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Sample records for polymicrobial culture-negative samples

  1. Culture-negative endocarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the lining of one or more heart valves, but no endocarditis-causing germs can be found ... the heart, where they can settle on damaged heart valves. Alternative Names Endocarditis (culture-negative) Images Culture-negative ...

  2. Identification of Common Bacterial Pathogens Causing Meningitis in Culture-Negative Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Meningitis is a serious communicable disease with high morbidity and mortality rates. It is an endemic disease in Egypt caused mainly by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. In some settings, bacterial meningitis is documented depending mainly on positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture results or CSF positive latex agglutination test, missing the important role of prior antimicrobial intake which can yield negative culture and latex agglutination test results. This study aimed to utilize molecular technology in order to diagnose bacterial meningitis in culture-negative CSF samples. Materials and Methods. Forty culture-negative CSF samples from suspected cases of bacterial meningitis were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) for the presence of lytA, bexA, and ctrA genes specific for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis, respectively. Results. Positive real-time PCR results for Streptococcus pneumoniae were detected in 36 (90%) of culture-negative CSF samples while no positive results for Haemophilus influenzae or Neisseria meningitidis were detected. Four (10%) samples were negative by real-time PCR for all tested organisms. Conclusion. The use of molecular techniques as real-time PCR can provide a valuable addition to the proportion of diagnosed cases of bacterial meningitis especially in settings with high rates of culture-negative results. PMID:27563310

  3. The Optimization of Molecular Detection of Clinical Isolates of Brucella in Blood Cultures by eryD Transcriptase Gene for Confirmation of Culture-Negative Samples

    PubMed Central

    Tabibnejad, Mahsa; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef; Arjomandzadegan, Mohammad; Hashemi, Seyed Hamid; Naseri, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Brucellosis is a zoonosis disease which is widespread across the world. Objectives The aim of the present study is the evaluation of culture-negative blood samples. Materials and Methods A total of 100 patients with suspected brucellosis were included in this experimental study and given positive serological tests. Diagnosis was performed on patients with clinical symptoms of the disease, followed by the detection of a titer that was equal to or more than 1:160 (in endemic areas) by the standard tube agglutination method. Blood samples were cultured by a BACTEC 9050 system, and subsequently by Brucella agar. At the same time, DNA from all blood samples was extracted by Qiagen Kit Company (Qia Amp Mini Kit). A molecular assay of blood samples was carried out by detection of eryD transcriptase and bcsp 31 genes in specific double PCR reactions. The specificity of the primers was evaluated by DNA from pure and approved Brucella colonies found in the blood samples, by DNA from other bacteria, and by ordinary PCR. DNA extraction from the pure colonies was carried out by both Qiagen Kit and Chelex 100 methods; the two were compared. Results 39 cases (39%) had positive results when tested by the BACTEC system, and 61 cases (61%) became negative. 23 culture-positive blood samples were randomly selected for PCR reactions; all showed 491 bp for the eryD gene and 223 bp for the bcsp 31 gene. Interestingly, out of 14 culture-negative blood samples, 13 cases showed positive bonds in PCR. The specificity of the PCR method was equal to 100%. DNA extraction from pure cultures was done by both Chelex 100 and Qiagen Kit; these showed the same results for all samples. Conclusions The results prove that the presented double PCR method could be used to detect positive cases from culture-negative blood samples. The Chelex 100 method is simpler and safer than the use of Qiagen Kit for DNA extraction. PMID:27330831

  4. Virulence determinants in clinical Staphylococcus aureus from monomicrobial and polymicrobial infections of diabetic foot ulcers.

    PubMed

    Shettigar, Kavitha; Jain, Spoorthi; Bhat, Deepika V; Acharya, Raviraj; Ramachandra, Lingadakai; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Murali, Thokur Sreepathy

    2016-12-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is a major public health concern, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus has emerged as an important pathogen. We characterized S. aureus isolates from monomicrobial and polymicrobial wound infections from 200 diabetic individuals with foot ulcers to understand their underlying diversity and pathogenicity. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing was performed, and genes coding for production of biofilm, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, toxic shock syndrome toxin and leukotoxins DE and M were screened. Biofilm production was also quantified by the tissue culture plate method. Strains were genotyped using multilocus sequence typing, multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis and repetitive sequence PCR methods. Polymicrobial infections were present in 115 samples, 61 samples showed monomicrobial infection and 24 samples were culture negative. Polymicrobial infections were significantly higher in patients with previous amputation history. Of the 86 samples infected with S. aureus, virulence genes were found in 81 isolates, and 41 isolates possessed more than one virulence gene. Strains which contained pvl gene alone or luk-DE alone were significantly higher in polymicrobial wounds. Based on biofilm production, 18.6 % of isolates were classified as high, 24.4 % as moderate and 57 % as low biofilm producers. Genotyping of 30 strains revealed 10 different sequence types with a strong association among sequence types, specific virulence markers and antibiotic resistance profiles. Moreover, isolates from monomicrobial and polymicrobial wounds differed significantly in their virulence potential and the sequence types to which they belonged, and these are helpful in mapping the evolution of the identified strains of S. aureus.

  5. Biofilm models of polymicrobial infection

    PubMed Central

    Gabrilska, Rebecca A; Rumbaugh, Kendra P

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between microbes are complex and play an important role in the pathogenesis of infections. These interactions can range from fierce competition for nutrients and niches to highly evolved cooperative mechanisms between different species that support their mutual growth. An increasing appreciation for these interactions, and desire to uncover the mechanisms that govern them, has resulted in a shift from monomicrobial to polymicrobial biofilm studies in different disease models. Here we provide an overview of biofilm models used to study select polymicrobial infections and highlight the impact that the interactions between microbes within these biofilms have on disease progression. Notable recent advances in the development of polymicrobial biofilm-associated infection models and challenges facing the study of polymicrobial biofilms are addressed. PMID:26592098

  6. Diverticular Pylephlebitis and Polymicrobial Septicemia

    PubMed Central

    Punjabi, Chitra

    2017-01-01

    Diverticulitis primarily affects the sigmoid colon and is often complicated by intra-abdominal abscesses and fistulas. Rarely, however, mesenteric venous thrombosis has been known to occur. Optimal management is still unclear. We report the first case of polymicrobial sepsis resulting from diverticular pylephlebitis, managed successfully with bowel rest, antibiotics, and anticoagulation. PMID:28163946

  7. Update on blood culture-negative endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tattevin, P; Watt, G; Revest, M; Arvieux, C; Fournier, P-E

    2015-01-01

    Blood culture-negative endocarditis is often severe, and difficult to diagnose. The rate of non-documented infective endocarditis has decreased with the advent of molecular biology - improved performance for the diagnosis of bacterial endocarditis with blood cultures sterilized by previous antibacterial treatment - and cardiac surgery - access to the main infected focus, the endocardium, for half of the patients. Blood culture-negative endocarditis are classified in 3 main categories: (i) bacterial endocarditis with blood cultures sterilized by previous antibacterial treatment (usually due to usual endocarditis-causing bacteria, i.e. streptococci, more rarely staphylococci, or enterococci); (ii) endocarditis related to fastidious microorganisms (e.g. HACEK bacteria; defective streptococci - Gemella, Granulicatella, and Abiotrophia sp. - Propionibacterium acnes, Candida sp.): in these cases, prolonged incubation will allow identifying the causative pathogen in a few days; (iii) and the "true" blood culture-negative endocarditis, due to intra-cellular bacteria that cannot be routinely cultured in blood with currently available techniques: in France, these are most frequently Bartonella sp., Coxiella burnetti (both easily diagnosed by ad hoc serological tests), and Tropheryma whipplei (usually diagnosed by PCR on excised cardiac valve tissue). Non-infective endocarditis is rare, mostly limited to marantic endocarditis, and the rare endocarditis related to systemic diseases (lupus, Behçet).

  8. The biogeography of polymicrobial infection

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Apollo; McNally, Luke; Darch, Sophie E.; Brown, Sam P.; Whiteley, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Microbial communities are spatially organized in both the environment and the human body. Although patterns exhibited by these communities are described by microbial biogeography this discipline has previously only considered large-scale, global patterns. By contrast, the fine-scale positioning of a pathogen within an infection site can greatly alter its virulence potential. In this Review, we highlight the importance of considering spatial positioning in the study of polymicrobial infections and discuss targeting biogeography as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:26714431

  9. Clues to diagnosing culture negative Listeria rhombencephalitis.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Marguerite; Mok, Tzehow; Lefter, Stela; Harrington, Hugh

    2012-09-30

    A previously healthy 35-year-old Caucasian woman developed left body (including facial) hemianaesthesia, asymmetrical lower cranial nerve palsies and cerebellar signs after a 4-day history of headache, nausea and vomiting. Serial blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures returned negative for a culprit organism. CSF examination revealed a lymphocytic pleocytosis and an elevated protein count. CSF cytological examination identified plasma cells. MRI of brain showed multiple ring-enhancing 'abscess-like' lesions in the brainstem and upper cervical cord together with abnormal meningeal enhancement. A decision was made to treat her empirically for Listeria rhombencephalitis to which she responded completely. CSF PCR eventually returned positive for Listeria monocytogenes. This case illustrates the utility of clinical features, MRI, CSF cytology and PCR in diagnosis and treatment of culture negative L monocytogenes rhombencephalitis in an immunocompetent individual.

  10. Metagenomic analysis for detecting pathogens in culture-negative infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Yuto; Aoki, Kotaro; Okuma, Shinnosuke; Sato, Takahiro; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Pathogen identification is important for proper diagnosis and optimal treatment of infective endocarditis (IE). Blood and valve cultures are the gold standard for detecting pathogens responsible for IE. However, these tests only detect culturable pathogens, and have low sensitivity, especially in patients previously treated with antibiotics. Culture-negative IE is still a major clinical problem and a diagnostic challenge. Recently, metagenomic analysis using next generation sequencing has been used to detect pathogens directly from clinical samples. However, there are very few reports of the use of metagenomic analysis for pathogen identification in culture-negative IE cases and the usefulness of this new method is unknown. Here, we report a case of successful pathogen detection with metagenomic analysis in a patient of culture-negative IE. The patient underwent valve replacement surgery and received antibiotics for 5 weeks and survived. Using metagenomic analysis of resected vegetation, we detected Abiotrophia defectiva, which is often associated with culture-negative IE due to its fastidious growth. This method may be useful for pathogen identification in future cases of culture-negative IE.

  11. Identification of torque teno virus in culture-negative endophthalmitis by representational deep-DNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron Y.; Akileswaran, Lakshmi; Tibbetts, Michael D.; Garg, Sunir J.; Van Gelder, Russell N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that uncultured organisms may be present in cases of culture-negative endophthalmitis, by use of deep DNA sequencing of vitreous biopsies. Design Single center consecutive prospective observational study. Participants and Controls Aqueous or vitreous biopsies from 21 consecutive patients presenting with presumed infectious endophthalmitis, and seven vitreous samples from patients undergoing surgery for non-infectious retinal disorders. Methods Traditional bacterial and fungal culture, 16S quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and a representational deep-sequencing method (Biome Representational in Silico Karyotyping [BRiSK]) were applied in parallel to samples to identify DNA sequences corresponding to potential pathogens. Main Outcome Measures Presence of potential pathogen DNA in ocular samples. Results None of 7 control eyes undergoing routine vitreous surgery yielded positive results for bacteria or virus by culture or 16S PCR. Fourteen of the 21 samples (66.7%) from eyes harboring suspected infectious endophthalmitis were culture-positive, the most common being Staphylococcal and Streptococcal species. There was good agreement among culture, 16S bacterial PCR, and BRiSK methodologies for culture-positive cases (Fleiss’ kappa of 0.621). 16S PCR did not yield a recognizable pathogen sequence in any culture-negative sample, while BRiSK suggested presence of Steptococcus in one culture-negative sample. Surprisingly, using BRiSK, 57.1% of culture-positive and 100% of culture-negative samples demonstrated presence of Torque Teno Virus (TTV) sequences, compared to none in the controls (Fisher exact, p = 0.0005). Presence of TTV viral DNA was confirmed in seven cases by qPCR. No other known viruses or potential pathogens were identified in these samples. Conclusion Culture, 16S qPCR, and BRiSK provide complementary information in presumed infectious endophthalmitis. The majority of culture-negative endophthalmitis samples did

  12. Polymicrobial synergy and dysbiosis in inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Richard J.; Hajishengallis, George

    2014-01-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation of the periodontal area may arise when complex microbial communities transition from a commensal to a pathogenic entity. Communication among constituent species leads to polymicrobial synergy among metabolically compatible organisms that acquire functional specialization within the developing community. Keystone pathogens, even at low abundance, elevate community virulence and the resulting dysbiotic community targets specific aspects of host immunity to further disable immune surveillance while promoting an overall inflammatory response. Inflammophilic organisms benefit from proteinaceous substrates derived from inflammatory tissue breakdown. Inflammation and dysbiosis reinforce each other and the escalating environmental changes further select for a pathobiotic community. We have synthesized the polymicrobial synergy and dysbiotic components of the process into a new model for inflammatory diseases. PMID:25498392

  13. Polymicrobial synergy and dysbiosis in inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Richard J; Hajishengallis, George

    2015-03-01

    Uncontrolled inflammation of the periodontal area may arise when complex microbial communities transition from a commensal to a pathogenic entity. Communication among constituent species leads to polymicrobial synergy between metabolically compatible organisms that acquire functional specialization within the developing community. Keystone pathogens, even at low abundance, elevate community virulence, and the resulting dysbiotic community targets specific aspects of host immunity to further disable immune surveillance while promoting an overall inflammatory response. Inflammophilic organisms benefit from proteinaceous substrates derived from inflammatory tissue breakdown. Inflammation and dysbiosis reinforce each other, and the escalating environmental changes further select for a pathobiotic community. We have synthesized the polymicrobial synergy and dysbiotic components of the process into a new model for inflammatory diseases.

  14. Polymicrobial Infective Endocarditis: Clinical Features and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    García-Granja, Pablo Elpidio; López, Javier; Vilacosta, Isidre; Ortiz-Bautista, Carlos; Sevilla, Teresa; Olmos, Carmen; Sarriá, Cristina; Ferrera, Carlos; Gómez, Itziar; Román, José Alberto San

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To describe the profile of left-sided polymicrobial endocarditis (PE) and to compare it with monomicrobial endocarditis (ME). Among 1011 episodes of left-sided endocarditis consecutively diagnosed in 3 tertiary centers, between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2014, 60 were polymicrobial (5.9%), 821 monomicrobial (81.7%), and in 123 no microorganism was detected (12.2%). Seven patients (0.7%) were excluded from the analysis because contamination of biologic tissue could not be discarded. The authors described the clinical, microbiologic, echocardiographic, and outcome of patients with PE and compared it with ME. Mean age was 64 years SD 16 years, 67% were men and 30% nosocomial. Diabetes mellitus (35%) were the most frequent comorbidities, fever (67%) and heart failure (43%) the most common symptoms at admission. Prosthetic valves (50%) were the most frequent infection location and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (48%) and enterococci (37%) the leading etiologies. The most repeated combination was coagulase-negative Staphylococci with enterococci (n = 9). Polymicrobial endocarditis appeared more frequently in patients with underlying disease (70% versus 56%, P = 0.036), mostly diabetics (35% versus 24%, P = 0.044) with previous cardiac surgery (15% versus 8% P = 0.049) and prosthetic valves (50% versus 37%, P = 0.038). Coagulase-negative Staphylococci, enterococci, Gram-negative bacilli, anaerobes, and fungi were more frequent in PE. No differences on age, sex, symptoms, need of surgery, and in-hospital mortality were detected. Polymicrobial endocarditis represents 5.9% of episodes of left-sided endocarditis in our series. Despite relevant demographic and microbiologic differences between PE and ME, short-term outcome is similar. PMID:26656328

  15. Polymicrobial Interactions: Impact on Pathogenesis and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brian M.; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; O'May, Graeme A.; Costerton, J. William

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Microorganisms coexist in a complex milieu of bacteria, fungi, archaea, and viruses on or within the human body, often as multifaceted polymicrobial biofilm communities at mucosal sites and on abiotic surfaces. Only recently have we begun to appreciate the complicated biofilm phenotype during infection; moreover, even less is known about the interactions that occur between microorganisms during polymicrobial growth and their implications in human disease. Therefore, this review focuses on polymicrobial biofilm-mediated infections and examines the contribution of bacterial-bacterial, bacterial-fungal, and bacterial-viral interactions during human infection and potential strategies for protection against such diseases. PMID:22232376

  16. Culture-negative hand abscesses in immunocompetent individuals.

    PubMed

    Ho, Y M S; Sebastin, S J; Lim, A Y T

    2012-02-01

    Gonococcal infection is a common sexually-transmitted infection in the older male population in our local setting. It is caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and results in fever, dysuria and a foul-smelling discharge from the external urethral meatus. Occasionally, it may also present with disseminated gonococcal infection - dermatitis, septic arthritis and even meningitis or endocarditis. We present two unusual cases, where the primary presentation was that of multiple subcutaneous hand and wrist abscesses. This illustrates the need for competent history-taking, especially in culture-negative patients. We also recommend the use of gonococcal polymerase chain reaction tests in patients who demonstrate negative routine cultures, or in lieu of gonococcal culture when the diagnosis is equivocal or urgently required.

  17. Clinical Differences Between Monomicrobial and Polymicrobial Vertebral Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Issa, Kimona; Pourtaheri, Sina; Stewart, Tyler; Faloon, Michael; Sahai, Nikhil; Mease, Samuel; Sinha, Kumar; Hwang, Ki; Emami, Arash

    2016-11-11

    Little literature exists examining differences in presentation and outcomes between monomicrobial and polymicrobial vertebral infections. Seventy-nine patients treated for vertebral osteomyelitis between 2001 and 2011 were reviewed. Patients were divided into monomicrobial and polymicrobial cohorts based on type of infection. Various characteristics were compared between the 2 groups. The 26 patients with a polymicrobial infection were older and had a higher mortality rate, lower clearance of infection, larger infection, more vertebral instability, higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate at presentation, and longer mean length of stay. There were no significant differences in Oswestry Disability Index scores at final follow-up, but there were differences in presentation and clinical outcomes between monomicrobial and polymicrobial vertebral osteomyelitis. Patients may benefit from counseling regarding their disease type and potential prognosis. [Orthopedics. 201x; xx(x):xx-xx.].

  18. Polymerase chain reaction detection of Kingella kingae in children with culture-negative septic arthritis in eastern Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Slinger, Robert; Moldovan, Ioana; Bowes, Jennifer; Chan, Francis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The bacterium Kingella kingae may be an under-recognized cause of septic arthritis in Canadian children because it is difficult to grow in culture and best detected using molecular methods. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether K kingae is present in culture-negative joint fluid specimens from children in eastern Ontario using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection methods. METHODS: K kingae PCR testing was performed using residual bacterial culture-negative joint fluid collected from 2010 to 2013 at a children’s hospital in Ottawa, Ontario. The clinical features of children with infections caused by K kingae were compared with those of children with infections caused by the ‘typical’ septic arthritis bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. RESULTS: A total of 50 joint fluid specimens were submitted over the study period. Ten were culture-positive, eight for S aureus and two for S pyogenes. Residual joint fluid was available for 27 of the 40 culture-negative specimens and K kingae was detected using PCR in seven (25.93%) of these samples. Children with K kingae were significantly younger (median age 1.7 versus 11.3 years; P=0.01) and had lower C-reactive protein levels (median 23.8 mg/L versus 117.6. mg/L; P=0.01) than those infected with other bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: K kingae was frequently detected using PCR in culture-negative joint fluid specimens from children in eastern Ontario. K kingae PCR testing of culture-negative joint samples in children appears to be warranted. PMID:27095882

  19. Polymicrobial Biofilm Studies: From Basic Science to Biofilm Control

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Hubertine ME; Xu, Zhenbo; Peters, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    Microbes rarely exist as single species planktonic forms as they have been commonly studied in the laboratory. Instead, the vast majority exists as part of complex polymicrobial biofilm communities attached to host and environmental surfaces. The oral cavity represents one of the most diverse and well-studied polymicrobial consortia. Despite a burgeoning field of mechanistic biofilm research within the past decades, our understanding of interactions that occur between microbial members within oral biofilms is still limited. Thus, the primary objective of this review is to focus on polymicrobial biofilm formation, microbial interactions and signaling events that mediate oral biofilm development, consequences of oral hygiene on both local and systemic disease, and potential therapeutic strategies to limit oral dysbiosis. PMID:27134811

  20. Distinct polymicrobial populations in a chronic foot ulcer with implications for diagnostics and anti-infective therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polymicrobial infections caused by combinations of different bacteria are being detected with an increasing frequency. The evidence of such complex infections is being revealed through the use of novel molecular and culture-independent methods. Considerable progress has been made in the last decade regarding the diagnostic application of such molecular techniques. In particular, 16S rDNA-based sequencing and even metagenomic analyses have been successfully used to study the microbial diversity in ecosystems and human microbiota. Here, we utilized denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) as a diagnostic tool for identifying different bacterial species in complex clinical samples of a patient with a chronic foot ulcer. Case presentation A 45-year-old female suffered from a chronic 5x5cm large plantar ulcer located in the posterior calcaneal area with subcutaneous tissue infection and osteomyelitis. The chronic ulcer developed over a period of 8 years. Culture and DHPLC revealed a distinct and location-dependent polymicrobial infection of the ulcer. The analysis of a superficial biopsy revealed a mixture of Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris, and Fusobacterium nucleatum, whereas the tissue-deep biopsy harbored a mixture of four different bacterial species, namely Gemella morbillorum, Porphyromonas asaccharolytica, Bacteroides fragilis, and Arcanobacterium haemolyticum. Conclusions This clinical case highlights the difficulties in assessing polymicrobial infections where a mixture of fastidious, rapid and slow growing bacteria as well as anaerobes exists as structured communities within the tissue architecture of chronic wound infections. The diagnosis of this multilayered polymicrobial infection led to a microbe-adapted antibiotic therapy, targeting the polymicrobial nature of this infection in addition to a standard local wound treatment. However, a complete wound closure could not be achieved due to the long-lasting extensive

  1. A case of culture-negative endocarditis due to Streptococcus tigurinus.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Hajime; Kakuta, Risako; Yano, Hisakazu; Suzuki, Tomoyuki; Gu, Yoshiaki; Oe, Chihiro; Inomata, Shinya; Aoyagi, Tetsuji; Hatta, Masumitsu; Endo, Shiro; Tokuda, Koichi; Weber, David J; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2015-02-01

    Culture-negative endocarditis remains a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge despite recent medical advances. Streptococcus tigurinus, a novel member of the Streptococcus mitis group, was first identified in Zurich. S. tigurinus possesses virulence determinants and causes invasive infections. We report a case of culture-negative endocarditis with serious complications due to S. tigurinus, which was identified by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis of excised valve tissue specimens. This technique is useful for identification of the causative microorganism in patients with culture-negative endocarditis and may facilitate early diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial treatment.

  2. Necrotizing ANCA-Positive Glomerulonephritis Secondary to Culture-Negative Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Van Haare Heijmeijer, Sophie; Wilmes, Dunja; Aydin, Selda; Clerckx, Caroline; Labriola, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) and small-vessel vasculitis may have similar clinical features, including glomerulonephritis. Furthermore the association between IE and ANCA positivity is well documented, making differential diagnosis between IE- and ANCA-associated vasculitis particularly difficult, especially in case of culture-negative IE. We report on one patient with glomerulonephritis secondary to culture-negative IE caused by Bartonella henselae which illustrates this diagnostic difficulty. PMID:26819786

  3. Reduced Expression of SARM in Mouse Spleen during Polymicrobial Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Zou, Lin; Cen, Dongzhi; Chao, Wei; Chen, Dunjin

    2016-12-01

    Objective Immune dysfunction, including prominent apoptosis of immune cells and decreased functioning of the remaining immune cells, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Sterile α and HEAT/armadillo motif-containing protein (SARM) is implicated in the regulation of immune cell apoptosis. This study aimed to elucidate SARM contributes to sepsis-induced immune cell death and immunosuppression. Methods A mouse model of polymicrobial sepsis was generated by cecum ligation and puncture (CLP). SARM gene and protein expression, caspase 3 cleavage and intracellular ATP production were measured in the mouse spleens. Results CLP-induced polymicrobial sepsis specifically attenuated both the gene and protein expression of SARM in the spleens. Moreover, the attenuation of SARM expression synchronized with splenocyte apoptosis, as evidenced by increased caspase 3 cleavage and ATP depletion. Conclusions These findings suggest that SARM is a potential regulator of sepsis-induced splenocyte apoptosis.

  4. Impact of Staphylococcus aureus on Pathogenesis in Polymicrobial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Nisha; Biswas, Raja; Götz, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Polymicrobial infections involving Staphylococcus aureus exhibit enhanced disease severity and morbidity. We reviewed the nature of polymicrobial interactions between S. aureus and other bacterial, fungal, and viral cocolonizers. Microbes that were frequently recovered from the infection site with S. aureus are Haemophilus influenzae, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Corynebacterium sp., Lactobacillus sp., Candida albicans, and influenza virus. Detailed analyses of several in vitro and in vivo observations demonstrate that S. aureus exhibits cooperative relations with C. albicans, E. faecalis, H. influenzae, and influenza virus and competitive relations with P. aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Lactobacillus sp., and Corynebacterium sp. Interactions of both types influence changes in S. aureus that alter its characteristics in terms of colony formation, protein expression, pathogenicity, and antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:24643542

  5. Polymicrobial Candida biofilms: friends and foe in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Lindsay E; Millhouse, Emma; Sherry, Leighann; Kean, Ryan; Malcolm, Jennifer; Nile, Christopher J; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-11-01

    The role of polymicrobial biofilm infections in medicine is becoming more apparent. Increasing number of microbiome studies and deep sequencing has enabled us to develop a greater understanding of how positive and negative microbial interactions influence disease outcomes. An environment where this is particularly pertinent is within the oral cavity, a rich and diverse ecosystem inhabited by both bacteria and yeasts, which collectively occupy and coexist within various niches as biofilm communities. Studies within this environment have however tended to be subject to extensive independent investigation, in the context of either polymicrobial bacterial communities or yeast biofilms, but rarely both together. It is clear however that they are not mutually exclusive. Therefore, this review aims to explore the influence of candidal populations on the composition of these complex aggregates and biofilm communities, to investigate their mechanistic interactions to understand how these impact clinical outcomes, and determine whether we can translate how this knowledge can be used to improve patient management.

  6. Importance of Candida-bacterial polymicrobial biofilms in disease

    PubMed Central

    Harriott, Melphine M.; Noverr, Mairi C.

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent human fungal pathogen, with an ability to inhabit diverse host niches and cause disease in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. C. albicans also readily forms biofilms on indwelling medical devices and mucosal tissues, which serve as an infectious reservoir that is difficult to eradicate, and can lead to lethal systemic infections. Biofilm formation occurs within a complex milieu of host factors and other members of the human microbiota. Polymicrobial interactions will likely dictate the cellular and biochemical composition of the biofilm, as well as influence clinically relevant outcomes such as drug and host resistance and virulence. In this manuscript, we review C. albicans infections in the context of in vivo polymicrobial biofilms and implications for pathogenesis. PMID:21855346

  7. Distinct interacting core taxa in co-occurrence networks enable discrimination of polymicrobial oral diseases with similar symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Takahiko; Watanabe, Takayasu; Kachi, Hirokazu; Koyanagi, Tatsuro; Maruyama, Noriko; Murase, Kazunori; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Maruyama, Fumito; Izumi, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Polymicrobial diseases, which can be life threatening, are caused by the presence and interactions of multiple microbes. Peri-implantitis and periodontitis are representative polymicrobial diseases that show similar clinical symptoms. To establish a means of differentiating between them, we compared microbial species and functional genes in situ by performing metatranscriptomic analyses of peri-implantitis and periodontitis samples obtained from the same subjects (n = 12 each). Although the two diseases differed in terms of 16S rRNA-based taxonomic profiles, they showed similarities with respect to functional genes and taxonomic and virulence factor mRNA profiles. The latter—defined as microbial virulence types—differed from those of healthy periodontal sites. We also showed that networks based on co-occurrence relationships of taxonomic mRNA abundance (co-occurrence networks) were dissimilar between the two diseases. Remarkably, these networks consisted mainly of taxa with a high relative mRNA-to-rRNA ratio, with some showing significant co-occurrence defined as interacting core taxa, highlighting differences between the two groups. Thus, peri-implantitis and periodontitis have shared as well as distinct microbiological characteristics. Our findings provide insight into microbial interactions in polymicrobial diseases with unknown etiologies. PMID:27499042

  8. Etiology of bacterial vaginosis and polymicrobial biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun-Sul; Ehlers, Marthie M; Lombaard, Hennie; Redelinghuys, Mathys J; Kock, Marleen M

    2017-03-30

    Microorganisms in nature rarely exist in a planktonic form, but in the form of biofilms. Biofilms have been identified as the cause of many chronic and persistent infections and have been implicated in the etiology of bacterial vaginosis (BV). Bacterial vaginosis is the most common form of vaginal infection in women of reproductive age. Similar to other biofilm infections, BV biofilms protect the BV-related bacteria against antibiotics and cause recurrent BV. In this review, an overview of BV-related bacteria, conceptual models and the stages involved in the polymicrobial BV biofilm formation will be discussed.

  9. Do Polymicrobial Intra-Abdominal Infections Have Worse Outcomes than Monomicrobial Intra-Abdominal Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Brandy L.; Dietch, Zachary C.; Guidry, Christopher A.; Davies, Stephen W.; Hennessy, Sara A.; Duane, Therese M.; O'Neill, Patrick J.; Coimbra, Raul; Cook, Charles H.; Askari, Reza; Popovsky, Kimberly; Sawyer, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Numerous studies have demonstrated microorganism interaction through signaling molecules, some of which are recognized by other bacterial species. This interspecies synergy can prove detrimental to the human host in polymicrobial infections. We hypothesized that polymicrobial intra-abdominal infections (IAI) have worse outcomes than monomicrobial infections. Methods: Data from the Study to Optimize Peritoneal Infection Therapy (STOP-IT), a prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trial, were reviewed for all occurrences of IAI having culture results available. Patients in STOP-IT had been randomized to receive four days of antibiotics vs. antibiotics until two days after clinical symptom resolution. Patients with polymicrobial and monomicrobial infections were compared by univariable analysis using the Wilcoxon rank sum, χ2, and Fisher exact tests. Results: Culture results were available for 336 of 518 patients (65%). The durations of antibiotic therapy in polymicrobial (n = 225) and monomicrobial IAI (n = 111) were equal (p = 0.78). Univariable analysis demonstrated similar demographics in the two populations. The 37 patients (11%) with inflammatory bowel disease were more likely to have polymicrobial IAI (p = 0.05). Polymicrobial infections were not associated with a higher risk of surgical site infection, recurrent IAI, or death. Conclusion: Contrary to our hypothesis, polymicrobial IAI do not have worse outcomes than monomicrobial infections. These results suggest polymicrobial IAI can be treated the same as monomicrobial IAI. PMID:26397376

  10. A case of polymicrobial infective endocarditis involving Neisseria mucosa occurring in an intravenous drug abuser.

    PubMed

    Giles, M W; Andrew, J H; Tellus, M M

    1988-12-01

    The incidence of polymicrobial endocarditis has increased markedly in recent years, in association with the increasing level of abuse of intravenous drugs. Neisseria mucosa, an upper respiratory tract commensal, is a rare cause of infective endocarditis. We report the first case of polymicrobial infective endocarditis involving Neisseria mucosa occurring in an intravenous drug abuser.

  11. Molecular Detection of Campylobacter jejuni as a Cause of Culture-Negative Spondylodiscitis

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Marco H.; Oesterlein, Anett; Abele-Horn, Marianne; Baron, Stefan; Durchholz, Daniel; Langen, Heinz-Jakob; Jany, Berthold; Schoen, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Spondylodiscitis caused by Campylobacter species is a rare disease which is most often caused by Campylobacter fetus. We report a case of culture-negative spondylodiscitis and a psoas abscess due to Campylobacter jejuni in a 68-year-old woman, as revealed by 16S rRNA gene and Campylobacter-specific PCRs from biopsied tissue. PMID:22259199

  12. Noisy neighbourhoods: quorum sensing in fungal–polymicrobial infections

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Emily F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Quorum sensing was once considered a way in which a species was able to sense its cell density and regulate gene expression accordingly. However, it is now becoming apparent that multiple microbes can sense particular quorum‐sensing molecules, enabling them to sense and respond to other microbes in their neighbourhood. Such interactions are significant within the context of polymicrobial disease, in which the competition or cooperation of microbes can alter disease progression. Fungi comprise a small but important component of the human microbiome and are in constant contact with bacteria and viruses. The discovery of quorum‐sensing pathways in fungi has led to the characterization of a number of interkingdom quorum‐sensing interactions. Here, we review the recent developments in quorum sensing in medically important fungi, and the implications these interactions have on the host's innate immune response. PMID:26243526

  13. Noisy neighbourhoods: quorum sensing in fungal-polymicrobial infections.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Emily F; Hall, Rebecca A

    2015-10-01

    Quorum sensing was once considered a way in which a species was able to sense its cell density and regulate gene expression accordingly. However, it is now becoming apparent that multiple microbes can sense particular quorum-sensing molecules, enabling them to sense and respond to other microbes in their neighbourhood. Such interactions are significant within the context of polymicrobial disease, in which the competition or cooperation of microbes can alter disease progression. Fungi comprise a small but important component of the human microbiome and are in constant contact with bacteria and viruses. The discovery of quorum-sensing pathways in fungi has led to the characterization of a number of interkingdom quorum-sensing interactions. Here, we review the recent developments in quorum sensing in medically important fungi, and the implications these interactions have on the host's innate immune response.

  14. Culture-negative infective endocarditis of the aortic valve due to Aerococcus urinae: a rare aetiology.

    PubMed

    Alozie, Anthony; Yerebakan, Can; Westphal, Bernd; Steinhoff, Gustav; Podbielski, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    Bacteria of the species Aerococcus urinae are Gram-positive, catalase-negative cocci that are arranged in pairs, tetrads, or clusters resembling enterococci or staphylococci. They are rare causative agents of infective endocarditis. Repetitive urinary tract infections based upon underlying genitourinary tract abnormalities could involve these bacteria. Due to their similarity to other Gram-positive cocci misinterpretation may occur along the line of microbiologic differentiation, which could potentially lead to a fatal outcome. We herein report on the clinical course of a 68 year-old male patient who in the setting of an embolic stroke was initially diagnosed with a culture-negative acute infective endocarditis of the aortic valve.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Can Be Detected in a Polymicrobial Competition Model Using Impedance Spectroscopy with a Novel Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Andrew C.; Connolly, Patricia; Tucker, Nicholas P.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is a powerful technique that can be used to elicit information about an electrode interface. In this article, we highlight six principal processes by which the presence of microorganisms can affect impedance and show how one of these - the production of electroactive metabolites - changes the impedance signature of culture media containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. EIS, was used in conjunction with a low cost screen printed carbon sensor to detect the presence of P. aeruginosa when grown in isolation or as part of a polymicrobial infection with Staphylococcus aureus. By comparing the electrode to a starting measurement, we were able to identify an impedance signature characteristic of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, we are able to show that one of the changes in the impedance signature is due to pyocyanin and associated phenazine compounds. The findings of this study indicate that it might be possible to develop a low cost sensor for the detection of P. aeruginosa in important point of care diagnostic applications. In particular, we suggest that a development of the device described here could be used in a polymicrobial clinical sample such as sputum from a CF patient to detect P. aeruginosa. PMID:24614411

  16. Viable Compositional Analysis of an Eleven Species Oral Polymicrobial Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Leighann; Lappin, Gillian; O'Donnell, Lindsay E.; Millhouse, Emma; Millington, Owain R.; Bradshaw, David J.; Axe, Alyson S.; Williams, Craig; Nile, Christopher J.; Ramage, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Polymicrobial biofilms are abundant in clinical disease, particularly within the oral cavity. Creating complex biofilm models that recapitulate the polymicrobiality of oral disease are important in the development of new chemotherapeutic agents. In order to do this accurately we require the ability to undertake compositional analysis, in addition to determine individual cell viability, which is difficult using conventional microbiology. The aim of this study was to develop a defined multispecies denture biofilm model in vitro, and to assess viable compositional analysis following defined oral hygiene regimens. Methods: An in vitro multispecies denture biofilm containing various oral commensal and pathogenic bacteria and yeast was created on poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Denture hygiene regimens tested against the biofilm model included brushing only, denture cleansing only and combinational brushing and denture cleansing. Biofilm composition and viability were assessed by culture (CFU) and molecular (qPCR) methodologies. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy were also employed to visualize changes in denture biofilms following treatment. Results: Combinational treatment of brushing and denture cleansing had the greatest impact on multispecies denture biofilms, reducing the number of live cells by more than 2 logs, and altering the overall composition in favor of streptococci. This was even more evident during the sequential testing, whereby daily sequential treatment reduced the total and live number of bacteria and yeast more than those treated intermittently. Bacteria and yeast remaining following treatment tended to aggregate in the pores of the PMMA, proving more difficult to fully eradicate the biofilm. Conclusions: Overall, we are the first to develop a method to enable viable compositional analysis of an 11 species denture biofilm following chemotherapeutic challenge. We were able to demonstrate viable cell

  17. Oxygen as a Virulence Determinant in Polymicrobial Infections

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infections caused by multiple organisms, or polymicrobial infections, are likely more common than is broadly appreciated. Interaction among microbial communities (and with their host) can change the infection landscape by subverting immunity, providing nutrients and inhibiting competing microbes. Stacy et al. (A. Stacy, D. Fleming, R. J. Lamont, K. P. Rumbaugh, and M. Whiteley, mBio 7:e00782-16, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.00782-16) described a novel mechanism that results in synergistic growth of oral microbes Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Streptococcus gordonii. The authors used whole-genome fitness profiling by transposon sequencing (Tn-seq) to identify genes differentially required for growth in vitro versus in a mono- or coinfection in a thigh abscess model. They found that coinfection with S. gordonii allowed A. actinomycetemcomitans to shift from an anaerobic to an aerobic mode of growth. This shift involved the production of a terminal electron acceptor H2O2 by S. gordonii and increased A. actinomycetemcomitans persistence—an interaction termed “cross-respiration.” PMID:27531913

  18. Ertapenem Articulating Spacer for the Treatment of Polymicrobial Total Knee Arthroplasty Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marinkovic, Jugoslav

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Periprosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are the primary cause of early failure of the total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Polymicrobial TKA infections are often associated with a higher risk of treatment failure. The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy of ertapenem loaded spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial PJI. Methods. There were 18 patients enrolled; nine patients with polymicrobial PJI treated with ertapenem loaded articulating spacers were compared to the group of 9 patients treated with vancomycin or ceftazidime loaded spacers. Results. Successful reimplantation with revision implants was possible in 66.67%. Ertapenem spacers were used in 6 cases in primary two-stage procedure and in 3 cases in secondary spacer exchange. Successful infection eradication was achieved in all cases; final reimplantation with revision knee arthroplasty implants was possible in 6 cases. Conclusion. Ertapenem can be successfully used as antimicrobial addition to the cement spacers in two-stage revision treatment of polymicrobial PJIs. However, this type of spacer may also be useful in the treatment of infections caused by monomicrobial extended spectrum beta-lactamases producing gram-negative bacilli. Further clinical studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ertapenem spacers in the treatment of polymicrobial and monomicrobial PJIs. PMID:27366173

  19. [PCR rDNA 16S used for the etiological diagnosis of blood culture negative endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Baty, G; Lanotte, P; Hocqueloux, L; Prazuck, T; Bret, L; Romano, M; Mereghetti, L

    2010-06-01

    We report the case of a 55 year-old man presenting with a double aortic and mitral endocarditis for which resected valve culture was repeatedly negative. Specific PCR made on valves because of highly positive blood tests for Bartonella henselae remained negative. A molecular approach was made with 16S rDNA PCR, followed by sequencing. Bartonella quintana was identified as the etiology of endocarditis. B. quintana, "fastidious" bacteria, even if hard to identify in a laboratory, is often reported as a blood culture negative endocarditis (BCNE) agent. Molecular biology methods have strongly improved the diagnosis of BCNE. We propose a review of the literature focusing on the interest of broad-spectrum PCR on valve for the etiological diagnosis of BCNE.

  20. Evaluation of the use of DMSA in culture positive UTI and culture negative acute pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Nammalwar, B R; Vijayakumar, M; Sankar, Janani; Ramnath, B; Prahlad, N

    2005-07-01

    This prospective study was done to assess the frequency of acute pyelonephritis (APN) in febrile children with positive urine culture as documented by Tc99m DMSA scintigraphy (DMSA) and the frequency of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) in these children. Secondly, to determine the frequency of APN, in febrile children with supportive evidence for UTI but with negative urine culture, as documented by DMSA and frequency of VUR in them. Thirdly to stress the utility of DMSA to diagnose APN in urine culture negative febrile children and to suggest DMSA as a clinical tool in evaluation of fever of unknown origin (FUO). This study included 42 children with positive urine culture and 26 children with negative urine culture who had supportive evidence of UTI as determined by the predetermined criteria and diagnosed to have APN by DMSA. All of them had ultrasonogram (USG), DMSA and voiding cystourethrogram (VCU). They were followed up for a minimum period of 6 months. Out of the 42 children with positive urine culture 92.9% had features of APN in the DMSA of whom 82.1% had vesicoureteric relux (VUR). The DMSA was abnormal in 26 children with negative urine culture, of whom 65.4% had VUR. Ultrasound suggestive of parenchymal change was observed in 47.6% in the culture positive group and 65.4% in the culture negative group. In conclusion, it is suggested, that DMSA is a useful investigation for the diagnosis of APN in febrile UTI. DMSA is indicated in febrile children with negative urine culture but with supportive evidence of UTI and in FUO. An abnormal DMSA is a strong indication for work up for VUR.

  1. Polymicrobial Multi-functional Approach for Enhancement of Crop Productivity.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Chilekampalli A; Saravanan, Ramu S

    2013-01-01

    There is an increasing global need for enhancing the food production to meet the needs of the fast-growing human population. Traditional approach to increasing agricultural productivity through high inputs of chemical nitrogen and phosphate fertilizers and pesticides is not sustainable because of high costs and concerns about global warming, environmental pollution, and safety concerns. Therefore, the use of naturally occurring soil microbes for increasing productivity of food crops is an attractive eco-friendly, cost-effective, and sustainable alternative to the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides. There is a vast body of published literature on microbial symbiotic and nonsymbiotic nitrogen fixation, multiple beneficial mechanisms used by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), the nature and significance of mycorrhiza-plant symbiosis, and the growing technology on production of efficacious microbial inoculants. These areas are briefly reviewed here. The construction of an inoculant with a consortium of microbes with multiple beneficial functions such as N(2) fixation, biocontrol, phosphate solubilization, and other plant growth-promoting properties is a positive new development in this area in that a single inoculant can be used effectively for increasing the productivity of a broad spectrum of crops including legumes, cereals, vegetables, and grasses. Such a polymicrobial inoculant containing several microorganisms for each major function involved in promoting the plant growth and productivity gives it greater stability and wider applications for a range of major crops. Intensifying research in this area leading to further advances in our understanding of biochemical/molecular mechanisms involved in plant-microbe-soil interactions coupled with rapid advances in the genomics-proteomics of beneficial microbes should lead to the design and development of inoculants with greater efficacy for increasing the productivity of a wide range of crops.

  2. What can we learn from the microbial ecological interactions associated with polymicrobial diseases?

    PubMed

    Antiabong, J F; Boardman, W; Ball, A S

    2014-03-15

    Periodontal diseases in humans and animals are model polymicrobial diseases which are associated with a shift in the microbial community structure and function; there is therefore a need to investigate these diseases from a microbial ecological perspective. This review highlights three important areas of microbial ecological investigation of polymicrobial diseases and the lessons that could be learnt: (1) identification of disease-associated microbes and the implications for choice of anti-infective treatment; (2) the implications associated with vaccine design and development and (3) application of the dynamics of microbial interaction in the discovery of novel anti-infective agents. This review emphasises the need to invigorate microbial ecological approaches to the study of periodontal diseases and other polymicrobial diseases for greater understanding of the ecological interactions between and within the biotic and abiotic factors of the environment.

  3. Peptoid Efficacy against Polymicrobial Biofilms Determined by Using Propidium Monoazide-Modified Quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu; Bolt, Hannah L; Eggimann, Gabriela A; McAuley, Danny F; McMullan, Ronan; Curran, Tanya; Zhou, Mei; Jahoda, Professor Colin A B; Cobb, Steven L; Lundy, Fionnuala T

    2017-01-03

    Biofilms containing Candida albicans are responsible for a wide variety of clinical infections. The protective effects of the biofilm matrix, the low metabolic activity of microorganisms within a biofilm and their high mutation rate, significantly enhance the resistance of biofilms to conventional antimicrobial treatments. Peptoids are peptide-mimics that share many features of host defence antimicrobial peptides but have increased resistance to proteases and therefore have better stability in vivo. The activity of a library of peptoids was tested against monospecies and polymicrobial bacterial/fungal biofilms. Selected peptoids showed significant bactericidal and fungicidal activity against the polymicrobial biofilms. This coupled with low cytotoxicity suggests that peptoids could offer a new option for the treatment of clinically relevant polymicrobial infections.

  4. Case series of Bartonella quintana blood culture-negative endocarditis in Washington, DC

    PubMed Central

    Ghidey, Fisseha Y.; Mills, Kristin; Lai, Leon; Woods, Christian; Ruiz, Maria E.; Fishbein, Dawn; Sampath, Rahul; Lowery, Robert; Wortmann, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prior studies (predominantly from Europe) have demonstrated blood culture-negative endocarditis due to Bartonella. Our objective was to describe three cases of Bartonella quintana endocarditis identified within one year at a large hospital in Washington, DC, USA. Case presentation: We constructed a descriptive case series from a retrospective review of medical records from April to December 2013 at an 800-bed urban hospital. All three patients (ages: 52, 55 and 57 years) were undomiciled/homeless men with a history of alcoholism. Although they had negative blood cultures, echocardiography demonstrated aortic/mitral valve perforation and regurgitation in one patient, aortic/mitral valve vegetation with mitral regurgitation in the second patient, and aortic valve vegetation with regurgitation in the third patient. The patients had positive Bartonella quintana serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) with negative immunoglobulin M (IgM). PCR on DNA extracted from cardiac valves was positive for Bartonella, and DNA sequencing of PCR amplicons identified Bartonella quintana. Patients received treatment with doxycycline/rifampin or doxycycline/gentamicin. Conclusion: Clinicians should consider Bartonella endocarditis as a differential diagnosis in patients who fit elements of the Duke Criteria, as well as having a history of homelessness and alcoholism. PMID:28348772

  5. Polymicrobial Chronic Infection Including Acinetobacter Baumannii in a Plated Segmental Defect in the Rat Femur

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Including Acinetobacter baumannii in a Plated Segmental Defect in the Rat Femur PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dean T. Tsukayama, MD...FEB 2007 - 31 DEC 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Polymicrobial Chronic Infection Including Acinetobacter baumannii 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER in a Plated...bone isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii exhibited very little osteolytic involvement when used alone in the model. Qualitative cultures indicated very

  6. Exploring Preterm Birth as a Polymicrobial Disease: An Overview of the Uterine Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Matthew S.; Bayatibojakhi, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Infection is a leading cause of preterm birth (PTB). A focus of many studies over the past decade has been to characterize microorganisms present in the uterine cavity and document any association with negative pregnancy outcome. A range of techniques have been used to achieve this, including microbiological culture and targeted polymerase chain reaction assays, and more recently, microbiome-level analyses involving either conserved, phylogenetically informative genes such as the bacterial 16S rRNA gene or whole shotgun metagenomic sequencing. These studies have contributed vast amounts of data toward characterization of the uterine microbiome, specifically that present in the amniotic fluid, fetal membranes, and placenta. However, an overwhelming emphasis has been placed on the bacterial microbiome, with far less data produced on the viral and fungal/yeast microbiomes. With numerous studies now referring to PTB as a polymicrobial condition, there is the need to investigate the role of viruses and fungi/yeasts in more detail and in particular, look for associations between colonization with these microorganisms and bacteria in the same samples. Although the major pathway by which microorganisms are believed to colonize the uterine cavity is vertical ascension from the vagina, numerous studies are now emerging suggesting hematogenous transfer of oral microbiota to the uterine cavity. Evidence of this has been produced in mouse models and although DNA-based evidence in humans appears convincing in some aspects, use of methodologies that only detect viable cells as opposed to lysed cells and extracellular DNA are needed to clarify this. Such techniques as RNA analyses and viability polymerase chain reaction are likely to play key roles in the clinical translation of future microbiome-based data, particularly in confined environments such as the uterus, as detection of viable cells plays a key role in diagnosis and treatment of infection. PMID:25505898

  7. A novel natural compound from garlic (Allium sativum L.) with therapeutic effects against experimental polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Kyun; Park, Yoo Jung; Ko, Min Jung; Wang, Ziyu; Lee, Ha Young; Choi, Young Whan; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-28

    Sepsis is a serious, life-threatening, infectious disease. In this study, we demonstrate that sucrose methyl 3-formyl-4-methylpentanoate (SMFM), a novel natural compound isolated from garlic (Allium sativum L.), markedly enhances survival rates by inhibiting lung inflammation in a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) experimental polymicrobial sepsis model. SMFM strongly reduced bacterial colony units from peritoneal fluid in CLP mice by stimulating the generation of reactive oxygen species. Lymphocyte apoptosis in spleens from CLP mice was also markedly decreased by SMFM administration. SMFM also significantly inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6, in CLP mice. Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of TNF-α and IL-6 were also strongly inhibited by SMFM in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that SMFM has therapeutic effects against polymicrobial sepsis that are mediated by enhanced microbial killing and blockage of cytokine storm.

  8. The synthetic antimicrobial peptide 19-2.5 attenuates septic cardiomyopathy and prevents down-regulation of SERCA2 in polymicrobial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; Horst, Klemens; Chiazza, Fausto; Oggero, Silvia; Collino, Massimo; Brandenburg, Klaus; Hildebrand, Frank; Marx, Gernot; Thiemermann, Christoph; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    An impairment of cardiac function is a key feature of the cardiovascular failure associated with sepsis. Although there is some evidence that suppression of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATP-ase (SERCA2) contributes to septic cardiomyopathy, it is not known whether prevention of the down-regulation of SERCA2 improves outcome in sepsis. Thus, we investigated whether the administration of the synthetic antimicrobial peptide Pep2.5 may attenuate the cardiac dysfunction in murine polymicrobial sepsis through regulating SERCA2 expression. We show here for the first time that the infusion of Pep2.5 reduces the impaired systolic and diastolic contractility and improves the survival time in polymicrobial sepsis. Preservation of cardiac function in sepsis by Pep2.5 is associated with prevention of the activation of NF-κB and activation of the Akt/eNOS survival pathways. Most notably, Pep2.5 prevented the down-regulation of SERCA2 expression in a) murine heart samples obtained from mice with sepsis and b) in cardiomyocytes exposed to serum from septic shock patients. Thus, we speculate that Pep2.5 may be able to prevent down-regulation of cardiac SERCA2 expression in patients with sepsis, which, in turn, may improve cardiac function and outcome in these patients. PMID:27853260

  9. Impact of polymicrobial biofilms in catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Andreia S; Almeida, Carina; Melo, Luís F; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2016-12-30

    Recent reports have demonstrated that most biofilms involved in catheter-associated urinary tract infections are polymicrobial communities, with pathogenic microorganisms (e.g. Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae) and uncommon microorganisms (e.g. Delftia tsuruhatensis, Achromobacter xylosoxidans) frequently co-inhabiting the same urinary catheter. However, little is known about the interactions that occur between different microorganisms and how they impact biofilm formation and infection outcome. This lack of knowledge affects CAUTIs management as uncommon bacteria action can, for instance, influence the rate at which pathogens adhere and grow, as well as affect the overall biofilm resistance to antibiotics. Another relevant aspect is the understanding of factors that drive a single pathogenic bacterium to become prevalent in a polymicrobial community and subsequently cause infection. In this review, a general overview about the IMDs-associated biofilm infections is provided, with an emphasis on the pathophysiology and the microbiome composition of CAUTIs. Based on the available literature, it is clear that more research about the microbiome interaction, mechanisms of biofilm formation and of antimicrobial tolerance of the polymicrobial consortium are required to better understand and treat these infections.

  10. Comparative genome analysis and identification of competitive and cooperative interactions in a polymicrobial disease.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akiko; Watanabe, Takayasu; Ogata, Nachiko; Nozawa, Takashi; Aikawa, Chihiro; Arakawa, Shinichi; Maruyama, Fumito; Izumi, Yuichi; Nakagawa, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Polymicrobial diseases are caused by combinations of multiple bacteria, which can lead to not only mild but also life-threatening illnesses. Periodontitis represents a polymicrobial disease; Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia, called 'the red complex', have been recognized as the causative agents of periodontitis. Although molecular interactions among the three species could be responsible for progression of periodontitis, the relevant genetic mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we uncovered novel interactions in comparative genome analysis among the red complex species. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) of T. forsythia might attack the restriction modification system of P. gingivalis, and possibly work as a defense system against DNA invasion from P. gingivalis. On the other hand, gene deficiencies were mutually compensated in metabolic pathways when the genes of all the three species were taken into account, suggesting that there are cooperative relationships among the three species. This notion was supported by the observation that each of the three species had its own virulence factors, which might facilitate persistence and manifestations of virulence of the three species. Here, we propose new mechanisms of bacterial symbiosis in periodontitis; these mechanisms consist of competitive and cooperative interactions. Our results might shed light on the pathogenesis of periodontitis and of other polymicrobial diseases.

