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Sample records for polymorphism microarray analyses

  1. Clinical significance of previously cryptic copy number alterations and loss of heterozygosity in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome determined using combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Jin Ok; Seo, Eul Ju; Lee, Seong Wook; Suh, Jin Kyung; Im, Ho Joon; Seo, Jong Jin

    2014-07-01

    The combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray (CGH+SNP microarray) platform can simultaneously detect copy number alterations (CNA) and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Eighteen children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n=15) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n=3) were studied using CGH+SNP microarray to evaluate the clinical significance of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations. CGH+SNP microarray revealed CNAs at 14 regions in 9 patients, while metaphase cytogenetic (MC) analysis detected CNAs in 11 regions in 8 patients. Using CGH+SNP microarray, LOHs>10 Mb involving terminal regions or the whole chromosome were detected in 3 of 18 patients (17%). CGH+SNP microarray revealed cryptic LOHs with or without CNAs in 3 of 5 patients with normal karyotypes. CGH+SNP microarray detected additional cryptic CNAs (n=2) and LOHs (n=5) in 6 of 13 patients with abnormal MC. In total, 9 patients demonstrated additional aberrations, including CNAs (n=3) and/or LOHs (n=8). Three of 15 patients with AML and terminal LOH>10 Mb demonstrated a significantly inferior relapse-free survival rate (P=0.041). This study demonstrates that CGH+SNP microarray can simultaneously detect previously cryptic CNAs and LOH, which may demonstrate prognostic implications.

  2. Sequential interim analyses of survival data in DNA microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Discovery of biomarkers that are correlated with therapy response and thus with survival is an important goal of medical research on severe diseases, e.g. cancer. Frequently, microarray studies are performed to identify genes of which the expression levels in pretherapeutic tissue samples are correlated to survival times of patients. Typically, such a study can take several years until the full planned sample size is available. Therefore, interim analyses are desirable, offering the possibility of stopping the study earlier, or of performing additional laboratory experiments to validate the role of the detected genes. While many methods correcting the multiple testing bias introduced by interim analyses have been proposed for studies of one single feature, there are still open questions about interim analyses of multiple features, particularly of high-dimensional microarray data, where the number of features clearly exceeds the number of samples. Therefore, we examine false discovery rates and power rates in microarray experiments performed during interim analyses of survival studies. In addition, the early stopping based on interim results of such studies is evaluated. As stop criterion we employ the achieved average power rate, i.e. the proportion of detected true positives, for which a new estimator is derived and compared to existing estimators. Results In a simulation study, pre-specified levels of the false discovery rate are maintained in each interim analysis, where reduced levels as used in classical group sequential designs of one single feature are not necessary. Average power rates increase with each interim analysis, and many studies can be stopped prior to their planned end when a certain pre-specified power rate is achieved. The new estimator for the power rate slightly deviates from the true power rate but is comparable to other estimators. Conclusions Interim analyses of microarray experiments can provide evidence for early stopping of

  3. Gene set analyses for interpreting microarray experiments on prokaryotic organisms.

    SciTech Connect

    Tintle, Nathan; Best, Aaron; Dejongh, Matthew; VanBruggen, Dirk; Heffron, Fred; Porwollik, Steffen; Taylor, Ronald C.

    2008-11-05

    Background: Recent advances in microarray technology have brought with them the need for enhanced methods of biologically interpreting gene expression data. Recently, methods like Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and variants of Fisher’s exact test have been proposed which utilize a priori biological information. Typically, these methods are demonstrated with a priori biological information from the Gene Ontology. Results: Alternative gene set definitions are presented based on gene sets inferred from the SEED: open-source software environment for comparative genome annotation and analysis of microbial organisms. Many of these gene sets are then shown to provide consistent expression across a series of experiments involving Salmonella Typhimurium. Implementation of the gene sets in an analysis of microarray data is then presented for the Salmonella Typhimurium data. Conclusions: SEED inferred gene sets can be naturally defined based on subsystems in the SEED. The consistent expression values of these SEED inferred gene sets suggest their utility for statistical analyses of gene expression data based on a priori biological information

  4. Microarrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are revolutionizing genetics by making it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of DNA markers and to assess the expression (RNA transcripts) of all of the genes in the genome. Microarrays are slides the size of a postage stamp that contain millions of DNA sequences to which single-stranded DNA or RNA can hybridize. This…

  5. Microarrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are revolutionizing genetics by making it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of DNA markers and to assess the expression (RNA transcripts) of all of the genes in the genome. Microarrays are slides the size of a postage stamp that contain millions of DNA sequences to which single-stranded DNA or RNA can hybridize. This…

  6. Environmental microarray analyses of Antarctic soil microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Yergeau, Etienne; Schoondermark-Stolk, Sung A; Brodie, Eoin L; Déjean, Sébastien; DeSantis, Todd Z; Gonçalves, Olivier; Piceno, Yvette M; Andersen, Gary L; Kowalchuk, George A

    2009-03-01

    Antarctic ecosystems are fascinating in their limited trophic complexity, with decomposition and nutrient cycling functions being dominated by microbial activities. Not only are Antarctic habitats exposed to extreme environmental conditions, the Antarctic Peninsula is also experiencing unequalled effects of global warming. Owing to their uniqueness and the potential impact of global warming on these pristine systems, there is considerable interest in determining the structure and function of microbial communities in the Antarctic. We therefore utilized a recently designed 16S rRNA gene microarray, the PhyloChip, which targets 8741 bacterial and archaeal taxa, to interrogate microbial communities inhabiting densely vegetated and bare fell-field soils along a latitudinal gradient ranging from 51 degrees S (Falkland Islands) to 72 degrees S (Coal Nunatak). Results indicated a clear decrease in diversity with increasing latitude, with the two southernmost sites harboring the most distinct Bacterial and Archaeal communities. The microarray approach proved more sensitive in detecting the breadth of microbial diversity than polymerase chain reaction-based bacterial 16S rRNA gene libraries of modest size ( approximately 190 clones per library). Furthermore, the relative signal intensities summed for phyla and families on the PhyloChip were significantly correlated with the relative occurrence of these taxa in clone libraries. PhyloChip data were also compared with functional gene microarray data obtained earlier, highlighting numerous significant relationships and providing evidence for a strong link between community composition and functional gene distribution in Antarctic soils. Integration of these PhyloChip data with other complementary methods provides an unprecedented understanding of the microbial diversity and community structure of terrestrial Antarctic habitats.

  7. Genome-wide transcription analyses in rice using tiling microarrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Wang, Xiangfeng; Stolc, Viktor; Li, Xueyong; Zhang, Dongfen; Su, Ning; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Li, Songgang; Cheng, Zhukuan; Wang, Jun; Deng, Xing Wang

    2006-01-01

    Sequencing and computational annotation revealed several features, including high gene numbers, unusual composition of the predicted genes and a large number of genes lacking homology to known genes, that distinguish the rice (Oryza sativa) genome from that of other fully sequenced model species. We report here a full-genome transcription analysis of the indica rice subspecies using high-density oligonucleotide tiling microarrays. Our results provided expression data support for the existence of 35,970 (81.9%) annotated gene models and identified 5,464 unique transcribed intergenic regions that share similar compositional properties with the annotated exons and have significant homology to other plant proteins. Elucidating and mapping of all transcribed regions revealed an association between global transcription and cytological chromosome features, and an overall similarity of transcriptional activity between duplicated segments of the genome. Collectively, our results provide the first whole-genome transcription map useful for further understanding the rice genome.

  8. Robust embryo identification using first polar body single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Treff, Nathan R; Su, Jing; Kasabwala, Natasha; Tao, Xin; Miller, Kathleen A; Scott, Richard T

    2010-05-01

    This study sought to validate a novel, minimally invasive system for embryo tracking by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based DNA fingerprinting of the first polar body. First polar body-based assignments of which embryos implanted and were delivered after multiple ET were 100% consistent with previously validated embryo DNA fingerprinting-based assignments. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene set analyses for interpreting microarray experiments on prokaryotic organisms.

    PubMed

    Tintle, Nathan L; Best, Aaron A; DeJongh, Matthew; Van Bruggen, Dirk; Heffron, Fred; Porwollik, Steffen; Taylor, Ronald C

    2008-11-05

    Despite the widespread usage of DNA microarrays, questions remain about how best to interpret the wealth of gene-by-gene transcriptional levels that they measure. Recently, methods have been proposed which use biologically defined sets of genes in interpretation, instead of examining results gene-by-gene. Despite a serious limitation, a method based on Fisher's exact test remains one of the few plausible options for gene set analysis when an experiment has few replicates, as is typically the case for prokaryotes. We extend five methods of gene set analysis from use on experiments with multiple replicates, for use on experiments with few replicates. We then use simulated and real data to compare these methods with each other and with the Fisher's exact test (FET) method. As a result of the simulation we find that a method named MAXMEAN-NR, maintains the nominal rate of false positive findings (type I error rate) while offering good statistical power and robustness to a variety of gene set distributions for set sizes of at least 10. Other methods (ABSSUM-NR or SUM-NR) are shown to be powerful for set sizes less than 10. Analysis of three sets of experimental data shows similar results. Furthermore, the MAXMEAN-NR method is shown to be able to detect biologically relevant sets as significant, when other methods (including FET) cannot. We also find that the popular GSEA-NR method performs poorly when compared to MAXMEAN-NR. MAXMEAN-NR is a method of gene set analysis for experiments with few replicates, as is common for prokaryotes. Results of simulation and real data analysis suggest that the MAXMEAN-NR method offers increased robustness and biological relevance of findings as compared to FET and other methods, while maintaining the nominal type I error rate.

  10. Gene set analyses for interpreting microarray experiments on prokaryotic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Tintle, Nathan L; Best, Aaron A; DeJongh, Matthew; Van Bruggen, Dirk; Heffron, Fred; Porwollik, Steffen; Taylor, Ronald C

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite the widespread usage of DNA microarrays, questions remain about how best to interpret the wealth of gene-by-gene transcriptional levels that they measure. Recently, methods have been proposed which use biologically defined sets of genes in interpretation, instead of examining results gene-by-gene. Despite a serious limitation, a method based on Fisher's exact test remains one of the few plausible options for gene set analysis when an experiment has few replicates, as is typically the case for prokaryotes. Results We extend five methods of gene set analysis from use on experiments with multiple replicates, for use on experiments with few replicates. We then use simulated and real data to compare these methods with each other and with the Fisher's exact test (FET) method. As a result of the simulation we find that a method named MAXMEAN-NR, maintains the nominal rate of false positive findings (type I error rate) while offering good statistical power and robustness to a variety of gene set distributions for set sizes of at least 10. Other methods (ABSSUM-NR or SUM-NR) are shown to be powerful for set sizes less than 10. Analysis of three sets of experimental data shows similar results. Furthermore, the MAXMEAN-NR method is shown to be able to detect biologically relevant sets as significant, when other methods (including FET) cannot. We also find that the popular GSEA-NR method performs poorly when compared to MAXMEAN-NR. Conclusion MAXMEAN-NR is a method of gene set analysis for experiments with few replicates, as is common for prokaryotes. Results of simulation and real data analysis suggest that the MAXMEAN-NR method offers increased robustness and biological relevance of findings as compared to FET and other methods, while maintaining the nominal type I error rate. PMID:18986519

  11. A molecular beacon microarray based on a quantum dot label for detecting single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qingsheng; Bai, Zhixiong; Liu, Yuqian; Sun, Qingjiang

    2016-03-15

    In this work, we report the application of streptavidin-coated quantum dot (strAV-QD) in molecular beacon (MB) microarray assays by using the strAV-QD to label the immobilized MB, avoiding target labeling and meanwhile obviating the use of amplification. The MBs are stem-loop structured oligodeoxynucleotides, modified with a thiol and a biotin at two terminals of the stem. With the strAV-QD labeling an "opened" MB rather than a "closed" MB via streptavidin-biotin reaction, a sensitive and specific detection of label-free target DNA sequence is demonstrated by the MB microarray, with a signal-to-background ratio of 8. The immobilized MBs can be perfectly regenerated, allowing the reuse of the microarray. The MB microarray also is able to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms, exhibiting genotype-dependent fluorescence signals. It is demonstrated that the MB microarray can perform as a 4-to-2 encoder, compressing the genotype information into two outputs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Using microarray analysis to evaluate genetic polymorphisms involved in the metabolism of environmental chemicals.

    PubMed

    Ban, Susumu; Kondo, Tomoko; Ishizuka, Mayumi; Sasaki, Seiko; Konishi, Kanae; Washino, Noriaki; Fujita, Syoichi; Kishi, Reiko

    2007-05-01

    The field of molecular biology currently faces the need for a comprehensive method of evaluating individual differences derived from genetic variation in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). SNPs in human genes are generally considered to be very useful in determining inherited genetic disorders, susceptibility to certain diseases, and cancer predisposition. Quick and accurate discrimination of SNPs is the key characteristic of technology used in DNA diagnostics. For this study, we first developed a DNA microarray and then evaluated its efficacy by determining the detection ability and validity of this method. Using DNA obtained from 380 pregnant Japanese women, we examined 13 polymorphisms of 9 genes, which are associated with the metabolism of environmental chemical compounds found in high frequency among Japanese populations. The ability to detect CYP1A1 I462V, CYP1B1 L432V, GSTP1 I105V and AhR R554K gene polymorphisms was above 98%, and agreement rates when compared with real time PCR analysis methods (kappa values) showed high validity: 0.98 (0.96), 0.97 (0.93), 0.90 (0.81), 0.90 (0.91), respectively. While this DNA microarray analysis should prove important as a method for initial screening, it is still necessary that we find better methods for improving the detection of other gene polymorphisms not part of this study.

  13. GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN CDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN cDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    B.S. Pukazhenthi1, J. C. Rockett2, M. Ouyang3, D.J. Dix2, J.G. Howard1, P. Georgopoulos4, W.J. J. Welsh3 and D. E. Wildt1

    1Department of Reproductiv...

  14. GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN CDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    GENE EXPRESSION IN THE TESTES OF NORMOSPERMIC VERSUS TERATOSPERMIC DOMESTIC CATS USING HUMAN cDNA MICROARRAY ANALYSES

    B.S. Pukazhenthi1, J. C. Rockett2, M. Ouyang3, D.J. Dix2, J.G. Howard1, P. Georgopoulos4, W.J. J. Welsh3 and D. E. Wildt1

    1Department of Reproductiv...

  15. MAAMD: a workflow to standardize meta-analyses and comparison of affymetrix microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mandatory deposit of raw microarray data files for public access, prior to study publication, provides significant opportunities to conduct new bioinformatics analyses within and across multiple datasets. Analysis of raw microarray data files (e.g. Affymetrix CEL files) can be time consuming, complex, and requires fundamental computational and bioinformatics skills. The development of analytical workflows to automate these tasks simplifies the processing of, improves the efficiency of, and serves to standardize multiple and sequential analyses. Once installed, workflows facilitate the tedious steps required to run rapid intra- and inter-dataset comparisons. Results We developed a workflow to facilitate and standardize Meta-Analysis of Affymetrix Microarray Data analysis (MAAMD) in Kepler. Two freely available stand-alone software tools, R and AltAnalyze were embedded in MAAMD. The inputs of MAAMD are user-editable csv files, which contain sample information and parameters describing the locations of input files and required tools. MAAMD was tested by analyzing 4 different GEO datasets from mice and drosophila. MAAMD automates data downloading, data organization, data quality control assesment, differential gene expression analysis, clustering analysis, pathway visualization, gene-set enrichment analysis, and cross-species orthologous-gene comparisons. MAAMD was utilized to identify gene orthologues responding to hypoxia or hyperoxia in both mice and drosophila. The entire set of analyses for 4 datasets (34 total microarrays) finished in ~ one hour. Conclusions MAAMD saves time, minimizes the required computer skills, and offers a standardized procedure for users to analyze microarray datasets and make new intra- and inter-dataset comparisons. PMID:24621103

  16. The Clinical Utility of a Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray in Patients With Epilepsy at a Tertiary Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hrabik, Sarah A; Standridge, Shannon M; Greiner, Hansel M; Neilson, Derek E; Pilipenko, Valentina V; Zimmerman, Sarah L; Connor, Jessica A; Spaeth, Christine G

    2015-11-01

    Microarray testing has revolutionized clinical cytogenetics, as it provides a significantly higher resolution and greater clinical yield than karyotype analysis. This study assessed the clinical utility of single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray in patients with epilepsy. Study subjects were patients between the ages of birth to 23 years who were diagnosed with epilepsy and had a microarray performed at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Statistical analysis explored the association of microarray results and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), seizure type, and structural malformations. Approximately 17.7% (26/147) of participants had an abnormal microarray as defined by laboratory guidelines. There were no differences in frequency of abnormal brain MRI or seizure type between the abnormal and normal microarray groups. There was a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal malformations (P < .0035) and cardiovascular malformations (P < .0081) in subjects with abnormal microarrays. Clinicians should consider microarray analysis in individuals who have epilepsy, especially in combination with musculoskeletal malformation or cardiovascular malformation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Microarray study of single nucleotide polymorphisms and expression of ATP-binding cassette genes in breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, M. M.; Ibragimova, M. K.; Karabut, I. V.; Freydin, M. B.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Litvyakov, N. V.

    2015-11-01

    Our previous research establishes that changes of expression of the ATP-binding cassette genes family is connected with the neoadjuvant chemotherapy effect. However, the mechanism of regulation of resistance gene expression remains unclear. As many researchers believe, single nucleotide polymorphisms can be involved in this process. Thereupon, microarray analysis is used to study polymorphisms in ATP-binding cassette genes. It is thus found that MDR gene expression is connected with 5 polymorphisms, i.e. rs241432, rs241429, rs241430, rs3784867, rs59409230, which participate in the regulation of expression of own genes.

  18. Genome-wide DNA polymorphism analyses using VariScan

    PubMed Central

    Hutter, Stephan; Vilella, Albert J; Rozas, Julio

    2006-01-01

    Background DNA sequence polymorphisms analysis can provide valuable information on the evolutionary forces shaping nucleotide variation, and provides an insight into the functional significance of genomic regions. The recent ongoing genome projects will radically improve our capabilities to detect specific genomic regions shaped by natural selection. Current available methods and software, however, are unsatisfactory for such genome-wide analysis. Results We have developed methods for the analysis of DNA sequence polymorphisms at the genome-wide scale. These methods, which have been tested on a coalescent-simulated and actual data files from mouse and human, have been implemented in the VariScan software package version 2.0. Additionally, we have also incorporated a graphical-user interface. The main features of this software are: i) exhaustive population-genetic analyses including those based on the coalescent theory; ii) analysis adapted to the shallow data generated by the high-throughput genome projects; iii) use of genome annotations to conduct a comprehensive analyses separately for different functional regions; iv) identification of relevant genomic regions by the sliding-window and wavelet-multiresolution approaches; v) visualization of the results integrated with current genome annotations in commonly available genome browsers. Conclusion VariScan is a powerful and flexible suite of software for the analysis of DNA polymorphisms. The current version implements new algorithms, methods, and capabilities, providing an important tool for an exhaustive exploratory analysis of genome-wide DNA polymorphism data. PMID:16968531

  19. Development of multiplex DNA electronic microarrays using a universal adaptor system for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Shirley; Sun, Zhonghe; Stewart, Claudia; Lum, Nicole; Frankenberger, Casey; Subleski, Marianne; Rasmussen, Lynn; Munroe, David J

    2004-04-01

    The NanoChip electronic microarray is designed for the rapid detection of genetic variation in research and clinical diagnosis. We have developed a multiplex electronic microarray assay, specific for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping and mutation detection, using universal adaptor sequences tailed to the 5' end of PCR primers specific to each target. PCR products, amplified by primers directed to the universal adaptor sequence, are immobilized on the microarray either directly or via capture oligonucleotides complementary to the universal adaptor sequence. This simple modification results in a significant increase in fidelity with improved specificity and accuracy. In addition, the multiplexing of genetic variant detection allows increased throughput and significantly reduced cost per assay. This general schema can also be applied to other microarray and macroarray formats.

  20. New single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in homologous recombination repair genes detected by microarray analysis in Polish breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Romanowicz, Hanna; Strapagiel, Dominik; Słomka, Marcin; Sobalska-Kwapis, Marta; Kępka, Ewa; Siewierska-Górska, Anna; Zadrożny, Marek; Bieńkiewicz, Jan; Smolarz, Beata

    2016-11-30

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of malignancy and mortality in women worldwide. This study aimed at localising homologous recombination repair (HR) genes and their chromosomal loci and correlating their nucleotide variants with susceptibility to breast cancer. In this study, authors analysed the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in homologous recombination repair genes and the incidence of breast cancer in the population of Polish women. Blood samples from 94 breast cancer patients were analysed as test group. Individuals were recruited into the study at the Department of Oncological Surgery and Breast Diseases of the Institute of the Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital in Lodz, Poland. Healthy controls (n = 500) were obtained from the Biobank Laboratory, Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz. Then, DNA of breast cancer patients was compared with one of the disease-free women. The test was supported by microarray analysis. Statistically significant correlations were identified between breast cancer and 3 not described previously SNPs of homologous recombination repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2: rs59004709, rs4986852 and rs1799950. Further studies on larger groups are warranted to support the hypothesis of correlation between the abovementioned genetic variants and breast cancer risk.

  1. Pigeons: A Novel GUI Software for Analysing and Parsing High Density Heterologous Oligonucleotide Microarray Probe Level Data

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hung-Ming; May, Sean T.; Mayes, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Genomic DNA-based probe selection by using high density oligonucleotide arrays has recently been applied to heterologous species (Xspecies). With the advent of this new approach, researchers are able to study the genome and transcriptome of a non-model or an underutilised crop species through current state-of-the-art microarray platforms. However, a software package with a graphical user interface (GUI) to analyse and parse the oligonucleotide probe pair level data is still lacking when an experiment is designed on the basis of this cross species approach. A novel computer program called Pigeons has been developed for customised array data analysis to allow the user to import and analyse Affymetrix GeneChip® probe level data through XSpecies. One can determine empirical boundaries for removing poor probes based on genomic hybridisation of the test species to the Xspecies array, followed by making a species-specific Chip Description File (CDF) file for transcriptomics in the heterologous species, or Pigeons can be used to examine an experimental design to identify potential Single-Feature Polymorphisms (SFPs) at the DNA or RNA level. Pigeons is also focused around visualization and interactive analysis of the datasets. The software with its manual (the current release number version 1.2.1) is freely available at the website of the Nottingham Arabidopsis Stock Centre (NASC). PMID:27605027

  2. Rapid and sensitive detection of UGT1A1 polymorphisms associated with irinotecan toxicity by a novel DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Tsunedomi, Ryouichi; Hazama, Shoichi; Okayama, Naoko; Oka, Masaaki; Nagano, Hiroaki

    2017-07-01

    Recent developments in the field of human genomics have greatly enhanced the potential for precision and personalized medicine. We have developed a novel DNA microarray, using a 3-mm square chip coated with diamond-like carbon to enhance the signal-to-background ratio, for use as an in vitro diagnostic tool in precision medicine. To verify the genotyping effectiveness of this newly developed DNA microarray we examined UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) polymorphisms in DNA extracted from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. It is established that the polymorphisms of UGT1A1*28 and UGT1A1*6 are significantly associated with severe toxicity induced by the anti-cancer drug irinotecan. For each sample, the results obtained with the novel microarray platform were compared with those obtained using other, more established, methods, including direct sequencing and the Invader assay. The polymorphisms tested included a single nucleotide substitution (UGT1A1*6) and a TA-repeat polymorphism (UGT1A1*28), both of which were detected simultaneously and accurately using our method. Moreover, our method required 1.5-fold less time to assay and 20-fold less sample than those required by the Invader assay. In summary, our newly developed DNA microarray is more practical than established methods, and is at least as accurate; this will increase the efficiency of polymorphism detection prior to diagnosis and the commencement of treatment, and can feasibly be applied in precision medicine. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  3. Analysing breast cancer microarrays from African Americans using shrinkage-based discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Herbert; Ebisu, Keita; Watanabe, Emi; Sue, Laura Y; Tong, Tiejun

    2010-10-01

    Breast cancer tumours among African Americans are usually more aggressive than those found in Caucasian populations. African-American patients with breast cancer also have higher mortality rates than Caucasian women. A better understanding of the disease aetiology of these breast cancers can help to improve and develop new methods for cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment. The main goal of this project was to identify genes that help differentiate between oestrogen receptor-positive and -negative samples among a small group of African-American patients with breast cancer. Breast cancer microarrays from one of the largest genomic consortiums were analysed using 13 African-American and 201 Caucasian samples with oestrogen receptor status. We used a shrinkage-based classification method to identify genes that were informative in discriminating between oestrogen receptor-positive and -negative samples. Subset analysis and permutation were performed to obtain a set of genes unique to the African-American population. We identified a set of 156 probe sets, which gave a misclassification rate of 0.16 in distinguishing between oestrogen receptor-positive and -negative patients. The biological relevance of our findings was explored through literature-mining techniques and pathway mapping. An independent dataset was used to validate our findings and we found that the top ten genes mapped onto this dataset gave a misclassification rate of 0.15. The described method allows us best to utilise the information available from small sample size microarray data in the context of ethnic minorities.

  4. Response of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) to 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' infection: microscopy and microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Soon; Sagaram, Uma Shankar; Burns, Jacqueline K; Li, Jian-Liang; Wang, Nian

    2009-01-01

    Citrus greening or huanglongbing (HLB) is a devastating disease of citrus. HLB is associated with the phloem-limited fastidious prokaryotic alpha-proteobacterium 'Candidatus Liberibacter spp.' In this report, we used sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) leaf tissue infected with 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' and compared this with healthy controls. Investigation of the host response was examined with citrus microarray hybridization based on 33,879 expressed sequence tag sequences from several citrus species and hybrids. The microarray analysis indicated that HLB infection significantly affected expression of 624 genes whose encoded proteins were categorized according to function. The categories included genes associated with sugar metabolism, plant defense, phytohormone, and cell wall metabolism, as well as 14 other gene categories. The anatomical analyses indicated that HLB bacterium infection caused phloem disruption, sucrose accumulation, and plugged sieve pores. The up-regulation of three key starch biosynthetic genes including ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase, granule-bound starch synthase and starch debranching enzyme likely contributed to accumulation of starch in HLB-affected leaves. The HLB-associated phloem blockage resulted from the plugged sieve pores rather than the HLB bacterial aggregates since 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' does not form aggregate in citrus. The up-regulation of pp2 gene is related to callose deposition to plug the sieve pores in HLB-affected plants.

  5. Microarray and cytokine analyses of field cases of pigs with diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, M; Andersson, M; Lindberg, R; Fossum, C; Jensen-Waern, M

    2011-12-15

    This field study explored the cytokine expression in intestinal tissue and serum from 19 diarrhoeic and 9 healthy pigs in herds with a long-time history of Lawsonia intracellularis-infection. The disease, proliferative enteropathy (PE), is associated with diarrhoea and poor performance in growers and haemorrhagic diarrhoea and sudden death in finisher pigs, but the immunopathology is poorly understood. Histopathology, demonstration of L. intracellularis and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in intestinal tissue by PCR, and detection of serum antibodies to L. intracellularis, were performed. The presence of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-α, IFN-γ, TNF-α and TGF-β in sera was determined by immunoassays, and intestinal mRNA expression of these cytokines plus IL-12p40 was determined by qPCR. Intestinal specimens from pigs with intestinal adenomatosis (n=2), proliferative haemorrhagic enteropathy or swine dysentery (n=2), and controls (n=2) were analysed by a genome wide porcine microarray. The clinical signs of PE were not always supported by the subsequent analyses, and the presence of PCV2 may have contributed to an increased mRNA expression for IFN-γ in intestinal specimens from some pigs. The limited gene expression in the microarray analyses and the limited expression of cytokines in both sera and intestines, indicate that the immune response is poorly activated in the initial course of an infection with L. intracellularis. However, the gene encoding for insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) was up-regulated in two pigs with prominent mucosal proliferation.

  6. Detection of genome-wide polymorphisms in the AT-rich Plasmodium falciparum genome using a high-density microarray

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongying; Yi, Ming; Mu, Jianbing; Zhang, Louie; Ivens, Al; Klimczak, Leszek J; Huyen, Yentram; Stephens, Robert M; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetic mapping is a powerful method to identify mutations that cause drug resistance and other phenotypic changes in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. For efficient mapping of a target gene, it is often necessary to genotype a large number of polymorphic markers. Currently, a community effort is underway to collect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) from the parasite genome. Here we evaluate polymorphism detection accuracy of a high-density 'tiling' microarray with 2.56 million probes by comparing single feature polymorphisms (SFP) calls from the microarray with known SNP among parasite isolates. Results We found that probe GC content, SNP position in a probe, probe coverage, and signal ratio cutoff values were important factors for accurate detection of SFP in the parasite genome. We established a set of SFP calling parameters that could predict mSFP (SFP called by multiple overlapping probes) with high accuracy (≥ 94%) and identified 121,087 mSFP genome-wide from five parasite isolates including 40,354 unique mSFP (excluding those from multi-gene families) and ~18,000 new mSFP, producing a genetic map with an average of one unique mSFP per 570 bp. Genomic copy number variation (CNV) among the parasites was also cataloged and compared. Conclusion A large number of mSFP were discovered from the P. falciparum genome using a high-density microarray, most of which were in clusters of highly polymorphic genes at chromosome ends. Our method for accurate mSFP detection and the mSFP identified will greatly facilitate large-scale studies of genome variation in the P. falciparum parasite and provide useful resources for mapping important parasite traits. PMID:18724869

  7. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism-Microarray Ploidy Analysis of Paraffin-Embedded Products of Conception in Recurrent Pregnancy Loss Evaluations.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Bat-Sheva L; Budinetz, Tara; Sueldo, Carolina; Anspach, Erica; Engmann, Lawrence; Benadiva, Claudio; Nulsen, John C

    2015-07-01

    To compare the analysis of chromosome number from paraffin-embedded products of conception using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray with the recommended screening for the evaluation of couples presenting with recurrent pregnancy loss who do not have previous fetal cytogenetic data. We performed a retrospective cohort study including all women who presented for a new evaluation of recurrent pregnancy loss over a 2-year period (January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013). All participants had at least two documented first-trimester losses and both the recommended screening tests and SNP microarray performed on at least one paraffin-embedded products of conception sample. Single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray identifies all 24 chromosomes (22 autosomes, X, and Y). Forty-two women with a total of 178 losses were included in the study. Paraffin-embedded products of conception from 62 losses were sent for SNP microarray. Single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray successfully diagnosed fetal chromosome number in 71% (44/62) of samples, of which 43% (19/44) were euploid and 57% (25/44) were noneuploid. Seven of 42 (17%) participants had abnormalities on recurrent pregnancy loss screening. The per-person detection rate for a cause of pregnancy loss was significantly higher in the SNP microarray (0.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.36-0.64) compared with recurrent pregnancy loss evaluation (0.17; 95% CI 0.08-0.31) (P=.002). Participants with one or more euploid loss identified on paraffin-embedded products of conception were significantly more likely to have an abnormality on recurrent pregnancy loss screening than those with only noneuploid results (P=.028). The significance remained when controlling for age, number of losses, number of samples, and total pregnancies. These results suggest that SNP microarray testing of paraffin-embedded products of conception is a valuable tool for the evaluation of recurrent pregnancy loss in patients without prior fetal

  8. Assessment and integration of publicly available SAGE, cDNA microarray, and oligonucleotide microarray expression data for global coexpression analyses.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Obi L; Pleasance, Erin D; Fulton, Debra L; Oveisi, Mehrdad; Ester, Martin; Siddiqui, Asim S; Jones, Steven J M

    2005-10-01

    Large amounts of gene expression data from several different technologies are becoming available to the scientific community. A common practice is to use these data to calculate global gene coexpression for validation or integration of other "omic" data. To assess the utility of publicly available datasets for this purpose we have analyzed Homo sapiens data from 1202 cDNA microarray experiments, 242 SAGE libraries, and 667 Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray experiments. The three datasets compared demonstrate significant but low levels of global concordance (rc<0.11). Assessment against Gene Ontology (GO) revealed that all three platforms identify more coexpressed gene pairs with common biological processes than expected by chance. As the Pearson correlation for a gene pair increased it was more likely to be confirmed by GO. The Affymetrix dataset performed best individually with gene pairs of correlation 0.9-1.0 confirmed by GO in 74% of cases. However, in all cases, gene pairs confirmed by multiple platforms were more likely to be confirmed by GO. We show that combining results from different expression platforms increases reliability of coexpression. A comparison with other recently published coexpression studies found similar results in terms of performance against GO but with each method producing distinctly different gene pair lists.

  9. Identification of conserved core xylem gene sets: conifer cDNA microarray development, transcript profiling and computational analyses.

    PubMed

    Pavy, Nathalie; Boyle, Brian; Nelson, Colleen; Paule, Charles; Giguère, Isabelle; Caron, Sébastien; Parsons, Lee S; Dallaire, Nancy; Bedon, Frank; Bérubé, Hugo; Cooke, Janice; Mackay, John

    2008-01-01

    One approach for investigating the molecular basis of wood formation is to integrate microarray profiling data sets and sequence analyses, comparing tree species with model plants such as Arabidopsis. Conifers may be included in comparative studies thanks to large-scale expressed sequence tag (EST) analyses, which enable the development of cDNA microarrays with very significant genome coverage. A microarray of 10,400 low-redundancy sequences was designed starting from white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench.) Voss) cDNAs. Computational procedures that were developed to ensure broad transcriptome coverage and efficient PCR amplification were used to select cDNA clones, which were re-sequenced in the microarray manufacture process. White spruce transcript profiling experiments that compared secondary xylem to phloem and needles identified 360 xylem-preferential gene sequences. The functional annotations of all differentially expressed sequences were highly consistent with the results of similar analyses carried out in angiosperm trees and herbaceous plants. Computational analyses comparing the spruce microarray sequences and core xylem gene sets from Arabidopsis identified 31 transcripts that were highly conserved in angiosperms and gymnosperms, in terms of both sequence and xylem expression. Several other spruce sequences have not previously been linked to xylem differentiation (including genes encoding TUBBY-like domain proteins (TLPs) and a gibberellin insensitive (gai) gene sequence) or were shown to encode proteins of unknown function encompassing diverse conserved domains of unknown function.

  10. High-resolution genomic copy number profiling of glioblastoma multiforme by single nucleotide polymorphism DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dong; Ogawa, Seishi; Kawamata, Norihiko; Tunici, Patrizia; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Eoli, Marica; Ruckert, Christian; Huynh, Thien; Liu, Gentao; Kato, Motohiro; Sanada, Masashi; Jauch, Anna; Dugas, Martin; Black, Keith L; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2009-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an extremely malignant brain tumor. To identify new genomic alterations in GBM, genomic DNA of tumor tissue/explants from 55 individuals and 6 GBM cell lines were examined using single nucleotide polymorphism DNA microarray (SNP-Chip). Further gene expression analysis relied on an additional 56 GBM samples. SNP-Chip results were validated using several techniques, including quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), nucleotide sequencing, and a combination of Q-PCR and detection of microsatellite markers for loss of heterozygosity with normal copy number [acquired uniparental disomy (AUPD)]. Whole genomic DNA copy number in each GBM sample was profiled by SNP-Chip. Several signaling pathways were frequently abnormal. Either the p16(INK4A)/p15(INK4B)-CDK4/6-pRb or p14(ARF)-MDM2/4-p53 pathways were abnormal in 89% (49 of 55) of cases. Simultaneous abnormalities of both pathways occurred in 84% (46 of 55) samples. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase pathway was altered in 71% (39 of 55) GBMs either by deletion of PTEN or amplification of epidermal growth factor receptor and/or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha. Deletion of chromosome 6q26-27 often occurred (16 of 55 samples). The minimum common deleted region included PARK2, PACRG, QKI, and PDE10A genes. Further reverse transcription Q-PCR studies showed that PARK2 expression was decreased in another collection of GBMs at a frequency of 61% (34 of 56) of samples. The 1p36.23 region was deleted in 35% (19 of 55) of samples. Notably, three samples had homozygous deletion encompassing this site. Also, a novel internal deletion of a putative tumor suppressor gene, LRP1B, was discovered causing an aberrant protein. AUPDs occurred in 58% (32 of 55) of the GBM samples and five of six GBM cell lines. A common AUPD was found at chromosome 17p13.3-12 (included p53 gene) in 13 of 61 samples and cell lines. Single-strand conformational polymorphism and nucleotide

  11. Optimization of diagnostic microarray for application in analysing landfill methanotroph communities under different plant covers.

    PubMed

    Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Sessitsch, Angela; Weilharter, Alexandra; Reichenauer, Thomas; Riesing, Johann; Csontos, József; Murrell, J Colin; Bodrossy, Levente

    2004-04-01

    Landfill sites are responsible for 6-12% of global methane emission. Methanotrophs play a very important role in decreasing landfill site methane emissions. We investigated the methane oxidation capacity and methanotroph diversity in lysimeters simulating landfill sites with different plant vegetations. Methane oxidation rates were 35 g methane m-2 day-1 or higher for planted lysimeters and 18 g methane m-2 day-1 or less for bare soil controls. Best methane oxidation, as displayed by gas depth profiles, was found under a vegetation of grass and alfalfa. Methanotroph communities were analysed at high throughput and resolution using a microbial diagnostic microarray targeting the particulate methane monooxygenase (pmoA) gene of methanotrophs and functionally related bacteria. Members of the genera Methylocystis and Methylocaldum were found to be the dominant members in landfill site simulating lysimeters. Soil bacterial communities in biogas free control lysimeters, which were less abundant in methanotrophs, were dominated by Methylocaldum. Type Ia methanotrophs were found only in the top layers of bare soil lysimeters with relatively high oxygen and low methane concentrations. A competetive advantage of type II methanotrophs over type Ia methanotrophs was indicated under all plant covers investigated. Analysis of average and individual results from parallel samples was used to identify general trends and variations in methanotroph community structures in relation to depth, methane supply and plant cover. The applicability of the technology for the detection of environmental perturbations was proven by an erroneous result, where an unexpected community composition detected with the microarray indicated a potential gas leakage in the lysimeter being investigated.

  12. Development of a single nucleotide polymorphism DNA microarray for the detection and genotyping of the SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xi; Geng, Peng; Wang, Quan; Cao, Boyang; Liu, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a disease that spread widely in the world during late 2002 to 2004, severely threatened public health. Although there have been no reported infections since 2004, the extremely pathogenic SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), as the causative agent of SARS, has recently been identified in animals, showing the potential for the re-emergence of this disease. Previous studies showed that 27 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutations among the spike (S) gene of this virus are correlated closely with the SARS pathogenicity and epidemicity. We have developed a SNP DNA microarray in order to detect and genotype these SNPs, and to obtain related information on the pathogenicity and epidemicity of a given strain. The microarray was hybridized with PCR products amplified from cDNAs obtained from different SARS-CoV strains. We were able to detect 24 SNPs and determine the type of a given strain. The hybridization profile showed that 19 samples were detected and genotyped correctly by using our microarray, with 100% accuracy. Our microarray provides a novel method for the detection and epidemiological surveillance of SARS-CoV.

  13. A Hidden Markov model web application for analysing bacterial genomotyping DNA microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Newton, Richard; Hinds, Jason; Wernisch, Lorenz

    2006-01-01

    Whole genome DNA microarray genomotyping experiments compare the gene content of different species or strains of bacteria. A statistical approach to analysing the results of these experiments was developed, based on a Hidden Markov model (HMM), which takes adjacency of genes along the genome into account when calling genes present or absent. The model was implemented in the statistical language R and applied to three datasets. The method is numerically stable with good convergence properties. Error rates are reduced compared with approaches that ignore spatial information. Moreover, the HMM circumvents a problem encountered in a conventional analysis: determining the cut-off value to use to classify a gene as absent. An Apache Struts web interface for the R script was created for the benefit of users unfamiliar with R. The application may be found at http://hmmgd.cryst.bbk.ac.uk/hmmgd. The source code illustrating how to run R scripts from an Apache Struts-based web application is available from the corresponding author on request. The application is also available for local installation if required.

  14. Microarray Analyses and Comparisons of Upper or Lower Flanks of Rice Shoot Base Preceding Gravitropic Bending

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Aiping; Chen, Haiying; Dou, Xianying; Jin, Jing; Cai, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    Gravitropism is a complex process involving a series of physiological pathways. Despite ongoing research, gravitropism sensing and response mechanisms are not well understood. To identify the key transcripts and corresponding pathways in gravitropism, a whole-genome microarray approach was used to analyze transcript abundance in the shoot base of rice (Oryza sativa sp. japonica) at 0.5 h and 6 h after gravistimulation by horizontal reorientation. Between upper and lower flanks of the shoot base, 167 transcripts at 0.5 h and 1202 transcripts at 6 h were discovered to be significantly different in abundance by 2-fold. Among these transcripts, 48 were found to be changed both at 0.5 h and 6 h, while 119 transcripts were only changed at 0.5 h and 1154 transcripts were changed at 6 h in association with gravitropism. MapMan and PageMan analyses were used to identify transcripts significantly changed in abundance. The asymmetric regulation of transcripts related to phytohormones, signaling, RNA transcription, metabolism and cell wall-related categories between upper and lower flanks were demonstrated. Potential roles of the identified transcripts in gravitropism are discussed. Our results suggest that the induction of asymmetrical transcription, likely as a consequence of gravitropic reorientation, precedes gravitropic bending in the rice shoot base. PMID:24040303

  15. Methods for transcriptomic analyses of the porcine host immune response: application to Salmonella infection using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Tuggle, C K; Bearson, S M D; Uthe, J J; Huang, T H; Couture, O P; Wang, Y F; Kuhar, D; Lunney, J K; Honavar, V

    2010-12-15

    Technological developments in both the collection and analysis of molecular genetic data over the past few years have provided new opportunities for an improved understanding of the global response to pathogen exposure. Such developments are particularly dramatic for scientists studying the pig, where tools to measure the expression of tens of thousands of transcripts, as well as unprecedented data on the porcine genome sequence, have combined to expand our abilities to elucidate the porcine immune system. In this review, we describe these recent developments in the context of our work using primarily microarrays to explore gene expression changes during infection of pigs by Salmonella. Thus while the focus is not a comprehensive review of all possible approaches, we provide links and information on both the tools we use as well as alternatives commonly available for transcriptomic data collection and analysis of porcine immune responses. Through this review, we expect readers will gain an appreciation for the necessary steps to plan, conduct, analyze and interpret the data from transcriptomic analyses directly applicable to their research interests. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Gene co-expression analyses: an overview from microarray collections in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Di Salle, Pasquale; Incerti, Guido; Colantuono, Chiara; Chiusano, Maria Luisa

    2017-03-01

    Bioinformatics web-based resources and databases are precious references for most biological laboratories worldwide. However, the quality and reliability of the information they provide depends on them being used in an appropriate way that takes into account their specific features. Huge collections of gene expression data are currently publicly available, ready to support the understanding of gene and genome functionalities. In this context, tools and resources for gene co-expression analyses have flourished to exploit the 'guilty by association' principle, which assumes that genes with correlated expression profiles are functionally related. In the case of Arabidopsis thaliana, the reference species in plant biology, the resources available mainly consist of microarray results. After a general overview of such resources, we tested and compared the results they offer for gene co-expression analysis. We also discuss the effect on the results when using different data sets, as well as different data normalization approaches and parameter settings, which often consider different metrics for establishing co-expression. A dedicated example analysis of different gene pools, implemented by including/excluding mutant samples in a reference data set, showed significant variation of gene co-expression occurrence, magnitude and direction. We conclude that, as the heterogeneity of the resources and methods may produce different results for the same query genes, the exploration of more than one of the available resources is strongly recommended. The aim of this article is to show how best to integrate data sources and/or merge outputs to achieve robust analyses and reliable interpretations, thereby making use of diverse data resources an opportunity for added value. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Multiple detection of single nucleotide polymorphism by microarray-based resonance light scattering assay with enlarged gold nanoparticle probes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiaxue; Ma, Lan; Lei, Zhen; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-03-07

    The mapping of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients' genome is a critical process for the development of personalized therapy. In this work, a DNA microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay has been developed for multiplexed detection of breast cancer related SNPs with high sensitivity and selectivity. After hybridization of the desired target single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) with the ssDNA probes on a microarray, the polyvalent ssDNA modified 13 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are employed to label the hybridization reaction through the formation of a three-stranded DNA system. The H2O2-mediated enlargement of GNPs is then used to enhance the RLS signal. The microarray-based RLS assay provides a detection limit of 10 pM (S/N = 3) for the target ssDNA and determines an allele frequency as low as 1.0% in the target ssDNA cocktail. Combined with an asymmetric PCR technique, the proposed assay shows good accuracy and sensitivity in profiling 4 SNPs related to breast cancer of three selected cell lines.

  18. Clinical utility of concurrent single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray on fresh tissue as a supplementary test in the diagnosis of renal epithelial neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Heidi H; McDermott, Annie; Smith, M Timothy; Savage, Stephen J; Wolff, Daynna J

    2015-11-01

    The histologic and immunohistochemical variability of renal epithelial tumors makes classification difficult; with significant clinical implications, efforts to make the proper diagnoses are necessary. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray analysis has been proposed as a supplementary study for the classification of renal epithelial neoplasms; however, its practical use in the routine clinical setting has not been explored. Surgical pathology cases that were classified histologically as renal epithelial tumor subtypes and had concurrent SNP microarray were retrospectively reviewed to correlate tumor morphology and SNP microarray results. Of the 99 cases reviewed, 88 (89%) had concordant histologic and microarray results. Four (4%) cases were unclassifiable by microarray due to uncharacteristic chromosomal abnormalities. Seven (7%) of the 99 cases had discordant microarray and histologic diagnoses, and following review of the histology, the diagnoses in two of these cases were subsequently changed. For most cases, concurrent SNP microarray confirmed the histologic diagnosis. However, discrepant microarray results prompted review of morphology and further ancillary studies, resulting in amendment of the final diagnosis in 29% of discrepant cases. SNP microarray analysis can be used to assist with the diagnosis of renal epithelial tumors, particularly those with atypical morphologic features. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  19. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  20. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  1. Macrophage Gene Expression Associated with Remodeling of the Prepartum Rat Cervix: Microarray and Pathway Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Dobyns, Abigail E.; Goyal, Ravi; Carpenter, Lauren Grisham; Freeman, Tom C.; Longo, Lawrence D.; Yellon, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    As the critical gatekeeper for birth, prepartum remodeling of the cervix is associated with increased resident macrophages (Mφ), proinflammatory processes, and extracellular matrix degradation. This study tested the hypothesis that expression of genes unique to Mφs characterizes the prepartum from unremodeled nonpregnant cervix. Perfused cervix from prepartum day 21 postbreeding (D21) or nonpregnant (NP) rats, with or without Mφs, had RNA extracted and whole genome microarray analysis performed. By subtractive analyses, expression of 194 and 120 genes related to Mφs in the cervix from D21 rats were increased and decreased, respectively. In both D21 and NP groups, 158 and 57 Mφ genes were also more or less up- or down-regulated, respectively. Mφ gene expression patterns were most strongly correlated within groups and in 5 major clustering patterns. In the cervix from D21 rats, functional categories and canonical pathways of increased expression by Mφ gene related to extracellular matrix, cell proliferation, differentiation, as well as cell signaling. Pathways were characteristic of inflammation and wound healing, e.g., CD163, CD206, and CCR2. Signatures of only inflammation pathways, e.g., CSF1R, EMR1, and MMP12 were common to both D21 and NP groups. Thus, a novel and complex balance of Mφ genes and clusters differentiated the degraded extracellular matrix and cellular genomic activities in the cervix before birth from the unremodeled state. Predicted Mφ activities, pathways, and networks raise the possibility that expression patterns of specific genes characterize and promote prepartum remodeling of the cervix for parturition at term and with preterm labor. PMID:25811906

  2. Macrophage gene expression associated with remodeling of the prepartum rat cervix: microarray and pathway analyses.

    PubMed

    Dobyns, Abigail E; Goyal, Ravi; Carpenter, Lauren Grisham; Freeman, Tom C; Longo, Lawrence D; Yellon, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    As the critical gatekeeper for birth, prepartum remodeling of the cervix is associated with increased resident macrophages (Mφ), proinflammatory processes, and extracellular matrix degradation. This study tested the hypothesis that expression of genes unique to Mφs characterizes the prepartum from unremodeled nonpregnant cervix. Perfused cervix from prepartum day 21 postbreeding (D21) or nonpregnant (NP) rats, with or without Mφs, had RNA extracted and whole genome microarray analysis performed. By subtractive analyses, expression of 194 and 120 genes related to Mφs in the cervix from D21 rats were increased and decreased, respectively. In both D21 and NP groups, 158 and 57 Mφ genes were also more or less up- or down-regulated, respectively. Mφ gene expression patterns were most strongly correlated within groups and in 5 major clustering patterns. In the cervix from D21 rats, functional categories and canonical pathways of increased expression by Mφ gene related to extracellular matrix, cell proliferation, differentiation, as well as cell signaling. Pathways were characteristic of inflammation and wound healing, e.g., CD163, CD206, and CCR2. Signatures of only inflammation pathways, e.g., CSF1R, EMR1, and MMP12 were common to both D21 and NP groups. Thus, a novel and complex balance of Mφ genes and clusters differentiated the degraded extracellular matrix and cellular genomic activities in the cervix before birth from the unremodeled state. Predicted Mφ activities, pathways, and networks raise the possibility that expression patterns of specific genes characterize and promote prepartum remodeling of the cervix for parturition at term and with preterm labor.

