferase reporter plasmid under the control of a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent promoter demonstrated that C4 inhibits NF-κB activation at, or downstream of, the inhibitor of kappa kinase (IKK) complex. Consistent with this, C4 inhibited interleukin-1β-induced translocation of p65 into the nucleus. A VACV lacking the C4L gene (vΔC4) showed no significant differences from wild-type virus in growth kinetics or spread in cell culture, but had reduced virulence in a murine intranasal model of infection. vΔC4-infected mice exhibited fewer symptoms, lost less weight and recovered 7 days earlier than animals infected with control viruses expressing C4. Furthermore, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from vΔC4-infected mice had increased cell numbers at day 5 post-infection, which correlated with reduced lung virus titres from this time onward. C4 represents the ninth VACV protein to inhibit NF-κB activation and remarkably, in every case examined, loss of each protein individually caused an alteration in virus virulence, despite the presence of other NF-κB inhibitors. PMID:22791606

  9. Vaccinia virus protein C4 inhibits NF-κB activation and promotes virus virulence.

    PubMed

    Ember, Stuart W J; Ren, Hongwei; Ferguson, Brian J; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2012-10-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) strain Western Reserve protein C4 has been characterized and its function and contribution to virus virulence assessed. Bioinformatic analysis showed that C4 is conserved in six orthopoxvirus species and shares 43 % amino acid identity with VACV protein C16, a known virulence factor. A recombinant VACV expressing a C-terminally tagged version of C4 showed that, like C16, this 37 kDa protein is expressed early during infection and localizes to both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Functional assays using a firefly luciferase reporter plasmid under the control of a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent promoter demonstrated that C4 inhibits NF-κB activation at, or downstream of, the inhibitor of kappa kinase (IKK) complex. Consistent with this, C4 inhibited interleukin-1β-induced translocation of p65 into the nucleus. A VACV lacking the C4L gene (vΔC4) showed no significant differences from wild-type virus in growth kinetics or spread in cell culture, but had reduced virulence in a murine intranasal model of infection. vΔC4-infected mice exhibited fewer symptoms, lost less weight and recovered 7 days earlier than animals infected with control viruses expressing C4. Furthermore, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from vΔC4-infected mice had increased cell numbers at day 5 post-infection, which correlated with reduced lung virus titres from this time onward. C4 represents the ninth VACV protein to inhibit NF-κB activation and remarkably, in every case examined, loss of each protein individually caused an alteration in virus virulence, despite the presence of other NF-κB inhibitors.

  10. Mutational analysis of adeno-associated virus Rep protein-mediated inhibition of heterologous and homologous promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Hörer, M; Weger, S; Butz, K; Hoppe-Seyler, F; Geisen, C; Kleinschmidt, J A

    1995-01-01

    The four Rep proteins encoded by adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2) inhibit transcription of their own promoters and of several heterologous promoters. To gain insight into the molecular mechanism of Rep-mediated transcription repression, we studied the effects of the four Rep proteins on the accumulation of mRNA transcribed from the human papillomavirus type 18 upstream regulatory region HPV18 URR, the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat, and the AAV-2 p5 and p19 promoters by transient transfection experiments in HeLa cells. We observed a distinct contribution of the C- and N-terminal sequences in which the four Rep proteins (Rep78, Rep68, Rep52, and Rep40) differ from each other. While Rep78 showed a more than 10-fold inhibition of the four promoters studied, transcriptional repression mediated by Rep68 and Rep52 was reduced and nearly completely abolished for Rep40. The contribution of the C terminus of Rep78 was reduced with respect to the inhibition of the AAV-2 p5 and p19 promoters. Point mutations and deletions showed that a C-terminal zinc binding motif is required for zinc binding in vitro but plays no obvious role in the inhibition of homologous and heterologous promoters. Overall, inhibition of the four different promoters was dependent on the identical Rep protein domains with the exception of the AAV-2 p5 promoter. Expression of the AAV-2 p5 promoter was inhibited by a Rep78 protein with a mutation in the nucleotide binding motif, whereas expression of the AAV-2 p19 promoter, the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat, and the HPV18 URR was not. Mutational analysis of the HPV18 URR showed that several, but not a single, cis regulatory elements are involved in the inhibition process. This finding suggests that transcriptional repression is mediated by protein-protein interactions of the Rep proteins either with multiple transcription factors or with target proteins of sequence-specific transcription factors of the basal

  11. Sequence specific protein binding to and activation of the TGF-beta 3 promoter through a repeated TCCC motif.

    PubMed Central

    Lafyatis, R; Denhez, F; Williams, T; Sporn, M; Roberts, A

    1991-01-01

    We have previously characterized the TGF-beta 3 promoter and shown that the activity of this promoter is highly variable in different cell types. Although the promoter contains a proximal cAMP responsive element, which is critical to basal and forskolin-induced promoter activity, this element is not responsible for the variable, cell-specific regulation of the promoter. In this paper, we identify a 25 base pair sequence in the proximal region of the TGF-beta 3 promoter that binds a novel DNA-binding protein. This region includes the sequence T-CCCTCCCTCCC, (3 x TCCC), and mutation of these T-CCC repeats inhibits protein binding. Further, we show that in the cell line A375, which we have previously shown expresses high levels of TGF-beta 3 mRNA, this region is responsible for mediating high level TGF-beta 3 promoter activity. Immediately 3' to the 3 x TCCC sequence is a consensus AP-2 binding site, however, we show that this region does not bind AP-2, and AP-2 does not transactivate the TGF-beta 3 promoter. Therefore, we provide strong evidence that high level expression of TGF-beta 3 in A375 cells results from transactivation of the TGF-beta 3 promoter by a protein that binds to a repeated TCCC motif in the promoter and suggest that this DNA-binding protein likely also regulates aspects of developmental and tissue-specific expression of this cytokine. Images PMID:1754378

  12. ATPase-promoting dead end inhibitors of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Mendelow, M; Prorok, M; Salerno, A; Lawrence, D S

    1993-06-15

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase is a bifunctional enzyme, catalyzing the phosphorylation of the serine and threonine residues in peptides and proteins (kinase activity) as well as the phosphorylation of water (ATPase activity). We have found that several peptides, which serve as inhibitors of the kinase reaction, will either maintain or enhance the ATPase reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Positively charged dipeptides (e.g. Arg-Arg), as well as small guanidino-containing compounds (e.g. guanethidine) block protein kinase activity yet enhance ATPase activity up to 3.5-fold over that exhibited by the enzyme in the absence of these compounds. In contrast, several nonphosphorylatable peptides, whose primary sequences are based on that of a known substrate (i.e. Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ser-Leu-Gly), such as Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Ala-Leu-Gly, Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Phe-Leu-Gly, and Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Tyr-Leu-Gly, have little or no effect on the rate of the kinase-catalyzed hydrolysis of ATP. An exception to the latter observation is Leu-Arg-Arg-Ala-Cys-Leu-Gly, a cysteine-containing peptide that promotes the protein kinase-catalyzed ATPase reaction by 2.2-fold. We have also found that peptides that possess relatively large amino acid side chain moieties immediately following the arginine dyad (i.e. such as Phe, Tyr, Cys, or Asn at Xaa in Leu-Arg-Arg-Xaa-Ala-Leu-Gly) sharply reduce the rate of enzyme-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis. This suggests that in the presence of peptides containing an -Arg-Arg-Ala- sequence, the enzyme-bound gamma-phosphate of ATP is relatively accessible to water. In contrast, when the latter alanine moiety is replaced by a larger residue, access by water to ATP appears to be hindered. These results indicate that certain structural features associated with the substrate or substrate analog have a profound influence on the manner by which these species interact with the protein kinase. Furthermore, the work described herein demonstrates that it is possible to block the

  13. The reconstitution of actin polymerization on liposomes.

    PubMed

    Stamnes, Mark; Xu, Weidong

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-associated actin polymerization is of considerable interest due to its role in cell migration and the motility of intracellular organelles. Intensive research efforts are underway to investigate the physiological role of membrane-associated actin as well as the regulation and mechanics of actin assembly. Branched actin polymerization on membranes is catalyzed by the Arp2/3 complex. Signaling events leading to the activation of the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein Cdc42 stimulate Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization. We have studied the role of Cdc42 at the Golgi apparatus in part by reconstituting actin polymerization on isolated Golgi membranes and on liposomes. In this manner, we showed that cytosolic proteins are sufficient for actin assembly on a phospholipid bilayer. Here we describe methods for the cell-free reconstitution of membrane-associated actin polymerization using liposomes and brain cytosol.

  14. The Wnt secretion protein Evi/Gpr177 promotes glioma tumourigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Iris; Goidts, Violaine; Bongers, Angelika; Kerr, Grainne; Vollert, Gordon; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Hartmann, Christian; Herold-Mende, Christel; Reifenberger, Guido; von Deimling, Andreas; Boutros, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Malignant astrocytomas are highly aggressive brain tumours with poor prognosis. While a number of structural genomic changes and dysregulation of signalling pathways in gliomas have been described, the identification of biomarkers and druggable targets remains an important task for novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Here, we show that the Wnt-specific secretory protein Evi (also known as GPR177/Wntless/Sprinter) is overexpressed in astrocytic gliomas. Evi/Wls is a core Wnt signalling component and a specific regulator of pan-Wnt protein secretion, affecting both canonical and non-canonical signalling. We demonstrate that its depletion in glioma and glioma-derived stem-like cells led to decreased cell proliferation and apoptosis. Furthermore, Evi/Wls silencing in glioma cells reduced cell migration and the capacity to form tumours in vivo. We further show that Evi/Wls overexpression is sufficient to promote downstream Wnt signalling. Taken together, our study identifies Evi/Wls as an essential regulator of glioma tumourigenesis, identifying a pathway-specific protein trafficking factor as an oncogene and offering novel therapeutic options to interfere with the aberrant regulation of growth factors at the site of production. PMID:22147553

  15. Repression of Pumilio Protein Expression by Rbfox1 Promotes Germ Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Carreira-Rosario, Arnaldo; Bhargava, Varsha; Hillebrand, Jens; Kollipara, Rahul K; Ramaswami, Mani; Buszczak, Michael

    2016-03-01

    RNA-binding Fox (Rbfox) proteins have well-established roles in regulating alternative splicing, but specific Rbfox isoforms lack nuclear localization signals and accumulate in the cytoplasm. The potential splicing-independent functions of these proteins remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that cytoplasmic Drosophila Rbfox1 regulates germ cell development and represses the translation of mRNAs containing (U)GCAUG elements within their 3'UTRs. During germline cyst differentiation, Rbfox1 targets pumilio mRNA for destabilization and translational silencing, thereby promoting germ cell development. Mis-expression of pumilio results in the formation of germline tumors, which contain cysts that break down and dedifferentiate back to single, mitotically active cells. Together, these results reveal that cytoplasmic Rbfox family members regulate the translation of specific target mRNAs. In the Drosophila ovary, this activity provides a genetic barrier that prevents germ cells from reverting back to an earlier developmental state. The finding that Rbfox proteins regulate mRNA translation has implications for Rbfox-related diseases. PMID:26954550

  16. Yes-associated Protein (YAP) Promotes Cell Survival by Inhibiting Proapoptotic Dendrin Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kirk N.; Wong, Jenny S.; Gupta, Ritu; Asanuma, Katsuhiko; Sudol, Marius; He, John Cijiang; Mundel, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Kidney podocytes are highly specialized terminally differentiated cells that form the final barrier to urinary protein loss. Podocytes are a target for injury by metabolic, autoimmune, hereditary, inflammatory, and other stressors. Persistence of podocyte injury leads to podocyte death and loss, which results in progressive kidney damage and ultimately kidney failure. Dendrin is a dual compartment protein with proapoptotic signaling properties. Nuclear relocation of dendrin in response to glomerular injury promotes podocyte apoptosis. Here we show that Yes-associated protein (YAP), a downstream target of Hippo kinases and an inhibitor of apoptosis, is expressed in the nucleus of podocytes. The WW domains of YAP mediate the interaction with the PPXY motifs of dendrin. This interaction is functionally relevant because YAP binding to dendrin reduces dendrin-dependent, staurosporine-induced apoptosis in co-transfected HEK293 cells. Moreover gene silencing of YAP in podocytes increases adriamycin-induced podocyte apoptosis. It also increases staurosporine-induced caspase-3/7 activity, which is rescued by dendrin depletion in YAP knockdown cells. Our findings elucidate YAP binding to dendrin as a prosurvival mechanism. The antiapoptotic signaling properties of YAP in podocytes could hold significance in the quest for targeted therapeutics aimed at preventing podocyte loss. PMID:23667252

  17. VAMP-associated protein B (VAPB) promotes breast tumor growth by modulation of Akt activity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Meghana; Song, Wenqiang; Jiang, Aixiang; Shyr, Yu; Lev, Sima; Greenstein, David; Brantley-Sieders, Dana; Chen, Jin

    2012-01-01

    VAPB (VAMP- associated protein B) is an ER protein that regulates multiple biological functions. Although aberrant expression of VAPB is associated with breast cancer, its function in tumor cells is poorly understood. In this report, we provide evidence that VAPB regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and AKT activation. VAPB protein expression is elevated in primary and metastatic tumor specimens, and VAPB mRNA expression levels correlated negatively with patient survival in two large breast tumor datasets. Overexpression of VAPB in mammary epithelial cells increased cell growth, whereas VAPB knockdown in tumor cells inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic mammary gland allografts. The growth regulation of mammary tumor cells controlled by VAPB appears to be mediated, at least in part, by modulation of AKT activity. Overexpression of VAPB in MCF10A-HER2 cells enhances phosphorylation of AKT. In contrast, knockdown of VAPB in MMTV-Neu tumor cells inhibited pAKT levels. Pharmacological inhibition of AKT significantly reduced three-dimensional spheroid growth induced by VAPB. Collectively, the genetic, functional and mechanistic analyses suggest a role of VAPB in tumor promotion in human breast cancer.

  18. VAMP-Associated Protein B (VAPB) Promotes Breast Tumor Growth by Modulation of Akt Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Meghana; Song, Wenqiang; Jiang, Aixiang; Shyr, Yu; Lev, Sima; Greenstein, David; Brantley-Sieders, Dana; Chen, Jin

    2012-01-01

    VAPB (VAMP- associated protein B) is an ER protein that regulates multiple biological functions. Although aberrant expression of VAPB is associated with breast cancer, its function in tumor cells is poorly understood. In this report, we provide evidence that VAPB regulates breast tumor cell proliferation and AKT activation. VAPB protein expression is elevated in primary and metastatic tumor specimens, and VAPB mRNA expression levels correlated negatively with patient survival in two large breast tumor datasets. Overexpression of VAPB in mammary epithelial cells increased cell growth, whereas VAPB knockdown in tumor cells inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in orthotopic mammary gland allografts. The growth regulation of mammary tumor cells controlled by VAPB appears to be mediated, at least in part, by modulation of AKT activity. Overexpression of VAPB in MCF10A-HER2 cells enhances phosphorylation of AKT. In contrast, knockdown of VAPB in MMTV-Neu tumor cells inhibited pAKT levels. Pharmacological inhibition of AKT significantly reduced three-dimensional spheroid growth induced by VAPB. Collectively, the genetic, functional and mechanistic analyses suggest a role of VAPB in tumor promotion in human breast cancer. PMID:23049696

  19. Double-Stranded RNA-Induced Activation of Activating Protein-1 Promoter Is Differentially Regulated by the Non-structural Protein 1 of Avian Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zohari, Siamak; Belák, Sándor; Berg, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A viruses is a multifunctional protein that antagonizes the host immune response by interfering with several host signaling pathways. Based on putative amino acid sequences, NS1 proteins are categorized into two gene pools, allele A and allele B. Here we identified that allele A NS1 proteins of H6N8 and H4N6 are able to inhibit double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced activating protein-1 (AP-1) promoter in cultured cell lines (human A549 and mink lung cells). Allele B NS1 proteins from corresponding subtypes of influenza A viruses are weak in this inhibition, despite significant levels of expression of each NS1 protein in human A549 cells. Furthermore, the capability to inhibit AP-1 promoter was mapped in the effector domain, since RNA binding domain alone lost its ability to inhibit this promoter activation. Chimeric forms of NS1 protein, composed of either RNA binding domain of allele A or B and effector domain of allele A or B, showed comparable inhibition to that of their wild-type NS1 proteins, or to the effector domain of corresponding NS1 proteins. Both alleles A and B NS1 proteins of H6N8 and H4N6 were expressed to significant levels, and were localized predominantly in the nucleus of human A549 cells. These results underscore the importance of the effector domain in inhibiting AP-1 promoter activation, and the biological function of the effector domain in stabilizing the RNA binding domain. Further, we revealed the versatile nature of NS1 in inhibiting the AP-1 transcription factor, in a manner dependent on allele type. Comprehensive studies, focusing on the molecular mechanisms behind this differential inhibition, may facilitate exploration of the zoonotic and pathogenic potential of influenza A viruses. PMID:22239235

  20. Method of preparing water purification membranes. [polymerization of allyl amine as thin films in plasma discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T. J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Allyl amine and chemically related compounds are polymerized as thin films in the presence of a plasma discharge. The monomer compound can be polymerized by itself or in the presence of an additive gas to promote polymerization and act as a carrier. The polymerized films thus produced show outstanding advantages when used as reverse osmosis membranes.

  1. Human Umbilical Tissue-Derived Cells Promote Synapse Formation and Neurite Outgrowth via Thrombospondin Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sehwon; Kim, Namsoo; Yin, Henry H.; Harris, Ian R.; Dejneka, Nadine S.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy demonstrates great potential for the treatment of neurological disorders. Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTCs) were previously shown to have protective and regenerative effects in animal models of stroke and retinal degeneration, but the underlying therapeutic mechanisms are unknown. Because synaptic dysfunction, synapse loss, degeneration of neuronal processes, and neuronal death are hallmarks of neurological diseases and retinal degenerations, we tested whether hUTCs contribute to tissue repair and regeneration by stimulating synapse formation, neurite outgrowth, and neuronal survival. To do so, we used a purified rat retinal ganglion cell culture system and found that hUTCs secrete factors that strongly promote excitatory synaptic connectivity and enhance neuronal survival. Additionally, we demonstrated that hUTCs support neurite outgrowth under normal culture conditions and in the presence of the growth-inhibitory proteins chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, myelin basic protein, or Nogo-A (reticulon 4). Furthermore, through biochemical fractionation and pharmacology, we identified the major hUTC-secreted synaptogenic factors as the thrombospondin family proteins (TSPs), TSP1, TSP2, and TSP4. Silencing TSP expression in hUTCs, using small RNA interference, eliminated both the synaptogenic function of these cells and their ability to promote neurite outgrowth. However, the majority of the prosurvival functions of hUTC-conditioned media was spared after TSP knockdown, indicating that hUTCs secrete additional neurotrophic factors. Together, our findings demonstrate that hUTCs affect multiple aspects of neuronal health and connectivity through secreted factors, and each of these paracrine effects may individually contribute to the therapeutic function of these cells. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) are currently under clinical investigation for the treatment of geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular

  2. Extensive Citrullination Promotes Immunogenicity of HSP90 through Protein Unfolding and Exposure of Cryptic Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Travers, Timothy S; Harlow, Lisa; Rosas, Ivan O; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Mikuls, Ted R; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K; Camacho, Carlos J; Ascherman, Dana P

    2016-09-01

    Post-translational protein modifications such as citrullination have been linked to the breach of immune tolerance and clinical autoimmunity. Previous studies from our laboratory support this concept, demonstrating that autoantibodies targeting citrullinated isoforms of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) are associated with rheumatoid arthritis complicated by interstitial lung disease. To further explore the relationship between citrullination and structural determinants of HSP90 immunogenicity, we employed a combination of ELISA-based epitope profiling, computational modeling, and mass-spectrometric sequencing of peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD)-modified protein. Remarkably, ELISAs involving selected citrullinated HSP90β/α peptides identified a key epitope corresponding to an internal Arg residue (R502 [HSP90β]/R510 [HSP90α]) that is normally buried within the crystal structure of native/unmodified HSP90. In vitro time/dose-response experiments reveal an ordered pattern of PAD-mediated deimination events culminating in citrullination of R502/R510. Conventional as well as scaled molecular dynamics simulations further demonstrate that citrullination of selected Arg residues leads to progressive disruption of HSP90 tertiary structure, promoting exposure of R502/R510 to PAD modification and subsequent autoantibody binding. Consistent with this process, ELISAs incorporating variably deiminated HSP90 as substrate Ag indicate a direct relationship between the degree of citrullination and the level of ex vivo Ab recognition. Overall, these data support a novel structural paradigm whereby citrullination-induced shifts in protein structure generate cryptic epitopes capable of bypassing B cell tolerance in the appropriate genetic context. PMID:27448590

  3. Extensive Citrullination Promotes Immunogenicity of HSP90 through Protein Unfolding and Exposure of Cryptic Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Travers, Timothy S; Harlow, Lisa; Rosas, Ivan O; Gochuico, Bernadette R; Mikuls, Ted R; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K; Camacho, Carlos J; Ascherman, Dana P

    2016-09-01

    Post-translational protein modifications such as citrullination have been linked to the breach of immune tolerance and clinical autoimmunity. Previous studies from our laboratory support this concept, demonstrating that autoantibodies targeting citrullinated isoforms of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) are associated with rheumatoid arthritis complicated by interstitial lung disease. To further explore the relationship between citrullination and structural determinants of HSP90 immunogenicity, we employed a combination of ELISA-based epitope profiling, computational modeling, and mass-spectrometric sequencing of peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD)-modified protein. Remarkably, ELISAs involving selected citrullinated HSP90β/α peptides identified a key epitope corresponding to an internal Arg residue (R502 [HSP90β]/R510 [HSP90α]) that is normally buried within the crystal structure of native/unmodified HSP90. In vitro time/dose-response experiments reveal an ordered pattern of PAD-mediated deimination events culminating in citrullination of R502/R510. Conventional as well as scaled molecular dynamics simulations further demonstrate that citrullination of selected Arg residues leads to progressive disruption of HSP90 tertiary structure, promoting exposure of R502/R510 to PAD modification and subsequent autoantibody binding. Consistent with this process, ELISAs incorporating variably deiminated HSP90 as substrate Ag indicate a direct relationship between the degree of citrullination and the level of ex vivo Ab recognition. Overall, these data support a novel structural paradigm whereby citrullination-induced shifts in protein structure generate cryptic epitopes capable of bypassing B cell tolerance in the appropriate genetic context.

  4. Elongation factor 2 kinase promotes cell survival by inhibiting protein synthesis without inducing autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Claire E.J.; Wang, Xuemin; Xie, Jianling; Pickford, Jo; Barron, John; Regufe da Mota, Sergio; Versele, Matthias; Proud, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) inhibits the elongation stage of protein synthesis by phosphorylating its only known substrate, eEF2. eEF2K is tightly regulated by nutrient-sensitive signalling pathways. For example, it is inhibited by signalling through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). It is therefore activated under conditions of nutrient deficiency. Here we show that inhibiting eEF2K or knocking down its expression renders cancer cells sensitive to death under nutrient-starved conditions, and that this is rescued by compounds that block protein synthesis. This implies that eEF2K protects nutrient-deprived cells by inhibiting protein synthesis. Cells in which signalling through mTORC1 is highly active are very sensitive to nutrient withdrawal. Inhibiting mTORC1 protects them. Our data reveal that eEF2K makes a substantial contribution to the cytoprotective effect of mTORC1 inhibition. eEF2K is also reported to promote another potentially cytoprotective process, autophagy. We have used several approaches to test whether inhibition or loss of eEF2K affects autophagy under a variety of conditions. We find no evidence that eEF2K is involved in the activation of autophagy in the cell types we have studied. We conclude that eEF2K protects cancer cells against nutrient starvation by inhibiting protein synthesis rather than by activating autophagy. PMID:26795954

  5. The nuclear protein Artemis promotes AMPK activation by stabilizing the LKB1-AMPK complex

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Koji; Uehata, Yasuko; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Kohara, Toshihisa; Darmanin, Stephanie; Asaka, Masahiro; Takeda, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masanobu

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear protein Artemis physically interacts with AMPK{alpha}2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Artemis co-localizes with AMPK{alpha}2 in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Artemis promotes phosphorylation and activation of AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction between AMPK{alpha}2 and LKB1 is stabilized by Artemis. -- Abstract: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a hetero-trimeric Ser/Thr kinase composed of a catalytic {alpha} subunit and regulatory {beta} and {gamma} subunits; it functions as an energy sensor that controls cellular energy homeostasis. In response to an increased cellular AMP/ATP ratio, AMPK is activated by phosphorylation at Thr172 in the {alpha}-subunit by upstream AMPK kinases (AMPKKs), including tumor suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1). To elucidate more precise molecular mechanisms of AMPK activation, we performed yeast two-hybrid screening and isolated the complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding the nuclear protein Artemis/DNA cross-link repair 1C (DCLRE1C) as an AMPK{alpha}2-binding protein. Artemis was found to co-immunoprecipitate with AMPK{alpha}2, and the co-localization of Artemis with AMPK{alpha}2 in the nucleus was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining in U2OS cells. Moreover, over-expression of Artemis enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPK{alpha}2 and the AMPK substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). Conversely, RNAi-mediated knockdown of Artemis reduced AMPK and ACC phosphorylation. In addition, Artemis markedly increased the physical association between AMPK{alpha}2 and LKB1. Taken together, these results suggest that Artemis functions as a positive regulator of AMPK signaling by stabilizing the LKB1-AMPK complex.

