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Sample records for polymorphic conformational epitopes

  1. Analysis of the Effects of Polymorphism on Pollen Profilin Structural Functionality and the Generation of Conformational, T- and B-Cell Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Lopez, Jose C.; Rodríguez-García, María I.; Alché, Juan D.

    2013-01-01

    An extensive polymorphism analysis of pollen profilin, a fundamental regulator of the actin cytoskeleton dynamics, has been performed with a major focus in 3D-folding maintenance, changes in the 2-D structural elements, surface residues involved in ligands-profilin interactions and functionality, and the generation of conformational and lineal B- and T-cell epitopes variability. Our results revealed that while the general fold is conserved among profilins, substantial structural differences were found, particularly affecting the special distribution and length of different 2-D structural elements (i.e. cysteine residues), characteristic loops and coils, and numerous micro-heterogeneities present in fundamental residues directly involved in the interacting motifs, and to some extension these residues nearby to the ligand-interacting areas. Differential changes as result of polymorphism might contribute to generate functional variability among the plethora of profilin isoforms present in the olive pollen from different genetic background (olive cultivars), and between plant species, since biochemical interacting properties and binding affinities to natural ligands may be affected, particularly the interactions with different actin isoforms and phosphoinositides lipids species. Furthermore, conspicuous variability in lineal and conformational epitopes was found between profilins belonging to the same olive cultivar, and among different cultivars as direct implication of sequences polymorphism. The variability of the residues taking part of IgE-binding epitopes might be the final responsible of the differences in cross-reactivity among olive pollen cultivars, among pollen and plant-derived food allergens, as well as between distantly related pollen species, leading to a variable range of allergy reactions among atopic patients. Identification and analysis of commonly shared and specific epitopes in profilin isoforms is essential to gain knowledge about the interacting

  2. Characterization of Conformation-dependent Prion Protein Epitopes*

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hae-Eun; Weng, Chu Chun; Saijo, Eri; Saylor, Vicki; Bian, Jifeng; Kim, Sehun; Ramos, Laylaa; Angers, Rachel; Langenfeld, Katie; Khaychuk, Vadim; Calvi, Carla; Bartz, Jason; Hunter, Nora; Telling, Glenn C.

    2012-01-01

    Whereas prion replication involves structural rearrangement of cellular prion protein (PrPC), the existence of conformational epitopes remains speculative and controversial, and PrP transformation is monitored by immunoblot detection of PrP(27–30), a protease-resistant counterpart of the pathogenic scrapie form (PrPSc) of PrP. We now describe the involvement of specific amino acids in conformational determinants of novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against randomly chimeric PrP. Epitope recognition of two mAbs depended on polymorphisms controlling disease susceptibility. Detection by one, referred to as PRC5, required alanine and asparagine at discontinuous mouse PrP residues 132 and 158, which acquire proximity when residues 126–218 form a structured globular domain. The discontinuous epitope of glycosylation-dependent mAb PRC7 also mapped within this domain at residues 154 and 185. In accordance with their conformational dependence, tertiary structure perturbations compromised recognition by PRC5, PRC7, as well as previously characterized mAbs whose epitopes also reside in the globular domain, whereas conformation-independent epitopes proximal or distal to this region were refractory to such destabilizing treatments. Our studies also address the paradox of how conformational epitopes remain functional following denaturing treatments and indicate that cellular PrP and PrP(27–30) both renature to a common structure that reconstitutes the globular domain. PMID:22948149

  3. Dissecting Antibodies with Regards to Linear and Conformational Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Forsström, Björn; Bisławska Axnäs, Barbara; Rockberg, Johan; Danielsson, Hanna; Bohlin, Anna; Uhlen, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    An important issue for the performance and specificity of an antibody is the nature of the binding to its protein target, including if the recognition involves linear or conformational epitopes. Here, we dissect polyclonal sera by creating epitope-specific antibody fractions using a combination of epitope mapping and an affinity capture approach involving both synthesized peptides and recombinant protein fragments. This allowed us to study the relative amounts of antibodies to linear and conformational epitopes in the polyclonal sera as well as the ability of each antibody-fraction to detect its target protein in Western blot assays. The majority of the analyzed polyclonal sera were found to have most of the target-specific antibodies directed towards linear epitopes and these were in many cases giving Western blot bands of correct molecular weight. In contrast, many of the antibodies towards conformational epitopes did not bind their target proteins in the Western blot assays. The results from this work have given us insights regarding the nature of the antibody response generated by immunization with recombinant protein fragments and has demonstrated the advantage of using antibodies recognizing linear epitopes for immunoassay involving wholly or partially denatured protein targets. PMID:25816293

  4. Major histocompatibility complex conformational epitopes are peptide specific

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Serologically distinct forms of H-2Kb are stabilized by loading cells expressing "empty" class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules with different H-2Kb binding peptides. The H-2Kb epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody (mAb) 28.8.6 was stabilized by ovalbumin (OVA) (257-264) and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) pp89 (168- 176) peptides, but not by vesicular stomatic virus nucleoprotein (VSV NP) (52-59) and influenza NP (Y345-360) peptides. The H-2Kb epitope recognized by mAb 34.4.20 was stabilized by VSV NP (52-59) peptide but not by OVA (257-264), MCMV pp89 (168-176), or influenza NP (Y345-360) peptides. Immunoprecipitation of H-2Kb molecules from normal cells showed that 28.8.6 and 34.4.20 epitopes were only present on a subset of all conformationally reactive H-2Kb molecules. Using alanine- substituted derivatives of the VSV peptide, the 28.8.6 epitope was completely stabilized by substitution of the first residue and partially stabilized by substitution of the third or the fifth residues in the peptides. These results indicate that distinct conformational MHC epitopes are dependent on the specific peptide that occupies the antigenic peptide binding groove on individual MHC molecules. The changes in MHC epitopes observed may also be important in understanding the diversity of T cell receptors used in an immune response and the influence of peptides on development of the T cell repertoire. PMID:1281212

  5. Mimotopes of conformational epitopes in fibrillar beta-amyloid.

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, Goar; Petrushina, Irina; Manoutcharian, Karen; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Acero, Gonzalo; Vasilevko, Vitaly; Cribbs, David H; Agadjanyan, Michael G

    2004-11-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) beta-amyloid peptide accumulates in the brain in different forms including fibrils. Amyloid fibrils could be recognized as foreign by the mature immune system since they are not present during its development. Thus, using mouse antisera raised against the fibrillar form of Abeta42, we have screened two phage peptide libraries for the presence of foreign conformational mimotopes of Abeta. Antisera from wild type animals recognized predominately peptides with the EFRH motif from Abeta42 sequence, whereas amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice recognized mainly phage clones that mimic epitopes (mimotopes) within the fibrillar Abeta42 but lack sequence homology with this peptide.

  6. Characterization of a cashew allergen, 11S globulin (Ana o 2), conformational epitope.

    PubMed

    Robotham, Jason M; Xia, Lixin; Willison, LeAnna N; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H

    2010-05-01

    Both linear and conformational epitopes likely contribute to the allergenicity of tree nut allergens, yet, due largely to technical issues, few conformational epitopes have been characterized. Using the well studied recombinant cashew allergen, Ana o 2, an 11S globulin or legumin, we identified a murine monoclonal antibody which recognizes a conformational epitope and competes with patient IgE Ana o 2-reactive antibodies. This epitope is expressed on the large subunit of Ana o 2, but only when associated with an 11S globulin small subunit. Both Ana o 2 and the homologous soybean Gly m 6 small subunits can foster epitope expression, even when the natural N-terminal to C-terminal subunit order is reversed in chimeric molecules. The epitope, which is also expressed on native Ana o 2, is readily susceptible to destruction by physical and chemical denaturants.

  7. Effects of vector fusion peptides on the conformation and immune reactivity of epitope-shuffled, recombinant multi-epitope antigens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Lin, Yahui; Cai, Pengfei; Wang, Heng

    2011-01-01

    The use of multi-epitopes has been considered as a promising strategy to overcome the obstacle of antigenic variation in malarial vaccine development. Previously, we constructed a multi-epitope artificial antigen, Malaria Random Constructed Antigen-1(M.RCAg-1), to optimize expression of the antigen, and we subcloned the gene into three prokaryotic expression vectors that contain different fusion tags at the N-terminus. Three recombinant proteins expressed by these vectors, named M.RCAg-1/Exp.V-1, V-2, and V-3, were purified after the cleavage of the fusion tag. All three recombinant proteins were able to induce similar levels of antigenicity in BALB/c murine models. However, the antibody responses against the individual epitope peptides of the recombinant products were dramatically different. Additionally, the different epitopes elicited various CD4(+) T-cell responses, as shown by the resulting lymphocyte proliferation and varied IFN-γ and IL-4 levels determined by EILSPOT; however, each could be distinctly recognized by sera derived from malaria patients. Additionally, the rabbit antibody induced by these proteins showed diverse efficacy in malaria parasite growth inhibition assays in vitro. Furthermore, analysis via circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that the secondary structure was different among these recombinant proteins. These results suggest that the expressed multi-epitope artificial antigens originating from the different vector fusion peptides indeed affect the protein folding and, subsequently, the epitope exposure. Thus, these proteins are able to induce both distinct humoral and cellular immune responses in animal models, and they affect the efficacy of immune inhibition against the parasite. This work should lead to a further understanding of the impact of vector fusion peptides on the conformation and immune reactivity of recombinant proteins and could provide a useful reference for the development of artificial multi-epitope vaccines.

  8. Phase transformation in conformational polymorphs of nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Sanphui, Palash; Sarma, Bipul; Nangia, Ashwini

    2011-06-01

    Nimesulide is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and a COX-2 inhibitor. The native crystal structure of nimesulide (or Form I) has been characterized in the literature by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) lines, whereas full three-dimensional coordinates are known for a second polymorph (Form II). A detailed structural characterization and phase stability of nimesulide polymorphs were carried out. Rod-like crystals of Form I (space group Pca2(1); number of symmetry-independent molecules, Z' = 2) were crystallized from EtOH concomitantly with Form II (C2/c, Z' = 1). These conformational polymorphs have different torsion angles at the phenoxy and sulfonamide groups. The crystal structures are stabilized by N-H · · · O hydrogen bonds and C-H · · · O, C-H · · · π interactions. Phase transition from the metastable Form (II) to the stable modification (I) was studied using differential scanning calorimetry, hot-stage microscopy, solid-state grinding, solvent-drop grinding, and slurry crystallization. The phase transition was monitored by infrared, Raman, and ss-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; and XRPD and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The stable polymorph I was obtained in excess during solution crystallization, grinding, and slurry methods. Intrinsic dissolution and equilibrium solubility experiments showed that the metastable Form II dissolves much faster than the stable Form I. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Conformational IgE epitopes of peanut allergens Ara h 2 and Ara h 6.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueni; Negi, Surendra S; Liao, Sumei; Gao, Valerie; Braun, Werner; Dreskin, Stephen C

    2016-08-01

    Cross-linking of IgE antibody by specific epitopes on the surface of mast cells is a prerequisite for triggering symptoms of peanut allergy. IgE epitopes are frequently categorized as linear or conformational epitopes. Although linear IgE-binding epitopes of peanut allergens have been defined, little is known about conformational IgE-binding epitopes. To identify clinically relevant conformational IgE epitopes of the two most important peanut allergens, Ara h 2 and Ara h 6, using phage peptide library. A phage 12mer peptide library was screened with allergen-specific IgE from 4 peanut-allergic patients. Binding of the mimotopes to IgE from a total of 29 peanut-allergic subjects was measured by ELISA. The mimotope sequences were mapped on the surface areas of Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 using EpiSearch. Forty-one individual mimotopes were identified that specifically bind anti- Ara h 2/Ara h 6 IgE as well as rabbit anti-Ara h 2 and anti-Ara h 6 IgG. Sequence alignment showed that none of the mimotope sequences match a linear segment of the Ara h 2 or Ara h 6 sequences. EpiSearch analysis showed that all the mimotopes mapped to surface patches of Ara h 2 and Ara h 6. Eight of the mimotopes were recognized by more than 90% of the patients, suggesting immunodominance. Each patient had distinct IgE recognition patterns but the recognition frequency was not correlated to the concentration of peanut specific IgE or to clinical history. The mimotopes identified in this study represent conformational epitopes. Identification of similar surface patches on Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 further underscores the similarities between these two potent allergens. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A meta-learning approach for B-cell conformational epitope prediction.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuh-Jyh; Lin, Shun-Chien; Lin, Yu-Lung; Lin, Kuan-Hui; You, Shun-Ning

    2014-11-18

    One of the major challenges in the field of vaccine design is identifying B-cell epitopes in continuously evolving viruses. Various tools have been developed to predict linear or conformational epitopes, each relying on different physicochemical properties and adopting distinct search strategies. We propose a meta-learning approach for epitope prediction based on stacked and cascade generalizations. Through meta learning, we expect a meta learner to be able integrate multiple prediction models, and outperform the single best-performing model. The objective of this study is twofold: (1) to analyze the complementary predictive strengths in different prediction tools, and (2) to introduce a generic computational model to exploit the synergy among various prediction tools. Our primary goal is not to develop any particular classifier for B-cell epitope prediction, but to advocate the feasibility of meta learning to epitope prediction. With the flexibility of meta learning, the researcher can construct various meta classification hierarchies that are applicable to epitope prediction in different protein domains. We developed the hierarchical meta-learning architectures based on stacked and cascade generalizations. The bottom level of the hierarchy consisted of four conformational and four linear epitope prediction tools that served as the base learners. To perform consistent and unbiased comparisons, we tested the meta-learning method on an independent set of antigen proteins that were not used previously to train the base epitope prediction tools. In addition, we conducted correlation and ablation studies of the base learners in the meta-learning model. Low correlation among the predictions of the base learners suggested that the eight base learners had complementary predictive capabilities. The ablation analysis indicated that the eight base learners differentially interacted and contributed to the final meta model. The results of the independent test demonstrated that

  11. Structure of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in the Postfusion Conformation Reveals Preservation of Neutralizing Epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-09-16

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) invades host cells via a type I fusion (F) glycoprotein that undergoes dramatic structural rearrangements during the fusion process. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, such as 101F, palivizumab, and motavizumab, target two major antigenic sites on the RSV F glycoprotein. The structures of these sites as peptide complexes with motavizumab and 101F have been previously determined, but a structure for the trimeric RSV F glycoprotein ectodomain has remained elusive. To address this issue, we undertook structural and biophysical studies on stable ectodomain constructs. Here, we present the 2.8-{angstrom} crystal structure of the trimeric RSV F ectodomain in its postfusion conformation. The structure revealed that the 101F and motavizumab epitopes are present in the postfusion state and that their conformations are similar to those observed in the antibody-bound peptide structures. Both antibodies bound the postfusion F glycoprotein with high affinity in surface plasmon resonance experiments. Modeling of the antibodies bound to the F glycoprotein predicts that the 101F epitope is larger than the linear peptide and restricted to a single protomer in the trimer, whereas motavizumab likely contacts residues on two protomers, indicating a quaternary epitope. Mechanistically, these results suggest that 101F and motavizumab can bind to multiple conformations of the fusion glycoprotein and can neutralize late in the entry process. The structural preservation of neutralizing epitopes in the postfusion state suggests that this conformation can elicit neutralizing antibodies and serve as a useful vaccine antigen.

  12. Limited conformational flexibility in the paratope may be responsible for degenerate specificity of HIV epitope recognition.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Arijit; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2013-02-01

    Exquisite specificity is the hallmark of antigen-antibody recognition. However, breakdown in the specific recognition potential culminating in the binding to multiple antigens by a single antibody has been observed, even after the maturation of the humoral response. While such a broad specificity may be expected to assist the host to counter the antigenic variations associated with an immune-evading pathogen, escape from immune surveillance by subtle epitopic mutations in pathogens like HIV and influenza virus has been clearly established. In the light of this dichotomy, the issues of degeneracy/specificity in the humoral response against such epitopes were analysed using three HIV-neutralizing epitopes and their variants as a model system. Cross-reactivity was observed in the polyclonal response against two of the epitopes. Multi-reactive mAb KEL10 was isolated against one of the epitopes, ELDKWA from this response. It is evident that even after the affinity maturation, antibodies showing binding to multiple variants of an immunizing peptide epitope existed. Binding kinetics and in silico structural analyses indicated that conserved interactions across epitopes and limited conformational flexibility in the paratope may account for the observed multi-reactivity. Though the affinity maturation process is expected to incorporate an extent of specificity to the paratope, there appear to be still some B-cell clones producing antibodies with subtle flexibility in their binding site, as demonstrated in case of KEL10. Generation of such antibodies against effective immunogens could be a possible approach for countering the antibody neutralization escape by various immune-evading pathogens.

  13. Allergenicity of peanut component Ara h 2: Contribution of conformational versus linear hydroxyproline-containing epitopes.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Hervé; Guillon, Blanche; Drumare, Marie-Françoise; Paty, Evelyne; Dreskin, Stephen C; Wal, Jean-Michel; Adel-Patient, Karine; Hazebrouck, Stéphane

    2015-05-01

    The 2S-albumin Ara h 2 is the most potent peanut allergen and a good predictor of clinical reactivity in allergic children. Posttranslational hydroxylation of proline residues occurs in DPYSP(OH)S motifs, which are repeated 2 or 3 times in different isoforms. We investigated the effect of proline hydroxylation on IgE binding and the relative contributions of linear and conformational epitopes to Ara h 2 allergenicity. Peptides containing DPYSP(OH)S motifs were synthesized. A recombinant variant of Ara h 2 without DPYSP(OH)S motifs was generated by means of deletion mutagenesis. IgE reactivity of 18 French and 5 American patients with peanut allergy toward synthetic peptides and recombinant allergens was assessed by using IgE-binding inhibition assays and degranulation tests of humanized rat basophilic leukemia cells. Hydroxyproline-containing peptides exhibited an IgE-binding activity equivalent to that of the unfolded Ara h 2. In contrast, corresponding peptides without hydroxyprolines displayed a very weak IgE-binding capacity. Despite removal of the DPYSP(OH)S motifs, the deletion variant still displayed Ara h 2 conformational epitopes. The IgE-binding capacity of Ara h 2 was then recapitulated with an equimolar mixture of a hydroxylated peptide and the deletion variant. Hydroxylated peptides of 15 and 27 amino acid residues were also able to trigger cell degranulation. Sensitization toward linear and conformational epitopes of Ara h 2 is variable among patients with peanut allergy. Optimal IgE binding to linear epitopes of Ara h 2 requires posttranslational hydroxylation of proline residues. The absence of hydroxyprolines could then affect the accuracy of component-resolved diagnostics by using rAra h 2. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of Relevant Conformational Epitopes on the HER2 Oncoprotein by Using Large Fragment Phage Display (LFPD)

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Federico; Salvi, Roberto; Garulli, Chiara; Kalogris, Cristina; Arima, Serena; Tardella, Luca; Monaci, Paolo; Pupa, Serenella M.; Tagliabue, Elda; Montani, Maura; Quaglino, Elena; Stramucci, Lorenzo; Curcio, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    We developed a new phage-display based approach, the Large Fragment Phage Display (LFPD), that can be used for mapping conformational epitopes on target molecules of immunological interest. LFPD uses a simplified and more effective phage-display approach in which only a limited set of larger fragments (about 100 aa in length) are expressed on the phage surface. Using the human HER2 oncoprotein as a target, we identified novel B-cell conformational epitopes. The same homologous epitopes were also detected in rat HER2 and all corresponded to the epitopes predicted by computational analysis (PEPITO software), showing that LFPD gives reproducible and accurate results. Interestingly, these newly identified HER2 epitopes seem to be crucial for an effective immune response against HER2-overexpressing breast cancers and might help discriminating between metastatic breast cancer and early breast cancer patients. Overall, the results obtained in this study demonstrated the utility of LFPD and its potential application to the detection of conformational epitopes on many other molecules of interest, as well as, the development of new and potentially more effective B-cell conformational epitopes based vaccines. PMID:23555577

  15. Mapping of a conformational epitope on the cashew allergen Ana o 2: a discontinuous large subunit epitope dependent upon homologous or heterologous small subunit association.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lixin; Willison, LeAnna N; Porter, Lauren; Robotham, Jason M; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H

    2010-05-01

    The 11S globulins are members of the cupin protein superfamily and represent an important class of tree nut allergens for which a number of linear epitopes have been mapped. However, specific conformational epitopes for these allergens have yet to be described. We have recently reported a cashew Ana o 2 conformational epitope defined by murine mAb 2B5 and competitively inhibited by a subset of patient IgE antibodies. The 2B5 epitope appears to reside on the large (acidic) subunit, is dependent upon small (basic) subunit association for expression, and is highly susceptible to denaturation. Here we fine map the epitope using a combination of recombinant chimeric cashew Ana o 2-soybean Gly m 6 chimeras, deletion and point mutations, molecular modeling, and electron microscopy of 2B5-Ana o 2 immune complexes. Key residues appear confined to a 24 amino acid segment near the N-terminus of the large subunit peptide, a portion of which makes direct contact with the small subunit. These data provide an explanation for both the small subunit dependence and the structurally labile nature of the epitope.

  16. Analysis of Conformational B-Cell Epitopes in the Antibody-Antigen Complex Using the Depth Function and the Convex Hull.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Ruan, Jishou; Hu, Gang; Wang, Kui; Hanlon, Michelle; Gao, Jianzhao

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of conformational b-cell epitopes plays an important role in immunoinformatics. Several computational methods are proposed on the basis of discrimination determined by the solvent-accessible surface between epitopes and non-epitopes, but the performance of existing methods is far from satisfying. In this paper, depth functions and the k-th surface convex hull are used to analyze epitopes and exposed non-epitopes. On each layer of the protein, we compute relative solvent accessibility and four different types of depth functions, i.e., Chakravarty depth, DPX, half-sphere exposure and half space depth, to analyze the location of epitopes on different layers of the proteins. We found that conformational b-cell epitopes are rich in charged residues Asp, Glu, Lys, Arg, His; aliphatic residues Gly, Pro; non-charged residues Asn, Gln; and aromatic residue Tyr. Conformational b-cell epitopes are rich in coils. Conservation of epitopes is not significantly lower than that of exposed non-epitopes. The average depths (obtained by four methods) for epitopes are significantly lower than that of non-epitopes on the surface using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Epitopes are more likely to be located in the outer layer of the convex hull of a protein. On the benchmark dataset, the cumulate 10th convex hull covers 84.6% of exposed residues on the protein surface area, and nearly 95% of epitope sites. These findings may be helpful in building a predictor for epitopes.

  17. Characterization of a Novel Conformational GII.4 Norovirus Epitope: Implications for Norovirus-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Vicente, Noelia; Vila-Vicent, Susana; Allen, David; Gozalbo-Rovira, Roberto; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human noroviruses (NoVs) are the main etiological agents of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. While NoVs are highly diverse (more than 30 genotypes have been detected in humans), during the last 40 years most outbreaks and epidemics have been caused by GII.4 genotype strains, raising questions about their persistence in the population. Among other potential explanations, immune evasion is considered to be a main driver of their success. In order to study antibody recognition and evasion in detail, we analyzed a conformational epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody (3C3G3) by phage display, site-directed mutagenesis, and surface plasmon resonance. Our results show that the predicted epitope is composed of 11 amino acids within the P domain: P245, E247, I389, Q390, R397, R435, G443, Y444, P445, N446, and D448. Only two of them, R397 and D448, differ from the homologous variant (GII.4 Den-Haag_2006b) and from a previous variant (GII.4 VA387_1996) that is not recognized by the antibody. A double mutant derived from the VA387_1996 variant containing both changes, Q396R and N447D, is recognized by the 3C3G3 monoclonal antibody, confirming the participation of the two sites in the epitope recognized by the antibody. Furthermore, a single change, Q396R, is able to modify the histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) recognition pattern. These results provide evidence that the epitope recognized by the 3C3G3 antibody is involved in the virus-host interactions, both at the immunological and at the receptor levels. IMPORTANCE Human noroviruses are the main cause of viral diarrhea worldwide in people of all ages. Noroviruses can infect individuals who had been previously exposed to the same or different norovirus genotypes. Norovirus genotype GII.4 has been reported to be most prevalent during the last 40 years. In the present study, we describe a novel viral epitope identified by a monoclonal antibody and located within the highly diverse P domain of the capsid protein

  18. NMR and molecular dynamics studies of the conformational epitope of the type III group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharide and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Brisson, J R; Uhrinova, S; Woods, R J; van der Zwan, M; Jarrell, H C; Paoletti, L C; Kasper, D L; Jennings, H J

    1997-03-18

    The conformational epitope of the type III group B Streptococcus capsular polysaccharide (GBSP III) exhibits unique properties which can be ascribed to the presence of sialic acid in its structure and the requirement for an extended binding site. By means of NMR and molecular dynamics studies on GBSP III and its fragments, the extended epitope of GBSP III was further defined. The influence of sialic acid on the conformational properties of GBSP III was examined by performing conformational analysis on desialylated GBSP III, which is identical to the polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 14, and also on oxidized and reduced GBSP III. Conformational changes were gauged by 1H and 13C chemical shift analysis, NOE, 1D selective TOCSY-NOESY experiments, J(HH) and J(CH) variations, and NOE of OH resonances. Changes in mobility were examined by 13C T1 and T2 measurements. Unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water using the AMBER force field and the GLYCAM parameter set were used to assess static and dynamic conformational models, simulate the observable NMR parameters and calculate helical parameters. GBSP III was found to be capable of forming extended helices. Hence, the length dependence of the conformational epitope could be explained by its location on extended helices within the random coil structure of GBSP III. The interaction of sialic acid with the backbone of the PS was also found to be important in defining the conformational epitope of GBSP III.

  19. BepiPred-2.0: improving sequence-based B-cell epitope prediction using conformational epitopes.

    PubMed

    Jespersen, Martin Closter; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2017-05-02

    Antibodies have become an indispensable tool for many biotechnological and clinical applications. They bind their molecular target (antigen) by recognizing a portion of its structure (epitope) in a highly specific manner. The ability to predict epitopes from antigen sequences alone is a complex task. Despite substantial effort, limited advancement has been achieved over the last decade in the accuracy of epitope prediction methods, especially for those that rely on the sequence of the antigen only. Here, we present BepiPred-2.0 (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/BepiPred/), a web server for predicting B-cell epitopes from antigen sequences. BepiPred-2.0 is based on a random forest algorithm trained on epitopes annotated from antibody-antigen protein structures. This new method was found to outperform other available tools for sequence-based epitope prediction both on epitope data derived from solved 3D structures, and on a large collection of linear epitopes downloaded from the IEDB database. The method displays results in a user-friendly and informative way, both for computer-savvy and non-expert users. We believe that BepiPred-2.0 will be a valuable tool for the bioinformatics and immunology community. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Role of conformational epitopes expressed by human papillomavirus major capsid proteins in the serologic detection of infection and prophylactic vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hines, J F; Ghim, S J; Christensen, N D; Kreider, J W; Barnes, W A; Schlegel, R; Jenson, A B

    1994-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a variety of cutaneous warts, mucosal condylomata, and dysplasias and are etiologic in cervical cancer. Papillomavirus (PV) conformational epitopes on the surface of virions are type-specific and are the target of neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we describe two methods of in vitro expression of HPV major capsid (L1) proteins which mimicked conformational epitopes and demonstrate their type specificity and ability to react with neutralizing and/or conformation-dependent antibodies. The L1 open reading frames (ORFs) for HPV-1, 6, 11, and 16 were molecularly cloned into a SV 40 expression vector and the encoded gene products were expressed in mammalian (cos) cells. Similarly, the L1 ORFs for HPV-6, 11, 16, and 18 were molecularly cloned into recombinant baculovirus and the encoded gene products were expressed in insect (SF9) cells. The expressed L1 proteins reacted by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies generated against their corresponding native virions and by Western blotting with antibodies that recognized nonconformational epitopes of denatured virions. The recombinant L1 proteins expressed conformational epitopes in both cos and Sf9 cells that were type-specific and displayed neutralizing epitopes. The ability to express, purify, and qualitate the reactivity of recombinant L1 proteins will now permit the serologic analysis of host response to HPV infection and the development of prophylactic PV subunit vaccines.

  1. Structural and Physicochemical Studies of Olopatadine Hydrochloride Conformational Polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Łaszcz, Marta; Trzcińska, Kinga; Witkowska, Anna; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Badowska-Rosłonek, Katarzyna; Kuziak, Krzysztof

    2016-08-01

    Crystal and molecular structures of 2 conformational polymorphs (forms I and II) of olopatadine hydrochloride, an antiallergic agent, are presented. Both crystal modifications crystallize in the monoclinic crystal system with 1 olopatadine hydrochloride molecule in the Z configuration in the asymmetric unit. Molecules are arranged into the centrosymmetric association through the interactions of the intermolecular strong and weak hydrogen bonds of N-H…Cl, O-H…Cl and C-H…Cl, C-H…O types. Conformational change between polymorphs is proved by calculations of a maximum torsion angle deviation (max[Δθ]) and a root-mean-square deviation between the atomic positions (rmsd[r]). The physicochemical characterization of polymorphs is performed by X-ray powder diffraction, infrared and Raman spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry. The comparison of the melting points and heats of fusions shows that the forms are monotropically related. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to conformational epitopes of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 gp46.

    PubMed Central

    Hadlock, K G; Rowe, J; Perkins, S; Bradshaw, P; Song, G Y; Cheng, C; Yang, J; Gascon, R; Halmos, J; Rehman, S M; McGrath, M S; Foung, S K

    1997-01-01

    Ten human monoclonal antibodies derived from peripheral B cells of a patient with human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-associated myelopathy are described. One monoclonal antibody recognized a linear epitope within the carboxy-terminal 43 amino acids of HTLV gp21, and two monoclonal antibodies recognized linear epitopes within HTLV type 1 (HTLV-1) gp46. The remaining seven monoclonal antibodies recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 that were expressed on the surfaces of infected cells. Two of these antibodies also bound to viable HTLV-2 infected cells and immunoprecipitated HTLV-2 gp46. Virus neutralization was determined by syncytium inhibition assays. Eight monoclonal antibodies, including all seven that recognized denaturation-sensitive epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46, possessed significant virus neutralization activity. By competitive inhibition analysis it was determined that these antibodies recognized at least four distinct conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46. These findings indicate the importance of conformational epitopes within HTLV-1 gp46 in mediating a neutralizing antibody response to HTLV infection. PMID:9223472

  3. Evaluation of conformational epitopes on thyroid peroxidase by antipeptide antibody binding and mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    GORA, M; GARDAS, A; WIKTOROWICZ, W; HOBBY, P; WATSON, P F; WEETMAN, A P; SUTTON, B J; BANGA, J P

    2004-01-01

    Autoantibodies to thyroid peroxidase (TPO) recognize predominantly conformational epitopes, which are restricted to two distinct determinants, termed immunodominant domain region (IDR) A and B. These dominant determinants reside in the region with structural homology to myeloperoxidase (MPO)-like domain and may extend into the adjacent complement control protein (CCP) domain. We have explored the location of these determinants on the MPO-like domain of the structural model of TPO, by identifying exposed hydrophilic loops that are potential candidates for the autoantigenic sites, generating rabbit antipeptide antisera, and competing with well characterized murine monoclonal antibodies (mabs) specific for these two IDRs. We recently defined the location of IDR-B, and here report our findings on the location of IDR-A and its relationship to IDR-B, defined with a new panel of 15 antipeptide antisera. Moreover, in combination with single amino acid replacements by in vitro mutagenesis, we have defined the limits of the IDR-B region on the TPO model. The combination of antisera to peptides P12 (aa 549–563), P14 (aa 599–617) and P18 (aa 210–225) inhibited the binding of the mab specific for IDR-A (mab 2) by 75. The same combination inhibited the binding of autoantibodies to native TPO from 67 to 94% (mean 81·5%) at autoantibody levels of 5 IU. Fabs prepared from the antipeptide IgG and pooled in this combination were also effective in competition assays, thus defining the epitopes more precisely. IDR-A was found to lie immediately adjacent to IDR-B and thus the two immunodominant epitopes form an extended patch on the surface of TPO. Finally, by single amino acid mutagenesis, we show that IDR-B extends to residue N642, thus further localizing the boundary of this autoantigenic region on the structural model. PMID:15030525

  4. Identification of Two Major Conformational Aquaporin-4 Epitopes for Neuromyelitis Optica Autoantibody Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Francesco; Mastrototaro, Mauro; Rossi, Andrea; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Tortorella, Carla; Ruggieri, Maddalena; Trojano, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease characterized by the presence of anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibodies in the patient sera. We recently reported that these autoantibodies are able to bind AQP4 when organized in the supramolecular structure called the orthogonal array of particles (OAP). To map the antigenic determinants, we produced a series of AQP4 mutants based on multiple alignment sequence analysis between AQP4 and other OAP-forming AQPs. Mutations were introduced in the three extracellular loops (A, C, and E), and the binding capacity of NMO sera was tested on AQP4 mutants. Results indicate that one group of sera was able to recognize a limited portion of loop C containing the amino acid sequence 146GVT(T/M)V150. A second group of sera was characterized by a predominant role of loop A. Deletion of four AQP4-specific amino acids (61G(S/T)E(N/K)64) in loop A substantially affected the binding of this group of sera. However, the binding capacity was further reduced when amino acids in loop A were mutated together with those in loop E or when those in loop C were mutated in combination with loop E. Finally, a series of AQP0 mutants were produced in which the extracellular loops were progressively changed to make them identical to AQP4. Results showed that none of the mutants was able to reproduce in AQP0 the NMO-IgG epitopes, indicating that the extracellular loop sequence by itself was not sufficient to determine the rearrangement required to create the epitopes. Although our data highlight the complexity of the disease, this study identifies key immunodominant epitopes and provides direct evidence that the transition from AQP4 tetramers to AQP4-OAPs involves conformational changes of the extracellular loops. PMID:21212277

  5. Identification of two major conformational aquaporin-4 epitopes for neuromyelitis optica autoantibody binding.

    PubMed

    Pisani, Francesco; Mastrototaro, Mauro; Rossi, Andrea; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Tortorella, Carla; Ruggieri, Maddalena; Trojano, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria

    2011-03-18

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease characterized by the presence of anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4) antibodies in the patient sera. We recently reported that these autoantibodies are able to bind AQP4 when organized in the supramolecular structure called the orthogonal array of particles (OAP). To map the antigenic determinants, we produced a series of AQP4 mutants based on multiple alignment sequence analysis between AQP4 and other OAP-forming AQPs. Mutations were introduced in the three extracellular loops (A, C, and E), and the binding capacity of NMO sera was tested on AQP4 mutants. Results indicate that one group of sera was able to recognize a limited portion of loop C containing the amino acid sequence (146)GVT(T/M)V(150). A second group of sera was characterized by a predominant role of loop A. Deletion of four AQP4-specific amino acids ((61)G(S/T)E(N/K)(64)) in loop A substantially affected the binding of this group of sera. However, the binding capacity was further reduced when amino acids in loop A were mutated together with those in loop E or when those in loop C were mutated in combination with loop E. Finally, a series of AQP0 mutants were produced in which the extracellular loops were progressively changed to make them identical to AQP4. Results showed that none of the mutants was able to reproduce in AQP0 the NMO-IgG epitopes, indicating that the extracellular loop sequence by itself was not sufficient to determine the rearrangement required to create the epitopes. Although our data highlight the complexity of the disease, this study identifies key immunodominant epitopes and provides direct evidence that the transition from AQP4 tetramers to AQP4-OAPs involves conformational changes of the extracellular loops.

  6. Predicted philogeny, secondary conformational structure, and epitope antigenicity of immunological sequences in poultry.

    PubMed

    Lara, L J; Peconick, A P; Fassani, É J; Júnior, A M P; Chalfun, P R B; Raymundo, D L; Barçante, T A; Barçante, J M de P

    2017-05-18

    Poultry production is faced with different types of stresses that are responsible for issues of animal welfare as well as for economic losses. Moreover, the immunity decreases when animals are stressed. In silico analyses are important in reducing the cost and in increasing the accuracy of scientific results. A bioinformatics tool was used to perform ontology studies on 15 different immunological sequences of poultry. The mRNA structures and sequences with maximum antigenic residues were also predicted. No homology was found between the sequences of poultry and mammals. These results helped in the prediction of new potential molecular markers. Of the 15 sequences that were analyzed, predictions could not be made for five because they were longer than 2500 nucleotides; for the remaining 10 sequences, 20 conformational structures per sequence were predicted and the most stable sequences were identified by their minimum free energy values. The highest antigenic epitopes were accepted by the maximum scores; 15 of the total 8934 epitopes that were predicted were analyzed. These results would aid future studies that use synthetic peptides or recombinants as markers or immunomodulators and would expand our understanding on how stress can modulate the immune system. These would also help in developing rapid diagnostic tools, in increasing animal welfare, biosecurity, and productivity, and also in developing of food additives and environmental enrichment for stress control, thereby, making animal production more sustainable.

  7. Conformational Epitopes Recognized by Protective Anti-Neisserial Surface Protein A Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Victor C.; Moe, Gregory R.; Raad, Zyde; Wuorimaa, Tomi; Granoff, Dan M.

    2003-01-01

    NspA is a conserved membrane protein that elicits protective antibody responses in mice against Neisseria meningitidis. A recent crystallographic study showed that NspA adopts an eight-stranded β-barrel structure when reconstituted in detergent. In order to define the segments of NspA-containing epitopes recognized by protective murine anti-NspA antibodies, we studied the binding of two bactericidal and protective anti-NspA monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), AL12 and 14C7. Neither MAb binds to overlapping synthetic peptides (10-mers, 12-mers, and cyclic 12-mers) corresponding to the entire mature sequence of NspA, or to denatured recombinant NspA (rNspA), although binding to the protein can be restored by refolding in liposomes. Based on the ability of the two MAbs to bind to Escherichia coli microvesicles prepared from a set of rNspA variants created by site-specific mutagenesis, the most important contacts between the MAbs and NspA appear to be located within the LGG segment of loop 3. The conformation of loop 2 also appears to be an important determinant, as particular combinations of residues in this segment resulted in loss of antibody binding. Thus, the two anti-NspA MAbs recognize discontinuous conformational epitopes that result from the close proximity of loops 2 and 3 in the three-dimensional structure of NspA. The data suggest that optimally immunogenic vaccines using rNspA will require formulations that permit proper folding of the protein. PMID:14638771

  8. Peptide Conformations for a Microarray Surface-Tethered Epitope of the Tumor Suppressor p53

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Jun; Wong, Ka-Yiu; Lynch, Gillian C.; Gao, Xiaolian; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2007-12-13

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Peptides or proteins near surfaces exhibit different structural properties from those present in a homogeneous solution, and these differences give rise to varied biological activity. Therefore, understanding the detailed molecular structure of these molecules tethered to a surface is important for interpreting the performance of the various microarrays based on the activities of the immobilized peptides or proteins. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of a pentapeptide, RHSVV, an epitope of the tumor suppressor protein p53, tethered via a spacer on a functionalized silica surface and free in solution, to study their structural and conformational differences. These calculations allowed analyses of the peptide-surface interactions, the sequence orientations, and the translational motions of the peptide on the surface to be performed. Conformational similarities are found among dominant structures of the tethered and free peptide. In the peptide microarray simulations, the peptide fluctuates between a parallel and tilted orientation driven in part by the hydrophobic interactions between the nonpolar peptide residues and the methyl-terminated silica surface. The perpendicular movement of the peptide relative to the surface is also restricted due to the hydrophobic nature of the microarray surface. With regard to structures available for recognition and binding, we find that similar conformations to those found in solution are available to the peptide tethered to the surface, but with a shifted equilibrium constant. Comparisons with experimental results show important implications of this for peptide microarray design and assays.

  9. Flexible vs Rigid Epitope Conformations for Diagnostic- and Vaccine-Oriented Applications: Novel Insights from the Burkholderia pseudomallei BPSL2765 Pal3 Epitope.

    PubMed

    Gori, Alessandro; Peri, Claudio; Quilici, Giacomo; Nithichanon, Arnone; Gaudesi, Davide; Longhi, Renato; Gourlay, Louise; Bolognesi, Martino; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Musco, Giovanna; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-03-11

    Peptides seldom retain stable conformations if separated from their native protein structure. In an immunological context, this potentially affects the development of selective peptide-based bioprobes and, from a vaccine perspective, poses inherent limits in the elicitation of cross-reactive antibodies by candidate epitopes. Here, a 1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazole-mediated stapling strategy was used to stabilize the native α-helical fold of the Pal3 peptidic epitope from the protein antigen PalBp (BPSL2765) from Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiological agent of melioidosis. Whereas Pal3 shows no propensity to fold outside its native protein context, the engineered peptide (Pal3H) forms a stable α-helix, as assessed by MD, NMR, and CD structural analyses. Importantly, Pal3H shows an enhanced ability to discriminate between melioidosis patient subclasses in immune sera reactivity tests, demonstrating the potential of the stapled peptide for diagnostic purposes. With regard to antibody elicitation and related bactericidal activities, the linear peptide is shown to elicit a higher response. On these bases, we critically discuss the implications of epitope structure engineering for diagnostic- and vaccine-oriented applications.

  10. A single conformational transglutaminase 2 epitope contributed by three domains is critical for celiac antibody binding and effects

    PubMed Central

    Simon-Vecsei, Zsófia; Király, Róbert; Bagossi, Péter; Tóth, Boglárka; Dahlbom, Ingrid; Caja, Sergio; Csősz, Éva; Lindfors, Katri; Sblattero, Daniele; Nemes, Éva; Mäki, Markku; Fésüs, László; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma R.

    2012-01-01

    The multifunctional, protein cross-linking transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is the main autoantigen in celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder with defined etiology. Glutamine-rich gliadin peptides from ingested cereals, after their deamidation by TG2, induce T-lymphocyte activation accompanied by autoantibody production against TG2 in 1–2% of the population. The pathogenic role and exact binding properties of these antibodies to TG2 are still unclear. Here we show that antibodies from different celiac patients target the same conformational TG2 epitope formed by spatially close amino acids of adjacent domains. Glu153 and 154 on the first alpha-helix of the core domain and Arg19 on first alpha-helix of the N-terminal domain determine the celiac epitope that is accessible both in the closed and open conformation of TG2 and dependent on the relative position of these helices. Met659 on the C-terminal domain also can cooperate in antibody binding. This composite epitope is disease-specific, recognized by antibodies derived from celiac tissues and associated with biological effects when passively transferred from celiac mothers into their newborns. These findings suggest that celiac antibodies are produced in a surface-specific way for which certain homology of the central glutamic acid residues of the TG2 epitope with deamidated gliadin peptides could be a structural basis. Monoclonal mouse antibodies with partially overlapping epitope specificity released celiac antibodies from patient tissues and antagonized their harmful effects in cell culture experiments. Such antibodies or similar specific competitors will be useful in further functional studies and in exploring whether interference with celiac antibody actions leads to therapeutic benefits. PMID:22198767

  11. Localization of key amino acid residues in the dominant conformational epitopes on thyroid peroxidase recognized by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Marlena; Czarnocka, Barbara; Gora, Monika

    2012-09-01

    Autoantibodies to thyroid peroxidase (TPO), the major target autoantigen in autoimmune thyroid diseases, recognize conformational epitopes limited to two immunodominant regions (IDRs) termed IDR-A and -B. The apparent restricted heterogeneity of TPO autoantibodies was discovered using TPO-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and later confirmed by human recombinant Fabs. In earlier studies we identified key amino acids crucial for the interaction of human autoantibodies with TPO. Here we show the critical residues that participate in binding of five mAbs to the conformational epitopes on the TPO surface. Using ELISA we tested the reactivity of single and multiple TPO mutants expressed in CHO cells with a panel of mAbs specifically recognizing IDR-A (mAb 2 and 9) and IDR-B (mAb 15, 18, 64). We show that antibodies recognizing very similar regions on the TPO surface may interact with different sets of residues. We found that residues K713 and E716 contribute to the interaction between mAb 2 and TPO. The epitope for mAb 9 is critically dependent on residues R646 and E716. Moreover, we demonstrate that amino acids E604 and D630 are part of the functional epitope for mAb 15, and amino acids D624 and K627 for mAb 18. Finally, residues E604, D620, D624, K627, and D630 constitute the epitope for mAb 64. This is the first detailed study identifying the key resides for binding of mAbs 2, 9, 15, 18, and 64. Better understanding of those antibodies' specificity will be helpful in elucidating the properties of TPO as an antigen in autoimmune disorders.

  12. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for differentiating phytoplasma strains.

    PubMed

    Musić, Martina Seruga; Skorić, Dijana

    2013-01-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis is a sensitive and rapid technique for detecting DNA polymorphisms and mutations in PCR-amplified fragments. Due to its technical simplicity, it is widely used as a screening tool in various investigations, ranging from clinical diagnosis of human hereditary diseases to the characterization of microbial communities. This method can also be used successfully on phytoplasmas as a tool for the detection of molecular variability in conserved housekeeping genes such as 16S rRNA and tuf, as well as in more variable genes, revealing the presence of polymorphisms undetected by routine RFLP analyses. The reliability of SSCP has been confirmed by multiple alignments and phylogenetic analyses of representative sequences showing different SSCP profiles. However, it is not broadly applied in phytoplasma research yet. The technique provides an inexpensive, convenient, and sensitive method for determining sequence variation and to differentiate phytoplasma strains, and is particularly suitable for epidemiological studies or as a fast screening, typing tool when dealing with a large number of field samples.

  13. The transport signal on Sec22 for packaging into COPII-coated vesicles is a conformational epitope.

    PubMed

    Mancias, Joseph D; Goldberg, Jonathan

    2007-05-11

    The mechanism of cargo concentration into ER-derived vesicles involves interactions between the COPII vesicular coat complex and cargo transport signals--peptide sequences of 10-15 residues. The SNARE protein Sec22 contains a signal that binds the COPII subcomplex Sec23/24 and specifies its endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit as an unassembled SNARE. The 200 kDa crystal structure of Sec22 bound to Sec23/24 reveals that the transport signal is a folded epitope rather than a conventional short peptide sequence. The NIE segment of the SNARE motif folds against the N-terminal longin domain, and this closed form of Sec22 binds at the Sec23/24 interface. Thus, COPII recognizes unassembled Sec22 via a folded epitope, whereas Sec22 assembly into SNARE complexes would mask the NIE segment. The concept of a conformational epitope as a transport signal suggests packaging mechanisms in which a coat is sensitive to the folded state of a cargo protein or the assembled state of a multiprotein complex.

  14. Identification of atherosclerosis-associated conformational heat shock protein 60 epitopes by phage display and structural alignment.

    PubMed

    Perschinka, Hannes; Wellenzohn, Bernd; Parson, Walther; van der Zee, Ruurd; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan; Wick, Georg

    2007-09-01

    Autoimmune reactions to HSP60 are believed to play a key role during development of early atherosclerosis. Due to the high degree of phylogenetic conservation between microbial and human HSP60, bacterial infections might be responsible for inducing cross-reactivity to self HSP60, which is expressed on the surface of arterial endothelial cells stressed by classical atherosclerosis risk factors. Conformational epitopes recognized by polyclonal anti-mycobacterial HSP60 antibodies from subjects with atherosclerosis were identified using a phage displayed random library of cyclic constrained 7mer peptides. After five rounds of selection, DNA sequencing of strongly binding clones revealed that one peptide motif (CIGSPSTNC) was present in 64% of all clones, and a second motif (CSFHYQNRC) in 14%. Using a newly developed method for structural alignment of small constrained peptides onto a protein surface, we located the motif present in 14% of all clones on the surface of mycobacterial HSP60. The motif present in 64% of all clones was found on the surface of mycobacterial HSP60 as well as in the homologous region of human HSP60, which makes this epitope a promising candidate for further investigations on cross-reactive epitopes involved in early atherogenesis.

  15. Rapid Conformational Epitope Mapping of anti-gp120 Antibodies with a Designed Mutant Panel Displayed on Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Fink, Jordi; Kriegsman, Barry; Xin, Yu Hui; Zhu, Hanna; Hanson, Melissa; Irvine, Darrell J.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2013-01-01

    gp120 is a substrate for protein engineering both for HIV immunogen design and as a bait for isolating anti-HIV antibodies from patient samples. In this work we describe the display of a stripped core gp120 on the yeast cell surface. Validation against a panel of neutralizing antibodies confirms that yeast-displayed gp120 presents the CD4 binding site in the correct conformation. We map the epitope of the broadly neutralizing anti-gp120 antibody VRC01 using both a random mutagenesis library and a defined mutant panel, and find the resultant epitope maps are consistent with one another and with the crystallographically identified contact residues. Mapping the VRC01-competitive antibodies b12 and b13 reveals energetic differences in their epitopes that are not obvious from existing crystal structures. These data suggest mutation sets that abrogate binding to broadly neutralizing antibodies with greater specificity than the canonical mutation D368R, useful in rapidly assessing the nature of a vaccine response. PMID:23159556

  16. Positive-unlabeled learning for the prediction of conformational B-cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The incomplete ground truth of training data of B-cell epitopes is a demanding issue in computational epitope prediction. The challenge is that only a small fraction of the surface residues of an antigen are confirmed as antigenic residues (positive training data); the remaining residues are unlabeled. As some of these uncertain residues can possibly be grouped to form novel but currently unknown epitopes, it is misguided to unanimously classify all the unlabeled residues as negative training data following the traditional supervised learning scheme. Results We propose a positive-unlabeled learning algorithm to address this problem. The key idea is to distinguish between epitope-likely residues and reliable negative residues in unlabeled data. The method has two steps: (1) identify reliable negative residues using a weighted SVM with a high recall; and (2) construct a classification model on the positive residues and the reliable negative residues. Complex-based 10-fold cross-validation was conducted to show that this method outperforms those commonly used predictors DiscoTope 2.0, ElliPro and SEPPA 2.0 in every aspect. We conducted four case studies, in which the approach was tested on antigens of West Nile virus, dihydrofolate reductase, beta-lactamase, and two Ebola antigens whose epitopes are currently unknown. All the results were assessed on a newly-established data set of antigen structures not bound by antibodies, instead of on antibody-bound antigen structures. These bound structures may contain unfair binding information such as bound-state B-factors and protrusion index which could exaggerate the epitope prediction performance. Source codes are available on request. PMID:26681157

  17. Molecular Docking Study of Conformational Polymorph: Building Block of Crystal Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Rashmi; Tewari, Ashish Kumar; Singh, Ved Prakash; Singh, Praveen; Dangi, Jawahar Singh; Puerta, Carmen; Valerga, Pedro; Kant, Rajni

    2013-01-01

    Two conformational polymorphs of novel 2-[2-(3-cyano-4,6-dimethyl-2-oxo-2H-pyridin-1-yl)-ethoxy]-4,6-dimethyl nicotinonitrile have been developed. The crystal structure of both polymorphs (1a and 1b) seems to be stabilized by weak interactions. A difference was observed in the packing of both polymorphs. Polymorph 1b has a better binding affinity with the cyclooxygenase (COX-2) receptor than the standard (Nimesulide). PMID:24250264

  18. Two amino acid residues confer type specificity to a neutralizing, conformationally dependent epitope on human papillomavirus type 11.

    PubMed Central

    Ludmerer, S W; Benincasa, D; Mark, G E

    1996-01-01

    Characterization of virus binding by neutralizing antibodies is important both in understanding early events in viral infectivity and in development of vaccines. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to human papillomavirus type 11 (HPV11) have been described, but mapping the binding site has been difficult because of the conformational nature of key type-specific neutralization epitopes on the L1 coat protein. We have determined those residues of the L1 protein of HPV11 which confer type specificity to the binding of HPV11-neutralizing MAbs. Binding of three HPV11-specific neutralizing MAbs could be redirected to HPV6 L1 virus-like particles in which as few as two substitutions of corresponding amino acid residues from HPV11 L1 have been made, thus demonstrating the importance of these residues to MAb binding through the transfer of a conformationally dependent epitope. In addition, a fourth neutralizing MAb could be distinguished from the other neutralizing MAbs in terms of the amino acid residues which affect binding, suggesting the possibility that it neutralizes HPV11 through a different mechanism. PMID:8676509

  19. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P; Kim, Arthur S; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W; Zwick, Michael B; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B

    2015-09-25

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120-gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120-gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes.

  20. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P.; Kim, Arthur S.; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120–gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120–gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes. PMID:26404402

  1. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P.; Kim, Arthur S.; Torrents de La Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-09-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120-gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120-gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes.

  2. Vaccination with Altered Peptide Ligands of a Plasmodium berghei Circumsporozoite Protein CD8 T-Cell Epitope: A Model to Generate T Cells Resistant to Immune Interference by Polymorphic Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Minigo, Gabriela; Flanagan, Katie L.; Slattery, Robyn M.; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Many pathogens, including the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, display high levels of polymorphism within T-cell epitope regions of proteins associated with protective immunity. The T-cell epitope variants are often non-cross-reactive. Herein, we show in a murine model, which modifies a protective CD8 T-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CS) of Plasmodium berghei (SYIPSAEKI), that simultaneous or sequential co-stimulation with two of its putative similarly non-cross-reactive altered peptide ligand (APL) epitopes (SYIPSAEDI or SYIPSAEAI) has radically different effects on immunity. Hence, co-immunization or sequential stimulation in vivo of SYIPSAEKI with its APL antagonist SYIPSAEDI decreases immunity to both epitopes. By contrast, co-immunization with SYIPSAEAI has no apparent initial effect, but it renders the immune response to SYIPSAEKI resistant to being turned off by subsequent immunization with SYIPSAEDI. These results suggest a novel strategy for vaccines that target polymorphic epitopes potentially capable of mutual immune interference in the field, by initiating an immune response by co-immunization with the desired index epitope, together with a carefully selected “potentiator” APL peptide. PMID:28261200

  3. Comprehensive Analysis of Contributions from Protein Conformational Stability and Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II-Peptide Binding Affinity to CD4+ Epitope Immunogenicity in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingfeng; Steede, N. Kalaya; Nguyen, Hong-Nam P.; Freytag, Lucy C.; McLachlan, James B.; Mettu, Ramgopal R.; Robinson, James E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Helper T-cell epitope dominance in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 is not adequately explained by peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Antigen processing potentially influences epitope dominance, but few, if any, studies have attempted to reconcile the influences of antigen processing and MHC protein binding for all helper T-cell epitopes of an antigen. Epitopes of gp120 identified in both humans and mice occur on the C-terminal flanks of flexible segments that are likely to be proteolytic cleavage sites. In this study, the influence of gp120 conformation on the dominance pattern in gp120 from HIV strain 89.6 was examined in CBA mice, whose MHC class II protein has one of the most well defined peptide-binding preferences. Only one of six dominant epitopes contained the most conserved element of the I-Ak binding motif, an aspartic acid. Destabilization of the gp120 conformation by deletion of single disulfide bonds preferentially enhanced responses to the cryptic I-Ak motif-containing sequences, as reported by T-cell proliferation or cytokine secretion. Conversely, inclusion of CpG in the adjuvant with gp120 enhanced responses to the dominant CD4+ T-cell epitopes. The gp120 destabilization affected secretion of some cytokines more than others, suggesting that antigen conformation could modulate T-cell functions through mechanisms of antigen processing. IMPORTANCE CD4+ helper T cells play an essential role in protection against HIV and other pathogens. Thus, the sites of helper T-cell recognition, the dominant epitopes, are targets for vaccine design; and the corresponding T cells may provide markers for monitoring infection and immunity. However, T-cell epitopes are difficult to identify and predict. It is also unclear whether CD4+ T cells specific for one epitope are more protective than T cells specific for other epitopes. This work shows that the three-dimensional (3D) structure of an

  4. Novel Phospho-Tau Monoclonal Antibody Generated Using a Liposomal Vaccine, with Enhanced Recognition of a Conformational Tauopathy Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Theunis, Clara; Adolfsson, Oskar; Crespo-Biel, Natalia; Piorkowska, Kasia; Pihlgren, Maria; Hickman, David T.; Gafner, Valérie; Borghgraef, Peter; Devijver, Herman; Pfeifer, Andrea; Van Leuven, Fred; Muhs, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein Tau is an intrinsically unfolded, very soluble neuronal protein. Under still unknown circumstances, Tau protein forms soluble oligomers and insoluble aggregates that are closely linked to the cause and progression of various brain pathologies, including Alzheimer’s disease. Previously we reported the development of liposome-based vaccines and their efficacy and safety in preclinical mouse models for tauopathy. Here we report the use of a liposomal vaccine for the generation of a monoclonal antibody with particular characteristics that makes it a valuable tool for fundamental studies as well as a candidate antibody for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The specificity and affinity of antibody ACI-5400 were characterized by a panel of methods: (i) measuring the selectivity for a specific phospho-Tau epitope known to be associated with tauopathy, (ii) performing a combination of peptide and protein binding assays, (iii) staining of brain sections from mouse preclinical tauopathy models and from human subjects representing six different tauopathies, and (iv) evaluating the selective binding to pathological epitopes on extracts from tauopathy brains in non-denaturing sandwich assays. We conclude that the ACI-5400 antibody binds to protein Tau phosphorylated at S396 and favors a conformation that is typically present in the brain of tauopathy patients, including Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:28035925

  5. A Carboxy-Terminal Trimerization Domain Stabilizes Conformational Epitopes on the Stalk Domain of Soluble Recombinant Hemagglutinin Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Krammer, Florian; Margine, Irina; Tan, Gene S.; Pica, Natalie; Krause, Jens C.; Palese, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a new class of broadly neutralizing anti-influenza virus antibodies that target the stalk domain of the viral hemagglutinin was discovered. As such, induction, isolation, characterization, and quantification of these novel antibodies has become an area of intense research and great interest. Since most of these antibodies bind to conformational epitopes, the structural integrity of hemagglutinin substrates for the detection and quantification of these antibodies is of high importance. Here we evaluate the binding of these antibodies to soluble, secreted hemagglutinins with or without a carboxy-terminal trimerization domain based on the natural trimerization domain of T4 phage fibritin. The lack of such a domain completely abolishes binding to group 1 hemagglutinins and also affects binding to group 2 hemagglutinins. Additionally, the presence of a trimerization domain positively influences soluble hemagglutinin stability during expression and purification. Our findings suggest that a carboxy-terminal trimerization domain is a necessary requirement for the structural integrity of stalk epitopes on recombinant soluble influenza virus hemagglutinin. PMID:22928001

  6. Production and Characterization of Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies Recognizing Human Pan-IgG Specific Conformational or Linear Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Hajighasemi, Fatemeh; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Shokri, Fazel

    2012-01-01

    Background Pan-IgG specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are essential tools for assessment of humoral immunity, immune deficiency and gammopathy. In this study, four hybridoma clones producing MAbs with different specificities for human IgG isotypes were established. Methods Splenocytes from Balb/c mice immunized with Fc fractions of human IgG were fused with SP2/0 myeloma cells. Hybridoma cells were selected in HAT selective medium and cloned by limiting dilution assay. Antibody-secreting cells were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the specificity of secreted MAbs was further analyzed using a panel of purified myeloma IgG proteins by ELISA and immunoblotting. Cross-reactivity to immunoglobulins (Igs) of other species was studied by indirect ELISA using serum samples collected from 9 animals. Results Immunoblotting studies revealed recognition of either linear or conformational epitopes by these MAbs. The most abundant cross-reactivity (100%) was observed with monkey Igs, while no cross-reactivity was detected with rabbit, guinea pig, sheep, goat, cat and hen sera. Two of the MAbs cross-reacted with either dog or horse sera. The affinity constant of two MAbs was measured by ELISA and found to be 0.74×108M−1 and 0.96×107M−1. Conclusion Our results indicate that these pan-IgG specific MAbs recognize restricted linear or conformational epitopes located on all human IgG subclasses with no cross-reactivity to IgG from most species studied. These MAbs are potentially useful tools for quantification of total or antigen-specific IgG levels. PMID:23408136

  7. Distinction and temporal stability of conformational epitopes on myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein recognized by patients with different inflammatory central nervous system diseases.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Marie C; Breithaupt, Constanze; Reindl, Markus; Schanda, Kathrin; Rostásy, Kevin; Berger, Thomas; Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne; Olsson, Tomas; Jenne, Dieter; Pröbstel, Anne-Katrin; Dornmair, Klaus; Wekerle, Hartmut; Hohlfeld, Reinhard; Banwell, Brenda; Bar-Or, Amit; Meinl, Edgar

    2013-10-01

    Autoantibodies targeting conformationally intact myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) are found in different inflammatory diseases of the CNS, but their antigenic epitopes have not been mapped. We expressed mutants of MOG on human HeLa cells and analyzed sera from 111 patients (104 children, 7 adults) who recognized cell-bound human MOG, but had different diseases, including acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), one episode of transverse myelitis or optic neuritis, multiple sclerosis (MS), anti-aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-negative neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuritis (CRION). We obtained insight into the recognition of epitopes in 98 patients. All epitopes identified were located at loops connecting the β strands of MOG. The most frequently recognized MOG epitope was revealed by the P42S mutation positioned in the CC'-loop. Overall, we distinguished seven epitope patterns, including the one mainly recognized by mouse mAbs. In half of the patients, the anti-MOG response was directed to a single epitope. The epitope specificity was not linked to certain disease entities. Longitudinal analysis of 11 patients for up to 5 y indicated constant epitope recognition without evidence for intramolecular epitope spreading. Patients who rapidly lost their anti-MOG IgG still generated a long-lasting IgG response to vaccines, indicating that their loss of anti-MOG reactivity did not reflect a general lack of capacity for long-standing IgG responses. The majority of human anti-MOG Abs did not recognize rodent MOG, which has implications for animal studies. Our findings might assist in future detection of potential mimotopes and pave the way to Ag-specific depletion.

  8. Extra-epitopic hepatitis C virus polymorphisms confer resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies by modulating binding to scavenger receptor B1.

    PubMed

    El-Diwany, Ramy; Cohen, Valerie J; Mankowski, Madeleine C; Wasilewski, Lisa N; Brady, Jillian K; Snider, Anna E; Osburn, William O; Murrell, Ben; Ray, Stuart C; Bailey, Justin R

    2017-02-01

    Broadly-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) may guide vaccine development for highly variable viruses including hepatitis C virus (HCV), since they target conserved viral epitopes that could serve as vaccine antigens. However, HCV resistance to bNAbs could reduce the efficacy of a vaccine. HC33.4 and AR4A are two of the most potent anti-HCV human bNAbs characterized to date, binding to highly conserved epitopes near the amino- and carboxy-terminus of HCV envelope (E2) protein, respectively. Given their distinct epitopes, it was surprising that these bNAbs showed similar neutralization profiles across a panel of natural HCV isolates, suggesting that some viral polymorphisms may confer resistance to both bNAbs. To investigate this resistance, we developed a large, diverse panel of natural HCV envelope variants and a novel computational method to identify bNAb resistance polymorphisms in envelope proteins (E1 and E2). By measuring neutralization of a panel of HCV pseudoparticles by 10 μg/mL of each bNAb, we identified E1E2 variants with resistance to one or both bNAbs, despite 100% conservation of the AR4A binding epitope across the panel. We discovered polymorphisms outside of either binding epitope that modulate resistance to both bNAbs by altering E2 binding to the HCV co-receptor, scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1). This study is focused on a mode of neutralization escape not addressed by conventional analysis of epitope conservation, highlighting the contribution of extra-epitopic polymorphisms to bNAb resistance and presenting a novel mechanism by which HCV might persist even in the face of an antibody response targeting multiple conserved epitopes.

  9. Extra-epitopic hepatitis C virus polymorphisms confer resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies by modulating binding to scavenger receptor B1

    PubMed Central

    El-Diwany, Ramy; Mankowski, Madeleine C.; Wasilewski, Lisa N.; Brady, Jillian K.; Snider, Anna E.; Osburn, William O.; Murrell, Ben; Ray, Stuart C.

    2017-01-01

    Broadly-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) may guide vaccine development for highly variable viruses including hepatitis C virus (HCV), since they target conserved viral epitopes that could serve as vaccine antigens. However, HCV resistance to bNAbs could reduce the efficacy of a vaccine. HC33.4 and AR4A are two of the most potent anti-HCV human bNAbs characterized to date, binding to highly conserved epitopes near the amino- and carboxy-terminus of HCV envelope (E2) protein, respectively. Given their distinct epitopes, it was surprising that these bNAbs showed similar neutralization profiles across a panel of natural HCV isolates, suggesting that some viral polymorphisms may confer resistance to both bNAbs. To investigate this resistance, we developed a large, diverse panel of natural HCV envelope variants and a novel computational method to identify bNAb resistance polymorphisms in envelope proteins (E1 and E2). By measuring neutralization of a panel of HCV pseudoparticles by 10 μg/mL of each bNAb, we identified E1E2 variants with resistance to one or both bNAbs, despite 100% conservation of the AR4A binding epitope across the panel. We discovered polymorphisms outside of either binding epitope that modulate resistance to both bNAbs by altering E2 binding to the HCV co-receptor, scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1). This study is focused on a mode of neutralization escape not addressed by conventional analysis of epitope conservation, highlighting the contribution of extra-epitopic polymorphisms to bNAb resistance and presenting a novel mechanism by which HCV might persist even in the face of an antibody response targeting multiple conserved epitopes. PMID:28235087

  10. Significant conformational changes in an antigenic carbohydrate epitope upon binding to a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Glaudemans, C.P.J.; Lerner, L.; Daves, G.D. Jr.; Kovac, P.; Bax, A. ); Venable, R. )

    1990-12-01

    Transferred nulcear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (TRNOE) was used to observe changes in a ligand's conformation upon binding to its specific antibody. The ligands studied were methyl O-{beta}-D-galactopyranosyl(1{yields}6)-4-deoxy-4-fluoro-{beta}-D galactopyranoside (me4FGal{sub 2}) and its selectively deuteriated analogue, methyl O-{beta}-D-galactopyranosyl(1{yields}6)-4-deoxy-2-deuterio-4-fluoro-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (me4F2dGal{sub 2}). The monoclonal antibody was mouse IgA X24. The solution conformation of the free ligand me4F2dGal{sub 2} was inferred from measurements of vicinal {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H coupling constants, long-range {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C coupling constants, and NOE cross-peak intensities. For free ligand, both galactosyl residues adopt a regular chair conformation, but the NMR spectra are incompatible with a single unique conformation of the glycosidic linkage. Analysis of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C constants indicates that the major conformer has an extended conformation. TRNOE measurements on me4FGal{sub 2} and me4F2dGal{sub 2} in the presence of the specific antibody indicate that the pyranose ring pucker of each galactose ring remains unchanged, but rotations about the glycosidic linkage occur upon binding to X24. Computer calculations indicate that there are two sets of torsion angles that satisfy the observed NMR constraints. A new method, based on changes in the fluorine longitudinal relaxation rate, is used to measure the ligand-antibody dissociation rate constant.

  11. Using small molecule reagents to selectively modify epitopes based on their conformation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    PrPSc is an infectious protein. The only experimentally verified difference between PrPSc and their normal cellular isoform (PrPC) is conformational. This work describes an approach to determining the presence of surface exposed or sequestered amino acids present in the PrPSc isoform. The N-hydroxys...

  12. Expression of Heterologous Antigens in Commensal Neisseria spp.: Preservation of Conformational Epitopes with Vaccine Potential

    PubMed Central

    O'Dwyer, Clíona A.; Reddin, Karen; Martin, Denis; Taylor, Stephen C.; Gorringe, Andrew R.; Hudson, Michael J.; Brodeur, Bernard R.; Langford, Paul R.; Kroll, J. Simon

    2004-01-01

    Commensal neisseriae share with Neisseria meningitidis (meningococcus) a tendency towards overproduction of the bacterial outer envelope, leading to the formation and release during growth of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). OMVs from both meningococci and commensal neisseriae have shown promise as vaccines to protect against meningococcal disease. We report here the successful expression at high levels of heterologous proteins in commensal neisseriae and the display, in its native conformation, of one meningococcal outer membrane protein vaccine candidate, NspA, in OMVs prepared from such a recombinant Neisseria flavescens strain. These NspA-containing OMVs conferred protection against otherwise lethal intraperitoneal challenge of mice with N. meningitidis serogroup B, and sera raised against them mediated opsonophagocytosis of meningococcal strains expressing this antigen. This development promises to facilitate the design of novel vaccines containing membrane protein antigens that are otherwise difficult to present in native conformation that provide cross-protective efficacy in the prevention of meningococcal disease. PMID:15501782

  13. Human anti-Aβ IgGs target conformational epitopes on synthetic dimer assemblies and the AD brain-derived peptide.

    PubMed

    Welzel, Alfred T; Williams, Angela D; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P; Acero, Luis; Weber, Alfred; Blinder, Veronika; Mably, Alex; Bunk, Sebastian; Hermann, Corinna; Farrell, Michael A; Ehrlich, Hartmut J; Schwarz, Hans P; Walsh, Dominic M; Solomon, Alan; O'Nuallain, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Soluble non-fibrillar assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and aggregated tau protein are the proximate synaptotoxic species associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Anti-Aβ immunotherapy is a promising and advanced therapeutic strategy, but the precise Aβ species to target is not yet known. Previously, we and others have shown that natural human IgGs (NAbs) target diverse Aβ conformers and have therapeutic potential. We now demonstrate that these antibodies bound with nM avidity to conformational epitopes on plate-immobilized synthetic Aβ dimer assemblies, including synaptotoxic protofibrils, and targeted these conformers in solution. Importantly, NAbs also recognized Aβ extracted from the water-soluble phase of human AD brain, including species that migrated on denaturing PAGE as SDS-stable dimers. The critical reliance on Aβ's conformational state for NAb binding, and not a linear sequence epitope, was confirmed by the antibody's nM reactivity with plate-immobilized protofibrills, and weak uM binding to synthetic Aβ monomers and peptide fragments. The antibody's lack of reactivity against a linear sequence epitope was confirmed by our ability to isolate anti-Aβ NAbs from intravenous immunoglobulin using affinity matrices, immunoglobulin light chain fibrils and Cibacron blue, which had no sequence similarity with the peptide. These findings suggest that further investigations on the molecular basis and the therapeutic/diagnostic potential of anti-Aβ NAbs are warranted.