  11. Interactions of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Polymicrobial Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pastar, Irena; Nusbaum, Aron G.; Gil, Joel; Patel, Shailee B.; Chen, Juan; Valdes, Jose; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Plano, Lisa R.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Davis, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections. PMID:23451098

  12. Insights into Dynamic Polymicrobial Synergy Revealed by Time-Coursed RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Erik L.; Beck, David A. C.; Miller, Daniel P.; Wang, Qian; Whiteley, Marvin; Lamont, Richard J.; Hackett, Murray

    2017-01-01

    Many bacterial infections involve polymicrobial communities in which constituent organisms are synergistically pathogenic. Periodontitis, a commonly occurring chronic inflammatory disorder, is induced by multispecies bacterial communities. The periodontal keystone pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and the accessory pathogen Streptococcus gordonii exhibit polymicrobial synergy in animal models of disease. Mechanisms of co-adhesion and community formation by P. gingivalis and S. gordonii are well-established; however, little is known regarding the basis for increased pathogenicity. In this study we used time-coursed RNA-Seq to comprehensively and quantitatively examine the dynamic transcriptional landscape of P. gingivalis in a model consortium with S. gordonii. Genes encoding a number of potential virulence determinants had higher relative mRNA levels in the context of dual species model communities than P. gingivalis alone, including adhesins, the Type IX secretion apparatus, and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motif proteins. In contrast, genes encoding conjugation systems and many of the stress responses showed lower levels of expression in P. gingivalis. A notable exception to reduced abundance of stress response transcripts was the genes encoding components of the oxidative stress-related OxyR regulon, indicating an adaptation of P. gingivalis to detoxify peroxide produced by the streptococcus. Collectively, the results are consistent with evolutionary adaptation of P. gingivalis to a polymicrobial oral environment, one outcome of which is increased pathogenic potential. PMID:28293219

  13. Sheltering effect and indirect pathogenesis of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in polymicrobial infection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yu-Ting; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Chen, Chien-Pei; Lin, Shu-Wen; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Fung, Chang-Phone; Cho, Wen-Long; Chen, Te-Li

    2014-07-01

    The role of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAb) in polymicrobial infection remains elusive. Having observed the ability of CRAb to shelter other susceptible bacteria from carbapenem killing, we sought to determine the factors contributing to this sheltering effect by transforming different recombinant plasmids into recipient A. baumannii cells. The sheltering effects of CRAb were reproduced in recipient A. baumannii cells that highly expressed carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamases (CHDLs) through their associated strong promoter. With the use of Western blot analysis and a bioassay, the highly expressed CHDLs were found to be extracellularly released and led to hydrolysis of carbapenem. The level of extracellular CHDLs increased after challenge with a higher concentration of CHDL substrates, such as carbapenem and ticarcillin. This increased CHDL may, in part, be attributed to cell lysis, as indicated by the presence of extracellular gyrase. In the planktonic condition, the sheltering effect for the cocultured susceptible bacteria might represent an indirect and passive effect of the CRAb self-defense mechanism, because coculture with the susceptible pathogen did not augment the amount of the extracellular CHDLs. Polymicrobial infection caused by CRAb and a susceptible counterpart exerted higher pathogenicity than monomicrobial infection caused by either pathogen alone in mice receiving carbapenem therapy. This study demonstrated that CHDL-producing CRAb appears to provide a sheltering effect for carbapenem-susceptible pathogens via the extracellular release of CHDLs and, by this mechanism, can enhance the pathogenesis of polymicrobial infection in the presence of carbapenem therapy.

  14. Detection and Quantification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Sputum of Culture-Negative HIV-infected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspects: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Madico, Guillermo; Mpeirwe, Moses; White, Laura; Vinhas, Solange; Orr, Beverley; Orikiriza, Patrick; Miller, Nancy S.; Gaeddert, Mary; Mwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet; Palaci, Moises; Kreiswirth, Barry; Straight, Joe; Dietze, Reynaldo; Boum, Yap; Jones-López, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is critical for timely initiation of treatment and interruption of transmission. Yet, despite recent advances, many patients remain undiagnosed. Culture, usually considered the most sensitive diagnostic method, is sub-optimal for paucibacillary disease. Methods We evaluated the Totally Optimized PCR (TOP) TB assay, a new molecular test that we hypothesize is more sensitive than culture. After pre-clinical studies, we estimated TOP’s per-patient sensitivity and specificity in a convenience sample of 261 HIV-infected pulmonary TB suspects enrolled into a TB diagnostic study in Mbarara, Uganda against MGIT culture, Xpert MTB/RIF and a composite reference standard. We validated results with a confirmatory PCR used for sequencing M. tuberculosis. Measurements and Results Using culture as reference, TOP had 100% sensitivity but 35% specificity. Against a composite reference standard, the sensitivity of culture (27%) and Xpert MTB/RIF (27%) was lower than TOP (99%), with similar specificity (100%, 98% and 87%, respectively). In unadjusted analyses, culture-negative/TOP-positive patients were more likely to be older (P<0·001), female (P<0·001), have salivary sputum (P = 0·05), sputum smear-negative (P<0.001) and less advanced disease on chest radiograph (P = 0.05). M. tuberculosis genotypes identified in sputum by DNA sequencing exhibit differential growth in culture. Conclusions These findings suggest that the TOP TB assay is accurately detecting M. tuberculosis DNA in the sputum of culture-negative tuberculosis suspects. Our results require prospective validation with clinical outcomes. If the operating characteristics of the TOP assay are confirmed in future studies, it will be justified as a “TB rule out” test. PMID:27391604

  15. Development and antimicrobial susceptibility studies of in vitro monomicrobial and polymicrobial biofilm models with Aspergillus fumigatus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mixed microbial infections of the respiratory tracts with P. aeruginosa and A. fumigatus capable of producing biofilms are commonly found in cystic fibrosis patients. The primary objective of this study was to develop an in vitro model for P. aeruginosa and A. fumigatus polymicrobial biofilm to study the efficacy of various antimicrobial drugs alone and in combinations against biofilm-embedded cells. Simultaneous static cocultures of P. aeruginosa and sporelings were used for the development of in vitro P. aeruginosa-A. fumigatus polymicrobial biofilm in SD broth in 24-well cell culture plates at 35°C, and the biofilm formation was monitored microscopically and spectrophotometrically. Using P. aeruginosa-A. fumigatus sporelings cocultures we examined the effects of various antimicrobial drugs alone and in combination against polymicrobial biofilm by CFU and tetrazolium reduction assays. Results In simultaneous static cocultures P. aeruginosa cells killed A. fumigatus conidia, whereas the bacterial cells showed no substantial fungicidal effect on sporelings grown for 12 h or longer at 35°C. Monospecies cultures of P. aeruginosa produced loosely adhered monomicrobial biofilm and addition of 10% bovine serum to the growth medium inhibited the formation of monomicrobial biofilm by P. aeruginosa whereas it produced tightly adhered polymicrobial biofilm in the presence of A. fumigatus mycelial growth. A. fumigatus produced firmly adherent monomicrobial and polymicrobial biofilms. A comparison of CFU and MTT assays showed that the latter is unsuitable for studying the effectiveness of antimicrobial treatment against polymicrobial biofilm. Tobramycin alone and in combination with posaconazole was highly effective against monomicrobial and polymicrobial biofilms of P. aeruginosa whereas cefepime alone and in combination with posaconazole showed excellent activity against monomicrobial biofilm of P. aeruginosa but was less effective against polymicrobial

  16. Polymicrobial Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Fighting In Vitro Candida albicans-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms with Antifungal-Antibacterial Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Maria E; Lopes, Susana P; Pereira, Cláudia R; Azevedo, Nuno F; Lourenço, Anália; Henriques, Mariana; Pereira, Maria O

    2017-01-01

    The polymicrobial nature of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is now evident, with mixed bacterial-fungal biofilms colonizing the VAP endotracheal tube (ETT) surface. The microbial interplay within this infection may contribute for enhanced pathogenesis and exert impact towards antimicrobial therapy. Consequently, the high mortality/morbidity rates associated to VAP and the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance has promoted the search for novel therapeutic strategies to fight VAP polymicrobial infections. Under this scope, this work aimed to assess the activity of mono- vs combinational antimicrobial therapy using one antibiotic (Polymyxin B; PolyB) and one antifungal (Amphotericin B; AmB) agent against polymicrobial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. The action of isolated antimicrobials was firstly evaluated in single- and polymicrobial cultures, with AmB being more effective against C. albicans and PolyB against P. aeruginosa. Mixed planktonic cultures required equal or higher antimicrobial concentrations. In biofilms, only PolyB at relatively high concentrations could reduce P. aeruginosa in both monospecies and polymicrobial populations, with C. albicans displaying only punctual disturbances. PolyB and AmB exhibited a synergistic effect against P. aeruginosa and C. albicans mixed planktonic cultures, but only high doses (256 mg L-1) of PolyB were able to eradicate polymicrobial biofilms, with P. aeruginosa showing loss of cultivability (but not viability) at 2 h post-treatment, whilst C. albicans only started to be inhibited after 14 h. In conclusion, combination therapy involving an antibiotic and an antifungal agent holds an attractive therapeutic option to treat severe bacterial-fungal polymicrobial infections. Nevertheless, optimization of antimicrobial doses and further clinical pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and toxicodynamics studies underpinning the optimal use of these drugs are urgently required to improve therapy

  17. Polymicrobial Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Fighting In Vitro Candida albicans-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms with Antifungal-Antibacterial Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Cláudia R.; Azevedo, Nuno F.; Lourenço, Anália; Henriques, Mariana; Pereira, Maria O.

    2017-01-01

    The polymicrobial nature of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is now evident, with mixed bacterial-fungal biofilms colonizing the VAP endotracheal tube (ETT) surface. The microbial interplay within this infection may contribute for enhanced pathogenesis and exert impact towards antimicrobial therapy. Consequently, the high mortality/morbidity rates associated to VAP and the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance has promoted the search for novel therapeutic strategies to fight VAP polymicrobial infections. Under this scope, this work aimed to assess the activity of mono- vs combinational antimicrobial therapy using one antibiotic (Polymyxin B; PolyB) and one antifungal (Amphotericin B; AmB) agent against polymicrobial biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. The action of isolated antimicrobials was firstly evaluated in single- and polymicrobial cultures, with AmB being more effective against C. albicans and PolyB against P. aeruginosa. Mixed planktonic cultures required equal or higher antimicrobial concentrations. In biofilms, only PolyB at relatively high concentrations could reduce P. aeruginosa in both monospecies and polymicrobial populations, with C. albicans displaying only punctual disturbances. PolyB and AmB exhibited a synergistic effect against P. aeruginosa and C. albicans mixed planktonic cultures, but only high doses (256 mg L-1) of PolyB were able to eradicate polymicrobial biofilms, with P. aeruginosa showing loss of cultivability (but not viability) at 2 h post-treatment, whilst C. albicans only started to be inhibited after 14 h. In conclusion, combination therapy involving an antibiotic and an antifungal agent holds an attractive therapeutic option to treat severe bacterial-fungal polymicrobial infections. Nevertheless, optimization of antimicrobial doses and further clinical pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and toxicodynamics studies underpinning the optimal use of these drugs are urgently required to improve therapy

  18. Synergy in Polymicrobial Infections in a Mouse Model of Type 2 Diabetes†

    PubMed Central

    Mastropaolo, Matthew D.; Evans, Nicholas P.; Byrnes, Meghan K.; Stevens, Ann M.; Robertson, John L.; Melville, Stephen B.

    2005-01-01

    Human diabetics frequently suffer delayed wound healing, increased susceptibility to localized and systemic infections, and limb amputations as a consequence of the disease. Lower-limb infections in diabetic patients are most often polymicrobial, involving mixtures of aerobic, facultative anaerobic, and anaerobic bacteria. The purpose of this study is to determine if these organisms contribute to synergy in polymicrobial infections by using diabetic mice as an in vivo model. The model was the obese diabetic mouse strain BKS.Cg-m +/+ Leprdb/J, a model of human type 2 diabetes. Young (5- to 6-week-old) prediabetic mice and aged (23- to 24-week-old) diabetic mice were compared. The mice were injected subcutaneously with mixed cultures containing Escherichia coli, Bacteroides fragilis, and Clostridium perfringens. Progression of the infection (usually abscess formation) was monitored by examining mice for bacterial populations and numbers of white blood cells at 1, 8, and 22 days postinfection. Synergy in the mixed infections was defined as a statistically significant increase in the number of bacteria at the site of injection when coinfected with a second bacterium, compared to when the bacterium was inoculated alone. E. coli provided strong synergy to B. fragilis but not to C. perfringens. C. perfringens and B. fragilis provided moderate synergy to each other but only in young mice. B. fragilis was anergistic (antagonistic) to E. coli in coinfections in young mice at 22 days postinfection. When age-matched nondiabetic mice (C57BLKS/J) were used as controls, the diabetic mice exhibited 5 to 35 times the number of CFU as did the nondiabetic mice, indicating that diabetes was a significant factor in the severity of the polymicrobial infections. PMID:16113326

  19. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Bacterial Strains Isolated from a Polymicrobial Culture of Naked (N-Type) Emiliania huxleyi CCMP1516

    PubMed Central

    Orata, Fabini D.; Rosana, Albert Remus R.; Xu, Yue; Simkus, Danielle N.; Bramucci, Anna R.; Boucher, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Strains of Sulfitobacter spp., Erythrobacter sp., and Marinobacter sp. were isolated from a polymicrobial culture of the naked (N-type) haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi strain CCMP1516. The genomes encode genes for the production of phytohormones, vitamins, and the consumption of their hosts’ metabolic by-products, suggesting symbiotic interactions within this polymicrobial culture. PMID:27417846

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Seven Bacterial Strains Isolated from a Polymicrobial Culture of Coccolith-Bearing (C-Type) Emiliania huxleyi M217

    PubMed Central

    Rosana, Albert Remus R.; Orata, Fabini D.; Xu, Yue; Simkus, Danielle N.; Bramucci, Anna R.; Boucher, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Strains of Rhodobacteraceae, Sphingomonadales, Alteromonadales, and Bacteroidetes were isolated from a polymicrobial culture of the coccolith-forming (C-type) haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi strain M217. The genomes encode genes for the production of algal growth factors and the consumption of their hosts’ metabolic by-products, suggesting that the polymicrobial culture harbors many symbiotic interactions. PMID:27417845

  1. Polymicrobial Pituitary Abscess Predominately Involving Escherichia coli in the Setting of an Apoplectic Pituitary Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Norman; Medina-Garcia, Luis; Al Mohajer, Mayar; Zangeneh, Tirdad T.

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare intracranial infection that can be life-threatening if not appropriately diagnosed and treated upon presentation. The most common presenting symptoms include headache, anterior pituitary hypofunction, and visual field disturbances. Brain imaging with either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging usually reveals intra- or suprasellar lesion(s). Diagnosis is typically confirmed intra- or postoperatively when pathological analysis is done. Clinicians should immediately start empiric antibiotics and request a neurosurgical consult when pituitary abscess is suspected. Escherichia coli (E. coli) causing intracranial infections are not well understood and are uncommon in adults. We present an interesting case of an immunocompetent male with a history of hypogonadism presenting with worsening headache and acute right eye vision loss. He was found to have a polymicrobial pituitary abscess predominantly involving E.   coli in addition to Actinomyces odontolyticus and Prevotella melaninogenica in the setting of an apoplectic pituitary prolactinoma. The definitive etiology of this infection was not determined but an odontogenic process was suspected. A chronic third molar eruption and impaction in close proximity to the pituitary gland likely led to contiguous spread of opportunistic oral microorganisms allowing for a polymicrobial pituitary abscess formation. PMID:27006841

  2. Cyanide Toxicity to Burkholderia cenocepacia Is Modulated by Polymicrobial Communities and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bernier, Steve P.; Workentine, Matthew L.; Li, Xiang; Magarvey, Nathan A.; O'Toole, George A.; Surette, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Microbes within polymicrobial communities can establish positive and negative interactions that have the potential to influence the overall behavior of the community. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) can co-exist in the lower airways, however several studies have shown that P. aeruginosa can effectively kill the Bcc in vitro, for which hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was recently proposed to play a critical role. Here we show that modification of the environment (i.e., culture medium), long-term genetic adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, or the addition of another bacterial species to the community can alter the sensitivity of Burkholderia cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins. We specifically demonstrate that undefined rich media leads to higher susceptibility of B. cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins like cyanide as compared to a synthetic medium (SCFM), that mimics the CF lung nutritional content. Overall, our study shows that the polymicrobial environment can have profound effects on negative interactions mediated by P. aeruginosa against B. cenocepacia. In fact, evolved P. aeruginosa or the presence of other species such as Staphylococcus aureus can directly abolish the direct competition mediated by cyanide and consequently maintaining a higher level of species diversity within the community. PMID:27242743

  3. Combining ANOVA-PCA with POCHEMON to analyse micro-organism development in a polymicrobial environment.

    PubMed

    Geurts, Brigitte P; Neerincx, Anne H; Bertrand, Samuel; Leemans, Manja A A P; Postma, Geert J; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Cristescu, Simona M; Buydens, Lutgarde M C; Jansen, Jeroen J

    2017-04-22

    Revealing the biochemistry associated to micro-organismal interspecies interactions is highly relevant for many purposes. Each pathogen has a characteristic metabolic fingerprint that allows identification based on their unique multivariate biochemistry. When pathogen species come into mutual contact, their co-culture will display a chemistry that may be attributed both to mixing of the characteristic chemistries of the mono-cultures and to competition between the pathogens. Therefore, investigating pathogen development in a polymicrobial environment requires dedicated chemometric methods to untangle and focus upon these sources of variation. The multivariate data analysis method Projected Orthogonalised Chemical Encounter Monitoring (POCHEMON) is dedicated to highlight metabolites characteristic for the interaction of two micro-organisms in co-culture. However, this approach is currently limited to a single time-point, while development of polymicrobial interactions may be highly dynamic. A well-known multivariate implementation of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) uses Principal Component Analysis (ANOVA-PCA). This allows the overall dynamics to be separated from the pathogen-specific chemistry to analyse the contributions of both aspects separately. For this reason, we propose to integrate ANOVA-PCA with the POCHEMON approach to disentangle the pathogen dynamics and the specific biochemistry in interspecies interactions. Two complementary case studies show great potential for both liquid and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry to reveal novel information on chemistry specific to interspecies interaction during pathogen development.

  4. Success rates of first-line antibiotics for culture-negative sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chuckpaiwong, Bavornrit; Phoompoung, Saravut

    2014-09-01

    A combination of surgical and medical treatment is normally required for patients with septic arthritis. Antibiotics selected for use on these patients are normally based on tissue culture results. However, in sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis cases, the results of the culture are usually negative as a result of prior treatment. The present study will investigate the incidence of culture-negative septic arthritis and the outcomes based on the use of first-line drug antibiotics for the treatment of sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis. For the present study, the authors retrospectively reviewed medical records of surgically treated septic arthritis cases over the past 10 years at Siriraj Hospital. The patient culture results, the antibiotics used, and the results of treatment were all recorded and analyzed. One hundredfifty-three septic arthritis patients were reviewed. Sixty-two patients were classified as having been diagnosed with either sub-acute or chronic septic arthritis. Thirty-six of 62 patients (58.1%) had a negative culture result. In the culture-positive patients, 42.3% had Streptococcus, 26.9% had Staphylococcus aureus, 11.5% had other gram positive bacteria, 15.4% had gram-negative bacteria, and 3.8% had tuberculus infection. In the culture-negative sub-acute and chronic group (36 of 62), 23 patients received Cefazolin, nine patients received Cloxacillin, and four patients received Clindamycin. Successful results were 69.9%, 66.7% and 75%, respectively. The present study reflects that the incidence ofculture-negative, sub-acute and chronic septic arthritis is approximately 58.1%. The first-line class of antibiotics remains the appropriate antibiotic choice for these patients because they are still effective for treatment of septic arthritis in up to 70% of all cases.

  5. Polymicrobial biofilm formation by Candida albicans, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Streptococcus mutans is Candida albicans strain and medium dependent.

    PubMed

    Arzmi, Mohd Hafiz; Alnuaimi, Ali D; Dashper, Stuart; Cirillo, Nicola; Reynolds, Eric C; McCullough, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Oral biofilms comprise of extracellular polysaccharides and polymicrobial microorganisms. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of polymicrobial interactions of Candida albicans, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Streptococcus mutans on biofilm formation with the hypotheses that biofilm biomass and metabolic activity are both C. albicans strain and growth medium dependent. To study monospecific biofilms, C. albicans, A. naeslundii, and S. mutans were inoculated into artificial saliva medium (ASM) and RPMI-1640 in separate vials, whereas to study polymicrobial biofilm formation, the inoculum containing microorganisms was prepared in the same vial prior inoculation into a 96-well plate followed by 72 hours incubation. Finally, biofilm biomass and metabolic activity were measured using crystal violet and XTT assays, respectively. Our results showed variability of monospecies and polymicrobial biofilm biomass between C. albicans strains and growth medium. Based on cut-offs, out of 32, seven RPMI-grown biofilms had high biofilm biomass (HBB), whereas, in ASM-grown biofilms, 14 out of 32 were HBB. Of the 32 biofilms grown in RPMI-1640, 21 were high metabolic activity (HMA), whereas in ASM, there was no biofilm had HMA. Significant differences were observed between ASM and RPMI-grown biofilms with respect to metabolic activity (P <01). In conclusion, biofilm biomass and metabolic activity were both C. albicans strain and growth medium dependent.

  6. Importance of Toll-like Receptor 2 in Mitochondrial Dysfunction during Polymicrobial Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yu; Zou, Lin; Feng, Yan; Li, Dan; Cai, Jiayan; Chen, Dunjin; Chao, Wei

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) contributes to sepsis pathogenesis such as deleterious systemic inflammation, cardiac dysfunction, and high mortality in animal studies. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a key molecular event that is associated with organ injury in sepsis. The role of TLR2 in sepsis-induced mitochondrial dysfunction remains unclear. METHODS Intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and mitochondrial superoxide (O2−), mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were measured in peritoneal leukocytes. A mouse model of polymicrobial sepsis was generated by cecum ligation and puncture (CLP). Wild-type and TLR2-deficient (TLR2−/−) mice were subjected to sham or CLP. Mitochondrial functions including reactive oxygen species (ROS), ΔΨm, intracellular ATP, and complex III activity were measured. RESULTS TLR2/1 activation by Pam3Cys enhanced intracellular H2O2 and mitochondrial O2- production in leukocytes, but had no effect on mitochondrial ΔΨm and ATP production. The effect was specific for TLR2/1 as TLR3 or TLR9 ligands did not induce ROS production. Polymicrobial sepsis induced mitochondrial dysfunction in leukocytes, as demonstrated by increased H2O2 and mitochondrial O2− production (CLP vs. sham; H2O2: 3,173 ± 498, n = 5 vs. 557 ± 38, n = 4; O2−: 707 ± 66, n = 35 vs. 485 ± 35, n = 17, mean fluorescence intensity, mean ± SEM), attenuated complex III activity (13 ± 2, n = 16 vs. 30 ± 3, n = 7, milli-optical densities per minute, mOD/min), loss of mitochondrial ΔΨm, and depletion of intracellular ATP (33 ± 6, n = 11 vs. 296 ± 29, n = 4, nmol/mg protein). In comparison, there was significant improvement in mitochondrial function in septic TLR2−/− mice as evidenced by attenuated mitochondrial ROS production, better- maintained mitochondrial ΔΨm and higher cellular ATP production. CONCLUSIONS TLR2 signaling plays a critical role in mediating mitochondrial dysfunction in peritoneal

  7. Fish Oil-Based Fat Emulsion Reduces Acute Kidney Injury and Inflammatory Response in Antibiotic-Treated Polymicrobial Septic Mice.

    PubMed

    Shih, Juey-Ming; Shih, Yao-Ming; Pai, Man-Hui; Hou, Yu-Chen; Yeh, Chiu-Li; Yeh, Sung-Ling

    2016-03-15

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication in sepsis. This study compared the effects of a fish oil-based with a mixed oil fat emulsion on remote renal injury in an antibiotic-treated septic murine model. Mice were randomly assigned to a normal control (NC) group and three septic groups. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). The antibiotic was injected intraperitoneally (IP) after CLP and then daily till the time of sacrifice. Three hours after antibiotic treatment, one of the septic groups was injected IP with a fish oil-based emulsion (FO), while the other two groups were given either a mixed oil emulsion (MO) or saline (SC). The septic groups were further divided into two separate time groups, with blood and kidneys samples collected at 24 h or 72 h post-CLP. The results showed that sepsis leads to the activation of neutrophils, T helper (Th)1/Th-2/Th-17 and Treg cells (p < 0.05). Plasma NGAL and mRNA expressions of renal MyD88 and TLR4 were also enhanced (p < 0.05). Compared to the SC group, the group given the fish oil-based emulsion had decreased plasma NGAL by 22% and Treg by 33%. Furthermore, renal gene expressions of MyD88 and TLR4 reduced by 46% and 62%, respectively, whereas heat shock protein 70 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ increased by 158% and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05), at Day 3 after CLP. These results suggest that administration of a fish oil-based emulsion has favorable effects, maintaining blood T cell percentage, downregulating Treg expression, attenuating systemic and local inflammation and offering renal protection under conditions of antibiotic-treated polymicrobial sepsis.

  8. Adrenergic modulation of cytokine release in bone marrow progenitor-derived macrophage following polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Muthu, Kuzhali; Deng, Jiangping; Gamelli, Richard; Shankar, Ravi; Jones, Stephen B

    2005-01-01

    Catecholamines may impact on the pathophysiology of sepsis by attenuating proinflammatory cytokine and augmenting antiinflammatory cytokine production by macrophages. We tested this premise in bone marrow monocyte progenitor-derived macrophages. Polymicrobial sepsis was induced in mice through cecal ligation and puncture. ER-MP 12 monocyte progenitors were isolated and differentiated into macrophages in vitro 72 hr later. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cytokine production was measured with and without epinephrine, IL-10 and anti-IL-10 antibody. Epinephrine significantly increased IL-10 production, but attenuated TNF-alpha release exclusively through beta2 adrenergic receptors, and is independent of IL-10 production. Together, these results suggest that epinephrine can promote a potent antiinflammatory response in sepsis.

  9. Treatment of Polymicrobial Osteomyelitis with Ceftolozane-Tazobactam: Case Report and Sensitivity Testing of Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Jolliff, Jeffrey C.; Joson, Jeremiah; Heidari, Arash; Johnson, Royce

    2016-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an inherently multidrug resistant (MDR) opportunistic pathogen with many mechanisms of resistance. SENTRY studies reveal decreasing sensitivities of S. maltophilia to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and fluoroquinolones. Ceftolozane-tazobactam (Zerbaxa, Merck & Co., Inc.) a novel intravenous combination agent of a third-generation cephalosporin and β-lactamase inhibitor was demonstrated to have in vitro activity against many Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and MDR organisms. Data for ceftolozane-tazobactam's use outside of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved indications has been limited thus far to two case reports which demonstrated its efficacy in pan-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Herein, we describe the first published case of treatment of MDR S. maltophilia in polymicrobial osteomyelitis with long-term (>14 days) ceftolozane-tazobactam and metronidazole. Ceftolozane-tazobactam may offer a possible alternative for clinicians faced with limited options in the treatment of resistant pathogens including MDR S. maltophilia. PMID:27437155

  10. Chemical chaperone TUDCA prevents apoptosis and improves survival during polymicrobial sepsis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Doerflinger, Marcel; Glab, Jason; Nedeva, Christina; Jose, Irvin; Lin, Ann; O’Reilly, Lorraine; Allison, Cody; Pellegrini, Marc; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Puthalakath, Hamsa

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis-induced lymphopenia is a major cause of morbidities in intensive care units and in populations with chronic conditions such as renal failure, diabetes, HIV and alcohol abuse. Currently, other than supportive care and antibiotics, there are no treatments for this condition. We developed an in vitro assay to understand the role of the ER-stress-mediated apoptosis process in lymphocyte death during polymicrobial sepsis, which was reproducible in in vivo mouse models. Modulating ER stress using chemical chaperones significantly reduced the induction of the pro-apoptotic protein Bim both in vitro and in mice. Furthermore, in a ‘two-hit’ pneumonia model in mice, we have been able to demonstrate that administration of the chemical chaperone TUDCA helped to maintain lymphocyte homeostasis by significantly reducing lymphocyte apoptosis and this correlated with four-fold improvement in survival. Our results demonstrate a novel therapeutic opportunity for treating sepsis-induced lymphopenia in humans. PMID:27694827

  11. Microbial Protection and Virulence in Periodontal Tissue as a Function of Polymicrobial Communities: Symbiosis and Dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    This review discusses polymicrobial interactions with the host in both health and disease. As our ability improves to identify specific bacterial clonal types both with respect to abundance and location in the oral biofilm we will learn more concerning their contribution to both oral health and disease. Recent studies examining host-bacterial interactions have revealed that commensal bacteria not only protect the host simply by niche occupation, but that bacterial interactions with host tissue can promote the development of proper tissue structure and function. These data indicate that our host-associated polymicrobial communities, such as those found in the oral cavity, co-evolved with us and have become an integral part of who we are. Understanding the microbial community factors that underpin associations with host tissue that contribute to periodontal health may also reveal how dysbiotic periodontopathic oral communities disrupt normal periodontal tissue functions in disease. A disruption of the oral microbial community creates dysbiosis, either by overgrowth of specific or nonspecific microorganisms or changes in the local host response where the community can now support a disease state. Dysbiosis provides the link between systemic changes (e.g., diabetes), exogenous risk factors (e.g., smoking), and the dysbiotic community and can drive the periodontal tissue destruction. Many other risk factors associated with periodontal disease such as stress, aging, and genetics also likely affect the microbial community, and more research is needed utilizing sophisticated bacterial taxonomic techniques to better elucidate these effects on the microbiome and to develop strategies to target the dysbiotic mechanisms and improve periodontal health. PMID:26252399

  12. Microbial protection and virulence in periodontal tissue as a function of polymicrobial communities: symbiosis and dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Frank A; Darveau, Richard P

    2015-10-01

    This review discusses polymicrobial interactions with the host in both health and disease. As our ability to identify specific bacterial clonal types, with respect to their abundance and location in the oral biofilm, improves, we will learn more concerning their contribution to both oral health and disease. Recent studies examining host- bacteria interactions have revealed that commensal bacteria not only protect the host simply by niche occupation, but that bacterial interactions with host tissue can promote the development of proper tissue structure and function. These data indicate that our host-associated polymicrobial communities, such as those found in the oral cavity, co-evolved with us and have become an integral part of who we are. Understanding the microbial community factors that underpin the associations with host tissue that contribute to periodontal health may also reveal how dysbiotic periodontopathic oral communities disrupt normal periodontal tissue functions in disease. A disruption of the oral microbial community creates dysbiosis, either by overgrowth of specific or nonspecific microorganisms or by changes in the local host response where the community can now support a disease state. Dysbiosis provides the link between systemic changes (e.g. diabetes) and exogenous risk factors (e.g. smoking), and the dysbiotic community, and can drive the destruction of periodontal tissue. Many other risk factors associated with periodontal disease, such as stress, aging and genetics, are also likely to affect the microbial community, and more research is needed, utilizing sophisticated bacterial taxonomic techniques, to elucidate these effects on the microbiome and to develop strategies to target the dysbiotic mechanisms and improve periodontal health.

  13. The Pathogenic Potential of Proteus mirabilis Is Enhanced by Other Uropathogens during Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Armbruster, Chelsie E; Smith, Sara N; Johnson, Alexandra O; DeOrnellas, Valerie; Eaton, Kathryn A; Yep, Alejandra; Mody, Lona; Wu, Weisheng; Mobley, Harry L T

    2017-02-01

    Urinary catheter use is prevalent in health care settings, and polymicrobial colonization by urease-positive organisms, such as Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii, commonly occurs with long-term catheterization. We previously demonstrated that coinfection with P. mirabilis and P. stuartii increased overall urease activity in vitro and disease severity in a model of urinary tract infection (UTI). In this study, we expanded these findings to a murine model of catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI), delineated the contribution of enhanced urease activity to coinfection pathogenesis, and screened for enhanced urease activity with other common CAUTI pathogens. In the UTI model, mice coinfected with the two species exhibited higher urine pH values, urolithiasis, bacteremia, and more pronounced tissue damage and inflammation compared to the findings for mice infected with a single species, despite having a similar bacterial burden within the urinary tract. The presence of P. stuartii, regardless of urease production by this organism, was sufficient to enhance P. mirabilis urease activity and increase disease severity, and enhanced urease activity was the predominant factor driving tissue damage and the dissemination of both organisms to the bloodstream during coinfection. These findings were largely recapitulated in the CAUTI model. Other uropathogens also enhanced P. mirabilis urease activity in vitro, including recent clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa We therefore conclude that the underlying mechanism of enhanced urease activity may represent a widespread target for limiting the detrimental consequences of polymicrobial catheter colonization, particularly by P. mirabilis and other urease-positive bacteria.

  14. Gram-Positive Uropathogens, Polymicrobial Urinary Tract Infection, and the Emerging Microbiota of the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Kimberly A.; Lewis, Amanda L.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-positive bacteria are a common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI), particularly among individuals who are elderly, pregnant, or who have other risk factors for UTI. Here we review the epidemiology, virulence mechanisms, and host response to the most frequently isolated Gram-positive uropathogens: Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Enterococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus agalactiae. We also review several emerging, rare, misclassified, and otherwise underreported Gram-positive pathogens of the urinary tract including Aerococcus, Corynebacterium, Actinobaculum, and Gardnerella. The literature strongly suggests that urologic diseases involving Gram-positive bacteria may be easily overlooked due to limited culture-based assays typically utilized for urine in hospital microbiology laboratories. Some UTIs are polymicrobial in nature, often involving one or more Gram-positive bacteria. We herein review the risk factors and recent evidence for mechanisms of bacterial synergy in experimental models of polymicrobial UTI. Recent experimental data has demonstrated that, despite being cleared quickly from the bladder, some Gram-positive bacteria can impact pathogenic outcomes of co-infecting organisms. When taken together, the available evidence argues that Gram-positive bacteria are important uropathogens in their own right, but that some can be easily overlooked because they are missed by routine diagnostic methods. Finally, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that a surprising variety of fastidious Gram-positive bacteria may either reside in or be regularly exposed to the urinary tract and further suggests that their presence is widespread among women, as well as men. Experimental studies in this area are needed; however, there is a growing appreciation that the composition of bacteria found in the bladder could be a potentially important determinant in urologic disease, including susceptibility to UTI. PMID:27227294

  15. Gonorrhoea Diagnostic and Treatment Uncertainties: Risk Factors for Culture Negative Confirmation after Positive Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests.

    PubMed

    Vyth, Rebecka; Leval, Amy; Eriksson, Björn; Ericson, Eva-Lena; Marions, Lena; Hergens, Maria-Pia

    2016-01-01

    Gonorrhoea incidence has increased substantially in Stockholm during the past years. These increases have coincided with changes in testing practice from solely culture-based to nucleic acid amplification tests (NAAT). Gonorrhoea NAAT is integrated with Chlamydia trachomatis testing and due to opportunistic screening for chlamydia, testing prevalence for gonorrhoea has increased substantially in the Stockholm population. The aim of this study was to examine epidemiological risk-factors for discordant case which are NAAT positive but culture negative. These discordant cases are especially problematic as they give rise to diagnostic and treatment uncertainties with risk for subsequent sequelae. All gonorrhoea cases from Stockholm county during 2011-2012 with at least one positive N. gonorrhoea NAAT test and follow-up cultures were included (N = 874). Data were analysed using multivariate and stratified logistic regression models. Results showed that women were 4-times more likely (OR 4.9; 95% CI 2.4-6.7) than men to have discordant cultures. Individuals tested for gonorrhoea without symptoms were 2.3 times more likely (95% CI 1.5-3.5) than those with symptoms to be discordant. NAAT method and having one week or more between NAAT and culture testing were also indicative of an increased likelihood for discordance. Using NAAT should be based on proper clinical or epidemiological indications and, when positive, followed-up with a culture-based test within one week if possible. Routine gonorrhoea testing is not recommended in low prevalence populations.

  16. Aerococcus christensenii native aortic valve subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) presenting as culture negative endocarditis (CNE) mimicking marantic endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Jose, Anita; Cunha, Burke A; Klein, Natalie C; Schoch, Paul E

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report of an adult who presented with apparent culture negative endocarditis (CNE) thought to be marantic endocarditis due to a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. This was a most perplexing case and was eventually diagnosed as subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) due to a rare slow growing organism. Against the diagnosis of SBE was the lack of fever, hepatomegaly, peripheral manifestations and microscopic hematuria. Also, against a diagnosis of SBE was another explanation for the patient's abnormal findings, e.g., elevated ferritin levels, elevated α1/α2 globulins on SPEP, an elevated alkaline phosphatase, flow cytometry showing B-lymphocytes expressing CD5, and a bone lesion in the right iliac. Findings compatible with both SBE and marantic endocarditis due to a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder included an elevated ESR, and splenomegaly. Blood cultures eventually became positive during hospitalization. We report a case of native aortic valve (AV) subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) due to Aerococcus christensenii mimicking marantic endocarditis due to a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of native AV SBE due to A. christensenii presenting as marantic endocarditis.

  17. Endocarditis Caused by Culture-Negative Organisms Visible by Brown and Brenn Staining: Utility of PCR and DNA Sequencing for Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wilck, Marissa B.; Wu, Yanyun; Howe, John G.; Crouch, Jill Y.; Edberg, Stephen C.

    2001-01-01

    Two cases of culture-negative endocarditis with cocci seen in valve vegetations are presented. The organisms were identified by molecular analysis using broad-range PCR primers complementary to the 16S rRNA gene, sequencing, and database search using BLAST software. The results and utility of this method are discussed. PMID:11326041

  18. Identification of Risk Factors for the Development of Clostridium difficile-Associated Diarrhea Following Treatment of Polymicrobial Surgical Infections

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Rosemarie; Swenson, Brian R.; Bonatti, Hugo; Hedrick, Traci L.; Hranjec, Tjasa; Popovsky, Kimberley A.; Pruett, Timothy L.; Sawyer, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify risk factors for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) in surgical patients following treatment of polymicrobial infections. Summary Background Data Infections among surgical patients are frequently anaerobic or mixed aerobic-anaerobic infections and are therefore subject to polymicrobial antibiotic coverage, including metronidazole. While multiple antibiotics are known to contribute to the development of CDAD, the role of preventive antibiotics is unproven. Methods An 11-year dataset of consecutive infections treated in surgical patients at a single hospital was reviewed. All intra-abdominal, surgical site, or skin/skin structure infections were identified. Each infection was evaluated for antibiotic coverage and subsequent CDAD. Antibiotic usage was assessed using χ2 analysis. A multiple logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of CDAD. Results A total of 4178 intra-abdominal, surgical site, or skin/skin structure infections were identified. Of these infections, 98 were followed by CDAD. Only carbapenem use affected the incidence of CDAD: 3.5% of infections treated with a carbapenem were followed by CDAD, whereas only 2.1% of infections treated without carbapenems were followed by CDAD (P = 0.04). Metronidazole had no association with future CDAD. Only age and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score were independently associated with CDAD by multiple logistic regression analysis. Conclusions Older patients with a high severity of illness are at greatest risk for developing CDAD following treatment of polymicrobial infections. No specific antibiotic class, including fluoroquinolones, is associated with an increased incidence of CDAD in this population. Although use of metronidazole in the treatment of polymicrobial infections is appropriate for anaerobic coverage, it does not reduce the risk of future CDAD. PMID:20101175

  19. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae causes otitis media during single-species infection and during polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Murrah, Kyle A; Pang, Bing; Richardson, Stephen; Perez, Antonia; Reimche, Jennifer; King, Lauren; Wren, John; Swords, W Edward

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae strains lacking capsular polysaccharide have been increasingly reported in carriage and disease contexts. Since most cases of otitis media involve more than one bacterial species, we aimed to determine the capacity of a nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae clinical isolate to induce disease in the context of a single-species infection and as a polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media, we found that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx following intranasal inoculation, but does not readily ascend into the middle ear. However, when we inoculated nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae directly into the middle ear, the bacteria persisted for two weeks post-inoculation and induced symptoms consistent with chronic otitis media. During coinfection with nontypeable H. influenzae, both species persisted for one week and induced polymicrobial otitis media. We also observed that nontypeable H. influenzae conferred passive protection from killing by amoxicillin upon S. pneumoniae from within polymicrobial biofilms in vitro. Therefore, based on these results, we conclude that nonencapsulated pneumococci are a potential causative agent of chronic/recurrent otitis media, and can also cause mutualistic infection with other opportunists, which could complicate treatment outcomes.

  20. Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae causes otitis media during single-species infection and during polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Murrah, Kyle A.; Pang, Bing; Richardson, Stephen; Perez, Antonia; Reimche, Jennifer; King, Lauren; Wren, John; Swords, W. Edward

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae strains lacking capsular polysaccharide have been increasingly reported in carriage and disease contexts. Since most cases of otitis media involve more than one bacterial species, we aimed to determine the capacity of a nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae clinical isolate to induce disease in the context of a single-species infection and as a polymicrobial infection with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae. Using the chinchilla model of otitis media, we found that nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx following intranasal inoculation, but does not readily ascend into the middle ear. However, when we inoculated nonencapsulated S. pneumoniae directly into the middle ear, the bacteria persisted for two weeks post-inoculation and induced symptoms consistent with chronic otitis media. During coinfection with nontypeable H. influenzae, both species persisted for one week and induced polymicrobial otitis media. We also observed that nontypeable H. influenzae conferred passive protection from killing by amoxicillin upon S. pneumoniae from within polymicrobial biofilms in vitro. Therefore, based on these results, we conclude that nonencapsulated pneumococci are a potential causative agent of chronic/recurrent otitis media, and can also cause mutualistic infection with other opportunists, which could complicate treatment outcomes. PMID:26014114

  1. PPAR-γ/IL-10 axis inhibits MyD88 expression and ameliorates murine polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Elisa; Sisti, Flavia; Sônego, Fabiane; Wang, Suojuan; Filgueiras, Luciano Ribeiro; Brandt, Stephanie; Serezani, Ana Paula Moreira; Du, Hong; Cunha, Fernando Q; Alves-Filho, Jose Carlos; Serezani, Carlos Henrique

    2014-03-01

    Polymicrobial sepsis induces organ failure and is accompanied by overwhelming inflammatory response and impairment of microbial killing. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ is a nuclear receptor with pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism, inflammation, and cell proliferation. The insulin-sensitizing drugs thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are specific PPAR-γ agonists. TZDs exert anti-inflammatory actions in different disease models, including polymicrobial sepsis. The TZD pioglitazone, which has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, improves sepsis outcome; however, the molecular programs that mediate its effect have not been determined. In a murine model of sepsis, we now show that pioglitazone treatment improves microbial clearance and enhances neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection. We also observed reduced proinflammatory cytokine production and high IL-10 levels in pioglitazone-treated mice. These effects were associated with a decrease in STAT-1-dependent expression of MyD88 in vivo and in vitro. IL-10R blockage abolished PPAR-γ-mediated inhibition of MyD88 expression. These data demonstrate that the primary mechanism by which pioglitazone protects against polymicrobial sepsis is through the impairment of MyD88 responses. This appears to represent a novel regulatory program. In this regard, pioglitazone provides advantages as a therapeutic tool, because it improves different aspects of host defense during sepsis, ultimately enhancing survival.

  2. Resistance to disinfection of a polymicrobial association contaminating the surface of elastomeric dental impressions.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Giovanni M; Melilli, Dario; Rallo, Antonio; Pecorella, Sonia; Mammina, Caterina; Pizzo, Giuseppe

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability to resist disinfection of a polymicrobial association contaminating the surface of dental impressions obtained with two different elastomers: a polyether (Impregum) and an addition-polymerized silicone (Elite). Impressions were contaminated with a mixture of three biofilm-forming microorganisms (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans) and disinfected immediately after contamination, or after microbial layers were allowed to develop during a six-hour storage. Two commercial disinfectants were tested: MD 520 containing 0.5% glutaraldehyde and Sterigum Powder without glutaraldehyde. Residual contamination was recovered by mechanical rinsing immediately after disinfection and after a six-hour storage of disinfected impressions, and assessed by colony counting. Both disinfectants tested were shown to be effective in reducing the microbial presence on the impression materials, achieving at least a 102 reduction of microbial counts compared to water rinsing. However, Sterigum was generally less effective on the Elite elastomer and could not grant disinfection on six-hour aged P. aeruginosa and C. albicans microbial layers. The results of this study suggest that the materials used for the impressions influence the efficacy of disinfection. Disinfectants should be tested according to conditions encountered in everyday clinical practice and the need for immediate disinfection of impressions should be clearly indicated by manufacturers.

  3. CXCL1 contributes to host defense in polymicrobial sepsis via modulating T cell and neutrophil functions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liliang; Batra, Sanjay; Douda, David Nobuhiro; Palaniyar, Nades; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2014-10-01

    Severe bacterial sepsis leads to a proinflammatory condition that can manifest as septic shock, multiple organ failure, and death. Neutrophils are critical for the rapid elimination of bacteria; however, the role of neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL1 in bacterial clearance during sepsis remains elusive. To test the hypothesis that CXCL1 is critical to host defense during sepsis, we used CXCL1-deficient mice and bone marrow chimeras to demonstrate the importance of this molecule in sepsis. We demonstrate that CXCL1 plays a pivotal role in mediating host defense to polymicrobial sepsis after cecal ligation and puncture in gene-deficient mice. CXCL1 appears to be essential for restricting bacterial outgrowth and death in mice. CXCL1 derived from both hematopoietic and resident cells contributed to bacterial clearance. Moreover, CXCL1 is essential for neutrophil migration, expression of proinflammatory mediators, activation of NF-κB and MAPKs, and upregulation of adhesion molecule ICAM-1. rIL-17 rescued impaired host defenses in cxcl1(-/-) mice. CXCL1 is important for IL-17A production via Th17 differentiation. CXCL1 is essential for NADPH oxidase-mediated reactive oxygen species production and neutrophil extracellular trap formation. This study reveals a novel role for CXCL1 in neutrophil recruitment via modulating T cell function and neutrophil-related bactericidal functions. These studies suggest that modulation of CXCL1 levels in tissues and blood could reduce bacterial burden in sepsis.

  4. PAD4-deficiency does not affect bacteremia in polymicrobial sepsis and ameliorates endotoxemic shock.

    PubMed

    Martinod, Kimberly; Fuchs, Tobias A; Zitomersky, Naamah L; Wong, Siu Ling; Demers, Melanie; Gallant, Maureen; Wang, Yanming; Wagner, Denisa D

    2015-03-19

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), consisting of nuclear DNA with histones and microbicidal proteins, are expelled from activated neutrophils during sepsis. NETs were shown to trap microbes, but they also fuel cardiovascular, thrombotic, and autoimmune disease. The role of NETs in sepsis, particularly the balance between their antimicrobial and cytotoxic actions, remains unclear. Neutrophils from peptidylarginine deiminase 4-(PAD4(-/-)) deficient mice, which lack the enzyme allowing for chromatin decondensation and NET formation, were evaluated. We found that neutrophil functions involved in bacterial killing, other than NETosis, remained intact. Therefore, we hypothesized that prevention of NET formation might not have devastating consequences in sepsis. To test this, we subjected the PAD4(-/-) mice to mild and severe polymicrobial sepsis produced by cecal ligation and puncture. Surprisingly, under septic conditions, PAD4(-/-) mice did not fare worse than wild-type mice and had comparable survival. In the presence of antibiotics, PAD4-deficiency resulted in slightly accelerated mortality but bacteremia was unaffected. PAD4(-/-) mice were partially protected from lipopolysaccharide-induced shock, suggesting that PAD4/NETs may contribute to the toxic inflammatory and procoagulant host response to endotoxin. We propose that preventing NET formation by PAD4 inhibition in inflammatory or thrombotic diseases is not likely to increase host vulnerability to bacterial infections.

  5. Mincle activation enhances neutrophil migration and resistance to polymicrobial septic peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wook-Bin; Yan, Ji-Jing; Kang, Ji-Seon; Zhang, Quanri; Choi, Won Young; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Young-Joon

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to bacterial infection. The therapeutic options for treating sepsis are limited. Impaired neutrophil recruitment into the infection site is directly associated with severe sepsis, but the precise mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that Mincle plays a key role in neutrophil migration and resistance during polymicrobial sepsis. Mincle-deficient mice exhibited lower survival rates in experimental sepsis from cecal ligation and puncture and Escherichia coli–induced peritonitis. Mincle deficiency led to higher serum inflammatory cytokine levels and reduced bacterial clearance and neutrophil recruitment. Transcriptome analyses revealed that trehalose dimycolate, a Mincle ligand, reduced the expression of G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in neutrophils. Indeed, GRK2 expression was upregulated, but surface expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 was downregulated in blood neutrophils from Mincle-deficient mice with septic injury. Moreover, CXCL2-mediated adhesion, chemotactic responses, and F-actin polymerization were reduced in Mincle-deficient neutrophils. Finally, we found that fewer Mincle-deficient neutrophils infiltrated from the blood circulation into the peritoneal fluid in bacterial septic peritonitis compared with wild-type cells. Thus, our results indicate that Mincle plays an important role in neutrophil infiltration and suggest that Mincle signaling may provide a therapeutic target for treating sepsis. PMID:28112221

  6. PAD4-deficiency does not affect bacteremia in polymicrobial sepsis and ameliorates endotoxemic shock

    PubMed Central

    Martinod, Kimberly; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Zitomersky, Naamah L.; Wong, Siu Ling; Demers, Melanie; Gallant, Maureen; Wang, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), consisting of nuclear DNA with histones and microbicidal proteins, are expelled from activated neutrophils during sepsis. NETs were shown to trap microbes, but they also fuel cardiovascular, thrombotic, and autoimmune disease. The role of NETs in sepsis, particularly the balance between their antimicrobial and cytotoxic actions, remains unclear. Neutrophils from peptidylarginine deiminase 4-(PAD4−/−) deficient mice, which lack the enzyme allowing for chromatin decondensation and NET formation, were evaluated. We found that neutrophil functions involved in bacterial killing, other than NETosis, remained intact. Therefore, we hypothesized that prevention of NET formation might not have devastating consequences in sepsis. To test this, we subjected the PAD4−/− mice to mild and severe polymicrobial sepsis produced by cecal ligation and puncture. Surprisingly, under septic conditions, PAD4−/− mice did not fare worse than wild-type mice and had comparable survival. In the presence of antibiotics, PAD4-deficiency resulted in slightly accelerated mortality but bacteremia was unaffected. PAD4−/− mice were partially protected from lipopolysaccharide-induced shock, suggesting that PAD4/NETs may contribute to the toxic inflammatory and procoagulant host response to endotoxin. We propose that preventing NET formation by PAD4 inhibition in inflammatory or thrombotic diseases is not likely to increase host vulnerability to bacterial infections. PMID:25624317

  7. Characterization of the systemic loss of dendritic cells in murine lymph nodes during polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Efron, Philip A; Martins, Antonio; Minnich, Douglas; Tinsley, Kevin; Ungaro, Ricardo; Bahjat, Frances R; Hotchkiss, Richard; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Moldawer, Lyle L

    2004-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in critical illness and are depleted in spleens from septic patients and mice. To date, few studies have characterized the systemic effect of sepsis on DC populations in lymphoid tissues. We analyzed the phenotype of DCs and Th cells present in the local (mesenteric) and distant (inguinal and popliteal) lymph nodes of mice with induced polymicrobial sepsis (cecal ligation and puncture). Flow cytometry and immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that there was a significant local (mesenteric nodes) and partial systemic (inguinal, but not popliteal nodes) loss of DCs from lymph nodes in septic mice, and that this process was associated with increased apoptosis. This sepsis-induced loss of DCs occurred after CD3(+)CD4(+) T cell activation and loss in the lymph nodes, and the loss of DCs was not preceded by any sustained increase in their maturation status. In addition, there was no preferential loss of either mature/activated (MHCII(high)/CD86(high)) or immature (MHCII(low)/CD86(low)) DCs during sepsis. However, there was a preferential loss of CD8(+) DCs in the local and distant lymph nodes. The loss of DCs in lymphoid tissue, particularly CD8(+) lymphoid-derived DCs, may contribute to the alterations in acquired immune status that frequently accompany sepsis.