  6. TATA-binding protein (TBP)-like protein is required for p53-dependent transcriptional activation of upstream promoter of p21Waf1/Cip1 gene.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidefumi; Ito, Ryo; Ikeda, Kaori; Tamura, Taka-Aki

    2012-06-01

    TATA-binding protein-like protein (TLP) is involved in development, checkpoint, and apoptosis through potentiation of gene expression. TLP-overexpressing human cells, especially p53-containing cells, exhibited a decreased growth rate and increased proportion of G(1) phase cells. TLP stimulated expression of several growth-related genes including p21 (p21(Waf1/Cip1)). TLP-mediated activation of the p21 upstream promoter in cells was shown by a promoter-luciferase reporter assay. The p53-binding sequence located in the p21 upstream promoter and p53 itself are required for TLP-mediated transcriptional activation. TLP and p53 bound to each other and synergistically enhanced activity of the upstream promoter. TLP specifically activated transcription from the endogenous upstream promoter, and p53 was required for this activation. Etoposide treatment also resulted in activation of the upstream promoter as well as nuclear accumulation of TLP and p53. Moreover, the upstream promoter was associated with endogenous p53 and TLP, and the p53 recruitment was enhanced by TLP. The results of the present study suggest that TLP mediates p53-governed transcriptional activation of the p21 upstream promoter.

  7. Comparisons of Ribosomal Protein Gene Promoters Indicate Superiority of Heterologous Regulatory Sequences for Expressing Transgenes in Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Khachatoorian, Careen; Judelson, Howard S.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetics approaches in Phytophthora research can be hampered by the limited number of known constitutive promoters for expressing transgenes and the instability of transgene activity. We have therefore characterized genes encoding the cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins of Phytophthora and studied their suitability for expressing transgenes in P. infestans. Phytophthora spp. encode a standard complement of 79 cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Several genes are duplicated, and two appear to be pseudogenes. Half of the genes are expressed at similar levels during all stages of asexual development, and we discovered that the majority share a novel promoter motif named the PhRiboBox. This sequence is enriched in genes associated with transcription, translation, and DNA replication, including tRNA and rRNA biogenesis. Promoters from the three P. infestans genes encoding ribosomal proteins S9, L10, and L23 and their orthologs from P. capsici were tested for their ability to drive transgenes in stable transformants of P. infestans. Five of the six promoters yielded strong expression of a GUS reporter, but the stability of expression was higher using the P. capsici promoters. With the RPS9 and RPL10 promoters of P. infestans, about half of transformants stopped making GUS over two years of culture, while their P. capsici orthologs conferred stable expression. Since cross-talk between native and transgene loci may trigger gene silencing, we encourage the use of heterologous promoters in transformation studies. PMID:26716454

  8. Comparisons of Ribosomal Protein Gene Promoters Indicate Superiority of Heterologous Regulatory Sequences for Expressing Transgenes in Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Poidevin, Laetitia; Andreeva, Kalina; Khachatoorian, Careen; Judelson, Howard S

    2015-01-01

    Molecular genetics approaches in Phytophthora research can be hampered by the limited number of known constitutive promoters for expressing transgenes and the instability of transgene activity. We have therefore characterized genes encoding the cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins of Phytophthora and studied their suitability for expressing transgenes in P. infestans. Phytophthora spp. encode a standard complement of 79 cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins. Several genes are duplicated, and two appear to be pseudogenes. Half of the genes are expressed at similar levels during all stages of asexual development, and we discovered that the majority share a novel promoter motif named the PhRiboBox. This sequence is enriched in genes associated with transcription, translation, and DNA replication, including tRNA and rRNA biogenesis. Promoters from the three P. infestans genes encoding ribosomal proteins S9, L10, and L23 and their orthologs from P. capsici were tested for their ability to drive transgenes in stable transformants of P. infestans. Five of the six promoters yielded strong expression of a GUS reporter, but the stability of expression was higher using the P. capsici promoters. With the RPS9 and RPL10 promoters of P. infestans, about half of transformants stopped making GUS over two years of culture, while their P. capsici orthologs conferred stable expression. Since cross-talk between native and transgene loci may trigger gene silencing, we encourage the use of heterologous promoters in transformation studies. PMID:26716454

  9. Polymeric vesicles: from drug carriers to nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Pascal; Baumann, Patric; Enea, Ramona; Onaca, Ozana; Palivan, Cornelia; Meier, Wolfgang

    2011-10-18

    act in situ. In recent years, we have created a variety of multifunctional, proteinpolymersomes combinations for biomedical applications. The insertion of membrane proteins or biopores into the polymer membrane supported the activity of co-encapsulated enzymes that act in tandem inside the cavity or of combinations of drugs and imaging agents. Surface functionalization of these nanocarriers permitted specific targeting of the desired biological compartments. Polymeric vesicles alone are relatively easy to prepare and functionalize. Those features, along with their stability and multifunctionality, promote their use in the development of new theranostic strategies. The combination of polymer vesicles and biological entities will serve as tools to improve the observation and treatment of pathological events and the overall condition of the patient.

  10. Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Promotes Fibrosis and Activates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases in MRC-5 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Tang, Su; Tang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening hypoxemic respiratory disorder with high incidence and mortality. ALI usually manifests as widespread inflammation and lung fibrosis with the accumulation of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic factors and collagen. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has a significant role in regulation of inflammation but little is known about its roles in lung fibrosis or ALI. This study aimed to define the role and possible regulatory mechanism of TSLP in lung fibrosis. Material/Methods We cultured human lung fibroblast MRC-5 cells and overexpressed or inhibited TSLP by the vector or small interfering RNA transfection. Then, the pro-fibrotic factors skeletal muscle actin alpha (α-SMA) and collagen I, and the 4 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) – MAPK7, p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) – were detected by Western blot. Results Results showed that TSLP promoted the production of α-SMA and collagen I (P<0.001), suggesting that it can accelerate MRC-5 cell fibrosis. It also activated the expression of MAPK7, p-p38, p-ERK1, and p-JNK1, but the total MAPK7, p-38, ERK1, and JNK1 protein levels were mostly unchanged, indicating the activated MAPK pathways that might contribute to the promotion of cell fibrosis. Conclusions This study shows the pro-fibrotic role of TSLP in MRC-5 cells, suggesting TSLP is a potential therapeutic target for treating lung fibrosis in ALI. It possibly functions via activating MAPKs. These findings add to our understanding of the mechanism of fibrosis. PMID:27385084

  11. Yes-Associated Protein (YAP) Promotes the Nuclear Import of p73

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Wu, Shengnan

    2011-01-01

    p73 has been identified as a structural and functional homolog of the tumor suppressor p53. However, mechanisms that regulate the localization of p73 have not been fully clarified. The Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional coactivator. As a transcriptional coactivator, YAP needs to bind transcription factors to stimulate gene expression. p73 is a reported YAP target transcription factors and YAP has been shown to positively regulate p73 in promoting apoptosis. Previous studies show that p73 interacts with YAP through its PPPY motif, and increases p73 transactivation of apoptotic genes. In this study, we focused on YAP's regulation of the localization of p73. After transient transfection into Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells and Human embryonic kidney 293T cells with GFP-YAP and/or YFP-p73, and incubated for 24 hours expression. p73 was fused to YFP to allow the examination of its subcellular localization. When expressed alone, YFP-p73 was distributed throughout the cell. When coexpressed with YAP, nuclear accumulation of YFP-p73 became evident. We quantitated the effect of YAP on the redistribution of YFP-p73 by counting cells with nuclear-only YFP signal. We found that YAP can influence the subcellular distribution of p73. Altogether, coexpression with YAP affected the subcellular distribution of the p73 protein. Our studies attribute a central role to YAP in regulating p73 accumulation and YAP, at least in part, might promote the nuclear import of p73.

  12. A Single Amino Acid Substitution in an ORANGE Protein Promotes Carotenoid Overaccumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hui; Owsiany, Katherine; Sheeja, T E; Zhou, Xiangjun; Rodriguez, Caroline; Li, Yongxi; Welsch, Ralf; Chayut, Noam; Yang, Yong; Thannhauser, Theodore W; Parthasarathy, Mandayam V; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin; Fei, Zhangjun; Schaffer, Ari; Katzir, Nurit; Burger, Joseph; Tadmor, Yaakov; Li, Li

    2015-09-01

    Carotenoids are crucial for plant growth and human health. The finding of ORANGE (OR) protein as a pivotal regulator of carotenogenesis offers a unique opportunity to comprehensively understand the regulatory mechanisms of carotenoid accumulation and develop crops with enhanced nutritional quality. Here, we demonstrated that alteration of a single amino acid in a wild-type OR greatly enhanced its ability to promote carotenoid accumulation. Whereas overexpression of OR from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtOR) or from the agronomically important crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor; SbOR) increased carotenoid levels up to 2-fold, expression of AtOR(His) (R90H) or SbOR(His) (R104H) variants dramatically enhanced carotenoid accumulation by up to 7-fold in the Arabidopsis calli. Moreover, we found that AtOR(Ala) (R90A) functioned similarly to AtOR(His) to promote carotenoid overproduction. Neither AtOR nor AtOR(His) greatly affected carotenogenic gene expression. AtOR(His) exhibited similar interactions with phytoene synthase (PSY) as AtOR in posttranscriptionally regulating PSY protein abundance. AtOR(His) triggered biogenesis of membranous chromoplasts in the Arabidopsis calli, which shared structures similar to chromoplasts found in the curd of the orange cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) mutant. By contrast, AtOR did not cause plastid-type changes in comparison with the controls, but produced plastids containing larger and electron-dense plastoglobuli. The unique ability of AtOR(His) in mediating chromoplast biogenesis is responsible for its induced carotenoid overproduction. Our study demonstrates OR(His/Ala) as powerful tools for carotenoid enrichment in plants, and provides insights into the mechanisms underlying OR(His)-regulated carotenoid accumulation.

  13. Nodal promotes invasive phenotypes via a Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Quail, DF; Zhang, G; Findlay, SD; Hess, DA; Postovit, LM

    2016-01-01

    The progression of cancer from localized to invasive disease is requisite for metastasis, and is often characterized by epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and alterations in cellular adhesion and migration. Studies have shown that this transition is associated with an up-regulation of embryonic stem cell-associated genes, resulting in a dedifferentiated phenotype and poor patient prognosis. Nodal is an embryonic factor that plays a critical role in promoting early invasive events during development. Nodal is silenced as stem cells differentiate; however, it re-emerges in adult life during placentation and mammary gland development, and is aberrantly expressed in many cancers. Here, we show that Nodal over-expression, in poorly-invasive breast cancer and choriocarcinoma cells, causes increased invasion and migration in vitro. Furthermore, we show that Nodal over-expression in these epithelial cancer types induces an EMT-like event concomitant with the internalization of E-Cadherin. This ability of Nodal to promote cellular invasion and EMT-like phenomena is dependent upon the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Since Nodal normally signals through SMADs, these findings lend insight into an alternative pathway that is hijacked by this protein in cancer. To evaluate the clinical implications of our results, we show that Nodal inhibition reduces liver tumor burden in a model of spontaneous breast cancer metastasis in vivo, and that Nodal loss-of-function in aggressive breast cancer lines results in a decrease in invasive phenotypes. Our results demonstrate that Nodal is involved in promoting invasion in multiple cellular contexts, and that Nodal inhibition may be useful as a therapeutic target for patients with progressive disease. PMID:23334323

  14. Vascular adhesion protein-1 promotes liver inflammation and drives hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Weston, Chris J.; Shepherd, Emma L.; Claridge, Lee C.; Rantakari, Pia; Curbishley, Stuart M.; Tomlinson, Jeremy W.; Hubscher, Stefan G.; Reynolds, Gary M.; Aalto, Kristiina; Anstee, Quentin M.; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salmi, Marko; Smith, David J.; Day, Christopher P.; Adams, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a range of manifestations, including steatosis and cirrhosis. Progressive disease is characterized by hepatic leukocyte accumulation in the form of steatohepatitis. The adhesion molecule vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is a membrane-bound amine oxidase that promotes leukocyte recruitment to the liver, and the soluble form (sVAP-1) accounts for most circulating monoamine oxidase activity, has insulin-like effects, and can initiate oxidative stress. Here, we determined that hepatic VAP-1 expression is increased in patients with chronic liver disease and that serum sVAP-1 levels are elevated in patients with NAFLD compared with those in control individuals. In 4 murine hepatic injury models, an absence or blockade of functional VAP-1 reduced inflammatory cell recruitment to the liver and attenuated fibrosis. Moreover, disease was reduced in animals expressing a catalytically inactive form of VAP-1, implicating enzyme activity in the disease pathogenesis. Within the liver, hepatic stromal cells expressed functional VAP-1, and evaluation of cultured cells revealed that sVAP-1 promotes leukocyte migration through catalytic generation of ROS, which depended on VAP-1 enzyme activity. VAP-1 enhanced stromal cell spreading and wound closure and modulated expression of profibrotic genes. Together, these results link the amine oxidase activity of VAP-1 with hepatic inflammation and fibrosis and suggest that targeting VAP-1 has therapeutic potential for NAFLD and other chronic fibrotic liver diseases. PMID:25562318

  15. Protein kinase Cα inhibits myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through the promotion of myocardin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Weizong; Wang, Nan; Li, Man; Gong, Huiqin; Liao, Xinghua; Yang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Tongcun

    2015-09-01

    Myocardin plays a key role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, the upstream signals that control the stability and transactivity of myocardin remain to be fully understood. The expression of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) also induces cardiac hypertrophy. An essential downstream molecule of PKCα, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, was reported to negatively regulate the activities of myocardin. But, the effect of cooperation between PKCα and myocardin and the potential molecular mechanism by which PKCα regulates myocardin-mediated cardiac hypertrophy are unclear. In this study, a luciferase assay was performed using H9C2 cells transfected with expression plasmids for PKCα and myocardin. Surprisingly, the results showed that PKCα inhibited the transcriptional activity of myocardin. PKCα inhibited myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, demonstrated by the decrease in cell surface area and fetal gene expression, in cardiomyocyte cells overexpressing PKCα and myocardin. The potential mechanism underlying the inhibition effect of PKCα on the function of myocardin is further explored. PKCα directly promoted the basal phosphorylation of endogenous myocardin at serine and threonine residues. In myocardin-overexpressing cardiomyocyte cells, PKCα induced the excessive phosphorylation of myocardin, resulting in the degradation of myocardin and a transcriptional suppression of hypertrophic genes. These results demonstrated that PKCα inhibits myocardin-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy through the promotion of myocardin phosphorylation. PMID:26206583

  16. The Yeast Cell Fusion Protein Prm1p Requires Covalent Dimerization to Promote Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Alex; Aguilar, Pablo S.; Walter, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Prm1p is a multipass membrane protein that promotes plasma membrane fusion during yeast mating. The mechanism by which Prm1p and other putative regulators of developmentally controlled cell-cell fusion events facilitate membrane fusion has remained largely elusive. Here, we report that Prm1p forms covalently linked homodimers. Covalent Prm1p dimer formation occurs via intermolecular disulfide bonds of two cysteines, Cys-120 and Cys-545. PRM1 mutants in which these cysteines have been substituted are fusion defective. These PRM1 mutants are normally expressed, retain homotypic interaction and can traffic to the fusion zone. Because prm1-C120S and prm1-C545S mutants can form covalent dimers when coexpressed with wild-type PRM1, an intermolecular C120-C545 disulfide linkage is inferred. Cys-120 is adjacent to a highly conserved hydrophobic domain. Mutation of a charged residue within this hydrophobic domain abrogates formation of covalent dimers, trafficking to the fusion zone, and fusion-promoting activity. The importance of intermolecular disulfide bonding informs models regarding the mechanism of Prm1-mediated cell-cell fusion. PMID:20485669

  17. [Envelope protein of Jaagsiekte sheep retrovious expressed in NIH3T3 cells promotes cell proliferation].

    PubMed

    DU, Fangyuan; Chen, Dayong; Zhang, Yufei; Sun, Xiaolin; Guo, Wenqing; Liu, Shuying

    2016-09-01

    Objective To explore the influence of the exogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retrovious (exJSRV) envelope protein (Env) on NIH3T3 cell proliferation. Methods A recombinant plasmid pcDNA4/myc-His/exJSRV- env carrying exJSRV- env gene was constructed, and then the correctness of the recombinant plasmid was identified by PCR, restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The recombinant plasmid pcDNA4/myc-His/exJSRV- env was transiently transfected into NIH3T3 cells by Lipofectamine(TM) LTX. After the transfection of the recombinant plasmid, the expression of exJSRV- env was detected by reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting. The effect of Env on cell proliferation was investigated by CCK-8 assay and plate colony formation assay. Results The recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid containing exJSRV- env was successfully constructed as identified by PCR, restriction enzyme identification and sequencing. After the recombinant plasmid was transiently transfected into NIH3T3 cells, reverse transcription PCR and Western blotting showed the expression of exJSRV- env , and Env promoted NIH3T3 cell proliferation significantly. Conclusion JSRV Env was expressed successfully in the NIH3T3 cells and promoted the proliferation of NIH3T3 cells. PMID:27609573

  18. Study of the glucoamylase promoter in Aspergillus niger using green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Santerre Henriksen, A L; Even, S; Müller, C; Punt, P J; van den Hondel, C A; Nielsen, J

    1999-03-01

    An Aspergillus niger strain expressing a red-shifted green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the cytoplasm under the control of the glucoamylase promoter (PgIaA) was characterized with respect to its physiology and morphology. Although xylose acted as a repressor carbon source during batch cultivations, PgIaA-driven GFP expression by the glucoamylase promoter could be demonstrated in xylose-limited continuous cultures. In these cultivations, the xylose concentration was therefore too low to cause repression. Transient experiments initiated with a maltose pulse did not further induce red-shifted GFP production in xylose-limited continuous cultures. Maltose induction under conditions of xylose repression was microscopically observed and quantified in a flow-through chamber. Red-shifted GFP was first produced after 5 h induction. Finally the strain was characterized in glucose-limited continuous cultures, and here the area of the mycelium stained with cytoplasmic GFP increased with increasing specific growth rate, indicating that GFP can be used as a marker of cellular activity in this type of cultivation.

  19. Secreted Frizzled related protein-4 (sFRP4) promotes epidermal differentiation and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Maganga, Richard; Giles, Natalie; Adcroft, Katharine; Unni, Ambili; Keeney, Diane; Wood, Fiona; Fear, Mark Dharmarajan, Arunasalam

    2008-12-12

    The skin provides vital protection from infection and dehydration. Maintenance of the skin is through a constant program of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of epidermal cells, whereby proliferating cells in the basal layer differentiating to form the keratinized, anucleated stratum corneum. The WNT signalling pathway is known to be important in the skin. WNT signalling has been shown to be important both in epidermal development and in the maintenance and cycling of hair follicles and epidermal stem cells. However, the precise role for this pathway in epidermal differentiation remains unknown. We investigated the role of the WNT signalling inhibitor sFRP4 in epidermal differentiation. sFRP4 is expressed in both normal skin and keratinocytes in culture. Expression of sFRP4 mRNA and protein increases with keratinocyte differentiation and apoptosis, whilst exposure of keratinocytes to exogenous sFRP4 promotes apoptosis and expression of the terminal differentiation marker Involucrin. These data suggest sFRP4 promotes epidermal differentiation.

  20. HCV core protein promotes hepatocyte proliferation and chemoresistance by inhibiting NR4A1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yongsheng; Li, Yan

    2015-10-23

    This study investigated the effect of HCV core protein on the proliferation of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the influence of HCV core protein on HCC apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, and the mechanism through which HCV core protein acts as a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related HCC by measuring the levels of NR4A1 and Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), which are associated with tumor suppression and chemotherapy resistance. In the present study, PcDNA3.1-core and RUNX3 siRNA were transfected into LO2 and HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. LO2-core, HepG2-core, LO2-RUNX3 (low) and control cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin for 72 h, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed using the CellTiter 96(®)Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Western blot and real time PCR analyses were used to detect NR4A1, RUNX3, smad7, Cyclin D1 and BAX. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the levels of NR4A1 in HepG2 and HepG2-core cells. The growth rate of HepG2-core cells was considerably greater than that of HepG2 cells. HCV core protein increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. In LO2 - RUNX3 (low), the rate of cell proliferation and the level of cisplatin resistance were the same as in the LO2 -core. These results suggest that HCV core protein decreases the sensitivity of hepatocytes to cisplatin by inhibiting the expression of NR4A1 and promoting the expression of smad7, which negatively regulates the TGF-β pathway. This effect results in down regulation of RUNX3, a target of the TGF-β pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that in hepatocytes, HCV core protein increases drug resistance and inhibits cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3.

  1. Btf, a Novel Death-Promoting Transcriptional Repressor That Interacts with Bcl-2-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kasof, Gary M.; Goyal, Lakshmi; White, Eileen

    1999-01-01

    The adenovirus E1B 19,000-molecular-weight (19K) protein is a potent inhibitor of apoptosis and cooperates with E1A to transform primary rodent cells. E1B 19K shows sequence and functional homology to the mammalian antiapoptotic gene product, Bcl-2. Like Bcl-2, the biochemical mechanism of E1B 19K function includes binding to and antagonization of cellular proapoptotic proteins such as Bax, Bak, and Nbk/Bik. In addition, there is evidence that E1B 19K can affect gene expression, but whether this contributes to its antiapoptotic function has not been determined. In an effort to further understand the functions of E1B 19K, we screened for 19K-associated proteins by the yeast two-hybrid system. A novel protein, Btf (Bcl-2-associated transcription factor), that interacts with E1B 19K as well as with the antiapoptotic family members Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL but not with the proapoptotic protein Bax was identified. btf is a widely expressed gene that encodes a protein with homology to the basic zipper (bZip) and Myb DNA binding domains. Btf binds DNA in vitro and represses transcription in reporter assays. E1B 19K, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL sequester Btf in the cytoplasm and block its transcriptional repression activity. Expression of Btf also inhibited transformation by E1A with either E1B 19K or mutant p53, suggesting a role in either promotion of apoptosis or cell cycle arrest. Indeed, the sustained overexpression of Btf in HeLa cells induced apoptosis, which was inhibited by E1B 19K. Furthermore, the chromosomal localization of btf (6q22-23) maps to a region that is deleted in some cancers, consistent with a role for Btf in tumor suppression. Thus, btf may represent a novel tumor suppressor gene residing in a unique pathway by which the Bcl-2 family can regulate apoptosis. PMID:10330179

  2. HCV core protein promotes hepatocyte proliferation and chemoresistance by inhibiting NR4A1.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yongsheng; Li, Yan

    2015-10-23

    This study investigated the effect of HCV core protein on the proliferation of hepatocytes and hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC), the influence of HCV core protein on HCC apoptosis induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, and the mechanism through which HCV core protein acts as a potential oncoprotein in HCV-related HCC by measuring the levels of NR4A1 and Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3), which are associated with tumor suppression and chemotherapy resistance. In the present study, PcDNA3.1-core and RUNX3 siRNA were transfected into LO2 and HepG2 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. LO2-core, HepG2-core, LO2-RUNX3 (low) and control cells were treated with different concentrations of cisplatin for 72 h, and cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed using the CellTiter 96(®)Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Western blot and real time PCR analyses were used to detect NR4A1, RUNX3, smad7, Cyclin D1 and BAX. Confocal microscopy was used to determine the levels of NR4A1 in HepG2 and HepG2-core cells. The growth rate of HepG2-core cells was considerably greater than that of HepG2 cells. HCV core protein increased the expression of cyclin D1 and decreased the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. In LO2 - RUNX3 (low), the rate of cell proliferation and the level of cisplatin resistance were the same as in the LO2 -core. These results suggest that HCV core protein decreases the sensitivity of hepatocytes to cisplatin by inhibiting the expression of NR4A1 and promoting the expression of smad7, which negatively regulates the TGF-β pathway. This effect results in down regulation of RUNX3, a target of the TGF-β pathway. Taken together, these findings indicate that in hepatocytes, HCV core protein increases drug resistance and inhibits cell apoptosis by inhibiting the expressions of NR4A1 and RUNX3. PMID:26392314

  3. Binding of cellular repressor protein or the IE2 protein to a cis-acting negative regulatory element upstream of a human cytomegalovirus early promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L; Stinski, M F

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that the human cytomegalovirus early UL4 promoter has upstream negative and positive cis-acting regulatory elements. In the absence of the upstream negative regulatory region, the positive element confers strong transcriptional activity. The positive element contains a CCAAT box dyad symmetry and binds the cellular transcription factor NF-Y. The effect of the negative regulatory element is negated by the viral IE2 protein (L. Huang, C.L. Malone, and M.F. Stinski, J. Virol. 68:2108, 1994). We investigated the binding of cellular or viral IE2 protein to the negative regulatory region. The major cis-acting negative regulatory element was located between -168 and -134 bp relative to the transcription start site. This element could be transferred to a heterologous promoter, and it functioned in either orientation. Mutational analysis demonstrated that a core DNA sequence in the cis-acting negative regulatory element, 5'-GTTTGGAATCGTT-3', was required for the binding of either a cellular repressor protein(s) or the viral IE2 protein. The cellular DNA binding activity was present in both nonpermissive HeLa and permissive human fibroblast cells but more abundant in HeLa cells. Binding of the cellular repressor protein to the upstream cis-acting negative regulatory element correlates with repression of transcription from the early UL4 promoter. Binding of the viral IE2 protein correlates with negation of the repressive effect. PMID:7494269

  4. Operational strategies, monitoring and control of heterologous protein production in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris under different promoters: A review

    PubMed Central

    Cos, Oriol; Ramón, Ramón; Montesinos, José Luis; Valero, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    The methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris has been widely reported as a suitable expression system for heterologous protein production. The use of different phenotypes under PAOX promoter, other alternative promoters, culture medium, and operational strategies with the objective to maximize either yield or productivity of the heterologous protein, but also to obtain a repetitive product batch to batch to get a robust process for the final industrial application have been reported. Medium composition, kinetics growth, fermentation operational strategies from fed-batch to continuous cultures using different phenotypes with the most common PAOX promoter and other novel promoters (GAP, FLD, ICL), the use of mixed substrates, on-line monitoring of the key fermentation parameters (methanol) and control algorithms applied to the bioprocess are reviewed and discussed in detail. PMID:16600031

  5. Adipocyte differentiation-related protein promotes lipid accumulation in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, H B; Yu, K; Luo, J; Li, J; Tian, H B; Zhu, J J; Sun, Y T; Yao, D W; Xu, H F; Shi, H P; Loor, J J