  3. Microarray and quantitative RT-PCR analyses in calcium-channel blockers induced gingival overgrowth tissues of periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Taro; Kubota, Takehiko; Nakasone, Naohiro; Abe, Daisuke; Morozumi, Toshiya; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyse transcriptomes and mRNA expression levels for specific genes in calcium-channel blocker-induced gingival overgrowth (GO) tissues. Eight gingival tissues samples (from both GO negative and positive sites) were harvested from four GO patients for microarray analyses. Twelve candidate genes were selected for further quantitative real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses. Ten GO tissues from periodontitis patients and ten control gingival tissues from healthy subjects were compared by qRT-PCR. Mann-Whitney U-test was used for statistical evaluation. In GO positive tissues, 163-1631 up-regulated and 100-695 down-regulated genes were identified with more than two-fold changes compared with GO negative tissues amongst patients by microarray experiments. No commonly expressed genes amongst the eight sets of microarray data were found. The clustering analysis confirmed that the entire transcriptome patterns showed similarities in individuals, but differences amongst the four patients. The qRT-PCR and statistical analyses for the candidate genes, though, revealed differential gene expressions between GO-positive and negative tissues. We found that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-12 as well as cathepsin-L were significantly up-regulated whilst keratin-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 were significantly down-regulated in GO tissues of periodontitis patients compared with the control gingival tissues of healthy subjects. The microarray analyses revealed that GO pathogenesis was complex and individually varied, though GO-affected gingival tissues were controlled at least by genes related to collagen metabolisms including regulated MMPs, cathepsin-L, growth factors, and keratins to maintain tissue homeostasis in vivo. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Microarray-based genetic analyses for studying susceptibility to arterial and venous thrombotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Pollak, E S; Feng, L; Ahadian, H; Fortina, P

    2001-08-01

    We describe the potential of microarray technology for parallel, high-throughput approaches to molecular detection of DNA variations associated with progression to arterial and venous thrombotic diseases. The use of the newly commercialized NanoChip platform and a framework for genetic screening with a list of potential genetic targets useful to the evaluation of cardiovascular risk are presented. Implementation in clinical setting of analytical silicon and glass microarrays will facilitate early diagnosis, help direct specific advice to high-risk individuals and evaluate treatment strategies.

  5. ArrayWiki: an enabling technology for sharing public microarray data repositories and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Todd H; Torrance, JT; Li, Henry; Wang, May D

    2008-01-01

    Background A survey of microarray databases reveals that most of the repository contents and data models are heterogeneous (i.e., data obtained from different chip manufacturers), and that the repositories provide only basic biological keywords linking to PubMed. As a result, it is difficult to find datasets using research context or analysis parameters information beyond a few keywords. For example, to reduce the "curse-of-dimension" problem in microarray analysis, the number of samples is often increased by merging array data from different datasets. Knowing chip data parameters such as pre-processing steps (e.g., normalization, artefact removal, etc), and knowing any previous biological validation of the dataset is essential due to the heterogeneity of the data. However, most of the microarray repositories do not have meta-data information in the first place, and do not have a a mechanism to add or insert this information. Thus, there is a critical need to create "intelligent" microarray repositories that (1) enable update of meta-data with the raw array data, and (2) provide standardized archiving protocols to minimize bias from the raw data sources. Results To address the problems discussed, we have developed a community maintained system called ArrayWiki that unites disparate meta-data of microarray meta-experiments from multiple primary sources with four key features. First, ArrayWiki provides a user-friendly knowledge management interface in addition to a programmable interface using standards developed by Wikipedia. Second, ArrayWiki includes automated quality control processes (caCORRECT) and novel visualization methods (BioPNG, Gel Plots), which provide extra information about data quality unavailable in other microarray repositories. Third, it provides a user-curation capability through the familiar Wiki interface. Fourth, ArrayWiki provides users with simple text-based searches across all experiment meta-data, and exposes data to search engine crawlers

  6. ArrayWiki: an enabling technology for sharing public microarray data repositories and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Todd H; Torrance, J T; Li, Henry; Wang, May D

    2008-05-28

    A survey of microarray databases reveals that most of the repository contents and data models are heterogeneous (i.e., data obtained from different chip manufacturers), and that the repositories provide only basic biological keywords linking to PubMed. As a result, it is difficult to find datasets using research context or analysis parameters information beyond a few keywords. For example, to reduce the "curse-of-dimension" problem in microarray analysis, the number of samples is often increased by merging array data from different datasets. Knowing chip data parameters such as pre-processing steps (e.g., normalization, artefact removal, etc), and knowing any previous biological validation of the dataset is essential due to the heterogeneity of the data. However, most of the microarray repositories do not have meta-data information in the first place, and do not have a a mechanism to add or insert this information. Thus, there is a critical need to create "intelligent" microarray repositories that (1) enable update of meta-data with the raw array data, and (2) provide standardized archiving protocols to minimize bias from the raw data sources. To address the problems discussed, we have developed a community maintained system called ArrayWiki that unites disparate meta-data of microarray meta-experiments from multiple primary sources with four key features. First, ArrayWiki provides a user-friendly knowledge management interface in addition to a programmable interface using standards developed by Wikipedia. Second, ArrayWiki includes automated quality control processes (caCORRECT) and novel visualization methods (BioPNG, Gel Plots), which provide extra information about data quality unavailable in other microarray repositories. Third, it provides a user-curation capability through the familiar Wiki interface. Fourth, ArrayWiki provides users with simple text-based searches across all experiment meta-data, and exposes data to search engine crawlers (Semantic Agents

  7. Moderated effect size and P-value combinations for microarray meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Marot, Guillemette; Foulley, Jean-Louis; Mayer, Claus-Dieter; Jaffrézic, Florence

    2009-10-15

    With the proliferation of microarray experiments and their availability in the public domain, the use of meta-analysis methods to combine results from different studies increases. In microarray experiments, where the sample size is often limited, meta-analysis offers the possibility to considerably increase the statistical power and give more accurate results. A moderated effect size combination method was proposed and compared with other meta-analysis approaches. All methods were applied to real publicly available datasets on prostate cancer, and were compared in an extensive simulation study for various amounts of inter-study variability. Although the proposed moderated effect size combination improved already existing effect size approaches, the P-value combination was found to provide a better sensitivity and a better gene ranking than the other meta-analysis methods, while effect size methods were more conservative. An R package metaMA is available on the CRAN.

  8. Differential gene expression in recombinant Pichia pastoris analysed by heterologous DNA microarray hybridisation

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Michael; Branduardi, Paola; Gasser, Brigitte; Valli, Minoska; Maurer, Michael; Porro, Danilo; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2004-01-01

    Background Pichia pastoris is a well established yeast host for heterologous protein expression, however, the physiological and genetic information about this yeast remains scanty. The lack of a published genome sequence renders DNA arrays unavailable, thereby hampering more global investigations of P. pastoris from the beginning. Here, we examine the suitability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA microarrays for heterologous hybridisation with P. pastoris cDNA. Results We could show that it is possible to obtain new and valuable information about transcriptomic regulation in P. pastoris by probing S. cerevisiae DNA microarrays. The number of positive signals was about 66 % as compared to homologous S. cerevisiae hybridisation, and both the signal intensities and gene regulations correlated with high significance between data obtained from P. pastoris and S. cerevisiae samples. The differential gene expression patterns upon shift from glycerol to methanol as carbon source were investigated in more detail. Downregulation of TCA cycle genes and a decrease of genes related to ribonucleotide and ribosome synthesis were among the major effects identified. Conclusions We could successfully demonstrate that heterologous microarray hybridisations allow deep insights into the transcriptomic regulation processes of P. pastoris. The observed downregulation of TCA cycle and ribosomal synthesis genes correlates to a significantly lower specific growth rate during the methanol feed phase. PMID:15610561

  9. 3D niche microarrays for systems-level analyses of cell fate.

    PubMed

    Ranga, A; Gobaa, S; Okawa, Y; Mosiewicz, K; Negro, A; Lutolf, M P

    2014-07-14

    The behaviour of mammalian cells in a tissue is governed by the three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment and involves a dynamic interplay between biochemical and mechanical signals provided by the extracellular matrix (ECM), cell-cell interactions and soluble factors. The complexity of the microenvironment and the context-dependent cell responses that arise from these interactions have posed a major challenge to understanding the underlying regulatory mechanisms. Here we develop an experimental paradigm to dissect the role of various interacting factors by simultaneously synthesizing more than 1,000 unique microenvironments with robotic nanolitre liquid-dispensing technology and by probing their effects on cell fate. Using this novel 3D microarray platform, we assess the combined effects of matrix elasticity, proteolytic degradability and three distinct classes of signalling proteins on mouse embryonic stem cells, unveiling a comprehensive map of interactions involved in regulating self-renewal. This approach is broadly applicable to gain a systems-level understanding of multifactorial 3D cell-matrix interactions.

  10. Comparative microarray analyses of adult female midgut tissues from feeding Rhipicephalus species.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Willem A; Stutzer, Christian; Olivier, Nicholas A; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2015-02-01

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, has a debilitating effect on the livestock industry worldwide, owing to its being a vector of the causative agents of bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. In South Africa, co-infestation with R. microplus and R. decoloratus, a common vector species on local livestock, occurs widely in the northern and eastern parts of the country. An alternative to chemical control methods is sought in the form of a tick vaccine to control these tick species. However, sequence information and transcriptional data for R. decoloratus is currently lacking. Therefore, this study aimed at identifying genes that are shared between midgut tissues of feeding adult female R. microplus and R. decoloratus ticks. In this regard, a custom oligonucleotide microarray comprising of 13,477 R. microplus sequences was used for transcriptional profiling and 2476 genes were found to be shared between these Rhipicephalus species. In addition, 136 transcripts were found to be more abundantly expressed in R. decoloratus and 1084 in R. microplus. Chi-square analysis revealed that genes involved in lipid transport and metabolism are significantly overrepresented in R. microplus and R. decoloratus. This study is the first transcriptional profiling of R. decoloratus and is an additional resource that can be evaluated further in future studies for possible tick control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Microarray and bioinformatic analyses suggest models for carbon metabolism in the autotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    SciTech Connect

    C. Appia-ayme; R. Quatrini; Y. Denis; F. Denizot; S. Silver; F. Roberto; F. Veloso; J. Valdes; J. P. Cardenas; M. Esparza; O. Orellana; E. Jedlicki; V. Bonnefoy; D. Holmes

    2006-09-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that uses iron or sulfur as an energy and electron source. Bioinformatic analysis was used to identify putative genes and potential metabolic pathways involved in CO2 fixation, 2P-glycolate detoxification, carboxysome formation and glycogen utilization in At. ferrooxidans. Microarray transcript profiling was carried out to compare the relative expression of the predicted genes of these pathways when the microorganism was grown in the presence of iron versus sulfur. Several gene expression patterns were confirmed by real-time PCR. Genes for each of the above predicted pathways were found to be organized into discrete clusters. Clusters exhibited differential gene expression depending on the presence of iron or sulfur in the medium. Concordance of gene expression within each cluster, suggested that they are operons Most notably, clusters of genes predicted to be involved in CO2 fixation, carboxysome formation, 2P-glycolate detoxification and glycogen biosynthesis were up-regulated in sulfur medium, whereas genes involved in glycogen utilization were preferentially expressed in iron medium. These results can be explained in terms of models of gene regulation that suggest how A. ferrooxidans can adjust its central carbon management to respond to changing environmental conditions.

  12. Identification of aberrantly expressed glycans in gastric cancer by integrated lectin microarray and mass spectrometric analyses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Guan, Feng; Li, Dongliang; Tan, Zengqi; Yang, Ganglong; Wu, Yanli; Huang, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Cancer progression is usually associated with alterations of glycan expression patterns. Little is known regarding global glycomics in gastric cancer, the most common type of epithelial cancer. We integrated lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) methods to profile glycan expression in three gastric cancer cell lines (SGC-7901, HGC-27, and MGC-803) and one normal gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1). Significantly altered glycans were confirmed by lectin staining and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. The three cancer cell lines showed increased levels of core-fucosylated N-glycans, GalNAcα-Ser/Thr (Tn antigen), and Sia2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc N-glycans, but reduced levels of biantennary N-glycans, Galβ1-3GalNAcα-Ser/Thr (T antigen), and (GlcNAc)n N-glycans. Lectin histochemistry was used to validate aberrant expression of four representative glycans (core-fucosylation, Sia2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc, biantennary N-glycans, T antigen, recognized respectively by lectins LCA, SNA, PHA-E+L, and ACA) in clinical gastric cancer samples. Lower binding capacity for ACA was correlated with significantly poorer patient prognosis. Our findings indicate for the first time that glycans recognized by LCA, ACA, and PHA-E+L are aberrantly expressed in gastric cancer, and suggest that ACA is a potential prognostic factor for gastric cancer. PMID:27895315

  13. Tetrahymena Gene Expression Database (TGED): a resource of microarray data and co-expression analyses for Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jie; Lu, XingYi; Lu, YuMing; Zeng, HongHui; Yuan, DongXia; Feng, LiFang; Chang, Yue; Bowen, Josephine; Gorovsky, Martin; Fu, ChengJie; Miao, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila is a model eukaryotic organism. Functional genomic analyses in Tetrahymena present rich opportunities to address fundamental questions of cell and molecular biology. The Tetrahymena Gene Expression Database (TGED; available at http://tged.ihb.ac.cn) is the first expression database of a ciliated protozoan. It covers three major physiological and developmental states: growth, starvation, and conjugation, and can be accessed through a user-friendly web interface. The gene expression profiles and candidate co-expressed genes for each gene can be retrieved using Gene ID or Gene description searches. Descriptions of standardized methods of sample preparation and the opportunity to add new Tetrahymena microarray data will be of great interest to the Tetrahymena research community. TGED is intended to be a resource for all members of the scientific research community who are interested in Tetrahymena and other ciliates.

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis in cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas identifies new candidate genes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Ronchi, Cristina L; Leich, Ellen; Sbiera, Silviu; Weismann, Dirk; Rosenwald, Andreas; Allolio, Bruno; Fassnacht, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The genetic mechanisms underlying adrenocortical tumor development are still largely unknown. We used high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (Affymetrix SNP 6.0) to detect copy number alterations (CNAs) and copy-neutral losses of heterozygosity (cnLOH) in 15 cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas with matched blood samples. We focused on microalterations aiming to discover new candidate genes involved in early tumorigenesis and/or autonomous cortisol secretion. We identified 962 CNAs with a median of 18 CNAs per sample. Half of them involved noncoding regions, 89% were less than 100 kb, and 28% were found in at least two samples. The most frequently gained regions were 5p15.33, 6q16.1, 7p22.3-22.2, 8q24.3, 9q34.2-34.3, 11p15.5, 11q11, 12q12, 16q24.3, 20p11.1-20q21.11, and Xq28 (≥20% of cases), most of them being identified in the same three adenomas. These regions contained among others genes like NOTCH1, CYP11B2, HRAS, and IGF2. Recurrent losses were less common and smaller than gains, being mostly localized at 1p, 6q, and 11q. Pathway analysis revealed that Notch signaling was the most frequently altered. We identified 46 recurrent CNAs that each affected a single gene (31 gains and 15 losses), including genes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP11B1) or tumorigenesis (CTNNB1, EPHA7, SGK1, STIL, FHIT). Finally, 20 small cnLOH in four cases affecting 15 known genes were found. Our findings provide the first high-resolution genome-wide view of chromosomal changes in cortisol-secreting adenomas and identify novel candidate genes, such as HRAS, EPHA7, and SGK1. Furthermore, they implicate that the Notch1 signaling pathway might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors.

  15. A Systematic Review of Meta-Analyses on Gene Polymorphisms and Gastric Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Gianfagna, Francesco; De Feo, Emma; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ricciardi, Gualtiero; Boccia, Stefania

    2008-01-01

    Background Individual variations in gastric cancer risk have been associated in the last decade with specific variant alleles of different genes that are present in a significant proportion of the population. Polymorphisms may modify the effects of environmental exposures, and these gene-environment interactions could partly explain the high variation of gastric cancer incidence around the world. The aim of this report is to carry out a systematic review of the published meta-analyses of studies investigating the association between gene polymorphisms and gastric cancer risk, and describe their impact at population level. Priorities on the design of further primary studies are then provided. Methods A structured bibliographic search on Medline and EMBASE databases has been performed to identify meta-analyses on genetic susceptibility to gastric cancer, without restriction criteria. We report the main results of the meta-analyses and we describe the subgroup analyses performed, focusing on the detection of statistical heterogeneity. We investigated publication bias by pooling the primary studies included in the meta-analyses, and we computed the population attributable risk (PAR) for each polymorphism. Results Twelve meta-analyses and one pooled-analysis of community based genetic association studies were included, focusing on nine genes involved in inflammation (IL-1β, IL-1RN, IL-8), detoxification of carcinogens (GSTs, CYP2E1), folate metabolism (MTHFR), intercellular adhesion (E-cadherin) and cell cycle regulation (p53). According to their random-Odds Ratios, individuals carrying one of the IL-1RN *2, IL-1β -511T variant alleles or homozygotes for MTHFR 677T are significantly at higher risk of gastric cancer than those with the wild type homozygote genotypes, showing high PARs. The main sources of heterogeneity in the meta-analyses were ethnicity, quality of the primary study, and selected environmental co-exposures. Effect modification by Helicobacter pylori

  16. Microarray Analyses Reveal Marked Differences in Growth Factor and Receptor Expression Between 8-Cell Human Embryos and Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vlismas, Antonis; Bletsa, Ritsa; Mavrogianni, Despina; Mamali, Georgina; Pergamali, Maria; Dinopoulou, Vasiliki; Partsinevelos, George; Drakakis, Peter; Loutradis, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    Previous microarray analyses of RNAs from 8-cell (8C) human embryos revealed a lack of cell cycle checkpoints and overexpression of core circadian oscillators and cell cycle drivers relative to pluripotent human stem cells [human embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem (hES/iPS)] and fibroblasts, suggesting growth factor independence during early cleavage stages. To explore this possibility, we queried our combined microarray database for expression of 487 growth factors and receptors. Fifty-one gene elements were overdetected on the 8C arrays relative to hES/iPS cells, including 14 detected at least 80-fold higher, which annotated to multiple pathways: six cytokine family (CSF1R, IL2RG, IL3RA, IL4, IL17B, IL23R), four transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) family (BMP6, BMP15, GDF9, ENG), one fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family [FGF14(FH4)], one epidermal growth factor member (GAB1), plus CD36, and CLEC10A. 8C-specific gene elements were enriched (73%) for reported circadian-controlled genes in mouse tissues. High-level detection of CSF1R, ENG, IL23R, and IL3RA specifically on the 8C arrays suggests the embryo plays an active role in blocking immune rejection and is poised for trophectoderm development; robust detection of NRG1, GAB1, -2, GRB7, and FGF14(FHF4) indicates novel roles in early development in addition to their known roles in later development. Forty-four gene elements were underdetected on the 8C arrays, including 11 at least 80-fold under the pluripotent cells: two cytokines (IFITM1, TNFRSF8), five TGFBs (BMP7, LEFTY1, LEFTY2, TDGF1, TDGF3), two FGFs (FGF2, FGF receptor 1), plus ING5, and WNT6. The microarray detection patterns suggest that hES/iPS cells exhibit suppressed circadian competence, underexpression of early differentiation markers, and more robust expression of generic pluripotency genes, in keeping with an artificial state of continual uncommitted cell division. In contrast, gene expression patterns of the 8C embryo suggest that

  17. Microarray Analyses Reveal Marked Differences in Growth Factor and Receptor Expression Between 8-Cell Human Embryos and Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Vlismas, Antonis; Bletsa, Ritsa; Mavrogianni, Despina; Mamali, Georgina; Pergamali, Maria; Dinopoulou, Vasiliki; Partsinevelos, George; Drakakis, Peter; Loutradis, Dimitris; Kiessling, Ann A

    2016-01-15

    Previous microarray analyses of RNAs from 8-cell (8C) human embryos revealed a lack of cell cycle checkpoints and overexpression of core circadian oscillators and cell cycle drivers relative to pluripotent human stem cells [human embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem (hES/iPS)] and fibroblasts, suggesting growth factor independence during early cleavage stages. To explore this possibility, we queried our combined microarray database for expression of 487 growth factors and receptors. Fifty-one gene elements were overdetected on the 8C arrays relative to hES/iPS cells, including 14 detected at least 80-fold higher, which annotated to multiple pathways: six cytokine family (CSF1R, IL2RG, IL3RA, IL4, IL17B, IL23R), four transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) family (BMP6, BMP15, GDF9, ENG), one fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family [FGF14(FH4)], one epidermal growth factor member (GAB1), plus CD36, and CLEC10A. 8C-specific gene elements were enriched (73%) for reported circadian-controlled genes in mouse tissues. High-level detection of CSF1R, ENG, IL23R, and IL3RA specifically on the 8C arrays suggests the embryo plays an active role in blocking immune rejection and is poised for trophectoderm development; robust detection of NRG1, GAB1, -2, GRB7, and FGF14(FHF4) indicates novel roles in early development in addition to their known roles in later development. Forty-four gene elements were underdetected on the 8C arrays, including 11 at least 80-fold under the pluripotent cells: two cytokines (IFITM1, TNFRSF8), five TGFBs (BMP7, LEFTY1, LEFTY2, TDGF1, TDGF3), two FGFs (FGF2, FGF receptor 1), plus ING5, and WNT6. The microarray detection patterns suggest that hES/iPS cells exhibit suppressed circadian competence, underexpression of early differentiation markers, and more robust expression of generic pluripotency genes, in keeping with an artificial state of continual uncommitted cell division. In contrast, gene expression patterns of the 8C embryo suggest that

  18. Modeling Oncogenic Signaling in Colon Tumors by Multidirectional Analyses of Microarray Data Directed for Maximization of Analytical Reliability

    PubMed Central

    Rubel, Tymon; Paziewska, Agnieszka; Mikula, Michal; Jarosz, Dorota; Pachlewski, Jacek; Oledzki, Janusz; Ostrowsk, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    Background Clinical progression of colorectal cancers (CRC) may occur in parallel with distinctive signaling alterations. We designed multidirectional analyses integrating microarray-based data with biostatistics and bioinformatics to elucidate the signaling and metabolic alterations underlying CRC development in the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Methodology/Principal Findings Studies were performed on normal mucosa, adenoma, and carcinoma samples obtained during surgery or colonoscopy. Collections of cryostat sections prepared from the tissue samples were evaluated by a pathologist to control the relative cell type content. The measurements were done using Affymetrix GeneChip HG-U133plus2, and probe set data was generated using two normalization algorithms: MAS5.0 and GCRMA with least-variant set (LVS). The data was evaluated using pair-wise comparisons and data decomposition into singular value decomposition (SVD) modes. The method selected for the functional analysis used the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Expressional profiles obtained in 105 samples of whole tissue sections were used to establish oncogenic signaling alterations in progression of CRC, while those representing 40 microdissected specimens were used to select differences in KEGG pathways between epithelium and mucosa. Based on a consensus of the results obtained by two normalization algorithms, and two probe set sorting criteria, we identified 14 and 17 KEGG signaling and metabolic pathways that are significantly altered between normal and tumor samples and between benign and malignant tumors, respectively. Several of them were also selected from the raw microarray data of 2 recently published studies (GSE4183 and GSE8671). Conclusion/Significance Although the proposed strategy is computationally complex and labor–intensive, it may reduce the number of false results. PMID:20957034

  19. Microarray and Proteomic Analyses of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with a Highlight on the mTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Čokić, Vladan P.; Mossuz, Pascal; Han, Jing; Socoro, Nuria; Beleslin-Čokić, Bojana B.; Mitrović, Olivera; Subotički, Tijana; Diklić, Miloš; Leković, Danijela; Gotić, Mirjana; Puri, Raj K.; Noguchi, Constance Tom; Schechter, Alan N.

    2015-01-01

    The gene and protein expression profiles in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) may reveal gene and protein markers of a potential clinical relevance in diagnosis, treatment and prediction of response to therapy. Using cDNA microarray analysis of 25,100 unique genes, we studied the gene expression profile of CD34+ cells and granulocytes obtained from peripheral blood of subjects with essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). The microarray analyses of the CD34+ cells and granulocytes were performed from 20 de novo MPN subjects: JAK2 positive ET, PV, PMF subjects, and JAK2 negative ET/PMF subjects. The granulocytes for proteomic studies were pooled in 4 groups: PV with JAK2 mutant allele burden above 80%, ET with JAK2 mutation, PMF with JAK2 mutation and ET/PMF with no JAK2 mutation. The number of differentially regulated genes was about two fold larger in CD34+ cells compared to granulocytes. Thirty-six genes (including RUNX1, TNFRSF19) were persistently highly expressed, while 42 genes (including FOXD4, PDE4A) were underexpressed both in CD34+ cells and granulocytes. Using proteomic studies, significant up-regulation was observed for MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling regulators that control myeloid cell apoptosis and proliferation: RAC2, MNDA, S100A8/9, CORO1A, and GNAI2. When the status of the mTOR signaling pathway related genes was analyzed, PI3K/AKT regulators were preferentially up-regulated in CD34+ cells of MPNs, with down-regulated major components of the protein complex EIF4F. Molecular profiling of CD34+ cells and granulocytes of MPN determined gene expression patterns beyond their recognized function in disease pathogenesis that included dominant up-regulation of PI3K/AKT signaling. PMID:26275051

  20. Preoperative overnight parenteral nutrition (TPN) improves skeletal muscle protein metabolism indicated by microarray algorithm analyses in a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Engström, Cecilia; Lundholm, Kent

    2016-06-01

    Loss of muscle mass is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Uncertainties of treatment efficiency by short-term artificial nutrition remain, specifically improvement of protein balance in skeletal muscles. In this study, algorithmic microarray analysis was applied to map cellular changes related to muscle protein metabolism in human skeletal muscle tissue during provision of overnight preoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Twenty-two patients (11/group) scheduled for upper GI surgery due to malignant or benign disease received a continuous peripheral all-in-one TPN infusion (30 kcal/kg/day, 0.16 gN/kg/day) or saline infusion for 12 h prior operation. Biopsies from the rectus abdominis muscle were taken at the start of operation for isolation of muscle RNA RNA expression microarray analyses were performed with Agilent Sureprint G3, 8 × 60K arrays using one-color labeling. 447 mRNAs were differently expressed between study and control patients (P < 0.1). mRNAs related to ribosomal biogenesis, mRNA processing, and translation were upregulated during overnight nutrition; particularly anabolic signaling S6K1 (P < 0.01-0.1). Transcripts of genes associated with lysosomal degradation showed consistently lower expression during TPN while mRNAs for ubiquitin-mediated degradation of proteins as well as transcripts related to intracellular signaling pathways, PI3 kinase/MAPkinase, were either increased or decreased. In conclusion, muscle mRNA alterations during overnight standard TPN infusions at constant rate altered mRNAs associated with mTOR signaling; increased initiation of protein translation; and suppressed autophagy/lysosomal degradation of proteins. This indicates that overnight preoperative parenteral nutrition is effective to promote muscle protein metabolism. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The

  1. Genome-wide quantitative trait locus association scan of general cognitive ability using pooled DNA and 500K single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, L M; Davis, O S P; Craig, I W; Plomin, R

    2008-01-01

    General cognitive ability (g), which refers to what cognitive abilities have in common, is an important target for molecular genetic research because multivariate quantitative genetic analyses have shown that the same set of genes affects diverse cognitive abilities as well as learning disabilities. In this first autosomal genome-wide association scan of g, we used a two-stage quantitative trait locus (QTL) design with pooled DNA to screen more than 500 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on microarrays, selecting from a sample of 7000 7-year-old children. In stage 1, we screened for allele frequency differences between groups pooled for low and high g. In stage 2, 47 SNPs nominated in stage 1 were tested by individually genotyping an independent sample of 3195 individuals, representative of the entire distribution of g scores in the full 7000 7-year-old children. Six SNPs yielded significant associations across the normal distribution of g, although only one SNP remained significant after a false discovery rate of 0.05 was imposed. However, none of these SNPs accounted for more than 0.4% of the variance of g, despite 95% power to detect associations of that size. It is likely that QTL effect sizes, even for highly heritable traits such as cognitive abilities and disabilities, are much smaller than previously assumed. Nonetheless, an aggregated ‘SNP set’ of the six SNPs correlated 0.11 (P < 0.00000003) with g. This shows that future SNP sets that will incorporate many more SNPs could be useful for predicting genetic risk and for investigating functional systems of effects from genes to brain to behavior. PMID:18067574

  2. Combinatory microarray and SuperSAGE analyses identify pairing-dependently transcribed genes in Schistosoma mansoni males, including follistatin.

    PubMed

    Leutner, Silke; Oliveira, Katia C; Rotter, Björn; Beckmann, Svenja; Buro, Christin; Hahnel, Steffen; Kitajima, Joao P; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Winter, Peter; Grevelding, Christoph G

    2013-11-01

    Schistosomiasis is a disease of world-wide importance and is caused by parasitic flatworms of the genus Schistosoma. These parasites exhibit a unique reproduction biology as the female's sexual maturation depends on a constant pairing-contact to the male. Pairing leads to gonad differentiation in the female, and even gene expression of some gonad-associated genes is controlled by pairing. In contrast, no morphological changes have been observed in males, although first data indicated an effect of pairing also on gene transcription in males. To investigate the influence of pairing on males, we performed a combinatory approach applying SuperSAGE and microarray hybridization, generating the most comprehensive data-set on differential transcription available to date. Of 6,326 sense transcripts detected by both analyses, 29 were significantly differentially transcribed. Besides mutual confirmation, the two methods complemented each other as shown by data comparison and real-time PCR, which revealed a number of genes with consistent regulation across all methods. One of the candidate genes, follistatin of S. mansoni (SmFst) was characterized in more detail by in situ hybridization and yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) interaction analyses with potential binding partners. Beyond confirming previously hypothesized differences in metabolic processes between pairing-experienced (EM) and pairing-unexperienced males (UM), our data indicate that neuronal processes are involved in male-female interaction but also TGFβ-signaling. One candidate revealing significant down-regulation in EM was the TGFβ-pathway controlling molecule follistatin (SmFst). First functional analyses demonstrated SmFst interaction with the S. mansoni TGFβ-receptor agonists inhibin/activin (SmInAct) and bone morphogenic protein (SmBMP), and all molecules colocalized in the testes. This indicates a yet unknown role of the TGFβ-pathway for schistosome biology leading to male competence and a possible influence of

  3. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray Analysis in Cortisol-Secreting Adrenocortical Adenomas Identifies New Candidate Genes and Pathways1 2

    PubMed Central

    Ronchi, Cristina L; Leich, Ellen; Sbiera, Silviu; Weismann, Dirk; Rosenwald, Andreas; Allolio, Bruno; Fassnacht, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The genetic mechanisms underlying adrenocortical tumor development are still largely unknown. We used high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (Affymetrix SNP 6.0) to detect copy number alterations (CNAs) and copy-neutral losses of heterozygosity (cnLOH) in 15 cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas with matched blood samples. We focused on microalterations aiming to discover new candidate genes involved in early tumorigenesis and/or autonomous cortisol secretion. We identified 962 CNAs with a median of 18 CNAs per sample. Half of them involved noncoding regions, 89% were less than 100 kb, and 28% were found in at least two samples. The most frequently gained regions were 5p15.33, 6q16.1, 7p22.3-22.2, 8q24.3, 9q34.2-34.3, 11p15.5, 11q11, 12q12, 16q24.3, 20p11.1-20q21.11, and Xq28 (≥20% of cases), most of them being identified in the same three adenomas. These regions contained among others genes like NOTCH1, CYP11B2, HRAS, and IGF2. Recurrent losses were less common and smaller than gains, being mostly localized at 1p, 6q, and 11q. Pathway analysis revealed that Notch signaling was the most frequently altered. We identified 46 recurrent CNAs that each affected a single gene (31 gains and 15 losses), including genes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP11B1) or tumorigenesis (CTNNB1, EPHA7, SGK1, STIL, FHIT). Finally, 20 small cnLOH in four cases affecting 15 known genes were found. Our findings provide the first high-resolution genome-wide view of chromosomal changes in cortisol-secreting adenomas and identify novel candidate genes, such as HRAS, EPHA7, and SGK1. Furthermore, they implicate that the Notch1 signaling pathway might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. PMID:22496620

  4. Distinct Signal Transduction Pathways Downstream of the (P)RR Revealed by Microarray and ChIP-chip Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zaade, Daniela; Schmitz, Jennifer; Benke, Eileen; Klare, Sabrina; Seidel, Kerstin; Kirsch, Sebastian; Goldin-Lang, Petra; Zollmann, Frank S.; Unger, Thomas; Funke-Kaiser, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    The (pro)renin receptor ((P)RR) signaling is involved in different pathophysiologies ranging from cardiorenal end-organ damage via diabetic retinopathy to tumorigenesis. We have previously shown that the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) is an adaptor protein of the (P)RR. Furthermore, recent publications suggest that major functions of the (P)RR are mediated ligand-independently by its transmembrane and intracellular part, which acts as an accessory protein of V-ATPases. The transcriptome and recruitmentome downstream of the V-ATPase function and PLZF in the context of the (P)RR are currently unknown. Therefore, we performed a set of microarray and chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip experiments using siRNA against the (P)RR, stable overexpression of PLZF, the PLZF translocation inhibitor genistein and the specific V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin to dissect transcriptional pathways downstream of the (P)RR. We were able to identify distinct and overlapping genetic signatures as well as novel real-time PCR-validated target genes of the different molecular functions of the (P)RR. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses of our data confirm the role of (P)RŔs signal transduction pathways in cardiovascular disease and tumorigenesis. PMID:23469216

  5. Computational deconvolution of gene expression by individual host cellular subsets from microarray analyses of complex, parasite-infected whole tissues.

    PubMed

    Banskota, Nirad; Odegaard, Justin I; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Hsieh, Michael H

    2016-06-01

    Analyses of whole organs from parasite-infected animals can reveal the entirety of the host tissue transcriptome, but conventional approaches make it difficult to dissect out the contributions of individual cellular subsets to observed gene expression. Computational deconvolution of gene expression data may be one solution to this problem. We tested this potential solution by deconvoluting whole bladder gene expression microarray data derived from a model of experimental urogenital schistosomiasis. A supervised technique was used to group B-cell and T-cell related genes based on their cell types, with a semi-supervised technique to calculate the proportions of urothelial cells. We demonstrate that the deconvolution technique was able to group genes into their correct cell types with good accuracy. A clustering-based methodology was also used to improve prediction. However, incorrectly predicted genes could not be discriminated using this methodology. The incorrect predictions were primarily IgH- and IgK-related genes. To our knowledge, this is the first application of computational deconvolution to complex, parasite-infected whole tissues. Other computational techniques such as neural networks may need to be used to improve prediction. Copyright © 2016 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Meta-analyses of associations between interleukin-10 polymorphisms and susceptibility to recurrent pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Song, Gwan Gyu

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether interleukin-10 (IL-10) polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). We conducted a literature search using the PubMed and EMBASE databases and performed meta-analyses on the associations between IL-10 -1082 G/A, -819 C/T, and -592 C/A polymorphisms and RPL, using fixed- or random-effects models. A total of 15 papers involving 1858 RPL patients and 1949 controls were considered in this study. Meta-analysis of IL-10 -1082 G/A polymorphism revealed no association between RPL and the IL-10 -1082 G allele (OR=0.999, 95% CI=0.815-1.223, p=0.989). However, meta-analysis of IL-10 -819 C/T polymorphism in all study subjects revealed an association between RPL and the IL-10 -819 C allele (OR=0.680, 95% CI=0.498-0.927, p=0.015). Stratification by ethnicity indicated an association between the IL-10 -819 C allele and RPL in the Asian group (OR=0.421, 95% CI=0.226-0.783, p=0.006), but not in the Caucasian and Arab groups (OR=1.053, 95% CI=0.218-5.077, p=0.949, and OR=0.800, 95% CI=0.606-1.081, p=0.152, respectively). Furthermore, a relationship between the IL-10 -592 C allele and RPL was identified in the Asian group (OR=0.763, 95% CI=0.633-0.919, p=0.004), but not in the Caucasian and Arab groups. The meta-analyses demonstrate that IL-10 -819 C/T and -592 C/A polymorphisms are associated with RPL susceptibility in Asian women, but not in the Caucasian and Arab populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Massive Collection of Full-Length Complementary DNA Clones and Microarray Analyses:. Keys to Rice Transcriptome Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2009-02-01

    Completion of the high-precision genome sequence analysis of rice led to the collection of about 35,000 full-length cDNA clones and the determination of their complete sequences. Mapping of these full-length cDNA sequences has given us information on (1) the number of genes expressed in the rice genome; (2) the start and end positions and exon-intron structures of rice genes; (3) alternative transcripts; (4) possible encoded proteins; (5) non-protein-coding (np) RNAs; (6) the density of gene localization on the chromosome; (7) setting the parameters of gene prediction programs; and (8) the construction of a microarray system that monitors global gene expression. Manual curation for rice gene annotation by using mapping information on full-length cDNA and EST assemblies has revealed about 32,000 expressed genes in the rice genome. Analysis of major gene families, such as those encoding membrane transport proteins (pumps, ion channels, and secondary transporters), along with the evolution from bacteria to higher animals and plants, reveals how gene numbers have increased through adaptation to circumstances. Family-based gene annotation also gives us a new way of comparing organisms. Massive amounts of data on gene expression under many kinds of physiological conditions are being accumulated in rice oligoarrays (22K and 44K) based on full-length cDNA sequences. Cluster analyses of genes that have the same promoter cis-elements, that have similar expression profiles, or that encode enzymes in the same metabolic pathways or signal transduction cascades give us clues to understanding the networks of gene expression in rice. As a tool for that purpose, we recently developed "RiCES", a tool for searching for cis-elements in the promoter regions of clustered genes.

  8. Nitric oxide is required for determining root architecture and lignin composition in sunflower. Supporting evidence from microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Corti Monzón, Georgina; Pinedo, Marcela; Di Rienzo, Julio; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Pomar, Federico; Lamattina, Lorenzo; de la Canal, Laura

    2014-05-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signal molecule involved in several physiological processes in plants, including root development. Despite the importance of NO as a root growth regulator, the knowledge about the genes and metabolic pathways modulated by NO in this process is still limited. A constraint to unravel these pathways has been the use of exogenous applications of NO donors that may produce toxic effects. We have analyzed the role of NO in root architecture through the depletion of endogenous NO using the scavenger cPTIO. Sunflower seedlings growing in liquid medium supplemented with cPTIO showed unaltered primary root length while the number of lateral roots was deeply reduced; indicating that endogenous NO participates in determining root branching in sunflower. The transcriptional changes induced by NO depletion have been analyzed using a large-scale approach. A microarray analysis showed 330 genes regulated in the roots (p≤0.001) upon endogenous NO depletion. A general cPTIO-induced up-regulation of genes involved in the lignin biosynthetic pathway was observed. Even if no detectable changes in total lignin content could be detected, cell walls analyses revealed that the ratio G/S lignin increased in roots treated with cPTIO. This means that endogenous NO may control lignin composition in planta. Our results suggest that a fine tuning regulation of NO levels could be used by plants to regulate root architecture and lignin composition. The functional implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Single-gene testing combined with single nucleotide polymorphism microarray preimplantation genetic diagnosis for aneuploidy: a novel approach in optimizing pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Brezina, Paul R; Benner, Andrew; Rechitsky, Svetlana; Kuliev, Anver; Pomerantseva, Ekaterina; Pauling, Dana; Kearns, William G

    2011-04-01

    To describe a method of amplifying DNA from blastocyst trophectoderm cells (two or three cells) and simultaneously performing 23-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays and single-gene preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Case report. IVF clinic and preimplantation genetic diagnostic centers. A 36-year-old woman, gravida 2, para 1011, and her husband who both were carriers of GM(1) gangliosidosis. The couple wished to proceed with microarray analysis for aneuploidy detection coupled with DNA sequencing for GM(1) gangliosidosis. An IVF cycle was performed. Ten blastocyst-stage embryos underwent trophectoderm biopsy. Twenty-three-chromosome microarray analysis for aneuploidy and specific DNA sequencing for GM(1) gangliosidosis mutations were performed. Viable pregnancy. After testing, elective single embryo transfer was performed followed by an intrauterine pregnancy with documented fetal cardiac activity by ultrasound. Twenty-three-chromosome microarray analysis for aneuploidy detection and single-gene evaluation via specific DNA sequencing and linkage analysis are used for preimplantation diagnosis for single-gene disorders and aneuploidy. Because of the minimal amount of genetic material obtained from the day 3 to 5 embryos (up to 6 pg), these modalities have been used in isolation of each other. The use of preimplantation genetic diagnosis for aneuploidy coupled with testing for single-gene disorders via trophectoderm biopsy is a novel approach to maximize pregnancy outcomes. Although further investigation is warranted, preimplantation genetic diagnosis for aneuploidy and single-gene testing seem destined to be used increasingly to optimize ultimate pregnancy success. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic association analyses of PDYN polymorphisms with heroin and cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Clarke, T-K; Ambrose-Lanci, L; Ferraro, T N; Berrettini, W H; Kampman, K M; Dackis, C A; Pettinati, H M; O'Brien, C P; Oslin, D W; Lohoff, F W

    2012-06-01

    Genetic factors are believed to account for 30-50% of the risk for cocaine and heroin addiction. Dynorphin peptides, derived from the prodynorphin (PDYN) precursor, bind to opioid receptors, preferentially the kappa-opioid receptor, and may mediate the aversive effects of drugs of abuse. Dynorphin peptides produce place aversion in animals and produce dysphoria in humans. Cocaine and heroin have both been shown to increase expression of PDYN in brain regions relevant for drug reward and use. Polymorphisms in PDYN are therefore hypothesized to increase risk for addiction to drugs of abuse. In this study, 3 polymorphisms in PDYN (rs1022563, rs910080 and rs1997794) were genotyped in opioid-addicted [248 African Americans (AAs) and 1040 European Americans (EAs)], cocaine-addicted (1248 AAs and 336 EAs) and control individuals (674 AAs and 656 EAs). Sex-specific analyses were also performed as a previous study identified PDYN polymorphisms to be more significantly associated with female opioid addicts. We found rs1022563 to be significantly associated with opioid addiction in EAs [P = 0.03, odds ratio (OR) = 1.31; false discovery rate (FDR) corrected q-value]; however, when we performed female-specific association analyses, the OR increased from 1.31 to 1.51. Increased ORs were observed for rs910080 and rs199774 in female opioid addicts also in EAs. No statistically significant associations were observed with cocaine or opioid addiction in AAs. These data show that polymorphisms in PDYN are associated with opioid addiction in EAs and provide further evidence that these risk variants may be more relevant in females. © 2012 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  11. Genome-wide copy number profiling on high-density bacterial artificial chromosomes, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and oligonucleotide microarrays: a platform comparison based on statistical power analysis.

    PubMed

    Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Egmont-Petersen, Michael; Janssen, Irene M; Smeets, Dominique; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Veltman, Joris A

    2007-02-28

    Recently, comparative genomic hybridization onto bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) arrays (array-based comparative genomic hybridization) has proved to be successful for the detection of submicroscopic DNA copy-number variations in health and disease. Technological improvements to achieve a higher resolution have resulted in the generation of additional microarray platforms encompassing larger numbers of shorter DNA targets (oligonucleotides). Here, we present a novel method to estimate the ability of a microarray to detect genomic copy-number variations of different sizes and types (i.e. deletions or duplications). We applied our method, which is based on statistical power analysis, to four widely used high-density genomic microarray platforms. By doing so, we found that the high-density oligonucleotide platforms are superior to the BAC platform for the genome-wide detection of copy-number variations smaller than 1 Mb. The capacity to reliably detect single copy-number variations below 100 kb, however, appeared to be limited for all platforms tested. In addition, our analysis revealed an unexpected platform-dependent difference in sensitivity to detect a single copy-number loss and a single copy-number gain. These analyses provide a first objective insight into the true capacities and limitations of different genomic microarrays to detect and define DNA copy-number variations.