  8. Aerococcus christensenii as Part of Severe Polymicrobial Chorioamnionitis in a Pregnant Woman.

    PubMed

    Carlstein, Catrine; Marie Søes, Lillian; Jørgen Christensen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is a potentially life threatening infection of the fetal membranes, commonly caused by ascending bacteria from the vagina and cervix. In our case, a healthy nullipara with a term pregnancy presented clinical signs of infection after induced labour with an intracervical balloon. Thick green and foul smelling amniotic fluid was observed and culture showed massive growth of Aerococcus christensenii, a facultative anaerob species found in the human vagina, previously only rarely alleged to cause invasive infection. Additional testing with 16S rRNA gene analysis also identified the presence of Gemella asaccharolytica, Snethia sanguinegens, P arvimonas micra and S treptobacillus moniliformis. The patient was treated with cefuroxime and metronidazole and recovered quickly. The newborn showed no signs of infection. This case points at the possible role of these pathogens in female genital tract infections. The case also underlines the importance of the combination of culture and culture independent diagnostic approaches to reveal possible polymicrobial natures of selected infections, in this case chorioamnionitis.

  9. Aerococcus christensenii as Part of Severe Polymicrobial Chorioamnionitis in a Pregnant Woman

    PubMed Central

    Carlstein, Catrine; Marie Søes, Lillian; Jørgen Christensen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is a potentially life threatening infection of the fetal membranes, commonly caused by ascending bacteria from the vagina and cervix. In our case, a healthy nullipara with a term pregnancy presented clinical signs of infection after induced labour with an intracervical balloon. Thick green and foul smelling amniotic fluid was observed and culture showed massive growth of Aerococcus christensenii, a facultative anaerob species found in the human vagina, previously only rarely alleged to cause invasive infection. Additional testing with 16S rRNA gene analysis also identified the presence of Gemella asaccharolytica, Snethia sanguinegens, Parvimonas micra and Streptobacillus moniliformis. The patient was treated with cefuroxime and metronidazole and recovered quickly. The newborn showed no signs of infection. This case points at the possible role of these pathogens in female genital tract infections. The case also underlines the importance of the combination of culture and culture independent diagnostic approaches to reveal possible polymicrobial natures of selected infections, in this case chorioamnionitis. PMID:27014376

  10. Host-to-host variation of ecological interactions in polymicrobial infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sayak; Weimer, Kristin E.; Seok, Sang-Cheol; Ray, Will C.; Jayaprakash, C.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Swords, W. Edward; Das, Jayajit

    2015-02-01

    Host-to-host variability with respect to interactions between microorganisms and multicellular hosts are commonly observed in infection and in homeostasis. However, the majority of mechanistic models used to analyze host-microorganism relationships, as well as most of the ecological theories proposed to explain coevolution of hosts and microbes, are based on averages across a host population. By assuming that observed variations are random and independent, these models overlook the role of differences between hosts. Here, we analyze mechanisms underlying host-to-host variations of bacterial infection kinetics, using the well characterized experimental infection model of polymicrobial otitis media (OM) in chinchillas, in combination with population dynamic models and a maximum entropy (MaxEnt) based inference scheme. We find that the nature of the interactions between bacterial species critically regulates host-to-host variations in these interactions. Surprisingly, seemingly unrelated phenomena, such as the efficiency of individual bacterial species in utilizing nutrients for growth, and the microbe-specific host immune response, can become interdependent in a host population. The latter finding suggests a potential mechanism that could lead to selection of specific strains of bacterial species during the coevolution of the host immune response and the bacterial species.

  11. Tolerability and efficacy of long-term treatment with daptomycin, ceftazidime and colistin in a patient with a polymicrobial, multidrug-resistant prosthetic joint reinfection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic joint infections are severe complications of joint implants. Further complications arise when polymicrobial and/or multidrug-resistant microorganisms are involved. Currently, there are limited data on the management of these infections and on the tolerability of long-term treatment with daptomycin, ceftazidime and colistin. Case presentation A 55-year-old Caucasian woman who had a right hip prosthesis removed 1 year prior because of infection was admitted for prosthesis reimplantation. On admission at our hospital, anamnesis regarding etiology and management of prosthesis infection was not available. On clinical, laboratory findings and imaging studies infection was not suspected. A hip prosthesis was reimplanted. At surgery, histopathological and microbiological investigations were not taken. Three weeks after reimplantation, surgical site infection due to Enterobacter cloacae was diagnosed and oral ciprofloxacin was prescribed. Four days later, a periprosthesis fluid collection was evidenced and a percutaneous needle aspirate grew Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. haemolyticus. Enterobacter genome was also detected from the same sample. Teicoplanin and meropenem were added to ciprofloxacin without clinical improvement. Moreover, acetabular cup dislocation was documented. She underwent prosthesis explantation, debridement, and positioning of an antimicrobial mixed spacer. From the intraoperatory cultures S. epidermidis and Acinetobacter baumannii were grown. Daptomycin, ceftazidime, colistin and rifampin were administered. Four days later, rifampin was stopped due to a suspected liver toxicity. While undergoing therapy she presented recurrent episodes of wound dehiscence and on the 22nd week of treatment a further surgical debridement was performed, upon which the spacer was removed. At this time, intraoperative cultures resulted negative. Three months later, after a total of 8 months, antimicrobials were interrupted. Subsequently, a

  12. Bioluminescence based biosensors for quantitative detection of enterococcal peptide–pheromone activity reveal inter-strain telesensing in vivo during polymicrobial systemic infection

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Sabina Leanti; Solheim, Margrete; Diep, Dzung B.; Nes, Ingolf F.; Brede, Dag Anders

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a significant threat in the nosocomial setting due to the emergence of isolates that are multi-antibiotic resistant, refractory to the available therapies and equipped with a variety of pathogenicity determinants. This bacterium uses quorum-sensing systems to regulate its physiological processes, including the expression of virulence traits, to adapt and proliferate within a host. Here, we describe the construction and application of two bioluminescence-based reporter systems for the direct detection of the quorum-sensing regulated expression of (i) the gelatinase biosynthesis-activating pheromone (GBAP) and (ii) the cytolysin small subunit (CylLS) in natural samples. The two E. faecalis reporters conditionally expressed bioluminescence in the presence of GBAP and CylLS both in the supernatants of liquid cultures and in an agar-overlay assay in as little as three hours, with a high level of sensitivity. Biosensors employed to investigate the interaction between the fsr and cyl systems revealed that fsr impeded CylLS activity by 75%. Furthermore, we identified a clinical E. faecalis isolate that acted as a biological cheater, producing cytolysin only upon sensing CylLS-producers in its environment. This isolate enhanced its virulence during polymicrobial systemic infection of Galleria mellonella. PMID:25661457

  13. High-Level Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Associated with a Polymicrobial Biofilm▿

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Linda M.; Donlan, Rodney M.; Shin, Dong Hyeon; Jensen, Bette; Clark, Nancye C.; McDougal, Linda K.; Zhu, Wenming; Musser, Kimberlee A.; Thompson, Jill; Kohlerschmidt, Donna; Dumas, Nellie; Limberger, Ronald J.; Patel, Jean B.

    2007-01-01

    Glycopeptides such as vancomycin are the treatment of choice for infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This study describes the identification of high-level vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) isolates in a polymicrobial biofilm within an indwelling nephrostomy tube in a patient in New York. S. aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Micrococcus species, Morganella morganii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from the biofilm. For VRSA isolates, vancomycin MICs ranged from 32 to >128 μg/ml. VRSA isolates were also resistant to aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, penicillin, and tetracycline but remained susceptible to chloramphenicol, linezolid, rifampin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The vanA gene was localized to a plasmid of ∼100 kb in VRSA and E. faecium isolates from the biofilm. Plasmid analysis revealed that the VRSA isolate acquired the 100-kb E. faecium plasmid, which was then maintained without integration into the MRSA plasmid. The tetracycline resistance genes tet(U) and tet(S), not previously detected in S. aureus isolates, were identified in the VRSA isolates. Additional resistance elements in the VRSA isolate included a multiresistance gene cluster, ermB-aadE-sat4-aphA-3, msrA (macrolide efflux), and the bifunctional aminoglycoside resistance gene aac(6′)-aph(2")-Ia. Multiple combinations of resistance genes among the various isolates of staphylococci and enterococci, including vanA, tet(S), and tet(U), illustrate the dynamic nature of gene acquisition and loss within and between bacterial species throughout the course of infection. The potential for interspecies transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes, including resistance to vancomycin, may be enhanced by the microenvironment of a biofilm. PMID:17074796

  14. Diversity in a Polymicrobial Community Revealed by Analysis of Viromes, Endolysins and CRISPR Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Treangen, Todd J.; Koren, Sergey; Pop, Mihai; Bhaya, Devaki

    2016-01-01

    The polymicrobial biofilm communities in Mushroom and Octopus Spring in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) are well characterized, yet little is known about the phage populations. Dominant species, Synechococcus sp. JA-2-3B'a(2–13), Synechococcus sp. JA-3-3Ab, Chloroflexus sp. Y-400-fl, and Roseiflexus sp. RS-1, contain multiple CRISPR-Cas arrays, suggesting complex interactions with phage predators. To analyze phage populations from Octopus Spring biofilms, we sequenced a viral enriched fraction. To assemble and analyze phage metagenomic data, we developed a custom module, VIRITAS, implemented within the MetAMOS framework. This module bins contigs into groups based on tetranucleotide frequencies and CRISPR spacer-protospacer matching and ORF calling. Using this pipeline we were able to assemble phage sequences into contigs and bin them into three clusters that corroborated with their potential host range. The virome contained 52,348 predicted ORFs; some were clearly phage-like; 9319 ORFs had a recognizable Pfam domain while the rest were hypothetical. Of the recognized domains with CRISPR spacer matches, was the phage endolysin used by lytic phage to disrupt cells. Analysis of the endolysins present in the thermophilic cyanophage contigs revealed a subset of characterized endolysins as well as a Glyco_hydro_108 (PF05838) domain not previously associated with sequenced cyanophages. A search for CRISPR spacer matches to all identified phage endolysins demonstrated that a majority of endolysin domains were targets. This strategy provides a general way to link host and phage as endolysins are known to be widely distributed in bacteriophage. Endolysins can also provide information about host cell wall composition and have the additional potential to be used as targets for novel therapeutics. PMID:27611571

  15. Zinc deficiency increases organ damage and mortality in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Knoell, Daren L.; Julian, Mark W.; Bao, Shengying; Besecker, Beth; Macre, Jennifer E.; Leikauf, George D.; DiSilvestro, Robert A.; Crouser, Elliott D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Zinc deficiency is common among populations at high risk for sepsis mortality, including elderly, alcoholic, and hospitalized patients. Zinc deficiency causes exaggerated inflammatory responses to endotoxin but has not been evaluated during bacterial sepsis. We hypothesized that subacute zinc deficiency would amplify immune responses and oxidant stress during bacterial sepsis [i.e., cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)] resulting in increased mortality and that acute nutritional repletion of zinc would be beneficial. Design Prospective, randomized, controlled animal study. Setting University medical center research laboratory. Subjects Adult male C57BL/6 mice. Interventions Ten-week-old, male, C57BL/6 mice were randomized into three dietary groups: 1) control diet, 2) zinc-deficient diet for 3 weeks, and 3) zinc-deficient diet for 3 weeks followed by oral zinc supplementation for 3 days (n = 35 per diet). Mice were then assigned to receive either CLP or sham operation (n = 15 each per diet). CLP and sham-operated treatment groups were further assigned to a 7-day survival study (n = 10 per treatment per diet) or were evaluated at 24 hours (n = 5 per treatment per diet) for signs of vital organ damage. Measurements and Main Results Sepsis mortality was significantly increased with zinc deficiency (90% vs. 30% on control diet). Zinc-deficient animals subject to CLP had higher plasma cytokines, more severe organ injury, including increased oxidative tissue damage and cell death, particularly in the lungs and spleen. None of the sham-operated animals died or developed signs of organ damage. Zinc supplementation normalized the inflammatory response, greatly diminished tissue damage, and significantly reduced mortality. Conclusions Subacute zinc deficiency significantly increases systemic inflammation, organ damage, and mortality in a murine polymicrobial sepsis model. Short-term zinc repletion provides significant, but incomplete protection despite normalization

  16. Zinc dyshomeostasis during polymicrobial sepsis in mice involves zinc transporter Zip14 and can be overcome by zinc supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Integrity of the immune system is particularly dependent on the availability of zinc. Recent data suggest that zinc is involved in the development of sepsis, a life-threatening systemic inflammation with high death rates, but with limited therapeutic options. Altered cell zinc transport mechanisms could contribute to the inflammatory effects of sepsis. Zip14, a zinc importer induced by proinflammatory stimuli, could influence zinc metabolism during sepsis and serve as a target for therapy. Using cecal ligation-and-puncture (CLP) to model polymicrobial sepsis, we narrowed the function of ZIP14 to regulation of zinc homeostasis in hepatocytes, while hepatic leukocytes were mostly responsible for driving inflammation, as shown by higher expression of IL-1β, TNFα, S100A8, and matrix metalloproteinase-8. Using Zip14 knockout (KO) mice as a novel approach, we found that ablation of Zip14 produced a delay in development of leukocytosis, prevented zinc accumulation in the liver, altered the kinetics of hypozincemia, and drastically increased serum IL-6, TNFα, and IL-10 concentrations following CLP. Hence, this model revealed that the zinc transporter ZIP14 is a component of the pathway for zinc redistribution that contributes to zinc dyshomeostasis during polymicrobial sepsis. In contrast, using the identical CLP model, we found that supplemental dietary zinc reduced the severity of sepsis, as shown by amelioration of cytokines, calprotectins, and blood bacterial loads. We conclude that the zinc transporter ZIP14 influences aspects of the pathophysiology of nonlethal polymicrobial murine sepsis induced by CLP through zinc delivery. The results are promising for the use of zinc and its transporters as targets for future sepsis therapy. PMID:26272258

  17. Could Externalized St. Jude Medical Riata® Lead Be a Culture Medium of a Polymicrobial Endocarditis? A Clinical Case

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Roberta; Mandurino, Cosimo; Pinto, Mariangela; Luzzi, Giovanni; Favale, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a man affected by polymicrobial endocarditis developed on a St. Jude Medical Riata lead with a malfunction because of the outsourcing of conductors. The patient was treated with antibiotic targeted therapy and showed different bacteria at the blood cultures and then underwent transvenous leads extraction. Vegetations were highlighted on the caval, atrial, and ventricular tracts of the Riata lead, but the cultures were all negative. The externalization of Riata lead may cause the malfunction but it could also promote bacterial colonies and vegetations. In conclusion, looking for early signs of infection is mandatory during Riata leads follow-up checks. PMID:28191354

  18. Therapeutic benefits of the group B3 vitamin nicotinamide in mice with lethal endotoxemia and polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongmei; Wan, Jingyuan; Li, Longjiang; Ge, Pu; Li, Hongzhong; Zhang, Li

    2012-03-01

    Nicotinamide (NAM) is a group B3 vitamin involved in a wide range of biological processes. Recently, the anti-inflammatory properties of NAM have been revealed. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of NAM in murine models of endotoxemia and sepsis. Endotoxemic liver injury was induced by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into D-galactosamine (D-Gal)-sensitized mice. Lethal endotoxemia was induced by intraperitoneal administration of LPS at a dose of 20 mg/kg. Polymicrobial sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). In mice challenged with LPS/D-Gal, treatment with NAM significantly deceased serum aminotransferases level and alleviated hepatic lesions. NAM also reduced serum tumor necrosis factor-α level and attenuated apoptosis in liver, as assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nucleotide nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining and measurements of caspases activities. Survival analysis indicated that NAM reduced the mortality rate of LPS/D-Gal-challenged mice. In mice with lethal endotoxemia, NAM reduced serum level of pro-inflammatory cytokines and multiple organ damage as evidence by improved morphological lesion, reduced lung wet to dry ratio as well as decreased serum level of aminotransferase and blood urea nitrogen. In survival analysis, treatment with NAM increased the survival rate of mice with lethal endotoxemia or CLP-induced polymicrobial sepsis. Taken together, treatment with NAM might provide therapeutic benefits in sepsis, which attenuated inflammatory injury and improved the survival rate.

  19. Mycobacterium fortuitum and Polymicrobial Peritoneal Dialysis-Related Peritonitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Hamade, Anwar; Pozdzik, Agnieszka; Denis, O; Tooulou, Monika; Keyzer, Caroline; Jacobs, F; Khabbout, Jose; Nortier, Joëlle L

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a ubiquitous, rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM). It is the most commonly reported NTM in peritoneal dialysis (PD) associated peritonitis. We report a case of a 52-year-old man on PD, who developed refractory polymicrobial peritonitis necessitating PD catheter removal and shift to hemodialysis. Thereafter, M. fortuitum was identified in the PD catheter culture and in successive cultures of initial peritoneal effluent and patient was treated with amikacin and ciprofloxacin for six months with a good and sustained clinical response. Months after completion of the course of antibiotics, the patient successfully returned to PD. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of M. fortuitum peritonitis in the field of polymicrobial PD peritonitis. It demonstrates the diagnostic yield of pursuing further investigations in cases of refractory PD peritonitis. In a systematic review of the literature, only 20 reports of M. fortuitum PD peritonitis were identified. Similar to our case, a delay in microbiological diagnosis was frequently noted and the Tenckhoff catheter was commonly removed. However, the type and duration of antibiotic therapy varied widely making the optimal treatment unclear.

  20. Trichinella spiralis excretory-secretory products protect against polymicrobial sepsis by suppressing MyD88 via mannose receptor.

    PubMed

    Du, Linlin; Liu, Lihua; Yu, Yang; Shan, Hui; Li, Leiqing

    2014-01-01

    Trichinella spiralis (T. spiralis) or its excretory-secretory products (TsES) protect hosts from autoimmune diseases, which depend on inducing host T helper (Th) 2 immune response and inhibiting inflammatory factors. Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) evoked by infection. Little is known about the effects of helminths or their excretory-secretory products on sepsis. Here, we investigated the effects of TsES in a mice model of polymicrobial sepsis. TsES improved survival, reduced organ injury, and enhanced bacterial clearance in septic mice. To investigate the molecular mechanism, macrophages from septic patients or the control group were incubated with TsES. TsES reduced sepsis-inducing inflammatory cytokines mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLR) in vitro by suppressing TLR adaptor-transducer myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and nuclear factor- (NF-)-κB. Furthermore, TsES upregulated mannose receptor (MR) expression during sepsis. MR blocking attenuated the effects of TsES on MyD88 and NF-κB expression. In vivo, MR RNAi reduced the survival rate of septic mice treated with TsES, suggesting that TsES-mediated protection against polymicrobial sepsis is dependent on MR. Thus, TsES administration might be a potential therapeutic strategy for treating sepsis.

  1. Incorporation of Real-Time PCR into Routine Public Health Surveillance of Culture Negative Bacterial Meningitis in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, Claudio T.; Fukasawa, Lucila O.; Gonçalves, Maria G.; Salgado, Maristela M.; Shutt, Kathleen A.; Carvalhanas, Telma R.; Ribeiro, Ana F.; Kemp, Brigina; Gorla, Maria C. O.; Albernaz, Ricardo K.; Marques, Eneida G. L.; Cruciano, Angela; Waldman, Eliseu A.; Brandileone, M. Cristina C; Harrison, Lee H.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time (RT)-PCR increases diagnostic yield for bacterial meningitis and is ideal for incorporation into routine surveillance in a developing country. We validated a multiplex RT-PCR assay for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae in Brazil. Risk factors for being culture-negative, RT-PCR positive were determined. The sensitivity of RT-PCR in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was 100% (95% confidence limits, 96.0%–100%) for N. meningitidis, 97.8% (85.5%–99.9%) for S. pneumoniae, and 66.7% (9.4%–99.2%) for H. influenzae. Specificity ranged from 98.9% to 100%. Addition of RT-PCR to routine microbiologic methods increased the yield for detection of S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, and H. influenzae cases by 52%, 85%, and 20%, respectively. The main risk factor for being culture negative and RT-PCR positive was presence of antibiotic in CSF (odds ratio 12.2, 95% CI 5.9-25.0). RT-PCR using CSF was highly sensitive and specific and substantially added to measures of meningitis disease burden when incorporated into routine public health surveillance in Brazil. PMID:21731621

  2. Fatal Case of Polymicrobial Meningitis Caused by Cryptococcus liquefaciens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patient.

    PubMed

    Conde-Pereira, César; Rodas-Rodríguez, Lia; Díaz-Paz, Manuel; Palacios-Rivera, Hilda; Firacative, Carolina; Meyer, Wieland; Alcázar-Castillo, Myriam

    2015-08-01

    We describe a fatal case of polymicrobial meningitis in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient from Guatemala caused by Cryptococcus liquefaciens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Central nervous system infections caused concurrently by these species are extremely rare. This is also the first report of disseminated disease caused by C. liquefaciens.

  3. "Orostim"--polymicrobial preparation for oral administration. I. "In vivo" determination of toxicity and of inborn resistance stimulation characteristic.

    PubMed

    Hoişie, S; Pencea, I; Dimache, G; Lupuşoru, E C; Grigoraş, E; Oiţă, V; Buzdzgan, R; Anton, D A; Ionescu, O N; Uliciuc, S

    1989-01-01

    "Orostim" is a polymicrobial immunomodulator for oral administration, obtained from bacterial suspensions, disintegrated by ultrasonics and dried by atomization. The preparation was chemically characterized before and after atomization without presenting essential modifications. Orostim was not shown to be toxic in mice and rats by esophageal intubation, as long as 20 days. The animals presented normal evolution; hemoleukograms, serum proteins and alkaline phosphatase, in rats, did not present significant modifications in comparison with controls. Histopathologic examination of the organs, obtained from mice, treated for 20 days (liver, spleen, lung) did not emphasize modifications in comparison with controls. Circulating neutrophils phagocytosis in rabbits, orally treated with Orostim, was increased as compared to 0 time; serum complement values decreased compared to the initial ones for 0 time but turned to normal and reached even superior limits, 10 days after the treatment ending.

  4. [A case of culture-negative brain abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius infection diagnosed by broad-range PCR of 16S ribosomal RNA].

    PubMed

    Ohara, Nobuyuki; Asai, Katsunori; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Wakayama, Akatsuki

    2013-10-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with altered mental status during hospitalization for pneumonia. MRI showed multifocal ring-enhanced lesions, which consisted of multiple cerebral abscesses. We started empirical antibiotic therapy, but the following morning, his condition rapidly deteriorated and a CT scan revealed acute hydrocephalus, which required ventricular drainage. Gram staining of cerebro-spinal fluid from the ventricular drainage showed gram-positive cocci in chains, but culture results were negative. 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing with broad-range PCR of the cerebro-spinal fluid identified Streptococcus intermedius. On the basis of this identification, the antibiotic regimen was changed to ampicillin monotherapy. After 1 year of antibiotic therapy, all the abscesses had disappeared and the patient was discharged without any sequelae. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene analysis with broad-range PCR is a very useful method for facilitating the etiological diagnosis and selection of appropriate treatment for culture-negative infections.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide and neurogenic inflammation in polymicrobial sepsis: involvement of substance P and ERK-NF-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Ang, Seah-Fang; Moochhala, Shabbir M; MacAry, Paul A; Bhatia, Madhav

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) has been shown to induce transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-mediated neurogenic inflammation in polymicrobial sepsis. However, endogenous neural factors that modulate this event and the molecular mechanism by which this occurs remain unclear. Therefore, this study tested the hypothesis that whether substance P (SP) is one important neural element that implicates in H(2)S-induced neurogenic inflammation in sepsis in a TRPV1-dependent manner, and if so, whether H(2)S regulates this response through activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase-nuclear factor-κB (ERK-NF-κB) pathway. Male Swiss mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis and treated with TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine 30 minutes before CLP. DL-propargylglycine (PAG), an inhibitor of H(2)S formation, was administrated 1 hour before or 1 hour after sepsis, whereas sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), an H(2)S donor, was given at the same time as CLP. Capsazepine significantly attenuated H(2)S-induced SP production, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules levels, and protected against lung and liver dysfunction in sepsis. In the absence of H(2)S, capsazepine caused no significant changes to the PAG-mediated attenuation of lung and plasma SP levels, sepsis-associated systemic inflammatory response and multiple organ dysfunction. In addition, capsazepine greatly inhibited phosphorylation of ERK(1/2) and inhibitory κBα, concurrent with suppression of NF-κB activation even in the presence of NaHS. Furthermore, capsazepine had no effect on PAG-mediated abrogation of these levels in sepsis. Taken together, the present findings show that H(2)S regulates TRPV1-mediated neurogenic inflammation in polymicrobial sepsis through enhancement of SP production and activation of the ERK-NF-κB pathway.

  6. Polymicrobial subdural empyema: involvement of Streptococcus pneumoniae revealed by lytA PCR and antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Greve, Thomas; Clemmensen, Dorte; Ridderberg, Winnie; Pedersen, Lisbeth N; Møller, Jens K

    2011-03-01

    The authors report a case of a subdural empyema (SDE) caused by a coinfection with Streptococcus intermedius and Streptococcus pneumoniae, initially considered a S. intermedius infection only. An otherwise healthy 11-year-old female was admitted to the hospital after 5 days of illness. Symptoms were consistent with classical SDE symptoms and progressed rapidly with finally somnolence before the first neurosurgical procedure despite relevant antibiotic treatment. Primary MRI showed an interhemispheric SDE and a postoperative control CT scan showed progression of the empyema infratentorially. The empyema was evacuated twice, day 8 and 18, with good results. Primary samples showed growth of S. intermedius only. The severity of the clinical picture elicited supplementary samples, which were additionally positive for S. pneumoniae by an in-house specific lytA PCR and/or a commercial antigen test.

  7. Prevalence of streptococci and increased polymicrobial diversity associated with cystic fibrosis patient stability.

    PubMed

    Filkins, L M; Hampton, T H; Gifford, A H; Gross, M J; Hogan, D A; Sogin, M L; Morrison, H G; Paster, B J; O'Toole, G A

    2012-09-01

    Diverse microbial communities chronically colonize the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. Pyrosequencing of amplicons for hypervariable regions in the 16S rRNA gene generated taxonomic profiles of bacterial communities for sputum genomic DNA samples from 22 patients during a state of clinical stability (outpatients) and 13 patients during acute exacerbation (inpatients). We employed quantitative PCR (qPCR) to confirm the detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus by the pyrosequencing data and human oral microbe identification microarray (HOMIM) analysis to determine the species of the streptococci identified by pyrosequencing. We show that outpatient sputum samples have significantly higher bacterial diversity than inpatients, but maintenance treatment with tobramycin did not impact overall diversity. Contrary to the current dogma in the field that Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the dominant organism in the majority of cystic fibrosis patients, Pseudomonas constituted the predominant genera in only half the patient samples analyzed and reported here. The increased fractional representation of Streptococcus in the outpatient cohort relative to the inpatient cohort was the strongest predictor of clinically stable lung disease. The most prevalent streptococci included species typically associated with the oral cavity (Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus parasanguis) and the Streptococcus milleri group species. These species of Streptococcus may play an important role in increasing the diversity of the cystic fibrosis lung environment and promoting patient stability.

  8. Lysozyme-modified probiotic components protect rats against polymicrobial sepsis: role of macrophages and cathelicidin-related innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Bu, Heng-Fu; Wang, Xiao; Zhu, Ya-Qin; Williams, Roxanne Y; Hsueh, Wei; Zheng, Xiaotian; Rozenfeld, Ranna A; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Tan, Xiao-Di

    2006-12-15

    Severe sepsis is associated with dysfunction of the macrophage/monocyte, an important cellular effector of the innate immune system. Previous investigations suggested that probiotic components effectively enhance effector cell functions of the immune system in vivo. In this study, we produced bacteria-free, lysozyme-modified probiotic components (LzMPC) by treating the probiotic bacteria, Lactobacillus sp., with lysozyme. We showed that oral delivery of LzMPC effectively protected rats against lethality from polymicrobial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture. We found that orally administrated LzMPC was engulfed by cells such as macrophages in the liver after crossing the intestinal barrier. Moreover, LzMPC-induced protection was associated with an increase in bacterial clearance in the liver. In vitro, LzMPC up-regulated the expression of cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) in macrophages and enhanced bactericidal activity of these cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that surgical stress or cecal ligation and puncture caused a decrease in CRAMP expression in the liver, whereas enteral administration of LzMPC restored CRAMP gene expression in these animals. Using a neutralizing Ab, we showed that protection against sepsis by LzMPC treatment required endogenous CRAMP. In addition, macrophages from LzMPC-treated rats had an enhanced capacity of cytokine production in response to LPS or LzMPC stimulation. Together, our data suggest that the protective effect of LzMPC in sepsis is related to an enhanced cathelicidin-related innate immunity in macrophages. Therefore, LzMPC, a novel probiotic product, is a potent immunomodulator for macrophages and may be beneficial for the treatment of sepsis.

  9. Fungal β-1,3-glucan increases ofloxacin tolerance of Escherichia coli in a polymicrobial E. coli/Candida albicans biofilm.

    PubMed

    De Brucker, Katrijn; Tan, Yulong; Vints, Katlijn; De Cremer, Kaat; Braem, Annabel; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan; Vleugels, Jef; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2015-01-01

    In the past, biofilm-related research has focused mainly on axenic biofilms. However, in nature, biofilms are often composed of multiple species, and the resulting polymicrobial interactions influence industrially and clinically relevant outcomes such as performance and drug resistance. In this study, we show that Escherichia coli does not affect Candida albicans tolerance to amphotericin or caspofungin in an E. coli/C. albicans biofilm. In contrast, ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli is significantly increased in a polymicrobial E. coli/C. albicans biofilm compared to its tolerance in an axenic E. coli biofilm. The increased ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli is mainly biofilm specific, as ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli is less pronounced in polymicrobial E. coli/C. albicans planktonic cultures. Moreover, we found that ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli decreased significantly when E. coli/C. albicans biofilms were treated with matrix-degrading enzymes such as the β-1,3-glucan-degrading enzyme lyticase. In line with a role for β-1,3-glucan in mediating ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli in a biofilm, we found that ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli increased even more in E. coli/C. albicans biofilms consisting of a high-β-1,3-glucan-producing C. albicans mutant. In addition, exogenous addition of laminarin, a polysaccharide composed mainly of poly-β-1,3-glucan, to an E. coli biofilm also resulted in increased ofloxacin tolerance. All these data indicate that β-1,3-glucan from C. albicans increases ofloxacin tolerance of E. coli in an E. coli/C. albicans biofilm.

  10. Synergistic Effects of Honey and Propolis toward Drug Multi-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, Escherichia Coli and Candida Albicans Isolates in Single and Polymicrobial Cultures

    PubMed Central

    AL-Waili, Noori; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmad; Ansari, Mohammad Javed; Al-Attal, Y.; Salom, Khelod

    2012-01-01

    Background: Propolis and honey are natural bee products with wide range of biological and medicinal properties. The study investigated antimicrobial activity of ethyl alcohol extraction of propolis collected from Saudi Arabia (EEPS) and from Egypt (EEPE), and their synergistic effect when used with honey. Single and polymicrobial cultures of antibiotic resistant human pathogens were tested. Material and methods; Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus),), Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Candida albicans (C.albicans) were cultured in 10-100% (v/v) honey diluted in broth, or 0.08-1.0% (weight/volume) EEPS and EEPE diluted in broth. Four types of polymicrobial cultures were prepared by culturing the isolates with each other in broth (control) and broth containing various concentrations of honey or propolis. Microbial growth was assessed on solid plate media after 24 h incubation. Results; EEPS and EEPE inhibited antibiotic resistant E.coli, and S.aureus, and C.albicans in single and polymicrobial cultures. S.aureus became more susceptible when it was cultured with E.coli or C.albicans or when all cultured together. C.albicans became more susceptible when it was cultured with S.aureus or with E.coli and S. aureus together. The presence of ethyl alcohol or honey potentiated antimicrobial effect of propolis toward entire microbes tested in single or polymicrobial cultures. EEPS had lower MIC toward E.coli and C.albicans than EEPE. When propolis was mixed with honey, EEPS showed lower MIC than EEPE. In addition, honey showed lower MIC toward entire microbes when mixed with EEPS than when it was mixed with EEPE. Conclusion; 1) propolis prevents the growth of the microorganisms in single and mixed microbial cultures, and has synergistic effect when used with honey or ethyl alcohol, 2) the antimicrobial property of propolis varies with geographical origin, and 3) this study will pave the way to isolate active ingredients from honey and propolis to be further tested individually or

  11. Identification of Dietzia spp. from Cardiac Tissue by 16S rRNA PCR in a Patient with Culture-Negative Device-Associated Endocarditis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guiqing; Nadelman, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Dietzia was recently distinguished from other actinomycetes such as Rhodococcus. While these organisms are known to be distributed widely in the environment, over the past decade several novel species have been described and isolated from human clinical specimens. Here we describe the identification of Dietzia natronolimnaea/D. cercidiphylli by PCR amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA encoding gene from cardiac tissue in a patient with culture-negative device-associated endocarditis. PMID:28101387

  12. Development of a new pentaplex real-time PCR assay for the identification of poly-microbial specimens containing Staphylococcus aureus and other staphylococci, with simultaneous detection of staphylococcal virulence and methicillin resistance markers.

    PubMed

    Okolie, Charles E; Wooldridge, Karl G; Turner, David P; Cockayne, Alan; James, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strains harbouring genes encoding virulence and antibiotic resistance are of public health importance. In clinical samples, pathogenic S. aureus is often mixed with putatively less pathogenic coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), both of which can harbour mecA, the gene encoding staphylococcal methicillin-resistance. There have been previous attempts at distinguishing MRSA from MRCoNS, most of which were based on the detection of one of the pathognomonic markers of S. aureus, such as coa, nuc or spa. That approach might suffice for discrete colonies and mono-microbial samples; it is inadequate for identification of clinical specimens containing mixtures of S. aureus and CoNS. In the present study, a real-time pentaplex PCR assay has been developed which simultaneously detects markers for bacteria (16S rRNA), coagulase-negative staphylococcus (cns), S. aureus (spa), Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) and methicillin resistance (mecA). Staphylococcal and non-staphylococcal bacterial strains (n = 283) were used to validate the new assay. The applicability of this test to clinical samples was evaluated using spiked blood cultures (n = 43) containing S. aureus and CoNS in mono-microbial and poly-microbial models, which showed that the 5 markers were all detected as expected. Cycling completes within 1 h, delivering 100% specificity, NPV and PPV with a detection limit of 1.0 × 10(1) to 3.0 × 10(1) colony forming units (CFU)/ml, suggesting direct applicability in routine diagnostic microbiology. This is the most multiplexed real-time PCR-based PVL-MRSA assay and the first detection of a unique marker for CoNS without recourse to the conventional elimination approach. There was no evidence that this new assay produced invalid/indeterminate test results.

  13. Double blockade of CD14 and complement C5 abolishes the cytokine storm and improves morbidity and survival in polymicrobial sepsis in mice.

    PubMed

    Huber-Lang, Markus; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Pischke, Søren E; Sandanger, Øystein; Nilsson, Per H; Nunn, Miles A; Denk, Stephanie; Gaus, Wilhelm; Espevik, Terje; Mollnes, Tom E

    2014-06-01

    Sepsis and septic shock, caused by an excessive systemic host-inflammatory response, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The complement system and TLRs provide important pattern recognition receptors initiating the cytokine storm by extensive cross-talk. We hypothesized that double blockade of complement C5 and the TLR coreceptor CD14 could improve survival of experimental polymicrobial sepsis. Mice undergoing cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis were treated with neutralizing anti-CD14 Ab biG 53, complement C5 inhibitor coversin (Ornithodoros moubata C inhibitor), or a combination thereof. The inflammatory study (24-h observation) revealed statistically significant increases in 22 of 24 measured plasma biomarkers in the untreated CLP group, comprising 14 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and 8 chemokines, growth factors, and granulocyte activation markers. Single CD14 or C5 blockade significantly inhibited 20 and 19 of the 22 biomarkers, respectively. Combined CD14 and C5 inhibition significantly reduced all 22 biomarkers (mean reduction 85%; range 54-95%) compared with the untreated CLP group. Double blockade was more potent than single treatment and was required to significantly inhibit IL-6 and CXCL1. Combined inhibition significantly reduced morbidity (motility and eyelid movement) and mortality measured over 10 d. In the positive control CLP group, median survival was 36 h (range 24-48 h). Combined treatment increased median survival to 96 h (range 24-240 h) (p = 0.001), whereas survival in the single-treatment groups was not significantly increased (median and range for anti-CD14 and anti-C5 treatment were 36 h [24-48 h] and 48 h [24-96 h]). Combined with standard intervention therapy, specific blockade of CD14 and C5 might represent a promising new therapeutic strategy for treatment of polymicrobial sepsis.

  14. Double Blockade of CD14 and Complement C5 Abolishes the Cytokine Storm and Improves Morbidity and Survival in Polymicrobial Sepsis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huber-Lang, Markus; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Pischke, Søren E.; Sandanger, Øystein; Nilsson, Per H.; Nunn, Miles A.; Denk, Stephanie; Gaus, Wilhelm; Espevik, Terje

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock, caused by an excessive systemic host-inflammatory response, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The complement system and TLRs provide important pattern recognition receptors initiating the cytokine storm by extensive cross-talk. We hypothesized that double blockade of complement C5 and the TLR coreceptor CD14 could improve survival of experimental polymicrobial sepsis. Mice undergoing cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)–induced sepsis were treated with neutralizing anti-CD14 Ab biG 53, complement C5 inhibitor coversin (Ornithodoros moubata C inhibitor), or a combination thereof. The inflammatory study (24-h observation) revealed statistically significant increases in 22 of 24 measured plasma biomarkers in the untreated CLP group, comprising 14 pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and 8 chemokines, growth factors, and granulocyte activation markers. Single CD14 or C5 blockade significantly inhibited 20 and 19 of the 22 biomarkers, respectively. Combined CD14 and C5 inhibition significantly reduced all 22 biomarkers (mean reduction 85%; range 54–95%) compared with the untreated CLP group. Double blockade was more potent than single treatment and was required to significantly inhibit IL-6 and CXCL1. Combined inhibition significantly reduced morbidity (motility and eyelid movement) and mortality measured over 10 d. In the positive control CLP group, median survival was 36 h (range 24–48 h). Combined treatment increased median survival to 96 h (range 24–240 h) (p = 0.001), whereas survival in the single-treatment groups was not significantly increased (median and range for anti-CD14 and anti-C5 treatment were 36 h [24–48 h] and 48 h [24–96 h]). Combined with standard intervention therapy, specific blockade of CD14 and C5 might represent a promising new therapeutic strategy for treatment of polymicrobial sepsis. PMID:24790148

  15. Blood-Brain Barrier Deterioration and Hippocampal Gene Expression in Polymicrobial Sepsis: An Evaluation of Endothelial MyD88 and the Vagus Nerve.

    PubMed

    Honig, Gerard; Mader, Simone; Chen, Huiyi; Porat, Amit; Ochani, Mahendar; Wang, Ping; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Systemic infection can initiate or exacerbate central nervous system (CNS) pathology, even in the absence of overt invasion of bacteria into the CNS. Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that human survivors of sepsis have an increased risk of long-term neurocognitive decline. There is thus a need for improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms whereby acute sepsis affects the CNS. In particular, MyD88-dependent activation of brain microvascular endothelial cells and a resulting loss of blood-brain barrier integrity have been proposed to play an important role in the effects of systemic inflammation on the CNS. Signaling through the vagus nerve has also been considered to be an important component of CNS responses to systemic infection. Here, we demonstrate that blood-brain barrier permeabilization and hippocampal transcriptional responses during polymicrobial sepsis occur even in the absence of MyD88-dependent signaling in cerebrovascular endothelial cells. We further demonstrate that these transcriptional responses can occur without vagus nerve input. These results suggest that redundant signals mediate CNS responses in sepsis. Either endothelial or vagus nerve activation may be individually sufficient to transmit systemic inflammation to the central nervous system. Transcriptional activation in the forebrain in sepsis may be mediated by MyD88-independent endothelial mechanisms or by non-vagal neuronal pathways.

  16. Evaluation of a novel PCR-based diagnostic assay for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples.

    PubMed Central

    Maher, M; Glennon, M; Martinazzo, G; Turchetti, E; Marcolini, S; Smith, T; Dawson, M T

    1996-01-01

    We report on a PCR-based assay we have developed for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum samples. One hundred sputum specimens, which included 34 culture-positive and 66 culture-negative specimens, were evaluated with this system. Of the 34 culture-positive specimens, 31 were PCR positive, and 60 of the culture-negative specimens were PCR negative. An internal standard has been included in the assay system to monitor PCR inhibition and to confirm the reliability of the PCR assay. PMID:8862607

  17. Insights into Cystic Fibrosis Polymicrobial Consortia: The Role of Species Interactions in Biofilm Development, Phenotype, and Response to In-Use Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Andreia P; Lopes, Susana P; Pereira, Maria O

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) airways disease involves complex polymicrobial infections where different bacterial species can interact and influence each other and/or even interfere with the whole community. To gain insights into the role that interactions between Pseudomonas aeruginosa in co-culture with Staphylococcus aureus, Inquilinus limosus, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia may play in infection, the reciprocal effect during biofilm formation and the response of dual biofilms toward ciprofloxacin under in vitro atmospheres with different oxygen availabilities were evaluated. Biofilm formation kinetics showed that the growth of S. aureus, I. limosus, and S. maltophilia was disturbed in the presence of P. aeruginosa, under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. On the other hand, under aerobic conditions, I. limosus led to a decrease in biofilm mass production by P. aeruginosa, although biofilm-cells viability remains unaltered. The interaction between S. maltophilia and P. aeruginosa positively influenced dual biofilm development by increasing its biomass. Compared with monocultures, biomass of P. aeruginosa+ S. aureus biofilms was significantly reduced by reciprocal interference. When grown in dual biofilms with P. aeruginosa, ciprofloxacin was less effective against S. aureus, I. limosus, and S. maltophilia, with increasing antibiotic doses leading to drastic inhibitions of P. aeruginosa cultivability. Therefore, P. aeruginosa might be responsible for the protection of the whole dual consortia against ciprofloxacin activity. Based on the overall data, it can be speculated that reciprocal interferences occur between the different bacterial species in CF lung, regardless the level of oxygen. The findings also suggest that alterations of bacterial behavior due to species interplay may be important for disease progression in CF infection.

  18. Antibacterial Action of a Condensed Tannin Extracted from Astringent Persimmon as a Component of Food Addictive Pancil PS-M on Oral Polymicrobial Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Kiyoshi; Mukai, Yoshiharu; Saito, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kiyoko; Kumada, Hidefumi; Nihei, Tomotaro; Hamada, Nobushiro; Teranaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity against polymicrobial (PM) biofilms of a condensed tannin extracted from astringent persimmon (PS-M), which is contained in refreshing beverages commercially available in Japan. Salivary PM biofilms were formed anaerobically on glass coverslips for 24 and 72 h and were treated for 5 min with sterilized deionized water (DW), 0.05 and 0.2 wt% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), and 0.5-4.0 wt% PS-M solution. The colony forming units (CFU/mL) were determined and morphological changes of the biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The CFUs were lower in all PS-M and CHX groups compared to the DW group. PS-M exerted a dose-dependent effect. PS-M (1.53 × 10(7)) at a dose of 4.0 wt% had the same effect as 0.2 wt% CHX (2.03 × 10(7)), regardless of the culture period. SEM revealed the biofilm structures were considerably destroyed in the 4.0 wt% PS-M and 0.2 wt% CHX. These findings indicate that the antibacterial effects of PS-M, a naturally derived substance, are comparable to those of CHX. PS-M may keep the oral cavity clean and prevent dental caries and periodontal disease related to dental plaque, as well as systemic disease such as aspiration pneumonitis.

  19. Antibacterial Action of a Condensed Tannin Extracted from Astringent Persimmon as a Component of Food Addictive Pancil PS-M on Oral Polymicrobial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Tomiyama, Kiyoshi; Mukai, Yoshiharu; Saito, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kiyoko; Kumada, Hidefumi; Nihei, Tomotaro; Hamada, Nobushiro; Teranaka, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial activity against polymicrobial (PM) biofilms of a condensed tannin extracted from astringent persimmon (PS-M), which is contained in refreshing beverages commercially available in Japan. Salivary PM biofilms were formed anaerobically on glass coverslips for 24 and 72 h and were treated for 5 min with sterilized deionized water (DW), 0.05 and 0.2 wt% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX), and 0.5–4.0 wt% PS-M solution. The colony forming units (CFU/mL) were determined and morphological changes of the biofilms were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The CFUs were lower in all PS-M and CHX groups compared to the DW group. PS-M exerted a dose-dependent effect. PS-M (1.53 × 107) at a dose of 4.0 wt% had the same effect as 0.2 wt% CHX (2.03 × 107), regardless of the culture period. SEM revealed the biofilm structures were considerably destroyed in the 4.0 wt% PS-M and 0.2 wt% CHX. These findings indicate that the antibacterial effects of PS-M, a naturally derived substance, are comparable to those of CHX. PS-M may keep the oral cavity clean and prevent dental caries and periodontal disease related to dental plaque, as well as systemic disease such as aspiration pneumonitis. PMID:26981533

  20. Insights into Cystic Fibrosis Polymicrobial Consortia: The Role of Species Interactions in Biofilm Development, Phenotype, and Response to In-Use Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Andreia P.; Lopes, Susana P.; Pereira, Maria O.

    2017-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) airways disease involves complex polymicrobial infections where different bacterial species can interact and influence each other and/or even interfere with the whole community. To gain insights into the role that interactions between Pseudomonas aeruginosa in co-culture with Staphylococcus aureus, Inquilinus limosus, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia may play in infection, the reciprocal effect during biofilm formation and the response of dual biofilms toward ciprofloxacin under in vitro atmospheres with different oxygen availabilities were evaluated. Biofilm formation kinetics showed that the growth of S. aureus, I. limosus, and S. maltophilia was disturbed in the presence of P. aeruginosa, under both aerobic and anaerobic environments. On the other hand, under aerobic conditions, I. limosus led to a decrease in biofilm mass production by P. aeruginosa, although biofilm-cells viability remains unaltered. The interaction between S. maltophilia and P. aeruginosa positively influenced dual biofilm development by increasing its biomass. Compared with monocultures, biomass of P. aeruginosa+ S. aureus biofilms was significantly reduced by reciprocal interference. When grown in dual biofilms with P. aeruginosa, ciprofloxacin was less effective against S. aureus, I. limosus, and S. maltophilia, with increasing antibiotic doses leading to drastic inhibitions of P. aeruginosa cultivability. Therefore, P. aeruginosa might be responsible for the protection of the whole dual consortia against ciprofloxacin activity. Based on the overall data, it can be speculated that reciprocal interferences occur between the different bacterial species in CF lung, regardless the level of oxygen. The findings also suggest that alterations of bacterial behavior due to species interplay may be important for disease progression in CF infection. PMID:28133457

  1. Polymicrobial ventriculitis involving Pseudomonas fulva.

    PubMed

    Rebolledo, Paulina A; Vu, Catphuong Cathy L; Carlson, Renee Donahue; Kraft, Colleen S; Anderson, Evan J; Burd, Eileen M

    2014-06-01

    Infections due to Pseudomonas fulva remain a rare but emerging concern. A case of ventriculitis due to Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas fulva following placement of an external ventricular drain is described. Similar to other reports, the organism was initially misidentified as Pseudomonas putida. The infection was successfully treated with levofloxacin.

  2. Animal models of polymicrobial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hraiech, Sami; Papazian, Laurent; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Bregeon, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the leading causes of severe and occasionally life-threatening infections. The physiopathology of pneumonia has been extensively studied, providing information for the development of new treatments for this condition. In addition to in vitro research, animal models have been largely used in the field of pneumonia. Several models have been described and have provided a better understanding of pneumonia under different settings and with various pathogens. However, the concept of one pathogen leading to one infection has been challenged, and recent flu epidemics suggest that some pathogens exhibit highly virulent potential. Although “two hits” animal models have been used to study infectious diseases, few of these models have been described in pneumonia. Therefore the aims of this review were to provide an overview of the available literature in this field, to describe well-studied and uncommon pathogen associations, and to summarize the major insights obtained from this information. PMID:26170617

  3. Performance of selective and differential media in the primary isolation of yeasts from different biological samples.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jaqueline Otero; Franceschini, Silvio Antônio; Lavrador, Marco Aurélio Sicchiroli; Candido, Regina Célia

    2004-01-01

    In view of the increase in yeast infections, especially polymicrobial ones, differential culture media have acquired increasing importance. The present study evaluated the Sabouraud chloramphenicol, Biggy agar, Pagano Levin agar and CHROMagar Candida media in terms of isolation, number of yeast colony forming units per plate, and inhibition of bacteria and filamentous fungi. To this end, we used 223 biological samples, including feces, and oral, vaginal and anal mucosae from 86 patients presenting or not symptoms of fungal infections. The four media did not differ significantly in terms of detection of yeast-positive cultures. The number of colony forming units per plate ranged from zero to 2.380, with a predominance of counts of 1 to 9 colonies per plate. No significant differences were observed among the four culture media in terms of number of colonies counted, for each kind of biological material. Fifteen species belonging to the genera Candida, Saccharomyces, Cryptococcus, Trichosporon and Rhodotorula were isolated, with C. albicans being the predominant species, followed by C. parapsilosis and R. rubra. CHROMagar Candida and Biggy agar were complementary in the isolation of the different species and favored a greater recovery of polymicrobial cultures. Pagano Levin agar isolated the smallest variety of species. Sabouraud chloramphenicol agar was the least effective in terms of bacterial inhibition and favored a greater development of filamentous fungi. The results suggest that more than one culture medium should be used for an adequate primary isolation.

  4. Capillary sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... repeat the test with blood drawn from a vein. Alternative Names Blood sample - capillary; Fingerstick; Heelstick Images Phenylketonuria test Phenylketonuria test Capillary sample References Garza ...

  5. Identification of legionella in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Jarraud, Sophie; Descours, Ghislaine; Ginevra, Christophe; Lina, Gerard; Etienne, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    Currently, several methods are used for the detection of Legionella in clinical samples, and these methods constitute part of the criteria for defining legionellosis cases. Urinary antigen detection is the first-line diagnostic test, although this test is limited to L. pneumophila serogroup 1 (Lp1) (Helbig et al., J Clin Microbiol 41:838-840, 2003). The use of molecular techniques can improve Legionaire's disease (LD) diagnosis by detecting other serogroups and species (Diederen et al., J Clin Microbiol 46:671-677, 2008). The isolation of Legionella strains from pulmonary samples by axenic culture is still required to perform further epidemiological investigations (Blyth et al., N S W Public Health Bull 20:157-161, 2009; Fields et al., Clin Microbiol Rev 15:506-526, 2002) but demonstrates various sensitivities. Amoebic coculture has been described as a method to recover Legionella from clinical culture-negative specimens (La Scola et al., J Clin Microbiol 39:365-366, 2001; Rowbotham, J Clin Pathol 36:978-986, 1983) and can be proposed for optimizing Legionella strain isolation from samples contaminated by oropharyngeal flora. Identification of Legionella isolates is based on serological characterization, genotypic methods (with sequencing of the mip gene as the standard method) and, more recently, the Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) method.This chapter is limited to the identification of Legionella in clinical samples; antibody detection in human serum will not be discussed.

  6. Nocardia isolation from clinical samples with the paraffin baiting technique

    PubMed Central

    Bafghi, Mehdi Fatahi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Soori, Tahereh; Saber, Sasan; Meysamie, Alipasha; Gheitoli, Khavar; Habibnia, Shadi; Rasouli Nasab, Masoumeh; Eshraghi, Seyyed Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Background The genus Nocardia is a cause of infection in the lungs, skin, brain, cerebrospinal fluid, eyes, joints and kidneys. Nocardia isolation from polymicrobial specimens is difficult due to its slow growth. Several methods have been reported for Nocardia isolation from clinical samples. In the current study, we used three methods: paraffin baiting technique, paraffin agar, and conventional media for Nocardia isolation from various clinical specimens from Iranian patients. Methods In this study, we examined 517 samples from various clinical specimens such as: sputum of patients with suspected tuberculosis, bronchoalveolar lavage, sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, tracheal aspirate, cutaneous and subcutaneous abscesses, cerebrospinal fluid, dental abscess, mycetoma, wound, bone marrow biopsy, and gastric lavage. All collected specimens were cultured on carbon-free broth tubes (paraffin baiting technique), paraffin agar, Sabouraud dextrose agar, and Sabouraud dextrose agar with cycloheximide and were incubated at 35°C for one month. Results Seven Nocardia spp. were isolated with paraffin baiting technique, compared with 5 positive results with the paraffin agar technique and 3 positive results with Sabouraud dextrose agar with and without cycloheximide. The prevalence of nocardial infections in our specimens was 5.28%. Conclusion In the present study, the use of the paraffin baiting technique appeared to be more effective than other methods for Nocardia isolation from various clinical specimens. PMID:25763363

  7. Venous Sampling

    MedlinePlus

    ... parts of the body, including: Adrenal venous sampling (AVS) , in which blood samples are taken from the ... for a few days before the procedure. For AVS, you will be asked to stop taking certain ...

  8. Laser sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbatenko, A. A.; Revina, E. I.

    2015-10-01

    The review is devoted to the major advances in laser sampling. The advantages and drawbacks of the technique are considered. Specific features of combinations of laser sampling with various instrumental analytical methods, primarily inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, are discussed. Examples of practical implementation of hybrid methods involving laser sampling as well as corresponding analytical characteristics are presented. The bibliography includes 78 references.