    2015-10-01

    Milk fat originates from the secretion of cytosolic lipid droplets (CLD) synthesized within mammary epithelial cells. Adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP; gene symbol PLIN2) is a CLD-binding protein that is crucial for synthesis of mature CLD. Our hypothesis was that ADRP regulates CLD production and metabolism in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC) and thus plays a role in determining milk fat content. To understand the role of ADRP in ruminant milk fat metabolism, ADRP (PLIN2) was overexpressed or knocked down in GMEC using an adenovirus system. Immunocytochemical staining revealed that ADRP localized to the surface of CLD. Supplementation with oleic acid (OA) enhanced its colocalization with CLD surface and enhanced lipid accumulation. Overexpression of ADRP increased lipid accumulation and the concentration of triacylglycerol in GMEC. In contrast, morphological examination revealed that knockdown of ADRP decreased lipid accumulation even when OA was supplemented. This response was confirmed by the reduction in mass of cellular TG when ADRP was knocked down. The fact that knockdown of ADRP did not completely eliminate lipid accumulation at a morphological level in GMEC without OA suggests that some other compensatory factors may also aid in the process of CLD formation. The ADRP reversed the decrease of CLD accumulation induced by adipose triglyceride lipase. This is highly suggestive of ADRP promoting triacylglycerol stability within CLD by preventing access to adipose triglyceride lipase. Collectively, these data provide direct in vitro evidence that ADRP plays a key role in CLD formation and stability in GMEC. PMID:26298750

  6. Heterotrimeric G-protein alpha-12 (Gα12) subunit promotes oral cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Chai Phei; Patel, Vyomesh; Mikelis, Constantinos M.; Zain, Rosnah Binti; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Abraham, Mannil Thomas; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Abdul Rahman, Zainal Ariff; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Cheong, Sok Ching

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has a propensity to spread to the cervical lymph nodes (LN). The presence of cervical LN metastases severely impacts patient survival, whereby the two-year survival for oral cancer patients with involved LN is ~30% compared to over 80% in patients with non-involved LN. Elucidation of key molecular mechanisms underlying OSCC metastasis may afford an opportunity to target specific genes, to prevent the spread of OSCC and to improve patient survival. In this study, we demonstrated that expression of the heterotrimeric G-protein alpha-12 (Gα12) is highly up-regulated in primary tumors and LN of OSCC patients, as assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also found that exogenous expression of the constitutively activated-form of Gα12 promoted cell migration and invasion in OSCC cell lines. Correspondingly, inhibition of Gα12 expression by shRNA consistently inhibited OSCC cell migration and invasion in vitro. Further, the inhibition of G12 signaling by regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) inhibited Gα12-mediated RhoA activation, which in turn resulted in reduced LN metastases in a tongue-orthotopic xenograft mouse model of oral cancer. This study provides a rationale for future development and evaluation of drug candidates targeting Gα12-related pathways for metastasis prevention. PMID:25275299

  7. LAMP-3 (Lysosome-Associated Membrane Protein 3) Promotes the Intracellular Proliferation of Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Ju; Park, Kwan-Sik; Jeon, In-Sook; Choi, Jae-Woon; Lee, Sang-Jeon; Choy, Hyun E.; Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Choi, Joong-Kook

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are cellular organelles containing diverse classes of catabolic enzymes that are implicated in diverse cellular processes including phagocytosis, autophagy, lipid transport, and aging. Lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) are major glycoproteins important for maintaining lysosomal integrity, pH, and catabolism. LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 are constitutively expressed in Salmonella-infected cells and are recruited to Salmonella-containing vacuoles (SCVs) as well as Salmonella-induced filaments (Sifs) that promote the survival and proliferation of the Salmonella. LAMP-3, also known as DC-LAMP/CD208, is a member of the LAMP family of proteins, but its role during Salmonella infection remains unclear. DNA microarray analysis identified LAMP-3 as one of the genes responding to LPS stimulation in THP-1 macrophage cells. Subsequent analyses reveal that LPS and Salmonella induced the expression of LAMP-3 at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Confocal Super resolution N-SIM imaging revealed that LAMP-3, like LAMP-2, shifts its localization from the cell surface to alongside Salmonella. Knockdown of LAMP-3 by specific siRNAs decreased the number of Salmonella recovered from the infected cells. Therefore, we conclude that LAMP-3 is induced by Salmonella infection and recruited to the Salmonella pathogen for intracellular proliferation. PMID:27329040

  8. Myelin basic protein cleaves cell adhesion molecule L1 and promotes neuritogenesis and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Lutz, David; Loers, Gabriele; Kleene, Ralf; Oezen, Iris; Kataria, Hardeep; Katagihallimath, Nainesh; Braren, Ingke; Harauz, George; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-05-01

    The cell adhesion molecule L1 is a Lewis(x)-carrying glycoprotein that plays important roles in the developing and adult nervous system. Here we show that myelin basic protein (MBP) binds to L1 in a Lewis(x)-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MBP is released by murine cerebellar neurons as a sumoylated dynamin-containing protein upon L1 stimulation and that this MBP cleaves L1 as a serine protease in the L1 extracellular domain at Arg(687) yielding a transmembrane fragment that promotes neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival in cell culture. L1-induced neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival are reduced in MBP-deficient cerebellar neurons and in wild-type cerebellar neurons in the presence of an MBP antibody or L1 peptide containing the MBP cleavage site. Genetic ablation of MBP in shiverer mice and mutagenesis of the proteolytically active site in MBP or of the MBP cleavage site within L1 as well as serine protease inhibitors and an L1 peptide containing the MBP cleavage site abolish generation of the L1 fragment. Our findings provide evidence for novel functions of MBP in the nervous system. PMID:24671420

  9. Inhibition of SNW1 association with spliceosomal proteins promotes apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Naoki; Maeda, Masao; Sugiyama, Mai; Ito, Satoko; Hyodo, Toshinori; Masuda, Akio; Tsunoda, Nobuyuki; Kokuryo, Toshio; Hamaguchi, Michinari; Nagino, Masato; Senga, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    RNA splicing is a fundamental process for protein synthesis. Recent studies have reported that drugs that inhibit splicing have cytotoxic effects on various tumor cell lines. In this report, we demonstrate that depletion of SNW1, a component of the spliceosome, induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Proteomics and biochemical analyses revealed that SNW1 directly associates with other spliceosome components, including EFTUD2 (Snu114) and SNRNP200 (Brr2). The SKIP region of SNW1 interacted with the N-terminus of EFTUD2 as well as two independent regions in the C-terminus of SNRNP200. Similar to SNW1 depletion, knockdown of EFTUD2 increased the numbers of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that exogenous expression of either the SKIP region of SNW1 or the N-terminus region of EFTUD2 significantly promoted cellular apoptosis. Our results suggest that the inhibition of SNW1 or its associating proteins may be a novel therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. PMID:25450007

  10. The matricellular protein CCN1 promotes mucosal healing in murine colitis through IL-6.

    PubMed

    Choi, J S; Kim, K-H; Lau, L F

    2015-11-01

    The matricellular protein CCN1 (CYR61) is known to function in wound healing and is upregulated in colons of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, yet its specific role in colitis is unknown. Here we have used Ccn1(dm/dm) knockin mice expressing a CCN1 mutant unable to bind integrins α6β1 and αMβ2 as a model to probe CCN1 function in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Ccn1(dm/dm) mice exhibited high mortality, impaired mucosal healing, and diminished interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression during the repair phase of DSS-induced colitis compared with wild-type mice, despite having comparable severity of initial inflammation and tissue injury. CCN1-induced IL-6 expression in macrophages through integrin αMβ2 and in fibroblasts through α6β1, and IL-6 promoted intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation. Administration of purified CCN1 protein fully rescued Ccn1(dm/dm) mice from DSS-induced mortality, restored IEC proliferation and enhanced mucosal healing, whereas delivery of IL-6 partially rectified these defects. CCN1 therapy accelerated mucosal healing and recovery from DSS-induced colitis even in wild-type mice. These findings reveal a critical role for CCN1 in restoring mucosal homeostasis after intestinal injury in part through integrin-mediated induction of IL-6 expression, and suggest a therapeutic potential for activating the CCN1/IL-6 axis for treating inflammatory bowel disease.

  11. Yes-associated protein 1 is widely expressed in human brain tumors and promotes glioblastoma growth.

    PubMed

    Orr, Brent A; Bai, Haibo; Odia, Yazmin; Jain, Deepali; Anders, Robert A; Eberhart, Charles G

    2011-07-01

    The hippo pathway and its downstream mediator yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) regulate mammalian organ size in part through modulating progenitor cell numbers. YAP1 has also been implicated as an oncogene in multiple human cancers. Currently, little is known about the expression of YAP1 either in normal human brain tissue or in central nervous system neoplasms. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate nuclear YAP1 expression in the fetal and normal adult human brains and in 264 brain tumors. YAP1 was expressed in fetal and adult brain regions known to harbor neural progenitor cells, but there was little YAP1 immunoreactivity in the adult cerebral cortex. YAP1 protein was also readily detected in the nuclei of human brain tumors. In medulloblastoma, the expression varied between histologic subtypes and was most prominent in nodular/desmoplastic tumors. In gliomas, it was frequently expressed in infiltrating astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas but rarely in pilocytic astrocytomas. Using a loss-of-function approach, we show that YAP1 promoted growth of glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. High levels of YAP1 messenger RNA expression were associated with aggressive molecular subsets of glioblastoma and with a nonsignificant trend toward reduced mean survival in human astrocytoma patients. These findings suggest that YAP1 may play an important role in normal human brain development and that it could represent a new target in human brain tumors.

  12. Activation and repression of transcription at two different phage phi29 promoters are mediated by interaction of the same residues of regulatory protein p4 with RNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Monsalve, M; Mencia, M; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1996-01-01

    Phage phi29 regulatory protein p4 activates transcription from the late A3 promoter and represses the main early promoters, named A2b and A2c. Activation involves stabilization of RNA polymerase (RNAP) at the A3 promoter as a closed complex and is mediated by interaction between RNAP and a small domain of protein p4 in which residue Arg120 plays an essential role. We show that protein p4 represses the A2c promoter by binding to DNA immediately upstream from RNAP in a way that does not hinder RNAP binding; rather, the two proteins bind cooperatively to DNA. In the presence of protein p4, RNAP can form an initiated complex at the A2c promoter that generates short abortive transcripts, but cannot leave the promoter. Mutation of protein p4 residue Arg120, which relieves the contact between the two proteins, leads to a loss of repression. Therefore, the contact between protein p4 and RNAP through the protein p4 domain containing Arg120 can activate or repress transcription, depending on the promoter. The relative position of protein p4 and RNAP, which is different at each promoter, together with the distinct characteristics of the two promoters, may determine whether protein p4 activates or represses transcription. Images PMID:8617213

  13. Non-essential repeats in the promoter region of a Brassica rapa acyl carrier protein gene expressed in developing embryos.

    PubMed

    Scherer, D; Sato, A; McCarter, D W; Radke, S E; Kridl, J C; Knauf, V C

    1992-02-01

    A genomic clone of an acyl carrier protein gene (Bcg4-4) which is highly expressed in developing embryos of Brassica rapa was isolated and sequenced. The promoter and transcription terminator regions of Bcg4-4 were used to express a beta-glucuronidase reporter gene in transgenic rapeseed. Deletion of repeated domains in the promoter region did not lower beta-glucuronidase expression in seeds.

  14. Formulations of polymeric biodegradable low-cost foam by melt extrusion to deliver plant growth-promoting bacteria in agricultural systems.

    PubMed

    Marcelino, Paulo Ricardo Franco; Milani, Karina Maria Lima; Mali, Suzana; Santos, Odair José Andrade Pais Dos; de Oliveira, André Luiz Martinez

    2016-08-01

    The extrusion technology of blends formed by compounds with different physicochemical properties often results in new materials that present properties distinctive from its original individual constituents. Here, we report the use of melt extrusion of blends made from low-cost materials to produce a biodegradable foam suitable for use as an inoculant carrier of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB). Six formulations were prepared with variable proportions of the raw materials; the resulting physicochemical and structural properties are described, as well as formulation performance in the maintenance of bacterial viability during 120 days of storage. Differences in blend composition influenced foam density, porosity, expansion index, and water absorption. Additionally, differences in the capability of sustaining bacterial viability for long periods of time were more related to the foam composition than to the resulting physicochemical characteristics. Microscopic analyses showed that the inoculant bacteria had firmly attached to the extruded material by forming biofilms. Inoculation assays using maize plants demonstrated that the bacteria attached to the extruded foams could survive in the soil for up to 10 days before maize sowing, without diminishing its ability to promote plant growth. The results presented demonstrate the viability of the new matrix as a biotechnological material for bacterial delivery not only in agriculture but also in other biotechnological applications, according to the selected bacterial strains.

  15. Herpesviral ICP0 Protein Promotes Two Waves of Heterochromatin Removal on an Early Viral Promoter during Lytic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer S.; Raja, Priya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpesviruses must contend with host cell epigenetic silencing responses acting on their genomes upon entry into the host cell nucleus. In this study, we confirmed that unchromatinized herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) genomes enter primary human foreskin fibroblasts and are rapidly subjected to assembly of nucleosomes and association with repressive heterochromatin modifications such as histone 3 (H3) lysine 9-trimethylation (H3K9me3) and lysine 27-trimethylation (H3K27me3) during the first 1 to 2 h postinfection. Kinetic analysis of the modulation of nucleosomes and heterochromatin modifications over the course of lytic infection demonstrates a progressive removal that coincided with initiation of viral gene expression. We obtained evidence for three phases of heterochromatin removal from an early gene promoter: an initial removal of histones and heterochromatin not dependent on ICP0, a second ICP0-dependent round of removal of H3K9me3 that is independent of viral DNA synthesis, and a third phase of H3K27me3 removal that is dependent on ICP0 and viral DNA synthesis. The presence of ICP0 in transfected cells is also sufficient to promote removal of histones and H3K9me3 modifications of cotransfected genes. Overall, these results show that ICP0 promotes histone removal, a reduction of H3K9me3 modifications, and a later indirect reduction of H3K27me3 modifications following viral early gene expression and DNA synthesis. Therefore, HSV ICP0 promotes the reversal of host epigenetic silencing mechanisms by several mechanisms. PMID:26758183

  16. Method for forming polymerized microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Claudnic, Mark R.

    2011-11-01

    Methods for making a micofluidic device according to embodiments of the present invention include defining a cavity. Polymer precursor solution is positioned in the cavity, and exposed to light to begin the polymerization process and define a microchannel. In some embodiments, after the polymerization process is partially complete, a solvent rinse is performed, or fresh polymer precursor introduced into the microchannel. This may promote removal of unpolymerized material from the microchannel and enable smaller feature sizes. The polymer precursor solution may contain an iniferter. Polymerized features therefore may be capped with the iniferter, which is photoactive. The iniferter may aid later binding of a polyacrylamide gel to the microchannel surface.

  17. Method for forming polymerized microfluidic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Claudnic, Mark R.

    2013-03-12

    Methods for making a microfluidic device according to embodiments of the present invention include defining.about.cavity. Polymer precursor solution is positioned in the cavity, and exposed to light to begin the polymerization process and define a microchannel. In some embodiments, after the polymerization process is partially complete, a solvent rinse is performed, or fresh polymer precursor introduced into the microchannel. This may promote removal of unpolymerized material from the microchannel and enable smaller feature sizes. The polymer precursor solution may contain an iniferter. Polymerized features therefore may be capped with the iniferter, which is photoactive. The iniferter may aid later binding of a polyacrylamide gel to the microchannel surface.

  18. TDP1 promotes assembly of non-homologous end joining protein complexes on DNA

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jinho; Li, Jing; Summerlin, Matthew; Hays, Annette; Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J.; Nitiss, Karin C.; Nitiss, John L.; Hanakahi, Leslyn A.

    2015-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) is central to the maintenance of genomic integrity. In tumor cells, the ability to repair DSBs predicts response to radiation and many cytotoxic anti-cancer drugs. DSB repair pathways include homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). NHEJ is a template-independent mechanism, yet many NHEJ repair products carry limited genetic changes, which suggests that NHEJ includes mechanisms to minimize error. Proteins required for mammalian NHEJ include Ku70/80, the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), XLF/Cernunnos and the XRCC4:DNA ligase IV complex. NHEJ also utilizes accessory proteins that include DNA polymerases, nucleases, and other end-processing factors. In yeast, mutations of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP1) reduced NHEJ fidelity. TDP1 plays an important role in repair of topoisomerase-mediated DNA damage and 3′-blocking DNA lesions, and mutation of the human TDP1 gene results in an inherited human neuropathy termed SCAN1. We found that human TDP1 stimulated DNA binding by XLF and physically interacted with XLF to form TDP1:XLF:DNA complexes. TDP1:XLF interactions preferentially stimulated TDP1 activity on dsDNA as compared to ssDNA. TDP1 also promoted DNA binding by Ku70/80 and stimulated DNA-PK activity. Because Ku70/80 and XLF are the first factors recruited to the DSB at the onset of NHEJ, our data suggest a role for TDP1 during the early stages of mammalian NHEJ. PMID:25841101

  19. Dentin Matrix Protein-1 Isoforms Promote Differential Cell Attachment and Migration*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    von Marschall, Zofia; Fisher, Larry W.

    2008-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and osteopontin (OPN) are three SIBLINGs (small integrin-binding ligand, N-linked glycoproteins) co-expressed/secreted by skeletal and active ductal epithelial cells. Although etiological mechanisms remain unclear, DMP1 is the only one of these three genes currently known to have mutations resulting in human disease, and yet it remains the least studied. All three contain the highly conserved integrin-binding tripeptide, RGD, and experiments comparing the cell attachment and haptotactic migration-enhancing properties of DMP1 to BSP and OPN were performed using human skeletal (MG63 and primary dental pulp cells) and salivary gland (HSG) cells. Mutation of any SIBLING's RGD destroyed all attachment and migration activity. Using itsαVβ5 integrin, HSG cells attached to BSP but not to DMP1 or OPN. However, HSG cells could not migrate onto BSP in a modified Boyden chamber assay. Expression of αVβ3 integrin enhanced HSG attachment to DMP1 and OPN and promoted haptotactic migration onto all three proteins. Interchanging the first four coding exons or the conserved amino acids adjacent to the RGD of DMP1 with corresponding sequences of BSP did not enhance the ability of DMP1 to bindαVβ5. For αVβ3-expressing cells, intact DMP1, its BMP1-cleaved C-terminal fragment, and exon six lacking all post-translational modifications worked equally well but the proteoglycan isoform of DMP1 had greatly reduced ability for cell attachment and migration. The sequence specificity of the proposed BMP1-cleavage site of DMP1 was verified by mutation analysis. Direct comparison of the three proteins showed that cells discriminate among these SIBLINGs and among DMP1 isoforms. PMID:18819913

  20. Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein Promotes miR-122 Destabilization by Inhibiting GLD-2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Cho, Hee; Kim, Minwoo; Shin, Eui-Cheol; Oh, Jong-Won

    2016-01-01

    The liver-specific microRNA miR-122, which has essential roles in liver development and metabolism, is a key proviral factor for hepatitis C virus (HCV). Despite its crucial role in the liver and HCV life cycle, little is known about the molecular mechanism of miR-122 expression regulation by HCV infection. Here, we show that the HCV core protein downregulates the abundance of miR-122 by promoting its destabilization via the inhibition of GLD-2, a non-canonical cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase. The decrease in miR-122 expression resulted in the dysregulation of the known functions of miR-122, including its proviral activity for HCV. By high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs from human liver biopsies, we found that the 22-nucleotide (nt) prototype miR-122 is modified at its 3′ end by 3′-terminal non-templated and templated nucleotide additions. Remarkably, the proportion of miR-122 isomers bearing a single nucleotide tail of any ribonucleotide decreased in liver specimens from patients with HCV. We found that these single-nucleotide-tailed miR-122 isomers display increased miRNA activity and stability over the 22-nt prototype miR-122 and that the 3′-terminal extension is catalyzed by the unique terminal nucleotidyl transferase activity of GLD-2, which is capable of adding any single ribonucleotide without preference of adenylate to the miR-122 3′ end. The HCV core protein specifically inhibited GLD-2, and its interaction with GLD-2 in the cytoplasm was found to be responsible for miR-122 downregulation. Collectively, our results provide new insights into the regulatory role of the HCV core protein in controlling viral RNA abundance and miR-122 functions through miR-122 stability modulation. PMID:27366906

  1. Regulation of pseudorabies virus gG glycoprotein gene promoter independently of pseudorabies immediate early IE180 protein.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, A L; Torres, M; Martín, B; Lerma, L; Tabarés, E

    2010-04-01

    The pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoprotein known as gG is generally regarded as an early protein, and the immediate early IE180 protein regulates its expression during infection. This study, however, provides evidence that although induction by IE180 is observed, the expression of a marker protein (EGFP), or gG itself, under the control of the gG promoter, can also occur independently of the expression of IE180. This result was demonstrated both with transient transfection assays using plasmids and with viral infections. In transient transfections, the expression under control of the gG promoter depends on the cell type and surprisingly, can be 1.3-fold higher than the expression under the control of the IE180 promoter in Hela Tet-Off cells. Recombinant PRV S3 was constructed by replacing gE in the PRV genome with a chimeric transgene, expressing EGFP under the control of the gG promoter. In PK15 cells infected with NIA-3 wild-type virus or with S3 recombinant virus, expression of gG PRV mRNA (or EGFP mRNA) under the control of the gG promoter in the presence of cycloheximide was detected by RT-PCR. This again indicates that some basal expression was produced in infected cells independently of IE180. This expression was augmented by IE180 protein in both plasmid transfections and viral infections.

  2. Pulse Dynamics in Endocytic Protein Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Anders; Wang, Xinxin

    2015-03-01

    During the process of endocytosis in yeast, submicron-sized protein patches assemble, exert forces on the membrane to bend it, and finally disassemble. The patches contain an initial coat that establishes the endocytic site and binds cargo, polymers of the protein actin, ``nucleation-promoting factors'' (NPFs) that catalyze actin polymerization, and curvature-generating proteins. We model the dynamics of protein patches in yeast using a variant of the activator-inhibitor ``Fitzhugh-Nagumo'' model. We treat NPFs as the activator, and polymerized actin as the inhibitor, on the basis of findings that the lifetime of NPF patches is extended when actin polymerization is inhibited. Using this model, we find that as the polymerization rate is reduced, there is a discontinuous transition from protein pulses to persistent patches. We also find, surprisingly, that in some parameter regimes reducing the polymerization rate can increase the polymerized-actin content of the patch. We present data for NPF dynamics budding yeast, which confirm some of the predictions of the model. Supported by NIH under Grant R01-GM107667.

  3. Mediator, TATA-binding Protein, and RNA Polymerase II Contribute to Low Histone Occupancy at Active Gene Promoters in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Suraiya A.; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z.; Rode, Kara A.; Barber, Wesley T.; Ellis, Laura C.; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M.; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. PMID:24727477

  4. Mena–GRASP65 interaction couples actin polymerization to Golgi ribbon linking

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Danming; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Shijiao; Yuan, Hebao; Li, Jie; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Golgi reassembly stacking protein 65 (GRASP65) has been implicated in both Golgi stacking and ribbon linking by forming trans-oligomers through the N-terminal GRASP domain. Because the GRASP domain is globular and relatively small, but the gaps between stacks are large and heterogeneous, it remains puzzling how GRASP65 physically links Golgi stacks into a ribbon. To explore the possibility that other proteins may help GRASP65 in ribbon linking, we used biochemical methods and identified the actin elongation factor Mena as a novel GRASP65-binding protein. Mena is recruited onto the Golgi membranes through interaction with GRASP65. Depleting Mena or disrupting actin polymerization resulted in Golgi fragmentation. In cells, Mena and actin were required for Golgi ribbon formation after nocodazole washout; in vitro, Mena and microfilaments enhanced GRASP65 oligomerization and Golgi membrane fusion. Thus Mena interacts with GRASP65 to promote local actin polymerization, which facilitates Golgi ribbon linking. PMID:26538023

  5. Cryo-EM structure of the activated NAIP2-NLRC4 inflammasome reveals nucleated polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liman; Chen, Shuobing; Ruan, Jianbin; Wu, Jiayi; Tong, Alexander B.; Yin, Qian; Li, Yang; David, Liron; Lu, Alvin; Wang, Wei Li; Marks, Carolyn; Ouyang, Qi; Zhang, Xinzheng; Mao, Youdong; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The NLR family apoptosis inhibitory proteins (NAIPs) bind conserved bacterial ligands, such as the bacterial rod protein PrgJ, and recruit NLR family CARD-containing protein 4 (NLRC4) as the inflammasome adapter to activate innate immunity. We found that the PrgJ-NAIP2-NLRC4 inflammasome is assembled into multisubunit disk-like structures through a unidirectional adenosine triphosphatase polymerization, primed with a single PrgJ-activated NAIP2 per disk. Cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstruction at subnanometer resolution revealed a ~90° hinge rotation accompanying NLRC4 activation. Unlike in the related heptameric Apaf-1 apoptosome, in which each subunit needs to be conformationally activated by its ligand before assembly, a single PrgJ-activated NAIP2 initiates NLRC4 polymerization in a domino-like reaction to promote the disk assembly. These insights reveal the mechanism of signal amplification in NAIP-NLRC4 inflammasomes. PMID:26449474

  6. Cryo-EM structure of the activated NAIP2-NLRC4 inflammasome reveals nucleated polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liman; Chen, Shuobing; Ruan, Jianbin; Wu, Jiayi; Tong, Alexander B; Yin, Qian; Li, Yang; David, Liron; Lu, Alvin; Wang, Wei Li; Marks, Carolyn; Ouyang, Qi; Zhang, Xinzheng; Mao, Youdong; Wu, Hao

    2015-10-23

    The NLR family apoptosis inhibitory proteins (NAIPs) bind conserved bacterial ligands, such as the bacterial rod protein PrgJ, and recruit NLR family CARD-containing protein 4 (NLRC4) as the inflammasome adapter to activate innate immunity. We found that the PrgJ-NAIP2-NLRC4 inflammasome is assembled into multisubunit disk-like structures through a unidirectional adenosine triphosphatase polymerization, primed with a single PrgJ-activated NAIP2 per disk. Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) reconstruction at subnanometer resolution revealed a ~90° hinge rotation accompanying NLRC4 activation. Unlike in the related heptameric Apaf-1 apoptosome, in which each subunit needs to be conformationally activated by its ligand before assembly, a single PrgJ-activated NAIP2 initiates NLRC4 polymerization in a domino-like reaction to promote the disk assembly. These insights reveal the mechanism of signal amplification in NAIP-NLRC4 inflammasomes. PMID:26449474

  7. IN-MACA-MCC: Integrated Multiple Attractor Cellular Automata with Modified Clonal Classifier for Human Protein Coding and Promoter Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Pokkuluri, Kiran Sree; Inampudi, Ramesh Babu; Nedunuri, S. S. S. N. Usha Devi

    2014-01-01

    Protein coding and promoter region predictions are very important challenges of bioinformatics (Attwood and Teresa, 2000). The identification of these regions plays a crucial role in understanding the genes. Many novel computational and mathematical methods are introduced as well as existing methods that are getting refined for predicting both of the regions separately; still there is a scope for improvement. We propose a classifier that is built with MACA (multiple attractor cellular automata) and MCC (modified clonal classifier) to predict both regions with a single classifier. The proposed classifier is trained and tested with Fickett and Tung (1992) datasets for protein coding region prediction for DNA sequences of lengths 54, 108, and 162. This classifier is trained and tested with MMCRI datasets for protein coding region prediction for DNA sequences of lengths 252 and 354. The proposed classifier is trained and tested with promoter sequences from DBTSS (Yamashita et al., 2006) dataset and nonpromoters from EID (Saxonov et al., 2000) and UTRdb (Pesole et al., 2002) datasets. The proposed model can predict both regions with an average accuracy of 90.5% for promoter and 89.6% for protein coding region predictions. The specificity and sensitivity values of promoter and protein coding region predictions are 0.89 and 0.92, respectively. PMID:25132849

  8. IN-MACA-MCC: Integrated Multiple Attractor Cellular Automata with Modified Clonal Classifier for Human Protein Coding and Promoter Prediction.