  12. Meta-analyses of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms and post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Escámez, Teresa; Koenen, Karestan C; Alonso, Jordi; Sánchez-Meca, Julio

    2013-01-01

    To conduct a meta-analysis of all published genetic association studies of 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms performed in PTSD cases. Potential studies were identified through PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science databases (Web of Knowledge, WoK), PsychINFO, PsychArticles and HuGeNet (Human Genome Epidemiology Network) up until December 2011. Published observational studies reporting genotype or allele frequencies of this genetic factor in PTSD cases and in non-PTSD controls were all considered eligible for inclusion in this systematic review. Two reviewers selected studies for possible inclusion and extracted data independently following a standardized protocol. A biallelic and a triallelic meta-analysis, including the total S and S' frequencies, the dominant (S+/LL and S'+/L'L') and the recessive model (SS/L+ and S'S'/L'+), was performed with a random-effect model to calculate the pooled OR and its corresponding 95% CI. Forest plots and Cochran's Q-Statistic and I(2) index were calculated to check for heterogeneity. Subgroup analyses and meta-regression were carried out to analyze potential moderators. Publication bias and quality of reporting were also analyzed. 13 studies met our inclusion criteria, providing a total sample of 1874 patients with PTSD and 7785 controls in the biallelic meta-analyses and 627 and 3524, respectively, in the triallelic. None of the meta-analyses showed evidence of an association between 5-HTTLPR and PTSD but several characteristics (exposure to the same principal stressor for PTSD cases and controls, adjustment for potential confounding variables, blind assessment, study design, type of PTSD, ethnic distribution and Total Quality Score) influenced the results in subgroup analyses and meta-regression. There was no evidence of potential publication bias. Current evidence does not support a direct effect of 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms on PTSD. Further analyses of gene-environment interactions, epigenetic modulation and new studies with large samples

  13. Meta-Analyses of Microarray Datasets Identifies ANO1 and FADD as Prognostic Markers of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Ram Bhupal; Bhat, Anupama Rajan; James, Bonney Lee; Govindan, Sindhu Valiyaveedan; Mathew, Rohit; DR, Ravindra; Hedne, Naveen; Illiayaraja, Jeyaram; Kekatpure, Vikram; Khora, Samanta S.; Hicks, Wesley; Tata, Pramila; Kuriakose, Moni A.; Suresh, Amritha

    2016-01-01

    The head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) transcriptome has been profiled extensively, nevertheless, identifying biomarkers that are clinically relevant and thereby with translational benefit, has been a major challenge. The objective of this study was to use a meta-analysis based approach to catalog candidate biomarkers with high potential for clinical application in HNSCC. Data from publically available microarray series (N = 20) profiled using Agilent (4X44K G4112F) and Affymetrix (HGU133A, U133A_2, U133Plus 2) platforms was downloaded and analyzed in a platform/chip-specific manner (GeneSpring software v12.5, Agilent, USA). Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and clustering analysis was carried out iteratively for segregating outliers; 140 normal and 277 tumor samples from 15 series were included in the final analysis. The analyses identified 181 differentially expressed, concordant and statistically significant genes; STRING analysis revealed interactions between 122 of them, with two major gene clusters connected by multiple nodes (MYC, FOS and HSPA4). Validation in the HNSCC-specific database (N = 528) in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) identified a panel (ECT2, ANO1, TP63, FADD, EXT1, NCBP2) that was altered in 30% of the samples. Validation in treatment naïve (Group I; N = 12) and post treatment (Group II; N = 12) patients identified 8 genes significantly associated with the disease (Area under curve>0.6). Correlation with recurrence/re-recurrence showed ANO1 had highest efficacy (sensitivity: 0.8, specificity: 0.6) to predict failure in Group I. UBE2V2, PLAC8, FADD and TTK showed high sensitivity (1.00) in Group I while UBE2V2 and CRYM were highly sensitive (>0.8) in predicting re-recurrence in Group II. Further, TCGA analysis showed that ANO1 and FADD, located at 11q13, were co-expressed at transcript level and significantly associated with overall and disease-free survival (p<0.05). The meta-analysis approach adopted in this study has identified

  14. Plasmon analyses of Triticum (wheat) and Aegilops: PCR–single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analyses of organellar DNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gui-Zhi; Miyashita, Naohiko T.; Tsunewaki, Koichiro

    1997-01-01

    To investigate phylogenetic relationships among plasmons in Triticum and Aegilops, PCR–single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analyses were made of 14.0-kb chloroplast (ct) and 13.7-kb mitochondrial (mt)DNA regions that were isolated from 46 alloplasmic wheat lines and one euplasmic line. These plasmons represent 31 species of the two genera. The ct and mtDNA regions included 10 and 9 structural genes, respectively. A total of 177 bands were detected, of which 40.6% were variable. The proportion of variable bands in ctDNA (51.1%) was higher than that of mtDNA (28.9%). The phylogenetic trees of plasmons, derived by two different models, indicate a common picture of plasmon divergence in the two genera and suggest three major groups of plasmons (Einkorn, Triticum, and Aegilops). Because of uniparental plasmon transmission, the maternal parents of all but one polyploid species were identified. Only one Aegilops species, Ae. speltoides, was included in the Triticum group, suggesting that this species is the plasmon and B and G genome donor of all polyploid wheats. ctDNA variations were more intimately correlated with vegetative characters, whereas mtDNA variations were more closely correlated with reproductive characters. Plasmon divergence among the diploids of the two genera largely paralleled genome divergence. The relative times of origin of the polyploid species were inferred from genetic distances from their putative maternal parents. PMID:9405654

  15. Prediction Formulas for Individual Opioid Analgesic Requirements Based on Genetic Polymorphism Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kaori; Nishizawa, Daisuke; Ichinomiya, Takashi; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Hayashida, Masakazu; Fukuda, Ken-ichi; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Background The analgesic efficacy of opioids is well known to vary widely among individuals, and various factors related to individual differences in opioid sensitivity have been identified. However, a prediction model to calculate appropriate opioid analgesic requirements has not yet been established. The present study sought to construct prediction formulas for individual opioid analgesic requirements based on genetic polymorphisms and clinical data from patients who underwent cosmetic orthognathic surgery and validate the utility of the prediction formulas in patients who underwent major open abdominal surgery. Methods To construct the prediction formulas, we performed multiple linear regression analyses using data from subjects who underwent cosmetic orthognathic surgery. The dependent variable was 24-h postoperative or perioperative fentanyl use, and the independent variables were age, gender, height, weight, pain perception latencies (PPL), and genotype data of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To examine the utility of the prediction formulas, we performed simple linear regression analyses using subjects who underwent major open abdominal surgery. Actual 24-h postoperative or perioperative analgesic use and the predicted values that were calculated using the multiple regression equations were incorporated as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Results Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the four SNPs, PPL, and weight were retained as independent predictors of 24-h postoperative fentanyl use (R2 = 0.145, P = 5.66 × 10-10) and the two SNPs and weight were retained as independent predictors of perioperative fentanyl use (R2 = 0.185, P = 1.99 × 10-15). Simple linear regression analyses showed that the predicted values were retained as an independent predictor of actual 24-h postoperative analgesic use (R2 = 0.033, P = 0.030) and perioperative analgesic use (R2 = 0.100, P = 1.09 × 10-4), respectively. Conclusions We

  16. Meta-Analyses of the 5-HTTLPR Polymorphisms and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Escámez, Teresa; Koenen, Karestan C.; Alonso, Jordi; Sánchez-Meca, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Objective To conduct a meta-analysis of all published genetic association studies of 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms performed in PTSD cases Methods Data Sources Potential studies were identified through PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science databases (Web of Knowledge, WoK), PsychINFO, PsychArticles and HuGeNet (Human Genome Epidemiology Network) up until December 2011. Study Selection: Published observational studies reporting genotype or allele frequencies of this genetic factor in PTSD cases and in non-PTSD controls were all considered eligible for inclusion in this systematic review. Data Extraction: Two reviewers selected studies for possible inclusion and extracted data independently following a standardized protocol. Statistical analysis: A biallelic and a triallelic meta-analysis, including the total S and S' frequencies, the dominant (S+/LL and S'+/L'L') and the recessive model (SS/L+ and S'S'/L'+), was performed with a random-effect model to calculate the pooled OR and its corresponding 95% CI. Forest plots and Cochran's Q-Statistic and I2 index were calculated to check for heterogeneity. Subgroup analyses and meta-regression were carried out to analyze potential moderators. Publication bias and quality of reporting were also analyzed. Results 13 studies met our inclusion criteria, providing a total sample of 1874 patients with PTSD and 7785 controls in the biallelic meta-analyses and 627 and 3524, respectively, in the triallelic. None of the meta-analyses showed evidence of an association between 5-HTTLPR and PTSD but several characteristics (exposure to the same principal stressor for PTSD cases and controls, adjustment for potential confounding variables, blind assessment, study design, type of PTSD, ethnic distribution and Total Quality Score) influenced the results in subgroup analyses and meta-regression. There was no evidence of potential publication bias. Conclusions Current evidence does not support a direct effect of 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms on PTSD

  17. Comparative microarray analyses of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate impacts on fat cell bioenergetics and adipokine network.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Huai-Chih; Wang, Chih-Hong; Yeh, Szu-Ching; Lin, Yi-Hua; Kuo, Ya-Ting; Liao, Chih-Wei; Tsai, Feng-Yuan; Lin, Wei-Yu; Chuang, Wen-Han; Tsou, Tsui-Chun

    2017-01-12

    Cellular accumulation of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP) has been recently demonstrated to disturb fat cell energy metabolism; however, the underlying mechanism remained unclear. The study aimed to determine how MEHP influenced fat cell transcriptome and how the changes might contribute to bioenergetics. Because of the pivotal role of PPARγ in energy metabolism of fat cells, comparative microarray analysis of gene expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with both MEHP and rosiglitazone was performed. Pathway enrichment analysis and gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis revealed that both treatments caused up-regulation of genes involved in PPAR signaling/energy metabolism-related pathways and down-regulation of genes related to adipokine/inflammation signals. MEHP/rosiglitazone-treated adipocytes exhibited increased levels of lipolysis, glucose uptake, and glycolysis; the gene expression profiles provided molecular basis for the functional changes. Moreover, MEHP was shown to induce nuclear translocation and activation of PPARγ. The similarity in gene expression and functional changes in response to MEHP and rosiglitazone suggested that MEHP influenced bioenergetics and adipokine network mainly via PPARγ. Importantly, adipokine levels in C57BL/6J mice with di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) treatments provided in vivo evidence for microarray results. On the basis of correlation between gene expression and functional assays, possible involvements of genes in bioenergetics of MEHP-treated adipocytes were proposed.

  18. Inferring epitopes of a polymorphic antigen amidst broadly cross-reactive antibodies using protein microarrays: a study of OspC proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Baum, Elisabeth; Randall, Arlo Z; Zeller, Michael; Barbour, Alan G

    2013-01-01

    Epitope mapping studies aim to identify the binding sites of antibody-antigen interactions to enhance the development of vaccines, diagnostics and immunotherapeutic compounds. However, mapping is a laborious process employing time- and resource-consuming 'wet bench' techniques or epitope prediction software that are still in their infancy. For polymorphic antigens, another challenge is characterizing cross-reactivity between epitopes, teasing out distinctions between broadly cross-reactive responses, limited cross-reactions among variants and the truly type-specific responses. A refined understanding of cross-reactive antibody binding could guide the selection of the most informative subsets of variants for diagnostics and multivalent subunit vaccines. We explored the antibody binding reactivity of sera from human patients and Peromyscus leucopus rodents infected with Borrelia burgdorferi to the polymorphic outer surface protein C (OspC), an attractive candidate antigen for vaccine and improved diagnostics for Lyme disease. We constructed a protein microarray displaying 23 natural variants of OspC and quantified the degree of cross-reactive antibody binding between all pairs of variants, using Pearson correlation calculated on the reactivity values using three independent transforms of the raw data: (1) logarithmic, (2) rank, and (3) binary indicators. We observed that the global amino acid sequence identity between OspC pairs was a poor predictor of cross-reactive antibody binding. Then we asked if specific regions of the protein would better explain the observed cross-reactive binding and performed in silico screening of the linear sequence and 3-dimensional structure of OspC. This analysis pointed to residues 179 through 188 the fifth C-terminal helix of the structure as a major determinant of type-specific cross-reactive antibody binding. We developed bioinformatics methods to systematically analyze the relationship between local sequence/structure variation

  19. Linkage and microarray analyses of susceptibility genes in ACI/Seg rats: a model for prostate cancers in the aged.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shugo; Nomoto, Tomoko; Kondo, Yasushi; Wakazono, Kuniko; Tsujino, Yoshimi; Sugimura, Takashi; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Homma, Yukio; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2005-04-01

    ACI/Seg (ACI) rats develop prostate cancers spontaneously with aging, similar to humans. Here, to identify genes involved in prostate cancer susceptibility, we did linkage analysis and oligonucleotide microarray analysis. Linkage analysis was done using 118 effective rats, and prostate cancer susceptibility 1 (Pcs1), whose ACI allele dominantly induced prostate cancers, was mapped on chromosome 19 [logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 5.0]. PC resistance 1 (Pcr1), whose ACI allele dominantly and paradoxically suppressed the size of prostate cancers, was mapped on chromosome 2 (LOD score of 5.0). When linkage analysis was done in 51 rats with single or no macroscopic testicular tumors, which had larger prostates and higher testosterone levels than those with bilateral testicular tumors, Pcs2 and Pcr2 were mapped on chromosomes 20 and 1, respectively. By oligonucleotide microarray analysis with 8,800 probe sets and confirmation by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, only two genes within these four loci were found to be differentially expressed >1.8-fold. Membrane metalloendopeptidase (Mme), known to inhibit androgen-independent growth of prostate cancers, on Pcr1 was expressed 2.0- to 5.5-fold higher in the ACI prostate, in accordance with its paradoxical effect. Cdkn1a on Pcs2 was expressed 1.5- to 4.5-fold lower in the ACI prostate. Additionally, genes responsible for testicular tumors and unilateral renal agenesis were mapped on chromosomes 11 and 14, respectively. These results showed that prostate cancer susceptibility of ACI rats involves at least four loci, and suggested Mme and Cdkn1a as candidates for Pcr1 and Pcs2.

  20. A high-density transcript linkage map with 1,845 expressed genes positioned by microarray-based Single Feature Polymorphisms (SFP) in Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Technological advances are progressively increasing the application of genomics to a wider array of economically and ecologically important species. High-density maps enriched for transcribed genes facilitate the discovery of connections between genes and phenotypes. We report the construction of a high-density linkage map of expressed genes for the heterozygous genome of Eucalyptus using Single Feature Polymorphism (SFP) markers. Results SFP discovery and mapping was achieved using pseudo-testcross screening and selective mapping to simultaneously optimize linkage mapping and microarray costs. SFP genotyping was carried out by hybridizing complementary RNA prepared from 4.5 year-old trees xylem to an SFP array containing 103,000 25-mer oligonucleotide probes representing 20,726 unigenes derived from a modest size expressed sequence tags collection. An SFP-mapping microarray with 43,777 selected candidate SFP probes representing 15,698 genes was subsequently designed and used to genotype SFPs in a larger subset of the segregating population drawn by selective mapping. A total of 1,845 genes were mapped, with 884 of them ordered with high likelihood support on a framework map anchored to 180 microsatellites with average density of 1.2 cM. Using more probes per unigene increased by two-fold the likelihood of detecting segregating SFPs eventually resulting in more genes mapped. In silico validation showed that 87% of the SFPs map to the expected location on the 4.5X draft sequence of the Eucalyptus grandis genome. Conclusions The Eucalyptus 1,845 gene map is the most highly enriched map for transcriptional information for any forest tree species to date. It represents a major improvement on the number of genes previously positioned on Eucalyptus maps and provides an initial glimpse at the gene space for this global tree genome. A general protocol is proposed to build high-density transcript linkage maps in less characterized plant species by SFP genotyping

  1. Performing statistical analyses on quantitative data in Taverna workflows: An example using R and maxdBrowse to identify differentially-expressed genes from microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peter; Castrillo, Juan I; Velarde, Giles; Wassink, Ingo; Soiland-Reyes, Stian; Owen, Stuart; Withers, David; Oinn, Tom; Pocock, Matthew R; Goble, Carole A; Oliver, Stephen G; Kell, Douglas B

    2008-01-01

    Background There has been a dramatic increase in the amount of quantitative data derived from the measurement of changes at different levels of biological complexity during the post-genomic era. However, there are a number of issues associated with the use of computational tools employed for the analysis of such data. For example, computational tools such as R and MATLAB require prior knowledge of their programming languages in order to implement statistical analyses on data. Combining two or more tools in an analysis may also be problematic since data may have to be manually copied and pasted between separate user interfaces for each tool. Furthermore, this transfer of data may require a reconciliation step in order for there to be interoperability between computational tools. Results Developments in the Taverna workflow system have enabled pipelines to be constructed and enacted for generic and ad hoc analyses of quantitative data. Here, we present an example of such a workflow involving the statistical identification of differentially-expressed genes from microarray data followed by the annotation of their relationships to cellular processes. This workflow makes use of customised maxdBrowse web services, a system that allows Taverna to query and retrieve gene expression data from the maxdLoad2 microarray database. These data are then analysed by R to identify differentially-expressed genes using the Taverna RShell processor which has been developed for invoking this tool when it has been deployed as a service using the RServe library. In addition, the workflow uses Beanshell scripts to reconcile mismatches of data between services as well as to implement a form of user interaction for selecting subsets of microarray data for analysis as part of the workflow execution. A new plugin system in the Taverna software architecture is demonstrated by the use of renderers for displaying PDF files and CSV formatted data within the Taverna workbench. Conclusion Taverna can

  2. Performing statistical analyses on quantitative data in Taverna workflows: an example using R and maxdBrowse to identify differentially-expressed genes from microarray data.

    PubMed

    Li, Peter; Castrillo, Juan I; Velarde, Giles; Wassink, Ingo; Soiland-Reyes, Stian; Owen, Stuart; Withers, David; Oinn, Tom; Pocock, Matthew R; Goble, Carole A; Oliver, Stephen G; Kell, Douglas B

    2008-08-07

    There has been a dramatic increase in the amount of quantitative data derived from the measurement of changes at different levels of biological complexity during the post-genomic era. However, there are a number of issues associated with the use of computational tools employed for the analysis of such data. For example, computational tools such as R and MATLAB require prior knowledge of their programming languages in order to implement statistical analyses on data. Combining two or more tools in an analysis may also be problematic since data may have to be manually copied and pasted between separate user interfaces for each tool. Furthermore, this transfer of data may require a reconciliation step in order for there to be interoperability between computational tools. Developments in the Taverna workflow system have enabled pipelines to be constructed and enacted for generic and ad hoc analyses of quantitative data. Here, we present an example of such a workflow involving the statistical identification of differentially-expressed genes from microarray data followed by the annotation of their relationships to cellular processes. This workflow makes use of customised maxdBrowse web services, a system that allows Taverna to query and retrieve gene expression data from the maxdLoad2 microarray database. These data are then analysed by R to identify differentially-expressed genes using the Taverna RShell processor which has been developed for invoking this tool when it has been deployed as a service using the RServe library. In addition, the workflow uses Beanshell scripts to reconcile mismatches of data between services as well as to implement a form of user interaction for selecting subsets of microarray data for analysis as part of the workflow execution. A new plugin system in the Taverna software architecture is demonstrated by the use of renderers for displaying PDF files and CSV formatted data within the Taverna workbench. Taverna can be used by data analysis

  3. Determination of genotoxic effects of boron and zinc on Zea mays using protein and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analyses.

    PubMed

    Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Nardemir, Gokce; Hilal, A Y; Arslan, Esra; Agar, Guleray

    2015-11-01

    In this research, we aimed to determine genotoxic effects of boron (B) and zinc (Zn) on Zea mays by using total soluble protein content and random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. For the RAPD analysis, 16 RAPD primers were found to produce unique polymorphic band profiles on treated maize seedlings. With increased Zn and B concentrations, increased polymorphism rate was observed, while genomic template stability and total soluble protein content decreased. The treatment with Zn was more effective than that of B groups on the levels of total proteins. The obtained results from this study revealed that the total soluble protein levels and RAPD profiles were performed as endpoints of genotoxicity and these analyses can offer useful biomarker assays for the evaluation of genotoxic effects on Zn and B polluted plants.

  4. Genome and Phenotype Microarray Analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7: Genetic Determinants and Metabolic Abilities with Environmental Relevance

    PubMed Central

    D’Ursi, Pasqualina; Milanesi, Luciano; Di Canito, Alessandra; Zampolli, Jessica; Collina, Elena; Decorosi, Francesca; Viti, Carlo; Fedi, Stefano; Presentato, Alessandro; Zannoni, Davide; Di Gennaro, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comparative genome and phenotype microarray analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7 were performed. Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 was selected for its ability to grow on short-chain n-alkanes and R. opacus R7 was isolated for its ability to grow on naphthalene and on o-xylene. Results of genome comparison, including BCP1, R7, along with other Rhodococcus reference strains, showed that at least 30% of the genome of each strain presented unique sequences and only 50% of the predicted proteome was shared. To associate genomic features with metabolic capabilities of BCP1 and R7 strains, hundreds of different growth conditions were tested through Phenotype Microarray, by using Biolog plates and plates manually prepared with additional xenobiotic compounds. Around one-third of the surveyed carbon sources was utilized by both strains although R7 generally showed higher metabolic activity values compared to BCP1. Moreover, R7 showed broader range of nitrogen and sulphur sources. Phenotype Microarray data were combined with genomic analysis to genetically support the metabolic features of the two strains. The genome analysis allowed to identify some gene clusters involved in the metabolism of the main tested xenobiotic compounds. Results show that R7 contains multiple genes for the degradation of a large set of aromatic and PAHs compounds, while a lower variability in terms of genes predicted to be involved in aromatic degradation was found in BCP1. This genetic feature can be related to the strong genetic pressure exerted by the two different environment from which the two strains were isolated. According to this, in the BCP1 genome the smo gene cluster involved in the short-chain n-alkanes degradation, is included in one of the unique regions and it is not conserved in the Rhodococcus strains compared in this work. Data obtained underline the great potential of these two Rhodococcus spp. strains for biodegradation and environmental decontamination

  5. Genome and Phenotype Microarray Analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7: Genetic Determinants and Metabolic Abilities with Environmental Relevance.

    PubMed

    Orro, Alessandro; Cappelletti, Martina; D'Ursi, Pasqualina; Milanesi, Luciano; Di Canito, Alessandra; Zampolli, Jessica; Collina, Elena; Decorosi, Francesca; Viti, Carlo; Fedi, Stefano; Presentato, Alessandro; Zannoni, Davide; Di Gennaro, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comparative genome and phenotype microarray analyses of Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 and Rhodococcus opacus R7 were performed. Rhodococcus sp. BCP1 was selected for its ability to grow on short-chain n-alkanes and R. opacus R7 was isolated for its ability to grow on naphthalene and on o-xylene. Results of genome comparison, including BCP1, R7, along with other Rhodococcus reference strains, showed that at least 30% of the genome of each strain presented unique sequences and only 50% of the predicted proteome was shared. To associate genomic features with metabolic capabilities of BCP1 and R7 strains, hundreds of different growth conditions were tested through Phenotype Microarray, by using Biolog plates and plates manually prepared with additional xenobiotic compounds. Around one-third of the surveyed carbon sources was utilized by both strains although R7 generally showed higher metabolic activity values compared to BCP1. Moreover, R7 showed broader range of nitrogen and sulphur sources. Phenotype Microarray data were combined with genomic analysis to genetically support the metabolic features of the two strains. The genome analysis allowed to identify some gene clusters involved in the metabolism of the main tested xenobiotic compounds. Results show that R7 contains multiple genes for the degradation of a large set of aromatic and PAHs compounds, while a lower variability in terms of genes predicted to be involved in aromatic degradation was found in BCP1. This genetic feature can be related to the strong genetic pressure exerted by the two different environment from which the two strains were isolated. According to this, in the BCP1 genome the smo gene cluster involved in the short-chain n-alkanes degradation, is included in one of the unique regions and it is not conserved in the Rhodococcus strains compared in this work. Data obtained underline the great potential of these two Rhodococcus spp. strains for biodegradation and environmental decontamination

  6. Differential Gene Expression from Genome-Wide Microarray Analyses Distinguishes Lohmann Selected Leghorn and Lohmann Brown Layers

    PubMed Central

    Habig, Christin; Geffers, Robert; Distl, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    The Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL) and Lohmann Brown (LB) layer lines have been selected for high egg production since more than 50 years and belong to the worldwide leading commercial layer lines. The objectives of the present study were to characterize the molecular processes that are different among these two layer lines using whole genome RNA expression profiles. The hens were kept in the newly developed small group housing system Eurovent German with two different group sizes. Differential expression was observed for 6,276 microarray probes (FDR adjusted P-value <0.05) among the two layer lines LSL and LB. A 2-fold or greater change in gene expression was identified on 151 probe sets. In LSL, 72 of the 151 probe sets were up- and 79 of them were down-regulated. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis accounting for biological processes evinced 18 GO-terms for the 72 probe sets with higher expression in LSL, especially those taking part in immune system processes and membrane organization. A total of 32 enriched GO-terms were determined among the 79 down-regulated probe sets of LSL. Particularly, these terms included phosphorus metabolic processes and signaling pathways. In conclusion, the phenotypic differences among the two layer lines LSL and LB are clearly reflected in their gene expression profiles of the cerebrum. These novel findings provide clues for genes involved in economically important line characteristics of commercial laying hens. PMID:23056453

  7. Transcriptional response of Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans AK-01 to growth on alkanes: insights from RT-qPCR and microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Herath, Anjumala; Wawrik, Boris; Qin, Yujia; Zhou, Jizhong; Callaghan, Amy V

    2016-05-01

    Microbial transformation of n-alkanes in anaerobic ecosystems plays a pivotal role in biogeochemical carbon cycling and bioremediation, but the requisite genetic machinery is not well elucidated.Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans AK-01 utilizes n-alkanes (C13 to C18) and contains two genomic loci encoding alkylsuccinate synthase (ASS) gene clusters. ASS catalyzes alkane addition to fumarate to form methylalkylsuccinic acids. We hypothesized that the genes in the two clusters would be differentially expressed depending on the alkane substrate utilized for growth. RT-qPCR was used to investigate ass-gene expression across AK-01's known substrate range, and microarray-based transcriptomic analysis served to investigate whole-cell responses to growth on n-hexadecane versus hexadecanoate. RT-qPCR revealed induction of ass gene cluster 1 during growth on all tested alkane substrates, and the transcriptional start sites in cluster 1 were determined via 5'RACE. Induction of ass gene cluster 2 was not observed under the tested conditions. Transcriptomic analysis indicated that the upregulation of genes potentially involved in methylalkylsuccinate metabolism, including methylmalonyl-CoA mutase and a putative carboxyl transferase. These findings provide new directions for studying the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in alkane addition to fumarate, fumarate recycling and the processing of methylalkylsuccinates with regard to isolates, enrichment cultures and ecological datasets.

  8. Shared clonal cytogenetic abnormalities in aberrant mast cells and leukemic myeloid blasts detected by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based whole-genome scanning.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, John K; Shao, Lina; Bixby, Dale L; Ross, Charles W

    2016-04-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by a clonal proliferation of aberrant mast cells within extracutaneous sites. In a subset of SM cases, a second associated hematologic non-mast cell disease (AHNMD) is also present, usually of myeloid origin. Polymerase chain reaction and targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization studies have provided evidence that, in at least some cases, the aberrant mast cells are related clonally to the neoplastic cells of the AHNMD. In this work, a single nucleotide polymorphism microarray (SNP-A) was used to characterize the cytogenetics of the aberrant mast cells from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia and concomitant mast cell leukemia associated with a KIT D816A mutation. The results demonstrate the presence of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the mast cells and myeloid blasts, as well as additional abnormalities within mast cells (copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity) not detectable by routine karyotypic analysis. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of SNP-A whole-genome scanning to the detection of shared cytogenetic abnormalities between the two components of a case of SM-AHNMD. The findings provide additional evidence of a frequent clonal link between aberrant mast cells and cells of myeloid AHNMDs, and also highlight the importance of direct sequencing for identifying uncommon activating KIT mutations.

  9. Polymorphisms in the XPC gene affect urinary bladder cancer risk: a case-control study, meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses

    PubMed Central

    Sankhwar, Monica; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Bansal, Sandeep Kumar; Gupta, Gopal; Rajender, Singh

    2016-01-01

    Compromised activity of the DNA repair enzymes may raise the risk of a number of cancers. We analyzed polymorphisms in the Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group C (XPC) gene for their correlation with urinary bladder cancer. Ala499Val and Lys939Gln polymorphisms were genotyped in 234 urinary bladder cancer cases and 258 control samples. A significant association between Ala499Val polymorphism and bladder cancer was observed (OR = 1.78, CI = 1.19–2.66, p = 0.005); however, Lys939Gln was unrelated (OR = 0.97, CI = 0.65–1.45, P = 0.89). Further analysis revealed that Ala499Val was a significant risk factor only in the presence of smoking (OR = 2.23, CI = 1.28–3.87, p < 0.004) or tobacco chewing (OR = 2.40, CI = 1.43–4.04, p = 0.0008). To further appraise the association, we undertook meta-analyses on seven studies (2893 cases and 3056 controls) on Ala499Val polymorphism and eleven studies (5064 cases and 5208 controls) on Lys939Gln polymorphism. Meta-analyses corroborated the above results, showing strong association of Ala499Val (OR = 1.54, CI = 1.21–1.97, p = 0.001) but not that of Lys939Gln (OR = 1.13, CI = 0.95–1.34, p = 0.171) with urinary bladder cancer risk. In conclusion, XPC Ala499Val substitution increases urinary bladder cancer risk, but Lys939Gln appears to be neutral. PMID:27246180

  10. Cancer immunotherapy using novel tumor-associated antigenic peptides identified by genome-wide cDNA microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yasuharu; Tomita, Yusuke; Yuno, Akira; Yoshitake, Yoshihiro; Shinohara, Masanori

    2015-05-01

    Recent genome-wide cDNA microarray analysis of gene expression profiles in comprehensive tumor types coupled with isolation of cancer tissues by laser-microbeam microdissection have revealed ideal tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) that are frequently overexpressed in various cancers including head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and lung cancer, but not in most normal tissues except for testis, placenta, and fetal organs. Preclinical studies using HLA-transgenic mice and human T cells in vitro showed that TAA-derived CTL-epitope short peptides (SPs) are highly immunogenic and induce HLA-A2 or -A24-restricted CTLs. Based on the accumulated evidence, we carried out a phase II clinical trial of the TAA-SP vaccine in advanced 37 HNSCC patients. This study showed a significant induction of TAA-specific CTLs in the majority of patients without serious adverse effects. Importantly, clinical responses including a complete response were observed in this study. Another phase II clinical trial of therapeutic TAA-SP vaccine, designed to evaluate the ability of prevention of recurrence, is ongoing in HNSCC patients who have received curative operations. Further studies in human preclinical studies and in vivo studies using HLA class I transgenic mice showed TAA-derived long peptides (TAA-LPs) have the capacity to induce not only promiscuous HLA class II-restricted CD4(+) T helper type 1 cells but also tumor-specific CTLs through a cross-presentation mechanism. Moreover, we observed an augmentation of TAA-LP-specific T helper type 1 cell responses and tumor antigen-spreading in HNSCC patients vaccinated with TAA-SPs. This accumulated evidence suggests that therapeutic TAA-SPs and LPs vaccines may provide a promising cancer immunotherapy.

  11. Haplotype Analyses of DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Their Role in Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bardia, Avinash; Tiwari, Santosh K.; Vishwakarma, Sandeep K.; Habeeb, Md. Aejaz; Nallari, Pratibha; Sultana, Shaik A.; Pasha, Shaik A.; Reddy, Yugandhar P.; Khan, Aleem A.

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a major clinical form of inflammatory bowel disease. UC is characterized by mucosal inflammation limited to the colon, always involving the rectum and a variable extent of the more proximal colon in a continuous manner. Genetic variations in DNA repair genes may influence the extent of repair functions, DNA damage, and thus the manifestations of UC. This study thus evaluated the role of polymorphisms of the genes involved in DNA repair mechanisms. A total of 171 patients and 213 controls were included. Genotyping was carried out by ARMS PCR and PCR-RFLP analyses for RAD51, XRCC3 and hMSH2 gene polymorphisms. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were computed in both control & patient groups and data was analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. The frequency of ‘A’ allele of hMSH2 in the UC group caused statistically significant increased risk for UC compared to controls (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.16–2.31, p = 0.004). Similarly, the CT genotype of XRCC3 gene was predominant in the UC group and increased the risk for UC by 1.75 fold compared to controls (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.15–2.67, p = 0.03), further confirming the risk of ‘T’ allele in UC. The GC genotype frequency of RAD51 gene was significantly increased (p = 0.02) in the UC group (50.3%) compared to controls (38%). The GC genotype significantly increased the risk for UC compared to GG genotype by 1.73 fold (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.14–2.62, p = 0.02) confirming the strong association of ‘C’ allele with UC. Among the controls, the SNP loci combination of hMSH2:XRCC3 were in perfect linkage. The GTC and ACC haplotypes were found to be predominant in UC than controls with a 2.28 and 2.93 fold significant increase risk of UC. PMID:25247297

  12. Genomic DNA Enrichment Using Sequence Capture Microarrays: a Novel Approach to Discover Sequence Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) in Brassica napus L

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Wayne E.; Parkin, Isobel A.; Gajardo, Humberto A.; Gerhardt, Daniel J.; Higgins, Erin; Sidebottom, Christine; Sharpe, Andrew G.; Snowdon, Rod J.; Federico, Maria L.; Iniguez-Luy, Federico L.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genomic selection methodologies, or sequence capture, allow for DNA enrichment and large-scale resequencing and characterization of natural genetic variation in species with complex genomes, such as rapeseed canola (Brassica napus L., AACC, 2n=38). The main goal of this project was to combine sequence capture with next generation sequencing (NGS) to discover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in specific areas of the B. napus genome historically associated (via quantitative trait loci –QTL– analysis) to traits of agronomical and nutritional importance. A 2.1 million feature sequence capture platform was designed to interrogate DNA sequence variation across 47 specific genomic regions, representing 51.2 Mb of the Brassica A and C genomes, in ten diverse rapeseed genotypes. All ten genotypes were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences chemistry and to assess the effect of increased sequence depth, two genotypes were also sequenced using Illumina HiSeq chemistry. As a result, 589,367 potentially useful SNPs were identified. Analysis of sequence coverage indicated a four-fold increased representation of target regions, with 57% of the filtered SNPs falling within these regions. Sixty percent of discovered SNPs corresponded to transitions while 40% were transversions. Interestingly, fifty eight percent of the SNPs were found in genic regions while 42% were found in intergenic regions. Further, a high percentage of genic SNPs was found in exons (65% and 64% for the A and C genomes, respectively). Two different genotyping assays were used to validate the discovered SNPs. Validation rates ranged from 61.5% to 84% of tested SNPs, underpinning the effectiveness of this SNP discovery approach. Most importantly, the discovered SNPs were associated with agronomically important regions of the B. napus genome generating a novel data resource for research and breeding this crop species. PMID:24312619

  13. Genomic DNA enrichment using sequence capture microarrays: a novel approach to discover sequence nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in Brassica napus L.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Wayne E; Parkin, Isobel A; Gajardo, Humberto A; Gerhardt, Daniel J; Higgins, Erin; Sidebottom, Christine; Sharpe, Andrew G; Snowdon, Rod J; Federico, Maria L; Iniguez-Luy, Federico L

    2013-01-01

    Targeted genomic selection methodologies, or sequence capture, allow for DNA enrichment and large-scale resequencing and characterization of natural genetic variation in species with complex genomes, such as rapeseed canola (Brassica napus L., AACC, 2n=38). The main goal of this project was to combine sequence capture with next generation sequencing (NGS) to discover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in specific areas of the B. napus genome historically associated (via quantitative trait loci -QTL- analysis) to traits of agronomical and nutritional importance. A 2.1 million feature sequence capture platform was designed to interrogate DNA sequence variation across 47 specific genomic regions, representing 51.2 Mb of the Brassica A and C genomes, in ten diverse rapeseed genotypes. All ten genotypes were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences chemistry and to assess the effect of increased sequence depth, two genotypes were also sequenced using Illumina HiSeq chemistry. As a result, 589,367 potentially useful SNPs were identified. Analysis of sequence coverage indicated a four-fold increased representation of target regions, with 57% of the filtered SNPs falling within these regions. Sixty percent of discovered SNPs corresponded to transitions while 40% were transversions. Interestingly, fifty eight percent of the SNPs were found in genic regions while 42% were found in intergenic regions. Further, a high percentage of genic SNPs was found in exons (65% and 64% for the A and C genomes, respectively). Two different genotyping assays were used to validate the discovered SNPs. Validation rates ranged from 61.5% to 84% of tested SNPs, underpinning the effectiveness of this SNP discovery approach. Most importantly, the discovered SNPs were associated with agronomically important regions of the B. napus genome generating a novel data resource for research and breeding this crop species.

  14. Genetic lineages of undifferentiated-type gastric carcinomas analysed by unsupervised clustering of genomic DNA microarray data.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Ayano; Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Nakayama, Takahisa; Diem, Vo Thi Ngoc; Hattori, Takanori; Andoh, Akira; Fujiyama, Yoshihide; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-19

    It is suspected that early gastric carcinoma (GC) is a dormant variant that rarely progresses to advanced GC. We demonstrated that the dormant and aggressive variants of tubular adenocarcinomas (TUBs) of the stomach are characterized by loss of MYC and gain of TP53 and gain of MYC and/or loss of TP53, respectively. The aim of this study is to determine whether this is also the case in undifferentiated-type GCs (UGCs) of different genetic lineages: one with a layered structure (LS+), derived from early signet ring cell carcinomas (SIGs), and the other, mostly poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas, without LS but with a minor tubular component (TC), dedifferentiated from TUBs (LS-/TC+). Using 29 surgically resected stomachs with 9 intramucosal and 20 invasive UGCs (11 LS+ and 9 LS-/TC+), 63 genomic DNA samples of mucosal and invasive parts and corresponding reference DNAs were prepared from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues with laser microdissection, and were subjected to array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), using 60K microarrays, and subsequent unsupervised, hierarchical clustering. Of 979 cancer-related genes assessed, we selected genes with mean copy numbers significantly different between the two major clusters. Based on similarity in genomic copy-number profile, the 63 samples were classified into two major clusters. Clusters A and B, which were rich in LS+ UGC and LS-/TC+ UGC, respectively, were discriminated on the basis of 40 genes. The aggressive pattern was more frequently detected in LS-/TC+ UGCs, (20/26; 77%), than in LS+UGCs (17/37; 46%; P = 0.0195), whereas no dormant pattern was detected in any of the UGC samples. In contrast to TUBs, copy number alterations of MYC and TP53 exhibited an aggressive pattern in LS+ SIG at early and advanced stages, indicating that early LS+ UGCs inevitably progress to an advanced GC. Cluster B (enriched in LS-/TC+) exhibited more frequent gain of driver genes and a more frequent

  15. Genetic lineages of undifferentiated-type gastric carcinomas analysed by unsupervised clustering of genomic DNA microarray data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is suspected that early gastric carcinoma (GC) is a dormant variant that rarely progresses to advanced GC. We demonstrated that the dormant and aggressive variants of tubular adenocarcinomas (TUBs) of the stomach are characterized by loss of MYC and gain of TP53 and gain of MYC and/or loss of TP53, respectively. The aim of this study is to determine whether this is also the case in undifferentiated-type GCs (UGCs) of different genetic lineages: one with a layered structure (LS+), derived from early signet ring cell carcinomas (SIGs), and the other, mostly poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas, without LS but with a minor tubular component (TC), dedifferentiated from TUBs (LS−/TC+). Methods Using 29 surgically resected stomachs with 9 intramucosal and 20 invasive UGCs (11 LS+ and 9 LS−/TC+), 63 genomic DNA samples of mucosal and invasive parts and corresponding reference DNAs were prepared from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues with laser microdissection, and were subjected to array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), using 60K microarrays, and subsequent unsupervised, hierarchical clustering. Of 979 cancer-related genes assessed, we selected genes with mean copy numbers significantly different between the two major clusters. Results Based on similarity in genomic copy-number profile, the 63 samples were classified into two major clusters. Clusters A and B, which were rich in LS+ UGC and LS−/TC+ UGC, respectively, were discriminated on the basis of 40 genes. The aggressive pattern was more frequently detected in LS−/TC+ UGCs, (20/26; 77%), than in LS+UGCs (17/37; 46%; P = 0.0195), whereas no dormant pattern was detected in any of the UGC samples. Conclusions In contrast to TUBs, copy number alterations of MYC and TP53 exhibited an aggressive pattern in LS+ SIG at early and advanced stages, indicating that early LS+ UGCs inevitably progress to an advanced GC. Cluster B (enriched in LS−/TC+) exhibited more

  16. Microarray and Functional Gene Analyses of Sulfate-Reducing Prokaryotes in Low-Sulfate, Acidic Fens Reveal Cooccurrence of Recognized Genera and Novel Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Loy, Alexander; Küsel, Kirsten; Lehner, Angelika; Drake, Harold L.; Wagner, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Low-sulfate, acidic (approximately pH 4) fens in the Lehstenbach catchment in the Fichtelgebirge mountains in Germany are unusual habitats for sulfate-reducing prokaryotes (SRPs) that have been postulated to facilitate the retention of sulfur and protons in these ecosystems. Despite the low in situ availability of sulfate (concentration in the soil solution, 20 to 200 μM) and the acidic conditions (soil and soil solution pHs, approximately 4 and 5, respectively), the upper peat layers of the soils from two fens (Schlöppnerbrunnen I and II) of this catchment displayed significant sulfate-reducing capacities. 16S rRNA gene-based oligonucleotide microarray analyses revealed stable diversity patterns for recognized SRPs in the upper 30 cm of both fens. Members of the family “Syntrophobacteraceae” were detected in both fens, while signals specific for the genus Desulfomonile were observed only in soils from Schlöppnerbrunnen I. These results were confirmed and extended by comparative analyses of environmentally retrieved 16S rRNA and dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase (dsrAB) gene sequences; dsrAB sequences from Desulfobacca-like SRPs, which were not identified by microarray analysis, were obtained from both fens. Hypotheses concerning the ecophysiological role of these three SRP groups in the fens were formulated based on the known physiological properties of their cultured relatives. In addition to these recognized SRP lineages, six novel dsrAB types that were phylogenetically unrelated to all known SRPs were detected in the fens. These dsrAB sequences had no features indicative of pseudogenes and likely represent novel, deeply branching, sulfate- or sulfite-reducing prokaryotes that are specialized colonists of low-sulfate habitats. PMID:15574893

  17. Association analyses of osteoprotegerin gene polymorphisms with bone mineral density in Chinese postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; He, Chunlei; Chen, Gang; Li, Fangcai; Gao, Hui

    2013-03-01

    Osteoprotegerin gene (OPG) is an important candidate gene of osteoporosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between OPG gene polymorphisms and bone mineral density (BMD). A total of 336 Chinese postmenopausal women were included in this study. OPG gene polymorphisms were detected by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), created restriction site-PCR (CRS-PCR) and DNA sequencing methods. BMD was evaluated at the lumbar spine (L(2-4)), total hip and femoral neck. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (g.21775C>T and g.23367T>C) were identified and the association analysis showed significant difference of spine BMD among different g.23367T>C genotype, subjects with the genotype TT was significantly higher than those of genotype TC and CC. Such a significant difference was not observed at the neck hip BMD and total hip BMD. The g.21775C>T polymorphism was not significantly associated with spine BMD, total hip BMD and neck hip BMD in the studied subjects. These findings suggested that OPG gene polymorphisms were associated with BMD in Chinese postmenopausal women. Results from this study will be helpful in further studies to determine the role of OPG gene in osteoporosis.

  18. Single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray-based preimplantation genetic diagnosis is likely to improve the clinical outcome for translocation carriers.

    PubMed

    Tan, Y-Q; Tan, K; Zhang, S-P; Gong, F; Cheng, D-H; Xiong, B; Lu, C-F; Tang, X-C; Luo, K-L; Lin, G; Lu, G-X

    2013-09-01

    Is preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for translocation carriers more effective when done with a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array using trophectoderm (TE) biopsy and frozen embryo transfer (FET) compared with traditional PGD based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-PGD) using blastomere biopsy and fresh embryo transfer? The procedure using the SNP array combined with TE biopsy and FET significantly improves the clinical pregnancy rate for translocation carriers. The miscarriage rate also slightly decreases. FISH-PGD has been widely used in translocation carriers but the clinical outcomes have not been ideal. SNP arrays can detect both chromosome segmental imbalances and aneuploidy, and may overcome the limitations of FISH in PGD for translocation carriers. This was a retrospective study of 575 couples with chromosomal translocations, including 169 couples treated by SNP-PGD between October 2011 and August 2012, and 406 couples treated by FISH-PGD between January 2005 and October 2011. The study was set in an IVF center at the Reproductive and Genetic Hospital of CITIC-Xiangya, China. In total, 169 couples underwent SNP analysis, including 52 Robertsonian translocation carriers and 117 carriers of reciprocal translocations. Blastocysts (n = 773) were biopsied and FET was carried out on the balanced embryos. Four hundred and six couples underwent FISH-PGD, including 149 Robertsonian translocation carriers and 257 reciprocal translocation carriers. In total, 3968 embryos were biopsied and balanced embryos were transferred fresh. The SNP-PGD results and clinical outcomes were compared with those of FISH-PGD. Reliable SNP-PGD results were obtained for 717 out of 773 (92.8%) biopsied blastocysts. The proportions of normal/balanced embryos, embryos with translocation-related and translocation-unrelated abnormalities, the median number of embryos per patient, the ongoing pregnancy rate per embryo transfer and the miscarriage rate were 58, 23, 19, 2

  19. [Kohonen network study of the results of RAPD and ISSR analyses of genomic polymorphism in the genus Capsicum L].

    PubMed

    Ruanet, V V; Kochieva, E Z; Ryzhova, N N

    2005-02-01

    The results of studies based on multilocus molecular analyses, including random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analyses, are usually presented in the form of images (electrophoregrams, photographs, etc.). The interpretation of this information is complicated, labor-consuming, and subjective. Artificial neural networks (ANNs), which are ideal "image processors," may be useful when solving such tasks. The possibility of using ANNs for the treatment of the results of RAPD and ISSR analyses has been studied. The RAPD and ISSR spectra have been studied in fragments of DNA of plants from the genus Capsicum L. (peppers). The results of clustering the accessions studied by means of the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA), which is often used for phylogenetic constructions based on RAPD and ISSR data, serve as expert estimates. Fundamentally new methods of genetic polymorphism estimation using ANN technologies, namely, self-organizing feature maps (SOFMs) have been developed. The results show that the clusters obtained with the use of UPGMA and SOFM coincide by more than 90%; taking into account that ANNs can deal with high noise levels and incomplete or contradictory data, the approach proposed may prove to be efficient.

  20. The application and performance of single nucleotide polymorphism markers for population genetic analyses of Lepidoptera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are nucleotide substitution mutations that tend to be at high densities within eukaryotic genomes. The development of assays that detect allelic variation at SNP loci is attractive for genome mapping, population genetics, and phylogeographic applications. A p...

  1. CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism and acute myeloid leukemia risk: meta-analyses based on 5018 subjects

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Evidence indicates that CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism might be a possible risk factor for several malignancies. A growing body of literature has been devoted to the association of CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the results remain conflicting. The aim of the present study was to derive a more precise estimation of the relationship. Methods Meta-analyses assessing the association of CYP1A1 MspI variation with AML were conducted and subgroup analyses on ethnicity and age groups were further performed. Eligible studies were identified for the period up to May 2012. Results A total of ten case–control studies including 1330 cases and 3688 controls were selected for analysis. The overall data failed to indicate a significant association of CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism with AML risk (C vs T: OR = 1.13; 95%CI = 0.87-1.48; CC vs TT: OR = 1.72; 95%CI = 0.99-3.01; CC + TC vs TT: OR = 1.16; 95%CI = 0.86-1.55). In subgroup analysis stratified by ethnicity, significant AML risk was shown among Asians (CC + TC vs TT: OR = 1.33; 95%CI = 1.09-1.62) but not Caucasians or mixed races. In subgroup analysis regarding age groups, no associations were observed in either the childhood AML or the adult AML subgroups. Conclusion The results of the present study suggested that CYP1A1 MspI polymorphism might be a risk factor for AML among Asians. Further investigations are needed to confirm the conclusions. PMID:22846179

  2. Microarray data and pathway analyses for primary human activated hepatic stellate cells compared to HepG2 human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hetherington, Alexandra M; Sawyez, Cynthia G; Borradaile, Nica M

    2017-02-01

    As nonalcoholic fatty liver disease progresses to end-stage diseases, including fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, fibrotic activated hepatic stellate cells and cancerous epithelial cells can become abundant, changing the cellular composition of this organ. Despite potentially residing within the same diseased tissue, direct comparisons of global gene expression between activated hepatic stellate cells and hepatocellular carcinoma cells are lacking. Here we provide data collected using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays to identify differential gene expression in cultured primary human activated hepatic stellate cells compared to HepG2 human hepatoma cells. The dataset includes many genes involved in intermediary metabolism which were investigated in greater depth in our associated article (A.M. Hetherington, C.G. Sawyez, E. Zilberman, A.M. Stoianov, D.L. Robson, J.M. Hughes-Large, et al., 2016) [1]. Pathway analyses of known protein coding genes down-regulated or up-regulated by greater than 2.0-fold are also provided.

  3. Prediction of recurrence of non muscle-invasive bladder cancer by means of a protein signature identified by antibody microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Harish; Allory, Yves; Sill, Martin; Vordos, Dimitri; Alhamdani, Mohamed Saiel Saeed; Radvanyi, Francois; Hoheisel, Jörg D; Schröder, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    About 70% of newly diagnosed cases of bladder cancer are low-stage, low-grade, non muscle-invasive. Standard treatment is transurethral resection. About 60% of the tumors will recur, however, and in part progress to become invasive. Therefore, surveillance cystoscopy is performed after resection. However, in the USA and Europe alone, about 54 000 new patients per year undergo repeated cystoscopies over several years, who do not experience recurrence. Analysing in a pilot study resected tumors from patients with (n = 19) and without local recurrence (n = 6) after a period of 5 years by means of an antibody microarray that targeted 724 cancer-related proteins, we identified 255 proteins with significantly differential abundance. Most are involved in the regulation and execution of apoptosis and cell proliferation. A multivariate classifier was constructed based on 20 proteins. It facilitates the prediction of recurrence with a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 100%. As a measure of overall accuracy, the area under the curve value was found to be 91%. After validation in additional sample cohorts with a similarly long follow-up, such a signature could support decision making about the stringency of surveillance or even different treatment options.

  4. Meta and pooled analyses of FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism as a cancer prognostic factor.

    PubMed

    Frullanti, Elisa; Berking, Carola; Harbeck, Nadia; Jézéquel, Pascal; Haugen, Aage; Mawrin, Christian; Parise, Orlando; Sasaki, Hidefumi; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Dragani, Tommaso A

    2011-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) contains a Gly388Arg functional polymorphism (rs351855) that has shown contrasting results in association studies. In this study, we assessed the association between the FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism and cancer prognosis. Meta-analysis and pooled analysis of 6817 and 2537 cancer cases, respectively, were carried out by nodal status and overall survival. The study included the following types of cancer: brain, breast, colorectal, head and neck, larynx, lung, melanoma, prostate, sarcomas. A statistically significant association between the Arg388Arg genotype and nodal involvement was found in the meta-analysis (odds ratio=1.33, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.74). In the pooled analysis, the Arg388 allele carriers showed an increased hazard of poor overall survival compared with homozygous carriers of the common Gly388 allele, even after adjusting for nodal status (hazard ratio=1.21, 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.40). These results provide evidence of a role for the FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism in modulating patients' outcome in different types of cancer, thus offering to clinicians a new marker to predict predisposition to poor survival in cancer patients.