  9. Lunar Sample Quarantine & Sample Curation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.

    2000-01-01

    The main goal of this presentation is to discuss some of the responsibility of the lunar sample quarantine project. The responsibilities are: flying the mission safely, and on schedule, protect the Earth from biohazard, and preserve scientific integrity of samples.

  10. Sampling Development

    PubMed Central

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of the enterprise. This article discusses how to sample development in order to accurately discern the shape of developmental change. The ideal solution is daunting: to summarize behavior over 24-hour intervals and collect daily samples over the critical periods of change. We discuss the magnitude of errors due to undersampling, and the risks associated with oversampling. When daily sampling is not feasible, we offer suggestions for sampling methods that can provide preliminary reference points and provisional sketches of the general shape of a developmental trajectory. Denser sampling then can be applied strategically during periods of enhanced variability, inflections in the rate of developmental change, or in relation to key events or processes that may affect the course of change. Despite the challenges of dense repeated sampling, researchers must take seriously the problem of sampling on a developmental time scale if we are to know the true shape of developmental change. PMID:22140355

  11. Sampling Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adolph, Karen E.; Robinson, Scott R.

    2011-01-01

    Research in developmental psychology requires sampling at different time points. Accurate depictions of developmental change provide a foundation for further empirical studies and theories about developmental mechanisms. However, overreliance on widely spaced sampling intervals in cross-sectional and longitudinal designs threatens the validity of…

  12. Application of a pathogen microarray for the analysis of viruses and bacteria in clinical diagnostic samples from pigs.

    PubMed

    Jaing, Crystal J; Thissen, James B; Gardner, Shea N; McLoughlin, Kevin S; Hullinger, Pam J; Monday, Nicholas A; Niederwerder, Megan C; Rowland, Raymond R R

    2015-05-01

    Many of the disease syndromes challenging the commercial swine industry involve the analysis of complex problems caused by polymicrobial, emerging or reemerging, and transboundary pathogens. This study investigated the utility of the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California), designed to detect 8,101 species of microbes, in the evaluation of known and unknown microbes in serum, oral fluid, and tonsil from pigs experimentally coinfected with Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and Porcine circovirus-2 (PCV-2). The array easily identified PRRSV and PCV-2, but at decreased sensitivities compared to standard polymerase chain reaction detection methods. The oral fluid sample was the most informative, possessing additional signatures for several swine-associated bacteria, including Streptococcus sp., Clostridium sp., and Staphylococcus sp.

  13. Elevating sampling

    PubMed Central

    Labuz, Joseph M.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2014-01-01

    Sampling – the process of collecting, preparing, and introducing an appropriate volume element (voxel) into a system – is often under appreciated and pushed behind the scenes in lab-on-a-chip research. What often stands in the way between proof-of-principle demonstrations of potentially exciting technology and its broader dissemination and actual use, however, is the effectiveness of sample collection and preparation. The power of micro- and nanofluidics to improve reactions, sensing, separation, and cell culture cannot be accessed if sampling is not equally efficient and reliable. This perspective will highlight recent successes as well as assess current challenges and opportunities in this area. PMID:24781100

  14. Culture-negative ulcerative keratitis after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Lam, D S; Leung, A T; Wu, J T; Fan, D S; Cheng, A C; Wang, Z

    1999-07-01

    A 40-year old man, highly myopic in both eyes, had laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in the left eye in November 1996. Corneal melting and ulceration and fine striae-like interface infiltrates were noticed 1 day postoperatively. There was no response to intensive topical antibiotics in the form of hourly ofloxacin 3% (Tarivid), and satellite lesions developed on day 4. Corneal scrapings for gram stain and culture were done twice. No bacterial or fungal organisms were identified. Intensive topical fortified vancomycin (50 mg/mL) was added, and the lesions resolved gradually over the ensuing 2 weeks. Eighteen months after LASIK, refraction was -1.50 - 0.75 x 105 in the left eye, and uncorrected visual acuity was 20/70, correctable to 20/25 with spectacles.

  15. SAMPLING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Hannaford, B.A.; Rosenberg, R.; Segaser, C.L.; Terry, C.L.

    1961-01-17

    An apparatus is given for the batch sampling of radioactive liquids such as slurries from a system by remote control, while providing shielding for protection of operating personnel from the harmful effects of radiation.

  16. Hydrogen sulfide production from subgingival plaque samples.

    PubMed

    Basic, A; Dahlén, G

    2015-10-01

    Periodontitis is a polymicrobial anaerobe infection. Little is known about the dysbiotic microbiota and the role of bacterial metabolites in the disease process. It is suggested that the production of certain waste products in the proteolytic metabolism may work as markers for disease severity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gas produced by degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket. It is highly toxic and believed to have pro-inflammatory properties. We aimed to study H2S production from subgingival plaque samples in relation to disease severity in subjects with natural development of the disease, using a colorimetric method based on bismuth precipitation. In remote areas of northern Thailand, adults with poor oral hygiene habits and a natural development of periodontal disease were examined for their oral health status. H2S production was measured with the bismuth method and subgingival plaque samples were analyzed for the presence of 20 bacterial species with the checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization technique. In total, 43 subjects were examined (age 40-60 years, mean PI 95 ± 6.6%). Fifty-six percent had moderate periodontal breakdown (CAL > 3 < 7 mm) and 35% had severe periodontal breakdown (CAL > 7 mm) on at least one site. Parvimonas micra, Filifactor alocis, Porphyromonas endodontalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum were frequently detected. H2S production could not be correlated to periodontal disease severity (PPD or CAL at sampled sites) or to a specific bacterial composition. Site 21 had statistically lower production of H2S (p = 0.02) compared to 16 and 46. Betel nut chewers had statistically significant lower H2S production (p = 0.01) than non-chewers. Rapid detection and estimation of subgingival H2S production capacity was easily and reliably tested by the colorimetric bismuth sulfide precipitation method. H2S may be a valuable clinical marker for degradation of proteins in the subgingival pocket.

  17. SAMPLING OSCILLOSCOPE

    DOEpatents

    Sugarman, R.M.

    1960-08-30

    An oscilloscope is designed for displaying transient signal waveforms having random time and amplitude distributions. The oscilloscopc is a sampling device that selects for display a portion of only those waveforms having a particular range of amplitudes. For this purpose a pulse-height analyzer is provided to screen the pulses. A variable voltage-level shifter and a time-scale rampvoltage generator take the pulse height relative to the start of the waveform. The variable voltage shifter produces a voltage level raised one step for each sequential signal waveform to be sampled and this results in an unsmeared record of input signal waveforms. Appropriate delay devices permit each sample waveform to pass its peak amplitude before the circuit selects it for display.

  18. Sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, N.R.; King, L.L.; Jackson, P.O.; Zulich, A.W.

    1989-07-18

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface. 15 figs.

  19. Sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gordon, Norman R.; King, Lloyd L.; Jackson, Peter O.; Zulich, Alan W.

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided for sampling substances from solid surfaces. The apparatus includes first and second elongated tubular bodies which telescopically and sealingly join relative to one another. An absorbent pad is mounted to the end of a rod which is slidably received through a passageway in the end of one of the joined bodies. The rod is preferably slidably and rotatably received through the passageway, yet provides a selective fluid tight seal relative thereto. A recess is formed in the rod. When the recess and passageway are positioned to be coincident, fluid is permitted to flow through the passageway and around the rod. The pad is preferably laterally orientable relative to the rod and foldably retractable to within one of the bodies. A solvent is provided for wetting of the pad and solubilizing or suspending the material being sampled from a particular surface.

  20. Chain Sampling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-08-01

    35609 Advanced Techniques Branch Plans and Programs Analysis Division Directorate for Product Assurance U. S. Army Missile Command Redstone Arsenal...Ray Heathcock Advanced Techniques Branch Plans and Programs Analysis Division Directorate for Product Assurance U. S. Army Missile Command...for Product Assurance has established a rather unique computer program for handling a variety of chain sampling schemes and is available for

  1. Sampling Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Three locations to the right of the test dig area are identified for the first samples to be delivered to the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL), and the Optical Microscope (OM) on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. These sampling areas are informally labeled 'Baby Bear', 'Mama Bear', and 'Papa Bear' respectively. This image was taken on the seventh day of the Mars mission, or Sol 7 (June 1, 2008) by the Surface Stereo Imager aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Utility of gram staining for evaluation of the quality of cystic fibrosis sputum samples.

    PubMed

    Nair, Bindu; Stapp, Jenny; Stapp, Lynn; Bugni, Linda; Van Dalfsen, Jill; Burns, Jane L

    2002-08-01

    The microscopic examination of Gram-stained sputum specimens is very helpful in the evaluation of patients with community-acquired pneumonia and has also been recommended for use in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate that recommendation. One hundred one sputum samples from CF patients were cultured for gram-negative bacilli and examined by Gram staining for both sputum adequacy (using the quality [Q] score) and bacterial morphology. Subjective evaluation of adequacy was also performed and categorized. Based on Q score evaluation, 41% of the samples would have been rejected despite a subjective appearance of purulence. Only three of these rejected samples were culture negative for gram-negative CF pathogens. Correlation between culture results and quantitative Gram stain examination was also poor. These data suggest that subjective evaluation combined with comprehensive bacteriology is superior to Gram staining in identifying pathogens in CF sputum.

  3. Diagnosis of intramammary infection in samples yielding negative results or minor pathogens in conventional bacterial culturing.

    PubMed

    Bexiga, Ricardo; Koskinen, Mikko T; Holopainen, Jani; Carneiro, Carla; Pereira, Helena; Ellis, Kathryn A; Vilela, Cristina L

    2011-02-01

    Up to half of quarter milk samples submitted for mastitis diagnosis are culture-negative results or lead to identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci or Corynebacterium bovis in conventional culturing, the so-called minor pathogens. The interpretation and usefulness of these results in terms of udder and animal health management is limited, even though the amount of resources spent is relatively high. This work aimed to test two methods of analysis of milk samples with the goal of increasing detection of intramammary pathogens. In the first study, 783 milk samples were processed in duplicate: before and after freezing at -20°C for 24 h, using standard bacteriological techniques. There was a significant difference between the two methods with samples frozen for 24 h yielding significantly fewer Gram-positive catalase-positive cocci, Gram-negative bacilli, Gram-positive bacilli and significantly more samples leading to no growth, than samples before freezing. The number of samples yielding Gram-positive catalase-negative cocci was not significantly affected by freezing. In the second study, a real-time PCR-based test was performed on milk samples with an individual quarter somatic cell count above 500,000 cells/ml that were either negative (n=51 samples) or that led to the isolation of minor pathogens in culturing: Corynebacterium bovis (n=79 samples) or non-aureus staphylococci (NAS, n=32). A mastitis pathogen, beyond the result obtained with standard bacteriology, was detected on 47% of the no-growth samples, on 35% of the samples from which C. bovis had been isolated and on 25% of the samples from which NAS had been isolated. The most commonly detected major pathogen was Escherichia coli, followed by Streptococcus uberis, Arcanobacterium pyogenes/Peptoniphilus indolicus and Streptococcus dysgalactiae. These results suggest that simply freezing milk samples for 24 h does not increase the detection of intramammary bacteria in milk samples and therefore

  4. How Many Samples and How Many Culture Media To Diagnose a Prosthetic Joint Infection: a Clinical and Microbiological Prospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Julie; Tandé, Didier; Plouzeau, Chloé; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Lemarié, Carole; Kempf, Marie; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Bret, Laurent; Juvin, Marie Emmanuelle; Giraudeau, Bruno; Burucoa, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous perioperative samples and culture media are required to diagnose prosthetic joint infection (PJI), their exact number and types have not yet been definitely determined with a high level of proof. We conducted a prospective multicenter study to determine the minimal number of samples and culture media required for accurate diagnosis of PJI. Over a 2-year period, consecutive patients with clinical signs suggesting PJI were included, with five perioperative samples per patient. The bacteriological and PJI diagnosis criteria were assessed using a random selection of two, three, or four samples and compared with those obtained using the recommended five samples (references guidelines). The results obtained with two or three culture media were then compared with those obtained with five culture media for both criteria. The times-to-positivity of the different culture media were calculated. PJI was confirmed in 215/264 suspected cases, with a bacteriological criterion in 192 (89%). The PJI was monomicrobial (85%) or polymicrobial (15%). Percentages of agreement of 98.1% and 99.7%, respectively, for the bacteriological criterion and confirmed PJI diagnosis were obtained when four perioperative samples were considered. The highest percentages of agreement were obtained with the association of three culture media, a blood culture bottle, a chocolate agar plate, and Schaedler broth, incubated for 5, 7, and 14 days, respectively. This new procedure leads to significant cost saving. Our prospective multicenter study showed that four samples seeded on three culture media are sufficient for diagnosing PJI. PMID:26637380

  5. How Many Samples and How Many Culture Media To Diagnose a Prosthetic Joint Infection: a Clinical and Microbiological Prospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Bémer, Pascale; Léger, Julie; Tandé, Didier; Plouzeau, Chloé; Valentin, Anne Sophie; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Lemarié, Carole; Kempf, Marie; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Bret, Laurent; Juvin, Marie Emmanuelle; Giraudeau, Bruno; Corvec, Stéphane; Burucoa, Christophe

    2016-02-01

    Although numerous perioperative samples and culture media are required to diagnose prosthetic joint infection (PJI), their exact number and types have not yet been definitely determined with a high level of proof. We conducted a prospective multicenter study to determine the minimal number of samples and culture media required for accurate diagnosis of PJI. Over a 2-year period, consecutive patients with clinical signs suggesting PJI were included, with five perioperative samples per patient. The bacteriological and PJI diagnosis criteria were assessed using a random selection of two, three, or four samples and compared with those obtained using the recommended five samples (references guidelines). The results obtained with two or three culture media were then compared with those obtained with five culture media for both criteria. The times-to-positivity of the different culture media were calculated. PJI was confirmed in 215/264 suspected cases, with a bacteriological criterion in 192 (89%). The PJI was monomicrobial (85%) or polymicrobial (15%). Percentages of agreement of 98.1% and 99.7%, respectively, for the bacteriological criterion and confirmed PJI diagnosis were obtained when four perioperative samples were considered. The highest percentages of agreement were obtained with the association of three culture media, a blood culture bottle, a chocolate agar plate, and Schaedler broth, incubated for 5, 7, and 14 days, respectively. This new procedure leads to significant cost saving. Our prospective multicenter study showed that four samples seeded on three culture media are sufficient for diagnosing PJI.

  6. Universal digital high-resolution melt: a novel approach to broad-based profiling of heterogeneous biological samples.

    PubMed

    Fraley, Stephanie I; Hardick, Justin; Masek, Billie J; Jo Masek, Billie; Athamanolap, Pornpat; Rothman, Richard E; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Carroll, Karen C; Wakefield, Teresa; Wang, Tza-Huei; Yang, Samuel

    2013-10-01

    Comprehensive profiling of nucleic acids in genetically heterogeneous samples is important for clinical and basic research applications. Universal digital high-resolution melt (U-dHRM) is a new approach to broad-based PCR diagnostics and profiling technologies that can overcome issues of poor sensitivity due to contaminating nucleic acids and poor specificity due to primer or probe hybridization inaccuracies for single nucleotide variations. The U-dHRM approach uses broad-based primers or ligated adapter sequences to universally amplify all nucleic acid molecules in a heterogeneous sample, which have been partitioned, as in digital PCR. Extensive assay optimization enables direct sequence identification by algorithm-based matching of melt curve shape and Tm to a database of known sequence-specific melt curves. We show that single-molecule detection and single nucleotide sensitivity is possible. The feasibility and utility of U-dHRM is demonstrated through detection of bacteria associated with polymicrobial blood infection and microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with host response to infection. U-dHRM using broad-based 16S rRNA gene primers demonstrates universal single cell detection of bacterial pathogens, even in the presence of larger amounts of contaminating bacteria; U-dHRM using universally adapted Lethal-7 miRNAs in a heterogeneous mixture showcases the single copy sensitivity and single nucleotide specificity of this approach.

  7. Utility of a Lateral Flow Immunoassay (LFI) to Detect Burkholderia pseudomallei in Soil Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rongkard, Patpong; Hantrakun, Viriya; Dittrich, Sabine; Srilohasin, Prapaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Langla, Sayan; Lim, Cherry; Day, Nicholas P. J.; AuCoin, David; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn

    2016-01-01

    Background Culture is the gold standard for the detection of environmental B. pseudomallei. In general, soil specimens are cultured in enrichment broth for 2 days, and then the culture broth is streaked on an agar plate and incubated further for 7 days. However, identifying B. pseudomallei on the agar plates among other soil microbes requires expertise and experience. Here, we evaluate a lateral flow immunoassay (LFI) developed to detect B. pseudomallei capsular polysaccharide (CPS) in clinical samples as a tool to detect B. pseudomallei in environmental samples. Methodology/Principal Findings First, we determined the limit of detection (LOD) of LFI for enrichment broth of the soil specimens. Soil specimens (10 grams/specimen) culture negative for B. pseudomallei were spiked with B. pseudomallei ranging from 10 to 105 CFU, and incubated in 10 ml of enrichment broth in air at 40°C. Then, on day 2, 4 and 7 of incubation, 50 μL of the upper layer of the broth were tested on the LFI, and colony counts to determine quantity of B. pseudomallei in the broth were performed. We found that all five soil specimens inoculated at 10 CFU were negative by LFI on day 2, but four of those five specimens were LFI positive on day 7. The LOD of the LFI was estimated to be roughly 3.8x106 CFU/ml, and culture broth on day 7 was selected as the optimal sample for LFI testing. Second, we evaluated the utility of the LFI by testing 105 soil samples from Northeast Thailand. All samples were also tested by standard culture and quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting orf2. Of 105 soil samples, 35 (33%) were LFI positive, 25 (24%) were culture positive for B. pseudomallei, and 79 (75%) were qPCR positive. Of 11 LFI positive but standard culture negative specimens, six were confirmed by having the enrichment broth on day 7 culture positive for B. pseudomallei, and an additional three by qPCR. The LFI had 97% (30/31) sensitivity to detect soil specimens culture positive for B. pseudomallei

  8. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  9. Sampling by Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handley, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of sampling methods used in information science research focuses on Fussler's method for sampling catalog cards and on sampling by length. Highlights include simple random sampling, sampling with probability equal to size without replacement, sampling with replacement, and examples of estimating the number of books on shelves in certain…

  10. A Mars Sample Return Sample Handling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David; Stroker, Carol

    2013-01-01

    We present a sample handling system, a subsystem of the proposed Dragon landed Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission [1], that can return to Earth orbit a significant mass of frozen Mars samples potentially consisting of: rock cores, subsurface drilled rock and ice cuttings, pebble sized rocks, and soil scoops. The sample collection, storage, retrieval and packaging assumptions and concepts in this study are applicable for the NASA's MPPG MSR mission architecture options [2]. Our study assumes a predecessor rover mission collects samples for return to Earth to address questions on: past life, climate change, water history, age dating, understanding Mars interior evolution [3], and, human safety and in-situ resource utilization. Hence the rover will have "integrated priorities for rock sampling" [3] that cover collection of subaqueous or hydrothermal sediments, low-temperature fluidaltered rocks, unaltered igneous rocks, regolith and atmosphere samples. Samples could include: drilled rock cores, alluvial and fluvial deposits, subsurface ice and soils, clays, sulfates, salts including perchlorates, aeolian deposits, and concretions. Thus samples will have a broad range of bulk densities, and require for Earth based analysis where practical: in-situ characterization, management of degradation such as perchlorate deliquescence and volatile release, and contamination management. We propose to adopt a sample container with a set of cups each with a sample from a specific location. We considered two sample cups sizes: (1) a small cup sized for samples matching those submitted to in-situ characterization instruments, and, (2) a larger cup for 100 mm rock cores [4] and pebble sized rocks, thus providing diverse samples and optimizing the MSR sample mass payload fraction for a given payload volume. We minimize sample degradation by keeping them frozen in the MSR payload sample canister using Peltier chip cooling. The cups are sealed by interference fitted heat activated memory

  11. Ranked set sampling with unequal samples.

    PubMed

    Bhoj, D S

    2001-09-01

    A ranked set sampling procedure with unequal samples (RSSU) is proposed and used to estimate the population mean. This estimator is then compared with the estimators based on the ranked set sampling (RSS) and median ranked set sampling (MRSS) procedures. It is shown that the relative precisions of the estimator based on RSSU are higher than those of the estimators based on RSS and MRSS. An example of estimating the mean diameter at breast height of longleaf-pine trees on the Wade Tract in Thomas County, Georgia, is presented.

  12. How Sample Size Affects a Sampling Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulekar, Madhuri S.; Siegel, Murray H.

    2009-01-01

    If students are to understand inferential statistics successfully, they must have a profound understanding of the nature of the sampling distribution. Specifically, they must comprehend the determination of the expected value and standard error of a sampling distribution as well as the meaning of the central limit theorem. Many students in a high…

  13. From Sample to Multi-Omics Conclusions in under 48 Hours.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert A; Navas-Molina, Jose A; Hyde, Embriette R; Song, Se Jin; Vázquez-Baeza, Yoshiki; Humphrey, Greg; Gaffney, James; Minich, Jeremiah J; Melnik, Alexey V; Herschend, Jakob; DeReus, Jeff; Durant, Austin; Dutton, Rachel J; Khosroheidari, Mahdieh; Green, Clifford; da Silva, Ricardo; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Multi-omics methods have greatly advanced our understanding of the biological organism and its microbial associates. However, they are not routinely used in clinical or industrial applications, due to the length of time required to generate and analyze omics data. Here, we applied a novel integrated omics pipeline for the analysis of human and environmental samples in under 48 h. Human subjects that ferment their own foods provided swab samples from skin, feces, oral cavity, fermented foods, and household surfaces to assess the impact of home food fermentation on their microbial and chemical ecology. These samples were analyzed with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, inferred gene function profiles, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) metabolomics through the Qiita, PICRUSt, and GNPS pipelines, respectively. The human sample microbiomes clustered with the corresponding sample types in the American Gut Project (http://www.americangut.org), and the fermented food samples produced a separate cluster. The microbial communities of the household surfaces were primarily sourced from the fermented foods, and their consumption was associated with increased gut microbial diversity. Untargeted metabolomics revealed that human skin and fermented food samples had separate chemical ecologies and that stool was more similar to fermented foods than to other sample types. Metabolites from the fermented foods, including plant products such as procyanidin and pheophytin, were present in the skin and stool samples of the individuals consuming the foods. Some food metabolites were modified during digestion, and others were detected in stool intact. This study represents a first-of-its-kind analysis of multi-omics data that achieved time intervals matching those of classic microbiological culturing. IMPORTANCE Polymicrobial infections are difficult to diagnose due to the challenge in comprehensively cultivating the microbes present. Omics methods, such as 16S r

  14. From Sample to Multi-Omics Conclusions in under 48 Hours

    PubMed Central

    Navas-Molina, Jose A.; Hyde, Embriette R.; Vázquez-Baeza, Yoshiki; Humphrey, Greg; Gaffney, James; Minich, Jeremiah J.; Melnik, Alexey V.; Herschend, Jakob; DeReus, Jeff; Durant, Austin; Dutton, Rachel J.; Khosroheidari, Mahdieh; Green, Clifford; da Silva, Ricardo; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Knight, Rob

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multi-omics methods have greatly advanced our understanding of the biological organism and its microbial associates. However, they are not routinely used in clinical or industrial applications, due to the length of time required to generate and analyze omics data. Here, we applied a novel integrated omics pipeline for the analysis of human and environmental samples in under 48 h. Human subjects that ferment their own foods provided swab samples from skin, feces, oral cavity, fermented foods, and household surfaces to assess the impact of home food fermentation on their microbial and chemical ecology. These samples were analyzed with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, inferred gene function profiles, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) metabolomics through the Qiita, PICRUSt, and GNPS pipelines, respectively. The human sample microbiomes clustered with the corresponding sample types in the American Gut Project (http://www.americangut.org), and the fermented food samples produced a separate cluster. The microbial communities of the household surfaces were primarily sourced from the fermented foods, and their consumption was associated with increased gut microbial diversity. Untargeted metabolomics revealed that human skin and fermented food samples had separate chemical ecologies and that stool was more similar to fermented foods than to other sample types. Metabolites from the fermented foods, including plant products such as procyanidin and pheophytin, were present in the skin and stool samples of the individuals consuming the foods. Some food metabolites were modified during digestion, and others were detected in stool intact. This study represents a first-of-its-kind analysis of multi-omics data that achieved time intervals matching those of classic microbiological culturing. IMPORTANCE Polymicrobial infections are difficult to diagnose due to the challenge in comprehensively cultivating the microbes present. Omics methods, such as 16S

  15. Identification of bacteria directly from positive blood culture samples by DNA pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Motoshima, Maiko; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Matsuda, Junichi; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Kohno, Shigeru; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2012-11-01

    Rapid identification of the causative bacteria of sepsis in patients can contribute to the selection of appropriate antibiotics and improvement of patients' prognosis. Genotypic identification is an emerging technology that may provide an alternative method to, or complement, established phenotypic identification procedures. We evaluated a rapid protocol for bacterial identification based on PCR and pyrosequencing of the V1 and V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene using DNA extracted directly from positive blood culture samples. One hundred and two positive blood culture bottles from 68 patients were randomly selected and the bacteria were identified by phenotyping and pyrosequencing. The results of pyrosequencing identification displayed 84.3 and 64.7 % concordance with the results of phenotypic identification at the genus and species levels, respectively. In the monomicrobial samples, the concordance between the results of pyrosequencing and phenotypic identification at the genus level was 87.0 %. Pyrosequencing identified one isolate in 60 % of polymicrobial samples, which were confirmed by culture analysis. Of the samples identified by pyrosequencing, 55.7 % showed consistent results in V1 and V3 targeted sequencing; other samples were identified based on the results of V1 (12.5 %) or V3 (31.8 %) sequencing alone. One isolate was erroneously identified by pyrosequencing due to high sequence similarity with another isolate. Pyrosequencing identified one isolate that was not detected by phenotypic identification. The process of pyrosequencing identification can be completed within ~4 h. The information provided by DNA-pyrosequencing for the identification of micro-organisms in positive blood culture bottles is accurate and could prove to be a rapid and useful tool in standard laboratory practice.

  16. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  17. Enhanced conformational sampling using enveloping distribution sampling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhixiong; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2013-10-14

    To lessen the problem of insufficient conformational sampling in biomolecular simulations is still a major challenge in computational biochemistry. In this article, an application of the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) is proposed that addresses this challenge and its sampling efficiency is demonstrated in simulations of a hexa-β-peptide whose conformational equilibrium encompasses two different helical folds, i.e., a right-handed 2.7(10∕12)-helix and a left-handed 3(14)-helix, separated by a high energy barrier. Standard MD simulations of this peptide using the GROMOS 53A6 force field did not reach convergence of the free enthalpy difference between the two helices even after 500 ns of simulation time. The use of soft-core non-bonded interactions in the centre of the peptide did enhance the number of transitions between the helices, but at the same time led to neglect of relevant helical configurations. In the simulations of a two-state EDS reference Hamiltonian that envelops both the physical peptide and the soft-core peptide, sampling of the conformational space of the physical peptide ensures that physically relevant conformations can be visited, and sampling of the conformational space of the soft-core peptide helps to enhance the transitions between the two helices. The EDS simulations sampled many more transitions between the two helices and showed much faster convergence of the relative free enthalpy of the two helices compared with the standard MD simulations with only a slightly larger computational effort to determine optimized EDS parameters. Combined with various methods to smoothen the potential energy surface, the proposed EDS application will be a powerful technique to enhance the sampling efficiency in biomolecular simulations.

  18. Apollo 14 rock samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, I. C.

    1978-01-01

    Petrographic descriptions of all Apollo 14 samples larger than 1 cm in any dimension are presented. The sample description format consists of: (1) an introductory section which includes information on lunar sample location, orientation, and return containers, (2) a section on physical characteristics, which contains the sample mass, dimensions, and a brief description; (3) surface features, including zap pits, cavities, and fractures as seen in binocular view; (4) petrographic description, consisting of a binocular description and, if possible, a thin section description; and (5) a discussion of literature relevant to sample petrology is included for samples which have previously been examined by the scientific community.

  19. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Danny A.; Tomich, Stanley D.; Glover, Donald W.; Allen, Errol V.; Hales, Jeremy M.; Dana, Marshall T.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  20. Rain sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  1. Stardust Sample: Investigator's Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carl

    2006-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust spacecraft returned the first in situ collection of samples from a comet, and the first samples of contemporary interstellar dust. Stardust is the first US sample return mission from a planetary body since Apollo, and the first ever from beyond the moon. This handbook is a basic reference source for allocation procedures and policies for Stardust samples. These samples consist of particles and particle residues in aerogel collectors, in aluminum foil, and in spacecraft components. Contamination control samples and unflown collection media are also available for allocation.

  2. GROUND WATER SAMPLING ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Obtaining representative ground water samples is important for site assessment and
    remedial performance monitoring objectives. Issues which must be considered prior to initiating a ground-water monitoring program include defining monitoring goals and objectives, sampling point...

  3. Improved Sampling Method Reduces Isokinetic Sampling Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karels, Gale G.

    The particulate sampling system currently in use by the Bay Area Air Pollution Control District, San Francisco, California is described in this presentation for the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971. The method represents a practical, inexpensive tool that can…

  4. Decision by Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Neil; Chater, Nick; Brown, Gordon D. A.

    2006-01-01

    We present a theory of decision by sampling (DbS) in which, in contrast with traditional models, there are no underlying psychoeconomic scales. Instead, we assume that an attribute's subjective value is constructed from a series of binary, ordinal comparisons to a sample of attribute values drawn from memory and is its rank within the sample. We…

  5. Developing Water Sampling Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Participants in the D-19 symposium on aquatic sampling and measurement for water pollution assessment were informed that determining the extent of waste water stream pollution is not a cut and dry procedure. Topics discussed include field sampling, representative sampling from storm sewers, suggested sampler features and application of improved…

  6. SAMPLING OF CONTAMINATED SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical aspect of characterization of the amount and species of contamination of a hazardous waste site is the sampling plan developed for that site. f the sampling plan is not thoroughly conceptualized before sampling takes place, then certain critical aspects of the limits o...

  7. Fluid sampling pump

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.V.; Nimberger, M.; Ward, R.L.

    1991-12-24

    This patent describes a fluid sampling pump for withdrawing pressurized sample fluid from a flow line and for pumping a preselected quantity of sample fluid with each pump driving stroke from the pump to a sample vessel, the sampling pump including a pump body defining a pump bore therein having a central axis, a piston slideably moveable within the pump bore and having a fluid inlet end and an opposing operator end, a fluid sample inlet port open to sample fluid in the flow line, a fluid sample outlet port for transmitting fluid from the pump bore to the sample vessel, and a line pressure port in fluid pressure sample fluid in the flow line, an inlet valve for selectively controlling sample fluid flow from the flow line through the fluid sample inlet port, an operator unit for periodically reciprocating the piston within the pump bore, and a controller for regulating the stroke of the piston within the pump bore, and thereby the quantity of fluid pumped with each pump driving stroke. It comprises a balanced check valve seat; a balanced check valve seal; a compression member; and a central plunger.

  8. Aerosol sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Masquelier, Donald A.

    2004-02-10

    A system for sampling air and collecting particulate of a predetermined particle size range. A low pass section has an opening of a preselected size for gathering the air but excluding particles larger than the sample particles. An impactor section is connected to the low pass section and separates the air flow into a bypass air flow that does not contain the sample particles and a product air flow that does contain the sample particles. A wetted-wall cyclone collector, connected to the impactor section, receives the product air flow and traps the sample particles in a liquid.

  9. Rockballer Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Cook, Brant T.

    2013-01-01

    It would be desirable to acquire rock and/or ice samples that extend below the surface of the parent rock or ice in extraterrestrial environments such as the Moon, Mars, comets, and asteroids. Such samples would allow measurements to be made further back into the geologic history of the rock, providing critical insight into the history of the local environment and the solar system. Such samples could also be necessary for sample return mission architectures that would acquire samples from extraterrestrial environments for return to Earth for more detailed scientific investigation.

  10. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  11. Sample size calculations.

    PubMed

    Noordzij, Marlies; Dekker, Friedo W; Zoccali, Carmine; Jager, Kitty J

    2011-01-01

    The sample size is the number of patients or other experimental units that need to be included in a study to answer the research question. Pre-study calculation of the sample size is important; if a sample size is too small, one will not be able to detect an effect, while a sample that is too large may be a waste of time and money. Methods to calculate the sample size are explained in statistical textbooks, but because there are many different formulas available, it can be difficult for investigators to decide which method to use. Moreover, these calculations are prone to errors, because small changes in the selected parameters can lead to large differences in the sample size. This paper explains the basic principles of sample size calculations and demonstrates how to perform such a calculation for a simple study design.

  12. Curation of Frozen Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, L. A.; Allen, C. C.; Bastien, R.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) and the Astromaterials Curator are charged by NPD 7100.10D with the curation of all of NASA s extraterrestrial samples, including those from future missions. This responsibility includes the development of new sample handling and preparation techniques; therefore, the Astromaterials Curator must begin developing procedures to preserve, prepare and ship samples at sub-freezing temperatures in order to enable future sample return missions. Such missions might include the return of future frozen samples from permanently-shadowed lunar craters, the nuclei of comets, the surface of Mars, etc. We are demonstrating the ability to curate samples under cold conditions by designing, installing and testing a cold curation glovebox. This glovebox will allow us to store, document, manipulate and subdivide frozen samples while quantifying and minimizing contamination throughout the curation process.

  13. The Lunar Sample Compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Sample Compendium is a succinct summary of the data obtained from 40 years of study of Apollo and Luna samples of the Moon. Basic petrographic, chemical and age information is compiled, sample-by-sample, in the form of an advanced catalog in order to provide a basic description of each sample. The LSC can be found online using Google. The initial allocation of lunar samples was done sparingly, because it was realized that scientific techniques would improve over the years and new questions would be formulated. The LSC is important because it enables scientists to select samples within the context of the work that has already been done and facilitates better review of proposed allocations. It also provides back up material for public displays, captures information found only in abstracts, grey literature and curatorial databases and serves as a ready access to the now-vast scientific literature.

  14. Lunar Sample Compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Lunar Sample Compendium is a succinct summary of what has been learned from the study of Apollo and Luna samples of the Moon. Basic information is compiled, sample-by-sample, in the form of an advanced catalog in order to provide a basic description of each sample. Information presented is carefully attributed to the original source publication, thus the Compendium also serves as a ready access to the now vast scientific literature pertaining to lunar smples. The Lunar Sample Compendium is a work in progress (and may always be). Future plans include: adding sections on additional samples, adding new thin section photomicrographs, replacing the faded photographs with newly digitized photos from the original negatives, attempting to correct the age data using modern decay constants, adding references to each section, and adding an internal search engine.

  15. Urine sample collection protocols for bioassay samples

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, J.A.; McFadden, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    In vitro radiobioassay analyses are used to measure the amount of radioactive material excreted by personnel exposed to the potential intake of radioactive material. The analytical results are then used with various metabolic models to estimate the amount of radioactive material in the subject`s body and the original intake of radioactive material. Proper application of these metabolic models requires knowledge of the excretion period. It is normal practice to design the bioassay program based on a 24-hour excretion sample. The Hanford bioassay program simulates a total 24-hour urine excretion sample with urine collection periods lasting from one-half hour before retiring to one-half hour after rising on two consecutive days. Urine passed during the specified periods is collected in three 1-L bottles. Because the daily excretion volume given in Publication 23 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1975, p. 354) for Reference Man is 1.4 L, it was proposed to use only two 1-L bottles as a cost-saving measure. This raised the broader question of what should be the design capacity of a 24-hour urine sample kit.

  16. Urine sample collection protocols for bioassay samples

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, J.A.; McFadden, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    In vitro radiobioassay analyses are used to measure the amount of radioactive material excreted by personnel exposed to the potential intake of radioactive material. The analytical results are then used with various metabolic models to estimate the amount of radioactive material in the subject's body and the original intake of radioactive material. Proper application of these metabolic models requires knowledge of the excretion period. It is normal practice to design the bioassay program based on a 24-hour excretion sample. The Hanford bioassay program simulates a total 24-hour urine excretion sample with urine collection periods lasting from one-half hour before retiring to one-half hour after rising on two consecutive days. Urine passed during the specified periods is collected in three 1-L bottles. Because the daily excretion volume given in Publication 23 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1975, p. 354) for Reference Man is 1.4 L, it was proposed to use only two 1-L bottles as a cost-saving measure. This raised the broader question of what should be the design capacity of a 24-hour urine sample kit.

  17. Sampling functions for geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.; Lunquist, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A set of spherical sampling functions is defined such that they are related to spherical-harmonic functions in the same way that the sampling functions of information theory are related to sine and cosine functions. An orderly distribution of (N + 1) squared sampling points on a sphere is given, for which the (N + 1) squared spherical sampling functions span the same linear manifold as do the spherical-harmonic functions through degree N. The transformations between the spherical sampling functions and the spherical-harmonic functions are given by recurrence relations. The spherical sampling functions of two arguments are extended to three arguments and to nonspherical reference surfaces. Typical applications of this formalism to geophysical topics are sketched.

  18. Sampling in Qualitative Research

    PubMed Central

    LUBORSKY, MARK R.; RUBINSTEIN, ROBERT L.

    2011-01-01

    In gerontology the most recognized and elaborate discourse about sampling is generally thought to be in quantitative research associated with survey research and medical research. But sampling has long been a central concern in the social and humanistic inquiry, albeit in a different guise suited to the different goals. There is a need for more explicit discussion of qualitative sampling issues. This article will outline the guiding principles and rationales, features, and practices of sampling in qualitative research. It then describes common questions about sampling in qualitative research. In conclusion it proposes the concept of qualitative clarity as a set of principles (analogous to statistical power) to guide assessments of qualitative sampling in a particular study or proposal. PMID:22058580

  19. Sample positioning in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Repulsion forces arising from laser beams are provided to produce mild positioning forces on a sample in microgravity vacuum environments. The system of the preferred embodiment positions samples using a plurality of pulsed lasers providing opposing repulsion forces. The lasers are positioned around the periphery of a confinement area and expanded to create a confinement zone. The grouped laser configuration, in coordination with position sensing devices, creates a feedback servo whereby stable position control of a sample within microgravity environment can be achieved.

  20. Statistical distribution sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. S.

    1975-01-01

    Determining the distribution of statistics by sampling was investigated. Characteristic functions, the quadratic regression problem, and the differential equations for the characteristic functions are analyzed.

  1. National Sample Assessment Protocols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    These protocols represent a working guide for planning and implementing national sample assessments in connection with the national Key Performance Measures (KPMs). The protocols are intended for agencies involved in planning or conducting national sample assessments and personnel responsible for administering associated tenders or contracts,…

  2. Sampling system and method

    DOEpatents

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  3. Implementing Teacher Work Sampling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinne, Lenore J.; Watson, Dwight C.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how the teacher work sample methodology of the Renaissance Partnership for Improving Teacher Quality was implemented within the teacher education program at a small liberal arts college. Resulting program improvements are described, as well as on-going challenges. The adapted teacher work sample prompt and scoring rubric are…

  4. Extraterrestrial Samples at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the curation of extraterrestrial samples at NASA Johnson Space Center is shown. The topics include: 1) Apollo lunar samples; 2) Meteorites from Antarctica; 3) Cosmic dust from the stratosphere; 4) Genesis solar wind ions; 5) Stardust comet and interstellar grains; and 5) Space-Exposed Hardware.

  5. Urine sample (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A "clean-catch" urine sample is performed by collecting the sample of urine in midstream. Men or boys should wipe clean the head ... water and rinse well. A small amount of urine should initially fall into the toilet bowl before ...

  6. Assessment of bioburden on human and animal tissues: part 2--results of testing of human tissue and qualification of a composite sample for routine bioburden determination.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, John B; Merritt, Karen; Gocke, David; Osborne, Joel

    2012-08-01

    A quantitative method was developed and validated to assess bioburden on tissue from human donors and to compare bioburden determination results to swab culture results from the same donor. An initial study with allograft tissue from 101 donors showed a wide range of bioburden levels; values from no colony-forming units (CFU) detected to >28,000 CFU were observed. Tissues from donors that had swab cultures negative for objectionable microorganisms generally had lower bioburden than tissues from donors where objectionable microorganisms were recovered by swab culturing. In a follow-up study with 1,445 donors, a wide range of bioburden levels was again observed on tissues from donors that were swab culture negative for objectionable microorganisms. Tissues from 885 (61%) of these donors had no recoverable bioburden (<2 CFU). Importantly, tissues from 560 (39%) of the donors had recoverable bioburden which ranged from 1 to >24,000 CFU. Identification of bioburden isolates showed a diversity of genera and species. In compliance with the recent revision of the American Association of Tissue Banks K2.210 Standard, the quantitative bioburden determination method was validated with a composite tissue sample that contains bone and soft tissue sections tested together in one extraction vessel. A recovery efficiency of 68% was validated and the composite sample was shown to be representative of all of the tissues recovered from a donor. The use of the composite sample in conjunction with the quantitative bioburden determination method will facilitate an accurate assessment of the numbers and types of contaminating microorganisms on allografts prior to disinfection/sterilization. This information will ensure that disinfection/sterilization processes are properly validated and the capability of the overall allograft process is understood on a donor by donor basis.

  7. Biological sample collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Gloria A.

    2010-09-07

    A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

  8. Automated versus manual sample inoculations in routine clinical microbiology: a performance evaluation of the fully automated InoqulA instrument.

    PubMed

    Froment, P; Marchandin, H; Vande Perre, P; Lamy, B

    2014-03-01

    The process of plate streaking has been automated to improve the culture readings, isolation quality, and workflow of microbiology laboratories. However, instruments have not been well evaluated under routine conditions. We aimed to evaluate the performance of the fully automated InoqulA instrument (BD Kiestra B.V., The Netherlands) in the automated seeding of liquid specimens and samples collected using swabs with transport medium. We compared manual and automated methods according to the (i) within-run reproducibility using Escherichia coli-calibrated suspensions, (ii) intersample contamination using a series of alternating sterile broths and broths with >10(5) CFU/ml of either E. coli or Proteus mirabilis, (iii) isolation quality with standardized mixed bacterial suspensions of diverse complexity and a 4-category standardized scale (very poor, poor, fair to good, or excellent), and (iv) agreement of the results obtained from 244 clinical specimens. By involving 15 technicians in the latter part of the comparative study, we estimated the variability in the culture quality at the level of the laboratory team. The instrument produced satisfactory reproducibility with no sample cross-contamination, and it performed better than the manual method, with more colony types recovered and isolated (up to 11% and 17%, respectively). Finally, we showed that the instrument did not shorten the seeding time over short periods of work compared to that for the manual method. Altogether, the instrument improved the quality and standardization of the isolation, thereby contributing to a better overall workflow, shortened the time to results, and provided more accurate results for polymicrobial specimens.

  9. Rapid Active Sampling Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    A field-deployable, battery-powered Rapid Active Sampling Package (RASP), originally designed for sampling strong materials during lunar and planetary missions, shows strong utility for terrestrial geological use. The technology is proving to be simple and effective for sampling and processing materials of strength. Although this originally was intended for planetary and lunar applications, the RASP is very useful as a powered hand tool for geologists and the mining industry to quickly sample and process rocks in the field on Earth. The RASP allows geologists to surgically acquire samples of rock for later laboratory analysis. This tool, roughly the size of a wrench, allows the user to cut away swaths of weathering rinds, revealing pristine rock surfaces for observation and subsequent sampling with the same tool. RASPing deeper (.3.5 cm) exposes single rock strata in-situ. Where a geologist fs hammer can only expose unweathered layers of rock, the RASP can do the same, and then has the added ability to capture and process samples into powder with particle sizes less than 150 microns, making it easier for XRD/XRF (x-ray diffraction/x-ray fluorescence). The tool uses a rotating rasp bit (or two counter-rotating bits) that resides inside or above the catch container. The container has an open slot to allow the bit to extend outside the container and to allow cuttings to enter and be caught. When the slot and rasp bit are in contact with a substrate, the bit is plunged into it in a matter of seconds to reach pristine rock. A user in the field may sample a rock multiple times at multiple depths in minutes, instead of having to cut out huge, heavy rock samples for transport back to a lab for analysis. Because of the speed and accuracy of the RASP, hundreds of samples can be taken in one day. RASP-acquired samples are small and easily carried. A user can characterize more area in less time than by using conventional methods. The field-deployable RASP used a Ni

  10. Waste classification sampling plan

    SciTech Connect

    Landsman, S.D.

    1998-05-27

    The purpose of this sampling is to explain the method used to collect and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream so that the correct waste classification for the waste stream can be made, and to collect samples for studies of decontamination methods that could be used to remove fixed contamination present on the waste. The scope of this plan is to establish the technical basis for collecting samples and compiling quantitative data on the radioactive constituents present in waste generated during deactivation activities in B-Cell. Sampling and radioisotopic analysis will be performed on the fixed layers of contamination present on structural material and internal surfaces of process piping and tanks. In addition, dose rate measurements on existing waste material will be performed to determine the fraction of dose rate attributable to both removable and fixed contamination. Samples will also be collected to support studies of decontamination methods that are effective in removing the fixed contamination present on the waste. Sampling performed under this plan will meet criteria established in BNF-2596, Data Quality Objectives for the B-Cell Waste Stream Classification Sampling, J. M. Barnett, May 1998.

  11. Instructions for borehole sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, K.D.; Lindsey, K.A.

    1994-11-11

    Geologic systems generally are complex with physical properties and trends that can be difficult to predict. Subsurface geology exerts a fundamental control on groundwater flow and contaminant transport. The primary source for direct observation of subsurface geologic information is a borehole. However, direct observations from a borehole essentially are limited to the diameter and spacing of boreholes and the quality of the information derived from the drilling. Because it is impractical to drill a borehole every few feet to obtain data, it is necessary to maximize the data gathered during limited drilling operations. A technically defensible balance between the customer`s data quality objectives and control of drilling costs through limited drilling can be achieved with proper conduct of operations. This report presents the minimum criteria for geologic and hydrologic characterization and sampling that must be met during drilling. It outlines the sampling goals that need to be addressed when drilling boreholes, and the types of drilling techniques that work best to achieve these goals under the geologic conditions found at Hanford. This report provides general guidelines for: (1) how sampling methods are controlled by data needs, (2) how minimum sampling requirements change as knowledge and needs change, and (3) when drilling and sampling parameters need to be closely controlled with respect to the specific data needs. Consequently, the report is divided into two sections that center on: (1) a discussion of basic categories of subsurface characterization, sampling, and sampling techniques, and (2) guidelines for determining which drilling and sampling techniques meet required characterization and sampling objectives.

  12. Sample quality criteria.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Charles A; Wagner, Claas

    2015-01-01

    The concept of Sample Quality Criteria (SQC) is the initial step in the scientific approach to representative sampling. It includes the establishment of sampling objectives, Decision Unit (DU), and confidence. Once fully defined, these criteria serve as input, in addition to material properties, to the Theory of Sampling for developing a representative sampling protocol. The first component of the SQC establishes these questions: What is the analyte(s) of concern? What is the concentration level of interest of the analyte(s)? How will inference(s) be made from the analytical data to the DU? The second component of the SQC establishes the DU, i.e., the scale at which decisions are to be made. On a large scale, a DU could be a ship or rail car; examples for small-scale DUs are individual beans, seeds, or kernels. A well-defined DU is critical because it defines the spatial and temporal boundaries of sample collection. SQC are not limited to a single DU; they can also include multiple DUs. The third SQC component, the confidence, establishes the desired probability that a correct inference (decision) can be made. The confidence level should typically correlate to the potential consequences of an incorrect decision (e.g., health or economic). The magnitude of combined errors in the sampling, sample processing and analytical protocols determines the likelihood of an incorrect decision. Thus, controlling error to a greater extent increases the probability of a correct decision. The required confidence level directly affects the sampling effort and QC measures.

  13. Sampling video compression system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Lum, H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A system for transmitting video signal of compressed bandwidth is described. The transmitting station is provided with circuitry for dividing a picture to be transmitted into a plurality of blocks containing a checkerboard pattern of picture elements. Video signals along corresponding diagonal rows of picture elements in the respective blocks are regularly sampled. A transmitter responsive to the output of the sampling circuitry is included for transmitting the sampled video signals of one frame at a reduced bandwidth over a communication channel. The receiving station is provided with a frame memory for temporarily storing transmitted video signals of one frame at the original high bandwidth frequency.

  14. Sealed container sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennigan, T. J.

    1969-01-01

    Sampling device, by means of a tapered needle, pierces a sealed container while maintaining the seal and either evacuates or pressurizes the container. This device has many applications in the chemical, preservative and battery-manufacturing industries.

  15. Soil Gas Sampling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Field Branches Quality System and Technical Procedures: This document describes general and specific procedures, methods and considerations to be used and observed when collecting soil gas samples for field screening or laboratory analysis.

  16. Lunar sample contracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The major scientific accomplishments through 1971 are reported for the particle track studies of lunar samples. Results are discussed of nuclear track measurements by optical and electron microscopy, thermoluminescence, X-ray diffraction, and differential thermal analysis.

  17. Water Sample Concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2009-07-21

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  18. Sample positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Thomas H.; Johnson, Jr., Charles H.; Lane, Robert L.; Martin, Bradley E.; Tyree, William H.

    1976-01-06

    Apparatus for use in alpha particle counting with such as photomultiplier tubes, comprising a platform and linkage mechanism whereby samples are moved in linear manner toward and away from ends of the photomultiplier tubes.

  19. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-07-12

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  20. Dissolution actuated sample container

    SciTech Connect

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  1. TANK 5 SAMPLING

    SciTech Connect

    Vrettos, N; William Cheng, W; Thomas Nance, T

    2007-11-26

    Tank 5 at the Savannah River Site has been used to store high level waste and is currently undergoing waste removal processes in preparation for tank closure. Samples were taken from two locations to determine the contents in support of Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) development for chemical cleaning. These samples were obtained through the use of the Drop Core Sampler and the Snowbank Sampler developed by the Engineered Equipment & Systems (EES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL).

  2. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

    2007-02-09

    Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

  3. Lunar Sample Compendium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Charles

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Lunar Sample Compendium will be to inform scientists, astronauts and the public about the various lunar samples that have been returned from the Moon. This Compendium will be organized rock by rock in the manor of a catalog, but will not be as comprehensive, nor as complete, as the various lunar sample catalogs that are available. Likewise, this Compendium will not duplicate the various excellent books and reviews on the subject of lunar samples (Cadogen 1981, Heiken et al. 1991, Papike et al. 1998, Warren 2003, Eugster 2003). However, it is thought that an online Compendium, such as this, will prove useful to scientists proposing to study individual lunar samples and should help provide backup information for lunar sample displays. This Compendium will allow easy access to the scientific literature by briefly summarizing the significant findings of each rock along with the documentation of where the detailed scientific data are to be found. In general, discussion and interpretation of the results is left to the formal reviews found in the scientific literature. An advantage of this Compendium will be that it can be updated, expanded and corrected as need be.

  4. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  5. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, Loren L.

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  6. Comparison of polymerase chain reaction and bacteriological culture for the diagnosis of sheep brucellosis using aborted fetus samples.

    PubMed

    Leyla, Güler; Kadri, Gündüz; Umran, Ok

    2003-05-02

    PCR assay has been shown to be a promising option for the diagnosis of brucellosis. However, few studies have been performed with field samples in order to evaluate the assay as a diagnostic tool. In this study, routine use of a species-specific PCR assay previously developed for the identification of Brucella cultures was assessed for the detection of Brucella DNA directly from the stomach contents of aborted sheep fetuses. The assay is based on the insertion sequence IS711 in the Brucella chromosome. In the study, during 3 successive lambing seasons (1998-1999, 1999-2000 and 2000-2001) 126 aborted fetus samples each from different flocks and locations were examined. Brucella strains were isolated from 39 (31%) of the samples and all of the strains were identified as Brucella melitensis by biochemical characteristics, agglutination with monospecific A and M sera and PCR. Thirty-seven of 39 B. melitensis isolates were biotyped as biotype 3, and 2 isolates as biotype 1. From 38 of 39 culture positive fetal stomach contents B. melitensis-specific DNA was detected by PCR. PCR was found negative in all of the culture negative samples. Compared with culture, sensitivity and specificity of PCR were determined as 97.4 and 100%, respectively. The results indicate that this PCR procedure has a potential for use in routine diagnosis of sheep brucellosis.

  7. Sample Return Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williford, K. H.; Allwood, A.; Beegle, L. W.; Bhartia, R.; Flannery, D.; Hoffmann, A.; Mora, M. F.; Orbay, J.; Petrizzo, D. A.; Tuite, M. L., Jr.; Willis, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The first clear identification of an ancient habitable environment on Mars by the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission relied on a synthetic analytical approach combining orbital and surface imagery and spectroscopy with sophisticated sample acquisition and handling technology including a rotary percussive drill that provided powdered rock for bulk geochemical analysis [1]. The recent announcement of the instrument package for the proposed NASA Mars2020 rover mission, including micro x-ray fluorescence (PIXL) for elemental mapping as well as scanning ultraviolet laser fluorescence and Raman (SHERLOC) suggests a shift in emphasis of Mars surface science towards spatially resolved geochemical analysis that will support the selection and acquisition of samples for coring, caching, and possible return to Earth for further analysis. During a recent field expedition to investigate Archean and Proterozoic biosignatures in the Pilbara region of Western Australia, we deployed a dry, rotary percussive coring drill with a bit assembly analogous to that being considered for Mars2020. Six targets of varying age and lithology were sampled with the coring drill, and surrounding and adjacent rock samples were collected simultaneously. These samples were subsequently prepared and subsampled for bulk and in situ, spatially resolved analysis using conventional laboratory methods as well as the existing PIXL and SHERLOC platforms currently in development. Here we present new approaches and data from this integrated and ongoing program of "sample return science" designed to simulate, and eventually reduce risk associated with a long-term effort towards Mars sample return. [1] Grotzinger, J.P. et al. 2014. Science 343 DOI: 10.1126/science.1242777.