    PubMed

    Pokkuluri, Kiran Sree; Inampudi, Ramesh Babu; Nedunuri, S S S N Usha Devi

    2014-01-01

    Protein coding and promoter region predictions are very important challenges of bioinformatics (Attwood and Teresa, 2000). The identification of these regions plays a crucial role in understanding the genes. Many novel computational and mathematical methods are introduced as well as existing methods that are getting refined for predicting both of the regions separately; still there is a scope for improvement. We propose a classifier that is built with MACA (multiple attractor cellular automata) and MCC (modified clonal classifier) to predict both regions with a single classifier. The proposed classifier is trained and tested with Fickett and Tung (1992) datasets for protein coding region prediction for DNA sequences of lengths 54, 108, and 162. This classifier is trained and tested with MMCRI datasets for protein coding region prediction for DNA sequences of lengths 252 and 354. The proposed classifier is trained and tested with promoter sequences from DBTSS (Yamashita et al., 2006) dataset and nonpromoters from EID (Saxonov et al., 2000) and UTRdb (Pesole et al., 2002) datasets. The proposed model can predict both regions with an average accuracy of 90.5% for promoter and 89.6% for protein coding region predictions. The specificity and sensitivity values of promoter and protein coding region predictions are 0.89 and 0.92, respectively. PMID:25132849

  9. Polymerization of perfluorobutadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J.; Toy, M. S.

    1970-01-01

    Diisopropyl peroxydicarbonate dissolved in liquid perfluorobutadiene is conducted in a sealed vessel at the autogenous pressure of polymerization. Reaction temperature, ratio of catalyst to monomer, and amount of agitation determine degree of polymerization and product yield.

  10. Charged Multivesicular Body Protein 2B (CHMP2B) of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport-III (ESCRT-III) Polymerizes into Helical Structures Deforming the Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Bodon, Gilles; Chassefeyre, Romain; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Martinelli, Nicolas; Effantin, Grégory; Hulsik, David Lutje; Belly, Agnès; Goldberg, Yves; Chatellard-Causse, Christine; Blot, Béatrice; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Sadoul, Rémy

    2011-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT-0-III) allow membrane budding and fission away from the cytosol. This machinery is used during multivesicular endosome biogenesis, cytokinesis, and budding of some enveloped viruses. Membrane fission is catalyzed by ESCRT-III complexes made of polymers of charged multivesicular body proteins (CHMPs) and by the AAA-type ATPase VPS4. How and which of the ESCRT-III subunits sustain membrane fission from the cytoplasmic surface remain uncertain. In vitro, CHMP2 and CHMP3 recombinant proteins polymerize into tubular helical structures, which were hypothesized to drive vesicle fission. However, this model awaits the demonstration that such structures exist and can deform membranes in cellulo. Here, we show that depletion of VPS4 induces specific accumulation of endogenous CHMP2B at the plasma membrane. Unlike other CHMPs, overexpressed full-length CHMP2B polymerizes into long, rigid tubes that protrude out of the cell. CHMP4s relocalize at the base of the tubes, the formation of which depends on VPS4. Cryo-EM of the CHMP2B membrane tubes demonstrates that CHMP2B polymerizes into a tightly packed helical lattice, in close association with the inner leaflet of the membrane tube. This association is tight enough to deform the lipid bilayer in cases where the tubular CHMP2B helix varies in diameter or is closed by domes. Thus, our observation that CHMP2B polymerization scaffolds membranes in vivo represents a first step toward demonstrating its structural role during outward membrane deformation. PMID:21926173

  11. The Legionella pneumophila F-box protein Lpp2082 (AnkB) modulates ubiquitination of the host protein parvin B and promotes intracellular replication.

    PubMed

    Lomma, M; Dervins-Ravault, D; Rolando, M; Nora, T; Newton, H J; Sansom, F M; Sahr, T; Gomez-Valero, L; Jules, M; Hartland, E L; Buchrieser, C

    2010-09-01

    The environmental pathogen Legionella pneumophila encodes three proteins containing F-box domains and additional protein-protein interaction domains, reminiscent of eukaryotic SCF ubiquitin-protein ligases. Here we show that the F-box proteins of L. pneumophila strain Paris are Dot/Icm effectors involved in the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins associated with the Legionella-containing vacuole. Single, double and triple mutants of the F-box protein encoding genes were impaired in infection of Acanthamoeba castellanii, THP-1 macrophages and human lung epithelial cells. Lpp2082/AnkB was essential for infection of the lungs of A/J mice in vivo, and bound Skp1, the interaction partner of the SCF complex in mammalian cells, similar to AnkB from strain AA100/130b. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen and co-immunoprecipitation analysis we identified ParvB a protein present in focal adhesions and in lamellipodia, as a target. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that ectopically expressed Lpp2082/AnkB colocalized with ParvB at the periphery of lamellipodia. Unexpectedly, ubiquitination tests revealed that Lpp2082/AnkB diminishes endogenous ubiquitination of ParvB. Based on these results we propose that L. pneumophila modulates ubiquitination of ParvB by competing with eukaryotic E3 ligases for the specific protein-protein interaction site of ParvB, thereby revealing a new mechanism by which L. pneumophila may employ translocated effector proteins to promote bacterial survival.

  12. Light response and potential interacting proteins of a grape flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Run-Ze; Pan, Qiu-Hong; Duan, Chang-Qing; Wang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H), a member of cytochrome P450 protein family, introduces B-ring hydroxyl group in the 3' position of the flavonoid. In this study, the cDNA sequence of a F3'H gene (VviF3'H), which contains an open reading frame of 1530 bp encoding a polypeptide of 509 amino acids, was cloned and characterized from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Cabernet Sauvignon. VviF3'H showed high homology to known F3'H genes, especially F3'Hs from the V. vinifera reference genome (Pinot Noir) and lotus. Expression profiling analysis using real-time PCR revealed that VviF3'H was ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissues including berries, leaves, flowers, roots, stems and tendrils, suggesting its important physiological role in plant growth and development. Moreover, the transcript level of VviF3'H gene in grape berries was relatively higher at early developmental stages and gradually decreased during véraison, and then increased in the mature phase. In addition, the promoter of VviF3'H was isolated by using TAIL-PCR. Yeast one-hybrid screening of the Cabernet Sauvignon cDNA library and subsequent in vivo/vitro validations revealed the interaction between VviF3'H promoter and several transcription factors, including members of HD-Zip, NAC, MYB and EIN families. A transcriptional regulation mechanism of VviF3'H expression is proposed for the first time. PMID:26433636

  13. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  14. CDH1 promoter hypermethylation and E-cadherin protein expression in infiltrating breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, José Roberto F; Prando, Érika C; Quevedo, Francisco C; Neto, Francisco A Moraes; Rainho, Cláudia A; Rogatto, Silvia R

    2006-01-01

    Background The E-cadherin gene (CDH1) maps, at chromosome 16q22.1, a region often associated with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in human breast cancer. LOH at this site is thought to lead to loss of function of this tumor suppressor gene and was correlated with decreased disease-free survival, poor prognosis, and metastasis. Differential CpG island methylation in the promoter region of the CDH1 gene might be an alternative way for the loss of expression and function of E-cadherin, leading to loss of tissue integrity, an essential step in tumor progression. Methods The aim of our study was to assess, by Methylation-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (MSP), the methylation pattern of the CDH1 gene and its possible correlation with the expression of E-cadherin and other standard immunohistochemical parameters (Her-2, ER, PgR, p53, and K-67) in a series of 79 primary breast cancers (71 infiltrating ductal, 5 infiltrating lobular, 1 metaplastic, 1 apocrine, and 1 papillary carcinoma). Results CDH1 hypermethylation was observed in 72% of the cases including 52/71 ductal, 4/5 lobular carcinomas and 1 apocrine carcinoma. Reduced levels of E-cadherin protein were observed in 85% of our samples. Although not statistically significant, the levels of E-cadherin expression tended to diminish with the CDH1 promoter region methylation. In the group of 71 ductal cancinomas, most of the cases of showing CDH1 hypermethylation also presented reduced levels of expression of ER and PgR proteins, and a possible association was observed between CDH1 methylation and ER expression (p = 0.0301, Fisher's exact test). However, this finding was not considered significant after Bonferroni correction of p-value. Conclusion Our preliminary findings suggested that abnormal CDH1 methylation occurs in high frequencies in infiltrating breast cancers associated with a decrease in E-cadherin expression in a subgroup of cases characterized by loss of expression of other important genes to the mammary

  15. Human T-lymphotropic virus tax activates human cytomegalovirus major-immediate early promoter and improves production of recombinant proteins in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Lwa, Teng Rhui; Lee, Jialing; Ng, Chew Har; Lew, Qiao Jing; Hia, Hui Ching; Chao, Sheng-Hao

    2011-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (CMV) major immediate-early (MIE) promoter is widely used in mammalian cells for production of recombinant proteins. It is of great interest to further enhance protein production driven by the CMV promoter. Here, we report that the Tax protein of human T-lymphotropic virus stimulates the transgene expression under the control of CMV MIE promoter in HEK293 cells. At least threefold increases in transient production of recombinant proteins, including luciferase and two biopharmaceutical proteins (erythropoietin and interferon-γ), were detected. Furthermore, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-response element binding protein 2 (CREB2) was identified as a cellular cofactor, which might be responsible for Tax transactivation of the CMV MIE promoter. Our results not only demonstrate the potential use of this novel expression strategy for improvement of recombinant protein production in HEK293 cells but also provide the molecular mechanism for Tax-mediated activation of CMV MIE promoter. PMID:21425252

  16. Germin-like protein 2 gene promoter from rice is responsive to fungal pathogens in transgenic potato plants.

    PubMed

    Munir, Faiza; Hayashi, Satomi; Batley, Jacqueline; Naqvi, Syed Muhammad Saqlan; Mahmood, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Controlled transgene expression via a promoter is particularly triggered in response to pathogen infiltration. This is significant for eliciting disease-resistant features in crops through genetic engineering. The germins and germin-like proteins (GLPs) are known to be associated with plant and developmental stages. The 1107-bp Oryza sativa root GLP2 (OsRGLP2) gene promoter fused to a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene was transformed into potato plants through an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The OsRGLP2 promoter was activated in response to Fusarium solani (Mart.) Sacc. and Alternaria solani Sorauer. Quantitative real-time PCR results revealed 4-5-fold increase in promoter activity every 24 h following infection. There was a 15-fold increase in OsRGLP2 promoter activity after 72 h of F. solani (Mart.) Sacc. treatment and a 12-fold increase observed with A. solani Sorauer. Our results confirmed that the OsRGLP2 promoter activity was enhanced under fungal stress. Furthermore, a hyperaccumulation of H2O2 in transgenic plants is a clear signal for the involvement of OsRGLP2 promoter region in the activation of specific genes in the potato genome involved in H2O2-mediated defense response. The OsRGLP2 promoter evidently harbors copies of GT-I and Dof transcription factors (AAAG) that act in response to elicitors generated in the wake of pathogen infection. PMID:26277722

  17. Germin-like protein 2 gene promoter from rice is responsive to fungal pathogens in transgenic potato plants.

    PubMed

    Munir, Faiza; Hayashi, Satomi; Batley, Jacqueline; Naqvi, Syed Muhammad Saqlan; Mahmood, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Controlled transgene expression via a promoter is particularly triggered in response to pathogen infiltration. This is significant for eliciting disease-resistant features in crops through genetic engineering. The germins and germin-like proteins (GLPs) are known to be associated with plant and developmental stages. The 1107-bp Oryza sativa root GLP2 (OsRGLP2) gene promoter fused to a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene was transformed into potato plants through an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The OsRGLP2 promoter was activated in response to Fusarium solani (Mart.) Sacc. and Alternaria solani Sorauer. Quantitative real-time PCR results revealed 4-5-fold increase in promoter activity every 24 h following infection. There was a 15-fold increase in OsRGLP2 promoter activity after 72 h of F. solani (Mart.) Sacc. treatment and a 12-fold increase observed with A. solani Sorauer. Our results confirmed that the OsRGLP2 promoter activity was enhanced under fungal stress. Furthermore, a hyperaccumulation of H2O2 in transgenic plants is a clear signal for the involvement of OsRGLP2 promoter region in the activation of specific genes in the potato genome involved in H2O2-mediated defense response. The OsRGLP2 promoter evidently harbors copies of GT-I and Dof transcription factors (AAAG) that act in response to elicitors generated in the wake of pathogen infection.

  18. G Protein-Coupled Receptor 87 (GPR87) Promotes Cell Proliferation in Human Bladder Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xia; Liu, Dage; Hayashida, Yushi; Okazoe, Homare; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Ueda, Nobufumi; Sugimoto, Mikio; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 87 (GPR87) is a newly deorphanized member of the cell surface molecule G protein-coupled receptor family. GPR signaling was shown to play a role in promotion of cell growth and survival, metastasis, and drug resistance. The overexpression of GPR87 has also been reported in many malignant tumors including bladder cancer. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of silencing GPR87 expression with a replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector expressing short hairpin RNA targeting GPR87 (Ad-shGPR87) and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms in bladder cancer cells. Six GPR87-expressing human bladder cancer cells, HT1197, HT1376, J82, RT112, TCCSUP and UMUC3, were used. Infection with Ad-shGPR87 effectively downregulated the GPR87 expression, and significantly reduced the percentage of viable cells in 4 of 6 cell lines as detected by an MTT assay. Significant inhibition on cell proliferation with Ad-shGPR87 was observed in the wild-type p53 bladder cancer cell lines (HT1197, RT112, TCCSUP and UMUC3), but not in the mutant p53 cells (HT1376 and J82). As represented by a wild-type p53 RT112 cell, Ad-shGPR87 infection significantly enhanced p53 and p21 expression and caused caspase-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, the treatment with Ad-shGPR87 exerted a significant antitumor effect against the GPR87-expressing RT112 xenografts. GPR87 appeared to be a promising target for gene therapy, and Ad-shGPR87 had strong antitumor effects, specifically anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects, against GPR87-expressing human bladder cancer cells. PMID:26473854

  19. The protein O-glucosyltransferase Rumi modifies eyes shut to promote rhabdomere separation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Haltom, Amanda R; Lee, Tom V; Harvey, Beth M; Leonardi, Jessica; Chen, Yi-Jiun; Hong, Yang; Haltiwanger, Robert S; Jafar-Nejad, Hamed

    2014-11-01

    The protein O-glucosyltransferase Rumi/POGLUT1 regulates Drosophila Notch signaling by adding O-glucose residues to the Notch extracellular domain. Rumi has other predicted targets including Crumbs (Crb) and Eyes shut (Eys), both of which are involved in photoreceptor development. However, whether Rumi is required for the function of Crb and Eys remains unknown. Here we report that in the absence of Rumi or its enzymatic activity, several rhabdomeres in each ommatidium fail to separate from one another in a Notch-independent manner. Mass spectral analysis indicates the presence of O-glucose on Crb and Eys. However, mutating all O-glucosylation sites in a crb knock-in allele does not cause rhabdomere attachment, ruling out Crb as a biologically-relevant Rumi target in this process. In contrast, eys and rumi exhibit a dosage-sensitive genetic interaction. In addition, although in wild-type ommatidia most of the Eys protein is found in the inter-rhabdomeral space (IRS), in rumi mutants a significant fraction of Eys remains in the photoreceptor cells. The intracellular accumulation of Eys and the IRS defect worsen in rumi mutants raised at a higher temperature, and are accompanied by a ∼50% decrease in the total level of Eys. Moreover, removing one copy of an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone enhances the rhabdomere attachment in rumi mutant animals. Altogether, our data suggest that O-glucosylation of Eys by Rumi ensures rhabdomere separation by promoting proper Eys folding and stability in a critical time window during the mid-pupal stage. Human EYS, which is mutated in patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa, also harbors multiple Rumi target sites. Therefore, the role of O-glucose in regulating Eys may be conserved. PMID:25412384

  20. Far upstream element-binding protein 1 is a prognostic biomarker and promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Z-H; Hu, J-L; Liang, J-Z; Zhou, A-J; Li, M-Z; Yan, S-M; Zhang, X; Gao, S; Chen, L; Zhong, Q; Zeng, M-S

    2015-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignant epithelial tumor with tremendous invasion and metastasis capacities, and it has a high incidence in southeast Asia and southern China. Previous studies identified that far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FBP1), a transcriptional regulator of c-Myc that is one of the most frequently aberrantly expressed oncogenes in various human cancers, including NPC, is an important biomarker for many cancers. Our study aimed to investigate the expression and function of FBP1 in human NPC. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), western blot and immunohistochemical staining (IHC) were performed in NPC cells and biopsies. Furthermore, the effect of FBP1 knockdown on cell proliferation, colony formation, side population tests and tumorigenesis in nude mice were measured by MTT, clonogenicity analysis, flow cytometry and a xenograft model, respectively. The results showed that the mRNA and protein levels of FBP1, which are positively correlated with c-Myc expression, were substantially higher in NPC than that in nasopharyngeal epithelial cells. IHC revealed that the patients with high FBP1 expression had a significantly poorer prognosis compared with the patients with low expression (P=0.020). In univariate analysis, high FBP1 and c-Myc expression predicted poorer overall survival (OS) and poorer progression-free survival. Multivariate analysis indicated that high FBP1 and c-Myc expression were independent prognostic markers. Knockdown of FBP1 reduced cell proliferation, clonogenicity and the ratio of side populations, as well as tumorigenesis in nude mice. These data indicate that FBP1 expression, which is closely correlated with c-Myc expression, is an independent prognostic factor and promotes NPC progression. Our results suggest that FBP1 can not only serve as a useful prognostic biomarker for NPC but also as a potential therapeutic target for NPC patients. PMID:26469968

  1. The Protein O-glucosyltransferase Rumi Modifies Eyes Shut to Promote Rhabdomere Separation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Beth M.; Leonardi, Jessica; Chen, Yi-Jiun; Hong, Yang; Haltiwanger, Robert S.; Jafar-Nejad, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    The protein O-glucosyltransferase Rumi/POGLUT1 regulates Drosophila Notch signaling by adding O-glucose residues to the Notch extracellular domain. Rumi has other predicted targets including Crumbs (Crb) and Eyes shut (Eys), both of which are involved in photoreceptor development. However, whether Rumi is required for the function of Crb and Eys remains unknown. Here we report that in the absence of Rumi or its enzymatic activity, several rhabdomeres in each ommatidium fail to separate from one another in a Notch-independent manner. Mass spectral analysis indicates the presence of O-glucose on Crb and Eys. However, mutating all O-glucosylation sites in a crb knock-in allele does not cause rhabdomere attachment, ruling out Crb as a biologically-relevant Rumi target in this process. In contrast, eys and rumi exhibit a dosage-sensitive genetic interaction. In addition, although in wild-type ommatidia most of the Eys protein is found in the inter-rhabdomeral space (IRS), in rumi mutants a significant fraction of Eys remains in the photoreceptor cells. The intracellular accumulation of Eys and the IRS defect worsen in rumi mutants raised at a higher temperature, and are accompanied by a ∼50% decrease in the total level of Eys. Moreover, removing one copy of an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone enhances the rhabdomere attachment in rumi mutant animals. Altogether, our data suggest that O-glucosylation of Eys by Rumi ensures rhabdomere separation by promoting proper Eys folding and stability in a critical time window during the mid-pupal stage. Human EYS, which is mutated in patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa, also harbors multiple Rumi target sites. Therefore, the role of O-glucose in regulating Eys may be conserved. PMID:25412384

  2. The Secreted Form of Transmembrane Protein 98 Promotes the Differentiation of T Helper 1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Weiwei; Cheng, Yingying; Zhang, Yanfei; Mo, Xiaoning; Li, Ting; Liu, Yuanfeng; Wang, Pingzhang; Pan, Wen; Chen, Yingyu; Xue, Yintong; Ma, Dalong; Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines mediate the interaction of immune cells. Discovery of novel potential cytokines is of great value for both basic research and clinical application. In this study, we identified a novel immune-related molecule, transmembrane protein 98 (TMEM98), through a high-throughput screening platform for novel potential cytokines at a genome-wide level using the strategy of immunogenomics. So far, there is no characteristic and immune-related functional report about it. In this study, we demonstrate that TMEM98 exists as a type II transmembrane protein both in the ectopically and endogenously expressed systems. Interestingly, TMEM98 could also be secreted through exosomes. Moreover, the native secreted form of TMEM98 could be detected in the supernatants of activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and mouse CD4+ T cells. Further expression profile analysis showed TMEM98 was upregulated during the activation and differentiation of T helper (Th) 1 cells. Function analysis showed that eukaryotic recombinant TMEM98 (rTMEM98) promoted the differentiation of Th1 cells under both antigen-nonspecific and antigen-specific Th1-skewing conditions. These findings were further confirmed in vivo as prokaryotic rTMEM98 administration significantly increased antigen-specific IFN-γ production and serum antigen-specific IgG2a in the methylated bovine serum albumin-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity model. Overall, these observations emphasize the characteristics and essential roles of TMEM98 for the first time and will be helpful in further understanding the development of Th1 cells. PMID:25946230

  3. A Milk Protein, Casein, as a Proliferation Promoting Factor in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Woo; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, You-Sun; Lee, Sang Jin; Chung, Moon Kee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Despite most epidemiologic studies reporting that an increase in milk intake affects the growth of prostate cancer, the results of experimental studies are not consistent. In this study, we investigated the proliferation of prostate cancer cells treated with casein, the main protein in milk. Materials and Methods Prostate cancer cells (LNCaP and PC3), lung cancer cells (A459), stomach cancer cells (SNU484), breast cancer cells (MCF7), immortalized human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293), and immortalized normal prostate cells (RWPE1) were treated with either 0.1 or 1 mg/mL of α-casein and total casein extracted from bovine milk. Treatments were carried out in serum-free media for 72 hours. The proliferation of each cell line was evaluated by an 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results α-Casein and total casein did not affect the proliferations of RWPE1, HEK293, A459, SNU484, MCF7, HEK293, or RWPE1 cells. However, PC3 cells treated with 1 mg/mL of α-casein and casein showed increased proliferation (228% and 166%, respectively), and the proliferation of LNCaP cells was also enhanced by 134% and 142%, respectively. The proliferation mechanism of α-casein in PC3 and LNCaP cells did not appear to be related to the induction of Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), since the level of IGF-1 did not change upon the supplementation of casein. Conclusions The milk protein, casein, promotes the proliferation of prostate cancer cells such as PC3 and LNCaP. PMID:25237656

  4. Regulation of glnB gene promoter expression in Azospirillum brasilense by the NtrC protein.

    PubMed

    Huergo, Luciano F; Souza, Emanuel M; Steffens, M Berenice R; Yates, M Geoffrey; Pedrosa, Fabio O; Chubatsu, Leda S

    2003-06-01

    In Azospirillum brasilense the glnB and glnA genes are clustered in an operon regulated by three different promoters: two located upstream of glnB (glnBp1-sigma(70), and glnBp2-sigma(N)) and one as yet unidentified promoter, in the glnBA intergenic region. We have investigated the expression of the glnB gene promoter using glnB-lacZ gene fusions, mutation analysis, heterologous expression and DNA band-shift assays. Deletion of the glnB promoter region showed that NtrC-binding sequences were essential for glnB expression under nitrogen limitation. The A. brasilense NtrC protein activated transcription of glnB-lacZ fusions in the heterologous genetic background of Escherichia coli. Expression of glnB-lacZ fusions in two A. brasilense ntrC mutants differed from that in the wild-type strain. In vitro studies also indicated that the purified NtrC protein from E. coli was able to bind to the glnB promoter region of A. brasilense. Our results show that the NtrC protein activates glnBglnA expression under nitrogen limitation in A. brasilense.