  5. Flower color polymorphism in Iris lutescens (Iridaceae): biochemical analyses in light of plant-insect interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Conchou, Lucie; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Cazals, Guillaume; Schatz, Bertrand; Imbert, Eric

    2013-10-01

    We describe a flower color polymorphism in Iris lutescens, a species widespread in the Northern part of the Mediterranean basin. We studied the biochemical basis of the difference between purple and yellow flowers, and explored the ecological and evolutionary consequences of such difference, in particular visual discrimination by insects, a potential link with scent emitted and the association between color and scent. Anthocyanins were found to be present in much greater concentrations in purple flowers than in yellow ones, but the anthocyanin composition did not differ between color morphs. Likewise, no quantitative difference in anthocyanin content was found between vegetative tissues of the two morphs. Floral anthocyanins were dominated by delphinidin 3-O-(p-coumaroylrutinoside)-5-O-glucoside (also called delphanin) and its aliphatic derivatives. Small amounts of delphinidin 3-O-(p-caffeoylrutinoside)-5-O-glucoside and its aliphatic derivatives were also characterized. Based on a description of bumblebees' (one of the main pollinators of I. lutescens) color perception, purple and yellow flowers of I. lutescens could be visually discriminated as blue and blue-green, respectively, and likely by a wide variety of other insects. The overall chemical composition of the scent produced was not significantly different between morphs, being dominated by terpenoids, mainly myrcene, (E)-β-ocimene and limonene. A slight color-scent correlation was nevertheless detected, consistent with the shared biosynthetic origin of both pigments and volatile compounds. Therefore in this species, the difference in the amounts of pigments responsible for flower color difference seems to be the major difference between the two morphs. Pollinators are probably the main selective agent driving the evolution of flower color polymorphism in I. lutescens, which represents a suitable species for investigating how such polymorphism is maintained. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  6. Functional Analyses of Endometriosis-Related Polymorphisms in the Estrogen Synthesis and Metabolism-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsin-Shih; Wu, Hsien-Ming; Cheng, Bi-Hwa; Yen, Chih-Feng; Chang, Pi-Yueh; Chao, Angel; Lee, Yun-Shien; Huang, Hsien-Da; Wang, Tzu-Hao

    2012-01-01

    Endometriosis is determined by genetic factors, and the prevalence of genetic polymorphisms varies greatly depending on the ethnic group studied. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 9 genes involved in estrogen biosynthesis and metabolism and the risks of endometriosis. Three hundred patients with endometriosis and 337 non-endometriotic controls were recruited. Thirty four non-synonymous SNPs, which change amino acid residues, were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The functions of SNP-resulted amino acid changes were analyzed using multiple web-accessible databases and phosphorylation predicting algorithms. Among the 34 NCBI-listed SNPs, 22 did not exhibit polymorphism in this study of more than 600 Taiwanese Chinese women. However, homozygous and heterozygous mutants of 4 SNPs - rs6165 (genotype GG+GA, 307Ala/Ala+307Ala/Thr) of FSHR, rs 6166 (genotype GG+GA, 680Ser/Asn+680Ser/Ser) of FSHR, rs2066479 (genotype AA+AG, 289Ser/Ser+289Ser/Gly) of HSD17B3 and rs700519 (genotype TT+TC, 264Cys/Cys+264Cys/Arg) of CYP19, alone or in combination, were significantly associated with decreased risks of endometriosis. Bioinformatics results identified 307Thr of FSHR to be a site for O-linked glycosylation, 680Ser of FSHR a phosphorylated site by protein kinase B, and 289Ser of HSD17B3 a phosphorylated site by protein kinase B or ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1. Results of this study suggest that non-synonymous polymorphisms of FSHR, HSD17B3 and CYP19 genes may modulate the risk of endometriosis in Taiwanese Chinese women. Identification of the endometrosis-preferential non-synonymous SNPs and the conformational changes in those proteins may pave the way for the development of more disease-specific drugs. PMID:23139742

  7. Mutational analysis using oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Hacia, J.; Collins, F.

    1999-01-01

    The development of inexpensive high throughput methods to identify individual DNA sequence differences is important to the future growth of medical genetics. This has become increasingly apparent as epidemiologists, pathologists, and clinical geneticists focus more attention on the molecular basis of complex multifactorial diseases. Such undertakings will rely upon genetic maps based upon newly discovered, common, single nucleotide polymorphisms. Furthermore, candidate gene approaches used in identifying disease associated genes necessitate screening large sequence blocks for changes tracking with the disease state. Even after such genes are isolated, large scale mutational analyses will often be needed for risk assessment studies to define the likely medical consequences of carrying a mutated gene.
This review concentrates on the use of oligonucleotide arrays for hybridisation based comparative sequence analysis. Technological advances within the past decade have made it possible to apply this technology to many different aspects of medical genetics. These applications range from the detection and scoring of single nucleotide polymorphisms to mutational analysis of large genes. Although we discuss published scientific reports, unpublished work from the private sector12 could also significantly affect the future of this technology.


Keywords: mutational analysis; oligonucleotide microarrays; DNA chips PMID:10528850

  8. Diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of factor V Leiden and prothrombin 20210G > A. A comparison of the Nanogen Eelectronic Microarray with restriction enzyme digestion and the Roche LightCycler.

    PubMed

    Schrijver, Iris; Lay, Marla J; Zehnder, James L

    2003-04-01

    Genetic thrombosis risk factors include a sequence variant in the prothrombin gene (20210G > A) and factor V Leiden (1691G > A). These single nucleotide polymorphisms can be diagnosed with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, fluorescent genotyping on the LightCycler (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN), and microarray-based testing on the novel NanoChip electronic microarray (NanoChip Molecular Biology Workstation, Nanogen, San Diego, CA). We compared these methods for accuracy, time to results, throughput, and interpretation. Results from 789 of 800 individual amplicons analyzed on the NanoChip were in complete agreement with the other assays. Eleven were "no calls" (uninterpreted by the NanoChip system) resulting from failed polymerase chain reaction amplifications. Although the NanoChip System, when used in a low-throughput setting, requires more overall time than the LightCycler, it is nearly equivalent per genotyping call. Owing to minimal sample handling, assay results are more reliable on the NanoChip platform and on the LightCycler than with RFLP. The NanoChip assay is reliable and may be especially valuable to laboratories with a large volume of thrombophilia test requests.

  9. Feasibility of mini-sequencing schemes based on nucleotide polymorphisms for microbial identification and population analyses.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Ricardo; Eusebio, Nadia; Caramalho, Rita

    2015-03-01

    Practical schemes based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have been proposed as alternatives to simplify and replace the molecular methodologies based on the extensive sequencing analysis of genes. SNaPshot mini-sequencing has been progressively experienced during the last decade and represents a fast and robust strategy to analyze critical polymorphisms. Such assays have been proposed to characterize some bacteria and microbial eukaryotes, and its feasibility was now reviewed in the present manuscript. The mini-sequencing schemes showed high discriminatory power and competence for identification of microorganisms, but some specificity errors were still found, particularly for species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex and mycobacteria. SNP assays designed for other goals, e.g., comparison of strains, detection of serotypes, virulence, epidemic, and phylogenetic-related subgroups of isolates, can be very useful by facilitating the investigation of large collections of isolates. The next-generation of SNP assays might consider the inclusion of large number of markers to fully characterize microbial taxonomy and strains; nevertheless, these new technologies are still prone to errors and can largely benefit from integration with well-established mini-sequencing assays. Newly proposed molecular tools should be systematically tested in collections of isolates with high indexes of diversity and guarantee interlaboratorial validation.

  10. Comparison of Mediterranean Pistacia lentiscus genotypes by random amplified polymorphic DNA, chemical, and morphological analyses.

    PubMed

    Barazani, Oz; Dudai, Nativ; Golan-Goldhirsh, Avi

    2003-08-01

    Characterization of the genetic variability of Mediterranean Pistacia lentiscus genotypes by RAPD, composition of essential oils, and morphology is presented. High polymorphism in morphological parameters was found among accessions, with no significant differences in relation to geographical origin, or to gender. GC-MS analysis of leaves extracted by t-butyl methyl ether, showed 12 monoterpenes, seven sesquiterpenes, and one linear nonterpenic compound. Cluster analysis divided the accessions into two main groups according to the relative content of the major compounds, with no relation to their geographical origin. In contrast, a dendrogram based on RAPD analysis gave two main clusters according to their geographical origins. Low correlation was found between genetic and essential oil content matrices. High morphological and chemical variability on one hand, and genotypic polymorphism on the other, provide ecological advantages that might explain the distribution of Pistacia lentiscus over a wide range of habitats. The plants under study were grown together in the same climatic and environmental conditions, thus pointing to the plausible genetic basis of the observed phenotypic differences.

  11. Timecourse microarray analyses reveal global changes in gene expression of susceptible Glycine max (soybean) roots during infection by Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode).

    PubMed

    Alkharouf, Nadim W; Klink, Vincent P; Chouikha, Imed B; Beard, Hunter S; MacDonald, Margaret H; Meyer, Susan; Knap, Halina T; Khan, Rana; Matthews, Benjamin F

    2006-09-01

    Changes in gene expression within roots of Glycine max (soybean), cv. Kent, susceptible to infection by Heterodera glycines (the soybean cyst nematode [SCN]), at 6, 12, and 24 h, and 2, 4, 6, and 8 days post-inoculation were monitored using microarrays containing more than 6,000 cDNA inserts. Replicate, independent biological samples were examined at each time point. Gene expression was analyzed statistically using T-tests, ANOVA, clustering algorithms, and online analytical processing (OLAP). These analyses allow the user to query the data in several ways without importing the data into third-party software. RT-PCR confirmed that WRKY6 transcription factor, trehalose phosphate synthase, EIF4a, Skp1, and CLB1 were differentially induced across most time-points. Other genes induced across most timepoints included lipoxygenase, calmodulin, phospholipase C, metallothionein-like protein, and chalcone reductase. RT-PCR demonstrated enhanced expression during the first 12 h of infection for Kunitz trypsin inhibitor and sucrose synthase. The stress-related gene, SAM-22, phospholipase D and 12-oxophytodienoate reductase were also induced at the early time-points. At 6 and 8 dpi there was an abundance of transcripts expressed that encoded genes involved in transcription and protein synthesis. Some of those genes included ribosomal proteins, and initiation and elongation factors. Several genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport were also more abundant. Those genes included glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and sucrose synthase. These results identified specific changes in gene transcript levels triggered by infection of susceptible soybean roots by SCN.

  12. Multievidence microarray mining.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Martin; Scherf, Matthias; Epple, Anton; Werner, Thomas

    2005-10-01

    Microarray mining is a challenging task because of the superposition of several processes in the data. We believe that the combination of microarray data-based analyses (statistical significance analysis of gene expression) with array-independent analyses (literature-mining and promoter analysis) enables some of the problems of traditional array analysis to be overcome. As a proof-of-principle, we revisited publicly available microarray data derived from an experiment with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated fibroblasts. Our strategy revealed results beyond the detection of the major metabolic pathway known to be linked to the PDGF response: we were able to identify the crosstalking regulatory networks underlying the metabolic pathway without using a priori knowledge about the experiment.

  13. Gaucher Disease: Transcriptome Analyses Using Microarray or mRNA Sequencing in a Gba1 Mutant Mouse Model Treated with Velaglucerase alfa or Imiglucerase

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sunghee; Sun, Ying; Jia, Li; Keddache, Mehdi; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    Gaucher disease type 1, an inherited lysosomal storage disorder, is caused by mutations in GBA1 leading to defective glucocerebrosidase (GCase) function and consequent excess accumulation of glucosylceramide/glucosylsphingosine in visceral organs. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with the biosimilars, imiglucerase (imig) or velaglucerase alfa (vela) improves/reverses the visceral disease. Comparative transcriptomic effects (microarray and mRNA-Seq) of no ERT and ERT (imig or vela) were done with liver, lung, and spleen from mice having Gba1 mutant alleles, termed D409V/null. Disease-related molecular effects, dynamic ranges, and sensitivities were compared between mRNA-Seq and microarrays and their respective analytic tools, i.e. Mixed Model ANOVA (microarray), and DESeq and edgeR (mRNA-Seq). While similar gene expression patterns were observed with both platforms, mRNA-Seq identified more differentially expressed genes (DEGs) (∼3-fold) than the microarrays. Among the three analytic tools, DESeq identified the maximum number of DEGs for all tissues and treatments. DESeq and edgeR comparisons revealed differences in DEGs identified. In 9V/null liver, spleen and lung, post-therapy transcriptomes approximated WT, were partially reverted, and had little change, respectively, and were concordant with the corresponding histological and biochemical findings. DEG overlaps were only 8–20% between mRNA-Seq and microarray, but the biological pathways were similar. Cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle, heme metabolism, and mitochondrial dysfunction were most altered with the Gaucher disease process. Imig and vela differentially affected specific disease pathways. Differential molecular responses were observed in direct transcriptome comparisons from imig- and vela-treated tissues. These results provide cross-validation for the mRNA-Seq and microarray platforms, and show differences between the molecular effects of two highly structurally similar ERT biopharmaceuticals

  14. Population analyses of Amblyomma maculatum ticks and Rickettsia parkeri using single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Flavia A G; Goddard, Jerome; Caprio, Michael; Paddock, Christopher D; Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; Varela-Stokes, Andrea S

    2013-09-01

    Gulf Coast ticks, Amblyomma maculatum, and the zoonotic agents they transmit, Rickettsia parkeri, are expanding into areas in the United States where they were not previously reported, and are emerging threats for public and veterinary health. The dynamics of this tick-pathogen system and implications for disease transmission are still unclear. To assess genetic variation of tick and rickettsial populations, we collected adult A. maculatum from 10 sites in Mississippi, 4 in the northern, one in the central, and 5 in the southern part of the state. PCR amplicons from tick mitochondrial 16S rRNA and rickettsial ompA genes as well as 5 intergenic spacer regions were evaluated for genetic variation using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Frequencies of the 4 tick 16S haplotypes were not significantly different among regions of Mississippi, but within sites there were differences in distribution that can be explained by high migration rates. Phylogenetically, one lineage of tick haplotypes was a species-poor sister group to remaining haplotypes in the species-rich sister group. No genetic variation was identified in any of the 6 selected gene targets of R. parkeri examined in the infected ticks, suggesting high levels of intermixing.

  15. Cost-effective fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analyses using a three primer system.

    PubMed

    Stölting, Kai N; Clarke, Andrew C; Meudt, Heidi M; Blankenhorn, Wolf U; Wilson, Anthony B

    2011-05-01

    The amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique is a widely used multi-purpose DNA fingerprinting tool. The ability to size-separate fluorescently labelled AFLP fragments on a capillary electrophoresis instrument has provided a means for high-throughput genome screening, an approach particularly useful in studying the molecular ecology of nonmodel organisms. While the 'per-marker-generated' costs for AFLP are low, fluorescently labelled oligonucleotides remain costly. We present a cost-effective method for fluorescently end-labelling AFLPs that should make this tool more readily accessible for laboratories with limited budgets. Both standard fluorescent AFLPs and the end-labelled alternatives presented here are repeatable and produce similar numbers of fragments when scored using both manual and automated scoring methods. While it is not recommended to combine data using the two approaches, the results of the methods are qualitatively comparable, indicating that AFLP end-labelling is a robust alternative to standard methods of AFLP genotyping. For researchers commencing a new AFLP project, the AFLP end-labelling method outlined here is easily implemented, as it does not require major changes to PCR protocols and can significantly reduce the costs of AFLP studies.

  16. Karyotype versus microarray testing for genetic abnormalities after stillbirth.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Uma M; Page, Grier P; Saade, George R; Silver, Robert M; Thorsten, Vanessa R; Parker, Corette B; Pinar, Halit; Willinger, Marian; Stoll, Barbara J; Heim-Hall, Josefine; Varner, Michael W; Goldenberg, Robert L; Bukowski, Radek; Wapner, Ronald J; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn D; O'Brien, Barbara M; Dudley, Donald J; Levy, Brynn

    2012-12-06

    Genetic abnormalities have been associated with 6 to 13% of stillbirths, but the true prevalence may be higher. Unlike karyotype analysis, microarray analysis does not require live cells, and it detects small deletions and duplications called copy-number variants. The Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network conducted a population-based study of stillbirth in five geographic catchment areas. Standardized postmortem examinations and karyotype analyses were performed. A single-nucleotide polymorphism array was used to detect copy-number variants of at least 500 kb in placental or fetal tissue. Variants that were not identified in any of three databases of apparently unaffected persons were then classified into three groups: probably benign, clinical significance unknown, or pathogenic. We compared the results of karyotype and microarray analyses of samples obtained after delivery. In our analysis of samples from 532 stillbirths, microarray analysis yielded results more often than did karyotype analysis (87.4% vs. 70.5%, P<0.001) and provided better detection of genetic abnormalities (aneuploidy or pathogenic copy-number variants, 8.3% vs. 5.8%; P=0.007). Microarray analysis also identified more genetic abnormalities among 443 antepartum stillbirths (8.8% vs. 6.5%, P=0.02) and 67 stillbirths with congenital anomalies (29.9% vs. 19.4%, P=0.008). As compared with karyotype analysis, microarray analysis provided a relative increase in the diagnosis of genetic abnormalities of 41.9% in all stillbirths, 34.5% in antepartum stillbirths, and 53.8% in stillbirths with anomalies. Microarray analysis is more likely than karyotype analysis to provide a genetic diagnosis, primarily because of its success with nonviable tissue, and is especially valuable in analyses of stillbirths with congenital anomalies or in cases in which karyotype results cannot be obtained. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.).

  17. Karyotype versus Microarray Testing for Genetic Abnormalities after Stillbirth

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Uma M.; Page, Grier P.; Saade, George R.; Silver, Robert M.; Thorsten, Vanessa R.; Parker, Corette B.; Pinar, Halit; Willinger, Marian; Stoll, Barbara J.; Heim-Hall, Josefine; Varner, Michael W.; Goldenberg, Robert L.; Bukowski, Radek; Wapner, Ronald J.; Drews-Botsch, Carolyn D.; O’Brien, Barbara M.; Dudley, Donald J.; Levy, Brynn

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic abnormalities have been associated with 6 to 13% of stillbirths, but the true prevalence may be higher. Unlike karyotype analysis, microarray analysis does not require live cells, and it detects small deletions and duplications called copy-number variants. Methods The Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network conducted a population-based study of stillbirth in five geographic catchment areas. Standardized postmortem examinations and karyotype analyses were performed. A single-nucleotide polymorphism array was used to detect copy-number variants of at least 500 kb in placental or fetal tissue. Variants that were not identified in any of three databases of apparently unaffected persons were then classified into three groups: probably benign, clinical significance unknown, or pathogenic. We compared the results of karyotype and microarray analyses of samples obtained after delivery. Results In our analysis of samples from 532 stillbirths, microarray analysis yielded results more often than did karyotype analysis (87.4% vs. 70.5%, P<0.001) and provided better detection of genetic abnormalities (aneuploidy or pathogenic copy-number variants, 8.3% vs. 5.8%; P = 0.007). Microarray analysis also identified more genetic abnormalities among 443 antepartum stillbirths (8.8% vs. 6.5%, P = 0.02) and 67 stillbirths with congenital anomalies (29.9% vs. 19.4%, P = 0.008). As compared with karyotype analysis, microarray analysis provided a relative increase in the diagnosis of genetic abnormalities of 41.9% in all stillbirths, 34.5% in antepartum stillbirths, and 53.8% in stillbirths with anomalies. Conclusions Microarray analysis is more likely than karyotype analysis to provide a genetic diagnosis, primarily because of its success with nonviable tissue, and is especially valuable in analyses of stillbirths with congenital anomalies or in cases in which karyotype results cannot be obtained. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health

  18. Polymorphic DNA microsatellite markers for forensic individual identification and parentage analyses of seven threatened species of parrots (family Psittacidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The parrot family represents one of the bird group with the largest number of endangered species, as a result of habitat destruction and illegal trade. This illicit traffic involves the smuggling of eggs and animals, and the laundering through captive breeding facilities of wild-caught animals. Despite the huge potential of wildlife DNA forensics to determine with conclusive evidence illegal trade, current usage of DNA profiling approaches in parrots has been limited by the lack of suitable molecular markers specifically developed for the focal species and by low cross-species polymorphism. In this study, we isolated DNA microsatellite markers in seven parrot species threatened with extinction (Amazona brasiliensis, A. oratrix, A. pretrei, A. rhodocorytha, Anodorhynchus leari, Ara rubrogenys and Primolius couloni). From an enriched genomic library followed by 454 pyrosequencing, we characterized a total of 106 polymorphic microsatellite markers (mostly tetranucleotides) in the seven species and tested them across an average number of 19 individuals per species. The mean number of alleles per species and across loci varied from 6.4 to 8.3, with the mean observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.65 to 0.84. Identity and parentage exclusion probabilities were highly discriminatory. The high variability displayed by these microsatellite loci demonstrates their potential utility to perform individual genotyping and parentage analyses, in order to develop a DNA testing framework to determine illegal traffic in these threatened species. PMID:27688959

  19. Polymorphic DNA microsatellite markers for forensic individual identification and parentage analyses of seven threatened species of parrots (family Psittacidae).

    PubMed

    Jan, Catherine; Fumagalli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The parrot family represents one of the bird group with the largest number of endangered species, as a result of habitat destruction and illegal trade. This illicit traffic involves the smuggling of eggs and animals, and the laundering through captive breeding facilities of wild-caught animals. Despite the huge potential of wildlife DNA forensics to determine with conclusive evidence illegal trade, current usage of DNA profiling approaches in parrots has been limited by the lack of suitable molecular markers specifically developed for the focal species and by low cross-species polymorphism. In this study, we isolated DNA microsatellite markers in seven parrot species threatened with extinction (Amazona brasiliensis, A. oratrix, A. pretrei, A. rhodocorytha, Anodorhynchus leari, Ara rubrogenys and Primolius couloni). From an enriched genomic library followed by 454 pyrosequencing, we characterized a total of 106 polymorphic microsatellite markers (mostly tetranucleotides) in the seven species and tested them across an average number of 19 individuals per species. The mean number of alleles per species and across loci varied from 6.4 to 8.3, with the mean observed heterozygosities ranging from 0.65 to 0.84. Identity and parentage exclusion probabilities were highly discriminatory. The high variability displayed by these microsatellite loci demonstrates their potential utility to perform individual genotyping and parentage analyses, in order to develop a DNA testing framework to determine illegal traffic in these threatened species.

  20. Genomic Analyses of Three Malaria Vectors Reveals Extensive Shared Polymorphism but Contrasting Population Histories

    PubMed Central

    O’Loughlin, Samantha M.; Magesa, Stephen; Mbogo, Charles; Mosha, Franklin; Midega, Janet; Lomas, Susan; Burt, Austin

    2014-01-01

    Anopheles gambiae s.l. are important malaria vectors, but little is known about their genomic variation in the wild. Here, we present inter- and intraspecies analysis of genome-wide RADseq data, in three Anopheles gambiae s.l. species collected from East Africa. The mosquitoes fall into three genotypic clusters representing described species (A. gambiae, A. arabiensis, and A. merus) with no evidence of cryptic breeding units. Anopheles merus is the most divergent of the three species, supporting a recent new phylogeny based on chromosomal inversions. Even though the species clusters are well separated, there is extensive shared polymorphism, particularly between A. gambiae and A. arabiensis. Divergence between A. gambiae and A. arabiensis does not vary across the autosomes but is higher in X-linked inversions than elsewhere on X or on the autosomes, consistent with the suggestion that this inversion (or a gene within it) is important in reproductive isolation between the species. The 2La/2L+a inversion shows no more evidence of introgression between A. gambiae and A. arabiensis than the rest of the autosomes. Population differentiation within A. gambiae and A. arabiensis is weak over approximately 190–270 km, implying no strong barriers to dispersal. Analysis of Tajima’s D and the allele frequency spectrum is consistent with modest population increases in A. arabiensis and A. merus, but a more complex demographic history of expansion followed by contraction in A. gambiae. Although they are less than 200 km apart, the two A. gambiae populations show evidence of different demographic histories. PMID:24408911

  1. Genetic diversity in populations of Slovak Spotted cattle based on single nucleotide polymorphisms analyses.

    PubMed

    Moravčíková, Nina; Trakovická, Anna; Navrátilová, Alica

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify SNPs in leptin (LEP), leptin receptor (LEPR) and growth hormone (GH) genes in order to analyze genetic diversity of Slovak Spotted cattle. The total numbers of blood samples were taken from 353 Slovak Spotted cows originating from four farms. Genomic DNA was isolated by phenol-chloroform extraction method and analyzed by PCR-RFLP method. After digestion with restriction, enzymes were detected in whole population of cow's alleles with frequency: LEP/Sau3AI A 0.84 and B 0.16 (±0.0152); LEPR/BseGI C 0.95 and T 0.05 (±0.0089) and GH/AluI L 0.70 and V 0.30 (±0.0188). Based on the observed vs. expected genotypes frequencies populations across loci were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P\\>0.05). Predominant for SNP LEP/Sau3AI was AA genotype (0.70), for SNP LEPR/T945M CC genotype (0.91), and LL genotype (0.48) was most frequent for SNP GH/AluI. The observed heterozygosity of SNPs across populations was also transferred to the low or median polymorphic information content 0.24 (He 0.28), 0.08 (He 0.09) and 0.33 (He 0.47) for LEP, LEPR and GH genes, respectively. Within genetic variability estimating negative values of fixation indexes FIS (-0.09-0.05) and FIT (-0.07-0.03) indicating heterozygote excess were observed. The value of FST indexes (0.018-0.023) shows very low levels of genetic differentiation in allele frequencies of loci among evaluated subpopulations. The low values of genetic distances (0.0018-0.0159) indicated high genetic relatedness among animals in subpopulations caused probably by common ancestry used in breeding program at farms.

  2. Bridging the Gap Between Large-scale Data Sets and Analyses: Semi-automated Methods to Facilitate Length Polymorphism Scoring and Data Analyses.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers can be developed more quickly and at a lower cost than microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism markers, which makes them ideal markers for large-scale studies of understudied taxa — such as species at risk. However,...

  3. Bridging the Gap Between Large-scale Data Sets and Analyses: Semi-automated Methods to Facilitate Length Polymorphism Scoring and Data Analyses.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers can be developed more quickly and at a lower cost than microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism markers, which makes them ideal markers for large-scale studies of understudied taxa — such as species at risk. However,...

  4. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed.

  5. Analyses of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) indicate rapid radiation of Diospyros species (Ebenaceae) endemic to New Caledonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation in some plant groups has occurred on islands and due to the characteristic rapid pace of phenotypic evolution, standard molecular markers often provide insufficient variation for phylogenetic reconstruction. To resolve relationships within a clade of 21 closely related New Caledonian Diospyros species and evaluate species boundaries we analysed genome-wide DNA variation via amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP). Results A neighbour-joining (NJ) dendrogram based on Dice distances shows all species except D. minimifolia, D. parviflora and D. vieillardii to form unique clusters of genetically similar accessions. However, there was little variation between these species clusters, resulting in unresolved species relationships and a star-like general NJ topology. Correspondingly, analyses of molecular variance showed more variation within species than between them. A Bayesian analysis with BEAST produced a similar result. Another Bayesian method, this time a clustering method, Structure, demonstrated the presence of two groups, highly congruent with those observed in a principal coordinate analysis (PCO). Molecular divergence between the two groups is low and does not correspond to any hypothesised taxonomic, ecological or geographical patterns. Conclusions We hypothesise that such a pattern could have been produced by rapid and complex evolution involving a widespread progenitor for which an initial split into two groups was followed by subsequent fragmentation into many diverging populations, which was followed by range expansion of then divergent entities. Overall, this process resulted in an opportunistic pattern of phenotypic diversification. The time since divergence was probably insufficient for some species to become genetically well-differentiated, resulting in progenitor/derivative relationships being exhibited in a few cases. In other cases, our analyses may have revealed evidence for the existence of cryptic species, for which

  6. A new agarose matrix for single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), heteroduplex (HTX), and gel shift analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Dumais, M.M.; White, H.W.; Rashid, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    Detection of mutation, by SSCP or heteroduplex analysis, is important in medical genetics and oncology. Analysis of DNA binding proteins is a powerful tool in molecular biology research. Traditionally, these methods are performed using nondenaturing gel electrophoresis on poly-acrylamide or polyacrylamide-type matrices. Here we report the development of a new agarose gel matrix that can be used for all three methods. SSCP analyses were performed using the prototype agarose gel matrix for wild-type, polymorphic, and mutant samples from c-Kras exon 12, p53 exons 8 and 9, and HOX2B. We performed SSCP analyses using both isotopic and nonisotopic methods. We also analyzed the samples by deliberate HTX formation and subsequent gel analysis. Using the prototype agarose matrix, we detected single and multiple DNA sequence variants in 150-350 bp fragments with an efficiency comparable to polyacrylamide gels run under similar conditions. For SSCP and HTX assays, we achieved optimal resolution in gels run in vertical formats. However, some HTX samples could be resolved in horizontal gel systems. In addition, based on our studies, we have developed a useful battery of controls and standards for quality control of SSCP and HTX assays. We analyzed several different DNA/protein complexes (SP1, AP2, and octamer binding protein) using the prototype agarose matrix. We obtained good resolution in both vertical and horizontal gel formats. The horizontal gel system is generally superior for this application, due to its ease of use and slightly better resolution. This new prototype gel matrix offers an alternative for researchers performing analyses that previously could only be done on polyacrylamide-type gel matrices. For some applications, this new matrix offers the ease of horizontal gel casting. For all applications, this matrix offers the safety of a nontoxic system and the reproducibility of a thermally gelling system.

  7. DNA microarray analyses reveal a post-irradiation differential time-dependent gene expression profile in yeast cells exposed to X-rays and gamma-rays.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shinzo; Ishidou, Emi; Kurita, Sakiko; Suzuki, Yoshiteru; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2006-07-21

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is the most enigmatic of genotoxic stress inducers in our environment that has been around from the eons of time. IR is generally considered harmful, and has been the subject of numerous studies, mostly looking at the DNA damaging effects in cells and the repair mechanisms therein. Moreover, few studies have focused on large-scale identification of cellular responses to IR, and to this end, we describe here an initial study on the transcriptional responses of the unicellular genome model, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain S288C), by cDNA microarray. The effect of two different IR, X-rays, and gamma (gamma)-rays, was investigated by irradiating the yeast cells cultured in YPD medium with 50 Gy doses of X- and gamma-rays, followed by resuspension of the cells in YPD for time-course experiments. The samples were collected for microarray analysis at 20, 40, and 80 min after irradiation. Microarray analysis revealed a time-course transcriptional profile of changed gene expressions. Up-regulated genes belonged to the functional categories mainly related to cell cycle and DNA processing, cell rescue defense and virulence, protein and cell fate, and metabolism (X- and gamma-rays). Similarly, for X- and gamma-rays, the down-regulated genes belonged to mostly transcription and protein synthesis, cell cycle and DNA processing, control of cellular organization, cell fate, and C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism categories, respectively. This study provides for the first time a snapshot of the genome-wide mRNA expression profiles in X- and gamma-ray post-irradiated yeast cells and comparatively interprets/discusses the changed gene functional categories as effects of these two radiations vis-à-vis their energy levels.

  8. DNA microarray analyses reveal a post-irradiation differential time-dependent gene expression profile in yeast cells exposed to X-rays and {gamma}-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Shinzo; Ishidou, Emi; Kurita, Sakiko; Suzuki, Yoshiteru; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep . E-mail: rakwal-68@aist.go.jp; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2006-07-21

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is the most enigmatic of genotoxic stress inducers in our environment that has been around from the eons of time. IR is generally considered harmful, and has been the subject of numerous studies, mostly looking at the DNA damaging effects in cells and the repair mechanisms therein. Moreover, few studies have focused on large-scale identification of cellular responses to IR, and to this end, we describe here an initial study on the transcriptional responses of the unicellular genome model, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain S288C), by cDNA microarray. The effect of two different IR, X-rays, and gamma ({gamma})-rays, was investigated by irradiating the yeast cells cultured in YPD medium with 50 Gy doses of X- and {gamma}-rays, followed by resuspension of the cells in YPD for time-course experiments. The samples were collected for microarray analysis at 20, 40, and 80 min after irradiation. Microarray analysis revealed a time-course transcriptional profile of changed gene expressions. Up-regulated genes belonged to the functional categories mainly related to cell cycle and DNA processing, cell rescue defense and virulence, protein and cell fate, and metabolism (X- and {gamma}-rays). Similarly, for X- and {gamma}-rays, the down-regulated genes belonged to mostly transcription and protein synthesis, cell cycle and DNA processing, control of cellular organization, cell fate, and C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism categories, respectively. This study provides for the first time a snapshot of the genome-wide mRNA expression profiles in X- and {gamma}-ray post-irradiated yeast cells and comparatively interprets/discusses the changed gene functional categories as effects of these two radiations vis-a-vis their energy levels.

  9. Genetic Diversity among Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. Trifolii Strains Revealed by Allozyme and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Demezas, David H.; Reardon, Terry B.; Watson, John M.; Gibson, Alan H.

    1991-01-01

    Allozyme electrophoresis and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses were used to examine the genetic diversity of a collection of 18 Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii, 1 R. leguminosarum bv. viciae, and 2 R. meliloti strains. Allozyme analysis at 28 loci revealed 16 electrophoretic types. The mean genetic distance between electrophoretic types of R. leguminosarum and R. meliloti was 0.83. Within R. leguminosarum, the single strain of bv. viciae differed at an average of 0.65 from strains of bv. trifolii, while electrophoretic types of bv. trifolii differed at a range of 0.23 to 0.62. Analysis of RFLPs around two chromosomal DNA probes also delineated 16 unique RFLP patterns and yielded genetic diversity similar to that revealed by the allozyme data. Analysis of RFLPs around three Sym (symbiotic) plasmid-derived probes demonstrated that the Sym plasmids reflect genetic divergence similar to that of their bacterial hosts. The large genetic distances between many strains precluded reliable estimates of their genetic relationships. PMID:16348600

  10. Demographic and random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses reveal high levels of genetic diversity in a clonal violet.

    PubMed

    Auge, H; Neuffer, B; Erlinghagen, F; Grupe, R; Brandl, R

    2001-07-01

    We performed demographic and molecular investigations on woodland populations of the clonal herb Viola riviniana in central Germany. We investigated the pattern of seedling recruitment, the amount of genotypic (clonal) variation and the partitioning of genetic variation among and within populations. Our demographic study was carried out in six violet populations of different ages and habitat conditions. It revealed that repeated seedling recruitment takes place in all of these populations, and that clonal propagation is accompanied by high ramet mortality. Our molecular investigations were performed on a subset of three of these six violet populations. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses using six primers yielded 45 scorable bands that were used to identify multilocus genotypes, i.e. putative clones. Consistent with our demographic results and independent of population age, we found a large genotypic diversity with a mean proportion of distinguishable genotypes of 0.93 and a mean Simpson's diversity index of 0.99. Using AMOVA we found a strong genetic differentiation among these violet populations with a PhiST value of 0.41. We suggest that a high selfing rate, limited gene flow due to short seed dispersal distances and drift due to founder effects are responsible for this pattern. Although Viola riviniana is a clonal plant, traits associated with sexual reproduction rather than clonality per se are moulding the pattern of genetic variation in this species.

  11. Genetic variation in Opisthorchis viverrini (Trematoda: Opisthorchiidae) from northeast Thailand and Laos PDR based on random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses

    PubMed Central

    Chilton, Neil B.; Andrews, Ross H.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic variation in Opisthorchis viverrini adults originating from different locations in northeast Thailand and Laos, People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), was examined using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analyses. In an initial analysis, the genomic DNA of one fluke from each of ten localities was amplified using 15 random primers (10-mers); however, genetic variation among O. viverrini specimens was detected reliably for only four primers. A more detailed RAPD analysis using these four primers was conducted on ten individuals from nine localities. Considerable genetic variation was detected among O. viverrini from different geographical areas and among some individuals from the same collecting locality. Comparison of the RAPD profiles revealed that O. viverrini adults from Laos PDR were genetically distinct from those from northeast Thailand. The taxonomic significance of this finding needs to be explored in more detail. The RAPD markers established in the present study provide opportunities to examine the biology and epidemiology of O. viverrini and fish-borne trematodes within the region. Additionally, application of these markers in such studies could have important implications in relation to the prevalence of cholangiocarcinoma in different regions of Asia. PMID:17016722

  12. Identification of virulence factors in vibrio vulnificus by comparative transcriptomic analyses between clinical and environmental isolates using cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Hwang; Kim, Byung-Soo; Lee, Kyung Shin; Kim, Ik-Joong; Son, Jee Soo; Kim, Kun-Soo

    2011-12-01

    We compared the gene expression among four clinical and five environmental V. vulnificus isolates, using a cDNA microarray containing 131 genes possibly associated with pathogenicity, transport, signal transduction, and gene regulations in the pathogen. cDNAs from total RNAs of these isolates were hybridized into the cDNA microarray using the cDNA of the wild-type strain MO6/24-O as a reference. We focused on selecting differentially expressed (DE) genes between clinical and environmental isolates using a modified t-statistic. We could detect two statistically significant DE genes between virulent isolates and less-virulent isolates with a marginal statistical significance (pvalue of 0.008). These were genes putatively encoding pilin and adenlyate cylase. Real time-PCR confirmed that these two selected genes transcribed in significantly higher levels in virulent isolates than in less-virulent isolates. Mutants with lesions in the gene encoding pilin showed significantly higher LD50 values than that of wild type.

  13. Differential Regulation of Listeria monocytogenes Internalin and Internalin-Like Genes by σB and PrfA as Revealed by Subgenomic Microarray Analyses

    PubMed Central

    McGann, Patrick; Raengpradub, Sarita; Ivanek, Renata; Wiedmann, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The Listeria monocytogenes genome contains more than 20 genes that encode cell surface–associated internalins. To determine the contributions of the alternative sigma factor σB and the virulence gene regulator PrfA to internalin gene expression, a subgenomic microarray was designed to contain two probes for each of 24 internalin-like genes identified in the L. monocytogenes 10403S genome. Competitive microarray hybridization was performed on RNA extracted from (i) the 10403S parent strain and an isogenic ΔsigB strain; (ii) 10403S and an isogenic ΔprfA strain; (iii) a (G155S) 10403S derivative that expresses the constitutively active PrfA (PrfA*) and the ΔprfA strain; and (iv) 10403S and an isogenic ΔsigBΔprfA strain. σB- and PrfA-dependent transcription of selected genes was further confirmed by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. For the 24 internalin-like genes examined, (i) both σB and PrfA contributed to transcription of inlA and inlB, (ii) only σB contributed to transcription of inlC2, inlD, lmo0331, and lmo0610; (iii) only PrfA contributed to transcription of inlC and lmo2445; and (iv) neither σB nor PrfA contributed to transcription of the remaining 16 internalin-like genes under the conditions tested. PMID:18713061

  14. Identification of proteasome subunit beta type 2 associated with deltamethrin detoxification in Drosophila Kc cells by cDNA microarray analysis and bioassay analyses.

    PubMed

    Hu, Junli; Jiao, Dongxu; Xu, Qin; Ying, Xiaoli; Liu, Wei; Chi, Qingping; Ye, Yuting; Li, Xueyu; Cheng, Luogen

    2016-05-10

    Insecticide deltamethrin resistance has presented a difficult obstacle for pest control and the resistance development is complex and associated with many genes. To better understand the possible molecular mechanisms involved in DM stress, in this study, cDNA microarray analysis was employed. 448 differentially expressed genes with at least a 2-fold expression difference were identified in Drosophila cells after DM exposure. Moreover, some genes were confirmed with qPCR, which yielded results consistent with the microarray analysis. Three members of the ubiquitin-proteasome system were significantly elevated in DM-stressed cells, suggesting that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may play an important role in DM detoxification. The proteasome beta2 subunit (Prosbeta2) is a member of 20S proteasome subunit family, which forms the proteolytic core of 26S proteasome. Whether Prosbeta2 participates in DM detoxification requires further study. RNAi and heterologous expression were conducted to investigate the contribution of Prosbeta2 in DM detoxification. The results revealed Prosbeta2 knockdown significantly reduce the level of DM detoxification in RNAi-treated cells after 48 h. Overexpression of Prosbeta2 increased cellular viability. These detoxification results represent the first evidence that Prosbeta2 plays a role in the detoxification of DM, which may provide new idea and target for studying the molecular mechanisms of insect resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genome-wide divergence and linkage disequilibrium analyses for Capsicum baccatum revealed by genome-anchored single nucleotide polymorphisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Principal component analysis (PCA) with 36,621 polymorphic genome-anchored single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified collectively for Capsicum annuum and Capsicum baccatum was used to show the distribution of these 2 important incompatible cultivated pepper species. Estimated mean nucleotide...

  16. EST and microarray analyses of pathogen-responsive genes in hot pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) non-host resistance against soybean pustule pathogen (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghyeob; Kim, Soo-Yong; Chung, Eunjoo; Joung, Young-Hee; Pai, Hyun-Sook; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Choi, Doil

    2004-07-01

    Large-scale single-pass sequencing of cDNA libraries and microarray analysis have proven to be useful tools for discovering new genes and studying gene expression. As a first step in elucidating the defense mechanisms in hot pepper plants, a total of 8,525 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated and analyzed in silico. The cDNA microarray analysis identified 613 hot pepper genes that were transcriptionally responsive to the non-host soybean pustule pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. glycines ( Xag). Several functional types of genes, including those involved in cell wall modification/biosynthesis, transport, signaling pathways and divergent defense reactions, were induced at the early stage of Xag infiltration. In contrast, genes encoding proteins that are involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism and the synthesis of chloroplast biogenetic proteins were down-regulated at the late stage of Xag infiltration. These expression profiles share common features with the expression profiles elicited by other stresses, such as fungal challenge, wounding, cold, drought and high salinity. However, we also identified several novel transcription factors that may be specifically involved in the defense reaction of the hot pepper. We also found that the defense reaction of the hot pepper may involve the deactivation of gibberellin. Furthermore, many genes encoding proteins with unknown function were identified. Functional analysis of these genes may broaden our understanding of non-host resistance. This study is the first report of large-scale sequencing and non-host defense transcriptome analysis of the hot pepper plant species. (The sequence data in this paper have been submitted to the dbEST and GenBank database under the codes 10227604-10236595 and BM059564-BM068555, respectively. Additional information is available at http://plant.pdrc.re.kr/ks200201/pepper.html).

  17. Assessment of biases associated with profiling simple, model communities using terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism-based analyses.

    PubMed

    Frey, Julie C; Angert, Esther R; Pell, Alice N

    2006-10-01

    Community profiles based on terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of amplified ribosomal RNA genes are used to monitor changes in microbial community structure and are sometimes employed for semi-quantitative estimates of species richness and abundance in environmental samples. To assess the accuracy of T-RFLP community profiles representing the relative abundance of bacteria in a sample, five species of ruminal bacteria were used to construct simple "communities". Template DNA for PCR amplification was generated either by mixing equal quantities of genomic DNA from pure cultures or by mixing equal numbers of cells prior to DNA extraction. Pairwise mixtures of Fibrobacter succinogenes S85 with Ruminococcus albus 8, Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens 49 and Streptococcus bovis JB1 were created and a 5-member community was constructed. With genomic DNA mixes, relative abundance calculations based on T-RFLP patterns did not reflect input ratios. These discrepancies could not be accounted for by differences in genome size and rRNA operon copy number. In cell mixing experiments, easily lysed cells were overrepresented. To determine if a numerical correction factor could be used to compensate for observed discrepancies, we attempted to quantify biases attributed to DNA extraction and PCR amplification. Biases attributable to these factors led to deviations from expected PCR product ratios by 6% to 38%. We found that interactions were so complex that a suitable factor could not be derived. The unsystematic dependence of T-RFLP peak ratios on variability of DNA extraction and PCR amplification prevents accurate quantification of the relative abundance of microorganisms designed to represent simplified natural populations.

  18. VDBP, CYP27B1, and 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Gene Polymorphism Analyses in a Group of Sicilian Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Agnello, L; Scazzone, C; Lo Sasso, B; Bellia, C; Bivona, G; Realmuto, S; Brighina, F; Schillaci, R; Ragonese, P; Salemi, G; Ciaccio, Marcello

    2017-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of central nervous system regarded as one of the most common causes of neurological disability in young adults. The exact etiology of MS is not yet known, although epidemiological data indicate that both genetic susceptibility and environmental exposure are involved. A poor vitamin D status has been proposed as the most attractive environmental factor. Several evidence have highlighted the importance of mutations in vitamin D-regulating genes for vitamin D status. The purpose of our study was to assess the genetic variants of VDBP and CYP27B1 in MS patients and in a control group. A total of 192 subjects, including 100 MS patients and 92 healthy controls, were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured in MS patients and controls by high-performance liquid chromatography. We did not observe any statically significant difference in the distribution of genotypic VDBP variants between the study groups. 25(OH)D plasma levels were significantly higher in the control group versus MS patients; MS patients who carried Gc2 showed lower 25(OH)D plasma levels and those who carried Gc1f showed higher levels. We observed only wild-type allele for CYP27B1 mutations analyzed both in MS patients and in the control group. In conclusion, our findings do not support a role of an independent effect of the investigated vitamin D-related gene variants, VDBP and CYP27B1, in the risk of MS.

  19. Gene expression and single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses of spindle cell lipomas and conventional lipomas with 13q14 deletion.

    PubMed

    Bartuma, Hammurabi; Nord, Karolin H; Macchia, Gemma; Isaksson, Margareth; Nilsson, Jenny; Domanski, Henryk A; Mandahl, Nils; Mertens, Fredrik

    2011-08-01

    Spindle cell lipomas (SCL) are circumscribed, usually s.c. tumors that typically occur on the posterior neck, shoulder, and back of middle aged men. Cytogenetically, almost all SCL are characterized by deletions of chromosome arm 13q, often in combination with loss of 16q. Deletions of 13q are seen also in approximately 15% of conventional lipomas. Through single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array analyses, we identified two minimal deleted regions (MDR) in 13q14 in SCL. In MDR1, four genes were located, including the tumor suppressor gene RB1. MDR1 in SCL overlapped with the MDR detected in conventional lipomas with 13q14 deletion. In MDR2 in SCL there were 34 genes and the two microRNA (miRNA) genes miR-15a and miR-16-1. Global gene expression analysis was used to study the impact of the deletions on genes mapping to the two SCL-associated MDR. Five genes (C13orf1, DHRS12, ATP7B, ALG11, and VPS36) in SCL and one gene (C13orf1) in conventional lipomas with 13q-deletions were found to be significantly underexpressed compared with control tissues. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that miR-16-1 was expressed at lower levels in SCL than in the control samples. No mutations were found at sequencing of RB1, miR-15a, and miR-16-1. Our findings further delineate the target region for the 13q deletion in SCL and conventional lipomas and show that the deletions are associated with down-regulated expression of several genes, notably C13orf1, which was the only gene to be significantly down-regulated in both tumor types. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. DNA Microarrays in Herbal Drug Research

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Preeti; Joshi, Kalpana; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2006-01-01

    Natural products are gaining increased applications in drug discovery and development. Being chemically diverse they are able to modulate several targets simultaneously in a complex system. Analysis of gene expression becomes necessary for better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Conventional strategies for expression profiling are optimized for single gene analysis. DNA microarrays serve as suitable high throughput tool for simultaneous analysis of multiple genes. Major practical applicability of DNA microarrays remains in DNA mutation and polymorphism analysis. This review highlights applications of DNA microarrays in pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics and quality control of herbal drugs and extracts. PMID:17173108

  1. ddRAD-seq phylogenetics based on nucleotide, indel, and presence-absence polymorphisms: Analyses of two avian genera with contrasting histories.

    PubMed

    DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Sorenson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Genotype-by-sequencing (GBS) methods have revolutionized the field of molecular ecology, but their application in molecular phylogenetics remains somewhat limited. In addition, most phylogenetic studies based on large GBS data sets have relied on analyses of concatenated data rather than species tree methods that explicitly account for genealogical stochasticity among loci. We explored the utility of "double-digest" restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRAD-seq) for phylogenetic analyses of the Lagonosticta firefinches (family Estrildidae) and the Vidua brood parasitic finches (family Viduidae). As expected, the number of homologous loci shared among samples was negatively correlated with genetic distance due to the accumulation of restriction site polymorphisms. Nonetheless, for each genus, we obtained data sets of ∼3000 loci shared in common among all samples, including a more distantly related outgroup taxon. For all samples combined, we obtained >1000 homologous loci despite ∼20my divergence between estrildid and parasitic finches. In addition to nucleotide polymorphisms, the ddRAD-seq data yielded large sets of indel and locus presence-absence polymorphisms, all of which had higher consistency indices than mtDNA sequence data in the context of concatenated parsimony analyses. Species tree methods, using individual gene trees or single nucleotide polymorphisms as input, generated results broadly consistent with analyses of concatenated data, particularly for Lagonosticta, which appears to have a well resolved, bifurcating history. Results for Vidua were also generally consistent across methods and data sets, although nodal support and results from different species tree methods were more variable. Lower gene tree congruence in Vidua is likely the result of its unique evolutionary history, which includes rapid speciation by host shift and occasional hybridization and introgression due to incomplete reproductive isolation. We conclude that dd

  2. RNA-Seq and Microarrays Analyses Reveal Global Differential Transcriptomes of Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R between Bacteroids and Free-Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jieli; Hao, Baohai; Liu, Liu; Wang, Shanming; Ma, Binguang; Yang, Yi; Xie, Fuli; Li, Youguo

    2014-01-01

    Mesorhizobium huakuii 7653R occurs either in nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with its host plant, Astragalus sinicus, or free-living in the soil. The M. huakuii 7653R genome has recently been sequenced. To better understand the complex biochemical and developmental changes that occur in 7653R during bacteroid development, RNA-Seq and Microarrays were used to investigate the differential transcriptomes of 7653R bacteroids and free-living cells. The two approaches identified several thousand differentially expressed genes. The most prominent up-regulation occurred in the symbiosis plasmids, meanwhile gene expression is concentrated to a set of genes (clusters) in bacteroids to fulfill corresponding functional requirements. The results suggested that the main energy metabolism is active while fatty acid metabolism is inactive in bacteroid and that most of genes relevant to cell cycle are down-regulated accordingly. For a global analysis, we reconstructed a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network for 7653R and integrated gene expression data into the network using Cytoscape. A highly inter-connected subnetwork, with function enrichment for nitrogen fixation, was found, and a set of hubs and previously uncharacterized genes participating in nitrogen fixation were identified. The results described here provide a broader biological landscape and novel insights that elucidate rhizobial bacteroid differentiation, nitrogen fixation and related novel gene functions. PMID:24695521

  3. X chromosome cDNA microarray screening identifies a functional PLP2 promoter polymorphism enriched in patients with X-linked mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lilei; Jie, Chunfa; Obie, Cassandra; Abidi, Fatima; Schwartz, Charles E.; Stevenson, Roger E.; Valle, David; Wang, Tao

    2007-01-01

    X-linked Mental Retardation (XLMR) occurs in 1 in 600 males and is highly genetically heterogeneous. We used a novel human X chromosome cDNA microarray (XCA) to survey the expression profile of X-linked genes in lymphoblasts of XLMR males. Genes with altered expression verified by Northern blot and/or quantitative PCR were considered candidates. To validate this approach, we documented the expected changes of expression in samples from a patient with a known X chromosome microdeletion and from patients with multiple copies of the X chromosome. We used our XCA to survey lymphoblast RNA samples from 43 unrelated XLMR males and found 15 genes with significant (≥1.5-fold) reduction in expression in at least one proband. Of these, subsequent analysis confirmed altered expression in 12. We followed up one, PLP2, at Xp11.23, which exhibits approximately fourfold decreased expression in two patients. Sequencing analysis in both patients revealed a promoter variant, −113C>A, that alters the core-binding site of the transcription factor ELK1. We showed that PLP2-(−113C>A) is sufficient to cause reduced expression using a luciferase reporter system and is enriched in a cohort of males with probable XLMR (14 of 239, 5.85%) as compared to normal males (9 of 577, 1.56%) (χ2 = 11.07, P < 0.001). PLP2 is expressed abundantly in the pyramidal cells of hippocampus and granular cells of the cerebellum in the brain. We conclude that our XCA screening is an efficient strategy to identify genes that show significant changes in transcript abundance as candidate genes for XLMR. PMID:17416750

  4. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E.; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-10-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2-6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2-3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms.