  8. Rapid Dispersion of Polymicrobial Wound Biofilms with Depolymerase Enzymes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    sensitizing” the bacteria to antibiotics and the soldier’s immune system . To accomplish this goal, we will use special enzymes called depolymerases...kill the bacteria, it is believed that dissolution of the biofilm protective layer will allow common antibiotics or the immune system to clear the...CFU) present. An active enzyme will digest the biofilm matrix and increase the CFUs released to the supernatant. The figure below shows the anti

  9. Microbial Community Composition Impacts Pathogen Iron Availability during Polymicrobial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stacy, Apollo; Whiteley, Marvin

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for bacterial pathogenesis, but in the host, iron is tightly sequestered, limiting its availability for bacterial growth. Although this is an important arm of host immunity, most studies examine how bacteria respond to iron restriction in laboratory rather than host settings, where the microbiome can potentially alter pathogen strategies for acquiring iron. One of the most important transcriptional regulators controlling bacterial iron homeostasis is Fur. Here we used a combination of RNA-seq and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq to characterize the iron-restricted and Fur regulons of the biofilm-forming opportunistic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. We discovered that iron restriction and Fur regulate 4% and 3.5% of the genome, respectively. While most genes in these regulons were related to iron uptake and metabolism, we found that Fur also directly regulates the biofilm-dispersing enzyme Dispersin B, allowing A. actinomycetemcomitans to escape from iron-scarce environments. We then leveraged these datasets to assess the availability of iron to A. actinomycetemcomitans in its primary infection sites, abscesses and the oral cavity. We found that A. actinomycetemcomitans is not restricted for iron in a murine abscess mono-infection, but becomes restricted for iron upon co-infection with the oral commensal Streptococcus gordonii. Furthermore, in the transition from health to disease in human gum infection, A. actinomycetemcomitans also becomes restricted for iron. These results suggest that host iron availability is heterogeneous and dependent on the infecting bacterial community. PMID:27973608

  10. Sinomenine hydrochloride protects against polymicrobial sepsis via autophagy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Gao, Min; Wang, Wenmei; Lang, Yuejiao; Tong, Zhongyi; Wang, Kangkai; Zhang, Huali; Chen, Guangwen; Liu, Meidong; Yao, Yongming; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2015-01-23

    Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, is the major cause of death in intensive care units (ICUs). The mortality rate of sepsis remains high even though the treatment and understanding of sepsis both continue to improve. Sinomenine (SIN) is a natural alkaloid extracted from Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, and its hydrochloride salt (Sinomenine hydrochloride, SIN-HCl) is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, its role in sepsis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of SIN-HCl in sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in BALB/c mice and the corresponding mechanism. SIN-HCl treatment improved the survival of BALB/c mice that were subjected to CLP and reduced multiple organ dysfunction and the release of systemic inflammatory mediators. Autophagy activities were examined using Western blotting. The results showed that CLP-induced autophagy was elevated, and SIN-HCl treatment further strengthened the autophagy activity. Autophagy blocker 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was used to investigate the mechanism of SIN-HCl in vitro. Autophagy activities were determined by examining the autophagosome formation, which was shown as microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) puncta with green immunofluorescence. SIN-HCl reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine release and increased autophagy in peritoneal macrophages (PM). 3-MA significantly decreased autophagosome formation induced by LPS and SIN-HCl. The decrease of inflammatory cytokines caused by SIN-HCl was partially aggravated by 3-MA treatment. Taken together, our results indicated that SIN-HCl could improve survival, reduce organ damage, and attenuate the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by CLP, at least in part through regulating autophagy activities.

  11. Sinomenine Hydrochloride Protects against Polymicrobial Sepsis via Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Gao, Min; Wang, Wenmei; Lang, Yuejiao; Tong, Zhongyi; Wang, Kangkai; Zhang, Huali; Chen, Guangwen; Liu, Meidong; Yao, Yongming; Xiao, Xianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, a systemic inflammatory response to infection, is the major cause of death in intensive care units (ICUs). The mortality rate of sepsis remains high even though the treatment and understanding of sepsis both continue to improve. Sinomenine (SIN) is a natural alkaloid extracted from Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, and its hydrochloride salt (Sinomenine hydrochloride, SIN-HCl) is widely used to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, its role in sepsis remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of SIN-HCl in sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in BALB/c mice and the corresponding mechanism. SIN-HCl treatment improved the survival of BALB/c mice that were subjected to CLP and reduced multiple organ dysfunction and the release of systemic inflammatory mediators. Autophagy activities were examined using Western blotting. The results showed that CLP-induced autophagy was elevated, and SIN-HCl treatment further strengthened the autophagy activity. Autophagy blocker 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was used to investigate the mechanism of SIN-HCl in vitro. Autophagy activities were determined by examining the autophagosome formation, which was shown as microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) puncta with green immunofluorescence. SIN-HCl reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokine release and increased autophagy in peritoneal macrophages (PM). 3-MA significantly decreased autophagosome formation induced by LPS and SIN-HCl. The decrease of inflammatory cytokines caused by SIN-HCl was partially aggravated by 3-MA treatment. Taken together, our results indicated that SIN-HCl could improve survival, reduce organ damage, and attenuate the release of inflammatory cytokines induced by CLP, at least in part through regulating autophagy activities. PMID:25625512

  12. Rapid Dispersion of Polymicrobial Wound Biofilms with Depolymerase Enzymes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    196 ESBL (TEM-10) Escherichia coli 35218 used as a positive control for B- lactamase, contains TEM1 Enterobacter cloacae BAA-1143 AmpC beta-lactamase...biofilms. 1 35218 E. coli; + control for beta-lactamases; contains Tem-1 2 BAA68 Enteric group 137; ESBL 3 BAA1143 Enterobacter; AmpC beta

  13. Rapid Dispersion of Polymicrobial Wound Biofilms with Depolymerase Enzymes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    Bacteriophage , depolymerase, biofilm, extrapolymeric substance, enzyme 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF...surface of bacterial viruses (i.e. bacteriophage ) where they function to dissolve the EPS layer on naturally occurring biofilms allowing the phage to...Metrology of Microbial Systems Seminar Series. “Exploiting Bacteriophage Endolysins for Therapeutic and Diagnostic Use against Bacterial Pathogens

  14. Fluid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-10-11

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

  15. Fluid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

  16. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  17. Experimental scattershot boson sampling

    PubMed Central

    Bentivegna, Marco; Spagnolo, Nicolò; Vitelli, Chiara; Flamini, Fulvio; Viggianiello, Niko; Latmiral, Ludovico; Mataloni, Paolo; Brod, Daniel J.; Galvão, Ernesto F.; Crespi, Andrea; Ramponi, Roberta; Osellame, Roberto; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Boson sampling is a computational task strongly believed to be hard for classical computers, but efficiently solvable by orchestrated bosonic interference in a specialized quantum computer. Current experimental schemes, however, are still insufficient for a convincing demonstration of the advantage of quantum over classical computation. A new variation of this task, scattershot boson sampling, leads to an exponential increase in speed of the quantum device, using a larger number of photon sources based on parametric down-conversion. This is achieved by having multiple heralded single photons being sent, shot by shot, into different random input ports of the interferometer. We report the first scattershot boson sampling experiments, where six different photon-pair sources are coupled to integrated photonic circuits. We use recently proposed statistical tools to analyze our experimental data, providing strong evidence that our photonic quantum simulator works as expected. This approach represents an important leap toward a convincing experimental demonstration of the quantum computational supremacy. PMID:26601164

  18. INEL Sample Management Office

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, C.

    1994-12-31

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Sample Management Office (SMO) was formed as part of the EG&G Idaho Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) in June, 1990. Since then, the SMO has been recognized and sought out by other prime contractors and programs at the INEL. Since December 1991, the DOE-ID Division Directors for the Environmental Restoration Division and Waste Management Division supported the expansion of the INEL ERP SMO into the INEL site wide SMO. The INEL SMO serves as a point of contact for multiple environmental analytical chemistry and laboratory issues (e.g., capacity, capability). The SMO chemists work with project managers during planning to help develop data quality objectives, select appropriate analytical methods, identify special analytical services needs, identify a source for the services, and ensure that requirements for sampling and analysis (e.g., preservations, sample volumes) are clear and technically accurate. The SMO chemists also prepare work scope statements for the laboratories performing the analyses.

  19. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOEpatents

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  20. Thermoluminescence of lunar samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Doell, Richard R.

    1970-01-01

    Appreciable natural thermoluminescence with glow curve peaks at about 350 degrees centigrade for lunar fines and breccias and above 400 degrees centigrade for crystalline rocks has been recognized in lunar samples. Plagioclase has been identified as the principal carrier of thermoluminescence, and the difference in peak temperatures indicates compositional or structural differences between the feldspars of the different rock types. The present thermoluminescence in the lunar samples is probably the result of a dynamic equilibrium between acquisition from radiation and loss in the lunar thermal environment. A progressive change in the glow curves of core samples with depth below the surface suggests the use of thermoluminescence disequilibrium to detect surfaces buried by recent surface activity, and it also indicates that the lunar diurnal temperature variation penetrates to at least 10.5 centimeters.

  1. Contamination sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, Felix A. (Inventor); Stern, Susan M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A contamination sample collection device has a wooden dowel with a cotton swab at one end, the cotton being covered by a nylon cloth and the wooden dowel being encapsulated by plastic tubing which is heat shrunk onto the dowel and onto a portion of the cotton swab to secure the cotton in place. Another plastic tube is heat shrunk onto the plastic that encapsulates the dowel and a portion of the nylon cloth to secure the nylon cloth in place. The device may thereafter be covered with aluminum foil protector. The device may be used for obtaining samples of contamination in clean room environments.

  2. Returning Samples from Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Kanik, I.; Brownlee, D.; McKay, C.; Anbar, A.; Glavin, D.; Yano, H.

    2012-12-01

    From the first half century of space exploration, we have obtained samples only from the Moon, comet Wild 2, the Solar Wind and the asteroid Itokawa. The in-depth analyses of these samples in terrestrial laboratories have yielded profound knowledge that could not have been obtained without the returned samples. While obtaining samples from Solar System bodies is crucial science, it is rarely done due to cost and complexity. Cassini's discovery of geysers on Enceladus and organic materials, indicate that there is an exceptional opportunity and science rational to do a low-cost flyby sample return mission, similar to what was done by the Stardust. The earliest low cost possible flight opportunity is the next Discovery Mission [Tsou et al 2012]. Enceladus Plume Discovery - While Voyager provided evidence for young surfaces on Enceladus, the existence of Enceladus plumes was discovered by Cassini. Enceladus and comets are the only known solar system bodies that have jets enabling sample collection without landing or surface contact. Cassini in situ Findings -Cassini's made many discoveries at Saturn, including the break up of large organics in the plumes of Enceladus. Four prime criteria for habitability are liquid water, a heat source, organics and nitrogen [McKay et al. 2008, Waite et al. 2009, Postberg et al. 2011]. Out of all the NASA designated habitability targets, Enceladus is the single body that presents evidence for all four criteria. Significant advancement in the exploration of the biological potential of Enceladus can be made on returned samples in terrestrial laboratories where the full power of state-of-the-art laboratory instrumentation and procedures can be used. Without serious limits on power, mass or even cost, terrestrial laboratories provide the ultimate in analytical capability, adaptability, reproducibility and reliability. What Questions can Samples Address? - Samples collected from the Enceladus plume will enable a thorough and replicated

  3. Using Language Sample Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilmann, John J.; Miller, Jon F.; Nockerts, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Over the past 50 years, language sample analysis (LSA) has evolved from a powerful research tool that is used to document children's linguistic development into a powerful clinical tool that is used to identify and describe the language skills of children with language impairment. The Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts (SALT; J.…

  4. Groundwater sampling: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Qingren; Munoz-Carpena, Rafael; Foster, Adam; Migliaccio, Kati W.; Li, Yuncong; Migliaccio, Kati

    2011-01-01

    Discussing an array of water quality topics, from water quality regulations and criteria, to project planning and sampling activities, this book outlines a framework for improving water quality programs. Using this framework, you can easily put the proper training and tools in place for better management of water resources.

  5. Adaptive Sampling Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flournoy, Nancy

    Designs for sequential sampling procedures that adapt to cumulative information are discussed. A familiar illustration is the play-the-winner rule in which there are two treatments; after a random start, the same treatment is continued as long as each successive subject registers a success. When a failure occurs, the other treatment is used until…

  6. Proficiency Sample Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apodaca, Mary

    The instrument for Colorado's Foreign Language Proficiency Sample Project and directions for its administration are provided in this document. The project is a voluntary, teacher-designed and -administered effort to standardize high school student language proficiency assessment techniques. The materials are used in teacher workshops. The…

  7. Sampling for Chemical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochvil, Byron; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This review, designed to make analysts aware of uncertainties introduced into analytical measurements during sampling, is organized under these headings: general considerations; theory; standards; and applications related to mineralogy, soils, sediments, metallurgy, atmosphere, water, biology, agriculture and food, medical and clinical areas, oil…

  8. Driven Boson Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhofen, Sonja; Bartley, Tim J.; Sansoni, Linda; Kruse, Regina; Hamilton, Craig S.; Jex, Igor; Silberhorn, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Sampling the distribution of bosons that have undergone a random unitary evolution is strongly believed to be a computationally hard problem. Key to outperforming classical simulations of this task is to increase both the number of input photons and the size of the network. We propose driven boson sampling, in which photons are input within the network itself, as a means to approach this goal. We show that the mean number of photons entering a boson sampling experiment can exceed one photon per input mode, while maintaining the required complexity, potentially leading to less stringent requirements on the input states for such experiments. When using heralded single-photon sources based on parametric down-conversion, this approach offers an ˜e -fold enhancement in the input state generation rate over scattershot boson sampling, reaching the scaling limit for such sources. This approach also offers a dramatic increase in the signal-to-noise ratio with respect to higher-order photon generation from such probabilistic sources, which removes the need for photon number resolution during the heralding process as the size of the system increases.

  9. Lunar sample analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housley, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    A wide variety of lunar sample and meteorite studies were performed. Abstracts of the most recent reports are also attached. Experimental techniques employed have included scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Mossbauer spectroscopy, atomic absorption analysis and a variety of simulation studies.

  10. Randomization and sampling issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    The need for randomly selected routes and other sampling issues have been debated by the Amphibian electronic discussion group. Many excellent comments have been made, pro and con, but we have not reached consensus yet. This paper brings those comments together and attempts a synthesis. I hope that the resulting discussion will bring us closer to a consensus.

  11. ANNULAR IMPACTOR SAMPLING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Tait, G.W.C.

    1959-03-31

    A high-rate air sampler capable of sampling alphaemitting particles as small as 0.5 microns is described. The device is a cylindrical shaped cup that fits in front of a suction tube and which has sticky grease coating along its base. Suction forces contaminated air against the periodically monitored particle absorbing grease.

  12. Color Discrimination Work Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational-Technical High School, Billerica, MA.

    This manual contains a work sample intended to assess a handicapped student's ability to see likenesses or differences in colors or shades, identifying or matching certain colors, and selecting colors that go together. Section 1 describes the assessment and lists related occupations and DOT codes. Instructions to the evaluator are provided in the…

  13. Biological Sampling Variability Study

    SciTech Connect

    Amidan, Brett G.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2016-11-08

    There are many sources of variability that exist in the sample collection and analysis process. This paper addresses many, but not all, sources of variability. The main focus of this paper was to better understand and estimate variability due to differences between samplers. Variability between days was also studied, as well as random variability within each sampler. Experiments were performed using multiple surface materials (ceramic and stainless steel), multiple contaminant concentrations (10 spores and 100 spores), and with and without the presence of interfering material. All testing was done with sponge sticks using 10-inch by 10-inch coupons. Bacillus atrophaeus was used as the BA surrogate. Spores were deposited using wet deposition. Grime was coated on the coupons which were planned to include the interfering material (Section 3.3). Samples were prepared and analyzed at PNNL using CDC protocol (Section 3.4) and then cultured and counted. Five samplers were trained so that samples were taken using the same protocol. Each sampler randomly sampled eight coupons each day, four coupons with 10 spores deposited and four coupons with 100 spores deposited. Each day consisted of one material being tested. The clean samples (no interfering materials) were run first, followed by the dirty samples (coated with interfering material). There was a significant difference in recovery efficiency between the coupons with 10 spores deposited (mean of 48.9%) and those with 100 spores deposited (mean of 59.8%). There was no general significant difference between the clean and dirty (containing interfering material) coupons or between the two surface materials; however, there was a significant interaction between concentration amount and presence of interfering material. The recovery efficiency was close to the same for coupons with 10 spores deposited, but for the coupons with 100 spores deposited, the recovery efficiency for the dirty samples was significantly larger (65

  14. Same-day diagnostic and surveillance data for tuberculosis via whole genome sequencing of direct respiratory samples.

    PubMed

    Votintseva, Antonina A; Bradley, Phelim; Pankhurst, Louise; Del Ojo Elias, Carlos; Loose, Matthew; Nilgiriwala, Kayzad; Chatterjee, Anirvan; Smith, E Grace; Sanderson, Nicolas; Walker, Timothy M; Morgan, Marcus R; Wyllie, David H; Walker, A Sarah; Peto, Tim E A; Crook, Derrick W; Iqbal, Zamin

    2017-03-08

    Routine full characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) is culture-based, taking many weeks. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) can generate antibiotic susceptibility profiles to inform treatment, augmented with strain information for global surveillance; such data could be transformative if provided at or near point of care.We demonstrate a low-cost DNA extraction method for TB WGS direct from patient samples. We initially evaluated the method using the Illumina MiSeq sequencer (40 smear-positive respiratory samples, obtained after routine clinical testing, and 27 matched liquid cultures). M. tuberculosis was identified in all 39 samples from which DNA was successfully extracted. Sufficient data for antibiotic susceptibility prediction was obtained from 24 (62%) samples; all results were concordant with reference laboratory phenotypes. Phylogenetic placement was concordant between direct and cultured samples. Using an Illumina MiSeq/MiniSeq the workflow from patient sample to results can be completed in 44/16 hours at a reagent cost of £96/£198 per sample.We then employed a non-specific PCR-based library preparation method for sequencing on an Oxford Nanopore Technologies MinION sequencer. We applied this to cultured Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain (BCG), and to combined culture-negative sputum DNA and BCG DNA. For flowcell version R9.4, the estimated turnaround time from patient to identification of BCG, detection of pyrazinamide resistance, and phylogenetic placement was 7.5 hours, with full susceptibility results 5 hours later. Antibiotic susceptibility predictions were fully concordant. A critical advantage of the MinION is the ability to continue sequencing until sufficient coverage is obtained, providing a potential solution to the problem of variable amounts of M. tuberculosis in direct samples.

  15. Seabed observation & sampling system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blackwood, D.; Parolski, K.

    2001-01-01

    SEABOSS has proved to be a valuable addition to the USGS data-acquisition and processing field program. It has allowed researchers to collect high-quality images and seabed samples in a timely manner. It is a simple, dependable and trouble-free system with a track record of over 3,000 deployments. When used as part of the USGS seafloor mapping acquisition, processing, and ground-truth program, SEABOSS has been invaluable in providing information quickly and efficiently, with a minimum of downtime. SEABOSS enables scientists to collect high-quality images and samples of the seabed, essential to the study of sedimentary environments and biological habitats and to the interpretation of side-scan sonar and multibeam imagery, the most common tools for mapping the seabed.

  16. Sampling system and method

    DOEpatents

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2017-03-07

    In one embodiment, the present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for supporting a tubing bundle during installation or removal. The apparatus includes a clamp for securing the tubing bundle to an external wireline. In various examples, the clamp is external to the tubing bundle or integral with the tubing bundle. According to one method, a tubing bundle and wireline are deployed together and the tubing bundle periodically secured to the wireline using a clamp. In another embodiment, the present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit. In a specific example, one or more clamps are used to connect the first and/or second conduits to an external wireline.

  17. Cerenkov fiber sampling calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, K.; Kefford, D.; Kennedy, J.; Pisani, R.; Sanzeni, C.; Segall, K.; Wall, D.; Winn, D.R. ); Carey, R.; Dye, S.; Miller, J.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W. ); Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Savin, A.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E. )

    1994-08-01

    Clear optical fibers were used as a Cerenkov sampling media in Pb (electromagnetic) and Cu (hadron) absorbers in spaghetti calorimeters, for high rate and high radiation dose experiments, such as the forward region of high energy colliders. The fiber axes were aligned close to the direction of the incident particles (1[degree]--7[degree]). The 7 [lambda] deep hadron tower contained 2.8% by volume 1.5 mm diameter core clear plastic fibers. The 27 radiation length deep electromagnetic towers had packing fractions of 6.8% and 7.2% of 1 mm diameter core quartz fibers as the active Cerenkov sampling medium. The energy resolution on electrons and pions, energy response, pulse shapes and angular studies are presented.

  18. Nonadiabatic transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, M. C.; Corcelli, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) is combined with transition path sampling (TPS) to produce a new method called nonadiabatic path sampling (NAPS). The NAPS method is validated on a model electron transfer system coupled to a Langevin bath. Numerically exact rate constants are computed using the reactive flux (RF) method over a broad range of solvent frictions that span from the energy diffusion (low friction) regime to the spatial diffusion (high friction) regime. The NAPS method is shown to quantitatively reproduce the RF benchmark rate constants over the full range of solvent friction. Integrating FSSH within the TPS framework expands the applicability of both approaches and creates a new method that will be helpful in determining detailed mechanisms for nonadiabatic reactions in the condensed-phase.

  19. Lunar sample analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tittmann, B. R.

    1975-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that very small amounts of absorbed volatiles only removed by outgassing in high vacuum and elevated temperatures-drastically increase the internal friction in terrestrial analogs of lunar basalt. Recently room temperature Q values as high as 2000 were achieved by thorough outgassing procedures in 10 to the 8th power torr. Results are presented on Q measurements for lunar rock 70215.85, along with some data on the effect on Q of a variety of gases. Data show that substantially greater increases in Q are obtainable in a lunar rock sample than in the terrestrial analog samples studied, and that in addition to H2O other gases also can make non-negligible contributions to the internal friction.

  20. Phoenix Test Sample Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image, acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 7, the seventh day of the mission (June 1, 2008), shows the so-called 'Knave of Hearts' first-dig test area to the north of the lander. The Robotic Arm's scraping blade left a small horizontal depression above where the sample was taken.

    Scientists speculate that white material in the depression left by the dig could represent ice or salts that precipitated into the soil. This material is likely the same white material observed in the sample in the Robotic Arm's scoop.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Advanced hierarchical distance sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, Andy

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we cover a number of important extensions of the basic hierarchical distance-sampling (HDS) framework from Chapter 8. First, we discuss the inclusion of “individual covariates,” such as group size, in the HDS model. This is important in many surveys where animals form natural groups that are the primary observation unit, with the size of the group expected to have some influence on detectability. We also discuss HDS integrated with time-removal and double-observer or capture-recapture sampling. These “combined protocols” can be formulated as HDS models with individual covariates, and thus they have a commonality with HDS models involving group structure (group size being just another individual covariate). We cover several varieties of open-population HDS models that accommodate population dynamics. On one end of the spectrum, we cover models that allow replicate distance sampling surveys within a year, which estimate abundance relative to availability and temporary emigration through time. We consider a robust design version of that model. We then consider models with explicit dynamics based on the Dail and Madsen (2011) model and the work of Sollmann et al. (2015). The final major theme of this chapter is relatively newly developed spatial distance sampling models that accommodate explicit models describing the spatial distribution of individuals known as Point Process models. We provide novel formulations of spatial DS and HDS models in this chapter, including implementations of those models in the unmarked package using a hack of the pcount function for N-mixture models.

  2. Water sample filtration unit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skougstad, M.W.; Scarbro, G.F.

    1968-01-01

    A readily portable, all plastic, pressure filtration unit is described which greatly facilitates rapid micropore membrane field filtration of up to several liters of water with a minimum risk of inorganic chemical alteration or contamination of the sample. The unit accommodates standard 10.2-cm. (4-inch) diameter filters. The storage and carrying case serves as a convenient filter stand for both field and laboratory use.

  3. Natural sampling strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallum, C. R.; Basu, J. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    A natural stratum-based sampling scheme and the aggregation procedures for estimating wheat area, yield, and production and their associated prediction error estimates are described. The methodology utilizes LANDSAT imagery and agrophysical data to permit an improved stratification in foreign areas by ignoring political boundaries and restratifying along boundaries that are more homogeneous with respect to the distribution of agricultural density, soil characteristics, and average climatic conditions. A summary of test results is given including a discussion of the various problems encountered.

  4. Digital Microfluidics Sample Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Michael G.; Srinivasan, Vijay; Eckhardt, Allen; Paik, Philip Y.; Sudarsan, Arjun; Shenderov, Alex; Hua, Zhishan; Pamula, Vamsee K.

    2010-01-01

    Three innovations address the needs of the medical world with regard to microfluidic manipulation and testing of physiological samples in ways that can benefit point-of-care needs for patients such as premature infants, for which drawing of blood for continuous tests can be life-threatening in their own right, and for expedited results. A chip with sample injection elements, reservoirs (and waste), droplet formation structures, fluidic pathways, mixing areas, and optical detection sites, was fabricated to test the various components of the microfluidic platform, both individually and in integrated fashion. The droplet control system permits a user to control droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. Also, the programming system allows a user to develop software routines for controlling droplet microactuator system functions, such as droplet operations and detector operations. A chip is incorporated into the system with a controller, a detector, input and output devices, and software. A novel filler fluid formulation is used for the transport of droplets with high protein concentrations. Novel assemblies for detection of photons from an on-chip droplet are present, as well as novel systems for conducting various assays, such as immunoassays and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The lab-on-a-chip (a.k.a., lab-on-a-printed-circuit board) processes physiological samples and comprises a system for automated, multi-analyte measurements using sub-microliter samples of human serum. The invention also relates to a diagnostic chip and system including the chip that performs many of the routine operations of a central labbased chemistry analyzer, integrating, for example, colorimetric assays (e.g., for proteins), chemiluminescence/fluorescence assays (e.g., for enzymes, electrolytes, and gases), and/or conductometric assays (e.g., for hematocrit on plasma and whole blood) on a single chip platform.

  5. Sustainable Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Christie; Hancock, Sean; Laub, Joshua; Perry, Christopher; Ash, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The proposed Mars sample return mission will be completed using natural Martian resources for the majority of its operations. The system uses the following technologies: In-Situ Propellant Production (ISPP), a methane-oxygen propelled Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV), a carbon dioxide powered hopper, and a hydrogen fueled balloon system (large balloons and small weather balloons). The ISPP system will produce the hydrogen, methane, and oxygen using a Sabatier reactor. a water electrolysis cell, water extracted from the Martian surface, and carbon dioxide extracted from the Martian atmosphere. Indigenous hydrogen will fuel the balloon systems and locally-derived methane and oxygen will fuel the MAV for the return of a 50 kg sample to Earth. The ISPP system will have a production cycle of 800 days and the estimated overall mission length is 1355 days from Earth departure to return to low Earth orbit. Combining these advanced technologies will enable the proposed sample return mission to be executed with reduced initial launch mass and thus be more cost efficient. The successful completion of this mission will serve as the next step in the advancement of Mars exploration technology.

  6. Diagnosis of neonatal group B Streptococcus sepsis by nested-PCR of residual urine samples

    PubMed Central

    Cezarino, Bruno Nicolino; Yamamoto, Lidia; Del Negro, Gilda Maria Barbaro; Rocha, Daisy; Okay, Thelma Suely

    2008-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) remains the most common cause of early-onset sepsis in newborns. Laboratory gold-standard, broth culture methods are highly specific, but lack sensitivity. The aim of this study was to validate a nested-PCR and to determine whether residue volumes of urine samples obtained by non invasive, non sterile methods could be used to confirm neonatal GBS sepsis. The nested-PCR was performed with primers of the major GBS surface antigen. Unavailability of biological samples to perform life supporting exams, as well as others to elucidate the etiology of infections is a frequent problem concerning newborn patients. Nevertheless, we decided to include cases according to strict criteria: newborns had to present with signs and symptoms compatible with GBS infection; at least one of the following biological samples had to be sent for culture: blood, urine, or cerebrospinal fluid; availability of residue volumes of the samples sent for cultures, or of others collected on the day of hospitalization, prior to antibiotic therapy prescription, to be analyzed by PCR; favorable outcome after GBS empiric treatment. In only one newborn GBS infection was confirmed by cultures, while infection was only presumptive in the other three patients (they fulfilled inclusion criteria but were GBS-culture negative). From a total of 12 biological samples (5 blood, 3 CSF and 4 urine specimen), eight were tested by culture methods (2/8 were positive), and 8 were tested by PCR (7/8 were positive), and only 4 samples were simultaneously tested by both methods (1 positive by culture and 3 by PCR). In conclusion, although based on a restricted number of neonates and samples, our results suggest that the proposed nested-PCR might be used to diagnose GBS sepsis as it has successfully amplified the three types of biological samples analyzed (blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid), and was more sensitive than culture methods as PCR in urine confirmed diagnosis in all four patients

  7. 340 Representative sampling verification tank sampling and analysis plan

    SciTech Connect

    Olander, A.R., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-21

    This Sampling and Analysis Plan contains requirements for characterizing the 340 vault tank 1. The objective of the sampling and characterization is to determine if the tank is homogeneous when agitated and which sampling method provides the most representative sample. A secondary objective is to collect and characterize solid samples.

  8. Germanium-76 Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-04-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0νββ). The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, and the first one gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on April 24, 2011. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility, a DOE user facility at PNNL, was used to make the required isotopic and chemical purity measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The results of this first analysis are reported here.

  9. Air Sampling Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    General Metal Works' Accu-Vol is a high-volume air sampling system used by many government agencies to monitor air quality for pollution control purposes. Procedure prevents possible test-invalidating contamination from materials other than particulate pollutants, caused by manual handling or penetration of windblown matter during transit, a cassette was developed in which the filter is sealed within a metal frame and protected in transit by a snap-on aluminum cover, thus handled only under clean conditions in the laboratory.

  10. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Dahl, David A.; Delmore, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  11. Stack sampling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Love, Lonnie J; Noakes, Mark W; Pin, Francois G; Richardson, Bradley S; Rowe, John C

    2014-09-16

    An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, at least one stabilizing member, and at least one moveable member. The stabilizing member has a first portion coupled to the support member and a second portion configured to engage with the structure to restrict relative movement between the support member and the structure. The stabilizing member is radially expandable from a first configuration where the second portion does not engage with a surface of the structure to a second configuration where the second portion engages with the surface of the structure.

  12. 46. VIEW OF SAMPLING ROOM FROM SOUTHEAST. TO LEFT, SAMPLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. VIEW OF SAMPLING ROOM FROM SOUTHEAST. TO LEFT, SAMPLING ELEVATOR AND IN CENTER, SAMPLE BINS WITH DISCHARGE CHUTE AND THREE LABELS. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  13. Acclerated rare event sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevick, David

    2015-03-01

    We suggest a strategy for biased transition matrix Monte-Carlo calculations that both ensures the most rapid coverage of the entire computational window in the macroscopic variables of interest E --> and yields estimates of transition probabilities between states that are equally accurate in low and high probability regions. Further, paths between different low probability regions are sampled at regular intervals. For the case of a single E variable, a random system realization for which the value of E falls in e.g. the i:th histogram bin is generated. This state is perturbed and the resulting realization is rejected until a transition is observed to a neighboring bin, taken here as i + 1 . All accepted and rejected transitions are simultaneously employed to generate the elements of a transition matrix. Subsequently, only a transition to bin i + 2 is accepted and this procedure is continued until the last of the N bins comprising the computational window is sampled. The procedure is then repeated but in the direction of decreasing bin number. The probability distribution of E can then be obtained by e.g. repeatedly multiplying a random vector by the transition matrix.

  14. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall.

  15. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

  16. Bacterial community composition of chronic periodontitis and novel oral sampling sites for detecting disease indicators

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is an infectious and inflammatory disease of polymicrobial etiology that can lead to the destruction of bones and tissues that support the teeth. The management of chronic periodontitis (CP) relies heavily on elimination or at least control of known pathogenic consortia associated with the disease. Until now, microbial plaque obtained from the subgingival (SubG) sites has been the primary focus for bacterial community analysis using deep sequencing. In addition to the use of SubG plaque, here, we investigated whether plaque obtained from supragingival (SupG) and tongue dorsum sites can serve as alternatives for monitoring CP-associated bacterial biomarkers. Results Using SubG, SupG, and tongue plaque DNA from 11 healthy and 13 diseased subjects, we sequenced V3 regions (approximately 200 bases) of the 16S rRNA gene using Illumina sequencing. After quality filtering, approximately 4.1 million sequences were collapsed into operational taxonomic units (OTUs; sequence identity cutoff of >97%) that were classified to a total of 19 phyla spanning 114 genera. Bacterial community diversity and overall composition was not affected by health or disease, and multiresponse permutation procedure (MRPP) on Bray-Curtis distance measures only supported weakly distinct bacterial communities in SubG and tongue plaque depending on health or disease status (P < 0.05). Nonetheless, in SubG and tongue sites, the relative abundance of Firmicutes was increased significantly from health to disease and members of Synergistetes were found in higher abundance across all sites in disease. Taxa indicative of CP were identified in all three locations (for example, Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Synergistes oral taxa 362 and 363). Conclusions For the first time, this study demonstrates that SupG and tongue dorsum plaque can serve as alternative sources for detecting and enumerating known and novel bacterial biomarkers of CP. This finding is clinically

  17. Revisiting sample entropy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindan, R. B.; Wilson, J. D.; Eswaran, H.; Lowery, C. L.; Preißl, H.

    2007-03-01

    We modify the definition of sample entropy (SaEn) by incorporating a time delay between the components of the block (from which the densities are estimated) and show that the modified method characterizes the complexity of the system better than the original version. We apply the modified SaEn to the standard deterministic systems and stochastic processes (uncorrelated and long range correlated (LRC) processes) and show that the underlying complexity of the system is better quantified by the modified method. We extend this analysis to the RR intervals of the normal and congestive heart failure (CHF) subjects (available via www.physionet.org) and show that there is a good degree of separation between the two groups.

  18. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  19. Glass sample characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Anees

    1990-01-01

    The development of in-house integrated optical performance modelling capability at MSFC is described. This performance model will take into account the effects of structural and thermal distortions, as well as metrology errors in optical surfaces to predict the performance of large an complex optical systems, such as Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility. The necessary hardware and software were identified to implement an integrated optical performance model. A number of design, development, and testing tasks were supported to identify the debonded mirror pad, and rebuilding of the Technology Mirror Assembly. Over 300 samples of Zerodur were prepared in different sizes and shapes for acid etching, coating, and polishing experiments to characterize the subsurface damage and stresses produced by the grinding and polishing operations.

  20. Samples from Asteroid Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.; Martel, L. M. V.

    2011-08-01

    The Hayabusa spacecraft, flown by the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), returned samples from asteroid 25143 Itokawa on June 13, 2010. Though the sampling device did not operate properly, the mission was able to return a couple thousand particles, from a few- to a few hundred-micrometers across. A battery of laboratory analyses (electron microscopy, elemental analysis, and oxygen isotopic measurements) shows that the particles derive from materials like those in thermally metamorphosed LL group ordinary chondrites. Astronomical observations had classified Itokawa as a stony S(IV) type of asteroid. The nature of S-type asteroids has been debated for decades; some astronomers argued that S-type asteroids are ordinary chondrites while others suggested that they were more likely to be differentiated objects (i.e., melted or partially melted to make igneous rocks). The problem was that we did not know enough about space weathering on asteroids to know how the spectra of chondritic or differentiated asteroids changed with exposure to micrometeorites and solar wind. The examinations of Hayabusa's treasure have settled the argument: S-type asteroid, Itokawa, indeed has an ordinary chondrite composition whose spectrum has been reddened by space weathering. This conclusion is supported by detailed studies of the surfaces of 10 Itokawa particles, half of which have glassy rims (5-50 nanometers thick) containing nano-sized particles of iron sulfide and metallic iron, signatures of space weathering. Analysis of noble gases in three particles from the asteroid indicate that they were exposed on the surface of Itokawa for surprisingly short times, less than 8 million years. The Hayabusa science team suggests that the short exposure time indicates loss of particles into space through small impacts at the surprisingly fast rate of tens of centimeters per million years. This might not seem fast, but the asteroid, only 535 x 294 x 209 meters in size, would become just a

  1. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.; Wise, Marcus B.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus.

  2. Sample introducing apparatus and sample modules for mass spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1993-12-21

    An apparatus for introducing gaseous samples from a wide range of environmental matrices into a mass spectrometer for analysis of the samples is described. Several sample preparing modules including a real-time air monitoring module, a soil/liquid purge module, and a thermal desorption module are individually and rapidly attachable to the sample introducing apparatus for supplying gaseous samples to the mass spectrometer. The sample-introducing apparatus uses a capillary column for conveying the gaseous samples into the mass spectrometer and is provided with an open/split interface in communication with the capillary and a sample archiving port through which at least about 90 percent of the gaseous sample in a mixture with an inert gas that was introduced into the sample introducing apparatus is separated from a minor portion of the mixture entering the capillary discharged from the sample introducing apparatus. 5 figures.

  3. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  4. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Cyril V.

    1991-01-01

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  5. Considerations in sampling of water.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    Sampling water is no different than sampling any other media. It starts with the development of Sample Quality Criteria, understanding of material properties, then application of the Theory of Sampling. The main difference with sampling water as opposed to solids is the material properties. This paper addresses some of the material properties and consequences of those properties for the development of the sampling protocols. Two properties that must be addressed for water are the temporal nature and the inclusion of suspended solids. Examples are provided for three specific water sampling scenarios which may have application to other water sampling scenarios.

  6. [A comparison of convenience sampling and purposive sampling].

    PubMed

    Suen, Lee-Jen Wu; Huang, Hui-Man; Lee, Hao-Hsien

    2014-06-01

    Convenience sampling and purposive sampling are two different sampling methods. This article first explains sampling terms such as target population, accessible population, simple random sampling, intended sample, actual sample, and statistical power analysis. These terms are then used to explain the difference between "convenience sampling" and purposive sampling." Convenience sampling is a non-probabilistic sampling technique applicable to qualitative or quantitative studies, although it is most frequently used in quantitative studies. In convenience samples, subjects more readily accessible to the researcher are more likely to be included. Thus, in quantitative studies, opportunity to participate is not equal for all qualified individuals in the target population and study results are not necessarily generalizable to this population. As in all quantitative studies, increasing the sample size increases the statistical power of the convenience sample. In contrast, purposive sampling is typically used in qualitative studies. Researchers who use this technique carefully select subjects based on study purpose with the expectation that each participant will provide unique and rich information of value to the study. As a result, members of the accessible population are not interchangeable and sample size is determined by data saturation not by statistical power analysis.

  7. Variable Sampling Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey, S.; Aronstein, David L.; Dean, Bruce H.; Lyon, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of an optical system (for example, a telescope) is limited by the misalignments and manufacturing imperfections of the optical elements in the system. The impact of these misalignments and imperfections can be quantified by the phase variations imparted on light traveling through the system. Phase retrieval is a methodology for determining these variations. Phase retrieval uses images taken with the optical system and using a light source of known shape and characteristics. Unlike interferometric methods, which require an optical reference for comparison, and unlike Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors that require special optical hardware at the optical system's exit pupil, phase retrieval is an in situ, image-based method for determining the phase variations of light at the system s exit pupil. Phase retrieval can be used both as an optical metrology tool (during fabrication of optical surfaces and assembly of optical systems) and as a sensor used in active, closed-loop control of an optical system, to optimize performance. One class of phase-retrieval algorithms is the iterative transform algorithm (ITA). ITAs estimate the phase variations by iteratively enforcing known constraints in the exit pupil and at the detector, determined from modeled or measured data. The Variable Sampling Mapping (VSM) technique is a new method for enforcing these constraints in ITAs. VSM is an open framework for addressing a wide range of issues that have previously been considered detrimental to high-accuracy phase retrieval, including undersampled images, broadband illumination, images taken at or near best focus, chromatic aberrations, jitter or vibration of the optical system or detector, and dead or noisy detector pixels. The VSM is a model-to-data mapping procedure. In VSM, fully sampled electric fields at multiple wavelengths are modeled inside the phase-retrieval algorithm, and then these fields are mapped to intensities on the light detector, using the properties

  8. Sample Manipulation System for Sample Analysis at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumm, Erik; Kennedy, Tom; Carlson, Lee; Roberts, Dustyn

    2008-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument will analyze Martian samples collected by the Mars Science Laboratory Rover with a suite of spectrometers. This paper discusses the driving requirements, design, and lessons learned in the development of the Sample Manipulation System (SMS) within SAM. The SMS stores and manipulates 74 sample cups to be used for solid sample pyrolysis experiments. Focus is given to the unique mechanism architecture developed to deliver a high packing density of sample cups in a reliable, fault tolerant manner while minimizing system mass and control complexity. Lessons learned are presented on contamination control, launch restraint mechanisms for fragile sample cups, and mechanism test data.

  9. Subsurface Samples: Collection and Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Philip E.; Griffin, W. Timothy; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2002-12-01

    Microbiological data, interpretation, and conclusions from subsurface samples ultimately depend on the quality and representative character of the samples. Subsurface samples for environmental microbiology ideally contain only the microbial community and geochemical properties that are representative of the subsurface environment from which the sample was taken. To that end, sample contamination by exogenous microorganisms or chemical constituents must be eliminated or minimized, and sample analyses need to begin before changes in the microbial community or geochemical characteristics occur. This article presents sampling methods and sample processing techniques for collecting representative samples from a range of subsurface environments. Factors that should be considered when developing a subsurface sampling program are discussed, including potential benefits, costs, and limitations enabling researchers to evaluate the techniques that are presented and match them to their project requirements. Methods and protocols to address coring, sampling, processing and quality assessment issues are presented.

  10. Sample holder with optical features

    DOEpatents

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2013-07-30

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  11. Quantum Metropolis sampling.

    PubMed

    Temme, K; Osborne, T J; Vollbrecht, K G; Poulin, D; Verstraete, F

    2011-03-03

    The original motivation to build a quantum computer came from Feynman, who imagined a machine capable of simulating generic quantum mechanical systems--a task that is believed to be intractable for classical computers. Such a machine could have far-reaching applications in the simulation of many-body quantum physics in condensed-matter, chemical and high-energy systems. Part of Feynman's challenge was met by Lloyd, who showed how to approximately decompose the time evolution operator of interacting quantum particles into a short sequence of elementary gates, suitable for operation on a quantum computer. However, this left open the problem of how to simulate the equilibrium and static properties of quantum systems. This requires the preparation of ground and Gibbs states on a quantum computer. For classical systems, this problem is solved by the ubiquitous Metropolis algorithm, a method that has basically acquired a monopoly on the simulation of interacting particles. Here we demonstrate how to implement a quantum version of the Metropolis algorithm. This algorithm permits sampling directly from the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian, and thus evades the sign problem present in classical simulations. A small-scale implementation of this algorithm should be achievable with today's technology.

  12. Sample preparation techniques.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, W A; Hill, V A

    1993-12-01

    Evidentiary false positives are caused by passive exposure to drugs in the environment rather than by active use of drugs. The avoidance of such positives is essential for both hair and urine analysis. Hair analysis enjoys the advantage over urinalysis in having a number of approaches for making this distinction. These include: methylene blue staining of the hair specimen for selecting the appropriate wash solvent; application of hair digestion techniques for the complete release of chemically unaltered analytes; the determination of three diagnostic ratios from wash and digestion data; the measurement of metabolite:drug ratios; the use of cut-off levels setting the limits for passive endogenous drug exposure; reproducibility of results (including segmental analysis) with a newly collected hair specimen; and the reporting of results as either negative, positive, or contaminated. Our sample preparation procedures have been effectively applied to the analyses of nearly 200,000 specimens, i.e. to approximately one million drug analyses for cocaine, opiates, methamphetamine, phencyclidine or marijuana. On the basis of this experience we conclude that hair analysis is a safe and effective method for workplace drug testing.

  13. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara R. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of preserving a liquid biological sample, comprising the step of: contacting said liquid biological sample with a preservative comprising, sodium benzoate in an amount of at least about 0.15% of the sample (weight/volume) and citric acid in an amount of at least about 0.025% of the sample (weight/volume).

  14. How Many Samples are Needed

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-29

    if the sampling grid pattern or the regular frequency of taking samples coincides with any pattern of contamination 61 Example: Littlewood Site...Conclusion for Littlewood 71 Need 22 + 4 = 26 samples for Production Area Need 5 + 1 = 6 samples for Parking/Admin As the budget allowed

  15. Preservation of Liquid Biological Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi (Inventor); Nimmagudda, Ramalingeshwara (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention related to the preservation of a liquid biological sample. The biological sample is exposed to a preservative containing at least about 0.15 g of sodium benzoate and at least about 0.025 g of citric acid per 100 ml of sample. The biological sample may be collected in a vessel or an absorbent mass. The biological sample may also be exposed to a substrate and/or a vehicle.

  16. Real-time PCR using SYBR Green for the detection of Shigella spp. in food and stool samples.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, W; Nsaibia, S; Gharbi, A; Aouni, M

    2013-02-01

    Shigella spp are exquisitely fastidious Gram negative organisms that frequently get missed in the detection by traditional culture methods. For this reason, this work has adapted a classical PCR for detection of Shigella in food and stool specimens to real-time PCR using the SYBR Green format. This method follows a melting curve analysis to be more rapid and provide both qualitative and quantitative data about the targeted pathogen. A total of 117 stool samples with diarrhea and 102 food samples were analyzed in Public Health Regional Laboratory of Nabeul by traditional culture methods and real-time PCR. To validate the real-time PCR assay, an experiment was conducted with both spiked and naturally contaminated stool samples. All Shigella strains tested were ipaH positive and all non-Shigella strains yielded no amplification products. The melting temperature (T(m) = 81.5 ± 0.5 °C) was consistently specific for the amplicon. Correlation coefficients of standard curves constructed using the quantification cycle (C(q)) versus copy numbers of Shigella showed good linearity (R² = 0.995; slope = 2.952) and the minimum level of detection was 1.5 × 10³ CFU/g feces. All food samples analyzed were negative for Shigella by standard culture methods, whereas ipaH was detected in 8.8% culture negative food products. Moreover, the ipaH specific PCR system increased the detection rate over that by culture alone from 1.7% to 11.1% among patients with diarrhea. The data presented here shows that the SYBR Green I was suitable for use in the real-time PCR assay, which provided a specific, sensitive and efficient method for the detection and quantification of Shigella spp in food and stool samples.

  17. INCORPORATING PRIOR KNOWLEDGE IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING: RANKED SET SAMPLING AND OTHER DOUBLE SAMPLING PROCEDURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental sampling can be difficult and expensive to carry out. Those taking the samples would like to integrate their knowledge of the system of study or their judgment about the system into the sample selection process to decrease the number of necessary samples. However,...

  18. The Digital Morphological Sampling Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haralick, Robert M.; Zhuang, Xinhua; Lin, Charlotte; Lee, James

    1988-02-01

    There are potential industrial applications for any methodology which inherently reduces processing time and cost and yet produces results sufficiently close to the result of full processing. It is for this reason that a morphological sampling theorem is important. The morphological sampling theorem described in this paper states: (1) how a digital image must be morphologically filtered before sampling in order to preserve the relevant information after sampling; (2) to what precision an appropriately morphologically filtered image can be reconstructed after sampling; and (3) the relationship between morphologically operating before sampling and the more computationally efficient scheme of morphologically operating on the sampled image with a sampled structuring element. The digital sampling theorem is developed first for the case of binary morphology and then it is extended to gray scale morphology through the use of the umbra homomorphism theorems.

  19. Sampling for area estimation: A comparison of full-frame sampling with the sample segment approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixson, M.; Bauer, M. E.; Davis, B. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Full-frame classifications of wheat and non-wheat for eighty counties in Kansas were repetitively sampled to simulate alternative sampling plans. Evaluation of four sampling schemes involving different numbers of samples and different size sampling units shows that the precision of the wheat estimates increased as the segment size decreased and the number of segments was increased. Although the average bias associated with the various sampling schemes was not significantly different, the maximum absolute bias was directly related to sampling size unit.

  20. Specified assurance level sampling procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Willner, O.

    1980-11-01

    In the nuclear industry design specifications for certain quality characteristics require that the final product be inspected by a sampling plan which can demonstrate product conformance to stated assurance levels. The Specified Assurance Level (SAL) Sampling Procedure has been developed to permit the direct selection of attribute sampling plans which can meet commonly used assurance levels. The SAL procedure contains sampling plans which yield the minimum sample size at stated assurance levels. The SAL procedure also provides sampling plans with acceptance numbers ranging from 0 to 10, thus, making available to the user a wide choice of plans all designed to comply with a stated assurance level.

  1. Comparison of culture versus quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction for the detection of Taylorella equigenitalis in field samples from naturally infected horses in Canada and Germany.

    PubMed

    Nadin-Davis, Susan; Knowles, Margaret K; Burke, Teresa; Böse, Reinhard; Devenish, John

    2015-07-01

    A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction method (qPCR) was developed and tested for the detection of Taylorella equigenitalis. It was shown to have an analytical sensitivity of 5 colony-forming units (CFU) of T. equigenitalis when applied to the testing of culture swabs that mimicked field samples, and a high analytical specificity in not reacting to 8 other commensal bacterial species associated with horses. As designed, it could also differentiate specifically between T. equigenitalis and T. asinigenitalis. The qPCR was compared to standard culture in a study that included 45 swab samples from 6 horses (1 stallion, 5 mares) naturally infected with T. equigenitalis in Canada, 39 swab samples from 5 naturally infected stallions in Germany, and 311 swab samples from 87 culture negative horses in Canada. When the comparison was conducted on an individual sample swab basis, the qPCR had a statistical sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 96.4%, respectively, and 100% and 99.1% when the comparison was conducted on a sample set basis. A comparison was also made on 203 sample swabs from the 5 German stallions taken over a span of 4 to 9 mo following antibiotic treatment. The qPCR was found to be highly sensitive and at least as good as culture in detecting the presence of T. equigenitalis in post-treatment samples. The work demonstrates that the qPCR assay described here can potentially be used to detect the presence of T. equigenitalis directly from submitted sample swabs taken from infected horses and also for determining T. equigenitalis freedom following treatment.

  2. Association between thermal environment and Salmonella in fecal samples from dairy cattle in midwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Likavec, Tasha; Pires, Alda F.A.; Funk, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the association between thermal measures in the barn environment (pen temperature and humidity) and fecal shedding of Salmonella in dairy cattle. A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted within a commercial dairy herd located in the midwestern United States. Five pooled fecal samples were collected monthly from each pen for 9 mo and submitted for microbiological culture. Negative binomial regression methods were used to test the association [incidence rate ratio (IRR)] between Salmonella pen status (the count of Salmonella-positive pools) and thermal environmental parameters [average temperature and temperature humidity index (THI)] for 3 time periods (48 h, 72 h, and 1 wk) before fecal sampling. Salmonella was cultured from 10.8% [39/360; 95% confidence interval (CI): 7.8% to 14.5%] of pooled samples. The highest proportion of positive pools occurred in August. The IRR ranged from 1.26 (95% CI: 1.15 to 1.39, THI 1 wk) to 4.5 (95% CI: 2.13 to 9.51, heat exposure 1 wk) across all thermal parameters and lag time periods measured. For example, the incidence rate of Salmonella-positive pools increased by 54% for every 5°C increment in average temperature (IRR = 1.54; 95% CI: 1.29 to 1.85) and 29% for every 5-unit increase in THI (IRR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.16 to 1.42) during the 72 h before sampling. The incidence rate ratio for pens exposed to higher temperatures (> 25°C) was 4.5 times (95% CI: 2.13 to 9.51) the incidence rate ratio for pens exposed to temperatures < 25°C in the 72 h before sampling. Likewise, the incidence rate ratio for pens exposed to THI > 70 was 4.23 times greater (95% CI: 2.1 to 8.28) than when the THI was < 70 in the 72 h before sampling. An association was found between the thermal environment and Salmonella shedding in dairy cattle. Further research is warranted in order to fully understand the component risks associated with the summer season and increased Salmonella shedding. PMID:27408330

  3. Association between thermal environment and Salmonella in fecal samples from dairy cattle in midwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Likavec, Tasha; Pires, Alda F A; Funk, Julie A

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the association between thermal measures in the barn environment (pen temperature and humidity) and fecal shedding of Salmonella in dairy cattle. A repeated cross-sectional study was conducted within a commercial dairy herd located in the midwestern United States. Five pooled fecal samples were collected monthly from each pen for 9 mo and submitted for microbiological culture. Negative binomial regression methods were used to test the association [incidence rate ratio (IRR)] between Salmonella pen status (the count of Salmonella-positive pools) and thermal environmental parameters [average temperature and temperature humidity index (THI)] for 3 time periods (48 h, 72 h, and 1 wk) before fecal sampling. Salmonella was cultured from 10.8% [39/360; 95% confidence interval (CI): 7.8% to 14.5%] of pooled samples. The highest proportion of positive pools occurred in August. The IRR ranged from 1.26 (95% CI: 1.15 to 1.39, THI 1 wk) to 4.5 (95% CI: 2.13 to 9.51, heat exposure 1 wk) across all thermal parameters and lag time periods measured. For example, the incidence rate of Salmonella-positive pools increased by 54% for every 5°C increment in average temperature (IRR = 1.54; 95% CI: 1.29 to 1.85) and 29% for every 5-unit increase in THI (IRR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.16 to 1.42) during the 72 h before sampling. The incidence rate ratio for pens exposed to higher temperatures (> 25°C) was 4.5 times (95% CI: 2.13 to 9.51) the incidence rate ratio for pens exposed to temperatures < 25°C in the 72 h before sampling. Likewise, the incidence rate ratio for pens exposed to THI > 70 was 4.23 times greater (95% CI: 2.1 to 8.28) than when the THI was < 70 in the 72 h before sampling. An association was found between the thermal environment and Salmonella shedding in dairy cattle. Further research is warranted in order to fully understand the component risks associated with the summer season and increased Salmonella shedding.