  14. Human Anti-Aβ IgGs Target Conformational Epitopes on Synthetic Dimer Assemblies and the AD Brain-Derived Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Welzel, Alfred T.; Williams, Angela D.; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Acero, Luis; Weber, Alfred; Blinder, Veronika; Mably, Alex; Bunk, Sebastian; Hermann, Corinna; Farrell, Michael A.; Ehrlich, Hartmut J.; Schwarz, Hans P.; Walsh, Dominic M.; Solomon, Alan; O’Nuallain, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Soluble non-fibrillar assemblies of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and aggregated tau protein are the proximate synaptotoxic species associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Anti-Aβ immunotherapy is a promising and advanced therapeutic strategy, but the precise Aβ species to target is not yet known. Previously, we and others have shown that natural human IgGs (NAbs) target diverse Aβ conformers and have therapeutic potential. We now demonstrate that these antibodies bound with nM avidity to conformational epitopes on plate-immobilized synthetic Aβ dimer assemblies, including synaptotoxic protofibrils, and targeted these conformers in solution. Importantly, NAbs also recognized Aβ extracted from the water-soluble phase of human AD brain, including species that migrated on denaturing PAGE as SDS-stable dimers. The critical reliance on Aβ’s conformational state for NAb binding, and not a linear sequence epitope, was confirmed by the antibody’s nM reactivity with plate-immobilized protofibrills, and weak uM binding to synthetic Aβ monomers and peptide fragments. The antibody’s lack of reactivity against a linear sequence epitope was confirmed by our ability to isolate anti-Aβ NAbs from intravenous immunoglobulin using affinity matrices, immunoglobulin light chain fibrils and Cibacron blue, which had no sequence similarity with the peptide. These findings suggest that further investigations on the molecular basis and the therapeutic/diagnostic potential of anti-Aβ NAbs are warranted. PMID:23209707

  15. Simultaneous detection of the exon 10 polymorphism and a novel intronic single base insertion polymorphism in the XPD gene using single strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajiv; Angelini, Sabrina; Hemminki, Kari

    2003-03-01

    We developed a new method based on the single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique for the detection of a G23591A (Asp312Asn) polymorphism in exon 10 of the XPD gene. In the process we also identified a novel polymorphism 23623C-ins (IVS10+17C-ins) in intron 10 of the same gene. With this newly developed SSCP-based method of genotyping we could detect both polymorphisms in the same assay and thus consequently determine the haplotype. In order to determine the population frequency of the novel polymorphism and the haplotype frequency, 302 healthy individuals were genotyped. The allelic frequency of the 23623C-ins intronic polymorphism was 0.16, whereas the frequency of the variant allele for the G23591A polymorphism was 0.39. Forty-three individuals (14%) were heterozygous for both polymorphisms but none carried polymorphic variants for both G23591A and 23623C-ins on the same allele. The effect of the novel intronic insertion polymorphism, which is located 16 nt downstream of the 3'-end of exon 10 of the XPD gene and involves a mononucleotide C repeat sequence, on expression remains to be determined.

  16. Crystal Structures of Polymorphic Prion Protein β1 Peptides Reveal Variable Steric Zipper Conformations.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu; Lee, Seung-Joo; Yee, Vivien C

    2015-06-16

    The pathogenesis of prion diseases is associated with the conformational conversion of normal, predominantly α-helical prion protein (PrP(C)) into a pathogenic form that is enriched with β-sheets (PrP(Sc)). Several PrP(C) crystal structures have revealed β1-mediated intermolecular sheets, suggesting that the β1 strand may contribute to a possible initiation site for β-sheet-mediated PrP(Sc) propagation. This β1 strand contains the polymorphic residue 129 that influences disease susceptibility and phenotype. To investigate the effect of the residue 129 polymorphism on the conformation of amyloid-like continuous β-sheets formed by β1, crystal structures of β1 peptides containing each of the polymorphic residues were determined. To probe the conformational influence of the peptide construct design, four different lengths of β1 peptides were studied. From the 12 peptides studied, 11 yielded crystal structures ranging in resolution from 0.9 to 1.4 Å. This ensemble of β1 crystal structures reveals conformational differences that are influenced by both the nature of the polymorphic residue and the extent of the peptide construct, indicating that comprehensive studies in which peptide constructs vary are a more rigorous approach to surveying conformational possibilities.

  17. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W

    2012-04-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  18. Amyloid-β-Anti-Amyloid-β Complex Structure Reveals an Extended Conformation in the Immunodominant B-Cell Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Luke A; Wun, Kwok S; Crespi, Gabriela A.N.; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Galatis, Denise; Bagley, Christopher J; Beyreuther, Konrad; Masters, Colin L; Cappai, Roberto; McKinstry, William J; Barnham, Kevin J; Parker, Michael W

    2008-04-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein, is central to AD pathogenesis. Most pharmaceutical activity in AD research has focused on Aβ, its generation and clearance from the brain. In particular, there is much interest in immunotherapy approaches with a number of anti-Aβ antibodies in clinical trials. We have developed a monoclonal antibody, called WO2, which recognises the Aβ peptide. To this end, we have determined the three-dimensional structure, to near atomic resolution, of both the antibody and the complex with its antigen, the Aβ peptide. The structures reveal the molecular basis for WO2 recognition and binding of Aβ. The Aβ peptide adopts an extended, coil-like conformation across its major immunodominant B-cell epitope between residues 2 and 8. We have also studied the antibody-bound Aβ peptide in the presence of metals known to affect its aggregation state and show that WO2 inhibits these interactions. Thus, antibodies that target the N-terminal region of Aβ, such as WO2, hold promise for therapeutic development.

  19. Conformational Nature of the Borrelia burgdorferi Decorin Binding Protein A Epitopes That Elicit Protective Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrandt, Nancy D.; Cassatt, David R.; Patel, Nita K.; Roberts, William C.; Bachy, Christine M.; Fazenbaker, Christine A.; Hanson, Mark S.

    2001-01-01

    Decorin binding protein A (DbpA) has been shown by several laboratories to be a protective antigen for the prevention of experimental Borrelia burgdorferi infection in the mouse model of Lyme borreliosis. However, different recombinant forms of the antigen having either lipidated amino termini, approximating the natural secretion and posttranslational processing, or nonprocessed cytosolic forms have elicited disparate levels of protection in the mouse model. We have now used the unique functional properties of this molecule to investigate the structural requirements needed to elicit a protective immune response. Genetic and physicochemical alterations to DbpA showed that the ability to bind to the ligand decorin is indicative of a potent immunogen but is not conclusive. By mutating the two carboxy-terminal nonconserved cysteines of DbpA from B. burgdorferi strain N40, we have determined that the stability afforded by the putative disulfide bond is essential for the generation of protective antibodies. This mutated protein was more sensitive to thermal denaturation and proteolysis, suggesting that it is in a less ordered state. Immunization with DbpA that was thermally denatured and functionally inactivated stimulated an immune response that was not protective and lacked bactericidal antibodies. Antibodies against conformationally altered forms of DbpA also failed to kill heterologous B. garinii and B. afzelii strains. Additionally, nonsecreted recombinant forms of DbpAN40 were found to be inferior to secreted lipoprotein DbpAN40 in terms of functional activity and antigenic potency. These data suggest that elicitation of a bactericidal and protective immune response to DbpA requires a properly folded conformation for the production of functional antibodies. PMID:11447153

  20. Mutation screening in the human epsilon-globin gene using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Menounos, Panagiotis G; Kolonelou, Christina; Patrinos, George P

    2006-02-01

    The human epsilon-globin gene is necessary for primitive human erythropoiesis in the yolk sac. Herein we report a non-radioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) approach to screen the human epsilon-globin gene and its regulatory regions for possible mutations and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in normal adult subjects, in order to determine those genomic regions, which are not necessary for its proper regulation and function. We identified no sequence variations apart from the expected 5'epsilon /HincII polymorphism in the fragments analyzed, suggesting that genomic alterations in the epsilon-globin gene are most likely incompatible with normal erythropoiesis and proper embryonic development.

  1. Alpha S1-casein polymorphisms in camel (Camelus dromedarius) and descriptions of biological active peptides and allergenic epitopes.

    PubMed

    Erhardt, Georg; Shuiep, El Tahir Salih; Lisson, Maria; Weimann, Christina; Wang, Zhaoxin; El Zubeir, Ibtisam El Yas Mohamed; Pauciullo, Alfredo

    2016-06-01

    Milk samples of 193 camels (Camelus dromedarius) from different regions of Sudan were screened for casein variability by isoelectric focusing. Kappa-casein and beta-casein were monomorphic, whereas three protein patterns named αs1-casein A, C, and D were identified. The major allele A revealed frequencies of 0.79 (Lahaoi), 0.75 (Shanbali), 0.90 (Arabi Khali), and 0.88 (Arabi Gharbawi) in the different ecotypes. CSN1S1*C shows a single G > T nucleotide substitution in the exon 5, leading to a non-synonymous amino acid exchange (p.Glu30 > Asp30) in comparison to CSN1S1*A and D. At cDNA level, no further single nucleotide polymorphisms could be identified in CSN1S1* A, C, and D, whereas the variants CSN1S1*A and CSN1S1*C are characterized by missing of exon 18 compared to the already described CSN1S1*B, as consequence of DNA insertion of 11 bp at intron 17 which alter the pre-mRNA spliceosome machinery. A polymerase chain-restriction fragment length polymorphism method (PCR-RFLP) was established to type for G > T nucleotide substitution at genomic DNA level. The occurrence and differences of IgE-binding epitopes and bioactive peptides between αs1-casein A, C, and D after digestion were analyzed in silico. The amino acid substitutions and deletion affected the arising peptide pattern and thus modifications between IgE-binding epitopes and bioactive peptides of the variants were found. The allergenic potential of these different peptides will be investigated by microarray immunoassay using sera from milk-sensitized individuals, as it was already demonstrated for bovine αs1-casein variants.

  2. Mapping the conformational epitope of a neutralizing antibody (AcV1) directed against the AcMNPV GP64 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jian; Blissard, Gary W. . E-mail: gwb1@cornell.edu

    2006-09-01

    The envelope glycoprotein GP64 of Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is necessary and sufficient for the acid-induced membrane fusion activity that is required for fusion of the budded virus (BV) envelope and the endosome membrane during virus entry. Infectivity of the budded virus (BV) is neutralized by AcV1, a monoclonal antibody (MAb) directed against GP64. Prior studies indicated that AcV1 recognizes a conformational epitope and does not inhibit virus attachment to the cell, but instead inhibits entry at a step following virus attachment. We found that AcV1 recognition of GP64 was lost upon exposure of GP64 to low pH (pH 4.5) and restored by returning GP64 to pH 6.2. In addition, the AcV1 epitope was lost upon denaturation of GP64 in SDS, but the AcV1 epitope was restored by refolding the protein in the absence of SDS. Using truncated GP64 proteins expressed in insect cells, we mapped the AcV1 epitope to a 24 amino acid region in the central variable domain of GP64. When sequences within the mapped AcV1 epitope were substituted with a c-Myc epitope and the resulting construct was used to replace wt GP64 in recombinant AcMNPV viruses, the modified GP64 protein appeared to function normally. However, an anti-c-Myc monoclonal antibody did not neutralize infectivity of those viruses. Because binding of the c-Myc MAb to the same site in the GP64 sequence did not result in neutralization, these studies suggest that AcV1 neutralization may result from a specific structural constraint caused by AcV1 binding and not simply by steric hindrance caused by antibody binding at this position in GP64.

  3. Conformational stability and crystal packing: polymorphism in Neurospora crassa CAT-3.

    PubMed

    Zárate-Romero, Andrés; Stojanoff, Vivian; Rojas-Trejo, Sonia Patricia; Hansberg, Wilhelm; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2013-07-01

    Polymorphism is frequently observed from different crystallization conditions. In proteins, the effect on conformational variability is poorly documented, with only a few reported examples. Here, three polymorphic crystal structures determined for a large-subunit catalase, CAT-3 from Neurospora crassa, are reported. Two of them belonged to new space groups, P1 and P43212, and a third structure belonged to the same space group, P212121, as the previously deposited 2.3 Å resolution structure (PDB entry 3ej6), but had a higher resolution (1.95 Å). Comparisons between these polymorphic structures highlight the conformational stability of tetrameric CAT-3 and reveal a distortion in the tetrameric structure that has not previously been described.

  4. Conformational stability and crystal packing: polymorphism in Neurospora crassa CAT-3

    PubMed Central

    Zárate-Romero, Andrés; Stojanoff, Vivian; Rojas-Trejo, Sonia Patricia; Hansberg, Wilhelm; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphism is frequently observed from different crystallization conditions. In proteins, the effect on conformational variability is poorly documented, with only a few reported examples. Here, three polymorphic crystal structures determined for a large-subunit catalase, CAT-3 from Neurospora crassa, are reported. Two of them belonged to new space groups, P1 and P43212, and a third structure belonged to the same space group, P212121, as the previously deposited 2.3 Å resolution structure (PDB entry 3ej6), but had a higher resolution (1.95 Å). Comparisons between these polymorphic structures highlight the conformational stability of tetrameric CAT-3 and reveal a distortion in the tetrameric structure that has not previously been described. PMID:23832201

  5. A new Leishmania-specific hypothetical protein and its non-described specific B cell conformational epitope applied in the serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Lage, Daniela P; Martins, Vívian T; Duarte, Mariana C; Costa, Lourena E; Garde, Esther; Dimer, Laura M; Kursancew, Amanda C S; Chávez-Fumagalli, Miguel A; de Magalhães-Soares, Danielle F; Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Roatt, Bruno M; Machado-de-Ávila, Ricardo A; Soto, Manuel; Tavares, Carlos A P; Coelho, Eduardo A F

    2016-04-01

    The serodiagnosis of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) presents problems related to its sensitivity and/or specificity. In the present study, a new Leishmania-specific hypothetical protein, LiHyD, was produced as a recombinant protein (rLiHyD) and evaluated in ELISA experiments for the CVL serodiagnosis. LiHyD was characterized as antigenic in a recent immunoproteomic search performed with Leishmania infantum proteins and the sera of dogs developing visceral leishmaniasis (VL). Aiming to compare the efficacy between whole proteins and synthetic peptides, two linear and one conformational B cell epitopes of LiHyD were synthesized and also evaluated as diagnostic markers. The four antigens were recognized by the sera of dogs suffering VL. On the contrary, low reactivity was observed when they were assayed with sera from non-infected healthy dogs living in endemic or non-endemic areas of leishmaniasis. In addition, no reactivity was found against them using sera from dogs experimentally infected by Trypanosoma cruzi, Babesia canis, or Ehrlichia canis, or sera from animals vaccinated with the Leish-Tec® vaccine, a prophylactic preparation commercially available for CVL prevention in Brazil. As comparative diagnostic tools, a recombinant version of the amastigote-specific A2 protein and a soluble crude Leishmania extract were studied. Both antigens presented lower sensitivity and/or specificity values than the LiHyD-based products. The rLiHyD presented better results for the CVL serodiagnosis than its linear epitopes, although the peptide recreating the conformational epitope resulted also appropriate as a diagnostic marker of CVL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing the use of a conformational epitope derived from a Leishmania protein for serodiagnosis of CVL.

  6. Recombinant DNA approach for defining the primary structure of monoclonal antibody epitopes. The analysis of a conformation-specific antibody to myosin light chain 2.

    PubMed

    Reinach, F C; Fischman, D A

    1985-02-05

    A monoclonal antibody (MF5), capable of recognizing a divalent cation-induced conformational change in myosin light chain 2 (LC2f), has been used to screen a cDNA library constructed in the expression vector lambda gt11. A clone has been isolated that contains the whole coding sequence of this myosin subunit. The light chain was synthesized as a fusion peptide linked to beta-galactosidase by ten amino acids encoded in the 5' untranslated region of its mRNA. Seven imperfect repeats were identified in the 3' untranslated region of the mRNA. The amino acids conferring specificity on the MF 5 epitope were established by first determining the nucleotide sequence of shorter subclones that expressed the epitope and then eliminating those amino acid residues shared by cardiac myosin LC2, which was unreactive with this antibody. The epitope, which becomes accessible to MF 5 upon removal of bound divalent cations, resides at the junction between the first alpha-helical domain and the metal binding site. Theoretically, this approach can be used to define the primary structure of most protein epitopes.

  7. Generation of a novel high-affinity monoclonal antibody with conformational recognition epitope on human IgM.

    PubMed

    Sarikhani, Sina; Mirshahi, Manouchehr; Gharaati, Mohammad Reza; Mirshahi, Tooran

    2010-11-01

    As IgM is the first isotype of antibody which appears in blood after initial exposure to a foreign antigen in the pattern of primary response, detection, and quantification of this molecule in blood seems invaluable. To approach these goals, generation, and characterization of a highly specific mAb (monoclonal antibody) against human IgM were investigated. Human IgM immunoglobulins were used to immunize Balb/c mice. Spleen cells taken from the immunized animals were fused with SP2/O myeloma cells using PEG (polyethylene glycol, MW 1450) as fusogen. The hybridomas were cultured in HAT containing medium and supernatants from the growing hybrids were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using plates coated with pure human IgM and the positive wells were then cloned at limiting dilutions. The best clone designated as MAN-1, was injected intraperitoneally to some Pristane-injected mice. Anti-IgM mAb was purified from the animals' ascitic fluid by protein-G sepharose followed by DEAE-cellulose ion exchange chromatography. MAN-1 interacted with human IgM with a very high specificity and affinity. The purity of the sample was tested by SDS-PAGE and the affinity constant was measured (K(a) = 3.5 x 10(9)M(-1). Immunoblotting and competitive ELISA were done and the results showed that the harvested antibody recognizes a conformational epitope on the mu chain of human IgM and there was no cross-reactivity with other subclasses of immunoglobulins. Furthermore, isotyping test was done and the results showed the subclass of the obtained mAb which was IgG(1)kappa.

  8. A novel pre-fusion conformation-specific neutralizing epitope on the respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Jarrod J; Kose, Nurgun; Matta, Pranathi; Gilchuk, Pavlo; Crowe, James E

    2017-01-30

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains a major human pathogen, infecting the majority of infants before age two and causing re-infection throughout life. Despite decades of RSV research, there is no licensed RSV vaccine. Most candidate vaccines studied to date have incorporated the RSV fusion (F) surface glycoprotein, because the sequence of F is highly conserved among strains of RSV. To better define the human B cell response to RSV F, we isolated from a single donor 13 new neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that recognize the RSV F protein in the pre-fusion conformation. Epitope binning studies showed that the majority of neutralizing mAbs targeted a new antigenic site on the globular head domain of F, designated here antigenic site VIII, which occupies an intermediate position between the previously defined major antigenic sites II and site Ø. Antibodies to site VIII competed for binding with antibodies to both of those adjacent neutralizing sites. The new mAbs exhibited unusual breadth for pre-fusion F-specific antibodies, cross-reacting with F proteins from both RSV subgroups A and B viruses. We solved the X-ray crystal structure of one site VIII mAb, hRSV90, in complex with pre-fusion RSV F protein. The structure revealed a large footprint of interaction for hRSV90 on RSV F, in which the heavy chain and light chain both have specific interactions mediating binding to site VIII, the heavy chain overlaps with site Ø, and the light chain interacts partially with site II.

  9. A Conformational Switch in Human Immunodeficiency Virus gp41 Revealed by the Structures of Overlapping Epitopes Recognized by Neutralizing Antibodies ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S.; Brunel, Florence M.; Cardoso, Rosa M.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Dawson, Philip E.; Burton, Dennis R.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-01-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope glycoprotein (gp41) is critical for viral fusion and infectivity and is the target of three of the five known broadly neutralizing HIV type 1 (HIV-1) antibodies, 2F5, Z13, and 4E10. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Fab fragment of Z13e1, an affinity-enhanced variant of monoclonal antibody Z13, in complex with a 12-residue peptide corresponding to the core epitope (W670NWFDITN677) at 1.8-Å resolution. The bound peptide adopts an S-shaped conformation composed of two tandem, perpendicular helical turns. This conformation differs strikingly from the α-helical structure adopted by an overlapping MPER peptide bound to 4E10. Z13e1 binds to an elbow in the MPER at the membrane interface, making relatively few interactions with conserved aromatics (Trp672 and Phe673) that are critical for 4E10 recognition. The comparison of the Z13e1 and 4E10 epitope structures reveals a conformational switch such that neutralization can occur by the recognition of the different conformations and faces of the largely amphipathic MPER. The Z13e1 structure provides significant new insights into the dynamic nature of the MPER, which likely is critical for membrane fusion, and it has significant implications for mechanisms of HIV-1 neutralization by MPER antibodies and for the design of HIV-1 immunogens. PMID:19515770

  10. Identification of a hexapeptide that mimics a conformation-dependent binding site of acetylcholine receptor by use of a phage-epitope library.

    PubMed Central

    Balass, M; Heldman, Y; Cabilly, S; Givol, D; Katchalski-Katzir, E; Fuchs, S

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (mAb) 5.5 is directed against the ligand-binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The epitope for this antibody is conformation-dependent, and the antibody does not react with synthetic peptides derived from the receptor sequence. We have identified a ligand peptide that mimics this conformation-dependent epitope from a phage-epitope library composed of filamentous phage displaying random hexapeptides. Among 38 positive phage clones, individually selected from the library, 34 positive clones carried the sequence Asp-Leu-Val-Trp-Leu-Leu (DLVWLL), 1 positive clone had the sequence Asp-Ile-Val-Trp-Leu-Leu (DIVWLL), and 3 positive clones expressed the sequence Leu-Ile-Glu-Trp-Leu-Leu (LIEWLL), none of which are significantly homologous with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit sequence. All of these phages bind specifically to mAb 5.5. The synthetic peptide DLVWLL inhibits binding of mAb 5.5 to the related peptide-presenting phage and to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in a concentration-dependent manner; the IC50 value is of the order of 10(-4) M. Bioactivity of the peptide "mimotope" DLVWLL was demonstrated in vivo in hatched chickens by inhibition of the mAb 5.5 effect by the peptide. The neuromuscular block and myasthenia gravis-like symptoms that are induced in chicken by passive transfer of mAb 5.5 were specifically abolished by DLVWLL. This study shows the potential of a random peptide phage-epitope library for selecting a mimotope for an antibody that recognizes a folded form of the protein, where peptides from the linear amino acid sequence of the protein are not applicable. Images Fig. 5 PMID:7504273

  11. Structural details of HIV-1 recognition by the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2F5: epitope conformation, antigen-recognition loop mobility, and anion-binding site.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Bryson, Steve; Nieva, Jose L; Pai, Emil F

    2008-12-12

    2F5 is a monoclonal antibody with potent and broadly neutralizing activity against HIV-1. It targets the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the gp41 subunit of the envelope glycoprotein and interferes with the process of fusion between viral and host cell membranes. This study presents eight 2F5 F(ab)' crystal structures in complex with various gp41 peptide epitopes. These structures reveal several key features of this antibody-antigen interaction. (1) Whenever free of contacts caused by crystal artifacts, the extended complementarity-determining region H3 loop is mobile; this is true for ligand-free and epitope-bound forms. (2) The interaction between the antibody and the gp41 ELDKWA epitope core is absolutely critical, and there are also close and specific contacts with residues located N-terminal to the epitope core. (3) Residues located at the C-terminus of the gp41 ELDKWA core do not interact as tightly with the antibody. However, in the presence of a larger peptide containing the gp41 fusion peptide segment, these residues adopt a conformation consistent with the start of an alpha-helix. (4) At high sulfate concentrations, the electron density maps of 2F5 F(ab)'-peptide complexes contain a peak that may mark a binding site for phosphate groups of negatively charged lipid headgroups. The refined atomic-level details of 2F5 paratope-epitope interactions revealed here should contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of 2F5-based virus neutralization, in general, and prove important for the design of potential vaccine candidates intended to elicit 2F5-like antibody production.

  12. Exploring polymorphisms in B-DNA helical conformations

    PubMed Central

    Dans, Pablo D.; Pérez, Alberto; Faustino, Ignacio; Lavery, Richard; Orozco, Modesto

    2012-01-01

    The traditional mesoscopic paradigm represents DNA as a series of base-pair steps whose energy response to equilibrium perturbations is elastic, with harmonic oscillations (defining local stiffness) around a single equilibrium conformation. In addition, base sequence effects are often analysed as a succession of independent XpY base-pair steps (i.e. a nearest-neighbour (NN) model with only 10 unique cases). Unfortunately, recent massive simulations carried out by the ABC consortium suggest that the real picture of DNA flexibility may be much more complex. The paradigm of DNA flexibility therefore needs to be revisited. In this article, we explore in detail one of the most obvious violations of the elastic NN model of flexibility: the bimodal distributions of some helical parameters. We perform here an in-depth statistical analysis of a very large set of MD trajectories and also of experimental structures, which lead to very solid evidence of bimodality. We then suggest ways to improve mesoscopic models to account for this deviation from the elastic regime. PMID:23012264

  13. Using single-strand conformational polymorphism gel electrophoresis to analyze mutually exclusive alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Celotto, Alicia M; Graveley, Brenton R

    2004-01-01

    Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis has been used successfully to identify single nucleotide changes within sequences based on the fact that multidetection enhancement gels will separate molecules based on their conformation rather than their size. We have expanded the utility of this technique to analyze easily the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs containing multiple mutually exclusive exons of the same size. We have used this technique to study the Caenorhabditis elegans let-2 gene containing two alternative exons and the Drosophilia melanogaster Dscam gene, which contains 12 mutually exclusive exons. The ease and the quantitative nature of this technique should be very useful.

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ovine casein genes detected by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ceriotti, G; Chessa, S; Bolla, P; Budelli, E; Bianchi, L; Duranti, E; Caroli, A

    2004-08-01

    Casein genetic polymorphisms are important and well known due to their effects on quantitative traits and technological properties of milk. At the DNA level, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) allows for the simultaneous typing of several alleles at casein loci, as well as the detection of unknown polymorphisms. Here we describe the usefulness of the PCR-SSCP technique for casein typing in sheep. In particular, three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are described at CSN1S1, CSN2, and CSN3, all resulting in amino acid exchanges. At CSN1S1, a transition T-->C was found, resulting in the deduced amino acid exchange Ile186-->Thr186. A transition A-->G resulting in the deduced amino acid exchange Met183-->Val183 was identified at CSN2. The 2 SNP showed a rather high frequency (ranging from 0.12 to 0.26) in 3 Italian breeds (Sarda, Comisana, Sopravissana). Another transition C-->T (Ser104-->Leu104) was found at CSN3 in one heterozygous animal.

  15. Polymorphisms in ten candidate genes are associated with conformational and locomotive traits in Spanish Purebred horses.

    PubMed

    Sevane, Natalia; Dunner, Susana; Boado, Ana; Cañon, Javier

    2017-08-01

    The Spanish Purebred horses, also known as Andalusian horses, compete to the highest standards in international dressage events. Gait and conformation could be used as early selection criteria to detect young horses with promising dressage ability. Although the genetic background of equine size variation has been recently uncovered, the genetic basis of horse conformational and locomotive traits is not known, hampered by the complex genetic architecture underlying quantitative traits and the lack of phenotypic data. The aim of this study was to validate the loci associated with size in 144 Spanish Purebred horses, and to seek novel associations between loci previously associated with the development of osteochondrosis (OC) lesions and 20 conformational and locomotive traits. Ten loci were associated with different conformational and locomotive traits (LCORL/NCAPG, HMGA2, USP31, MECR, COL24A1, MGP, FAM184B, PTH1R, KLF3 and SGK1), and the LCORL/NCAPG association with size in the Spanish Purebred horse was validated. Except for HMGA2, all polymorphisms seem to influence both the prevalence of OC lesions and morphological characters, supporting the link between conformation and OC. Also, the implication of most genes in either immune and inflammatory responses and cellular growth, or ossification processes, reinforces the role that these mechanisms have in the aetiology of OC, as well as their reflection on the general conformation of the individual. These polymorphisms could be used in marker-assisted selection (MAS) programmes to improve desirable conformational traits, but taking into account their possible detrimental effect on OC prevalence.

  16. High resolution single strand conformation polymorphism analysis using formamide and ethidium bromide staining.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, T; Ho, S L; Ma, O C

    1997-01-01

    Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis using ethidium bromide can be improved by adding formamide as the denaturant. This gives higher resolution than previous SSCP methods; it had 100% sensitivity in the discrimination of 14 PCR samples from two different genes, even for a long fragment close to the upper limit of 250 base pairs. This modified procedure is a rapid, simple, safe, and yet highly sensitive method for detecting structural differences in DNA fragments. Images PMID:9497922

  17. [Comparative study of single strand conformation polymorphism of 4.5S RNA gene in enterobacteria].

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Gong, L; Zhang, L; Li, S; Zhu, S

    1994-04-01

    A recently developed technique, non-isotopic single strand conformation polymorphism analysis (PCR-SSCP), was applied to study the conserved feature of 4.5S RNA gene in enterobacteria. The 4.5S RNA gene was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, using the template DNA extracted respectively from five strains of Escherichia coli and three strains of different genera in Enterobacteriaceae, i.e. Proteus vulgaris, Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter aerogenes. The PCR products were then carried out SSCP analysis. The experimental results showed that there seemed to be no detectable differences in the size and single strand conformation of 4.5S RNA genes from above strains, except the negative strand conformation of Enterobacter aerogenes. Thus it can be seen that the secondary structures of 4.5S RNA gene in enterobacteria are quite conservative.

  18. Human Monoclonal Antibodies to a Novel Cluster of Conformational Epitopes on HCV E2 with Resistance to Neutralization Escape in a Genotype 2a Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-yong; Xia, Jinming; Wang, Yong; Wang, Wenyan; Krey, Thomas; Prentoe, Jannick; Carlsen, Thomas; Li, Angela Ying-Jian; Patel, Arvind H.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Bukh, Jens; Rey, Felix A.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of broadly neutralizing antibodies to hepatitis C virus (HCV) are against conformational epitopes on the E2 glycoprotein. Many of them recognize overlapping epitopes in a cluster, designated as antigenic domain B, that contains residues G530 and D535. To gain information on other regions that will be relevant for vaccine design, we employed yeast surface display of antibodies that bound to genotype 1a H77C E2 mutant proteins containing a substitution either at Y632A (to avoid selecting non-neutralizing antibodies) or D535A. A panel of nine human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) was isolated and designated as HC-84-related antibodies. Each HMAb neutralized cell culture infectious HCV (HCVcc) with genotypes 1–6 envelope proteins with varying profiles, and each inhibited E2 binding to the viral receptor CD81. Five of these antibodies neutralized representative genotypes 1–6 HCVcc. Epitope mapping identified a cluster of overlapping epitopes that included nine contact residues in two E2 regions encompassing aa418–446 and aa611–616. Effect on virus entry was measured using H77C HCV retroviral pseudoparticles, HCVpp, bearing an alanine substitution at each of the contact residues. Seven of ten mutant HCVpp showed over 90% reduction compared to wild-type HCVpp and two others showed approximately 80% reduction. Interestingly, four of these antibodies bound to a linear E2 synthetic peptide encompassing aa434–446. This region on E2 has been proposed to elicit non-neutralizing antibodies in humans that interfere with neutralizing antibodies directed at an adjacent E2 region from aa410–425. The isolation of four HC-84 HMAbs binding to the peptide, aa434–446, proves that some antibodies to this region are to highly conserved epitopes mediating broad virus neutralization. Indeed, when HCVcc were passaged in the presence of each of these antibodies, virus escape was not observed. Thus, the cluster of HC-84 epitopes, designated as antigenic domain D, is

  19. Genetic analysis of Trichinella populations by 'cold' single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Robin B; Hu, Min; El-Osta, Youssef Abs; Zarlenga, Dante S; Pozio, Edoardo

    2005-09-05

    A non-isotopic single-strand conformation polymorphism ('cold' SSCP) technique has been assessed for the analysis of sequence variability in the expansion segment 5 (ES5) of domain IV and the D3 domain of nuclear ribosomal DNA within and/or among isolates and individual muscle (first-stage) larvae representing all currently recognized species/genotypes of Trichinella. Data are consistent with the ability of cold SSCP to identify intra-specific as well as inter-specific variability among Trichinella genotypes. The cold SSCP approach should be applicable to a range of other genetic markers for comparative studies of Trichinella populations globally.

  20. Destabilizing polymorphism in cervid prion protein hydrophobic core determines prion conformation and conversion efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hannaoui, Samia; Amidian, Sara; Cheng, Yo Ching; Duque Velásquez, Camilo; Law, Sampson; Telling, Glenn; Stepanova, Maria; McKenzie, Debbie

    2017-01-01

    Prion diseases are infectious neurodegenerative disorders of humans and animals caused by misfolded forms of the cellular prion protein PrPC. Prions cause disease by converting PrPC into aggregation-prone PrPSc. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is the most contagious prion disease with substantial lateral transmission, affecting free-ranging and farmed cervids. Although the PrP primary structure is highly conserved among cervids, the disease phenotype can be modulated by species-specific polymorphisms in the prion protein gene. How the resulting amino-acid substitutions impact PrPC and PrPSc structure and propagation is poorly understood. We investigated the effects of the cervid 116A>G substitution, located in the most conserved PrP domain, on PrPC structure and conversion and on 116AG-prion conformation and infectivity. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed structural de-stabilization of 116G-PrP, which enhanced its in vitro conversion efficiency when used as recombinant PrP substrate in real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC). We demonstrate that 116AG-prions are conformationally less stable, show lower activity as a seed in RT-QuIC and exhibit reduced infectivity in vitro and in vivo. Infectivity of 116AG-prions was significantly enhanced upon secondary passage in mice, yet conformational features were retained. These findings indicate that structurally de-stabilized PrPC is readily convertible by cervid prions of different genetic background and results in a prion conformation adaptable to cervid wild-type PrP. Conformation is an important criterion when assessing transmission barrier, and conformational variants can target a different host range. Therefore, a thorough analysis of CWD isolates and re-assessment of species-barriers is important in order to fully exclude a zoonotic potential of CWD. PMID:28800624

  1. Mapping the anatomy of a Plasmodium falciparum MSP-1 epitope using pseudopeptide-induced mono- and polyclonal antibodies and CD and NMR conformation analysis.

    PubMed

    Lozano, José Manuel; Espejo, Fabiola; Ocampo, Marisol; Salazar, Luz Mary; Tovar, Diana; Barrera, Nubia; Guzmán, Fanny; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin

    2004-10-01

    Antigen structure modulation represents an approach towards designing subunit malaria vaccines. A specific epitope's alpha carbon stereochemistry, as well as its backbone topochemistry, was assessed for obtaining novel malarial immunogens. A variety of MSP-1(38-61) Plasmodium falciparum epitope pseudopeptides derived were synthesised, based on solid-phase pseudopeptide chemistry strategies; these included all-L, all-D, partially-D substituted, all-Psi-[NH-CO]-Retro, all-Psi-[NH-CO]-Retro-inverso, and Psi-[CH2NH] reduced amide surrogates. We demonstrate that specific recombinant MSP-1(34-469) fragment binding to red blood cells (RBCs) is specifically inhibited by non-modified MSP-1(42-61), as well as by its V52-L53, M51-V52 reduced amide surrogates and partial-D substitutions in K48 and E49. In vivo tests revealed that reduced amide pseudopeptide-immunised Aotus monkeys induced neutralising antibodies specifically recognising the MSP-1 N-terminus region. These findings support the role of molecular conformation in malaria vaccine development.

  2. A monoclonal antibody (1B7) specific for polymorphic determinant on mouse I-A antigens recognizes monomorphic epitope shared by most of RT-1 haplotypes in rats.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, K; Ishikawa, N; Mizuno, K; Kojima, H; Natori, T; Ogasawara, K; Ogasawara, M; Fujita, M; Onoé, K

    1986-10-01

    A monoclonal antibody, 1B7, which was established by immunizing C57BL/10 mice with splenocytes from B10.BR, was investigated by serological, immunochemical and functional analyses in mouse, rat, guinea pig and human systems. 1B7 recognized a polymorphic determinant on class II antigens in the mouse system. In the rat system, however, this antibody appeared to recognize a monomorphic epitope shared by all RT-1 haplotypes. 1B7 showed no reactivity in the human and guinea pig strains tested.

  3. Gel-based nonradioactive single-strand conformational polymorphism and mutation detection: limitations and solutions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vibhuti; Arora, Reetakshi; Gochhait, Sailesh; Bairwa, Narendra K; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2014-01-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) for screening mutations/single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a simple, cost-effective technique, saving an expensive exercise of sequencing each and every polymerase chain reaction product and assisting in choosing only the amplicons of interest with expected mutations. The principle of detection of small changes in DNA sequences is based on changes in single-strand DNA conformations. The changes in electrophoretic mobility that SSCP detects are sequence dependent. The limitations faced in SSCP range from routine polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) problems to the problems of resolving mutant DNA bands. Both these problems can be solved by controlling PAGE conditions and by varying physical and environmental conditions such as pH, temperature, voltage, gel type and percentage, addition of additives or denaturants, and others. Despite much upgrading of the technology for mutation detection, SSCP remains the method of choice to analyze mutations and SNPs in order to understand genomic variations, both spontaneous and induced, and the genetic basis of diseases.

  4. Polymorphs and solvatomorphs of azilsartan medoxomil: Elucidation of solvent-induced construction and conformational diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xian-Rui; He, Sai-Fei; Zhang, Shuo; Li, Jing; Li, Shan; Liu, Jin-Song; Zhang, Lei

    2017-02-01

    Two polymorphs (AM-A and AM-B) of azilsartan medoxomil (AM) and four AM solvatomorphs with toluene (AM-TOL), 1,4-dioxane (AM-DIO), chloroform (AM-TCM) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (AM-DMA) have been prepared by the hydrolysis of azilsartan medoxomil potassium in aqueous-organic solutions. In the crystal structures of two polymorphs and three solvatomorphs (AM-TOL, AM-DIO and AM-TCM), two asymmetric AM molecules form the dimeric cycle-like structures via intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯N hydrogen bonds in R22 (26) ring, while AM-DMA shows intramolecular Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond between AM and DMA molecules. The hydrogen bonds (Csbnd H⋯O or Csbnd H⋯N) and π···π (or Csbnd H···π) interactions are helpful to stabilize the conformational diversity of AM. The solvent-induced experiment shows that solvent molecules have great influence on the solvatomorph formation and DIO can form the most steady solvatomorph than other solvents. The thermal study demonstrates that toluene molecules in three solvatomorphs (AM-TOL, AM-DIO and AM-TCM) are the most difficult to remove from the cage. Our results illustrate that the solvent plays significant role in tuning the size of the cage and producing the conformational diversity of AM molecules.

  5. Plant somatic hybrid cytoplasmic DNA characterization by single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Fuster, Oscar; Hernández-Garrido, María; Guerri, José; Navarro, Luis

    2007-06-01

    Unlike maternal inheritance in sexual hybridization, plant somatic hybridization allows transfer, mixing and recombination of cytoplasmic genomes. In addition to the use of somatic hybridization in plant breeding programs, application of this unique tool should lead to a better understanding of the roles played by the chloroplastic and mitochondrial genomes in determining agronomically important traits. The nucleotide sequences of cytoplasmic genomes are much more conserved than those of nuclear genomes. Cytoplasmic DNA composition in somatic hybrids is commonly elucidated either by length polymorphism analysis of restricted genome regions amplified with universal primers (PCR-RF) or by hybridization of total DNA using universal cytoplasmic probes. In this study, we demonstrate that single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis is a powerful, quick and easy alternative method for cytoplasmic DNA characterization of somatic hybrids, especially for mitochondrial DNA. The technique allows detection of polymorphisms based on both size and sequence of amplified targets. Twenty-two species of the subfamily Aurantioideae were analyzed with eight universal primers (four from chloroplastic and four from mitochondrial regions). Differences in chloroplastic DNA composition were scored in 98% of all possible two-parent combinations, and different mitochondrial DNA profiles were found in 87% of them. Analysis by SSCP was also successfully used to characterize somatic hybrids and cybrids obtained by fusion of Citrus sinensis (L.) Osb. and C. excelsa Wester protoplasts.

  6. Quantification and modeling of nanomechanical properties of chlorpropamide α, β, and γ conformational polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Janković, Biljana; Joksimović, Tatjana; Stare, Jernej; Losev, Evgeniy; Zemtsova, Viktoriya; Srčič, Stane; Boldyreva, Elena

    2017-06-10

    The nanomechanical properties of the α-, β-, and γ- conformational polymorphs of chlorpropamide were determined by the dynamic contact module continuous stiffness measurement at nanoindenter. The mechanical anisotropy of the α-polymorph was confirmed by indenting different faces, and its deformational behavior was assigned as ductile. Based on the nanoindentation results, the β and γ forms are moderately hard with plastic flow at contact points. The results revealed a correlation between Young's modulus and inter-planar interaction energy with regard to crystal orientation. Interpretation of the measurements was assisted by two- and three-dimensional periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations, yielding inter-planar energies of polymorphs along the cell vectors and exhibiting a very good match with the experimental observations. The results suggest that the inter-planar interaction energy could serve as a first-order indicator for ranking the mechanical propensity of crystalline active ingredients. The study confirms the practical aspect of using the α- form for preparing chlorpropamide tablets with a direct compression procedure due to its substantial level of ductility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Single strand conformation polymorphism is a sensitive method for screening nucleotide variations in Mycosphaerella graminicola.

    PubMed

    Siah, A; Tisserant, B; El Chartouni, L; Deweer, C; Roisin-Fichter, C; Sanssené, J; Durand, R; Reignault, Ph; Halama, P

    2010-01-01

    Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) and sequencing were performed in order to assess molecular polymorphism of mating type sequences in the heterothallic ascomycete Mycosphaerella graminicola, the causal agent of Septoria tritici blotch of wheat. The screening was undertaken on mat1-1 and mat1-2 partial sequences of 341 and 657 bp, respectively, amplified with multiplex PCR from 510 French single-conidial strains plus the two reference isolates IPO323 and IPO94269 from The Netherlands. After restriction with Taq1 in order to reduce the fragment sizes, all digested amplicons were subjected to SSCP. Sequencing was then performed when a SSCP pattern deviates from the most frequently occurring profile. Among the assessed strains, 228 ones plus IPO323 were MAT1-1 and 282 ones plus IPO94269 were MAT1-2. Among the MAT1-1 strains, only a single one exhibited a SSCP profile distinct to the other MAT1-1 strains, whereas 10 MAT1-2 strains (among which 2 and 4 with same profiles, respectively) showed a SSCP profile differing to the other MAT1-2 strains. Sequencing revealed that all polymorphisms observed on SSCP gels were single nucleotide variations and all strains displaying the same SSCP profiles showed identical nucleotide sequences. Among the seven disclosed nucleotide variations, only two were non-synonymous and both were non-conservative. This study reports a high sensitivity of SSCP allowing detection of single point mutations in M. graminicola, shows a conservation of mating type idiomorphs in the fungus at both sequence and population scales, but also suggests a difference in polymorphism level between the two mating type sequences.

  8. Immunization with a soluble CD4-gp120 complex preferentially induces neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibodies directed to conformation-dependent epitopes of gp120.

    PubMed

    Kang, C Y; Hariharan, K; Nara, P L; Sodroski, J; Moore, J P

    1994-09-01

    Preservation of the conformation of recombinant gp120 in an adjuvant, enabling it to elicit conformation-dependent, epitope-specific, broadly neutralizing antibodies, may be critical for the development of any gp120-based human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine. It was hypothesized that recombinant gp120 complexed with recombinant CD4 could stabilize the conformation-dependent neutralizing epitopes and effectively deliver them to the immune system. Therefore, a soluble CD4-gp120 complex in Syntex adjuvant formulation was tested with mice for its ability to induce neutralizing anti-gp120 antibody responses. Seventeen monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were generated and characterized. Immunochemical studies, neutralization assays, and mapping studies with gp120 mutants indicated that the 17 MAbs fell into three groups. Four of them were directed to what is probably a conformational epitope involving the C1 domain and did not possess virus-neutralizing activities. Another four MAbs bound to V3 peptide 302-321 and exhibited cross-reactive gp120 binding and relatively weak virus-neutralizing activities. These MAbs were very sensitive to amino acid substitutions, not only in the V3 regions but also in the base of the V1/V2 loop, implying a conformational constraint on the epitope. The last group of nine MAbs recognized conformation-dependent epitopes near the CD4 binding site of gp120 and inhibited the gp120-soluble CD4 interaction. Four of these nine MAbs showed broadly neutralizing activities against multiple laboratory-adapted strains of HIV-1, three of them neutralized only HIVIIIB, and the two lower-affinity MAbs did not neutralize any strain tested. Collectively, the results from this study indicate that immunization with the CD4-gp120 complex can elicit antibodies to conformationally sensitive gp120 epitopes, with some of the antibodies having broadly neutralizing activities. We suggest that immunization with CD4-gp120 complexes may be worth evaluating

  9. Inferring epitopes of a polymorphic antigen amidst broadly cross-reactive antibodies using protein microarrays: a study of OspC proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Baum, Elisabeth; Randall, Arlo Z; Zeller, Michael; Barbour, Alan G

    2013-01-01

    Epitope mapping studies aim to identify the binding sites of antibody-antigen interactions to enhance the development of vaccines, diagnostics and immunotherapeutic compounds. However, mapping is a laborious process employing time- and resource-consuming 'wet bench' techniques or epitope prediction software that are still in their infancy. For polymorphic antigens, another challenge is characterizing cross-reactivity between epitopes, teasing out distinctions between broadly cross-reactive responses, limited cross-reactions among variants and the truly type-specific responses. A refined understanding of cross-reactive antibody binding could guide the selection of the most informative subsets of variants for diagnostics and multivalent subunit vaccines. We explored the antibody binding reactivity of sera from human patients and Peromyscus leucopus rodents infected with Borrelia burgdorferi to the polymorphic outer surface protein C (OspC), an attractive candidate antigen for vaccine and improved diagnostics for Lyme disease. We constructed a protein microarray displaying 23 natural variants of OspC and quantified the degree of cross-reactive antibody binding between all pairs of variants, using Pearson correlation calculated on the reactivity values using three independent transforms of the raw data: (1) logarithmic, (2) rank, and (3) binary indicators. We observed that the global amino acid sequence identity between OspC pairs was a poor predictor of cross-reactive antibody binding. Then we asked if specific regions of the protein would better explain the observed cross-reactive binding and performed in silico screening of the linear sequence and 3-dimensional structure of OspC. This analysis pointed to residues 179 through 188 the fifth C-terminal helix of the structure as a major determinant of type-specific cross-reactive antibody binding. We developed bioinformatics methods to systematically analyze the relationship between local sequence/structure variation

  10. Speciation of human microsporidia by polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Fedorko, D P; Nelson, N A; Didier, E S; Bertucci, D; Delgado, R M; Hruszkewycz, A M

    2001-10-01

    We describe the application of single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis to the speciation of human microsporidia after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification with the panmicrosporidian primers PMP1 and PMP2. We compared the DNA extracted and amplified from different genotypes or isolates of Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, E. hellem, and E. intestinalis plus an isolate of Vittaforma corneae. The PCR-SSCP, when performed at 20 degrees C, generated 2 bands in distinctive, reproducible patterns in polyacrylamide gels for each species of microsporidia tested, regardless of genotype or isolate. We found PCR-SSCP to be an easy and reproducible method for speciation of human microsporidia when the primer pair PMP1 and PMP2 is used.

  11. Single-strand conformation polymorphism for molecular variability studies of six viroid species.

    PubMed

    Elleuch, Amine; Hamdi, Imen; Bessaies, Nabiha; Fakhfakh, Hatem

    2013-01-01

    Molecular diversity within six viroid species and different molecular variants, in each species infecting fruit trees was first estimated by the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique and then by direct sequencing analysis. The different variants studied are to three Australian grapevine viroids(AGVd), four citrus dwarfing viroids (CDVd), eleven grapevine yellow speckle viroids type-1 (GYSVd-1), four hop stunt viroids (HSVd), seven peach latent mosaic viroids (PLMVd), and eight pear blister canker viroids (PBCVd). Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) conditions were compared and optimized to improve the sensitivity of the existing SSCP parameters. The relationships among the various SSCP profiles observed and the variation in nucleotide sequences was studied. The results indicate that the variations of some parameters of electrophoresis for each species allowed higher resolution and hence detection of single nucleotide variations among clones initially clustered into the same group.

  12. Single-strand conformation polymorphism of microsatellite for rapid strain typing of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Bai, Feng-Yan

    2007-11-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) of Candida albicans' microsatellite CAI were characterized. Among the 76 clinical isolates recovered from different patients (independent strains), 60 distinct CAI SSCP patterns were recognized, resulting in a discriminatory power of 0.993. The multiple isolates recovered sequentially from the same or different body locations of the same patient showed exactly the same CAI SSCP pattern. The reliability of the SSCP analysis was confirmed by GeneScan and sequence analyses. From the same set of independent strains, 59 distinct CAI genotypes were identified by GeneScan analysis. Sequence comparison showed the advantage of SSCP over GeneSan analysis in the detection of point mutations in the microsatellite. The results indicated that PCR SSCP analysis of CAI microsatellite is a powerful and economical approach for rapid strain typing of C. albicans in clinical laboratories, especially in the detection of microevolutionary changes in microsatellites and in large-scale epidemiological investigation.

  13. Analysis of population structures of viral isolates using single-strand conformation polymorphism method.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, Agnès; Rolland, Mathieu; Jacquot, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of viral populations requires the use of techniques that describe characteristics of individuals. The single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) makes possible the identification of genetic differences between viral sequences and constitutes an alternative to the expensive and time-consuming cloning and sequencing strategies. Applied to small genomic regions (from 100 to 500 bases in length), SSCP patterns could describe, under appropriate experimental conditions, single nucleotide variations in the studied sequence. The different steps of a complete SSCP procedure, from sampling to pattern analysis (including nucleic acid extraction, RT-PCR amplification, double-stranded DNA quantification, polyacrylamide gel preparation, electrophoresis conditions, and staining procedures), are described using a region (500 bases) of the barley yellow dwarfvirus-PAV (BYDV-PAV, Luteovirus) genome as molecular target.

  14. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis using capillary array electrophoresis for large-scale mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Lars Allan; Jespersgaard, Cathrine; Andersen, Paal Skytt

    2007-01-01

    This protocol describes capillary array electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (CAE-SSCP), a screening method for detection of unknown and previously identified mutations. The method detects 98% of mutations in a sample material and can be applied to any organism where the goal is to determine genetic variation. This protocol describes how to screen for mutations in 192 singleplex or up to 768 multiplex samples over 3 days. The protocol is based on the principle of sequence-specific mobility of single-stranded DNA in a native polymer, and covers all stages in the procedure, from initial DNA purification to final CAE-SSCP data analysis, as follows: DNA is purified, followed by PCR amplification using fluorescent primers. After PCR amplification, double-stranded DNA is heat-denatured to separate the strands and subsequently cooled on ice to avoid reannealing. Finally, samples are analyzed by capillary electrophoresis and appropriate analysis software.

  15. Conformational polymorphs and solid-state polymerization of 9-(1,3-butadiynyl)carbazole derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabata, Hideyuki; Kuwamoto, Kazunori; Okuno, Tsunehisa

    2016-02-01

    The novel diacetylenes, 9-(5-(4-nitrophenoxy)penta-1,3-diyn-1-yl)-9H-carbazole (1) and 4-((5-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)penta-2,4-diyn-1-yl)oxy)benzonitrile (2), were prepared and characterized by crystallographic analyses. Compound 1 gave two conformational polymorphs, 1-(I) and 1-(II), whose differences were concluded to originate in intermolecular interactions among nitrophenyl groups. Crystal 1-(I) and 2 had suitable molecular arrangements for solid-state polymerization and polymerized by thermal annealing to give crystalline polydiacetylenes (PDAs). While an arrangement of 1-(II) was unsuitable for the polymerization. The PDAs showed broad absorption from UV to near IR region (ca. 900 nm), suggesting effective expansion of π-conjugated system by carbazolyl groups.

  16. Self-assembled monolayers of shape-persistent macrocycles on graphite: interior design and conformational polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Vollmeyer, Joscha; Eberhagen, Friederike; Höger, Sigurd

    2014-01-01

    Summary Three shape-persistent naphthylene–phenylene–acetylene macrocycles of identical backbone structures and extraannular substitution patterns but different (empty, apolar, polar) nanopore fillings are self-assembled at the solid/liquid interface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene. Submolecularly resolved images of the resulting two-dimensional (2D) crystalline monolayer patterns are obtained by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy. A concentration-dependent conformational polymorphism is found, and open and more dense packing motifs are observed. For all three compounds alike lattice parameters are found, therefore the intermolecular macrocycle distances are mainly determined by their size and symmetry. This is an excellent example that the graphite acts as a template for the macrocycle organization independent from their specific interior. PMID:25550743

  17. Self-assembled monolayers of shape-persistent macrocycles on graphite: interior design and conformational polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Vollmeyer, Joscha; Eberhagen, Friederike; Höger, Sigurd; Jester, Stefan-S

    2014-01-01

    Three shape-persistent naphthylene-phenylene-acetylene macrocycles of identical backbone structures and extraannular substitution patterns but different (empty, apolar, polar) nanopore fillings are self-assembled at the solid/liquid interface of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene. Submolecularly resolved images of the resulting two-dimensional (2D) crystalline monolayer patterns are obtained by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy. A concentration-dependent conformational polymorphism is found, and open and more dense packing motifs are observed. For all three compounds alike lattice parameters are found, therefore the intermolecular macrocycle distances are mainly determined by their size and symmetry. This is an excellent example that the graphite acts as a template for the macrocycle organization independent from their specific interior.

  18. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of HLA-DRB1*1101-06.

    PubMed

    Mora, B; Petronzelli, F; Grillo, R; Ferrante, P; Mazzilli, M C

    1996-10-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) has been developed as a method for detecting the presence of mutations in a segment of DNA. We applied it to the subtyping of the DR11 group of alleles. The SSCP patterns of DRB1-DR52 group-specific products were defined in cell lines representing the DRB1*1101-06 alleles, using non-denaturing acrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. Only one set of gel electrophoresis conditions was able to discriminate the DR11 alleles tested. The protocol was validated in an analysis of 105 DR11-positive individuals previously typed by oligonucleotides probing. The study demonstrates the suitability of the SSCP technique to define the DRB1*1101-06 alleles, the technique being particularly valuable in confirming and extending the oligotyping of DRB1-DR52 heterozygous samples.

  19. Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphisms as a Method to Differentiate Algal Species.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, Alice; Hestekin, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformational polymorphism (CE-SSCP) was explored as a fast and inexpensive method to differentiate both prokaryotic (blue-green) and eukaryotic (green and brown) algae. A selection of two blue-green algae (Nostoc muscorum and Anabaena inaequalis), five green algae (Chlorella vulgaris, Oedogonium foveolatum, Mougeotia sp., Scenedesmus quadricauda, and Ulothrix fimbriata), and one brown algae (Ectocarpus sp.) were examined and CE-SSCP electropherogram "fingerprints" were compared to each other for two variable regions of either the 16S or 18S rDNA gene. The electropherogram patterns were remarkably stable and consistent for each particular species. The patterns were unique to each species, although some common features were observed between the different types of algae. CE-SSCP could be a useful method for monitoring changes in an algae species over time as potential shifts in species occurred.

  20. Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphisms as a Method to Differentiate Algal Species

    PubMed Central

    Jernigan, Alice; Hestekin, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformational polymorphism (CE-SSCP) was explored as a fast and inexpensive method to differentiate both prokaryotic (blue-green) and eukaryotic (green and brown) algae. A selection of two blue-green algae (Nostoc muscorum and Anabaena inaequalis), five green algae (Chlorella vulgaris, Oedogonium foveolatum, Mougeotia sp., Scenedesmus quadricauda, and Ulothrix fimbriata), and one brown algae (Ectocarpus sp.) were examined and CE-SSCP electropherogram “fingerprints” were compared to each other for two variable regions of either the 16S or 18S rDNA gene. The electropherogram patterns were remarkably stable and consistent for each particular species. The patterns were unique to each species, although some common features were observed between the different types of algae. CE-SSCP could be a useful method for monitoring changes in an algae species over time as potential shifts in species occurred. PMID:26101693

  1. Monoclonal antibodies to the West Nile virus NS5 protein map to linear and conformational epitopes in the methyltransferase and polymerase domains.

    PubMed

    Hall, Roy A; Tan, Si En; Selisko, Barbara; Slade, Rachael; Hobson-Peters, Jody; Canard, Bruno; Hughes, Megan; Leung, Jason Y; Balmori-Melian, Ezequiel; Hall-Mendelin, Sonja; Pham, Kim B; Clark, David C; Prow, Natalie A; Khromykh, Alexander A

    2009-12-01

    The West Nile virus (WNV) NS5 protein contains a methyltransferase (MTase) domain involved in RNA capping and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domain essential for virus replication. Crystal structures of individual WNV MTase and RdRp domains have been solved; however, the structure of full-length NS5 has not been determined. To gain more insight into the structure of NS5 and interactions between the MTase and RdRp domains, we generated a panel of seven monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to the NS5 protein of WNV (Kunjin strain) and mapped their binding sites using a series of truncated NS5 proteins and synthetic peptides. Binding sites of four mAbs (5D4, 4B6, 5C11 and 6A10) were mapped to residues 354-389 in the fingers subdomain of the RdRp. This is consistent with the ability of these mAbs to inhibit RdRp activity in vitro and suggests that this region represents a potential target for RdRp inhibitors. Using a series of synthetic peptides, we also identified a linear epitope (bound by mAb 5H1) that mapped to a 13 aa stretch surrounding residues 47 and 49 in the MTase domain, a region predicted to interact with the palm subdomain of the RdRp. The failure of one mAb (7G6) to bind both N- and C-terminally truncated NS5 recombinants indicates that the antibody recognizes a conformational epitope that requires the presence of residues in both the MTase and RdRp domains. These data support a structural model of the full-length NS5 molecule that predicts a physical interaction between the MTase and the RdRp domains.

  2. Characterization of desmoglein-3 epitope region peptides as synthetic antigens: analysis of their in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy, cytotoxicity, stability, and their conformational features.

    PubMed

    Szabados, Hajnalka; Uray, Katalin; Majer, Zsuzsa; Silló, Pálma; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Hudecz, Ferenc; Bősze, Szilvia

    2015-09-01

    Desmoglein-3 (Dsg3) adhesion protein is the main target of autoantibodies and autoreactive T cells in Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) autoimmune skin disorder. Several mapping studies of Dsg3 T cell epitope regions were performed, and based on those data, we designed and synthesized four peptide series corresponding to Dsg3 T cell epitope regions. Each peptide series consists of a 17mer full-length peptide (Dsg3/189-205, Dsg3/206-222, Dsg3/342-358, and Dsg3/761-777) and its N-terminally truncated derivatives, resulting in 15 peptides altogether. The peptides were prepared on solid phase and were chemically characterized. In order to establish a structure-activity relationship, the solution conformation of the synthetic peptides has been investigated using electronic circular dichroism spectroscopy. The in vitro T cell stimulating efficacy of the peptides has been determined on peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from whole blood of PV patients and also from healthy donors. After 20 h of stimulation, the interferon (IFN)-γ content of the supernatants was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the in vitro conditions, peptides were stable and non-cytotoxic. The in vitro IFN-γ production profile of healthy donors and PV patients, induced by peptides as synthetic antigens, was markedly different. The most unambiguous differences were observed after stimulation with 17mer peptide Dsg3/342-358, and three truncated derivatives from two other peptide series, namely, peptides Dsg3/192-205, Dsg3/763-777, and Dsg3/764-777. Comparative analysis of in vitro activity and the capability of oligopeptides to form ordered or unordered secondary structure showed that peptides bearing high solvent sensibility and backbone flexibility were the most capable to distinguish between healthy and PV donors.

  3. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of ribosomal DNA for detection of Phytophthora ramorum directly from plant tissues

    Treesearch

    Ping Kong; Patricia A. Richardson; Chuanxue Hong; Thomas L. Kubisiak

    2006-01-01

    At the first Sudden Oak Death Science Symposium, we reported on the use of a single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis for rapid identification of Phytophthora ramorum in culture. We have since assessed and improved the fingerprinting technique for detecting this pathogen directly from plant tissues. The improved SSCP protocol uses a...

  4. Chemical design enables the control of conformational polymorphism in functional 2,3-thieno(bis)imide-ended materials.

    PubMed

    Maini, Lucia; Gallino, Federico; Zambianchi, Massimo; Durso, Margherita; Gazzano, Massimo; Rubini, Katia; Gentili, Denis; Manet, Ilse; Muccini, Michele; Toffanin, Stefano; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Melucci, Manuela

    2015-02-07

    We report a successful chemical design strategy based on the even-odd alkyl end tailoring, which allows us to promote and control conformational polymorphism in single crystal and thin deposits of thienoimide-based molecular semiconductors (Cx-NT4N).

  5. Profiling the diversity of microbial communities with single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP).

    PubMed

    Schmalenberger, Achim; Tebbe, Christoph C

    2014-01-01

    Genetic fingerprinting techniques for microbial community analysis have evolved over the last decade into standard applications for efficient and fast differentiation of microbial communities based on their diversity. These techniques commonly analyze the diversity of PCR products amplified from extracted environmental DNA usually utilizing primers hybridizing to suspected conserved regions of the targeted genes. In comparison to the more commonly applied terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) or denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) techniques, the here-described single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) fingerprinting technique features some advantageous key characteristics. (1) Primers for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) do only need minimal 5'-end alterations; (2) SSCP is adaptable to high throughput applications in automated sequencers; and (3) a second dimension in the SSCP gel electrophoresis can be implemented to obtain high resolution 2D gels. One central key requirement for SSCP gel electrophoresis is a tight temperature control. Gels that run at different temperatures will produce entirely different fingerprints. This can be exploited for an improved analysis of highly diverse communities by running the same template at different temperatures or by 2D-SSCP gel electrophoresis.

  6. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) for the analysis of genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Robin B; Hu, Min; Chilton, Neil B; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Jex, Aaron J; Otranto, Domenico; Cafarchia, Claudia; Beveridge, Ian; Zhu, Xingquan

    2006-01-01

    The accurate analysis of genetic variation has major implications in many areas of biomedical research, including the identification of infectious agents (such as parasites), the diagnosis of infections, and the detection of unknown or known disease-causing mutations. Mutation scanning methods, including PCR-coupled single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), have significant advantages over many other nucleic acid techniques for the accurate analysis of allelic and mutational sequence variation. The present protocol describes the SSCP method of analysis, including all steps from the small-scale isolation of genomic DNA and PCR amplification of target sequences, through to the gel-based separation of amplicons and scanning for mutations by SSCP (either by the analysis of radiolabeled amplicons in mutation detection enhancement (MDE) gels or by non-isotopic SSCP using precast GMA gels). The subsequent sequence analysis of polymorphic bands isolated from gels is also detailed. The SSCP protocol can readily detect point mutations for amplicon sizes of up to 450-500 bp, and usually takes 1-2 days to carry out. This user-friendly, low-cost, potentially high-throughput platform has demonstrated the utility to study a wide range of pathogens and diseases, and has the potential to be applied to any gene of any organism.

  7. Identification and differentiation of Cryptosporidium species by capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Power, Michelle L; Holley, Marita; Ryan, Una M; Worden, Paul; Gillings, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Cryptosporidium species generally lack distinguishing morphological traits, and consequently, molecular methods are commonly used for parasite identification. Various methods for Cryptosporidium identification have been proposed, each with their advantages and disadvantages. In this study, we show that capillary electrophoresis coupled with single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) is a rapid, simple and cost-effective method for the identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. Species could be readily differentiated based on the SSCP mobility of amplified 18S rRNA gene molecules. Clones that differed by single-nucleotide polymorphisms could be distinguished on CE-SSCP mobility. Profiles of species known to have heterogenic copies of 18S rRNA gene contained multiple peaks. Cloning and sequencing of Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, Cryptosporidium fayeri and Cryptosporidium possum genotype 18S rRNA gene amplicons confirmed that these multiple peaks represented type A and type B 18S rRNA gene copies. CE-SSCP provides a reliable and sensitive analysis for epidemiological studies, environmental detection and diversity screening.

  8. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of genetic variation in Labiostrongylus longispicularis from kangaroos.

    PubMed

    Huby-Chilton, F; Beveridge, I; Gasser, R B; Chilton, N B

    2001-06-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was employed to screen for sequence heterogeneity in the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of ribosomal (r) DNA of Labiostrongylus longispicularis, a parasitic strongylid nematode occuring in some species of kangaroo in different geographical regions of Australia. The results showed that most of the nematodes screened had different SSCP profiles, which were subsequently shown to correspond to polymorphisms and/or an indel in the ITS-2 sequence. These variable sites related mainly to unpaired regions of the predicted secondary structure of the precursor rRNA molecule. SSCP profiles could be used to distinguish L. longispicularis in Macropus robustus robustus (New South Wales) from L. longispicularis in Macropus robustus erubescens and Macropus rufus (South Australia). This difference corresponded to a transversional change in the ITS-2 sequence at alignment position 82. The study demonstrated clearly the effectiveness of SSCP analysis for future large-scale population genetic studies of L. longispicularis in order to test the hypothesis that L. longispicularis from different geographical regions represents multiple sibling species.

  9. Molecular identification of Amazonian stingless bees using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Souza, M T; Carvalho-Zilse, G A

    2014-07-25

    In countries containing a mega diversity of wildlife, such as Brazil, identifying and characterizing biological diversity is a continuous process for the scientific community, even in face of technological and scientific advances. This activity demands initiatives for the taxonomic identification of highly diverse groups, such as stingless bees, including molecular analysis strategies. This type of bee is distributed in all of the Brazilian states, with the highest species diversity being found in the State of Amazônia. However, the estimated number of species diverges among taxonomists. These bees are considered the main pollinators in the Amazon rainforest, in which they obtain food and shelter; however, their persistence is constantly threatened by deforestation pressure. Hence, it is important to classify the number and abundance of bee specie, to measure their decline and implement meaningful, priority conservation strategies. This study aims to maximize the implementation of more direct, economic and successful techniques for the taxonomic identification of stingless bees. Specifically, the genes 16S rRNA and COI from mitochondrial DNA were used as molecular markers to differentiate 9 species of Amazonian stingless bees based on DNA polymorphism, using the polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism technique. We registered different, exclusive SSCP haplotypes for both genes in all species analyzed. These results demonstrate that SSCP is a simple and cost-effective technique that is applicable to the molecular identification of stingless bee species.

  10. Rapid discrimination of Salmonella isolates by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Adhami, Batol H; Huby-Chilton, Florence; Blais, Burton W; Martinez-Perez, Amalia; Chilton, Neil B; Gajadhar, Alvin A

    2008-10-01

    A molecular typing technique was developed for the differentiation of Salmonella isolates based on single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of amplicons generated by PCR. Amplicons from parts of the fimA (both the 5' and 3' ends), mdh, invA, and atpD genes were generated separately from a panel of Salmonella strains representing Salmonella bongori, and four subspecies and 17 serovars of Salmonella enterica. These amplicons were subjected to SSCP analysis for differentiation of the salmonellae on the basis of different conformational forms arising due to nucleotide sequence variations in the target genes. Several distinct SSCP banding patterns (a maximum of 14 each for atpD and fimA 3' end) were observed with this panel of Salmonella strains for amplicons generated from each target gene. The best discrimination of Salmonella subspecies and serovar was achieved from the SSCP analysis of a combination of at least three gene targets: atpD, invA, and either mdh or fimA 3' end. This demonstrates the applicability of SSCP analysis as an important additional method to classical typing approaches for the differentiation of foodborne Salmonella isolates. SSCP is simple to perform and should be readily transferable to food microbiology laboratories with basic PCR capability.

  11. Polymorphisms at Amino Acid Residues 141 and 154 Influence Conformational Variation in Ovine PrP

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sujeong; Thackray, Alana M.; Hopkins, Lee; Monie, Tom P.; Burke, David F.; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphisms in ovine PrP at amino acid residues 141 and 154 are associated with susceptibility to ovine prion disease: Leu141Arg154 with classical scrapie and Phe141Arg154 and Leu141His154 with atypical scrapie. Classical scrapie is naturally transmissible between sheep, whereas this may not be the case with atypical scrapie. Critical amino acid residues will determine the range or stability of structural changes within the ovine prion protein or its functional interaction with potential cofactors, during conversion of PrPC to PrPSc in these different forms of scrapie disease. Here we computationally identified that regions of ovine PrP, including those near amino acid residues 141 and 154, displayed more conservation than expected based on local structural environment. Molecular dynamics simulations showed these conserved regions of ovine PrP displayed genotypic differences in conformational repertoire and amino acid side-chain interactions. Significantly, Leu141Arg154 PrP adopted an extended beta sheet arrangement in the N-terminal palindromic region more frequently than the Phe141Arg154 and Leu141His154 variants. We supported these computational observations experimentally using circular dichroism spectroscopy and immunobiochemical studies on ovine recombinant PrP. Collectively, our observations show amino acid residues 141 and 154 influence secondary structure and conformational change in ovine PrP that may correlate with different forms of scrapie. PMID:25126555

  12. Autoantibodies to IA-2 and IA-2 beta in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus recognize conformational epitopes: location of the 37- and 40-kDa fragments determined.

    PubMed

    Xie, H; Zhang, B; Matsumoto, Y; Li, Q; Notkins, A L; Lan, M S

    1997-10-01

    IA-2 and IA-2 beta are major autoantigens in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and the precursors, respectively, of a 40-and 37-kDa tryptic fragment that reacts with IDDM sera. In the present study, by amino acid sequencing of recombinant IA-2 and IA-2 beta, we determined the tryptic cleavage sites involved in the generation of these fragments. Both cleavage sites are immediately after an arginine residue at position 653 for IA-2 and position 679 for IA-2 beta. The resulting tryptic fragments are 326 and 307 amino acids in length and retain their ability to react with IDDM sera. In contrast to IA-2 and IA-2 beta, other members of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family (i.e., RPTP kappa, RPTPmu, NU-3, SHP, and 3CH134) are completely susceptible to digestion by trypsin. Sequence analysis revealed five conserved cysteine residues in IA-2 and IA-2 beta that are not present in other PTPs. Reduction and alkylation of IA-2 and IA-2 beta recombinant proteins resulted in loss of both resistance to digestion by trypsin and reactivity with autoantibodies in IDDM sera. It is concluded that disulfide bond formation plays a critical role in the maintenance of antigenic structure and that the autoantibodies to IA-2/IA-2 beta in IDDM sera recognize conformational epitopes.

  13. Pit-1 gene polymorphism, milk yield, and conformation traits for Italian Holstein-Friesian bulls.

    PubMed

    Renaville, R; Gengler, N; Vrech, E; Prandi, A; Massart, S; Corradini, C; Bertozzi, C; Mortiaux, F; Burny, A; Portetelle, D

    1997-12-01

    The growth hormone factor-1/pituitary-specific transcription factor Pit-1 is responsible for the expression of growth hormone in mammals. Mutations in Pit-1 have been found in growth hormone disorders of mice and humans. We studied the eventual association between Pit-1 polymorphism using the HinfI enzyme and the milk yield and conformation traits of 89 Italian Holstein-Friesian bulls. A strategy employing polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify a 451-bp fragment from semen DNA. Digestion of polymerase chain reaction products with HinfI revealed two alleles: allele A was not digested (451-bp fragment), and allele B was cut at one restriction site, generating two fragments of 244 and 207 bp. Three patterns were observed; frequencies were 2.2, 31.5, and 66.3% for AA, AB, and BB, respectively. Fixed and mixed linear models were fitted on daughter yield deviations for milk yields and on deregressed proofs for conformation traits. Predictions were weighted using the inverse of the estimated variance of records. The models used contained mean and gene substitution effects for Pit-1 A allele as fixed effects and random sire effect for the mixed model. The A allele was found to be superior for milk and protein yields, inferior for fat percentage, and superior for body depth, angularity, and rear leg set, which is difficult to explain. A canonical transformation revealed that Pit-1 had three actions, one linked to milk yield traits and angularity, a second linked to body depth and rear leg set, and a third linked to lower fat yields and to higher angularity.

  14. Molecular typing of isolates of the fish pathogen, Flavobacterium columnare, by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Olivares-Fuster, Oscar; Shoemaker, Craig A; Klesius, Phillip H; Arias, Covadonga R

    2007-04-01

    Flavobacterium columnare intraspecies diversity was revealed by analyzing the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S internal spacer region (ISR). Standard restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of these sequences was compared with single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Diversity indexes showed that both 16S-SSCP and ISR-SSCP improved resolution (D>or=0.9) when compared with standard RFLP. ISR-SSCP offered a simpler banding pattern than 16S-SSCP while providing high discrimination between isolates. SSCP analysis of rRNA genes proved to be a simple, rapid, and cost-effective method for routine fingerprinting of F. columnare.