  5. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E.; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2–6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2–8Neu5Acα2–8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2–6Galβ1–4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2–3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms. PMID:26508590

  6. Small RNA sequencing-microarray analyses in Parkinson leukocytes reveal deep brain stimulation-induced splicing changes that classify brain region transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, Lilach; Salomonis, Nathan; Bronstein, Michal; Greenberg, David S.; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai; Soreq, Hermona

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key post transcriptional regulators of their multiple target genes. However, the detailed profile of miRNA expression in Parkinson's disease, the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide and the first motor disorder has not been charted yet. Here, we report comprehensive miRNA profiling by next-generation small-RNA sequencing, combined with targets inspection by splice-junction and exon arrays interrogating leukocyte RNA in Parkinson's disease patients before and after deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment and of matched healthy control volunteers (HC). RNA-Seq analysis identified 254 miRNAs and 79 passenger strand forms as expressed in blood leukocytes, 16 of which were modified in patients pre-treatment as compared to HC. 11 miRNAs were modified following brain stimulation 5 of which were changed inversely to the disease induced changes. Stimulation cessation further induced changes in 11 miRNAs. Transcript isoform abundance analysis yielded 332 changed isoforms in patients compared to HC, which classified brain transcriptomes of 47 PD and control independent microarrays. Functional enrichment analysis highlighted mitochondrion organization. DBS induced 155 splice changes, enriched in ubiquitin homeostasis. Cellular composition analysis revealed immune cell activity pre and post treatment. Overall, 217 disease and 74 treatment alternative isoforms were predictably targeted by modified miRNAs within both 3′ and 5′ untranslated ends and coding sequence sites. The stimulation-induced network sustained 4 miRNAs and 7 transcripts of the disease network. We believe that the presented dynamic networks provide a novel avenue for identifying disease and treatment-related therapeutic targets. Furthermore, the identification of these networks is a major step forward in the road for understanding the molecular basis for neurological and neurodegenerative diseases and assessment of the impact of brain stimulation on human diseases

  7. Microarray and Real-Time PCR Analyses of the Responses of High-Arctic Soil Bacteria to Hydrocarbon Pollution and Bioremediation Treatments▿

    PubMed Central

    Yergeau, Etienne; Arbour, Mélanie; Brousseau, Roland; Juck, David; Lawrence, John R.; Masson, Luke; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    High-Arctic soils have low nutrient availability, low moisture content, and very low temperatures and, as such, they pose a particular problem in terms of hydrocarbon bioremediation. An in-depth knowledge of the microbiology involved in this process is likely to be crucial to understand and optimize the factors most influencing bioremediation. Here, we compared two distinct large-scale field bioremediation experiments, located at the Canadian high-Arctic stations of Alert (ex situ approach) and Eureka (in situ approach). Bacterial community structure and function were assessed using microarrays targeting the 16S rRNA genes of bacteria found in cold environments and hydrocarbon degradation genes as well as quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR targeting key functional genes. The results indicated a large difference between sampling sites in terms of both soil microbiology and decontamination rates. A rapid reorganization of the bacterial community structure and functional potential as well as rapid increases in the expression of alkane monooxygenases and polyaromatic hydrocarbon-ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases were observed 1 month after the bioremediation treatment commenced in the Alert soils. In contrast, no clear changes in community structure were observed in Eureka soils, while key gene expression increased after a relatively long lag period (1 year). Such discrepancies are likely caused by differences in bioremediation treatments (i.e., ex situ versus in situ), weathering of the hydrocarbons, indigenous microbial communities, and environmental factors such as soil humidity and temperature. In addition, this study demonstrates the value of molecular tools for the monitoring of polar bacteria and their associated functions during bioremediation. PMID:19684169

  8. A semi-quantitative model of Quorum-Sensing in Staphylococcus aureus, approved by microarray meta-analyses and tested by mutation studies.

    PubMed

    Audretsch, Christof; Lopez, Daniel; Srivastava, Mugdha; Wolz, Christiane; Dandekar, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) causes infections including severe sepsis by antibiotic-resistant strains. It forms biofilms to protect itself from the host and antibiotics. Biofilm and planktonic lifestyle are regulated by a complex quorum sensing system (QS) with the central regulator agr. To study biofilm formation and QS we set up a Boolean node interaction network (94 nodes, 184 edges) that included different two component systems such as agr, sae and arl. Proteins such as sar, rot and sigB were included. Each gene node represents the resulting activity of its gene products (mRNA and protein). Network consistency was tested according to previous knowledge and the literature. Regulator mutation combinations (agr-, sae-, sae-/agr-, sigB+, sigB+/sae-) were tested in silico in the model and compared regarding system changes and responses to experimental gene expression data. High connectivity served as a guide to identify master regulators, and their detailed behaviour was studied both in vitro and in the model. System analysis showed two stable states, biofilm forming versus planktonic, with clearly different sub-networks turned on. Predicted node activity changes from the in silico model were in line with microarray gene expression data of different knockout strains. Additional in silico predictions about node activity and biofilm formation were compared to new in vitro experiments (northern blots and biofilm adherence assays) which confirmed these. Further experiments in silico as well as in vitro showed the sae locus as the central modulator of biofilm production. Sae knockout strains showed stronger biofilms. Wild type phenotype was rescued by sae complementation. The in silico network provides a theoretical model that agrees well with the presented experimental data on how integration of different inputs is achieved in the QS of SA. It faithfully reproduces the behaviour of QS mutants and their biofilm forming ability and allows predictions about mutations and

  9. Clustering Short Time-Series Microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Loh Wei; Hasan, Yahya Abu

    2008-01-01

    Most microarray analyses are carried out on static gene expressions. However, the dynamical study of microarrays has lately gained more attention. Most researches on time-series microarray emphasize on the bioscience and medical aspects but few from the numerical aspect. This study attempts to analyze short time-series microarray mathematically using STEM clustering tool which formally preprocess data followed by clustering. We next introduce the Circular Mould Distance (CMD) algorithm with combinations of both preprocessing and clustering analysis. Both methods are subsequently compared in terms of efficiencies.

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: IS900 Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and IS1311 Polymorphism Analyses of Isolates from Animals and a Human in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Whittington, R. J.; Hope, A. F.; Marshall, D. J.; Taragel, C. A.; Marsh, I.

    2000-01-01

    The distribution and prevalence of strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis were determined among sheep, cattle, and other species with Johne's disease in Australia. A total of 328 isolates were evaluated from numerous farms in New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, and South Australia, Australia. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of genomic DNA using BstEII and an IS900 probe and IS1311 polymorphism analysis using PCR and restriction endonuclease analysis (PCR-REA) was used to classify isolates as cattle (C) or sheep (S) strains. IS1311 PCR-REA provided similar information to IS900 RFLP analysis but was more useful than RFLP analysis where DNA was degraded or scarce. Twelve IS900 RFLP types were found. Johne's disease in sheep was always due to S strains, while cattle were infected only with C strains. RFLP type S1 was the dominant strain in sheep in New South Wales (97% of isolates) and was the only strain found in sheep from Victoria. Seven RFLP types were present in cattle. RFLP types C3 and C1 were most common (collectively, 85% of isolates), but C1 was not found in New South Wales and C3 was present in dairy cattle but not in beef cattle in Victoria. These differences may be explained by restricted livestock trading patterns between different segments of the cattle industry. Up to five RFLP types were present in some geographic regions in Victoria, while up to three RFLP types were found among cattle on some farms. Individual cattle usually were infected with only one RFLP type, but one animal was infected with both C5 and CU4. Two isolates from goats were C type as were three from alpacas, one from a rhinoceros, and two from a human with Crohn's disease. The prevalences of specific RFLP types in Australia differ from those reported in Europe and elsewhere. Given the existence of geographical and farm enterprise differences in IS900 RFLP type, this technique may be applied selectively to trace the spread of Johne's disease

  11. Number of blastocysts biopsied as a predictive indicator to obtain at least one normal/balanced embryo following preimplantation genetic diagnosis with single nucleotide polymorphism microarray in translocation cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Zi; Ding, Chen-Hui; Wang, Jing; Zeng, Yan-Hong; Zhou, Wen; Li, Rong; Zhou, Can-Quan; Deng, Ming-Fen; Xu, Yan-Wen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the minimum number of blastocysts for biopsy to increase the likelihood of obtaining at least one normal/balanced embryo in preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for translocation carriers. This blinded retrospective study included 55 PGD cycles for Robertsonian translocation (RT) and 181 cycles for reciprocal translocation (rcp) to indicate when only one of the couples carried a translocation. Single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray after trophectoderm biopsy was performed. Reliable results were obtained for 355/379 (93.7 %) biopsied blastocysts in RT group and 986/1053 (93.6 %) in rcp group. Mean numbers of biopsied embryos per patient, normal/balanced embryos per patient, and mean normal/balanced embryo rate per patient were 7.4, 3.1, and 40.7 % in RT group and 8.0, 2.1, and 27.3 %, respectively, in rcp group. In a regression model, three factors significantly affected the number of genetically transferrable embryos: number of biopsied embryos (P = 0.001), basal FSH level (P = 0.040), and maternal age (P = 0.027). ROC analysis with a cutoff of 1.5 was calculated for the number of biopsied embryos required to obtain at least one normal/balanced embryo for RT carriers. For rcp carriers, the cutoff was 3.5. The clinical pregnancy rate per embryo transfer was 44.2 and 42.6 % in RT and rcp groups (P = 0.836). The minimum numbers of blastocysts to obtain at least one normal/balanced embryo for RT and rcp were 2 and 4 under the conditions of female age < 37 years with a basal FSH level < 11.4 IU/L.

  12. Microarray Technologies in Fungal Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Microarray technologies have been a major research tool in the last decades. In addition they have been introduced into several fields of diagnostics including diagnostics of infectious diseases. Microarrays are highly parallelized assay systems that initially were developed for multiparametric nucleic acid detection. From there on they rapidly developed towards a tool for the detection of all kind of biological compounds (DNA, RNA, proteins, cells, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, etc.) or their modifications (methylation, phosphorylation, etc.). The combination of closed-tube systems and lab on chip devices with microarrays further enabled a higher automation degree with a reduced contamination risk. Microarray-based diagnostic applications currently complement and may in the future replace classical methods in clinical microbiology like blood cultures, resistance determination, microscopic and metabolic analyses as well as biochemical or immunohistochemical assays. In addition, novel diagnostic markers appear, like noncoding RNAs and miRNAs providing additional room for novel nucleic acid based biomarkers. Here I focus an microarray technologies in diagnostics and as research tools, based on nucleic acid-based arrays.

  13. Characterization of Influenza Vaccine Hemagglutinin Complexes by Cryo-Electron Microscopy and Image Analyses Reveals Structural Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    McCraw, Dustin M.; Gallagher, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus afflicts millions of people worldwide on an annual basis. There is an ever-present risk that animal viruses will cross the species barrier to cause epidemics and pandemics resulting in great morbidity and mortality. Zoonosis outbreaks, such as the H7N9 outbreak, underscore the need to better understand the molecular organization of viral immunogens, such as recombinant influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) proteins, used in influenza virus subunit vaccines in order to optimize vaccine efficacy. Here, using cryo-electron microscopy and image analysis, we show that recombinant H7 HA in vaccines formed macromolecular complexes consisting of variable numbers of HA subunits (range, 6 to 8). In addition, HA complexes were distributed across at least four distinct structural classes (polymorphisms). Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and molecular modeling indicated that HA was in the prefusion state and suggested that the oligomerization and the structural polymorphisms observed were due to hydrophobic interactions involving the transmembrane regions. These experiments suggest that characterization of the molecular structures of influenza virus HA complexes used in subunit vaccines will lead to better understanding of the differences in vaccine efficacy and to the optimization of subunit vaccines to prevent influenza virus infection. PMID:27074939

  14. Ecotoxicogenomics: Microarray interlaboratory comparability.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dorsch, Doris E; Bay, Steven M; Moore, Shelly; Layton, Blythe; Mehinto, Alvine C; Vulpe, Chris D; Brown-Augustine, Marianna; Loguinov, Alex; Poynton, Helen; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Perkins, Edward J; Escalon, Lynn; Denslow, Nancy D; Cristina, Colli-Dula R; Doan, Tri; Shukradas, Shweta; Bruno, Joy; Brown, Lorraine; Van Agglen, Graham; Jackman, Paula; Bauer, Megan

    2016-02-01

    Transcriptomic analysis can complement traditional ecotoxicology data by providing mechanistic insight, and by identifying sub-lethal organismal responses and contaminant classes underlying observed toxicity. Before transcriptomic information can be used in monitoring and risk assessment, it is necessary to determine its reproducibility and detect key steps impacting the reliable identification of differentially expressed genes. A custom 15K-probe microarray was used to conduct transcriptomics analyses across six laboratories with estuarine amphipods exposed to cyfluthrin-spiked or control sediments (10 days). Two sample types were generated, one consisted of total RNA extracts (Ex) from exposed and control samples (extracted by one laboratory) and the other consisted of exposed and control whole body amphipods (WB) from which each laboratory extracted RNA. Our findings indicate that gene expression microarray results are repeatable. Differentially expressed data had a higher degree of repeatability across all laboratories in samples with similar RNA quality (Ex) when compared to WB samples with more variable RNA quality. Despite such variability a subset of genes were consistently identified as differentially expressed across all laboratories and sample types. We found that the differences among the individual laboratory results can be attributed to several factors including RNA quality and technical expertise, but the overall results can be improved by following consistent protocols and with appropriate training. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Integrative assessment of potential effects of dioxins and related compounds in wild Baikal seals (Pusa sibirica): application of microarray and biochemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Shusaku; Imaeda, Daisuke; Nakayama, Kei; Udaka, Masayuki; Kim, Eun-Young; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Masako; Matsuda, Tomonari; Matsui, Saburo; Petrov, Evgeny A; Batoev, Valeriy B; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Iwata, Hisato

    2011-09-01

    We have previously indicated that accumulation of chlorinated dioxins and related compounds (DRCs) induced cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, 1A2 and 1B1 isozymes in the liver of wild Baikal seals (Pusa sibirica). Here we attempt to assess the potential effects of DRCs triggered by the induction of these CYP1 isozymes in this species, using an integrative approach, combining gene expression monitoring and biochemical assays. To screen genes that may potentially respond to the exposure of DRCs, we constructed a custom cDNA oligo array that can target mRNAs in Baikal seals, and monitored hepatic mRNA expression levels in the wild population. Correlation analyses between the hepatic total 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) and mRNA levels supported our previous findings that high accumulation of DRCs induces the transcription of CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1 genes. In addition, our integrative assessment indicated that the chronic exposure to DRCs may alter the hepatic transcript levels of genes related to oxidative stress, Fe ion homeostasis, and inflammatory responses. The expression levels of CYP1A2 showed significant positive correlations with levels of malondialdehyde, a biomarker of lipid peroxidation, and of etheno-dA, a DNA adduct, suggesting that the lipid peroxidation may be enhanced through the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggered by CYP1A2 induction. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between heme oxygenase activities and malondialdehyde levels, suggesting the prompted heme degradation by ROS. Fetuin-A levels, which are suppressed by inflammation, showed a significant negative correlation with TEQ levels, and hepcidin levels, which are conversely increased by inflammation, had significant positive correlations with malondialdehyde and etheno-dA levels, implying the progression of inflammation by DRC-induced oxidative stress. Taken together, we propose here that wild Baikal seals may suffer from effects of chronic

  16. HER2 codon 655 polymorphism and breast cancer: results from kin-cohort and case-control analyses.

    PubMed

    Millikan, Robert C; Hummer, Amanda J; Wolff, Mary S; Hishida, Asahi; Begg, Colin B

    2005-02-01

    Several published epidemiologic studies show increased breast cancer risk for carriers of the Val-allele at codon 655 of the HER2 gene. We conducted additional analyses using data from three studies, including case-control analyses stratified on age and kin-cohort analyses using relatives of cases and controls. The results provide additional evidence that HER2 codon 655 genotype may predispose to early-onset breast cancer.

  17. Application of Single-nucleotide Polymorphism and Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units-Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analyses to Clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Go Eun; Jang, Mi Hee; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Sun Min; Yi, Jongyoun; Lee, Eun Yup; Chang, Chulhun L.; Kim, Yeong Dae

    2011-01-01

    Background Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis is a powerful strategy for large-scale molecular population studies examining phylogenetic relationships among bacterial strains. Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) can be easily digitized to share data among laboratories. This study applied SNP and MIRU-VNTR analyses for molecular strain typing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates collected throughout Korea. Methods We studied 102 clinical M. tuberculosis isolates, including 6 paired strains, collected from 11 university hospitals in Korea in 2008 and 2009. SNPs were detected using hairpin primer assays, and then, MIRU-VNTR analysis was performed. Results Thirty-five SNPs contained polymorphisms that helped differentiate the 96 tested isolates. The isolates were classified into 15 clusters. The Beijing family strains were distributed within closely related clusters in the SNP dendrogram. For MIRU-VNTR analysis, the 96 isolates were divided into 12 groups. The discriminatory index in 8 of these groups (MIRU-10, -23, -26, and -31; ETR-A, -B, -C, and -F) was high (Hunter-Gaston diversity index > 0.6). Unlike the SNP method, MIRU-VNTR analysis did not identify any notable localizations of Beijing or non-Beijing family isolates in specific clusters. Conclusions SNP and MIRU-VNTR analyses are surrogate molecular strain-typing methods for M. tuberculosis in Korea where Beijing family isolates are predominant. PMID:21239869

  18. DNA microarray integromics analysis platform.

    PubMed

    Waller, Tomasz; Gubała, Tomasz; Sarapata, Krzysztof; Piwowar, Monika; Jurkowski, Wiktor

    2015-01-01

    The study of interactions between molecules belonging to different biochemical families (such as lipids and nucleic acids) requires specialized data analysis methods. This article describes the DNA Microarray Integromics Analysis Platform, a unique web application that focuses on computational integration and analysis of "multi-omics" data. Our tool supports a range of complex analyses, including - among others - low- and high-level analyses of DNA microarray data, integrated analysis of transcriptomics and lipidomics data and the ability to infer miRNA-mRNA interactions. We demonstrate the characteristics and benefits of the DNA Microarray Integromics Analysis Platform using two different test cases. The first test case involves the analysis of the nutrimouse dataset, which contains measurements of the expression of genes involved in nutritional problems and the concentrations of hepatic fatty acids. The second test case involves the analysis of miRNA-mRNA interactions in polysaccharide-stimulated human dermal fibroblasts infected with porcine endogenous retroviruses. The DNA Microarray Integromics Analysis Platform is a web-based graphical user interface for "multi-omics" data management and analysis. Its intuitive nature and wide range of available workflows make it an effective tool for molecular biology research. The platform is hosted at https://lifescience.plgrid.pl/.

  19. Evidence from single nucleotide polymorphism analyses of ADVANCE study demonstrates EFNB3 as a hypertension risk gene

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Johanne; Wang, Yujia; Raelson, John; Marois-Blanchet, Francois-Christophe; Wu, Zenghui; Luo, Hongyu; Bradley, Edward; Chalmers, John; Woodward, Mark; Harrap, Stephen; Hamet, Pavel; Wu, Jiangping

    2017-01-01

    EPH kinases and their ligands, ephrins (EFNs), have vital and diverse biological functions. We recently reported that Efnb3 gene deletion results in hypertension in female but not male mice. These data suggest that EFNB3 regulates blood pressure in a sex- and sex hormone-dependent way. In the present study, we conducted a human genetic study to assess the association of EFNB3 single nucleotide polymorphisms with human hypertension risks, using 3,448 patients with type 2 diabetes from the ADVANCE study (Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Peterax and Diamicron MR Controlled Evaluation). We have observed significant association between 2 SNPs in the 3′ untranslated region or within the adjacent region just 3′ of the EFNB3 gene with hypertension, corroborating our findings from the mouse model. Thus, our investigation has shown that EFNB3 is a hypertension risk gene in certain individuals. PMID:28272517

  20. Genetic Diversity among Clinical Isolates of Candida glabrata Analyzed by Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA and Multilocus Enzyme Electrophoresis Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Boldo, Xavier M.; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Zúñiga, Gerardo; Hernández-Rodríguez, César

    2003-01-01

    The genetic diversity of 47 clinical and reference strains of Candida glabrata from several geographical origins and diverse clinical disorders, with different antifungal susceptibilities, as well as their genetic relationships were studied through multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) techniques. The genetic diversity estimated for 11 MLEE loci measured as average heterozygosity (h) was 0.055. A high level of genetic relatedness among isolates was established by cluster analysis. Forty-nine RAPD markers were analyzed, and the average genetic diversity among isolates, estimated by Shannon's index (Ho), was 0.372. The ΦST values estimated through an analysis of molecular variance to assess genetic differentiation among isolates revealed no genetic differentiation among them. Our results revealed very low genetic diversity among isolates, a lack of differentiation, and no association with their geographic origin and the clinical characteristics. PMID:14532225

  1. Genome-Wide Divergence and Linkage Disequilibrium Analyses for Capsicum baccatum Revealed by Genome-Anchored Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Nimmakayala, Padma; Abburi, Venkata L; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Almeida, Aldo; Davenport, Brittany; Davidson, Joshua; Reddy, C V Chandra Mohan; Hankins, Gerald; Ebert, Andreas; Choi, Doil; Stommel, John; Reddy, Umesh K

    2016-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) with 36,621 polymorphic genome-anchored single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified collectively for Capsicum annuum and Capsicum baccatum was used to characterize population structure and species domestication of these two important incompatible cultivated pepper species. Estimated mean nucleotide diversity (π) and Tajima's D across various chromosomes revealed biased distribution toward negative values on all chromosomes (except for chromosome 4) in cultivated C. baccatum, indicating a population bottleneck during domestication of C. baccatum. In contrast, C. annuum chromosomes showed positive π and Tajima's D on all chromosomes except chromosome 8, which may be because of domestication at multiple sites contributing to wider genetic diversity. For C. baccatum, 13,129 SNPs were available, with minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥0.05; PCA of the SNPs revealed 283 C. baccatum accessions grouped into 3 distinct clusters, for strong population structure. The fixation index (FST ) between domesticated C. annuum and C. baccatum was 0.78, which indicates genome-wide divergence. We conducted extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis of C. baccatum var. pendulum cultivars on all adjacent SNP pairs within a chromosome to identify regions of high and low LD interspersed with a genome-wide average LD block size of 99.1 kb. We characterized 1742 haplotypes containing 4420 SNPs (range 9-2 SNPs per haplotype). Genome-wide association study (GWAS) of peduncle length, a trait that differentiates wild and domesticated C. baccatum types, revealed 36 significantly associated genome-wide SNPs. Population structure, identity by state (IBS) and LD patterns across the genome will be of potential use for future GWAS of economically important traits in C. baccatum peppers.

  2. Genome-Wide Divergence and Linkage Disequilibrium Analyses for Capsicum baccatum Revealed by Genome-Anchored Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Nimmakayala, Padma; Abburi, Venkata L.; Saminathan, Thangasamy; Almeida, Aldo; Davenport, Brittany; Davidson, Joshua; Reddy, C. V. Chandra Mohan; Hankins, Gerald; Ebert, Andreas; Choi, Doil; Stommel, John; Reddy, Umesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) with 36,621 polymorphic genome-anchored single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified collectively for Capsicum annuum and Capsicum baccatum was used to characterize population structure and species domestication of these two important incompatible cultivated pepper species. Estimated mean nucleotide diversity (π) and Tajima's D across various chromosomes revealed biased distribution toward negative values on all chromosomes (except for chromosome 4) in cultivated C. baccatum, indicating a population bottleneck during domestication of C. baccatum. In contrast, C. annuum chromosomes showed positive π and Tajima's D on all chromosomes except chromosome 8, which may be because of domestication at multiple sites contributing to wider genetic diversity. For C. baccatum, 13,129 SNPs were available, with minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥0.05; PCA of the SNPs revealed 283 C. baccatum accessions grouped into 3 distinct clusters, for strong population structure. The fixation index (FST) between domesticated C. annuum and C. baccatum was 0.78, which indicates genome-wide divergence. We conducted extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis of C. baccatum var. pendulum cultivars on all adjacent SNP pairs within a chromosome to identify regions of high and low LD interspersed with a genome-wide average LD block size of 99.1 kb. We characterized 1742 haplotypes containing 4420 SNPs (range 9–2 SNPs per haplotype). Genome-wide association study (GWAS) of peduncle length, a trait that differentiates wild and domesticated C. baccatum types, revealed 36 significantly associated genome-wide SNPs. Population structure, identity by state (IBS) and LD patterns across the genome will be of potential use for future GWAS of economically important traits in C. baccatum peppers. PMID:27857720

  3. The Genopolis Microarray Database

    PubMed Central

    Splendiani, Andrea; Brandizi, Marco; Even, Gael; Beretta, Ottavio; Pavelka, Norman; Pelizzola, Mattia; Mayhaus, Manuel; Foti, Maria; Mauri, Giancarlo; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene expression databases are key resources for microarray data management and analysis and the importance of a proper annotation of their content is well understood. Public repositories as well as microarray database systems that can be implemented by single laboratories exist. However, there is not yet a tool that can easily support a collaborative environment where different users with different rights of access to data can interact to define a common highly coherent content. The scope of the Genopolis database is to provide a resource that allows different groups performing microarray experiments related to a common subject to create a common coherent knowledge base and to analyse it. The Genopolis database has been implemented as a dedicated system for the scientific community studying dendritic and macrophage cells functions and host-parasite interactions. Results The Genopolis Database system allows the community to build an object based MIAME compliant annotation of their experiments and to store images, raw and processed data from the Affymetrix GeneChip® platform. It supports dynamical definition of controlled vocabularies and provides automated and supervised steps to control the coherence of data and annotations. It allows a precise control of the visibility of the database content to different sub groups in the community and facilitates exports of its content to public repositories. It provides an interactive users interface for data analysis: this allows users to visualize data matrices based on functional lists and sample characterization, and to navigate to other data matrices defined by similarity of expression values as well as functional characterizations of genes involved. A collaborative environment is also provided for the definition and sharing of functional annotation by users. Conclusion The Genopolis Database supports a community in building a common coherent knowledge base and analyse it. This fills a gap between a local

  4. Relatedness Analyses of Histoplasma capsulatum Isolates from Mexican Patients with AIDS-Associated Histoplasmosis by Using Histoplasmin Electrophoretic Profiles and Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Montes, M. R.; Bobadilla-Del Valle, M.; Martínez-Rivera, M. A.; Rodríguez-Arellanes, G.; Maravilla, E.; Sifuentes-Osornio, J.; Taylor, M. L.

    1999-01-01

    The present paper analyzes the histoplasmin electrophoretic profiles and the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns of the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum isolated from Mexican patients with AIDS-associated histoplasmosis. Clinical isolates from Guatemala, Colombia, and Panama, as well as H. capsulatum isolates from different sources in nature, were also processed. All histoplasmin samples shared four antigenic fractions of 200, 49, 10.5, and 8.5 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). According to their percentage of relatedness, based on SDS-PAGE histoplasmin electrophoretic image analysis, H. capsulatum isolates were divided in two groups: group A contained all AIDS-associated isolates studied and two human reference strains from Mexican histoplasmosis patients without AIDS; group B included bat guano, infected bat, and cock excreta isolates from the State of Guerrero, Mexico, plus three human histoplasmosis strains from Guatemala, Panama, and Colombia. Polymorphic DNA patterns evaluated by RAPD-PCR showed three major bands of 4.4, 3.2, and 2.3 kb in most H. capsulatum isolates studied. Four groups were related by DNA polymorphisms: group I was formed by most of the AIDS-associated H. capsulatum isolates studied, one human histoplasmosis strain from Colombia, two human reference strains from Mexican patients without AIDS, and one human histoplasmosis strain from Guatemala. Group II consisted of only a single strain from Panama. Group III included three strains: one from a Mexican patient with AIDS and two isolated from nature in Guerrero (cock excreta and bat guano). The last, group IV, consisted of only one strain isolated from an infected bat, captured in Guerrero. A tight relationship between phenotypic and genotypic characterization was observed, and both analyses could be useful tools for typing H. capsulatum from different sources and geographic origins. PMID:10203495

  5. Meta-analyses of microarrays of Arabidopsis asymmetric leaves1 (as1), as2 and their modifying mutants reveal a critical role for the ETT pathway in stabilization of adaxial-abaxial patterning and cell division during leaf development.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hiro; Iwakawa, Hidekazu; Ishibashi, Nanako; Kojima, Shoko; Matsumura, Yoko; Prananingrum, Pratiwi; Iwasaki, Mayumi; Takahashi, Anna; Ikezaki, Masaya; Luo, Lilan; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Machida, Yasunori; Machida, Chiyoko

    2013-03-01

    It is necessary to use algorithms to analyze gene expression data from DNA microarrays, such as in clustering and machine learning. Previously, we developed the knowledge-based fuzzy adaptive resonance theory (KB-FuzzyART), a clustering algorithm suitable for analyzing gene expression data, to find clues for identifying gene networks. Leaf primordia form around the shoot apical meristem (SAM), which consists of indeterminate stem cells. Upon initiation of leaf development, adaxial-abaxial patterning is crucial for lateral expansion, via cellular proliferation, and the formation of flat symmetric leaves. Many regulatory genes that specify such patterning have been identified. Analysis by the KB-FuzzyART and subsequent molecular and genetic analyses previously showed that ASYMMETRIC LEAVES1 (AS1) and AS2 repress the expression of some abaxial-determinant genes, such as AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3 (ARF3)/ETTIN (ETT) and ARF4, which are responsible for defects in leaf adaxial-abaxial polarity in as1 and as2. In the present study, genetic analysis revealed that ARF3/ETT and ARF4 were regulated by modifier genes, BOBBER1 (BOB1) and ELONGATA3 (ELO3), together with AS1-AS2. We analyzed expression arrays with as2 elo3 and as2 bob1, and extracted genes downstream of ARF3/ETT by using KB-FuzzyART and molecular analyses. The results showed that expression of Kip-related protein (KRP) (for inhibitors of cyclin-dependent protein kinases) and Isopentenyltransferase (IPT) (for biosynthesis of cytokinin) genes were controlled by AS1-AS2 through ARF3/ETT and ARF4 functions, which suggests that the AS1-AS2-ETT pathway plays a critical role in controlling the cell division cycle and the biosynthesis of cytokinin around SAM to stabilize leaf development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  6. Structural Analyses of Human Toll-like Receptor 4 Polymorphisms D299G and T399I*

    PubMed Central

    Ohto, Umeharu; Yamakawa, Natsuko; Akashi-Takamura, Sachiko; Miyake, Kensuke; Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and its coreceptor MD-2 recognize bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and signal the innate immune response. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of human TLR4, D299G and T399I, have been identified and suggested to be associated with LPS hyporesponsiveness. Moreover, the SNPs have been proposed to be associated with a variety of infectious and noninfectious diseases. However, how the SNPs affect the function of TLR4 remains largely unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human TLR4 (D299G/T399I)·MD-2·LPS complex at 2.4 Å resolution. The ternary complex exhibited an agonistic “m”-shaped 2:2:2 architecture that was similar to that of the human wild type TLR4·MD-2·LPS complex. Local structural differences that might affect the binding of the ligands were observed around D299G, but not around T399I, SNP site. PMID:23055527

  7. Characterization of the CYP2D6 drug metabolizing phenotypes of the Chilean mestizo population through polymorphism analyses.

    PubMed

    Varela, Nelson; Quiñones, Luis A; Stojanova, Jana; Garay, Joselyn; Cáceres, Dante; Cespedes, Silvia; Sasso, Jaime; Miranda, Carla

    2015-11-01

    We tested the influence of four polymorphisms and gene duplication in CYP2D6 on in vivo enzyme activity in a Chilean mestizo population in order to identify the most relevant genetic profiles that account for observed phenotypes in this ethnic group. CYP2D6*2 (2850C>T), *3 (2549A>del), *4 (1846G>A), *17 (1023C>T) and gene duplication were determined by PCR-RFLP or PCRL in a group of 321 healthy volunteers. Individuals with different variant alleles were phenotyped by determining debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase activity as a metabolic ratio (MR) using a validated HPLC assay. Minor allele frequencies were 0.41, 0.01, 0.12 and 0.00 for CYP2D6*2, *3, *4 and *17 variants, respectively, and the duplication frequency was 0.003. Genotype analysis correlated with phenotypes in 18 of 23 subjects (78.3%). 11 subjects were extensive metabolizers (EM), 8 were intermediate metabolizers (IM), 2 were poor metabolizers (PM) and 2 were ultra-rapid metabolizers (UM) which is fairly coincident with expected phenotypes metabolic ratios ranged from 0.11 to 126.41. The influence of CYP2D6*3 was particularly notable, although only heterozygote carriers were present in our population. Individuals homozygous for *4 were always PM. As expected, the only subject with gene duplication was UM. In conclusion, there was a clear effect of genotype on observed CYP2D6 activity. Classification of EM, PM and UM through genotyping was useful to characterize CYP2D6 phenotype in the Chilean mestizo population.

  8. Genome-wide polymorphism and comparative analyses in the white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus): a model for conservation genomics.

    PubMed

    Seabury, Christopher M; Bhattarai, Eric K; Taylor, Jeremy F; Viswanathan, Ganesh G; Cooper, Susan M; Davis, Donald S; Dowd, Scot E; Lockwood, Mitch L; Seabury, Paul M

    2011-01-19

    The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) represents one of the most successful and widely distributed large mammal species within North America, yet very little nucleotide sequence information is available. We utilized massively parallel pyrosequencing of a reduced representation library (RRL) and a random shotgun library (RSL) to generate a complete mitochondrial genome sequence and identify a large number of putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed throughout the white-tailed deer nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. A SNP validation study designed to test specific classes of putative SNPs provides evidence for as many as 10,476 genome-wide SNPs in the current dataset. Based on cytogenetic evidence for homology between cow (Bos taurus) and white-tailed deer chromosomes, we demonstrate that a divergent genome may be used for estimating the relative distribution and density of de novo sequence contigs as well as putative SNPs for species without draft genome assemblies. Our approach demonstrates that bioinformatic tools developed for model or agriculturally important species may be leveraged to support next-generation research programs for species of biological, ecological and evolutionary importance. We also provide a functional annotation analysis for the de novo sequence contigs assembled from white-tailed deer pyrosequencing reads, a mitochondrial phylogeny involving 13,722 nucleotide positions for 10 unique species of Cervidae, and a median joining haplotype network as a putative representation of mitochondrial evolution in O. virginianus. The results of this study are expected to provide a detailed template enabling genome-wide sequence-based studies of threatened, endangered or conservationally important non-model organisms.

  9. Genome-Wide Polymorphism and Comparative Analyses in the White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus): A Model for Conservation Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Seabury, Christopher M.; Bhattarai, Eric K.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Viswanathan, Ganesh G.; Cooper, Susan M.; Davis, Donald S.; Dowd, Scot E.; Lockwood, Mitch L.; Seabury, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) represents one of the most successful and widely distributed large mammal species within North America, yet very little nucleotide sequence information is available. We utilized massively parallel pyrosequencing of a reduced representation library (RRL) and a random shotgun library (RSL) to generate a complete mitochondrial genome sequence and identify a large number of putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed throughout the white-tailed deer nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. A SNP validation study designed to test specific classes of putative SNPs provides evidence for as many as 10,476 genome-wide SNPs in the current dataset. Based on cytogenetic evidence for homology between cow (Bos taurus) and white-tailed deer chromosomes, we demonstrate that a divergent genome may be used for estimating the relative distribution and density of de novo sequence contigs as well as putative SNPs for species without draft genome assemblies. Our approach demonstrates that bioinformatic tools developed for model or agriculturally important species may be leveraged to support next-generation research programs for species of biological, ecological and evolutionary importance. We also provide a functional annotation analysis for the de novo sequence contigs assembled from white-tailed deer pyrosequencing reads, a mitochondrial phylogeny involving 13,722 nucleotide positions for 10 unique species of Cervidae, and a median joining haplotype network as a putative representation of mitochondrial evolution in O. virginianus. The results of this study are expected to provide a detailed template enabling genome-wide sequence-based studies of threatened, endangered or conservationally important non-model organisms. PMID:21283515

  10. Analyses of single nucleotide polymorphisms in selected nutrient-sensitive genes in weight-regain prevention: the DIOGENES study.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Lesli H; Angquist, Lars; Vimaleswaran, Karani S; Hager, Jörg; Viguerie, Nathalie; Loos, Ruth J F; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora; Jebb, Susan A; Kunesova, Marie; Larsen, Thomas M; Martinez, J Alfredo; Papadaki, Angeliki; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; van Baak, Marleen A; Sørensen, Thorkild Ia; Holst, Claus; Langin, Dominique; Astrup, Arne; Saris, Wim H M

    2012-05-01

    Differences in the interindividual response to dietary intervention could be modified by genetic variation in nutrient-sensitive genes. This study examined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in presumed nutrient-sensitive candidate genes for obesity and obesity-related diseases for main and dietary interaction effects on weight, waist circumference, and fat mass regain over 6 mo. In total, 742 participants who had lost ≥ 8% of their initial body weight were randomly assigned to follow 1 of 5 different ad libitum diets with different glycemic indexes and contents of dietary protein. The SNP main and SNP-diet interaction effects were analyzed by using linear regression models, corrected for multiple testing by using Bonferroni correction and evaluated by using quantile-quantile (Q-Q) plots. After correction for multiple testing, none of the SNPs were significantly associated with weight, waist circumference, or fat mass regain. Q-Q plots showed that ALOX5AP rs4769873 showed a higher observed than predicted P value for the association with less waist circumference regain over 6 mo (-3.1 cm/allele; 95% CI: -4.6, -1.6; P/Bonferroni-corrected P = 0.000039/0.076), independently of diet. Additional associations were identified by using Q-Q plots for SNPs in ALOX5AP, TNF, and KCNJ11 for main effects; in LPL and TUB for glycemic index interaction effects on waist circumference regain; in GHRL, CCK, MLXIPL, and LEPR on weight; in PPARC1A, PCK2, ALOX5AP, PYY, and ADRB3 on waist circumference; and in PPARD, FABP1, PLAUR, and LPIN1 on fat mass regain for dietary protein interaction. The observed effects of SNP-diet interactions on weight, waist, and fat mass regain suggest that genetic variation in nutrient-sensitive genes can modify the response to diet. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00390637.

  11. DNA microarrays: an introduction to the technology.

    PubMed

    Bilitewski, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarrays allow the comprehensive genetic analysis of an organism or a sample. They are based on probes, which are immobilized in an ordered two-dimensional pattern on substrates, such as nylon membranes or glass slides. Probes are either spotted cDNAs or oligonucleotides and are designed to be specific for an organism, a gene, a genetic variant (mutation or polymorphism), or intergenic regions. Thus, they can be used for example for genotyping, expression analysis, or studies of protein-DNA interactions, and in the biomedical field they allow the detection of pathogens, antibiotic resistances, gene mutations and polymorphisms, and pathogenic states and can guide therapy. Microarrays, which cover the whole genome of an organism, are as well available as those which are focussed on genes related to a certain diagnostic application.

  12. Evaluation of high-resolution microarray platforms for genomic profiling of bone tumours

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several high-density oligonucleotide microarray platforms are available for genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (array CGH), which may be used to detect copy number aberrations in human tumours. As part of the EuroBoNeT network of excellence for research on bone tumours (eurobonet.eu), we have evaluated four different commercial high-resolution microarray platforms in order to identify the most appropriate technology for mapping DNA copy number aberrations in such tumours. Findings DNA from two different cytogenetically well-characterized bone sarcoma cell lines, representing a simple and a complex karyotype, respectively, was tested in duplicate on four high-resolution microarray platforms; Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0, Agilent Human Genome CGH 244A, Illumina HumanExon510s-duo and Nimblegen HG18 CGH 385 k WG tiling v1.0. The data was analysed using the platform-specific analysis software, as well as a platform-independent analysis algorithm. DNA copy number was measured at six specific chromosomes or chromosomal regions, and compared with the expected ratio based on available cytogenetic information. All platforms performed well in terms of reproducibility and were able to delimit and score small amplifications and deletions at similar resolution, but Agilent microarrays showed better linearity and dynamic range. The platform-specific analysis software provided with each platform identified in general correct copy numbers, whereas using a platform-independent analysis algorithm, correct copy numbers were determined mainly for Agilent and Affymetrix microarrays. Conclusions All platforms performed reasonably well, but Agilent microarrays showed better dynamic range, and like Affymetrix microarrays performed well with the platform-independent analysis software, implying more robust data. Bone tumours like osteosarcomas are heterogeneous tumours with complex

  13. Overview of Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Reymond Sutandy, FX; Qian, Jiang; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    Protein microarray is an emerging technology that provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds of thousands of proteins in a highly parallel and high-throughput way. Two major classes of protein microarrays are defined to describe their applications: analytical and functional protein microarrays. In addition, tissue or cell lysates can also be fractionated and spotted on a slide to form a reverse-phase protein microarray. While the fabrication technology is maturing, applications of protein microarrays, especially functional protein microarrays, have flourished during the past decade. Here, we will first review recent advances in the protein microarray technologies, and then present a series of examples to illustrate the applications of analytical and functional protein microarrays in both basic and clinical research. The research areas will include detection of various binding properties of proteins, study of protein posttranslational modifications, analysis of host-microbe interactions, profiling antibody specificity, and identification of biomarkers in autoimmune diseases. As a powerful technology platform, it would not be surprising if protein microarrays will become one of the leading technologies in proteomic and diagnostic fields in the next decade. PMID:23546620

  14. Reverse Phase Protein Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Baldelli, Elisa; Calvert, Valerie; Hodge, Alex; VanMeter, Amy; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Pierobon, Mariaelena

    2017-01-01

    While genes and RNA encode information about cellular status, proteins are considered the engine of the cellular machine, as they are the effective elements that drive all cellular functions including proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis. Consequently, investigations of the cellular protein network are considered a fundamental tool for understanding cellular functions.Alteration of the cellular homeostasis driven by elaborate intra- and extracellular interactions has become one of the most studied fields in the era of personalized medicine and targeted therapy. Increasing interest has been focused on developing and improving proteomic technologies that are suitable for analysis of clinical samples. In this context, reverse-phase protein microarrays (RPPA) is a sensitive, quantitative, high-throughput immunoassay for protein analyses of tissue samples, cells, and body fluids.RPPA is well suited for broad proteomic profiling and is capable of capturing protein activation as well as biochemical reactions such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, ubiquitination, protein cleavage, and conformational alterations across hundreds of samples using a limited amount of biological material. For these reasons, RPPA represents a valid tool for protein analyses and generates data that help elucidate the functional signaling architecture through protein-protein interaction and protein activation mapping for the identification of critical nodes for individualized or combinatorial targeted therapy.

  15. Gene-environment interaction for polymorphisms in ataxia telangiectasia-mutated gene and radiation exposure in carcinogenesis: results from two literature-based meta-analyses of 27120 participants

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Di; He, Hua; Wang, Mengmeng; Ge, Tingwen; Liu, Yudi; Tian, Huimin; Cui, Jiuwei; Jia, Lin; Wan, Ziqiang; Han, Fujun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We conducted two meta-analyses of ATM genetic polymorphisms and cancer risk in individuals with or without radiation exposure to determine whether there was a joint effect between the ATM gene and radiation exposure in carcinogenesis. Results rs1801516, which was the only ATM polymorphism investigated by more than 3 studies of radiation exposure, was eligible for the present study. The meta-analysis of 23333 individuals without radiation exposure from 24 studies showed no association between the rs1801516 polymorphism and cancer risk, without heterogeneity across studies. The meta-analysis of 3787 individuals with radiation exposure from 6 studies showed a significant association between the rs1801516 polymorphism and a decreased cancer risk, with heterogeneity across studies. There was a borderline-significant difference between the ORs of the two meta-analyses (P = 0.066), and the difference was significant when only Caucasians were included (P = 0.011). Materials and methods Publications were identified by searching PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and CNKI databases. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to estimate the association between ATM genetic polymorphisms and cancer risk. Tests of interaction were used to compare differences between the ORs of the two meta-analyses. Conclusions Our meta-analyses confirmed the presence of a gene-environment interaction between the rs1801516 polymorphism and radiation exposure in carcinogenesis, whereas no association was found between the rs1801516 polymorphism and cancer risk for individuals without radiation exposure. The heterogeneity observed in the meta-analysis of individuals with radiation exposure might be due to gene-ethnicity or gene-gene interactions. Further studies are needed to elucidate sources of the heterogeneity. PMID:27764772

  16. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance.

  17. DNA microarray technology in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Manfred

    2008-03-01

    In recent years, DNA microarray technology has been used for the analysis of gene expression patterns in a variety of skin diseases, including malignant melanoma, psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis. Many of the studies described herein confirmed earlier results on individual genes or functional groups of genes. However, a plethora of new candidate genes, gene patterns, and regulatory pathways have been identified. Major progresses were reached by the identification of a prognostic gene pattern in malignant melanoma, an immune signaling cluster in psoriasis, and a so-called interferon signature in systemic lupus erythematosus. In future, interference with genes or regulatory pathways with the use of different RNA interference technologies or targeted therapy may not only underscore the functional significance of microarray data but also may open interesting therapeutic perspectives. Large-scale gene expression analyses may also help to design more individualized treatment approaches of cutaneous diseases.

  18. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  19. Lack of association between polymorphisms in the CYP1A2 gene and risk of cancer: evidence from meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Vladimir; Ianuale, Carolina; Leoncini, Emanuele; Pastorino, Roberta; Gualano, Maria Rosaria; Amore, Rosarita; Boccia, Stefania

    2016-02-10

    Polymorphisms in the CYP1A2 genes have the potential to affect the individual capacity to convert pre-carcinogens into carcinogens. With these comprehensive meta-analyses, we aimed to provide a quantitative assessment of the association between the published genetic association studies on CYP1A2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the risk of cancer. We searched MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science and SCOPUS bibliographic online databases and databases of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). After data extraction, we calculated Odds Ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between the retrieved CYP1A2 SNPs and cancer. Random effect model was used to calculate the pooled ORs. Begg and Egger tests, one-way sensitivity analysis were performed, when appropriate. We conducted stratified analyses by study design, sample size, ethnicity and tumour site. Seventy case-control studies and one GWA study detailing on six different SNPs were included. Among the 71 included studies, 42 were population-based case-control studies, 28 hospital-based case-control studies and one genome-wide association study, including total of 47,413 cancer cases and 58,546 controls. The meta-analysis of 62 studies on rs762551, reported an OR of 1.03 (95% CI, 0.96-1.12) for overall cancer (P for heterogeneity < 0.01; I(2) = 50.4%). When stratifying for tumour site, an OR of 0.84 (95% CI, 0.70-1.01; P for heterogeneity = 0.23, I(2) = 28.5%) was reported for bladder cancer for those homozygous mutant of rs762551. An OR of 0.79 (95% CI, 0.65-0.95; P for heterogeneity = 0.09, I(2) = 58.1%) was obtained for the bladder cancer from the hospital-based studies and on Caucasians. This large meta-analysis suggests no significant effect of the investigated CYP1A2 SNPs on cancer overall risk under various genetic models. However, when stratifying according to the tumour site, our results showed a borderline not significant OR of 0.84 (95% CI, 0.70-1.01) for bladder cancer for those

  20. DNA microarray-based mutation discovery and genotyping.

    PubMed

    Gresham, David

    2011-01-01

    DNA microarrays provide an efficient means of identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA samples and characterizing their frequencies in individual and mixed samples. We have studied the parameters that determine the sensitivity of DNA probes to SNPs and found that the melting temperature (T (m)) of the probe is the primary determinant of probe sensitivity. An isothermal-melting temperature DNA microarray design, in which the T (m) of all probes is tightly distributed, can be implemented by varying the length of DNA probes within a single DNA microarray. I describe guidelines for designing isothermal-melting temperature DNA microarrays and protocols for labeling and hybridizing DNA samples to DNA microarrays for SNP discovery, genotyping, and quantitative determination of allele frequencies in mixed samples.