  4. Sample Tube Sealing for Future Proposed Mars Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younse, P.; Aveline, D.; Bao, X.; Berisford, D.; Bhandari, P.; Budney, C.; Chen, F.; Cooper, M.; Chung, S.; Lewis, D.

    2013-01-01

    A key premise of a proposed Sample Caching Rover, a crucial element of the proposed Mars Sample Return (MSR) campaign, is that the samples could be packaged and left on Mars for an extended period of time (at least five Mars years) without loss of scientific value (Fig. 1). The MEPAG E2E-iSAG (2011) concluded that the single most important factor in preserving the scientific integrity of the samples during the interval between their collection and their analysis is effective sealing of the samples.

  5. Analysis of Pet Coke Samples

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA required KCBX to submit samples of the petroleum coke stored at their North and South Chicago terminals to EPA's Chicago Regional Laboratory for analysis of pollutant levels. Results will be compared to coal and pet coke sampled in Detroit.

  6. Sampling properties of directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.-W.; Christensen, C.; Bizhani, G.; Foster, D. V.; Grassberger, P.; Paczuski, M.

    2012-10-01

    For many real-world networks only a small “sampled” version of the original network may be investigated; those results are then used to draw conclusions about the actual system. Variants of breadth-first search (BFS) sampling, which are based on epidemic processes, are widely used. Although it is well established that BFS sampling fails, in most cases, to capture the IN component(s) of directed networks, a description of the effects of BFS sampling on other topological properties is all but absent from the literature. To systematically study the effects of sampling biases on directed networks, we compare BFS sampling to random sampling on complete large-scale directed networks. We present new results and a thorough analysis of the topological properties of seven complete directed networks (prior to sampling), including three versions of Wikipedia, three different sources of sampled World Wide Web data, and an Internet-based social network. We detail the differences that sampling method and coverage can make to the structural properties of sampled versions of these seven networks. Most notably, we find that sampling method and coverage affect both the bow-tie structure and the number and structure of strongly connected components in sampled networks. In addition, at a low sampling coverage (i.e., less than 40%), the values of average degree, variance of out-degree, degree autocorrelation, and link reciprocity are overestimated by 30% or more in BFS-sampled networks and only attain values within 10% of the corresponding values in the complete networks when sampling coverage is in excess of 65%. These results may cause us to rethink what we know about the structure, function, and evolution of real-world directed networks.

  7. Sampling and sample processing in pesticide residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Lehotay, Steven J; Cook, Jo Marie

    2015-05-13

    Proper sampling and sample processing in pesticide residue analysis of food and soil have always been essential to obtain accurate results, but the subject is becoming a greater concern as approximately 100 mg test portions are being analyzed with automated high-throughput analytical methods by agrochemical industry and contract laboratories. As global food trade and the importance of monitoring increase, the food industry and regulatory laboratories are also considering miniaturized high-throughput methods. In conjunction with a summary of the symposium "Residues in Food and Feed - Going from Macro to Micro: The Future of Sample Processing in Residue Analytical Methods" held at the 13th IUPAC International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry, this is an opportune time to review sampling theory and sample processing for pesticide residue analysis. If collected samples and test portions do not adequately represent the actual lot from which they came and provide meaningful results, then all costs, time, and efforts involved in implementing programs using sophisticated analytical instruments and techniques are wasted and can actually yield misleading results. This paper is designed to briefly review the often-neglected but crucial topic of sample collection and processing and put the issue into perspective for the future of pesticide residue analysis. It also emphasizes that analysts should demonstrate the validity of their sample processing approaches for the analytes/matrices of interest and encourages further studies on sampling and sample mass reduction to produce a test portion.

  8. Mars Sample Quarantine Protocol Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Editor); Bagby, John (Editor); Race, Margaret (Editor); Rummel, John (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Sample Quarantine Protocol (QP) Workshop was convened to deal with three specific aspects of the initial handling of a returned Mars sample: 1) biocontainment, to prevent uncontrolled release of sample material into the terrestrial environment; 2) life detection, to examine the sample for evidence of live organisms; and 3) biohazard testing, to determine if the sample poses any threat to terrestrial life forms and the Earth's biosphere. During the first part of the Workshop, several tutorials were presented on topics related to the workshop in order to give all participants a common basis in the technical areas necessary to achieve the objectives of the Workshop.

  9. Rotary Percussive Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, K.; Badescu, M.; Haddad, N.; Shiraishi, L.; Walkemeyer, P.

    2012-01-01

    As part of a potential Mars Sample Return campaign NASA is studying a sample caching mission to Mars, with a possible 2018 launch opportunity. As such, a Sample Acquisition Tool (SAT) has been developed in support of the Integrated Mars Sample Acquisition and Handling (IMSAH) architecture as it relates to the proposed Mars Sample Return (MSR) campaign. The tool allows for core generation and capture directly into a sample tube. In doing so, the sample tube becomes the fundamental handling element within the IMSAH sample chain reducing the risk associated with sample contamination as well as the need to handle a sample of unknown geometry. The tool's functionality was verified utilizing a proposed rock test suite that encompasses a series of rock types that have been utilized in the past to qualify Martian surface sampling hardware. The corresponding results have shown the tool can effectively generate, fracture, and capture rock cores while maintaining torque margins of no less than 50% with an average power consumption of no greater than 90W and a tool mass of less than 6kg.

  10. Adaptive sampling for noisy problems

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu-Paz, E

    2004-03-26

    The usual approach to deal with noise present in many real-world optimization problems is to take an arbitrary number of samples of the objective function and use the sample average as an estimate of the true objective value. The number of samples is typically chosen arbitrarily and remains constant for the entire optimization process. This paper studies an adaptive sampling technique that varies the number of samples based on the uncertainty of deciding between two individuals. Experiments demonstrate the effect of adaptive sampling on the final solution quality reached by a genetic algorithm and the computational cost required to find the solution. The results suggest that the adaptive technique can effectively eliminate the need to set the sample size a priori, but in many cases it requires high computational costs.

  11. On-board sample cleaver.

    PubMed

    Månsson, Martin; Claesson, Thomas; Karlsson, Ulf O; Tjernberg, Oscar; Pailhés, Stéphane; Chang, Johan; Mesot, Joël; Shi, Ming; Patthey, Luc; Momono, Naoki; Oda, Migaku; Ido, Masayuki

    2007-07-01

    An on-board sample cleaver has been developed in order to cleave small and hard-to-cleave samples. To acquire good cleaves from rigid samples the alignment of the cleaving blade with respect to the internal crystallographic planes is crucial. To have the opportunity to mount the sample and align it to the blade ex situ has many advantages. The design presented has allowed us to cleave very tiny and rigid samples, e.g., the high-temperature superconductor La((2-x))Sr(x)CuO(4). Further, in this design the sample and the cleaver will have the same temperature, allowing us to cleave and keep the sample at low temperature. This is a big advantage over prior cleaver systems. As a result, better surfaces and alignments can be realized, which considerably simplifies and improves the experiments.

  12. Clean and Cold Sample Curation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Agee, C. B.; Beer, R.; Cooper, B. L.

    2000-01-01

    Curation of Mars samples includes both samples that are returned to Earth, and samples that are collected, examined, and archived on Mars. Both kinds of curation operations will require careful planning to ensure that the samples are not contaminated by the instruments that are used to collect and contain them. In both cases, sample examination and subdivision must take place in an environment that is organically, inorganically, and biologically clean. Some samples will need to be prepared for analysis under ultra-clean or cryogenic conditions. Inorganic and biological cleanliness are achievable separately by cleanroom and biosafety lab techniques. Organic cleanliness to the <50 ng/sq cm level requires material control and sorbent removal - techniques being applied in our Class 10 cleanrooms and sample processing gloveboxes.

  13. Obstructions to Sampling Qualitative Properties

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Arne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sampling methods have proven to be a very efficient and intuitive method to understand properties of complicated spaces that cannot easily be computed using deterministic methods. Therefore, sampling methods became a popular tool in the applied sciences. Results Here, we show that sampling methods are not an appropriate tool to analyze qualitative properties of complicated spaces unless RP = NP. We illustrate these results on the example of the thermodynamically feasible flux space of genome-scale metabolic networks and show that with artificial centering hit and run (ACHR) not all reactions that can have variable flux rates are sampled with variables flux rates. In particular a uniform sample of the flux space would not sample the flux variabilities completely. Conclusion We conclude that unless theoretical convergence results exist, qualitative results obtained from sampling methods should be considered with caution and if possible double checked using a deterministic method. PMID:26287384

  14. Rapid and Accurate Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Sputum Samples by Cepheid Xpert MTB/RIF Assay—A Clinical Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Rachow, Andrea; Zumla, Alimuddin; Heinrich, Norbert; Rojas-Ponce, Gabriel; Mtafya, Bariki; Reither, Klaus; Ntinginya, Elias N.; O'Grady, Justin; Huggett, Jim; Dheda, Keertan; Boehme, Catharina; Perkins, Mark; Saathoff, Elmar; Hoelscher, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background A crucial impediment to global tuberculosis control is the lack of an accurate, rapid diagnostic test for detection of patients with active TB. A new, rapid diagnostic method, (Cepheid) Xpert MTB/RIF Assay, is an automated sample preparation and real-time PCR instrument, which was shown to have good potential as an alternative to current reference standard sputum microscopy and culture. Methods We performed a clinical validation study on diagnostic accuracy of the Xpert MTB/RIF Assay in a TB and HIV endemic setting. Sputum samples from 292 consecutively enrolled adults from Mbeya, Tanzania, with suspected TB were subject to analysis by the Xpert MTB/RIF Assay. The diagnostic performance of Xpert MTB/RIF Assay was compared to standard sputum smear microscopy and culture. Confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a positive culture was used as a reference standard for TB diagnosis. Results Xpert MTB/RIF Assay achieved 88.4% (95%CI = 78.4% to 94.9%) sensitivity among patients with a positive culture and 99% (95%CI = 94.7% to 100.0%) specificity in patients who had no TB. HIV status did not affect test performance in 172 HIV-infected patients (58.9% of all participants). Seven additional cases (9.1% of 77) were detected by Xpert MTB/RIF Assay among the group of patients with clinical TB who were culture negative. Within 45 sputum samples which grew non-tuberculous mycobacteria the assay's specificity was 97.8% (95%CI = 88.2% to 99.9%). Conclusions The Xpert MTB/RIF Assay is a highly sensitive, specific and rapid method for diagnosing TB which has potential to complement the current reference standard of TB diagnostics and increase its overall sensitivity. Its usefulness in detecting sputum smear and culture negative patients needs further study. Further evaluation in high burden TB and HIV areas under programmatic health care settings to ascertain applicability, cost-effectiveness, robustness and local acceptance are required. PMID:21738575

  15. Sub-sampling and preparing forensic samples for pollen analysis.

    PubMed

    Horrocks, Mark

    2004-09-01

    The main forensic application of palynology is in providing associative evidence, assisting to prove or disprove a link between people and objects with places or with other people. Although identification and interpretation of pollen is a specialist job, sub-sampling and preparing pollen samples for analysis may be carried out by non-specialists. As few forensic laboratories have residing palynologists, laboratories may wish to reduce the cost of analysis or risk of contamination by doing their own sub-sampling and preparation. Presented is a practical guide for sub-sampling and preparing forensic samples for pollen analysis, providing a complete standard procedure for both the palynologist and non-specialist. Procedures for sub-sampling include a wide variety of materials commonly collected for forensic analysis (soil, clothing and other fabrics, footwear, twine and rope, firearms, granulated materials, plant and animal material, and illicit drugs), many of which palynologists will not be familiar with. Procedures for preparation of samples (pollen concentration) are presented as a detailed, step-by-step method. Minimizing the risks of laboratory and cross-sample contamination during sub-sampling and preparation is emphasized.

  16. Sampling almonds for aflatoxin, part I: estimation of uncertainty associated with sampling, sample preparation, and analysis.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Thomas B; Slate, Andrew B; Jacobs, Merle; Hurley, J Michael; Adams, Julie G; Giesbrecht, Francis G

    2006-01-01

    Domestic and international regulatory limits have been established for aflatoxin in almonds and other tree nuts. It is difficult to obtain an accurate and precise estimate of the true aflatoxin concentration in a bulk lot because of the uncertainty associated with the sampling, sample preparation, and analytical steps of the aflatoxin test procedure. To evaluate the performance of aflatoxin sampling plans, the uncertainty associated with sampling lots of shelled almonds for aflatoxin was investigated. Twenty lots of shelled almonds were sampled for aflatoxin contamination. The total variance associated with measuring B1 and total aflatoxins in bulk almond lots was estimated and partitioned into sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variance components. All variances were found to increase with an increase in aflatoxin concentration (both B1 and total). By using regression analysis, mathematical expressions were developed to predict the relationship between each variance component (total, sampling, sample preparation, and analysis variances) and aflatoxin concentration. Variance estimates were the same for B1 and total aflatoxins. The mathematical relationships can be used to estimate each variance for a given sample size, subsample size, and number of analyses other than that measured in the study. When a lot with total aflatoxins at 15 ng/g was tested by using a 10 kg sample, a vertical cutter mixer type of mill, a 100 g subsample, and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, the sampling, sample preparation, analytical, and total variances (coefficient of variation, CV) were 394.7 (CV, 132.4%), 14.7 (CV, 25.5%), 0.8 (CV, 6.1%), and 410.2 (CV, 135.0%), respectively. The percentages of the total variance associated with sampling, sample preparation, and analytical steps were 96.2, 3.6, and 0.2, respectively.

  17. Comet coma sample return instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.; Brownlee, Don E.; Burnett, Donald S.; Tsou, Peter; Uesugi, K. T.

    1994-01-01

    The sample collection technology and instrument concept for the Sample of Comet Coma Earth Return Mission (SOCCER) are described. The scientific goals of this Flyby Sample Return are to return to coma dust and volatile samples from a known comet source, which will permit accurate elemental and isotopic measurements for thousands of individual solid particles and volatiles, detailed analysis of the dust structure, morphology, and mineralogy of the intact samples, and identification of the biogenic elements or compounds in the solid and volatile samples. Having these intact samples, morphologic, petrographic, and phase structural features can be determined. Information on dust particle size, shape, and density can be ascertained by analyzing penetration holes and tracks in the capture medium. Time and spatial data of dust capture will provide understanding of the flux dynamics of the coma and the jets. Additional information will include the identification of cosmic ray tracks in the cometary grains, which can provide a particle's process history and perhaps even the age of the comet. The measurements will be made with the same equipment used for studying micrometeorites for decades past; hence, the results can be directly compared without extrapolation or modification. The data will provide a powerful and direct technique for comparing the cometary samples with all known types of meteorites and interplanetary dust. This sample collection system will provide the first sample return from a specifically identified primitive body and will allow, for the first time, a direct method of matching meteoritic materials captured on Earth with known parent bodies.

  18. Comet coma sample return instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albee, A. L.; Brownlee, Don E.; Burnett, Donald S.; Tsou, Peter; Uesugi, K. T.

    The sample collection technology and instrument concept for the Sample of Comet Coma Earth Return Mission (SOCCER) are described. The scientific goals of this Flyby Sample Return are to return to coma dust and volatile samples from a known comet source, which will permit accurate elemental and isotopic measurements for thousands of individual solid particles and volatiles, detailed analysis of the dust structure, morphology, and mineralogy of the intact samples, and identification of the biogenic elements or compounds in the solid and volatile samples. Having these intact samples, morphologic, petrographic, and phase structural features can be determined. Information on dust particle size, shape, and density can be ascertained by analyzing penetration holes and tracks in the capture medium. Time and spatial data of dust capture will provide understanding of the flux dynamics of the coma and the jets. Additional information will include the identification of cosmic ray tracks in the cometary grains, which can provide a particle's process history and perhaps even the age of the comet. The measurements will be made with the same equipment used for studying micrometeorites for decades past; hence, the results can be directly compared without extrapolation or modification. The data will provide a powerful and direct technique for comparing the cometary samples with all known types of meteorites and interplanetary dust. This sample collection system will provide the first sample return from a specifically identified primitive body and will allow, for the first time, a direct method of matching meteoritic materials captured on Earth with known parent bodies.

  19. SALTSTONE PROCESSING FACILITY TRANSFER SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.; Reigel, M.

    2010-08-04

    On May 19, 2010, the Saltstone Production Facility inadvertently transferred 1800 gallons of untreated waste from the salt feed tank to Vault 4. During shut down, approximately 70 gallons of the material was left in the Saltstone hopper. A sample of the slurry in the hopper was sent to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze the density, pH and the eight Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals. The sample was hazardous for chromium, mercury and pH. The sample received from the Saltstone hopper was analyzed visually while obtaining sample aliquots and while the sample was allowed to settle. It was observed that the sample contains solids that settle in approximately 20 minutes (Figure 3-1). There is a floating layer on top of the supernate during settling and disperses when the sample is agitated (Figure 3-2). The untreated waste inadvertently transferred from the SFT to Vault 4 was toxic for chromium and mercury. In addition, the pH of the sample is at the regulatory limit. Visually inspecting the sample indicates solids present in the sample.

  20. Sampling hazelnuts for aflatoxin: uncertainty associated with sampling, sample preparation, and analysis.

    PubMed

    Ozay, Guner; Seyhan, Ferda; Yilmaz, Aysun; Whitaker, Thomas B; Slate, Andrew B; Giesbrecht, Francis

    2006-01-01

    The variability associated with the aflatoxin test procedure used to estimate aflatoxin levels in bulk shipments of hazelnuts was investigated. Sixteen 10 kg samples of shelled hazelnuts were taken from each of 20 lots that were suspected of aflatoxin contamination. The total variance associated with testing shelled hazelnuts was estimated and partitioned into sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variance components. Each variance component increased as aflatoxin concentration (either B1 or total) increased. With the use of regression analysis, mathematical expressions were developed to model the relationship between aflatoxin concentration and the total, sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variances. The expressions for these relationships were used to estimate the variance for any sample size, subsample size, and number of analyses for a specific aflatoxin concentration. The sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variances associated with estimating aflatoxin in a hazelnut lot at a total aflatoxin level of 10 ng/g and using a 10 kg sample, a 50 g subsample, dry comminution with a Robot Coupe mill, and a high-performance liquid chromatographic analytical method are 174.40, 0.74, and 0.27, respectively. The sampling, sample preparation, and analytical steps of the aflatoxin test procedure accounted for 99.4, 0.4, and 0.2% of the total variability, respectively.

  1. Chemical analyses of provided samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Christopher H.

    1993-01-01

    Two batches of samples were received and chemical analysis was performed of the surface and near surface regions of the samples by the surface analysis by laser ionization (SALI) method. The samples included four one-inch optics and several paint samples. The analyses emphasized surface contamination or modification. In these studies, pulsed sputtering by 7 keV Ar+ and primarily single-photon ionization (SPI) by coherent 118 nm radiation (at approximately 5 x 10(exp 5) W/cm(sup 2) were used. For two of the samples, also multiphoton ionization (MPI) at 266 nm (approximately 5 x 10(exp 11) W/cm(sup 2) was used. Most notable among the results was the silicone contamination on Mg2 mirror 28-92, and that the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) paint sample had been enriched in K and Na and depleted in Zn, Si, B, and organic compounds relative to the control paint.

  2. Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

    2010-09-01

    We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

  3. Study of sample drilling techniques for Mars sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D. C.; Harris, P. T.

    1980-01-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of acquiring various surface samples for a Mars sample return mission the following tasks were performed: (1) design of a Mars rover-mounted drill system capable of acquiring crystalline rock cores; prediction of performance, mass, and power requirements for various size systems, and the generation of engineering drawings; (2) performance of simulated permafrost coring tests using a residual Apollo lunar surface drill, (3) design of a rock breaker system which can be used to produce small samples of rock chips from rocks which are too large to return to Earth, but too small to be cored with the Rover-mounted drill; (4)design of sample containers for the selected regolith cores, rock cores, and small particulate or rock samples; and (5) design of sample handling and transfer techniques which will be required through all phase of sample acquisition, processing, and stowage on-board the Earth return vehicle. A preliminary design of a light-weight Rover-mounted sampling scoop was also developed.

  4. Microwave sample preparation for analysis of metals in environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.W.

    1996-10-01

    The unique nature of microwave energy enhances heating efficiency and improves acid digestion sample preparation. Faster sample preparation and improved precision of the analysis occur. These results will be illustrated in this presentation using various standard reference materials and environmentally important samples. The analytical microwave system used offers accurate temperature and pressure feedback control through the use of a hand-held controller or PC-based control. Digestions are performed in patented, user-friendly microwave vessels. USEPA Method 3015, {open_quotes}Microwave-Assisted Acid Digestion of Aqueous Samples and Extracts,{close_quotes} is properly performed when the sample is heated to 170{degrees}C within 10 minutes, and maintained for an additional 10 minutes. USEPA Method 3051, {open_quotes}Microwave-Assisted Acid Digestion of Sediments, Sludges, Soils, and Oils,{close_quotes} is properly performed when the sample is heated to 175{degrees}C within 5.5 minutes, and maintained at 175{degrees}C for an additional 4.5 minutes. After the timesaving microwave digestion period, the samples were analyzed for metals by ICP-AES. Excellent accuracy and precision were obtained, in addition to 90% time reduction when using microwave sample preparation.

  5. 16. DETAILED VIEW OF SAMPLING EQUIPMENT. SAMPLED OFFGAS IS SENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAILED VIEW OF SAMPLING EQUIPMENT. SAMPLED OFF-GAS IS SENT THROUGH A FOUR - STAGE COLD WATER TRAP. COOLING OF THE GAS ALLOWS A CONDENSATE TO FORM. THE CONDENSATE IS ANALYZED FOR CHEMICAL CONTENT. (6/2/80) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  6. Sampling and sample processing in pesticide residue analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proper sampling and sample processing in pesticide residue analysis of food and soil has always been essential to obtain accurate results, but the subject is becoming a greater concern as approximately 100 mg test portions are being analyzed with automated high-throughput analytical methods by agroc...

  7. Image correlation and sampling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Sedwick, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development of analytical approaches for solving image correlation and image sampling of multispectral data is discussed. Relevant multispectral image statistics which are applicable to image correlation and sampling are identified. The general image statistics include intensity mean, variance, amplitude histogram, power spectral density function, and autocorrelation function. The translation problem associated with digital image registration and the analytical means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques are considered. General expressions for determining the reconstruction error for specific image sampling strategies are developed.

  8. Adaptive sampling in convergent beams.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Julián; Mas, David; Pérez, Jorge; Illueca, Carlos

    2008-09-01

    Numerical calculation of convergent Fresnel patterns through fast Fourier transform usually requires a large number of samples to fulfill the Nyquist sampling condition around the focus. From polynomial decomposition of the wavefront it is possible to determine which polynomial orders are the main contributors to the number of samples. This information can be used to properly modify the initial wavefront and relax the Nyquist condition thus giving a more efficient numerical algorithm.

  9. New real-time PCR-based method for Kingella kingae DNA detection: application to samples collected from 89 children with acute arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ilharreborde, Brice; Bidet, Philippe; Lorrot, Mathie; Even, Julien; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Liguori, Sandrine; Vitoux, Christine; Lefevre, Yann; Doit, Catherine; Fitoussi, Franck; Penneçot, Georges; Bingen, Edouard; Mazda, Keyvan; Bonacorsi, Stéphane

    2009-06-01

    Inoculation of blood culture vials with joint fluid samples has revealed the important pathogenic role of Kingella kingae in pediatric arthritis. However, recent studies based on broad-range 16S ribosomal DNA PCR and real-time PCR without a probe suggest that conventional methods remain suboptimal. We developed a new real-time PCR method with a probe that is highly specific for K. kingae and applied it to joint fluid samples collected from 89 children with suspected arthritis admitted to our institution during a 2-year period. Real-time PCR was also applied to blood samples obtained before surgery and to joint drainage fluid samples obtained during several days after surgery. Thirty-six (40%) of the 89 cases of suspected septic arthritis had positive culture. Staphylococcus aureus was the main isolate (n = 19/36, 53%), followed by K. kingae (n = 7/36, 19%). Specific real-time PCR identified K. kingae in 24 of the 53 culture-negative cases. Thus, K. kingae was present in 31 (52%) of the 60 documented cases, making it the leading pathogen. Real-time PCR on all 15 blood DNA extracts from patients with K. kingae infection was negative, demonstrating that joint fluid positivity did not result from DNA circulating in blood. Real-time PCR amplification of drainage fluid samples showed that the pathogen could be detected for up to 6 days after antibiotic initiation. K. kingae real-time PCR applied to DNA extracted from joint fluid samples, but not from blood samples, markedly improved the etiological diagnosis of septic arthritis in children. Retrospective diagnosis is feasible for up to 6 days after treatment initiation.

  10. New Real-Time PCR-Based Method for Kingella kingae DNA Detection: Application to Samples Collected from 89 Children with Acute Arthritis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ilharreborde, Brice; Bidet, Philippe; Lorrot, Mathie; Even, Julien; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Liguori, Sandrine; Vitoux, Christine; Lefevre, Yann; Doit, Catherine; Fitoussi, Franck; Penneçot, Georges; Bingen, Edouard; Mazda, Keyvan; Bonacorsi, Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Inoculation of blood culture vials with joint fluid samples has revealed the important pathogenic role of Kingella kingae in pediatric arthritis. However, recent studies based on broad-range 16S ribosomal DNA PCR and real-time PCR without a probe suggest that conventional methods remain suboptimal. We developed a new real-time PCR method with a probe that is highly specific for K. kingae and applied it to joint fluid samples collected from 89 children with suspected arthritis admitted to our institution during a 2-year period. Real-time PCR was also applied to blood samples obtained before surgery and to joint drainage fluid samples obtained during several days after surgery. Thirty-six (40%) of the 89 cases of suspected septic arthritis had positive culture. Staphylococcus aureus was the main isolate (n = 19/36, 53%), followed by K. kingae (n = 7/36, 19%). Specific real-time PCR identified K. kingae in 24 of the 53 culture-negative cases. Thus, K. kingae was present in 31 (52%) of the 60 documented cases, making it the leading pathogen. Real-time PCR on all 15 blood DNA extracts from patients with K. kingae infection was negative, demonstrating that joint fluid positivity did not result from DNA circulating in blood. Real-time PCR amplification of drainage fluid samples showed that the pathogen could be detected for up to 6 days after antibiotic initiation. K. kingae real-time PCR applied to DNA extracted from joint fluid samples, but not from blood samples, markedly improved the etiological diagnosis of septic arthritis in children. Retrospective diagnosis is feasible for up to 6 days after treatment initiation. PMID:19369442

  11. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons characterizes bacterial composition in cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with purulent meningitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aicui; Wang, Chao; Liang, Zhijuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Lin; Ma, Qiaoli; Wang, Guowei; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Wang, Zhenhai

    2015-01-01

    Purulent meningitis (PM) is a severe infectious disease that is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. It has been recognized that bacterial infection is a major contributing factor to the pathogenesis of PM. However, there is a lack of information on the bacterial composition in PM, due to the low positive rate of cerebrospinal fluid bacterial culture. Herein, we aimed to discriminate and identify the main pathogens and bacterial composition in cerebrospinal fluid sample from PM patients using high-throughput sequencing approach. The cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected from 26 PM patients, and were determined as culture-negative samples. The polymerase chain reaction products of the hypervariable regions of 16S rDNA gene in these 26 samples of PM were sequenced using the 454 GS FLX system. The results showed that there were 71,440 pyrosequencing reads, of which, the predominant phyla were Proteobacteria and Firmicutes; and the predominant genera were Streptococcus, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, and Neisseria. The bacterial species in the cerebrospinal fluid were complex, with 61.5% of the samples presenting with mixed pathogens. A significant number of bacteria belonging to a known pathogenic potential was observed. The number of operational taxonomic units for individual samples ranged from six to 75 and there was a comparable difference in the species diversity that was calculated through alpha and beta diversity analysis. Collectively, the data show that high-throughput sequencing approach facilitates the characterization of the pathogens in cerebrospinal fluid and determine the abundance and the composition of bacteria in the cerebrospinal fluid samples of the PM patients, which may provide a better understanding of pathogens in PM and assist clinicians to make rational and effective therapeutic decisions.

  12. Development of Sample Verification System for Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; McKinney, Colin; Jackson, Shannon P.; Mojarradi, Mohammad; Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey; Manohara, Harish

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a proof of-concept sample verification system (SVS) for in-situ mass measurement of planetary rock and soil sample in future robotic sample return missions. Our proof-of-concept SVS device contains a 10 cm diameter pressure sensitive elastic membrane placed at the bottom of a sample canister. The membrane deforms under the weight of accumulating planetary sample. The membrane is positioned in proximity to an opposing substrate with a narrow gap. The deformation of the membrane makes the gap to be narrower, resulting in increased capacitance between the two nearly parallel plates. Capacitance readout circuitry on a nearby printed circuit board (PCB) transmits data via a low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS) interface. The fabricated SVS proof-of-concept device has successfully demonstrated approximately 1pF/gram capacitance change

  13. Mars sample return: Site selection and sample acquisition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickle, N. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Various vehicle and mission options were investigated for the continued exploration of Mars; the cost of a minimum sample return mission was estimated; options and concepts were synthesized into program possibilities; and recommendations for the next Mars mission were made to the Planetary Program office. Specific sites and all relevant spacecraft and ground-based data were studied in order to determine: (1) the adequacy of presently available data for identifying landing sities for a sample return mission that would assure the acquisition of material from the most important geologic provinces of Mars; (2) the degree of surface mobility required to assure sample acquisition for these sites; (3) techniques to be used in the selection and drilling of rock a samples; and (4) the degree of mobility required at the two Viking sites to acquire these samples.

  14. IWTU Process Sample Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg

    2013-04-01

    CH2M-WG Idaho (CWI) requested that Battelle Energy Alliance (BEA) analyze various samples collected during June – August 2012 at the Integrated Waste Treatment Facility (IWTU). Samples of IWTU process materials were collected from various locations in the process. None of these samples were radioactive. These samples were collected and analyzed to provide more understanding of the compositions of various materials in the process during the time of the process shutdown that occurred on June 16, 2012, while the IWTU was in the process of nonradioactive startup.

  15. Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection and Differentiation of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli from Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Eileen J.; Galanakis, Emmanouil; Thomas, Anita A.; Stapp, Jennifer R.; Rich, Shannon; Buccat, Anne Marie; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2015-01-01

    Timely accurate diagnosis of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections is important. We evaluated a laboratory-developed real-time PCR (LD-PCR) assay targeting stx1, stx2, and rfbEO157 with 2,386 qualifying stool samples submitted to the microbiology laboratory of a tertiary care pediatric center between July 2011 and December 2013. Broth cultures of PCR-positive samples were tested for Shiga toxins by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (ImmunoCard STAT! enterohemorrhagic E. coli [EHEC]; Meridian Bioscience) and cultured in attempts to recover both O157 and non-O157 STEC. E. coli O157 and non-O157 STEC were detected in 35 and 18 cases, respectively. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) occurred in 12 patients (10 infected with STEC O157, one infected with STEC O125ac, and one with PCR evidence of STEC but no resulting isolate). Among the 59 PCR-positive STEC specimens from 53 patients, only 29 (54.7%) of the associated specimens were toxin positive by EIA. LD-PCR differentiated STEC O157 from non-O157 using rfbEO157, and LD-PCR results prompted successful recovery of E. coli O157 (n = 25) and non-O157 STEC (n = 8) isolates, although the primary cultures and toxin assays were frequently negative. A rapid “mega”-multiplex PCR (FilmArray gastrointestinal panel; BioFire Diagnostics) was used retrospectively, and results correlated with LD-PCR findings in 25 (89%) of the 28 sorbitol-MacConkey agar culture-negative STEC cases. These findings demonstrate that PCR is more sensitive than EIA and/or culture and distinguishes between O157 and non-O157 STEC in clinical samples and that E. coli O157:H7 remains the predominant cause of HUS in our institution. PCR is highly recommended for rapid diagnosis of pediatric STEC infections. PMID:25926491

  16. [Isolation and identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the urine samples by conventional and molecular methods].

    PubMed

    Aslan, Gönül; Doruk, Erdal; Emekdaş, Gürol; Serin, M Sami; Direkel, Sahin; Bayram, Gül; Durmaz, Riza

    2007-04-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis presents a challenge in diagnosis and treatment due to variations in clinical and radiological signs, insufficient patient history and difficulty in the isolation of the bacilli. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the urine samples obtained from patients with suspected urinary tuberculosis admitted to our hospital by using Ehrlich-Ziehl-Neelsen (EZN), culture and polymerase chain reaction-restriction analysis (PCR-RFLP) methods. A total of 1004 urine samples collected from 437 patients who were admitted to our hospital between January 2004-July 2006, were inoculated on Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) and/or BACTEC 12B (Becton Dickinson, USA) after decontamination and, direct preparations stained with EZN method were evaluated microscopically. M. tuberculosis complex (MTC) and mycobacteria other than tuberculosis (MOTT) were differentiated by nitro-alpha-acetylamino-beta-hydroxypropiophenone (NAP) test and the susceptibility testing for the MTC strains to primary antituberculosis drugs were performed by BACTEC 460 TB (Becton Dickinson, USA) system. PCR-RFLP method was performed for the identification of Mycobacterium spp. Twenty-two (5%) patients have yielded positive results by at least one of the conventional methods (EZN, LJ and/or BACTEC). Fifteen samples were positive for acido-resistant bacilli (ARB) by EZN method, and 17 samples were positive for mycobacterial growth in the cultures. Ten of 22 patients were found positive by both of the methods, while seven were culture positive but ARB negative and five were culture negative but ARB positive. These five patients received BCG treatment because of the presence of bladder tumor. Twelve (70.5%) of 17 strains isolated from culture were identified as MTC, while five (29.4%) were identified as M. fortuitum. Of 12 MTC isolates, eight (66.7%) were found susceptible to all of the antituberculosis agents, while one was found resistant to isoniazide (INH

  17. The alteration of icy samples during sample acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungas, G.; Bearman, G.; Beegle, L. W.; Hecht, M.; Peters, G. H.; Glucoft, J.; Strothers, K.

    2006-12-01

    Valid in situ scientific studies require both that samples be analyzed in as pristine condition as possible and that any modification from the pristine to the sampled state be well understood. While samples with low to high ice concentration are critical for the study of astrobiology and geology, they pose problems with respect to the sample acquisition, preparation and distribution systems (SPAD) upon which the analytical instruments depend. Most significant of the processes that occur during SPAD is sublimation or melting caused by thermal loading from drilling, coring, etc. as well as exposure to a dry low pressure ambient environment. These processes can alter the sample, as well as generating, meta-stable liquid water that can refreeze in the sample transfer mechanisms, interfering with proper operation and creating cross-contamination. We have investigated and quantified loss of volatiles such as H2O, CO, CO2, and organics contained within icy and powdered samples when acquired, processed and transferred. During development of the MSL rock crusher, for example, ice was observed to pressure-fuse and stick to the side even at -70C. We have investigated sublimation from sample acquisition at Martian temperature and pressure for a samples ranging from 10 to 100 water/dirt ratios. Using the RASP that will be on Phoenix, we have measured sublimation of ice during excavation at Martian pressure and find that the sublimation losses can range from 10 to 50 percent water. It is the thermal conductivity of the soil that determines local heat transport, and how much of the sample acquisition energy is wicked away into the soil and how much goes into the sample. Modeling of sample acquisition methods requires measurement of these parameters. There is a two phase model for thermal conductivity as a function of dirt/ice ratio but it needed to be validated. We used an ASTM method for measuring thermal conductivity and implemented it in the laboratory. The major conclusion is

  18. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control, and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling .events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site. Sampling is indicated as annual, semi-annual, quarterly, or monthly in the sampling schedule. Some samples are collected and analyzed as part of ground-water monitoring and characterization programs at Hanford (e.g. Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), or Operational). The number of samples planned by other programs are identified in the sampling schedule by a number in the analysis column and a project designation in the Cosample column. Well sampling events may be merged to avoid redundancy in cases where sampling is planned by both-environmental surveillance and another program.

  19. Bioaerosol sampling: sampling mechanisms, bioefficiency and field studies.

    PubMed

    Haig, C W; Mackay, W G; Walker, J T; Williams, C

    2016-07-01

    Investigations into the suspected airborne transmission of pathogens in healthcare environments have posed a challenge to researchers for more than a century. With each pathogen demonstrating a unique response to environmental conditions and the mechanical stresses it experiences, the choice of sampling device is not obvious. Our aim was to review bioaerosol sampling, sampling equipment, and methodology. A comprehensive literature search was performed, using electronic databases to retrieve English language papers on bioaerosol sampling. The review describes the mechanisms of popular bioaerosol sampling devices such as impingers, cyclones, impactors, and filters, explaining both their strengths and weaknesses, and the consequences for microbial bioefficiency. Numerous successful studies are described that point to best practice in bioaerosol sampling, from the use of small personal samplers to monitor workers' pathogen exposure through to large static samplers collecting airborne microbes in various healthcare settings. Of primary importance is the requirement that studies should commence by determining the bioefficiency of the chosen sampler and the pathogen under investigation within laboratory conditions. From such foundations, sampling for bioaerosol material in the complexity of the field holds greater certainty of successful capture of low-concentration airborne pathogens. From the laboratory to use in the field, this review enables the investigator to make informed decisions about the choice of bioaerosol sampler and its application.

  20. Rock Sample Destruction Limits for the Mars Sample Return Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, D. K.; Budney, C. J.; Shiraishi, L.; Klein, K.; Gilbert, J.

    2012-12-01

    Sample return missions, including the proposed Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission, propose to collect core samples from scientifically valuable sites on Mars. These core samples would undergo extreme forces during the drilling process, and during the reentry process if the Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) performs a hard landing on Earth. Because of the foreseen damage to the cores, it is important to evaluate each core for rock quality. However, because no planetary core sample return mission has yet been conducted, it remains unclear as to how to assess the cores for rock quality. In this report, we describe the development of a metric designed to quantitatively assess the quality of the rock cores returned from MSR. We report on the process by which we tested the metric on core samples of Mars analogue materials, and the effectiveness of the core assessment metric (CAM) in assessing rock core quality before and after the cores were subjected to shocking (g forces representative of an EEV landing). Mars-analogue Basalt rock core. Cores like this one are being used to develop a metric with which to assess rock quality before and after shock-testing. The sample canister that houses the cores during shock-testing. SolidWorks design by James Gilbert.

  1. A Demonstration of Sample Segregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, Mark D.; Brumbach, Stephen B.; Hartman, JudithAnn R.

    2005-01-01

    The demonstration of sample segregation, which is simple, and visually compelling illustrates the importance of sample handling for students studying analytical chemistry and environmental chemistry. The mixture used in this demonstration has two components, which have big particle size, and different colors, which makes the segregation graphic.

  2. Gamma spectroscopy of environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, P. B.

    2013-05-01

    We describe experiments for the undergraduate laboratory that use a high-resolution gamma detector to measure radiation in environmental samples. The experiments are designed to instruct the students in the quantitative analysis of gamma spectra and secular equilibrium. Experiments include the radioactive dating of Brazil nuts, determining radioisotope concentrations in natural samples, and measurement of the 235U abundance in uranium rich rocks.

  3. FIELD SAMPLING PROTOCOLS AND ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    I have been asked to speak again to the environmental science class regarding actual research scenarios related to my work at Kerr Lab. I plan to discuss sampling protocols along with various field analyses performed during sampling activities. Many of the students have never see...

  4. Simulated Sampling of Estuary Plankton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jenkins, Deborah Bainer

    2009-01-01

    To find out about the microscopic life in the valuable estuary environment, it is usually necessary to be near the water. This dry lab offers an alternative, using authentic data and a simulation of plankton sampling. From the types of organisms found in the sample, middle school students can infer relationships in the biological and physical…

  5. Learning about Sampling with Boxer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picciotto, Henri; Ploger, Don

    1991-01-01

    Described is an introductory probability and statistics class focused on teaching the concepts of sampling and binomial distributions through a strategy based on teacher and student generated simulation using the Boxer computer language. The value of integrating programing with teaching subject matter is demonstrated, and sample student work is…

  6. Sample Size for Correlation Estimates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    graphs, and computer programs are developed to find the sample number needed for a desired confidence interval size. Nonparametric measures of...correlation (Spearman’s ra and Kendall’s tau) are also examined for appropriate sample numbers when a specific confidence interval size desired.

  7. Learning to Reason from Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-Zvi, Dani; Bakker, Arthur; Makar, Katie

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this article is to introduce the topic of "learning to reason from samples," which is the focus of this special issue of "Educational Studies in Mathematics" on "statistical reasoning." Samples are data sets, taken from some wider universe (e.g., a population or a process) using a particular procedure…

  8. Sampling stratospheric aerosols with impactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, Verne R.

    1989-01-01

    Derivation of statistically significant size distributions from impactor samples of rarefield stratospheric aerosols imposes difficult sampling constraints on collector design. It is shown that it is necessary to design impactors of different size for each range of aerosol size collected so as to obtain acceptable levels of uncertainty with a reasonable amount of data reduction.

  9. Insights into Cruciform Sample Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creuziger, A.; Iadicola, M. A.; Foecke, T.; Rust, E.; Banerjee, D.

    2017-01-01

    Four different cruciform sample designs, based on the work of Abu-Farha et al. (JOM 61:48, 2009) were studied. Key features of these designs are a recessed pocket with fillet and re-entrant corners. These samples were shown via digital image correlation to achieve widely differing strain values inside and outside the pocket. From the results of these tests, there are two competing failure mechanisms in the sample. The pocket region is affected by stress concentrations caused by the fillet, and re-entrant notches lead to strain-limited constraints similar to diffuse and localized necks in uniaxial samples. Balancing these two constraints determines the success or premature failure of the sample.

  10. Sample collection, biobanking, and analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahsman, Maurice J; Tibboel, Dick; Mathot, Ron A A; de Wildt, Saskia N

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric pharmacokinetic studies require sampling of biofluids from neonates and children. Limitations on sampling frequency and sample volume complicate the design of these studies. In addition, strict guidelines, designed to guarantee patient safety, are in place. This chapter describes the practical implications of sample collection and their storage, with special focus on the selection of the appropriate type of biofluid and withdrawal technique. In addition, we describe appropriate measures for storage of these specimens, for example, in the context of biobanking, and the requirements on drug assay methods that they pose. Pharmacokinetic studies in children are possible, but they require careful selection of an appropriate sampling method, specimen volume, and assay method. The checklist provided could help prospective researchers with the design of an appropriate study protocol and infrastructure.

  11. Sample push-out fixture

    DOEpatents

    Biernat, John L.

    2002-11-05

    This invention generally relates to the remote removal of pelletized samples from cylindrical containment capsules. V-blocks are used to receive the samples and provide guidance to push out rods. Stainless steel liners fit into the v-channels on the v-blocks which permits them to be remotely removed and replaced or cleaned to prevent cross contamination between capsules and samples. A capsule holder securely holds the capsule while allowing manual up/down and in/out movement to align each sample hole with the v-blocks. Both end sections contain identical v-blocks; one that guides the drive out screw and rods or manual push out rods and the other to receive the samples as they are driven out of the capsule.

  12. Development of a diagnostic real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of invasive Haemophilus influenzae in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Meyler, Kenneth L; Meehan, Mary; Bennett, Desiree; Cunney, Robert; Cafferkey, Mary

    2012-12-01

    Since the introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae serotype b vaccine, invasive H. influenzae disease has become dominated by nontypeable (NT) strains. Several widely used molecular diagnostic methods have been shown to lack sensitivity or specificity in the detection of some of these strains. Novel real-time assays targeting the fucK, licA, and ompP2 genes were developed and evaluated. The fucK assay detected all strains of H. influenzae tested (n = 116) and had an analytical sensitivity of 10 genome copies/polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This assay detected both serotype b and NT H. influenzae in 12 previously positive specimens (culture and/or bexA PCR) and also detected H. influenzae in a further 5 of 883 culture-negative blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. The fucK assay has excellent potential as a diagnostic test for detection of typeable and nontypeable strains of invasive H. influenzae in clinical samples of blood and CSF.

  13. Development and validation of an immunohistochemical method for rapid diagnosis of swine erysipelas in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, Tanja; Bender, Joseph S; Halbur, Patrick G

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to develop an immunohistochemical (IHC) assay for rapid detection of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. Serotypes 1a, 1b, and 2 are most frequently associated with clinical disease in pigs. Antiserum against serotypes 1a, 1b, and 2 was produced in rabbits, pooled, and applied to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections of pigs (lungs, heart, spleen, and skin). The results obtained with the IHC assay were compared with direct culture on tissue samples from experimentally inoculated pigs either treated (n = 6) with antibiotics or untreated (n = 8) as well as on samples from field cases (n = 170) submitted to the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at Iowa State University. The agreement between direct culture and IHC staining was found to be substantial. The results of the present study indicate that the IHC assay is highly sensitive and specific in detecting E. rhusiopathiae antigen in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. Results indicated that the IHC is particularly useful in cases in which pigs had been treated with antibiotics prior to submission and in which direct cultures of organs were negative. In addition, the IHC was found to be useful for detection of E. rhusiopathiae antigen in skin lesions, which are often culture negative.

  14. BACTERIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS WITH SAMPLING AND SAMPLE PRESERVATION SPECIFICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current federal regulations (40CFR 503) specify that under certain conditions treated municipal biosolids must be analyzed for fecal coliform or salmonellae. The regulations state that representative samples of biosolids must be collected and analyzed using standard methods. Th...

  15. Sample Results From Routine Salt Batch 7 Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.

    2016-01-14

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the “microbatches” of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 7B have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, cations (Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy - ICPES), and anions (Ion Chromatography Anions - IC-A). The analytical results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from previous macrobatch samples. The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) continue to show more than adequate Pu and Sr removal, and there is a distinct positive trend in Cs removal (increasing cesium decontamination), due to the use of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The bulk chemistry of the DSSHT and SEHT samples do not show any signs of unusual behavior.

  16. Curation of Samples from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, D.; Allen, C.

    One of the strong scientific reasons for returning samples from Mars is to search for evidence of current or past life in the samples. Because of the remote possibility that the samples may contain life forms that are hazardous to the terrestrial biosphere, the National Research Council has recommended that all samples returned from Mars be kept under strict biological containment until tests show that they can safely be released to other laboratories. It is possible that Mars samples may contain only scarce or subtle traces of life or prebiotic chemistry that could readily be overwhelmed by terrestrial contamination. Thus, the facilities used to contain, process, and analyze samples from Mars must have a combination of high-level biocontainment and organic / inorganic chemical cleanliness that is unprecedented. We have been conducting feasibility studies and developing designs for a facility that would be at least as capable as current maximum containment BSL-4 (BioSafety Level 4) laboratories, while simultaneously maintaining cleanliness levels exceeding those of the cleanest electronics manufacturing labs. Unique requirements for the processing of Mars samples have inspired a program to develop handling techniques that are much more precise and reliable than the approach (currently used for lunar samples) of employing gloved human hands in nitrogen-filled gloveboxes. Individual samples from Mars are expected to be much smaller than lunar samples, the total mass of samples returned by each mission being 0.5- 1 kg, compared with many tens of kg of lunar samples returned by each of the six Apollo missions. Smaller samp les require much more of the processing to be done under microscopic observation. In addition, the requirements for cleanliness and high-level containment would be difficult to satisfy while using traditional gloveboxes. JSC has constructed a laboratory to test concepts and technologies important to future sample curation. The Advanced Curation

  17. Sampling of illicit drugs for quantitative analysis--part III: sampling plans and sample preparations.

    PubMed

    Csesztregi, T; Bovens, M; Dujourdy, L; Franc, A; Nagy, J

    2014-08-01

    The findings in this paper are based on the results of our drug homogeneity studies and particle size investigations. Using that information, a general sampling plan (depicted in the form of a flow-chart) was devised that could be applied to the quantitative instrumental analysis of the most common illicit drugs: namely heroin, cocaine, amphetamine, cannabis resin, MDMA tablets and herbal cannabis in 'bud' form (type I). Other more heterogeneous forms of cannabis (type II) were found to require alternative, more traditional sampling methods. A table was constructed which shows the sampling uncertainty expected when a particular number of random increments are taken and combined to form a single primary sample. It also includes a recommended increment size; which is 1 g for powdered drugs and cannabis resin, 1 tablet for MDMA and 1 bud for herbal cannabis in bud form (type I). By referring to that table, individual laboratories can ensure that the sampling uncertainty for a particular drug seizure can be minimised, such that it lies in the same region as their analytical uncertainty for that drug. The table shows that assuming a laboratory wishes to quantitatively analyse a seizure of powdered drug or cannabis resin with a 'typical' heterogeneity, a primary sample of 15×1 g increments is generally appropriate. The appropriate primary sample for MDMA tablets is 20 tablets, while for herbal cannabis (in bud form) 50 buds were found to be appropriate. Our study also showed that, for a suitably homogenised primary sample of the most common powdered drugs, an analytical sample size of between 20 and 35 mg was appropriate and for herbal cannabis the appropriate amount was 200 mg. The need to ensure that the results from duplicate or multiple incremental sampling were compared, to demonstrate whether or not a particular seized material has a 'typical' heterogeneity and that the sampling procedure applied has resulted in a 'correct sample', was highlighted and the setting

  18. Dried saliva spot as a sampling technique for saliva samples.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rehim, Abbi; Abdel-Rehim, Mohamed

    2014-06-01

    For the first time, dried saliva spot (DSS) was used as a sampling technique for saliva samples. In the DSS technique 50 μL of saliva was collected on filter paper and the saliva was then extracted with an organic solvent. The local anesthetic lidocaine was used as a model compound, which was determined in the DSS using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The results obtained for the determination of lidocaine in saliva using DSS were compared with those from a previous study using a microextraction by packed sorbent syringe as the sampling method for saliva. This study shows that DSS can be used for the analysis of saliva samples. The method is promising and very easy in terms of sampling and extraction procedures. The results from this study are in good agreement with those from our previous work on the determination of lidocaine in saliva. DSS can open a new dimension in the saliva handling process in terms of sampling, storing and transport.

  19. Duplex sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Paul E.; Lloyd, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An improved apparatus is provided for sampling a gaseous mixture and for measuring mixture components. The apparatus includes two sampling containers connected in series serving as a duplex sampling apparatus. The apparatus is adapted to independently determine the amounts of condensable and noncondensable gases in admixture from a single sample. More specifically, a first container includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a sample source and a second port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a second container. A second container also includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from the second port of the first container and a second port capable of either selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a differential pressure source. By cooling a mixture sample in the first container, the condensable vapors form a liquid, leaving noncondensable gases either as free gases or dissolved in the liquid. The condensed liquid is heated to drive out dissolved noncondensable gases, and all the noncondensable gases are transferred to the second container. Then the first and second containers are separated from one another in order to separately determine the amount of noncondensable gases and the amount of condensable gases in the sample.

  20. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Ground-Water Monitoring Project. The routine sampling plan for the SESP has been revised this year to reflect changing site operations and priorities. Some sampling previously performed at least annually has been reduced in frequency, and some new sampling to be performed at a less than annual frequency has been added. Therefore, the SESP schedule reflects sampling to be conducted in calendar year 1991 as well as future years. The ground-water sampling schedule is for 1991. This schedule is subject to modification during the year in response to changes in Site operation, program requirements, and the nature of the observed results. Operational limitations such as weather, mechanical failures, sample availability, etc., may also require schedule modifications. Changes will be documented in the respective project files, but this plan will not be reissued. The purpose of these monitoring projects is to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford evirons.

  1. Rapid Sampling from Sealed Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.G.; Garcia, A.R.E.; Martinez, R.K.; Baca, E.T.