  15. Significance of the immune response to a major, conformational B-cell epitope on the hepatitis C virus NS3 region defined by a human monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Mondelli, M U; Cerino, A; Boender, P; Oudshoorn, P; Middeldorp, J; Fipaldini, C; La Monica, N; Habets, W

    1994-01-01

    The nonstructural protein NS3 of hepatitis C virus (HCV) possesses two enzymatic domains which are thought to be essential for the virus life cycle: an N-terminal serine-type proteinase, responsible for the processing of nonstructural polypeptides, and a C-terminal nucleoside triphosphatase/helicase, presumably involved in the unwinding of the viral genome. The human antibody response to NS3 usually appears early in the course of HCV infection and is predominantly directed against the carboxyl-terminal portion; however, its fine specificity and clinical significance are largely unknown. We have generated a human monoclonal antibody (hMAb), designated CM3.B6, from a cloned B-cell line obtained from the peripheral blood of a patient with chronic HCV infection, which selectively recognized the purified NS3 protein expressed in bacteria or in eukaryotic cells transfected with full-length or NS3 cDNA. Fine-specificity studies revealed that CM3.B6 recognized a 92-amino-acid sequence (clone 8, amino acids 1363 to 1454) selected from an NS3 DNase fragment library but failed to bind to 12-mer peptides synthesized from the same region, suggesting recognition of a conformational B-cell epitope. Experiments using deletion mutants of clone 8 and competitive inhibition studies using a panel of NS3 peptide-specific murine MAbs indicated that limited N-terminal and C-terminal deletions resulted in a significant reduction of hMAb binding to clone 8, thus identifying a minimal antibody binding domain within clone 8. Competition experiments showed that binding of CM3.B6 to the NS3 protein was efficiently inhibited by 39 of 44 (89%) sera from HCV-infected patients, suggesting that the hMAb recognized an immunodominant epitope within the NS3 region. More importantly, recognition of the sequence defined by CM3.B6 appeared to accurately discriminate between viremic and nonviremic anti-HCV positive sera, suggesting potentially relevant clinical applications in the diagnosis and treatment

  16. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for the study of adenoviral diversity in urban rivers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Kim, Sang-Jong

    2010-05-01

    The diversity of human adenoviruses (AdVs) in river waters was studied by single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Water samples were collected between 2002 and 2003 from 4 rivers in the Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. Forty-six (79.3%) of the 58 samples were positive for AdVs as determined on PCR amplification. Nine different SSCP profiles (profiles A to I) were detected in all the AdVs-positive samples by SSCP analysis, and most of the AdVs-positive samples (38 of 46 samples; 82.6%) showed the SSCP profile D. Nine different sequences were obtained in the SSCP profiles; sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis identified 5 different sequences that were closely related to the human AdV type 41, and the 4 different sequences that were closely related to human AdV types 3, 4, 12, and 40. Two AdVs genomic variants were detected (types 3 and 41 in A, types 12 and 41 in B, and 2 genomic variants of type 41 in C) in SSCP profiles A, B, and C, respectively. SSCP analysis could be a useful technique for the identification of genetic variants of AdVs and for studying AdVs diversity in urban rivers.

  17. AFLP and single-strand conformation polymorphism studies of recombination in the entomopathogenic fungus Nomuraea rileyi.

    PubMed

    Devi, Uma K; Reineke, Annette; Rao, Uma C Maheswara; Reddy, Nageswara Rao N; Khan, Akbar P Ali

    2007-06-01

    In most putative asexual fungi analysed through population genetic studies, recombination has been detected. However, the mechanism by which it is achieved is still not known. A parasexual cycle is known to occur in asexual fungi but there is no evidence, as yet, of its prevalence in natural populations. This study was undertaken to investigate the possibility of a parasexual cycle mediating recombination in the mitosporic fungus Nomuraea rileyi. The genotypic diversity in isolates sampled from an epizootic population from South India was studied through AFLP. The AFLP data were subjected to analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and cluster analysis. Great genetic variation was observed in the population including the isolates from a single insect. To assess the occurrence of recombination in the population, single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) of partial regions of two mitochondrial (mt) genes (rRNA genes of LSU and SSU) and a nuclear gene (beta tubulin) was performed. The SSCP data were analysed using MP, the tree length permutation test, and multilocus analysis. Recombination was inferred from the SSCP analysis. The occurrence of isolates with diverse genotypes in a single insect; the fact that fungi multiply as hyphal bodies (cell wall-less) in the insect haemolymph; and the inference of recombination in mitochondrial genes (suggesting cytomixis), all indicate that recombination is accomplished by fusion of hyphal bodies of different isolates infecting the insect.

  18. Screening for haplotypic variability within Oesophagostomum bifurcum (Nematoda) employing a single-strand conformation polymorphism approach.

    PubMed

    de Gruijter, J M; Polderman, A M; Zhu, X Q; Gasser, R B

    2002-06-01

    Genetic markers in the mitochondrial genome have proven useful for population genetic studies because of their maternal inheritance and relatively high evolutionary rates. In this study, we exploited the high resolution capacity of PCR-coupled single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) to screen for sequence variation in part of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (p cox 1) among individuals of the parasitic nematode, Oesophagostomum bifurcum from human or Mona monkey hosts from Africa. SSCP analysis revealed distinct profiles among some of the individuals, and subsequent sequence analysis of representative samples defined 10 different haplotypes. For comparative purposes, the p cox 1 sequences for representatives of four other species of Oesophagostomum from livestock were included. While there were high levels (11.5-13.7%) of sequence difference among the latter species, there was no fixed nucleotide difference between O. bifurcum individuals from humans and those from monkeys. The data support the proposal that O. bifurcum from the two primate hosts represents a single species and that the haplotypic variability in p cox 1 represents population variation. The results reinforce the usefulness of the SSCP-sequencing approach for studying genetic variation in nematode populations using mitochondrial markers.

  19. Population analyses of Amblyomma maculatum ticks and Rickettsia parkeri using single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Flavia A G; Goddard, Jerome; Caprio, Michael; Paddock, Christopher D; Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; Varela-Stokes, Andrea S

    2013-09-01

    Gulf Coast ticks, Amblyomma maculatum, and the zoonotic agents they transmit, Rickettsia parkeri, are expanding into areas in the United States where they were not previously reported, and are emerging threats for public and veterinary health. The dynamics of this tick-pathogen system and implications for disease transmission are still unclear. To assess genetic variation of tick and rickettsial populations, we collected adult A. maculatum from 10 sites in Mississippi, 4 in the northern, one in the central, and 5 in the southern part of the state. PCR amplicons from tick mitochondrial 16S rRNA and rickettsial ompA genes as well as 5 intergenic spacer regions were evaluated for genetic variation using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Frequencies of the 4 tick 16S haplotypes were not significantly different among regions of Mississippi, but within sites there were differences in distribution that can be explained by high migration rates. Phylogenetically, one lineage of tick haplotypes was a species-poor sister group to remaining haplotypes in the species-rich sister group. No genetic variation was identified in any of the 6 selected gene targets of R. parkeri examined in the infected ticks, suggesting high levels of intermixing.

  20. Molecular detection of plant pathogenic bacteria using polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa, Chandrashekar; Sharanaiah, Umesha; Shivamallu, Chandan

    2012-03-01

    The application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology to molecular diagnostics holds great promise for the early identification of agriculturally important plant pathogens. Ralstonia solanacearum, Xanthomoans axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae are phytopathogenic bacteria, which can infect vegetables, cause severe yield loss. PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) is a simple and powerful technique for identifying sequence changes in amplified DNA. The technique of PCR-SSCP is being exploited so far, only to detect and diagnose human bacterial pathogens in addition to plant pathogenic fungi. Selective media and serology are the commonly used methods for the detection of plant pathogens in infected plant materials. In this study, we developed PCR-SSCP technique to identify phytopathogenic bacteria. The PCR product was denatured and separated on a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel. SSCP banding patterns were detected by silver staining of nucleic acids. We tested over 56 isolates of R. solanacearum, 44 isolates of X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, and 20 isolates of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. With the use of universal primer 16S rRNA, we could discriminate such species at the genus and species levels. Species-specific patterns were obtained for bacteria R. solanacearum, X. axonopodis pv. vesicatoria, and X. oryzae pv. oryzae. The potential use of PCR-SSCP technique for the detection and diagnosis of phytobacterial pathogens is discussed in the present paper.

  1. Capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism for the monitoring of gastrointestinal microbiota of chicken flocks.

    PubMed

    Pissavin, C; Burel, C; Gabriel, I; Beven, V; Mallet, S; Maurice, R; Queguiner, M; Lessire, M; Fravalo, P

    2012-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) to characterize poultry gut microbiota and the ability of this molecular method to detect modifications related to rearing conditions to be used as an epidemiological tool. The V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was selected as the PCR target. Our results showed that this method provides reproducible data. The microbiota analysis of individuals showed that variability between individual fingerprints was higher for ileum and cloaca than for ceca. However, pooling the samples decreased this variability. To estimate the variability within and between farms, we compared molecular gut patterns of animals from the same hatchery reared under similar conditions and fed the same diet in 2 separate farms. Total aerobic bacteria, coliforms, and lactic acid bacteria were enumerated using conventional bacteriological methods. A significant difference was observed for coliforms present in the ceca and the cloaca depending on the farm. Ileal contents fingerprints were more closely related to those of cloacal contents than to those of ceca contents. When comparing samples from the 2 farms, a specific microbiota was highlighted for each farm. For each gut compartment, the microbiota fingerprints were joined in clusters according to the farm. Thus, this rapid and potentially high-throughput method to obtain gut flora fingerprints is sensitive enough to detect a "farm effect" on the balance of poultry gut microbiota despite the birds being fed the same regimens and reared under similar conditions.

  2. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the molecular pathology of hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    David, D; Rosa, H A; Pemberton, S; Diniz, M J; Campos, M; Lavinha, J

    1993-01-01

    In the present study, we report the application of polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis to the screening of seven functionally important factor IX gene (FIX) regions (total length 2.66 kb) in 9 unrelated haemophilia B patients of Portuguese or African origin. In eight of the patients an altered migration pattern of single-stranded DNA was observed. Direct sequencing of the relevant DNA fragments unveiled the following sequence alterations: two novel mutations, namely FIXBarcelos Thr-380-Pro and FIXLousada 9bp insertion at position 31,309 or 31,318; five mutations previously reported in other ethnic groups (FIXPorto Arg-145-His, FIXLuanda Gly-207-Arg, FIXPenafiel Arg-248-Gln, FIXSesimbra Arg-333-Gln, FIXCascais Arg-333-Stop); and a normal variant, G-->T transvertion at position 6,596 in intron 2. We propose hypothetical models for the generation of the 9 bp duplication (FIXLousada). We have performed molecular modeling studies in order to predict the structure of the variant FIX molecules.

  3. Single-stranded DNA conformation polymorphism at the Rdl locus in Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Scolytidae).

    PubMed

    Borsa, P; Coustau, C

    1996-02-01

    The homologue of the resistance to dieldrin gene (Rdl) in Drosophila melanogaster was cloned and sequenced in the scolytid beetle Hypothenemus hampei, a coffee pest resistant to cyclodiene insecticides in New Caledonia. The amino acid sequence of the Rdl exon no. 7 protein product in H. hampei was identical to that in D. melanogaster and showed the same amino acid change as that characterizing susceptible vs. resistant D. melanogaster. Samples from natural H. hampei populations (from Asia, the Pacific Islands, Africa and Central America), from reference susceptible (S) and resistant (R) laboratory strains, and from their hybrid progenies, were analysed at the Rdl locus using single-stranded DNA conformation polymorphism on polymerase chain reaction products. The susceptible allele was the only allele present in all samples from natural populations except in the only resistant population known to date (Ponerihouen, New Caledonia). Females and some males obtained at F1 from R x S crosses were heterozygous at the Rdl locus, confirming that this local mate competing species is diplo-diploid.

  4. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism applied to sex identification of Accipiter cooperii.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Pedro Silveira; Bastos, Estela; Mannan, Richard William; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique

    2009-04-01

    Determination of sex in birds is valuable for studying population dynamics and structure, habitat use, behavior and mating systems. The purpose of the present study was to optimize a DNA-based methodology to allow the sex identification in Accipiter cooperii nestlings. Chromo-helicase-DNA-binding (CHD1) gene was used in this work as a marker for sex identification. CHD-W and CHD-Z sequences should present length and/or sequence differences providing a way to identify gender. We used a non-invasive method for DNA extraction from feathers and performed polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) method. The length difference between CHD-W and CHD-Z amplified fragments observed by electrophoresis in conventional agarose gel was not enough to provide a clear differentiation between males and females. However, patterns obtained by PCR-SSCP differentiated undoubtedly males and females in A. cooperii. This tool provides a precise gender identification assay and will be applied to confirm and refine morphometrically based sexing techniques used in the field.

  5. Prenatal diagnosis of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP).

    PubMed

    Francoual, Jeanne; Trioche, Pascale; Mokrani, Chahnez; Seboui, Hassen; Khrouf, Naïma; Chalas, Jacqueline; Clement, Marina; Capel, Liliane; Tachdjian, Gérard; Labrune, Philippe

    2002-10-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I (CN-I) is a rare and severe inherited disorder of bilirubin metabolism, caused by the total deficiency of bilirubin-UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity. Enzymatic diagnosis cannot be performed in chorionic villi or amniocytes as UGT is not active in these tissues. The cloning of the UGT1 gene and the identification of disease-causing mutations have led to the possibility of performing DNA-based diagnosis. Here we report DNA-based prenatal diagnosis of CN-I in two Tunisian families in whom CN-I patients were diagnosed. As we had previously shown that CN-I was, in Tunisia, associated with homozygosity for the Q357R mutation within the UGT1 gene, we were able to detect this mutation in both families and to show that it was easily recognized by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. In both cases, SSCP analysis of fetal DNA showed that the fetus was heterozygous for the Q357R mutation. In one family, the pregnancy was carried to term and a healthy baby was born, whereas, in the other family, the pregnancy is still continuing. Thus the prenatal diagnosis of CN-I is possible, provided disease-causing mutations have been identified. SSCP analysis of DNA prepared either from amniocytes or from chorionic villi is a simple, reliable and fast method for prenatal diagnosis. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Applications of single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) to taxonomy, diagnosis, population genetics and molecular evolution of parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Gasser, R B; Chilton, N B

    2001-11-22

    The analysis of genetic variation in parasitic nematodes has important implications for studying aspects of taxonomy, diagnosis, population genetics, drug resistance and molecular evolution. This article highlights some applications of PCR-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) for the analysis of sequence variation in individual parasites (and their populations) to address some of these areas. It also describes the principles and advantages of SSCP, and provides some examples for future applications in parasitology.

  7. Identification of conformational epitopes and antigen-specific residues at the D/A domains and the extramembrane C-terminal region of E2 glycoprotein of classical swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Yi; Huang, Chin-Cheng; Deng, Ming-Chung; Huang, Yeou-Liang; Lin, Yu-Ju; Liu, Hsin-Meng; Lin, Yeou-Liang; Wang, Fun-In

    2012-09-01

    Envelope glycoprotein E2 of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the major antigen that induces neutralizing antibodies in infected pigs. Previous studies revealed that both conformation-dependent and linear epitopes are most present within domains B/C/D/A in the N-terminal half of E2. However, studies of antigenicity beyond the B/C domains remain limited. This study revealed that conformational epitopes were present on the D/A domains as well as the proximal C-terminal of E2, since the mutation of cysteine abrogated their bindings to monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The residue R845 at domain A and E902 at the C-terminal region were critical for specific binding to mAbs, further supporting the presence of antigenic determinants on these regions. Substitutions of cysteines in domains D/A not only abrogated the binding to mAbs directed to D/A, but also affected the binding of the downstream C-terminal region to its specific mAbs, suggesting a close interaction between the two conformational epitopes. Mutations on the five proximal cysteines at positions 869, 877, 893, 896 and 930 in the C-terminal region only affected the binding to its specific mAbs binding sites. In addition, mutation on the three distal C-terminal cysteines at positions 945, 966, and 983 resulted in loss of E2 homodimerization. This study demonstrates new antigenic epitopes on D/A domains and C-terminal of E2 that have not been reported before, and that the nine cysteines in the C-terminal function differently in either maintaining the antigenic structure or in intermolecular dimerization of E2.

  8. Attenuating Mutations in Coxsackievirus B3 Map to a Conformational Epitope That Comprises the Puff Region of VP2 and the Knob of VP3

    PubMed Central

    Stadnick, E.; Dan, M.; Sadeghi, A.; Chantler, J. K.

    2004-01-01

    Ten antibody escape mutants of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) were used to identify nucleotide substitutions that determine viral virulence for the heart and pancreas. The P1 region, encoding the structural genes of each mutant, was sequenced to identify mutations associated with the lack of neutralization. Eight mutants were found to have a lysine-to arginine mutation in the puff region of VP2, while two had a glutamate-to-glycine substitution in the knob of VP3. Two mutants, EM1 and EM10, representing each of these mutations, were further analyzed, initially by determining their entire sequence. In addition to the mutations in P1, EM1 was found to have two mutations in the 3D polymerase, while EM10 had a mutation in stem-loop II of the 5′ nontranslated region (5′NTR). The pathogenesis of the mutants relative to that of CVB3 strain RK [CVB3(RK)] then was examined in A/J mice. Both mutants were found to be less cardiotropic than the parental strain, with a 40-fold (EM1) or a 100- to 1,000-fold (EM10) reduction in viral titers in the heart relative to the titers of CVB3(RK). The mutations in VP2, VP3, and the 5′NTR were introduced independently into the RK infectious clone, and the phenotypes of the progeny viruses were determined. The results substantiated that the VP2 and VP3 mutations reduced cardiovirulence, while the 5′NTR mutation in EM10 was associated with a more virulent phenotype when expressed on its own. Stereographic imaging of the two mutations in the capsomer showed that they lie in close proximity on either side of a narrow cleft between the puff and the knob, forming a conformational epitope that is part of the putative binding site for coreceptor DAF. PMID:15564506

  9. Polymorphism at 129 dictates metastable conformations of the human prion protein N-terminal β-sheet.

    PubMed

    Paz, S Alexis; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Abrams, Cameron F

    2017-02-01

    We study the thermodynamic stability of the native state of the human prion protein using a new free-energy method, replica-exchange on-the-fly parameterization. This method is designed to overcome hidden-variable sampling limitations to yield nearly error-free free-energy profiles along a conformational coordinate. We confirm that all four (M129V, D178N) polymorphs have a ground-state conformation with three intact β-sheet hydrogen bonds. Additionally, they are observed to have distinct metastabilities determined by the side-chain at position 129. We rationalize these findings with reference to the prion "strain" hypothesis, which links the variety of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy phenotypes to conformationally distinct infectious prion forms and classifies distinct phenotypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease based solely on the 129 polymorphism. Because such metastable structures are not easily observed in structural experiments, our approach could potentially provide new insights into the conformational origins of prion diseases and other pathologies arising from protein misfolding and aggregation.

  10. HLA-DR3 transgenic mice immunized with adenovirus encoding the thyrotropin receptor: T cell epitopes and functional analysis of the CD40 Graves' polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Pichurin, Pavel; Pham, Nancy; David, Chella S; Rapoport, Basil; McLachlan, Sandra M

    2006-12-01

    The major histocompatibility (MHC) molecule HLA-DR3 is a susceptibility gene for Graves' disease (GD) in Caucasians. Mice lacking murine MHC and expressing human HLA-DR3 develop thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) antibodies and sometimes hyperthyroidism after vaccination with TSHR-DNA. MHC molecules present peptides processed from antigens to T cells. Therefore, we used DR3-transgenic mice to investigate recognition of TSHR ectodomain peptides. After immunization with TSHR A-subunit adenovirus (A-subunit-Ad) but not control-adenovirus (Control-Ad), splenocytes from DR3 mice responded to A-subunit protein in culture by producing interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma). When challenged with 29 overlapping TSHR peptides, splenocytes from A-subunit-Ad- or Control-Ad-immunized mice responded to several peptides. However, in splenocytes from A-subunit-Ad but not Control-Ad mice, a peptide containing TSHR residues 142-161 induced significantly more IFN-gamma than the same splenocytes in medium alone. Immunized DR3 mice also permitted testing the TSHR-specific function of the CD40 single nucleotide polymorphism (C vs. T) associated with GD. Of three human DR3 human Epstein-Barr virus lines (EBVL), two had C in both alleles (CC) and one was CT. However, these EBVL presented peptides poorly and there was no difference between CC vs. CT EBVL in peptide presentation to splenocytes from immunized mice. A peptide corresponding to residues 145-163 is one of seven suggested to be important in GD based on HLA-binding affinities, T-epitope algorithms, and human studies. Consequently, as in human GD, TSHR amino acids 142-161 appear to include a major T cell epitope in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice immunized with A-subunit-Ad.

  11. Identification and characterization of NF1 mutations using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenhiser, D.I.; Hovland, K.; Singh, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common human genetic disorders with a constellation of cutaneous and skeletal manifestations, intellectual impairment, and an increased risk for a variety of malignancies. The neurofibromin gene is also considered a tumor-suppressor gene since its loss of function is associated with a variety of sporadic cancers in the general population. The NF1 gene has a high spontaneous mutation rate, and while a number of laboratories are involved in a coordinated effort to identify NF1 mutations, only a small number of mutations have been characterized. Despite considerable efforts no high frequency or recurrent mutation has been found. We report the application of single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analysis on the Phastgel system to identify mutations in the neurofibromin gene. A DNA panel of patients representing 100 families from Ontario, Canada was used to screen fourteen NF1 exons encompassing 30% of the NF1 gene: the 5{prime} exons 1, 17, 24 and the 3{prime} exons 28-33, 39-42 and 49. SSCP and heteroduplex variants were identified in PCR products amplified from 8 exons and mutations were identified in 10% of patients. Three RFLPs also have been identified and three other SSCP variants are being characterized. While most small deletions and insertions form heteroduplexes readily detectable on native gels, our results suggest that the detection of heteroduplexes resulting from point mutations is best facilitated on native Phastgels at low temperature. Our results suggest that as point mutations comprise a significant proportion of NF1 mutations, optimization of the SSCP protocol is critical to ensure the detection of all sequence variants.

  12. Polymorphism of Alzheimer's Abeta17-42 (p3) oligomers: the importance of the turn location and its conformation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Yifat; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2009-08-19

    Abeta(17-42) (so-called p3) amyloid is detected in vivo in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's disease or Down's syndrome. We investigated the polymorphism of Abeta(17-42) oligomers based on experimental data from steady-state NMR measurements, electron microscopy, two-dimensional hydrogen exchange, and mutational studies, using all-atom molecular-dynamics simulation with explicit solvent. We assessed the structural stability and the populations. Our results suggest that conformational differences in the U-turn of Abeta(17-42) lead to polymorphism in beta-sheet registration and retention of an ordered beta-strand organization at the termini. Further, although the parallel Abeta(17-42) oligomer organization is the most stable of the conformers investigated here, different antiparallel Abeta(17-42) organizations are also stable and compete with the parallel architectures, presenting a polymorphic population. In this study we propose that 1), the U-turn conformation is the primary factor leading to polymorphism in the assembly of Abeta(17-42) oligomers, and is also coupled to oligomer growth; and 2), both parallel Abeta(17-42) oligomers and an assembly of Abeta(17-42) oligomers that includes both parallel and antiparallel organizations contribute to amyloid fibril formation. Finally, since a U-turn motif generally appears in amyloids formed by full proteins or long fragments, and since to date these have been shown to exist only in parallel architectures, our results apply to a broad range of oligomers and fibrils.

  13. Mapping and conformational analysis of IgE-binding epitopic regions on the molecular surface of the major Ara h 3 legumin allergen of peanut (Arachis hypogaea).

    PubMed

    Rougé, Pierre; Culerrier, Raphaël; Sabatier, Virginie; Granier, Claude; Rancé, Fabienne; Barre, Annick

    2009-03-01

    Eight distinct sequential IgE-binding epitopes were identified along the amino acid sequence of Ara h 3 using the Spot technology. They essentially correspond to preferencially electropositive regions exposed on the molecular surface of the protein. A few IgE-binding epitopes are coalescent to create more extended IgE-binding regions exposed on the surface of the allergen. Ara h 3 contains a core region corresponding to the cupin motifs and predicted to be preserved upon the trypsin and chymotrypsin attack in the gastro-intestinal tract. Some of the identified IgE-binding epitopes should remain unaltered in the core region to subsequently interact with the local immune system. They most probably account for the strong allergenic potency of Ara h 3. Most of the identified IgE-binding epitopes of Ara h 3 readily differ from the corresponding regions of other legume and tree-nut legumin allergens except for epitope #1 and #7 which are rather conserved essentially in other allergens. These structurally related epitopes could account for some cross-reactions occurring between Ara h 3 and other legumin allergens.

  14. Analysis of sequence variation in Gnathostoma spinigerum mitochondrial DNA by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Ngarmamonpirat, Charinthon; Waikagul, Jitra; Petmitr, Songsak; Dekumyoy, Paron; Rojekittikhun, Wichit; Anantapruti, Malinee T

    2005-03-01

    Morphological variations were observed in the advance third stage larvae of Gnathostoma spinigerum collected from swamp eel (Fluta alba), the second intermediate host. Larvae with typical and three atypical types were chosen for partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequence analysis. A 450 bp polymerase chain reaction product of the COI gene was amplified from mitochondrial DNA. The variations were analyzed by single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. The nucleotide variations of the COI gene in the four types of larvae indicated the presence of an intra-specific variation of mitochondrial DNA in the G. spinigerum population.

  15. Intensive linkage mapping in a wasp (Bracon hebetor) and a mosquito (Aedes aegypti) with single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA markers.

    PubMed

    Antolin, M F; Bosio, C F; Cotton, J; Sweeney, W; Strand, M R; Black, W C

    1996-08-01

    The use of random amplified polymorphic DNA from the polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) allows efficient construction of saturated linkage maps. However, when analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, most RAPD-PCR markers segregate as dominant alleles, reducing the amount of linkage information obtained. We describe the use of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of RAPD markers to generate linkage maps in a haplodiploid parasitic wasp Bracon (Habrobracon) hebetor and a diploid mosquito. Aedes aegypti. RAPD-SSCP analysis revealed segregation of codominant alleles at markers that appeared to segregate as dominant (band presence/band absence) markers or appeared invariant on agarose gels. Our SSCP protocol uses silver staining to detect DNA fractionated on large thin polyacrylamide gels and reveals more polymorphic markers than agarose gel electrophoresis. In B. hebetor, 79 markers were mapped with 12 RAPD primers in six weeks; in A aygpti, 94 markers were mapped with 10 RAPD primers in five weeks. Forty-five percent of markers segregated as codominant loci in B. hebetor, while 11% segregated as codominant loci in A. aegypti. SSCP analysis of RAPD-PCR markers offers a rapid and inexpensive means of constructing intensive linkage maps of many species.

  16. Intensive Linkage Mapping in a Wasp (Bracon Hebetor) and a Mosquito (Aedes Aegypti) with Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism Analysis of Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Markers

    PubMed Central

    Antolin, M. F.; Bosio, C. F.; Cotton, J.; Sweeney, W.; Strand, M. R.; Black-IV, W. C.

    1996-01-01

    The use of random amplified polymorphic DNA from the polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) allows efficient construction of saturated linkage maps. However, when analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, most RAPD-PCR markers segregate as dominant alleles, reducing the amount of linkage information obtained. We describe the use of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of RAPD markers to generate linkage maps in a haplodiploid parasitic wasp Bracon (Habrobracon) hebetor and a diploid mosquito, Aedes aegypti. RAPD-SSCP analysis revealed segregation of codominant alleles at markers that appeared to segregate as dominant (band presence/band absence) markers or appeared invariant on agarose gels. Our SSCP protocol uses silver staining to detect DNA fractionated on large thin polyacrylamide gels and reveals more polymorphic markers than agarose gel electrophoresis. In B. hebetor, 79 markers were mapped with 12 RAPD primers in six weeks; in A. aegypti, 94 markers were mapped with 10 RAPD primers in five weeks. Forty-five percent of markers segregated as codominant loci in B. hebetor, while 11% segregated as codominant loci in A. aegypti. SSCP analysis of RAPD-PCR markers offers a rapid and inexpensive means of constructing intensive linkage maps of many species. PMID:8844159

  17. Discovery of black dye crystal structure polymorphs: Implications for dye conformational variation in dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Jacqueline M.; Low, Kian Sing; Gong, Yun

    2015-11-24

    Here, we present the discovery of a new crystal structure polymorph (1) and pseudopolymorph (2) of the Black Dye, one of the world’s leading dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells, DSSCs (10.4% device performance efficiency). This reveals that Black Dye molecules can adopt multiple low-energy conformers. This is significant since it challenges existing models of the Black Dye···TiO2 adsorption process that renders a DSSC working electrode; these have assumed a single molecular conformation that refers to the previously reported Black Dye crystal structure (3). The marked structural differences observed between 1, 2, and 3 make the need for modeling multiple conformations more acute. Additionally, the ordered form of the Black Dye (1) provides a more appropriate depiction of its anionic structure, especially regarding its anchoring group and NCS bonding descriptions. The tendency toward NCS ligand isomerism, evidenced via the disordered form 2, has consequences for electron injection and electron recombination in Black Dye embedded DSSC devices. Dyes 2 and 3 differ primarily by the absence or presence of a solvent of crystallization, respectively; solvent environment effects on the dye are thereby elucidated. This discovery of multiple Black Dye conformers from diffraction, with atomic-level definition, complements recently reported nanoscopic evidence for multiple dye conformations existing at a dye···TiO2 interface, for a chemically similar DSSC dye; those results emanated from imaging and spectroscopy, but were unresolved at the submolecular level. Taken together, these findings lead to the general notion that multiple dye conformations should be explicitly considered when modeling dye···TiO2 interfaces in DSSCs, at least for ruthenium-based dye complexes.

  18. Discovery of Black Dye Crystal Structure Polymorphs: Implications for Dye Conformational Variation in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jacqueline M; Low, Kian Sing; Gong, Yun

    2015-12-23

    We present the discovery of a new crystal structure polymorph (1) and pseudopolymorph (2) of the Black Dye, one of the world's leading dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells, DSSCs (10.4% device performance efficiency). This reveals that Black Dye molecules can adopt multiple low-energy conformers. This is significant since it challenges existing models of the Black Dye···TiO2 adsorption process that renders a DSSC working electrode; these have assumed a single molecular conformation that refers to the previously reported Black Dye crystal structure (3). The marked structural differences observed between 1, 2, and 3 make the need for modeling multiple conformations more acute. Additionally, the ordered form of the Black Dye (1) provides a more appropriate depiction of its anionic structure, especially regarding its anchoring group and NCS bonding descriptions. The tendency toward NCS ligand isomerism, evidenced via the disordered form 2, has consequences for electron injection and electron recombination in Black Dye embedded DSSC devices. Dyes 2 and 3 differ primarily by the absence or presence of a solvent of crystallization, respectively; solvent environment effects on the dye are thereby elucidated. This discovery of multiple Black Dye conformers from diffraction, with atomic-level definition, complements recently reported nanoscopic evidence for multiple dye conformations existing at a dye···TiO2 interface, for a chemically similar DSSC dye; those results emanated from imaging and spectroscopy, but were unresolved at the submolecular level. Taken together, these findings lead to the general notion that multiple dye conformations should be explicitly considered when modeling dye···TiO2 interfaces in DSSCs, at least for ruthenium-based dye complexes.

  19. Genetic and epitopic analysis of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) autoantibodies: markers of the human thyroid autoimmune response.

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, S M; Rapoport, B

    1995-01-01

    TPO autoantibodies, the hallmark of human autoimmune thyroid disease, are of IgG class and are associated with thyroid destruction and hypothyroidism. Using the immunoglobulin gene combinatorial library approach, a panel of human monoclonal TPO autoantibodies (expressed as Fab) has been generated from thyroid tissue-infiltrating B cells. TPO-specific Fab closely resemble patients' serum autoantibodies in terms of L chain type, IgG subclass, affinities for TPO as well as epitopes recognized by > 80% of TPO autoantibodies in an individual's serum. TPO autoantibody V region genes are not unique; H chain V genes are usually mutated, while L chain V genes are sometimes in germ-line conformation. The autoantibodies recognize an immunodominant region involving conformational, overlapping epitopes in domains A and B. Finally, TPO autoantibody epitopic fingerprints are distinctive for individual sera, are not associated with hypothyroidism, but are conserved over time (indicating a lack of B cell epitope spreading). Evidence for conservation as well as inheritance of the fingerprints in some families, together with VH gene polymorphisms, may provide insight into the genetic basis of human autoimmune thyroid disease. Furthermore, monoclonal human TPO autoantibodies will be invaluable for B cell presentation of TPO to determine the T cell epitopes involved in TPO autoantibody production. PMID:7544244

  20. Polymorphism and epitope sharing between the alleles of merozoite surface protein-1 of Plasmodium falciparum among Indian isolates

    PubMed Central

    Mamillapalli, Anitha; Sunil, Sujatha; Diwan, Suraksha S; Sharma, Surya K; Tyagi, Prajesh K; Adak, Tridibes; Joshi, Hema; Malhotra, Pawan

    2007-01-01

    Background The C-terminal region of merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) is one of the leading candidates for vaccination against the erythrocytic stages of malaria. However, a major concern in the development of MSP-1 based malaria vaccine is the polymorphism observed in different geographical Plasmodium falciparum isolates. To explore whether the sequence heterogeneity of PfMSP-1 leads to variation in naturally acquired anti-MSP-119 antibodies, the present study was undertaken to study PfMSP-119 sequence polymorphism in malaria-endemic villages in eastern India and also carried out a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using three PfMSP-119 variant forms. Methods The sequence variations in the C-terminal region of PfMSP-119 were determined in a malaria endemic region. Three PfMSP-119 variants were produced in Escherichia coli (PfMSP119QKNG-L, PfMSP119EKNG-L and PfMSP119ETSR-F) and an immunodepletion assay was carried out using the corresponding patients' sera. Results Results revealed predominance of PfMAD20 allele among Indian field isolates. Seven PfMSP-119 variant forms were isolated in a singe geographical location. Three of PfMSP-119 variant forms when expressed in E. coli showed presence of cross-reaction as well as variant specific antibodies in malaria infected patient sera. Conclusion The present study demonstrates the existence of allele specific antibodies in P. falciparum-infected patient sera, however their role in protection requires further investigation. These results thereby, suggest the importance of a multi-allelic PfMSP-119 based vaccine for an effective malaria control. PMID:17659072

  1. Bags of words models of epitope sets: HIV viral load regression with counting grids.

    PubMed

    Perina, Alessandro; Lovato, Pietro; Jojic, Nebojsa

    2014-01-01

    The immune system gathers evidence of the execution of various molecular processes, both foreign and the cells' own, as time- and space-varying sets of epitopes, small linear or conformational segments of the proteins involved in these processes. Epitopes do not have any obvious ordering in this scheme: The immune system simply sees these epitope sets as disordered "bags" of simple signatures based on whose contents the actions need to be decided. The immense landscape of possible bags of epitopes is shaped by the cellular pathways in various cells, as well as the characteristics of the internal sampling process that chooses and brings epitopes to cellular surface. As a consequence, upon the infection by the same pathogen, different individuals' cells present very different epitope sets. Modeling this landscape should thus be a key step in computational immunology. We show that among possible bag-of-words models, the counting grid is most fit for modeling cellular presentation. We describe each patient by a bag-of-peptides they are likely to present on the cellular surface. In regression tests, we found that compared to the state-of-the-art, counting grids explain more than twice as much of the log viral load variance in these patients. This is potentially a significant advancement in the field, given that a large part of the log viral load variance also depends on the infecting HIV strain, and that HIV polymorphisms themselves are known to strongly associate with HLA types, both effects beyond what is modeled here.

  2. Effective screen of CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutants in rice by single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuelian; Yang, Shixin; Zhang, Dengwei; Zhong, Zhaohui; Tang, Xu; Deng, Kejun; Zhou, Jianping; Qi, Yiping; Zhang, Yong

    2016-07-01

    A method based on DNA single-strand conformation polymorphism is demonstrated for effective genotyping of CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutants in rice. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) has been widely adopted for genome editing in many organisms. A large proportion of mutations generated by CRISPR/Cas9 are very small insertions and deletions (indels), presumably because Cas9 generates blunt-ended double-strand breaks which are subsequently repaired without extensive end-processing. CRISPR/Cas9 is highly effective for targeted mutagenesis in the important crop, rice. For example, homozygous mutant seedlings are commonly recovered from CRISPR/Cas9-treated calli. However, many current mutation detection methods are not very suitable for screening homozygous mutants that typically carry small indels. In this study, we tested a mutation detection method based on single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP). We found it can effectively detect small indels in pilot experiments. By applying the SSCP method for CRISRP-Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis in rice, we successfully identified multiple mutants of OsROC5 and OsDEP1. In conclusion, the SSCP analysis will be a useful genotyping method for rapid identification of CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutants, including the most desirable homozygous mutants. The method also has high potential for similar applications in other plant species.

  3. Discovery of black dye crystal structure polymorphs: Implications for dye conformational variation in dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Cole, Jacqueline M.; Low, Kian Sing; Gong, Yun

    2015-11-24

    Here, we present the discovery of a new crystal structure polymorph (1) and pseudopolymorph (2) of the Black Dye, one of the world’s leading dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells, DSSCs (10.4% device performance efficiency). This reveals that Black Dye molecules can adopt multiple low-energy conformers. This is significant since it challenges existing models of the Black Dye···TiO2 adsorption process that renders a DSSC working electrode; these have assumed a single molecular conformation that refers to the previously reported Black Dye crystal structure (3). The marked structural differences observed between 1, 2, and 3 make the need for modeling multiple conformationsmore » more acute. Additionally, the ordered form of the Black Dye (1) provides a more appropriate depiction of its anionic structure, especially regarding its anchoring group and NCS bonding descriptions. The tendency toward NCS ligand isomerism, evidenced via the disordered form 2, has consequences for electron injection and electron recombination in Black Dye embedded DSSC devices. Dyes 2 and 3 differ primarily by the absence or presence of a solvent of crystallization, respectively; solvent environment effects on the dye are thereby elucidated. This discovery of multiple Black Dye conformers from diffraction, with atomic-level definition, complements recently reported nanoscopic evidence for multiple dye conformations existing at a dye···TiO2 interface, for a chemically similar DSSC dye; those results emanated from imaging and spectroscopy, but were unresolved at the submolecular level. Taken together, these findings lead to the general notion that multiple dye conformations should be explicitly considered when modeling dye···TiO2 interfaces in DSSCs, at least for ruthenium-based dye complexes.« less

  4. Direct determination of single nucleotide polymorphism haplotype of NFKBIL1 promoter polymorphism by DNA conformation analysis and its application to association study of chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Hiroki; Yasunami, Michio; Obuchi, Nobuhisa; Takahashi, Megumi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Numano, Fujio; Kimura, Akinori

    2006-01-01

    We previously revealed that one of the human leukocyte antigen-linked susceptibility genes for Takayasu's arteritis (TA) was mapped between TNFA and MICB loci and that -63T allele of NFKBIL1, which is between TNFA and MICB loci, was associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Japanese population. We have developed a novel typing method based on reference strand-mediated conformation analysis for the upstream sequence of the NFKBIL1 gene, where -422 (T)8/(T)9, -325 C/G, -263 A/G, and -63 T/A polymorphisms were found. Upon the analysis of the patients with TA (n = 84), those with RA (n = 120), and healthy control subjects (n = 217), five common haplotypes named IKBLp*01 through IKBLp*05 were found in the Japanese population. The frequency of IKBLp*03 was significantly increased in the patient with TA (57.1% vs 35.0%, giving an odds ratio of 2.47). In addition, the frequency of IKBLp*01, but not that of other -63T-bearing alleles, was increased in the patients with RA (73.3% vs 58.1%, giving an odds ratio of 1.99), suggesting that the susceptibility to RA was conferred not by -63T alone but by combination of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the NFKBIL1 promoter. A higher promoter activity associated with IKBLp*03 and a lower activity associated with IKBLp*01 may contribute to the susceptibility to TA and RA, respectively.

  5. Conformational polymorphism in G-tetraplex structures: strand reversal by base flipover or sugar flipover.

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, D; Bansal, M

    1993-01-01

    Guanine rich sequences adopt a variety of four stranded structures, which differ in strand orientation and conformation about the glycosidic bond even though they are all stabilised by Hoogsteen hydrogen bonded guanine tetrads. Detailed model building and molecular mechanics calculations have been carried out to investigate various possible conformations of guanines along a strand and different possible orientations of guanine strands in a G-tetraplex structure. It is found that for an oligo G stretch per se, a parallel four stranded structure with all guanines in anti conformation is favoured over other possible tetraplex structures. Hence an alternating syn-anti arrangement of guanines along a strand is likely to occur only in folded back tetraplex structures with antiparallel G strands. Our study provides a theoretical rationale for the observed alternation of glycosidic conformation and the inverted stacking arrangement arising from base flipover, in antiparallel G-tetraplex structures and also highlights the various structural features arising due to different types of strand orientations. The molecular mechanics calculations help in elucidating the various interactions which stabilize different G-tetraplex structures and indicate that screening of phosphate charge by counterions could have a dramatic effect on groove width in these four stranded structures. PMID:8493095

  6. Technical note: Identification of Prototheca species from bovine milk samples by PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Pozzi, F; Ricchi, M; Castiglioni, B; Luini, M; Chessa, S

    2012-12-01

    We report the development of a PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) method to identify Prototheca spp. responsible for bovine mastitis: P. zopfii and P. blaschkeae. The method was set up using reference strains belonging to P. zopfii genotype 1, P. zopfii genotype 2, and P. blaschkeae as target species and P. stagnora, and P. ulmea as negative controls. The assay was applied on 50 isolates of Prototheca spp. isolated from bovine mastitic milk or bulk-tank milk samples, and all isolates were identified as P. zopfii genotype 2. We conclude that the described PCR-SSCP approach is accurate, inexpensive, and highly suitable for the identification of P. zopfii genotype 2 on field isolates but also directly on milk, if preceded by a specific DNA extraction method.

  7. Multiplex and quantitative pathogen detection with high-resolution capillary electrophoresis-based single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hee Sung; Shin, Gi Won; Chung, Boram; Na, Jeongkyeong; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2013-01-01

    Among the molecular diagnostic methods for bacteria-induced diseases, capillary electrophoresis-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) combined with 16S rRNA gene-specific PCR has enormous potential because it can separate sequence variants using a simple procedure. However, conventional CE-SSCP systems have limited resolution and cannot separate most 16S rRNA gene-specific markers into separate peaks. A high-resolution CE-SSCP system that uses a poly(ethyleneoxide)-poly(propyleneoxide)-poly(ethyleneoxide) triblock copolymer matrix was recently developed and shown to effectively separate highly similar PCR products. In this report, a protocol for the detection of 12 pathogenic bacteria is provided. Pathogen markers were amplified by PCR using universal primers and separated by CE-SSCP; each marker peak was well separated at baseline and showed a characteristic mobility, allowing the easy identification of the pathogens.

  8. Monitoring of a pyrite-oxidising bacterial population using DNA single-strand conformation polymorphism and microscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Battaglia-Brunet, F; Clarens, M; D'Hugues, P; Godon, J J; Foucher, S; Morin, D

    2002-10-01

    The single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique was used to study the evolution of a bacterial consortium during the batch oxidation of a cobaltiferous pyrite in two types of bio-reactor: a bubble column and a classical stirred tank. Sequencing 16S rDNA revealed the presence of three organisms affiliated to Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, respectively. Attempts were made to determine the proportions of bacteria attached to solid particles or freely suspended in the medium using a combination of PCR-SSCP and a microscopic technique. Ac. thiooxidans-related bacteria were dominant in the liquid during the early phase of the batch, but were later supplanted by L. ferrooxidans-related bacteria. L. ferrooxidans-related organisms were always in the majority on the solids. The growth of S. thermosulfidooxidans-related bacteria seemed to be favoured by the bubble-column reactor.

  9. Single-strand conformation polymorphism-based analysis reveals genetic variation within Spirometra erinacei (Cestoda: Pseudophyllidea) from Australia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X Q; Beveridge, I; Berger, L; Barton, D; Gasser, R B

    2002-04-01

    This study examined genetic variability within Spirometra erinacei (Cestoda: Pseudophyllidea) from different host species and geographical origins in Australia using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based mutation detection approach, followed by DNA sequencing. Part of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (p cox 1) was amplified by PCR, scanned for sequence variation by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), and representative samples from different host species were selected for DNA sequencing. While no variation in SSCP profiles was detected among S. erinacei samples from dog, fox, cat, tiger snake and python, they differed in profile from 5 specimens from the green tree frog (Litoria caerulea). This was supported by sequence data which demonstrated that p cox 1 sequences of samples from the latter host species differed at 8 of 393 (2%) nucleotide positions from those from the non-amphibian host. Using a nucleotide difference in the p cox 1 sequence, a PCR-linked restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) could be employed to unequivocally delineate between samples from non-amphibian and amphibian hosts. These findings demonstrate the existence of at least two genotypes within S. erinacei, which may have important implications for studying the epidemiology, ecology and systematics of this cestode.

  10. Haplotyping using a combination of polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis and haplotype-specific PCR amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huitong; Li, Shaobin; Liu, Xiu; Wang, Jiqing; Luo, Yuzhu; Hickford, Jon G H

    2014-12-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may have an impact on phenotype, but it may also be influenced by multiple SNPs within a gene; hence, the haplotype or phase of multiple SNPs needs to be known. Various methods for haplotyping SNPs have been proposed, but a simple and cost-effective method is currently unavailable. Here we describe a haplotyping approach using two simple techniques: polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and haplotype-specific PCR. In this approach, individual regions of a gene are analyzed by PCR-SSCP to identify variation that defines sub-haplotypes, and then extended haplotypes are assembled from the sub-haplotypes either directly or with the additional use of haplotype-specific PCR amplification. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by haplotyping ovine FABP4 across two variable regions that contain seven SNPs and one indel. The simplicity of this approach makes it suitable for large-scale studies and/or diagnostic screening.

  11. [High frequency of ancestral allele of the TJP1 polymorphism rs2291166 in Mexican population, conformational effect and applications in surgery and medicine].

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Garcia, Sergio Alberto; Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Topete-González, Luz Rosalba; Charles-Niño, Claudia; Mazariegos-Rubi, Manuel; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory Omayra

    2016-01-01

    TJP1 gene encodes a ZO-1 protein that is required for the recruitment of occludins and claudins in tight junction, and is involved in cell polarisation. It has different variations, the frequency of which has been studied in different populations. In Mexico there are no studies of this gene. These are required because their polymorphisms can be used in studies associated with medicine and surgery. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of alleles and genotypes of rs2291166 gene polymorphism TJP1 in Mexico Mestizos population, and to estimate the conformational effect of an amino acid change. A total of 473 individuals were included. The rs2291166 polymorphism was identified PASA PCR-7% PAGE, and stained with silver nitrate. The conformational effect of amino acid change was performed in silico, and was carried out with servers ProtPraram Tool and Search Database with Fasta. The most frequent allele in the two populations is the ancestral allele (T). A genotype distribution similar to other populations was found. The polymorphism is in Hardy-Weinberg, p>0.05. Changing aspartate to alanine produced a conformational change. The study reveals a high frequency of the ancestral allele at rs2291166 polymorphism in the Mexican population. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. The N-terminus of the Montano virus nucleocapsid protein possesses broadly cross-reactive conformation-dependent epitopes conserved in rodent-borne hantaviruses.

    PubMed

    Saasa, Ngonda; Yoshida, Haruka; Shimizu, Kenta; Sánchez-Hernández, Cornelio; Romero-Almaraz, María de Lourdes; Koma, Takaaki; Sanada, Takahiro; Seto, Takahiro; Yoshii, Kentaro; Ramos, Celso; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Arikawa, Jiro; Takashima, Ikuo; Kariwa, Hiroaki

    2012-06-20

    The hantavirus nucleocapsid (N) protein is an important immunogen that stimulates a strong and cross-reactive immune response in humans and rodents. A large proportion of the response to N protein has been found to target its N-terminus. However, the exact nature of this bias towards the N-terminus is not yet fully understood. We characterized six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the N protein of Montano virus (MTNV), a Mexican hantavirus. Five of these mAbs recognized eight American hantaviruses and six European and Asian hantaviruses, but not the Soricomorpha-borne Thottapalayam hantavirus. The N protein-reactive binding regions of the five mAbs were mapped to discontinuous epitopes within the N-terminal 13-51 amino acid residues, while a single serotype-specific mAb was mapped to residues 1-25 and 49-75. Our findings suggest that discontinuous epitopes at the N-terminus are conserved, at least in rodent-borne hantaviruses, and that they contribute considerably to N protein cross-reactivity.

  13. Non-native Soluble Oligomers of Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase (SOD1) Contain a Conformational Epitope Linked to Cytotoxicity in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Soluble misfolded Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is implicated in motor neuron death in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); however, the relative toxicities of the various non-native species formed by SOD1 as it misfolds and aggregates are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that early stages of SOD1 aggregation involve the formation of soluble oligomers that contain an epitope specific to disease-relevant misfolded SOD1; this epitope, recognized by the C4F6 antibody, has been proposed as a marker of toxic species. Formation of potentially toxic oligomers is likely to be exacerbated by an oxidizing cellular environment, as evidenced by increased oligomerization propensity and C4F6 reactivity when oxidative modification by glutathione is present at Cys-111. These findings suggest that soluble non-native SOD1 oligomers, rather than native-like dimers or monomers, share structural similarity to pathogenic misfolded species found in ALS patients and therefore represent potential cytotoxic agents and therapeutic targets in ALS. PMID:24660965

  14. A conformational epitope mapped in the bovine herpesvirus type 1 envelope glycoprotein B by phage display and the HSV-1 3D structure.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Greyciele R; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Cunha-Junior, Jair P; Bataus, Luiz A M; Japolla, Greice; Brito, Wilia M E D; Campos, Ivan T N; Ribeiro, Cristina; Souza, Guilherme R L

    2015-08-01

    The selected dodecapeptide (1)DRALYGPTVIDH(12) from a phage-displayed peptide library and the crystal structure of the envelope glycoprotein B (Env gB) from Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) led us to the identification of a new discontinuous epitope on the Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) Env gB. In silico analysis revealed a short BoHV-1 gB motif ((338)YKRD(341)) within a epitope region, with a high similarity to the motifs shared by the dodecapeptide N-terminal region ((5)YxARD(1)) and HSV-1 Env gB ((326)YARD(329)), in which the (328)Arg residue is described to be a neutralizing antibody target. Besides the characterization of an antibody-binding site of the BoHV-1 Env gB, we have demonstrated that the phage-fused peptide has the potential to be used as a reagent for virus diagnosis by phage-ELISA assay, which discriminated BoHV-1 infected serum samples from negative ones.

  15. Polymorphism of 41 kD Flagellin Gene and Its Human B-Cell Epitope in Borrelia burgdorferi Strains of China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huixin; Liu, Wei; Hou, Xuexia; Zhang, Lin; Hao, Qin; Wan, Kanglin

    2016-01-01

    The 41 kD flagellin of Borrelia burgdorferi (B. burgdorferi) is a major component of periplasmic flagellar filament core and a good candidate for serodiagnosis in early stage of Lyme disease. Here, we chose 89 B. burgdorferi strains in China, amplified the gene encoding the 41 kD flagellin, and compared the sequences. The results showed that genetic diversity presented in the 41 kD flagellin genes of all 89 strains among the four genotypes of B. burgdorferi, especially in the genotype of B. garinii. Some specific mutation sites for each genotype of the 41 kD flagellin genes were found, which could be used for genotyping B. burgdorferi strains in China. Human B-cell epitope analysis showed that thirteen of 15 nonsynonymous mutations occurred in the epitope region of 41 kD flagellin and thirty of 42 B-cell epitopes were altered due to all 13 nonsynonymous mutations in the epitope region, which may affect the function of the antigen. Nonsynonymous mutations and changed human B-cell epitopes exist in 41 kD flagellin of B. burgdorferi sensu lato strains; these changes should be considered in serodiagnosis of Lyme disease.

  16. Optical detection of DNA conformational polymorphism on single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Heller, Daniel A; Jeng, Esther S; Yeung, Tsun-Kwan; Martinez, Brittany M; Moll, Anthonie E; Gastala, Joseph B; Strano, Michael S

    2006-01-27

    The transition of DNA secondary structure from an analogous B to Z conformation modulates the dielectric environment of the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) around which it is adsorbed. The SWNT band-gap fluorescence undergoes a red shift when an encapsulating 30-nucleotide oligomer is exposed to counter ions that screen the charged backbone. The transition is thermodynamically identical for DNA on and off the nanotube, except that the propagation length of the former is shorter by five-sixths. The magnitude of the energy shift is described by using an effective medium model and the DNA geometry on the nanotube sidewall. We demonstrate the detection of the B-Z change in whole blood, tissue, and from within living mammalian cells.

  17. Optical Detection of DNA Conformational Polymorphism on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Daniel A.; Jeng, Esther S.; Yeung, Tsun-Kwan; Martinez, Brittany M.; Moll, Anthonie E.; Gastala, Joseph B.; Strano, Michael S.

    2006-01-01

    The transition of DNA secondary structure from an analogous B to Z conformation modulates the dielectric environment of the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) around which it is adsorbed. The SWNT band-gap fluorescence undergoes a red shift when an encapsulating 30-nucleotide oligomer is exposed to counter ions that screen the charged backbone. The transition is thermodynamically identical for DNA on and off the nanotube, except that the propagation length of the former is shorter by five-sixths. The magnitude of the energy shift is described by using an effective medium model and the DNA geometry on the nanotube sidewall. We demonstrate the detection of the B-Z change in whole blood, tissue, and from within living mammalian cells.

  18. Single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of candidate genes for reliable identification of alleles by capillary array electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, David N; Borrone, James; Meerow, Alan W; Motamayor, Juan C; Brown, J Steven; Schnell, Raymond J

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the reliability of capillary array electrophoresis-single strand conformation polymorphism (CAE-SSCP) to determine if it can be used to identify novel alleles of candidate genes in a germplasm collection. Both strands of three different size fragments (160, 245 and 437 bp) that differed by one or more nucleotides in sequence were analyzed at four different temperatures (18 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 30 degrees C, and 35 degrees C). Mixtures of amplified fragments of either the intron interrupting the C-terminal WRKY domain of the Tc10 locus or the NBS domain of the TcRGH1 locus of Theobroma cacao were electroinjected into all 16 capillaries of an ABI 3100 Genetic Analyzer and analyzed three times at each temperature. Multiplexing of samples of different size range is possible, as intermediate and large fragments were analyzed simultaneously in these experiments. A statistical analysis of the means of the fragment mobilities demonstrated that single-stranded conformers of the fragments could be reliably identified by their mobility at all temperatures and size classes. The order of elution of fragments was not consistent over strands or temperatures for the intermediate and large fragments. If samples are only run once at a single temperature, small fragments could be identified from a single strand at a single temperature. A combination of data from both strands of a single run was needed to identify correctly all four of the intermediate fragments and no combination of data from strands or temperatures would allow the correct identification of two large fragments that differed by only a single single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) from a single run. Thus, to adequately assess alleles at a candidate gene locus using SSCP on a capillary array, fragments should be < or =250 bp, samples should be analyzed at two different temperatures between 18 degrees C and 30 degrees C to reduce the variability introduced by the capillaries, data should be combined

  19. Effect of temperature gradients on single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis in a capillary electrophoresis system using Pluronic polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hee Sung; Shin, Gi Won; Park, Han Jin; Ryu, Chang Y; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2013-09-02

    Capillary electrophoresis-single strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) analysis is a prominent bioseparation method based on the mobility diversity caused by sequence-induced conformational differences of single-stranded DNA. The use of Pluronic polymer matrix has opened up new opportunities for CE-SSCP, because it improved the resolution for various genetic analyses. However, there still exists a challenge in optimizing Pluronic-based CE-SSCP, because the physical properties of Pluronic solutions are sensitive to temperature, particularly near the gelation temperature, where the viscoelasticity of Pluronic F108 solutions sharply changes from that of a Newtonian fluid to a hydrogel upon heating. We have focused on a set of experiments to control the ambient temperature of the CE system with the aim of enhancing the reliability of the CE-SSCP analysis by using the Applied Biosystems ABI 3130xl genetic analyzer with Pluronic F108 solution matrix. The ambient temperature control allowed us to vary the inlet and outlet portion of the capillary column, while the temperature of the column was kept at 35°C. The resolution to separate 2 single-base-pair-differing DNA fragments was significantly enhanced by changing the temperature from 19 to 30°C. The viscoelastic properties of the F108 solution matrix upon heating were also investigated by ex situ rheological experiments with an effort to reveal how the development of gels in Pluronic solutions affects the resolution of CE-SSCP. We found that the column inlet and outlet temperatures of the capillary column have to be controlled to optimize the resolution in CE-SSCP by using the Pluronic matrix.

  20. Epitope structure of the Bordetella pertussis protein P.69 pertactin, a major vaccine component and protective antigen.

    PubMed

    Hijnen, Marcel; Mooi, Frits R; van Gageldonk, Pieter G M; Hoogerhout, Peter; King, Audrey J; Berbers, Guy A M

    2004-07-01

    Bordetella pertussis is reemerging in several countries with a traditionally high vaccine uptake. An analysis of clinical isolates revealed antigenic divergence between vaccine strains and circulating strains with respect to P.69 pertactin. Polymorphisms in P.69 pertactin are mainly limited to regions comprised of amino acid repeats, designated region 1 and region 2. Region 1 flanks the RGD motif, which is involved in adherence. Although antibodies against P.69 pertactin are implicated in protective immunity, little is known about the structure and location of its epitopes. Here we describe the identification by pepscan analysis of the locations of mainly linear epitopes recognized by human sera and mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). A total of 24 epitopes were identified, and of these only 2 were recognized by both MAbs and human antibodies in serum. A number of immunodominant epitopes were identified which were recognized by 78 to 93% of the human sera tested. Blocking experiments indicated the presence of high-avidity human antibodies against conformational epitopes. Human antibodies against linear epitopes had much lower avidities, as they were unable to block MAbs. Pepscan analyses revealed several MAbs which bound to both region 1 and region 2. The two regions are separated by 289 amino acids in the primary structure, and we discuss the possibility that they form a single conformational epitope. Thus, both repeat regions may serve to deflect the immune response targeted to the functional domain of P.69 pertactin. This may explain why the variation in P.69 pertactin is so effective, despite the fact that it is limited to only two small segments of the molecule.

  1. Polymorphic Ab protofilaments exhibit distinct conformational dynamics as calculated by normal mode analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, Matthew; Soto, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    This project proposes to test the hypothesis that the physicochemical milieu modulates the conformational dynamics of synthetic Alzheimer's Ab protofilament structures, the main component of Alzheimer's senile plaques. To this end, 3D solid-state NMR structures of Ab protofilaments were used as initial structures for molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water and a water/hexane environment. The initial structures of the simulations and representative structures from the simulation-generated trajectories were taken to perform computational normal mode analysis. We developed a code in python with a graphical user-friendly interface. The program incorporated the ProDy (0.7.1) package. With the application, we examined cross-correlation plots of Ca positions of the 2-fold Ab protofilaments along the most collective mode and the slowest mode. The protofilament structures were highly correlated in the water environment. We hypothesized the protofilament would move as one in water because of the viscosity. The square fluctuation of Ca positions was calculated for the slowest mode for the hexane model and the MD generated ensemble. The two plots match up until midway through the structure. At the midway point a phase shift emerged between the two structures most likely where the surrounding changes. The in-house developed code made it easy to perform analysis and will be used by other students in the research group.

  2. Solution structure of Atg8 reveals conformational polymorphism of the N-terminal domain

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarten, Melanie; Stoldt, Matthias; Mohrlueder, Jeannine; Willbold, Dieter

    2010-05-07

    During autophagy a crescent shaped like membrane is formed, which engulfs the material that is to be degraded. This membrane grows further until its edges fuse to form the double membrane covered autophagosome. Atg8 is a protein, which is required for this initial step of autophagy. Therefore, a multistage conjugation process of newly synthesized Atg8 to phosphatidylethanolamine is of critical importance. Here we present the high resolution structure of unprocessed Atg8 determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Its C-terminal subdomain shows a well-defined ubiquitin-like fold with slightly elevated mobility in the pico- to nanosecond timescale as determined by heteronuclear NOE data. In comparison to unprocessed Atg8, cleaved Atg8{sup G116} shows a decreased mobility behaviour. The N-terminal domain adopts different conformations within the micro- to millisecond timescale. The possible biological relevance of the differences in dynamic behaviours between both subdomains as well as between the cleaved and uncleaved forms is discussed.

  3. The Relationship between B-cell Epitope and Mimotope Sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Yunyun; Tang, Weina; Zhou, Zhiguo; Sun, Pingping; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    B-cell epitope is a group of residues which is on the surface of an antigen. It invokes humoral responses. Locating B-cell epitope is important for effective vaccine design, and the development of diagnostic reagents. Mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction method is a kind of conformational B-cell epitope prediction, and the core idea of the method is mapping the mimotope sequences which are obtained from a random phage display library. However, current mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods cannot maintain a high degree of satisfaction in the circumstances of employing only mimotope sequences. In this study, we did a multi-perspective analysis on parameters for conformational B-cell epitopes and characteristics between epitope and mimotope on a benchmark datasets which contains 67 mimotope sets, corresponding to 40 unique complex structures. In these 67 cases, there are 25 antigen-antibody complexes and 42 protein-protein interactions. We analyzed the two parts separately. The results showed the mimotope sequences do have some epitope features, but there are also some epitope properties that mimotope sequences do not contain. In addition, the numbers of epitope segments with different lengths were obviously different between the antigen-antibody complexes and the protein-protein interactions. This study reflects how similar do mimotope sequence and genuine epitopes have; and evaluates existing mimotope-based B-cell epitope prediction methods from a novel viewpoint.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis-single strand conformation polymorphism for the detection of multiple mutations leading to tuberculosis drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Krothapalli, Sowmya; May, Michael K; Hestekin, Christa N

    2012-10-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) is a major health problem in both developed and developing countries. Mutations in the Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis bacterial genome, such as those to the rpoB gene and mabA-inhA promoter region, have been linked to TB drug resistance in against rifampicin and isoniazid, respectively. The rapid, accurate, and inexpensive identification of these and other mutations leading to TB drug resistance is an essential tool for improving human health. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) can be a highly sensitive technique for the detection of genetic mutation that has not been previously explored for drug resistance mutations in M. tuberculosis. This work explores the potential of CE-SSCP through the optimization of variables such as polymer separation matrix concentration, capillary wall coating, electric field strength, and temperature on resolution of mutation detection. The successful detection of an rpoB gene mutation and two mabA-inhA promoter region mutations while simultaneously differentiating a TB-causing mycobacteria from a non-TB bacteria was accomplished using the optimum conditions of 4.5% (w/v) PDMA in a PDMA coated capillary at 20°C using a separation voltage of 278 V/cm. This multiplexed analysis that can be completed in a few hours demonstrates the potential of CE-SSCP to be an inexpensive and rapid analysis method.

  5. The application of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis in determining Hepatitis E virus intra-host diversity.

    PubMed

    Černi, S; Prpić, J; Jemeršić, L; Škorić, D

    2015-09-01

    Genetic heterogeneity of RNA populations influences virus pathogenesis, epidemiology and evolution. Therefore, accurate information regarding virus genetic structure is highly important for both diagnostic and scientific purposes. For the Hepatitis E virus (HEV), the causal agent of hepatitis in humans, the intra-host population structure has been poorly investigated, mainly using the less sensitive RFLP-based approach. The objective of this study was to assess the suitability and the accuracy of single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, a well-established tool in genetic variation research, for the characterization of HEV quasispecies. The analysis was conducted on 50 clones of five swine isolates and 30 clones of three human HEV isolates. To identify and quantify the sequence variants present in each HEV isolate, 348bp long fragments of the amplified conserved ORF2 region were separated by cloning. Ten clones per isolate were subjected to SSCP and sequenced in a parallel experiment. The results show a high correlation of SSCP haplotype profiling with the sequencing results, confirming the sensitivity and reliability of this simple, rapid and low cost approach in the characterization of HEV quasispecies.

  6. Capillary Electrophoresis – Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism for the Detection of Multiple Mutations Leading to Tuberculosis Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Krothapalli, Sowmya; May, Michael K.; Hestekin, Christa N.

    2013-01-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis (TB) is a major health problem in both developed and developing countries. Mutations in the Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis bacterial genome, such as those to the rpoB gene and mabA-inhA promoter region, have been linked to TB drug resistance in against rifampicin and isoniazid, respectively. The rapid, accurate, and inexpensive identification of these and other mutations leading to TB drug resistance is an essential tool for improving human health. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) can be a highly sensitive technique for the detection of genetic mutation that has not been previously explored for drug resistance mutations in M. tuberculosis. This work explores the potential of CE-SSCP through the optimization of variables such as polymer separation matrix concentration, capillary wall coating, electric field strength, and temperature on resolution of mutation detection. The successful detection of an rpoB gene mutation and two mabA-inhA promoter region mutations while simultaneously differentiating a TB-causing mycobacteria from a non-TB bacteria was accomplished using the optimum conditions of 4.5% (w/v) PDMA in a PDMA coated capillary at 20°C using a separation voltage of 278 V/cm. This multiplexed analysis that can be completed in a few hours demonstrates the potential of CE-SSCP to be an inexpensive and rapid analysis method. PMID:22884688

  7. Sensitive measurement of single-nucleotide polymorphism-induced changes of RNA conformation: application to disease studies.

    PubMed

    Salari, Raheleh; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava; Gottesman, Michael M; Przytycka, Teresa M

    2013-01-07

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are often linked to critical phenotypes such as diseases or responses to vaccines, medications and environmental factors. However, the specific molecular mechanisms by which a causal SNP acts is usually not obvious. Changes in RNA secondary structure emerge as a possible explanation necessitating the development of methods to measure the impact of single-nucleotide variation on RNA structure. Despite the recognition of the importance of considering the changes in Boltzmann ensemble of RNA conformers in this context, a formal method to perform directly such comparison was lacking. Here, we solved this problem and designed an efficient method to compute the relative entropy between the Boltzmann ensembles of the native and a mutant structure. On the basis of this theoretical progress, we developed a software tool, remuRNA, and investigated examples of its application. Comparing the impact of common SNPs naturally occurring in populations with the impact of random point mutations, we found that structural changes introduced by common SNPs are smaller than those introduced by random point mutations. This suggests a natural selection against mutations that significantly change RNA structure and demonstrates, surprisingly, that randomly inserted point mutations provide inadequate estimation of random mutations effects. Subsequently, we applied remuRNA to determine which of the disease-associated non-coding SNPs are potentially related to RNA structural changes.

  8. Identification of Chinese medicinal fungus Cordyceps sinensis by PCR-single-stranded conformation polymorphism and phylogenetic relationship.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsiao-Che; Su, Yong-Lin; Yang, Huey-Lang; Chen, Tzong-Yueh

    2005-05-18

    Fungi belonging to the Cordyceps species have long been used as food and herbal medicines in Asia and are especially popular as commercially available powdered supplements. Despite this acceptance and use, little is known of the phylogenetic relationships of the genus. Presently, the neighbor-joining method based on the ITS1, 5.8S rRNA, and ITS2 regions was used to construct a phylogenetic tree of 17 Cordyceps isolates. Five major groups were evident. Cordyceps sinensis was less closely related to 15 Cordyceps species but shared a closer relationship with Cordyceps agriota. PCR-single-stranded conformational polymorphism was applied to differentiate seven Cordyceps isolates: five were different from those used to construct the phylogenetic tree, based on differences in the internal spacer 2 (ITS2). The length of ITS2, amplified by primers 5.8SR and ITS4, vary between 334 and 400 bp. This segment could be used for intraspecies classification or detection of mutations and represents potential novel means of identification of this fungal genus in herbal medicines and in quality control applications in the fermentation industry.

  9. Plasmon analyses of Triticum (wheat) and Aegilops: PCR–single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analyses of organellar DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Zhi; Miyashita, Naohiko T.; Tsunewaki, Koichiro

    1997-01-01

    To investigate phylogenetic relationships among plasmons in Triticum and Aegilops, PCR–single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analyses were made of 14.0-kb chloroplast (ct) and 13.7-kb mitochondrial (mt)DNA regions that were isolated from 46 alloplasmic wheat lines and one euplasmic line. These plasmons represent 31 species of the two genera. The ct and mtDNA regions included 10 and 9 structural genes, respectively. A total of 177 bands were detected, of which 40.6% were variable. The proportion of variable bands in ctDNA (51.1%) was higher than that of mtDNA (28.9%). The phylogenetic trees of plasmons, derived by two different models, indicate a common picture of plasmon divergence in the two genera and suggest three major groups of plasmons (Einkorn, Triticum, and Aegilops). Because of uniparental plasmon transmission, the maternal parents of all but one polyploid species were identified. Only one Aegilops species, Ae. speltoides, was included in the Triticum group, suggesting that this species is the plasmon and B and G genome donor of all polyploid wheats. ctDNA variations were more intimately correlated with vegetative characters, whereas mtDNA variations were more closely correlated with reproductive characters. Plasmon divergence among the diploids of the two genera largely paralleled genome divergence. The relative times of origin of the polyploid species were inferred from genetic distances from their putative maternal parents. PMID:9405654

  10. Hot topic: Bovine milk samples yielding negative or nonspecific results in bacterial culturing--the possible role of PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism in mastitis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, K; Wimmer, M; Huber-Schlenstedt, R; Fehlings, K; Hölzel, C S; Bauer, J

    2012-01-01

    A large proportion of mastitis milk samples yield negative or nonspecific results (i.e., no mastitis pathogen can be identified) in bacterial culturing. Therefore, the culture-independent PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism method was applied to the investigation of bovine mastitis milk samples. In addition to the known mastitis pathogens, the method was suitable for the detection of fastidious bacteria such as Mycoplasma spp., which are often missed by conventional culturing methods. The detection of Helcococcus ovis in 4 samples might indicate an involvement of this species in pathogenesis of bovine mastitis. In conclusion, PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism is a promising tool for gaining new insights into the bacteriological etiology of mastitis.

  11. Rapid detection of apolipoprotein E genotypes in Alzheimer's disease using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Kamruecha, Worawan; Chansirikarnjana, Sirintorn; Nimkulrat, Ekapot; Udommongkol, Chesda; Wongmek, Wanna; Thangnipon, Wipawan

    2006-07-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene on chromosome 19q13.2 is encoded by three common alleles designated as epsilon2, epsilon3 and epsilon4. In Alzheimer's disease (AD) the epsilon4 allele is over-represented and is considered to be a major genetic risk factor. Several methods have been developed to determine APOE genotypes. Among them, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) appears to be highly reliable. In this study, we improved the nonisotopic PCR-SSCP method for determining APOE genotypes in 42 cases of AD patients, 40 cases of non-AD dementia patients, and 49 cases of age-matched controls. DNA from the target sequence on APOE was amplified by PCR from peripheral blood genomic DNA. PCR products were electrophoresed in a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel and visualized by silver staining. We found that the epsilon4 allele had a significantly high frequency of occurrence in AD patients (33.3%) compared with age-matched controls (13.3%) (chi(2) = 10.43, p = 0.001) and non-AD dementia (10%) (chi(2) = 13.02, p<0.001) whereas the epsilon3 allele was of high frequency in non-AD dementia (90%) compared with age-matched controls (85.7%) and AD patients (66.7%). APOE epsilon4 homozygotes were found only in AD groups. On the other hand, the epsilon2 allele was found only in an age-matched control. This study confirmed that the APOE psilon4 allele is a risk factor in Thai AD subjects and that the PCR-SSCP method is a rapid and useful means of detecting the APOE genotype in AD.