  1. Microarray in parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Rakesh; Misra, Shubham; Anand, Namrata; Sharma, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Modern biology and genomic sciences are rooted in parasitic disease research. Genome sequencing efforts have provided a wealth of new biological information that promises to have a major impact on our understanding of parasites. Microarrays provide one of the major high-throughput platforms by which this information can be exploited in the laboratory. Many excellent reviews and technique articles have recently been published on applying microarrays to organisms for which fully annotated genomes are at hand. However, many parasitologists work on organisms whose genomes have been only partially sequenced. This review is mainly focused on how to use microarray in these situations. PMID:23508469

  2. Stock structure and homing fidelity in Gulf of Mexico sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi) based on restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Stabile, J; Waldman, J R; Parauka, F; Wirgin, I

    1996-10-01

    Efforts have been proposed worldwide to restore sturgeon populations through the use of hatcheries to supplement natural reproduction and to reintroduce sturgeon where they have become extinct. We examined the population structure and inferred the extent of homing in the anadromous Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi). Restriction fragment length polymorphism and control region sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were used to identify haplotypes of Gulf sturgeon specimens obtained from eight drainages spanning the subspecies' entire distribution from Louisiana to Florida. Significant differences in haplotype frequencies indicated substantial geographic structuring of populations. A minimum of four regional or river-specific populations were identified (from west to east): (1) Pearl River, LA and Pascagoula River, MS, (2) Escambia and Yellow rivers, FI, (3) Choctawbatchee River, FL and (4) Apalachicola Ochlockonee, and Suwannee rivers, FL. Estimates of maternally mediated gene flow between any pair of the four regional or river-specific stocks ranged between 0.15 to 1.2. Tandem repeats in the mtDNA control region of Gulf sturgeon were not perfectly conserved. This result, together with an absence of heteroplasmy and length variation in Gulf sturgeon mtDNA, indicates that the molecular mechanisms of mtDNA control region sequence evolution differ among acipenserids.

  3. DNA Microarray Technology

    SciTech Connect

    WERNER-WASHBURNE, MARGARET; DAVIDSON, GEORGE S.

    2002-01-01

    Collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico Biology Department resulted in the capability to train students in microarray techniques and the interpretation of data from microarray experiments. These studies provide for a better understanding of the role of stationary phase and the gene regulation involved in exit from stationary phase, which may eventually have important clinical implications. Importantly, this research trained numerous students and is the basis for three new Ph.D. projects.

  4. Evaluation of Surface Chemistries for Antibody Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; White, Amanda M.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-12-01

    Antibody microarrays are an emerging technology that promises to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The current technology for protein microarrays has been primarily derived from DNA microarrays and is not fully characterized for use with proteins. For example, there are a myriad of surface chemistries that are commercially available for antibody microarrays, but no rigorous studies that compare these different surfaces. Therefore, we have used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to analyze 16 different commercially available slide types. Full standard curves were generated for 24 different assays. We found that this approach provides a rigorous and quantitative system for comparing the different slide types based on spot size and morphology, slide noise, spot background, lower limit of detection, and reproducibility. These studies demonstrate that the properties of the slide surface affect the activity of immobilized antibodies and the quality of data produced. Although many slide types can produce useful data, glass slides coated with poly-L-lysine or aminosilane, with or without activation with a crosslinker, consistently produce superior results in the ELISA microarray analyses we performed.

  5. The role of a FADS1 polymorphism in the association of fatty acid blood levels, BMI and blood pressure in young children-Analyses based on path models.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Maike; Dering, Carmen; Siani, Alfonso; Russo, Paola; Kaprio, Jaakko; Risé, Patrizia; Moreno, Luis A; De Henauw, Stefaan; Mehlig, Kirsten; Veidebaum, Toomas; Molnár, Denés; Tornaritis, Michael; Iacoviello, Licia; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Galli, Claudio; Foraita, Ronja; Börnhorst, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The recent obesity epidemic in children also showed an increase in the prevalence of hypertension. As blood pressure (BP) is associated with (long-chain) polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC PUFA), genetic variation in desaturase enzymes being involved in the synthesis of LC PUFA may be associated with BP. This study aimed to investigate the direct effects (independent of mediating variables) and indirect effects (mediated through intermediate variables) of a common variant in the FADS1 gene, rs174546, known to affect delta-5 desaturase (D5D) activity on PUFA level, body mass index (BMI) and BP. A subsample of the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants) baseline survey including 520 children aged 2 to <10 years from six European countries was included. The association between rs174546 (Tanalyses, adjusting for sex, age, educational level of parents, family history of hypertension, lifestyle factors and blood levels of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, triglycerides and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Whole blood fatty acids were measured by a validated gas chromatographic method and recorded as percentage of weight of all fatty acids detected. Minor allele carriers of the SNP rs174546 had significantly higher DGLA and lower ARA and EPA levels as well as a lower D5D index. Via ARA and BMI z-score, the polymorphism had an indirect lowering effect on systolic BP z-score for each additional T allele (standardized effect estimate -0.057, p = 0.007). For DGLA, EPA and D5D index, the indirect effects of rs174546 on systolic BP were also negative but did not reach significance. DGLA and EPA had an increasing indirect effect on systolic BP

  6. The role of a FADS1 polymorphism in the association of fatty acid blood levels, BMI and blood pressure in young children—Analyses based on path models

    PubMed Central

    Dering, Carmen; Siani, Alfonso; Russo, Paola; Kaprio, Jaakko; Risé, Patrizia; Moreno, Luis A.; De Henauw, Stefaan; Mehlig, Kirsten; Veidebaum, Toomas; Molnár, Denés; Tornaritis, Michael; Iacoviello, Licia; Pitsiladis, Yannis; Foraita, Ronja; Börnhorst, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Background The recent obesity epidemic in children also showed an increase in the prevalence of hypertension. As blood pressure (BP) is associated with (long-chain) polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC PUFA), genetic variation in desaturase enzymes being involved in the synthesis of LC PUFA may be associated with BP. This study aimed to investigate the direct effects (independent of mediating variables) and indirect effects (mediated through intermediate variables) of a common variant in the FADS1 gene, rs174546, known to affect delta-5 desaturase (D5D) activity on PUFA level, body mass index (BMI) and BP. Methods A subsample of the IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants) baseline survey including 520 children aged 2 to <10 years from six European countries was included. The association between rs174546 (Tanalyses, adjusting for sex, age, educational level of parents, family history of hypertension, lifestyle factors and blood levels of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, triglycerides and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Whole blood fatty acids were measured by a validated gas chromatographic method and recorded as percentage of weight of all fatty acids detected. Results Minor allele carriers of the SNP rs174546 had significantly higher DGLA and lower ARA and EPA levels as well as a lower D5D index. Via ARA and BMI z-score, the polymorphism had an indirect lowering effect on systolic BP z-score for each additional T allele (standardized effect estimate -0.057, p = 0.007). For DGLA, EPA and D5D index, the indirect effects of rs174546 on systolic BP were also negative but did not reach significance. DGLA and EPA had an increasing

  7. Diagnostic Oligonucleotide Microarray Fingerprinting of Bacillus Isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Alferov, Oleg; Chernov, Boris; Daly, Don S.; Golova, Julia; Perov, Alexander N.; Protic, Miroslava; Robison, Richard; Shipma, Matthew; White, Amanda M.; Willse, Alan R.

    2006-01-01

    A diagnostic, genome-independent microbial fingerprinting method using DNA oligonucleotide microarrays was used for high-resolution differentiation between closely related Bacillus strains, including two strains of Bacillus anthracis that are monomorphic (indistinguishable) via amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting techniques. Replicated hybridizations on 391-probe nonamer arrays were used to construct a prototype fingerprint library for quantitative comparisons. Descriptive analysis of the fingerprints, including phylogenetic reconstruction, is consistent with previous taxonomic organization of the genus. Newly developed statistical analysis methods were used to quantitatively compare and objectively confirm apparent differences in microarray fingerprints with the statistical rigor required for microbial forensics and clinical diagnostics. These data suggest that a relatively simple fingerprinting microarray and statistical analysis method can differentiate between species in the Bacillus cereus complex, and between strains of B. anthracis. A synthetic DNA standard was used to understand underlying microarray and process-level variability, leading to specific recommendations for the development of a standard operating procedure and/or continued technology enhancements for microbial forensics and diagnostics.

  8. Studying cellular processes and detecting disease with protein microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.; Bollinger, Nikki

    2005-10-31

    Protein microarrays are a rapidly developing analytic tool with diverse applications in biomedical research. These applications include profiling of disease markers or autoimmune responses, understanding molecular pathways, protein modifications and protein activities. One factor that is driving this expanding usage is the wide variety of experimental formats that protein microarrays can take. In this review, we provide a short, conceptual overview of the different approaches for protein microarray. We then examine some of the most significant applications of these microarrays to date, with an emphasis on how global protein analyses can be used to facilitate biomedical research.

  9. Methanotrophic bacteria associated to rice roots: the cultivar effect assessed by T-RFLP and microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Lüke, Claudia; Bodrossy, Levente; Lupotto, Elisabetta; Frenzel, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Rice plants play a key role in regulating methane emissions from paddy fields by affecting both underlying processes: methane production and oxidation. Specific differences were reported for methane oxidation rates; however, studies on the bacterial communities involved are rare. Here, we analysed the methanotrophic community on the roots of 18 different rice cultivars by pmoA-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and microarray analysis. Both techniques showed comparable and consistent results revealing a high diversity dominated by type II and type Ib methanotrophs. pmoA microarrays have been successfully used to study methane-oxidizing bacteria in various environments. However, the microarray's full potential resolving community structure has not been exploited yet. Here, we provide an example on how to include this information into multivariate statistics. The analysis revealed a rice cultivar effect on the methanotroph community composition that could be affiliated to the plant genotype. This effect became only significant by including the specific phylogenetic resolution provided by the microarray into the statistical analysis.

  10. Characterization of isolates of Citrus tristeza virus by sequential analyses of enzyme immunoassays and capillary electrophoresis-single-strand conformation polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Licciardello, G; Raspagliesi, D; Bar-Joseph, M; Catara, A

    2012-05-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is the causal agent of tristeza disease, which is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus crops worldwide. This paper describes a method for the rapid detection and genotyping of naturally spreading CTV isolates. This method uses ELISA or dot-blot immunological tests to detect trees infected with CTV. The reaction wells or membrane spots for which there is a positive reaction are sequentially treated by (i) washing and elution of viral RNA from the trapped samples, (ii) one-step synthesis of cDNA and PCR and (iii) automated fluorescence-based capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) analysis of amplification products. Comparative CE-SSCP results are presented for CTV RNA extracted directly from infected leaves and ELISA plates or from membranes. In the analyses of all of these RNA samples, the p18, p27 and p23 CTV genes were targeted for amplification. Specific profiles of forward and reverse strands were obtained from a group of eight CTV isolates collected in Sicily, each with distinct biological characteristics, which were analyzed using the conventional two-step procedure (immunological detection followed by CE-SSCP molecular characterization after RNA isolation) or in a continuous process of ELISA/CE-SSCP or dot-blot/CE-SSCP starting from infected plant material. The combined method is simple, highly sensitive and reproducible, thus allowing the processing of numerous field samples for a variety of epidemiological needs. The sequential processing of an ELISA or dot-blot/ELISA followed by CE-SSCP is expected to allow the rapid detection of recent CTV infections along with the simultaneous characterization of the genetic diversity and structure of the population of newly invading CTV.

  11. "Harshlighting" small blemishes on microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Haider, Asifa; Wittkowski, Knut M

    2005-01-01

    Background Microscopists are familiar with many blemishes that fluorescence images can have due to dust and debris, glass flaws, uneven distribution of fluids or surface coatings, etc. Microarray scans show similar artefacts, which affect the analysis, particularly when one tries to detect subtle changes. However, most blemishes are hard to find by the unaided eye, particularly in high-density oligonucleotide arrays (HDONAs). Results We present a method that harnesses the statistical power provided by having several HDONAs available, which are obtained under similar conditions except for the experimental factor. This method "harshlights" blemishes and renders them evident. We find empirically that about 25% of our chips are blemished, and we analyze the impact of masking them on screening for differentially expressed genes. Conclusion Experiments attempting to assess subtle expression changes should be carefully screened for blemishes on the chips. The proposed method provides investigators with a novel robust approach to improve the sensitivity of microarray analyses. By utilizing topological information to identify and mask blemishes prior to model based analyses, the method prevents artefacts from confounding the process of background correction, normalization, and summarization. PMID:15784152

  12. "Harshlighting" small blemishes on microarrays.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Haider, Asifa; Wittkowski, Knut M

    2005-03-22

    Microscopists are familiar with many blemishes that fluorescence images can have due to dust and debris, glass flaws, uneven distribution of fluids or surface coatings, etc. Microarray scans show similar artefacts, which affect the analysis, particularly when one tries to detect subtle changes. However, most blemishes are hard to find by the unaided eye, particularly in high-density oligonucleotide arrays (HDONAs). We present a method that harnesses the statistical power provided by having several HDONAs available, which are obtained under similar conditions except for the experimental factor. This method "harshlights" blemishes and renders them evident. We find empirically that about 25% of our chips are blemished, and we analyze the impact of masking them on screening for differentially expressed genes. Experiments attempting to assess subtle expression changes should be carefully screened for blemishes on the chips. The proposed method provides investigators with a novel robust approach to improve the sensitivity of microarray analyses. By utilizing topological information to identify and mask blemishes prior to model based analyses, the method prevents artefacts from confounding the process of background correction, normalization, and summarization.

  13. Empirical evaluation of oligonucleotide probe selection for DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Mulle, Jennifer G; Patel, Viren C; Warren, Stephen T; Hegde, Madhuri R; Cutler, David J; Zwick, Michael E

    2010-03-29

    DNA-based microarrays are increasingly central to biomedical research. Selecting oligonucleotide sequences that will behave consistently across experiments is essential to the design, production and performance of DNA microarrays. Here our aim was to improve on probe design parameters by empirically and systematically evaluating probe performance in a multivariate context. We used experimental data from 19 array CGH hybridizations to assess the probe performance of 385,474 probes tiled in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) region of the X chromosome. Our results demonstrate that probe melting temperature, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and homocytosine motifs all have a strong effect on probe behavior. These findings, when incorporated into future microarray probe selection algorithms, may improve microarray performance for a wide variety of applications.

  14. Examining microarray slide quality for the EPA using SNL's hyperspectral microarray scanner.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohde, Rachel M.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann

    2005-11-01

    This report summarizes research performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assess microarray quality on arrays from two platforms of interest to the EPA. Custom microarrays from two novel, commercially produced array platforms were imaged with SNL's unique hyperspectral imaging technology and multivariate data analysis was performed to investigate sources of emission on the arrays. No extraneous sources of emission were evident in any of the array areas scanned. This led to the conclusions that either of these array platforms could produce high quality, reliable microarray data for the EPA toxicology programs. Hyperspectral imaging results are presented and recommendations for microarray analyses using these platforms are detailed within the report.

  15. Microarray Inspector: tissue cross contamination detection tool for microarray data.

    PubMed

    Stępniak, Piotr; Maycock, Matthew; Wojdan, Konrad; Markowska, Monika; Perun, Serhiy; Srivastava, Aashish; Wyrwicz, Lucjan S; Świrski, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology changed the landscape of contemporary life sciences by providing vast amounts of expression data. Researchers are building up repositories of experiment results with various conditions and samples which serve the scientific community as a precious resource. Ensuring that the sample is of high quality is of utmost importance to this effort. The task is complicated by the fact that in many cases datasets lack information concerning pre-experimental quality assessment. Transcription profiling of tissue samples may be invalidated by an error caused by heterogeneity of the material. The risk of tissue cross contamination is especially high in oncological studies, where it is often difficult to extract the sample. Therefore, there is a need of developing a method detecting tissue contamination in a post-experimental phase. We propose Microarray Inspector: customizable, user-friendly software that enables easy detection of samples containing mixed tissue types. The advantage of the tool is that it uses raw expression data files and analyses each array independently. In addition, the system allows the user to adjust the criteria of the analysis to conform to individual needs and research requirements. The final output of the program contains comfortable to read reports about tissue contamination assessment with detailed information about the test parameters and results. Microarray Inspector provides a list of contaminant biomarkers needed in the analysis of adipose tissue contamination. Using real data (datasets from public repositories) and our tool, we confirmed high specificity of the software in detecting contamination. The results indicated the presence of adipose tissue admixture in a range from approximately 4% to 13% in several tested surgical samples.

  16. Functional GPCR microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yulong; Webb, Brian L; Su, Hui; Mozdy, Eric J; Fang, Ye; Wu, Qi; Liu, Li; Beck, Jonathan; Ferrie, Ann M; Raghavan, Srikanth; Mauro, John; Carre, Alain; Müeller, Dirk; Lai, Fang; Rasnow, Brian; Johnson, Michael; Min, Hosung; Salon, John; Lahiri, Joydeep

    2005-11-09

    This paper describes G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) microarrays on porous glass substrates and functional assays based on the binding of a europium-labeled GTP analogue. The porous glass slides were made by casting a glass frit on impermeable glass slides and then coating with gamma-aminopropyl silane (GAPS). The emitted fluorescence was captured on an imager with a time-gated intensified CCD detector. Microarrays of the neurotensin receptor 1, the cholinergic receptor muscarinic 2, the opioid receptor mu, and the cannabinoid receptor 1 were fabricated by pin printing. The selective agonism of each of the receptors was observed. The screening of potential antagonists was demonstrated using a cocktail of agonists. The amount of activation observed was sufficient to permit determinations of EC50 and IC50. Such microarrays could potentially streamline drug discovery by helping integrate primary screening with selectivity and safety screening without compromising the essential functional information obtainable from cellular assays.

  17. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures.

  18. Validation of affinity reagents using antigen microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Sundberg, Mårten; Gundberg, Anna; Sivertsson, Asa; Schwenk, Jochen M; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2012-06-15

    There is a need for standardised validation of affinity reagents to determine their binding selectivity and specificity. This is of particular importance for systematic efforts that aim to cover the human proteome with different types of binding reagents. One such international program is the SH2-consortium, which was formed to generate a complete set of renewable affinity reagents to the SH2-domain containing human proteins. Here, we describe a microarray strategy to validate various affinity reagents, such as recombinant single-chain antibodies, mouse monoclonal antibodies and antigen-purified polyclonal antibodies using a highly multiplexed approach. An SH2-specific antigen microarray was designed and generated, containing more than 6000 spots displayed by 14 identical subarrays each with 406 antigens, where 105 of them represented SH2-domain containing proteins. Approximately 400 different affinity reagents of various types were analysed on these antigen microarrays carrying antigens of different types. The microarrays revealed not only very detailed specificity profiles for all the binders, but also showed that overlapping target sequences of spotted antigens were detected by off-target interactions. The presented study illustrates the feasibility of using antigen microarrays for integrative, high-throughput validation of various types of binders and antigens.

  19. Microarrays for Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Nguyen, Lisa L.; Denyer, Gareth S.; Johnston, Jill M.

    2006-01-01

    A microarray experiment is presented that, in six laboratory sessions, takes undergraduate students from the tissue sample right through to data analysis. The model chosen, the murine erythroleukemia cell line, can be easily cultured in sufficient quantities for class use. Large changes in gene expression can be induced in these cells by…

  20. Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David A.; Ptacek, Jason

    2007-01-01

    Protein chips have emerged as a promising approach for a wide variety of applications including the identification of protein-protein interactions, protein-phospholipid interactions, small molecule targets, and substrates of proteins kinases. They can also be used for clinical diagnostics and monitoring disease states. This article reviews current methods in the generation and applications of protein microarrays. PMID:17126887

  1. Microarrays for Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Nguyen, Lisa L.; Denyer, Gareth S.; Johnston, Jill M.

    2006-01-01

    A microarray experiment is presented that, in six laboratory sessions, takes undergraduate students from the tissue sample right through to data analysis. The model chosen, the murine erythroleukemia cell line, can be easily cultured in sufficient quantities for class use. Large changes in gene expression can be induced in these cells by…

  2. Polymorphism and haplotype analyses of swine leukocyte antigen DQA exons 2, 3, 4, and their associations with piglet diarrhea in Chinese native pig.

    PubMed

    Huang, X Y; Yang, Q L; Yuan, J H; Gun, S B

    2015-09-08

    In this study, 290 Chinese native Yantai black pig piglets were investigated to identify gene polymorphisms, for haplotype reconstruction, and to determine the association between piglet diarrhea and swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) class II DQA exons 2, 3, and 4 by polymerase chain reaction-single stranded conformational polymorphism and cloning sequencing. The results showed that the 5, 8, and 7 genotypes were identified from SLA-DQA exon 2, 3, and 4, respectively, based on the single-stranded conformational polymorphism banding patterns and found a novel allele D in exon 2 and 2 novel mutational sites of allele C (c.4828T>C) and allele F (c.4617T>C) in exon 3. Polymorphism information content testing showed that exon 2 was moderately polymorphic and that exons-3 and -4 loci were highly polymorphic. The piglet diarrhea scores for genotypes AB (1.40 ± 0.14) and AC (1.54 ± 0.17) in exon 2, AA (1.22 ± 0.32), BC (1.72 ± 0.13), DD (1.67 ± 0.35), and CF (1.22 ± 0.45) in exon 3, and AD (2.35 ± 0.25) in exon 4 were significantly higher than those for the other genotypes (P ≤ 0.05) in DQA exons. There were 14 reconstructed haplotypes in the 3 exons from 290 individuals and Hap12 may be the diarrhea-resistant gene. Haplotype distribution was extremely uneven, and the SLA-DQA gene showed genetic linkage. In this study, we identified molecular genetic markers and provided a theoretical foundation for future pig anti-disease resistance breeding.

  3. MGDB: crossing the marker genes of a user microarray with a database of public-microarrays marker genes.

    PubMed

    Huerta, Mario; Munyi, Marc; Expósito, David; Querol, Enric; Cedano, Juan

    2014-06-15

    The microarrays performed by scientific teams grow exponentially. These microarray data could be useful for researchers around the world, but unfortunately they are underused. To fully exploit these data, it is necessary (i) to extract these data from a repository of the high-throughput gene expression data like Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and (ii) to make the data from different microarrays comparable with tools easy to use for scientists. We have developed these two solutions in our server, implementing a database of microarray marker genes (Marker Genes Data Base). This database contains the marker genes of all GEO microarray datasets and it is updated monthly with the new microarrays from GEO. Thus, researchers can see whether the marker genes of their microarray are marker genes in other microarrays in the database, expanding the analysis of their microarray to the rest of the public microarrays. This solution helps not only to corroborate the conclusions regarding a researcher's microarray but also to identify the phenotype of different subsets of individuals under investigation, to frame the results with microarray experiments from other species, pathologies or tissues, to search for drugs that promote the transition between the studied phenotypes, to detect undesirable side effects of the treatment applied, etc. Thus, the researcher can quickly add relevant information to his/her studies from all of the previous analyses performed in other studies as long as they have been deposited in public repositories. Marker-gene database tool: http://ibb.uab.es/mgdb © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-2 P12A polymorphism and risk of acute myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke: A case-cohort study and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Zafarmand, Mohammad Hadi; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Grobbee, Diederick E; de Leeuw, Peter W; Bots, Michiel L

    2008-01-01

    Background The alanine allele of P12A polymorphism in PPARG gene in a few studies has been associated with a reduced or increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Yet, the risk relation has not been confi rmed, and data on ischemic stroke (IS) is scarce. We therefore investigated the role of this polymorphism on occurrence of AMI, coronary heart disease (CHD) and IS. Methods and fi ndings We performed a case-cohort study in 15,236 initially healthy Dutch women and applied a Cox proportional hazards model to study the relation of the P12A polymorphism and AMI (n = 71), CHD (n = 211), and IS (n = 49) under different inheritance models. In addition, meta-analyses of published studies were performed. Under the dominant inheritance model, carriers of the alanine allele compared with those with the more common genotype were not at increased or decreased risk of CHD (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.82; 95% confi dence interval [CI], 0.58 to 1.17) and of IS (HR = 1.03; 95% CI, 0.14 to 7.74). In addition no relations were found under the recessive and additive models. Our meta-analyses corroborated these fi ndings by showing no signifi cant association. For AMI we found a borderline signifi cant association under dominant (HR = 0.49; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.94), and additive (HR = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.26 to 1.00) models which could be due to chance, because of small cases in this subgroup. The meta-analysis did not show any association between the polymorphism and risk of AMI under the different genetic models. Conclusions Our study in healthy Dutch women in combination with the meta-analyses of previous reports does not provide support for a role of P12A polymorphism in PPARG gene in MI and CHD risk. Also our study shows that the polymorphism has no association with IS risk. PMID:18561518

  5. Global gene expression analyses of mouse fibroblast L929 cells exposed to IC50 MMA by DNA microarray and confirmation of four detoxification genes' expression by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Atsuko; Jinno, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tomoo; Hayashi, Tatsuhide; Kawai, Tatsushi; Mizuno, Tatsuya; Mori, Takashi; Hattori, Masami

    2006-06-01

    Methyl methacrylate (MMA) is the main component of methyl methacrylic resin, which is widely used in dentistry. Previous studies have investigated whether MMA has any adverse effects on growth and gene expression in mouse fibroblast L929 cells. The present study was designed to further understand the effects of MMA by focusing on cDNA microarray data after L929 cells were exposed to MMA. MMA was found to inhibit cell growth and induce detoxification response genes in L929 cells. One of the most highly up-regulated genes was glutathione S-transferase, alpha 1 (Ya) (Gsta1), which has recently been shown to participate in Nrf2 regulation and is considered to be related to detoxification response. Molecular biological data obtained in the present study may therefore provide useful insights into the effects of MMA on living tissue.

  6. [TUB9 polymorphism in the CFTR gene of cystic fibrosis patients, carriers, and healthy donors from the Moscow region. SSCP and restriction analyses].

    PubMed

    Amosenko, F A; Trubnikova, I S; Zakhar'ev, V M; Bannikov, V M; Sazonova, M A; Petrova, N V; Kapranov, N I; Kaplinin, V N

    1997-02-01

    Data on the screening of 266 non-delta F508 chromosomes (42 cystic fibrosis patients, 43 carriers, and 48 healthy donors from the Moscow region) for the presence of structural abnormalities within the tenth exon of the CFTR gene conducted by means of the single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique in nonisotope modification are presented. The method used made it possible to detect three SSCP variants, one of which was present in cystic fibrosis patients (23.8%) and carriers (9.3%), but not in healthy donors. Sequencing of the 5 amplified DNA fragments carrying this SSCP variant revealed an A-->G substitution in the 1525-61 position, which indicated the presence of TUB9 polymorphism with allele 1 in the homozygous state in all cases tested. The three SSCP variants described corresponded to the three allelic variants of TUB9 polymorphism as judged by MnlI restriction analysis of the amplified tenth exon sequence. The modified SSCP technique is also suitable for routine screening for the G542X, G55ID, and W1282X point mutations within the CFTR gene. The frequency distribution of polymorphic TUB9 marker alleles across the non-delta F508 chromosomes in the three studied groups were estimated. Homozygotes for the TUB9 allele 1 were shown to have identical GATT-TUB9-M470V haplotypes.

  7. Microarray analysis of erythromycin resistance determinants.

    PubMed

    Volokhov, D; Chizhikov, V; Chumakov, K; Rasooly, A

    2003-01-01

    To develop a DNA microarray for analysis of genes encoding resistance determinants to erythromycin and the related macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLS) compounds. We developed an oligonucleotide microarray containing seven oligonucleotide probes (oligoprobes) for each of the six genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, ereA, ereB and msrA/B) that account for more than 98% of MLS resistance in Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates. The microarray was used to test reference and clinical S. aureus and Streptococcus pyrogenes strains. Target genes from clinical strains were amplified and fluorescently labelled using multiplex PCR target amplification. The microarray assay correctly identified the MLS resistance genes in the reference strains and clinical isolates of S. aureus, and the results were confirmed by direct DNA sequence analysis. Of 18 S. aureus clinical strains tested, 11 isolates carry MLS determinants. One gene (ermC) was found in all 11 clinical isolates tested, and two others, ermA and msrA/B, were found in five or more isolates. Indeed, eight (72%) of 11 clinical isolate strains contained two or three MLS resistance genes, in one of the three combinations (ermA with ermC, ermC with msrA/B, ermA with ermC and msrA/B). Oligonucleotide microarray can detect and identify the six MLS resistance determinants analysed in this study. Our results suggest that microarray-based detection of microbial antibiotic resistance genes might be a useful tool for identifying antibiotic resistance determinants in a wide range of bacterial strains, given the high homology among microbial MLS resistance genes.

  8. Biolog phenotype microarrays.

    PubMed

    Shea, April; Wolcott, Mark; Daefler, Simon; Rozak, David A

    2012-01-01

    Phenotype microarrays nicely complement traditional genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analysis by offering opportunities for researchers to ground microbial systems analysis and modeling in a broad yet quantitative assessment of the organism's physiological response to different metabolites and environments. Biolog phenotype assays achieve this by coupling tetrazolium dyes with minimally defined nutrients to measure the impact of hundreds of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous, and sulfur sources on redox reactions that result from compound-induced effects on the electron transport chain. Over the years, we have used Biolog's reproducible and highly sensitive assays to distinguish closely related bacterial isolates, to understand their metabolic differences, and to model their metabolic behavior using flux balance analysis. This chapter describes Biolog phenotype microarray system components, reagents, and methods, particularly as they apply to bacterial identification, characterization, and metabolic analysis.

  9. Microarray oligonucleotide probe designer (MOPeD): A web service.

    PubMed

    Patel, Viren C; Mondal, Kajari; Shetty, Amol Carl; Horner, Vanessa L; Bedoyan, Jirair K; Martin, Donna; Caspary, Tamara; Cutler, David J; Zwick, Michael E

    2010-11-01

    Methods of genomic selection that combine high-density oligonucleotide microarrays with next-generation DNA sequencing allow investigators to characterize genomic variation in selected portions of complex eukaryotic genomes. Yet choosing which specific oligonucleotides to be use can pose a major technical challenge. To address this issue, we have developed a software package called MOPeD (Microarray Oligonucleotide Probe Designer), which automates the process of designing genomic selection microarrays. This web-based software allows individual investigators to design custom genomic selection microarrays optimized for synthesis with Roche NimbleGen's maskless photolithography. Design parameters include uniqueness of the probe sequences, melting temperature, hairpin formation, and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms. We generated probe databases for the human, mouse, and rhesus macaque genomes and conducted experimental validation of MOPeD-designed microarrays in human samples by sequencing the human X chromosome exome, where relevant sequence metrics indicated superior performance relative to a microarray designed by the Roche NimbleGen proprietary algorithm. We also performed validation in the mouse to identify known mutations contained within a 487-kb region from mouse chromosome 16, the mouse chromosome 16 exome (1.7 Mb), and the mouse chromosome 12 exome (3.3 Mb). Our results suggest that the open source MOPeD software package and website (http://moped.genetics.emory.edu/) will make a valuable resource for investigators in their sequence-based studies of complex eukaryotic genomes.

  10. Basic Concepts of Microarrays and Potential Applications in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa B.; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The introduction of in vitro nucleic acid amplification techniques, led by real-time PCR, into the clinical microbiology laboratory has transformed the laboratory detection of viruses and select bacterial pathogens. However, the progression of the molecular diagnostic revolution currently relies on the ability to efficiently and accurately offer multiplex detection and characterization for a variety of infectious disease pathogens. Microarray analysis has the capability to offer robust multiplex detection but has just started to enter the diagnostic microbiology laboratory. Multiple microarray platforms exist, including printed double-stranded DNA and oligonucleotide arrays, in situ-synthesized arrays, high-density bead arrays, electronic microarrays, and suspension bead arrays. One aim of this paper is to review microarray technology, highlighting technical differences between them and each platform's advantages and disadvantages. Although the use of microarrays to generate gene expression data has become routine, applications pertinent to clinical microbiology continue to rapidly expand. This review highlights uses of microarray technology that impact diagnostic microbiology, including the detection and identification of pathogens, determination of antimicrobial resistance, epidemiological strain typing, and analysis of microbial infections using host genomic expression and polymorphism profiles. PMID:19822891

  11. Analyzing Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Hung, Jui-Hung; Weng, Zhiping

    2017-03-01

    Because there is no widely used software for analyzing RNA-seq data that has a graphical user interface, this protocol provides an example of analyzing microarray data using Babelomics. This analysis entails performing quantile normalization and then detecting differentially expressed genes associated with the transgenesis of a human oncogene c-Myc in mice. Finally, hierarchical clustering is performed on the differentially expressed genes using the Cluster program, and the results are visualized using TreeView.

  12. Membrane-based microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Elliott P.; Hudson, James; Steward, John; Donnell, Philip A.; Chan, Wing W.; Taylor, Richard F.

    1999-11-01

    Microarrays represent a new approach to the rapid detection and identification of analytes. Studies to date have shown that the immobilization of receptor molecules (such as DNA, oligonucleotides, antibodies, enzymes and binding proteins) onto silicon and polymeric substrates can result in arrays able to detect hundreds of analytes in a single step. The formation of the receptor/analyte complex can, itself, lead to detection, or the complex can be interrogated through the use of fluorescent, chemiluminescent or radioactive probes and ligands.

  13. Meta- and pooled analyses of the cytochrome P-450 1B1 Val432Leu polymorphism and breast cancer: a HuGE-GSEC review.

    PubMed

    Paracchini, Valentina; Raimondi, Sara; Gram, Inger T; Kang, Daehee; Kocabas, Neslihan A; Kristensen, Vessela N; Li, Donghui; Parl, Fritz F; Rylander-Rudqvist, Tove; Soucek, Pavel; Zheng, Wei; Wedren, Sara; Taioli, Emanuela

    2007-01-15

    The association between the cytochrome P-450 1B1 (CYP1B1) Val432Leu polymorphism and breast cancer was assessed through a meta-analysis of all published case-control studies and a pooled analysis of both published and unpublished case-control studies from the Genetic Susceptibility to Environmental Carcinogens (GSEC) database ( www.upci.upmc.edu/research/ccps/ccontrol/g_intro.html ). GSEC is a collaborative project that gathers information on studies of metabolic gene polymorphisms and cancer. Thirteen articles were included in the meta-analysis (14,331 subjects; 7,514 cases, 6,817 controls); nine data sets were included in the pooled analysis (6,842 subjects; 3,391 cases, 3,451 controls). A summary meta- or pooled estimate of the association between the CYP1B1 Val432Leu polymorphism and breast cancer could not be calculated because of statistically significant heterogeneity in the point estimates among studies. No association between the CYP1B1 Val432Leu polymorphism and breast cancer was observed in Asians (for Val/Val and Val/Leu combined, odds ratio (OR) = 1.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8, 1.2). An inverse association was observed in populations of mixed/African origin (OR = 0.8, 95% CI: 0.7, 0.9). The pooled analysis suggested a possible association in Caucasians (for Val/Val and Val/Leu combined, OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.1), with effect modification across age categories. The observed effect of age on the association in Caucasians indicates that further studies are needed on the role of CYP1B1 Val432Leu in estrogen metabolism according to age, ethnicity, and menopausal status.

  14. Meta- and Pooled Analyses of the Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR) C677T Polymorphism and Colorectal Cancer: A HuGE-GSEC Review

    PubMed Central

    Taioli, E.; Garza, M. A.; Ahn, Y. O.; Bishop, D. T.; Bost, J.; Budai, B.; Chen, K.; Gemignani, F.; Keku, T.; Lima, C. S. P.; Le Marchand, L.; Matsuo, K.; Moreno, V.; Plaschke, J.; Pufulete, M.; Thomas, S. B.; Toffoli, G.; Wolf, C. R.; Moore, C. G.; Little, J.

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, over 1 million cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) were reported in 2002, with a 50% mortality rate, making CRC the second most common cancer in adults. Certain racial/ethnic populations continue to experience a disproportionate burden of CRC. A common polymorphism in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene has been associated with a lower risk of CRC. The authors performed both a meta-analysis (29 studies; 11,936 cases, 18,714 controls) and a pooled analysis (14 studies; 5,068 cases, 7,876 controls) of the C677T MTHFR polymorphism and CRC, with stratification by racial/ethnic population and behavioral risk factors. There were few studies on different racial/ethnic populations. The overall meta-analysis odds ratio for CRC for persons with the TT genotype was 0.83 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.77, 0.90). An inverse association was observed in whites (odds ratio = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.74, 0.94) and Asians (odds ratio = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.96) but not in Latinos or blacks. Similar results were observed for Asians, Latinos, and blacks in the pooled analysis. The inverse association between the MTHFR 677TT polymorphism and CRC was not significantly modified by smoking status or body mass index; however, it was present in regular alcohol users only. The MTHFR 677TT polymorphism seems to be associated with a reduced risk of CRC, but this may not hold true for all populations. PMID:19846566

  15. Analyses of sequence polymorphism and haplotype diversity of LEAFY genes revealed post-domestication selection in the Chinese elite maize inbred lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zefeng; Zhang, Enying; Li, Jing; Jiang, Ying; Wang, Yifan; Hu, Yunyun; Xu, Chenwu

    2014-02-01

    Post-domestication selection refers to the artificial selection on the loci controlling important agronomic traits during the process of genetic improvement in a population. The maize genes Zfl1 and Zfl2, duplicate orthologs of Arabidopsis LEAFY, are key regulators in plant branching, inflorescence and flower development, and reproduction. In this study, the full gene sequences of Zfl1 and Zfl2 from 62 Chinese elite inbred lines were amplified to evaluate their nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotype diversities. A total of 254 and 192 variants that included SNPs and indels were identified from the full sequences of Zfl1 and Zfl2, respectively. Although most of the variants were found to be located in the non-coding regions, the polymorphisms of CDS sequences classified Zfl1 into 16 haplotypes encoding 16 different proteins and Zfl2 into 18 haplotypes encoding eight different proteins. The population of Huangzaosi and its derived lines showed statistically significant signals of post-domestication selection on the Zfl1 CDS sequences, as well as lower nucleotide polymorphism and haplotype diversity than the whole set. However, the Zfl2 locus was only selected for in the heterotic group Reid. Further evidence revealed that at least 17 recombination events contributed to the genetic and haplotype diversities at the Zfl1 locus and 16 recombination events at the Zfl2 locus.

  16. Microarray and suppression subtractive hybridization analyses of gene expression in hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus tremula var. glandulosa) cell suspension cultures after exposure to NaCl.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Hyoshin; Lee, Jae-Soon; Noh, Eun-Woon; Choi, Young-Im; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Choi, Dong-Woog

    2012-09-01

    The gene expression profiles of hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus tremula var. glandulosa) cells in suspension culture after exposure to salinity (NaCl) induced stress were examined by constructing two suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries. cDNA from non-treated cells was used as a driver and cDNA samples from cell suspension cultures exposed to 150 mM NaCl for 2 or 10 h were used as testers. Randomly selected clones from each SSH library were sequenced and 727 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained and analyzed. Four novel ESTs were identified. Between the two libraries, 542 unique SSH clones were selected for placement on a cDNA microarray. In total, 18 differentially expressed genes were identified with 4 and 12 genes being significantly differentially expressed 2 and 10 h after the treatment, respectively. Genes related to metabolism and protein synthesis and several genes whose protein products are implicated in salt or other abiotic stress-related responses were expressed in the salt-stressed cells.

  17. High confidence rule mining for microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Tara; Chawla, Sanjay

    2007-01-01

    We present an association rule mining method for mining high confidence rules, which describe interesting gene relationships from microarray datasets. Microarray datasets typically contain an order of magnitude more genes than experiments, rendering many data mining methods impractical as they are optimised for sparse datasets. A new family of row-enumeration rule mining algorithms have emerged to facilitate mining in dense datasets. These algorithms rely on pruning infrequent relationships to reduce the search space by using the support measure. This major shortcoming results in the pruning of many potentially interesting rules with low support but high confidence. We propose a new row-enumeration rule mining method, MaxConf, to mine high confidence rules from microarray data. MaxConf is a support-free algorithm which directly uses the confidence measure to effectively prune the search space. Experiments on three microarray datasets show that MaxConf outperforms support-based rule mining with respect to scalability and rule extraction. Furthermore, detailed biological analyses demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach -- the rules discovered by MaxConf are substantially more interesting and meaningful compared with support-based methods.

  18. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach for microarray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-04-01

    Microarray technology was developed for the purpose of monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes. A microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints including the high cost of producing microarray chips. As a result, the widely used standard covariance estimator is not appropriate for this purpose. One such technique is the Hotelling's T2 statistic which is a multivariate test statistic for comparing means between two groups. It requires that the number of observations (n) exceeds the number of genes (p) in the set but in microarray studies it is common that n < p. This leads to a biased estimate of the covariance matrix. In this study, the Hotelling's T2 statistic with the shrinkage approach is proposed to estimate the covariance matrix for testing differential gene expression. The performance of this approach is then compared with other commonly used multivariate tests using a widely analysed diabetes data set as illustrations. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  19. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  20. Proteomic, Microarray, and Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis Analyses of Anaerobic Pseudomonas aeruginosa at pH 6.5, Likely Representing Chronic, Late-Stage Cystic Fibrosis Airway Conditions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Mark D.; Schurr, Michael J.; Sauer, Karin; Vazquez, Gustavo; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Potvin, Eric; Levesque, Roger C.; Fedynak, Amber; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.; Schurr, Jill; Hwang, Sung-Hei; Lau, Gee W.; Limbach, Patrick A.; Rowe, John J.; Lieberman, Michael A.; Barraud, Nicolas; Webb, Jeremy; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Hunt, Donald F.; Hassett, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) commonly harbor the important pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in their airways. During chronic late-stage CF, P. aeruginosa is known to grow under reduced oxygen tension and is even capable of respiring anaerobically within the thickened airway mucus, at a pH of ∼6.5. Therefore, proteins involved in anaerobic metabolism represent potentially important targets for therapeutic intervention. In this study, the clinically relevant “anaerobiome” or “proteogenome” of P. aeruginosa was assessed. First, two different proteomic approaches were used to identify proteins differentially expressed under anaerobic versus aerobic conditions. Microarray studies were also performed, and in general, the anaerobic transcriptome was in agreement with the proteomic results. However, we found that a major portion of the most upregulated genes in the presence of NO3− and NO2− are those encoding Pf1 bacteriophage. With anaerobic NO2−, the most downregulated genes are those involved postglycolytically and include many tricarboxylic acid cycle genes and those involved in the electron transport chain, especially those encoding the NADH dehydrogenase I complex. Finally, a signature-tagged mutagenesis library of P. aeruginosa was constructed to further screen genes required for both NO3− and NO2− respiration. In addition to genes anticipated to play important roles in the anaerobiome (anr, dnr, nar, nir, and nuo), the cysG and dksA genes were found to be required for both anaerobic NO3− and NO2− respiration. This study represents a major step in unraveling the molecular machinery involved in anaerobic NO3− and NO2− respiration and offers clues as to how we might disrupt such pathways in P. aeruginosa to limit the growth of this important CF pathogen when it is either limited or completely restricted in its oxygen supply. PMID:18203836

  1. Meta-analyses of blood homocysteine levels for gender and genetic association studies of the MTHFR C677T polymorphism in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Akira; Numata, Shusuke; Tajima, Atsushi; Kinoshita, Makoto; Kikuchi, Kumiko; Shimodera, Shinji; Tomotake, Masahito; Ohi, Kazutaka; Hashimoto, Ryota; Imoto, Issei; Takeda, Masatoshi; Ohmori, Tetsuro

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that elevated blood homocysteine levels and the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism are risk factors for schizophrenia. However, the effects of gender and MTHFR C677T genotypes on blood homocysteine levels in schizophrenia have not been consistent. We first investigated whether plasma total homocysteine levels were higher in patients with schizophrenia than in controls with stratification by gender and by the MTHFR C677T genotypes in a large cohort (N = 1379). Second, we conducted a meta-analysis of association studies between blood homocysteine levels and schizophrenia separately by gender (N = 4714). Third, we performed a case-control association study between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and schizophrenia (N = 4998) and conducted a meta-analysis of genetic association studies based on Japanese subjects (N = 10 378). Finally, we assessed the effect of plasma total homocysteine levels on schizophrenia by a mendelian randomization approach. The ANCOVA after adjustment for age demonstrated a significant effect of diagnosis on the plasma total homocysteine levels in all strata, and the subsequent meta-analysis for gender demonstrated elevated blood homocysteine levels in both male and female patients with schizophrenia although antipsychotic medication might influence the outcome. The meta-analysis of the Japanese genetic association studies demonstrated a significant association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and schizophrenia. The mendelian randomization analysis in the Japanese populations yielded an OR of 1.15 for schizophrenia per 1-SD increase in plasma total homocysteine. Our study suggests that increased plasma total homocysteine levels may be associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia.

  2. Meta-analyses of Blood Homocysteine Levels for Gender and Genetic Association Studies of the MTHFR C677T Polymorphism in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Akira; Numata, Shusuke; Tajima, Atsushi; Kinoshita, Makoto; Kikuchi, Kumiko; Shimodera, Shinji; Tomotake, Masahito; Ohi, Kazutaka; Hashimoto, Ryota; Imoto, Issei; Takeda, Masatoshi; Ohmori, Tetsuro

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that elevated blood homocysteine levels and the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism are risk factors for schizophrenia. However, the effects of gender and MTHFR C677T genotypes on blood homocysteine levels in schizophrenia have not been consistent. We first investigated whether plasma total homocysteine levels were higher in patients with schizophrenia than in controls with stratification by gender and by the MTHFR C677T genotypes in a large cohort (N = 1379). Second, we conducted a meta-analysis of association studies between blood homocysteine levels and schizophrenia separately by gender (N = 4714). Third, we performed a case-control association study between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and schizophrenia (N = 4998) and conducted a meta-analysis of genetic association studies based on Japanese subjects (N = 10 378). Finally, we assessed the effect of plasma total homocysteine levels on schizophrenia by a mendelian randomization approach. The ANCOVA after adjustment for age demonstrated a significant effect of diagnosis on the plasma total homocysteine levels in all strata, and the subsequent meta-analysis for gender demonstrated elevated blood homocysteine levels in both male and female patients with schizophrenia although antipsychotic medication might influence the outcome. The meta-analysis of the Japanese genetic association studies demonstrated a significant association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and schizophrenia. The mendelian randomization analysis in the Japanese populations yielded an OR of 1.15 for schizophrenia per 1-SD increase in plasma total homocysteine. Our study suggests that increased plasma total homocysteine levels may be associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia. PMID:24535549

  3. Combining routine morphology, p16(INK4a) immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization for the detection of human papillomavirus infection in penile carcinomas: a tissue microarray study using classifier performance analyses.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Alcides; Cubilla, Antonio L; Haffner, Michael C; Lecksell, Kristen L; Sharma, Rajni; Burnett, Arthur L; Netto, George J

    2014-02-01

    Infection by high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of penile cancer in approximately 50% of the patients. The gold standard for human papillomavirus (HPV) detection is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. However, technical requirements and associated costs preclude the worldwide use of PCR assays on a routine basis. Herein, we evaluated the predictive abilities of tumor morphology, immunohistochemistry for p16(INK4a) expression, and in situ hybridization (ISH) for HR-HPV detection in defining HPV status, as established by PCR. Tissue samples from 48 patients with HPV-positive penile squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) were included in 4 tissue microarrays (TMA). Sensitivities and specificities were as follows: tumor morphology, 70% and 68%; p16(INK4a) immunohistochemistry, 65% and 90%; HR-HPV ISH, 47% and 100%. Regarding combinations of the predictors, the best performance was seen when HR-HPV ISH and p16(INK4a) immunohistochemistry were combined, regardless of the tumor morphology: sensitivity, 88%; specificity, 64%; area under the receiver-operating characteristic (AUC) curve, 0.83. Combinations of tumor morphology with p16(INK4a) immunohistochemistry or with HR-HPV ISH performed similarly well. In penile SCC, both p16(INK4a) immunohistochemistry and ISH for HR-HPV increase the predictive ability of routine morphology in defining HPV status. These tests can be interpreted differentially, depending on the necessity of a higher sensitivity or a higher specificity. For research/screening studies, we recommend combining tumor morphology, p16(INK4a) immunohistochemistry, and HR-HPV ISH. To increase sensitivity, positivity in any of these predictors should be considered as indicative of HPV infection. For routine diagnosis of clinical cases, criteria should be more stringent, and, to achieve the highest specificity in classifying a case as HPV-related, all predictors should be consistently positive. The data generated in

  4. Microarrays in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Grant, Geraldine M; Fortney, Amanda; Gorreta, Francesco; Estep, Michael; Del Giacco, Luca; Van Meter, Amy; Christensen, Alan; Appalla, Lakshmi; Naouar, Chahla; Jamison, Curtis; Al-Timimi, Ali; Donovan, Jean; Cooper, James; Garrett, Carleton; Chandhoke, Vikas

    2004-01-01

    Microarray technology has presented the scientific community with a compelling approach that allows for simultaneous evaluation of all cellular processes at once. Cancer, being one of the most challenging diseases due to its polygenic nature, presents itself as a perfect candidate for evaluation by this approach. Several recent articles have provided significant insight into the strengths and limitations of microarrays. Nevertheless, there are strong indications that this approach will provide new molecular markers that could be used in diagnosis and prognosis of cancers. To achieve these goals it is essential that there is a seamless integration of clinical and molecular biological data that allows us to elucidate genes and pathways involved in various cancers. To this effect we are currently evaluating gene expression profiles in human brain, ovarian, breast and hematopoetic, lung, colorectal, head and neck and biliary tract cancers. To address the issues we have a joint team of scientists, doctors and computer scientists from two Virginia Universities and a major healthcare provider. The study has been divided into several focus groups that include; Tissue Bank Clinical & Pathology Laboratory Data, Chip Fabrication, QA/QC, Tissue Devitalization, Database Design and Data Analysis, using multiple microarray platforms. Currently over 300 consenting patients have been enrolled in the study with the largest number being that of breast cancer patients. Clinical data on each patient is being compiled into a secure and interactive relational database and integration of these data elements will be accomplished by a common programming interface. This clinical database contains several key parameters on each patient including demographic (risk factors, nutrition, co-morbidity, familial history), histopathology (non genetic predictors), tumor, treatment and follow-up information. Gene expression data derived from the tissue samples will be linked to this database, which

  5. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  6. Polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism analyses of nuclear and chloroplast DNA provide evidence for recombination, multiple introductions and nascent speciation in the Caulerpa taxifolia complex.