    1999-02-28

    The authors have developed several different types of tools for sampling from sealed containers. These tools allow the user to rapidly drill into a closed container, extract a sample of its contents (gas, liquid, or free-flowing powder), and permanently reseal the point of entry. This is accomplished without exposing the user or the environment to the container contents, even while drilling. The entire process is completed in less than 15 seconds for a 55 gallon drum. Almost any kind of container can be sampled (regardless of the materials) with wall thicknesses up to 1.3 cm and internal pressures up to 8 atm. Samples can be taken from the top, sides, or bottom of a container. The sampling tools are inexpensive, small, and easy to use. They work with any battery-powered hand drill. This allows considerable safety, speed, flexibility, and maneuverability. The tools also permit the user to rapidly attach plumbing, a pressure relief valve, alarms, or other instrumentation to a container. Possible applications include drum venting, liquid transfer, container flushing, waste characterization, monitoring, sampling for archival or quality control purposes, emergency sampling by rapid response teams, counter-terrorism, non-proliferation and treaty verification, and use by law enforcement personnel during drug or environmental raids.

  2. Biological Environmental Sampling Technologies Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    sa ti li ty Types of surfaces Info only Can the device support all types of surface sampling to include but not limited to tile, concrete ...sampling to include but not limited to tile, concrete , wood, glass, stone, plastic, etc. Yes/no Informational only Yes N/A N/A Info only...include but not limited to tile, concrete , wood, glass, stone, plastic, etc. Yes/no Informational only Yes N/A N/A Info only Sampling area size

  3. Air sampling of smallpox virus

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, G.

    1974-01-01

    Airborne smallpox virus has been recovered in an isolation hospital using an adhesive surface sampling technique in the presence of very low aerosol concentrations. Previous work in this field is reviewed. Successful recovery of airborne virus depends on sampling large volumes of air with a suitable sampler and thorough investigation of the whole sample taken for the presence of viable virus. More information on the characteristics and behaviour of airborne smallpox virus is needed in particular with regard to the future design and siting of smallpox isolation units. PMID:4371586

  4. Contactless Calorimetry for Levitated Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Dokko, W.

    1986-01-01

    Temperature and specific heat of hot sample measured with pyrometer in proposed experimental technique. Technique intended expecially for contactless calorimetry of such materials as undercooled molten alloys, samples of which must be levitated to prevent contamination and premature crystallization. Contactless calorimetry technique enables data to be taken over entire undercooling temperature range with only one sample. Technique proves valuable in study of undercooling because difference in specific heat between undercooled-liquid and crystalline phases at same temperature provides driving force to convert metastable undercooled phase to stable crystalline phase.

  5. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and

  6. PPIS Information and Report Samples

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technical information about the Pesticide Product Information System and its downloadable file formats, and sample reporting for Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) section 3 and section 24(c).

  7. Microfluidic Sample Preparation for Immunoassays

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S; Benett, W; Bettencourt, K; Chang, J; Fisher, K; Hamilton, J; Krulevitch, P; Park, C; Stockton, C; Tarte, L; Wang, A; Wilson, T

    2001-08-09

    Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are developing means to collect and identify fluid-based biological pathogens in the forms of proteins, viruses, and bacteria. to support detection instruments, they are developing a flexible fluidic sample preparation unit. The overall goal of this Microfluidic Module is to input a fluid sample, containing background particulates and potentially target compounds, and deliver a processed sample for detection. They are developing techniques for sample purification, mixing, and filtration that would be useful to many applications including immunologic and nucleic acid assays. Many of these fluidic functions are accomplished with acoustic radiation pressure or dielectrophoresis. They are integrating these technologies into packaged systems with pumps and valves to control fluid flow through the fluidic circuit.

  8. Proposal for Microwave Boson Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peropadre, Borja; Guerreschi, Gian Giacomo; Huh, Joonsuk; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-09-01

    Boson sampling, the task of sampling the probability distribution of photons at the output of a photonic network, is believed to be hard for any classical device. Unlike other models of quantum computation that require thousands of qubits to outperform classical computers, boson sampling requires only a handful of single photons. However, a scalable implementation of boson sampling is missing. Here, we show how superconducting circuits provide such platform. Our proposal differs radically from traditional quantum-optical implementations: rather than injecting photons in waveguides, making them pass through optical elements like phase shifters and beam splitters, and finally detecting their output mode, we prepare the required multiphoton input state in a superconducting resonator array, control its dynamics via tunable and dispersive interactions, and measure it with nondemolition techniques.

  9. Air Sampling System Evaluation Template

    SciTech Connect

    Blunt, Brent

    2000-05-09

    The ASSET1.0 software provides a template with which a user can evaluate an Air Sampling System against the latest version of ANSI N13.1 "Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities". The software uses the ANSI N13.1 PIC levels to establish basic design criteria for the existing or proposed sampling system. The software looks at such criteria as PIC level, type of radionuclide emissions, physical state of the radionuclide, nozzle entrance effects, particulate transmission effects, system and component accuracy and precision evaluations, and basic system operations to provide a detailed look at the subsystems of a monitoring and sampling system/program. A GAP evaluation can then be completed which leads to identification of design and operational flaws in the proposed systems. Corrective measures can then be limited to the GAPs.

  10. Mossbauer spectroscopy of moon samples.

    PubMed

    Muir, A H; Housley, R M; Grant, R W; Abdel-Gawad, M; Blander, M

    1970-01-30

    Lunar bulk sample 10084,85 (< 1 mm size dust), and samples from rocks 10017,17 (fine grained, vesicular), 10046,17 (breccia), 10057,59 (fine grained, vesicular, top surface), 10057,60 (fine grained, vesicular, interior), and 10058,24 (medium grained, not vesicular) have been investigated by (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Iron metal and the Fe(2+) minerals ilmenite, pyroxene, troilite, and iron containing glass have been identified. An iron line of sample 10084,85 (originally sealed in nitrogen) showed no significant intensity change when the sample was exposed to air. The antiferromagnetic transition in several lunar ilmenites at 57(0) +/- 2 degrees K corresponds to stoichiometric FeTiO,. Magneticallv separated 10057 showed troilite and somne metallic iron.

  11. Death anxiety among Lebanese samples.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Khalek, A M

    1991-06-01

    An Arabic version of the Templer Death Anxiety Scale was administered to 673 Lebanese volunteer subjects (164 boys, 165 girls in secondary school, 170 men, 174 women undergraduates). Females attained higher mean death anxiety scores than males. The Lebanese samples had either the same or a lower mean score on death anxiety than their Arab peers, that is, Egyptians and Kuwaitians and also US samples. Split-half reliabilities ranged from .57 to .68.

  12. Gibbs Sampling for the Uninitiated

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    CS-TR-4956 UMIACS-TR-2010-04 LAMP-TR-153 April 2010 GIBBS SAMPLING FOR THE UNINITIATED Philip Resnik Eric Hardisty Department of Linguistics...Institute for Advanced Computer Studies University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742-3275 resnik AT umd.edu Department of Computer Science Institute for...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Gibbs Sampling for the Uninitiated Philip Resnik Department of Linguistics and Institute for Advanced Computer Studies

  13. Depth-discrete sampling port

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, Bradley E.; May, Christopher P.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.; Nichols, Ralph L.

    1999-01-01

    A sampling port is provided which has threaded ends for incorporating the port into a length of subsurface pipe. The port defines an internal receptacle which is in communication with subsurface fluids through a series of fine filtering slits. The receptacle is in further communication through a bore with a fitting carrying a length of tubing there which samples are transported to the surface. Each port further defines an additional bore through which tubing, cables, or similar components of adjacent ports may pass.

  14. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Samples are routinely collected and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, ground water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project.

  15. Sample-Based Surface Coloring

    PubMed Central

    Bürger, Kai; Krüger, Jens; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a sample-based approach for surface coloring, which is independent of the original surface resolution and representation. To achieve this, we introduce the Orthogonal Fragment Buffer (OFB)—an extension of the Layered Depth Cube—as a high-resolution view-independent surface representation. The OFB is a data structure that stores surface samples at a nearly uniform distribution over the surface, and it is specifically designed to support efficient random read/write access to these samples. The data access operations have a complexity that is logarithmic in the depth complexity of the surface. Thus, compared to data access operations in tree data structures like octrees, data-dependent memory access patterns are greatly reduced. Due to the particular sampling strategy that is employed to generate an OFB, it also maintains sample coherence, and thus, exhibits very good spatial access locality. Therefore, OFB-based surface coloring performs significantly faster than sample-based approaches using tree structures. In addition, since in an OFB, the surface samples are internally stored in uniform 2D grids, OFB-based surface coloring can efficiently be realized on the GPU to enable interactive coloring of high-resolution surfaces. On the OFB, we introduce novel algorithms for color painting using volumetric and surface-aligned brushes, and we present new approaches for particle-based color advection along surfaces in real time. Due to the intermediate surface representation we choose, our method can be used to color polygonal surfaces as well as any other type of surface that can be sampled. PMID:20616392

  16. Onsite testing of pressure sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallory, R.

    1980-01-01

    Portable test instrument containing controller, pressure port identification, 5-V power source for transducer excitation, and digital voltmeter to test pressure sampling valves completely, including leak and plug check before, during, or after installation in any location or environment. Controller comprises 117/24-Vac 100-watt transformer, bridge rectifier, capacitive-discharge stepper, and constant voltage source for homing sampling valve. It also includes 5-V regulated power supply and bipolar digital voltmeter having 10-uV resolution.

  17. Depth-discrete sampling port

    DOEpatents

    Pemberton, Bradley E.; May, Christopher P.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.; Nichols, Ralph L.

    1998-07-07

    A sampling port is provided which has threaded ends for incorporating the port into a length of subsurface pipe. The port defines an internal receptacle which is in communication with subsurface fluids through a series of fine filtering slits. The receptacle is in further communication through a bore with a fitting carrying a length of tubing there which samples are transported to the surface. Each port further defines an additional bore through which tubing, cables, or similar components of adjacent ports may pass.

  18. Sample Return: What Happens to the Samples on Earth?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Karen

    2010-01-01

    As space agencies throughout the world turn their attention toward human exploration of the Moon, Mars, and the solar system beyond, there has been an increase in the number of robotic sample return missions proposed as precursors to these human endeavors. In reality, however, we, as a global community, have very little experience with robotic sample return missions: 3 of the Russian Luna Missions successfully returned lunar material in the 1970s; 28 years later, in 2004, NASA s Genesis Mission returned material from the solar wind; and in 2006, NASA s Stardust Mission returned material from the Comet Wild2. [Note: The Japanese Hyabusa mission continues in space with the hope of returning material from the asteroid 25143 Itokawa.] We launch many spacecraft to LEO and return them to Earth. We also launch spacecraft beyond LEO to explore the planets, our solar system, and beyond. Some even land on these bodies. But these do not return. So as we begin to contemplate the sample return missions of the future, some common questions arise: "What really happens when the capsule returns?" "Where does it land?" "Who retrieves it and just how do they do that?" "Where does it go after that?" "How do the scientists get the samples?" "Do they keep them?" "Who is in charge?" The questions are nearly endless. The goal of this paper/presentation is to uncover many of the mysteries of the post-return phase of a mission - from the time the return body enters the atmosphere until the mission ends and the samples become part of a long term collection. The discussion will be based largely on the author s own experience with both the Genesis and Stardust missions. Of course, these two missions have a great deal in common, being funded by the same NASA Program (Discovery) and having similar team composition. The intent, however, is to use these missions as examples in order to highlight the general requirements and the challenges in defining and meeting those requirements for the final

  19. Biofouling development on plasma treated samples versus layers coated samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatiuc, B.; Exnar, P.; Sabau, A.; Spatenka, P.; Dumitrache, C. L.; Hnatiuc, M.; Ghita, S.

    2016-12-01

    Biofouling is the most important cause of naval corrosion. In order to reduce the Biofouling development on naval materials as steel or resin, different new methods have been tested. These methods could help to follow the new IMO environment reglementations and they could replace few classic operations before the painting of the small ships. The replacement of these operations means a reduction in maintenance costs. Their action must influence especially the first two steps of the Biofouling development, called Microfouling, that demand about 24 hours. This work presents the comparative results of the Biofouling development on two different classic naval materials, steel and resin, for three treated samples, immersed in sea water. Non-thermal plasma, produced by GlidArc technology, is applied to the first sample, called GD. The plasma treatment was set to 10 minutes. The last two samples, called AE9 and AE10 are covered by hydrophobic layers, prepared from a special organic-inorganic sol synthesized by sol-gel method. Theoretically, because of the hydrophobic properties, the Biofouling formation must be delayed for AE9 and AE10. The Biofouling development on each treated sample was compared with a witness non-treated sample. The microbiological analyses have been done for 24 hours by epifluorescence microscopy, available for one single layer.

  20. Improving Lab Sample Management - POS/MCEARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Scientists face increasing challenges in managing their laboratory samples, including long-term storage of legacy samples, tracking multiple aliquots of samples for many experiments, and linking metadata to these samples. Other factors complicating sample management include the...

  1. GEOSTATISTICAL SAMPLING DESIGNS FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter discusses field sampling design for environmental sites and hazardous waste sites with respect to random variable sampling theory, Gy's sampling theory, and geostatistical (kriging) sampling theory. The literature often presents these sampling methods as an adversari...

  2. Precision of circular systematic sampling.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Orive, L M; Gual-Arnau, X

    2002-09-01

    In design stereology, many estimators require isotropic orientation of a test probe relative to the object in order to attain unbiasedness. In such cases, systematic sampling of orientations becomes imperative on grounds of efficiency and practical applicability. For instance, the planar nucleator and the vertical rotator imply systematic sampling on the circle, whereas the Buffon-Steinhaus method to estimate curve length in the plane, or the vertical designs to estimate surface area and curve length, imply systematic sampling on the semicircle. This leads to the need for predicting the precision of systematic sampling on the circle and the semicircle from a single sample. There are two main prediction approaches, namely the classical one of G. Matheron for non-necessarily periodic measurement functions, and a recent approach based on a global symmetric model of the covariogram, more specific for periodic measurement functions. The latter approach seems at least as satisfactory as the former for small sample sizes, and it is developed here incorporating local errors. Detailed examples illustrating common stereological tools are included.

  3. Sampling characteristics of satellite orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunsch, Carl

    1989-01-01

    The irregular space-time sampling of any finite region by an orbiting satellite raises difficult questions as to which frequencies and wavenumbers can be determined and which will alias into others. Conventional sampling theorems must be extended to account for both irregular data distributions and observational noise - the sampling irregularity making the system much more susceptible to noise than in regularly sampled cases. The problem is formulated here in terms of least-squares and applied to spacecraft in 10-day and 17-day repeating orbits. The 'diamond-pattern' laid down spatially in such repeating orbits means that either repeat period adequately samples the spatial variables, but the slow overall temporal coverage in the 17-day pattern leads to much greater uncertainty than in the shorter repeat cycle. The result is not definitive and it is not concluded that a 10-day orbit repeat is the most appropriate one. A major conclusion, however, is that different orbital choices have potentially quite different sampling characteristics which need to be analyzed in terms of the spectral characteristics of the moving sea surface.

  4. Improved sample size determination for attributes and variables sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Stirpe, D.; Picard, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Earlier INMM papers have addressed the attributes/variables problem and, under conservative/limiting approximations, have reported analytical solutions for the attributes and variables sample sizes. Through computer simulation of this problem, we have calculated attributes and variables sample sizes as a function of falsification, measurement uncertainties, and required detection probability without using approximations. Using realistic assumptions for uncertainty parameters of measurement, the simulation results support the conclusions: (1) previously used conservative approximations can be expensive because they lead to larger sample sizes than needed; and (2) the optimal verification strategy, as well as the falsification strategy, are highly dependent on the underlying uncertainty parameters of the measurement instruments. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  5. Chemical Data for Precipitate Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Andrea L.; Koski, Randolph A.

    2008-01-01

    During studies of sulfide oxidation in coastal areas of Prince William Sound in 2005, precipitate samples were collected from onshore and intertidal locations near the Ellamar, Threeman, and Beatson mine sites (chapter A, fig. 1; table 7). The precipitates include jarosite and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide from Ellamar, amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide from Threeman, and amorphous Fe oxyhydroxide, ferrihydrite, and schwertmannite from Beatson. Precipitates occurring in the form of loose, flocculant coatings were harvested using a syringe and concentrated in the field by repetitive decanting. Thicker accumulations were either scraped gently from rocks using a stainless steel spatula or were scooped directly into receptacles (polyethylene jars or plastic heavy-duty zippered bags). Most precipitate samples contain small amounts of sedimentary detritus. With three jarosite-bearing samples from Ellamar, an attempt was made to separate the precipitate from the heavy-mineral fraction of the sediment. In this procedure, the sample was stirred in a graduated cylinder containing deionized water. The jarosite-rich suspension was decanted onto analytical filter paper and air dried before analysis. Eleven precipitate samples from the three mine sites were analyzed in laboratories of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Denver, Colorado (table 8). Major and trace elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following multiacid (HCl-HNO3-HClO4-HF) digestion (Briggs and Meier, 2002), except for mercury, which was analyzed by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (Brown and others, 2002a). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on powdered samples (<200 mesh) by S. Sutley of the USGS. Additional details regarding sample preparation and detection limits are found in Taggert (2002). Discussions of the precipitate chemistry and associated microbial communities are presented in Koski and others (2008) and Foster and others (2008), respectively.

  6. Identifying the major bacteria causing intramammary infections in individual milk samples of sheep and goats using traditional bacteria culturing and real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Rovai, M; Caja, G; Salama, A A K; Jubert, A; Lázaro, B; Lázaro, M; Leitner, G

    2014-09-01

    Use of DNA-based methods, such as real-time PCR, has increased the sensitivity and shortened the time for bacterial identification, compared with traditional bacteriology; however, results should be interpreted carefully because a positive PCR result does not necessarily mean that an infection exists. One hundred eight lactating dairy ewes (56 Manchega and 52 Lacaune) and 24 Murciano-Granadina dairy goats were used for identifying the main bacteria causing intramammary infections (IMI) using traditional bacterial culturing and real-time PCR and their effects on milk performance. Udder-half milk samples were taken for bacterial culturing and somatic cell count (SCC) 3 times throughout lactation. Intramammary infections were assessed based on bacteria isolated in ≥2 samplings accompanied by increased SCC. Prevalence of subclinical IMI was 42.9% in Manchega and 50.0% in Lacaune ewes and 41.7% in goats, with the estimated milk yield loss being 13.1, 17.9, and 18.0%, respectively. According to bacteriology results, 87% of the identified single bacteria species (with more than 3 colonies/plate) or culture-negative growth were identical throughout samplings, which agreed 98.9% with the PCR results. Nevertheless, the study emphasized that 1 sampling may not be sufficient to determine IMI and, therefore, other inflammatory responses such as increased SCC should be monitored to identify true infections. Moreover, when PCR methodology is used, aseptic and precise milk sampling procedures are key for avoiding false-positive amplifications. In conclusion, both PCR and bacterial culture methods proved to have similar accuracy for identifying infective bacteria in sheep and goats. The final choice will depend on their response time and cost analysis, according to the requirements and farm management strategy.

  7. Ball assisted device for analytical surface sampling

    SciTech Connect

    ElNaggar, Mariam S; Van Berkel, Gary J; Covey, Thomas R

    2015-11-03

    A system for sampling a surface includes a sampling probe having a housing and a socket, and a rolling sampling sphere within the socket. The housing has a sampling fluid supply conduit and a sampling fluid exhaust conduit. The sampling fluid supply conduit supplies sampling fluid to the sampling sphere. The sampling fluid exhaust conduit has an inlet opening for receiving sampling fluid carried from the surface by the sampling sphere. A surface sampling probe and a method for sampling a surface are also disclosed.

  8. Estimating regression coefficients from clustered samples: Sampling errors and optimum sample allocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalton, G.

    1983-01-01

    A number of surveys were conducted to study the relationship between the level of aircraft or traffic noise exposure experienced by people living in a particular area and their annoyance with it. These surveys generally employ a clustered sample design which affects the precision of the survey estimates. Regression analysis of annoyance on noise measures and other variables is often an important component of the survey analysis. Formulae are presented for estimating the standard errors of regression coefficients and ratio of regression coefficients that are applicable with a two- or three-stage clustered sample design. Using a simple cost function, they also determine the optimum allocation of the sample across the stages of the sample design for the estimation of a regression coefficient.

  9. Compact drilling and sample system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis-Smith, Greg R.; Petercsak, Doug

    1998-01-01

    The Compact Drilling and Sample System (CDSS) was developed to drill into terrestrial, cometary, and asteroid material in a cryogenic, vacuum environment in order to acquire subsurface samples. Although drills were used by the Apollo astronauts some 20 years ago, this drill is a fraction of the mass and power and operates completely autonomously, able to drill, acquire, transport, dock, and release sample containers in science instruments. The CDSS has incorporated into its control system the ability to gather science data about the material being drilled by measuring drilling rate per force applied and torque. This drill will be able to optimize rotation and thrust in order to achieve the highest drilling rate possible in any given sample. The drill can be commanded to drill at a specified force, so that force imparted on the rover or lander is limited. This paper will discuss the cryo dc brush motors, carbide gears, cryogenic lubrication, quick-release interchangeable sampling drill bits, percussion drilling and the control system developed to achieve autonomous, cryogenic, vacuum, lightweight drilling.

  10. Sample Results from Routine Salt Batch 7 Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.

    2015-05-13

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the “microbatches” of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 7B have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES), and Ion Chromatography Anions (IC-A). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from earlier samples from this and previous macrobatches. The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) continue to show more than adequate Pu and Sr removal, and there is a distinct positive trend in Cs removal, due to the use of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) notes that historically, most measured Concentration Factor (CF) values during salt processing have been in the 12-14 range. However, recent processing gives CF values closer to 11. This observation does not indicate that the solvent performance is suffering, as the Decontamination Factor (DF) has still maintained consistently high values. Nevertheless, SRNL will continue to monitor for indications of process upsets. The bulk chemistry of the DSSHT and SEHT samples do not show any signs of unusual behavior.

  11. Hermetic Seal Designs for Sample Return Sample Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younse, Paulo J.

    2013-01-01

    Prototypes have been developed of potential hermetic sample sealing techniques for encapsulating samples in a ˜1-cm-diameter thin-walled sample tube that are compatible with IMSAH (Integrated Mars Sample Acquisition and Handling) architecture. Techniques include a heat-activated, finned, shape memory alloy plug; a contracting shape memory alloy activated cap; an expanding shape memory alloy plug; and an expanding torque plug. Initial helium leak testing of the shape memory alloy cap and finned shape memory alloy plug seals showed hermetic- seal capability compared against an industry standard of <1×10-8 atm-cc/s He. These tests were run on both clean tubes and dirty tubes dipped in MMS (Mojave Mars Simulant). The leak tests were also performed after thermal cycling between -135 and +55 ºC to ensure seal integrity after Martian diurnal cycles. Developmental testing is currently being done on the expanding torque plug, and expanding shape memory alloy plug seal designs. The finned shape memory alloy (SMA) plug currently shows hermetic sealing capability based on preliminary tests.

  12. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, L.E.

    1997-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned 1997 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. In addition, Section 3.0, Biota, also reflects a rotating collection schedule identifying the year a specific sample is scheduled for collection. The purpose of these monitoring projects is to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The sampling methods will be the same as those described in the Environmental Monitoring Plan, US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, DOE/RL91-50, Rev. 1, US Department of Energy, Richland, Washington.

  13. Sample mounts for microcrystal crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Robert E. (Inventor); Stum, Zachary (Inventor); O'Neill, Kevin (Inventor); Kmetko, Jan (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Sample mounts (10) for mounting microcrystals of biological macromolecules for X-ray crystallography are prepared by using patterned thin polyimide films (12) that have curvature imparted thereto, for example, by being attached to a curved outer surface of a small metal rod (16). The patterned film (12) preferably includes a tapered tip end (24) for holding a crystal. Preferably, a small sample aperture is disposed in the film for reception of the crystal. A second, larger aperture can also be provided that is connected to the sample aperture by a drainage channel, allowing removal of excess liquid and easier manipulation in viscous solutions. The curvature imparted to the film (12) increases the film's rigidity and allows a convenient scoop-like action for retrieving crystals. The polyimide contributes minimally to background and absorption, and can be treated to obtain desired hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity.

  14. Sample preparation for STED microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Christian A; Neumann, Daniel; Schmidt, Roman; Egner, Alexander; Jakobs, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery of the diffraction barrier in the late nineteenth century, it has been commonly accepted that with far-field optical microscopy it is not possible to resolve structural details considerably finer than half the wavelength of light. The emergence of STED microscopy showed that, at least for fluorescence imaging, these limits can be overcome. Since STED microscopy is a far-field technique, in principle, the same sample preparation as for conventional confocal microscopy may be utilized. The increased resolution, however, requires additional precautions to ensure the structural preservation of the specimen. We present robust protocols to generate test samples for STED microscopy. These protocols for bead samples and immunolabeled mammalian cells may be used as starting points to adapt existing labeling strategies for the requirements of sub-diffraction resolution microscopy.

  15. Sample mounts for microcrystal crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Robert E. (Inventor); Stum, Zachary (Inventor); O'Neill, Kevin (Inventor); Kmetko, Jan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Sample mounts (10) for mounting microcrystals of biological macromolecules for X-ray crystallography are prepared by using patterned thin polyimide films (12) that have curvature imparted thereto, for example, by being attached to a curved outer surface of a small metal rod (16). The patterned film (12) preferably includes a tip end (24) for holding a crystal. Preferably, a small sample aperture is disposed in the film for reception of the crystal. A second, larger aperture can also be provided that is connected to the sample aperture by a drainage channel, allowing removal of excess liquid and easier manipulation in viscous solutions. The curvature imparted to the film (12) increases the film's rigidity and allows a convenient scoop-like action for retrieving crystals. The polyimide contributes minimally to background and absorption, and can be treated to obtain desired hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity.

  16. 19 CFR 151.52 - Sampling procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... composite sample of the shipment shall be drawn for assay, providing composite sampling is feasible and... composite sample shall consist of proportional parts by weight of the prepared sample drawn from the various... address of the sampling concern. (c) Samples taken by Customs. Where no commercial samples have been...

  17. 19 CFR 151.52 - Sampling procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... composite sample of the shipment shall be drawn for assay, providing composite sampling is feasible and... composite sample shall consist of proportional parts by weight of the prepared sample drawn from the various... address of the sampling concern. (c) Samples taken by Customs. Where no commercial samples have been...

  18. 19 CFR 151.52 - Sampling procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... composite sample of the shipment shall be drawn for assay, providing composite sampling is feasible and... composite sample shall consist of proportional parts by weight of the prepared sample drawn from the various... address of the sampling concern. (c) Samples taken by Customs. Where no commercial samples have been...

  19. 19 CFR 151.52 - Sampling procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... composite sample of the shipment shall be drawn for assay, providing composite sampling is feasible and... composite sample shall consist of proportional parts by weight of the prepared sample drawn from the various... address of the sampling concern. (c) Samples taken by Customs. Where no commercial samples have been...

  20. Statistical Efficiency in Distance Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Robert Graham

    2016-01-01

    Distance sampling is a technique for estimating the abundance of animals or other objects in a region, allowing for imperfect detection. This paper evaluates the statistical efficiency of the method when its assumptions are met, both theoretically and by simulation. The theoretical component of the paper is a derivation of the asymptotic variance penalty for the distance sampling estimator arising from uncertainty about the unknown detection parameters. This asymptotic penalty factor is tabulated for several detection functions. It is typically at least 2 but can be much higher, particularly for steeply declining detection rates. The asymptotic result relies on a model which makes the strong assumption that objects are uniformly distributed across the region. The simulation study relaxes this assumption by incorporating over-dispersion when generating object locations. Distance sampling and strip transect estimators are calculated for simulated data, for a variety of overdispersion factors, detection functions, sample sizes and strip widths. The simulation results confirm the theoretical asymptotic penalty in the non-overdispersed case. For a more realistic overdispersion factor of 2, distance sampling estimation outperforms strip transect estimation when a half-normal distance function is correctly assumed, confirming previous literature. When the hazard rate model is correctly assumed, strip transect estimators have lower mean squared error than the usual distance sampling estimator when the strip width is close enough to its optimal value (± 75% when there are 100 detections; ± 50% when there are 200 detections). Whether the ecologist can set the strip width sufficiently accurately will depend on the circumstances of each particular study. PMID:26950934

  1. Sampled Longest Common Prefix Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirén, Jouni

    When augmented with the longest common prefix (LCP) array and some other structures, the suffix array can solve many string processing problems in optimal time and space. A compressed representation of the LCP array is also one of the main building blocks in many compressed suffix tree proposals. In this paper, we describe a new compressed LCP representation: the sampled LCP array. We show that when used with a compressed suffix array (CSA), the sampled LCP array often offers better time/space trade-offs than the existing alternatives. We also show how to construct the compressed representations of the LCP array directly from a CSA.

  2. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    SciTech Connect

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1987-12-10

    An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  3. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    SciTech Connect

    Dewhurst, K.H.

    1990-05-22

    An inertial impactor is designed which is to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air. The device may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. 3 figs.

  4. GET electronics samples data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovinazzo, J.; Goigoux, T.; Anvar, S.; Baron, P.; Blank, B.; Delagnes, E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Pancin, J.; Pedroza, J. L.; Pibernat, J.; Pollacco, E.; Rebii, A.; Roger, T.; Sizun, P.

    2016-12-01

    The General Electronics for TPCs (GET) has been developed to equip a generation of time projection chamber detectors for nuclear physics, and may also be used for a wider range of detector types. The goal of this paper is to propose first analysis procedures to be applied on raw data samples from the GET system, in order to correct for systematic effects observed on test measurements. We also present a method to estimate the response function of the GET system channels. The response function is required in analysis where the input signal needs to be reconstructed, in terms of time distribution, from the registered output samples.

  5. Amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling.

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, L P; Elias, S

    1993-01-01

    Amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling have been shown through prospective, multicenter trials to be safe and effective methods of prenatal diagnosis; accordingly, a knowledge of these tests is important for those physicians who care for women during their childbearing years. We review the indications, techniques, safety, accuracy, and efficacy of amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling and compare the advantages and disadvantages of each diagnostic test. This review should enable physicians to provide appropriate counseling and information to women at increased risk for fetal abnormalities detectable by either of these procedures. Images PMID:8236967

  6. Sample Return Primer and Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrow, Kirk; Cheuvront, Allan; Faris, Grant; Hirst, Edward; Mainland, Nora; McGee, Michael; Szalai, Christine; Vellinga, Joseph; Wahl, Thomas; Williams, Kenneth; Lee, Gentry; Duxbury, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This three-part Sample Return Primer and Handbook provides a road map for conducting the terminal phase of a sample return mission. The main chapters describe element-by-element analyses and trade studies, as well as required operations plans, procedures, contingencies, interfaces, and corresponding documentation. Based on the experiences of the lead Stardust engineers, the topics include systems engineering (in particular range safety compliance), mission design and navigation, spacecraft hardware and entry, descent, and landing certification, flight and recovery operations, mission assurance and system safety, test and training, and the very important interactions with external support organizations (non-NASA tracking assets, landing site support, and science curation).

  7. Population samples and genotyping technology.

    PubMed

    Mack, S J; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Single, R M; Meyer, D; Hill, J; Dron, H A; Jani, A J; Thomson, G; Erlich, H A

    2007-04-01

    The 14th International HLA (human leukocyte antigen) Immunogenetics Workshop (14th-IHIWS) Biostatistics and Anthropology/Human Genetic Diversity project continues the population sampling, genotype data generation, and biostatistic analyses of the 13th International Histocompatibility Workshop Anthropology/Human Genetic Diversity Component, with the overall goal of further characterizing global HLA allele and haplotype diversity and better describing the relationships between major histocompatibility complex diversity, geography, linguistics, and population history. Since the 13th Workshop, new investigators have and continue to be recruited to the project and new high-resolution class I and class II genotype data are being generated for 112 population samples from around the world.

  8. Gaussian-mixture umbrella sampling

    PubMed Central

    van der Vaart, Arjan; Karplus, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the Gaussian-mixture umbrella sampling method (GAMUS), a biased molecular dynamics technique based on adaptive umbrella sampling that efficiently escapes free energy minima in multi-dimensional problems. The prior simulation data are reweighted with a maximum likelihood formulation, and the new approximate probability density is fit to a Gaussian-mixture model, augmented by information about the unsampled areas. The method can be used to identify free energy minima in multi-dimensional reaction coordinates. To illustrate GAMUS, we apply it to the alanine dipeptide (2D reaction coordinate) and tripeptide (4D reaction coordinate). PMID:19284746

  9. Sample acquisition and instrument deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    Progress is reported in developing the Sample Acquisition and Instrument Deployment (SAID) system, a robotic system for deploying science instruments and acquiring samples for analysis. The system is a conventional four degree of freedom manipulator 2 meters in length. A baseline design has been achieved through analysis and trade studies. The design considers environmental operating conditions on the surface of Mars, as well as volume constraints on proposed Mars landers. Control issues have also been studied, and simulations of joint and tip movements have been performed. The systems have been fabricated and tested in environmental chambers, as well as soil testing and robotic control testing.

  10. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Sonnenschein, Eva C.; Cariou, Thierry; O’Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R.; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E.; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P.; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M.; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion M. F.; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C.; Kandil, Mahrous M.; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L’Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M.; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M.; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A. Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J.; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N.; Gasol, Josep M.; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S.; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M.; Collins, R. Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  11. The ocean sampling day consortium.

    PubMed

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z; Sonnenschein, Eva C; Cariou, Thierry; O'Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion Mf; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C; Kandil, Mahrous M; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; Ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L'Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; Dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N; Gasol, Josep M; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M; Collins, R Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Gilbert, Jack A; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world's oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  12. Inertial impaction air sampling device

    DOEpatents

    Dewhurst, Katharine H.

    1990-01-01

    An inertial impactor to be used in an air sampling device for collection of respirable size particles in ambient air which may include a graphite furnace as the impaction substrate in a small-size, portable, direct analysis structure that gives immediate results and is totally self-contained allowing for remote and/or personal sampling. The graphite furnace collects suspended particles transported through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles may be analyzed for elements, quantitatively and qualitatively, by atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  13. DNest3: Diffusive Nested Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Brendon

    2016-04-01

    DNest3 is a C++ implementation of Diffusive Nested Sampling (ascl:1010.029), a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for Bayesian Inference and Statistical Mechanics. Relative to older DNest versions, DNest3 has improved performance (in terms of the sampling overhead, likelihood evaluations still dominate in general) and is cleaner code: implementing new models should be easier than it was before. In addition, DNest3 is multi-threaded, so one can run multiple MCMC walkers at the same time, and the results will be combined together.

  14. Sampling Errors of Variance Components.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Piet F.

    A study on sampling errors of variance components was conducted within the framework of generalizability theory by P. L. Smith (1978). The study used an intuitive approach for solving the problem of how to allocate the number of conditions to different facets in order to produce the most stable estimate of the universe score variance. Optimization…

  15. Sample processor for chemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettger, Heinz G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus is provided which can process numerous samples that must be chemically analyzed by the application of fluids such as liquid reagents, solvents and purge gases, as well as the application of dumps for receiving the applied fluid after they pass across the sample, in a manner that permits numerous samples to be processed in a relatively short time and with minimal manpower. The processor includes a rotor which can hold numerous cartridges containing inert or adsorbent material for holding samples, and a pair of stators on opposite sides of the rotor. The stators form stations spaced along the path of the cartridges which lie in the rotor, and each station can include an aperture in one stator through which a fluid can be applied to a cartridge resting at that station, and an aperture in the other stator which can receive the fluid which has passed through the cartridge. The stators are sealed to the ends of the cartridges lying on the rotor, to thereby isolate the stations from one another.

  16. [Clinical research V. Sample size].

    PubMed

    Talavera, Juan O; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Bernal-Rosales, Laura Paola

    2011-01-01

    In clinical research it is impossible and inefficient to study all patients with a specific pathology, so it is necessary to study a sample of them. The estimation of the sample size before starting a study guarantees the stability of the results and allows us to foresee the feasibility of the study depending on the availability of patients and cost. The basic structure of sample size estimation is based on the premise that seeks to demonstrate, among other cases, that the observed difference between two or more maneuvers in the subsequent state is real. Initially, it requires knowing the value of the expected difference (δ) and its data variation (standard deviation). These data are usually obtained from previous studies. Then, other components must be considered: a (alpha), percentage of error in the assertion that the difference between means is real, usually 5 %; and β, error rate accepting the claim that the no-difference between the means is real, usually ranging from 15 to 20 %. Finally, these values are substituted into the formula or in an electronic program for estimating sample size. While summary and dispersion measures vary with the type of variable according to the outcome, the basic structure is the same.

  17. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, L.E.

    1996-02-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned 1996 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project.

  18. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, L.E.

    1994-02-01

    This document contains the planned 1994 schedules for routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP), Drinking Water Project, and Ground-Water Surveillance Project. Samples are routinely collected for the SESP and analyzed to determine the quality of air, surface water, soil, sediment, wildlife, vegetation, foodstuffs, and farm products at Hanford Site and surrounding communities. The responsibility for monitoring the onsite drinking water falls outside the scope of the SESP. The Hanford Environmental Health Foundation is responsible for monitoring the nonradiological parameters as defined in the National Drinking Water Standards while PNL conducts the radiological monitoring of the onsite drinking water. PNL conducts the drinking water monitoring project concurrent with the SESP to promote efficiency and consistency, utilize the expertise developed over the years, and reduce costs associated with management, procedure development, data management, quality control and reporting. The ground-water sampling schedule identifies ground-water sampling events used by PNL for environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site.

  19. Workplace Education Sample Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozarjian, Bob; Uvin, Johan

    This sample evaluation report is part of a series of resources developed for and by workplace education practitioners in business, education, and labor partnerships funded through the Massachusetts Department of Education's Workplace Literacy Program. Data included in the report are based on Project Health, which integrates the experiences from…

  20. Elaborating transition interface sampling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Erp, Titus S. van . E-mail: bolhuis@science.uva.nl

    2005-05-01

    We review two recently developed efficient methods for calculating rate constants of processes dominated by rare events in high-dimensional complex systems. The first is transition interface sampling (TIS), based on the measurement of effective fluxes through hypersurfaces in phase space. TIS improves efficiency with respect to standard transition path sampling (TPS) rate constant techniques, because it allows a variable path length and is less sensitive to recrossings. The second method is the partial path version of TIS. Developed for diffusive processes, it exploits the loss of long time correlation. We discuss the relation between the new techniques and the standard reactive flux methods in detail. Path sampling algorithms can suffer from ergodicity problems, and we introduce several new techniques to alleviate these problems, notably path swapping, stochastic configurational bias Monte Carlo shooting moves and order-parameter free path sampling. In addition, we give algorithms to calculate other interesting properties from path ensembles besides rate constants, such as activation energies and reaction mechanisms.

  1. Sampling Assumptions in Inductive Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarro, Daniel J.; Dry, Matthew J.; Lee, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Inductive generalization, where people go beyond the data provided, is a basic cognitive capability, and it underpins theoretical accounts of learning, categorization, and decision making. To complete the inductive leap needed for generalization, people must make a key "sampling" assumption about how the available data were generated.…

  2. Micropaleontological studies of lunar samples.

    PubMed

    Schopf, J W

    1970-01-30

    Optical and electron microscopic studies of rock chips and dust from the bulk sample box returned by Apollo 11 and of petrographic thin sections and acid-resistant residues of lunar material have yielded no evidence of indigenous biological activity. vestigations.

  3. Curiosity analyzes Martian soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy; Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-12-01

    NASA's Mars Curiosity rover has conducted its first analysis of Martian soil samples using multiple instruments, the agency announced at a 3 December news briefing at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco. "These results are an unprecedented look at the chemical diversity in the area," said NASA's Michael Meyer, program scientist for Curiosity.

  4. More about sampling and estimation of mercaptans in air samples.

    PubMed

    Moliner-Martínez, Y; Herráez-Hernández, R; Molins-Legua, C; Verdú-Andrés, J; Avella-Oliver, M; Campíns-Falcó, P

    2013-03-15

    Several strategies have been developed for sampling and determination of volatile thiols. The selectivity and sensitivity of the proposed methodologies are achieved by using a specific derivatizing reagent. The different procedures assayed are based on air sampling followed by derivatization of the analytes with OPA and isoleucine in alkaline solution. The derivatization products are separated and determined by liquid chromatography and fluorescence detection. To start, the derivatization conditions and stability of the derivates have been studied in order to establish the storage conditions. In general, the strategies studied consisted on trapping and detivatization the thiol compound on different support; a solution (Impinger) or sorbent (C₁₈ cartridges or glass fiber filter). The analytical properties of the different strategies have been obtained and compared. Procedures are recommended upon specific situations.

  5. Sample size and optimal sample design in tuberculosis surveys

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Crespo, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    Tuberculosis surveys sponsored by the World Health Organization have been carried out in different communities during the last few years. Apart from the main epidemiological findings, these surveys have provided basic statistical data for use in the planning of future investigations. In this paper an attempt is made to determine the sample size desirable in future surveys that include one of the following examinations: tuberculin test, direct microscopy, and X-ray examination. The optimum cluster sizes are found to be 100-150 children under 5 years of age in the tuberculin test, at least 200 eligible persons in the examination for excretors of tubercle bacilli (direct microscopy) and at least 500 eligible persons in the examination for persons with radiological evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis (X-ray). Modifications of the optimum sample size in combined surveys are discussed. PMID:5300008

  6. AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect

    CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

    2009-01-16

    Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the

  7. Apparatus for Sampling Surface Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Mark

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus denoted a swab device has been developed as a convenient means of acquiring samples of contaminants from surfaces and suspending the samples in liquids. (Thereafter, the liquids can be dispensed, in controlled volumes, into scientific instruments for analysis of the contaminants.) The swab device is designed so as not to introduce additional contamination and to facilitate, simplify, and systematize the dispensing of controlled volumes of liquid into analytical instruments. The swab device is a single apparatus into which are combined all the equipment and materials needed for sampling surface contamination. The swab device contains disposable components stacked together on a nondisposable dispensing head. One of the disposable components is a supply cartridge holding a sufficient volume of liquid for one complete set of samples. (The liquid could be clean water or another suitable solvent, depending on the application.) This supply of liquid is sealed by Luer valves. At the beginning of a sampling process, the user tears open a sealed bag containing the supply cartridge. A tip on the nondisposable dispensing head is engaged with a Luer valve on one end of the supply cartridge and rotated, locking the supply cartridge on the dispensing head and opening the valve. The swab tip includes a fabric swab that is wiped across the surface of interest to acquire a sample. A sealed bag containing a disposable dispensing tip is then opened, and the swab tip is pushed into the dispensing tip until seated. The dispensing head contains a piston that passes through a spring-loaded lip seal. The air volume displaced by this piston forces the liquid out of the supply cartridge, over the swab, and into the dispensing tip. The piston is manually cycled to enforce oscillation of the air volume and thereby to cause water to flow to wash contaminants from the swab and cause the resulting liquid suspension of contaminants to flow into the dispensing tip. After several cycles

  8. Phobos Sample Return: Next Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyi, Lev; Martynov, Maxim; Zakharov, Alexander; Korablev, Oleg; Ivanov, Alexey; Karabadzak, George

    The Martian moons still remain a mystery after numerous studies by Mars orbiting spacecraft. Their study cover three major topics related to (1) Solar system in general (formation and evolution, origin of planetary satellites, origin and evolution of life); (2) small bodies (captured asteroid, or remnants of Mars formation, or reaccreted Mars ejecta); (3) Mars (formation and evolution of Mars; Mars ejecta at the satellites). As reviewed by Galimov [2010] most of the above questions require the sample return from the Martian moon, while some (e.g. the characterization of the organic matter) could be also answered by in situ experiments. There is the possibility to obtain the sample of Mars material by sampling Phobos: following to Chappaz et al. [2012] a 200-g sample could contain 10-7 g of Mars surface material launched during the past 1 mln years, or 5*10-5 g of Mars material launched during the past 10 mln years, or 5*1010 individual particles from Mars, quantities suitable for accurate laboratory analyses. The studies of Phobos have been of high priority in the Russian program on planetary research for many years. Phobos-88 mission consisted of two spacecraft (Phobos-1, Phobos-2) and aimed the approach to Phobos at 50 m and remote studies, and also the release of small landers (long-living stations DAS). This mission implemented the program incompletely. It was returned information about the Martian environment and atmosphere. The next profect Phobos Sample Return (Phobos-Grunt) initially planned in early 2000 has been delayed several times owing to budget difficulties; the spacecraft failed to leave NEO in 2011. The recovery of the science goals of this mission and the delivery of the samples of Phobos to Earth remain of highest priority for Russian scientific community. The next Phobos SR mission named Boomerang was postponed following the ExoMars cooperation, but is considered the next in the line of planetary exploration, suitable for launch around 2022. A

  9. Authentication of forensic DNA samples.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Dan; Wasserstrom, Adam; Davidson, Ariane; Grafit, Arnon

    2010-02-01

    Over the past twenty years, DNA analysis has revolutionized forensic science, and has become a dominant tool in law enforcement. Today, DNA evidence is key to the conviction or exoneration of suspects of various types of crime, from theft to rape and murder. However, the disturbing possibility that DNA evidence can be faked has been overlooked. It turns out that standard molecular biology techniques such as PCR, molecular cloning, and recently developed whole genome amplification (WGA), enable anyone with basic equipment and know-how to produce practically unlimited amounts of in vitro synthesized (artificial) DNA with any desired genetic profile. This artificial DNA can then be applied to surfaces of objects or incorporated into genuine human tissues and planted in crime scenes. Here we show that the current forensic procedure fails to distinguish between such samples of blood, saliva, and touched surfaces with artificial DNA, and corresponding samples with in vivo generated (natural) DNA. Furthermore, genotyping of both artificial and natural samples with Profiler Plus((R)) yielded full profiles with no anomalies. In order to effectively deal with this problem, we developed an authentication assay, which distinguishes between natural and artificial DNA based on methylation analysis of a set of genomic loci: in natural DNA, some loci are methylated and others are unmethylated, while in artificial DNA all loci are unmethylated. The assay was tested on natural and artificial samples of blood, saliva, and touched surfaces, with complete success. Adopting an authentication assay for casework samples as part of the forensic procedure is necessary for maintaining the high credibility of DNA evidence in the judiciary system.

  10. Sampling honeybee colonies for brood production: a double sampling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, L.E.; Gilbert, R.O.; Burgett, M.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure is described for estimating numbers of capped brood cells by double sampling combined with linear regression. A complete census of capped brood cells is better than an estimate, provided it is possible to count all brood cells directly or from photographs of brood frames. The double sampling technique, however, has the advantage of enabling data to be collected more quickly and at a lower cost than for a complete count. It also provides an estimate of the approximate variability associated with brood estimates and a mechanism for correcting biases associated with different investigators or with estimates by the same individual at different times or under different conditions. The technique is easy to apply in the field and involves minimal disturbance to the colony. A disadvantage is that the calculations associated with estimates of brood area are more arduous, estimates of variability are approximate, and brood estimates may be biased if the data are too few. All calculations can be easily adapted to a programmable calculator or small computer. Linear calibration, an alternative to the use of double sampling, is briefly discussed.

  11. Molecular identification of adenovirus sequences: a rapid scheme for early typing of human adenoviruses in diagnostic samples of immunocompetent and immunodeficient patients.

    PubMed

    Madisch, Ijad; Wölfel, Roman; Harste, Gabi; Pommer, Heidi; Heim, Albert

    2006-09-01

    Precise typing of human adenoviruses (HAdV) is fundamental for epidemiology and the detection of infection chains. As only few of the 51 adenovirus types are associated with life- threatening disseminated diseases in immunodeficient patients, detection of one of these types may have prognostic value and lead to immediate therapeutic intervention. A recently published molecular typing scheme consisting of two steps (sequencing of a generic PCR product closely adjacent to loop 1 of the main neutralization determinant epsilon, and for species HAdV-B, -C, and -D the sequencing of loop 2 [Madisch et al., 2005]) was applied to 119 clinical samples. HAdV DNA was typed unequivocally even in cases of culture negative samples, for example in immunodeficient patients before HAdV causes high virus loads and disseminated disease. Direct typing results demonstrated the predominance of HAdV-1, -2, -5, and -31 in immunodeficient patients suggesting the significance of the persistence of these viruses for the pathogenesis of disseminated disease. In contrast, HAdV-3 predominated in immunocompetent patients and cocirculation of four subtypes was demonstrated. Typing of samples from a conjunctivitis outbreak in multiple military barracks demonstrated various HAdV types (2, 4, 8, 19) and not the suspected unique adenovirus etiology. This suggests that our molecular typing scheme will be also useful for epidemiological investigations. In conclusion, our two-step molecular typing system will permit the precise and rapid typing of clinical HAdV isolates and even of HAdV DNA in clinical samples without the need of time-consuming virus isolation prior to typing.

  12. Optical Spectroscopy of Stardust Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.

    2006-01-01

    The Stardust spacecraft collected dust samples of the Kuiper belt comet 81P Wild-2 in aerogel and returned them to Earth January 15, 2006. Preliminary examination (PE) of the collected dust includes teams focused on mineralogy, chemical composition, isotopic measurements, organic analysis, cratering and spectroscopic properties. The main PE science goals are to provide an initial characterization of the returned samples with an emphasis on the capture process and its effects on the samples, a comparison of Stardust samples to other meteoritic materials, and the abundance of presolar materials in the Stardust samples. The science objectives of the Spectroscopy team are to obtain spectroscopic data on Stardust particles through infrared (IR), UV/Vis and Raman measurements of particles in aerogel, extracted particles, keystones, and microtome thin sections. These data will be used to answer fundamental science questions about the nature of the samples, but will also serve as preliminary mineralogical data to guide follow-on measurements that will be performed in the other preliminary examination teams. The IR characteristics of Stardust particles are measured to determine: 1) the nature of the indigenous 3.4 micron organic feature, is it detected and can it be differentiated/deconvolved from the contaminated aerogel? How does it compare to features observed in interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and to astronomical measurements of comets and interstellar dust? 2) the shape and fine structure within the 10 micron silicate feature. Overlap with the strong Si-O stretching vibration from the aerogel complicates this analysis, but we hope to determine if the feature is dominated by amorphous silicates such as those observed in IDPs and comets and whether or not crystalline silicates (e.g. olivine, pyroxene, clays) are present, 3) the presence of secondary (alteration) phases. Deep Impact results suggest that IR observations of Stardust particles should be evaluated for

  13. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Eckels, Joel Del; Klunder, Gregory L.

    2008-03-04

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  14. Ground Water Sampling at ISCO Sites - Residual Oxidant Impact on Sample Quality and Sample Preservation Guideline

    EPA Science Inventory

    In-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) involves the delivery of a chemical oxidant into the subsurface where oxidative reactions transform ground water contaminants into less toxic or harmless byproducts. Due to oxidant persistence, ground water samples collected at hazardous waste si...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.1107 - Sample media and sample system preparation; sample system assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... number of repeat tests. Note that when repeating test cycles to increase sample mass, you may replace the... with methylene chloride for 24 hours and dry over dry nitrogen in a low-temperature vacuum oven. (2... methanol, 22 hours with methylene chloride, and 22 hours with toluene, followed by drying with nitrogen....

  16. [Infective endocarditis in intensive cardiac care unit - clinical and biochemical differences of blood-culture negative infective endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Kaziród-Wolski, Karol; Sielski, Janusz; Ciuraszkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2017-01-23

    Diagnosis and treatment of infective endocarditis (IE) is still a challenge for physicians. Group of patients with the worst prognosis is treated in Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU). Etiologic agent can not be identified in a substantial number of patients.

  17. Retrieving samples from comet nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhlinger, Ernst; Bassner, Helmut; Fechtig, Hugo; Igenbergs, Eduard; Kuczera, Heribert; Loeb, Horst; Schobert, Detlef

    1987-09-01

    A comet nucleus sampling scenario is proposed. Material samples for analysis in earth-based laboratories should be collected continuously to a depth of 3 m below the surface, and at a solar distance of at least 2.5 AU where the comet surface is inactive. The spacecraft is propelled by chemical and electric thrusters. While hovering above the comet nucleus at an altitude of 500 to 1000 m, the spacecraft will dispatch a rotating drill on a tether. The drill pipe will be driven into the nucleus by a rocket-powered reaction wheel. The inner pipe of the drill, when filled with cometary material, will be withdrawn by the tether, stored on the spacecraft, and transported back to Earth.

  18. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, L E

    1992-01-01

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Ground-Water Monitoring Project. Samples for radiological analyses include Air-Particulate Filter, gases and vapor; Water/Columbia River, Onsite Pond, Spring, Irrigation, and Drinking; Foodstuffs/Animal Products including Whole Milk, Poultry and Eggs, and Beef; Foodstuffs/Produce including Leafy Vegetables, Vegetables, and Fruit; Foodstuffs/Farm Products including Wine, Wheat and Alfalfa; Wildlife; Soil; Vegetation; and Sediment. Direct Radiation Measurements include Terrestrial Locations, Columbia River Shoreline Locations, and Onsite Roadway, Railway and Aerial, Radiation Surveys.

  19. Adaptive Sampling in Hierarchical Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Knap, J; Barton, N R; Hornung, R D; Arsenlis, A; Becker, R; Jefferson, D R

    2007-07-09

    We propose an adaptive sampling methodology for hierarchical multi-scale simulation. The method utilizes a moving kriging interpolation to significantly reduce the number of evaluations of finer-scale response functions to provide essential constitutive information to a coarser-scale simulation model. The underlying interpolation scheme is unstructured and adaptive to handle the transient nature of a simulation. To handle the dynamic construction and searching of a potentially large set of finer-scale response data, we employ a dynamic metric tree database. We study the performance of our adaptive sampling methodology for a two-level multi-scale model involving a coarse-scale finite element simulation and a finer-scale crystal plasticity based constitutive law.