  5. Dose-dependent regulation of the early promoter of human papillomavirus type 18 by the viral E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Steger, G; Corbach, S

    1997-01-01

    The activity of the E6/E7 promoter of genital human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is positively and negatively modulated by a complex interplay between a variety of cellular transcription factors and the virally encoded E2 protein. The long control region of genital HPVs contains four E2 binding sites in conserved positions, two of which are very close to the TATA box. Binding of E2 to these two sites has been shown to repress the promoter. To carefully analyze the effect of E2 on the activity of the early promoter P105 of HPV18, we used an in vitro transcription system, which allowed titration of the amount of E2 protein. We found that low amounts of HPV18 E2 stimulated the promoter, whereas increasing amounts resulted in promoter repression. When the affinity was analyzed, it became obvious that E2 bound with highest affinity to E2 binding site 4 (BS-4), located 500 bp upstream of the promoter. The promoter most proximal binding site (BS-1) was the weakest site. Transient transfection assays confirmed that small amounts of HPV type (HPV18) E2 and also of bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) E2 were able to activate the P105, which was dependent on an intact BS-4. The positive role of BS-4 was also obvious at higher E2 concentrations, since mutation of BS-4 enhanced repression. In contrast to HPV18 E2, BPV1 E2 bound better to BS-1 and, in correlation, was able to more strongly repress the P105 in vivo. Our results suggest a dose-dependent regulation of the HPV18 E6/E7 promoter by E2 due to variable occupancy of its binding sites, which have antagonizing effects on the activity of the E6/E7 promoter.

  6. Non-structural protein 1 of avian influenza A viruses differentially inhibit NF-κB promoter activation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Influenza virus infection activates NF-κB and is a general prerequisite for a productive influenza virus infection. On the other hand, non-structural protein 1 (NS1) suppresses this viral activated NF-κB, presumably to prevent expression of NF-κB mediated anti-viral response. NS1 proteins of influenza A viruses are divided into two groups, known as allele A and allele B. The possible functional relevance of this NS1 division to viral pathogenicity is lacking. Findings The ability of NS1 protein from two avian influenza subtypes, H6N8 and H4N6, to inhibit NF-κB promoter activation was assessed. Further, efforts were made to characterize the genetic basis of this inhibition. We found that allele A NS1 proteins of H6N8 and H4N6 are significantly better in preventing dsRNA induced NF-κB promoter activation compared to allele B of corresponding subtypes, in a species independent manner. Furthermore, the ability to suppress NF-κB promoter activation was mapped to the effector domain while the RNA binding domain alone was unable to suppress this activation. Chimeric NS1 proteins containing either RNA binding domain of allele A and effector domain of allele B or vice versa, were equally potent in preventing NF-κB promoter activation compared to their wt. NS1 protein of allele A and B from both subtypes expressed efficiently as detected by Western blotting and predominantly localized in the nucleus in both A549 and MiLu cells as shown by in situ PLA. Conclusions Here, we present another aspect of NS1 protein in inhibiting dsRNA induced NF-κB activation in an allele dependent manner. This suggests a possible correlation with the virus's pathogenic potential. PMID:21810221

  7. The Pallbearer E3 Ligase Promotes Actin Remodeling via RAC in Efferocytosis by Degrading the Ribosomal Protein S6

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hui; Wang, Hui; Silva, Elizabeth; Thompson, James; Guillou, Aurélien; Yates, John R.; Buchon, Nicolas; Franc, Nathalie C.

    2014-01-01

    Clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis) is achieved through phagocytosis by professional or amateur phagocytes. It is critical for tissue homeostasis and remodeling in all animals. Failure in this process can contribute to the development of inflammatory autoimmune or neurodegenerative diseases. We previously found that the PALL-SCF E3-Ubiquitin ligase complex promotes apoptotic cell clearance, yet it remained unclear as to how it did so. Here, we show that the F-Box protein PALL interacts with phosphorylated Ribosomal protein S6 (RpS6) to promote its ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. This leads to RAC2 GTPase up-regulation and activation and F-actin remodeling that promotes efferocytosis. We further show that the specific role of PALL in efferocytosis is driven by its apoptotic cell-induced nuclear export. Finding a role for RpS6 in negatively regulating efferocytosis provides the opportunity to develop new strategies to regulate this process. PMID:25533207

  8. Repressor and activator protein accelerates hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury by promoting neutrophil inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang Xian; Lo, Chung Mau; Lian, Qizhou; Ng, Kevin Tak-Pan; Liu, Xiao Bing; Ma, Yuen Yuen; Qi, Xiang; Yeung, Oscar Wai Ho; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Yang, Xin Xiang; Liu, Hui; Liu, Jiang; Shao, Yan; Man, Kwan

    2016-01-01

    Repressor and activator protein (Rap1) directly regulates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) dependent signaling, which contributes to hepatic IRI. We here intended to investigate the effect of Rap1 in hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) and to explore the underlying mechanisms. The association of Rap1 expression with hepatic inflammatory response were investigated in both human and rat liver transplantation. The effect of Rap1 in hepatic IRI was studied in Rap1 knockout mice IRI model in vivo and primary cells in vitro. Our results showed that over expression of Rap1 was associated with severe liver graft inflammatory response, especially in living donor liver transplantation. The results were also validated in rat liver transplantation model. In mice hepatic IRI model, the knockout of Rap1 reduced hepatic damage and hepatic inflammatory response. In primary cells, the knockout of Rap1 suppressed neutrophils migration activity and adhesion in response to liver sinusoidal endothelial cells through down-regulating neutrophils F-Actin expression and CXCL2/CXCR2 pathway. In addition, the knockout of Rap1 also decreased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in primary neutrophils and neutrophils-induced hepatocyte damage. In conclusion, Rap1 may induce hepatic IRI through promoting neutrophils inflammatory response. Rap1 may be the potential therapeutic target of attenuating hepatic IRI. PMID:27050284

  9. Amyloid β-Protein as a Substrate Interacts with Extracellular Matrix to Promote Neurite Outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Edward H.; Park, Lisa; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    1993-05-01

    Progressive deposition of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in brain parenchyma and blood vessels is a characteristic feature of Alzheimer disease. Recent evidence suggests that addition of solubilized synthetic Aβ to medium may produce toxic or trophic effects on cultured hippocampal neurons. Because soluble Aβ may not accumulate in significant quantities in brain, we asked whether immobilized Aβ peptide as a substrate alters neurite outgrowth from cultured rat peripheral sensory neurons. This paradigm may closely mimic the conditions in Alzheimer disease brain tissue, in which neurites contact insoluble, extracellular aggregates of β-amyloid. We detected no detrimental effects of Aβ substrate on neurite outgrowth. Rather, Aβ in combination with low doses of laminin or fibronectin enhanced neurite out-growth from these neuronal explants. Our results suggest that insoluble Aβ in the cerebral neuropil may serve as a neurite-promoting matrix, perhaps explaining the apparent regenerative response of neurites observed around amyloid plaques in Alzheimer disease. Moreover, in concert with the recent discovery of Aβ production by cultured neurons, our data suggest that Aβ plays a normal physiological role in brain by complexing with the extracellular matrix.

  10. The folate-coupled enzyme MTHFD2 is a nuclear protein and promotes cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson Sheppard, Nina; Jarl, Lisa; Mahadessian, Diana; Strittmatter, Laura; Schmidt, Angelika; Madhusudan, Nikhil; Tegnér, Jesper; Lundberg, Emma K; Asplund, Anna; Jain, Mohit; Nilsson, Roland

    2015-10-13

    Folate metabolism is central to cell proliferation and a target of commonly used cancer chemotherapeutics. In particular, the mitochondrial folate-coupled metabolism is thought to be important for proliferating cancer cells. The enzyme MTHFD2 in this pathway is highly expressed in human tumors and broadly required for survival of cancer cells. Although the enzymatic activity of the MTHFD2 protein is well understood, little is known about its larger role in cancer cell biology. We here report that MTHFD2 is co-expressed with two distinct gene sets, representing amino acid metabolism and cell proliferation, respectively. Consistent with a role for MTHFD2 in cell proliferation, MTHFD2 expression was repressed in cells rendered quiescent by deprivation of growth signals (serum) and rapidly re-induced by serum stimulation. Overexpression of MTHFD2 alone was sufficient to promote cell proliferation independent of its dehydrogenase activity, even during growth restriction. In addition to its known mitochondrial localization, we found MTHFD2 to have a nuclear localization and co-localize with DNA replication sites. These findings suggest a previously unknown role for MTHFD2 in cancer cell proliferation, adding to its known function in mitochondrial folate metabolism.

  11. Activation of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Promotes Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Vergarajauregui, Silvia; Miguel, Anitza San; Puertollano, Rosa

    2006-01-01

    Endocytic trafficking plays an important role in the regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). To address if cellular kinases regulate EGFR internalization, we used anisomycin, a potent activator of kinase cascades in mammalian cells, especially the stress-activated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase subtypes. Here, we report that activation of p38 MAP kinase by anisomycin is sufficient to induce internalization of EGFR. Anisomycin and EGF employ different mechanisms to promote EGFR endocytosis as anisomycin-induced internalization does not require tyrosine kinase activity or ubiquitination of the receptor. In addition, anisomycin treatment did not result in delivery and degradation of EGFR at lysosomes. Incubation with a specific inhibitor of p38, or depletion of endogenous p38 by small interfering RNAs, abolished anisomycin-induced internalization of EGFR while having no effect on transferrin endocytosis, indicating that the effect of p38 activation on EGFR endocytosis is specific. Interestingly, inhibition of p38 activation also abolished endocytosis of EGFR induced by UV radiation. Our results reveal a novel role for p38 in the regulation of EGFR endocytosis and suggest that stimulation of EGFR internalization by p38 might represent a general mechanism to prevent generation of proliferative or anti-apoptotic signals under stress conditions. PMID:16683917

  12. Autophagy-Related Proteins Target Ubiquitin-Free Mycobacterial Compartment to Promote Killing in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bah, Aïcha; Lacarrière, Camille; Vergne, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative process that plays essential functions in innate immunity, particularly, in the clearance of intracellular bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The molecular mechanisms involved in autophagy activation and targeting of mycobacteria, in innate immune responses of macrophages, are only partially characterized. Autophagy targets pathogenic M. tuberculosis via a cytosolic DNA recognition- and an ubiquitin-dependent pathway. In this report, we show that non-pathogenic M. smegmatis induces a robust autophagic response in THP-1 macrophages with an up regulation of several autophagy-related genes. Autophagy activation relies in part on recognition of mycobacteria by Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Notably, LC3 targeting of M. smegmatis does not rely on membrane damage, ubiquitination, or autophagy receptor recruitment. Lastly, M. smegmatis promotes recruitment of several autophagy proteins, which are required for mycobacterial killing. In conclusion, our study uncovered an alternative autophagic pathway triggered by mycobacteria which involves cell surface recognition but not bacterial ubiquitination. PMID:27242971

  13. SQUAMOSA promoter-binding protein-like transcription factors: star players for plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zenglin; Liu, Danmei; Zhang, Kai; Li, Aili; Mao, Long

    2010-11-01

    SQUAMOSA Promoter-Binding Protein-Like (SPL) genes encode plant-specific transcription factors that play important roles in plant phase transition, flower and fruit development, plant architecture, gibberellins signaling, sporogenesis, and response to copper and fungal toxins. In Arabidopsis, many SPL genes are post-transcriptionally regulated by the microRNA (miRNA) miR156, among which AtSPL9 in turn positively regulates the expression of the second miRNA miR172. This miR156-AtSPL9-miR172 regulatory pathway plays critical roles during juvenile to adult leaf development and the miR156-SPLs feedback interaction persists all through the plant development, which may be conserved in other plants. In the present paper, we provide a concise review on the most recent progress in the regulatory mechanisms associated with plant SPL transcription factors, especially in relation to miRNAs. The potential application of these discoveries in agriculture is briefly discussed.

  14. Phosphorylation of farnesoid X receptor by protein kinase C promotes its transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Gineste, Romain; Sirvent, Audrey; Paumelle, Réjane; Helleboid, Stéphane; Aquilina, Alexis; Darteil, Raphaël; Hum, Dean W; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Staels, Bart

    2008-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NR1H4) belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and is activated by bile acids such as chenodeoxycholic acid, or synthetic ligands such as GW4064. FXR is implicated in the regulation of bile acid, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. Posttranslational modifications regulating its activity have not been investigated yet. Here, we demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition impairs ligand-mediated regulation of FXR target genes. Moreover, in a transactivation assay, we show that FXR transcriptional activity is modulated by PKC. Furthermore, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate , a PKC activator, induces the phosphorylation of endogenous FXR in HepG2 cells and PKCalpha phosphorylates in vitro FXR in its DNA-binding domain on S135 and S154. Mutation of S135 and S154 to alanine residues reduces in cell FXR phosphorylation. In contrast to wild-type FXR, mutant FXRS135AS154A displays an impaired PKCalpha-induced transactivation and a decreased ligand-dependent FXR transactivation. Finally, phosphorylation of FXR by PKC promotes the recruitment of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha. In conclusion, these findings show that the phosphorylation of FXR induced by PKCalpha directly modulates the ability of agonists to activate FXR.

  15. C2 domain protein MIN1 promotes eyespot organization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Mittelmeier, Telsa M; Berthold, Peter; Danon, Avihai; Lamb, Mary Rose; Levitan, Alexander; Rice, Michael E; Dieckmann, Carol L

    2008-12-01

    Assembly and asymmetric localization of the photosensory eyespot in the biflagellate, unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires coordinated organization of photoreceptors in the plasma membrane and pigment granule/thylakoid membrane layers in the chloroplast. min1 (mini-eyed) mutant cells contain abnormally small, disorganized eyespots in which the chloroplast envelope and plasma membrane are no longer apposed. The MIN1 gene, identified here by phenotypic rescue, encodes a protein with an N-terminal C2 domain and a C-terminal LysM domain separated by a transmembrane sequence. This novel domain architecture led to the hypothesis that MIN1 is in the plasma membrane or the chloroplast envelope, where membrane association of the C2 domain promotes proper eyespot organization. Mutation of conserved C2 domain loop residues disrupted association of the MIN1 C2 domain with the chloroplast envelope in moss cells but did not abolish eyespot assembly in Chlamydomonas. In min1 null cells, channelrhodopsin-1 (ChR1) photoreceptor levels were reduced, indicating a role for MIN1 in ChR1 expression and/or stability. However, ChR1 localization was only minimally disturbed during photoautotrophic growth of min1 cells, conditions under which the pigment granule layers are disorganized. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that neither MIN1 nor proper organization of the plastidic components of the eyespot is essential for localization of ChR1. PMID:18849467

  16. The Protein Elicitor PevD1 Enhances Resistance to Pathogens and Promotes Growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengjie; Khan, Najeeb Ullah; Wang, Ningbo; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    The protein elicitor PevD1, isolated from Verticillium dahlia, could enhance resistance to TMV in tobacco and Verticillium wilt in cotton. Here, the pevd1 gene was over-expressed in wild type (WT) Arabidopsis, and its biological functions were investigated. Our results showed that the transgenic lines were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 than the WT line was. In transgenic plants, both the germination time and bolting time required were significantly shorter and fresh weights and plant heights were significantly higher than those in the WT line. A transcriptomics study using digital gene expression profiling (DGE) was performed in transgenic and WT Arabidopsis. One hundred and thirty-six differentially expressed genes were identified. In transgenic Arabidopsis, three critical regulators of JA biosynthesis were up-regulated and JA levels were slightly increased. Three important repressors of the ABA-responsive pathway were up-regulated, indicating that ABA signal transduction may be suppressed. One CML and two WRKY TFs involved in Ca2+-responsive pathways were up-regulated, indicating that this pathway may have been triggered. In conclusion, we show that PevD1 is involved in regulating several plant endogenous signal transduction pathways and regulatory networks to enhance resistance and promote growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:27489497

  17. Functional Evolution in the Plant SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) Gene Family

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jill C.; Hileman, Lena C.

    2013-01-01

    The SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) family of transcription factors is functionally diverse, controlling a number of fundamental aspects of plant growth and development, including vegetative phase change, flowering time, branching, and leaf initiation rate. In natural plant populations, variation in flowering time and shoot architecture have major consequences for fitness. Likewise, in crop species, variation in branching and developmental rate impact biomass and yield. Thus, studies aimed at dissecting how the various functions are partitioned among different SPL genes in diverse plant lineages are key to providing insight into the genetic basis of local adaptation and have already garnered attention by crop breeders. Here we use phylogenetic reconstruction to reveal nine major SPL gene lineages, each of which is described in terms of function and diversification. To assess evidence for ancestral and derived functions within each SPL gene lineage, we use ancestral character state reconstructions. Our analyses suggest an emerging pattern of sub-functionalization, neo-functionalization, and possible convergent evolution following both ancient and recent gene duplication. Based on these analyses we suggest future avenues of research that may prove fruitful for elucidating the importance of SPL gene evolution in plant growth and development. PMID:23577017

  18. Protein arginine methyltransferase 7 promotes breast cancer cell invasion through the induction of MMP9 expression

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, R. Mitchell; Haghandish, Nasim; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Amin, Shahrier; Paris, Geneviève; Falls, Theresa J.; Bell, John C.; Islam, Shahidul; Côté, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence points to the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family of enzymes playing critical roles in cancer. PRMT7 has been identified in several gene expression studies to be associated with increased metastasis and decreased survival in breast cancer patients. However, this has not been extensively studied. Here we report that PRMT7 expression is significantly upregulated in both primary breast tumour tissues and in breast cancer lymph node metastases. We have demonstrated that reducing PRMT7 levels in invasive breast cancer cells using RNA interference significantly decreased cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo. Conversely, overexpression of PRMT7 in non-aggressive MCF7 cells enhanced their invasiveness. Furthermore, we show that PRMT7 induces the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), a well-known mediator of breast cancer metastasis. Importantly, we significantly rescued invasion of aggressive breast cancer cells depleted of PRMT7 by the exogenous expression of MMP9. Our results demonstrate that upregulation of PRMT7 in breast cancer may have a significant role in promoting cell invasion through the regulation of MMP9. This identifies PRMT7 as a novel and potentially significant biomarker and therapeutic target for breast cancer. PMID:25605249

  19. Protein tyrosine kinase 6 promotes ERBB2-induced mammary gland tumorigenesis in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Peng, M; Ball-Kell, S M; Tyner, A L

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) expression, activation, and amplification of the PTK6 gene have been reported in ERBB2/HER2-positive mammary gland cancers. To explore contributions of PTK6 to mammary gland tumorigenesis promoted by activated ERBB2, we crossed Ptk6-/- mice with the mouse mammary tumor virus-ERBB2 transgenic mouse line expressing activated ERBB2 and characterized tumor development and progression. ERBB2-induced tumorigenesis was significantly delayed and diminished in mice lacking PTK6. PTK6 expression was induced in the mammary glands of ERBB2 transgenic mice before tumor development and correlated with activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and increased proliferation. Disruption of PTK6 impaired STAT3 activation and proliferation. Phosphorylation of the PTK6 substrates focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and breast cancer anti-estrogen resistance 1 (BCAR1; p130CAS) was decreased in Ptk6-/- mammary gland tumors. Reduced numbers of metastases were detected in the lungs of Ptk6-/- mice expressing activated ERBB2, compared with wild-type ERBB2 transgenic mice. PTK6 activation was detected at the edges of ERBB2-positive tumors. These data support roles for PTK6 in both ERBB2-induced mammary gland tumor initiation and metastasis, and identify STAT3, FAK, and BCAR1 as physiologically relevant PTK6 substrates in breast cancer. Including PTK6 inhibitors as part of a treatment regimen could have distinct benefits in ERBB2/HER2-positive breast cancers.

  20. The Protein Elicitor PevD1 Enhances Resistance to Pathogens and Promotes Growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengjie; Khan, Najeeb Ullah; Wang, Ningbo; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen

    2016-01-01

    The protein elicitor PevD1, isolated from Verticillium dahlia, could enhance resistance to TMV in tobacco and Verticillium wilt in cotton. Here, the pevd1 gene was over-expressed in wild type (WT) Arabidopsis, and its biological functions were investigated. Our results showed that the transgenic lines were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 than the WT line was. In transgenic plants, both the germination time and bolting time required were significantly shorter and fresh weights and plant heights were significantly higher than those in the WT line. A transcriptomics study using digital gene expression profiling (DGE) was performed in transgenic and WT Arabidopsis. One hundred and thirty-six differentially expressed genes were identified. In transgenic Arabidopsis, three critical regulators of JA biosynthesis were up-regulated and JA levels were slightly increased. Three important repressors of the ABA-responsive pathway were up-regulated, indicating that ABA signal transduction may be suppressed. One CML and two WRKY TFs involved in Ca(2+)-responsive pathways were up-regulated, indicating that this pathway may have been triggered. In conclusion, we show that PevD1 is involved in regulating several plant endogenous signal transduction pathways and regulatory networks to enhance resistance and promote growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:27489497

  1. Atlas of transgenic Tet-Off Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and prion protein promoter activity in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Francis; Leergaard, Trygve B; Boy, Jana; Schmidt, Thorsten; Riess, Olaf; Bjaalie, Jan G

    2011-02-14

    Conditional transgenic mouse models are important tools for investigations of neurodegenerative diseases and evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions. A popular conditional transgenic system is the binary tetracycline-responsive gene (Tet-Off) system, in which the expression of the gene of interest depends on a tetracycline-regulatable transactivator (tTA) under the control of a specific promoter construct. The most frequently used Tet-Off promoter mouse lines are the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CamKII) and prion protein (PrP) promoter lines, respectively. To target the regulated gene of interest to relevant brain regions, a priori knowledge about the spatial distribution of the regulated gene expression in the brain is important. Such distribution patterns can be investigated using double transgenic mice in which the promoter construct regulates a LacZ reporter gene encoding the marker β-galactosidase which can be histologically detected using its substrate X-gal. We have previously published an atlas showing the brain-wide expression mediated by the Tet-Off PrP promoter mouse line, but the distribution of activity in the Tet-Off CamKII promoter mouse line is less well known. To compare promoter activity distributions in these two Tet-Off mouse lines, we have developed an online digital atlas tailored for side-by-side comparison of histological section images. The atlas provides a comprehensive list of brain regions containing X-gal labeling and an interactive dual image viewer tool for panning and zooming of corresponding section images. Comparison of spatial expression patterns between the two lines show considerable regional and cellular differences, relevant in context of generation and analysis of inducible models based on these two tetracycline responsive promoter mouse lines.

  2. Promoter analysis reveals globally differential regulation of human long non-coding RNA and protein-coding genes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alam, Tanvir; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Jia, Hui; Brown, James B.; Lipovich, Leonard; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Mantovani, Roberto

    2014-10-02

    Transcriptional regulation of protein-coding genes is increasingly well-understood on a global scale, yet no comparable information exists for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes, which were recently recognized to be as numerous as protein-coding genes in mammalian genomes. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of the promoters of human lncRNA and protein-coding genes, finding global differences in specific genetic and epigenetic features relevant to transcriptional regulation. These two groups of genes are hence subject to separate transcriptional regulatory programs, including distinct transcription factor (TF) proteins that significantly favor lncRNA, rather than coding-gene, promoters. We report a specific signature of promoter-proximal transcriptionalmore » regulation of lncRNA genes, including several distinct transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Experimental DNase I hypersensitive site profiles are consistent with active configurations of these lncRNA TFBS sets in diverse human cell types. TFBS ChIP-seq datasets confirm the binding events that we predicted using computational approaches for a subset of factors. For several TFs known to be directly regulated by lncRNAs, we find that their putative TFBSs are enriched at lncRNA promoters, suggesting that the TFs and the lncRNAs may participate in a bidirectional feedback loop regulatory network. Accordingly, cells may be able to modulate lncRNA expression levels independently of mRNA levels via distinct regulatory pathways. Our results also raise the possibility that, given the historical reliance on protein-coding gene catalogs to define the chromatin states of active promoters, a revision of these chromatin signature profiles to incorporate expressed lncRNA genes is warranted in the future.« less

  3. Promoter analysis reveals globally differential regulation of human long non-coding RNA and protein-coding genes

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Tanvir; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Jia, Hui; Brown, James B.; Lipovich, Leonard; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Mantovani, Roberto

    2014-10-02

    Transcriptional regulation of protein-coding genes is increasingly well-understood on a global scale, yet no comparable information exists for long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes, which were recently recognized to be as numerous as protein-coding genes in mammalian genomes. We performed a genome-wide comparative analysis of the promoters of human lncRNA and protein-coding genes, finding global differences in specific genetic and epigenetic features relevant to transcriptional regulation. These two groups of genes are hence subject to separate transcriptional regulatory programs, including distinct transcription factor (TF) proteins that significantly favor lncRNA, rather than coding-gene, promoters. We report a specific signature of promoter-proximal transcriptional regulation of lncRNA genes, including several distinct transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Experimental DNase I hypersensitive site profiles are consistent with active configurations of these lncRNA TFBS sets in diverse human cell types. TFBS ChIP-seq datasets confirm the binding events that we predicted using computational approaches for a subset of factors. For several TFs known to be directly regulated by lncRNAs, we find that their putative TFBSs are enriched at lncRNA promoters, suggesting that the TFs and the lncRNAs may participate in a bidirectional feedback loop regulatory network. Accordingly, cells may be able to modulate lncRNA expression levels independently of mRNA levels via distinct regulatory pathways. Our results also raise the possibility that, given the historical reliance on protein-coding gene catalogs to define the chromatin states of active promoters, a revision of these chromatin signature profiles to incorporate expressed lncRNA genes is warranted in the future.