    PubMed

    Meusnier, I; Valero, M; Destombe, C; Godé, C; Desmarais, E; Bonhomme, F; Stam, W T; Olsen, J L

    2002-11-01

    Independent lines of evidence support an Australian origin for the Mediterranean populations of the tropical alga Caulerpa taxifolia. To complement previous biogeographical studies based on nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS), a new chloroplast marker was developed--the cp 16S rDNA intron-2. Sequence variability for both nuclear and chloroplast markers were assessed in 110 individuals using single strand conformation polymorphism. Comparison of intrapopulation genetic diversity between invasive Mediterranean and 'native' Australian populations revealed the occurrence of two divergent and widespread clades. The first clade grouped nontropical invasive populations with inshore-mainland populations from Australia, while the second clustered all offshore-island populations studied so far. Despite our finding of nine distinct nuclear and five distinct chloroplast profiles, a single nucleocytoplasmic combination was characteristic of the invasive populations and sexual reproduction was found to be very rare. C. taxifolia is clearly a complex of genetically and ecologically differentiated sibling species or subspecies.

  7. A comparison of Peronospora parasitica (Downy mildew) isolates from Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleracea using amplified fragment length polymorphism and internal transcribed spacer 1 sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Rehmany, A P; Lynn, J R; Tör, M; Holub, E B; Beynon, J L

    2000-07-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprints and internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences from 27 Peronospora parasitica isolates (collected from Arabidopsis thaliana or Brassica oleracea), 5 Albugo candida isolates (from the same hosts and from Capsella bursa-pastoris), and 1 Bremia lactucae isolate (from Lactuca sativa) were compared. The AFLP analysis divided the isolates into five groups that correlated with taxonomic species and, in most cases, with host origin. The only exception was a group consisting of A. candida isolates from both B. oleracea and C. bursa-pastoris. ITS1 sequence analysis divided the isolates into the same five groups, demonstrated the divergence between P. parasitica isolates from A. thaliana and B. oleracea, and, using previously published ITS1 sequences, clearly showed the relationship between A. candida isolates from different hosts. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  8. Genotyping of Candida albicans using length fragment and high-resolution melting analyses together with minisequencing of a polymorphic microsatellite locus.

    PubMed

    Costa, Jean-Marc; Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Olivi, Martine; Cabaret, Odile; Farrugia, Cécile; Lecellier, Gaël; Dromer, Françoise; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2010-03-01

    Microsatellite length polymorphism (MLP) typing is a PCR-based method used for genotyping of the diploid yeast Candida albicans. However, MLP is subject to homoplasia which can hamper the accuracy of the results. We combined fragment length analysis, high-resolution DNA melting (HRM) analysis, and SNaPshot minisequencing after a single amplification of the CDC3 locus to study 95 epidemiologically independent C. albicans isolates. HRM analysis for a given electrophoretic group led to a maximum of three different curves due to the presence of a SNP upstream of the tandem repeat which could be characterized using the SNaPshot assay. The combination of the three methods had a discriminatory index of 0.88 in complete congruence with previous MLP typing (Mantel test R=0.99, P<10(-)(4)). HRM is a useful tool of adding resolving power to MLP genotyping in identifying SNPs.

  9. Identification and Typing of Malassezia Species by Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism and Sequence Analyses of the Internal Transcribed Spacer and Large-Subunit Regions of Ribosomal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Aditya K.; Boekhout, Teun; Theelen, Bart; Summerbell, Richard; Batra, Roma

    2004-01-01

    Malassezia yeasts are associated with several dermatological disorders. The conventional identification of Malassezia species by phenotypic methods is complicated and time-consuming, and the results based on culture methods are difficult to interpret. A comparative molecular approach based on the use of three molecular techniques, namely, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis, sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer, and sequencing of the D1 and D2 domains of the large-subunit ribosomal DNA region, was applied for the identification of Malassezia species. All species could be correctly identified by means of these methods. The results of AFLP analysis and sequencing were in complete agreement with each other. However, some discrepancies were noted when the molecular methods were compared with the phenotypic method of identification. Specific genotypes were distinguished within a collection of Malassezia furfur isolates from Canadian sources. AFLP analysis revealed significant geographical differences between the North American and European M. furfur strains. PMID:15365020

  10. Interim report on updated microarray probes for the LLNL Burkholderia pseudomallei SNP array

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S; Jaing, C

    2012-03-27

    The overall goal of this project is to forensically characterize 100 unknown Burkholderia isolates in the US-Australia collaboration. We will identify genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from B. pseudomallei and near neighbor species including B. mallei, B. thailandensis and B. oklahomensis. We will design microarray probes to detect these SNP markers and analyze 100 Burkholderia genomic DNAs extracted from environmental, clinical and near neighbor isolates from Australian collaborators on the Burkholderia SNP microarray. We will analyze the microarray genotyping results to characterize the genetic diversity of these new isolates and triage the samples for whole genome sequencing. In this interim report, we described the SNP analysis and the microarray probe design for the Burkholderia SNP microarray.

  11. Molecular cloning, sequence characteristics, and polymorphism analyses of the tyrosinase-related protein 2 / DOPAchrome tautomerase gene of black-boned sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Deng, Weidong; Tan, Yuwen; Wang, Xinyu; Xi, Dongmei; He, Yiduo; Yang, Shuli; Mao, Huaming; Gao, Shizheng

    2009-12-01

    Tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TYRP2) plays a pivotal role in the biosynthesis of eumelanin. Black-boned sheep have excessive melanin and eumelanin, resulting in dark (black) muscles and organs. This study was designed to investigate the effects of variants of the TYRP2 gene on black traits and coat colour of black-boned sheep. Melanin traits were measured in three populations of sheep (Nanping black-boned, Nanping normal, and Romney Marsh) and compared in this study. From the TYRP2 cDNA, all 8 exons and their flanking regions were amplified and characterized. Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the exons and their flanking regions. Five exonic polymorphic sites, including two synonymous (c.93T>G and c.1140C>T) and three non-synonymous mutations (c.163C>T (p.R55W), c.605G>A (p.R202H), and c.1141A>G (p.T381A)), were retrieved. PCR-RFLP analysis of c.605G>A showed that the frequencies of allele G in the Nanping black-boned, Nanping normal, and Romney Marsh sheep were 0.632, 0.603, and 0.886, respectively. Sheep with the GG genotype had significantly (P < 0.05) lower tyrosinase activity, alkali-soluble melanin content, and ratio of eumelanin : total melanin than sheep with GA and AA genotypes when measured across all investigated samples but not when samples within each population of sheep were compared. However, there was no association of TYRP2 genotype at a single SNP position with coat colour across populations. Nonetheless, the two breeds with higher overall tyrosinase activity did produce darker and more varied coat colours than the breed with lower tyrosinase activity.

  12. Living-cell microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yarmush, Martin L; King, Kevin R

    2009-01-01

    Living cells are remarkably complex. To unravel this complexity, living-cell assays have been developed that allow delivery of experimental stimuli and measurement of the resulting cellular responses. High-throughput adaptations of these assays, known as living-cell microarrays, which are based on microtiter plates, high-density spotting, microfabrication, and microfluidics technologies, are being developed for two general applications: (a) to screen large-scale chemical and genomic libraries and (b) to systematically investigate the local cellular microenvironment. These emerging experimental platforms offer exciting opportunities to rapidly identify genetic determinants of disease, to discover modulators of cellular function, and to probe the complex and dynamic relationships between cells and their local environment.

  13. Stripping custom microRNA microarrays and the lessons learned about probe-slide interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Wayne; Tan, Jiankang; Zeng, Yan

    2009-03-15

    Microarrays have been used extensively in gene expression profiling and genotyping studies. To reduce the high cost and enhance the consistency of microarray experiments, it is often desirable to strip and reuse microarray slides. Our genome-wide analysis of microRNA expression involves the hybridization of fluorescently labeled nucleic acids to custom-made, spotted DNA microarrays based on GAPSII-coated slides. We describe here a simple and effective method to regenerate such custom microarrays that uses a very low-salt buffer to remove labeled nucleic acids from microarrays. Slides can be stripped and reused multiple times without significantly compromising data quality. Moreover, our analyses of the performance of regenerated slides identifies parameters that influence the attachment of oligonucleotide probes to GAPSII slides, shedding light on the interactions between DNA and the microarray surface and suggesting ways in which to improve the design of oligonucleotide probes.

  14. DNA microarray technology for target identification and validation.

    PubMed

    Jayapal, Manikandan; Melendez, Alirio J

    2006-01-01

    1. Microarrays, a recent development, provide a revolutionary platform to analyse thousands of genes at once. They have enormous potential in the study of biological processes in health and disease and, perhaps, microarrays have become crucial tools in diagnostic applications and drug discovery. 2. Microarray based studies have provided the essential impetus for biomedical experiments, such as identification of disease-causing genes in malignancies and regulatory genes in the cell cycle mechanism. Microarrays can identify genes for new and unique potential drug targets, predict drug responsiveness for individual patients and, finally, initiate gene therapy and prevention strategies. 3. The present article reviews the principles and technological concerns, as well as the steps involved in obtaining and analysing of data. Furthermore, applications of microarray based experiments in drug target identifications and validation strategies are discussed. 4. To exemplify how this tool can be useful, in the present review we provide an overview of some of the past and potential future aspects of microarray technology and present a broad overview of this rapidly growing field.

  15. Genome analyses of the wheat yellow (stripe) rust pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici reveal polymorphic and haustorial expressed secreted proteins as candidate effectors.

    PubMed

    Cantu, Dario; Segovia, Vanesa; MacLean, Daniel; Bayles, Rosemary; Chen, Xianming; Kamoun, Sophien; Dubcovsky, Jorge; Saunders, Diane G O; Uauy, Cristobal

    2013-04-22

    Wheat yellow (stripe) rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (PST) is one of the most devastating diseases of wheat worldwide. To design effective breeding strategies that maximize the potential for durable disease resistance it is important to understand the molecular basis of PST pathogenicity. In particular, the characterisation of the structure, function and evolutionary dynamics of secreted effector proteins that are detected by host immune receptors can help guide and prioritize breeding efforts. However, to date, our knowledge of the effector repertoire of cereal rust pathogens is limited. We re-sequenced genomes of four PST isolates from the US and UK to identify effector candidates and relate them to their distinct virulence profiles. First, we assessed SNP frequencies between all isolates, with heterokaryotic SNPs being over tenfold more frequent (5.29 ± 2.23 SNPs/kb) than homokaryotic SNPs (0.41 ± 0.28 SNPs/kb). Next, we implemented a bioinformatics pipeline to integrate genomics, transcriptomics, and effector-focused annotations to identify and classify effector candidates in PST. RNAseq analysis highlighted transcripts encoding secreted proteins that were significantly enriched in haustoria compared to infected tissue. The expression of 22 candidate effector genes was characterised using qRT-PCR, revealing distinct temporal expression patterns during infection in wheat. Lastly, we identified proteins that displayed non-synonymous substitutions specifically between the two UK isolates PST-87/7 and PST-08/21, which differ in virulence to two wheat varieties. By focusing on polymorphic variants enriched in haustoria, we identified five polymorphic effector candidates between PST-87/7 and PST-08/21 among 2,999 secreted proteins. These allelic variants are now a priority for functional validation as virulence/avirulence effectors in the corresponding wheat varieties. Integration of genomics, transcriptomics, and effector-directed annotation of

  16. Genome analyses of the wheat yellow (stripe) rust pathogen Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici reveal polymorphic and haustorial expressed secreted proteins as candidate effectors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat yellow (stripe) rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (PST) is one of the most devastating diseases of wheat worldwide. To design effective breeding strategies that maximize the potential for durable disease resistance it is important to understand the molecular basis of PST pathogenicity. In particular, the characterisation of the structure, function and evolutionary dynamics of secreted effector proteins that are detected by host immune receptors can help guide and prioritize breeding efforts. However, to date, our knowledge of the effector repertoire of cereal rust pathogens is limited. Results We re-sequenced genomes of four PST isolates from the US and UK to identify effector candidates and relate them to their distinct virulence profiles. First, we assessed SNP frequencies between all isolates, with heterokaryotic SNPs being over tenfold more frequent (5.29 ± 2.23 SNPs/kb) than homokaryotic SNPs (0.41 ± 0.28 SNPs/kb). Next, we implemented a bioinformatics pipeline to integrate genomics, transcriptomics, and effector-focused annotations to identify and classify effector candidates in PST. RNAseq analysis highlighted transcripts encoding secreted proteins that were significantly enriched in haustoria compared to infected tissue. The expression of 22 candidate effector genes was characterised using qRT-PCR, revealing distinct temporal expression patterns during infection in wheat. Lastly, we identified proteins that displayed non-synonymous substitutions specifically between the two UK isolates PST-87/7 and PST-08/21, which differ in virulence to two wheat varieties. By focusing on polymorphic variants enriched in haustoria, we identified five polymorphic effector candidates between PST-87/7 and PST-08/21 among 2,999 secreted proteins. These allelic variants are now a priority for functional validation as virulence/avirulence effectors in the corresponding wheat varieties. Conclusions Integration of genomics, transcriptomics, and

  17. Microarray simulator as educational tool.

    PubMed

    Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Nykter, Matti; Mäkiraatikka, Eeva; Lehmussola, Antti; Korpelainen, Tomi; Erkkilä, Timo; Yli-Harja, Olli

    2007-01-01

    As many real-world applications, microarray measurements are inapplicable for large-scale teaching purposes due to their laborious preparation process and expense. Fortunately, many phases of the array preparation process can be efficiently demonstrated by using a software simulator tool. Here we propose the use of microarray simulator as an aiding tool in teaching of computational biology. Three case studies on educational use of the simulator are presented, which demonstrate the effect of gene knock-out, synthetic time series, and effect of noise sources. We conclude that the simulator, used for teaching the principles of microarray measurement technology, proved to be a useful tool in education.

  18. Structural systematics and conformational analyses of a 3 × 3 isomer grid of fluoro-N-(pyridyl)benzamides: physicochemical correlations, polymorphism and isomorphous relationships.

    PubMed

    Mocilac, Pavle; Donnelly, Katie; Gallagher, John F

    2012-04-01

    An isomer grid of nine fluoro-N-(pyridyl)benzamides (Fxx) (x = para-/meta-/ortho-) has been examined to correlate structural relationships between the experimental crystal structure and ab initio calculations, based on the effect of fluorine (Fx) and pyridine N-atom (x) substitution patterns on molecular conformation. Eight isomers form N-H⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bonds, and only one (Fom) aggregates via intermolecular N-H⋅⋅⋅O=C interactions exclusively. The Fpm and Fom isomers both crystallize as two polymorphs with Fpm_O (N-H⋅⋅⋅O=C chains, P-syn) and Fpm_N (N-H⋅⋅⋅N chains, P-anti) both in P2(1)/n (Z' = 1) differing by their meta-N atom locations (P-syn, P-anti; N(pyridine) referenced to N-H), whereas the disordered Fom_O is mostly P-syn (Z' = 6) compared with Fom_F (P-anti) (Z' = 1). In the Fxo triad twisted dimers form cyclic R(2)(2)(8) rings via N-H⋅⋅⋅N interactions. Computational modelling and conformational preferences of the isomer grid demonstrate that the solid-state conformations generally conform with the most stable calculated conformations except for the Fxm triad, while calculations of the Fox triad predict the intramolecular N-H⋅⋅⋅F interaction established by spectroscopic and crystallographic data. Comparisons of Fxx with related isomer grids reveal a high degree of similarity in solid-state aggregation and physicochemical properties, while correlation of the melting point behaviour indicates the significance of the substituent position on melting point behaviour rather than the nature of the substituent.

  19. Polymorphism in the IL4R gene and clinical features are associated with glioma prognosis: Analyses of case-cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tian Bo; Du, Shuli; Zhu, Xi Kai; Li, Gang; Ouyang, Yongri; He, Na; Zhang, Zhiying; Zhang, Yuan; Kang, Longli; Yuan, Dongya

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory gene polymorphisms may be associated with glioma risk. The purpose of this study was to analyze effects of certain inflammatory gene and some clinical factors on patient survival.The clinical information of 269 glioma patients conceived operation from September 2010 to May 2014 to decide the 1-, 3-year survival rates according to follow-up results and analyze age, gender, the WHO classification, extent of surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy factors effects on prognosis. Survival distributions were estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier method and difference in the survival was tested using the log-rank test. To estimate the association between the IL4, IL13, IL10, IL4R SNPs, and PFS and OS in glioma, the HR and 95% CI were calculated by univariate Cox proportional hazards model. Multivariate Cox model were performed to compute adjusted HR and 95% CI. All data was analyzed with SPSS17.0 package. Extent of surgical resection, chemotherapy, and age are an important factor in glioma overall survival and progression-free survival overall. Extent of surgery and chemotherapy are important factors in astrocytoma overall survival. Univariate analysis showed that IL4R rs1801275 was significantly associated with overall survival of glioma and astrocytoma patients (P < 0.05). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that IL4R rs1801275 GG genotype could increase the death risk of glioma and astrocytoma patients (Glioma: hazard ratio [HR]: 4.897, 95% confidence limits [95% CI]: 1.962-12.222, P = 0.001; Astrocytoma: HR: 15.944, 95% CI: 4.019-63.253, P < 0.05).Our research results showed that extent of surgical resection, age, and chemotherapy affect the prognosis of glioma. The IL4R gene may affect the survival of glioma patients.

  20. Rapid Identification and Differentiation of the Soft Rot Erwinias by 16S-23S Intergenic Transcribed Spacer-PCR and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Toth, I. K.; Avrova, A. O.; Hyman, L. J.

    2001-01-01

    Current identification methods for the soft rot erwinias are both imprecise and time-consuming. We have used the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) to aid in their identification. Analysis by ITS-PCR and ITS-restriction fragment length polymorphism was found to be a simple, precise, and rapid method compared to current molecular and phenotypic techniques. The ITS was amplified from Erwinia and other genera using universal PCR primers. After PCR, the banding patterns generated allowed the soft rot erwinias to be differentiated from all other Erwinia and non-Erwinia species and placed into one of three groups (I to III). Group I comprised all Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica and subsp. betavasculorum isolates. Group II comprised all E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, subsp. odorifera, and subsp. wasabiae and E. cacticida isolates, and group III comprised all E. chrysanthemi isolates. To increase the level of discrimination further, the ITS-PCR products were digested with one of two restriction enzymes. Digestion with CfoI identified E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica and subsp. betavasculorum (group I) and E. chrysanthemi (group III) isolates, while digestion with RsaI identified E. carotovora subsp. wasabiae, subsp. carotovora, and subsp. odorifera/carotovora and E. cacticida isolates (group II). In the latter case, it was necessary to distinguish E. carotovora subsp. odorifera and subsp. carotovora using the α-methyl glucoside test. Sixty suspected soft rot erwinia isolates from Australia were identified as E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, E. chrysanthemi, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora, and non-soft rot species. Ten “atypical” E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica isolates were identified as E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica, subsp. carotovora, and subsp. betavasculorum and non-soft rot species, and two “atypical” E. carotovora subsp. carotovora isolates were identified as E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and subsp. atroseptica. PMID:11526007

  1. Chemistry of Natural Glycan Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Glycan microarrays have become indispensable tools for studying protein-glycan interactions. Along with chemo-enzymatic synthesis, glycans isolated from natural sources have played important roles in array development and will continue to be a major source of glycans. N- and O-glycans from glycoproteins, and glycans from glycosphingolipids can be released from corresponding glycoconjugates with relatively mature methods, although isolation of large numbers and quantities of glycans are still very challenging. Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchors and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are less represented on current glycan microarrays. Glycan microarray development has been greatly facilitated by bifunctional fluorescent linkers, which can be applied in a “Shotgun Glycomics” approach to incorporate isolated natural glycans. Glycan presentation on microarrays may affect glycan binding by GBPs, often through multivalent recognition by the GBP. PMID:24487062

  2. Identification of a novel FGFRL1 MicroRNA target site polymorphism for bone mineral density in meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Tianhua; Liu, Ning; Zhao, Ming; Xie, Guie; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jian; Pei, Yu-Fang; Shen, Hui; Fu, Xiaoying; He, Hao; Lu, Shan; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Tan, Li-Jun; Yang, Tie-Lin; Guo, Yan; Leo, Paul J.; Duncan, Emma L.; Shen, Jie; Guo, Yan-Fang; Nicholson, Geoffrey C.; Prince, Richard L.; Eisman, John A.; Jones, Graeme; Sambrook, Philip N.; Hu, Xiang; Das, Partha M.; Tian, Qing; Zhu, Xue-Zhen; Papasian, Christopher J.; Brown, Matthew A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Wang, Yu-Ping; Xiang, Shuanglin; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical post-transcriptional regulators. Based on a previous genome-wide association (GWA) scan, we conducted a polymorphism in microRNA target sites (poly-miRTS)-centric multistage meta-analysis for lumbar spine (LS)-, total hip (HIP)- and femoral neck (FN)-bone mineral density (BMD). In stage I, 41 102 poly-miRTSs were meta-analyzed in seven cohorts with a genome-wide significance (GWS) α = 0.05/41 102 = 1.22 × 10−6. By applying α = 5 × 10−5 (suggestive significance), 11 poly-miRTSs were selected, with FGFRL1 rs4647940 and PRR5 rs3213550 as top signals for FN-BMD (P = 7.67 × 10−6 and 1.58 × 10−5) in gender-combined sample. In stage II in silico replication (two cohorts), FGFRL1 rs4647940 was the only signal marginally replicated for FN-BMD (P = 5.08 × 10−3) at α = 0.10/11 = 9.09 × 10-3. PRR5 rs3213550 was also selected based on biological significance. In stage III de novo genotyping replication (two cohorts), FGFRL1 rs4647940 was the only signal significantly replicated for FN-BMD (P = 7.55 × 10−6) at α = 0.05/2 = 0.025 in gender-combined sample. Aggregating three stages, FGFRL1 rs4647940 was the single stage I-discovered and stages II- and III-replicated signal attaining GWS for FN-BMD (P = 8.87 × 10−12). Dual-luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that FGFRL1 3′ untranslated region harboring rs4647940 appears to be hsa-miR-140-5p's target site. In a zebrafish microinjection experiment, dre-miR-140-5p is shown to exert a dramatic impact on craniofacial skeleton formation. Taken together, we provided functional evidence for a novel FGFRL1 poly-miRTS rs4647940 in a previously known 4p16.3 locus, and experimental and clinical genetics studies have shown both FGFRL1 and hsa-miR-140-5p are important for bone formation. PMID:25941324

  3. Identification of IDUA and WNT16 Phosphorylation-Related Non-Synonymous Polymorphisms for Bone Mineral Density in Meta-Analyses of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Tianhua; Liu, Ning; Yu, Xun; Zhao, Ming; Choi, Hyung Jin; Leo, Paul J.; Brown, Matthew A.; Zhang, Lei; Pei, Yu-Fang; Shen, Hui; He, Hao; Fu, Xiaoying; Lu, Shan; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Tan, Li-Jun; Yang, Tie-Lin; Guo, Yan; Cho, Nam H.; Shen, Jie; Guo, Yan-Fang; Nicholson, Geoffrey C.; Prince, Richard L.; Eisman, John A.; Jones, Graeme; Sambrook, Philip N.; Tian, Qing; Zhu, Xue-Zhen; Papasian, Christopher J.; Duncan, Emma L.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Shin, Chan Soo; Xiang, Shuanglin; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates a wide variety of cellular processes. Thus, we hypothesize that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that may modulate protein phosphorylation could affect osteoporosis risk. Based on a previous conventional genome-wide association (GWA) study, we conducted a three-stage meta-analysis targeting phosphorylation-related SNPs (phosSNPs) for femoral neck (FN)-, total hip (HIP)-, and Lumbar Spine (LS)-BMD phenotypes. In stage 1, 9,593 phosSNPs were meta-analyzed in 11,140 individuals of various ancestries. Genome-wide significance (GWS) and suggestive significance were defined by α = 5.21×10−6 (0.05/9,593) and 1.00×10−4, respectively. In stage 2, 9 stage 1-discovered phosSNPs (based on α = 1.00×10−4) were in silico meta-analyzed in Dutch, Korean, and Australian cohorts. In stage 3, four phosSNPs that replicated in stage 2 (based on α = 5.56×10−3, 0.05/9) were de novo genotyped in two independent cohorts. IDUA rs3755955 and rs6831280, and WNT16 rs2707466 were associated with BMD phenotypes in each respective stage, and in 3 stages combined, achieving GWS for both FN-BMD (P-value = 8.36×10−10, 5.26×10−10, and 3.01×10−10, respectively) and HIP-BMD (P-value = 3.26×10−6, 1.97×10−6, and 1.63×10−12, respectively). Although in vitro studies demonstrated no differences in expressions of wild-type and mutant forms of IDUA and WNT16B proteins, in silico analysis predicts that WNT16 rs2707466 directly abolishes a phosphorylation site, which could cause a deleterious effect on WNT16 protein, and that IDUA phosSNPs rs3755955 and rs6831280 could exert indirect effects on nearby phosphorylation sites. Further studies will be required to determine the detailed and specific molecular effects of these BMD-associated non-synonymous variants. PMID:26256109

  4. Electrostatic readout of DNA microarrays with charged microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Clack, Nathan G; Salaita, Khalid; Groves, Jay T

    2014-01-01

    DNA microarrays are used for gene-expression profiling, single-nucleotide polymorphism detection and disease diagnosis1–3. A persistent challenge in this area is the lack of microarray screening technology suitable for integration into routine clinical care4,5. Here, we describe a method for sensitive and label-free electrostatic readout of DNA or RNA hybridization on microarrays. The electrostatic properties of the microarray are measured from the position and motion of charged microspheres randomly dispersed over the surface. We demonstrate nondestructive electrostatic imaging with 10-μm lateral resolution over centimeter-length scales, which is four-orders of magnitude larger than that achievable with conventional scanning electrostatic force microscopy. Changes in surface charge density as a result of specific hybridization can be detected and quantified with 50-pM sensitivity, single base-pair mismatch selectivity and in the presence of complex background. Because the naked eye is sufficient to read out hybridization, this approach may facilitate broad application of multiplexed assays. PMID:18587384

  5. Electrostatic readout of DNA microarrays with charged microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Clack, Nathan G.; Salaita, Khalid; Groves, Jay T.

    2008-06-29

    DNA microarrays are used for gene-expression profiling, single-nucleotide polymorphism detection and disease diagnosis. A persistent challenge in this area is the lack of microarray screening technology suitable for integration into routine clinical care. In this paper, we describe a method for sensitive and label-free electrostatic readout of DNA or RNA hybridization on microarrays. The electrostatic properties of the microarray are measured from the position and motion of charged microspheres randomly dispersed over the surface. We demonstrate nondestructive electrostatic imaging with 10-μm lateral resolution over centimeter-length scales, which is four-orders of magnitude larger than that achievable with conventional scanning electrostatic force microscopy. Changes in surface charge density as a result of specific hybridization can be detected and quantified with 50-pM sensitivity, single base-pair mismatch selectivity and in the presence of complex background. Lastly, because the naked eye is sufficient to read out hybridization, this approach may facilitate broad application of multiplexed assays.

  6. Validation of the Swine Protein-Annotated Oligonucleotide Microarray

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The specificity and utility of the Swine Protein-Annotated Oligonucleotide Microarray, or Pigoligoarray (www.pigoligoarray.org), has been evaluated by profiling the expression of transcripts from four porcine tissues. Tools for comparative analyses of expression on the Pigoligoarray were developed i...

  7. The miRNA targetome of coronary artery disease is perturbed by functional polymorphisms identified and prioritized by in-depth bioinformatics analyses exploiting genome-wide association studies.

    PubMed

    Bastami, Milad; Nariman-Saleh-Fam, Ziba; Saadatian, Zahra; Nariman-Saleh-Fam, Lida; Omrani, Mir Davood; Ghaderian, Sayyed Mohammad Hossein; Masotti, Andrea

    2016-12-05

    In recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have made great progress in elucidating the genetic influence on complex traits. An overwhelming number of GWAS signals resides in regulatory elements, therefore most post-GWAS studies focused only on transcriptional regulatory variants. However, recent findings have expanded the spectrum of trait/disease-associated regulatory variants beyond transcriptional level and highlighted the importance of post-transcriptional variants like those in miRNA targetome. The present work integrated genome-wide association data of coronary artery disease (CAD) with population-specific linkage disequilibrium structures from 1000 Genomes Project to map disease associations to miRNA targetome. Moreover, we performed a variety of functional prediction analyses to prioritize disease-associated variants (DAVs) influencing miRNA targetome and in-silico analyses to get insights into their functional significance. In conclusion, although the role of miRNA targetome variations in the development of CAD still has to be fully elucidated, we provided a systematic bioinformatics approach to the miRNA targetome variations in CAD. The results of this study will be valuable for researchers interested in the identification of CAD GWAS signals that may implicate polymorphic miRNA targeting.

  8. Comparing Bacterial DNA Microarray Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Chandler, Darrell P.; White, Amanda M.; Protic, Miroslava; Daly, Don S.; Wunschel, Sharon C.

    2005-08-15

    Detecting subtle genetic differences between microorganisms is an important problem in molecular epidemiology and microbial forensics. In a typical investigation, gel electrophoresis is used to compare randomly amplified DNA fragments between microbial strains, where the patterns of DNA fragment sizes are proxies for a microbe's genotype. The limited genomic sample captured on a gel is often insufficient to discriminate nearly identical strains. This paper examines the application of microarray technology to DNA fingerprinting as a high-resolution alternative to gel-based methods. The so-called universal microarray, which uses short oligonucleotide probes that do not target specific genes or species, is intended to be applicable to all microorganisms because it does not require prior knowledge of genomic sequence. In principle, closely related strains can be distinguished if the number of probes on the microarray is sufficiently large, i.e., if the genome is sufficiently sampled. In practice, we confront noisy data, imperfectly matched hybridizations, and a high-dimensional inference problem. We describe the statistical problems of microarray fingerprinting, outline similarities with and differences from more conventional microarray applications, and illustrate the statistical fingerprinting problem for 10 closely related strains from three Bacillus species, and 3 strains from non-Bacillus species.

  9. Genetic polymorphism analyses of 30 InDels in Chinese Xibe ethnic group and its population genetic differentiations with other groups.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hao-Tian; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Shen, Chun-Mei; Yuan, Guo-Lian; Yang, Chun-Hua; Jin, Rui; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Wang, Hong-Dan; Liu, Wen-Juan; Jing, Hang; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2015-02-05

    In the present study, we obtained population genetic data and forensic parameters of 30 InDel loci in Chinese Xibe ethnic group from northwestern China and studied the genetic relationships between the studied Xibe group and other reference groups. The observed heterozygosities ranged from 0.1704 at HLD118 locus to 0.5247 at HLD92 locus while the expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.1559 at HLD118 locus to 0.4997 at HLD101 locus. The cumulative power of exclusion and total probability of discrimination power in the studied group were 0.9867 and 0.9999999999902 for the 30 loci, respectively. Analyses of structure, PCA, interpopulation differentiations and phylogenetic tree revealed that the Xibe group had close genetic relationships with South Korean, Beijing Han and Guangdong Han groups. The results indicated that these 30 loci should only be used as a complement for autosomal STRs in paternity cases but could provide an acceptable level of discrimination in forensic identification cases in the studied Xibe group. Further studies should be conducted for better understanding of the Xibe genetic background.

  10. Diagnostic utility of microarray testing in pregnancy loss.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, J A; Tucker, M E; Escobar, L F; Neill, N J; Torchia, B S; McDaniel, L D; Schultz, R A; Chong, K; Chitayat, D

    2015-10-01

    To determine the frequency of clinically significant chromosomal abnormalities identified by chromosomal microarray in pregnancy losses at any gestational age and to compare microarray performance with that of traditional cytogenetic analysis when testing pregnancy losses. Among 535 fetal demise specimens of any gestational age, clinical microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was performed successfully on 515, and a subset of 107 specimens underwent additional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Overall, clinically significant abnormalities were identified in 12.8% (64/499) of specimens referred with normal or unknown karyotypes. Detection rates were significantly higher with earlier gestational age. In the subset with normal karyotype, clinically significant abnormalities were identified in 6.9% (20/288). This detection rate did not vary significantly with gestational age, suggesting that, unlike aneuploidy, the contribution of submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities to fetal demise does not vary with gestational age. In the 107 specimens that underwent aCGH and SNP analysis, seven cases (6.5%) had abnormalities of potential clinical significance detected by the SNP component, including female triploidy. aCGH failed to yield fetal results in 8.3%, which is an improvement over traditional cytogenetic analysis of fetal demise specimens. Both the provision of results in cases in which karyotype fails and the detection of abnormalities in the presence of a normal karyotype demonstrate the increased diagnostic utility of microarray in pregnancy loss. Thus, chromosomal microarray testing is a preferable, robust method of analyzing cases of pregnancy loss to better delineate possible genetic etiologies, regardless of gestational age. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Statistical approaches for the analysis of DNA methylation microarray data.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Kimberly D

    2011-06-01

    Following the rapid development and adoption in DNA methylation microarray assays, we are now experiencing a growth in the number of statistical tools to analyze the resulting large-scale data sets. As is the case for other microarray applications, biases caused by technical issues are of concern. Some of these issues are old (e.g., two-color dye bias and probe- and array-specific effects), while others are new (e.g., fragment length bias and bisulfite conversion efficiency). Here, I highlight characteristics of DNA methylation that suggest standard statistical tools developed for other data types may not be directly suitable. I then describe the microarray technologies most commonly in use, along with the methods used for preprocessing and obtaining a summary measure. I finish with a section describing downstream analyses of the data, focusing on methods that model percentage DNA methylation as the outcome, and methods for integrating DNA methylation with gene expression or genotype data.

  12. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-10-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) - about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences.

  13. Robust and efficient synthetic method for forming DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Dolan, P L; Wu, Y; Ista, L K; Metzenberg, R L; Nelson, M A; Lopez, G P

    2001-11-01

    The field of DNA microarray technology has necessitated the cooperative efforts of interdisciplinary scientific teams to achieve its primary goal of rapidly measuring global gene expression patterns. A collaborative effort was established to produce a chemically reactive surface on glass slide substrates to which unmodified DNA will covalently bind for improvement of cDNA microarray technology. Using the p-aminophenyl trimethoxysilane (ATMS)/diazotization chemistry that was developed, microarrays were fabricated and analyzed. This immobilization method produced uniform spots containing equivalent or greater amounts of DNA than commercially available immobilization techniques. In addition, hybridization analyses of microarrays made with ATMS/diazotization chemistry showed very sensitive detection of the target sequence, two to three orders of magnitude more sensitive than the commercial chemistries. Repeated stripping and re-hybridization of these slides showed that DNA loss was minimal, allowing multiple rounds of hybridization. Thus, the ATMS/diazotization chemistry facilitated covalent binding of unmodified DNA, and the reusable microarrays that were produced showed enhanced levels of hybridization and very low background fluorescence.

  14. PNA microarrays for hybridisation of unlabelled DNA samples

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Ole; Feldner, Julia; Stephan, Achim; Schröder, Markus; Schnölzer, Martina; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F.; Hoheisel, Jörg D.; Jacob, Anette

    2003-01-01

    Several strategies have been developed for the production of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) microarrays by parallel probe synthesis and selective coupling of full-length molecules. Such microarrays were used for direct detection of the hybridisation of unlabelled DNA by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. PNAs were synthesised by an automated process on filter-bottom microtitre plates. The resulting molecules were released from the solid support and attached without any purification to microarray surfaces via the terminal amino group itself or via modifications, which had been chemically introduced during synthesis. Thus, only full-length PNA oligomers were attached whereas truncated molecules, produced during synthesis because of incomplete condensation reactions, did not bind. Different surface chemistries and fitting modifications of the PNA terminus were tested. For an examination of coupling selectivity, bound PNAs were cleaved off microarray surfaces and analysed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Additionally, hybridisation experiments were performed to compare the attachment chemistries, with fully acetylated PNAs spotted as controls. Upon hybridisation of unlabelled DNA to such microarrays, binding events could be detected by visualisation of phosphates, which are an integral part of nucleic acids but missing entirely in PNA probes. Overall best results in terms of selectivity and sensitivity were obtained with thiol-modified PNAs on maleimide surfaces. PMID:14500847

  15. Microfluidic microarray systems and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    West, Jay A. A. [Castro Valley, CA; Hukari, Kyle W [San Ramon, CA; Hux, Gary A [Tracy, CA

    2009-04-28

    Disclosed are systems that include a manifold in fluid communication with a microfluidic chip having a microarray, an illuminator, and a detector in optical communication with the microarray. Methods for using these systems for biological detection are also disclosed.

  16. The cut-off value for normal nuchal translucency evaluated by chromosomal microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Maya, Idit; Yacobson, Shiri; Kahana, Sarit; Yeshaya, Josepha; Tenne, Tamar; Agmon-Fishman, Ifaat; Cohen-Vig, Lital; Shohat, Mordechai; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Sharony, Reuven

    2017-01-30

    An association between isolated, increased nuchal translucency thickness and pathogenic chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) has been reported. A recent meta-analysis reported that most studies used a 3.5 mm cut-off value. Considering nuchal translucency distribution and the commonly accepted 5% false positive rate in maternal serum screening, nuchal translucency cut-off levels should be reconsidered. This study evaluated the unique contribution of CMA to the investigation of foetuses with mildly increased nuchal translucency (NT) thickness of 3.0-3.4 mm. This was a retrospective, multicenter study. A single laboratory performed all genetic analyses. Comparative Genomic Hybridization Microarray analysis or Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array technology was used for CMA. NT was divided into three groups (≤2.9; 3.0-3.4; ≥3.5 mm) and the results were compared, focusing on pregnancies with NT as the only medical indication for CMA at the time of the invasive procedure. If combined first trimester screening (NT and biochemistry) indicated increased risk for common aneuploidies, the case was excluded. CMA results were recorded in 1,588 pregnancies, of which 770 foetuses had NT as a normal or an isolated abnormal finding. Of these, 462 had NT ≤2.9 mm, 170 had NT 3.0-3.4 mm and 138 had NT ≥3.5 mm. Pathogenic copy number variations were found in 1.7%, 7.1%, and 13.0%, respectively. The results suggest that CMA should be part of the investigation in foetuses with isolated, mildly increased NT (3.0-3.4 mm). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Assessing differential expression in two-color microarrays: a resampling-based empirical Bayes approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongmei; Le Pape, Marc A; Parikh, Nisha I; Chen, Will X; Dye, Timothy D

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays are widely used for examining differential gene expression, identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms, and detecting methylation loci. Multiple testing methods in microarray data analysis aim at controlling both Type I and Type II error rates; however, real microarray data do not always fit their distribution assumptions. Smyth's ubiquitous parametric method, for example, inadequately accommodates violations of normality assumptions, resulting in inflated Type I error rates. The Significance Analysis of Microarrays, another widely used microarray data analysis method, is based on a permutation test and is robust to non-normally distributed data; however, the Significance Analysis of Microarrays method fold change criteria are problematic, and can critically alter the conclusion of a study, as a result of compositional changes of the control data set in the analysis. We propose a novel approach, combining resampling with empirical Bayes methods: the Resampling-based empirical Bayes Methods. This approach not only reduces false discovery rates for non-normally distributed microarray data, but it is also impervious to fold change threshold since no control data set selection is needed. Through simulation studies, sensitivities, specificities, total rejections, and false discovery rates are compared across the Smyth's parametric method, the Significance Analysis of Microarrays, and the Resampling-based empirical Bayes Methods. Differences in false discovery rates controls between each approach are illustrated through a preterm delivery methylation study. The results show that the Resampling-based empirical Bayes Methods offer significantly higher specificity and lower false discovery rates compared to Smyth's parametric method when data are not normally distributed. The Resampling-based empirical Bayes Methods also offers higher statistical power than the Significance Analysis of Microarrays method when the proportion of significantly differentially

  18. The Microarray Revolution: Perspectives from Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Jay L.; Beason, K. Beth; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Evans, Irene M.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, microarray analysis has become a key experimental tool, enabling the analysis of genome-wide patterns of gene expression. This review approaches the microarray revolution with a focus upon four topics: 1) the early development of this technology and its application to cancer diagnostics; 2) a primer of microarray research,…

  19. The Microarray Revolution: Perspectives from Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Jay L.; Beason, K. Beth; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Evans, Irene M.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, microarray analysis has become a key experimental tool, enabling the analysis of genome-wide patterns of gene expression. This review approaches the microarray revolution with a focus upon four topics: 1) the early development of this technology and its application to cancer diagnostics; 2) a primer of microarray research,…

  20. Genomic and Transcriptomic Analyses of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Dudley, Edward G.; Wade, Joseph T.

    DNA microarrays (often interchangeably called DNA chips or DNA arrays) are among the most popular analytical tools for high-throughput comparative genomic and transcriptomic analyses of foodborne bacterial pathogens. A typical DNA microarray contains hundreds to millions of small DNA probes that are chemically attached (or "printed") onto the surface of a microscopic glass slide. Depending on the specific "printing" and probe synthesis technologies for different microarray platforms, such DNA probes can be PCR amplicons or in situ synthesized short oligonucleotides. DNA microarray technologies have revolutionized the way that we investigate the biology of foodborne bacterial pathogens. The major advantage of these technologies is that DNA microarrays allow comparison of subtle genomic or transcriptomic variations between two bacterial samples, such as genomic variations between two different bacterial strains or transcriptomic alterations of same bacterial strain under two different treatments. Some applications of comparative genomic hybridization microarrays and global gene expression microarrays have been covered in previous chapters of this book.

  1. Regularized gene selection in cancer microarray meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuangge; Huang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    In cancer studies, it is common that multiple microarray experiments are conducted to measure the same clinical outcome and expressions of the same set of genes. An important goal of such experiments is to identify a subset of genes that can potentially serve as predictive markers for cancer development and progression. Analyses of individual experiments may lead to unreliable gene selection results because of the small sample sizes. Meta analysis can be used to pool multiple experiments, increase statistical power, and achieve more reliable gene selection. The meta analysis of cancer microarray data is challenging because of the high dimensionality of gene expressions and the differences in experimental settings amongst different experiments. We propose a Meta Threshold Gradient Descent Regularization (MTGDR) approach for gene selection in the meta analysis of cancer microarray data. The MTGDR has many advantages over existing approaches. It allows different experiments to have different experimental settings. It can account for the joint effects of multiple genes on cancer, and it can select the same set of cancer-associated genes across multiple experiments. Simulation studies and analyses of multiple pancreatic and liver cancer experiments demonstrate the superior performance of the MTGDR. The MTGDR provides an effective way of analyzing multiple cancer microarray studies and selecting reliable cancer-associated genes.

  2. Polychromatic microarrays: simultaneous multicolor array hybridization of eight samples.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Jason R E

    2006-04-15

    High-throughput microscale platforms have transformed modern analytical investigations. Traditional microarray analyses involve a comparative approach, with two samples, a known control and an unknown sample, hybridized side-by-side and then contrasted for genetic differences. The samples are labeled with separate dyes and hybridized together, providing a differential expression pattern based on the reporter intensities. In contrast, the fiber-optic microarray platform described herein is analyzed with a microscope, thereby enabling the use of virtually any reporter, including quantum dots. The instrumentation takes advantage of the narrow emission bands characteristic of quantum dots to perform multiplexed detection of Bacillus anthracis. Advancing beyond the standard red/green microarray experiment, a panel of eight reporters were linked to eight B. anthracis samples and simultaneously analyzed in a microarray format. The ability to employ an assortment of reporters, along with the capacity to simultaneously hybridize eight samples confers an unprecedented flexibility to array-based analyses, providing a 4-fold increase in throughput over standard two-color assays.

  3. Development and application of a 6.5 million feature Affymetrix Genechip® for massively parallel discovery of single position polymorphisms in lettuce (Lactuca spp.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High-resolution genetic maps are needed in many crops to help characterize the genetic diversity that determines agriculturally important traits. Hybridization to microarrays to detect single feature polymorphisms is a powerful technique for marker discovery and genotyping because of its highly parallel nature. However, microarrays designed for gene expression analysis rarely provide sufficient gene coverage for optimal detection of nucleotide polymorphisms, which limits utility in species with low rates of polymorphism such as lettuce (Lactuca sativa). Results We developed a 6.5 million feature Affymetrix GeneChip® for efficient polymorphism discovery and genotyping, as well as for analysis of gene expression in lettuce. Probes on the microarray were designed from 26,809 unigenes from cultivated lettuce and an additional 8,819 unigenes from four related species (L. serriola, L. saligna, L. virosa and L. perennis). Where possible, probes were tiled with a 2 bp stagger, alternating on each DNA strand; providing an average of 187 probes covering approximately 600 bp for each of over 35,000 unigenes; resulting in up to 13 fold redundancy in coverage per nucleotide. We developed protocols for hybridization of genomic DNA to the GeneChip® and refined custom algorithms that utilized coverage from multiple, high quality probes to detect single position polymorphisms in 2 bp sliding windows across each unigene. This allowed us to detect greater than 18,000 polymorphisms between the parental lines of our core mapping population, as well as numerous polymorphisms between cultivated lettuce and wild species in the lettuce genepool. Using marker data from our diversity panel comprised of 52 accessions from the five species listed above, we were able to separate accessions by species using both phylogenetic and principal component analyses. Additionally, we estimated the diversity between different types of cultivated lettuce and distinguished morphological types

  4. Software and tools for microarray data analysis.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Jai Prakash; Rani, Sweta

    2011-01-01

    A typical microarray experiment results in series of images, depending on the experimental design and number of samples. Software analyses the images to obtain the intensity at each spot and quantify the expression for each transcript. This is followed by normalization, and then various data analysis techniques are applied on the data. The whole analysis pipeline requires a large number of software to accurately handle the massive amount of data. Fortunately, there are large number of freely available and commercial software to churn the massive amount of data to manageable sets of differentially expressed genes, functions, and pathways. This chapter describes the software and tools which can be used to analyze the gene expression data right from the image analysis to gene list, ontology, and pathways.

  5. Uses of Dendrimers for DNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Caminade, Anne-Marie; Padié, Clément; Laurent, Régis; Maraval, Alexandrine; Majoral, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Biosensors such as DNA microarrays and microchips are gaining an increasing importance in medicinal, forensic, and environmental analyses. Such devices are based on the detection of supramolecular interactions called hybridizations that occur between complementary oligonucleotides, one linked to a solid surface (the probe), and the other one to be analyzed (the target). This paper focuses on the improvements that hyperbranched and perfectly defined nanomolecules called dendrimers can provide to this methodology. Two main uses of dendrimers for such purpose have been described up to now; either the dendrimer is used as linker between the solid surface and the probe oligonucleotide, or the dendrimer is used as a multilabeled entity linked to the target oligonucleotide. In the first case the dendrimer generally induces a higher loading of probes and an easier hybridization, due to moving away the solid phase. In the second case the high number of localized labels (generally fluorescent) induces an increased sensitivity, allowing the detection of small quantities of biological entities.