  20. Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linton, R. C.; Miller, E. R.; Susko, M.

    1981-01-01

    A Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA) unit was mounted and flown in the cargo bay of the space shuttle Columbia during the first Orbital Flight Test (OFT-1). A similar unit was mounted in a different location in the cargo bay during the postflight operations. The samples in both POSA arrays were subjected to a series of optical and analytical measurements prior to delivery for installation in the cargo bay and after retrieval of the flight hardware. The final results of a comparison of the two series of measurements are presented. These STS-1 results are based on data obtained from only a portion of one of the ten Induced Environment Contamination Monitor instruments to be flown on several shuttle flights beginning with STS-2. These limited results do not indicate shuttle contamination levels in excess of those anticipated.

  1. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE PAGES

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; ...

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore » embedded functional traits.« less

  2. Replica trick for rare samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Tommaso

    2014-05-01

    In the context of disordered systems with quenched Hamiltonians I address the problem of characterizing rare samples where the thermal average of a specific observable has a value different from the typical one. These rare samples can be selected through a variation of the replica trick which amounts to replicating the system and dividing the replicas intwo two groups containing, respectively, M and -M replicas. Replicas in the first (second) group experience a positive (negative) small field O (1/M) conjugate to the observable considered and the M →∞ limit is to be taken in the end. Applications to the random-field Ising model and to the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model are discussed.

  3. Organics in APOLLO Lunar Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    One of many unknowns prior to the Apollo landings concerned the possibility of life, its remains, or its organic precursors on the surface of the Moon. While the existence of lunar organisms was considered highly unlikely, a program of biological quarantine and testing for the astronauts, the Apollo Command Modules, and the lunar rock and soil samples, was instituted in the Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL). No conclusive evidence of lunar organisms, was detected and the quarantine program was ended after Apollo 14. Analyses for organic compounds were also con-ducted. Considerable effort was expended, during lunar surface operations and in the LRL, to minimize and quantify organic contamination. Post-Apollo curatorial operations and cleaning minimize contamination from particulates, oxygen, and water but no longer specifically address organic contamination. The organic compounds measured in Apollo samples are generally consistent with known sources of contamination.

  4. Apparatus and method for handheld sampling

    DOEpatents

    Staab, Torsten A.

    2005-09-20

    The present invention includes an apparatus, and corresponding method, for taking a sample. The apparatus is built around a frame designed to be held in at least one hand. A sample media is used to secure the sample. A sample media adapter for securing the sample media is operated by a trigger mechanism connectively attached within the frame to the sample media adapter.

  5. Melting a Sample within TEMPUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    One of the final runs of the TEMPUS experiment shows heating of a sample on STS-94, July 15, 1997, MET:14/11:01 (approximate) and the flows on the surface. At the point this image was taken, the sample was in the process of melting. The surface of the sample is begirning to flow, looking like the motion of plate tectonics on the surface of a planet. During this mission, TEMPUS was able to run than 120 melting cycles with zirconium, with a maximum temperature of 2,000 degrees C, and was able to undercool by 340 degrees -- the highest temperature and largest undercooling ever achieved in space. The TEMPUS investigators also have provided the first measurements of viscosity of palladium-silicon alloys in the undercooled liquid alloy which are not possible on Earth. TEMPUS (stands for Tiegelfreies Elektromagnetisches Prozessiere unter Schwerelosigkeit (containerless electromagnetic processing under weightlessness). It was developed by the German Space Agency (DARA) for flight aboard Spacelab. The DARA project scientist was Igon Egry. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). DARA and NASA are exploring the possibility of flying an advanced version of TEMPUS on the International Space Station.(176KB JPEG, 1350 x 1516 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300193.html.

  6. Laser comminution of submerged samples

    SciTech Connect

    Mariella, R. Jr.; Rubenchik, A.; Norton, M.; Donohue, G.

    2013-07-07

    With the long-term goal in mind of investigating possible designs for a 'universal, solid-sample comminution technique' for elemental analysis of debris and rubble, we have studied pulsed-laser ablation of solid samples that were submerged in water. Using 351-nm, 15-ns laser pulses with energy between 1 J and 0.35 J, intensities between 500 MW/cm{sup 2} and 30 MW/cm{sup 2}, and samples of broken rock [quartzite] and concrete debris, we have observed conditions in which the laser-driven process can remove material from the solid target substrate, dissolving it and/or converting it into ultrafine particles in a controlled manner. Our study used impure, non-metallic substrates and investigated both the rate of material removal as well as the size distribution of particles that were ablated from the process. We studied ablation at lower regimes of intensity and fluence [below 100 MW/cm{sup 2} and 0.4 J/cm{sup 2}, respectively] than has previously attracted attention and discovered that there appears to be a new regime for energy-efficient material removal [Q* < 4000 J/g, for quartzite and <2000 J/g for concrete] and for the generation of ultrafine particles.

  7. Sample Handling in Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avellar, Louisa; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2013-01-01

    Harsh environments, such as that on Venus, preclude the use of existing equipment for functions that involve interaction with the environment. The operating limitations of current high temperature electronics are well below the actual temperature and pressure found on Venus (460 deg C and 92 atm), so proposed lander configurations typically include a pressure vessel where the science instruments are kept at Earth-like temperature and pressure (25 deg C and 1 atm). The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a method for sample transfer from an external drill to internal science instruments for a lander on Venus. The initial concepts were string and pneumatically driven systems; and the latter system was selected for its ability to deliver samples at very high speed. The pneumatic system was conceived to be driven by the pressure difference between the Venusian atmosphere and the inside of the lander. The pneumatic transfer of a small capsule was demonstrated, and velocity data was collected from the lab experiment. The sample transfer system was modeled using CAD software and prototyped using 3D printing. General structural and thermal analyses were performed to approximate the proposed system's mass and effects on the temperature and pressure inside of the lander. Additionally, a sampler breadboard for use on Titan was tested and functionality problems were resolved.

  8. Remanent magnetization of lunar samples.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangway, D. W.; Pearce, G. W.; Gose, W. A.; Timme, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The remanent magnetization of samples returned from the moon by the Apollo 11 and 12 missions consists, in most cases, of two distinct components. An unstable component is readily removed upon alternating field (AF) demagnetization in fields less than 100 Oe and is considered to be an isothermal remanence acquired during or after return to earth. The second component is unaltered by demagnetization in fields up to 400 Oe. It is probably a thermoremanent magnetization due to cooling from above 800 C in the presence of a field of a few thousand gammas. Chips from individual rocks have the same direction of magnetization after demagnetization, while the directions of different samples are random. This again demonstrates the high stability. Our data imply that the moon experienced a magnetic field that lasted at least from about 3.0 to 3.8 b.y., which is the age of Apollo 11 and 12 samples. One explanation of the origin of this field is that the moon had a liquid core and a self-exciting dynamo early in its history.

  9. Synchronized sampling improves fault location

    SciTech Connect

    Kezunovic, M.; Perunicic, B.

    1995-04-01

    Transmission line faults must be located accurately to allow maintenance crews to arrive at the scene and repair the faulted section as soon as possible. Rugged terrain and geographical layout cause some sections of power transmission lines to be difficult to reach. In the past, a variety of fault location algorithms were introduced as either an add-on feature in protective relays or stand-alone implementation in fault locators. In both cases, the measurements of current and voltages were taken at one terminal of a transmission line only. Under such conditions, it may become difficult to determine the fault location accurately, since data from other transmission line ends are required for more precise computations. In the absence of data from the other end, existing algorithms have accuracy problems under several circumstances, such as varying switching and loading conditions, fault infeed from the other end, and random value of fault resistance. Most of the one-end algorithms were based on estimation of voltage and current phasors. The need to estimate phasors introduces additional difficulty in high-speed tripping situations where the algorithms may not be fast enough in determining fault location accurately before the current signals disappear due to the relay operation and breaker opening. This article introduces a unique concept of high-speed fault location that can be implemented either as a simple add-on to the digital fault recorders (DFRs) or as a stand-alone new relaying function. This advanced concept is based on the use of voltage and current samples that are synchronously taken at both ends of a transmission line. This sampling technique can be made readily available in some new DFR designs incorporating receivers for accurate sampling clock synchronization using the satellite Global Positioning System (GPS).

  10. Nuclear tracks in lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, P. B.

    1971-01-01

    An attempt is made to relate the appearance of an etched tract to the atomic number and velocity of the ion that left it using 10 MeV/nucleon Kr beams and 6 MeV/nucleon Zn beams. It was found that the etching rate along a tract in minerals and glass is a monototonic function of ionization rate thus, making particle identification possible. Results show the following were present in lunar samples: superheavy elements, cosmic rays with z greater than 26, and solar flare particles in Surveyor glass.

  11. Magnetic studies of lunar samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doell, Richard R.; Gromme, S.C.; Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.

    1970-01-01

    The remanent magnetism of a lunar type C breccia sample includes a large viscous component with a time constant of several hours, and a high coercivity remanence, possibly acquired by impact processes on the lunar surface. Ilmenite(?) and metallic iron in breccias, and ferrous and metallic iron in glass beads separated from lunar fines (type D) were identified by high-field and low-temperature experiments. The iron appears to occur in a wide range of grain sizes including the single domain and multidomain states.

  12. Mars 2005 Sample Return Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Convened at the request of Dr. Jurgen Rahe of the NASA Office of Space Science, the purpose of this workshop was to reexamine the science issues that will determine how an optimum sample return mission would be carried out in 2005 given the new context that has emerged for Mars exploration since the last such workshop was held (in 1987). The results and summary of discussion that took place at the meeting are contained in this volume. The community was invited to participate in the preparation of the final written report by browsing through the agenda and reading the text and viewgraphs provided by workshop participants and submitting comments for that section.

  13. Posterior sampling with improved efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.

    1998-12-01

    The Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique provides a means to generate a random sequence of model realizations that sample the posterior probability distribution of a Bayesian analysis. That sequence may be used to make inferences about the model uncertainties that derive from measurement uncertainties. This paper presents an approach to improving the efficiency of the Metropolis approach to MCMC by incorporating an approximation to the covariance matrix of the posterior distribution. The covariance matrix is approximated using the update formula from the BFGS quasi-Newton optimization algorithm. Examples are given for uncorrelated and correlated multidimensional Gaussian posterior distributions.

  14. Automatic diluter for bacteriological samples.

    PubMed Central

    Trinel, P A; Bleuze, P; Leroy, G; Moschetto, Y; Leclerc, H

    1983-01-01

    The described apparatus, carrying 190 tubes, allows automatic and aseptic dilution of liquid or suspended-solid samples. Serial 10-fold dilutions are programmable from 10(-1) to 10(-9) and are carried out in glass tubes with screw caps and split silicone septa. Dilution assays performed with strains of Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus permitted efficient conditions for sterilization of the needle to be defined and showed that the automatic dilutions were as accurate and as reproducible as the most rigorous conventional dilutions. Images PMID:6338826

  15. Reverse Cross Blot Hybridization Assay for Rapid Detection of PCR-Amplified DNA from Candida Species, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Posteraro, Brunella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Masucci, Luca; Romano, Lucio; Morace, Giulia; Fadda, Giovanni

    2000-01-01

    A PCR-based assay was developed to detect and identify medically important yeasts in clinical samples. Using a previously described set of primers (G. Morace et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 35:667–672, 1997), we amplified a fragment of the ERG11 gene for cytochrome P-450 lanosterol 14α-demethylase, a crucial enzyme in the biosynthesis of ergosterol. The PCR product was analyzed in a reverse cross blot hybridization assay with species-specific probes directed to a target region of the ERG11 gene of Candida albicans (pCal), C. guilliermondii (pGui), C. (Torulopsis) glabrata (pGla), C. kefyr (pKef), C. krusei (pKru), C. parapsilosis (pPar), C. tropicalis (pTro), the newly described species C. dubliniensis (pDub), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (pSce), and Cryptococcus neoformans (pCry). The PCR-reverse cross blot hybridization assay correctly identified multiple isolates of each species tested. No cross-hybridization was detected with any other fungal, bacteria, or human DNAs tested. The method was tested against conventional identification on 140 different clinical samples, including blood and cerebrospinal fluid, from patients with suspected fungal infections. The results agreed with those of culture and phenotyping for all but six specimens (two of which grew yeasts not included in the PCR panel of probes and four in which PCR positivity-culture negativity was justified by clinical findings). Species identification time was reduced from a mean of 4 days with conventional identification to 7 h with the molecular method. The PCR-reverse cross blot hybridization assay is a rapid method for the direct detection and identification of yeasts in clinical samples. PMID:10747151

  16. Cold SQUIDs and hot samples

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.S.C. |

    1997-05-01

    Low transition temperature (low-{Tc}) and high-{Tc} Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) have been used to perform high-resolution magnetic measurements on samples whose temperatures are much higher than the operating temperatures of the devices. Part 1 of this work focuses on measurements of the rigidity of flux vortices in high-{Tc} superconductors using two low-{Tc} SQUIDs, one on either side of a thermally-insulated sample. The correlation between the signals of the SQUIDs is a direct measure of the extent of correlation between the movements of opposite ends of vortices. These measurements were conducted under the previously-unexplored experimental conditions of nominally-zero applied magnetic field, such that vortex-vortex interactions were unimportant, and with zero external current. At specific temperatures, the authors observed highly-correlated noise sources, suggesting that the vortices moved as rigid rods. At other temperatures, the noise was mostly uncorrelated, suggesting that the relevant vortices were pinned at more than one point along their length. Part 2 describes the design, construction, performance, and applications of a scanning high-{Tc} SQUID microscope optimized for imaging room-temperature objects with very high spatial resolution and magnetic source sensitivity.

  17. TRU waste-sampling program

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.L.; Zerwekh, A.

    1985-08-01

    As part of a TRU waste-sampling program, Los Alamos National Laboratory retrieved and examined 44 drums of /sup 238/Pu- and /sup 239/Pu-contaminated waste. The drums ranged in age from 8 months to 9 years. The majority of drums were tested for pressure, and gas samples withdrawn from the drums were analyzed by a mass spectrometer. Real-time radiography and visual examination were used to determine both void volumes and waste content. Drum walls were measured for deterioration, and selected drum contents were reassayed for comparison with original assays and WIPP criteria. Each drum tested at atmospheric pressure. Mass spectrometry revealed no problem with /sup 239/Pu-contaminated waste, but three 8-month-old drums of /sup 238/Pu-contaminated waste contained a potentially hazardous gas mixture. Void volumes fell within the 81 to 97% range. Measurements of drum walls showed no significant corrosion or deterioration. All reassayed contents were within WIPP waste acceptance criteria. Five of the drums opened and examined (15%) could not be certified as packaged. Three contained free liquids, one had corrosive materials, and one had too much unstabilized particulate. Eleven drums had the wrong (or not the most appropriate) waste code. In many cases, disposal volumes had been inefficiently used. 2 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Restricted sample variance reduces generalizability.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Kimberley D

    2013-06-01

    One factor that affects the reliability of observed scores is restriction of range on the construct measured for a particular group of study participants. This study illustrates how researchers can use generalizability theory to evaluate the impact of restriction of range in particular sample characteristics on the generalizability of test scores and to estimate how changes in measurement design could improve the generalizability of the test scores. An observer-rated measure of child self-regulation (Response to Challenge Scale; Lakes, 2011) is used to examine scores for 198 children (Grades K through 5) within the generalizability theory (GT) framework. The generalizability of ratings within relatively developmentally homogeneous samples is examined and illustrates the effect of reduced variance among ratees on generalizability. Forecasts for g coefficients of various D study designs demonstrate how higher generalizability could be achieved by increasing the number of raters or items. In summary, the research presented illustrates the importance of and procedures for evaluating the generalizability of a set of scores in a particular research context.

  19. NASA's Aerosol Sampling Experiment Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Marit E.

    2016-01-01

    In a spacecraft cabin environment, the size range of indoor aerosols is much larger and they persist longer than on Earth because they are not removed by gravitational settling. A previous aerosol experiment in 1991 documented that over 90 of the mass concentration of particles in the NASA Space Shuttle air were between 10 m and 100 m based on measurements with a multi-stage virtual impactor and a nephelometer (Liu et al. 1991). While the now-retired Space Shuttle had short duration missions (less than two weeks), the International Space Station (ISS) has been continually inhabited by astronauts for over a decade. High concentrations of inhalable particles on ISS are potentially responsible for crew complaints of respiratory and eye irritation and comments about 'dusty' air. Air filtration is the current control strategy for airborne particles on the ISS, and filtration modeling, performed for engineering and design validation of the air revitalization system in ISS, predicted that PM requirements would be met. However, aerosol monitoring has never been performed on the ISS to verify PM levels. A flight experiment is in preparation which will provide data on particulate matter in ISS ambient air. Particles will be collected with a thermophoretic sampler as well as with passive samplers which will extend the particle size range of sampling. Samples will be returned to Earth for chemical and microscopic analyses, providing the first aerosol data for ISS ambient air.

  20. Sampling and monitoring for closure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLemore, V.T.; Russell, C.C.; Smith, K.S.

    2004-01-01

    The Metals Mining Sector of the Acid Drainage Technology Initiative (ADTI-MMS) addresses technical drainage-quality issues related to metal mining and related metallurgical operations, for future and active mines, as well as, for historical mines and mining districts. One of the first projects of ADTI-MMS is to develop a handbook describing the best sampling, monitoring, predicting, mitigating, and modeling of drainage from metal mines, pit lakes and related metallurgical facilities based upon current scientific and engineering practices. One of the important aspects of planning a new mine in today's regulatory environment is the philosophy of designing a new or existing mine or expansion of operations for ultimate closure. The holistic philosophy taken in the ADTI-MMS handbook maintains that sampling and monitoring programs should be designed to take into account all aspects of the mine-life cycle. Data required for the closure of the operation are obtained throughout the mine-life cycle, from exploration through post-closure.

  1. Biobanking and international interoperability: samples.

    PubMed

    Kiehntopf, Michael; Krawczak, Michael

    2011-09-01

    In terms of sample exchange, international collaborations between biobanks, or between biobanks and their research partners, have two important aspects. First, the donors' consent usually implies that the scope and purpose of any sample transfer to third parties is subject to major constraints. Since the legal, ethical and political framework of biobanking may differ substantially, even between countries of comparable jurisdictional systems, general rules for the international sharing of biomaterial are difficult, if not impossible, to define. Issues of uncertainty include the right to transfer the material, the scope of research allowed, and intellectual property rights. Since suitable means of international law enforcement may not be available in the context of biobanking, collaborators are advised to clarify any residual uncertainty by means of bilateral contracts, for example, in the form of material transfer agreements. Second, biobank partners may rightly expect that the biomaterial they receive for further analysis attains a certain level of quality. This implies that a biobank has to implement stringent quality control measures covering, in addition to the material transfer itself, the whole process of material acquisition, transport, pre-analytical handling and storage. Again, it may be advisable for biobank partners to claim contractual warranties for the type and quality of the biomaterial they wish to acquire.

  2. Sampled-data controller implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Leduc, Ryan J.

    2012-09-01

    The setting of this article is the implementation of timed discrete-event systems (TDES) as sampled-data (SD) controllers. An SD controller is driven by a periodic clock and sees the system as a series of inputs and outputs. On each clock edge (tick event), it samples its inputs, changes states and updates its outputs. In this article, we establish a formal representation of an SD controller as a Moore synchronous finite state machine (FSM). We describe how to translate a TDES supervisor to an FSM, as well as necessary properties to be able to do so. We discuss how to construct a single centralised controller as well as a set of modular controllers, and show that they will produce equivalent output. We briefly discuss how the recently introduced SD controllability definition relates to our translation method. SD controllability is an extension of TDES controllability which captures several new properties that are useful in dealing with concurrency issues, as well as make it easier to translate a TDES supervisor into an SD controller. We next discuss the application of SD controllability to a small flexible manufacturing system (FMS) from the literature. The example demonstrates the successful application of the new SD properties. We describe the design of the system in detail to illustrate the new conditions and to provide designers with guidance on how to apply the properties. We also present some FSM translation issues encountered, as well as the FSM version of the system's supervisors.

  3. Offline solid phase microextraction sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Harvey, Chris A.

    2008-12-16

    An offline solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling apparatus for enabling SPME samples to be taken a number of times from a previously collected fluid sample (e.g. sample atmosphere) stored in a fused silica lined bottle which keeps volatile organics in the fluid sample stable for weeks at a time. The offline SPME sampling apparatus has a hollow body surrounding a sampling chamber, with multiple ports through which a portion of a previously collected fluid sample may be (a) released into the sampling chamber, (b) SPME sampled to collect analytes for subsequent GC analysis, and (c) flushed/purged using a fluidically connected vacuum source and purging fluid source to prepare the sampling chamber for additional SPME samplings of the same original fluid sample, such as may have been collected in situ from a headspace.

  4. Methodology Series Module 5: Sampling Strategies.

    PubMed

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Once the research question and the research design have been finalised, it is important to select the appropriate sample for the study. The method by which the researcher selects the sample is the ' Sampling Method'. There are essentially two types of sampling methods: 1) probability sampling - based on chance events (such as random numbers, flipping a coin etc.); and 2) non-probability sampling - based on researcher's choice, population that accessible & available. Some of the non-probability sampling methods are: purposive sampling, convenience sampling, or quota sampling. Random sampling method (such as simple random sample or stratified random sample) is a form of probability sampling. It is important to understand the different sampling methods used in clinical studies and mention this method clearly in the manuscript. The researcher should not misrepresent the sampling method in the manuscript (such as using the term ' random sample' when the researcher has used convenience sample). The sampling method will depend on the research question. For instance, the researcher may want to understand an issue in greater detail for one particular population rather than worry about the ' generalizability' of these results. In such a scenario, the researcher may want to use ' purposive sampling' for the study.

  5. Micro-organism distribution sampling for bioassays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, B. A.

    1975-01-01

    Purpose of sampling distribution is to characterize sample-to-sample variation so statistical tests may be applied, to estimate error due to sampling (confidence limits) and to evaluate observed differences between samples. Distribution could be used for bioassays taken in hospitals, breweries, food-processing plants, and pharmaceutical plants.

  6. Sampling for area estimation: A comparison of full-frame sampling with the sample segment approach. [Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixson, M. M.; Bauer, M. E.; Davis, B. J.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of sampling on the accuracy (precision and bias) of crop area estimates made from classifications of LANDSAT MSS data was investigated. Full-frame classifications of wheat and non-wheat for eighty counties in Kansas were repetitively sampled to simulate alternative sampling plants. Four sampling schemes involving different numbers of samples and different size sampling units were evaluated. The precision of the wheat area estimates increased as the segment size decreased and the number of segments was increased. Although the average bias associated with the various sampling schemes was not significantly different, the maximum absolute bias was directly related to sampling unit size.

  7. Sampling of respirable isocyanate particles.

    PubMed

    Gylestam, Daniel; Gustavsson, Marcus; Karlsson, Daniel; Dalene, Marianne; Skarping, Gunnar

    2014-04-01

    An advanced design of a denuder impactor (DI) sampler has been developed for characterization of possible airborne isocyanate exposure in different particle size fractions. The sampler is equipped with 12 different parallel denuder tubes, 4 impaction stages with the cut-off values (d50) of: 9.5, 4, 2.5 and 1 µm, and an end filter that collects particles < 1 µm. All collecting parts were impregnated with di-n-butylamine DBA as the reagent in a mixture with acetic acid. The performance of the DI sampler was studied on a standard atmosphere containing gas and particulate isocyanates. The isocyanate atmosphere was generated by liquid permeation of 2,4-, 2,6-Toluene Diisocyanate (TDI), 1,6-Hexamethylene Diisocyanate (HDI) and Isophorone Diisocyanate (IPDI). 4,4'-Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (MDI) particles were generated by heating of technical MDI and condensing the mixture of gas and particle-borne MDI in an atmosphere containing mixed salt particles. The study was performed in a 0.85 m3 environmental chamber with stainless steel walls. With the advancement of the DI sampler it is now possible to collect isocyanate particle samples for up to 320 min. The performance of the DI sampler is essentially unaffected by the humidity. The DI sampler and the ASSET EZ4-NCO sampler (Sigma-Aldrich/Supelco, Bellefonte, PA, USA) gave similar results. Sample losses within the DI sampler are low. In the environmental chamber it was observed that the particle distribution may be affected by the humidity and ageing. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) was used to separate a flow of selected fractions containing MDI particles from mixed MDI and salt particles. The particle-size distribution had a maximum at about 300 nm, but later in the environmental chamber 1 µm dominated. The distribution was very different as compared to with only NaCl or MDI present. The biological relevance for studying isocyanate nano particles is significant as these have the possibility to reach the

  8. Heuristic-biased stochastic sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Bresina, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a search technique for scheduling problems, called Heuristic-Biased Stochastic Sampling (HBSS). The underlying assumption behind the HBSS approach is that strictly adhering to a search heuristic often does not yield the best solution and, therefore, exploration off the heuristic path can prove fruitful. Within the HBSS approach, the balance between heuristic adherence and exploration can be controlled according to the confidence one has in the heuristic. By varying this balance, encoded as a bias function, the HBSS approach encompasses a family of search algorithms of which greedy search and completely random search are extreme members. We present empirical results from an application of HBSS to the realworld problem of observation scheduling. These results show that with the proper bias function, it can be easy to outperform greedy search.

  9. Sampling and handling of desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blank, G. B.; Cameron, R. E.

    1969-01-01

    Report on sampling and handling desert soils includes sections on selection, characterization, and photography of area, site, and soil, sterilization of sampling equipment and containers, and soil sample collection, transport, storage, and dispersal.

  10. Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Bisping, Lynn E.

    2000-01-27

    This document contains the CY2000 schedules for the routine collection of samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Drinking Water Monitoring Project. Each section includes sampling locations, sample types, and analyses to be performed.

  11. 77 FR 37471 - National Automotive Sampling System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Automotive Sampling System AGENCY: National Highway... comments. SUMMARY: The NHTSA is conducting a comprehensive review of the National Automotive Sampling... undertaking a modernization effort to upgrade the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) by improving...

  12. Hanford analytical sample projections 1996 - 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, S.M.

    1996-02-02

    Sample projections are compiled for the Hanford site based on inputs from the major programs for the years 1996 through 2000. Sample projections are categorized by radiation level, protocol, sample matrix and Program. Analyses requirements are also presented.

  13. Methodology Series Module 5: Sampling Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Once the research question and the research design have been finalised, it is important to select the appropriate sample for the study. The method by which the researcher selects the sample is the ‘ Sampling Method’. There are essentially two types of sampling methods: 1) probability sampling – based on chance events (such as random numbers, flipping a coin etc.); and 2) non-probability sampling – based on researcher's choice, population that accessible & available. Some of the non-probability sampling methods are: purposive sampling, convenience sampling, or quota sampling. Random sampling method (such as simple random sample or stratified random sample) is a form of probability sampling. It is important to understand the different sampling methods used in clinical studies and mention this method clearly in the manuscript. The researcher should not misrepresent the sampling method in the manuscript (such as using the term ‘ random sample’ when the researcher has used convenience sample). The sampling method will depend on the research question. For instance, the researcher may want to understand an issue in greater detail for one particular population rather than worry about the ‘ generalizability’ of these results. In such a scenario, the researcher may want to use ‘ purposive sampling’ for the study. PMID:27688438

  14. Physical sampling for site and waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnough, T.L.

    1996-08-01

    Physical sampling plays a basic role in high-level radioactive waste management program effort. The term ``physical sampling`` used here means collecting tangible, physical samples of soil, water, air, waste streams, or other materials. The industry defines the term ``physical sampling`` broadly to include measurements of physical conditions such as temperature, wind conditions, and pH, which are also often taken in a sample collection effort. Most environmental compliance actions are supported by the results of taking, recording, and analyzing physical samples and the measurements of physical conditions taken in association with sample collecting. Therefore, the when and how to take samples is needed to be known and planned.

  15. [Sampling and conveyance of mail testing].

    PubMed

    Higashino, Kouji

    2005-12-01

    In mail testing, a testee collects samples at home from his or her own body, and mails them to the medical institution. Because the testee does not need to attend the medical institution, an advantage of mail testing is that it is not time-consuming. Because the amount of sample is small and time from sampling to measurement is long, the manner of collecting and transporting samples are important factors affecting the precision of the result. There is the risk that inappropriate sample picking can occur, as the testee, who is not skilled in medical testing, may obtain the sample. Moreover, the samples may include blood, urine, secretions, and so on. Depending on the purpose of the test, the transport and sampling method varies, and the character of the sampling device and transport method influence the procedure required. I describe collection methods and other issues in this paper according to medical examination item, sample, and sampling.

  16. Apparatus for sectioning demountable semiconductor samples

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.; Wolf, Abraham

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for use during polishing and sectioning operations of a ribbon sample is described. The sample holder includes a cylinder having an axially extending sample cavity terminated in a first funnel-shaped opening and a second slot-like opening. A spring-loaded pressure plunger is located adjacent the second opening of the sample cavity for frictional engagement of the sample prior to introduction of a molding medium in the sample cavity. A heat softenable molding medium is inserted in the funnel-shaped opening, to surround the sample. After polishing, the heater is energized to allow draining of the molding medium from the sample cavity. During manual polishing, the second end of the sample holder is inserted in a support ring which provides mechanical support as well as alignment of the sample holder during polishing. A gauge block for measuring the protrusion of a sample beyond the second wall of the holder is also disclosed.

  17. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling.

    PubMed

    Zampetti, Benedetta; Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo; Loli, Paola

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing's syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88-100% and 67-100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50-70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres.

  18. Bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling

    PubMed Central

    Grossrubatscher, Erika; Dalino Ciaramella, Paolo; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling (BIPSS) plays a crucial role in the diagnostic work-up of Cushing’s syndrome. It is the most accurate procedure in the differential diagnosis of hypercortisolism of pituitary or ectopic origin, as compared with clinical, biochemical and imaging analyses, with a sensitivity and specificity of 88–100% and 67–100%, respectively. In the setting of hypercortisolemia, ACTH levels obtained from venous drainage of the pituitary are expected to be higher than the levels of peripheral blood, thus suggesting pituitary ACTH excess as the cause of hypercortisolism. Direct stimulation of the pituitary corticotroph with corticotrophin-releasing hormone enhances the sensitivity of the procedure. The procedure must be undertaken in the presence of hypercortisolemia, which suppresses both the basal and stimulated secretory activity of normal corticotrophic cells: ACTH measured in the sinus is, therefore, the result of the secretory activity of the tumor tissue. The poor accuracy in lateralization of BIPSS (positive predictive value of 50–70%) makes interpetrosal ACTH gradient alone not sufficient for the localization of the tumor. An accurate exploration of the gland is recommended if a tumor is not found in the predicted area. Despite the fact that BIPSS is an invasive procedure, the occurrence of adverse events is extremely rare, particularly if it is performed by experienced operators in referral centres. PMID:27352844

  19. Sample concentration using optical chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Sean J.; Terray, Alex; Arnold, Jonathan; Leski, Tomasz A.

    2007-03-01

    Optical chromatography is a technique for the separation of particles that capitalizes on the balance between optic and fluidic forces. When microscopic particles in a fluid flow encounter a laser beam propagating in the opposite direction, they are trapped axially along the beam. They are then optically pushed upstream from the laser focal point to rest at a point where the optic and fluidic forces on the particle balance. Because optical and fluid forces are sensitive to differences in the physical and chemical properties of a particle, both coarse and fine separations are possible. We describe how an optical chromatography beam directed into a tailored flow environment, has been adapted to operate as an optical filter for the concentration / bioenrichment of colloidal and biological samples. In this work, the demonstrated ability to concentrate spores of the biowarfare agent, Bacillus anthracis, may have significant impact in the biodefense arena. Application of these techniques and further design of fluidic and optical environments will allow for more specific identification, concentration and separation of many more microscopic particle and biological suspensions.

  20. Mars sample return power supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, Don; Ludwigs, Sharon; Schmitz, Paul; Wright, John

    1988-01-01

    A power supply is designed for a vehicle able to operate on the surface of Mars for a period of 5 to 10 years. This vehicle will be used for sample and data collection. The design is based on the assumption that the vehicle will be unmanned. Also, there will be no means by which components could be repaired or replaced while on the Martian surface. A consequence of this is that all equipment must meet high standards of reliability and, if possible, redundancy. Power will be supplied to the vehicle by means of a General Purpose Heat Source capable of producing a minimum of 7 kW of thermal power. The heat generated from the General Purpose Heat Source will be transferred to a Stirling engine via hot side heat pipes. The Stirling engine will then convert this heat into 2 kW of electrical power. Cold side heat pipes will be used to carry away waste heat, which will be released to the Martian environment via radiators connected to the end of the cold side heat pipes.

  1. Mars sample return power supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Don; Ludwigs, Sharon; Schmitz, Paul; Wright, John

    A power supply is designed for a vehicle able to operate on the surface of Mars for a period of 5 to 10 years. This vehicle will be used for sample and data collection. The design is based on the assumption that the vehicle will be unmanned. Also, there will be no means by which components could be repaired or replaced while on the Martian surface. A consequence of this is that all equipment must meet high standards of reliability and, if possible, redundancy. Power will be supplied to the vehicle by means of a General Purpose Heat Source capable of producing a minimum of 7 kW of thermal power. The heat generated from the General Purpose Heat Source will be transferred to a Stirling engine via hot side heat pipes. The Stirling engine will then convert this heat into 2 kW of electrical power. Cold side heat pipes will be used to carry away waste heat, which will be released to the Martian environment via radiators connected to the end of the cold side heat pipes.

  2. Electrphoretic Sample Excitation Light Assembly.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingbo; Liu, Changsheng

    2002-04-02

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  3. 40 CFR 761.323 - Sample preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 761.323 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL... Remediation Waste Samples § 761.323 Sample preparation. (a) The comparison study requires analysis of a minimum of 10 samples weighing at least 300 grams each. Samples of PCB remediation waste used in...

  4. A Primer on Sampling for Statewide Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Richard M.

    This paper is a primer on sampling procedures for statewide assessment. The careful reader should gain substantial knowledge about the promises and pitfalls of sampling for assessment. The primer has three basic objectives: (1) to define terms and concepts basic to sampling theory and its application, including population, sampling unit, sampling…

  5. 42 CFR 402.109 - Statistical sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Statistical sampling. 402.109 Section 402.109... Statistical sampling. (a) Purpose. CMS or OIG may introduce the results of a statistical sampling study to... or caused to be presented. (b) Prima facie evidence. The results of the statistical sampling...

  6. 42 CFR 402.109 - Statistical sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Statistical sampling. 402.109 Section 402.109... Statistical sampling. (a) Purpose. CMS or OIG may introduce the results of a statistical sampling study to... or caused to be presented. (b) Prima facie evidence. The results of the statistical sampling...

  7. 42 CFR 402.109 - Statistical sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Statistical sampling. 402.109 Section 402.109... Statistical sampling. (a) Purpose. CMS or OIG may introduce the results of a statistical sampling study to... or caused to be presented. (b) Prima facie evidence. The results of the statistical sampling...

  8. 42 CFR 402.109 - Statistical sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Statistical sampling. 402.109 Section 402.109... Statistical sampling. (a) Purpose. CMS or OIG may introduce the results of a statistical sampling study to... or caused to be presented. (b) Prima facie evidence. The results of the statistical sampling...

  9. Fluid sample collection and storage device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, D.; Stone, S. E.

    1969-01-01

    Fluid sampling device collects a sample from a low-pressure fluid system and stores it for an indefinite period, with little risk of contamination of either the sample or the surrounding environment. The collector /a plastic bladder/ is separated from the sampler after a sample is collected.

  10. Modification to Tracerlab Automatic Sample Changer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flanegan, F.J.; Nelson, J.M.; Warr, J.J.

    1950-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has recently modified the Tracerlab Automatic Sample Changer so that the geometry is greatly improved for counting larger low-activity samples in finely ground form. The larger sample and larger Geiger Mueller tubes allow a greater number of samples to be counted per hour with the same statistical accuracy.

  11. Tank 12H residuals sample analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.; Shine, E. P.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2015-06-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 12H final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Eleven Tank 12H floor and mound residual material samples and three cooling coil scrape samples were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August of 2014.

  12. Computer Graphics Simulations of Sampling Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Florence S.; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the use of computer graphics simulations to enhance student understanding of sampling distributions that arise in introductory statistics. Highlights include the distribution of sample proportions, the distribution of the difference of sample means, the distribution of the difference of sample proportions, and the distribution of sample…

  13. Physical sampling for site and waste characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnough, T.L.

    1994-06-01

    Physical sampling plays a basic role in site and waste characterization program effort. The term ``physical sampling`` used here means collecting tangible, physical samples of soil, water, air, waste streams, or other materials. The industry defines the term ``physical sampling`` broadly to include measurements of physical conditions such as temperature, wind conditions, and pH which are also often taken in a sample collection effort. Most environmental compliance actions are supported by the results of taking, recording, and analyzing physical samples and the measuring of physical conditions taken in association with sample collecting.

  14. Stability of multirate sampled-data systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, D. P.; Caglayan, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    Current adaptive sampling schemes that can be used in sampled-data systems with variable rate sampling does not guarantee the stability of the resulting closed-loop system. A study was undertaken with the objective of finding a stable control law for multirate sampled-data systems. The problem is formulated such that the sampling interval is selected from a set of fixed number of sample intervals. A necessary and sufficient condition under which these types of systems can be stabilized is given. For a certain subclass of these types of systems, a sampling selection algorithm is given which results in a stable closed-loop system.

  15. Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

  16. Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1998-01-01

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

  17. Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, G.

    1998-03-10

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it. 3 figs.

  18. Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer

    DOEpatents

    Engh, G. van den

    1997-02-11

    A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it. 3 figs.

  19. Apparatus for sectioning demountable semiconductor samples

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.; Wolf, A.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for use during polishing and sectioning operations of a ribbon sample is described. The sample holder includes a cylinder having an axially extending sample cavity terminated in a first funnel-shaped opening and a second slot-like opening. A spring-loaded pressure plunger is located adjacent the second opening of the sample cavity for frictional engagement of the sample cavity. A heat softenable molding medium is inserted in the funnel-shaped opening, to surround the sample. After polishing, the heater is energized to allow draining of the molding medium from the sample cavity. During manual polishing, the second end of the sample holder is inserted in a support ring which provides mechanical support as well as alignment of the sample holder during polishing. A gauge block for measuring the protrusion of a sample beyond the second wall of the holder is also disclosed.

  20. Concrete samples for organic samples, data package and 222-S validation summary report. Addendum 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    This document is in two parts: the first is the data package entitled ``Concrete Samples for Organic Samples`` and the second is entitled ``Concrete Samples for Organic Samples -- Addendum 1A`` which is the 222-S validation summary report.

  1. 40 CFR 761.286 - Sample size and procedure for collecting a sample.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DISTRIBUTION IN COMMERCE, AND USE PROHIBITIONS Sampling To Verify Completion of Self-Implementing Cleanup and...) § 761.286 Sample size and procedure for collecting a sample. At each selected sampling location for...

  2. Markovian Time-Delay Sampling Policies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    Markovian sampling policy for water quality monitoring. Biometrics 33: 41-46. Wald , A. and Wolfowitz , J. (1945). Sampling inspection plans for...to remain in control. This idea is not new. Sampling plans for the percent defective were devised along these lines by Dodge (1943), Wald and... Wolfowitz (1945), and Dodge and Torrey (1951), who gave rules for switching from 100% sampling to sampling a fraction f. Multi-level inspec- tion plans having

  3. Sampling bacteria with a laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzwälder, Kordula; Rutschmann, Peter

    2014-05-01

    also compared these data to samples of usual collection and filtering. The results of these laser measurements are very promising.

  4. Sample vial inserts: A better approach for sampling heterogeneous slurry samples in the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, C.J.; Goode, S.R.

    1996-05-01

    A convenient and effective new approach for analyzing DWPF samples involves the use of inserts with volumes of 1.5--3 ml placed in the neck of 14 ml sample vials. The inserts have rims that conform to the rim of the vials so that they sit straight and stable in the vial. The DWPF tank sampling system fills the pre-weighed insert rather than the entire vial, so the vial functions only as the insert holder. The shielded cell operator then removes the vial cap and decants the insert containing the sample into a plastic bottle, crucible, etc., for analysis. Inert materials such as Teflon, plastic, and zirconium are used for the insert so it is unnecessary to separate the insert from the sample for most analyses. The key technique advantage of using inserts to take DWPF samples versus filling sample vials is that it provides a convenient and almost foolproof way of obtaining and handling small volumes of slurry samples in a shielded cell without corrupting the sample. Since the insert allows the entire sample to be analyzed, this approach eliminates the errors inherent with subsampling heterogeneous slurries that comprise DWPF samples. Slurry samples can then be analyzed with confidence. Analysis times are dramatically reduced by eliminating the drying and vitrification steps normally used to produce a homogeneous solid sample. Direct dissolution and elemental analysis of slurry samples are achieved in 8 hours or less compared with 40 hours for analysis of vitrified slurry samples. Comparison of samples taken in inserts versus full vials indicate that the insert does not significantly affect sample composition.

  5. Using Inverse Probability Bootstrap Sampling to Eliminate Sample Induced Bias in Model Based Analysis of Unequal Probability Samples.

    PubMed

    Nahorniak, Matthew; Larsen, David P; Volk, Carol; Jordan, Chris E

    2015-01-01

    In ecology, as in other research fields, efficient sampling for population estimation often drives sample designs toward unequal probability sampling, such as in stratified sampling. Design based statistical analysis tools are appropriate for seamless integration of sample design into the statistical analysis. However, it is also common and necessary, after a sampling design has been implemented, to use datasets to address questions that, in many cases, were not considered during the sampling design phase. Questions may arise requiring the use of model based statistical tools such as multiple regression, quantile regression, or regression tree analysis. However, such model based tools may require, for ensuring unbiased estimation, data from simple random samples, which can be problematic when analyzing data from unequal probability designs. Despite numerous method specific tools available to properly account for sampling design, too often in the analysis of ecological data, sample design is ignored and consequences are not properly considered. We demonstrate here that violation of this assumption can lead to biased parameter estimates in ecological research. In addition, to the set of tools available for researchers to properly account for sampling design in model based analysis, we introduce inverse probability bootstrapping (IPB). Inverse probability bootstrapping is an easily implemented method for obtaining equal probability re-samples from a probability sample, from which unbiased model based estimates can be made. We demonstrate the potential for bias in model-based analyses that ignore sample inclusion probabilities, and the effectiveness of IPB sampling in eliminating this bias, using both simulated and actual ecological data. For illustration, we considered three model based analysis tools--linear regression, quantile regression, and boosted regression tree analysis. In all models, using both simulated and actual ecological data, we found inferences to be

  6. Using Inverse Probability Bootstrap Sampling to Eliminate Sample Induced Bias in Model Based Analysis of Unequal Probability Samples

    PubMed Central

    Nahorniak, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In ecology, as in other research fields, efficient sampling for population estimation often drives sample designs toward unequal probability sampling, such as in stratified sampling. Design based statistical analysis tools are appropriate for seamless integration of sample design into the statistical analysis. However, it is also common and necessary, after a sampling design has been implemented, to use datasets to address questions that, in many cases, were not considered during the sampling design phase. Questions may arise requiring the use of model based statistical tools such as multiple regression, quantile regression, or regression tree analysis. However, such model based tools may require, for ensuring unbiased estimation, data from simple random samples, which can be problematic when analyzing data from unequal probability designs. Despite numerous method specific tools available to properly account for sampling design, too often in the analysis of ecological data, sample design is ignored and consequences are not properly considered. We demonstrate here that violation of this assumption can lead to biased parameter estimates in ecological research. In addition, to the set of tools available for researchers to properly account for sampling design in model based analysis, we introduce inverse probability bootstrapping (IPB). Inverse probability bootstrapping is an easily implemented method for obtaining equal probability re-samples from a probability sample, from which unbiased model based estimates can be made. We demonstrate the potential for bias in model-based analyses that ignore sample inclusion probabilities, and the effectiveness of IPB sampling in eliminating this bias, using both simulated and actual ecological data. For illustration, we considered three model based analysis tools—linear regression, quantile regression, and boosted regression tree analysis. In all models, using both simulated and actual ecological data, we found inferences to be

  7. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOEpatents

    Odell, D.M.C.

    1994-04-19

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples is described. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium. 6 figures.

  8. Method and apparatus for data sampling

    DOEpatents

    Odell, Daniel M. C.

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sampling radiation detector outputs and determining event data from the collected samples. The method uses high speed sampling of the detector output, the conversion of the samples to digital values, and the discrimination of the digital values so that digital values representing detected events are determined. The high speed sampling and digital conversion is performed by an A/D sampler that samples the detector output at a rate high enough to produce numerous digital samples for each detected event. The digital discrimination identifies those digital samples that are not representative of detected events. The sampling and discrimination also provides for temporary or permanent storage, either serially or in parallel, to a digital storage medium.

  9. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Lau, Louis K.; Alper, Naum I.

    1994-01-01

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump.

  10. Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

    1994-11-22

    A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

  11. A Sample Return Container with Hermetic Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, Kin Yuen; Rafeek, Shaheed; Sadick, Shazad; Porter, Christopher C.

    2000-01-01

    A sample return container is being developed by Honeybee Robotics to receive samples from a derivative of the Champollion/ST4 Sample Acquisition and Transfer Mechanism or other samplers and then hermetically seal samples for a sample return mission. The container is enclosed in a phase change material (PCM) chamber to prevent phase change during return and re-entry to earth. This container is designed to operate passively with no motors and actuators. Using the sampler's featured drill tip for interfacing, transfer-ring and sealing samples, the container consumes no electrical power and therefore minimizes sample temperature change. The circular container houses a few isolated canisters, which will be sealed individually for samples acquired from different sites or depths. The drill based sampler indexes each canister to the sample transfer position, below the index interface for sample transfer. After sample transfer is completed, the sampler indexes a seal carrier, which lines up seals with the openings of the canisters. The sampler moves to the sealing interface and seals the sample canisters one by one. The sealing interface can be designed to work with C-seals, knife edge seals and cup seals. Again, the sampler provides all sealing actuation. This sample return container and co-engineered sample acquisition system are being developed by Honeybee Robotics in collaboration with the JPL Exploration Technology program.

  12. Options in Extraterrestrial Sample Handling and Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, Dimitri A.

    2000-01-01

    This presentation mentions important service functions such as: sample preservation, hazard assessment, and handling. It also discuss how preliminary examination of samples is necessary for sample hazard assessment and for sample allocations. Clean facilities and clean sample handling are required. Conflicts, cross contamination issues will be present and need to be resolved. Extensive experience is available for extraterrestrial samples and must be sought and applied. Extensive experience is available in studies of pathogenicity and must be sought and applied as necessary. Advisory and oversight structures must also be in place

  13. Sampling considerations for health care improvement.

    PubMed

    Perla, Rocco J; Provost, Lloyd P; Murray, Sandra K

    2014-01-01

    Sampling in improvement work can pose challenges. How is it different from the sampling strategies many use with research, clinical trials, or regulatory programs? What should improvement teams consider when determining a useful approach to sampling and a useful sample size? The aim of this article is to introduce some of the concepts related to sampling for improvement. We give specific guidance related to determining a useful sample size to a wider health care audience so that it can be applied to improvement projects in hospitals and health systems.

  14. Sampling considerations for health care improvement.

    PubMed

    Perla, Rocco J; Provost, Lloyd P; Murray, Sandra K

    2013-01-01

    Sampling in improvement work can pose challenges. How is it different from the sampling strategies many use with research, clinical trials, or regulatory programs? What should improvement teams consider when determining a useful approach to sampling and a useful sample size? The aim of this article is to introduce some of the concepts related to sampling for improvement. We give specific guidance related to determining a useful sample size to a wider health care audience so that it can be applied to improvement projects in hospitals and health systems.

  15. ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    NELSEN LA

    2009-01-30

    The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

  16. Dynamic Method for Identifying Collected Sample Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John

    2008-01-01

    G-Sample is designed for sample collection missions to identify the presence and quantity of sample material gathered by spacecraft equipped with end effectors. The software method uses a maximum-likelihood estimator to identify the collected sample's mass based on onboard force-sensor measurements, thruster firings, and a dynamics model of the spacecraft. This makes sample mass identification a computation rather than a process requiring additional hardware. Simulation examples of G-Sample are provided for spacecraft model configurations with a sample collection device mounted on the end of an extended boom. In the absence of thrust knowledge errors, the results indicate that G-Sample can identify the amount of collected sample mass to within 10 grams (with 95-percent confidence) by using a force sensor with a noise and quantization floor of 50 micrometers. These results hold even in the presence of realistic parametric uncertainty in actual spacecraft inertia, center-of-mass offset, and first flexibility modes. Thrust profile knowledge is shown to be a dominant sensitivity for G-Sample, entering in a nearly one-to-one relationship with the final mass estimation error. This means thrust profiles should be well characterized with onboard accelerometers prior to sample collection. An overall sample-mass estimation error budget has been developed to approximate the effect of model uncertainty, sensor noise, data rate, and thrust profile error on the expected estimate of collected sample mass.

  17. Small Sample Whole-Genome Amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, C A; Nguyen, C P; Wheeler, E K; Sorensen, K J; Arroyo, E S; Vrankovich, G P; Christian, A T

    2005-09-20

    Many challenges arise when trying to amplify and analyze human samples collected in the field due to limitations in sample quantity, and contamination of the starting material. Tests such as DNA fingerprinting and mitochondrial typing require a certain sample size and are carried out in large volume reactions; in cases where insufficient sample is present whole genome amplification (WGA) can be used. WGA allows very small quantities of DNA to be amplified in a way that enables subsequent DNA-based tests to be performed. A limiting step to WGA is sample preparation. To minimize the necessary sample size, we have developed two modifications of WGA: the first allows for an increase in amplified product from small, nanoscale, purified samples with the use of carrier DNA while the second is a single-step method for cleaning and amplifying samples all in one column. Conventional DNA cleanup involves binding the DNA to silica, washing away impurities, and then releasing the DNA for subsequent testing. We have eliminated losses associated with incomplete sample release, thereby decreasing the required amount of starting template for DNA testing. Both techniques address the limitations of sample size by providing ample copies of genomic samples. Carrier DNA, included in our WGA reactions, can be used when amplifying samples with the standard purification method, or can be used in conjunction with our single-step DNA purification technique to potentially further decrease the amount of starting sample necessary for future forensic DNA-based assays.

  18. Small sample whole-genome amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Christine; Nguyen, Christine; Wheeler, Elizabeth; Sorensen, Karen; Arroyo, Erin; Vrankovich, Greg; Christian, Allen

    2005-11-01

    Many challenges arise when trying to amplify and analyze human samples collected in the field due to limitations in sample quantity, and contamination of the starting material. Tests such as DNA fingerprinting and mitochondrial typing require a certain sample size and are carried out in large volume reactions; in cases where insufficient sample is present whole genome amplification (WGA) can be used. WGA allows very small quantities of DNA to be amplified in a way that enables subsequent DNA-based tests to be performed. A limiting step to WGA is sample preparation. To minimize the necessary sample size, we have developed two modifications of WGA: the first allows for an increase in amplified product from small, nanoscale, purified samples with the use of carrier DNA while the second is a single-step method for cleaning and amplifying samples all in one column. Conventional DNA cleanup involves binding the DNA to silica, washing away impurities, and then releasing the DNA for subsequent testing. We have eliminated losses associated with incomplete sample release, thereby decreasing the required amount of starting template for DNA testing. Both techniques address the limitations of sample size by providing ample copies of genomic samples. Carrier DNA, included in our WGA reactions, can be used when amplifying samples with the standard purification method, or can be used in conjunction with our single-step DNA purification technique to potentially further decrease the amount of starting sample necessary for future forensic DNA-based assays.

  19. Environmental sampling for spores of Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Teshale, Eyasu H; Painter, John; Burr, Gregory A; Mead, Paul; Wright, Scott V; Cseh, Larry F; Zabrocki, Ronald; Collins, Rick; Kelley, Kathy A; Hadler, James L; Swerdlow, David L

    2002-10-01

    On November 11, 2001, following the bioterrorism-related anthrax attacks, the U.S. Postal Service collected samples at the Southern Connecticut Processing and Distribution Center; all samples were negative for Bacillus anthracis. After a patient in Connecticut died from inhalational anthrax on November 19, the center was sampled again on November 21 and 25 by using dry and wet swabs. All samples were again negative for B. anthracis. On November 28, guided by information from epidemiologic investigation, we sampled the site extensively with wet wipes and surface vacuum sock samples (using HEPA vacuum). Of 212 samples, 6 (3%) were positive, including one from a highly contaminated sorter. Subsequently B. anthracis was also detected in mail-sorting bins used for the patient's carrier route. These results suggest cross-contaminated mail as a possible source of anthrax for the inhalational anthrax patient in Connecticut. In future such investigations, extensive sampling guided by epidemiologic data is imperative.

  20. 21 CFR 1230.44 - Samples.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... POISON ACT Imports § 1230.44 Samples. On the same day that samples are requested by the district, the... the containers do not comply with the requirements of the Federal Caustic Poison Act, they must...