  12. Detection of HLA-DRB1 microchimerism using nested polymerase chain reaction and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Young; Chung, Hye Yoon; Joo, Shin Young; Roh, Eun Youn; Seong, Moon-Woo; Shin, Yunsu; Park, Myoung Hee

    2012-03-01

    For the detection of microchimerism, molecular methods detecting donor-specific HLA-DRB1 alleles in the recipient are most commonly used. Nested polymerase chain reaction sequence specific primer (nested PCR-SSP) methods widely used to increase the sensitivity of detection have been reported to give frequent false-positive reactions. We have developed a new method combining nested PCR with single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis (nested PCR-SSCP) and tested the 1 to 0.00001% level of microchimerism for 27 different HLA-DRB1 alleles. For most (26/27) of the HLA-DRB1 alleles tested, this method could detect 0.01 to 0.001% of microchimerism and its sensitivity was equal to or better than that of nested PCR-SSP tested in parallel. Its specificity was verified by visualizing particular DRB1-specific SSCP bands under test. Nested PCR-SSP indicated frequent false-positive reactions, mainly caused by nonspecific amplification of DRB3/B4/B5 alleles present in the major (recipient) DNAs. We have compared a real-time quantitative PCR for non-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) target (insertion/deletion marker) using a commercial kit (AlleleSEQR Chimerism assay), and its microchimerism detection sensitivity (around 0.1%) was 1 step (10 times) lower than that of nested PCR-SSP or -SSCP methods for HLA-DRB1 alleles. We validated that the newly designed nested PCR-SSCP affords good sensitivity and specificity and may be useful for studying microchimerism in clinical settings.

  13. Immunogenicity and antigenicity of immunoglobulins. XII. Intact light chain and heavy chain isotype-restricted Vk-associated epitopes.

    PubMed

    Walker, M; Hardie, D; Lowe, J; Ling, N R; De Lange, G; Jefferis, R

    1985-06-01

    Immunization with intact IgG has allowed the isolation of four hybridomas producing antibodies recognizing epitopes expressed within subpopulations of human kappa light chains unrelated to known polymorphisms (Km) and previously defined V-region subgroups. The V-region-associated epitopes recognized are conformation-dependent, being expressed on intact light chain but not on isolated VK or CK fragments. The frequency of expression within paraprotein panels of different heavy chain isotypes varied between individual antibodies. An epitope recognized by B2A6, expressed by greater than 85% IgGK paraproteins, was not represented in 16 IgM paraproteins tested, suggesting that association of VK with mu chains does not result in display of the epitope recognized, or alternatively, that selective association between VK and CH gene products occurs. These data contrast with the reactivity of other McAb for CK epitopes which were reactive with isolated CK fragments, and for all kappa-bearing paraproteins, regardless of heavy chain isotypes.

  14. Computational prediction of B cell epitopes from antigen sequences.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jianzhao; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    Computational identification of B-cell epitopes from antigen chains is a difficult and actively pursued research topic. Efforts towards the development of method for the prediction of linear epitopes span over the last three decades, while only recently several predictors of conformational epitopes were released. We review a comprehensive set of 13 recent approaches that predict linear and 4 methods that predict conformational B-cell epitopes from the antigen sequences. We introduce several databases of B-cell epitopes, since the availability of the corresponding data is at the heart of the development and validation of computational predictors. We also offer practical insights concerning the use and availability of these B-cell epitope predictors, and motivate and discuss feature research in this area.

  15. Atomic-level mapping of antibody epitopes on a GPCR.

    PubMed

    Paes, Cheryl; Ingalls, Jada; Kampani, Karan; Sulli, Chidananda; Kakkar, Esha; Murray, Meredith; Kotelnikov, Valery; Greene, Tiffani A; Rucker, Joseph B; Doranz, Benjamin J

    2009-05-27

    Epitopes that define the immunodominant regions of conformationally complex integral membrane proteins have been difficult to reliably delineate. Here, a high-throughput approach termed shotgun mutagenesis was used to map the binding epitopes of five different monoclonal antibodies targeting the GPCR CCR5. The amino acids, and in some cases the atoms, that comprise the critical contact points of each epitope were identified, defining the immunodominant structures of this GPCR and their physicochemistry.

  16. Double-strand conformation polymorphism (DSCP) analysis of the mitochondrial control region generates highly variable markers for population studies in a social insect.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, L; Adams, E S

    1997-11-01

    Genetic markers were obtained for the termite Nasutitermes corniger by DSCP (double-strand conformation polymorphism) analysis of PCR-amplified mitochondrial control region DNA. This procedure revealed twenty-one haplotypes in forty-four colonies, whereas a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis detected only nine haplotypes. Sequence analysis of DSCP fragments of contrasting mobilities suggests that the electrophoretic haplotypes are caused by DNA curvature in this highly AT-rich region. DSCP markers showed that some termite colonies contained maternally unrelated queens, each of which produced worker offspring. This pattern is consistent with nest founding by unrelated queens. Due to the availability of conserved primers for the mtDNA control region, DSCP analysis may readily reveal comparatively high levels of variation in a wide variety of organisms.

  17. Is single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the full 5' untranslated region an adequate approach to study hepatitis C virus quasispecies distribution?

    PubMed

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Barría, María Inés; León, Ursula; Carvallo, Pilar; Soza, Alejandro; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2009-09-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis is used by many laboratories to study the quasispecies distribution of the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here we question the validity of this experimental approach, as conclusions are drawn from the analysis of the migration patterns of two ssDNA molecules and not from RNA. Using previously characterized mutants of the HCV 5' untranslated regions, we show that contrary to what has been predicted, SSCP migration patterns of DNA amplicons with differences in their nucleotide sequences generated from the full 5' UTR of HCV are not necessarily unique.

  18. Use of single-strand conformation polymorphism of amplified 16S rDNA for grouping of bacteria isolated from foods.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hajime; Kimura, Bon; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Mori, Mayumi; Yokoi, Asami; Fujii, Tateo

    2008-04-01

    The grouping method for isolated strains from foods using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) after PCR amplification of a portion of 16S rDNA was developed. This method was able to group the strains from various food samples based on 16S rDNA sequence. As 97.8% of the isolated strains from various foods were grouped correctly, use of the PCR-SSCP method enables the prompt and labor-saving analysis of microbial population of food-derived bacterial strains. Advantages in speed and accuracy of bacterial population identification by the PCR-SSCP method have practical application for food suppliers and testing laboratories.

  19. Is Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism Analysis of the Full 5′ Untranslated Region an Adequate Approach To Study Hepatitis C Virus Quasispecies Distribution? ▿

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Otarola, Jorge; Barría, María Inés; León, Ursula; Carvallo, Pilar; Soza, Alejandro; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis is used by many laboratories to study the quasispecies distribution of the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Here we question the validity of this experimental approach, as conclusions are drawn from the analysis of the migration patterns of two ssDNA molecules and not from RNA. Using previously characterized mutants of the HCV 5′ untranslated regions, we show that contrary to what has been predicted, SSCP migration patterns of DNA amplicons with differences in their nucleotide sequences generated from the full 5′ UTR of HCV are not necessarily unique. PMID:19553315

  20. Rapid PCR–Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism Method To Differentiate and Estimate Relative Abundance of Pneumocystis carinii Special Forms Infecting Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nahimana, Aimable; Cushion, Melanie T.; Blanc, Dominique S.; Hauser, Philippe M.

    2001-01-01

    A rapid method that uses PCR–single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the intron of the nuclear 26S rRNA gene was shown to differentiate the two Pneumocystis carinii special forms that infect rats, P. carinii f. sp. carinii and P. carinii f. sp. ratti. The method also provides a means for estimation of the relative abundance of the two special forms in the case of a coinfected rat. The results suggest that the method described will help to further standardize the immunosuppressed rat model of P. carinii infection and, thus, contribute to a better understanding of P. carinii infection in humans. PMID:11724884

  1. Epitope Mapping with Random Phage Display Library

    PubMed Central

    Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Goldblum, Randall M.

    2017-01-01

    Random phage display library is used to map conformational as well as linear epitopes. These libraries are available in varying lengths and with circularization. We provide here a protocol conveying our experience using a commercially available peptide phage display library, which in our hands provides good results. PMID:24515483

  2. Immunoinformatics prediction of linear epitopes from Taenia solium TSOL18

    PubMed Central

    Zimic, Mirko; Gutiérrez, Andrés Hazaet; Gilman, Robert Hugh; López, César; Quiliano, Miguel; Evangelista, Wilfredo; Gonzales, Armando; García, Héctor Hugo; Sheen, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a public health problem in several developing countries. The oncosphere protein TSOL18 is the most immunogenic and protective antigen ever reported against porcine cysticercosis, although no specific epitope has been identified to account for these properties. Recent evidence suggests that protection might be associated with conformational epitopes. Linear epitopes from TSOL18 were computationally predicted and evaluated for immunogenicity and protection against porcine cysticercosis. A synthetic peptide was designed based on predicted linear B cell and T cell epitopes that are exposed on the surface of the theoretically modeled structure of TSOL18. Three surface epitopes from TSOL18 were predicted as immunogenic. A peptide comprising a linear arrangement of these epitopes was chemically synthesized. The capacity of the synthetic peptide to protect pigs against an oral challenge with Taenia solium proglottids was tested in a vaccine trial. The synthetic peptide was able to produce IgG antibodies in pigs and was associated to a reduction of the number of cysts, although was not able to provide complete protection, defined as the complete absence of cysts in necropsy. This study demonstrated that B cell and T cell predicted epitopes from TSOL18 were not able to completely protect pigs against an oral challenge with Taenia solium proglottids. Therefore, other linear epitopes or eventually conformational epitopes may be responsible for the protection conferred by TSOL18. PMID:21738328

  3. Immunoinformatics prediction of linear epitopes from Taenia solium TSOL18.

    PubMed

    Zimic, Mirko; Gutiérrez, Andrés Hazaet; Gilman, Robert Hugh; López, César; Quiliano, Miguel; Evangelista, Wilfredo; Gonzales, Armando; García, Héctor Hugo; Sheen, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Cysticercosis is a public health problem in several developing countries. The oncosphere protein TSOL18 is the most immunogenic and protective antigen ever reported against porcine cysticercosis, although no specific epitope has been identified to account for these properties. Recent evidence suggests that protection might be associated with conformational epitopes. Linear epitopes from TSOL18 were computationally predicted and evaluated for immunogenicity and protection against porcine cysticercosis. A synthetic peptide was designed based on predicted linear B cell and T cell epitopes that are exposed on the surface of the theoretically modeled structure of TSOL18. Three surface epitopes from TSOL18 were predicted as immunogenic. A peptide comprising a linear arrangement of these epitopes was chemically synthesized. The capacity of the synthetic peptide to protect pigs against an oral challenge with Taenia solium proglottids was tested in a vaccine trial. The synthetic peptide was able to produce IgG antibodies in pigs and was associated to a reduction of the number of cysts, although was not able to provide complete protection, defined as the complete absence of cysts in necropsy. This study demonstrated that B cell and T cell predicted epitopes from TSOL18 were not able to completely protect pigs against an oral challenge with Taenia solium proglottids. Therefore, other linear epitopes or eventually conformational epitopes may be responsible for the protection conferred by TSOL18.

  4. Detection of RET proto-oncogene point mutations in paraffin-embedded pheochromocytoma specimens by nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Komminoth, P.; Kunz, E.; Hiort, O.; Schröder, S.; Matias-Guiu, X.; Christiansen, G.; Roth, J.; Heitz, P. U.

    1994-01-01

    The suitability of formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumor material was evaluated for molecular analysis of the RET proto-oncogene. We analyzed exons 10, 11, and 16 for point mutations in seven sporadic and six multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) 2A-associated pheochromocytomas by a nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism assay followed by nonradioactive direct sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA using an automated DNA sequencer. All MEN 2A-associated pheochromocytomas contained a heterozygous missense germline mutation within cystine codons of the cysteine-rich extracellular domain encoded by exons 10 and 11. Mutations were located in codon 619 (TGC-->TCC; Cys-->Ser) in one, in codon 635 (TGC-->CGC; Cys--Arg) in three, and in codon 635 (TGC-->TAC; Cys-->Tyr) in two pheochromocytomas. No tumor-specific (somatic) mutations were detected in exons 10, 11, and 16 of the sporadic pheochromocytomas. These data support recent findings that germline point mutations that are clustered in distinct cysteine codons of the RET proto-oncogene are involved in the neoplastic phenotype of the MEN 2A syndrome. Our results demonstrate that both nonradioactive single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing are suitable methods to detect single base substitutions in DNA extracted from archival material. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:7943181

  5. Epitope mapping: the first step in developing epitope-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gershoni, Jonathan M; Roitburd-Berman, Anna; Siman-Tov, Dror D; Tarnovitski Freund, Natalia; Weiss, Yael

    2007-01-01

    epitope mapping, computational algorithms have been developed, such as Mapitope, which has recently been found to be effective in mapping conformational discontinuous epitopes. The pros and cons of various approaches towards epitope mapping are also discussed.

  6. Structural systematics and conformational analyses of a 3 × 3 isomer grid of fluoro-N-(pyridyl)benzamides: physicochemical correlations, polymorphism and isomorphous relationships.

    PubMed

    Mocilac, Pavle; Donnelly, Katie; Gallagher, John F

    2012-04-01

    An isomer grid of nine fluoro-N-(pyridyl)benzamides (Fxx) (x = para-/meta-/ortho-) has been examined to correlate structural relationships between the experimental crystal structure and ab initio calculations, based on the effect of fluorine (Fx) and pyridine N-atom (x) substitution patterns on molecular conformation. Eight isomers form N-H⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bonds, and only one (Fom) aggregates via intermolecular N-H⋅⋅⋅O=C interactions exclusively. The Fpm and Fom isomers both crystallize as two polymorphs with Fpm_O (N-H⋅⋅⋅O=C chains, P-syn) and Fpm_N (N-H⋅⋅⋅N chains, P-anti) both in P2(1)/n (Z' = 1) differing by their meta-N atom locations (P-syn, P-anti; N(pyridine) referenced to N-H), whereas the disordered Fom_O is mostly P-syn (Z' = 6) compared with Fom_F (P-anti) (Z' = 1). In the Fxo triad twisted dimers form cyclic R(2)(2)(8) rings via N-H⋅⋅⋅N interactions. Computational modelling and conformational preferences of the isomer grid demonstrate that the solid-state conformations generally conform with the most stable calculated conformations except for the Fxm triad, while calculations of the Fox triad predict the intramolecular N-H⋅⋅⋅F interaction established by spectroscopic and crystallographic data. Comparisons of Fxx with related isomer grids reveal a high degree of similarity in solid-state aggregation and physicochemical properties, while correlation of the melting point behaviour indicates the significance of the substituent position on melting point behaviour rather than the nature of the substituent.

  7. First report on the antibody verification of HLA-ABC epitopes recorded in the website-based HLA Epitope Registry.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, R J; Marrari, M; Mulder, A; Sousa, L C D da Mata; da Silva, A S; do Monte, S J H

    2014-06-01

    The International Registry of Antibody-Defined HLA Epitopes ( http://www.epregistry.com.br) has been recently established as a tool to understand humoral responses to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches. These epitopes are defined structurally by three-dimensional molecular modeling and amino acid sequence differences between HLA antigens. So-called eplets represent essential components of HLA epitopes and they are defined by polymorphic residues. A major goal is to identify HLA epitopes that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. Our analysis has also included data in many publications. As of 1 November 2013, 95 HLA-ABC antibody-verified epitopes have been recorded, 62 correspond to eplets and 33 are defined by eplets paired with other residue configurations. The Registry is still a work-in-progress and will become a useful resource for HLA professionals interested in histocompatibility testing at the epitope level and investigating antibody responses to HLA mismatches in transplant patients.

  8. Proof of principle for epitope-focused vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Bruno E.; Bates, John T.; Loomis, Rebecca J.; Baneyx, Gretchen; Carrico, Christopher; Jardine, Joseph G.; Rupert, Peter; Correnti, Colin; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Vittal, Vinayak; Connell, Mary J.; Stevens, Eric; Schroeter, Alexandria; Chen, Man; MacPherson, Skye; Serra, Andreia M.; Adachi, Yumiko; Holmes, Margaret A.; Li, Yuxing; Klevit, Rachel E.; Graham, Barney S.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Crowe, James E.; Johnson, Philip R.; Schief, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vaccines prevent infectious disease largely by inducing protective neutralizing antibodies against vulnerable epitopes. Multiple major pathogens have resisted traditional vaccine development, although vulnerable epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies have been identified for several such cases. Hence, new vaccine design methods to induce epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies are needed. Here we show, with a neutralization epitope from respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), that computational protein design can generate small, thermally and conformationally stable protein scaffolds that accurately mimic the viral epitope structure and induce potent neutralizing antibodies. These scaffolds represent promising leads for research and development of a human RSV vaccine needed to protect infants, young children and the elderly. More generally, the results provide proof of principle for epitope-focused and scaffold-based vaccine design, and encourage the evaluation and further development of these strategies for a variety of other vaccine targets including antigenically highly variable pathogens such as HIV and influenza. PMID:24499818

  9. Proof of principle for epitope-focused vaccine design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Bruno E.; Bates, John T.; Loomis, Rebecca J.; Baneyx, Gretchen; Carrico, Chris; Jardine, Joseph G.; Rupert, Peter; Correnti, Colin; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Vittal, Vinayak; Connell, Mary J.; Stevens, Eric; Schroeter, Alexandria; Chen, Man; MacPherson, Skye; Serra, Andreia M.; Adachi, Yumiko; Holmes, Margaret A.; Li, Yuxing; Klevit, Rachel E.; Graham, Barney S.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Crowe, James E.; Johnson, Philip R.; Schief, William R.

    2014-03-01

    Vaccines prevent infectious disease largely by inducing protective neutralizing antibodies against vulnerable epitopes. Several major pathogens have resisted traditional vaccine development, although vulnerable epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies have been identified for several such cases. Hence, new vaccine design methods to induce epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies are needed. Here we show, with a neutralization epitope from respiratory syncytial virus, that computational protein design can generate small, thermally and conformationally stable protein scaffolds that accurately mimic the viral epitope structure and induce potent neutralizing antibodies. These scaffolds represent promising leads for the research and development of a human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine needed to protect infants, young children and the elderly. More generally, the results provide proof of principle for epitope-focused and scaffold-based vaccine design, and encourage the evaluation and further development of these strategies for a variety of other vaccine targets, including antigenically highly variable pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and influenza.

  10. Molecular subtyping of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Heneine, W; Switzer, W M; Busch, M; Khabbaz, R F; Kaplan, J E

    1995-01-01

    Molecular subtyping of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2) by the currently used method of restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis may not be sufficiently discriminatory for transmission studies because of the predominance of single restriction types in various HTLV-2-infected populations. The utility of single-strand conformations polymorphism (SSCP) analysis was evaluated as a tool to improve the sensitivity of the subtyping of HTLV-2. The assay was designed to target a highly variable region in the long terminal repeat and was shown to be able to detect single nucleotide changes in cloned HTLV-2 sequences. Analysis of 52 HTLV-2 samples, of which 32 were from 16 sex partner pairs (16 males, 16 females), showed nine different SSCP patterns. Identical SSCP results were obtained for each of the 16 couples, suggesting the presence of similar viral genotypes and, therefore, supporting the likelihood of sexual transmission of HTLV-2 in each of these couples. Furthermore, SSCP analysis of seven HTLV-2 samples of the same restriction type (b5) showed five different SSCP patterns. Nucleotide sequencing of two samples with distinct SSCP patterns confirmed the sequence differences. SSCP provides a facile and discriminatory tool for the differentiation of HTLV-2 strains, including those previously indistinguishable by restriction fragment length polymorphism. PMID:8586713

  11. Single strand conformation polymorphism of genomic and EST-SSRs marker and its utility in genetic evaluation of sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Kalwade, Sachin B; Devarumath, Rachayya M

    2014-07-01

    Sugarcane is an important crop producing around 75 % of sugar in world and used as first generation biofuel. In present study, the genomic and gene based microsatellite markers were analyzed by low cost Single Strand Confirmation Polymorphism technique for genetic evaluation of 22 selected sugarcane genotypes. Total 16 genomic and 12 Expression Sequence Tag derived markers were able to amplify the selected sugarcane genotypes. Total 138 alleles were amplified of which 99 alleles (72 %) found polymorphic with an average of 4.9 alleles per locus. Microsatellite marker, VCSSR7 and VCSSR 12 showed monomorphic alleles with frequency 7.1 % over the average of 3.5 obtained for polymorphic locus. The level of Polymorphic Information Content (PIC) varied from 0.09 in VCSSR 6 to 0.88 in VCSSR 11 marker respectively with a mean of 0.49. Genomic SSRs showed more polymorphism than EST-SSRs markers on selected sugarcane genotypes whereas, the genetic similarity indices calculated by Jaccard's similarity coefficient varied from 0.55 to 0.81 indicate a high level of genetic similarity among the genotypes that was mainly attributed to intra specific diversity. Hence, the SSR-SSCP technique helped to identify the genetically diverse clones which could be used in crossing program for introgression of sugar and stress related traits in hybrid sugarcane.

  12. Analysis of two abundant, highly related satellites in the allotetraploid Nicotiana arentsii using double-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Matyasek, Roman; Fulnecek, Jaroslav; Leitch, Andrew R; Kovarik, Ales

    2011-11-01

    • Allopolyploidy, a driving force in plant evolution, can induce rapid structural changes in parental subgenomes. Here, we examined the fate of homologous subtelomeric satellites in intrasection allotetraploid Nicotiana arentsii formed from N. undulata and N. wigandioides progenitors < 200,000 yr ago. • We cloned and sequenced a number of monomers from progenitors and the allotetraploid. Structural features of both cloned and genomic monomers were studied using double-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. • Two homologous satellites were isolated from N. undulata (called NUNSSP) and N. wigandioides (NWISSP). While the NUNSSP monomers were highly homogeneous in nucleotide sequences, the NWISSP monomers formed two separate clades. Likewise, the genomic NUNSSP monomers showed less DNA conformation heterogeneity than NWISSP monomers, with distinct conformations. While both satellites predominantly occupy subtelomeric positions, a fraction of the NWISSP repeats was found in an intercalary location, supporting the hypothesis that dispersion prevents the repeats becoming homogeneous. Sequence, structural and chromosomal features of the parental satellites were faithfully inherited by N. arentsii. • Our study revealed that intergenomic homogenization of subtelomeric satellite repeats does not occur in N. arentsii allotetraploid. We propose that the sequence and structural divergence of subtelomeric satellites may render allopolyploid chromosomes less vulnerable to intergenomic exchanges. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Genotypic characterization of an MHC class II locus in lake trout ( Salvelinus namaycush) from Lake Superior by single-stranded conformational polymorphism analysis and reference strand-mediated conformational analysis.

    PubMed

    Noakes, Marc A; Reimer, Tara; Phillips, Ruth B

    2003-01-01

    This study compares the genotypic information provided by reference strand-mediated conformational analysis and single-stranded confirmational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) II locus in lake trout. For this study 80 wild-caught animals from the Apostle Islands of Lake Superior were genotyped using both RSCA and SSCP analysis. Their genotypes were recorded using both methods and compared. The genotypic information provided by the 2 methods was essentially the same although some inconsistencies were observed. Both methods detected approximately 65 genotypes, and both were able to distinguish heterozygous and homozygous animals. The analyses determined that only approximately 20% of alleles were shared between 2 morphologically different populations within the sample set, and identified the dominant alleles. SSCP analysis was quicker, simple, and more robust than RSCA. SSCP analysis using fluorescence technologies could be the method of choice for future genotypic analysis of the MHC II locus in salmonids.

  14. Conformational stability of mammalian prion protein amyloid fibrils is dictated by a packing polymorphism within the core region.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Nathan J; Apostol, Marcin I; Chen, Shugui; Smirnovas, Vytautas; Surewicz, Witold K

    2014-01-31

    Mammalian prion strains are believed to arise from the propagation of distinct conformations of the misfolded prion protein PrP(Sc). One key operational parameter used to define differences between strains has been conformational stability of PrP(Sc) as defined by resistance to thermal and/or chemical denaturation. However, the structural basis of these stability differences is unknown. To bridge this gap, we have generated two strains of recombinant human prion protein amyloid fibrils that show dramatic differences in conformational stability and have characterized them by a number of biophysical methods. Backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments revealed that, in sharp contrast to previously studied strains of infectious amyloid formed from the yeast prion protein Sup35, differences in β-sheet core size do not underlie differences in conformational stability between strains of mammalian prion protein amyloid. Instead, these stability differences appear to be dictated by distinct packing arrangements (i.e. steric zipper interfaces) within the amyloid core, as indicated by distinct x-ray fiber diffraction patterns and large strain-dependent differences in hydrogen/deuterium exchange kinetics for histidine side chains within the core region. Although this study was limited to synthetic prion protein amyloid fibrils, a similar structural basis for strain-dependent conformational stability may apply to brain-derived PrP(Sc), especially because large strain-specific differences in PrP(Sc) stability are often observed despite a similar size of the PrP(Sc) core region.

  15. Leishmania major: genetic heterogeneity of Iranian isolates by single-strand conformation polymorphism and sequence analysis of ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer.

    PubMed

    Tashakori, Mahnaz; Mahnaz, Tashakori; Kuhls, Katrin; Katrin, Kuhls; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Amer, Al-Jawabreh; Mauricio, Isabel L; Isabel, Mauricio; Schönian, Gabriele; Gabriele, Schönian; Farajnia, Safar; Safar, Farajnia; Alimohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Hossein, Alimohammadian Mohammad

    2006-04-01

    Protozoan parasites of Leishmania major are the causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis in different parts of Iran. We applied PCR-based methods to analyze L. major parasites isolated from patients with active lesions from different geographic areas in Iran in order to understand DNA polymorphisms within L. major species. Twenty-four isolates were identified as L. major by RFLP analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) amplicons. These isolates were further studied by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and sequencing of ITS1 and ITS2. Data obtained from SSCP analysis of the ITS1 and ITS2 loci revealed three and four different patterns among all studied samples, respectively. Sequencing of ITS1 and ITS2 confirmed the results of SSCP analysis and showed the potential of the PCR-SSCP method for assessing genetic heterogeneity within L. major. Different patterns in ITS1 were due to substitution of one nucleotide, whereas in ITS2 the changes were defined by variation in the number of repeats in two polymorphic microsatellites. In total five genotypic groups LmA, LmB, LmC, LmD and LmE were identified among L. major isolates. The most frequent genotype, LmA, was detected in isolates collected from different endemic areas of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Iran. Genotypes LmC, LmD and LmE were found only in the new focus of CL in Damghan (Semnan province) and LmB was identified exclusively among isolates of Kashan focus (Isfahan province). The distribution of genetic polymorphisms suggests the existence of distinct endemic regions of L. major in Iran.

  16. Sequence Variations in the Bovine Growth Hormone Gene Characterized by Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism (Sscp) Analysis and Their Association with Milk Production Traits in Holsteins

    PubMed Central

    Yao, J.; Aggrey, S. E.; Zadworny, D.; Hayes, J. F.; Kuhnlein, U.

    1996-01-01

    Sequence variations in the bovine growth hormone (GH) gene were investigated by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of seven amplified fragments covering almost the entire gene (2.7 kb). SSCPs were detected in four of these fragments and a total of six polymorphisms were found in a sample of 128 Holstein bulls. Two polymorphisms, a T->C transition in the third intron (designated GH4.1) and an A->C transversion in the fifth exon (designated GH6.2), were shown to be associated with milk production traits. GH4.1(c)/GH4.1(c) bulls had higher milk yield than GH4.1(c)/GH4.1(t) (P <= 0.005) and GH4.1(t)/GH4.1(t) (P <= 0.0022) bulls. GH4.1(c)/GH4.1(c) bulls had higher kg fat (P <= 0.0076) and protein (P <= 0.0018) than GH4.1(c)/GH4.1(t) bulls. Similar effects on milk production traits with the GH6.2 polymorphism were observed with the GH6.2(a) allele being the favorable allele. The average effects of the gene substitution for GH4.1 and GH6.2 are similar, with +/-300 kg for milk yield, +/-8 kg for fat content and +/-7 kg for protein content per lactation. The positive association of GH4.1(c) and GH6.2(a) with milk production traits may be useful for improving milk performance in dairy cattle. PMID:8978066

  17. Diverse locations of amino acids in HLA-DR beta chains involved in polymorphic antibody binding epitopes on DR(alpha, beta 1*0101), DR(alpha, beta 1*1101), and DR(alpha,beta 3*0202) molecules.

    PubMed

    Fu, X T; Klohe, E; Alber, C; Yu, W Y; Ferrara, G B; Pistillo, M P; Ballas, M; Karr, R W

    1992-03-01

    In a previous study, we used transfectants expressing hybrid HLA-DR(beta 1*0403)/DR(beta 1*0701) chains to map sequences involved in polymorphic antibody binding epitopes on DR(alpha, beta 1*0403) or DR(alpha, beta 1*0701) molecules. Amino acids 1-40 of the beta 1 domain were found to make the major contributions to most of the antibody binding epitopes studied. To begin to localize sequences that contribute to polymorphic antibody epitopes on DR(alpha,beta 1*0101), DR(alpha,beta 1*1101) and DR(alpha,beta 3*0202) molecules, we used indirect immunofluorescence and flow cytometry to assess the binding of mAb to transfectants expressing hybrid DR(beta 1*0101)/DR(beta 1*1101) or DR(beta 1*1101)/DR(beta 3*0202) chains that divide the DR beta chain into three segments: amino acids 1-40, 41-97, and the beta 2 domain. The results indicate that amino acids 41-97 of the beta 1 domain on DR(beta 1*0101), DR(beta 1*1101), or DR(beta 3*0202) are critical in most of the epitopes, including those recognized by human antibodies MP4 and MP12, and mouse mAb GS88.2, I-LR1, 21r5, and 7.3.19.1, whereas amino acids 1-40 of DR(beta 1*1101) are critical in the epitope recognized by the MCS-7 mAb, and both segments 1-40 and 41-97 of DR(beta 1*1101) are important in the epitopes recognized by the I-LR2 and UL-52 mAbs. Based on these data and comparison of DR beta allelic protein sequences, the residues that may play critical roles in these antibody binding epitopes are predicted.

  18. Single strand conformation polymorphism based SNP and Indel markers for genetic mapping and synteny analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are an important source of gene-based markers such as those based on insertion-deletions (Indels) or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Several gel based methods have been reported for the detection of sequence variants, however they have not been widely exploited in common bean, an important legume crop of the developing world. The objectives of this project were to develop and map EST based markers using analysis of single strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCPs), to create a transcript map for common bean and to compare synteny of the common bean map with sequenced chromosomes of other legumes. Results A set of 418 EST based amplicons were evaluated for parental polymorphisms using the SSCP technique and 26% of these presented a clear conformational or size polymorphism between Andean and Mesoamerican genotypes. The amplicon based markers were then used for genetic mapping with segregation analysis performed in the DOR364 × G19833 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. A total of 118 new marker loci were placed into an integrated molecular map for common bean consisting of 288 markers. Of these, 218 were used for synteny analysis and 186 presented homology with segments of the soybean genome with an e-value lower than 7 × 10-12. The synteny analysis with soybean showed a mosaic pattern of syntenic blocks with most segments of any one common bean linkage group associated with two soybean chromosomes. The analysis with Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus presented fewer syntenic regions consistent with the more distant phylogenetic relationship between the galegoid and phaseoloid legumes. Conclusion The SSCP technique is a useful and inexpensive alternative to other SNP or Indel detection techniques for saturating the common bean genetic map with functional markers that may be useful in marker assisted selection. In addition, the genetic markers based on ESTs allowed the construction of a transcript map and

  19. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism analyses of nuclear and chloroplast DNA provide evidence for recombination, multiple introductions and nascent speciation in the Caulerpa taxifolia complex.

    PubMed

    Meusnier, I; Valero, M; Destombe, C; Godé, C; Desmarais, E; Bonhomme, F; Stam, W T; Olsen, J L

    2002-11-01

    Independent lines of evidence support an Australian origin for the Mediterranean populations of the tropical alga Caulerpa taxifolia. To complement previous biogeographical studies based on nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), a new chloroplast marker was developed--the cp 16S rDNA intron-2. Sequence variability for both nuclear and chloroplast markers were assessed in 110 individuals using single strand conformation polymorphism. Comparison of intrapopulation genetic diversity between invasive Mediterranean and 'native' Australian populations revealed the occurrence of two divergent and widespread clades. The first clade grouped nontropical invasive populations with inshore-mainland populations from Australia, while the second clustered all offshore-island populations studied so far. Despite our finding of nine distinct nuclear and five distinct chloroplast profiles, a single nucleocytoplasmic combination was characteristic of the invasive populations and sexual reproduction was found to be very rare. C. taxifolia is clearly a complex of genetically and ecologically differentiated sibling species or subspecies.

  20. Differentiation of Plum pox virus isolates by single-strand conformation polymorphism and low-stringency single specific primer PCR analysis of HC-Pro genome region.

    PubMed

    Gadiou, S; Safárová, D; Navrátil, M

    2009-01-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and low-stringency single specific primer (LSSP)-PCR were assessed for suitability and reliability in genotyping of Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates. Examined PPV isolates included 16 PPV-D, 12 PPV-M, and 14 PPV-Rec isolates collected in Czech Republic. The analysis was performed on the helper component protease (HC-Pro) region of the PPV genome. SSCP and LSSP-PCR allowed the differentiation of PPV strain, but SSCP was not able to distinguish isolates within the same strain. The individual genotyping of each PPV isolate was obtained by LSSP-PCR. Nevertheless, both SSCP and LSSP-PCR techniques are suitable for preliminary screening of genetic variability of plant RNA viruses.

  1. A single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) approach for investigating genetic interactions of Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma guineensis in Loum, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Webster, B L; Tchuem Tchuenté, L A; Southgate, V R

    2007-03-01

    Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA provides a molecular tool for the identification of Schistosoma haematobium, Schistosoma guineensis and the hybrids of these two species. This molecular tool was utilized to provide a detailed analysis of the interactions between S. haematobium and S. guineensis in hybrid zones of Loum, Littoral Province, Cameroon. Individual hybrid schistosomes were identified within the natural populations collected from Loum in 1990, 1999 and 2000, which would have been misidentified as S. haematobium using solely morphological and sequence criteria. This study indicates the complexities of the hybridization between S. haematobium and S. guineensis and emphasizes the importance of assessing morphological, biological and molecular data to gain insights into the interaction of these two species over time.

  2. Conformational polymorphism in a heteromolecular single crystal leads to concerted movement akin to collective rack-and-pinion gears at the molecular level.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Anatoliy N; Swenson, Dale C; MacGillivray, Leonard R

    2008-02-12

    We describe a heteromolecular single crystal that exhibits three reversible and concerted reorganizations upon heating and cooling. The products of the reorganizations are conformational polymorphs. The reorganizations are postulated to proceed through three motions: (i) alkyl translations, (ii) olefin rotations, and (iii) rotational tilts. The motions are akin to rack-and-pinion gears at the molecular level. The rack-like movement is based on expansions and compressions of alkyl chains that are coupled with pinion-like 180 degree rotations of olefins. To accommodate the movements, phenol and thiophene components undergo rotational tilts about intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The movements are collective, being propagated in close-packed repeating units. This discovery marks a step to understanding how organic solids can support the development of crystalline molecular machines and devices through correlated and collective movements.

  3. Rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) screening method for the identification of Aspergillus section Nigri species by the detection of calmodulin nucleotide variations.

    PubMed

    Susca, A; Stea, G; Perrone, G

    2007-10-01

    Single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis for genetic diversity studies has been widely applied to detect indirectly sequence differences up to a single base in amplified DNA fragments of the same length, representing an alternative to gene sequencing. In this study SSCP analysis was used to detect sequence variations contained in an about 180-bp region of the calmodulin gene in order to identify Aspergillus section Nigri species. The method described shows that fluorescence-based SSCP analysis by capillary electrophoresis is cheaper and faster than direct sequencing, and suitable for computer-assisted analyses allowing discrimination between the Aspergillus species belonging to the Nigri section: A. aculeatus, Aspergillus 'atypic uniseriate', A. brasiliensis, A. carbonarius, A. ellipticus, A. foetidus, A. heteromorphus, A. ibericus, A. japonicus, A. niger, and A. tubingensis.

  4. Employment of single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis in screening for α-1,3 glucosyltransferase gene mutation A333V in Croatian population.

    PubMed

    Goreta, Sandra Supraha; Dabelic, Sanja; Dumic, Jerka

    2011-01-01

    Congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ic (CDG-Ic) is caused by mutations in hALG6 gene encoding α-1,3 glucosyltransferase (NP_037471.2), an enzyme that catalyzes the addition of the first glucose residue to the growing lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursor in N-glycosylation process. The most frequent mutation in hALG6 gene causing CDG-Ic is c.998C>T that results in p.A333V substitution. Up-to-date, no CDG-Ic patient has been detected in Croatia. However, as a part of the comprehensive project undertaken with the aim to estimate the frequencies of the carriers for specific mutations and polymorphisms related to particular CDGs in Croatian population, we screened genomic DNA samples obtained from 600 healthy nonconsanguineous Croatian residents to determine the frequency of the A333V mutation. For that purpose, we established the conditions for polymerase chain reaction-based single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis that is suitable for primary screening and in population studies, especially when the initial sample volume is small or DNA quantity is limited. None of the analyzed samples carried this mutation, indicating that the frequency of the patients carrying this homozygous mutation in Croatian population would be <1 in 1.4×10(6).

  5. Technical note: simultaneous identification of CSN1S2 A, B, C, and E alleles in goats by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Chessa, S; Rignanese, D; Chiatti, F; Radeghieri, A; Gigliotti, C; Caroli, A

    2008-03-01

    Most variability in goat caseins originates from the high number of genetic polymorphisms often affecting the specific protein expression, with strong effects on milk composition traits and technological properties. At least 7 alleles have been found in the goat alpha(S2)-CN gene (CSN1S2). Five of them (CSN1S2*A, CSN1S2*B, CSN1S2*C, CSN1S2*E, and CSN1S2*F) are widespread in most breeds, whereas the other 2 (CSN1S2*D and CSN1S2*0) are rarer alleles. Four different PCR-RFLP tests are needed to detect all of these variants at the DNA level. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a rapid method for typing 4 of the 5 most-common goat CSN1S2 alleles by means of PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). The method was validated by analyzing 37 goat samples at the protein and DNA level, respectively, by milk isoelectrofocusing and PCR-RFLP methods already described. The genotypes obtained using the PCR-SSCP approach were in full agreement with those obtained by the validation analyses. The newly developed PCR-SSCP approach provides an accurate and inexpensive assay highly suitable for genotyping goat CSN1S2.

  6. dbQSNP: a database of SNPs in human promoter regions with allele frequency information determined by single-strand conformation polymorphism-based methods.

    PubMed

    Tahira, Tomoko; Baba, Shingo; Higasa, Koichiro; Kukita, Yoji; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2005-08-01

    We present a database, dbQSNP (http://qsnp.gen.kyushu-u.ac.jp/), that provides sequence and allele frequency information for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the promoter regions of human genes, which were defined by the 5' ends of full-length cDNA clones. We searched for the SNPs in these regions by sequencing or single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. The allele frequencies of the identified SNPs in two ethnic groups were quantified by SSCP analyses of pooled DNA samples. The accuracy of our estimation is supported by strong correlations between the frequencies in our data and those in other databases for the same ethnic groups. The frequencies vary considerably between the two ethnic groups studied, suggesting the need for population-based collections and allele frequency determination of SNPs, in, e.g., association studies of diseases. We show profiles of SNP densities that are characteristic of transcription start site regions. A fraction of the SNPs revealed a significantly different allele frequency between the groups, suggesting differential selection of the genes involved.

  7. High-efficiency multiplex capillary electrophoresis single strand conformation polymorphism (multi-CE-SSCP) mutation screening of SCN5A: a rapid genetic approach to cardiac arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Hofman-Bang, J; Behr, E R; Hedley, P; Tfelt-Hansen, J; Kanters, J K; Haunsøe, S; McKenna, W J; Christiansen, M

    2006-06-01

    Mutations in the SCN5A gene coding for the alpha-subunit of the cardiac Na(+) ion channel cause long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, idiopathic ventricular fibrillation, sick sinus node syndrome, progressive conduction disease, dilated cardiomyopathy and atrial standstill. These diseases exhibit variable expressivity, and identification of gene carriers is clinically important, particularly in sudden infant and adult death syndromes. The SCN5A gene comprises 28 exons distributed over 100 kbp of genomic sequence at chromosome 3p21. Disease-causing mutations are private and scattered over the DNA sequence, making it difficult to screen for specific mutations. We developed a multiplex capillary-electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (Multi-CE-SSCP) mutation screening protocol on the ABI 3100 platform and applied it to 10 previously slab-gel SSCP identified mutations and SNPs and used it to identify one novel deletion. The method is highly efficient, with a turnover of 23 patients per 24 h and a false positive rate of 0.5% of the analyzed amplicons. Each variant has a particular elution pattern, and all 20 carriers of the H558R polymorphism out of 57 persons were correctly identified. We suggest that the method could become part of routine work-up of patients with suspicious syncope and of members of families with sudden unexplained death.

  8. Short communication: Simultaneous identification of five kappa-casein (CSN3) alleles in domestic goat by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Chessa, S; Budelli, E; Gutscher, K; Caroli, A; Erhardt, G

    2003-11-01

    Until now, a total of nine polymorphic sites corresponding to six different alleles have been described at the kappa-casein (CSN3) locus in the domestic goat (Capra hircus). A protocol for the rapid and simultaneous genotyping of five goat CSN3 alleles by using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique was developed. Moreover, the developed test was validated by screening the CSN3 variability in four Italian breeds, Garganica, Jonica, Maltese, and Camosciata. Seven different patterns were readily identifiable. These corresponded to five known alleles and two newly identified variants. The G/A substitution at nucleotide position 471, which is not identifiable at the protein level but was found to be very frequent in the typed breeds, is easily detectable by the protocol developed. The PCR-SSCP analysis is a powerful tool for the genetic study of CSN3 variability in domestic goats, allowing both the simultaneous identification of different alleles, and the detection of new variants.

  9. Direct determination of MUC5B promoter haplotypes based on the method of single-strand conformation polymorphism and their statistical estimation.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Koichiro; Matsushita, Ikumi; Tanaka, Goh; Ohashi, Jun; Hijikata, Minako; Nakata, Koh; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Azuma, Arata; Kudoh, Shoji; Keicho, Naoto

    2004-09-01

    Haplotype-based human genome research is important in identifying disease susceptibility genes efficiently. Although haplotype reconstruction by statistical methods is widely used, direct haplotype determination by molecular techniques has also been developed as a complementary method for statistical estimation. In this study, we demonstrate a molecular haplotyping method making use of single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) gels. We identified 10 common SNPs and a dinucleotide insertion/deletion polymorphism within 2-kb region upstream of the transcription initiation site of MUC5B and determined haplotype structure, dividing the region into two DNA fragments. Real haplotypes were determined unambiguously by our SSCP-based analysis with fragments longer than 1 kb. Haplotypes reconstructed from diploid genotypes in the same region by the statistical methods including EM algorithm were also evaluated. Direct comparison between statistical estimation and direct determination of haplotypes revealed that major haplotypes containing multiple marker sites showing strong LD are estimated in great accuracy but that a variety of haplotypes reflecting weak LD are not reconstructed precisely enough. Our data can be helpful in implementing molecular haplotyping or statistical estimation, since usage of these methods may be determined depending on the haplotype structures.

  10. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) of oligodeoxyribonucleotides: an insight into solution structural dynamics of DNAs provided by gel electrophoresis and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Biyani, Manish; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2005-10-01

    Studies on the solution structure dynamics of RNA/DNA are becoming crucially important. The phenomena of SSCP (single-strand conformation polymorphism), small RNA dynamics in a cell, and others can be related to the conformational changes of single-stranded (ss) RNAs/DNAs in solution. However, little is known about those dynamics. Only the intra-structural transition of ssDNAs in solution has been reported based on Watson-Crick (W-C) base-pairing. Here, we found a general feature of the SSCP phenomenon by studying the simpler molecules of ss-oligodeoxyribonucleotides. A single base substitution or a positional exchange of nucleotide in a highly homologous series of ss-dodecanucleotides led to a change in the mobility-in-gel. This was unexpected, since most of these nucleotides [such as d(A(11)G) or d(A(11)C)] have no possibility of forming W-C base-pairing. MD (molecular dynamics) experiments revealed differences in shape and size between the dynamic structures of these molecules which could affect their mobility-in-gel. In addition, a high correlation was observed between the electrophoretic mobility and the size-related parameters such as end-to-end distance obtained from MD simulations. Because the simulation was considerably shorter (nanosecond) than the experimental time-scale (second), the result must be considered conservatively; but it is nevertheless encouraging for utilizing MD simulation for structural analysis of oligonucleotides.

  11. Structure of allergens and structure based epitope predictions☆

    PubMed Central

    Dall’Antonia, Fabio; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Zangger, Klaus; Keller, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The structure determination of major allergens is a prerequisite for analyzing surface exposed areas of the allergen and for mapping conformational epitopes. These may be determined by experimental methods including crystallographic and NMR-based approaches or predicted by computational methods. In this review we summarize the existing structural information on allergens and their classification in protein fold families. The currently available allergen-antibody complexes are described and the experimentally obtained epitopes compared. Furthermore we discuss established methods for linear and conformational epitope mapping, putting special emphasis on a recently developed approach, which uses the structural similarity of proteins in combination with the experimental cross-reactivity data for epitope prediction. PMID:23891546

  12. Relevant B Cell Epitopes in Allergic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pomés, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The 3-dimensional structure of an allergen defines the accessible parts on the surface of the molecule or epitopes that interact with antibodies. Mapping the antigenic determinants for IgE antibody binding has been pursued through strategies based on the use of overlapping synthetic peptides, recombinant allergenic fragments or unfolded allergens. These approaches led to the identification of mostly linear epitopes and are useful for food allergens that undergo digestion or food processing. For inhaled allergens, conformational epitopes appear to be the primary targets of IgE responses. Knowledge of the molecular structure of allergens alone and in complex with antibodies that interfere with IgE antibody binding is important to understand the immune recognition of B cell-antigenic determinants on allergens and the design of recombinant allergens for immunotherapy. Starting with the molecular cloning and expression of allergens, and with the advent of X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, we have been able to visualize conformational epitopes on allergens. PMID:19940500

  13. Building Classifier Ensembles for B-Cell Epitope Prediction

    PubMed Central

    EL-Manzalawy, Yasser; Honavar, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Identification of B-cell epitopes in target antigens is a critical step in epitope-driven vaccine design, immunodiagnostic tests, and antibody production. B-cell epitopes could be linear, i.e., a contiguous amino acid sequence fragment of an antigen, or conformational, i.e., amino acids that are often not contiguous in the primary sequence but appear in close proximity within the folded 3D antigen structure. Numerous computational methods have been proposed for predicting both types of B-cell epitopes. However, the development of tools for reliably predicting B-cell epitopes remains a major challenge in immunoinformatics. Classifier ensembles a promising approach for combining a set of classifiers such that the overall performance of the resulting ensemble is better than the predictive performance of the best individual classifier. In this chapter, we show how to build a classifier ensemble for improved prediction of linear B-cell epitopes. The method can be easily adapted to build classifier ensembles for predicting conformational epitopes. PMID:25048130

  14. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures.

    PubMed

    Sablón-Carrazana, Marquiza; Fernández, Isaac; Bencomo, Alberto; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Rivera-Marrero, Suchitil; Domínguez, Guadalupe; Pérez-Perera, Rafaela; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F; Diaz-Delgado, Massiel; Vedrenne, Fernand; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina; Pasten-Hidalgo, Karina; Segura-Valdez, María de Lourdes; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Garrido-Magaña, Eulalia; Perera-Pintado, Alejandro; Prats-Capote, Anaís; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine; Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF) in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA) is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP):NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17-42 and Aβ16-21):NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the chaperones are able

  15. Drug Development in Conformational Diseases: A Novel Family of Chemical Chaperones that Bind and Stabilise Several Polymorphic Amyloid Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bencomo, Alberto; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Rivera-Marrero, Suchitil; Domínguez, Guadalupe; Pérez-Perera, Rafaela; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly F.; Diaz-Delgado, Massiel; Vedrenne, Fernand; Rivillas-Acevedo, Lina; Pasten-Hidalgo, Karina; Segura-Valdez, María de Lourdes; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Garrido-Magaña, Eulalia; Perera-Pintado, Alejandro; Prats-Capote, Anaís; Rodríguez-Tanty, Chryslaine; Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of conformational diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Cancer, poses a global challenge at many different levels. It has devastating effects on the sufferers as well as a tremendous economic impact on families and the health system. In this work, we apply a cross-functional approach that combines ideas, concepts and technologies from several disciplines in order to study, in silico and in vitro, the role of a novel chemical chaperones family (NCHCHF) in processes of protein aggregation in conformational diseases. Given that Serum Albumin (SA) is the most abundant protein in the blood of mammals, and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is an off-the-shelf protein available in most labs around the world, we compared the ligandability of BSA:NCHCHF with the interaction sites in the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP):NCHCHF, and in the amyloid pharmacophore fragments (Aβ17–42 and Aβ16–21):NCHCHF. We posit that the merging of this interaction sites is a meta-structure of pharmacophore which allows the development of chaperones that can prevent protein aggregation at various states from: stabilizing the native state to destabilizing oligomeric state and protofilament. Furthermore to stabilize fibrillar structures, thus decreasing the amount of toxic oligomers in solution, as is the case with the NCHCHF. The paper demonstrates how a set of NCHCHF can be used for studying and potentially treating the various physiopathological stages of a conformational disease. For instance, when dealing with an acute phase of cytotoxicity, what is needed is the recruitment of cytotoxic oligomers, thus chaperone F, which accelerates fiber formation, would be very useful; whereas in a chronic stage it is better to have chaperones A, B, C, and D, which stabilize the native and fibril structures halting self-catalysis and the creation of cytotoxic oligomers as a consequence of fiber formation. Furthermore, all the chaperones are

  16. Protection of rhesus macaques against disease progression from pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD by vaccination with phage-displayed HIV-1 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Scala, G; Quinto, I; Liu, W; Chun, T W; Justement, J S; Cohen, O J; vanCott, T C; Iwanicki, M; Lewis, M G; Greenhouse, J; Barry, T; Venzon, D; Fauci, A S

    2001-11-01

    The antigenic polymorphism of HIV-1 is a major obstacle in developing an effective vaccine. Accordingly, we screened random peptide libraries (RPLs) displayed on phage with antibodies from HIV-infected individuals and identified an array of HIV-specific epitopes that behave as antigenic mimics of conformational epitopes of gp120 and gp41 proteins. We report that the selected epitopes are shared by a collection of HIV-1 isolates of clades A-F. The phage-borne epitopes are immunogenic in rhesus macaques, where they elicit envelope-specific antibody responses. Upon intravenous challenge with 60 MID50 of pathogenic SHIV-89.6PD, all monkeys became infected; however, in contrast to the naive and mock-immunized monkeys, four of five mimotope-immunized monkeys experienced lower levels of peak viremia, followed by viral set points of undetectable or transient levels of viremia and a mild decline of CD4+ T cells, and were protected from progression to AIDS-like illness. These results provide a new approach to the design of broadly protective HIV-1 vaccines.

  17. High sensitivity of the single-strand conformation polymorphism method for detecting sequence variations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene validated by DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Jensen, H K; Jensen, L G; Hansen, P S; Faergeman, O; Gregersen, N

    1996-08-01

    We designed oligonucleotide primer pairs to amplify the promoter region, the translated exon sequences, and the flanking intron sequences of all 18 exons of the LDL receptor gene to compare the ability of the PCR single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) method with semiautomated solid-phase genomic DNA sequencing to detect sequence variations. In 20 apparently unrelated Danish patients with a clinical diagnosis of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), we identified 13 different mutations in the LDL receptor gene: two silent (C331C, N494 N); five missense (W66G, E119K, T383P, W556S, T7051); one nonsense (W23X); three splice-site (313 + 1G-->A, 1061-8T-->C, 1846-1G-->A); and two frameshift (335del10, 1650delG) mutations. Four of these mutations, N494 N, T383P, 1061-8T-->C, and W556S, have not been reported earlier. The pathogenicity of the T383P, 1061-8T-->C, and W556S mutations remains to be established by in vitro mutagenesis and transfection studies. One patient had three mutations (335del10, 1061-8T-->C, and T705I) on the same allele. Further, nine well-known polymorphisms were detectable with this methodological setup. Direct DNA sequencing of the PCR products used for the SSCP analysis did not reveal any sequence variations not detected by the PCR-SSCP method. In two patients we did not detect any mutation by either method. We conclude that the PCR-SSCP analysis, performed as described here, is as sensitive and efficient as DNA sequencing in the ability to identify the sequence variations in the LDL receptor gene of the patients with heterozygous FH of this study.

  18. Application of capillary electrophoresis single-stranded conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) analysis for identification of fungal communities in cheese.

    PubMed

    Hermet, A; Mounier, J; Keravec, M; Vasseur, V; Barbier, G; Jany, J L

    2014-08-01

    As major contributors of the ripening process, yeasts and filamentous fungi play a fundamental role in cheese-making. Still, there is no rapid and affordable identification method available for both yeasts and filamentous fungi encountered in cheeses. In the present study, we developed a method based on CE-SSCP analysis of nuclear ribosomal DNA ITS amplicons, along with a species pattern database comprising 37 fungal species. By combining analyses of the ITS1 and ITS2 conformers, 25 out of 37 species were discriminated using CE-SSCP analysis. This reproducible and sensitive method was applied to determine the fungal community composition of 36 cheeses including blue-veined, pressed-cooked, pressed-uncooked, red-smear and surface-mould ripened cheeses. Overall, each cheese contained between 1 and 6 fungal species and 23 different species of fungi were detected including 8 yeast species, 9 filamentous species and 6 unidentified species. Comparison of the fungal diversity obtained after cloning and sequencing (rDNA ITS) versus CE-SSCP for 8 cheeses showed that CE-SSCP was at least as exhaustive as cloning and sequencing of thirty clones per cheese. In conclusion, this CE-SSCP method was an effective tool to identify the fungi present in various cheese varieties and may be of interest for the cheese industry to rapidly describe the composition of cheese fungal communities.

  19. One-dimensional TRFLP-SSCP is an effective DNA fingerprinting strategy for soil Archaea that is able to simultaneously differentiate broad taxonomic clades based on terminal fragment length polymorphisms and closely related sequences based on single stranded conformation polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Colby A; Sliwinski, Marek K

    2013-09-01

    DNA fingerprinting methods provide a means to rapidly compare microbial assemblages from environmental samples without the need to first cultivate species in the laboratory. The profiles generated by these techniques are able to identify statistically significant temporal and spatial patterns, correlations to environmental gradients, and biological variability to estimate the number of replicates for clone libraries or next generation sequencing (NGS) surveys. Here we describe an improved DNA fingerprinting technique that combines terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (TRFLP) and single stranded conformation polymorphisms (SSCP) so that both can be used to profile a sample simultaneously rather than requiring two sequential steps as in traditional two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. For the purpose of profiling Archaeal 16S rRNA genes from soil, the dynamic range of this combined 1-D TRFLP-SSCP approach was superior to TRFLP and SSCP. 1-D TRFLP-SSCP was able to distinguish broad taxonomic clades with genetic distances greater than 10%, such as Euryarchaeota and the Thaumarchaeal clades g_Ca. Nitrososphaera (formerly 1.1b) and o_NRP-J (formerly 1.1c) better than SSCP. In addition, 1-D TRFLP-SSCP was able to simultaneously distinguish closely related clades within a genus such as s_SCA1145 and s_SCA1170 better than TRFLP. We also tested the utility of 1-D TRFLP-SSCP fingerprinting of environmental assemblages by comparing this method to the generation of a 16S rRNA clone library of soil Archaea from a restored Tallgrass prairie. This study shows 1-D TRFLP-SSCP fingerprinting provides a rapid and phylogenetically informative screen of Archaeal 16S rRNA genes in soil samples. © 2013.

  20. Elicitation of structure-specific antibodies by epitope scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Ofek, Gilad; Guenaga, F. Javier; Schief, William R.; Skinner, Jeff; Baker, David; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Elicitation of antibodies against targets that are immunorecessive, cryptic, or transient in their native context has been a challenge for vaccine design. Here we demonstrate the elicitation of structure-specific antibodies against the HIV-1 gp41 epitope of the broadly neutralizing antibody 2F5. This conformationally flexible region of gp41 assumes mostly helical conformations but adopts a kinked, extended structure when bound by antibody 2F5. Computational techniques were employed to transplant the 2F5 epitope into select acceptor scaffolds. The resultant “2F5-epitope scaffolds” possessed nanomolar affinity for antibody 2F5 and a range of epitope flexibilities and antigenic specificities. Crystallographic characterization of the epitope scaffold with highest affinity and antigenic discrimination confirmed good to near perfect attainment of the target conformation for the gp41 molecular graft in free and 2F5-bound states, respectively. Animals immunized with 2F5-epitope scaffolds showed levels of graft-specific immune responses that correlated with graft flexibility (p < 0.04), while antibody responses against the graft—as dissected residue-by-residue with alanine substitutions—resembled more closely those of 2F5 than sera elicited with flexible or cyclized peptides, a resemblance heightened by heterologous prime-boost. Lastly, crystal structures of a gp41 peptide in complex with monoclonal antibodies elicited by the 2F5-epitope scaffolds revealed that the elicited antibodies induce gp41 to assume its 2F5-recognized shape. Epitope scaffolds thus provide a means to elicit antibodies that recognize a predetermined target shape and sequence, even if that shape is transient in nature, and a means by which to dissect factors influencing such elicitation. PMID:20876137

  1. A new agarose matrix for single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), heteroduplex (HTX), and gel shift analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Dumais, M.M.; White, H.W.; Rashid, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    Detection of mutation, by SSCP or heteroduplex analysis, is important in medical genetics and oncology. Analysis of DNA binding proteins is a powerful tool in molecular biology research. Traditionally, these methods are performed using nondenaturing gel electrophoresis on poly-acrylamide or polyacrylamide-type matrices. Here we report the development of a new agarose gel matrix that can be used for all three methods. SSCP analyses were performed using the prototype agarose gel matrix for wild-type, polymorphic, and mutant samples from c-Kras exon 12, p53 exons 8 and 9, and HOX2B. We performed SSCP analyses using both isotopic and nonisotopic methods. We also analyzed the samples by deliberate HTX formation and subsequent gel analysis. Using the prototype agarose matrix, we detected single and multiple DNA sequence variants in 150-350 bp fragments with an efficiency comparable to polyacrylamide gels run under similar conditions. For SSCP and HTX assays, we achieved optimal resolution in gels run in vertical formats. However, some HTX samples could be resolved in horizontal gel systems. In addition, based on our studies, we have developed a useful battery of controls and standards for quality control of SSCP and HTX assays. We analyzed several different DNA/protein complexes (SP1, AP2, and octamer binding protein) using the prototype agarose matrix. We obtained good resolution in both vertical and horizontal gel formats. The horizontal gel system is generally superior for this application, due to its ease of use and slightly better resolution. This new prototype gel matrix offers an alternative for researchers performing analyses that previously could only be done on polyacrylamide-type gel matrices. For some applications, this new matrix offers the ease of horizontal gel casting. For all applications, this matrix offers the safety of a nontoxic system and the reproducibility of a thermally gelling system.

  2. Epitope peptides and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2007-02-01

    Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens, usually proteins or glycoproteins. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Because allergen-specific IgE antibodies are the main effector molecules in the immune response to allergens, many studies have focused on the identification of IgE-binding epitopes (called B cell epitopes), specific and minimum regions of allergen molecules that binds to IgE. Our initial studies have provided evidence that only four to five amino acid residues are enough to comprise an epitope, since pentapeptide QQQPP in wheat glutenin is minimally required for IgE binding. Afterwards, various kinds of B cell epitope structures have been clarified. Such information contributes greatly not only to the elucidation of the etiology of allergy, but also to the development of strategies for the treatment and prevention of allergy. Allergen-specific T cells also play an important role in allergy and are obvious targets for intervention in the disease. Currently, the principle approach is to modify B cell epitopes to prevent IgE binding while preserving T cell epitopes to retain the capacity for immunotherapy. There is mounting evidence that the administration of peptide(s) containing immunodominant T cell epitopes from an allergen can induce T cell nonresponsiveness (immunotherapy). There have been clinical studies of peptide immunotherapy performed, the most promising being for bee venom sensitivity. Clinical trials of immunotherapy for cat allergen peptide have also received attention. An alternative strategy for the generation of an effective but hypoallergenic preparation for immunotherapy is to modify T cell epitope peptides by, for example, single amino acid substitution. In this article, I will present an overview of epitopes related to allergic disease, particularly stress on

  3. A fluorescence-based polymerase chain reaction-linked single-strand conformation polymorphism (F-PCR-SSCP) assay for the identification of Fasciola spp.

    PubMed

    Alasaad, Samer; Soriguer, Ramón C; Abu-Madi, Marawan; El Behairy, Ahmed; Baños, Pablo Díez; Píriz, Ana; Fickel, Joerns; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to establish a fluorescence-based polymerase chain reaction-linked single-strand conformation polymorphism (F-PCR-SSCP) assay for the identification of Fasciola spp. Based on the sequences of the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA, we designed a set of genus-specific primers for the amplification of Fasciola ITS-2, with an estimated size of 140 bp. These primers were labelled by fluorescence dyes, and the PCR products were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis under non-denaturing conditions (F-PCR-SSCP). Capillary electrophoresis analysis of the fluorescence-labelled DNA fragments displayed three different peak profiles that allowed the accurate identification of Fasciola species: one single peak specific for either Fasciola hepatica or Fasciola gigantica and a doublet peak corresponding to the "intermediate" Fasciola. Validation of our novel method was performed using Fasciola specimens from different host animals from China, Spain, Nigeria, and Egypt. This F-PCR-SSCP assay provides a rapid, simple, and robust tool for the identification and differentiation between Fasciola spp.

  4. Simultaneous Identification of 13 Foodborne Pathogens by Using Capillary Electrophoresis-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism Coupled with Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification and Its Application in Foods.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Young; Chung, Boram; Chang, Jin-Hee; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Kim, Hyoun Wook; Park, Beom-Young; Oh, Sang Suk; Oh, Mi-Hwa

    2016-10-01

    Capillary electrophoresis-single strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) coupled with stuffer-free multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) was developed to identify 13 species of foodborne pathogens simultaneously. Species-specific MLPA probes were designed for nine of these species. These probes were targeted to the groEL, glyA, MMS, tuf, inv, ipaH, nuc, vvh, and 16S rRNA genes, which corresponded to Bacillus cereus, Campylobacter coli, Cronobacter sakazakii, Enterococcus spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Yersinia enterocolitica, respectively. MLPA probes that had been previously developed by our laboratory were used for the other four species (Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes). The CE-SSCP method was optimized to identify all 13 foodborne microbes simultaneously in a single electrogram, in which 50-500 pg genomic DNA was detected per microbe. Twelve species were detected from animal-derived food samples (specifically, milk and sliced ham) that had been artificially inoculated with 12 of the foodborne pathogens, excluding V. vulnificus, which is not usually associated with animal foods. The method developed here could be used as an early warning system for outbreaks of foodborne diseases associated with animal-derived foods in the food industry.

  5. Identification of anisakid nematodes with zoonotic potential from Europe and China by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of nuclear ribosomal DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X Q; Podolska, M; Liu, J S; Yu, H Q; Chen, H H; Lin, Z X; Luo, C B; Song, H Q; Lin, R Q

    2007-11-01

    Using genetic markers defined previously in the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), isotopic, and non-isotopic polymerase-chain-reaction-coupled single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) were utilized to identify each of three anisakid species [Anisakis simplex (s.l.), Contracaecum osculatum (s.l.), and Hysterothylacium aduncum] from different host species and geographical locations in Poland and Sweden. While subtle microheterogeneity was observed within each of Anisakis simplex (s.l.) and H. aduncum, distinct SSCP profiles were displayed for each of the three species, allowing identification and differentiation of the three taxa. Subsequent sequencing of the ITS-1 and ITS-2 rDNA revealed that A. simplex (s.l.) represented Anisakis simplex s.s. and Contracaecum osculatum (s.l.) represented C. osculatum C. Application of the non-isotopic SSCP assay of ITS-2 to larval anisakid samples from different hosts and geographical locations in China revealed three distinct SSCP profiles, one of which was consistent with that of A. simplex (s.l.), and the other two had different SSCP profiles from that of C. osculatum C and H. aduncum. Sequencing of the ITS-1 and ITS-2 rDNA for representative Chinese anisakid samples examined revealed three anisakid species in China, i.e., Anisakis typica, Anisakis pegreffii, and Hysterothylacium sp. These molecular tools will be useful for identification and investigation of the ecology of anisakid nematodes in China and elsewhere.

  6. Experimental study of the impact of antimicrobial treatments on Campylobacter, Enterococcus and PCR-capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism profiles of the gut microbiota of chickens.

    PubMed

    Mourand, Gwenaëlle; Jouy, Eric; Bougeard, Stéphanie; Dheilly, Alexandra; Kérouanton, Annaëlle; Zeitouni, Salman; Kempf, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare the impact of antimicrobial treatments on the susceptibility of Campylobacter, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis, and on the diversity of broiler microbiota. Specific-pathogen-free chickens were first orally inoculated with strains of Campylobacter and Enterococcus faecium. Birds were then orally treated with recommended doses of oxytetracycline, sulfadimethoxine/trimethoprim, amoxicillin or enrofloxacin. Faecal samples were collected before, during and after antimicrobial treatment. The susceptibility of Campylobacter, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis strains isolated on supplemented or non-supplemented media was studied and PCR-capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) profiles of the gut microbiota were analysed. Enrofloxacin-resistant Campylobacter were selected in the enrofloxacin-treated group and showed the Thr86Ile mutation in the gyrA gene. Acquisition of the tetO gene in Campylobacter coli isolates was significantly more frequent in birds given oxytetracycline. No impact of amoxicillin treatment on the susceptibility of Campylobacter could be detected. Ampicillin- and sulfadimethoxine/trimethoprim-resistant Enterococcus faecium were selected in amoxicillin-treated broilers, but no selection of the inoculated vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium could be detected, although it was also resistant to tetracycline and sulfadimethoxine/trimethoprim. PCR-CE-SSCP revealed significant variations in a few peaks in treated birds as compared with non-treated chickens. In conclusion, antimicrobial treatments perturbed chicken gut microbiota, and certain antimicrobial treatments selected or co-selected resistant strains of Campylobacter and Enterococcus.

  7. Denaturing gradient electrophoresis (DGE) and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) molecular fingerprintings revisited by simulation and used as a tool to measure microbial diversity.

    PubMed

    Loisel, Patrice; Harmand, Jérôme; Zemb, Olivier; Latrille, Eric; Lobry, Claude; Delgenès, Jean-Philippe; Godon, Jean-Jacques

    2006-04-01

    The exact extent of microbial diversity remains unknowable. Nevertheless, fingerprinting patterns [denaturing gradient electrophoresis (DGE), single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP)] provide an image of a microbial ecosystem and contain diversity data. We generated numerical simulation fingerprinting patterns based on three types of distribution (uniform, geometric and lognormal) with a range of units from 10 to 500,000. First, simulated patterns containing a diversity of around 1000 units or more gave patterns similar to those obtained in experiments. Second, the number of bands or peaks saturated quickly to about 35 and were unrelated to the degree of diversity. Finally, assuming lognormal distribution, we used an estimator of diversity on in silico and experimental fingerprinting patterns. Results on in silico patterns corresponded to the simulation inputs. Diversity results in experimental patterns were in the same range as those obtained from the same DNA sample in molecular inventories. Thus, fingerprinting patterns contain extractable data about diversity although not on the basis of a number of bands or peaks, as is generally assumed to be the case.

  8. Analysis of Coinfections with A/H1N1 Strain Variants among Pigs in Poland by Multitemperature Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Lepek, Krzysztof; Pajak, Beata; Rabalski, Lukasz; Urbaniak, Kinga; Kucharczyk, Krzysztof; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Szewczyk, Boguslaw

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring and control of infections are key parts of surveillance systems and epidemiological risk prevention. In the case of influenza A viruses (IAVs), which show high variability, a wide range of hosts, and a potential of reassortment between different strains, it is essential to study not only people, but also animals living in the immediate surroundings. If understated, the animals might become a source of newly formed infectious strains with a pandemic potential. Special attention should be focused on pigs, because of the receptors specific for virus strains originating from different species, localized in their respiratory tract. Pigs are prone to mixed infections and may constitute a reservoir of potentially dangerous IAV strains resulting from genetic reassortment. It has been reported that a quadruple reassortant, A(H1N1)pdm09, can be easily transmitted from humans to pigs and serve as a donor of genetic segments for new strains capable of infecting humans. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a simple, cost-effective, and rapid method for evaluation of IAV genetic variability. We describe a method based on multitemperature single-strand conformational polymorphism (MSSCP), using a fragment of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene, for detection of coinfections and differentiation of genetic variants of the virus, difficult to identify by conventional diagnostic. PMID:25961024

  9. Single strand conformation polymorphism analysis of androgen receptor gene mutations in patients with androgen insensitivity syndromes: Application for diagnosis, genetic counseling, and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hiort, O. Tufts-New England Medical Center, Boston, MA ); Huang, Q. ); Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Kruse, K. ); Sadeghi-Nejad, A.; Wolfe, H.J. ); Yandell, D.W. ) Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA )

    1993-07-01

    Recent studies indicate that mutations in the androgen receptor gene are associated with androgen insensitivity syndromes, a heterogeneous group of related disorders involving defective sexual differentiation in karyotypic males. In this report, the authors address the possibility of rapid mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene for initial diagnosis, genetic counseling, and molecular subclassification of affected patients and their families. DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of six patients from five families with various degrees of androgen insensitivity was studied. Exons 2 to 8 of the androgen receptor gene were analyzed using a combination of single strand conformation polymorphism analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Female family members were also studied to identify heterozygote carriers. Point mutations in the AR gene were identified in all six patients, and all mutations caused amino acid substitutions. One patient with incomplete androgen insensitivity was a mosaic for the mutation. Four of the five mothers, as well as a young sister of one patient, were carriers of the mutation present in the affected child. The data show that new mutations may occur in the androgen receptor gene leading to sporadic androgen insensitivity syndrome. Molecular genetic characterization of the variant allele can serve as a primary tool for diagnosis and subsequent therapy, and can provide a basis for distinguishing heterozygous carriers in familial androgen resistance. The identification of carriers is of substantial clinical importance for genetic counseling. 29 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Bacterial Community Dynamics during Production of Registered Designation of Origin Salers Cheese as Evaluated by 16S rRNA Gene Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Duthoit, Frédérique; Godon, Jean-Jacques; Montel, Marie-Christine

    2003-01-01

    Microbial dynamics during processing and ripening of traditional cheeses such as registered designation of origin Salers cheese, an artisanal cheese produced in France, play an important role in the elaboration of sensory qualities. The aim of the present study was to obtain a picture of the dynamics of the microbial ecosystem of RDO Salers cheese by using culture-independent methods. This included DNA extraction, PCR, and single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Bacterial and high-GC% gram-positive bacterial primers were used to amplify V2 or V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene. SSCP patterns revealed changes during the manufacturing of the cheese. Patterns of the ecosystems of cheeses that were provided by three farmers were also quite different. Cloning and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene revealed sequences related to lactic acid bacteria (Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Enterococcus faecium, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Lactobacillus pentosus), which were predominant during manufacturing and ripening. Bacteria belonging to the high-GC% gram-positive group (essentially corynebacteria) were found by using specific primers. The present molecular approach can effectively describe the ecosystem of artisanal dairy products. PMID:12839752

  11. Analysis of the essential sequences of the factor VIII gene in twelve haemophilia A patients by single-stranded conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    David, D; Moreira, I; Lalloz, M R; Rosa, H A; Schwaab, R; Morais, S; Diniz, M J; de Deus, G; Campos, M; Lavinha, J

    1994-04-01

    We report the analysis by single-stranded conformation polymorphism of the essential sequences of the factor VIII(FVIII) gene (total length about 14 kb) including the entire coding sequence, flanking intronic sequences and the putative regulatory sequences 5' to the gene, in twelve unselected haemophilia A patients of Portuguese origin. Direct sequencing of the fragments with an altered migration pattern led to the identification of the disease-producing mutations in five patients. Three of these mutations, namely a 1 bp insertion in a motif of eight consecutive A residues at codon 1439 (FVIIIPorto3); a C to T transition at codon 1966 (Arg-->Stop), found in an inhibitor-positive patient (FVIIIMontijo); and a G to A transition at codon 479 (Gly-->Arg; FVIIIPorto1), have been reported in other ethnic groups. The two novel mutations are the substitution of AG by GG at the 3' end of intron 4 (FVIIILisboa1) destroying the invariant splice acceptor sequence, and a G to A transition at codon 1948 resulting in an aspartic acid substitution for glycine (FVIIIPorto2).