  4. Nipah Virus C Protein Recruits Tsg101 to Promote the Efficient Release of Virus in an ESCRT-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Tatyana; Vigant, Frederic; Pernet, Olivier; Won, Sohui T.; Dawes, Brian E.; Bartkowski, Wojciech; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Lee, Benhur

    2016-01-01

    The budding of Nipah virus, a deadly member of the Henipavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae, has been thought to be independent of the host ESCRT pathway, which is critical for the budding of many enveloped viruses. This conclusion was based on the budding properties of the virus matrix protein in the absence of other virus components. Here, we find that the virus C protein, which was previously investigated for its role in antagonism of innate immunity, recruits the ESCRT pathway to promote efficient virus release. Inhibition of ESCRT or depletion of the ESCRT factor Tsg101 abrogates the C enhancement of matrix budding and impairs live Nipah virus release. Further, despite the low sequence homology of the C proteins of known henipaviruses, they all enhance the budding of their cognate matrix proteins, suggesting a conserved and previously unknown function for the henipavirus C proteins. PMID:27203423

  5. Nipah Virus C Protein Recruits Tsg101 to Promote the Efficient Release of Virus in an ESCRT-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Arnold; Yun, Tatyana; Vigant, Frederic; Pernet, Olivier; Won, Sohui T; Dawes, Brian E; Bartkowski, Wojciech; Freiberg, Alexander N; Lee, Benhur

    2016-05-01

    The budding of Nipah virus, a deadly member of the Henipavirus genus within the Paramyxoviridae, has been thought to be independent of the host ESCRT pathway, which is critical for the budding of many enveloped viruses. This conclusion was based on the budding properties of the virus matrix protein in the absence of other virus components. Here, we find that the virus C protein, which was previously investigated for its role in antagonism of innate immunity, recruits the ESCRT pathway to promote efficient virus release. Inhibition of ESCRT or depletion of the ESCRT factor Tsg101 abrogates the C enhancement of matrix budding and impairs live Nipah virus release. Further, despite the low sequence homology of the C proteins of known henipaviruses, they all enhance the budding of their cognate matrix proteins, suggesting a conserved and previously unknown function for the henipavirus C proteins. PMID:27203423

  6. High Fat Diet Enhances β-Site Cleavage of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) via Promoting β-Site APP Cleaving Enzyme 1/Adaptor Protein 2/Clathrin Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Maesako, Masato; Uemura, Maiko; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Sasaki, Kazuki; Watanabe, Kiwamu; Noda, Yasuha; Ueda, Karin; Asada-Utsugi, Megumi; Kubota, Masakazu; Okawa, Katsuya; Ihara, Masafumi; Shimohama, Shun; Uemura, Kengo; Kinoshita, Ayae

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are risk factors of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We reported that a high fat diet (HFD) promotes amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavage by β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) without increasing BACE1 levels in APP transgenic mice. However, the detailed mechanism had remained unclear. Here we demonstrate that HFD promotes BACE1/Adaptor protein-2 (AP-2)/clathrin complex formation by increasing AP-2 levels in APP transgenic mice. In Swedish APP overexpressing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells as well as in SH-SY5Y cells, overexpression of AP-2 promoted the formation of BACE1/AP-2/clathrin complex, increasing the level of the soluble form of APP β (sAPPβ). On the other hand, mutant D495R BACE1, which inhibits formation of this trimeric complex, was shown to decrease the level of sAPPβ. Overexpression of AP-2 promoted the internalization of BACE1 from the cell surface, thus reducing the cell surface BACE1 level. As such, we concluded that HFD may induce the formation of the BACE1/AP-2/clathrin complex, which is followed by its transport of BACE1 from the cell surface to the intracellular compartments. These events might be associated with the enhancement of β-site cleavage of APP in APP transgenic mice. Here we present evidence that HFD, by regulation of subcellular trafficking of BACE1, promotes APP cleavage. PMID:26414661

  7. A fusogenic peptide from a sea urchin fertilization protein promotes intracellular delivery of biomacromolecules by facilitating endosomal escape.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Keisuke; Horisawa, Kenichi; Doi, Nobuhide

    2015-08-28

    The low efficiency of endosomal escape has been considered a bottleneck for the cytosolic delivery of biomacromolecules such as proteins and DNA. Although fusogenic peptides (FPs) such as HA2 have been employed to improve the intracellular delivery of biomacromolecules, the FPs studied thus far are not adequately efficient in enabling endosomal escape; therefore, novel FPs with higher activity are required. In this context, we focused on FPs derived from a sea urchin fertilization protein, bindin, which is involved in gamete recognition (B18, residues 103-120 and B55, residues 83-137 of mature bindin). We show that enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-fused B55 peptide binds to plasma membranes more strongly than EGFP-B18 and promotes the intracellular delivery of dextrans, which were co-administered using the trans method in a pH-dependent manner without affecting cell viability and proliferation, whereas conventional EGFP-HA2 did not affect dextran internalization. Furthermore, EGFP-B55 promoted the intracellular delivery of biomacromolecules such as antibodies, ribonuclease and plasmidic DNA using the trans method. Because the promotion of intracellular delivery by EGFP-B55 was suppressed by endocytosis inhibitors, EGFP-B55 is considered to have facilitated the endosomal escape of co-administered cargos. These results suggested that an FP that promotes the intracellular delivery of a variety of biomacromolecules with no detectable cytotoxicity should be useful for the cytosolic delivery of membrane-impermeable molecules for biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  8. C-reactive protein promotes acute kidney injury via Smad3-dependent inhibition of CDK2/cyclin E.

    PubMed

    Lai, Weiyan; Tang, Ying; Huang, Xiao R; Ming-Kuen Tang, Patrick; Xu, Anping; Szalai, Alexander J; Lou, Tan-Qi; Lan, Hui Y

    2016-09-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is exacerbated in C-reactive protein transgenic mice but alleviated in Smad3 knockout mice. Here we used C-reactive protein transgenic/Smad3 wild-type and C-reactive protein transgenic/Smad3 knockout mice to investigate the signaling mechanisms by which C-reactive protein promotes AKI. Serum creatinine was elevated, and the extent of tubular epithelial cell necrosis following ischemia/reperfusion-induced AKI was greater in C-reactive protein transgenics but was blunted when Smad3 was deleted. Exacerbation of AKI in C-reactive protein transgenics was associated with increased TGF-β/Smad3 signaling and expression of the cyclin kinase inhibitor p27, but decreased phosphorylated CDK2 and expression of cyclin E. Concomitantly, tubular epithelial cell proliferation was arrested at the G1 phase in C-reactive protein transgenics with fewer cells entering the S-phase cell cycle as evidenced by fewer bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells. In contrast, the protection from AKI in C-reactive protein transgenic/Smad3 knockout mice was associated with decreased expression of p27 and promotion of CDK2/cyclin E-dependent G1/S transition of tubular epithelial cells. In vitro studies using tubular epithelial cells showed that C-reactive protein activates Smad3 via both TGF-β-dependent and ERK/MAPK cross talk mechanisms, Smad3 bound directly to p27, and blockade of Smad3 or the Fc receptor CD32 prevented C-reactive protein-induced p27-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. In vivo, treatment of C-reactive protein transgenics with a Smad3 inhibitor largely improved AKI outcomes. Thus, C-reactive protein may promote AKI by impairing tubular epithelial cell regeneration via the CD32-Smad3-p27-driven inhibition of the CDK2/cyclin E complex. Targeting Smad3 may offer a new treatment approach for AKI. PMID:27470679

  9. Effect on epidermal cell of soybean protein-degraded products and structural determination of the root hair promoting peptide.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Yoshiki; Sumiyoshi, Sayoko; Matsukura, Takuma; Kubo, Motoki

    2007-11-01

    Peptide(s) produced from degraded soybean protein by an alkaline protease from Bacillus circulans HA12 (degraded soybean-meal products; DSP) increased the number of both the root hair cells (trichoblasts) and hairless cells (atrichoblasts) of Brassica rapa by about 4.4 times and 1.9 times, respectively. To identify the root hair-promoting peptide(s) in DSP, the origin protein of the root hair-promoting peptide(s) was identified as Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (KTI). The root hair-promoting peptide in the degraded products of KTI was purified and produced a signal of 1,198.2 Da with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. A search of the amino acid sequence of KTI located the peptide GGIRAAPTGNER, which had a molecular weight identical to 1,198.2 Da. The peptide GGIRAAPTGNER was chemically synthesized, and the synthetic peptide possessed root hair-promoting activity. Thus, it is concluded that this peptide in DSP is the foreign bioactive peptide promoting the differentiation of root hairs.

  10. TIPRL Inhibits Protein Phosphatase 4 Activity and Promotes H2AX Phosphorylation in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Kimberly Romero; Reid, Michael A.; Yang, Ying; Tran, Thai Q.; Wang, Wen-I; Lowman, Xazmin; Pan, Min; Kong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in our understanding of protein kinase regulation in the DNA damage response, the mechanism that controls protein phosphatase activity in this pathway is unclear. Unlike kinases, the activity and specificity of serine/threonine phosphatases is governed largely by their associated proteins. Here we show that Tip41-like protein (TIPRL), an evolutionarily conserved binding protein for PP2A-family phosphatases, is a negative regulator of protein phosphatase 4 (PP4). Knockdown of TIPRL resulted in increased PP4 phosphatase activity and formation of the active PP4-C/PP4R2 complex known to dephosphorylate γ-H2AX. Thus, overexpression of TIPRL promotes phosphorylation of H2AX, and increases γ-H2AX positive foci in response to DNA damage, whereas knockdown of TIPRL inhibits γ-H2AX phosphorylation. In correlation with γ-H2AX levels, we found that TIPRL overexpression promotes cell death in response to genotoxic stress, and knockdown of TIPRL protects cells from genotoxic agents. Taken together, these data demonstrate that TIPRL inhibits PP4 activity to allow for H2AX phosphorylation and the subsequent DNA damage response. PMID:26717153

  11. Gene promoter of apoptosis inhibitory protein IAP2: identification of enhancer elements and activation by severe hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zheng; Nishiyama, Junichiro; Yi, Xiaolan; Venkatachalam, Manjeri A; Denton, Michael; Gu, Sumin; Li, Senlin; Qiang, Mei

    2002-01-01

    Inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) antagonize cell death and regulate the cell cycle. One mechanism controlling IAP expression is translation initiation through the internal ribosome entry sites. Alternatively, IAP expression can be regulated at the transcription level. We showed recently the activation of IAP2 transcription by severe hypoxia. To pursue this regulation, we have cloned the full-length cDNA of rat IAP2, and have isolated and analysed the promoter regions of this gene. The cDNA encodes a protein of 589 amino acids, exhibiting structural features of IAP. In rat tissues, a major IAP2 transcript of approximately 3.5 kb was detected. We subsequently isolated 3.3 kb of the proximal 5'-flanking regions of this gene, which showed significant promoter activity. Of interest, 5' sequential deletion of the promoter sequence identified an enhancer of approximately 200 bp. Deletion of cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) sites in the enhancer sequence diminished its activity. Finally, the IAP2 gene promoter was activated significantly by severe hypoxia and not by CoCl(2) or desferrioxamine, pharmacological inducers of hypoxia-inducible factor-1. In conclusion, in this study we have cloned the full-length cDNA of rat IAP2, and for the first time we have isolated and analysed promoter sequences of this gene, leading to the identification of enhancer elements. Moreover, we have demonstrated activation of the gene promoter by severe hypoxia, a condition shown to induce IAP2. These findings provide a basis for further investigation of gene regulation of IAP2, a protein with multiple functions. PMID:12023884

  12. Identification of two Y-box binding proteins that interact with the promoters of columbid annexin I genes.

    PubMed

    Pratt, S L; Horseman, N D

    1998-07-01

    Two annexin I (anxI) genes, called cp35 and cp37, are expressed from the pigeon (Columba livia) genome, but they are regulated differently at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The proximal promoter elements of these two genes are very similar. A conserved sequence from the cp35 and cp37 promoters bound specifically with proteins present in cropsac cell extracts. This sequence of DNA was used to screen a lambdagt11 cDNA expression library. Clones encoding two pigeon Y-box binding proteins (YB) were isolated. One of the pigeon YB cDNAs was found to be most similar to YB1 from other species, and the other was most similar to chicken YB2. Each YB is encoded by a single-copy gene in the pigeon, and their mRNAs are expressed in many tissues. On Northern blots, the sizes of the mRNAs encoding pigeon YB1 (pYB1) and pigeon YB2 (pYB2) were 1.8 and 1.7kb, respectively. The sequences of both pYB1 and pYB2 diverge from their previously identified relatives in the N-terminal domain 'A'. Antisera were developed to unique peptide epitopes in YB1 or 2. Affinity-purified anti-YB1 and anti-YB2 detected immunoreactive proteins in extracts from a variety of pigeon tissues, including the cropsac. To confirm that pYB1 and pYB2 interact with the cp35 promoter, electrophoretic gel mobility shift reactions were carried out in the presence or absence of YB antibodies. Binding to the cp35 promoter was specifically neutralized by either anti-pYB1 or anti-pYB2. These results are the first evidence that two YB proteins simultaneously bind to a promoter element, and thereby may interact during regulation of gene expression.

  13. Flavodoxin-Like Proteins Protect Candida albicans from Oxidative Stress and Promote Virulence.

    PubMed

    Li, Lifang; Naseem, Shamoon; Sharma, Sahil; Konopka, James B

    2015-09-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans causes lethal systemic infections in humans. To better define how pathogens resist oxidative attack by the immune system, we examined a family of four Flavodoxin-Like Proteins (FLPs) in C. albicans. In agreement with previous studies showing that FLPs in bacteria and plants act as NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductases, a C. albicans quadruple mutant lacking all four FLPs (pst1Δ, pst2Δ, pst3Δ, ycp4Δ) was more sensitive to benzoquinone. Interestingly, the quadruple mutant was also more sensitive to a variety of oxidants. Quinone reductase activity confers important antioxidant effects because resistance to oxidation was restored in the quadruple mutant by expressing either Escherichia coli wrbA or mammalian NQO1, two distinct types of quinone reductases. FLPs were detected at the plasma membrane in C. albicans, and the quadruple mutant was more sensitive to linolenic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid that can auto-oxidize and promote lipid peroxidation. These observations suggested that FLPs reduce ubiquinone (coenzyme Q), enabling it to serve as an antioxidant in the membrane. In support of this, a C. albicans coq3Δ mutant that fails to synthesize ubiquinone was also highly sensitive to oxidative stress. FLPs are critical for survival in the host, as the quadruple mutant was avirulent in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis under conditions where infection with wild type C. albicans was lethal. The quadruple mutant cells initially grew well in kidneys, the major site of C. albicans growth in mice, but then declined after the influx of neutrophils and by day 4 post-infection 33% of the mice cleared the infection. Thus, FLPs and ubiquinone are important new antioxidant mechanisms that are critical for fungal virulence. The potential of FLPs as novel targets for antifungal therapy is further underscored by their absence in mammalian cells. PMID:26325183

  14. Bovine and rodent tamm-horsfall protein (THP) genes: cloning, structural analysis, and promoter identification.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Papa, F; Sukhatme, V P

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated bovine and rodent cDNA and genomic clones encoding the kidney-specific Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP). In both species the gene contains 11 exons, the first of which is noncoding. Exon/intron junctions were analyzed and all were shown to follow the AG/GT rule. A kidney-specific DNase I hypersensitive site was mapped onto a rodent genomic fragment for which the sequence is highly conserved in three species (rat, cow, and human) over a stretch of 350 base pairs. Primer extension and RNase protection analysis identified a transcription start site at the 3' end of this conserved region. A TATA box is located at 32 nucleotides upstream of the start site in the bovine gene and 34 nucleotides upstream in the rodent gene. An inverted CCAAT motif occurs at 65 and 66 nucleotides upstream of the start site in the bovine and rodent genes, respectively. Other highly conserved regions were noted in this 350 bp region and these are likely to be binding sites for transcription factors. A functional assay based on an in vitro transcription system confirmed that the conserved region is an RNA Pol II promoter. The in vitro system accurately initiated transcription from the in vivo start site and was highly sensitive to inhibition by alpha-amanitin at a concentration of 2.5 micrograms/ml. These studies set the stage for the further definition of cis-acting sequences and trans-factors regulating expression of the THP gene, a model for kidney-specific gene expression.

  15. Krüppel-Like Factor 12 Promotes Colorectal Cancer Growth through Early Growth Response Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Park, Yun-Yong; Cho, Sung-Nam; Margalit, Ofer; Wang, Dingzhi; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2016-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 12 (KLF12) is a transcription factor that plays a role in normal kidney development and repression of decidualization. KLF12 is frequently elevated in esophageal adenocarcinoma and has been reported to promote gastric cancer progression. Here, we examined the role of KLF12 in colorectal cancer (CRC). Indeed, KLF12 promotes tumor growth by directly activating early growth response protein 1 (EGR1). The levels of KLF12 and EGR1 correlate synergistically with a poor prognosis. These results indicate that KLF12 likely plays an important role in CRC and could serve as a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target. PMID:27442508

  16. Somatotroph- and lactotroph-specific interactions with the homeobox protein binding sites in the rat growth hormone gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Schaufele, F; West, B L; Reudelhuber, T

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear extracts prepared from growth hormone-secreting (GC) and prolactin-secreting (235-1) rat anterior pituitary cell lines were compared for their ability to bind to the DNA sequences conferring tissue-specificity to the expression of the rat growth hormone (rGH) gene promoter. Cell-specific differences in the interaction of Pit-1, a tissue-specific member of the POU-domain transcription factor family, with the pGHF1 binding site were detected by methylation interference experiments; otherwise the Pit-1 proteins present in GC cell and 235-1 cell extracts were similar. Two other protein/DNA complexes, GHF5 and GHF7, were detected by gel mobility shift assays and the binding of both complexes to the rGH promoter depended upon DNA sequences contained within the two binding sites for Pit-1. In contrast to Pit-1 which can bind to either of the two sites independently, a single Pit-1 binding site was insufficient for GHF5 and GHF7 binding; i.e. both Pit-1 binding sites within the rGH promoter were required. Whereas GHF5 was present in nuclear extracts of GC cells and a variety of cells not producing growth hormone, GHF7 binding activity was detected only in the GC cell line (and not in the 235-1 cell line). GHF7 binding activity was therefore more closely correlated with growth hormone gene transcription than was Pit-1. rGH promoters containing mutations which inhibited GHF5, GHF7 and Pit-1 binding were expressed less efficiently than the wild type promoter after transfection into GC cells. One promoter mutation to which the GHF7 complex but not the Pit-1 factor can bind was also transcription deficient demonstrating that Pit-1 binding, independent of GHF7 binding, was nevertheless important to the expression of the rat growth hormone promoter. Images PMID:1976240

  17. Nucleosome Stability Distinguishes Two Different Promoter Types at All Protein-Coding Genes in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Slawomir; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Jacquet, Philippe; Falcone, Jean-Luc; Rougemont, Jacques; Shore, David

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies indicate that eukaryotic promoters display a stereotypical chromatin landscape characterized by a well-positioned +1 nucleosome near the transcription start site and an upstream -1 nucleosome that together demarcate a nucleosome-free (or -depleted) region. Here we present evidence that there are two distinct types of promoters distinguished by the resistance of the -1 nucleosome to micrococcal nuclease digestion. These different architectures are characterized by two sequence motifs that are broadly deployed at one set of promoters where a nuclease-sensitive ("fragile") nucleosome forms, but concentrated in a narrower, nucleosome-free region at all other promoters. The RSC nucleosome remodeler acts through the motifs to establish stable +1 and -1 nucleosome positions, while binding of a small set of general regulatory (pioneer) factors at fragile nucleosome promoters plays a key role in their destabilization. We propose that the fragile nucleosome promoter architecture is adapted for regulation of highly expressed, growth-related genes.

  18. Autophagy-linked FYVE protein (Alfy) promotes autophagic removal of misfolded proteins involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Han, Huihui; Wei, Wanyi; Duan, Weisong; Guo, Yansu; Li, Yi; Wang, Jie; Bi, Yue; Li, Chunyan

    2015-03-01

    Autophagy-linked FYVE (Alfy) is a protein implicated in the selective degradation of aggregated proteins. In our present study, we found that Alfy was recruited into the aggregated G93A-SOD1 in transgenic mice with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We demonstrated that Alfy overexpression could decrease the expression of mutant proteins via the autophagosome-lysosome pathway, and thereby, the toxicity of mutant proteins was reduced. The clearance of the mutant proteins in NSC34 cells was significantly inhibited in an Alfy knockdown cellular model. We therefore deduced that Alfy translocalization likely is involved in the pathogenesis of ALS. Alfy may be developed into a useful target for ALS therapy.

  19. Specific nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins can promote the location of chromosomes to and from the nuclear periphery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Different cell types have distinctive patterns of chromosome positioning in the nucleus. Although ectopic affinity-tethering of specific loci can be used to relocate chromosomes to the nuclear periphery, endogenous nuclear envelope proteins that control such a mechanism in mammalian cells have yet to be widely identified. Results To search for such proteins, 23 nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins were screened for their ability to promote peripheral localization of human chromosomes in HT1080 fibroblasts. Five of these proteins had strong effects on chromosome 5, but individual proteins affected different subsets of chromosomes. The repositioning effects were reversible and the proteins with effects all exhibited highly tissue-restricted patterns of expression. Depletion of two nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins that were preferentially expressed in liver each reduced the normal peripheral positioning of chromosome 5 in liver cells. Conclusions The discovery of nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins that can modulate chromosome position and have restricted patterns of expression may enable dissection of the functional relevance of tissue-specific patterns of radial chromosome positioning. PMID:23414781

  20. Bee bread increases honeybee haemolymph protein and promote better survival despite of causing higher Nosema ceranae abundance in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Basualdo, Marina; Barragán, Sergio; Antúnez, Karina

    2014-08-01

    Adequate protein nutrition supports healthy honeybees and reduces the susceptibility to disease. However little is known concerning the effect of the diet on Nosema ceranae development, an obligate intracellular parasite that disturbs the protein metabolism of honeybees (Apis mellifera). Here we tested the effect of natural (bee bread) and non-natural protein diets (substitute) on haemolymph proteins titers of honeybee and N. ceranae spore production. The natural diet induced higher levels of protein and parasite development, but the survival of bees was also higher than with non-natural diets. The data showed that the administration of an artificially high nutritious diet in terms of crude protein content is not sufficient to promote healthy bees; rather the protein ingested should be efficiently assimilated. The overall results support the idea that the physiological condition of the bees is linked to protein levels in the haemolymph, which affects the tolerance to parasite; consequently the negative impact of the parasite on host fitness is not associated only with the level of infection.

  1. Bee bread increases honeybee haemolymph protein and promote better survival despite of causing higher Nosema ceranae abundance in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Basualdo, Marina; Barragán, Sergio; Antúnez, Karina

    2014-08-01

    Adequate protein nutrition supports healthy honeybees and reduces the susceptibility to disease. However little is known concerning the effect of the diet on Nosema ceranae development, an obligate intracellular parasite that disturbs the protein metabolism of honeybees (Apis mellifera). Here we tested the effect of natural (bee bread) and non-natural protein diets (substitute) on haemolymph proteins titers of honeybee and N. ceranae spore production. The natural diet induced higher levels of protein and parasite development, but the survival of bees was also higher than with non-natural diets. The data showed that the administration of an artificially high nutritious diet in terms of crude protein content is not sufficient to promote healthy bees; rather the protein ingested should be efficiently assimilated. The overall results support the idea that the physiological condition of the bees is linked to protein levels in the haemolymph, which affects the tolerance to parasite; consequently the negative impact of the parasite on host fitness is not associated only with the level of infection. PMID:24992539

  2. Polarized Exocytosis Induces Compensatory Endocytosis by Sec4p-Regulated Cortical Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Jesper; Alfaro, Gabriel; Beh, Christopher T.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized growth is maintained by both polarized exocytosis, which transports membrane components to specific locations on the cell cortex, and endocytosis, which retrieves these components before they can diffuse away. Despite functional links between these two transport pathways, they are generally considered to be separate events. Using live cell imaging, in vivo and in vitro protein binding assays, and in vitro pyrene-actin polymerization assays, we show that the yeast Rab GTPase Sec4p couples polarized exocytosis with cortical actin polymerization, which induces endocytosis. After polarized exocytosis to the plasma membrane, Sec4p binds Las17/Bee1p (yeast Wiskott—Aldrich Syndrome protein [WASp]) in a complex with Sla1p and Sla2p during actin patch assembly. Mutations that inactivate Sec4p, or its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Sec2p, inhibit actin patch formation, whereas the activating sec4-Q79L mutation accelerates patch assembly. In vitro assays of Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization established that GTPγS-Sec4p overrides Sla1p inhibition of Las17p-dependent actin nucleation. These results support a model in which Sec4p relocates along the plasma membrane from polarized sites of exocytic vesicle fusion to nascent sites of endocytosis. Activated Sec4p then promotes actin polymerization and triggers compensatory endocytosis, which controls surface expansion and kinetically refines cell polarization. PMID:27526190

  3. Drosophila Casein Kinase 2 (CK2) Promotes Warts Protein to Suppress Yorkie Protein Activity for Growth Control*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lianxin; Huang, Hongling; Li, Jinhui; Yin, Meng-Xin; Lu, Yi; Wu, Wenqing; Zeng, Rong; Jiang, Jin; Zhao, Yun; Zhang, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila Hippo signaling regulates Wts activity to phosphorylate and inhibit Yki in order to control tissue growth. CK2 is widely expressed and involved in a variety of signaling pathways. In this study we report that Drosophila CK2 promotes Wts activity to phosphorylate and inhibit Yki activity, which is independent of Hpo-induced Wts promotion. In vivo, CK2 overexpression suppresses hpo mutant-induced expanded (Ex) up-regulation and overgrowth phenotype, whereas it cannot affect wts mutant. Consistent with this, knockdown of CK2 up-regulates Hpo pathway target expression. We also found that Drosophila CK2 is essential for tissue growth as a cell death inhibitor as knockdown of CK2 in the developing disc induces severe growth defects as well as caspase3 signals. Taken together, our results uncover a dual role of CK2; although its major role is promoting cell survive, it may potentially be a growth inhibitor as well. PMID:25320084

  4. Sp-1 binds promoter elements regulated by the RB protein and Sp-1-mediated transcription is stimulated by RB coexpression.