  12. A comparative study of detection of p53 mutations in human breast cancer by flow cytometry, single-strand conformation polymorphism and genomic sequencing.

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, G.; Redkar, A.; Mittra, I.

    1996-01-01

    The accuracy of immunodetection by dual parameter flow cytometry (FCM), polymerase chain reaction-mediated single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and genomic sequencing to detect p53 mutations were compared. Analysis by the last two techniques was restricted to exons 5-8. Initially, 110 breast tumours were screened for p53 expression by FCM. Seventy (64%) of tumours were immunopositive. Fifteen highly immunopositive and 15 completely immunonegative tumours were selected for further analysis by PCR-SSCP and genomic sequencing. Eleven out of 15 immunopositive tumours were found to have mutation by PCR-SSCP. Genomic sequencing confirmed the presence of mutation in 10 of these 11 immunopositive tumours. Therefore, four immunopositive tumours failed to show mutation by SSCP and five by genomic sequencing. Of the 15 immunonegative tumours, one showed mutation by both PCR-SSCP and genomic sequencing and one tumour has undergone deletion of the p53 gene. Overall, immunoreactivity correlated with both PCR-SSCP and genomic sequencing in 80% of cases (24/30), and there was 96.5% (28/29) concordance between PCR-SSCP and genomic sequencing. We conclude that there is good concordance between mutations detected by PCR-SSCP and genomic sequencing, but immunochemical detection of p53 overexpression is not an absolute indicator of p53 gene mutation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8883402

  13. Amino acid polymorphisms in the fibronectin-binding repeats of fibronectin-binding protein A affect bond strength and fibronectin conformation.

    PubMed

    Casillas-Ituarte, Nadia N; Cruz, Carlos H B; Lins, Roberto D; DiBartola, Alex C; Howard, Jessica; Liang, Xiaowen; Höök, Magnus; Viana, Isabelle F T; Sierra-Hernández, M Roxana; Lower, Steven K

    2017-04-11

    The Staphylococcus aureus cell surface contains cell wall-anchored proteins such as fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA) that bind to host ligands (e.g. fibronectin; Fn) present in the extracellular matrix of tissue or coatings on cardiac implants. Recent clinical studies have found a correlation between cardiovascular infections caused by S. aureus and nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in FnBPA. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and molecular simulations were used to investigate interactions between Fn and each of eight, 20-mer peptide variants containing amino acids A, H, I, K, N, and Q at positions equivalent to 782 and/or 786 in Fn-binding repeat-9 (FnBR-9) of FnBPA. Experimentally measured bond lifetimes (1/koff ) and dissociation constants (Kd = koff / kon ), determined by mechanically dissociating the Fn-peptide complex at loading rates relevant to the cardiovascular system varied from the lowest-affinity H782A+K786A peptide (0.011 sec, 747 µM) to the highest-affinity H782Q+K786N peptide (0.192 sec, 15.7 µM). These AFM results tracked remarkably well to metadynamics simulations in which peptide detachment was defined solely by the free-energy landscape. Simulations and SPR experiments suggested that an Fn conformational change may enhance the stability of the binding complex for peptides with K786I or H782Q+K786I (Kd(app) = 0.2 to 0.5 µM. as determined by SPR) compared with the lowest-affinity double alanine peptide (Kd(app) = 3.8 µM). Together, these findings demonstrate that amino acid substitutions in FnBR-9 can significantly affect bond strength and influence the conformation of Fn upon binding. They provide a mechanistic explanation for the observation of nonsynonymous SNPs in fnbA) among clinical isolates of S. aureus that cause endovascular infections.

  14. Improved Method for Linear B-Cell Epitope Prediction Using Antigen’s Primary Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges in designing a peptide-based vaccine is the identification of antigenic regions in an antigen that can stimulate B-cell’s response, also called B-cell epitopes. In the past, several methods have been developed for the prediction of conformational and linear (or continuous) B-cell epitopes. However, the existing methods for predicting linear B-cell epitopes are far from perfection. In this study, an attempt has been made to develop an improved method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes. We have retrieved experimentally validated B-cell epitopes as well as non B-cell epitopes from Immune Epitope Database and derived two types of datasets called Lbtope_Variable and Lbtope_Fixed length datasets. The Lbtope_Variable dataset contains 14876 B-cell epitope and 23321 non-epitopes of variable length where as Lbtope_Fixed length dataset contains 12063 B-cell epitopes and 20589 non-epitopes of fixed length. We also evaluated the performance of models on above datasets after removing highly identical peptides from the datasets. In addition, we have derived third dataset Lbtope_Confirm having 1042 epitopes and 1795 non-epitopes where each epitope or non-epitope has been experimentally validated in at least two studies. A number of models have been developed to discriminate epitopes and non-epitopes using different machine-learning techniques like Support Vector Machine, and K-Nearest Neighbor. We achieved accuracy from ∼54% to 86% using diverse s features like binary profile, dipeptide composition, AAP (amino acid pair) profile. In this study, for the first time experimentally validated non B-cell epitopes have been used for developing method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes. In previous studies, random peptides have been used as non B-cell epitopes. In order to provide service to scientific community, a web server LBtope has been developed for predicting and designing B-cell epitopes (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/lbtope/). PMID:23667458

  15. Characterization of isolates of Citrus tristeza virus by sequential analyses of enzyme immunoassays and capillary electrophoresis-single-strand conformation polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Licciardello, G; Raspagliesi, D; Bar-Joseph, M; Catara, A

    2012-05-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the causal agent of tristeza disease, which is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus crops worldwide. This paper describes a method for the rapid detection and genotyping of naturally spreading CTV isolates. This method uses ELISA or dot-blot immunological tests to detect trees infected with CTV. The reaction wells or membrane spots for which there is a positive reaction are sequentially treated by (i) washing and elution of viral RNA from the trapped samples, (ii) one-step synthesis of cDNA and PCR and (iii) automated fluorescence-based capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) analysis of amplification products. Comparative CE-SSCP results are presented for CTV RNA extracted directly from infected leaves and ELISA plates or from membranes. In the analyses of all of these RNA samples, the p18, p27 and p23 CTV genes were targeted for amplification. Specific profiles of forward and reverse strands were obtained from a group of eight CTV isolates collected in Sicily, each with distinct biological characteristics, which were analyzed using the conventional two-step procedure (immunological detection followed by CE-SSCP molecular characterization after RNA isolation) or in a continuous process of ELISA/CE-SSCP or dot-blot/CE-SSCP starting from infected plant material. The combined method is simple, highly sensitive and reproducible, thus allowing the processing of numerous field samples for a variety of epidemiological needs. The sequential processing of an ELISA or dot-blot/ELISA followed by CE-SSCP is expected to allow the rapid detection of recent CTV infections along with the simultaneous characterization of the genetic diversity and structure of the population of newly invading CTV.

  16. Optimized polymerase chain reaction-based single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of p53 gene applied to Bulgarian patients with invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Krasteva, M E; Garanina, Z; Georgieva, E I

    2003-11-01

    During the last few decades a substantial amount of evidence has accumulated proving that the abrogation of the normal p53 pathway is a critical step in the initiation and progression of tumors. Decoding the genetic mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis requires screening for consistent genetic tumor alterations, including those concerning the p53 gene. Thus, practical, efficient, and inexpensive techniques for accurate determination of p53 mutational status are needed. Polymerase chain reaction/single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis is considered to be a useful tool to investigate the role of the p53 gene in the development and progression of human cancers. The sensitivity of the method can be increased considerably by varying the experimental conditions. Here we demonstrate a scheme of PCR-SSCP optimization for detection of p53 gene mutations of patients with various cancers. Optimal conditions for PCRSSCP of p53 exons 4-9 are reported. Such PCR-SSCP optimization could allow an increase in the sensitivity and reproducibility of the technique and facilitates screening of large series of patients to assess the clinical significance of p53 mutations in human cancers. Using the optimized PCR-SSCP analysis we screened Bulgarian patients with invasive breast cancer for p53 gene mutations and registered a 33.33% frequency of mutations. To date, there are no data concerning the p53 status of Bulgarian breast cancer patients. Screening for p53 gene mutations enables an accurate and routine determination of the p53 status of patients with cancer and may be applied in clinical oncology to cancer diagnosis, prediction of prognosis and response to treatment.

  17. PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism method for rapid detection of rifampin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Bin; Jiang, Rui-Hai; Sha, Wei; Li, Ling; Xiao, He-Ping

    2010-10-01

    The reference standard methods for drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, such as culture on Lowenstein-Jensen or Middlebrook 7H10/11 medium, are very slow to give results; and due to the emergence of multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis and extensively drug-resistant M. tuberculosis, there is an urgent demand for new, rapid, and accurate drug susceptibility testing methods. PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis has been proposed as a rapid method for the detection of resistance to rifampin, but its accuracy has not been systematically evaluated. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the accuracy of PCR-SSCP analysis for the detection of rifampin-resistant tuberculosis. We searched the Medline, Embase, Web of Science, BIOSIS, and LILACS databases and contacted authors if additional information was required. Ten studies met our inclusion criteria for rifampin resistance detection. We applied the summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curve to perform the meta-analysis and to summarize diagnostic accuracy. The sensitivity of PCR-SSCP analysis for the rapid detection of rifampin-resistant tuberculosis was 0.79 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75 to 0.82), the specificity was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.94 to 0.98), the positive likelihood ratio was 16.10 (95% CI, 5.87 to 44.13), the negative likelihood ratio was 0.20 (95% CI, 0.10 to 0.40), and the diagnostic odds ratio was 100.93 (95% CI, 31.95 to 318.83). PCR-SSCP analysis is a sensitive and specific test for the rapid detection of rifampin-resistant M. tuberculosis. Additional studies in countries with a high prevalence of multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis and also cost-effectiveness analysis are required in order to obtain a complete picture on the utility of this method for rapid drug resistance detection in M. tuberculosis.

  18. Succession of Microbial Communities during Hot Composting as Detected by PCR–Single-Strand-Conformation Polymorphism-Based Genetic Profiles of Small-Subunit rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Sabine; Koschinsky, Stefanie; Schwieger, Frank; Tebbe, Christoph C.

    2000-01-01

    A cultivation-independent technique for genetic profiling of PCR-amplified small-subunit rRNA genes (SSU rDNA) was chosen to characterize the diversity and succession of microbial communities during composting of an organic agricultural substrate. PCR amplifications were performed with DNA directly extracted from compost samples and with primers targeting either (i) the V4–V5 region of eubacterial 16S rRNA genes, (ii) the V3 region in the 16S rRNA genes of actinomycetes, or (iii) the V8–V9 region of fungal 18S rRNA genes. Homologous PCR products were converted to single-stranded DNA molecules by exonuclease digestion and were subsequently electrophoretically separated by their single-strand-conformation polymorphism (SSCP). Genetic profiles obtained by this technique showed a succession and increasing diversity of microbial populations with all primers. A total of 19 single products were isolated from the profiles by PCR reamplification and cloning. DNA sequencing of these molecular isolates showed similarities in the range of 92.3 to 100% to known gram-positive bacteria with a low or high G+C DNA content and to the SSU rDNA of γ-Proteobacteria. The amplified 18S rRNA gene sequences were related to the respective gene regions of Candida krusei and Candida tropicalis. Specific molecular isolates could be attributed to different composting stages. The diversity of cultivated bacteria isolated from samples taken at the end of the composting process was low. A total of 290 isolates were related to only 6 different species. Two or three of these species were also detectable in the SSCP community profiles. Our study indicates that community SSCP profiles can be highly useful for the monitoring of bacterial diversity and community successions in a biotechnologically relevant process. PMID:10698754

  19. Detection of Clonal T-Cell Receptor γ Gene Rearrangements in Paraffin-Embedded Tissue by Polymerase Chain Reaction and Nonradioactive Single-Strand Conformational Polymorphism Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Signoretti, Sabina; Murphy, Michael; Cangi, Maria Giulia; Puddu, Pietro; Kadin, Marshall E.; Loda, Massimo

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders, which frequently involve the skin and other extranodal sites, is often problematic because of the difficulty in establishing clonality in paraffin-embedded tissue. To this end, we developed a simple, nonradioactive method to detect T-cell receptor γ (TCR-γ) gene rearrangements by polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) in paraffin-embedded tissue. Jurkat and HSB-2 cell lines and peripheral blood samples from normal individuals were used as monoclonal and polyclonal controls, respectively. DNA was extracted from 24 biopsies of T-cell lymphomas, 12 biopsies of reactive lymphoid infiltrates, and 2 biopsies of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas. Vγ1–8, Vγ9, Vγ10, Vγ11, and Jγ1/Jγ2 consensus primers were used for TCR-γ gene rearrangement amplification and PCR products were analyzed by nonradioactive SSCP. Monoclonal controls yielded a well-defined banded pattern, whereas all polyclonal T-cell controls showed a reproducible pattern of smears. We detected monoclonality in 20/21 (95%) T-cell lymphoma cases, whereas no dominant T-cell clones were found in any of the reactive lymphoid infiltrates or B-cell lymphomas. Sensitivity of 1–5% was demonstrated by serially diluting Jurkat cells in mononuclear blood cells from normal individuals. We conclude that nonradioactive PCR-SSCP for TCR-γ gene rearrangement analysis is a useful adjunct to routine histological and immunophenotypic methods in the diagnosis of T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders in paraffin-embedded tissue. PMID:9916920

  20. Genetic diversity of hemagglutinin gene of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza strains isolated in Taiwan and its potential impact on HA-neutralizing epitope interaction

    PubMed Central

    Łepek, Krzysztof; Pająk, Beata; Siedlecki, Paweł; Niemcewicz, Marcin; Kocik, Janusz; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Yang, Ji-Rong; Kucharczyk, Krzysztof; Szewczyk, Bogusław

    2014-01-01

    Pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus is a global health threat and between 2009–2011 it became the predominant influenza virus subtype circulating in the world. The research describes the MSSCP (Multitemperature Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism) analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) region encompassing major neutralizing epitope in pandemic influenza isolates from Taiwan. Several genetically distinct changes appeared in isolates obtained in 2010 and 2011. The majority of changes in HA protein did not result in significant modifications, however three modifications were localized in epitope E of H1 and one was part of the interface binding antibodies BH151 and HC45 possibly making the current vaccine less effective.-Taking into account the possibility of the emergence of influenza A with antibody evading potential, the MSSCP method provides an alternative approach for detection of minor variants which escape detection by conventional Sanger sequencing. PMID:24407429

  1. Designing Probes for Immunodiagnostics: Structural Insights into an Epitope Targeting Burkholderia Infections.

    PubMed

    Capelli, Riccardo; Matterazzo, Elena; Amabili, Marco; Peri, Claudio; Gori, Alessandro; Gagni, Paola; Chiari, Marcella; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Cretich, Marina; Bolognesi, Martino; Colombo, Giorgio; Gourlay, Louise J

    2017-07-21

    Structure-based epitope prediction drives the design of diagnostic peptidic probes to reveal specific antibodies elicited in response to infections. We previously identified a highly immunoreactive epitope from the peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (Pal) antigen from Burkholderia pseudomallei, which could also diagnose Burkholderia cepacia infections. Here, considering the high phylogenetic conservation within Burkholderia species, we ask whether cross-reactivity can be reciprocally displayed by the synthetic epitope from B. cenocepacia. We perform comparative analyses of the conformational preferences and diagnostic performances of the corresponding epitopes from the two Burkholderia species when presented in the context of the full-length proteins or as isolated peptides. The effects of conformation on the diagnostic potential and cross-reactivity of Pal peptide epitopes are rationalized on the basis of the 1.8 Å crystal structure of B. cenocepacia Pal and through computational analyses. Our results are discussed in the context of designing new diagnostic molecules for the early detection of infectious diseases.

  2. Design and Characterization of Epitope-Scaffold Immunogens That Present the Motavizumab Epitope from Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Correia, Bruno E.; Chen, Man; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Schief, William R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2012-06-28

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, but an effective vaccine has not yet been developed. An ideal vaccine would elicit protective antibodies while avoiding virus-specific T-cell responses, which have been implicated in vaccine-enhanced disease with previous RSV vaccines. We propose that heterologous proteins designed to present RSV-neutralizing antibody epitopes and to elicit cognate antibodies have the potential to fulfill these vaccine requirements, as they can be fashioned to be free of viral T-cell epitopes. Here we present the design and characterization of three epitope-scaffolds that present the epitope of motavizumab, a potent neutralizing antibody that binds to a helix-loop-helix motif in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Two of the epitope-scaffolds could be purified, and one epitope-scaffold based on a Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain bound motavizumab with kinetic and thermodynamic properties consistent with the free epitope-scaffold being stabilized in a conformation that closely resembled the motavizumab-bound state. This epitope-scaffold was well folded as assessed by circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry, and its crystal structure (determined in complex with motavizumab to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution) was similar to the computationally designed model, with all hydrogen-bond interactions critical for binding to motavizumab preserved. Immunization of mice with this epitope-scaffold failed to elicit neutralizing antibodies but did elicit sera with F binding activity. The elicitation of F binding antibodies suggests that some of the design criteria for eliciting protective antibodies without virus-specific T-cell responses are being met, but additional optimization of these novel immunogens is required.

  3. Design and characterization of epitope-scaffold immunogens that present the motavizumab epitope from respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Jason S; Correia, Bruno E; Chen, Man; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S; Schief, William R; Kwong, Peter D

    2011-06-24

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, but an effective vaccine has not yet been developed. An ideal vaccine would elicit protective antibodies while avoiding virus-specific T-cell responses, which have been implicated in vaccine-enhanced disease with previous RSV vaccines. We propose that heterologous proteins designed to present RSV-neutralizing antibody epitopes and to elicit cognate antibodies have the potential to fulfill these vaccine requirements, as they can be fashioned to be free of viral T-cell epitopes. Here we present the design and characterization of three epitope-scaffolds that present the epitope of motavizumab, a potent neutralizing antibody that binds to a helix-loop-helix motif in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Two of the epitope-scaffolds could be purified, and one epitope-scaffold based on a Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain bound motavizumab with kinetic and thermodynamic properties consistent with the free epitope-scaffold being stabilized in a conformation that closely resembled the motavizumab-bound state. This epitope-scaffold was well folded as assessed by circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry, and its crystal structure (determined in complex with motavizumab to 1.9 Å resolution) was similar to the computationally designed model, with all hydrogen-bond interactions critical for binding to motavizumab preserved. Immunization of mice with this epitope-scaffold failed to elicit neutralizing antibodies but did elicit sera with F binding activity. The elicitation of F binding antibodies suggests that some of the design criteria for eliciting protective antibodies without virus-specific T-cell responses are being met, but additional optimization of these novel immunogens is required. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. T-Cell Epitope Discovery for Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Sri; Anderson, Karen S

    2016-01-01

    The success of recent immune checkpoint blockade trials in solid tumors has demonstrated the tremendous potential of immune-mediated treatment strategies for cancer therapy. These immune therapies activate preexisting cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells (CTL) to selectively target and eradicate malignant cells. In vitro models suggest that these therapies may be more effective in combination with priming of CTL using cancer vaccines. CTL-mediated tumor targeting is achieved by its recognition of tumor antigenic epitopes presented on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by tumor cells. Discovering CTL-antigenic epitopes is therefore central to the design of therapeutic T-cell vaccines and immune monitoring of these complex immunotherapies. However, selecting and monitoring T-cell epitopes remains difficult due to the extensive polymorphism of HLA alleles and the presence of confounding non-immunogenic self-peptides. To overcome these challenges, this chapter presents methodologies for the design of CTL-targeted vaccines using selection of target HLA alleles, novel integrated computational strategies to predict HLA-class I CTL epitopes, and epitope validation methods using short-term ex vivo T-cell stimulation. This strategy results in the improved efficiency for selecting antigenic epitopes for CTL-mediated vaccines and for immune monitoring of tumor antigens.

  5. Computational Prediction of Broadly Neutralizing HIV-1 Antibody Epitopes from Neutralization Activity Data

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Andrew L.; Falkowska, Emilia; Walker, Laura M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Burton, Dennis R.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies effective against the majority of circulating isolates of HIV-1 have been isolated from a small number of infected individuals. Definition of the conformational epitopes on the HIV spike to which these antibodies bind is of great value in defining targets for vaccine and drug design. Drawing on techniques from compressed sensing and information theory, we developed a computational methodology to predict key residues constituting the conformational epitopes on the viral spike from cross-clade neutralization activity data. Our approach does not require the availability of structural information for either the antibody or antigen. Predictions of the conformational epitopes of ten broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies are shown to be in good agreement with new and existing experimental data. Our findings suggest that our approach offers a means to accelerate epitope identification for diverse pathogenic antigens. PMID:24312481

  6. Tetramer-guided epitope mapping: rapid identification and characterization of immunodominant CD4+ T cell epitopes from complex antigens.

    PubMed

    Novak, E J; Liu, A W; Gebe, J A; Falk, B A; Nepom, G T; Koelle, D M; Kwok, W W

    2001-06-01

    T cell responses to Ags involve recognition of selected peptide epitopes contained within the antigenic protein. In this report, we describe a new approach for direct identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes of complex Ags that uses human class II tetramers to identify reactive cells. With a panel of 60 overlapping peptides covering the entire sequence of the VP16 protein, a major Ag for HSV-2, we generated a panel of class II MHC tetramers loaded with peptide pools that were used to stain peripheral lymphocytes of an HSV-2 infected individual. With this approach, we identified four new DRA1*0101/DRB1*0401- and two DRA1*0101/DRB1*0404-restricted, VP16-specific epitopes. By using tetramers to sort individual cells, we easily obtained a large number of clones specific to these epitopes. Although DRA1*0101/DRB1*0401 and DRA1*0101/DRB1*0404 are structurally very similar, nonoverlapping VP16 epitopes were identified, illustrating high selectivity of individual allele polymorphisms within common MHC variants. This rapid approach to detecting CD4+ T cell epitopes from complex Ags can be applied to any known Ag that gives a T cell response.

  7. Sensitivity of single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis in detecting p53 point mutations in tumors with mixed cell populations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.K.; Zhen Ye; Darras, B.T. Tufts Univ., Boston, MA )

    1993-06-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor-suppressor gene are commonly found in human cancers of diverse origin. Once of a number of methods developed to analyze large numbers of DNA samples for specific mutations is the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. This method is particularly well suited for analysis of tissues, such as brain tumors, with mixed cell populations. It takes advantage of the fact that, in a mixed cell population containing DNA with and without a mutation (e.g., the p53 gene mutation), both molecular species will be amplified by the PCR. A mutation within a PCR-amplified DNA fragment will alter the secondary structure of the amplified fragment and affect its electrophoretic mobility in a nondenaturing gel. The DNA fragments with the mutation are detected as an aberrantly migrating allele that can be seen concurrently with the wild-type allele. Although many studies have used this technique to screen for p53 mutations in tumors, with detection of a number of different mutations the limit of detection of point mutations in a background of wild-type DNA is not known. To test this, mixtures of mutant DNA from tumor D317 with a G-to-A point mutation in codon 272 of the p53 gene; or from tumor D263 (with a G-to-A point mutation in codon 175 of the p53 gene) and wild-type DNA from leukocytes, in ratios of 1:100, 5:95, 10:90, 15:85, 50:50, and 30:70, were prepared. The mixtures containing 100 ng of DNA were amplified using standard PCR technique. After the double-stranded DNAs were denatured, the DNA samples were loaded and electrophoresed on a nondenaturing acrylamide gel. The mutant allele was detectable even when the ratio of mutant to wild-type DNA was 5:95 in tumor D317. For tumor D263, the mutant allele was detectable when the ratio of mutant to wild-type DNA was 15:85, and it was not detectable at 10:90.

  8. Modeling the Role of Epitope Arrangement on Antibody Binding Stoichiometry in Flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Daniel R; Khavrutskii, Ilja; Wallqvist, Anders; Chaudhury, Sidhartha

    2016-10-18

    Cryo-electron-microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of flaviviruses reveal significant variation in epitope occupancy across different monoclonal antibodies that have largely been attributed to epitope-level differences in conformation or accessibility that affect antibody binding. The consequences of these variations for macroscopic properties such as antibody binding and neutralization are the results of the law of mass action-a stochastic process of innumerable binding and unbinding events between antibodies and the multiple binding sites on the flavivirus in equilibrium-that cannot be directly imputed from structure alone. We carried out coarse-grained spatial stochastic binding simulations for nine flavivirus antibodies with epitopes defined by cryo-EM or x-ray crystallography to assess the role of epitope spatial arrangement on antibody-binding stoichiometry, occupancy, and neutralization. In our simulations, all epitopes were equally competent for binding, representing the upper limit of binding stoichiometry that results from epitope spatial arrangement alone. Surprisingly, our simulations closely reproduced the relative occupancy and binding stoichiometry observed in cryo-EM, without having to account for differences in epitope accessibility or conformation, suggesting that epitope spatial arrangement alone may be sufficient to explain differences in binding occupancy and stoichiometry between antibodies. Furthermore, we found that there was significant heterogeneity in binding configurations even at saturating antibody concentrations, and that bivalent antibody binding may be more common than previously thought. Finally, we propose a structure-based explanation for the stoichiometric threshold model of neutralization.

  9. IgE epitopes of intact and digested Ara h 1: a comparative study in humans and rats.

    PubMed

    Bøgh, K L; Nielsen, H; Madsen, C B; Mills, E N C; Rigby, N; Eiwegger, T; Szépfalusi, Z; Roggen, E L

    2012-07-01

    Allergen epitope characterization provides valuable information useful for the understanding of proteins as food allergens. It is believed that IgE epitopes in general are conformational, nevertheless, for food allergens known to sensitize through the gastrointestinal tract linear epitopes have been suggested to be of great importance. The aim of this study was to identify IgE specific epitopes of intact and digested Ara h 1, and to compare epitope patterns between humans and rats. Sera from five peanut allergic patients and five Brown Norway rats were used to identify intact and digested Ara h 1-specific IgE epitopes by competitive immunoscreening of a phage-displayed random hepta-mer peptide library using polyclonal IgE from the individual sera. The resulting peptide sequences were mapped on the surface of a three-dimensional structure of the Ara h 1 molecule to mimic epitopes using a computer-based algorithm. Patients as well as rats were shown to have individual IgE epitope patterns. All epitope mimics were conformational and found to cluster into three different areas of the Ara h 1 molecule. Five epitope motifs were identified by patient IgE, which by far accounted for most of the eluted peptide sequences. Epitope patterns were rather similar for both intact and digested Ara h 1 as well as for humans and rats. Individual patient specific epitope patterns have been identified for the major allergen Ara h 1. IgE binding epitopes have been suggested as biomarkers for persistency and severity of food allergy, wherefore recognition of particular epitope patterns or motifs could be a valuable tool for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of food allergy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Further exploration of the conformational space of α-synuclein fibrils: solid-state NMR assignment of a high-pH polymorph.

    PubMed

    Verasdonck, Joeri; Bousset, Luc; Gath, Julia; Melki, Ronald; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H

    2016-04-01

    Polymorphism is a common and important phenomenon for protein fibrils which has been linked to the appearance of strains in prion and other neurodegenerative diseases. Parkinson disease is a frequently occurring neurodegenerative pathology, tightly associated with the formation of Lewy bodies. These deposits mainly consist of α-synuclein in fibrillar, β-sheet-rich form. α-synuclein is known to form numerous different polymorphs, which show distinct structural features. Here, we describe the chemical shift assignments, and derive the secondary structure, of a polymorph that was fibrillized at higher-than-physiological pH conditions. The fibrillar core contains residues 40-95, with both the C- and N-terminus not showing any ordered, rigid parts. The chemical shifts are similar to those recorded previously for an assigned polymorph that was fibrillized at neutral pH.

  11. Determination of B-Cell Epitopes in Patients with Celiac Disease: Peptide Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Choung, Rok Seon; Marietta, Eric V.; Van Dyke, Carol T.; Brantner, Tricia L.; Rajasekaran, John; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Wang, Tianhao; Bei, Kang; Krishna, Karthik; Krishnamurthy, Hari K.; Snyder, Melissa R.; Jayaraman, Vasanth; Murray, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Most antibodies recognize conformational or discontinuous epitopes that have a specific 3-dimensional shape; however, determination of discontinuous B-cell epitopes is a major challenge in bioscience. Moreover, the current methods for identifying peptide epitopes often involve laborious, high-cost peptide screening programs. Here, we present a novel microarray method for identifying discontinuous B-cell epitopes in celiac disease (CD) by using a silicon-based peptide array and computational methods. Methods Using a novel silicon-based microarray platform with a multi-pillar chip, overlapping 12-mer peptide sequences of all native and deamidated gliadins, which are known to trigger CD, were synthesized in situ and used to identify peptide epitopes. Results Using a computational algorithm that considered disease specificity of peptide sequences, 2 distinct epitope sets were identified. Further, by combining the most discriminative 3-mer gliadin sequences with randomly interpolated3- or 6-mer peptide sequences, novel discontinuous epitopes were identified and further optimized to maximize disease discrimination. The final discontinuous epitope sets were tested in a confirmatory cohort of CD patients and controls, yielding 99% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Conclusions These novel sets of epitopes derived from gliadin have a high degree of accuracy in differentiating CD from controls, compared with standard serologic tests. The method of ultra-high-density peptide microarray described here would be broadly useful to develop high-fidelity diagnostic tests and explore pathogenesis. PMID:26824466

  12. T-cell epitope prediction methods: an overview.

    PubMed

    Desai, Dattatraya V; Kulkarni-Kale, Urmila

    2014-01-01

    The scientific community is overwhelmed by the voluminous increase in the quantum of data on biological systems, including but not limited to the immune system. Consequently, immunoinformatics databases are continually being developed to accommodate this ever increasing data and analytical tools are continually being developed to analyze the same. Therefore, researchers are now equipped with numerous databases, analytical and prediction tools, in anticipation of better means of prevention of and therapeutic intervention in diseases of humans and other animals. Epitope is a part of an antigen, recognized either by B- or T-cells and/or molecules of the host immune system. Since only a few amino acid residues that comprise an epitope (instead of the whole protein) are sufficient to elicit an immune response, attempts are being made to identify or predict this critical stretch or patch of amino acid residues, i.e., T-cell epitopes and B-cell epitopes to be included in multiple-subunit vaccines. T-cell epitope prediction is a challenge owing to the high degree of MHC polymorphism and disparity in the volume of data on various steps encountered in the generation and presentation of T-cell epitopes in the living systems. Many algorithms/methods developed to predict T-cell epitopes and Web servers incorporating the same are available. These are based on approaches like considering amphipathicity profiles of proteins, sequence motifs, quantitative matrices (QM), artificial neural networks (ANN), support vector machines (SVM), quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) and molecular docking simulations, etc. This chapter aims to introduce the reader to the principle(s) underlying some of these methods/algorithms as well as procedural and practical aspects of using the same.

  13. A novel multi-epitope peptide vaccine against cancer: an in silico approach.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Navid; Ghasemi, Younes; Javadi, Gholamreza; Khoshnoud, Mohammad Javad; Omidinia, Eskandar

    2014-05-21

    Cancer immunotherapy has an outstanding position in cancer prevention and treatment. In this kind of therapy, the immune system is activated to eliminate cancerous cells. Multi-epitope peptide cancer vaccines are manifesting as the next generation of cancer immunotherapy. In the present study, we have implemented various strategies to design an efficient multi-epitope vaccine. CD8+ cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) epitopes, which have a pivotal role in cellular immune responses, helper epitopes and adjuvant, are three crucial components of peptide vaccine. CTL epitopes were determined from two high immunogenic protein Wilms tumor-1 (WT1) and human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 by various servers, which apply different algorithms. CTL epitopes were linked together by AAY and HEYGAEALERAG motifs to enhance epitope presentation. Pan HLA DR-binding epitope (PADRE) peptide sequence and helper epitopes, which have defined from Tetanus toxin fragment C (TTFrC) by various servers, were used to induce CD4+ helper T lymphocytes (HTLs) responses. Additionally, helper epitopes were conjugated together via GPGPG motifs that stimulate HTL immunity. Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin (HBHA), a novel TLR4 agonist was employed as an adjuvant to polarize CD4+ T cells toward T-helper 1 to induce strong CTL responses. Moreover, the EAAAK linker was introduced to N and C terminals of HBHA for efficient separation. 3D model of protein was generated and predicted B cell epitopes were determined from the surface of built structure. Our protein contains several linear and conformational B cell epitopes, which suggests the antibody triggering property of this novel vaccine. Hence, our final protein can be used for prophylactic or therapeutic usages, because it can potentially stimulate both cellular and humoral immune responses.

  14. Vaccine focusing to cross-subtype HIV-1 gp120 variable loop epitopes.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Timothy; Wang, Shixia; Jiang, Xunqing; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Hioe, Catarina; Krachmarov, Chavdar

    2014-09-03

    We designed synthetic, epitope-focused immunogens that preferentially display individual neutralization epitopes targeted by cross-subtype anti-HIV V3 loop neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Vaccination of rabbits with these immunogens resulted in the elicitation of distinct polyclonal serum Abs that exhibit cross-subtype neutralization specificities mimicking the mAbs that guided the design. Our results prove the principle that a predictable range of epitope-specific polyclonal cross-subtype HIV-1 neutralizing Abs can be intentionally elicited in mammals by vaccination. The precise boundaries of the epitopes and conformational flexibility in the presentation of the epitopes in the immunogen appeared to be important for successful elicitation. This work may serve as a starting point for translating the activities of human broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs) into matched immunogens that can contribute to an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine.

  15. Thyrotropin Receptor Epitope and Human Leukocyte Antigen in Graves’ Disease

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hidefumi; De Groot, Leslie J.; Akamizu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease (GD) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease, and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor (TSHR) is a major autoantigen in this condition. Since the extracellular domain of human TSHR (TSHR-ECD) is shed into the circulation, TSHR-ECD is a preferentially immunogenic portion of TSHR. Both genetic factors and environmental factors contribute to development of GD. Inheritance of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes, especially HLA-DR3, is associated with GD. TSHR-ECD protein is endocytosed into antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and processed to TSHR-ECD peptides. These peptide epitopes bind to HLA-class II molecules, and subsequently the complex of HLA-class II and TSHR-ECD epitope is presented to CD4+ T cells. The activated CD4+ T cells secrete cytokines/chemokines that stimulate B-cells to produce TSAb, and in turn hyperthyroidism occurs. Numerous studies have been done to identify T- and B-cell epitopes in TSHR-ECD, including (1) in silico, (2) in vitro, (3) in vivo, and (4) clinical experiments. Murine models of GD and HLA-transgenic mice have played a pivotal role in elucidating the immunological mechanisms. To date, linear or conformational epitopes of TSHR-ECD, as well as the molecular structure of the epitope-binding groove in HLA-DR, were reported to be related to the pathogenesis in GD. Dysfunction of central tolerance in the thymus, or in peripheral tolerance, such as regulatory T cells, could allow development of GD. Novel treatments using TSHR antagonists or mutated TSHR peptides have been reported to be effective. We review and update the role of immunogenic TSHR epitopes and HLA in GD, and offer perspectives on TSHR epitope specific treatments. PMID:27602020

  16. Epitope Insertion at the N-Terminal Molecular Switch of the Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus T=3 Capsid Protein Leads to Larger T=4 Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Daniel; González, José M.; Gómez-Blanco, Josué; Marabini, Roberto; Chichón, Javier; Mena, Ignacio; Angulo, Iván; Carrascosa, José L.; Verdaguer, Nuria; Trus, Benes L.; Bárcena, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Viruses need only one or a few structural capsid proteins to build an infectious particle. This is possible through the extensive use of symmetry and the conformational polymorphism of the structural proteins. Using virus-like particles (VLP) from rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) as a model, we addressed the basis of calicivirus capsid assembly and their application in vaccine design. The RHDV capsid is based on a T=3 lattice containing 180 identical subunits (VP1). We determined the structure of RHDV VLP to 8.0-Å resolution by three-dimensional cryoelectron microscopy; in addition, we used San Miguel sea lion virus (SMSV) and feline calicivirus (FCV) capsid subunit structures to establish the backbone structure of VP1 by homology modeling and flexible docking analysis. Based on the three-domain VP1 model, several insertion mutants were designed to validate the VP1 pseudoatomic model, and foreign epitopes were placed at the N- or C-terminal end, as well as in an exposed loop on the capsid surface. We selected a set of T and B cell epitopes of various lengths derived from viral and eukaryotic origins. Structural analysis of these chimeric capsids further validates the VP1 model to design new chimeras. Whereas most insertions are well tolerated, VP1 with an FCV capsid protein-neutralizing epitope at the N terminus assembled into mixtures of T=3 and larger T=4 capsids. The calicivirus capsid protein, and perhaps that of many other viruses, thus can encode polymorphism modulators that are not anticipated from the plane sequence, with important implications for understanding virus assembly and evolution. PMID:22491457

  17. Application of phage peptide display technology for the study of food allergen epitopes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueni; Dreskin, Stephen C

    2017-06-01

    Phage peptide display technology has been used to identify IgE-binding mimotopes (mimics of natural epitopes) that mimic conformational epitopes. This approach is effective in the characterization of those epitopes that are important for eliciting IgE-mediated allergic responses by food allergens and those that are responsible for cross-reactivity among allergenic food proteins. Application of this technology will increase our understanding of the mechanisms whereby food allergens elicit allergic reactions, will facilitate the discovery of diagnostic reagents and may lead to mimotope-based immunotherapy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Epitope mapping and functional analysis of sigma A and sigma NS proteins of avian reovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Pi H.; Li, Ying J.; Su, Yu P.; Lee, Long H.; Liu, Hung J. . E-mail: hjliu@mail.npust.edu.tw

    2005-02-20

    We have previously shown that avian reovirus (ARV) {sigma}A and {sigma}NS proteins possess dsRNA and ssRNA binding activity and suggested that there are two epitopes on {sigma}A (I and II) and three epitopes (A, B, and C) on {sigma}NS. To further define the location of epitopes on {sigma}A and {sigma}NS proteins and to further elucidate the biological functions of these epitopes by using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 62, 1F9, H1E1, and 4A123 against the ARV S1133 strain, the full-length and deletion fragments of S2 and S4 genes of ARV generated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were cloned into pET32 expression vectors and the fusion proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 strain. Epitope mapping using MAbs and E. coli-expressed deletion fragments of {sigma}A and {sigma}NS of the ARV S1133 strain, synthetic peptides, and the cross reactivity of MAbs to heterologous ARV strains demonstrated that epitope II on {sigma}A was located at amino acid residues {sup 340}QWVMAGLVSAA{sup 350} and epitope B on {sigma}NS at amino acid residues {sup 180}MLDMVDGRP{sup 188}. The MAbs (62, 1F9, and H1E1) directed against epitopes II and B did not require the native conformation of {sigma}A and {sigma}NS, suggesting that their binding activities were conformation-independent. On the other hand, MAb 4A123 only reacted with complete {sigma}NS but not with truncated {sigma}NS fusion proteins in Western blot, suggesting that the binding activity of MAb to epitope A on {sigma}NS was conformation-dependent. Amino acid sequence analysis and the binding assays of MAb 62 to heterologous ARV strains suggested that epitope II on {sigma}A was highly conserved among ARV strains and that this epitope is suitable as a serological marker for the detection of ARV antibodies following natural infection in chickens. On the contrary, an amino acid substitution at position 183 (M to V) in epitope B of ARV could hinder the reactivity of the {sigma}NS with MAb 1F9. The {sigma}NS of ARV with ss

  19. Collection of phage-peptide probes for HIV-1 immunodominant loop-epitope.

    PubMed

    Palacios-Rodríguez, Yadira; Gazarian, Tatiana; Rowley, Merrill; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham; Gazarian, Karlen

    2007-02-01

    Early diagnosis and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection, which remains a serious public health threat, is inhibited by the lack of reagents that elicit antiviral responses in the immune system. To create mimotopes (peptide models of epitopes) of the most immunodominant epitope, CSGKLIC, that occurs as a loop on the envelope gp41 glycoprotein and is a key participant in infection, we used phage-display technology involving biopanning of large random libraries with IgG of HIV-1-infected patients. Under the conditions used, library screening with IgG from patient serum was directed to the CSGKLIC epitope. Three rounds of selection converted a 12 mer library of 10(9) sequences into a population in which up to 79% of phage bore a family of CxxKxxC sequences ("x" designates a non-epitope amino acid). Twenty-one phage clones displaying the most frequently selected peptides were obtained and were shown to display the principal structural (sequence and conformational), antigenic and immunogenic features of the HIV-1 immunodominant loop-epitope. Notably, when the mixture of the phage mimotopes was injected into mice, it induced 2- to 3-fold higher titers of antibody to the HIV-1 epitope than could be induced from individual mimotopes. The described approach could be applicable for accurately reproducing HIV-1 epitope structural and immunological patterns by generation of specialized viral epitope libraries for use in diagnosis and therapy.

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies against Aβ42 Fibrils Distinguish Multiple Aggregation State Polymorphisms in Vitro and in Alzheimer Disease Brain*

    PubMed Central

    Hatami, Asa; Albay, Ricardo; Monjazeb, Sanaz; Milton, Saskia; Glabe, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Amyloidogenic proteins generally form intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded β-sheet aggregates, including parallel, in-register β-sheets (recognized by antiserum OC) or antiparallel β-sheets, β-solenoids, β-barrels, and β-cylindrins (recognized by antiserum A11). Although these groups share many common properties, some amyloid sequences have been reported to form polymorphic structural variants or strains. We investigated the humoral immune response to Aβ42 fibrils and produced 23 OC-type monoclonal antibodies recognizing distinct epitopes differentially associated with polymorphic structural variants. These mOC antibodies define at least 18 different immunological profiles represented in aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ). All of the antibodies strongly prefer amyloid aggregates over monomer, indicating that they recognize conformational epitopes. Most of the antibodies react with N-terminal linear segments of Aβ, although many recognize a discontinuous epitope consisting of an N-terminal domain and a central domain. Several of the antibodies that recognize linear Aβ segments also react with fibrils formed from unrelated amyloid sequences, indicating that reactivity with linear segments of Aβ does not mean the antibody is sequence-specific. The antibodies display strikingly different patterns of immunoreactivity in Alzheimer disease and transgenic mouse brain and identify spatially and temporally unique amyloid deposits. Our results indicate that the immune response to Aβ42 fibrils is diverse and reflects the structural polymorphisms in fibrillar amyloid structures. These polymorphisms may contribute to differences in toxicity and consequent effects on pathological processes. Thus, a single therapeutic monoclonal antibody may not be able to target all of the pathological aggregates necessary to make an impact on the overall disease process. PMID:25281743

  1. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-08-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  2. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-03-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  3. Search for genetic variants in the retinoid X receptor-gamma-gene by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism in patients with resistance to thyroid hormone without mutations in thyroid hormone receptor beta gene.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Stefano; Menzaghi, Claudia; Bruno, Rocco; Sentinelli, Federica; Fallarino, Mara; Fioretti, Francesca; Filetti, Sebastiano; Balsamo, Armando; Di Mario, Umberto; Baroni, Marco G

    2004-05-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is an inherited disease characterized by reduced tissue sensitivity to thyroid hormone. Approximately 90% of subjects with RTH have mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRbeta) gene. Approximately 10% of subjects diagnosed as having RTH do not carry mutation in the TRbeta gene. A possible linkage was reported with the retinoid X receptor-gamma (RXR-gamma) gene in two families. The aim of this study is to search for mutation within the RXR-gamma gene in unrelated subjects with diagnosed RTH without mutations in the TRbeta gene. Four subjects with RTH were studied, and sequence variants in the RXR-gamma gene were searched by polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP). Analysis of all the 10 exons of the RXR-gamma gene, including intron-exon boundaries, promoter region and 3' untranslated region (UTR) reveled two variant bands in subjects II and III. Sequencing of these variants showed two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): 447C > T in exon 3 for patients II and IVS9 + 6A > G for patient III. Both SNPs were also present at high frequency in a group of normal subjects and in nonaffected relatives of subject III. In conclusion, in patients with RTH we have found two SNPs in the RXR-gamma gene; these SNPS are common in the general population, thus excluding a role for the RXR-gamma gene in these patients.

  4. Genetic variability within Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato genospecies established by PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer in ixodes ricinus ticks from the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Derdáková, Markéta; Beati, Lorenza; Pet'ko, Branislav; Stanko, Michal; Fish, Durland

    2003-01-01

    In Europe the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex is represented by five distinct genospecies: Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia garinii, Borrelia valaisiana, and Borrelia lusitaniae. These taxonomic entities are known to differ in their specific associations with vertebrate hosts and to provoke distinct clinical manifestations in human patients. However, exceptions to these rules have often been observed, indicating that strains belonging to a single genospecies may be more heterogeneous than expected. It is, therefore, important to develop alternative identification tools which are able to distinguish Borrelia strains not only at the specific level but also at the intraspecific level. DNA from a sample of 370 Ixodes ricinus ticks collected in the Czech Republic was analyzed by PCR for the presence of a approximately 230-bp fragment of the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer of Borrelia spp. A total of 20.5% of the ticks were found to be positive. The infecting genospecies were identified by analyzing the amplified products by the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method with restriction enzyme MseI and by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. The two methods were compared, and PCR-SSCP analysis appeared to be a valuable tool for rapid identification of spirochetes at the intraspecific level, particularly when large samples are examined. Furthermore, by using PCR-SSCP analysis we identified a previously unknown Borrelia genotype, genotype I-77, which would have gone unnoticed if RFLP analysis alone had been used.

  5. Genetic Variability within Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato Genospecies Established by PCR-Single-Strand Conformation Polymorphism Analysis of the rrfA-rrlB Intergenic Spacer in Ixodes ricinus Ticks from the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Derdáková, Markéta; Beati, Lorenza; Pet'ko, Branislav; Stanko, Michal; Fish, Durland

    2003-01-01

    In Europe the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex is represented by five distinct genospecies: Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Borrelia afzelii, Borrelia garinii, Borrelia valaisiana, and Borrelia lusitaniae. These taxonomic entities are known to differ in their specific associations with vertebrate hosts and to provoke distinct clinical manifestations in human patients. However, exceptions to these rules have often been observed, indicating that strains belonging to a single genospecies may be more heterogeneous than expected. It is, therefore, important to develop alternative identification tools which are able to distinguish Borrelia strains not only at the specific level but also at the intraspecific level. DNA from a sample of 370 Ixodes ricinus ticks collected in the Czech Republic was analyzed by PCR for the presence of a ∼230-bp fragment of the rrfA-rrlB intergenic spacer of Borrelia spp. A total of 20.5% of the ticks were found to be positive. The infecting genospecies were identified by analyzing the amplified products by the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method with restriction enzyme MseI and by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. The two methods were compared, and PCR-SSCP analysis appeared to be a valuable tool for rapid identification of spirochetes at the intraspecific level, particularly when large samples are examined. Furthermore, by using PCR-SSCP analysis we identified a previously unknown Borrelia genotype, genotype I-77, which would have gone unnoticed if RFLP analysis alone had been used. PMID:12514035

  6. Intact Transition Epitope Mapping (ITEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yefremova, Yelena; Opuni, Kwabena F. M.; Danquah, Bright D.; Thiesen, Hans-Juergen; Glocker, Michael O.

    2017-08-01

    Intact transition epitope mapping (ITEM) enables rapid and accurate determination of protein antigen-derived epitopes by either epitope extraction or epitope excision. Upon formation of the antigen peptide-containing immune complex in solution, the entire mixture is electrosprayed to translate all constituents as protonated ions into the gas phase. There, ions from antibody-peptide complexes are separated from unbound peptide ions according to their masses, charges, and shapes either by ion mobility drift or by quadrupole ion filtering. Subsequently, immune complexes are dissociated by collision induced fragmentation and the ion signals of the "complex-released peptides," which in effect are the epitope peptides, are recorded in the time-of-flight analyzer of the mass spectrometer. Mixing of an antibody solution with a solution in which antigens or antigen-derived peptides are dissolved is, together with antigen proteolysis, the only required in-solution handling step. Simplicity of sample handling and speed of analysis together with very low sample consumption makes ITEM faster and easier to perform than other experimental epitope mapping methods.

  7. Non-rigid molecule of copper(II) diiminate Cu[CF3C(NH)C(F)C(NH)CF3]2, its conformational polymorphism in crystal and structure in solutions (Raman, UV-vis and quantum chemistry study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukalov, Sergey S.; Aysin, Rinat R.; Leites, Larissa A.; Kurykin, Mikhail A.; Khrustalev, Victor N.

    2015-10-01

    Calculation of potential energy surface (PES) of isolated molecule of copper(II) diiminate Cu[CF3С(NH)C(F)C(NH)CF3]2 (1) resulted a double-well curve with the minima corresponding to equivalent screwed conformations. The low barrier leads to molecular non-rigidity which seems to be the reason of conformational polymorphism in crystals, reported in [1]. For one of newly found polymorphs, the X-ray structure was determined. The differences in the Raman and UV-vis spectra between differently colored species and their solutions were revealed, they are determined by different geometries of Cu(II) coordination polyhedron and different systems of intermolecular interactions in crystals. Transformations of the polymorphs under thermal, mechanical and photo exposures were studied.

  8. In silico prediction of B cell epitopes of the extracellular domain of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Bayrami, Vahid; Keyhanfar, Mehrnaz; Mohabatkar, Hassan; Mahdavi, Manijeh; Moreau, Violaine

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a transmembrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity. The receptor plays a critical role in cancer. Using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the IGF-1R, typically blocks ligand binding and enhances down-regulation of the cell-surface IGF-1R. Some MAbs such as cixutumumab are under clinical trial investigation. Targeting multiple distinct epitopes on IGF-1R, might be an effective strategy to inhibit IGF-1R pathway in cancer. In this study, new linear B cell epitopes for the extracellular domains of IGF-1R were predicted by in silico methods using a combination of linear B cell epitope prediction web servers such as ABCpred, Bepired, BCPREDs, Bcepred and Elliprro. Moreover, Discotope, B- pred and PEPOP web server tools were employed to predict new conformational B cell epitopes. In contrast to previously reported epitopes from extracellular region of the IGF-1R, we predicted new linear P8: (RQPQDGYLYRHNYCSK) and conformational Pc4: (HYYYAGVCVPACPPNTYRFE), Ppc6: (KMCPSTGKRENNESAPDNDT) and Ppc20: (ANILSAESSDSEFMQEPSGFI) epitopes. These epitopes are useful for further study as peptide antigens to actively immune host animals to develop new MAbs. Furthermore, the epitopes can be used in peptide-based cancer vaccines design. PMID:28261624

  9. Structural basis for epitope sharing between group 1 allergens of cedar pollen

    PubMed Central

    Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Schein, Catherine H.; Mathura, Venkatarajan; Braun, Werner; Czerwinski, Edmund W.; Togawa, Akihisa; Kondo, Yasuto; Oka, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Masanao; Goldblum, Randall M.

    2008-01-01

    The group 1 allergens are a major cause of cedar pollen hypersensitivity in several geographic areas. Allergens from several taxa have been shown to cross-react. The goal of these studies was to compare the structural features of the shared and unique epitopes of the group 1 allergen from mountain cedar (Jun a 1) and Japanese cedar (Cry j 1). An array of overlapping peptides from the sequence of Jun a 1 and a panel of monoclonal anti-Cry j 1 antibodies were used to identify the IgE epitopes recognized by cedar-sensitive patients from Texas and Japan. IgE from Japanese patients reacted with peptides representing one of the two linear epitopes within the highly conserved β-helical core structure and both epitopes within less ordered loops and turns near the N- and C-termini of Jun a 1. A three-dimensional (3D) model of the Cry j 1, based on the crystal structure of Jun a 1, indicated a similar surface exposure for the four described epitopes of Jun a 1 and the homologous regions of Cry j 1. The monoclonal antibodies identified another shared epitope, which is most likely conformational and a unique Cry j 1 epitope that may be the previously recognized glycopeptide IgE epitope. Defining the structural basis for shared and unique epitopes will help to identify critical features of IgE epitopes that can be used to develop mimotopes or identify allergen homologues for vaccine development. PMID:15975657

  10. Conformational dynamics is key to understanding loss-of-function of NQO1 cancer-associated polymorphisms and its correction by pharmacological ligands

    PubMed Central

    Encarnación, Medina-Carmona; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio J.; Fuchs, Julian E.; Esperanza, Padín-Gonzalez; Noel, Mesa-Torres; Salido, Eduardo; Timson, David J.; Pey, Angel L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein dynamics is essential to understand protein function and stability, even though is rarely investigated as the origin of loss-of-function due to genetic variations. Here, we use biochemical, biophysical, cell and computational biology tools to study two loss-of-function and cancer-associated polymorphisms (p.R139W and p.P187S) in human NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), a FAD-dependent enzyme which activates cancer pro-drugs and stabilizes several oncosuppressors. We show that p.P187S strongly destabilizes the NQO1 dimer in vitro and increases the flexibility of the C-terminal domain, while a combination of FAD and the inhibitor dicoumarol overcome these alterations. Additionally, changes in global stability due to polymorphisms and ligand binding are linked to the dynamics of the dimer interface, whereas the low activity and affinity for FAD in p.P187S is caused by increased fluctuations at the FAD binding site. Importantly, NQO1 steady-state protein levels in cell cultures correlate primarily with the dynamics of the C-terminal domain, supporting a directional preference in NQO1 proteasomal degradation and the use of ligands binding to this domain to stabilize p.P187S in vivo. In conclusion, protein dynamics are fundamental to understanding loss-of-function in p.P187S, and to develop new pharmacological therapies to rescue this function. PMID:26838129

  11. Conformational dynamics is key to understanding loss-of-function of NQO1 cancer-associated polymorphisms and its correction by pharmacological ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encarnación, Medina-Carmona; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio J.; Fuchs, Julian E.; Esperanza, Padín-Gonzalez; Noel, Mesa-Torres; Salido, Eduardo; Timson, David J.; Pey, Angel L.

    2016-02-01

    Protein dynamics is essential to understand protein function and stability, even though is rarely investigated as the origin of loss-of-function due to genetic variations. Here, we use biochemical, biophysical, cell and computational biology tools to study two loss-of-function and cancer-associated polymorphisms (p.R139W and p.P187S) in human NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), a FAD-dependent enzyme which activates cancer pro-drugs and stabilizes several oncosuppressors. We show that p.P187S strongly destabilizes the NQO1 dimer in vitro and increases the flexibility of the C-terminal domain, while a combination of FAD and the inhibitor dicoumarol overcome these alterations. Additionally, changes in global stability due to polymorphisms and ligand binding are linked to the dynamics of the dimer interface, whereas the low activity and affinity for FAD in p.P187S is caused by increased fluctuations at the FAD binding site. Importantly, NQO1 steady-state protein levels in cell cultures correlate primarily with the dynamics of the C-terminal domain, supporting a directional preference in NQO1 proteasomal degradation and the use of ligands binding to this domain to stabilize p.P187S in vivo. In conclusion, protein dynamics are fundamental to understanding loss-of-function in p.P187S, and to develop new pharmacological therapies to rescue this function.

  12. Predicting population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Huynh-Hoa; Sidney, John; Dinh, Kenny; Southwood, Scott; Newman, Mark J; Sette, Alessandro

    2006-01-01

    Background T cells recognize a complex between a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule and a particular pathogen-derived epitope. A given epitope will elicit a response only in individuals that express an MHC molecule capable of binding that particular epitope. MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and over a thousand different human MHC (HLA) alleles are known. A disproportionate amount of MHC polymorphism occurs in positions constituting the peptide-binding region, and as a result, MHC molecules exhibit a widely varying binding specificity. In the design of peptide-based vaccines and diagnostics, the issue of population coverage in relation to MHC polymorphism is further complicated by the fact that different HLA types are expressed at dramatically different frequencies in different ethnicities. Thus, without careful consideration, a vaccine or diagnostic with ethnically biased population coverage could result. Results To address this issue, an algorithm was developed to calculate, on the basis of HLA genotypic frequencies, the fraction of individuals expected to respond to a given epitope set, diagnostic or vaccine. The population coverage estimates are based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data, although the tool can be utilized in a more general fashion. The algorithm was implemented as a web-application available at . Conclusion We have developed a web-based tool to predict population coverage of T-cell epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines based on MHC binding and/or T cell restriction data. Accordingly, epitope-based vaccines or diagnostics can be designed to maximize population coverage, while minimizing complexity (that is, the number of different epitopes included in the diagnostic or vaccine), and also minimizing the variability of coverage obtained or projected in different ethnic groups. PMID:16545123

  13. Epitope expression in nine commercial kits for the determination of anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies.

    PubMed

    Whitham, K; Patel, D; Ward, A M

    1999-01-01

    Anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies, from patients with autoimmune disease, bind predominantly to two neighbouring, non-identical, conformational domains referred to as domains A and B. In recent years a number of ELISA assays have been developed for the detection of anti-TPO antibodies, however, considerable variation between the different commercial assay kits has been documented in inter-laboratory surveys (UK NEQAS). This investigation assessed the differences between nine commercial ELISA assays currently available in the UK. The anti-TPO kits varied in terms of their imprecision and accuracy and in the density of coated antigen. Recombinant antigen containing kits demonstrated partial destruction of the B epitope, possibly due to the close proximity of both epitope regions in the recombinant molecule. None of the kits expressed only one epitope although there were differences in the degrees of expression of each epitope. Clinicians should be aware of the variability of the numbers generated, when interpreting test results.

  14. Mapping of B-Cell Epitopes in a Trypanosoma cruzi Immunodominant Antigen Expressed in Natural Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lesénéchal, Mylène; Becquart, Laurence; Lacoux, Xavier; Ladavière, Laurent; Baida, Renata C. P.; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; da Silveira, José Franco

    2005-01-01

    Tc40 is an immunodominant antigen present in natural Trypanosoma cruzi infections. This immunogen was thoroughly mapped by using overlapping amino acid sequences identified by gene cloning and chemical peptide synthesis. To map continuous epitopes of the Tc40 antigen, an epitope expression library was constructed and screened with sera from human chagasic patients. A major, linear B-cell epitope spanning residues 403 to 426 (PAKAAAPPAA) was identified in the central domain of Tc40. A synthetic peptide spanning this region reacted strongly with 89.8% of the serum samples from T. cruzi-infected individuals. This indicates that the main antigenic site is defined by the linear sequence of the peptide rather than a conformation-dependent structure. The major B-cell epitope of Tc40 shares a high degree of sequence identity with T. cruzi ribosomal and RNA binding proteins, suggesting the existence of cross-reactivity among these molecules. PMID:15699429

  15. Generation and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies against a Cyclic Variant of Hepatitis C Virus E2 Epitope 412-422

    PubMed Central

    Sandomenico, Annamaria; Leonardi, Antonio; Berisio, Rita; Sanguigno, Luca; Focà, Giuseppina; Focà, Annalia; Ruggiero, Alessia; Doti, Nunzianna; Muscariello, Livio; Barone, Daniela; Farina, Claudio; Owsianka, Ania; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 envelope glycoprotein is crucial for virus entry into hepatocytes. A conserved region of E2 encompassing amino acids 412 to 423 (epitope I) and containing Trp420, a residue critical for virus entry, is recognized by several broadly neutralizing antibodies. Peptides embodying this epitope I sequence adopt a β-hairpin conformation when bound to neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) AP33 and HCV1. We therefore generated new mouse MAbs that were able to bind to a cyclic peptide containing E2 residues 412 to 422 (C-epitope I) but not to the linear counterpart. These MAbs bound to purified E2 with affinities of about 50 nM, but they were unable to neutralize virus infection. Structural analysis of the complex between C-epitope I and one of our MAbs (C2) showed that the Trp420 side chain is largely buried in the combining site and that the Asn417 side chain, which is glycosylated in E2 and solvent exposed in other complexes, is slightly buried upon C2 binding. Also, the orientation of the cyclic peptide in the antibody-combining site is rotated by 180° compared to the orientations of the other complexes. All these structural features, however, do not explain the lack of neutralization activity. This is instead ascribed to the high degree of selectivity of the new MAbs for the cyclic epitope and to their inability to interact with the epitope in more flexible and extended conformations, which recent data suggest play a role in the mechanisms of neutralization escape. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a major health care burden, affecting almost 3% of the global population. The conserved epitope comprising residues 412 to 423 of the viral E2 glycoprotein is a valid vaccine candidate because antibodies recognizing this region exhibit potent neutralizing activity. This epitope adopts a β-hairpin conformation when bound to neutralizing MAbs. We explored the potential of cyclic peptides mimicking this structure to elicit

  16. Facile fabrication and instant application of miniaturized antibody-decorated affinity columns for higher-order structure and functional characterization of TRIM21 epitope peptides.

    PubMed

    Al-Majdoub, M; Opuni, K F M; Koy, C; Glocker, M O

    2013-11-05

    Both epitope excision and epitope extraction methods, combined with mass spectrometry, generate precise informations on binding surfaces of full-length proteins, identifying sequential (linear) or assembled (conformational) epitopes, respectively. Here, we describe the one-step fabrication and application of affinity columns using reversibly immobilized antibodies with highest flexibility with respect to antibody sources and lowest sample amount requirements (fmol range). Depending on the antibody source, we made use of protein G- or protein A-coated resins as support materials. These materials are packed in pipet tips and in combination with a programmable multichannel pipet form a highly efficient epitope mapping system. In addition to epitope identification, the influence of epitope structure modifications on antibody binding specificities could be studied in detail with synthetic peptides. Elution of epitope peptides was optimized such that mass spectrometric analysis was feasible after a single desalting step. Epitope peptides were identified by accurate molecular mass determinations or by partial amino acid sequence analysis. In addition, charge state comparison or ion mobility analysis of eluted epitope peptides enabled investigation of higher-order structures. The epitope peptide of the TRIM21 (TRIM: tripartite motif) autoantigen that is recognized by a polyclonal antibody was determined as assembling an "L-E-Q-L" motif on an α-helix. Secondary structure determination by circular dichroism spectroscopy and structure modeling are in accordance with the mass spectrometric results and the antigenic behavior of the 17-mer epitope peptide variants from the full-length autoantigen.

  17. The CEA/CD3-Bispecific Antibody MEDI-565 (MT111) Binds a Nonlinear Epitope in the Full-Length but Not a Short Splice Variant of CEA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaqi; Brohawn, Philip; Morehouse, Chris; Lekstrom, Kristen; Baeuerle, Patrick A.; Wu, Herren; Yao, Yihong; Coats, Steven R.; Dall’Acqua, William; Damschroder, Melissa; Hammond, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    MEDI-565 (also known as MT111) is a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody in development for the treatment of patients with cancers expressing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). MEDI-565 binds CEA on cancer cells and CD3 on T cells to induce T-cell mediated killing of cancer cells. To understand the molecular basis of human CEA recognition by MEDI-565 and how polymorphisms and spliced forms of CEA may affect MEDI-565 activity, we mapped the epitope of MEDI-565 on CEA using mutagenesis and homology modeling approaches. We found that MEDI-565 recognized a conformational epitope in the A2 domain comprised of amino acids 326–349 and 388–410, with critical residues F326, T328, N333, V388, G389, P390, E392, I408, and N410. Two non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs10407503, rs7249230) were identified in the epitope region, but they are found at low homozygosity rates. Searching the National Center for Biotechnology Information GenBank® database, we further identified a single, previously uncharacterized mRNA splice variant of CEA that lacks a portion of the N-terminal domain, the A1 and B1 domains, and a large portion of the A2 domain. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of multiple cancers showed widespread expression of full-length CEA in these tumors, with less frequent but concordant expression of the CEA splice variant. Because the epitope was largely absent from the CEA splice variant, MEDI-565 did not bind or mediate T-cell killing of cells solely expressing this form of CEA. In addition, the splice variant did not interfere with MEDI-565 binding or activity when co-expressed with full-length CEA. Thus MEDI-565 may broadly target CEA-positive tumors without regard for expression of the short splice variant of CEA. Together our data suggest that MEDI-565 activity will neither be impacted by SNPs nor by a splice variant of CEA. PMID:22574157

  18. Public epitope specificity of HLA class I antibodies induced by a failed kidney transplant: alloantibody characterization by flow cytometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Antonina; Poggi, Elvira; Ozzella, Giuseppina; Borrelli, Laura; Monaco, Palmina I; Scornajenghi, Alessandra; Tisone, Giuseppe; Adorno, Domenico

    2006-05-15

    Patients whose kidney grafts fail develop alloantibodies that react with many HLA molecules. We analyzed the epitope specificity of HLA class I alloantibodies in the sera of 55 patients who had been sensitized by kidney grafts, and investigated the immunogenicity of various polymorphic epitopes. HLA class I alloantibodies were detected and characterized by flow cytometry (FlowPRA beads). Potential "immunizing epitopes" were identified by comparing the amino acid sequences of HLA class I antigens/alleles of the donor, recipient and the antibody-reactivity pattern. In the 55 anti-HLA class I-positive patients, 82 different antibody reactivity patterns were identified; all but 5 (94%) were determined by a "public epitope" of donor HLA-A and/or -B molecules. Forty-five of 50 patients who showed HLA-A Res-MMs with their donors produced HLA-A antibodies, but only 31 of 51 subjects with HLA-B Res-MMs produced HLA-B antibodies (P=0.001; O.R.=5.81). The antibody patterns were specific for a "single" epitope of the mismatched donor molecules in 91% of patients. Forty-three of the 120 (36%) mismatched HLA-A and/or -B epitopes were positively correlated with antibody production. The polymorphic determinants of higher immunogenic capacity were b80N (Bw6-associated) and ab82-83LR (Bw4-associated) public epitopes. The humoral immune response against a kidney graft mainly produces HLA class I antibodies specific for "public epitopes" of mismatched donor molecules. A "single" donor-epitope may determine the production of a spread antibody pattern. In renal transplantation, epitope matching is better than HLA antigen matching for avoiding or minimizing development of HLA antibodies.

  19. Distinct Mechanisms Regulate Exposure of Neutralizing Epitopes in the V2 and V3 Loops of HIV-1 Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Chitra; Mayr, Luzia M.; Zhang, Jing; Kumar, Rajnish; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Nádas, Arthur; Zolla-Pazner, Susan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting the HIV-1 envelope (Env) are key components for protection against HIV-1. However, many cross-reactive epitopes are often occluded. This study investigates the mechanisms contributing to the masking of V2i (variable loop V2 integrin) epitopes compared to the accessibility of V3 epitopes. V2i are conformation-dependent epitopes encompassing the integrin α4β7-binding motif on the V1V2 loop of HIV-1 Env gp120. The V2i monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) display extensive cross-reactivity with gp120 monomers from many subtypes but neutralize only few viruses, indicating V2i's cryptic nature. First, we asked whether CD4-induced Env conformational changes affect V2i epitopes similarly to V3. CD4 treatment of BaL and JRFL pseudoviruses increased their neutralization sensitivity to V3 MAbs but not to the V2i MAbs. Second, the contribution of N-glycans in masking V2i versus V3 epitopes was evaluated by testing the neutralization of pseudoviruses produced in the presence of a glycosidase inhibitor, kifunensine. Viruses grown in kifunensine were more sensitive to neutralization by V3 but not V2i MAbs. Finally, we evaluated the time-dependent dynamics of the V2i and V3 epitopes. Extending the time of virus-MAb interaction to 18 h before adding target cells increased virus neutralization by some V2i MAbs and all V3 MAbs tested. Consistent with this, V2i MAb binding to Env on the surface of transfected cells also increased in a time-dependent manner. Hence, V2i and V3 epitopes are highly dynamic, but distinct factors modulate the antibody accessibility of these epitopes. The study reveals the importance of the structural dynamics of V2i and V3 epitopes in determining HIV-1 neutralization by antibodies targeting these sites. IMPORTANCE Conserved neutralizing epitopes are present in the V1V2 and V3 regions of HIV-1 Env, but these epitopes are often occluded from Abs. This study reveals that distinct mechanisms contribute to the masking

  20. Vicilin allergens of peanut and tree nuts (walnut, hazelnut and cashew nut) share structurally related IgE-binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Barre, Annick; Sordet, Camille; Culerrier, Raphaël; Rancé, Fabienne; Didier, Alain; Rougé, Pierre

    2008-03-01

    Surface-exposed IgE-binding epitopes of close overall conformation were characterized on the molecular surface of three-dimensional models built for the vicilin allergens of peanut (Ara h 1), walnut (Jug r 2), hazelnut (Cor a 11) and cashew nut (Ana o 1). They correspond to linear stretches of conserved amino acid sequences mainly located along the C-terminus of the polypeptide chains. A glyco-epitope corresponding to an exposed N-glycosylation site could also interfere with the IgE-binding epitopes. All these epitopic regions should participate in the IgE-binding cross-reactivity commonly reported between tree nuts or between peanut and some tree nuts in sensitized individuals. Owing to this epitopic community which constitutes a risk of cross-sensitization, the avoidance or a restricted consumption of other tree nuts should be recommended to peanut-sensitized individuals.

  1. PEPVAC: a web server for multi-epitope vaccine development based on the prediction of supertypic MHC ligands.

    PubMed

    Reche, Pedro A; Reinherz, Ellis L

    2005-07-01

    Prediction of peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules is a basis for anticipating T-cell epitopes, as well as epitope discovery-driven vaccine development. In the human, MHC molecules are known as human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) and are extremely polymorphic. HLA polymorphism is the basis of differential peptide binding, until now limiting the practical use of current epitope-prediction tools for vaccine development. Here, we describe a web server, PEPVAC (Promiscuous EPitope-based VACcine), optimized for the formulation of multi-epitope vaccines with broad population coverage. This optimization is accomplished through the prediction of peptides that bind to several HLA molecules with similar peptide-binding specificity (supertypes). Specifically, we offer the possibility of identifying promiscuous peptide binders to five distinct HLA class I supertypes (A2, A3, B7, A24 and B15). We estimated the phenotypic population frequency of these supertypes to be 95%, regardless of ethnicity. Targeting these supertypes for promiscuous peptide-binding predictions results in a limited number of potential epitopes without compromising the population coverage required for practical vaccine design considerations. PEPVAC can also identify conserved MHC ligands, as well as those with a C-terminus resulting from proteasomal cleavage. The combination of these features with the prediction of promiscuous HLA class I ligands further limits the number of potential epitopes. The PEPVAC server is hosted by the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute at the site http://immunax.dfci.harvard.edu/PEPVAC/.