    PubMed Central

    Udvadia, A J; Rogers, K T; Higgins, P D; Murata, Y; Martin, K H; Humphrey, P A; Horowitz, J M

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) protein is implicated in transcriptional regulation of at least five cellular genes, including c-fos, c-myc, and transforming growth factor beta 1. Cotransfection of RB and truncated promoter constructs has defined a discrete element (retinoblastoma control element; RCE) within the promoters of each of these genes as being necessary for RB-mediated transcription control. Previously, we have shown that RCEs form protein-DNA complexes in vitro with three heretofore unidentified nuclear proteins and mutation of their DNA-binding site within the c-fos RCE results in an abrogation of RCE-dependent transcription in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that one of the nuclear proteins that binds the c-fos, c-myc, and transforming growth factor beta 1 RCEs in vitro is Sp-1 and that Sp-1 stimulates RCE-dependent transcription in vivo. Moreover, we show that Sp-1-mediated transcription is stimulated by the transient coexpression of RB protein. We conclude from these observations that RB may regulate transcription in part by virtue of its ability to functionally interact with Sp-1. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8475068

  5. Metal containing polymeric functional microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Polymeric functional microspheres containing metal or metal compounds are formed by addition polymerization of a covalently bondable olefinic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate in the presence of finely divided metal or metal oxide particles, such as iron, gold, platinum or magnetite, which are embedded in the resulting microspheres. The microspheres can be covalently bonded to chemotherapeutic agents, antibodies, or other proteins providing a means for labeling or separating labeled cells. Labeled cells or microspheres can be concentrated at a specific body location such as in the vicinity of a malignant tumor by applying a magnetic field to the location and then introducing the magnetically attractable microspheres or cells into the circulatory system of the subject. Labeled cells can be separated from a cell mixture by applying a predetermined magnetic field to a tube in which the mixture is flowing. After collection of the labeled cells, the magnetic field is discontinued and the labeled sub-cell population recovered.

  6. Metastasis-promoting anterior gradient 2 protein has a dimeric thioredoxin fold structure and a role in cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pryank; Clarke, Christopher; Barraclough, Dong Liu; Jowitt, Thomas Adam; Rudland, Philip Spencer; Barraclough, Roger; Lian, Lu-Yun

    2013-03-11

    Anterior gradient 2 (AGR2) is a normal endoplasmic reticulum protein that has two important abnormal functions, amphibian limb regeneration and human cancer metastasis promotion. These normal intracellular and abnormal extracellular roles can be attributed to the multidomain structure of AGR2. The NMR structure shows that AGR2 consists of an unstructured N-terminal region followed by a thioredoxin fold. The protein exists in monomer-dimer equilibrium with a K(d) of 8.83μM, and intermolecular salt bridges involving E60 and K64 within the folded domain serve to stabilize the dimer. The unstructured region is primarily responsible for the ability of AGR2 to promote cell adhesion, while dimerization is less important for this activity. The structural data of AGR2 show a separation between potential catalytic redox activity and adhesion function within the context of metastasis and development. PMID:23274113

  7. Nanog Increases Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) Promoter Activity and Expression and Directly Binds to FAK Protein to Be Phosphorylated*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Baotran; Olson, Gretchen; Figel, Sheila; Gelman, Irwin; Cance, William G.; Golubovskaya, Vita M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanog and FAK were shown to be overexpressed in cancer cells. In this report, the Nanog overexpression increased FAK expression in 293, SW480, and SW620 cancer cells. Nanog binds the FAK promoter and up-regulates its activity, whereas Nanog siRNA decreases FAK promoter activity and FAK mRNA. The FAK promoter contains four Nanog-binding sites. The site-directed mutagenesis of these sites significantly decreased up-regulation of FAK promoter activity by Nanog. EMSA showed the specific binding of Nanog to each of the four sites, and binding was confirmed by ChIP assay. Nanog directly binds the FAK protein by pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays, and proteins co-localize by confocal microscopy. Nanog binds the N-terminal domain of FAK. In addition, FAK directly phosphorylates Nanog in a dose-dependent manner by in vitro kinase assay and in cancer cells in vivo. The site-directed mutagenesis of Nanog tyrosines, Y35F and Y174F, blocked phosphorylation and binding by FAK. Moreover, overexpression of wild type Nanog increased filopodia/lamellipodia formation, whereas mutant Y35F and Y174F Nanog did not. The wild type Nanog increased cell invasion that was inhibited by the FAK inhibitor and increased by FAK more significantly than with the mutants Y35F and Y174F Nanog. Down-regulation of Nanog with siRNA decreased cell growth reversed by FAK overexpression. Thus, these data demonstrate the regulation of the FAK promoter by Nanog, the direct binding of the proteins, the phosphorylation of Nanog by FAK, and the effect of FAK and Nanog cross-regulation on cancer cell morphology, invasion, and growth that plays a significant role in carcinogenesis. PMID:22493428

  8. Activation of protein kinase C subtypes alpha, gamma, delta, epsilon, zeta, and eta by tumor-promoting and nontumor-promoting agents.

    PubMed

    Geiges, D; Meyer, T; Marte, B; Vanek, M; Weissgerber, G; Stabel, S; Pfeilschifter, J; Fabbro, D; Huwiler, A

    1997-03-21

    Protein kinase C (PKC) subtypes alpha, gamma, delta, epsilon, zeta, and eta have been expressed using the baculovirus expression system. The partially purified PKC subtypes have been studied for their substrate specificities and phospholipid-independent activation by various chemically different nontumor- and tumor-promoting agents, as well as their inhibition of kinase activity by staurosporine and two related compounds. An endogenous PKC-like kinase activity of Sf9 cells was detected and analyzed for cofactor requirements and inhibition. Protamine sulfate was most efficiently phosphorylated by all of the PKC subtypes tested, although this phosphorylation was independent of phosphatidylserine (PS) and diacylglycerol (DAG) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Except for PKC-zeta, all subtypes tested phosphorylated myelin basic protein (MBP), histone, or a peptide derived from the pseudosubstrate region of PKC-alpha in a PS/DAG-dependent manner but to varying extents. Among the various agents tested, TPA most efficiently stimulated the kinase activities of the PKC subtypes in a phospholipid-dependent manner. Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) was less effective than TPA but displayed no major difference among the subtypes. Activation of PKC-alpha by bryostatin-1 reached only half of the TPA response whereas the other subtypes were activated more effectively. The weak tumor promoter resiniferonol 9,13,14-orthophenyl acetate (ROPA) mainly stimulated PKC-alpha and PKC-gamma at 1 microM concentration, whereas PKC-epsilon and PKC-eta were much less activated. Sapintoxin D, mezerein, indolactam V, and resiniferatoxin at concentrations of 1-100 nM preferentially activated PKC-alpha in a DAG-like manner, whereas at 1 microM other subtypes were activated as well. Preferential activation of PKC-alpha was also noted for tinyatoxin and thapsigargin, but their mode of activation is unclear because these two compounds did not compete for the phorbol ester binding of the

  9. Alternative promoter usage and mRNA splicing pathways for parathyroid hormone-related protein in normal tissues and tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Southby, J.; O'Keeffe, L. M.; Martin, T. J.; Gillespie, M. T.

    1995-01-01

    The parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) gene consists of nine exons and allows the production of multiple PTHrP mRNA species via the use of three promoters and 5' and 3' alternative splicing; as a result of 3' alternative splicing one of three protein isoforms may be produced. This organisation has potential for tissue-specific splicing patterns. We examined PTHrP mRNA expression and splicing patterns in a series of tumours and normal tissues, using the sensitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Use of promoter 3 and mRNA specifying the 141 amino acid PTHrP isoform were detected in all samples. Transcripts encoding the 139 amino acid isoform were detected in all but two samples. Use of promoters 1 and 2 was less widespread as was detection of mRNA encoding the 173 amino acid isoform. While different PTHrP splicing patterns were observed between tumours, no tissue- or tumour-specific transcripts were detected. In comparing normal and tumour tissue from the same patient, an increase in the number of promoters utilised was observed in the tumour tissue. Furthermore, mRNA for the PTH/PTHrP receptor was detected in all samples, thus the PTHrP produced by these tumours may potentially act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion. Images Figure 2 PMID:7669584

  10. Caffeine promotes autophagy in skeletal muscle cells by increasing the calcium-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Mathew, T S; Ferris, R K; Downs, R M; Kinsey, S T; Baumgarner, B L

    2014-10-24

    Caffeine has been shown to promote calcium-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and AMPK-dependent glucose and fatty acid uptake in mammalian skeletal muscle. Though caffeine has been shown to promote autophagy in various mammalian cell lines it is unclear if caffeine-induced autophagy is related to the calcium-dependent activation of AMPK. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of calcium-dependent AMPK activation in regulating caffeine-induced autophagy in mammalian skeletal muscle cells. We discovered that the addition of the AMPK inhibitor Compound C could significantly reduce the expression of the autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3b-II (LC3b-II) and autophagic vesicle accumulation in caffeine treated skeletal muscle cells. Additional experiments using pharmacological inhibitors and RNA interference (RNAi) demonstrated that the calcium/calmodulin-activated protein kinases CaMKKβ and CaMKII contributed to the AMPK-dependent expression of LC3b-II and autophagic vesicle accumulation in a caffeine dose-dependent manner. Our results indicate that in skeletal muscle cells caffeine increases autophagy by promoting the calcium-dependent activation of AMPK.

  11. Identification of a Taraxacum brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor protein that is localized on rubber particles and promotes rubber biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Laibach, Natalie; Hillebrand, Andrea; Twyman, Richard M; Prüfer, Dirk; Schulze Gronover, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Two protein families required for rubber biosynthesis in Taraxacum brevicorniculatum have recently been characterized, namely the cis-prenyltransferases (TbCPTs) and the small rubber particle proteins (TbSRPPs). The latter were shown to be the most abundant proteins on rubber particles, where rubber biosynthesis takes place. Here we identified a protein designated T. brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor (TbREF) by using mass spectrometry to analyze rubber particle proteins. TbREF is homologous to the TbSRPPs but has a molecular mass that is atypical for the family. The promoter was shown to be active in laticifers, and the protein itself was localized on the rubber particle surface. In TbREF-silenced plants generated by RNA interference, the rubber content was significantly reduced, correlating with lower TbCPT protein levels and less TbCPT activity in the latex. However, the molecular mass of the rubber was not affected by TbREF silencing. The colloidal stability of rubber particles isolated from TbREF-silenced plants was also unchanged. This was not surprising because TbREF depletion did not affect the abundance of TbSRPPs, which are required for rubber particle stability. Our findings suggest that TbREF is an important component of the rubber biosynthesis machinery in T. brevicorniculatum, and may play a role in rubber particle biogenesis and influence rubber production. PMID:25809497

  12. Identification of a Taraxacum brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor protein that is localized on rubber particles and promotes rubber biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Laibach, Natalie; Hillebrand, Andrea; Twyman, Richard M; Prüfer, Dirk; Schulze Gronover, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Two protein families required for rubber biosynthesis in Taraxacum brevicorniculatum have recently been characterized, namely the cis-prenyltransferases (TbCPTs) and the small rubber particle proteins (TbSRPPs). The latter were shown to be the most abundant proteins on rubber particles, where rubber biosynthesis takes place. Here we identified a protein designated T. brevicorniculatum rubber elongation factor (TbREF) by using mass spectrometry to analyze rubber particle proteins. TbREF is homologous to the TbSRPPs but has a molecular mass that is atypical for the family. The promoter was shown to be active in laticifers, and the protein itself was localized on the rubber particle surface. In TbREF-silenced plants generated by RNA interference, the rubber content was significantly reduced, correlating with lower TbCPT protein levels and less TbCPT activity in the latex. However, the molecular mass of the rubber was not affected by TbREF silencing. The colloidal stability of rubber particles isolated from TbREF-silenced plants was also unchanged. This was not surprising because TbREF depletion did not affect the abundance of TbSRPPs, which are required for rubber particle stability. Our findings suggest that TbREF is an important component of the rubber biosynthesis machinery in T. brevicorniculatum, and may play a role in rubber particle biogenesis and influence rubber production.

  13. Alpha-ketoglutarate promotes skeletal muscle hypertrophy and protein synthesis through Akt/mTOR signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xingcai; Zhu, Canjun; Xu, Yaqiong; Jing, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Yexian; Wang, Lina; Wang, Songbo; Zhu, Xiaotong; Gao, Ping; Zhang, Yongliang; Jiang, Qingyan; Shu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle weight loss is accompanied by small fiber size and low protein content. Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) participates in protein and nitrogen metabolism. The effect of AKG on skeletal muscle hypertrophy has not yet been tested, and its underlying mechanism is yet to be determined. In this study, we demonstrated that AKG (2%) increased the gastrocnemius muscle weight and fiber diameter in mice. Our in vitro study also confirmed that AKG dose increased protein synthesis in C2C12 myotubes, which could be effectively blocked by the antagonists of Akt and mTOR. The effects of AKG on skeletal muscle protein synthesis were independent of glutamate, its metabolite. We tested the expression of GPR91 and GPR99. The result demonstrated that C2C12 cells expressed GPR91, which could be upregulated by AKG. GPR91 knockdown abolished the effect of AKG on protein synthesis but failed to inhibit protein degradation. These findings demonstrated that AKG promoted skeletal muscle hypertrophy via Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. In addition, GPR91 might be partially attributed to AKG-induced skeletal muscle protein synthesis. PMID:27225984

  14. Human chorionic gonadotropin promotes expression of protein absorption factors in the intestine of goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Hao, G; Zhong, H; Wu, Q; Lu, S Q; Zhao, Q; Liu, Z

    2015-07-27

    Protein use is crucial for the ovulation and spawning of fish. Currently, limited information is available regarding the expression of protein absorption factors during the breeding seasons of teleosts and thus how various proteins involved in this process is not well-understood. The expression of CDX2, CREB, gluatamate dehydrogenase, LAT2, aminopeptidase N, PepT1, and SP1 were significantly elevated from the non-breeding season to the breeding season in female goldfish, and all proteins except PepT1 and SP1 were elevated in male goldfish. Injection of human chorionic gonadotropin upregulated the expression of all proteins except for aminopeptidase N in female goldfish and SP1 in male goldfish, suggesting a luteinizing hormone-inductive effect on protein absorption factors. Protein use in the intestine is increased during the breeding seasons as a result of increased luteinizing hormone.

  15. Microtubule-associated proteins 1 (MAP1) promote human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) intracytoplasmic routing to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Juliette; Portilho, Débora M; Danckaert, Anne; Munier, Sandie; Becker, Andreas; Roux, Pascal; Zambo, Anaba; Shorte, Spencer; Jacob, Yves; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Charneau, Pierre; Clavel, François; Arhel, Nathalie J

    2015-02-20

    After cell entry, HIV undergoes rapid transport toward the nucleus using microtubules and microfilaments. Neither the cellular cytoplasmic components nor the viral proteins that interact to mediate transport have yet been identified. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified four cytoskeletal components as putative interaction partners for HIV-1 p24 capsid protein: MAP1A, MAP1S, CKAP1, and WIRE. Depletion of MAP1A/MAP1S in indicator cell lines and primary human macrophages led to a profound reduction in HIV-1 infectivity as a result of impaired retrograde trafficking, demonstrated by a characteristic accumulation of capsids away from the nuclear membrane, and an overall defect in nuclear import. MAP1A/MAP1S did not impact microtubule network integrity or cell morphology but contributed to microtubule stabilization, which was shown previously to facilitate infection. In addition, we found that MAP1 proteins interact with HIV-1 cores both in vitro and in infected cells and that interaction involves MAP1 light chain LC2. Depletion of MAP1 proteins reduced the association of HIV-1 capsids with both dynamic and stable microtubules, suggesting that MAP1 proteins help tether incoming viral capsids to the microtubular network, thus promoting cytoplasmic trafficking. This work shows for the first time that following entry into target cells, HIV-1 interacts with the cytoskeleton via its p24 capsid protein. Moreover, our results support a role for MAP1 proteins in promoting efficient retrograde trafficking of HIV-1 by stimulating the formation of stable microtubules and mediating the association of HIV-1 cores with microtubules.

  16. Microtubule-associated Proteins 1 (MAP1) Promote Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type I (HIV-1) Intracytoplasmic Routing to the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Juliette; Portilho, Débora M.; Danckaert, Anne; Munier, Sandie; Becker, Andreas; Roux, Pascal; Zambo, Anaba; Shorte, Spencer; Jacob, Yves; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Charneau, Pierre; Clavel, François; Arhel, Nathalie J.

    2015-01-01

    After cell entry, HIV undergoes rapid transport toward the nucleus using microtubules and microfilaments. Neither the cellular cytoplasmic components nor the viral proteins that interact to mediate transport have yet been identified. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified four cytoskeletal components as putative interaction partners for HIV-1 p24 capsid protein: MAP1A, MAP1S, CKAP1, and WIRE. Depletion of MAP1A/MAP1S in indicator cell lines and primary human macrophages led to a profound reduction in HIV-1 infectivity as a result of impaired retrograde trafficking, demonstrated by a characteristic accumulation of capsids away from the nuclear membrane, and an overall defect in nuclear import. MAP1A/MAP1S did not impact microtubule network integrity or cell morphology but contributed to microtubule stabilization, which was shown previously to facilitate infection. In addition, we found that MAP1 proteins interact with HIV-1 cores both in vitro and in infected cells and that interaction involves MAP1 light chain LC2. Depletion of MAP1 proteins reduced the association of HIV-1 capsids with both dynamic and stable microtubules, suggesting that MAP1 proteins help tether incoming viral capsids to the microtubular network, thus promoting cytoplasmic trafficking. This work shows for the first time that following entry into target cells, HIV-1 interacts with the cytoskeleton via its p24 capsid protein. Moreover, our results support a role for MAP1 proteins in promoting efficient retrograde trafficking of HIV-1 by stimulating the formation of stable microtubules and mediating the association of HIV-1 cores with microtubules. PMID:25505242

  17. Step-Growth Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stille, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Following a comparison of chain-growth and step-growth polymerization, focuses on the latter process by describing requirements for high molecular weight, step-growth polymerization kinetics, synthesis and molecular weight distribution of some linear step-growth polymers, and three-dimensional network step-growth polymers. (JN)

  18. Halley's polymeric organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, W. F.; Boice, D. C.; Korth, A.

    1989-01-01

    The detection of polymeric organic compounds in the mass spectrum of Comet Halley obtained with the Positive Ion Cluster Composition analyzer on Giotto are examined. It is found that, in addition to polyoxymethylene, other polymers and complex molecules may exist in the comet. It is suggested that polymerized hydrogen cyanide may be a source for the observed CN and NH2 jets.

  19. IMP3 protein promotes chemoresistance in breast cancer cells by regulating breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) expression.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Sanjoy; Pursell, Bryan; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-05-01

    IMP3, a member of a family of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNA-binding proteins (IMPs), is expressed preferentially in triple-negative breast cancers, which are resistant to many chemotherapeutics. However, the mechanisms by which it impacts breast cancer have not been elucidated. We hypothesized a role for IMP3 in chemoresistance based on these observations. Depletion of IMP3 expression in triple-negative breast cancer cells increased their sensitivity to doxorubicin and mitoxantrone significantly but not to taxol. Given that doxorubicin and mitoxantrone are effluxed by breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), we assessed whether IMP3 regulates BCRP. The data obtained demonstrate that IMP3 binds to BCRP mRNA and regulates BCRP expression. These findings are significant because they provide insight into the mechanism by which IMP3 contributes to aggressive cancers, and they highlight the potential for targeting this mRNA-binding protein for the clinical management of cancer.

  20. Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IV Promotes Interplay of Proteins in Chromatoid Body of Male Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guishuan; Zhang, Huijuan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Yuan; Huang, Hefeng; Sun, Fei

    2015-07-16

    The chromatoid body is a granule-like structure of male germ cells, containing many proteins and RNAs, and is important for spermatogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms for the formation and function of the chromatoid body are still elusive. Here, we report that Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) accumulates in the chromatoid body by immunofluorescence staining, indicating that CaMKIV is a new component of the chromatoid body. Furthermore, we find that CaMKIV can interplay with the other components of the chromatoid body by immunoprecipitation: mouse VASA homologue (MVH), mouse homologue of PIWI, PIWIL1 (MIWI), and kinesin KIF17b. Importantly, interplay between KIF17b and MVH or MIWI can be potentially regulated by CaMKIV. These results imply that CaMKIV plays a role in maintenance the structure of chromatoid body by regulating the associations of proteins in it.

  1. Role of trans-activating proteins in the generation of active chromatin at the PHO5 promoter in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Fascher, K D; Schmitz, J; Hörz, W

    1990-01-01

    Induction of the PHO5 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by phosphate starvation was previously shown to be accompanied by the removal of four positioned nucleosomes from the promoter. We have now investigated the role of two trans-activating proteins, encoded by PHO2 and PHO4, which bind to the PHO5 promoter. Both proteins are absolutely required for the chromatin transition to occur as shown by analysis of null mutants of the two genes. Transformation of these mutant strains with plasmids containing the respective genes restores the wild type chromatin response. Increasing the gene dosage of PHO2 and of PHO4 makes it possible to differentiate functionally between the two proteins. From over-expressing PHO4 in a wild type and also in a pho2 null mutant strain and complementary experiments with PHO2, it is concluded that the PHO4 protein is the primary trigger for the chromatin transition, consistent with one of its two binding sites being located between positioned nucleosomes in repressed chromatin and thereby accessible. PHO2, the binding site of which is located within a nucleosome under conditions of PHO5 repression, contributes to the chromatin transition either by destabilizing histone-DNA interactions or by under-going interactions with PHO4. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2196175

  2. Rational design of translational pausing without altering the amino acid sequence dramatically promotes soluble protein expression: a strategic demonstration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Jin, Jingjie; Gu, Wei; Wei, Bo; Lei, Yun; Xiong, Sheng; Zhang, Gong

    2014-11-10

    The production of many pharmaceutical and industrial proteins in prokaryotic hosts is hindered by the insolubility of industrial expression products resulting from misfolding. Even with a correct primary sequence, an improper translation elongation rate in a heterologous expression system is an important cause of misfolding. In silico analysis revealed that most of the endogenous Escherichia coli genes display translational pausing sites that promote correct folding, and almost 1/5 genes have pausing sites at the 3'-termini of their coding sequence. Therefore, we established a novel strategy to efficiently promote the expression of soluble and active proteins without altering the amino acid sequence or expression conditions. This strategy uses the rational design of translational pausing based on structural information solely through synonymous substitutions, i.e. no change on the amino acids sequence. We demonstrated this strategy on a promising antiviral candidate, Cyanovirin-N (CVN), which could not be efficiently expressed in any previously reported system. By introducing silent mutations, we increased the soluble expression level in E. coli by 2000-fold without altering the CVN protein sequence, and the specific activity was slightly higher for the optimized CVN than for the wild-type variant. This strategy introduces new possibilities for the production of bioactive recombinant proteins.

  3. BAR-SH3 sorting nexins are conserved interacting proteins of Nervous wreck that organize synapses and promote neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Ukken, Fiona P; Bruckner, Joseph J; Weir, Kurt L; Hope, Sarah J; Sison, Samantha L; Birschbach, Ryan M; Hicks, Lawrence; Taylor, Kendra L; Dent, Erik W; Gonsalvez, Graydon B; O'Connor-Giles, Kate M

    2016-01-01

    Nervous wreck (Nwk) is a conserved F-BAR protein that attenuates synaptic growth and promotes synaptic function in Drosophila. In an effort to understand how Nwk carries out its dual roles, we isolated interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. We report a conserved interaction between Nwk proteins and BAR-SH3 sorting nexins, a family of membrane-binding proteins implicated in diverse intracellular trafficking processes. In mammalian cells, BAR-SH3 sorting nexins induce plasma membrane tubules that localize NWK2, consistent with a possible functional interaction during the early stages of endocytic trafficking. To study the role of BAR-SH3 sorting nexins in vivo, we took advantage of the lack of genetic redundancy in Drosophila and employed CRISPR-based genome engineering to generate null and endogenously tagged alleles of SH3PX1. SH3PX1 localizes to neuromuscular junctions where it regulates synaptic ultrastructure, but not synapse number. Consistently, neurotransmitter release was significantly diminished in SH3PX1 mutants. Double-mutant and tissue-specific-rescue experiments indicate that SH3PX1 promotes neurotransmitter release presynaptically, at least in part through functional interactions with Nwk, and might act to distinguish the roles of Nwk in regulating synaptic growth and function.

  4. BAR-SH3 sorting nexins are conserved interacting proteins of Nervous wreck that organize synapses and promote neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Ukken, Fiona P.; Bruckner, Joseph J.; Weir, Kurt L.; Hope, Sarah J.; Sison, Samantha L.; Birschbach, Ryan M.; Hicks, Lawrence; Taylor, Kendra L.; Dent, Erik W.; Gonsalvez, Graydon B.; O'Connor-Giles, Kate M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nervous wreck (Nwk) is a conserved F-BAR protein that attenuates synaptic growth and promotes synaptic function in Drosophila. In an effort to understand how Nwk carries out its dual roles, we isolated interacting proteins using mass spectrometry. We report a conserved interaction between Nwk proteins and BAR-SH3 sorting nexins, a family of membrane-binding proteins implicated in diverse intracellular trafficking processes. In mammalian cells, BAR-SH3 sorting nexins induce plasma membrane tubules that localize NWK2, consistent with a possible functional interaction during the early stages of endocytic trafficking. To study the role of BAR-SH3 sorting nexins in vivo, we took advantage of the lack of genetic redundancy in Drosophila and employed CRISPR-based genome engineering to generate null and endogenously tagged alleles of SH3PX1. SH3PX1 localizes to neuromuscular junctions where it regulates synaptic ultrastructure, but not synapse number. Consistently, neurotransmitter release was significantly diminished in SH3PX1 mutants. Double-mutant and tissue-specific-rescue experiments indicate that SH3PX1 promotes neurotransmitter release presynaptically, at least in part through functional interactions with Nwk, and might act to distinguish the roles of Nwk in regulating synaptic growth and function. PMID:26567222

  5. Lipid-protein nanodiscs promote in vitro folding of transmembrane domains of multi-helical and multimeric membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Butenko, Ivan O; Petrovskaya, Lada E; Paramonov, Alexander S; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Nekrasova, Oksana V; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2013-02-01

    Production of helical integral membrane proteins (IMPs) in a folded state is a necessary prerequisite for their functional and structural studies. In many cases large-scale expression of IMPs in cell-based and cell-free systems results in misfolded proteins, which should be refolded in vitro. Here using examples of the bacteriorhodopsin ESR from Exiguobacterium sibiricum and full-length homotetrameric K(+) channel KcsA from Streptomyces lividans we found that the efficient in vitro folding of the transmembrane domains of the polytopic and multimeric IMPs could be achieved during the protein encapsulation into the reconstructed high-density lipoprotein particles, also known as lipid-protein nanodiscs. In this case the self-assembly of the IMP/nanodisc complexes from a mixture containing apolipoprotein, lipids and the partially denatured protein solubilized in a harsh detergent induces the folding of the transmembrane domains. The obtained folding yields showed significant dependence on the properties of lipids used for nanodisc formation. The largest recovery of the spectroscopically active ESR (~60%) from the sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was achieved in the nanodiscs containing anionic saturated lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPG) and was approximately twice lower in the zwitterionic DMPC lipid. The reassembly of tetrameric KcsA from the acid-dissociated monomer solubilized in SDS was the most efficient (~80%) in the nanodiscs containing zwitterionic unsaturated lipid 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). The charged and saturated lipids provided lower tetramer quantities, and the lowest yield (<20%) was observed in DMPC. The overall yield of the ESR and KcsA folding was mainly restricted by the efficiency of the protein encapsulation into the nanodiscs.

  6. Polymeric Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C-S.

    1999-11-02

    Synthesis of polymeric carbon dioxide has long been of interest to many chemists and materials scientists. Very recently we discovered the polymeric phase of carbon dioxide (called CO{sub 2}-V) at high pressures and temperatures. Our optical and x-ray results indicate that CO{sub 2}-V is optically non-linear, generating the second harmonic of Nd: YLF laser at 527 nm and is also likely superhard similar to cubic-boron nitride or diamond. CO{sub 2}-V is made of CO{sub 4} tetrahedra, analogous to SiO{sub 2} polymorphs, and is quenchable at ambient temperature at pressures above 1 GPa. In this paper, we describe the pressure-induced polymerization of carbon dioxide together with the stability, structure, and mechanical and optical properties of polymeric CO{sub 2}-V. We also present some implications of polymeric CO{sub 2} for high-pressure chemistry and new materials synthesis.

  7. Zwitterionic gel encapsulation promotes protein stability, enhances pharmacokinetics, and reduces immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Sun, Fang; Tsao, Caroline; Liu, Sijun; Jain, Priyesh; Sinclair, Andrew; Hung, Hsiang-Chieh; Bai, Tao; Wu, Kan; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Advances in protein therapy are hindered by the poor stability, inadequate pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles, and immunogenicity of many therapeutic proteins. Polyethylene glycol conjugation (PEGylation) is the most successful strategy to date to overcome these shortcomings, and more than 10 PEGylated proteins have been brought to market. However, anti-PEG antibodies induced by treatment raise serious concerns about the future of PEGylated therapeutics. Here, we demonstrate a zwitterionic polymer network encapsulation technology that effectively enhances protein stability and PK while mitigating the immune response. Uricase modified with a comprehensive zwitterionic polycarboxybetaine (PCB) network exhibited exceptional stability and a greatly prolonged circulation half-life. More importantly, the PK behavior was unchanged, and neither anti-uricase nor anti-PCB antibodies were detected after three weekly injections in a rat model. This technology is applicable to a variety of proteins and unlocks the possibility of adopting highly immunogenic proteins for therapeutic or protective applications. PMID:26371311

  8. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Caifeng; Chen, Jinfeng; Chen, Nuoqi

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is implicated in liver cell proliferation. However, its role in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MALAT1 on hepatic lipid accumulation and its potential targets. As expected, MALAT1 expression is increased in hepatocytes exposed to palmitate and livers of ob/ob mice. Knockdown of MALAT1 expression dramatically suppressed palmitate-induced lipid accumulation and the increase of nuclear SREBP-1c protein in HepG2 cells. In addition, RNA immunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down assay confirmed that MALAT1 interacted with SREBP-1c to stabilize nuclear SREBP-1c protein. Finally, injection of si-MALAT1 prevented hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in ob/ob mice. In conclusion, our observations suggest that MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability. PMID:26935028

  9. Long noncoding RNA MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability.

    PubMed

    Yan, Caifeng; Chen, Jinfeng; Chen, Nuoqi

    2016-03-03

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is implicated in liver cell proliferation. However, its role in hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MALAT1 on hepatic lipid accumulation and its potential targets. As expected, MALAT1 expression is increased in hepatocytes exposed to palmitate and livers of ob/ob mice. Knockdown of MALAT1 expression dramatically suppressed palmitate-induced lipid accumulation and the increase of nuclear SREBP-1c protein in HepG2 cells. In addition, RNA immunoprecipitation and RNA pull-down assay confirmed that MALAT1 interacted with SREBP-1c to stabilize nuclear SREBP-1c protein. Finally, injection of si-MALAT1 prevented hepatic lipid accumulation and insulin resistance in ob/ob mice. In conclusion, our observations suggest that MALAT1 promotes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance by increasing nuclear SREBP-1c protein stability.

  10. Protein damage from electrophiles and oxidants in lungs of mice chronically exposed to the tumor promoter butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Shearn, Colin T; Fritz, Kristofer S; Thompson, John A

    2011-07-15

    The food additive butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) promotes tumorigenesis in mouse lung. Chronic BHT exposure is accompanied by pulmonary inflammation and several studies indicate that elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in its promoting activity. The link between BHT and elevated ROS involves formation of quinone methide (QM) metabolites; these electrophiles form adducts with a variety of lung proteins including several enzymes that protect cells from oxidative stress. Studies in vitro demonstrated that QM alkylation of cytoprotective enzymes is accompanied by inactivation, so an objective of the present investigation was to determine if inactivation also occurs in vivo. Two groups of mice were exposed to BHT by intraperitoneal injection, one for 10 days and the other for 24 days, and proteins from lung cytosols were examined for damage. Analysis by Western blotting demonstrated that BHT treatment caused substantial increases in protein carbonylation, nitration and adduction by 4-hydroxynonenal, confirming the occurrence of sustained oxidative and nitrosative stress over the treatment period required for tumor promotion. Effects of BHT on the activities and/or levels of a representative group of antioxidant/protective enzymes in mouse lung also were assessed; NAD(P)H:quinone reductase and glutathione reductase were unaffected, however carbonyl reductase activity decreased 50-60%. Superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities increased 2- and 1.5-fold, respectively, and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit expression increased 32-39% relative to untreated mice. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity decreased 50-60% but concentrations of the predominant isoforms, GSTM1 and P1, were not affected. GSTP1 was substantially more susceptible than M1 to adduction and inhibition by treatment with BHT-QM in vitro, suggesting that lower GST activity in mice after BHT treatment is due to adduction of the P1 isoform. The results of

  11. Bat3 promotes the membrane integration of tail-anchored proteins.

    PubMed

    Leznicki, Pawel; Clancy, Anne; Schwappach, Blanche; High, Stephen

    2010-07-01

    The membrane integration of tail-anchored proteins at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is post-translational, with different tail-anchored proteins exploiting distinct cytosolic factors. For example, mammalian TRC40 has a well-defined role during delivery of tail-anchored proteins to the ER. Although its Saccharomyces cerevisiae equivalent, Get3, is known to function in concert with at least four other components, Get1, Get2, Get4 and Get5 (Mdy2), the role of additional mammalian proteins during tail-anchored protein biogenesis is unclear. To this end, we analysed the cytosolic binding partners of Sec61beta, a well-defined substrate of TRC40, and identified Bat3 as a previously unknown interacting partner. Depletion of Bat3 inhibits the membrane integration of Sec61beta, but not of a second, TRC40-independent, tail-anchored protein, cytochrome b5. Thus, Bat3 influences the in vitro membrane integration of tail-anchored proteins using the TRC40 pathway. When expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking a functional GET pathway for tail-anchored protein biogenesis, Bat3 associates with the resulting cytosolic pool of non-targeted chains and diverts it to the nucleus. This Bat3-mediated mislocalisation is not dependent upon Sgt2, a recently identified component of the yeast GET pathway, and we propose that Bat3 either modulates the TRC40 pathway in higher eukaryotes or provides an alternative fate for newly synthesised tail-anchored proteins.

  12. WDR8 is a centriolar satellite and centriole-associated protein that promotes ciliary vesicle docking during ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Wang, Wenbo; Ruppert, Thomas; Neuner, Annett; Cerikan, Berati; Viol, Linda; Dueñas-Sánchez, Rafael; Gruss, Oliver J; Pereira, Gislene

    2016-02-01

    Ciliogenesis initiates at the mother centriole through a series of events that include membrane docking, displacement of cilia-inhibitory proteins and axoneme elongation. Centriolar proteins, in particular at distal and subdistal appendages, carry out these functions. Recently, cytoplasmic complexes named centriolar satellites have also been shown to promote ciliogenesis. Little is known about the functional and molecular relationship between appendage proteins, satellites and cilia biogenesis. Here, we identified the WD-repeat protein 8 (WDR8, also known as WRAP73) as a satellite and centriolar component. We show that WDR8 interacts with the satellite proteins SSX2IP and PCM1 as well as the centriolar proximal end component Cep135. Cep135 is required for the recruitment of WDR8 to centrioles. Depletion experiments revealed that WDR8 and Cep135 have strongly overlapping functions in ciliogenesis. Both are indispensable for ciliary vesicle docking to the mother centriole and for unlocking the distal end of the mother centriole from the ciliary inhibitory complex CP110-Cep97. Our data thus point to an important function of centriolar proximal end proteins in ciliary membrane biogenesis, and establish WDR8 and Cep135 as two factors that are essential for the initial steps of ciliation. PMID:26675238

  13. Technological options for the production of health-promoting proteins and peptides derived from milk and colostrum.

    PubMed

    Korhonen, H; Pihlanto, A

    2007-01-01

    Milk proteins are known to exert a wide range of nutritional, functional and biological activities. Apart from being a balanced source of valuable amino acids, milk proteins contribute to the consistency and sensory properties of various dairy products. Furthermore, many milk proteins possess specific biological properties which make them potential ingredients of health-promoting foods. These properties are attributed to both native protein molecules and to physiologically active peptides encrypted in the protein molecules. Considerable progress has been made over the last twenty years in technologies aimed at separation, fractionation and isolation in a purified form of many interesting proteins occurring in bovine colostrum and milk. Industrial-scale methods have been developed for native whey proteins such as immunoglobulins, lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase, alpha-lactalbumin and beta-lactoglobulin. Their large-scale manufacture and commercial exploitation is still limited although validated research data about their physiological health benefits is rapidly accumulating. Promising product concepts and novel fields of use have emerged recently, and some of these molecules have already found commercial applications. The same applies to bioactive peptides derived from different milk proteins. Active peptides can be liberated during gastrointestinal digestion or milk fermentation with proteolytic enzymes. Such peptides may exert a number of physiological effects in vivo on the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, endocrine, immune, nervous and other body systems. However, at present the industrial-scale production of such peptides is limited by a lack of suitable technologies. On the other hand, a number of bioactive peptides have been identified in fermented dairy products, and there are already a few commercial dairy products enriched with blood pressure-reducing milk protein peptides. There is a need to develop methods to optimise the activity of bioactive peptides in

  14. Protein O-Glucosyltransferase 1 (POGLUT1) Promotes Mouse Gastrulation through Modification of the Apical Polarity Protein CRUMBS2

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, Nitya; Harvey, Beth M.; Lee, Jeffrey D.; Alcorn, Heather L.; Silva-Gagliardi, Nancy F.; McGlade, C. Jane; Bestor, Timothy H.; Wijnholds, Jan; Haltiwanger, Robert S.; Anderson, Kathryn V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Crumbs family proteins are apical transmembrane proteins with ancient roles in cell polarity. Mouse Crumbs2 mutants arrest at midgestation with abnormal neural plate morphology and a deficit of mesoderm caused by defects in gastrulation. We identified an ENU-induced mutation, wsnp, that phenocopies the Crumbs2 null phenotype. We show that wsnp is a null allele of Protein O-glucosyltransferase 1 (Poglut1), which encodes an enzyme previously shown to add O-glucose to EGF repeats in the extracellular domain of Drosophila and mammalian Notch, but the role of POGLUT1 in mammalian gastrulation has not been investigated. As predicted, we find that POGLUT1 is essential for Notch signaling in the early mouse embryo. However, the loss of mouse POGLUT1 causes an earlier and more dramatic phenotype than does the loss of activity of the Notch pathway, indicating that POGLUT1 has additional biologically relevant substrates. Using mass spectrometry, we show that POGLUT1 modifies EGF repeats in the extracellular domain of full-length mouse CRUMBS2. CRUMBS2 that lacks the O-glucose modification fails to be enriched on the apical plasma membrane and instead accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum. The data demonstrate that CRUMBS2 is the target of POGLUT1 for the gastrulation epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) and that all activity of CRUMBS2 depends on modification by POGLUT1. Mutations in human POGLUT1 cause Dowling-Degos Disease, POGLUT1 is overexpressed in a variety of tumor cells, and mutations in the EGF repeats of human CRUMBS proteins are associated with human congenital nephrosis, retinitis pigmentosa and retinal degeneration, suggesting that O-glucosylation of CRUMBS proteins has broad roles in human health. PMID:26496195

  15. Characterization of promoter region and genomic structure of the murine and human genes encoding Src like adapter protein.

    PubMed

    Kratchmarova, I; Sosinowski, T; Weiss, A; Witter, K; Vincenz, C; Pandey, A

    2001-01-10

    Src-like adapter protein (SLAP) was identified as a signaling molecule in a yeast two-hybrid system using the cytoplasmic domain of EphA2, a receptor protein tyrosine kinase (Pandey et al., 1995. Characterization of a novel Src-like adapter protein that associates with the Eck receptor tyrosine kinase. J. Biol. Chem. 270, 19201-19204). It is very similar to members of the Src family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases in that it contains very homologous SH3 and SH2 domains (Abram and Courtneidge, 2000. Src family tyrosine kinases and growth factor signaling. Exp. Cell. Res. 254, 1-13.). However, instead of a kinase domain at the C-terminus, it contains a unique C-terminal region. In order to exclude the possibility that an alternative form exists, we have isolated genomic clones containing the murine Slap gene as well as the human SLA gene. The coding regions of murine Slap and human SLA genes contain seven exons and six introns. Absence of any kinase domain in the genomic region confirm its designation as an adapter protein. Additionally, we have cloned and sequenced approximately 2.6 kb of the region 5' to the initiator methionine of the murine Slap gene. When subcloned upstream of a luciferase gene, this fragment increased the transcriptional activity about 6-fold in a human Jurkat T cell line and approximately 52-fold in a murine T cell line indicating that this region contains promoter elements that dictate SLAP expression. We have also cloned the promoter region of the human SLA gene. Since SLAP is transcriptionally regulated by retinoic acid and by activation of B cells, the cloning of its promoter region will permit a detailed analysis of the elements required for its transcriptional regulation.

  16. Physico-chemical properties, probiotic survivability, microstructure, and acceptability of a yogurt-like symbiotic oats-based product using pre-polymerized whey protein as a gelation agent.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Helen; Ross, Jane; Hendricks, Gregory; Guo, Mingruo

    2010-06-01

    Consumption of a food product containing prebiotics and probiotics has been recognized as an important factor in lowering risk of intestinal cancer and gastrointestinal diseases and risks associated with high cholesterol. An oats-based symbiotic yogurt-like food (Oagurt) was developed using oats and probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium), with pre-polymerized whey protein (PWP) as a gelation agent. The product was also fortified with inulin to increase soluble fiber, minerals, and vitamins. Physico-chemical analyses and 9 wk shelf life for viability of probiotics and changes in pH and viscosity were carried out for formulations with (F) and without (C) fortification. Results of the shelf life study showed that both L. casei and Bifidobacterium remained at therapeutic levels: 4.8 x 10(6) CFU/g (F), 4.3 x 10(6) CFU/g (C) and 3.1 x 10(6) CFU/g (F), 3.17 x 10(6) CFU/g (C) after 9 wk. However L. acidophilus did not survive after 3 wk. Viscosity and pH decreased significantly during the study with the difference between formulations also significant for pH (P < 0.0001). Scanning electron microscopy of samples revealed that the pre-polymerized whey protein played a major role in the structure of the gel with an increased protein network structure visible at higher PWP levels. A consumer acceptability study showed that the product was "fair" for all organoleptic attributes.

  17. Glial fibrillary acidic protein promoters direct adenovirus early 1A gene and human telomerase reverse transcriptase promoters direct sodium iodide symporter expression for malignant glioma radioiodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tan, Jian; Wang, Peng; Li, Ning; Li, Chengxia

    2015-01-01

    Malignant glioma can be treated with radioiodine following transfection with human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) gene. Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS is engineered with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoters to express early region 1A (E1A) and hNIS genes, which may be useful in targeted gene therapy. The Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS was constructed and purified using the E1A and hNIS genes regulated by the hTERT and GFAP promoters, respectively. Glioma cells were infected by Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS. Selective replication ability of Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS was then evaluated by plaque forming assay, transgene expression by Western blot, (125)I-iodide uptake and efflux, clonogenicity following (131)I-iodide treatment in the tumor cells, and radioiodine therapy using nude mouse model. The Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS could selectively replicate; the hNIS gene was successfully expressed under the GFAP promoter. Western blot analyses using E1A- and hNIS-specific antibodies revealed two bands of approximately 40 and 70 kDa. In addition, the cells showed about 93.4 and 107.1 times higher (125)I uptake in U251 and U87 cells than in the control cells, respectively. Clonogenic assay indicated that >90% of cells transfected with Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS were killed. The Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS-transfected and 2 mCi (131)I-injected U87 xenograft nude mice survived the longest among the three groups. Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS has a good ability of selective replication and strong antitumor selectivity. An effective therapy of (131)I was achieved activity in malignant glioma cells after induction of tumor-specific iodide uptake activity by GFAP promoter-directed hNIS gene expression in vitro and in vivo.

  18. The Potyviral P3 Protein Targets Eukaryotic Elongation Factor 1A to Promote the Unfolded Protein Response and Viral Pathogenesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shine, M.B.; Cui, Xiaoyan; Chen, Xin; Ma, Na; Kachroo, Pradeep; Zhi, Haijan; Kachroo, Aardra

    2016-01-01

    The biochemical function of the potyviral P3 protein is not known, although it is known to regulate virus replication, movement, and pathogenesis. We show that P3, the putative virulence determinant of soybean mosaic virus (SMV), targets a component of the translation elongation complex in soybean. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A), a well-known host factor in viral pathogenesis, is essential for SMV virulence and the associated unfolded protein response (UPR). Silencing GmEF1A inhibits accumulation of SMV and another ER-associated virus in soybean. Conversely, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducing chemicals promote SMV accumulation in wild-type, but not GmEF1A-knockdown, plants. Knockdown of genes encoding the eEF1B isoform, which is important for eEF1A function in translation elongation, has similar effects on UPR and SMV resistance, suggesting a link to translation elongation. P3 and GmEF1A promote each other’s nuclear localization, similar to the nuclear-cytoplasmic transport of eEF1A by the Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Nef protein. Our results suggest that P3 targets host elongation factors resulting in UPR, which in turn facilitates SMV replication and place eEF1A upstream of BiP in the ER stress response during pathogen infection. PMID:27356973

  19. Fission of SNX-BAR–coated endosomal retrograde transport carriers is promoted by the dynamin-related protein Vps1

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Richard J.; Liu, Jingxuan; West, Matthew; Wang, Jing; Odorizzi, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Retromer is an endosomal sorting device that orchestrates capture and packaging of cargo into transport carriers coated with sorting nexin BAR domain proteins (SNX-BARs). We report that fission of retromer SNX-BAR–coated tubules from yeast endosomes is promoted by Vps1, a dynamin-related protein that localizes to endosomes decorated by retromer SNX-BARs and Mvp1, a SNX-BAR that is homologous to human SNX8. Mvp1 exhibits potent membrane remodeling activity in vitro, and it promotes association of Vps1 with the endosome in vivo. Retrograde transport carriers bud from the endosome coated by retromer and Mvp1, and cargo export is deficient in mvp1- and vps1-null cells, but with distinct endpoints; cargo export is delayed in mvp1-null cells, but cargo export completely fails in vps1-null cells. The results indicate that Mvp1 promotes Vps1-mediated fission of retromer- and Mvp1-coated tubules that bud from the endosome, revealing a functional link between the endosomal sorting and fission machineries to produce retrograde transport carriers. PMID:24567361

  20. ZBP-89, a Krüppel-like zinc finger protein, inhibits epidermal growth factor induction of the gastrin promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, J L; Iyer, G R; Taylor, B R; Kitchen, J R; Mortensen, E R; Wang, Z; Flintoft, R J; Michel, J B; Bassel-Duby, R

    1996-01-01

    We have shown previously that a GC-rich element (GGGGCGGGGTGGGGGG) conferring epidermal growth factor (EGF) responsiveness to the human gastrin promoter binds Sp1 and additional undefined complexes. A rat GH4 cell line expression library was screened by using a multimer of the gastrin EGF response element, and three overlapping cDNA clones were identified. The full-length rat cDNA encoded an 89-kDa zinc finger protein (ZBP-89) that was 89% identical to a 49-kDa human factor, ht(beta), that binds a GTGGG/CACCC element in T-cell receptor promoters. The conservation of amino acids between the zinc fingers indicates that ZBP-89 is a member of the C2H2 zinc finger family subclass typified by the Drosophila Krüppel protein. ZBP-89 is ubiquitously expressed in normal adult tissues. It binds specifically to the gastrin EGF response element and inhibits EGF induction of the gastrin promoter. Collectively, these results demonstrate that ZBP-89 functions as a repressor of basal and inducible expression of the gastrin gene. PMID:8943318

  1. HIV-1 Tat transactivator recruits p300 and CREB-binding protein histone acetyltransferases to the viral promoter

    PubMed Central

    Marzio, Giuseppe; Tyagi, Mudit; Gutierrez, Maria Ines; Giacca, Mauro

    1998-01-01

    In cells infected with HIV type 1 (HIV-1), the integrated viral promoter is present in a chromatin-bound conformation and is transcriptionally silent in the absence of stimulation. The HIV-1 Tat protein binds to a stem-loop structure at the 5′ end of viral mRNA and relieves this inhibition by inducing a remodeling of the nucleosome arrangement downstream of the transcription-initiation site. Here we show that Tat performs this activity by recruiting to the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) the transcriptional coactivator p300 and the closely related CREB-binding protein (CBP), having histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity. Tat associates with HAT activity in human nuclear extracts and binds to p300 and CBP both in vitro and in vivo. Integrity of the basic domain of Tat is essential for this interaction. By a quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation assay we show that the delivery of recombinant Tat induces the association of p300 and CBP with the chromosomally integrated LTR promoter. Expression of human p300 in both human and rodent cells increases the levels of Tat transactivation of the integrated LTR. These results reinforce the evidence that p300 and CBP have a pivotal function at both cellular and viral promoters and demonstrate that they also can be recruited by an RNA-targeted activator. Additionally, these findings have important implications for the understanding of the mechanisms of HIV-1 latency and reactivation. PMID:9811832

  2. A meiotic chromosomal core consisting of cohesin complex proteins recruits DNA recombination proteins and promotes synapsis in the absence of an axial element in mammalian meiotic cells.

    PubMed

    Pelttari, J; Hoja, M R; Yuan, L; Liu, J G; Brundell, E; Moens, P; Santucci-Darmanin, S; Jessberger, R; Barbero, J L; Heyting, C; Höög, C

    2001-08-01

    The behavior of meiotic chromosomes differs in several respects from that of their mitotic counterparts, resulting in the generation of genetically distinct haploid cells. This has been attributed in part to a meiosis-specific chromatin-associated protein structure, the synaptonemal complex. This complex consist of two parallel axial elements, each one associated with a pair of sister chromatids, and a transverse filament located between the synapsed homologous chromosomes. Recently, a different protein structure, the cohesin complex, was shown to be associated with meiotic chromosomes and to be required for chromosome segregation. To explore the functions of the two different protein structures, the synaptonemal complex and the cohesin complex, in mammalian male meiotic cells, we have analyzed how absence of the axial element affects early meiotic chromosome behavior. We find that the synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SCP3) is a main determinant of axial-element assembly and is required for attachment of this structure to meiotic chromosomes, whereas SCP2 helps shape the in vivo structure of the axial element. We also show that formation of a cohesin-containing chromosomal core in meiotic nuclei does not require SCP3 or SCP2. Our results also suggest that the cohesin core recruits recombination proteins and promotes synapsis between homologous chromosomes in the absence of an axial element. A model for early meiotic chromosome pairing and synapsis is proposed. PMID:11463847

  3. Ran GTPase protein promotes human pancreatic cancer proliferation by deregulating the expression of Survivin and cell cycle proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Lin; Lu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Xiaodi; Sun, Yi; Shi, Yongquan; Fan, Hongwei; Liu, Changhao; Zhou, Jinfeng; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Fan, Daiming; Guo, Xuegang

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Overexpression of Ran in pancreatic cancer was correlated with histological grade. •Downregulation of Ran could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. •The effects were mediated by cell cycle proteins, Survivin and cleaved Caspase-3. -- Abstract: Ran, a member of the Ras GTPase family, has important roles in nucleocytoplasmic transport. Herein, we detected Ran expression in pancreatic cancer and explored its potential role on tumour progression. Overexpressed Ran in pancreatic cancer tissues was found highly correlated with the histological grade. Downregulation of Ran led to significant suppression of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase and induction of apoptosis. In vivo studies also validated that result. Further studies revealed that those effects were at least partly mediated by the downregulation of Cyclin A, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, CDK2, CDK4, phospho-Rb and Survivin proteins and up regulation of cleaved Caspase-3.