  2. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of a common single nucleotide variation in WRAP53 gene, rs2287499, and evaluating its association in relation to breast cancer risk and prognosis among Iranian-Azeri population.

    PubMed

    Sedaie Bonab, Aida; Pouladi, Nasser; Hosseinpourfeizi, Mohammad Ali; Ravanbakhsh Gavgani, Reyhaneh; Dehghan, Roghayeh; Azarfam, Parvin; Montazeri, Vahid; Fakhrjou, Ashraf

    2014-09-01

    The WRAP53 (WD40-encoding RNA antisense to p53) gene encodes an antisense RNA, essential for p53 stabilization and induction upon DNA damage. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in WRAP53 have been associated with risk of cancer, which strengthens the role of WRAP53 in the pathogenesis of human malignancies. In fact, WRAP53 has been considered as a candidate cancer susceptibility gene. Accordingly, we performed a study to examine the association of a frequent genetic variation in WRAP53, rs2287499 (C/G), with breast cancer risk and prognosis among Iranian-Azeri population. A case-control association study, including 206 cases and 203 controls from Iranian-Azeri population, was conducted. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and tumor samples by salting-out method. SNP genotyping was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-based single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique. The sequence variation of SSCP banding patterns was determined by sequencing. The collected data were analyzed through statistical package for the social sciences software, using Chi-square (χ (2)) or Fisher's exact tests, with a significance level of 0.05. No significant differences in the allele and genotype frequencies between cases and controls were detected. Similarly, no significant associations between genotypes and clinicopathological data were observed. Concisely, no significant overall associations between rs2287499 and breast cancer risk and prognosis were detected in the studied population. The rs2287499 SNP is not associated with breast cancer predisposition in Iranian-Azeri women; it also cannot be used as a molecular biomarker to predict breast cancer prognosis in Iranian-Azeri population.

  3. Significance of Monoclonal Antibodies against the Conserved Epitopes within Non-Structural Protein 3 Helicase of Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Yixin; Zhao, Shuoxian; Zhu, Shaomei; Zeng, Jinfeng; Li, Tingting; Fu, Yongshui; Wang, Yuanzhan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Wenjing; Yang, Baocheng; Zhou, Yuanping; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2013-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) of hepatitis C virus (HCV), codes for protease and helicase carrying NTPase enzymatic activities, plays a crucial role in viral replication and an ideal target for diagnosis, antiviral therapy and vaccine development. In this study, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to NS3 helicase were characterized by epitope mapping and biological function test. A total of 29 monoclonal antibodies were produced to the truncated NS3 helicase of HCV-1b (T1b-rNS3, aa1192–1459). Six mAbs recognized 8/29 16mer peptides, which contributed to identify 5 linear and 1 discontinuous putative epitope sequences. Seven mAbs reacted with HCV-2a JFH-1 infected Huh-7.5.1 cells by immunofluorescent staining, of which 2E12 and 3E5 strongly bound to the exposed linear epitope 1231PTGSGKSTK1239 (EP05) or core motif 1373IPFYGKAI1380 (EP21), respectively. Five other mAbs recognized semi-conformational or conformational epitopes of HCV helicase. MAb 2E12 binds to epitope EP05 at the ATP binding site of motif I in domain 1, while mAb 3E5 reacts with epitope EP21 close to helicase nucleotide binding region of domain 2. Epitope EP05 is totally conserved and EP21 highly conserved across HCV genotypes. These two epitope peptides reacted strongly with 59–79% chronic and weakly with 30–58% resolved HCV infected blood donors, suggesting that these epitopes were dominant in HCV infection. MAb 2E12 inhibited 50% of unwinding activity of NS3 helicase in vitro. Novel monoclonal antibodies recognize highly conserved epitopes at crucial functional sites within NS3 helicase, which may become important antibodies for diagnosis and antiviral therapy in chronic HCV infection. PMID:23894620

  4. Transportation Conformity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This section provides information on: current laws, regulations and guidance, policy and technical guidance, project-level conformity, general information, contacts and training, adequacy review of SIP submissions

  5. Phage display revisited: Epitope mapping of a monoclonal antibody directed against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A using the PROFILER technology

    PubMed Central

    Cariccio, Veronica Lanza; Domina, Maria; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Faleri, Agnese; Bruttini, Marco; Bartolini, Erika; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Santini, Laura; Brunelli, Brunella; Norais, Nathalie; Borgogni, Erica; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is a strong need for rapid and reliable epitope mapping methods that can keep pace with the isolation of increasingly larger numbers of mAbs. We describe here the identification of a conformational epitope using Phage-based Representation OF ImmunoLigand Epitope Repertoire (PROFILER), a recently developed high-throughput method based on deep sequencing of antigen-specific lambda phage-displayed libraries. A novel bactericidal monoclonal antibody (mAb 9F11) raised against Neisseria meningitidis adhesin A (NadA), an important component of the Bexsero® anti-meningococcal vaccine, was used to evaluate the technique in comparison with other epitope mapping methods. The PROFILER technology readily identified NadA fragments that were capable of fully recapitulating the reactivity of the entire antigen against mAb 9F11. Further analysis of these fragments using mutagenesis and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry allowed us to identify the binding site of mAb 9F11 (A250-D274) and an adjoining sequence (V275-H312) that was also required for the full functional reconstitution of the epitope. These data suggest that, by virtue of its ability to detect a great variety of immunoreactive antigen fragments in phage-displayed libraries, the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify epitope-containing regions and provide, in addition, useful clues for the functional characterization of conformational mAb epitopes. PMID:26963435

  6. Epitope Mapping of Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies to Human Interferon-γ Using Human-Bovine Interferon-γ Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Bartek; Rudström, Karin; Ehrnfelt, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to identify conformational epitopes, recognized by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) made against human (h) interferon (IFN)-γ. Based on the mAbs' (n = 12) ability to simultaneously bind hIFN-γ in ELISA, 2 epitope clusters with 5 mAbs in each were defined; 2 mAbs recognized unique epitopes. Utilizing the mAbs' lack of reactivity with bovine (b) IFN-γ, epitopes were identified using 7 h/bIFN-γ chimeras where the helical regions (A-F) or the C terminus were substituted with bIFN-γ residues. Chimeras had a N-terminal peptide tag enabling the analysis of mAb recognition of chimeras in ELISA. The 2 mAb clusters mapped to region A and E, respectively; the epitopes of several mAbs also involved additional regions. MAbs in cluster A neutralized, to various degrees, IFN-γ-mediated activation of human cells, in line with the involvement of region A in the IFN-γ receptor interaction. MAbs mapping to region E displayed a stronger neutralizing capacity although this region has not been directly implicated in the receptor interaction. The results corroborate earlier studies and provide a detailed picture of the link between the epitope specificity and neutralizing capacity of mAbs. They further demonstrate the general use of peptide-tagged chimeric proteins as a powerful and straightforward method for efficient mapping of conformational epitopes. PMID:27336613

  7. Rapid screening of the heterogeneity of DNA methylation by single-strand conformation polymorphism and CE-LIF in the presence of electro-osmotic flow.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meng-Hsuan; Huang, Ya-Chi; Chang, Po-Ling

    2014-08-01

    DNA methylation is a complex event in epigenetic studies because of both the large CpG islands present upstream of the promoter region and the different distribution of DNA methylation despite similar methylation levels. For this reason, we proposed a fast, cost-effective method for the screening of DNA methylation based on SSCP and CE-LIF. In this study, the PCR products that were amplified from bisulfite-treated genomic DNA were denatured at 94°C, followed by immediate chilling in ice water to form the ssDNA. The ssDNA were separated by 1.5% poly(ethylene oxide) (Mavg 8 000 000 Da) in the presence of EOF according to the different conformations represented by their unique methylation states. This result demonstrated that four hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines represented a different heterogeneity of DNA methylation and could be distinguished by SSCP-CE. The results obtained from SSCP-CE also corresponded with those obtained from combined bisulfide restriction analysis and methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting analysis. Therefore, the proposed SSCP-CE method may potentially be used for rapid screening for determination of the heterogeneity of DNA methylation in further epigenetic studies and clinical diagnosis.

  8. Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Novel Conserved Epitopes within Filovirus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Enterlein, Sven G.; Howell, Katie A.; Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Warfield, Kelly L.; Froude, Jeffrey W.; Araghi, Nazli; Douglas, Robin; Biggins, Julia; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Lau, Patrick; Wang, Yong; Herbert, Andrew S.; Dye, John M.; Glass, Pamela J.; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses cause highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. Current immunotherapeutic options for filoviruses are mostly specific to Ebola virus (EBOV), although other members of Filoviridae such as Sudan virus (SUDV), Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), and Marburg virus (MARV) have also caused sizeable human outbreaks. Here we report a set of pan-ebolavirus and pan-filovirus monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) derived from cynomolgus macaques immunized repeatedly with a mixture of engineered glycoproteins (GPs) and virus-like particles (VLPs) for three different filovirus species. The antibodies recognize novel neutralizing and nonneutralizing epitopes on the filovirus glycoprotein, including conserved conformational epitopes within the core regions of the GP1 subunit and a novel linear epitope within the glycan cap. We further report the first filovirus antibody binding to a highly conserved epitope within the fusion loop of ebolavirus and marburgvirus species. One of the antibodies binding to the core GP1 region of all ebolavirus species and with lower affinity to MARV GP cross neutralized both SUDV and EBOV, the most divergent ebolavirus species. In a mouse model of EBOV infection, this antibody provided 100% protection when administered in two doses and partial, but significant, protection when given once at the peak of viremia 3 days postinfection. Furthermore, we describe novel cocktails of antibodies with enhanced protective efficacy compared to individual MAbs. In summary, the present work describes multiple novel, cross-reactive filovirus epitopes and innovative combination concepts that challenge the current therapeutic models. IMPORTANCE Filoviruses are among the most deadly human pathogens. The 2014-2015 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) led to more than 27,000 cases and 11,000 fatalities. While there are five species of Ebolavirus and several strains of marburgvirus, the current immunotherapeutics primarily target Ebola virus

  9. Protein grafting of an HIV-1-inhibiting epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sia, Samuel K.; Kim, Peter S.

    2003-08-01

    Protein grafting, the transfer of a binding epitope of one ligand onto the surface of another protein, is a potentially powerful technique for presenting peptides in preformed and active three-dimensional conformations. Its utility, however, has been limited by low biological activity of the designed ligands and low tolerance of the protein scaffolds to surface substitutions. Here, we graft the complete binding epitope (19 nonconsecutive amino acids with a solvent-accessible surface area of >2,000 Å2) of an HIV-1 C-peptide, which is derived from the C-terminal region of HIV-1 gp41 and potently inhibits HIV-1 entry into cells, onto the surface of a GCN4 leucine zipper. The designed peptide, named C34coil, displays a potent antiviral activity approaching that of the native ligand. Moreover, whereas the linear C-peptide is unstructured and sensitive to degradation by proteases, C34coil is well structured, conformationally stable, and exhibits increased resistance to proteolytic degradation compared with the linear peptide. In addition to being a structured antiviral inhibitor, C34coil may also serve as the basis for the development of an alternative class of immunogens. This study demonstrates that "one-shot" protein grafting, without subsequent rounds of optimization, can be used to create ligands with structural conformations and improved biomedical properties.

  10. Selection of Conserved Epitopes from Hepatitis C Virus for Pan-Populational Stimulation of T-Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Molero-Abraham, Magdalena; Lafuente, Esther M.; Flower, Darren R.; Reche, Pedro A.

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is able to persist as a chronic infection, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. There is evidence that clearance of HCV is linked to strong responses by CD8 cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), suggesting that eliciting CTL responses against HCV through an epitope-based vaccine could prove an effective means of immunization. However, HCV genomic plasticity as well as the polymorphisms of HLA I molecules restricting CD8 T-cell responses challenges the selection of epitopes for a widely protective vaccine. Here, we devised an approach to overcome these limitations. From available databases, we first collected a set of 245 HCV-specific CD8 T-cell epitopes, all known to be targeted in the course of a natural infection in humans. After a sequence variability analysis, we next identified 17 highly invariant epitopes. Subsequently, we predicted the epitope HLA I binding profiles that determine their potential presentation and recognition. Finally, using the relevant HLA I-genetic frequencies, we identified various epitope subsets encompassing 6 conserved HCV-specific CTL epitopes each predicted to elicit an effective T-cell response in any individual regardless of their HLA I background. We implemented this epitope selection approach for free public use at the EPISOPT web server. PMID:24348677

  11. Improvements of polymerase chain reaction and capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism methods in microbial ecology: toward a high-throughput method for microbial diversity studies in soil.

    PubMed

    Zinger, Lucie; Gury, Jérôme; Giraud, Frédéric; Krivobok, Serge; Gielly, Ludovic; Taberlet, Pierre; Geremia, Roberto A

    2007-08-01

    The molecular signature of bacteria from soil ecosystems is an important tool for studying microbial ecology and biogeography. However, a high-throughput technology is needed for such studies. In this article, we tested the suitability of available methods ranging from soil DNA extraction to capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) for high-throughput studies. Our results showed that the extraction method does not dramatically influence CE-SSCP profiles, and that DNA extraction of a 0.25 g soil sample is sufficient to observe overall bacterial diversity in soil matrices. The V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR, and the extension time was found to be critical. We have also found that proofreading DNA polymerases generate a better signal in CE-SSCP profiles. Experiments performed with different soil matrices revealed the repeatability, efficiency, and consistency of CE-SSCP. Studies on PCR and CE-SSCP using single-species genomic DNA as a matrix showed that several ribotypes may migrate at the same position, and also that single species can produce double peaks. Thus, the extrapolation between number of peaks and number of species remains difficult. Additionally, peak detection is limited by the analysis software. We conclude that the presented method, including CE-SSCP and the analyzing step, is a simple and effective technique to obtain the molecular signature of a given soil sample.

  12. The use of reference strand-mediated conformational analysis for the study of cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) feline leucocyte antigen class II DRB polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Drake, G J C; Kennedy, L J; Auty, H K; Ryvar, R; Ollier, W E R; Kitchener, A C; Freeman, A R; Radford, A D

    2004-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence to suggest the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has limited genetic diversity. However, the extent of this and its significance to the fitness of the cheetah population, both in the wild and captivity, is the subject of some debate. This reflects the difficulty associated with establishing a direct link between low variability at biologically significant loci and deleterious aspects of phenotype in this, and other, species. Attempts to study one such region, the feline leucocyte antigen (FLA), are hampered by a general reliance on cloning and sequencing which is expensive, labour-intensive, subject to PCR artefact and always likely to underestimate true variability. In this study we have applied reference strand-mediated conformational analysis (RSCA) to determine the FLA-DRB phenotypes of 25 cheetahs. This technique was rapid, repeatable and less prone to polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-induced sequence artefacts associated with cloning. Individual cheetahs were shown to have up to three FLA-DRB genes. A total of five alleles were identified (DRB*ha14-17 and DRB*gd01) distributed among four genotypes. Fifteen cheetahs were DRB*ha14/ha15/ha16/ha17, three were DRB*ha15/ha16/ha17, six were DRB*ha14/ha16/ha17 and one was DRB*ha14/ha15/ha16/ha17/gd01. Sequence analysis of DRB*gd01 suggested it was a recombinant of DRB*ha16 and DRB*ha17. Generation of new alleles is difficult to document, and the clear demonstration of such an event is unusual. This study confirms further the limited genetic variability of the cheetah at a biologically significant region. RSCA will facilitate large-scale studies that will be needed to correlate genetic diversity at such loci with population fitness in the cheetah and other species.

  13. Defining species-specific immunodominant B cell epitopes for molecular serology of Chlamydia species.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan U; Poudel, Anil; Ruettger, Anke; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Urgently needed species-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of antibodies against Chlamydia spp. have been elusive due to high cross-reactivity of chlamydial antigens. To identify Chlamydia species-specific B cell epitopes for such assays, we ranked the potential epitopes of immunodominant chlamydial proteins that are polymorphic among all Chlamydia species. High-scoring peptides were synthesized with N-terminal biotin, followed by a serine-glycine-serine-glycine spacer, immobilized onto streptavidin-coated microtiter plates, and tested with mono-specific mouse hyperimmune sera against each Chlamydia species in chemiluminescent ELISAs. For each of nine Chlamydia species, three to nine dominant polymorphic B cell epitope regions were identified on OmpA, CT618, PmpD, IncA, CT529, CT442, IncG, Omp2, TarP, and IncE proteins. Peptides corresponding to 16- to 40-amino-acid species-specific sequences of these epitopes reacted highly and with absolute specificity with homologous, but not heterologous, Chlamydia monospecies-specific sera. Host-independent reactivity of such epitopes was confirmed by testing of six C. pecorum-specific peptides from five proteins with C. pecorum-reactive sera from cattle, the natural host of C. pecorum. The probability of cross-reactivity of peptide antigens from closely related chlamydial species or strains correlated with percent sequence identity and declined to zero at <50% sequence identity. Thus, phylograms of B cell epitope regions predict the specificity of peptide antigens for rational use in the genus-, species-, or serovar-specific molecular serology of Chlamydia spp. We anticipate that these peptide antigens will improve chlamydial serology by providing easily accessible assays to nonspecialist laboratories. Our approach also lends itself to the identification of relevant epitopes of other microbial pathogens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Defining Species-Specific Immunodominant B Cell Epitopes for Molecular Serology of Chlamydia Species

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, K. Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan U.; Poudel, Anil; Ruettger, Anke; Sachse, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    Urgently needed species-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the detection of antibodies against Chlamydia spp. have been elusive due to high cross-reactivity of chlamydial antigens. To identify Chlamydia species-specific B cell epitopes for such assays, we ranked the potential epitopes of immunodominant chlamydial proteins that are polymorphic among all Chlamydia species. High-scoring peptides were synthesized with N-terminal biotin, followed by a serine-glycine-serine-glycine spacer, immobilized onto streptavidin-coated microtiter plates, and tested with mono-specific mouse hyperimmune sera against each Chlamydia species in chemiluminescent ELISAs. For each of nine Chlamydia species, three to nine dominant polymorphic B cell epitope regions were identified on OmpA, CT618, PmpD, IncA, CT529, CT442, IncG, Omp2, TarP, and IncE proteins. Peptides corresponding to 16- to 40-amino-acid species-specific sequences of these epitopes reacted highly and with absolute specificity with homologous, but not heterologous, Chlamydia monospecies-specific sera. Host-independent reactivity of such epitopes was confirmed by testing of six C. pecorum-specific peptides from five proteins with C. pecorum-reactive sera from cattle, the natural host of C. pecorum. The probability of cross-reactivity of peptide antigens from closely related chlamydial species or strains correlated with percent sequence identity and declined to zero at <50% sequence identity. Thus, phylograms of B cell epitope regions predict the specificity of peptide antigens for rational use in the genus-, species-, or serovar-specific molecular serology of Chlamydia spp. We anticipate that these peptide antigens will improve chlamydial serology by providing easily accessible assays to nonspecialist laboratories. Our approach also lends itself to the identification of relevant epitopes of other microbial pathogens. PMID:25761461

  15. Broadly neutralizing epitopes in the Plasmodium vivax vaccine candidate Duffy Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Edwin; Salinas, Nichole D.; Huang, Yining; Ntumngia, Francis; Plasencia, Manolo D.; Gross, Michael L.; Adams, John H.; Tolia, Niraj Harish

    2016-05-18

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) is the most promising vaccine candidate for P. vivax malaria. The polymorphic nature of PvDBP induces strain-specific immune responses, however, and the epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies are unknown. These features hamper the rational design of potent DBP-based vaccines and necessitate the identification of globally conserved epitopes. Using X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and mutational mapping, we have defined epitopes for three inhibitory mAbs (mAbs 2D10, 2H2, and 2C6) and one noninhibitory mAb (3D10) that engage DBP. These studies expand the currently known inhibitory epitope repertoire by establishing protective motifs in subdomain three outside the receptor-binding and dimerization residues of DBP, and introduce globally conserved protective targets. All of the epitopes are highly conserved among DBP alleles. In conclusion, the identification of broadly conserved epitopes of inhibitory antibodies provides critical motifs that should be retained in the next generation of potent vaccines for P. vivax malaria.

  16. Broadly neutralizing epitopes in the Plasmodium vivax vaccine candidate Duffy Binding Protein

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Edwin; Salinas, Nichole D.; Huang, Yining; ...

    2016-05-18

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) is the most promising vaccine candidate for P. vivax malaria. The polymorphic nature of PvDBP induces strain-specific immune responses, however, and the epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies are unknown. These features hamper the rational design of potent DBP-based vaccines and necessitate the identification of globally conserved epitopes. Using X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and mutational mapping, we have defined epitopes for three inhibitory mAbs (mAbs 2D10, 2H2, and 2C6) and one noninhibitory mAb (3D10) that engage DBP. These studies expand the currently known inhibitory epitope repertoire by establishing protective motifsmore » in subdomain three outside the receptor-binding and dimerization residues of DBP, and introduce globally conserved protective targets. All of the epitopes are highly conserved among DBP alleles. In conclusion, the identification of broadly conserved epitopes of inhibitory antibodies provides critical motifs that should be retained in the next generation of potent vaccines for P. vivax malaria.« less

  17. Broadly neutralizing epitopes in the Plasmodium vivax vaccine candidate Duffy Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Edwin; Salinas, Nichole D; Huang, Yining; Ntumngia, Francis; Plasencia, Manolo D; Gross, Michael L; Adams, John H; Tolia, Niraj Harish

    2016-05-31

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) is the most promising vaccine candidate for P. vivax malaria. The polymorphic nature of PvDBP induces strain-specific immune responses, however, and the epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies are unknown. These features hamper the rational design of potent DBP-based vaccines and necessitate the identification of globally conserved epitopes. Using X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and mutational mapping, we have defined epitopes for three inhibitory mAbs (mAbs 2D10, 2H2, and 2C6) and one noninhibitory mAb (3D10) that engage DBP. These studies expand the currently known inhibitory epitope repertoire by establishing protective motifs in subdomain three outside the receptor-binding and dimerization residues of DBP, and introduce globally conserved protective targets. All of the epitopes are highly conserved among DBP alleles. The identification of broadly conserved epitopes of inhibitory antibodies provides critical motifs that should be retained in the next generation of potent vaccines for P. vivax malaria.

  18. Broadly neutralizing epitopes in the Plasmodium vivax vaccine candidate Duffy Binding Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Edwin; Salinas, Nichole D.; Huang, Yining; Ntumngia, Francis; Plasencia, Manolo D.; Gross, Michael L.; Adams, John H.; Tolia, Niraj Harish

    2016-05-18

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) is the most promising vaccine candidate for P. vivax malaria. The polymorphic nature of PvDBP induces strain-specific immune responses, however, and the epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies are unknown. These features hamper the rational design of potent DBP-based vaccines and necessitate the identification of globally conserved epitopes. Using X-ray crystallography, small-angle X-ray scattering, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and mutational mapping, we have defined epitopes for three inhibitory mAbs (mAbs 2D10, 2H2, and 2C6) and one noninhibitory mAb (3D10) that engage DBP. These studies expand the currently known inhibitory epitope repertoire by establishing protective motifs in subdomain three outside the receptor-binding and dimerization residues of DBP, and introduce globally conserved protective targets. All of the epitopes are highly conserved among DBP alleles. In conclusion, the identification of broadly conserved epitopes of inhibitory antibodies provides critical motifs that should be retained in the next generation of potent vaccines for P. vivax malaria.

  19. ArrayPitope: Automated Analysis of Amino Acid Substitutions for Peptide Microarray-Based Antibody Epitope Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Christian Skjødt; Østerbye, Thomas; Marcatili, Paolo; Lund, Ole; Buus, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Identification of epitopes targeted by antibodies (B cell epitopes) is of critical importance for the development of many diagnostic and therapeutic tools. For clinical usage, such epitopes must be extensively characterized in order to validate specificity and to document potential cross-reactivity. B cell epitopes are typically classified as either linear epitopes, i.e. short consecutive segments from the protein sequence or conformational epitopes adapted through native protein folding. Recent advances in high-density peptide microarrays enable high-throughput, high-resolution identification and characterization of linear B cell epitopes. Using exhaustive amino acid substitution analysis of peptides originating from target antigens, these microarrays can be used to address the specificity of polyclonal antibodies raised against such antigens containing hundreds of epitopes. However, the interpretation of the data provided in such large-scale screenings is far from trivial and in most cases it requires advanced computational and statistical skills. Here, we present an online application for automated identification of linear B cell epitopes, allowing the non-expert user to analyse peptide microarray data. The application takes as input quantitative peptide data of fully or partially substituted overlapping peptides from a given antigen sequence and identifies epitope residues (residues that are significantly affected by substitutions) and visualize the selectivity towards each residue by sequence logo plots. Demonstrating utility, the application was used to identify and address the antibody specificity of 18 linear epitope regions in Human Serum Albumin (HSA), using peptide microarray data consisting of fully substituted peptides spanning the entire sequence of HSA and incubated with polyclonal rabbit anti-HSA (and mouse anti-rabbit-Cy3). The application is made available at: www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/ArrayPitope. PMID:28095436

  20. Inadequate Reference Datasets Biased toward Short Non-epitopes Confound B-cell Epitope Prediction*

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Kh. Shamsur; Chowdhury, Erfan Ullah; Sachse, Konrad; Kaltenboeck, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    X-ray crystallography has shown that an antibody paratope typically binds 15–22 amino acids (aa) of an epitope, of which 2–5 randomly distributed amino acids contribute most of the binding energy. In contrast, researchers typically choose for B-cell epitope mapping short peptide antigens in antibody binding assays. Furthermore, short 6–11-aa epitopes, and in particular non-epitopes, are over-represented in published B-cell epitope datasets that are commonly used for development of B-cell epitope prediction approaches from protein antigen sequences. We hypothesized that such suboptimal length peptides result in weak antibody binding and cause false-negative results. We tested the influence of peptide antigen length on antibody binding by analyzing data on more than 900 peptides used for B-cell epitope mapping of immunodominant proteins of Chlamydia spp. We demonstrate that short 7–12-aa peptides of B-cell epitopes bind antibodies poorly; thus, epitope mapping with short peptide antigens falsely classifies many B-cell epitopes as non-epitopes. We also show in published datasets of confirmed epitopes and non-epitopes a direct correlation between length of peptide antigens and antibody binding. Elimination of short, ≤11-aa epitope/non-epitope sequences improved datasets for evaluation of in silico B-cell epitope prediction. Achieving up to 86% accuracy, protein disorder tendency is the best indicator of B-cell epitope regions for chlamydial and published datasets. For B-cell epitope prediction, the most effective approach is plotting disorder of protein sequences with the IUPred-L scale, followed by antibody reactivity testing of 16–30-aa peptides from peak regions. This strategy overcomes the well known inaccuracy of in silico B-cell epitope prediction from primary protein sequences. PMID:27189949

  1. Delineation and comparison of ganglioside-binding epitopes for the toxins of Vibrio cholerae, Escherichia coli, and Clostridium tetani: evidence for overlapping epitopes.

    PubMed

    Angström, J; Teneberg, S; Karlsson, K A

    1994-12-06

    Binding studies of various glycolipids, mainly belonging to the ganglio series, to the toxins isolated from Vibrio cholerae, Escherichia coli, and Clostridium tetani have been performed, using the microtiter well assay. By using the found binding preferences in conjunction with minimum-energy conformations obtained from molecular modeling of the various ligands, binding epitopes on the natural receptor glycolipids for the toxins have been defined. The binding preferences for the cholera toxin and the heat-labile E. coli toxin are very similar, with the ganglioside GM1 being the most efficient ligand. The tetanus toxin binds strongly to gangliosides of the G1b series, with GT1b as the most efficient ligand. It is found that the binding epitope on GM1 for the cholera and heat-labile toxins to a large extent overlaps with the epitope on GQ1b for the tetanus toxin.

  2. PrP Antibody Binding-Induced Epitope Modulation Evokes Immunocooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Binggong; Miller, Michael W.; Bulgin, Marie S.; Sorenson-Melson, Sharon; Balachandran, Aru; Chiu, Allen; Rubenstein, Richard

    2008-01-01

    We have characterized the antibody-antigen binding events of the prion protein (PrP) utilizing three new PrP-specific monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). The degree of immunoreactivity was dependent on the denaturation treatment with the combination of heat and SDS resulting in the highest levels of epitope accessibility and antibody binding. Interestingly however, this harsh denaturation treatment was not sufficient to completely and irreversibly abolish protein conformation. The Mabs differed in their PrP epitopes with Mab 08-1/11F12 binding in the region of PrP93–122, Mab 08-1/8E9 reacting to PrP155–200 and Mab 08-1/5D6 directed to an undefined conformational epitope. Using normal and infected brains from hamsters, sheep and deer, we demonstrate that the binding of PrP to one Mab triggers PrP epitope unmasking, which enhances the binding of a second Mab. This phenomenon, termed positive immunocooperativity, is specific regarding epitope and the sequence of binding events. Positive immunocooperativity will likely increase immunoassay sensitivity since assay conditions for PrPSc detection does not require protease digestion. PMID:18977037

  3. PrP antibody binding-induced epitope modulation evokes immunocooperativity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Binggong; Miller, Michael W; Bulgin, Marie S; Sorenson-Melson, Sharon; Balachandran, Aru; Chiu, Allen; Rubenstein, Richard

    2008-12-15

    We have characterized the antibody-antigen binding events of the prion protein (PrP) utilizing three new PrP-specific monoclonal antibodies (Mabs). The degree of immunoreactivity was dependent on the denaturation treatment with the combination of heat and SDS resulting in the highest levels of epitope accessibility and antibody binding. Interestingly however, this harsh denaturation treatment was not sufficient to completely and irreversibly abolish protein conformation. The Mabs differed in their PrP epitopes with Mab 08-1/11F12 binding in the region of PrP(93-122), Mab 08-1/8E9 reacting to PrP(155-200) and Mab 08-1/5D6 directed to an undefined conformational epitope. Using normal and infected brains from hamsters, sheep and deer, we demonstrate that the binding of PrP to one Mab triggers PrP epitope unmasking, which enhances the binding of a second Mab. This phenomenon, termed positive immunocooperativity, is specific regarding epitope and the sequence of binding events. Positive immunocooperativity will likely increase immunoassay sensitivity since assay conditions for PrP(Sc) detection does not require protease digestion.

  4. Identification of Genogroup I and Genogroup II Broadly Reactive Epitopes on the Norovirus Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Tracy Dewese; Kitamoto, Noritoshi; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Hutson, Anne M.; Estes, Mary K.

    2005-01-01

    Norwalk virus, a member of the family Caliciviridae, is an important cause of acute epidemic nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Norwalk and related viruses are classified in a separate genus of Caliciviridae called Norovirus, which is comprised of at least three genogroups based on sequence differences. Many of the currently available immunologic reagents used to study these viruses are type specific, which limits the identification of antigenically distinct viruses in detection assays. Identification of type-specific and cross-reactive epitopes is essential for designing broadly cross-reactive diagnostic assays and dissecting the immune response to calicivirus infection. To address this, we have mapped the epitopes on the norovirus capsid protein for both a genogroup I-cross-reactive monoclonal antibody and a genogroup II-cross-reactive monoclonal antibody by use of norovirus deletion and point mutants. The epitopes for both monoclonal antibodies mapped to the C-terminal P1 subdomain of the capsid protein. Although the genogroup I-cross-reactive monoclonal antibody was previously believed to recognize a linear epitope, our results indicate that a conformational component of the epitope explains the monoclonal antibody's genogroup specificity. Identification of the epitopes for these monoclonal antibodies is of significance, as they are components in a commercially available norovirus-diagnostic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:15919896

  5. Novel CD8(+) cytotoxic T cell epitopes in bovine leukemia virus with cattle.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lanlan; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Isogai, Emiko; Kohara, Junko; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-16

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is associated with enzootic bovine leukosis and is closely related to human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) plays a key role in suppressing the progression of disease caused by BLV. T and B cell epitopes in BLV have been studied, but CD8(+) CTL epitopes remain poorly understood. We used a library of 115 synthetic peptides covering the entirety of the Env proteins (gp51 and gp30), the Gag proteins (p15, p24, and p12), and the Tax protein of BLV to identify 11 novel CD8(+) T cell epitopes (gp51N5, gp51N11, gp51N12, gp30N5, gp30N6, gp30N8, gp30N16, tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20) in four calves experimentally infected with BLV. The number of CD8(+) T cell epitopes that could be identified in each calf correlated with the BLV proviral load. Interestingly, among the 11 epitopes identified, only gp51N11 was capable of inducing CD8(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity in all four calves, but it is not a suitable vaccine target because it shows a high degree of polymorphism according to the Wu-Kabat variability index. By contrast, no CTL epitopes were identified from the Gag structural protein. In addition, several epitopes were obtained from gp30 and Tax, indicating that cellular immunity against BLV is strongly targeted to these proteins. CD8(+) CTL epitopes from gp30 and Tax were less polymorphic than epitopes from. Indeed, peptides tax16, tax18, tax19, and tax20 include a leucine-rich activation domain that encompasses a transcriptional activation domain, and the gp30N16 peptide contains a proline-rich region that interacts with a protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP1 to regulate B cell activation. Moreover, at least one CD8(+) CTL epitope derived from gp30 was identified in each of the four calves. These results indicate that BLV gp30 may be the best candidate for the development of a BLV vaccine. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. An Introduction to B-Cell Epitope Mapping and In Silico Epitope Prediction.

    PubMed

    Potocnakova, Lenka; Bhide, Mangesh; Pulzova, Lucia Borszekova

    2016-01-01

    Identification of B-cell epitopes is a fundamental step for development of epitope-based vaccines, therapeutic antibodies, and diagnostic tools. Epitope-based antibodies are currently the most promising class of biopharmaceuticals. In the last decade, in-depth in silico analysis and categorization of the experimentally identified epitopes stimulated development of algorithms for epitope prediction. Recently, various in silico tools are employed in attempts to predict B-cell epitopes based on sequence and/or structural data. The main objective of epitope identification is to replace an antigen in the immunization, antibody production, and serodiagnosis. The accurate identification of B-cell epitopes still presents major challenges for immunologists. Advances in B-cell epitope mapping and computational prediction have yielded molecular insights into the process of biorecognition and formation of antigen-antibody complex, which may help to localize B-cell epitopes more precisely. In this paper, we have comprehensively reviewed state-of-the-art experimental methods for B-cell epitope identification, existing databases for epitopes, and novel in silico resources and prediction tools available online. We have also elaborated new trends in the antibody-based epitope prediction. The aim of this review is to assist researchers in identification of B-cell epitopes.

  7. An Introduction to B-Cell Epitope Mapping and In Silico Epitope Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Potocnakova, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    Identification of B-cell epitopes is a fundamental step for development of epitope-based vaccines, therapeutic antibodies, and diagnostic tools. Epitope-based antibodies are currently the most promising class of biopharmaceuticals. In the last decade, in-depth in silico analysis and categorization of the experimentally identified epitopes stimulated development of algorithms for epitope prediction. Recently, various in silico tools are employed in attempts to predict B-cell epitopes based on sequence and/or structural data. The main objective of epitope identification is to replace an antigen in the immunization, antibody production, and serodiagnosis. The accurate identification of B-cell epitopes still presents major challenges for immunologists. Advances in B-cell epitope mapping and computational prediction have yielded molecular insights into the process of biorecognition and formation of antigen-antibody complex, which may help to localize B-cell epitopes more precisely. In this paper, we have comprehensively reviewed state-of-the-art experimental methods for B-cell epitope identification, existing databases for epitopes, and novel in silico resources and prediction tools available online. We have also elaborated new trends in the antibody-based epitope prediction. The aim of this review is to assist researchers in identification of B-cell epitopes. PMID:28127568

  8. Antigen retrieval causes protein unfolding: evidence for a linear epitope model of recovered immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Carol B; Evers, David L; O'Leary, Timothy J; Mason, Jeffrey T

    2011-04-01

    Antigen retrieval (AR), in which formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections are briefly heated in buffers at high temperature, often greatly improves immunohistochemical staining. An important unresolved question regarding AR is how formalin treatment affects the conformation of protein epitopes and how heating unmasks these epitopes for subsequent antibody binding. The objective of the current study was to use model proteins to determine the effect of formalin treatment on protein conformation and thermal stability in relation to the mechanism of AR. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to identify the presence of protein formaldehyde cross-links, and circular dichroism spectropolarimetry was used to determine the effect of formalin treatment and high-temperature incubation on the secondary and tertiary structure of the model proteins. Results revealed that for some proteins, formalin treatment left the native protein conformation unaltered, whereas for others, formalin denatured tertiary structure, yielding a molten globule protein. In either case, heating to temperatures used in AR methods led to irreversible protein unfolding, which supports a linear epitope model of recovered protein immunoreactivity. Consequently, the core mechanism of AR likely centers on the restoration of normal protein chemical composition coupled with improved accessibility to linear epitopes through protein unfolding.

  9. Interaction with cellular CD4 exposes HIV-1 envelope epitopes targeted by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Veillette, Maxime; Désormeaux, Anik; Medjahed, Halima; Gharsallah, Nour-Elhouda; Coutu, Mathieu; Baalwa, Joshua; Guan, Yongjun; Lewis, George; Ferrari, Guido; Hahn, Beatrice H; Haynes, Barton F; Robinson, James E; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Bonsignori, Mattia; Sodroski, Joseph; Finzi, Andrés

    2014-03-01

    Anti-HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) antibodies without broadly neutralizing activity correlated with protection in the RV144 clinical trial, stimulating interest in other protective mechanisms involving antibodies, such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). Env epitopes targeted by many antibodies effective at mediating ADCC are poorly exposed on the unliganded Env trimer. Here we investigated the mechanism of exposure of ADCC epitopes on Env and showed that binding of Env and CD4 within the same HIV-1-infected cell effectively exposes these epitopes. Env capacity to transit to the CD4-bound conformation is required for ADCC epitope exposure. Importantly, cell surface CD4 downregulation by Nef and Vpu accessory proteins and Vpu-mediated BST-2 antagonism modulate exposure of ADCC-mediating epitopes and reduce the susceptibility of infected cells to this effector function in vitro. Significantly, Env conformational changes induced by cell surface CD4 are conserved among Env from HIV-1 and HIV-2/SIVmac lineages. Altogether, our observations describe a highly conserved mechanism required to expose ADCC epitopes that might help explain the evolutionary advantage of downregulation of cell surface CD4 by the HIV-1 Vpu and Nef proteins. HIV-1 envelope epitopes targeted by many antibodies effective at mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) are poorly exposed on the unliganded envelope trimer. Here we investigated the mechanism of exposure of these epitopes and found that envelope interaction with the HIV-1 CD4 receptor is required to expose some of these epitopes. Moreover, our results suggest that HIV-1 CD4 downregulation might help avoid the killing of HIV-1-infected cells by this immune mechanism.

  10. Elicitation of Neutralizing Antibodies Directed against CD4-Induced Epitope(s) Using a CD4 Mimetic Cross-Linked to a HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Antu K.; Burke, Brian; Sun, Yide; Sirokman, Klara; Nandi, Avishek; Hartog, Karin; Lian, Ying; Geonnotti, Anthony R.; Montefiori, David; Franti, Michael; Martin, Grégoire; Carfi, Andrea; Kessler, Pascal; Martin, Loïc; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Barnett, Susan W.

    2012-01-01

    The identification of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) structures that can generate broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs) is pivotal to the development of a successful vaccine against HIV-1 aimed at eliciting effective humoral immune responses. To that end, the production of novel Env structure(s) that might induce BNAbs by presentation of conserved epitopes, which are otherwise occluded, is critical. Here, we focus on a structure that stabilizes Env in a conformation representative of its primary (CD4) receptor-bound state, thereby exposing highly conserved “CD4 induced” (CD4i) epitope(s) known to be important for co-receptor binding and subsequent virus infection. A CD4-mimetic miniprotein, miniCD4 (M64U1-SH), was produced and covalently complexed to recombinant, trimeric gp140 envelope glycoprotein (gp140) using site-specific disulfide linkages. The resulting gp140-miniCD4 (gp140-S-S-M64U1) complex was recognized by CD4i antibodies and the HIV-1 co-receptor, CCR5. The gp140-miniCD4 complex elicited the highest titers of CD4i binding antibodies as well as enhanced neutralizing antibodies against Tier 1 viruses as compared to gp140 protein alone following immunization of rabbits. Neutralization against HIV-27312/V434M and additional serum mapping confirm the specific elicitation of antibodies directed to the CD4i epitope(s). These results demonstrate the utility of structure-based approach in improving immunogenic response against specific region, such as the CD4i epitope(s) here, and its potential role in vaccine application. PMID:22291921

  11. Conformal Infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauendiener, Jörg

    2004-12-01

    The notion of conformal infinity has a long history within the research in Einstein's theory of gravity. Today, "conformal infinity" is related to almost all other branches of research in general relativity, from quantisation procedures to abstract mathematical issues to numerical applications. This review article attempts to show how this concept gradually and inevitably evolved from physical issues, namely the need to understand gravitational radiation and isolated systems within the theory of gravitation, and how it lends itself very naturally to the solution of radiation problems in numerical relativity. The fundamental concept of null-infinity is introduced. Friedrich's regular conformal field equations are presented and various initial value problems for them are discussed. Finally, it is shown that the conformal field equations provide a very powerful method within numerical relativity to study global problems such as gravitational wave propagation and detection.

  12. General Conformity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The General Conformity requirements ensure that the actions taken by federal agencies in nonattainment and maintenance areas do not interfere with a state’s plans to meet national standards for air quality.

  13. IgE versus IgG4 epitopes of the peanut allergen Ara h 1 in patients with severe allergy.

    PubMed

    Bøgh, K L; Nielsen, H; Eiwegger, T; Madsen, C B; Mills, E N C; Rigby, N M; Szépfalusi, Z; Roggen, E L

    2014-04-01

    Development and maintenance of tolerance to food allergens appears to be associated with alterations in antigen specific IgE and IgG4 responses. Previous studies have focused only on comparing IgE and IgG4 linear epitope recognition patterns but take no account of conformational epitopes. The aim of this study was to compare Ara h 1-specific IgE and IgG4 epitope recognition patterns in patients with severe peanut allergy, applying a method allowing for identification of both linear and conformational epitopes. Polyclonal sera from three individual patients, suffering from severe allergic reaction to peanuts, including anaphylaxis, were used to analyse the IgE and IgG4 epitope recognition patterns of the major peanut allergen Ara h 1. Epitope identification was conducted by competitive immuno-screening of a phage-displayed random heptamer peptide library. Resulting epitope-mimicking sequences were aligned for identification of consensus sequences and localised on the surface of the Ara h 1 molecule by a computer-based algorithm. All epitope-mimicking sequences identified were found to correspond to conformational epitopes. Each individual patient had his/her own distinct IgE as well as IgG4 epitope recognition profile, though some important IgE epitopes were common to all patients. In general the IgG4 epitope pattern was more heterogeneous than the IgE pattern, did not coincide with IgE epitopes and had a lower affinity than IgE. This study demonstrated the usefulness of the phage-display technology in distinguishing between the epitope pattern of IgE and IgG4, giving detailed information on fine specificity and affinity. Competitive immuno-screening of phage-display random peptide libraries could be a future valuable tool to study the balance and dynamics of the IgE and IgG4 epitope recognition repertoire and provide a diagnostic tool giving information on the associated allergic phenotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The genetics of amphibian decline: population substructure and molecular differentiation in the Yosemite toad, Bufo canorus (Anura, Bufonidae) based on single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis (SSCP) and mitochondrial DNA sequence data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaffer, H. Bradley; Fellers, Gary M.; Magee, Allison; Voss, S. Randal

    2000-01-01

    We present a comprehensive survey of genetic variation across the range of the narrowly distributed endemic Yosemite toad Bufo canorus, a declining amphibian restricted to the Sierra Nevada of California. Based on 322 bp of mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence data, we found limited support for the monophyly of B. canorus and its closely related congener B. exsul to the exclusion of the widespread western toad B. boreas. However, B. exsul was always phylogenetically nested within B. canorus, suggesting that the latter may not be monophyletic. SSCP (single-strand conformation polymorphism) analysis of 372 individual B. canorus from 28 localities in Yosemite and Kings Canyon National Parks revealed no shared haplotypes among these two regions and lead us to interpret these two parks as distinct management units for B. canorus. Within Yosemite, we found significant genetic substructure both at the level of major drainages and among breeding ponds. Kings Canyon samples show a different pattern, with substantial variation among breeding sites, but no substructure among drainages. Across the range of B. canorus as well as among Yosemite ponds, we found an isolation-by-distance pattern suggestive of a stepping stone model of migration. However, in Kings Canyon we found no hint of such a pattern, suggesting that movement patterns of toads may be quite different in these nearby parklands. Our data imply that management for B. canorus should focus at the individual pond level, and effective management may necessitate reintroductions if local extirpations occur. A brief review of other pond-breeding anurans suggests that highly structured populations are often the case, and thus that our results for B. canorus may be general for other species of frogs and toads.

  15. Classification of Mycoplasma synoviae strains using single-strand conformation polymorphism and high-resolution melting-curve analysis of the vlhA gene single-copy region.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Nathan; Gasser, Robin B; Steer, Penelope A; Noormohammadi, Amir H

    2007-08-01

    Mycoplasma synoviae is an economically important pathogen of poultry worldwide, causing respiratory infection and synovitis in chickens and turkeys. Identification of M. synoviae isolates is of critical importance, particularly in countries in which poultry flocks are vaccinated with the live attenuated M. synoviae strain MS-H. Using oligonucleotide primers complementary to the single-copy conserved 5' end of the variable lipoprotein and haemagglutinin gene (vlhA), amplicons of approximately 400 bp were generated from 35 different M. synoviae strains/isolates from chickens and subjected to mutation scanning analysis. Analysis of the amplicons by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) revealed 10 distinct profiles (A-J). Sequencing of the amplicons representing these profiles revealed that each profile related to a unique sequence, some differing from each other by only one base-pair substitution. Comparative high-resolution melting (HRM) curve analysis of the amplicons using SYTO 9 green fluorescent dye also displayed profiles which were concordant with the same 10 SSCP profiles (A-J) and their sequences. For both mutation detection methods, the Australian M. synoviae strains represented one of the A, B, C or D profiles, while the USA strains represented one of the E, F, G, H, I or J profiles. The results presented in this study show that the PCR-based SSCP or HRM curve analyses of vlhA provide high-resolution mutation detection tools for the detection and identification of M. synoviae strains. In particular, the HRM curve analysis is a rapid and effective technique which can be performed in a single test tube in less than 2 h.

  16. The genetics of amphibian declines: population substructure and molecular differentiation in the yosemite toad, Bufo canorus (Anura, bufonidae) based on single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis (SSCP) and mitochondrial DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, H B; Fellers, G M; Magee, A; Voss, S R

    2000-03-01

    We present a comprehensive survey of genetic variation across the range of the narrowly distributed endemic Yosemite toad Bufo canorus, a declining amphibian restricted to the Sierra Nevada of California. Based on 322 bp of mitochondrial cytochrome b sequence data, we found limited support for the monophyly of B. canorus and its closely related congener B. exsul to the exclusion of the widespread western toad B. boreas. However, B. exsul was always phylogenetically nested within B. canorus, suggesting that the latter may not be monophyletic. SSCP (single-strand conformation polymorphism) analysis of 372 individual B. canorus from 28 localities in Yosemite and Kings Canyon National Parks revealed no shared haplotypes among these two regions and lead us to interpret these two parks as distinct management units for B. canorus. Within Yosemite, we found significant genetic substructure both at the level of major drainages and among breeding ponds. Kings Canyon samples show a different pattern, with substantial variation among breeding sites, but no substructure among drainages. Across the range of B. canorus as well as among Yosemite ponds, we found an isolation-by-distance pattern suggestive of a stepping stone model of migration. However, in Kings Canyon we found no hint of such a pattern, suggesting that movement patterns of toads may be quite different in these nearby parklands. Our data imply that management for B. canorus should focus at the individual pond level, and effective management may necessitate reintroductions if local extirpations occur. A brief review of other pond-breeding anurans suggests that highly structured populations are often the case, and thus that our results for B. canorus may be general for other species of frogs and toads.

  17. Definition of a discontinuous immunodominant epitope at the NH2 terminus of the La/SS-B ribonucleoprotein autoantigen.

    PubMed Central

    McNeilage, L J; Umapathysivam, K; Macmillan, E; Guidolin, A; Whittingham, S; Gordon, T

    1992-01-01

    High-titer IgG autoantibodies to the La/SS-B ribonucleoprotein (RNP) are a hallmark of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome. Anti-La/SS-B-positive human sera bind to multiple epitopes on recombinant La/SS-B, although the initial response is against an immunodominant epitope within the first 107 NH2-terminal amino acids (aa). Sequence analysis has identified a striking homology between aa 88-101 in this NH2-terminal region of La/SS-B and a feline retroviral gag polypeptide suggesting the anti-La/SS-B response may be initiated by cross-reactivity with an exogenous agent. In the present study, detailed mapping of this NH2-terminal epitope, using recombinant La/SS-B purified from the expression of overlapping DNA fragments spanning aa 1-107, has shown that this immunodominant epitope is a complex conformational or discontinuous epitope dependent upon both aa 12-28 and 82-99 for expression, even though these regions share no homology with each other. This requirement questions the significance of the homology between La/SS-B and a retroviral gag polypeptide in the generation of the B cell response to La/SS-B and is in accord with the general concept that B cells recognize conformational epitopes on antigens rather than small linear peptide sequences. The finding also reinforces the notion that native autoantigen could be the initiator of the autoimmune response. Images PMID:1373741

  18. Ligand-induced Epitope Masking

    PubMed Central

    Mould, A. Paul; Askari, Janet A.; Byron, Adam; Takada, Yoshikazu; Jowitt, Thomas A.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing ligand-mimetic inhibitors of integrins are unable to dissociate pre-formed integrin-fibronectin complexes (IFCs). These observations suggested that amino acid residues involved in integrin-fibronectin binding become obscured in the ligand-occupied state. Because the epitopes of some function-blocking anti-integrin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) lie near the ligand-binding pocket, it follows that the epitopes of these mAbs may become shielded in the ligand-occupied state. Here, we tested whether function-blocking mAbs directed against α5β1 can interact with the integrin after it forms a complex with an RGD-containing fragment of fibronectin. We showed that the anti-α5 subunit mAbs JBS5, SNAKA52, 16, and P1D6 failed to disrupt IFCs and hence appeared unable to bind to the ligand-occupied state. In contrast, the allosteric anti-β1 subunit mAbs 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 could dissociate IFCs and therefore were able to interact with the ligand-bound state. However, another class of function-blocking anti-β1 mAbs, exemplified by Lia1/2, could not disrupt IFCs. This second class of mAbs was also distinguished from 13, 4B4, and AIIB2 by their ability to induce homotypic cell aggregation. Although the epitope of Lia1/2 was closely overlapping with those of 13, 4B4, and AIIB2, it appeared to lie closer to the ligand-binding pocket. A new model of the α5β1-fibronectin complex supports our hypothesis that the epitopes of mAbs that fail to bind to the ligand-occupied state lie within, or very close to, the integrin-fibronectin interface. Importantly, our findings imply that the efficacy of some therapeutic anti-integrin mAbs could be limited by epitope masking. PMID:27484800

  19. Automatic Generation of Validated Specific Epitope Sets.

    PubMed

    Carrasco Pro, Sebastian; Sidney, John; Paul, Sinu; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia; Weiskopf, Daniela; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement of B and T cell responses is a valuable tool to study autoimmunity, allergies, immunity to pathogens, and host-pathogen interactions and assist in the design and evaluation of T cell vaccines and immunotherapies. In this context, it is desirable to elucidate a method to select validated reference sets of epitopes to allow detection of T and B cells. However, the ever-growing information contained in the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) and the differences in quality and subjects studied between epitope assays make this task complicated. In this study, we develop a novel method to automatically select reference epitope sets according to a categorization system employed by the IEDB. From the sets generated, three epitope sets (EBV, mycobacteria and dengue) were experimentally validated by detection of T cell reactivity ex vivo from human donors. Furthermore, a web application that will potentially be implemented in the IEDB was created to allow users the capacity to generate customized epitope sets.

  20. Strategies to Query and Display Allergy-Derived Epitope Data from the Immune Epitope Database

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Kerrie; Peters, Bjoern; Larche, Mark; Pomes, Anna; Broide, David; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of specific epitopes on allergens by antibodies and T cells is a key element in allergic processes. Analysis of epitope data may be of interest for basic immunopathology or for potential application in diagnostics or immunotherapy. The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) is a freely available repository of epitope data from infectious disease agents, as well as epitopes defined for allergy, autoimmunity, and transplantation. The IEDB curates the experiments associated with each epitope and thus provides a variety of different ways to search the data. This review aims to demonstrate the utility of the IEDB and its query strategies, including searching by epitope structure (peptidic/nonpeptidic), by assay methodology, by host, by the allergen itself, or by the organism from which the allergen was derived. Links to tools for visualization of 3-D structures, epitope prediction, and analyses of B and T cell reactivity by host response frequency score are also highlighted. PMID:23172234

  1. A second neutralizing epitope of B19 parvovirus implicates the spike region in the immune response.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, K; Rosenfeld, S; Frickhofen, N; Kennedy, D; Hills, R; Kajigaya, S; Young, N S

    1991-01-01

    We used 18 monoclonal antibodies against B19 parvovirus to identify neutralizing epitopes on the viral capsid. Of the 18 antibodies, 9 had in vitro neutralizing activity in a bone marrow colony culture assay. The overlapping polypeptide fragments spanning the B19 structural proteins were produced in a pMAL-c Escherichia coli expression system and used to investigate the binding sites of the neutralizing antibodies. One of the nine neutralizing antibodies reacted with both VP1 and VP2 capsid proteins and a single polypeptide fragment on an immunoblot, identifying a linear neutralizing epitope between amino acids 57 and 77 of the VP2 capsid protein. Eight of nine neutralizing antibodies failed to react with either of the capsid proteins or any polypeptide fragments, despite reactivities with intact virions in a radioimmunoassay, suggesting that additional conformationally dependent neutralizing epitopes exist. Images PMID:1719240

  2. Antigenicity and predefined specificities of the multi-epitope vaccine in candidate consisting of neutralizing epitope and mutated epitopes suggested a new way against HIV-1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Tian, H; Xiao, Y; Qin, L; Chen, Y H

    2001-12-01

    A seven-amino acid epitope GPGRAFY located inside the V3 loop on envelope protein gp120 of HIV-1 is the principal neutralizing epitope (PNE), and a subset of anti-V3 antibodies specific for this epitope show a broad range of neutralizing activity. But this epitope undergoes restricted mutation. In this study, three epitope peptides [C-(GPGRAFY)2, C-(GPGQTFY)2 and C-(GPGQAWY)2] that contain neutralizing epitope GPGRAFY and its two mutated epitope GPGQTFY and GPGQAWY, were synthesized and then conjugated to carrier protein KLH (keyhole limpet hemocyanin). the epitope-vaccines C-(GPGRAFY)2-KLH, C-(GPGQTFY)2-KLH and C-(GPGQAWY)2-KLH induced high levels of antibodies to three V3 loop peptides that contain these epitopes respectively, and the antibody response induced by each epitope-vaccine showed predefined epitope-specific. When these three epitope-peptides mixed together and conjugated to carrier protein, or conjugated to carrier protein separately and then mixed together, high levels of epitope-specific antibodies which respectively recognized these epitopes on V3 loop peptide and both mutated peptides all can be induced by both of them. In blotting assay, these epitope-specific antibodies all recognized the neutralizing epitope and mutated epitopes on peptides respectively. In addition, the reactivity of the antibodies with whole gp120 molecule which contained the epitope GPGRAFY was tested. Only the GPGRAFY-epitope-specific antibodies but not the other antibodies recognized the gp120 molecule. These results provide experimental evidence that the candidate multi-epitope-vaccine containing neutralizing epitope and mutated epitopes may bring new hope against viral mutation resulting in HIV-1 immune evasion and may be developed as an effective vaccine with a broad neutralizing activity against HIV-1 infection.

  3. Superimposed epitopes restricted by the same HLA molecule drive distinct HIV-specific CD8+ T cell repertoires.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoming; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Shi, Yi; Kuse, Nozomi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Appay, Victor; Gao, George F; Oka, Shinichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2014-07-01

    Superimposed epitopes, in which a shorter epitope is embedded within a longer one, can be presented by the same HLA class I molecule. CD8(+) CTL responses against such epitopes and the contribution of this phenomenon to immune control are poorly characterized. In this study, we examined HLA-A*24:02-restricted CTLs specific for the superimposed HIV Nef epitopes RYPLTFGWCF (RF10) and RYPLTFGW (RW8). Unexpectedly, RF10-specific and RW8-specific CTLs from HIV-1-infected HLA-A*24:02+ individuals had no overlapping Ag reactivity or clonotypic compositions. Single-cell TCR sequence analyses demonstrated that RF10-specific T cells had a more diverse TCR repertoire than did RW8-specific T cells. Furthermore, RF10-specific CTLs presented a higher Ag sensitivity and HIV suppressive capacity compared with RW8-specific CTLs. Crystallographic analyses revealed important structural differences between RF10- and RW8-HLA-A*24:02 complexes as well, with featured and featureless conformations, respectively, providing an explanation for the induction of distinct T cell responses against these epitopes. The present study shows that a single viral sequence containing superimposed epitopes restricted by the same HLA molecule could elicit distinct CD8+ T cell responses, therefore enhancing the control of HIV replication. This study also showed that a featured epitope (e.g., RF10) could drive the induction of T cells with high TCR diversity and affinity. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Enlarging the toolbox for allergen epitope definition with an allergen-type model protein.

    PubMed

    Berkner, Hanna; Seutter von Loetzen, Christian; Hartl, Maximilian; Randow, Stefanie; Gubesch, Michaela; Vogel, Lothar; Husslik, Felix; Reuter, Andreas; Lidholm, Jonas; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara; Vieths, Stefan; Rösch, Paul; Schiller, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Birch pollen-allergic subjects produce polyclonal cross-reactive IgE antibodies that mediate pollen-associated food allergies. The major allergen Bet v 1 and its homologs in plant foods bind IgE in their native protein conformation. Information on location, number and clinical relevance of IgE epitopes is limited. We addressed the use of an allergen-related protein model to identify amino acids critical for IgE binding of PR-10 allergens. Norcoclaurine synthase (NCS) from meadow rue is structurally homologous to Bet v 1 but does not bind Bet v 1-reactive IgE. NCS was used as the template for epitope grafting. NCS variants were tested with sera from 70 birch pollen allergic subjects and with monoclonal antibody BV16 reported to compete with IgE binding to Bet v 1. We generated an NCS variant (Δ29NCSN57/I58E/D60N/V63P/D68K) harboring an IgE epitope of Bet v 1. Bet v 1-type protein folding of the NCS variant was evaluated by 1H-15N-HSQC NMR spectroscopy. BV16 bound the NCS variant and 71% (50/70 sera) of our study population showed significant IgE binding. We observed IgE and BV16 cross-reactivity to the epitope presented by the NCS variant in a subgroup of Bet v 1-related allergens. Moreover BV16 blocked IgE binding to the NCS variant. Antibody cross-reactivity depended on a defined orientation of amino acids within the Bet v 1-type conformation. Our system allows the evaluation of patient-specific epitope profiles and will facilitate both the identification of clinically relevant epitopes as biomarkers and the monitoring of therapeutic outcomes to improve diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of allergies caused by PR-10 proteins.

  5. Enlarging the Toolbox for Allergen Epitope Definition with an Allergen-Type Model Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, Maximilian; Randow, Stefanie; Gubesch, Michaela; Vogel, Lothar; Husslik, Felix; Reuter, Andreas; Lidholm, Jonas; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara; Vieths, Stefan; Rösch, Paul; Schiller, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Background Birch pollen-allergic subjects produce polyclonal cross-reactive IgE antibodies that mediate pollen-associated food allergies. The major allergen Bet v 1 and its homologs in plant foods bind IgE in their native protein conformation. Information on location, number and clinical relevance of IgE epitopes is limited. We addressed the use of an allergen-related protein model to identify amino acids critical for IgE binding of PR-10 allergens. Method Norcoclaurine synthase (NCS) from meadow rue is structurally homologous to Bet v 1 but does not bind Bet v 1-reactive IgE. NCS was used as the template for epitope grafting. NCS variants were tested with sera from 70 birch pollen allergic subjects and with monoclonal antibody BV16 reported to compete with IgE binding to Bet v 1. Results We generated an NCS variant (Δ29NCSN57/I58E/D60N/V63P/D68K) harboring an IgE epitope of Bet v 1. Bet v 1-type protein folding of the NCS variant was evaluated by 1H-15N-HSQC NMR spectroscopy. BV16 bound the NCS variant and 71% (50/70 sera) of our study population showed significant IgE binding. We observed IgE and BV16 cross-reactivity to the epitope presented by the NCS variant in a subgroup of Bet v 1-related allergens. Moreover BV16 blocked IgE binding to the NCS variant. Antibody cross-reactivity depended on a defined orientation of amino acids within the Bet v 1-type conformation. Conclusion Our system allows the evaluation of patient-specific epitope profiles and will facilitate both the identification of clinically relevant epitopes as biomarkers and the monitoring of therapeutic outcomes to improve diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy of allergies caused by PR-10 proteins. PMID:25356997

  6. Characterization of neutralizing epitopes within the major capsid protein of human papillomavirus type 33

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Stefanie D; Sapp, Martin; Streeck, Rolf E; Selinka, Hans-Christoph

    2006-01-01

    Background Infections with papillomaviruses induce type-specific immune responses, mainly directed against the major capsid protein, L1. Based on the propensity of the L1 protein to self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs), type-specific vaccines have already been developed. In order to generate vaccines that target a broader spectrum of HPV types, extended knowledge of neutralizing epitopes is required. Despite the association of human papillomavirus type 33 (HPV33) with cervical carcinomas, fine mapping of neutralizing conformational epitopes on HPV33 has not been reported yet. By loop swapping between HPV33 and HPV16 capsid proteins, we have identified amino acid sequences critical for the binding of conformation-dependent type-specific neutralizing antibodies to surface-exposed hyper variable loops of HPV33 capsid protein L1. Results Reactivities of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) H33.B6, H33.E12, H33.J3 and H16.56E with HPV16:33 and HPV33:16 hybrid L1 VLPs revealed the complex structures of their conformational epitopes as well as the major residues contributing to their binding sites. Whereas the epitope of mAb H33.J3 was determined by amino acids (aa) 51–58 in the BC loop of HPV33 L1, sequences of at least two hyper variable loops, DE (aa 132–140) and FGb (aa 282–291), were found to be essential for binding of H33.B6. The epitope of H33.E12 was even more complex, requiring sequences of the FGa loop (aa 260–270), in addition to loops DE and FGb. Conclusion These data demonstrate that neutralizing epitopes in HPV33 L1 are mainly located on the tip of the capsomere and that several hyper variable loops contribute to form these conformational epitopes. Knowledge of the antigenic structure of HPV is crucial for designing hybrid particles as a basis for intertypic HPV vaccines. PMID:17014700

  7. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for human insulin-like growth factor-I using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies with defined epitope recognition.

    PubMed

    Tamura, K; Kobayashi, M; Suzuki, S; Ishii, Y; Koyama, S; Yamada, H; Hashimoto, K; Niwa, M; Shibayama, F

    1990-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAb) and polyclonal antibodies (PcAb) against human insulin-like growth factor-I (somatomedin C; hIGF-I) were produced. Using these two antibodies, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for hIGF-I was established. The ELISA system was able to detect hIGF-I at a range of 1-25 micrograms/l, compared with the range of 1-50 micrograms/l detected by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Human IGF-II and human insulin could not be recognized in this system. The plasma concentrations of IGF-I found using the ELISA agreed well with those found using RIA after conventional Sep-Pak C18 cartridge pretreatment. Epitopes of hIGF-I to McAb and PcAb were investigated by enzymatic digestion of hIGF-I followed by comparing the affinity of the antibodies to the peptides obtained proteolytically. The epitope to McAb was found to be a peptide containing Leu10-Val11-Asp12 (epitope 2). Five epitopes to PcAb containing the following key fragments were identified: a conformational structure formed by the disulphide bonds between Cys6 and Cys48, and between Cys47 and Cys52 (epitope 1), Leu10-Val11-Asp12 (epitope 2), Val17-Cys18-Gly19-Asp20 (epitope 3), Arg21-Gly22-Phe23-Tyr24 (epitope 4) and Lys68-Ser69-Ala70 (epitope 5). Of these, the peptide containing epitope 5 showed the highest affinity to PcAb. The results indicated that our ELISA system combined recognition by epitope 2 of McAb and recognition by epitope 5 of PcAb to obtain its good specificity.

  8. Triosephosphate Isomerase and Filamin C Share Common Epitopes as Novel Allergens of Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yong-Xia; Liu, Meng; Maleki, Soheila J; Zhang, Ming-Li; Liu, Qing-Mei; Cao, Min-Jie; Su, Wen-Jin; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2017-02-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) is a key enzyme in glycolysis and has been identified as an allergen in saltwater products. In this study, TIM with a molecular mass of 28 kDa was purified from the freshwater crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) muscle. A 90-kDa protein that showed IgG/IgE cross-reactivity with TIM was purified and identified as filamin C (FLN c), which is an actin-binding protein. TIM showed similar thermal and pH stability with better digestion resistance compared with FLN c. The result of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiment demonstrated the infinity of anti-TIM polyclonal antibody (pAb) to both TIM and FLN c. Five linear and 3 conformational epitopes of TIM, as well as 9 linear and 10 conformational epitopes of FLN c, were mapped by phage display. Epitopes of TIM and FLN c demonstrated the sharing of certain residues; the occurrence of common epitopes in the two allergens accounts for their cross-reactivity.

  9. Unconventional T-cell recognition of an arthritogenic epitope of proteoglycan aggrecan released from degrading cartilage.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Jane; Mahida, Rahul; Venkatesh, Divya; Pearson, Jeffrey; Robinson, John H

    2016-04-01

    It has been proposed that peptide epitopes bind to MHC class II molecules to form distinct structural conformers of the same MHC II-peptide complex termed type A and type B, and that the two conformers of the same peptide-MHC II complex are recognized by distinct CD4 T cells, termed type A and type B T cells. Both types recognize short synthetic peptides but only type A recognize endosomally processed intact antigen. Type B T cells that recognize self peptides from exogenously degraded proteins have been shown to escape negative selection during thymic development and so have the potential to contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. We generated and characterized mouse CD4 T cells specific for an arthritogenic epitope of the candidate joint autoantigen proteoglycan aggrecan. Cloned T-cell hybridomas specific for a synthetic peptide containing the aggrecan epitope showed two distinct response patterns based on whether they could recognize processed intact aggrecan. Fine mapping demonstrated that both types of T-cell recognized the same core epitope. The results are consistent with the generation of aggrecan-specific type A and type B T cells. Type B T cells were activated by supernatants released from degrading cartilage, indicating the presence of antigenic extracellular peptides or fragments of aggrecan. Type B T cells could play a role in the pathogenesis of proteoglycan-induced arthritis in mice, a model for rheumatoid arthritis, by recognizing extracellular peptides or protein fragments of joint autoantigens released by inflamed cartilage.

  10. Epitope Mapping of Anti-Interleukin-13 Neutralizing Antibody CNTO607

    SciTech Connect

    Teplyakov, Alexey; Obmolova, Galina; Wu, Sheng-Jiun; Luo, Jinquan; Kang, James; O'Neil, Karyn; Gilliland, Gary L.

    2009-06-24

    CNTO607 is a neutralizing anti-interleukin-13 (IL-13) human monoclonal antibody obtained from a phage display library. To determine how this antibody inhibits the biological effect of IL-13, we determined the binding epitope by X-ray crystallography. The crystal structure of the complex between CNTO607 Fab and IL-13 reveals the antibody epitope at the surface formed by helices A and D of IL-13. This epitope overlaps with the IL-4Ralpha/IL-13Ralpha1 receptor-binding site, which explains the neutralizing effect of CNTO607. The extensive antibody interface covers an area of 1000 A(2), which is consistent with the high binding affinity. The key features of the interface are the charge and shape complementarity of the molecules that include two hydrophobic pockets on IL-13 that accommodate Phe32 [complementarity-determining region (CDR) L2] and Trp100a (CDR H3) and a number of salt bridges between basic residues of IL-13 and acidic residues of the antibody. Comparison with the structure of the free Fab shows that the CDR residues do not change their conformation upon complex formation, with the exception of two residues in CDR H3, Trp100a and Asp100b, which change rotamer conformations. To evaluate the relative contribution of the epitope residues to CNTO607 binding, we performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the A-D region of IL-13. This study confirmed the primary role of electrostatic interactions for antigen recognition.

  11. A novel monoclonal antibody to a defined peptide epitope in MUC16.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Silva, Lara; Ricardo, Sara; Chen, Kowa; Blixt, Ola; Arigi, Emma; Pereira, Daniela; Høgdall, Estrid; Mandel, Ulla; Bennett, Eric P; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; David, Leonor; Clausen, Henrik

    2015-11-01

    The MUC16 mucin is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in ovarian carcinomas. Immunodetection of circulating MUC16 is one of the most used cancer biomarker assays, but existing antibodies to MUC16 fail to distinguish normal and aberrant cancer glycoforms. Although all antibodies react with the tandem-repeat region, their epitopes appear to be conformational dependent and not definable by a short peptide. Aberrant glycoforms of MUC16 may constitute promising targets for diagnostic and immunotherapeutic intervention, and it is important to develop well-defined immunogens for induction of potent MUC16 immunity. Here, we developed a MUC16 vaccine based on a 1.7TR (264 aa) expressed in Escherichia coli and in vitro enzymatically glycosylated to generate the aberrant cancer-associated glycoform Tn. This vaccine elicited a potent serum IgG response in mice and we identified two major immunodominant linear peptide epitopes within the tandem repeat. We developed one monoclonal antibody, 5E11, reactive with a minimum epitope with the sequence FNTTER. This sequence contains potential N- and O-glycosylation sites and, interestingly, glycosylation blocked binding of 5E11. In immunochemistry of ovarian benign and cancer lesions, 5E11 showed similar reactivity as traditional MUC16 antibodies, suggesting that the epitope is not efficiently glycosylated. The study provides a vaccine design and immunodominant MUC16 TR epitopes.

  12. MALDI/Post Ionization-Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry of Noncovalent Complexes of Dopamine Receptors' Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Amina S.; Jackson, Shelley N.; Egan, Thomas; Lewis, Ernest K.; Tabet, Jean-Claude; Schultz, J. Albert

    2014-01-01

    Protein domains involved in receptor heteromer formation are disordered and rich in the amino acids necessary for the formation of noncovalent complexes (NCX). We present mass spectral NCX data from proteins and protein receptors' epitopes obtained by combining ion mobility (IM) and MALDI. Our main focus are NCX involved in heteromer formation occurring between epitopes of the Dopamine D2 (D2R) and Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) as well as D2R and a nicotinic (NR) receptors' subunit. The IM data yield information on the gas phase conformation of the singly charged NCX which are observed either directly from MALDI or as co-desorbed neutrals which are subsequently post-ionized by a time-delayed excimer laser pulse directed onto a portion of the neutral plume created by the MALDI desorption laser. Imaging mass spectrometry of the matrix/epitope dried droplet surface shows that the acidic and basic epitopes and their NCX are found to be spatially collocated within regions as small as 25×50 microns. Subtle differences in the relative abundance of protonated and cationized NCX and epitopes are measured in spatial regions near the sodium rich outer border of the droplet. PMID:23469763

  13. Proteome-wide Epitope Mapping of Antibodies Using Ultra-dense Peptide Arrays*

    PubMed Central

    Forsström, Björn; Axnäs, Barbara Bisławska; Stengele, Klaus-Peter; Bühler, Jochen; Albert, Thomas J.; Richmond, Todd A.; Hu, Francis Jingxin; Nilsson, Peter; Hudson, Elton P.; Rockberg, Johan; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are of importance for the field of proteomics, both as reagents for imaging cells, tissues, and organs and as capturing agents for affinity enrichment in mass-spectrometry-based techniques. It is important to gain basic insights regarding the binding sites (epitopes) of antibodies and potential cross-reactivity to nontarget proteins. Knowledge about an antibody's linear epitopes is also useful in, for instance, developing assays involving the capture of peptides obtained from trypsin cleavage of samples prior to mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we describe, for the first time, the design and use of peptide arrays covering all human proteins for the analysis of antibody specificity, based on parallel in situ photolithic synthesis of a total of 2.1 million overlapping peptides. This has allowed analysis of on- and off-target binding of both monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, complemented with precise mapping of epitopes based on full amino acid substitution scans. The analysis suggests that linear epitopes are relatively short, confined to five to seven residues, resulting in apparent off-target binding to peptides corresponding to a large number of unrelated human proteins. However, subsequent analysis using recombinant proteins suggests that these linear epitopes have a strict conformational component, thus giving us new insights regarding how antibodies bind to their antigens. PMID:24705123

  14. Epitope mapping of metuximab on CD147 using phage display and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    He, Bifang; Mao, Canquan; Ru, Beibei; Han, Hesong; Zhou, Peng; Huang, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Metuximab is the generic name of Licartin, a new drug for radioimmunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. Although it is known to be a mouse monoclonal antibody against CD147, the complete epitope mediating the binding of metuximab to CD147 remains unknown. We panned the Ph.D.-12 phage display peptide library against metuximab and got six mimotopes. The following bioinformatics analysis based on mimotopes suggested that metuximab recognizes a conformational epitope composed of more than 20 residues. The residues of its epitope may include T28, V30, K36, L38, K57, F74, D77, S78, D79, D80, Q81, G83, S86, N98, Q100, L101, H102, G103, P104, V131, P132, and K191. The homology modeling of metuximab and the docking of CD147 to metuximab were also performed. Based on the top one docking model, the epitope was predicted to contain 28 residues: AGTVFTTV (23-30), I37, D45, E84, V88, EPMGTANIQLH (92-102), VPP (131-133), Q164, and K191. Almost half of the residues predicted on the basis of mimotope analysis also appear in the docking result, indicating that both results are reliable. As the predicted epitopes of metuximab largely overlap with interfaces of CD147-CD147 interactions, a structural mechanism of metuximab is proposed as blocking the formation of CD147 dimer.

  15. Antibody and antigen contact residues define epitope and paratope size and structure.

    PubMed

    Stave, James W; Lindpaintner, Klaus

    2013-08-01

    A total of 111 Ag-Ab x-ray crystal structures of large protein Ag epitopes and paratopes were analyzed to inform the process of eliciting or selecting functional and therapeutic Abs. These analyses illustrate that Ab contact residues (CR) are distributed in three prominent CR regions (CRR) on L and H chains that overlap but do not coincide with Ab CDR. The number of Ag and Ab CRs per structure are overlapping and centered around 18 and 19, respectively. The CR span (CRS), a novel measure introduced in this article, is defined as the minimum contiguous amino acid sequence containing all CRs of an Ag or Ab and represents the size of a complete structural epitope or paratope, inclusive of CR and the minimum set of supporting residues required for proper conformation. The most frequent size of epitope CRS is 50-79 aa, which is similar in size to L (60-69) and H chain (70-79) CRS. The size distribution of epitope CRS analyzed in this study ranges from ~20 to 400 aa, similar to the distribution of independent protein domain sizes reported in the literature. Together, the number of CRs and the size of the CRS demonstrate that, on average, complete structural epitopes and paratopes are equal in size to each other and similar in size to intact protein domains. Thus, independent protein domains inclusive of biologically relevant sites represent the fundamental structural unit bound by, and useful for eliciting or selecting, functional and therapeutic Abs.

  16. First report on the antibody verification of MICA epitopes recorded in the HLA epitope registry.

    PubMed

    Duquesnoy, R J; Mostecki, J; Marrari, M; da Silva, A S; da Mata Sousa, L C D; do Monte, S J H

    2014-10-01

    The International Registry of HLA Epitopes (http://epregistry.com.br) has been recently established as a tool to understand antibody responses to HLA mismatches. These epitopes are defined structurally by three-dimensional molecular modelling and amino acid sequence differences between HLA antigens. A major goal was to identify HLA epitopes that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. This report addresses the identification of MICA epitopes. Our analysis included published information about MICA antibody reactivity in sera from sensitized patients as well as data from our own laboratories. This report describes twenty-one MICA epitopes verified with antibodies which have primarily been tested in Luminex assays with single alleles. The epitopes correspond to distinct eplets that are often defined by single residues. The Registry is still a work-in-progress and will become a useful resource for HLA professionals interested in histocompatibility testing at the epitope level and investigating antibody responses to HLA mismatches in transplant patients.

  17. Definition of immunogenic carbohydrate epitopes.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Fabini, Gustáv; Schuster, David; Rendić, Dubravko; Wilson, Iain B H

    2005-01-01

    Carbohydrates are known as sources of immunological cross-reactivity of allergenic significance. In celery and in cypress pollen, the major allergens Api g 5 and Cup a 1 are recognised by antisera raised against anti-horseradish peroxidase and by patients' IgE which apparently bind carbohydrate epitopes; mass spectrometric analysis of the tryptic peptides and of their N-glycans showed the presence of oligosaccharides carrying both xylose and core alpha1,3-fucose residues. Core alpha1,3-fucose residues are also a feature of invertebrates: genetic and biochemical studies on the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, the parasitic trematode Schistosoma mansoni and the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans indicate that these organisms possess core alpha1,3-fucosyltransferases. Various experiments have shown that fucosyltransferases from both fly and worm are responsible in vivo and in vitro for the synthesis of N-glycans which cross-react with anti-horseradish peroxidase; thus, we can consider these enzymes as useful tools in generating standard compounds for testing cross-reactive carbohydrate epitopes of allergenic interest.

  18. Facts and fictions about polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Cabeza, Aurora J; Reutzel-Edens, Susan M; Bernstein, Joel

    2015-12-07

    We present new facts about polymorphism based on (i) crystallographic data from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD, a database built over 50 years of community effort), (ii) 229 solid form screens conducted at Hoffmann-La Roche and Eli Lilly and Company over the course of 8+ and 15+ years respectively and (iii) a dataset of 446 polymorphic crystals with energies and properties computed with modern DFT-d methods. We found that molecular flexibility or size has no correlation with the ability of a compound to be polymorphic. Chiral molecules, however, were found to be less prone to polymorphism than their achiral counterparts and compounds able to hydrogen bond exhibit only a slightly higher propensity to polymorphism than those which do not. Whilst the energy difference between polymorphs is usually less than 1 kcal mol(-1), conformational polymorphs are capable of differing by larger values (up to 2.5 kcal mol(-1) in our dataset). As overall statistics, we found that one in three compounds in the CSD are polymorphic whilst at least one in two compounds from the Roche and Lilly set display polymorphism with a higher estimate of up to three in four when compounds are screened intensively. Whilst the statistics provide some guidance of expectations, each compound constitutes a new challenge and prediction and realization of targeted polymorphism still remains a holy grail of materials sciences.

  19. Recombinant multi-epitope vaccine induce predefined epitope-specific antibodies against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Liu, Zu-Qiang; Ding, Jian; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2002-11-01

    Monoclonal antibody 2F5 recognizing ELDKWA-epitope on HIV-1 gp41 has significant neutralization potency against 90% of the investigated viruses of African, Asia, American and European strains, but antibodies responses to ELDKWA-epitope in HIV-1 infected individuals were very low. Based on the epitope-vaccine strategy suggested by us, a recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (GST-MELDKWAGELDKWAGELDKWAVDIGPGRAFYGPGRAFYGPGRAFY) as vaccine antigen containing three repeats of neutralizing epitope ELDKWA on gp41 and GPGRAFY on gp120 was designed and expressed in Escherichia coli. After vaccination course, the recombinant multi-epitope vaccine could induce high levels of predefined multi-epitope-specific antibodies in mice. These antibodies in sera could bind to both neutralizing epitopes on gp41 peptide, V3 loop peptide and recombinant soluble gp41 (aa539-684) in ELISA assay (antisera dilution: 1:1,600-25,600), while normal sera did not. Moreover, these antibodies in sera could recognize the CHO-WT cells which expressed HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein on the cell surfaces, indicating that the predefined epitope-specific antibodies could recognize natural envelope protein of HIV-1 though these antibodies were induced by recombinant multi-epitope-vaccine. These experimental results suggested a possible way to develop recombinant multi-epitope vaccine inducing multi-antiviral activities against HIV-1.

  20. Purification of polyclonal anti-conformational antibodies for use in affinity selection from random peptide phage display libraries: A study using the hydatid vaccine EG95

    PubMed Central

    Read, A.J.; Gauci, C.G.; Lightowlers, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    The use of polyclonal antibodies to screen random peptide phage display libraries often results in the recognition of a large number of peptides that mimic linear epitopes on various proteins. There appears to be a bias in the use of this technology toward the selection of peptides that mimic linear epitopes. In many circumstances the correct folding of a protein immunogen is required for conferring protection. The use of random peptide phage display libraries to identify peptide mimics of conformational epitopes in these cases requires a strategy for overcoming this bias. Conformational epitopes on the hydatid vaccine EG95 have been shown to result in protective immunity in sheep, whereas linear epitopes are not protective. In this paper we describe a strategy that results in the purification of polyclonal antibodies directed against conformational epitopes while eliminating antibodies directed against linear epitopes. These affinity purified antibodies were then used to select a peptide from a random peptide phage display library that has the capacity to mimic conformational epitopes on EG95. This peptide was subsequently used to affinity purify monospecific antibodies against EG95. PMID:19349218

  1. A new EV71 VP3 epitope in norovirus P particle vector displays neutralizing activity and protection in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liping; Fan, Rongjun; Sun, Shiyang; Fan, Peihu; Su, Weiheng; Zhou, Yan; Gao, Feng; Xu, Fei; Kong, Wei; Jiang, Chunlai

    2015-11-27

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16), as the main agents causing hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), have become a serious public health concern in the Asia-Pacific region. Recently, various neutralizing B cell epitopes of EV71 were identified as targets for promising vaccine candidates. Structural studies of Picornaviridae indicated that potent immunodominant epitopes typically lie in the hypervariable loop of capsid surfaces. However, cross-neutralizing antibodies and cross-protection between EV71 and CVA16 have not been observed. Therefore, we speculated that divergent sequences of the two viruses are key epitopes for inducing protective neutralizing responses. In this study, we selected 10 divergent epitope candidates based on alignment of the EV71 and CVA16 P1 amino acid sequences using the Multalin interface page, and these epitopes are conserved among all subgenotypes of EV71. Simultaneously, by utilizing the norovirus P particle as a novel vaccine delivery carrier, we identified the 71-6 epitope (amino acid 176-190 of VP3) as a conformational neutralizing epitope against EV71 in an in vitro micro-neutralization assay as well as an in vivo protection assay in mice. Altogether, these results indicated that the incorporation of the 71-6 epitope into the norovirus P domain can provide a promising candidate for an effective synthetic peptide-based vaccine against EV71.

  2. Malondialdehyde epitopes as mediators of sterile inflammation.

    PubMed

    Busch, Clara J; Binder, Christoph J

    2017-04-01

    Enhanced lipid peroxidation occurs during oxidative stress and results in the generation of lipid peroxidation end products such as malondialdehyde (MDA), which can attach to autologous biomolecules, thereby generating neo-self epitopes capable of inducing potentially undesired biological responses. Therefore, the immune system has developed mechanisms to protect from MDA epitopes by binding and neutralizing them through both cellular and soluble effectors. Here, we briefly discuss innate immune responses targeting MDA epitopes and their pro-inflammatory properties, followed by a review of physiological carriers of MDA epitopes that are relevant in homeostasis and disease. Then we discuss in detail the evidence for cellular responses towards MDA epitopes mainly in lung, liver and the circulation as well as signal transduction mechanisms and receptors implicated in the response to MDA epitopes. Last, we hypothesize on the role of MDA epitopes as mediators of inflammation in diseases and speculate on their contribution to disease pathogenesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid modification and lipid peroxidation products in innate immunity and inflammation edited by Christoph J. Binder.

  3. Immunochemical identification of Brucella abortus lipopolysaccharide epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, N; Freer, E; Weintraub, A; Ramirez, M; Lind, S; Moreno, E

    1994-01-01

    Sera from Brucella abortus-infected and -vaccinated bovines recognized four lipopolysaccharide (LPS) determinants: two in the O-polysaccharide (A and C), one in the core oligosaccharide from rough Brucella LPS (R), and one in lipid A (LA). From 46 different hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against various LPS moieties, 9 different specificities were identified. Two epitopes, A and C/Y, were present in the O-polysaccharide. Two epitopes were found in the core oligosaccharide (R1 and R2) of rough Brucella LPS. MAbs against R1 and R2 epitopes reacted against LPS from different rough Brucella species; however, MAbs directed to the R2 epitope also reacted against enterobacterial LPS from deep rough mutants. Three epitopes (LA1, LA2, and LA3) were located in the lipid A backbone. Different sets of MAbs recognized two epitopes in the lipid A-associated outer membrane protein (LAOmp3-1 and LAOmp3-2). LPS preparations from smooth brucellae had small amounts of rough-type LPS. Although LPS from rough brucellae did not show smooth-type LPS in western blots (immunoblots), two hybridomas generated from mice immunized with rough B. abortus produced antibodies against smooth B. abortus LPS. Results are discussed in relation to the structure and function of B. abortus LPS and to previous findings on the epitopic density of the molecule. Images PMID:7496947

  4. The Immune Epitope Database 2.0

    PubMed Central

    Vita, Randi; Zarebski, Laura; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Emami, Hussein; Hoof, Ilka; Salimi, Nima; Damle, Rohini; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern

    2010-01-01

    The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB, www.iedb.org) provides a catalog of experimentally characterized B and T cell epitopes, as well as data on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) binding and MHC ligand elution experiments. The database represents the molecular structures recognized by adaptive immune receptors and the experimental contexts in which these molecules were determined to be immune epitopes. Epitopes recognized in humans, nonhuman primates, rodents, pigs, cats and all other tested species are included. Both positive and negative experimental results are captured. Over the course of 4 years, the data from 180 978 experiments were curated manually from the literature, which covers ∼99% of all publicly available information on peptide epitopes mapped in infectious agents (excluding HIV) and 93% of those mapped in allergens. In addition, data that would otherwise be unavailable to the public from 129 186 experiments were submitted directly by investigators. The curation of epitopes related to autoimmunity is expected to be completed by the end of 2010. The database can be queried by epitope structure, source organism, MHC restriction, assay type or host organism, among other criteria. The database structure, as well as its querying, browsing and reporting interfaces, was completely redesigned for the IEDB 2.0 release, which became publicly available in early 2009. PMID:19906713

  5. Characterization of periplasmic protein BP26 epitopes of Brucella melitensis reacting with murine monoclonal and sheep antibodies.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinlang; Wang, Wenjing; Wu, Jingbo; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Yuanzhi; Qiao, Jun; Chen, Chuangfu; Gao, Goege F; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2012-01-01

    More than 35,000 new cases of human brucellosis were reported in 2010 by the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention. An attenuated B. melitensis vaccine M5-90 is currently used for vaccination of sheep and goats in China. In the study, a periplasmic protein BP26 from M5-90 was characterized for its epitope reactivity with mouse monoclonal and sheep antibodies. A total of 29 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against recombinant BP26 (rBP26) were produced, which were tested for reactivity with a panel of BP26 peptides, three truncated rBP26 and native BP26 containing membrane protein extracts (NMP) of B. melitensis M5-90 in ELISA and Western-Blot. The linear, semi-conformational and conformational epitopes from native BP26 were identified. Two linear epitopes recognized by mAbs were revealed by 28 of 16mer overlapping peptides, which were accurately mapped as the core motif of amino acid residues ⁹³DRDLQTGGI¹⁰¹ (position 93 to 101) or residues ¹⁰⁴QPIYVYPD¹¹¹, respectively. The reactivity of linear epitope peptides, rBP26 and NMP was tested with 137 sheep sera by ELISAs, of which the two linear epitopes had 65-70% reactivity and NMP 90% consistent with the results of a combination of two standard serological tests. The results were helpful for evaluating the reactivity of BP26 antigen in M5-90.

  6. Immunogenicity of stabilized HIV-1 envelope trimers with reduced exposure of non-neutralizing epitopes

    PubMed Central

    de Taeye, Steven W.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Guttman, Miklos; Julien, Jean-Philippe; van den Kerkhof, Tom L.G.M.; Burger, Judith A.; Pritchard, Laura K.; Pugach, Pavel; Yasmeen, Anila; Crampton, Jordan; Hu, Joyce; Bontjer, Ilja; Torres, Jonathan L.; Arendt, Heather; DeStefano, Joanne; Koff, Wayne C.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Eggink, Dirk; Berkhout, Ben; Dean, Hansi; LaBranche, Celia; Crotty, Shane; Crispin, Max; Montefiori, David C.; Klasse, P. J.; Lee, Kelly K.; Moore, John P.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The envelope glycoprotein trimer mediates HIV-1 entry into cells. The trimer is flexible, fluctuating between closed and more open conformations and sometimes sampling the fully open, CD4-bound form. We hypothesized that conformational flexibility could hinder the induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). We therefore modified soluble Env trimers to stabilize their closed, ground states. The trimer variants were indeed stabilized in the closed conformation, with a reduced ability to undergo receptor-induced conformational changes and a decreased exposure of non-neutralizing V3-directed antibody epitopes. In rabbits, the stabilized trimers induced similar autologous Tier-1B or Tier-2 NAb titers to those elicited by the corresponding wild-type trimers, but lower levels of V3-directed Tier-1A NAbs. Stabilized, closed trimers might therefore be useful components of vaccines aimed at inducing bNAbs. PMID:26687358

  7. Antibody Recognition of a Highly Conserved Influenza Virus Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Ekiert, Damian C.; Bhabha, Gira; Elsliger, Marc-André; Friesen, Robert H.E.; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Throsby, Mark; Goudsmit, Jaap; Wilson, Ian A.; Scripps; Crucell

    2009-05-21

    Influenza virus presents an important and persistent threat to public health worldwide, and current vaccines provide immunity to viral isolates similar to the vaccine strain. High-affinity antibodies against a conserved epitope could provide immunity to the diverse influenza subtypes and protection against future pandemic viruses. Cocrystal structures were determined at 2.2 and 2.7 angstrom resolutions for broadly neutralizing human antibody CR6261 Fab in complexes with the major surface antigen (hemagglutinin, HA) from viruses responsible for the 1918 H1N1 influenza pandemic and a recent lethal case of H5N1 avian influenza. In contrast to other structurally characterized influenza antibodies, CR6261 recognizes a highly conserved helical region in the membrane-proximal stem of HA1 and HA2. The antibody neutralizes the virus by blocking conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion. The CR6261 epitope identified here should accelerate the design and implementation of improved vaccines that can elicit CR6261-like antibodies, as well as antibody-based therapies for the treatment of influenza.

  8. Major histocompatibility complex and T cell interactions of a universal T cell epitope from Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein.

    PubMed

    Parra-López, Carlos; Calvo-Calle, J Mauricio; Cameron, Thomas O; Vargas, Luis E; Salazar, Luz Mary; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Nardin, Elizabeth; Stern, Lawrence J

    2006-05-26

    A 20-residue sequence from the C-terminal region of the circumsporozoite protein of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is considered a universal helper T cell epitope because it is immunogenic in individuals of many major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes. Subunit vaccines containing T* and the major B cell epitope of the circumsporozoite protein induce high antibody titers to the malaria parasite and significant T cell responses in humans. In this study we have evaluated the specificity of the T* sequence with regard to its binding to the human class II MHC protein DR4 (HLA-DRB1*0401), its interactions with antigen receptors on T cells, and the effect of natural variants of this sequence on its immunogenicity. Computational approaches identified multiple potential DR4-binding epitopes within T*, and experimental binding studies confirmed the following two tight binding epitopes: one located toward the N terminus (the T*-1 epitope) and one at the C terminus (the T*-5 epitope). Immunization of a human DR4 volunteer with a peptide-based vaccine containing the T* sequence elicited CD4+ T cells that recognize each of these epitopes. Here we present an analysis of the immunodominant N-terminal epitope T*-1. T*-1 residues important for interaction with DR4 and with antigen receptors on T*-specific T cells were mapped. MHC tetramers carrying DR4/T*-1 MHC-peptide complexes stained and efficiently stimulated these cells in vitro. T*-1 overlaps a region of the protein that has been described as highly polymorphic; however, the particular T*-1 residues required for anchoring to DR4 were highly conserved in Plasmodium sequences described to date.

  9. In silico design of a DNA-based HIV-1 multi-epitope vaccine for Chinese populations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Sun, Weilai; Guo, Jingjing; Zhao, Guangyu; Sun, Shihui; Yu, Hong; Guo, Yan; Li, Jungfeng; Jin, Xia; Du, Lanying; Jiang, Shibo; Kou, Zhihua; Zhou, Yusen

    2015-01-01

    The development of an HIV-1 vaccine that is capable of inducing effective and broadly cross-reactive humoral and cellular immune responses remains a challenging task because of the extensive diversity of HIV-1, the difference of virus subtypes (clades) in different geographical regions, and the polymorphism of human leukocyte antigens (HLA). We performed an in silico design of 3 DNA vaccines, designated pJW4303-MEG1, pJW4303-MEG2 and pJW4303-MEG3, encoding multi-epitopes that are highly conserved within the HIV-1 subtypes most prevalent in China and can be recognized through HLA alleles dominant in China. The pJW4303-MEG1-encoded protein consisted of one Th epitope in Env, and one, 2, and 6 epitopes in Pol, Env, and Gag proteins, respectively, with a GGGS linker sequence between epitopes. The pJW4303-MEG2-encoded protein contained similar epitopes in a different order, but with the same linker as pJW4303-MEG1. The pJW4303-MEG3-encoded protein contained the same epitopes in the same order as that of pJW4303-MEG2, but with a different linker sequence (AAY). To evaluate immunogenicity, mice were immunized intramuscularly with these DNA vaccines. Both pJW4303-MEG1 and pJW4303-MEG2 vaccines induced equally potent humoral and cellular immune responses in the vaccinated mice, while pJW4303-MEG3 did not induce immune responses. These results indicate that both epitope and linker sequences are important in designing effective epitope-based vaccines against HIV-1 and other viruses. PMID:25839222

  10. Conformational activation of ADAMTS13.

    PubMed

    South, Kieron; Luken, Brenda M; Crawley, James T B; Phillips, Rebecca; Thomas, Mari; Collins, Richard F; Deforche, Louis; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; Lane, David A

    2014-12-30

    A disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) is a metalloprotease that regulates von Willebrand factor (VWF) function. ADAMTS13-mediated proteolysis is determined by conformational changes in VWF, but also may depend on its own conformational activation. Kinetic analysis of WT ADAMTS13 revealed ∼ 2.5-fold reduced activity compared with ADAMTS13 lacking its C-terminal tail (MDTCS) or its CUB1-2 domains (WTΔCUB1-2), suggesting that the CUB domains naturally limit ADAMTS13 function. Consistent with this suggestion, WT ADAMTS13 activity was enhanced ∼ 2.5-fold by preincubation with either an anti-CUB mAb (20E9) or VWF D4CK (the natural binding partner for the CUB domains). Furthermore, the isolated CUB1-2 domains not only bound MDTCS, but also inhibited activity by up to 2.5-fold. Interestingly, a gain-of-function (GoF) ADAMTS13 spacer domain variant (R568K/F592Y/R660K/Y661F/Y665F) was ∼ 2.5-fold more active than WT ADAMTS13, but could not be further activated by 20E9 mAb or VWF D4CK and was unable to bind or to be inhibited by the CUB1-2 domains, suggesting that the inhibitory effects of the CUB domains involve an interaction with the spacer domain that is disrupted in GoF ADAMTS13. Electron microscopy demonstrated a "closed" conformation of WT ADAMTS13 and suggested a more "open" conformation for GoF ADAMTS13. The cryptic spacer domain epitope revealed by conformational unfolding also represents the core antigenic target for autoantibodies in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. We propose that ADAMTS13 circulates in a closed conformation, which is maintained by a CUB-spacer domain binding interaction. ADAMTS13 becomes conformationally activated on demand through interaction of its C-terminal CUB domains with VWF, making it susceptible to immune recognition.

  11. Designing an efficient multi-epitope peptide vaccine against Vibrio cholerae via combined immunoinformatics and protein interaction based approaches.

    PubMed

    Nezafat, Navid; Karimi, Zeinab; Eslami, Mahboobeh; Mohkam, Milad; Zandian, Sanam; Ghasemi, Younes

    2016-06-01

    Cholera continues to be a major global health concern. Among different Vibrio cholerae strains, only O1 and O139 cause acute diarrheal diseases that are related to epidemic and pandemic outbreaks. The currently available cholera vaccines are mainly lived and attenuated vaccines consisting of V. cholerae virulence factors such as toxin-coregulated pili (TCP), outer membrane proteins (Omps), and nontoxic cholera toxin B subunit (CTB). Nowadays, there is a great interest in designing an efficient epitope vaccine against cholera. Epitope vaccines consisting of immunodominant epitopes and adjuvant molecules enhance the possibility of inciting potent protective immunity. In this study, V. cholerae protective antigens (OmpW, OmpU, TcpA and TcpF) and the CTB, which is broadly used as an immunostimulatory adjuvant, were analyzed using different bioinformatics and immunoinformatics tools. The common regions between promiscuous epitopes, binding to various HLA-II supertype alleles, and B-cell epitopes were defined based upon the aforementioned protective antigens. The ultimately selected epitopes and CTB adjuvant were fused together using proper GPGPG linkers to enhance vaccine immunogenicity. A three-dimensional model of the thus constructed vaccine was generated using I-TASSER. The model was structurally validated using the ProSA-web error-detection software and the Ramachandran plot. The validation results indicated that the initial 3D model needed refinement. Subsequently, a high-quality model obtained after various refinement cycles was used for defining conformational B-cell epitopes. Several linear and conformational B-cell epitopes were determined within the epitope vaccine, suggesting likely antibody triggering features of our designed vaccine. Next, molecular docking was performed between the 3D vaccine model and the tertiary structure of the toll like receptor 2 (TLR2). To gain further insight into the interaction between vaccine and TLR2, molecular dynamics

  12. Diverse specificity and effector function among human antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein epitopes exposed by CD4 binding

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Yongjun; Pazgier, Marzena; Sajadi, Mohammad M.; Kamin-Lewis, Roberta; Al-Darmarki, Salma; Flinko, Robin; Lovo, Elena; Wu, Xueji; Robinson, James E.; Seaman, Michael S.; Fouts, Timothy R.; Gallo, Robert C.; DeVico, Anthony L.; Lewis, George K.

    2012-12-13

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) undergoes conformational transitions consequent to CD4 binding and coreceptor engagement during viral entry. The physical steps in this process are becoming defined, but less is known about their significance as targets of antibodies potentially protective against HIV-1 infection. Here we probe the functional significance of transitional epitope exposure by characterizing 41 human mAbs specific for epitopes exposed on trimeric Env after CD4 engagement. These mAbs recognize three epitope clusters: cluster A, the gp120 face occluded by gp41 in trimeric Env; cluster B, a region proximal to the coreceptor-binding site (CoRBS) and involving the V1/V2 domain; and cluster C, the coreceptor-binding site. The mAbs were evaluated functionally by antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and for neutralization of Tiers 1 and 2 pseudoviruses. All three clusters included mAbs mediating ADCC. However, there was a strong potency bias for cluster A, which harbors at least three potent ADCC epitopes whose cognate mAbs have electropositive paratopes. Cluster A epitopes are functional ADCC targets during viral entry in an assay format using virion-sensitized target cells. In contrast, only cluster C contained epitopes that were recognized by neutralizing mAbs. There was significant diversity in breadth and potency that correlated with epitope fine specificity. In contrast, ADCC potency had no relationship with neutralization potency or breadth for any epitope cluster. In conclusion, Fc-mediated effector function and neutralization coselect with specificity in anti-Env antibody responses, but the nature of selection is distinct for these two antiviral activities.

  13. Diverse specificity and effector function among human antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein epitopes exposed by CD4 binding

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Yongjun; Pazgier, Marzena; Sajadi, Mohammad M.; ...

    2012-12-13

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) undergoes conformational transitions consequent to CD4 binding and coreceptor engagement during viral entry. The physical steps in this process are becoming defined, but less is known about their significance as targets of antibodies potentially protective against HIV-1 infection. Here we probe the functional significance of transitional epitope exposure by characterizing 41 human mAbs specific for epitopes exposed on trimeric Env after CD4 engagement. These mAbs recognize three epitope clusters: cluster A, the gp120 face occluded by gp41 in trimeric Env; cluster B, a region proximal to the coreceptor-binding site (CoRBS) and involving the V1/V2 domain;more » and cluster C, the coreceptor-binding site. The mAbs were evaluated functionally by antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and for neutralization of Tiers 1 and 2 pseudoviruses. All three clusters included mAbs mediating ADCC. However, there was a strong potency bias for cluster A, which harbors at least three potent ADCC epitopes whose cognate mAbs have electropositive paratopes. Cluster A epitopes are functional ADCC targets during viral entry in an assay format using virion-sensitized target cells. In contrast, only cluster C contained epitopes that were recognized by neutralizing mAbs. There was significant diversity in breadth and potency that correlated with epitope fine specificity. In contrast, ADCC potency had no relationship with neutralization potency or breadth for any epitope cluster. In conclusion, Fc-mediated effector function and neutralization coselect with specificity in anti-Env antibody responses, but the nature of selection is distinct for these two antiviral activities.« less

  14. The two-faced T cell epitope

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Leonard; Gutierrez, Andres H.; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Terry, Frances; Leng, Qibin; Abdel Hady, Karim M.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Losikoff, Phyllis T.; Martin, William D.; Rothman, Alan L; De Groot, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the field of T cell immunology have contributed to the understanding that cross-reactivity is an intrinsic characteristic of the T cell receptor (TCR), and that each TCR can potentially interact with many different T cell epitopes. To better define the potential for TCR cross-reactivity between epitopes derived from the human genome, the human microbiome, and human pathogens, we developed a new immunoinformatics tool, JanusMatrix, that represents an extension of the validated T cell epitope mapping tool, EpiMatrix. Initial explorations, summarized in this synopsis, have uncovered what appear to be important differences in the TCR cross-reactivity of selected regulatory and effector T cell epitopes with other epitopes in the human genome, human microbiome, and selected human pathogens. In addition to exploring the T cell epitope relationships between human self, commensal and pathogen, JanusMatrix may also be useful to explore some aspects of heterologous immunity and to examine T cell epitope relatedness between pathogens to which humans are exposed (Dengue serotypes, or HCV and Influenza, for example). In Hand-Foot-Mouth disease (HFMD) for example, extensive enterovirus and human microbiome cross-reactivity (and limited cross-reactivity with the human genome) seemingly predicts immunodominance. In contrast, more extensive cross-reactivity with proteins contained in the human genome as compared to the human microbiome was observed for selected Treg epitopes. While it may be impossible to predict all immune response influences, the availability of sequence data from the human genome, the human microbiome, and an array of human pathogens and vaccines has made computationally–driven exploration of the effects of T cell epitope cross-reactivity now possible. This is the first description of JanusMatrix, an algorithm that assesses TCR cross-reactivity that may contribute to a means of predicting the phenotype of T cells responding to selected T cell

  15. The epitope structure of Citrus tristeza virus coat protein mapped by recombinant proteins and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guan-Wei; Tang, Min; Wang, Guo-Ping; Wang, Cai-Xia; Liu, Yong; Yang, Fan; Hong, Ni

    2014-01-05

    It has been known that there exists serological differentiation among Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates. The present study reports three linear epitopes (aa 48-63, 97-104, and 114-125) identified by using bacterially expressed truncated coat proteins and ten monoclonal antibodies against the native virions of CTV-S4. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis demonstrated that the mutation D98G within the newly identified epitope (97)DDDSTGIT(104) abolished its reaction to MAbs 1, 4, and 10, and the presence of G98 in HB1-CP also resulted in its failure to recognize the three MAbs. Our results suggest that the conformational differences in the epitope I (48)LGTQQNAALNRDLFLT(63) between the CPs of isolates S4 and HB1 might contribute to the different reactions of two isolates to MAbs 5 and 6. This study provides new information for the antigenic structures of CTV, and will extend the understanding of the processes required for antibody binding and aid the development of epitope-based diagnostic tools. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. An epitope on carcinoembryonic antigen defined by the clinically relevant antibody PR1A3.

    PubMed Central

    Durbin, H; Young, S; Stewart, L M; Wrba, F; Rowan, A J; Snary, D; Bodmer, W F

    1994-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody PR1A3 has been used successfully for in vivo imaging of colorectal cancers, and several properties associated with this antibody, including minimal reactions of the antibody with circulating antigen in patients' sera, differentiate it from anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies used in similar studies. However, the antigen bound by PR1A3 was identified as CEA by analysis of somatic cell hybrids and by antigen expression from yeast artificial chromosomes, cosmids, and cDNA clones. The molecular weight, presence of a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor, elevation of surface expression by gamma-interferon, and N-terminal amino acid sequence all confirmed the antigen identification as CEA. A series of biliary glycoprotein-CEA hybrid proteins was produced which demonstrated that the epitope bound by the antibody was at the site of membrane attachment and involved parts of the glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor and the B3 domain of CEA to form a conformational epitope. Access to this epitope, although possible when the antigen was on the cell surface, appeared to be blocked when CEA was released from the cell. The nature and location of the epitope on CEA are proposed to be responsible for the unique properties of the antibody. Images PMID:7514303

  17. Phosducin and monomeric β-actin have common epitope recognized by anti-phosducin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Urszula; Adler, Grażyna

    2010-11-30

    Phosducin family proteins are regulators of cytoplasmic processes. The main function ascribed to phosducin is the binding and sequestration of the β subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. Phosducin-like protein 1, longer than phosducin by 37 amino-acids, is involved in chaperoning of newly synthesized proteins. β-Actin, a component of the cytoskeleton, participates in cell movement. There is no apparent evolutionary relationship between phosducin and β-actin nor structure similarity. Nevertheless we obtained the polyclonal antibodies named ap33, originally directed against a phosducin-derived peptide (SQSLEEDFEGQATHTGPK), that also recognized β-actin. The epitope on the β-actin molecule was characterized. It is a conformational epitope grouping some of the L-D-F-E-Q-A-T-K amino-acids found in the peptide originally used to obtain the antibodies. The main part of the epitope is localized on the actin-actin interface of polymerized actin, so it is accessible only on monomeric actin. The existence of a common epitope on the molecules of phosducin and β-actin may reflect a topological similarity of a small region of their surfaces. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel Epitopes Identified by Anti-PrP Monoclonal Antibodies Produced Following Immunization of Prnp0/0 Balb/cJ Mice with Purified Scrapie Prions

    PubMed Central

    Stanker, Larry H.; Scotcher, Miles C.; Lin, Alice; McGarvey, Jeffery; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2012-01-01

    Prions, or infectious proteins, cause a class of uniformly fatal neurodegenerative diseases. Prions are composed solely of an aberrantly folded isoform (PrPSc) of a normal cellular protein (PrPC). Shared sequence identity of PrPSc with PrPC has limited the detection sensitivity of immunochemical assays, as antibodies specific for the disease-causing PrPSc isoform have not been developed. Here we report the generation of three new monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to PrP, which were isolated following immunization of Prnp0/0 Balb/cJ mice with highly purified PrPSc isolated from brain lipid rafts. Epitope mapping using synthetic PrP peptides revealed that the three MAbs bind different epitopes of PrP. The DRM1-31 MAb has a conformational epitope at the proposed binding site for the putative prion conversion co-factor “protein X.” The DRM1-60 MAb binds a single linear epitope localized to the β2–α2 loop region of PrP, whereas DRM2-118 binds an epitope that includes sequences within the octarepeat region and near the site of N-terminal truncation of PrPSc by proteinase K. Our novel anti-PrP MAbs with defined PrP epitopes may be useful in deciphering the conformational conversion of PrPC into PrPSc. PMID:23098297

  19. Computational Identification and Characterization of a Promiscuous T-Cell Epitope on the Extracellular Protein 85B of Mycobacterium spp. for Peptide-Based Subunit Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Saddam; Chowdhury, Parveen Afroz; Wakayama, Mamoru

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a reemerging disease that remains as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. To identify and characterize a T-cell epitope suitable for vaccine design, we have utilized the Vaxign server to assess all antigenic proteins of Mycobacterium spp. recorded to date in the Protegen database. We found that the extracellular protein 85B displayed the most robust antigenicity among the proteins identified. Computational tools for identifying T-cell epitopes predicted an epitope, 181-QQFIYAGSLSALLDP-195, that could bind to at least 13 major histocompatibility complexes, revealing the promiscuous nature of the epitope. Molecular docking simulation demonstrated that the epitope could bind to the binding groove of MHC II and MHC I molecules by several hydrogen bonds. Molecular docking analysis further revealed that the epitope had a distinctive binding pattern to all DRB1 and A and B series of MHC molecules and presented almost no polymorphism in its binding site. Moreover, using “Allele Frequency Database,” we checked the frequency of HLA alleles in the worldwide population and found a higher frequency of both class I and II HLA alleles in individuals living in TB-endemic regions. Our results indicate that the identified peptide might be a universal candidate to produce an efficient epitope-based vaccine for TB. PMID:28401156

  20. HLA Epitopes: The Targets of Monoclonal and Alloantibodies Defined

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh

    2017-01-01

    Sensitization to human leukocyte antigens (HLA) in organ transplant patients causes graft rejection, according to the humoral theory of transplantation. Sensitization is almost ubiquitous as anti-HLA antibodies are found in almost all sera of transplant recipients. Advances in testing assays and amino acid sequencing of HLA along with computer software contributed further to the understanding of antibody-antigen reactivity. It is commonly understood that antibodies bind to HLA antigens. With current knowledge of epitopes, it is more accurate to describe that antibodies bind to their target epitopes on the surface of HLA molecular chains. Epitopes are present on a single HLA (private epitope) or shared by multiple antigens (public epitope). The phenomenon of cross-reactivity in HLA testing, often explained as cross-reactive groups (CREGs) of antigens with antibody, can be clearly explained now by public epitopes. Since 2006, we defined and reported 194 HLA class I unique epitopes, including 56 cryptic epitopes on dissociated HLA class I heavy chains, 83 HLA class II epitopes, 60 epitopes on HLA-DRB1, 15 epitopes on HLA-DQB1, 3 epitopes on HLA-DQA1, 5 epitopes on HLA-DPB1, and 7 MICA epitopes. In this paper, we provide a summary of our findings. PMID:28626773

  1. Epitope mapping of Ebola virus dominant and subdominant glycoprotein epitopes facilitates construction of an epitope-based DNA vaccine able to focus the antibody response in mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-06

    method identified monoclonal antibody epitopes and predicted additional epitopes recognized by antibodies in polyclonal sera from animals experimentally...glycoprotein (GP) of EBOV. We previously reported the development and animal testing of filovirus DNA vaccines expressing full length GP genes 1-3...acids) preceding the epitopes to facilitate intracellular trafficking. The EBOV transmembrane domain was included to anchor the construct to the cell

  2. Analysis of neutralizing epitopes on foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, E; Thiel, H J; Beck, E; Strohmaier, K; Schaller, H

    1988-01-01

    For the investigation of the antigenic determinant structure of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against complete virus were characterized by Western blot (immunoblot), enzyme immunoassay, and competition experiments with a synthetic peptide, isolated coat protein VP1, and viral particles as antigens. Two of the four MAbs reacted with each of these antigens, while the other two MAbs recognized only complete viral particles and reacted only very poorly with the peptide. The four MAbs showed different neutralization patterns with a panel of 11 different FMDV strains. cDNA-derived VP1 protein sequences of the different strains were compared to find correlations between the primary structure of the protein and the ability of virus to be neutralized. Based on this analysis, it appears that the first two MAbs recognized overlapping sequential epitopes in the known antigenic site represented by the peptide, whereas the two other MAbs recognized conformational epitopes. These conclusions were supported and extended by structural analyses of FMDV mutants resistant to neutralization by an MAb specific for a conformational epitope. These results demonstrate that no amino acid exchanges had occurred in the primary antigenic site of VP1 but instead in the other coat proteins VP2 and VP3, which by themselves do not induce neutralizing antibodies. Images PMID:2835507

  3. Functional conformations of calmodulin: I. Preparation and characterization of a conformational specific anti-bovine calmodulin monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Wolf, T; Fleminger, G; Solomon, B

    1995-01-01

    Calmodulin, similarly to many other Ca(2+)-activated proteins, undergoes considerable conformational changes in the presence of Ca2+ ions. These changes were followed using specific monoclonal antibodies against calmodulin. Since calmodulin is a poor immunogen due to its high phylogenetic conservancy, glutaraldehyde-crosslinked bovine brain extract, which contains a considerable amount of functionally active calmodulin complexed with its target proteins, was used as an antigen. Out of nine anti-calmodulin mAbs isolated, three (namely, CAM1, CAM2 and CAM4) were purified and characterized. MAb CAM1 was identified as an IgG1 while mAbs CAM2 and CAM4 belong to IgM class. Additivity ELISA showed that mAb CAM1 binds to an epitope located remote from the epitopes recognized by the other two mAbs, while mAbs CAM2 and CAM4 recognize close epitopes. MAb CAM1 was found to be especially sensitive to the conformational state of calmodulin in the presence of Ca2+ ions. The interactions of mAbs CAM2 and CAM4 with calmodulin are only slightly affected by Ca2+ removal. In addition mAb CAM1 failed to recognize other calmodulin molecules, such as spinach and various plant recombinant calmodulins, while mAbs CAM1 and CAM4 share common epitopes with the above molecules.

  4. Galactosylated Fucose Epitopes in Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shi; Bleuler-Martinez, Silvia; Plaza, David Fernando; Künzler, Markus; Aebi, Markus; Joachim, Anja; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Jantsch, Verena; Geyer, Rudolf; Wilson, Iain B. H.; Paschinger, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The modification of α1,6-linked fucose residues attached to the proximal (reducing-terminal) core N-acetylglucosamine residue of N-glycans by β1,4-linked galactose (“GalFuc” epitope) is a feature of a number of invertebrate species including the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. A pre-requisite for both core α1,6-fucosylation and β1,4-galactosylation is the presence of a nonreducing terminal N-acetylglucosamine; however, this residue is normally absent from the final glycan structure in invertebrates due to the action of specific hexosaminidases. Previously, we have identified two hexosaminidases (HEX-2 and HEX-3) in C. elegans, which process N-glycans. In the present study, we have prepared a hex-2;hex-3 double mutant, which possesses a radically altered N-glycomic profile. Whereas in the double mutant core α1,3-fucosylation of the proximal N-acetylglucosamine was abolished, the degree of galactosylation of core α1,6-fucose increased, and a novel Galα1,2Fucα1,3 moiety attached to the distal core N-acetylglucosamine residue was detected. Both galactosylated fucose moieties were also found in two parasitic nematodes, Ascaris suum and Oesophagostomum dentatum. As core modifications of N-glycans are known targets for fungal nematotoxic lectins, the sensitivity of the C. elegans double hexosaminidase mutant was assessed. Although this mutant displayed hypersensitivity to the GalFuc-binding lectin CGL2 and the N-acetylglucosamine-binding lectin XCL, the mutant was resistant to CCL2, which binds core α1,3-fucose. Thus, the use of C. elegans mutants aids the identification of novel N-glycan modifications and the definition of in vivo specificities of nematotoxic lectins with potential as anthelmintic agents. PMID:22733825

  5. Crystal and solution structures of d(CGC[e{sup 6}G]AATTCGCG)-drug complexes reveal conformational polymorphism of O{sup 6}-ethyl-guanine:cytosine base pair

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram, M.; Yang, D.; Gao, Y.G.

    1994-12-31

    O6-ethyl-guanine (e{sup 6}G) is a relatively persistent alkylation lesion caused by the exposure of DNA to carcinogen N-ethyl-N-nitrosurea. We have studied the structural consequences of the e{sup 6}G incorporation in DNA by X-ray crystallography and NMR. We have obtained crystals of the modified DNA dodecamer d(CGC[e{sup 6}G]AATTCGCG) complexed to several minor groove binding drugs including Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, netropsin, and SN6999. The space froup of the crystals from those complexes is P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. However, the crystal structure of the SN6999 complex is nor isomorphous to that from the other three complexes. In all four refined crystal structures, the drugs bind in the narrow minor groove at or clase to the central AATT region of the dodecamer B-DNA duplex. THe DNA conformation is influenced by the binding of drugs. The eight independent e{sup 6}G:C base pairs have a conformation ranging from one with three centered hydrogen bonds between the bases to a wobble conformation with two hydrogen bonds. The ethyl group of the eight e{sup 6}G bases is mostly in the proximal orientation to N7. Our 1D and 2D-NMR studies of the same (free) dodecamer reveal that the e{sup 6}G base pairs in the duplex are likely to adopt a wobble conformation in solution. Those results suggest that the e{sup 6}G base pair has a dynamic equilibrium among various conformations, which may present an ambiguous signal to cells. In contrast, the e{sup 6}G:T base pair adopts a Watson-Crick-like conformation. This may be a plausible explanation of why thymine is found preferentially incorporated across the e{sup 6}G during replication.

  6. A conformational transition at the N terminus of the prion protein features in formation of the scrapie isoform.

    PubMed

    Peretz, D; Williamson, R A; Matsunaga, Y; Serban, H; Pinilla, C; Bastidas, R B; Rozenshteyn, R; James, T L; Houghten, R A; Cohen, F E; Prusiner, S B; Burton, D R

    1997-10-31

    The scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) is formed from the cellular isoform (PrPC) by a post-translational process that involves a profound conformational change. Linear epitopes for recombinant antibody Fab fragments (Fabs) on PrPC and on the protease-resistant core of PrPSc, designated PrP 27-30, were identified using ELISA and immunoprecipitation. An epitope region at the C terminus was accessible in both PrPC and PrP 27-30; in contrast, epitopes towards the N-terminal region (residues 90 to 120) were accessible in PrPC but largely cryptic in PrP 27-30. Denaturation of PrP 27-30 exposed the epitopes of the N-terminal domain. We argue from our findings that the major conformational change underlying PrPSc formation occurs within the N-terminal segment of PrP 27-30.

  7. Intramolecular epitope spreading in Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pallavi; Tramontano, Alfonso; Makker, Sudesh P

    2007-12-01

    Immunization with megalin induces active Heymann nephritis, which reproduces features of human idiopathic membranous glomerulonephritis. Megalin is a complex immunological target with four discrete ligand-binding domains (LBDs) that may contain epitopes to which pathogenic autoantibodies are directed. Recently, a 236-residue N-terminal fragment, termed "L6," that spans the first LBD was shown to induce autoantibodies and severe disease. We used this model to examine epitope-specific contributions to pathogenesis. Sera obtained from rats 4 weeks after immunization with L6 demonstrated reactivity only with the L6 fragment on Western blot, whereas sera obtained after 8 weeks demonstrated reactivity with all four recombinant fragments of interest (L6 and LBDs II, III, and IV). We demonstrated that the L6 immunogen does not contain the epitopes responsible for the reactivity to the LBD fragments. Therefore, the appearance of antibodies directed at LBD fragments several weeks after the primary immune response suggests intramolecular epitope spreading. In vivo, we observed a temporal association between increased proteinuria and the appearance of antibodies to LBD fragments. These data implicate B cell epitope spreading in antibody-mediated pathogenesis of active Heymann nephritis, a model that should prove valuable for further study of autoimmune dysregulation.

  8. Equivalent T cell epitope promiscuity in ecologically diverse human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wiens, Kirsten E; Swaminathan, Harish; Copin, Richard; Lun, Desmond S; Ernst, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    The HLA (human leukocyte antigen) molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens' epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope's binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure. We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines. We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes. Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation.

  9. Proteasomes generate spliced epitopes by two different mechanisms and as efficiently as non-spliced epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Ebstein, F.; Textoris-Taube, K.; Keller, C.; Golnik, R.; Vigneron, N.; Van den Eynde, B. J.; Schuler-Thurner, B.; Schadendorf, D.; Lorenz, F. K. M.; Uckert, W.; Urban, S.; Lehmann, A.; Albrecht-Koepke, N.; Janek, K.; Henklein, P.; Niewienda, A.; Kloetzel, P. M.; Mishto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome-catalyzed peptide splicing represents an additional catalytic activity of proteasomes contributing to the pool of MHC-class I-presented epitopes. We here biochemically and functionally characterized a new melanoma gp100 derived spliced epitope. We demonstrate that the gp100mel47–52/40–42 antigenic peptide is generated in vitro and in cellulo by a not yet described proteasomal condensation reaction. gp100mel47–52/40–42 generation is enhanced in the presence of the β5i/LMP7 proteasome-subunit and elicits a peptide-specific CD8+ T cell response. Importantly, we demonstrate that different gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes are generated and presented to CD8+ T cells with efficacies comparable to non-spliced canonical tumor epitopes and that gp100mel-derived spliced epitopes trigger activation of CD8+ T cells found in peripheral blood of half of the melanoma patients tested. Our data suggest that both transpeptidation and condensation reactions contribute to the frequent generation of spliced epitopes also in vivo and that their immune relevance may be comparable to non-spliced epitopes. PMID:27049119

  10. The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource in Epitope Discovery and Synthetic Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Fleri, Ward; Paul, Sinu; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Mahajan, Swapnil; Xu, Xiaojun; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The task of epitope discovery and vaccine design is increasingly reliant on bioinformatics analytic tools and access to depositories of curated data relevant to immune reactions and specific pathogens. The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB) was indeed created to assist biomedical researchers in the development of new vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The Analysis Resource is freely available to all researchers and provides access to a variety of epitope analysis and prediction tools. The tools include validated and benchmarked methods to predict MHC class I and class II binding. The predictions from these tools can be combined with tools predicting antigen processing, TCR recognition, and B cell epitope prediction. In addition, the resource contains a variety of secondary analysis tools that allow the researcher to calculate epitope conservation, population coverage, and other relevant analytic variables. The researcher involved in vaccine design and epitope discovery will also be interested in accessing experimental published data, relevant to the specific indication of interest. The database component of the IEDB contains a vast amount of experimentally derived epitope data that can be queried through a flexible user interface. The IEDB is linked to other pathogen-specific and immunological database resources. PMID:28352270

  11. The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource in Epitope Discovery and Synthetic Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Fleri, Ward; Paul, Sinu; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Mahajan, Swapnil; Xu, Xiaojun; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The task of epitope discovery and vaccine design is increasingly reliant on bioinformatics analytic tools and access to depositories of curated data relevant to immune reactions and specific pathogens. The Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB) was indeed created to assist biomedical researchers in the development of new vaccines, diagnostics, and therapeutics. The Analysis Resource is freely available to all researchers and provides access to a variety of epitope analysis and prediction tools. The tools include validated and benchmarked methods to predict MHC class I and class II binding. The predictions from these tools can be combined with tools predicting antigen processing, TCR recognition, and B cell epitope prediction. In addition, the resource contains a variety of secondary analysis tools that allow the researcher to calculate epitope conservation, population coverage, and other relevant analytic variables. The researcher involved in vaccine design and epitope discovery will also be interested in accessing experimental published data, relevant to the specific indication of interest. The database component of the IEDB contains a vast amount of experimentally derived epitope data that can be queried through a flexible user interface. The IEDB is linked to other pathogen-specific and immunological database resources.

  12. Towards peptide vaccines against Zika virus: Immunoinformatics combined with molecular dynamics simulations to predict antigenic epitopes of Zika viral proteins

    PubMed Central

    Usman Mirza, Muhammad; Rafique, Shazia; Ali, Amjad; Munir, Mobeen; Ikram, Nazia; Manan, Abdul; Salo-Ahen, Outi M. H.; Idrees, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in Brazil has developed to a global health concern due to its likely association with birth defects (primary microcephaly) and neurological complications. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop a vaccine to prevent or a medicine to treat the infection. In this study, immunoinformatics approach was employed to predict antigenic epitopes of Zika viral proteins to aid in development of a peptide vaccine against ZIKV. Both linear and conformational B-cell epitopes as well as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes were predicted for ZIKV Envelope (E), NS3 and NS5 proteins. We further investigated the binding interactions of altogether 15 antigenic CTL epitopes with three class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC I) proteins after docking the peptides to the binding groove of the MHC I proteins. The stability of the resulting peptide-MHC I complexes was further studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The simulation results highlight the limits of rigid-body docking methods. Some of the antigenic epitopes predicted and analyzed in this work might present a preliminary set of peptides for future vaccine development against ZIKV. PMID:27934901

  13. Structure-based design of a protein immunogen that displays an HIV-1 gp41 neutralizing epitope.

    PubMed

    Stanfield, Robyn L; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S; Zwick, Michael B; Wilson, Ian A

    2011-12-02

    Antibody Z13e1 is a relatively broadly neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody that recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp41. Based on the crystal structure of an MPER epitope peptide in complex with Z13e1 Fab, we identified an unrelated protein, interleukin (IL)-22, with a surface-exposed region that is structurally homologous in its backbone to the gp41 Z13e1 epitope. By grafting the gp41 Z13e1 epitope sequence onto the structurally homologous region in IL-22, we engineered a novel protein (Z13-IL22-2) that contains the MPER epitope sequence for use as a potential immunogen and as a reagent for the detection of Z13e1-like antibodies. The Z13-IL22-2 protein binds Fab Z13e1 with a K(d) of 73 nM. The crystal structure of Z13-IL22-2 in complex with Fab Z13e1 shows that the epitope region is faithfully replicated in the Fab-bound scaffold protein; however, isothermal calorimetry studies indicate that Fab binding to Z13-IL22-2 is not a lock-and-key event, leaving open the question of whether conformational changes upon binding occur in the Fab, in Z13-IL-22, or in both.

  14. Structure-Based Design of a Protein Immunogen that Displays an HIV-1 gp41 Neutralizing Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-06-27

    Antibody Z13e1 is a relatively broadly neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody that recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp41. Based on the crystal structure of an MPER epitope peptide in complex with Z13e1 Fab, we identified an unrelated protein, interleukin (IL)-22, with a surface-exposed region that is structurally homologous in its backbone to the gp41 Z13e1 epitope. By grafting the gp41 Z13e1 epitope sequence onto the structurally homologous region in IL-22, we engineered a novel protein (Z13-IL22-2) that contains the MPER epitope sequence for use as a potential immunogen and as a reagent for the detection of Z13e1-like antibodies. The Z13-IL22-2 protein binds Fab Z13e1 with a K{sub d} of 73 nM. The crystal structure of Z13-IL22-2 in complex with Fab Z13e1 shows that the epitope region is faithfully replicated in the Fab-bound scaffold protein; however, isothermal calorimetry studies indicate that Fab binding to Z13-IL22-2 is not a lock-and-key event, leaving open the question of whether conformational changes upon binding occur in the Fab, in Z13-IL-22, or in both.

  15. Selection of Peptide Mimics of HIV-1 Epitope Recognized by Neutralizing Antibody VRC01

    PubMed Central

    Chikaev, Anton N.; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yu.; Burdick, Ryan C.; Karpenko, Larisa I.; Pathak, Vinay K.; Ilyichev, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to induce anti-HIV-1 antibodies that can neutralize a broad spectrum of viral isolates from different subtypes seems to be a key requirement for development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. The epitopes recognized by the most potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that have been characterized are largely discontinuous. Mimetics of such conformational epitopes could be potentially used as components of a synthetic immunogen that can elicit neutralizing antibodies. Here we used phage display technology to identify peptide motifs that mimic the epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody VRC01, which is able to neutralize up to 91% of circulating primary isolates. Three rounds of biopanning were performed against 2 different phage peptide libraries for this purpose. The binding specificity of selected phage clones to monoclonal antibody VRC01 was estimated using dot blot analysis. The putative peptide mimics exposed on the surface of selected phages were analyzed for conformational and linear homology to the surface of HIV-1 gp120 fragment using computational analysis. Corresponding peptides were synthesized and checked for their ability to interfere with neutralization activity of VRC01 in a competitive inhibition assay. One of the most common peptides selected from 12-mer phage library was found to partially mimic a CD4-binding loop fragment, whereas none of the circular C7C-mer peptides was able to mimic any HIV-1 domains. However, peptides identified from both the 12-mer and C7C-mer peptide libraries showed rescue of HIV-1 infectivity in the competitive inhibition assay. The identification of epitope mimics may lead to novel immunogens capable of inducing broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies. PMID:25785734

  16. Sex influences on the penetrance of HLA shared-epitope genotypes for rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.M.

    1996-02-01

    The association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and HLA DRB1 alleles may arise through linkage disequilibrium with a disease locus or the direct involvement of HLA alleles in RA. In support of the latter possibility, the shared-epitope hypothesis has been postulated, stating that conformationally similar DR{beta} chains encoded by several DRB1 alleles confer disease susceptibility. To examine these alternative hypotheses of marker-disease association and to investigate gender differences in RA susceptibility, we analyzed the distributions of PCR-based DRB1 genotypes of 309 Caucasian RA patients and 283 Caucasian controls. Initially, the marker-association-segregation {chi}{sup 2} method was used to evaluate evidence for linkage disequilibrium and the direct involvement of markers DR4 Dw4, DR4 Dw14, and DR1 in RA susceptibility. Additional shared-epitope models that grouped DRB1 alleles into five classes (*0401, *0404/*0102, *0405/*0408/*0101, *1001, and all others) and postulated relationships between genotypes and RA susceptibility were also fitted to observed genotypic distributions by the method of minimal {chi}{sup 2}. For females, a linkage-disequilibrium model provided a good fit to the data, as did a shared-epitope model with RA most penetrant among individuals with the *0401, *0401 genotype. For males, the best model indicated highest RA penetrance among shared-epitope compound heterozygotes. Clinically, male RA patients had more subcutaneous nodules and greater use of slowly acting antirheumatic drugs, while female RA patients had earlier disease onset. This study therefore suggests that sex-related factors influence the RA penetrance associated with DRB1 shared-epitope genotypes and that DRB1 effects on RA prognosis and pathogenesis should be considered separately for men and women. 67 refs., 7 tabs.

  17. Localization of immunodominant epitopes within the "a" determinant of hepatitis B surface antigen using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Mohammadi, Hamed; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shokri, Fazel

    2016-10-01

    The common "a" determinant is the major immunodominant region of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) shared by all serotypes and genotypes of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Antibodies against this region are thought to confer protection against HBV and are essential for viral clearance. Mutations within the "a" determinant may lead to conformational changes in this region, which can affect the binding of neutralizing antibodies. There is an increasing concern about identification and control of mutant viruses which is possible by comprehensive structural investigation of the epitopes located within this region. Anti-HBs monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against different epitopes of HBsAg are a promising tool to meet this goal. In the present study, 19 anti-HBs mAbs were employed to map epitopes localized within the "a" determinant, using a panel of recombinant mutant HBsAgs. The topology of the epitopes was analyzed by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results indicate that all of the mAbs seem to recognize epitopes within or in the vicinity of the "a" determinant of HBsAg. Different patterns of binding with mutant forms were observed with different mAbs. Amino acid substitutions at positions 123, 126, 129, 144, and 145 dramatically reduced the reactivity of antibodies with HBsAg. The T123N mutation had the largest impact on antibody binding to HBsAg. The reactivity pattern of our panel of mAbs with mutant forms of HBsAg could have important clinical implications for immunoscreening, diagnosis of HBV infection, design of a new generation of recombinant HB vaccines, and immunoprophylaxis of HBV infection as an alternative to therapy with hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG).

  18. IgE-binding epitope analysis of Bla g 5, the German cockroach allergen.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyoung-Jin; Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Kim, Chung-Ryul; Yong, Tai-Soon

    2010-05-01

    Cockroach infestations have been linked with allergic diseases such as asthma in humans. Bla g 5, sigma class glutathione S-transferase (GST), is the major cockroach allergen which has the highest IgE response value of all cockroach allergens. Although several cockroach allergens have been identified and cloned, information regarding their B ell and T cell IgE-binding epitopes is limited. In order to analyze the IgE binding epitopes of Bla g 5, full-length and five peptide fragments (A, 1-100 amino acid residue; B, 91-200; Ba, 1-125; Bb, 1-150; Bc, 1-175) were expressed. Twelve (37.5%) of 32 sera from cockroach-sensitized subjects showed positive IgE reactivity to the recombinant Bla g 5 (rBla g 5). Six strong positive sera were selected for the epitope study. Recombinant proteins not containing 176-200 amino acid residues were unable to react to sera from cockroach sensitized individuals, suggesting that this region contains the IgE-binding epitope. Despite strong IgE reactivity to rBla g 5, the pooled serum from 5 cockroach-sensitized patients did not show IgE reactivity to all synthetic peptides consisting of 15 residues covering 161-200 amino acids. These results suggest the possibility that Bla g 5 may have a conformational epitope in the C-terminal region. GST is the important target for the development of vaccines and drugs against allergic diseases because of high cross-reactivity among insect species. This study will aid recombinant allergen research for immunotherapy of cockroach allergens and other insect allergens.

  19. Conformation and conformational exchange of Olopatadine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lian-di; Zhu, Chuan-jun; Yang, Chun-hui; Cui, Yu-xin

    2008-12-01

    Besides the assignments of the 13C and 1H shifts by 1D and 2D NMR, the experiment 1H spectra of Olopatadine hydrochloride were recorded at temperature range 228-338 K. The variable-temperature spectra revealed a dynamic NMR effect which is attributed to conformational interconversion of the drug. At low temperature, the solution was shown to contain two conformers and the ration of them was 1:1. A conformational process with a free energy of activation of 56.7 kJ mol -1, coalescence temperature 298 K, was interpreted as geminal 1H exchange. Using molecule simulation, conformational candidates for two conformers are proposed.

  20. In silico predicted conserved B-cell epitopes in the Merozoite Surface Antigen -2 family of B. bovis are neutralization-sensitive

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Merozoite Surface Antigens-2 of Babesia bovis conform a family of GPI-anchored glycoproteins located at the parasite cell surface, that contain neutralization-sensitive B-cell epitopes, thus constituting putative vaccine candidates for bovine babesiosis. It was previously shown that (i) the MSA-...

  1. Discrimination and variable impact of ANCA binding to different surface epitopes on proteinase 3, the Wegener's autoantigen.

    PubMed

    Silva, Francisco; Hummel, Amber M; Jenne, Dieter E; Specks, Ulrich

    2010-12-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3)-specific antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are highly specific for the autoimmune small vessel vasculitis, Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). PR3-ANCA have proven diagnostic value but their pathogenic potential and utility as a biomarker for disease activity remain unclear. PR3-ANCA recognize conformational epitopes, and epitope-specific PR3-ANCA subsets with variable impact on biological functions of PR3 have been postulated. The aims of this study were to identify specific PR3 surface epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) and to determine whether the findings can be used to measure the functional impact of epitope-specific PR3-ANCA and their potential relationship to disease activity. We used a novel flow cytometry assay based on TALON-beads coated with recombinant human (H) and murine (M) PR3 and 10 custom-designed chimeric human/mouse rPR3-variants (Hm1-5/Mh1-5) identifying 5 separate non-conserved PR3 surface epitopes. Anti-PR3 moAbs recognize 4 major surface epitopes, and we identified the specific surface location of 3 of these with the chimeric rPR3-variants. The ability of PR3-ANCA to inhibit the enzymatic activity of PR3 was measured indirectly using a capture-ELISA system based on the different epitopes recognized by capturing moAbs. Epitope-specific PR3-ANCA capture-ELISA results obtained from patient plasma (n=27) correlated with the inhibition of enzymatic activity of PR3 by paired IgG preparations (r=0.7, P<0.01). The capture-ELISA results also seem to reflect disease activity. In conclusion, insights about epitopes recognized by anti-PR3 moAbs can be applied to separate PR3-ANCA subsets with predictable functional qualities. The ability of PR3-ANCA to inhibit the enzymatic activity of PR3, a property linked to disease activity, can now be gauged using a simple epitope-based capture-ELISA system.

  2. Discrimination and Variable Impact of ANCA Binding to Different Surface Epitopes on Proteinase 3, the Wegener’s Autoantigen

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francisco; Hummel, Amber M.; Jenne, Dieter E.; Specks, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3)-specific antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are highly specific for the autoimmune small vessel vasculitis, Wegener’s granulomatosis (WG). PR3-ANCA have proven diagnostic value but their pathogenic potential and utility as a biomarker for disease activity remain unclear. PR3-ANCA recognize conformational epitopes, and epitope-specific PR3-ANCA subsets with variable impact on biological functions of PR3 have been postulated. The aims of this study were to identify specific PR3 surface epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) and to determine whether the findings can be used to measure the functional impact of epitope-specific PR3-ANCA and their potential relationship to disease activity. We used a novel flow cytometry assay based on TALON-beads coated with recombinant human (H) and murine (M) PR3 and 10 custom-designed chimeric human/mouse rPR3-variants (Hm1–5/Mh1–5) identifying 5 separate non-conserved PR3 surface epitopes. Anti-PR3 moAbs recognize 4 major surface epitopes, and we identified the specific surface location of 3 of these with the chimeric rPR3-variants. The ability of PR3-ANCA to inhibit the enzymatic activity of PR3 was measured indirectly using a capture-ELISA system based on the different epitopes recognized by capturing moAbs. Epitope-specific PR3-ANCA capture-ELISA results obtained from patient plasma (n=27) correlated with the inhibition of enzymatic activity of PR3 by paired IgG preparations (r=0.7, P<0.01). The capture-ELISA results also seem to reflect disease activity. In conclusion, insights about epitopes recognized by anti-PR3 moAbs can be applied to separate PR3-ANCA subsets with predictable functional qualities. The ability of PR3-ANCA to inhibit the enzymatic activity of PR3, a property linked to disease activity, can now be gauged using a simple epitope-based capture-ELISA system. PMID:20810247

  3. Equivalent T Cell Epitope Promiscuity in Ecologically Diverse Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Kirsten E.; Swaminathan, Harish; Copin, Richard; Lun, Desmond S.; Ernst, Joel D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The HLA (human leukocyte antigen) molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens’ epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope’s binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure. Methods We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines. Results We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes. Conclusions Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation. PMID:23951341

  4. Identification of a novel overlapping sequential E epitope (E') on the bovine leukaemia virus SU glycoprotein and analysis of immunological data.

    PubMed

    Forti, Katia; Rizzo, Giorgia; Cagiola, Monica; Ferrante, Giovanna; Marini, Carla; Feliziani, Francesco; Pezzotti, Giovanni; De Giuseppe, Antonio

    2014-08-06

    Bovine leukaemia virus (BLV), an oncogenic C-type retrovirus, is the causative agent of enzootic bovine leucosis. Binding of BLV to its cellular receptor is mediated by the surface envelope glycoprotein subunit (SU). Previous studies have identified eight different epitopes (A through H) on the BLV SU. In this study, a new sequential epitope was identified using the monoclonal antibody 2G7 (MAb 2G7) on the C-terminal region of the BLV SU. To localise and refine the map of this epitope, a series of deleted forms in the C and N-terminal ends of the glycoprotein were made and synthesised in baculovirus and Escherichia coli expression systems. The synthetic proteins were analysed both in Western blot and MAb-capture ELISA assays. MAb 2G7 recognised a stretch of 11 amino acids, named epitope E', corresponding to residues 189-SDWVPSVRSWA-199 (comprising the 33 amino acids signal peptide) overlapping with the E epitope of the SU. The data obtained by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) revealed that the E' epitope was hidden on whole BLV particles and that the variation in reactivity between epitope E' and MAb 2G7 depends on the glycosylation state of SU. Similarly, the analysis of immunological data evidenced that the failure of interaction between the MAb anti-DD' and its epitope was also due to a steric hindrance of the glycosylation. Finally, the ELISA assay analysis performed with the deleted and mutated forms of rSU evidenced that the conformational epitopes F, G and H lied into in the 34-173 amino-acids residues of N-terminal region of SU. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Modules for C-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Schoeberl, Ursula E.; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-01-01

    Although epitope tagging has been widely used for analyzing protein function in many organisms, there are few genetic tools for epitope tagging in Tetrahymena. In this study, we describe several C-terminal epitope tagging modules that can be used to express tagged proteins in Tetrahymena cells by both plasmid- and PCR-based strategies. PMID:20624430

  6. Steinberg conformal algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhalev, A. V.; Pinchuk, I. A.

    2005-06-01

    The structure of Steinberg conformal algebras is studied; these are analogues of Steinberg groups (algebras, superalgebras).A Steinberg conformal algebra is defined as an abstract algebra by a system of generators and relations between the generators. It is proved that a Steinberg conformal algebra is the universal central extension of the corresponding conformal Lie algebra; the kernel of this extension is calculated.

  7. In silico vaccine design based on molecular simulations of rhinovirus chimeras presenting HIV-1 gp41 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Lapelosa, Mauro; Gallicchio, Emilio; Arnold, Gail Ferstandig; Arnold, Eddy; Levy, Ronald M

    2009-01-16

    A cluster of promising epitopes for the development of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines is located in the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the gp41 subunit of the HIV envelope spike structure. The crystal structure of the peptide corresponding to the so-called ELDKWA epitope (HIV-1 HxB2 gp41 residues 662-668), in complex with the corresponding broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2F5, provides a target for structure-based vaccine design strategies aimed at finding macromolecular carriers that are able to present this MPER-derived epitope with optimal antigenic activity. To this end, a series of replica exchange molecular dynamics computer simulations was conducted to characterize the distributions of conformations of ELDKWA-based epitopes inserted into a rhinovirus carrier and to identify those with the highest fraction of conformations that are able to bind 2F5. The length, hydrophobic character, and precise site of insertion were found to be critical for achieving structural similarity to the target crystal structure. A construct with a high degree of complementarity to the corresponding determinant region of 2F5 was obtained. This construct was employed to build a high-resolution structural model of the complex between the 2F5 antibody and the chimeric human rhinovirus type 14:HIV-1 ELDKWA virus particle. Additional simulations, which were conducted to study the conformational propensities of the ELDKWA region in solution, confirm the hypothesis that the ELDKWA region of gp41 is highly flexible and capable of assuming helical conformations (as in the postfusion helical bundle structure) and beta-turn conformations (as in the complex with the 2F5 antibody). These results also suggest that the ELDKWA epitope can be involved in intramolecular--and likely intermolecular--hydrophobic interactions. This tendency offers an explanation for the observation that mutations decreasing the hydrophobic character of the MPER in many cases result

  8. Epitope mapping of botulinum neurotoxins light chains

    PubMed Central

    Zdanovsky, Alexey; Zdanovsky, Denis; Zdanovskaia, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are listed among the most potent biothreat agents. Simultaneously, two out of seven known serotypes of these toxins are used in medicine and cosmetics. This situation calls for development of detailed epitope maps of these toxins. Such maps will help to develop new ways for decreasing damage caused by these toxins if they were to be used as weapons while retaining the therapeutic effect of these toxins used as medicine. Here, we used a library of random fragments of DNA encoding the catalytic domain of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A to identify short epitope-forming sequences. We demonstrated that knowledge of such sequences in a BoNT of one serotype can be used for identification of epitope-forming sequences in other serotypes of BoNTs. We also demonstrated a serodiagnostic value of identified sequences and their ability to retain epitope-specific structures and trigger production of corresponding antibodies, even when they are transferred into a background of a completely alien carrier protein. PMID:22922018

  9. Characterization of a Prefusion-Specific Antibody That Recognizes a Quaternary, Cleavage-Dependent Epitope on the RSV Fusion Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, Morgan S. A.; Moin, Syed M.; Mas, Vicente; Chen, Man; Patel, Nita K.; Kramer, Kari; Zhu, Qing; Kabeche, Stephanie C.; Kumar, Azad; Palomo, Concepción; Beaumont, Tim; Baxa, Ulrich; Ulbrandt, Nancy D.; Melero, José A.; Graham, Barney S.; McLellan, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Prevention efforts for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) have been advanced due to the recent isolation and characterization of antibodies that specifically recognize the prefusion conformation of the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein. These potently neutralizing antibodies are in clinical development for passive prophylaxis and have also aided the design of vaccine antigens that display prefusion-specific epitopes. To date, prefusion-specific antibodies have been shown to target two antigenic sites on RSV F, but both of these sites are also present on monomeric forms of F. Here we present a structural and functional characterization of human antibody AM14, which potently neutralized laboratory strains and clinical isolates of RSV from both A and B subtypes. The crystal structure and location of escape mutations revealed that AM14 recognizes a quaternary epitope that spans two protomers and includes a region that undergoes extensive conformational changes in the pre- to postfusion F transition. Binding assays demonstrated that AM14 is unique in its specific recognition of trimeric furin-cleaved prefusion F, which is the mature form of F on infectious virions. These results demonstrate that the prefusion F trimer contains potent neutralizing epitopes not present on monomers and that AM14 should be particularly useful for characterizing the conformational state of RSV F-based vaccine antigens. PMID:26161532

  10. Development of a multivalent, PrP(Sc)-specific prion vaccine through rational optimization of three disease-specific epitopes.

    PubMed

    Marciniuk, Kristen; Määttänen, Pekka; Taschuk, Ryan; Airey, T Dean; Potter, Andrew; Cashman, Neil R; Griebel, Philip; Napper, Scott

    2014-04-07

    Prion diseases represent a novel form of infectivity caused by the propagated misfolding of a self-protein (PrP(C)) into a pathological, infectious conformation (PrP(Sc)). Efforts to develop a prion vaccine have been complicated by challenges and potential dangers associated with induction of strong immune responses to a self protein. There is considerable value in the development of vaccines that are specifically targeted to the misfolded conformation. Conformation specific immunotherapy depends on identification and optimization of disease-specific epitopes (DSEs)(1) that are uniquely exposed upon misfolding. Previously, we reported development of a PrP(Sc)-specific vaccine through empirical expansions of a YYR DSE. Here we describe optimization of two additional prion DSEs, YML of β-sheet 1 and a rigid loop (RL) linking β-sheet 2 to α-helix 2, through in silico predictions of B cell epitopes and further translation of these epitopes into PrP(Sc)-specific vaccines. The optimized YML and RL vaccines retain their properties of immunogenicity, specificity and safety when delivered individually or in a multivalent format. This investigation supports the utility of combining DSE prediction models with algorithms to infer logical peptide expansions to optimize immunogenicity. Incorporation of optimized DSEs into established vaccine formulation and delivery strategies enables rapid development of peptide-based vaccines for protein misfolding diseases.

  11. PrPSc-Specific Antibody Reveals C-Terminal Conformational Differences between Prion Strains

    PubMed Central

    Saijo, Eri; Hughson, Andrew G.; Raymond, Gregory J.; Suzuki, Akio; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding the structure of PrPSc and its strain variation has been one of the major challenges in prion disease biology. To study the strain-dependent conformations of PrPSc, we purified proteinase-resistant PrPSc (PrPRES) from mouse brains with three different murine-adapted scrapie strains (Chandler, 22L, and Me7) and systematically tested the accessibility of epitopes of a wide range of anti-PrP and anti-PrPSc specific antibodies by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that epitopes of most anti-PrP antibodies were hidden in the folded structure of PrPRES, even though these epitopes are revealed with guanidine denaturation. However, reactivities to a PrPSc-specific conformational C-terminal antibody showed significant differences among the three different prion strains. Our results provide evidence for strain-dependent conformational variation near the C termini of molecules within PrPSc multimers. IMPORTANCE It has long been apparent that prion strains can have different conformations near the N terminus of the PrPSc protease-resistant core. Here, we show that a C-terminal conformational PrPSc-specific antibody reacts differently to three murine-adapted scrapie strains. These results suggest, in turn, that conformational differences in the C terminus of PrPSc also contribute to the phenotypic distinction between prion strains. PMID:26937029

  12. Measles Virus Hemagglutinin Protein Epitopes: The Basis of Antigenic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Maino; Bürckert, Jean-Philippe; Kanou, Kazuhiko; Maenaka, Katsumi; Muller, Claude P.; Takeda, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Globally eliminating measles using available vaccines is biologically feasible because the measles virus (MV) hemagglutinin (H) protein is antigenically stable. The H protein is responsible for receptor binding, and is the main target of neutralizing antibodies. The immunodominant epitope, known as the hemagglutinating and noose epitope, is located near the receptor-binding site (RBS). The RBS also contains an immunodominant epitope. Loss of receptor binding correlates with an escape from the neutralization by antibodies that target the epitope at RBS. Another neutralizing epitope is located near RBS and is shielded by an N-linked sugar in certain genotype strains. However, human sera from vaccinees and measles patients neutralized all MV strains with similar efficiencies, regardless of the N-linked sugar modification or mutations at these epitopes. Two other major epitopes exist at a distance from RBS. One has an unstructured flexible domain with a linear neutralizing epitope. When MV-H forms a tetramer (dimer of dimers), these epitopes may form the dimer-dimer interface, and one of the two epitopes may also interact with the F protein. The neutralization mechanisms of antibodies that recognize these epitopes may involve inhibiting the H-F interaction or blocking the fusion cascade after MV-H binds to its receptors. PMID:27490564

  13. Efficient epitope mapping by bacteriophage {lambda} surface display

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwabara, I.; Maruyama, H.; Zuberi, R.I.

    1997-01-01

    A bacteriophage {lambda} surface expression system, {lambda}foo, was used for epitope mapping of human galectin-3. We constructed random epitope and peptide libraries and compared their efficiencies in the mapping. The galectin-3 cDNA was randomly digested by DNase I to make random epitope libraries. The libraries were screened by affinity selection using a microtiter plate coated with monoclonal antibodies. Direct DNA sequencing of the selected clones defined two distinct epitope sites consisting of nine and 11 amino-acid residues. Affinity selection of random peptide libraries recovered a number of sequences that were similar to each other but distinct from the galectin-3 sequence. These results demonstrate that a single affinity selection of epitope libraries with antibodies is able to define an epitope determinant as small as nine residues long and is more efficient in epitope mapping than random peptide libraries. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. B cell epitope spreading: mechanisms and contribution to autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Cornaby, Caleb; Gibbons, Lauren; Mayhew, Vera; Sloan, Chad S; Welling, Andrew; Poole, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of factors act to trigger or initiate autoimmune diseases, the process of epitope spreading is an important contributor in their development. Epitope spreading is a diversification of the epitopes recognized by the immune system. This process happens to both T and B cells, with this review focusing on B cells. Such spreading can progress among multiple epitopes on a single antigen, or from one antigenic molecule to another. Systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and other autoimmune diseases, are all influenced by intermolecular and intramolecular B cell epitope spreading. Endocytic processing, antigen presentation, and somatic hypermutation act as molecular mechanisms that assist in driving epitope spreading and broadening the immune response in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of B cell epitope spreading with regard to autoimmunity, how it contributes during the progression of various autoimmune diseases, and treatment options available.

  15. Molecular modeling and in-silico engineering of Cardamom mosaic virus coat protein for the presentation of immunogenic epitopes of Leptospira LipL32.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikram; Damodharan, S; Pandaranayaka, Eswari P J; Madathiparambil, Madanan G; Tennyson, Jebasingh

    2016-01-01

    Expression of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) coat protein (CP) in E. coli forms virus-like particles. In this study, the structure of CdMV CP was predicted and used as a platform to display epitopes of the most abundant surface-associated protein, LipL32 of Leptospira at C, N, and both the termini of CdMV CP. In silico, we have mapped sequential and conformational B-cell epitopes from the crystal structure of LipL32 of Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni str. Fiocruz L1-130 using IEDB Elipro, ABCpred, BCPRED, and VaxiJen servers. Our results show that the epitopes displayed at the N-terminus of CdMV CP are promising vaccine candidates as compared to those displayed at the C-terminus or at both the termini. LipL32 epitopes, EP2, EP3, EP4, and EP6 are found to be promising B-cell epitopes for vaccine development. Based on the type of amino acids, length, surface accessibility, and docking energy with CdMV CP model, the order of antigenicity of the LipL32 epitopes was found to be EP4 > EP3 > EP2 > EP6.

  16. Computational Prediction and Analysis of Envelop Glycoprotein Epitopes of DENV-2 and DENV-3 Pakistani Isolates: A First Step towards Dengue Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Idrees, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever of tropics is a mosquito transmitted devastating disease caused by dengue virus (DENV). There is no effective vaccine available, so far, against any of its four serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4). There is a need for the development of preventive and therapeutic vaccines against DENV to decrease the prevalence of dengue fever, especially in Pakistan. In this research, linear and conformational B-cell epitopes of envelope glycoprotein of DENV-2 and DENV-3 (the most prevalent serotypes in Pakistan) were predicted. We used Kolaskar and Tongaonkar method for linear epitope prediction, Emini’s method for surface accessibility prediction and Karplus and Schulz’s algorithm for flexibility determination. To propose three dimensional epitopes, the E proteins for both serotypes were homology modeled by using Phyre2 V 2.0 server, and ElliPro was used for the prediction of surface epitopes on their globular structure. Total 21 and 19 linear epitopes were predicted for DENV-2 and DENV-3 Pakistani isolates respectively. Whereas, 5 and 4 discontinuous epitopes were proposed for DENV-2 and DENV-3 Pakistani isolates respectively. Moreover, the values of surface accessibility, flexibility and solvent-accessibility can be helpful in analyzing vaccines against DENV-2 and DENV-3. In conclusion, the proposed continuous and discontinuous antigenic peptides can be valuable candidates for diagnostic and therapeutics of DENV. PMID:25775090

  17. Linker regions and flexibility around the metalloprotease domain account for conformational activation of ADAMTS13

    PubMed Central

    Deforche, L.; Roose, E.; Vandenbulcke, A.; Vandeputte, N.; Feys, H.B.; Springer, T.A.; Mi, L.Z.; Muia, J.; Sadler, J.E.; Soejima, K.; Rottensteiner, H.; Deckmyn, H.; De Meyer, S.F.; Vanhoorelbeke, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, conformational activation of ADAMTS13 was identified. This mechanism showed the evolution from a condensed and inhibited conformation, in which the proximal MDTCS and distal T2-CUB2 domains are in close contact with each other, to an activated structure due to ding with the von Willebrand factor (VWF). Objectives Identification of cryptic epitope/exosite exposure after conformational activation and of sites of flexibility in ADAMTS13. Methods The activating effect of 25 anti-T2-CUB2 antibodies was studied in the FRETS-VWF73 and the vortex assay. Cryptic epitope/exosite exposure was determined in ELISA and VWF binding assay. The molecular basis for flexibility was hypothesized through RADAR analysis, tested in ELISA using deletion variants and visualized using electron microscopy. Results Eleven activating anti-ADAMTS13 antibodies, directed against the T5-CUB2 domains, were identified in the FRETS-VWF73 assay. RADAR analysis identified three linker regions in the distal domains. Interestingly, identification of an antibody recognizing a cryptic epitope in the metalloprotease domain confirmed the contribution of these linker regions to conformational activation of the enzyme. The proof of flexibility around both the T2 and metalloprotease domains by electron microscopy furthermore supported this contribution. In addition, cryptic epitope exposure was identified in the distal domains, as activating anti-T2-CUB2 antibodies increased the binding to folded VWF up to ~3-fold. Conclusion Conformational activation of ADAMTS13 leads to cryptic epitope/exosite exposure in both proximal and distal domains, subsequently inducing increased activity. Furthermore, three linker regions in the distal domains are responsible for flexibility and enable the interaction between the proximal and the T8-CUB2 domains. PMID:26391536

  18. Epitope-specificities of HLA antibodies: the effect of epitope structure on Luminex technique-dependent antibody reactivity.

    PubMed

    Resse, Marianna; Paolillo, Rossella; Minucci, Biagio Pellegrino; Cavalca, Francesco; Casamassimi, Amelia; Napoli, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    The search of HLA antibodies is currently more accessible by solid-phase techniques (Luminex) in the immunized patients leading to an expansion of the antibody patterns. The aim of this study was to investigate low median fluorescence intensity value in unexpected reactivity patterns. Here, we performed HLAMatchmaker analyses to evaluate the potential functional epitopes that can elicit HLA-specific alloantibody responses in a pregnancy-sensitized woman with an epitope defined by the 82LR. Surprisingly, in according to the registry of HLA epitopes, we found that 82LR epitope covered all allelic specificities of our unexpected antibody patterns, shared between Bw4-positive HLA-B antigen and HLA-A23, -A24, -A25 and -A32. This finding is consistent with the verification of HLA ABC epitope recorded in the website-based HLA Epitope Registry and addresses the importance of determining HLA antibody epitope-specificities on Luminex technique-dependent antibody reactivity.

  19. Amino acid residues 196–225 of LcrV represent a plague protective epitope

    PubMed Central

    Quenee, Lauriane E.; Berube, Bryan J.; Segal, Joshua; Elli, Derek; Ciletti, Nancy A.; Anderson, Deborah; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    LcrV, a protein that resides at the tip of the type III secretion needles of Yersinia pestis, is the single most important plague protective antigen. Earlier work reported monoclonal antibody MAb 7.3, which binds a conformational epitope of LcrV and protects experimental animals against lethal plague challenge. By screening monoclonal antibodies directed against LcrV for their ability to protect immunized mice against bubonic plague challenge, we examined here the possibility of additional protective epitopes. MAb BA5 protected animals against plague, neutralized the Y. pestis type III secretion pathway and promoted opsonophagocytic clearance of bacteria in blood. LcrV residues 196–225 were necessary and sufficient for MAb-BA5 binding. Compared to full length LcrV, a variant lacking its residues 196–225 retained the ability of eliciting plague protection. These results identify LcrV residues 196–225 as a linear epitope that is recognized by the murine immune system to confer plague protection. PMID:20005318

  20. Microwave-based treatments of wheat kernels do not abolish gluten epitopes implicated in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Gianfrani, Carmen; Mamone, Gianfranco; la Gatta, Barbara; Camarca, Alessandra; Di Stasio, Luigia; Maurano, Francesco; Picascia, Stefania; Capozzi, Vito; Perna, Giuseppe; Picariello, Gianluca; Di Luccia, Aldo

    2017-03-01

    Microwave based treatment (MWT) of wet wheat kernels induced a striking reduction of gluten, up to <20 ppm as determined by R5-antibodybased ELISA, so that wheat could be labeled as gluten-free. In contrast, analysis of gluten peptides by G12 antibody-based ELISA, mass spectrometry-based proteomics and in vitro assay with T cells of celiac subjects, indicated no difference of antigenicity before and after MWT. SDS-PAGE analysis and Raman spectroscopy demonstrated that MWT simply induced conformational modifications, reducing alcohol solubility of gliadins and altering the access of R5-antibody to the gluten epitopes. Thus, MWT neither destroys gluten nor modifies chemically the toxic epitopes, contradicting the preliminary claims that MWT of wheat kernels detoxifies gluten. This study provides evidence that R5-antibody ELISA alone is not effective to determine gluten in thermally treated wheat products. Gluten epitopes in processed wheat should be monitored using strategies based on combined immunoassays with T cells from celiacs, G12-antibody ELISA after proteolysis and proper molecular characterization.

  1. Calorimetric determinations and theoretical calculations of polymorphs of thalidomide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara-Ochoa, F.; Pérez, G. Espinosa; Mijangos-Santiago, F.

    2007-09-01

    The analysis of the thermograms of thalidomide obtained for the two reported polymorphs α and β by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) shows some inconsistencies that are discussed in the present work. The conception of a new polymorph form, named β ∗, allowed us to explain the observed thermal behavior more satisfactorily. This new polymorph shows enantiotropy with both α and β polymorphs, reflected in the unique endotherm obtained in the DSC-thermograms, when a heating rate of 10 °C/min is applied. Several additional experiments, such as re-melting of both polymorph forms, showed that there is indeed a new polymorph with an endotherm located between the endotherms of α and β. IR, Raman, and powder X-ray permit us to characterize the isolated compound, resulting from the re-melting of both polymorph forms. Mechanical calculations were performed to elucidate the conformations of each polymorph, and ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed to determine the energy of the more stable conformers and the spatial cell energy for both polymorphs α and β. These results suggested a possible conformation for the newly discovered polymorph β ∗.

  2. Computational design of high-affinity epitope scaffolds by backbone grafting of a linear epitope.

    PubMed

    Azoitei, Mihai L; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Bryson, Steve; Schroeter, Alexandria; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Porter, Justin R; Adachi, Yumiko; Baker, David; Pai, Emil F; Schief, William R

    2012-01-06

    Computational grafting of functional motifs onto scaffold proteins is a promising way to engineer novel proteins with pre-specified functionalities. Typically, protein grafting involves the transplantation of protein side chains from a functional motif onto structurally homologous regions of scaffold proteins. Using this approach, we previously transplanted the human immunodeficiency virus 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes onto heterologous proteins to design novel "epitope-scaffold" antigens. However, side-chain grafting is limited by the availability of scaffolds with compatible backbone for a given epitope structure and offers no route to modify backbone structure to improve mimicry or binding affinity. To address this, we report here a new and more aggressive computational method-backbone grafting of linear motifs-that transplants the backbone and side chains of linear functional motifs onto scaffold proteins. To test this method, we first used side-chain grafting to design new 2F5 epitope scaffolds with improved biophysical characteristics. We then independently transplanted the 2F5 epitope onto three of the same parent scaffolds using the newly developed backbone grafting procedure. Crystal structures of side-chain and backbone grafting designs showed close agreement with both the computational models and the desired epitope structure. In two cases, backbone grafting scaffolds bound antibody 2F5 with 30- and 9-fold higher affinity than corresponding side-chain grafting designs. These results demonstrate that flexible backbone methods for epitope grafting can significantly improve binding affinities over those achieved by fixed backbone methods alone. Backbone grafting of linear motifs is a general method to transplant functional motifs when backbone remodeling of the target scaffold is necessary.

  3. Identification of cross-reactive and serotype 2-specific neutralization epitopes on VP3 of human rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, K; Maloy, W L; Nishikawa, K; Green, K Y; Hoshino, Y; Urasawa, S; Kapikian, A Z; Chanock, R M; Gorziglia, M

    1988-01-01

    The group A rotaviruses are composed of at least seven serotypes. Serotype specificity is defined mainly by an outer capsid protein, VP7. In contrast, the other surface protein, VP3 (775 amino acids), appears to be associated with both serotype-specific and heterotypic immunity. To identify the cross-reactive and serotype-specific neutralization epitopes on VP3 of human rotavirus, we sequenced the VP3 gene of antigenic mutants resistant to each of seven anti-VP3 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (N-MAbs) which exhibited heterotypic or serotype 2-specific reactivity, and we defined three distinct neutralization epitopes on VP3. The mutants sustained single amino acid substitutions at position 305, 392, 433, or 439. Amino acid position 305 was critical to epitope I, whereas amino acid position 433 was critical to epitope III. In contrast, epitope II appeared to be more dependent upon conformation and protein folding because both amino acid positions 392 and 439 appeared to be critical. These four positions clustered in a relatively limited area of VP5, the larger of the two cleavage products of VP3. At the positions where amino acid substitutions occurred, there was a correlation between amino acid sequence homology among different serotypes and the reactivity patterns of various viruses with the N-MAbs used for selection of mutants. A synthetic peptide (amino acids 296 to 313) which included the sequence of epitope I reacted with its corresponding N-MAb, suggesting that the region contains a sequential antigenic determinant. These data may prove useful in current efforts to develop vaccines against human rotavirus infection. PMID:2453680

  4. Characterization and Epitope Mapping of Human Monoclonal Antibodies to PDC-E2, the Immunodominant Autoantigen of Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Patrick S. C.; Krams, Sheri; Munoz, Santiago; Surh, Charles P.; Ansari, Aftab; Kenny, Thomas; Robbins, Dick L.; Fung, John; Starzl, Thomas E.; Maddrey, Willis; Coppel, Ross L.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2010-01-01

    Further to define the epitopes of PDC-E2, the major autoantigen in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), we have developed and characterized five human monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies were derived by fusing a regional hepatic lymph node from a patient with PBC with the mouse human heterohybrid cell line F3B6. Previous studies of epitope mapping ofPDC-E2 have relied on whole sera and have suggested that the immunodominant epitope lies within the inner lipoyl domain of the molecule. However, selective absorption studies using whole sera and a series of overlapping recombinant peptides of PDC-E2 have suggested that the epitope may also include a large conformational component. Moreover, several laboratories have suggested that autoantibodies against the 2-oxo acids dehydrogenase autoantigens are cross-reactive. The five Inonoclonal antibodies generated included three IgG2a and two IgM antibodies and were studied for antigen specificity using recombinant PDC-E2, recombinant BCKD-E2, histone, dsDNA, IgG (Fe), collagen and a recombinant irrelevant liver specific control, the F alloantigen. The antibodies were also used to probe blots of human, bovine, mouse and rat mitochondria. Finally, fine specificity was studied by selective ELISA and absorption against overlapping expressing fragments of PDC-E2. All five monoclonals, but none of the other mitochondrial auto antigens were specific for PDC-E2. In fact, although affinity purified antibodies to PDC-E2 from patients with PBC cross-reacted with protein X, the human monoclonals did not, suggesting that protein X contains an epitope distinct from that found on PDC-E2. Additionally, all three IgG2 monoclonals recognized distinct epitopes within the inner lipoyl domain of PDC-E2. PMID:1283300

  5. Identification of Protective Epitopes by Sequencing of the Major Outer Membrane Protein Gene of a Variant Strain of Chlamydia psittaci Serotype 1 (Chlamydophila abortus)

    PubMed Central

    Vretou, Evangelia; Psarrou, Evgenia; Kaisar, Maria; Vlisidou, Isabella; Salti-Montesanto, Viviane; Longbottom, David

    2001-01-01

    Protective monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of species of the family Chlamydiaceae, which is the primary vaccine candidate antigen, recognize nonlinear epitopes conferred by the oligomeric conformation of the molecule. Protective MAbs failed to recognize oligomeric MOMP of the variant strain LLG, which bears amino acid substitutions in variable segments (VSs) 1, 2, and 4, and competed with monomer-specific MAbs mapping to these VSs in reference strain 577. The results suggest that multiple sites located in the three VSs contribute to the epitope of protective MAbs. PMID:11119563

  6. Conserved Neutralizing Epitope at Globular Head of Hemagglutinin in H3N2 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Iba, Yoshitaka; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Ohshima, Nobuko; Sumida, Tomomi; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Ikeda, Mariko; Wakiyama, Motoaki; Shirouzu, Mikako; Okada, Jun; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neutralizing antibodies that target the hemagglutinin of influenza virus either inhibit binding of hemagglutinin to cellular receptors or prevent the low-pH-induced conformational change in hemagglutinin required for membrane fusion. In general, the former type of antibody binds to the globular head formed by HA1 and has narrow strain specificity, while the latter type binds to the stem mainly formed by HA2 and has broad strain specificity. In the present study, we analyzed the epitope and function of a broadly neutralizing human antibody against H3N2 viruses, F005-126. The crystal structure of F005-126 Fab in complex with hemagglutinin revealed that the antibody binds to the globular head, spans a cleft formed by two hemagglutinin monomers in a hemagglutinin trimer, and cross-links them. It recognizes two peptide portions (sites L and R) and a glycan linked to asparagine at residue 285 using three complementarity-determining regions and framework 3 in the heavy chain. Binding of the antibody to sites L (residues 171 to 173, 239, and 240) and R (residues 91, 92, 270 to 273, 284, and 285) is mediated mainly by van der Waals contacts with the main chains of the peptides in these sites and secondarily by hydrogen bonds with a few side chains of conserved sequences in HA1. Furthermore, the glycan recognized by F005-126 is conserved among H3N2 viruses. F005-126 has the ability to prevent low-pH-induced conformational changes in hemagglutinin. The newly identified conserved epitope, including the glycan, should be immunogenic in humans and may induce production of broadly neutralizing antibodies against H3 viruses. IMPORTANCE Antibodies play an important role in protection against influenza virus, and hemagglutinin is the major target for virus neutralizing antibodies. It has long been believed that all effective neutralizing antibodies bind to the surrounding regions of the sialic acid-binding pocket and inhibit the binding of hemagglutinin to the cellular

  7. Relating conformation to function in integrin α5β1.

    PubMed

    Su, Yang; Xia, Wei; Li, Jing; Walz, Thomas; Humphries, Martin J; Vestweber, Dietmar; Cabañas, Carlos; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A

    2016-07-05

    Whether β1 integrin ectodomains visit conformational states similarly to β2 and β3 integrins has not been characterized. Furthermore, despite a wealth of activating and inhibitory antibodies to β1 integrins, the conformational states that these antibodies stabilize, and the relation of these conformations to function, remain incompletely characterized. Using negative-stain electron microscopy, we show that the integrin α5β1 ectodomain adopts extended-closed and extended-open conformations as well as a bent conformation. Antibodies SNAKA51, 8E3, N29, and 9EG7 bind to different domains in the α5 or β1 legs, activate, and stabilize extended ectodomain conformations. Antibodies 12G10 and HUTS-4 bind to the β1 βI domain and hybrid domains, respectively, activate, and stabilize the open headpiece conformation. Antibody TS2/16 binds a similar epitope as 12G10, activates, and appears to stabilize an open βI domain conformation without requiring extension or hybrid domain swing-out. mAb13 and SG/19 bind to the βI domain and βI-hybrid domain interface, respectively, inhibit, and stabilize the closed conformation of the headpiece. The effects of the antibodies on cell adhesion to fibronectin substrates suggest that the extended-open conformation of α5β1 is adhesive and that the extended-closed and bent-closed conformations are nonadhesive. The functional effects and binding sites of antibodies and fibronectin were consistent with their ability in binding to α5β1 on cell surfaces to cross-enhance or inhibit one another by competitive or noncompetitive (allosteric) mechanisms.

  8. BoLA-6*01301 and BoLA-6*01302, two allelic variants of the A18 haplotype, present the same epitope from the Tp1 antigen of Theileria parva.

    PubMed

    Svitek, N; Awino, E; Nene, V; Steinaa, L

    2015-09-15

    We have recently shown that the BoLA-A18 variant haplotype (BoLA-6*01302) is more prevalent than the BoLA-A18 haplotype (BoLA-6*01301) in a sample of Holstein/Friesian cattle in Kenya. These MHC class I allelic variants differ by a single amino acid polymorphism (Glu97 to Leu97) in the peptide-binding groove. We have previously mapped an 11-mer peptide epitope from the Theileria parva antigen Tp1 (Tp1214-224) that is presented by BoLA-6*01301. Crystal structure data indicates that Glu97 in the MHC molecule plays a role in epitope binding through electro-static interaction with a lysine residue in position 5 of the epitope, which also functions as an additional anchor residue. In contrast to expectations, we demonstrate that the amino acid substitution in BoLA-6*01302 does not divert the CTL response away from Tp1214-224. The two MHC molecules exhibit similar affinity for the Tp1 epitope and can present the epitope to parasite-specific CTLs derived from either BoLA allelic variants. These data confirm that this BoLA polymorphism does not alter Tp1 epitope specificity and that both allelic variants can be used for Tp1 vaccine studies. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Broad epitope coverage of a human in vitro antibody library.

    PubMed

    Sivasubramanian, Arvind; Estep, Patricia; Lynaugh, Heather; Yu, Yao; Miles, Adam; Eckman, Josh; Schutz, Kevin; Piffath, Crystal; Boland, Nadthakarn; Niles, Rebecca Hurley; Durand, Stéphanie; Boland, Todd; Vásquez, Maximiliano; Xu, Yingda; Abdiche, Yasmina

    2017-01-01

    Successful discovery of therapeutic antibodies hinges on the identification of appropriate affinity binders targeting a diversity of molecular epitopes presented by the antigen. Antibody campaigns that yield such broad "epitope coverage" increase the likelihood of identifying candidates with the desired biological functions. Accordingly, epitope binning assays are employed in the early discovery stages to partition antibodies into epitope families or "bins" and prioritize leads for further characterization and optimization. The collaborative program described here, which used hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) as a model antigen, combined 3 key capabilities: 1) access to a diverse panel of antibodies selected from a human in vitro antibody library; 2) application of state-of-the-art high-throughput epitope binning; and 3) analysis and interpretation of the epitope binning data with reference to an exhaustive set of published antibody:HEL co-crystal structures. Binning experiments on a large merged panel of antibodies containing clones from the library and the literature revealed that the inferred epitopes for the library clones overlapped with, and extended beyond, the known structural epitopes. Our analysis revealed that nearly the entire solvent-exposed surface of HEL is antigenic, as has been proposed for protein antigens in general. The data further demonstrated that synthetic antibody repertoires provide as wide epitope coverage as those obtained from animal immunizations. The work highlights molecular insights contributed by increasingly higher-throughput binning methods and their broad utility to guide the discovery of therapeutic antibodies representing a diverse set of functional epitopes.

  10. Epitope mapping of Canine distemper virus phosphoprotein by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sugai, Akihiro; Kooriyama, Takanori; Sato, Hiroki; Yoneda, Misako; Kai, Chieko

    2009-12-01

    The gene for phosphoprotein (P) of CDV encodes three different proteins, P, V, and C. The P protein is involved in viral gene transcription and replication. In the present study, we produced MAbs against a unique domain of the CDV-P protein, from aa 232 to 507, and determined their antigenic sites. By immunizing BALB/c mice with the recombinant P protein-specific fragment, we obtained six MAbs. Competitive binding inhibition assays revealed that they recognized two distinct regions of the P protein. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assays using deletion mutants of the unique C-terminus of the CDV-P protein revealed that all MAbs recognized a central short region (aa 233-303) of the CDV-P protein. In addition, linear and conformational epitopes have been determined, and at least four antigenic sites exist in the P protein central region. Furthermore, four of the MAbs were found to react with the P protein of recent Japanese field isolates but not with that of the older CDV strains, including a vaccine strain. Thus, these MAbs could be clinically useful for quick diagnosis during the CDV outbreaks.

  11. Differential diagnosis of Brazilian strains of Citrus tristeza virus by epitope mapping of coat protein using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Peroni, Luís Antonio; Lorencini, Márcio; dos Reis, José Raimundo Ribeiro; Machado, Marcos Antonio; Stach-Machado, Dagmar Ruth

    2009-10-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is one of the most important citrus pathogen, and among Brazilian CTV strains, the genotype Capão Bonito (CB) is the most harmful. Therefore, the coat protein (CP) gene were cloned and expressed as recombinant protein and used to develop four specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Our previously data had showed these MAbs could recognize different strains of CTV and the present goal is to identify the epitopes of the recombinant CP by ELISA screening of overlapping recombinant peptides and to determine the binding specificity of CTV isolates in light of their antigenic domains onto CB strains. Three MAbs, 30.G.02, 37.G.11 and 39.07 recognized linear and no identical epitopes, but the fourth MAb, IC.04-12, probably had a conformational epitope, since it could not be identified by ELISA screening. Our previous data revealed MAb IC.04-12 do not recognize CP under denaturing conditions, but can identify weak CTV strains in ELISA involving crop samples. MAb 30.G.02 recognized an extremely conserved sequence and can be classified as "universal" antibody, and, interestingly, the epitope turned out by MAb 39.07 corresponded to severe CTV isolates. So, these MAbs can be applied in a differential screening by ELISA.

  12. Computational design of an epitope-specific Keap1 binding antibody using hotspot residues grafting and CDR loop swapping

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Taylor, Richard D.; Griffin, Laura; Coker, Shu-Fen; Adams, Ralph; Ceska, Tom; Shi, Jiye; Lawson, Alastair D. G.; Baker, Terry

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic and diagnostic applications of monoclonal antibodies often require careful selection of binders that recognize specific epitopes on the target molecule to exert a desired modulation of biological function. Here we present a proof-of-concept application for the rational design of an epitope-specific antibody binding with the target protein Keap1, by grafting pre-defined structural interaction patterns from the native binding partner protein, Nrf2, onto geometrically matched positions of a set of antibody scaffolds. The designed antibodies bind to Keap1 and block the Keap1-Nrf2 interaction in an epitope-specific way. One resulting antibody is further optimised to achieve low-nanomolar binding affinity by in silico redesign of the CDRH3 sequences. An X-ray co-crystal structure of one resulting design reveals that the actual binding orientation and interface with Keap1 is very close to the design model, despite an unexpected CDRH3 tilt and VH/VL interface deviation, which indicates that the modelling precision may be improved by taking into account simultaneous CDR loops conformation and VH/VL orientation optimisation upon antibody sequence change. Our study confirms that, given a pre-existing crystal structure of the target protein-protein interaction, hotspots grafting with CDR loop swapping is an attractive route to the rational design of an antibody targeting a pre-selected epitope. PMID:28128368

  13. Correlation between efficacy and structure of recombinant epitope vaccines against bovine type O foot and mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingli; Li, Jianli; Wang, Hua; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Yongsheng; Zhou, Lei; Wei, Hongfei; Yang, Guang; Yu, Yue; Wei, Xuefeng; Yu, Yongli; Wang, Liying; Wan, Min

    2012-05-01

    To develop recombinant epitope vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), genes coding for six recombinant proteins (rP1–rP6) consisting of different combinations of B cell and T cell epitope from VP1 capsid protein (VP1) of type O FMDV were constructed and the 3D structure of these proteins analyzed. This revealed a surface-exposed RGD sequence of B cell epitopes in all six recombinant proteins as that in VP1 of FMDV and rP1, rP2 and rP4 globally mimicked the backbone conformation of the VP1. rP1, rP2 and rP4 stimulated guinea pigs to produce higher level of neutralizing antibodies capable of protecting suckling mice against FMDV challenge. rP1 stimulated cattle to produce FMDV-neutralizing antibody. The data suggest that an efficient recombinant epitope vaccine against FMDV should share local similarities with the natural VP1 of FMDV.

  14. Phage-displayed peptides that mimic epitopes of hepatitis E virus capsid.

    PubMed

    Larralde, Osmany; Petrik, Juraj

    2017-08-01

    Hepatitis E is an emerging zoonotic infection of increasing public health threat for the UK, especially for immunosuppressed individuals. A human recombinant vaccine has been licensed only in China and is not clear whether it protects against hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3, the most prevalent in Europe. The aim of this study was to use phage display technology as a tool to identify peptides that mimic epitopes of HEV capsid (mimotopes). We identified putative linear and conformational mimotopes using sera from Scottish blood donors that have the immunological imprint of past HEV infection. Four mimotopes did not have homology with the primary sequence of HEV ORF2 capsid but competed effectively with a commercial HEV antigen for binding to anti-HEV reference serum. When the reactivity profile of each mimotope was compared with Wantai HEV-IgG ELISA, the most sensitive HEV immunoassay, mimotopes showed 95.2-100% sensitivity while the specificity ranged from 81.5 to 95.8%. PepSurf algorithm was used to map affinity-selected peptides onto the ORF2 crystal structure of HEV genotype 3, which predicted that these four mimototopes are clustered in the P domain of ORF2 capsid, near conformational epitopes of anti-HEV neutralising monoclonal antibodies. These HEV mimotopes may have potential applications in the design of structural vaccines and the development of new diagnostic tests.

  15. A novel antibody humanization method based on epitopes scanning and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding; Chen, Cai-Feng; Zhao, Bin-Bin; Gong, Lu-Lu; Jin, Wen-Jing; Liu, Jing-Jun; Wang, Jing-Fei; Wang, Tian-Tian; Yuan, Xiao-Hui; He, You-Wen

    2013-01-01

    1-17-2 is a rat anti-human DEC-205 monoclonal antibody that induces internalization and delivers antigen to dendritic cells (DCs). The potentially clinical application of this antibody is limited by its murine origin. Traditional humanization method such as complementarity determining regions (CDRs) graft often leads to a decreased or even lost affinity. Here we have developed a novel antibody humanization method based on computer modeling and bioinformatics analysis. First, we used homology modeling technology to build the precise model of Fab. A novel epitope scanning algorithm was designed to identify antigenic residues in the framework regions (FRs) that need to be mutated to human counterpart in the humanization process. Then virtual mutation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were used to assess the conformational impact imposed by all the mutations. By comparing the root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) of CDRs, we found five key residues whose mutations would destroy the original conformation of CDRs. These residues need to be back-mutated to rescue the antibody binding affinity. Finally we constructed the antibodies in vitro and compared their binding affinity by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. The binding affinity of the refined humanized antibody was similar to that of the original rat antibody. Our results have established a novel method based on epitopes scanning and MD simulation for antibody humanization.

  16. Minute Time Scale Prolyl Isomerization Governs Antibody Recognition of an Intrinsically Disordered Immunodominant Epitope*

    PubMed Central

    Fassolari, Marisol; Chemes, Lucia B.; Gallo, Mariana; Smal, Clara; Sánchez, Ignacio E.; de Prat-Gay, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Conformational rearrangements in antibody·antigen recognition are essential events where kinetic discrimination of isomers expands the universe of combinations. We investigated the interaction mechanism of a monoclonal antibody, M1, raised against E7 from human papillomavirus, a prototypic viral oncoprotein and a model intrinsically disordered protein. The mapped 12-amino acid immunodominant epitope lies within a “hinge” region between the N-terminal intrinsically disordered and the C-terminal globular domains. Kinetic experiments show that despite being within an intrinsically disordered region, the hinge E7 epitope has at least two populations separated by a high energy barrier. Nuclear magnetic resonance traced the origin of this barrier to a very slow (t½ ∼4 min) trans-cis prolyl isomerization event involving changes in secondary structure. The less populated (10%) cis isomer is the binding-competent species, thus requiring the 90% of molecules in the trans configuration to isomerize before binding. The association rate for the cis isomer approaches 6 × 107 m−1 s−1, a ceiling for antigen-antibody interactions. Mutagenesis experiments showed that Pro-41 in E7Ep was required for both binding and isomerization. After a slow postbinding unimolecular rearrangement, a consolidated complex with KD = 1.2 × 10−7 m is reached. Our results suggest that presentation of this viral epitope by the antigen-presenting cells would have to be “locked” in the cis conformation, in opposition to the most populated trans isomer, in order to select the specific antibody clone that goes through affinity and kinetic maturation. PMID:23504368

  17. Internal epitope tagging informed by relative lack of sequence conservation

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Leonard; Zhang, Karen; Bonawitz, Tristan; Grajevskaja, Viktorija; Bellipanni, Gianfranco; Waring, Richard; Balciunas, Darius

    2016-01-01

    Many experimental techniques rely on specific recognition and stringent binding of proteins by antibodies. This can readily be achieved by introducing an epitope tag. We employed an approach that uses a relative lack of evolutionary conservation to inform epitope tag site selection, followed by integration of the tag-coding sequence into the endogenous locus in zebrafish. We demonstrate that an internal epitope tag is accessible for antibody binding, and that tagged proteins retain wild type function. PMID:27892520

  18. Reflections on HLA Epitope-Based Matching for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Duquesnoy, Rene J.

    2016-01-01

    HLA antibodies are primary causes of transplant rejection; they recognize epitopes that can be structurally defined by eplets. There are many reviews about HLA epitope-based matching in transplantation. This article describes some personal reflections about epitopes including a historical perspective of HLA typing at the antigen and allele levels, the repertoires of antibody-verified HLA epitopes, the use of HLAMatchmaker in determining the specificities of antibodies tested in different assays, and, finally, possible strategies to control HLA antibody responses. PMID:27965660

  19. Differential basal-to-apical accessibility of lamin A/C epitopes in the nuclear lamina regulated by changes in cytoskeletal tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihalainen, Teemu O.; Aires, Lina; Herzog, Florian A.; Schwartlander, Ruth; Moeller, Jens; Vogel, Viola

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear lamins play central roles at the intersection between cytoplasmic signalling and nuclear events. Here, we show that at least two N- and C-terminal lamin epitopes are not accessible at the basal side of the nuclear envelope under environmental conditions known to upregulate cell contractility. The conformational epitope on the Ig-domain of A-type lamins is more buried in the basal than apical nuclear envelope of human mesenchymal stem cells undergoing osteogenesis (but not adipogenesis), and in fibroblasts adhering to rigid (but not soft) polyacrylamide hydrogels. This structural polarization of the lamina is promoted by compressive forces, emerges during cell spreading, and requires lamin A/C multimerization, intact nucleoskeleton-cytoskeleton linkages (LINC), and apical-actin stress-fibre assembly. Notably, the identified Ig-epitope overlaps with emerin, DNA and histone binding sites, and comprises various laminopathy mutation sites. Our findings should help decipher how the physical properties of cellular microenvironments regulate nuclear events.

  20. Defining the immunogenicity and antigenicity of HLA epitopes is crucial for optimal epitope matching in clinical renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kramer, C S M; Roelen, D L; Heidt, S; Claas, F H J

    2017-07-01

    Transplantation of an human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatched graft can lead to the development of donor-specific antibodies (DSA), which can result in antibody mediated rejection and graft loss as well as complicate repeat transplantation. These DSA are induced by foreign epitopes present on the mismatched HLA antigens of the donor. However, not all epitopes appear to be equally effective in their ability to induce DSA. Understanding the characteristics of HLA epitopes is crucial for optimal epitope matching in clinical transplantation. In this review, the latest insights on HLA epitopes are described with a special focus on the definition of immunogenicity and antigenicity of HLA epitopes. Furthermore, the use of this knowledge to prevent HLA antibody formation and to select the optimal donor for sensitised transplant candidates will be discussed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Stabilizing Exposure of Conserved Epitopes by Structure Guided Insertion of Disulfide Bond in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Pampi; Labranche, Celia; Go, Eden P.; Clark, Daniel F.; Sun, Yide; Nandi, Avishek; Hartog, Karin; Desaire, Heather; Montefiori, David; Carfi, Andrea; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Barnett, Susan W.

    2013-01-01

    Entry of HIV-1 into target cells requires binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) to cellular receptors and subsequent conformational changes that culminates in fusion of viral and target cell membranes. Recent structural information has revealed that these conformational transitions are regulated by three conserved but potentially flexible layers stacked between the receptor-binding domain (gp120) and the fusion arm (gp41) of Env. We hypothesized that artificial insertion of a covalent bond will ‘snap’ Env into a conformation that is less mobile and stably expose conserved sites. Therefore, we analyzed the interface between these gp120 layers (layers 1, 2 and 3) and identified residues that may form disulfide bonds when substituted with cysteines. We subsequently probed the structures of the resultant mutant gp120 proteins by assaying their binding to a variety of ligands using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) assay. We found that a single disulfide bond strategically inserted between the highly conserved layers 1 and 2 (C65-C115) is able to ‘lock’ gp120 in a CD4 receptor bound conformation (in the absence of CD4), as indicated by the lower dissociation constant (Kd) for the CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope binding 17b antibody. When disulfide-stabilized monomeric (gp120) and trimeric (gp140) Envs were used to immunize rabbits, they were found to elicit a higher proportion of antibodies directed against both CD4i and CD4 binding site epitopes than the wild-type proteins. These results demonstrate that structure-guided stabilization of inter-layer interactions within HIV-1 Env can be used to expose conserved epitopes and potentially overcome the sequence diversity of these molecules. PMID:24146829

  2. Crystal structure of neotame anhydrate polymorph G.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zedong; Young, Victor G; Sheth, Agam; Munson, Eric J; Schroeder, Steve A; Prakash, Indra; Grant, David J W

    2002-10-01

    To determine the crystal structure of the neotame anhydrate polymorph G and to evaluate X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD) with molecular modeling as an alternative method for determining the crystal structure of this conformationally flexible dipeptide. The crystal structure of polymorph G was determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography (SCXRD) and also from the X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) pattern using molecular modeling (Cerius2, Powder Solve module). From SCXRD, polymorph G crystals are orthorhombic with space group of P2(1)2(1)2(1) with Z = 4, unit cell constants: a = 5.5999(4), b = 11.8921(8), c = 30.917(2) A, and one neotame molecule per asymmetric unit. The XRPD pattern of polymorph G, analyzed by Cerius2 software, led to the same P2(1)2(1)2(1) space group and almost identical unit cell dimensions. However, with 13 rigid bodies defined, Cerius2 gives a conformation of the neotame molecule, which is different from that determined by SCXRD. For neotame anhydrate polymorph G, the unit cell dimensions calculated from XRPD were almost identical to those determined by SCXRD. However, the crystal structure determined by XRPD closely resembled that determined by SCXRD, only when the correct conformation of the neotame molecule had been chosen before detailed analysis of the XRPD pattern.

  3. Fusion of C3d molecule with neutralization epitope(s) of hepatitis E virus enhances antibody avidity maturation and neutralizing activity following DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shucai; Wang, Chunling; Fang, Xuefeng; Zhai, Lijie; Dong, Chen; Ding, Lei; Meng, Jihong; Wang, Lixin

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies have identified that a hepatits E virus peptide (HEV-p179), spanning amino acids (aa) 439-617 in the 660-aa protein encoded by open reading frame 2(ORF2) of the Chinese epidemic strain (genotype 4), is the minimal size fragment of conformation-dependent neutralization epitope(s). We report here the successful immunization of mice with DNA vaccines expressing the secreted form of HEV-p179 (fused with a human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) signal sequence) and the tPA-p179-C3d fusion protein (fused with three tandem copies of the murine complement C3d). Analysis of antibody responses in vaccinated mice revealed that immunizations with tPA-p179-C3d3 DNA vaccine dramatically increased both the level and avidity maturation of antibodies against HEV-p179 compared to p179 and tPA-p179 DNA vaccines. In addition, this increased antibody response correlated with neutralizing titers in a PCR-based cell culture neutralization assay. These results indicate that vaccination with C3d conjugated p179 DNA vaccine enhances antibody responses to HEV, and this approach may be applied to overcome the poor immunogenicity of DNA vaccines to generate HEV neutralizing antibodies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Resistance-associated epitopes of HIV-1C-highly probable candidates for a multi-epitope vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Swaminathan, Soumya; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth

    2012-10-01

    Earlier studies have identified a large number of immunogenic epitopes in HIV-1. Efforts are required to prioritize these epitopes in order to identify the best candidates for formulating an effective multi-epitope vaccine for HIV. We modeled 155 known cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes of HIV-1 subtype C on the 3D structure of HLA-A*0201, HLA-B*2705, and HLA-B*5101 using MODPROPEP, as these alleles are known to be associated with resistance to HIV/slow progression to AIDS. Thirty-six epitopes were identified to bind to all the three HLA alleles with better binding affinity than the control peptides complexed with each HLA allele but not to any of the HLA alleles reported to be associated with susceptibility to HIV infection/rapid progression to disease. As increase in stability of the epitope-HLA complex results in increased immunogenicity, the short-listed epitopes could be suitable candidates for vaccine development. Twenty of the 36 epitopes were polyfunctional in nature adding to their immunological relevance for vaccine design. Further, 9 of the 20 polyfunctional epitopes were found to bind to all three resistance-associated HLA alleles using an additional method, adding worth to their potential as candidates for a vaccine formulation for HIV-1C.

  5. Crystal structure of swine major histocompatibility complex class I SLA-1 0401 and identification of 2009 pandemic swine-origin influenza A H1N1 virus cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nianzhi; Qi, Jianxun; Feng, Sijia; Gao, Feng; Liu, Jun; Pan, Xiaocheng; Chen, Rong; Li, Qirun; Chen, Zhaosan; Li, Xiaoying; Xia, Chun; Gao, George F

    2011-11-01

    The presentation of viral epitopes to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA I) is crucial for swine immunity. To illustrate the structural basis of swine CTL epitope presentation, the first SLA crystal structures, SLA-1 0401, complexed with peptides derived from either 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) swine-origin influenza A virus (S-OIV(NW9); NSDTVGWSW) or Ebola virus (Ebola(AY9); ATAAATEAY) were determined in this study. The overall peptide-SLA-1 0401 structures resemble, as expected, the general conformations of other structure-solved peptide major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC). The major distinction of SLA-1 0401 is that Arg(156) has a "one-ballot veto" function in peptide binding, due to its flexible side chain. S-OIV(NW9) and Ebola(AY9) bind SLA-1 0401 with similar conformations but employ different water molecules to stabilize their binding. The side chain of P7 residues in both peptides is exposed, indicating that the epitopes are "featured" peptides presented by this SLA. Further analyses showed that SLA-1 0401 and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I HLA-A 0101 can present the same peptides, but in different conformations, demonstrating cross-species epitope presentation. CTL epitope peptides derived from 2009 pandemic S-OIV were screened and evaluated by the in vitro refolding method. Three peptides were identified as potential cross-species influenza virus (IV) CTL epitopes. The binding motif of SLA-1 0401 was proposed, and thermostabilities of key peptide-SLA-1 0401 complexes were analyzed by circular dichroism spectra. Our results not only provide the structural basis of peptide presentation by SLA I but also identify some IV CTL epitope peptides. These results will benefit both vaccine development and swine organ-based xenotransplantation.

  6. Crystal Structure of Swine Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I SLA-1*0401 and Identification of 2009 Pandemic Swine-Origin Influenza A H1N1 Virus Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitope Peptides ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nianzhi; Qi, Jianxun; Feng, Sijia; Gao, Feng; Liu, Jun; Pan, Xiaocheng; Chen, Rong; Li, Qirun; Chen, Zhaosan; Li, Xiaoying; Xia, Chun; Gao, George F.

    2011-01-01

    The presentation of viral epitopes to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA I) is crucial for swine immunity. To illustrate the structural basis of swine CTL epitope presentation, the first SLA crystal structures, SLA-1*0401, complexed with peptides derived from either 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) swine-origin influenza A virus (S-OIVNW9; NSDTVGWSW) or Ebola virus (EbolaAY9; ATAAATEAY) were determined in this study. The overall peptide–SLA-1*0401 structures resemble, as expected, the general conformations of other structure-solved peptide major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC). The major distinction of SLA-1*0401 is that Arg156 has a “one-ballot veto” function in peptide binding, due to its flexible side chain. S-OIVNW9 and EbolaAY9 bind SLA-1*0401 with similar conformations but employ different water molecules to stabilize their binding. The side chain of P7 residues in both peptides is exposed, indicating that the epitopes are “featured” peptides presented by this SLA. Further analyses showed that SLA-1*0401 and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I HLA-A*0101 can present the same peptides, but in different conformations, demonstrating cross-species epitope presentation. CTL epitope peptides derived from 2009 pandemic S-OIV were screened and evaluated by the in vitro refolding method. Three peptides were identified as potential cross-species influenza virus (IV) CTL epitopes. The binding motif of SLA-1*0401 was proposed, and thermostabilities of key peptide–SLA-1*0401 complexes were analyzed by circular dichroism spectra. Our results not only provide the structural basis of peptide presentation by SLA I but also identify some IV CTL epitope peptides. These results will benefit both vaccine development and swine organ-based xenotransplantation. PMID:21900158

  7. Conformal Vortex Crystals.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Raí M; Silva, Clécio C de Souza

    2017-10-06

    We investigate theoretically globally nonuniform configurations of quantized-flux vortices in clean superconductors trapped by an external force field that induces a nonuniform vortex density profile. Using an extensive series of numerical simulations, we demonstrate that, for suitable choices of the force field, and bellow a certain transition temperature, the vortex system self-organizes into highly inhomogeneous conformal crystals in a way as to minimize the total energy. These nonuniform structures are topologically ordered and can be mathematically mapped into a triangular Abrikosov lattice via a conformal transformation. Above the crystallization temperature, the conformal vortex crystal becomes unstable and gives place to a nonuniform polycrystalline structure. We propose a simple method to engineer the potential energy profile necessary for the observation of conformal crystals of vortices, which can also be applied to other 2D particle systems, and suggest possible experiments in which conformal or quasi-conformal vortex crystals could be observed in bulk superconductors and in thin films.

  8. Identification and structural definition of H5-specific CTL epitopes restricted by HLA-A*0201 derived from the H5N1 subtype of influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yeping; Liu, Jun; Yang, Meng; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Jianfang; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Gao, Bin; Tien, Po; Shu, Yuelong; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Chen, Zhu; Gao, George F.

    2010-01-01

    The haemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein of influenza A virus is a major antigen that initiates humoral immunity against infection; however, the cellular immune response against HA is poorly understood. Furthermore, HA-derived cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes are relatively rare in comparison to other internal gene products. Here, CTL epitopes of the HA serotype H5 protein were screened. By using in silico prediction, in vitro refolding and a T2 cell-binding assay, followed by immunization of HLA-A2.1/Kb transgenic mice, an HLA-A*0201-restricted decameric epitope, RI-10 (H5 HA205–214, RLYQNPTTYI), was shown to elicit a robust CTL epitope-specific response. In addition, RI-10 and its variant, KI-10 (KLYQNPTTYI), were also demonstrated to be able to induce a higher CTL epitope-specific response than the influenza A virus dominant CTL epitope GL-9 (GILGFVFTL) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HLA-A*0201-positive patients who had recovered from H5N1 virus infection. Furthermore, the crystal structures of RI-10–HLA-A*0201 and KI-10–HLA-A*0201 complexes were determined at 2.3 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively, showing typical HLA-A*0201-restricted epitopes. The conformations of RI-10 and KI-10 in the antigen-presenting grooves in crystal structures of the two complexes show significant differences, despite their nearly identical sequences. These results provide implications for the discovery of diagnostic markers and the design of novel influenza vaccines. PMID:19955560

  9. Dominating IgE-binding epitope of Bet v 1, the major allergen of birch pollen, characterized by X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Spangfort, Michael D; Mirza, Osman; Ipsen, Henrik; Van Neerven, R J Joost; Gajhede, Michael; Larsen, Jørgen N

    2003-09-15

    Specific allergy vaccination is an efficient treatment for allergic disease; however, the development of safer vaccines would enable a more general use of the treatment. Determination of molecular structures of allergens and allergen-Ab complexes facilitates epitope mapping and enables a rational approach to the engineering of allergen molecules with reduced IgE binding. In this study, we describe the identification and modification of a human IgE-binding epitope based on the crystal structure of Bet v 1 in complex with the BV16 Fab' fragment. The epitope occupies approximately 10% of the molecular surface area of Bet v 1 and is clearly conformational. A synthetic peptide representing a sequential motif in the epitope (11 of 16 residues) did not inhibit the binding of mAb BV16 to Bet v 1, illustrating limitations in the use of peptides for B cell epitope characterization. The single amino acid substitution, Glu(45)-Ser, was introduced in the epitope and completely abolished the binding of mAb BV16 to the Bet v 1 mutant within a concentration range 1000-fold higher than wild type. The mutant also showed up to 50% reduction in the binding of human polyclonal IgE, demonstrating that glutamic acid 45 is a critical amino acid also in a major human IgE-binding epitope. By solving the three-dimensional crystal structure of the Bet v 1 Glu(45)-Ser mutant, it was shown that the change in immunochemical activity is directly related to the Glu(45)-Ser substitution and not to long-range structural alterations or collapse of the Bet v 1 mutant tertiary structure.

  10. The Conformal Bootstrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons-Duffin, David

    These notes are from courses given at TASI and the Advanced Strings School in summer 2015. Starting from principles of quantum field theory and the assumption of a traceless stress tensor, we develop the basics of conformal field theory, including conformal Ward identities, radial quantization, reection positivity, the operator product expansion, and conformal blocks. We end with an introduction to numerical bootstrap methods, focusing on the 2d and 3d Ising models.

  11. Deletion of fusion peptide or destabilization of fusion core of HIV gp41 enhances antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Chen Xi; Jiang Shibo Chen Yinghua

    2008-11-07

    The human monoclonal antibody 4E10 against the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41 demonstrates broad neutralizing activity across various strains, and makes its epitope an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. Although the contiguous epitope of 4E10 has been identified, attempts to re-elicit 4E10-like antibodies have failed, possibly due to the lack of proper conformation of the 4E10 epitope. Here we used pIg-tail expression system to construct a panel of eukaryotic cell-surface expression plasmids encoding the extracellular domain of gp41 with deletion of fusion peptide and/or introduction of L568P mutation that may disrupt the gp41 six-helix bundle core conformation as DNA vaccines for immunization of mice. We found that these changes resulted in significant increase of the antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope. This information is thus useful for rational design of vaccines targeting the HIV-1 gp41 MPER.

  12. Epitope mapping and key amino acid identification of anti-CD22 immunotoxin CAT-8015 using hybrid β-lactamase display

    PubMed Central

    Bannister, D.; Popovic, B.; Sridharan, S.; Giannotta, F.; Filée, P.; Yilmaz, N.; Minter, R.

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are a commercially successful class of drug molecules and there are now a growing number of antibodies coupled to toxic payloads, which demonstrate clinical efficacy. Determining the precise epitope of therapeutic antibodies is beneficial in understanding the structure–activity relationship of the drug, but in many cases is not done due to the structural complexity of, in particular, conformational protein epitopes. Using the immunotoxin CAT-8015 as a test case, this study demonstrates that a new methodology, hybrid β-lactamase display, can be employed to elucidate a complex epitope on CD22. Following insertion of random CD22 gene fragments into a permissive site within β-lactamase, proteins expressed in Escherichia coli were first screened for correct folding by resistance to ampicillin and then selected by phage display for affinity to CAT-8015. The optimal protein region recognised by CAT-8015 could then be used as a tool for fine epitope mapping, using alanine-scanning analysis, demonstrating that this technology is well suited to the rapid characterisation of antibody epitopes. PMID:21159620

  13. Epitope mapping and key amino acid identification of anti-CD22 immunotoxin CAT-8015 using hybrid β-lactamase display.

    PubMed

    Bannister, D; Popovic, B; Sridharan, S; Giannotta, F; Filée, P; Yilmaz, N; Minter, R

    2011-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are a commercially successful class of drug molecules and there are now a growing number of antibodies coupled to toxic payloads, which demonstrate clinical efficacy. Determining the precise epitope of therapeutic antibodies is beneficial in understanding the structure-activity relationship of the drug, but in many cases is not done due to the structural complexity of, in particular, conformational protein epitopes. Using the immunotoxin CAT-8015 as a test case, this study demonstrates that a new methodology, hybrid β-lactamase display, can be employed to elucidate a complex epitope on CD22. Following insertion of random CD22 gene fragments into a permissive site within β-lactamase, proteins expressed in Escherichia coli were first screened for correct folding by resistance to ampicillin and then selected by phage display for affinity to CAT-8015. The optimal protein region recognised by CAT-8015 could then be used as a tool for fine epitope mapping, using alanine-scanning analysis, demonstrating that this technology is well suited to the rapid characterisation of antibody epitopes.

  14. Neotame anhydrate polymorphs I: preparation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Doug, Zedong; Padden, Brian E; Salsbury, Jonathon S; Munson, Eric J; Schroeder, Steve A; Prakash, Indra; Grant, David J W

    2002-03-01

    To prepare, characterize, and compare polymorphs of neotame anhydrate. Neotame anhydrate polymorphs were prepared from amorphous or crystalline anhydrate by crystallization or suspension in various organic solvents, or by dehydration of neotame monohydrate. The following techniques were used for characterization: differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetry, hot-stage microscopy, powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD), 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, dynamic water vapor sorption/desorption, and density measurements. Seven polymorphs (Forms A-G) of neotame anhydrate were prepared and show different thermal properties and PXRD patterns. Two enantiotropically related pairs were identified: B and C; E and A. 13C SSNMR and FTIR spectroscopy clearly distinguish between Forms A, D, F, and G, which show similar needle-shaped morphology but distinct differences in dynamic water vapor sorption/desorption and density. The 13C SSNMR chemical shifts suggest conformational polymorphism. The stability in the presence of water vapor follows the rank order, G > A > D approximately = F, which resembles the rank orders of the molar volume and of the polarity of the solvents from which they crystallized. The neotame anhydrate polymorphs appear to show different molecular conformations. The less dense polymorphic structures crystallize from solvents of greater polarity and sorb water vapor less rapidly and less completely. Two enantiotropic pairs were discerned.

  15. Quaternary structures of HIV Env immunogen exhibit conformational vicissitudes and interface diminution elicited by ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Moscoso, Carlos G.; Sun, Yide; Poon, Selina; Xing, Li; Kan, Elaine; Martin, Loïc; Green, Dominik; Lin, Frank; Vahlne, Anders G.; Barnett, Susan; Srivastava, Indresh; Cheng, R. Holland

    2011-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus envelope protein is the key element mediating entry into host cells. Conformational rearrangement of Env upon binding to the host CD4 receptor and chemokine coreceptor drives membrane fusion. We elucidated the quaternary arrangement of the soluble Env trimeric immunogen o-gp140ΔV2TV1, in both its native (unliganded) and CD4-induced (liganded) states by cryoelectron microscopy and molecular modeling. The liganded conformation was elicited by binding gp140 to the synthetic CD4-mimicking miniprotein CD4m. Upon CD4m binding, an outward domain shift of the three gp120 subunits diminishes gp120–gp41 interactions, whereas a “flat open” concave trimer apex is observed consequent to gp120 tilting away from threefold axis, likely juxtaposing the fusion peptide with the host membrane. Additional features observed in the liganded conformation include rotations of individual gp120 subunits that may release gp41 for N- and C-helix refolding and also may lead to optimal exposure of the elicited coreceptor binding site. Such quaternary arrangements of gp140 lead to the metastable liganded conformation, with putative locations of exposed epitopes contributing to a description of sequential events occurring prior to membrane fusion. Our observations imply a mechanism whereby a soluble Env trimeric construct, as opposed to trimers extracted from virions, may better expose crucial epitopes such as the CD4 binding site and V3, as well as epitopes in the vicinity of gp41, subsequent to conjugation with CD4m. Structural features gleaned from our studies should aid the design of Env-based immunogens for inducement of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies against exposed conformational epitopes. PMID:21444771

  16. Dominant autoimmune epitopes recognized by pemphigus antibodies map to the N-terminal adhesive region of desmogleins.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, M; Futei, Y; Fujii, Y; Iwasaki, T; Nishikawa, T; Amagai, M

    2001-11-01

    Desmoglein (Dsg) is a cadherin-type adhesion molecule found in desmosomes. Dsg1 and Dsg3 are the target Ags in the autoimmune blistering diseases pemphigus foliaceus (PF) and pemphigus vulgaris (PV), respectively. To map conformational epitopes of Dsg1 and Dsg3 in PF and PV, we generated Dsg1- and Dsg3-domain-swapped molecules and point-mutated Dsg3 molecules with Dsg1-specific residues by baculovirus expression. The swapped domains were portions of the N-terminal extracellular domains of Dsg1 (1-496) and Dsg3 (1-566), which have similar structures but distinct epitopes. The binding of autoantibodies to the mutant molecules was assessed by competition ELISAs. Domain-swapped molecules containing the N-terminal 161 residues of Dsg1 and Dsg3 yielded >50% competition in 30/43 (69.8%) PF sera and 31/40 (77.5%) PV sera, respectively. Furthermore, removal of Abs against the 161 N-terminal residues of Dsg1 by immunoadsorption eliminated the ability of PF sera to induce cutaneous blisters in neonatal mice. Within these N-terminal regions, most of the epitopes were mapped to residues 26-87 of Dsg1 and 25-88 of Dsg3. Furthermore, a point-mutated Dsg3 molecule containing Dsg1-specific amino acid substitutions (His(25), Cys(28), Ala(29)) reacted with anti-Dsg1 IgG, thus defining one of the epitopes of Dsg1. Using the predicted three-dimensional structure of classic cadherins as a model, these findings suggest that the dominant autoimmune epitopes in both PF and PV are found in the N-terminal adhesive surfaces of Dsgs.

  17. Hypoxia upregulates the expression of the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine containing epitope H in human ependymal cells.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Leonidas D; Vassiou, Katerina; Kotrotsios, Anastasios; Sgantzos, Markos N

    2011-02-15

    Epitope H contains an O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) residue in a specific conformation and/or environment recognized by mouse IgM monoclonal antibody H (mabH). Epitope H is present in several types of cells and in several polypeptides outside the CNS. Previous results have shown that in the adult human brains, epitope H is confined mostly to a minority of fibrous astrocytes, and it is greatly upregulated in the reactive astrocytes. Post-translational modification with O-GlcNAc occurs on many proteins involved in several cell processes, such as cell cycle progression, apoptosis, proteasome degradation pathways, and modulation of cellular function in response to nutrition and stress. Hypoxia is one of the major causes of cellular stress. Therefore, in this study, we used the mAbH and the indirect immunoperoxidase method to investigate the expression of epitope H in ependymal cells in brains of persons who died with signs of hypoxic encephalopathy. The results of the present study showed that practically all ependymal cells showed cytoplasmic staining for epitope H in supranuclear cytoplasm in the brain of two premature neonates and in ten infants who died with signs of hypoxic encephalopathy. However, the overwhelming majority of ependymal cells of the nine human embryos taken from legal abortions, ranging from 26 days until 13 weeks of gestational age, and of the ten infants' brains without any sign of hypoxic encephalopathy remained negative. Only occasionally did the ependymal cells show weak cytoplasmic staining in some foci. In addition, the reactive astrocytes in the hypoxic brains showed strong cytoplasmic staining, confirming previous results.

  18. Epitope characterization of anti-JAM-A antibodies using orthogonal mass spectrometry and surface plasmon resonance approaches.

    PubMed

    Terral, Guillaume; Champion, Thierry; Debaene, François; Colas, Olivier; Bourguet, Maxime; Wagner-Rousset, Elsa; Corvaia, Nathalie; Beck, Alain; Cianferani, Sarah

    2017-09-21

    Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is an adherens and tight junction protein expressed by endothelial and epithelial cells and associated with cancer progression. We present here the extensive characterization of immune complexes involving JAM-A antigen and three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), including hz6F4-2, a humanized version of anti-tumoral 6F4 mAb identified by a functional and proteomic approach in our laboratory. A specific workflow that combines orthogonal approaches has been designed to determine binding stoichiometries along with JAM-A epitope mapping determination at high resolution for these three mAbs. Native mass spectrometry experiments revealed different binding stoichiometries and affinities, with two molecules of JAM-A being able to bind to hz6F4-2 and F11 Fab, while only one JAM-A was bound to J10.4. Surface plasmon resonance indirect competitive binding assays suggested epitopes located in close proximity for hz6F4-2 and F11. Finally, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry was used to precisely identify epitopes for all mAbs. The results obtained by orthogonal biophysical approaches showed a clear correlation between the determined epitopes and JAM-A binding characteristics, allowing the basis for molecular recognition of JAM-A by hz6F4-2 to be definitively established for the first time. Taken together, our results highlight the power of MS-based structural approaches for epitope mapping and mAb conformational characterization.

  19. Structure-Function Analysis of the Epitope for 4E10, a Broadly Neutralizing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Antibody†

    PubMed Central

    Brunel, Florence M.; Zwick, Michael B.; Cardoso, Rosa M. F.; Nelson, Josh D.; Wilson, Ian A.; Burton, Dennis R.; Dawson, Philip E.

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibody 4E10 binds to a linear, highly conserved epitope within the membrane-proximal external region of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41. We have delineated the peptide epitope of the broadly neutralizing 4E10 antibody to gp41 residues 671 to 683, using peptides with different lengths encompassing the previously suggested core epitope (NWFDIT). Peptide binding to the 4E10 antibody was assessed by competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the Kd values of selected peptides were determined using surface plasmon resonance. An Ala scan of the epitope indicated that several residues, W672, F673, and T676, are essential (>1,000-fold decrease in binding upon replacement with alanine) for 4E10 recognition. In addition, five other residues, N671, D674, I675, W680, and L679, make significant contributions to 4E10 binding. In general, the Ala scan results agree well with the recently reported crystal structure of 4E10 in complex with a 13-mer peptide and with our circular dichroism analyses. Neutralization competition assays confirmed that the peptide NWFDITNWLWYIKKKK-NH2 could effectively inhibit 4E10 neutralization. Finally, to limit the conformational flexibility of the peptides, helix-promoting 2-aminoisobutyric acid residues and helix-inducing tethers were incorporated. Several peptides have significantly improved affinity (>1,000-fold) over the starting peptide and, when used as immunogens, may be more likely to elicit 4E10-like neutralizing antibodies. Hence, this study represents the first stage toward iterative development of a vaccine based on the 4E10 epitope. PMID:16439525

  20. An update on conformation sensitive gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Arupa

    2002-04-01

    Conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) was developed as a method of heteroduplex analysis to screen large multi-exon genes for sequence variation. The novelty of the method was in the use of a non-proprietary acrylamide gel matrix that used 1,4-bis (acrolyl) piperazine (BAP) as a cross linker with ethylene glycol and formamide as mildly denaturing solvents. The denaturing environment enhances the conformation polymorphism present in DNA heteroduplexes containing variations as small as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). CSGE has also been adapted for use on a fluorescent platform (F-CSGE) that resulted in higher throughput and sensitivity. Variation in sensitivity of CSGE has been studied extensively. The results demonstrate that the nature of the mismatched base in a defined sequence context has the most profound effect on the conformation of the heteroduplex. Additionally, the size of the PCR product, as well as the location of the mismatch within the PCR product, are two important parameters that determine the resolution of the mismatch-containing heteroduplexes during CSGE. Like any other mutation scanning technique, CSGE can have limited resolution of two closely linked sequence variations. For specific genes, like BRCA1 and BRCA2 where multiple SNPs are present in the coding sequence, each CSGE shift has to be sequenced to define the exact nature of the sequence change. In conclusion, CSGE scanning provides a powerful, cost-efficient way to scan genes with high sensitivity and specificity.

  1. Structural dynamics associated with intermediate formation in an archetypal conformational disease.

    PubMed

    Nyon, Mun Peak; Segu, Lakshmi; Cabrita, Lisa D; Lévy, Géraldine R; Kirkpatrick, John; Roussel, Benoit D; Patschull, Anathe O M; Barrett, Tracey E; Ekeowa, Ugo I; Kerr, Richard; Wa