  6. A Pathway Analysis Tool for Analyzing Microarray Data of Species with Low Physiological Information

    PubMed Central

    te Pas, M. F. W.; van Hemert, S.; Hulsegge, B.; Hoekman, A. J. W.; Pool, M. H.; Rebel, J. M. J.; Smits, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Pathway information provides insight into the biological processes underlying microarray data. Pathway information is widely available for humans and laboratory animals in databases through the internet, but less for other species, for example, livestock. Many software packages use species-specific gene IDs that cannot handle genomics data from other species. We developed a species-independent method to search pathways databases to analyse microarray data. Three PERL scripts were developed that use the names of the genes on the microarray. (1) Add synonyms of gene names by searching the Gene Ontology (GO) database. (2) Search the Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database for pathway information using this GO-enriched gene list. (3) Combine the pathway data with the microarray data and visualize the results using color codes indicating regulation. To demonstrate the power of the method, we used a previously reported chicken microarray experiment investigating line-specific reactions to Salmonella infection as an example. PMID:19920988

  7. Microarray analysis of papillary thyroid cancers in Korean.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Sook; Kim, Do Hyung; Kim, Ji Yeon; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Lee, In Kyu; Bong, Jin Gu; Jung, Eui Dal

    2010-12-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is the most common malignancy of the thyroid gland. It involves several molecular mechanisms. The BRAF V600E mutation has been identified as the most common genetic abnormality in PTC. Moreover, it is known to be more prevalent in Korean PTC patients than in patients from other countries. We investigated distinct genetic profiles in Korean PTC through cDNA microarray analysis. Transcriptional profiles of five PTC samples and five paired normal thyroid tissue samples were generated using cDNA microarrays. The tumors were genotyped for BRAF mutations. The results of the cDNA microarray gene expression analysis were confirmed by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry analysis of 35 PTC patients. Four of the five patients whose PTC tissues were subjected to microarray analysis were found to carry the BRAF V600E mutation. Microarrays analysis of the five PTC tissue samples showed the expression of 96 genes to be increased and that of 16 genes decreased. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirmed increased expression of SLC34A2, TM7SF4, COMP, KLK7, and KCNJ2 and decreased expression of FOXA2, SLC4A4, LYVE-1, and TFCP2L1 in PTC compared with normal tissue. Of these genes, TFCP2L1, LYVE-1, and KLK7 were previously unidentified in PTC microarray analysis. Notably, Foxa2 activity in PTC was reduced, as shown by its cytoplasmic localization, in immunohistochemical analyses. These findings demonstrate both similarities and differences between our results and previous reports. In Korean cases of PTC, Foxa2 activity was reduced with its cytoplasmic accumulation. Further studies are needed to confirm the relationship between FOXA2 and BRAF mutations in Korean cases of PTC.

  8. The Current Status of DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger G.; Tong, Weida

    DNA microarray technology that allows simultaneous assay of thousands of genes in a single experiment has steadily advanced to become a mainstream method used in research, and has reached a stage that envisions its use in medical applications and personalized medicine. Many different strategies have been developed for manufacturing DNA microarrays. In this chapter, we discuss the manufacturing characteristics of seven microarray platforms that were used in a recently completed large study by the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) consortium, which evaluated the concordance of results across these platforms. The platforms can be grouped into three categories: (1) in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays based on photolithography synthesis and Agilent's arrays based on inkjet synthesis); (2) spotting of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (GE Healthcare's CodeLink system, Applied Biosystems' Genome Survey Microarrays, and the custom microarrays printed with Operon's oligonucleotide set); and (3) deposition of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on bead-based microarrays (Illumina's BeadChip microarrays). We conclude this chapter with our views on the challenges and opportunities toward acceptance of DNA microarray data in clinical and regulatory settings.

  9. The Current Status of DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger G.; Tong, Weida

    DNA microarray technology that allows simultaneous assay of thousands of genes in a single experiment has steadily advanced to become a mainstream method used in research, and has reached a stage that envisions its use in medical applications and personalized medicine. Many different strategies have been developed for manufacturing DNA microarrays. In this chapter, we discuss the manu facturing characteristics of seven microarray platforms that were used in a recently completed large study by the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) consortium, which evaluated the concordance of results across these platforms. The platforms can be grouped into three categories: (1) in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays based on photolithography synthesis and Agilent's arrays based on inkjet synthesis); (2) spotting of presynthe-sized oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (GE Healthcare's CodeLink system, Applied Biosystems' Genome Survey Microarrays, and the custom microarrays printed with Operon's oligonucleotide set); and (3) deposition of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on bead-based microarrays (Illumina's BeadChip microar-rays). We conclude this chapter with our views on the challenges and opportunities toward acceptance of DNA microarray data in clinical and regulatory settings.

  10. Microarrays, antiobesity and the liver

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Chávez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    In this review, the microarray technology and especially oligonucleotide arrays are exemplified with a practical example taken from the perilipin−/− mice and using the dChip software, available for non-lucrative purposes. It was found that the liver of perilipin−/− mice was healthy and normal, even under high-fat diet when compared with the results published for the scd1−/− mice, which under high-fat diets had a darker liver, suggestive of hepatic steatosis. Scd1 is required for the biosynthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids and plays a key role in the hepatic synthesis of triglycerides and of very-low-density lipoproteins. Both models of obesity resistance share many similar phenotypic antiobesity features, however, the perilipin−/− mice had a significant downregulation of stearoyl CoA desaturases scd1 and scd2 in its white adipose tissue, but a normal level of both genes inside the liver, even under high-fat diet. Here, different microarray methodologies are discussed, and also some of the most recent discoveries and perspectives regarding the use of microarrays, with an emphasis on obesity gene expression, and a personal remark on my findings of increased expression for hemoglobin transcripts and other hemo related genes (hemo-like), and for leukocyte like (leuko-like) genes inside the white adipose tissue of the perilipin−/− mice. In conclusion, microarrays have much to offer in comparative studies such as those in antiobesity, and also they are methodologies adequate for new astounding molecular discoveries [free full text of this article PMID:15657555

  11. Mitochondrial DNA Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and 18S Small-Subunit Ribosomal DNA PCR-RFLP Analyses of Acanthamoeba Isolated from Contact Lens Storage Cases of Residents in Southwestern Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hyun-Hee; Shin, Ji-Yeol; Yu, Hak-Sun; Kim, Jin; Hahn, Tae-Won; Hahn, Young-Ho; Chung, Dong-Il

    2002-01-01

    We applied ribosomal DNA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) RFLP analyses to 43 Acanthamoeba environmental isolates (KA/LH1 to KA/LH43) from contact lens storage cases in southwestern Korea. These isolates were compared to American Type Culture Collection strains and clinical isolates (KA/E1 to KA/E12) from patients with keratitis. Seven riboprint patterns were seen. To identify the species of the isolates, a phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the comparison of riboprint patterns with reference strains. Four types accounted for 39 of the isolates belonging to the A. castellanii complex. The most predominant (48.8%) type was A. castellanii KA/LH2 type, which had identical riboprint and mtDNA RFLP patterns to those of A. castellanii Castellani, KA/E3 and KA/E8. The riboprint and mtDNA RFLP patterns of the KA/LH7 (20.9%) type were identical to those of A. castellanii Ma, a corneal isolate from the United States. The riboprint and mtDNA RFLP patterns of the KA/LH1 (18.6%) type were the same as those of A. lugdunensis L3a, KA/E2, and KA/E12. The prevalent pattern for each type of Acanthamoeba in southwestern Korea was very different from that from southeastern Korea and Seoul, Korea. It is noteworthy that 38 (88.4%) out of 43 isolates from contact lens storage cases of the residents in southwestern Korea revealed mtDNA RFLP and riboprint patterns identical to those found for clinical isolates in our area. This indicates that most isolates from contact lens storage cases in the surveyed area are potential keratopathogens. More attention should be paid to the disinfection of contact lens storage cases to prevent possible amoebic keratitis. PMID:11923331

  12. Mitochondrial DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and 18S small-subunit ribosomal DNA PCR-RFLP analyses of Acanthamoeba isolated from contact lens storage cases of residents in southwestern Korea.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hyun-Hee; Shin, Ji-Yeol; Yu, Hak-Sun; Kim, Jin; Hahn, Tae-Won; Hahn, Young-Ho; Chung, Dong-Il

    2002-04-01

    We applied ribosomal DNA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) RFLP analyses to 43 Acanthamoeba environmental isolates (KA/LH1 to KA/LH43) from contact lens storage cases in southwestern Korea. These isolates were compared to American Type Culture Collection strains and clinical isolates (KA/E1 to KA/E12) from patients with keratitis. Seven riboprint patterns were seen. To identify the species of the isolates, a phylogenetic tree was constructed based on the comparison of riboprint patterns with reference strains. Four types accounted for 39 of the isolates belonging to the A. castellanii complex. The most predominant (48.8%) type was A. castellanii KA/LH2 type, which had identical riboprint and mtDNA RFLP patterns to those of A. castellanii Castellani, KA/E3 and KA/E8. The riboprint and mtDNA RFLP patterns of the KA/LH7 (20.9%) type were identical to those of A. castellanii Ma, a corneal isolate from the United States. The riboprint and mtDNA RFLP patterns of the KA/LH1 (18.6%) type were the same as those of A. lugdunensis L3a, KA/E2, and KA/E12. The prevalent pattern for each type of Acanthamoeba in southwestern Korea was very different from that from southeastern Korea and Seoul, Korea. It is noteworthy that 38 (88.4%) out of 43 isolates from contact lens storage cases of the residents in southwestern Korea revealed mtDNA RFLP and riboprint patterns identical to those found for clinical isolates in our area. This indicates that most isolates from contact lens storage cases in the surveyed area are potential keratopathogens. More attention should be paid to the disinfection of contact lens storage cases to prevent possible amoebic keratitis.

  13. DNA microarray technology in toxicogenomics of aquatic models: methods and applications.

    PubMed

    Ju, Zhenlin; Wells, Melissa C; Walter, Ronald B

    2007-02-01

    Toxicogenomics represents the merging of toxicology with genomics and bioinformatics to investigate biological functions of genome in response to environmental contaminants. Aquatic species have traditionally been used as models in toxicology to characterize the actions of environmental stresses. Recent completion of the DNA sequencing for several fish species has spurred the development of DNA microarrays allowing investigators access to toxicogenomic approaches. However, since microarray technology is thus far limited to only a few aquatic species and derivation of biological meaning from microarray data is highly dependent on statistical arguments, the full potential of microarray in aquatic species research has yet to be realized. Herein we review some of the issues related to construction, probe design, statistical and bioinformatical data analyses, and current applications of DNA microarrays. As a model a recently developed medaka (Oryzias latipes) oligonucleotide microarray was described to highlight some of the issues related to array technology and its application in aquatic species exposed to hypoxia. Although there are known non-biological variations present in microarray data, it remains unquestionable that array technology will have a great impact on aquatic toxicology. Microarray applications in aquatic toxicogenomics will range from the discovery of diagnostic biomarkers, to establishment of stress-specific signatures and molecular pathways hallmarking the adaptation to new environmental conditions.

  14. ArrayPipe: a flexible processing pipeline for microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Hokamp, Karsten; Roche, Fiona M.; Acab, Michael; Rousseau, Marc-Etienne; Kuo, Byron; Goode, David; Aeschliman, Dana; Bryan, Jenny; Babiuk, Lorne A.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Brinkman, Fiona S. L.

    2004-01-01

    A number of microarray analysis software packages exist already; however, none combines the user-friendly features of a web-based interface with potential ability to analyse multiple arrays at once using flexible analysis steps. The ArrayPipe web server (freely available at www.pathogenomics.ca/arraypipe) allows the automated application of complex analyses to microarray data which can range from single slides to large data sets including replicates and dye-swaps. It handles output from most commonly used quantification software packages for dual-labelled arrays. Application features range from quality assessment of slides through various data visualizations to multi-step analyses including normalization, detection of differentially expressed genes, andcomparison and highlighting of gene lists. A highly customizable action set-up facilitates unrestricted arrangement of functions, which can be stored as action profiles. A unique combination of web-based and command-line functionality enables comfortable configuration of processes that can be repeatedly applied to large data sets in high throughput. The output consists of reports formatted as standard web pages and tab-delimited lists of calculated values that can be inserted into other analysis programs. Additional features, such as web-based spreadsheet functionality, auto-parallelization and password protection make this a powerful tool in microarray research for individuals and large groups alike. PMID:15215429

  15. Surface characterization of carbohydrate microarrays.

    PubMed

    Scurr, David J; Horlacher, Tim; Oberli, Matthias A; Werz, Daniel B; Kroeck, Lenz; Bufali, Simone; Seeberger, Peter H; Shard, Alexander G; Alexander, Morgan R

    2010-11-16

    Carbohydrate microarrays are essential tools to determine the biological function of glycans. Here, we analyze a glycan array by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to gain a better understanding of the physicochemical properties of the individual spots and to improve carbohydrate microarray quality. The carbohydrate microarray is prepared by piezo printing of thiol-terminated sugars onto a maleimide functionalized glass slide. The hyperspectral ToF-SIMS imaging data are analyzed by multivariate curve resolution (MCR) to discern secondary ions from regions of the array containing saccharide, linker, salts from the printing buffer, and the background linker chemistry. Analysis of secondary ions from the linker common to all of the sugar molecules employed reveals a relatively uniform distribution of the sugars within the spots formed from solutions with saccharide concentration of 0.4 mM and less, whereas a doughnut shape is often formed at higher-concentration solutions. A detailed analysis of individual spots reveals that in the larger spots the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) salts are heterogeneously distributed, apparently resulting in saccharide concentrated at the rim of the spots. A model of spot formation from the evaporating sessile drop is proposed to explain these observations. Saccharide spot diameters increase with saccharide concentration due to a reduction in surface tension of the saccharide solution compared to PBS. The multivariate analytical partial least squares (PLS) technique identifies ions from the sugars that in the complex ToF-SIMS spectra correlate with the binding of galectin proteins.

  16. Spotting effect in microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Mary-Huard, Tristan; Daudin, Jean-Jacques; Robin, Stéphane; Bitton, Frédérique; Cabannes, Eric; Hilson, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Background Microarray data must be normalized because they suffer from multiple biases. We have identified a source of spatial experimental variability that significantly affects data obtained with Cy3/Cy5 spotted glass arrays. It yields a periodic pattern altering both signal (Cy3/Cy5 ratio) and intensity across the array. Results Using the variogram, a geostatistical tool, we characterized the observed variability, called here the spotting effect because it most probably arises during steps in the array printing procedure. Conclusions The spotting effect is not appropriately corrected by current normalization methods, even by those addressing spatial variability. Importantly, the spotting effect may alter differential and clustering analysis. PMID:15151695

  17. Diagnostic challenges for multiplexed protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Master, Stephen R; Bierl, Charlene; Kricka, Larry J

    2006-11-01

    Multiplexed protein analysis using planar microarrays or microbeads is growing in popularity for simultaneous assays of antibodies, cytokines, allergens, drugs and hormones. However, this new assay format presents several new operational issues for the clinical laboratory, such as the quality control of protein-microarray-based assays, the release of unrequested test data and the use of diagnostic algorithms to transform microarray data into diagnostic results.

  18. Automated Microarray Image Analysis Toolbox for MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Willse, Alan R.; Protic, Miroslava; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2005-09-01

    The Automated Microarray Image Analysis (AMIA) Toolbox for MATLAB is a flexible, open-source microarray image analysis tool that allows the user to customize analysis of sets of microarray images. This tool provides several methods of identifying and quantify spot statistics, as well as extensive diagnostic statistics and images to identify poor data quality or processing. The open nature of this software allows researchers to understand the algorithms used to provide intensity estimates and to modify them easily if desired.

  19. THE ABRF MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2005: TAKING THE PULSE ON THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years microarray technology has evolved into a critical component of any discovery based program. Since 1999, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Microarray Research Group (MARG) has conducted biennial surveys designed to generate a pr...

  20. THE ABRF MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2005: TAKING THE PULSE ON THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years microarray technology has evolved into a critical component of any discovery based program. Since 1999, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Microarray Research Group (MARG) has conducted biennial surveys designed to generate a pr...

  1. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. PMID:27600077

  2. Analysis of Endocrine Disruption in Southern California Coastal Fish Using an Aquatic Multispecies Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Michael E.; Ruggeri, Barbara; Sprague, L. James; Eckhardt-Ludka, Colleen; Lapira, Jennifer; Wick, Ivan; Soverchia, Laura; Ubaldi, Massimo; Polzonetti-Magni, Alberta Maria; Vidal-Dorsch, Doris; Bay, Steven; Gully, Joseph R.; Reyes, Jesus A.; Kelley, Kevin M.; Schlenk, Daniel; Breen, Ellen C.; Šášik, Roman; Hardiman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Background Endocrine disruptors include plasticizers, pesticides, detergents, and pharmaceuticals. Turbot and other flatfish are used to characterize the presence of chemicals in the marine environment. Unfortunately, there are relatively few genes of turbot and other flatfish in GenBank, which limits the use of molecular tools such as microarrays and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to study disruption of endocrine responses in sentinel fish captured by regulatory agencies. Objectives We fabricated a multigene cross-species microarray as a diagnostic tool to screen the effects of environmental chemicals in fish, for which there is minimal genomic information. The array included genes that are involved in the actions of adrenal and sex steroids, thyroid hormone, and xenobiotic responses. This microarray will provide a sensitive tool for screening for the presence of chemicals with adverse effects on endocrine responses in coastal fish species. Methods We used a custom multispecies microarray to study gene expression in wild hornyhead turbot (Pleuronichthys verticalis) collected from polluted and clean coastal waters and in laboratory male zebrafish (Danio rerio) after exposure to estradiol and 4-nonylphenol. We measured gene-specific expression in turbot liver by qRT-PCR and correlated it to microarray data. Results Microarray and qRT-PCR analyses of livers from turbot collected from polluted areas revealed altered gene expression profiles compared with those from nonaffected areas. Conclusions The agreement between the array data and qRT-PCR analyses validates this multispecies microarray. The microarray measurement of gene expression in zebrafish, which are phylogenetically distant from turbot, indicates that this multispecies microarray will be useful for measuring endocrine responses in other fish. PMID:19270792

  3. Molecular Microbial Analyses of the Mars Exploration Rovers Assembly Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; LaDuc, Myron T.; Newcombe, David; Kempf, Michael J.; Koke, John. A.; Smoot, James C.; Smoot, Laura M.; Stahl, David A.

    2004-01-01

    During space exploration, the control of terrestrial microbes associated with robotic space vehicles intended to land on extraterrestrial solar system bodies is necessary to prevent forward contamination and maintain scientific integrity during the search for life. Microorganisms associated with the spacecraft assembly environment can be a source of contamination for the spacecraft. In this study, we have monitored the microbial burden of air samples of the Mars Exploration Rovers' assembly facility at the Kennedy Space Center utilizing complementary diagnostic tools. To estimate the microbial burden and identify potential contaminants in the assembly facility, several microbiological techniques were used including culturing, cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes, DNA microarray analysis, and ATP assays to assess viable microorganisms. Culturing severely underestimated types and amounts of contamination since many of the microbes implicated by molecular analyses were not cultivable. In addition to the cultivation of Agrobacterium, Burkholderia and Bacillus species, the cloning approach retrieved 16s rDNA sequences of oligotrophs, symbionts, and y-proteobacteria members. DNA microarray analysis based on rational probe design and dissociation curves complemented existing molecular techniques and produced a highly parallel, high resolution analysis of contaminating microbial populations. For instance, strong hybridization signals to probes targeting the Bacillus species indicated that members of this species were present in the assembly area samples; however, differences in dissociation curves between perfect-match and air sample sequences showed that these samples harbored nucleotide polymorphisms. Vegetative cells of several isolates were resistant when subjected to treatments of UVC (254 nm) and vapor H202 (4 mg/L). This study further validates the significance of non-cultivable microbes in association with spacecraft assembly facilities, as our analyses have

  4. 2008 Microarray Research Group (MARG Survey): Sensing the State of Microarray Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution and transformation, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. Th...

  5. THE ABRF-MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2004: TAKING THE PULSE OF THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. The goal of the surve...

  6. THE ABRF-MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2004: TAKING THE PULSE OF THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. The goal of the surve...

  7. Genomic analyses of RH alleles to improve transfusion therapy in patients with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Marion E; Hipsky, Christine Halter; Hue-Roye, Kim; Hoppe, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Background: Red cell (RBC) blood group alloimmunization remains a major problem in transfusion medicine. Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at particularly high risk for developing alloantibodies to RBC antigens compared to other multiply transfused patient populations. Hemagglutination is the classical method used to test for blood group antigens, but depending on the typing methods and reagents used may result in discrepancies that preclude interpretation based on serologic reactivity alone. Molecular methods, including customized DNA microarrays, are increasingly used to complement serologic methods in predicting blood type. The purpose of this study was to determine the diversity and frequency of RH alleles in African Americans and to assess the performance of a DNA microarray for RH allele determination. Material and methods: Two sets of samples were tested: (i) individuals with known variant Rh types and (ii) randomly selected African American donors and patients with SCD. Standard hemagglutination tests were used to establish the Rh phenotype, and cDNA- and gDNA-based analyses (sequencing, PCR-RFLP, and customized RHD and RHCE microarrays were used to predict the genotype. Results: In a total of 829 samples (1,658 alleles), 72 different alleles (40 RHD and 32 RHCE) were identified, 22 of which are novel. DNA microarrays detected all nucleotides probed, allowing for characterization of over 900 alleles. Conclusions: High-throughput DNA testing platforms provide a means to test a relatively large number of donors and potentially prevent immunization by changing the way antigen-negative blood is provided to patients. Because of the high RH allelic diversity found in the African American population, determination of an accurate Rh phenotype often requires DNA testing, in conjunction with serologic testing. Allele-specific microarrays offer a means to perform high-throughput donor Rh typing and serve as a valuable adjunct to serologic methods to predict

  8. Genomic analyses of RH alleles to improve transfusion therapy in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, Marion E; Halter Hipsky, Christine; Hue-Roye, Kim; Hoppe, Carolyn

    2014-04-01

    Red cell (RBC) blood group alloimmunization remains a major problem in transfusion medicine. Patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) are at particularly high risk for developing alloantibodies to RBC antigens compared to other multiply transfused patient populations. Hemagglutination is the classical method used to test for blood group antigens, but depending on the typing methods and reagents used may result in discrepancies that preclude interpretation based on serologic reactivity alone. Molecular methods, including customized DNA microarrays, are increasingly used to complement serologic methods in predicting blood type. The purpose of this study was to determine the diversity and frequency of RH alleles in African Americans and to assess the performance of a DNA microarray for RH allele determination. Two sets of samples were tested: (i) individuals with known variant Rh types and (ii) randomly selected African American donors and patients with SCD. Standard hemagglutination tests were used to establish the Rh phenotype, and cDNA- and gDNA-based analyses (sequencing, PCR-RFLP, and customized RHD and RHCE microarrays were used to predict the genotype). In a total of 829 samples (1658 alleles), 72 different alleles (40 RHD and 32 RHCE) were identified, 22 of which are novel. DNA microarrays detected all nucleotides probed, allowing for characterization of over 900 alleles. High-throughput DNA testing platforms provide a means to test a relatively large number of donors and potentially prevent immunization by changing the way antigen-negative blood is provided to patients. Because of the high RH allelic diversity found in the African American population, determination of an accurate Rh phenotype often requires DNA testing, in conjunction with serologic testing. Allele-specific microarrays offer a means to perform high-throughput donor Rh typing and serve as a valuable adjunct to serologic methods to predict Rh type. Because DNA microarrays test for only a fixed

  9. Simultaneous discrimination between 15 fish pathogens by using 16S ribosomal DNA PCR and DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Warsen, Adelaide E; Krug, Melissa J; LaFrentz, Stacey; Stanek, Danielle R; Loge, Frank J; Call, Douglas R

    2004-07-01

    We developed a DNA microarray suitable for simultaneous detection and discrimination between multiple bacterial species based on 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymorphisms using glass slides. Microarray probes (22- to 31-mer oligonucleotides) were spotted onto Teflon-masked, epoxy-silane-derivatized glass slides using a robotic arrayer. PCR products (ca. 199 bp) were generated using biotinylated, universal primer sequences, and these products were hybridized overnight (55 degrees C) to the microarray. Targets that annealed to microarray probes were detected using a combination of Tyramide Signal Amplification and Alexa Fluor 546. This methodology permitted 100% specificity for detection of 18 microbes, 15 of which were fish pathogens. With universal 16S rDNA PCR (limited to 28 cycles), detection sensitivity for purified control DNA was equivalent to <150 genomes (675 fg), and this sensitivity was not adversely impacted either by the presence of competing bacterial DNA (1.1 x 10(6) genomes; 5 ng) or by the addition of up to 500 ng of fish DNA. Consequently, coupling 16S rDNA PCR with a microarray detector appears suitable for diagnostic detection and surveillance for commercially important fish pathogens.

  10. A genome-wide study of preferential amplification/hybridization in microarray-based pooled DNA experiments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, H.-C.; Liang, Y.-J.; Huang, M.-C.; Li, L.-H.; Lin, C.-H.; Wu, J.-Y.; Chen, Y.-T.; Fann, C.S.J.

    2006-01-01

    Microarray-based pooled DNA methods overcome the cost bottleneck of simultaneously genotyping more than 100 000 markers for numerous study individuals. The success of such methods relies on the proper adjustment of preferential amplification/hybridization to ensure accurate and reliable allele frequency estimation. We performed a hybridization-based genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyping analysis to dissect preferential amplification/hybridization. The majority of SNPs had less than 2-fold signal amplification or suppression, and the lognormal distributions adequately modeled preferential amplification/hybridization across the human genome. Comparative analyses suggested that the distributions of preferential amplification/hybridization differed among genotypes and the GC content. Patterns among different ethnic populations were similar; nevertheless, there were striking differences for a small proportion of SNPs, and a slight ethnic heterogeneity was observed. To fulfill appropriate and gratuitous adjustments, databases of preferential amplification/hybridization for African Americans, Caucasians and Asians were constructed based on the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 100 K Set. The robustness of allele frequency estimation using this database was validated by a pooled DNA experiment. This study provides a genome-wide investigation of preferential amplification/hybridization and suggests guidance for the reliable use of the database. Our results constitute an objective foundation for theoretical development of preferential amplification/hybridization and provide important information for future pooled DNA analyses. PMID:16931491

  11. SNP typing on the NanoChip electronic microarray.

    PubMed

    Børsting, Claus; Sanchez, Juan J; Morling, Niels

    2005-01-01

    We describe a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing protocol developed for the NanoChip electronic microarray. The NanoChip array consists of 100 electrodes covered by a thin hydrogel layer containing streptavidin. An electric currency can be applied to one, several, or all electrodes at the same time according to a loading protocol generated by the user. Biotinylated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is directed to the pad(s) via the electronic field(s) and bound to streptavidin in the hydrogel layer. Subsequently, fluorescently labeled reporter oligos and a stabilizer oligo are hybridized to the bound DNA. Base stacking between the short reporter and the longer stabilizer oligo stabilizes the binding of a matching reporter, whereas the binding of a reporter carrying a mismatch in the SNP position will be relatively weak. Thermal stringency is applied to the NanoChip array according to a reader protocol generated by the user and the fluorescent label on the matching reporter is detected.

  12. Incorporating Nonlinear Relationships in Microarray Missing Value Imputation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianwei; Peng, Hesen; Sun, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Microarray gene expression data often contain missing values. Accurate estimation of the missing values is important for downstream data analyses that require complete data. Nonlinear relationships between gene expression levels have not been well-utilized in missing value imputation. We propose an imputation scheme based on nonlinear dependencies between genes. By simulations based on real microarray data, we show that incorporating nonlinear relationships could improve the accuracy of missing value imputation, both in terms of normalized root-mean-squared error and in terms of the preservation of the list of significant genes in statistical testing. In addition, we studied the impact of artificial dependencies introduced by data normalization on the simulation results. Our results suggest that methods relying on global correlation structures may yield overly optimistic simulation results when the data have been subjected to row (gene)-wise mean removal.

  13. Incorporating nonlinear relationships in microarray missing value imputation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianwei; Peng, Hesen; Sun, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Microarray gene expression data often contain missing values. Accurate estimation of the missing values is important for down-stream data analyses that require complete data. Nonlinear relationships between gene expression levels have not been well-utilized in missing value imputation. We propose an imputation scheme based on nonlinear dependencies between genes. By simulations based on real microarray data, we show that incorporating non-linear relationships could improve the accuracy of missing value imputation, both in terms of normalized root mean squared error and in terms of the preservation of the list of significant genes in statistical testing. In addition, we studied the impact of artificial dependencies introduced by data normalization on the simulation results. Our results suggest that methods relying on global correlation structures may yield overly optimistic simulation results when the data has been subjected to row (gene) – wise mean removal. PMID:20733236

  14. Microarrays Made Simple: "DNA Chips" Paper Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is revolutionizing biological science. DNA microarrays (also called DNA chips) allow simultaneous screening of many genes for changes in expression between different cells. Now researchers can obtain information about genes in days or weeks that used to take months or years. The paper activity described in this article…

  15. Microarrays Made Simple: "DNA Chips" Paper Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is revolutionizing biological science. DNA microarrays (also called DNA chips) allow simultaneous screening of many genes for changes in expression between different cells. Now researchers can obtain information about genes in days or weeks that used to take months or years. The paper activity described in this article…

  16. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  17. Network theory to understand microarray studies of complex diseases.

    PubMed

    Benson, Mikael; Breitling, Rainer

    2006-09-01

    Complex diseases, such as allergy, diabetes and obesity depend on altered interactions between multiple genes, rather than changes in a single causal gene. DNA microarray studies of a complex disease often implicate hundreds of genes in the pathogenesis. This indicates that many different mechanisms and pathways are involved. How can we understand such complexity? How can hypotheses be formulated and tested? One approach is to organize the data in network models and to analyze these in a top-down manner. Globally, networks in nature are often characterized by a small number of highly connected nodes, while the majority of nodes have few connections. The highly connected nodes serve as hubs that affect many other nodes. Such hubs have key roles in the network. In yeast cells, for example, deletion of highly connected proteins is associated with increased lethality, compared to deletion of less connected proteins. This suggests the biological relevance of networks. Moving down in the network structure, there may be sub-networks or modules with specific functions. These modules may be further dissected to analyze individual nodes. In the context of DNA microarray studies of complex diseases, gene-interaction networks may contain modules of co-regulated or interacting genes that have distinct biological functions. Such modules may be linked to specific gene polymorphisms, transcription factors, cellular functions and disease mechanisms. Genes that are reliably active only in the context of their modules can be considered markers for the activity of the modules and may thus be promising candidates for biomarkers or therapeutic targets. This review aims to give an introduction to network theory and how it can be applied to microarray studies of complex diseases.

  18. In control: systematic assessment of microarray performance.

    PubMed

    van Bakel, Harm; Holstege, Frank C P

    2004-10-01

    Expression profiling using DNA microarrays is a powerful technique that is widely used in the life sciences. How reliable are microarray-derived measurements? The assessment of performance is challenging because of the complicated nature of microarray experiments and the many different technology platforms. There is a mounting call for standards to be introduced, and this review addresses some of the issues that are involved. Two important characteristics of performance are accuracy and precision. The assessment of these factors can be either for the purpose of technology optimization or for the evaluation of individual microarray hybridizations. Microarray performance has been evaluated by at least four approaches in the past. Here, we argue that external RNA controls offer the most versatile system for determining performance and describe how such standards could be implemented. Other uses of external controls are discussed, along with the importance of probe sequence availability and the quantification of labelled material.

  19. Analysis of DNA microarray expression data.

    PubMed

    Simon, Richard

    2009-06-01

    DNA microarrays are powerful tools for studying biological mechanisms and for developing prognostic and predictive classifiers for identifying the patients who require treatment and are best candidates for specific treatments. Because microarrays produce so much data from each specimen, they offer great opportunities for discovery and great dangers or producing misleading claims. Microarray based studies require clear objectives for selecting cases and appropriate analysis methods. Effective analysis of microarray data, where the number of measured variables is orders of magnitude greater than the number of cases, requires specialized statistical methods which have recently been developed. Recent literature reviews indicate that serious problems of analysis exist a substantial proportion of publications. This manuscript attempts to provide a non-technical summary of the key principles of statistical design and analysis for studies that utilize microarray expression profiling.

  20. Microarray Applications in Microbial Ecology Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, T.; Schadt, C.; Zhou, J.

    2006-04-06

    Microarray technology has the unparalleled potential tosimultaneously determine the dynamics and/or activities of most, if notall, of the microbial populations in complex environments such as soilsand sediments. Researchers have developed several types of arrays thatcharacterize the microbial populations in these samples based on theirphylogenetic relatedness or functional genomic content. Several recentstudies have used these microarrays to investigate ecological issues;however, most have only analyzed a limited number of samples withrelatively few experiments utilizing the full high-throughput potentialof microarray analysis. This is due in part to the unique analyticalchallenges that these samples present with regard to sensitivity,specificity, quantitation, and data analysis. This review discussesspecific applications of microarrays to microbial ecology research alongwith some of the latest studies addressing the difficulties encounteredduring analysis of complex microbial communities within environmentalsamples. With continued development, microarray technology may ultimatelyachieve its potential for comprehensive, high-throughput characterizationof microbial populations in near real-time.

  1. Chaotic mixer improves microarray hybridization.

    PubMed

    McQuain, Mark K; Seale, Kevin; Peek, Joel; Fisher, Timothy S; Levy, Shawn; Stremler, Mark A; Haselton, Frederick R

    2004-02-15

    Hybridization is an important aspect of microarray experimental design which influences array signal levels and the repeatability of data within an array and across different arrays. Current methods typically require 24h and use target inefficiently. In these studies, we compare hybridization signals obtained in conventional static hybridization, which depends on diffusional target delivery, with signals obtained in a dynamic hybridization chamber, which employs a fluid mixer based on chaotic advection theory to deliver targets across a conventional glass slide array. Microarrays were printed with a pattern of 102 identical probe spots containing a 65-mer oligonucleotide capture probe. Hybridization of a 725-bp fluorescently labeled target was used to measure average target hybridization levels, local signal-to-noise ratios, and array hybridization uniformity. Dynamic hybridization for 1h with 1 or 10ng of target DNA increased hybridization signal intensities approximately threefold over a 24-h static hybridization. Similarly, a 10- or 60-min dynamic hybridization of 10ng of target DNA increased hybridization signal intensities fourfold over a 24h static hybridization. In time course studies, static hybridization reached a maximum within 8 to 12h using either 1 or 10ng of target. In time course studies using the dynamic hybridization chamber, hybridization using 1ng of target increased to a maximum at 4h and that using 10ng of target did not vary over the time points tested. In comparison to static hybridization, dynamic hybridization reduced the signal-to-noise ratios threefold and reduced spot-to-spot variation twofold. Therefore, we conclude that dynamic hybridization based on a chaotic mixer design improves both the speed of hybridization and the maximum level of hybridization while increasing signal-to-noise ratios and reducing spot-to-spot variation.

  2. Microarray analysis of gene expression profiles in ripening pineapple fruits.

    PubMed

    Koia, Jonni H; Moyle, Richard L; Botella, Jose R

    2012-12-18

    Pineapple (Ananas comosus) is a tropical fruit crop of significant commercial importance. Although the physiological changes that occur during pineapple fruit development have been well characterized, little is known about the molecular events that occur during the fruit ripening process. Understanding the molecular basis of pineapple fruit ripening will aid the development of new varieties via molecular breeding or genetic modification. In this study we developed a 9277 element pineapple microarray and used it to profile gene expression changes that occur during pineapple fruit ripening. Microarray analyses identified 271 unique cDNAs differentially expressed at least 1.5-fold between the mature green and mature yellow stages of pineapple fruit ripening. Among these 271 sequences, 184 share significant homology with genes encoding proteins of known function, 53 share homology with genes encoding proteins of unknown function and 34 share no significant homology with any database accession. Of the 237 pineapple sequences with homologs, 160 were up-regulated and 77 were down-regulated during pineapple fruit ripening. DAVID Functional Annotation Cluster (FAC) analysis of all 237 sequences with homologs revealed confident enrichment scores for redox activity, organic acid metabolism, metalloenzyme activity, glycolysis, vitamin C biosynthesis, antioxidant activity and cysteine peptidase activity, indicating the functional significance and importance of these processes and pathways during pineapple fruit development. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis validated the microarray expression results for nine out of ten genes tested. This is the first report of a microarray based gene expression study undertaken in pineapple. Our bioinformatic analyses of the transcript profiles have identified a number of genes, processes and pathways with putative involvement in the pineapple fruit ripening process. This study extends our knowledge of the molecular basis of pineapple fruit

  3. Microarray analysis of gene expression profiles in ripening pineapple fruits

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pineapple (Ananas comosus) is a tropical fruit crop of significant commercial importance. Although the physiological changes that occur during pineapple fruit development have been well characterized, little is known about the molecular events that occur during the fruit ripening process. Understanding the molecular basis of pineapple fruit ripening will aid the development of new varieties via molecular breeding or genetic modification. In this study we developed a 9277 element pineapple microarray and used it to profile gene expression changes that occur during pineapple fruit ripening. Results Microarray analyses identified 271 unique cDNAs differentially expressed at least 1.5-fold between the mature green and mature yellow stages of pineapple fruit ripening. Among these 271 sequences, 184 share significant homology with genes encoding proteins of known function, 53 share homology with genes encoding proteins of unknown function and 34 share no significant homology with any database accession. Of the 237 pineapple sequences with homologs, 160 were up-regulated and 77 were down-regulated during pineapple fruit ripening. DAVID Functional Annotation Cluster (FAC) analysis of all 237 sequences with homologs revealed confident enrichment scores for redox activity, organic acid metabolism, metalloenzyme activity, glycolysis, vitamin C biosynthesis, antioxidant activity and cysteine peptidase activity, indicating the functional significance and importance of these processes and pathways during pineapple fruit development. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis validated the microarray expression results for nine out of ten genes tested. Conclusions This is the first report of a microarray based gene expression study undertaken in pineapple. Our bioinformatic analyses of the transcript profiles have identified a number of genes, processes and pathways with putative involvement in the pineapple fruit ripening process. This study extends our knowledge of the

  4. Dysbiosis of fecal microbiota in Crohn's disease patients as revealed by a custom phylogenetic microarray.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seungha; Denman, Stuart E; Morrison, Mark; Yu, Zhongtang; Dore, Joel; Leclerc, Marion; McSweeney, Chris S

    2010-12-01

    A custom phylogenetic microarray composed of small subunit ribosomal RNA probes, representing ≈500 bacterial species from the human and animal gut, was developed and evaluated for analysis of gut microbial diversity using fecal samples from healthy subjects and Crohn's disease (CD) patients. Oligonucleotide probes (≈40 mer) used on the microarray were selected from published articles or designed with the "GoArray" microarray probe design program using selected bacterial 16S rRNA sequences. Fecal 16S rDNA from individual samples of six healthy subjects and six CD patients were used as template to generate fluorescently labeled cRNA that was hybridized to the microarray. Differences revealed by the microarray in relative abundance of microbial populations between healthy and diseased patients were verified using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with species-specific primer sets. The microarray analyses showed that Eubacterium rectale, Bacteroides fragilis group, B. vulgatus, Ruminococcus albus, R. callidus, R. bromii, and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were 5-10-fold more abundant in the healthy subjects than in the CD patients, while Enterococcus sp., Clostridium difficile, Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Listeria sp. were more abundant in the CD group. The microarray detected differences in abundance of bacterial populations within the phylum Firmicutes that had been reported previously for the same samples based on phylogenetic analysis of metagenomic clone libraries. In addition, the microarray showed that Enterococcus sp. was in higher abundance in the CD patients. This microarray should be another useful tool to examine the diversity and abundance of human intestinal microbiota. Copyright © 2010 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  5. Identification of potential biomarkers from microarray experiments using multiple criteria optimization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Peña, Matilde L; Isaza, Clara E; Pérez-Morales, Jaileene; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Castro, José M; Cabrera-Ríos, Mauricio

    2013-04-01

    Microarray experiments are capable of determining the relative expression of tens of thousands of genes simultaneously, thus resulting in very large databases. The analysis of these databases and the extraction of biologically relevant knowledge from them are challenging tasks. The identification of potential cancer biomarker genes is one of the most important aims for microarray analysis and, as such, has been widely targeted in the literature. However, identifying a set of these genes consistently across different experiments, researches, microarray platforms, or cancer types is still an elusive endeavor. Besides the inherent difficulty of the large and nonconstant variability in these experiments and the incommensurability between different microarray technologies, there is the issue of the users having to adjust a series of parameters that significantly affect the outcome of the analyses and that do not have a biological or medical meaning. In this study, the identification of potential cancer biomarkers from microarray data is casted as a multiple criteria optimization (MCO) problem. The efficient solutions to this problem, found here through data envelopment analysis (DEA), are associated to genes that are proposed as potential cancer biomarkers. The method does not require any parameter adjustment by the user, and thus fosters repeatability. The approach also allows the analysis of different microarray experiments, microarray platforms, and cancer types simultaneously. The results include the analysis of three publicly available microarray databases related to cervix cancer. This study points to the feasibility of modeling the selection of potential cancer biomarkers from microarray data as an MCO problem and solve it using DEA. Using MCO entails a new optic to the identification of potential cancer biomarkers as it does not require the definition of a threshold value to establish significance for a particular gene and the selection of a normalization

  6. Striptease on glass: validation of an improved stripping procedure for in situ microarrays.

    PubMed

    Hahnke, Karin; Jacobsen, Marc; Gruetzkau, Andreas; Gruen, Joachim R; Koch, Markus; Emoto, Masashi; Meyer, Thomas F; Walduck, Anna; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim

    2007-01-30

    Microarrays have rapidly become an indispensable tool for gene analysis. Microarray experiments can be cost prohibitive, however, largely due to the price of the arrays themselves. Whilst different methods for stripping filter arrays on membranes have been established, only very few protocols are published for thermal and chemical stripping of microarrays on glass. Most of these protocols for stripping microarrays on glass were developed in combination with specific surface chemistry and different coatings for covalently immobilizing presynthesized DNA in a deposition process. We have developed a method for stripping commercial in situ microarrays using a multi-step procedure. We present a method that uses mild chemical degradation complemented by enzymatic treatment. We took advantage of the differences in biochemical properties of covalently linked DNA oligonucleotides on in situ synthesized microarrays and the antisense cRNA hybridization probes. The success of stripping protocols for microarrays on glass was critically dependent on the type of arrays, the nature of sample used for hybridization, as well as hybridization and washing conditions. The protocol employs alkali hydrolysis of the cRNA, several enzymatic degradation steps using RNAses and Proteinase K, combined with appropriate washing steps. Stripped arrays were rehybridized using the same protocols as for new microarrays. The stripping method was validated with microarrays from different suppliers and rehybridization of stripped in situ arrays yielded comparable results to hybridizations done on unused, new arrays with no significant loss in precision or accuracy. We show that stripping of commercial in situ arrays is feasible and that reuse of stripped arrays gave similar results compared to unused ones. This was true even for biological samples that show only slight differences in their expression profiles. Our analyses indicate that the stripping procedure does not significantly influence data

  7. MARS: Microarray analysis, retrieval, and storage system

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Michael; Molidor, Robert; Sturn, Alexander; Hartler, Juergen; Hackl, Hubert; Stocker, Gernot; Prokesch, Andreas; Scheideler, Marcel; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2005-01-01

    Background Microarray analysis has become a widely used technique for the study of gene-expression patterns on a genomic scale. As more and more laboratories are adopting microarray technology, there is a need for powerful and easy to use microarray databases facilitating array fabrication, labeling, hybridization, and data analysis. The wealth of data generated by this high throughput approach renders adequate database and analysis tools crucial for the pursuit of insights into the transcriptomic behavior of cells. Results MARS (Microarray Analysis and Retrieval System) provides a comprehensive MIAME supportive suite for storing, retrieving, and analyzing multi color microarray data. The system comprises a laboratory information management system (LIMS), a quality control management, as well as a sophisticated user management system. MARS is fully integrated into an analytical pipeline of microarray image analysis, normalization, gene expression clustering, and mapping of gene expression data onto biological pathways. The incorporation of ontologies and the use of MAGE-ML enables an export of studies stored in MARS to public repositories and other databases accepting these documents. Conclusion We have developed an integrated system tailored to serve the specific needs of microarray based research projects using a unique fusion of Web based and standalone applications connected to the latest J2EE application server technology. The presented system is freely available for academic and non-profit institutions. More information can be found at . PMID:15836795

  8. Microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic immunoassay system.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongsik; Park, Je-Kyun

    2016-05-01

    A microarray-based analytical platform has been utilized as a powerful tool in biological assay fields. However, an analyte depletion problem due to the slow mass transport based on molecular diffusion causes low reaction efficiency, resulting in a limitation for practical applications. This paper presents a novel method to improve the efficiency of microarray-based immunoassay via an optically induced electrokinetic phenomenon by integrating an optoelectrofluidic device with a conventional glass slide-based microarray format. A sample droplet was loaded between the microarray slide and the optoelectrofluidic device on which a photoconductive layer was deposited. Under the application of an AC voltage, optically induced AC electroosmotic flows caused by a microarray-patterned light actively enhanced the mass transport of target molecules at the multiple assay spots of the microarray simultaneously, which reduced tedious reaction time from more than 30 min to 10 min. Based on this enhancing effect, a heterogeneous immunoassay with a tiny volume of sample (5 μl) was successfully performed in the microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic system using immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-IgG, resulting in improved efficiency compared to the static environment. Furthermore, the application of multiplex assays was also demonstrated by multiple protein detection.

  9. Progress in the application of DNA microarrays.

    PubMed Central

    Lobenhofer, E K; Bushel, P R; Afshari, C A; Hamadeh, H K

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology has been applied to a variety of different fields to address fundamental research questions. The use of microarrays, or DNA chips, to study the gene expression profiles of biologic samples began in 1995. Since that time, the fundamental concepts behind the chip, the technology required for making and using these chips, and the multitude of statistical tools for analyzing the data have been extensively reviewed. For this reason, the focus of this review will be not on the technology itself but on the application of microarrays as a research tool and the future challenges of the field. PMID:11673116

  10. Metric learning for DNA microarray data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Ichiro; Nakagawa, Masao; Seto, Masao

    2009-12-01

    In many microarray studies, gene set selection is an important preliminary step for subsequent main task such as tumor classification, cancer subtype identification, etc. In this paper, we investigate the possibility of using metric learning as an alternative to gene set selection. We develop a simple metric learning algorithm aiming to use it for microarray data analysis. Exploiting a property of the algorithm, we introduce a novel approach for extending the metric learning to be adaptive. We apply the algorithm to previously studied microarray data on malignant lymphoma subtype identification.

  11. Use of Genomic DNA as A Reference in DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarray has become a mainstream technology to explore gene expression profiles, identify novel genes involved in a biological process of interest and predict their function, and determine biomarkers that are relevant to a given phenotype or disease. Typical two-channel microarray studies use an experimental design called the complementary DNA (cDNA) reference method, in which samples from test and control conditions are compared directly on a microarray slide. A substantial limitation of this strategy is that it is nearly impossible to compare data between experiments because the reference sample composition is subjected to changes at the level of experimental design and thereby not consistent from one experiment to another. Using genomic DNA as common reference will effectively overcome this limitation. This chapter describes detailed methods to prepare genomic DNA of high quality, label with fluorescent dye, co-hybridize with cDNA samples, and the subsequent data analyses. In addition, notes are provided to help the readers to obtain optimal results using the procedure.

  12. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) – about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences. PMID:26493176

  13. Classification of large microarray datasets using fast random forest construction.

    PubMed

    Manilich, Elena A; Özsoyoğlu, Z Meral; Trubachev, Valeriy; Radivoyevitch, Tomas

    2011-04-01

    Random forest is an ensemble classification algorithm. It performs well when most predictive variables are noisy and can be used when the number of variables is much larger than the number of observations. The use of bootstrap samples and restricted subsets of attributes makes it more powerful than simple ensembles of trees. The main advantage of a random forest classifier is its explanatory power: it measures variable importance or impact of each factor on a predicted class label. These characteristics make the algorithm ideal for microarray data. It was shown to build models with high accuracy when tested on high-dimensional microarray datasets. Current implementations of random forest in the machine learning and statistics community, however, limit its usability for mining over large datasets, as they require that the entire dataset remains permanently in memory. We propose a new framework, an optimized implementation of a random forest classifier, which addresses specific properties of microarray data, takes computational complexity of a decision tree algorithm into consideration, and shows excellent computing performance while preserving predictive accuracy. The implementation is based on reducing overlapping computations and eliminating dependency on the size of main memory. The implementation's excellent computational performance makes the algorithm useful for interactive data analyses and data mining.

  14. Fecal source tracking in water using a mitochondrial DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Nguyet-Minh; Villemur, Richard; Payment, Pierre; Brousseau, Roland; Topp, Edward; Masson, Luke

    2013-01-01

    A mitochondrial-based microarray (mitoArray) was developed for rapid identification of the presence of 28 animals and one family (cervidae) potentially implicated in fecal pollution in mixed activity watersheds. Oligonucleotide probes for genus or subfamily-level identification were targeted within the 12S rRNA - Val tRNA - 16S rRNA region in the mitochondrial genome. This region, called MI-50, was selected based on three criteria: 1) the ability to be amplified by universal primers 2) these universal primer sequences are present in most commercial and domestic animals of interest in source tracking, and 3) that sufficient sequence variation exists within this region to meet the minimal requirements for microarray probe discrimination. To quantify the overall level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in samples, a quantitative-PCR (Q-PCR) universal primer pair was also developed. Probe validation was performed using DNA extracted from animal tissues and, for many cases, animal-specific fecal samples. To reduce the amplification of potentially interfering fish mtDNA sequences during the MI-50 enrichment step, a clamping PCR method was designed using a fish-specific peptide nucleic acid. DNA extracted from 19 water samples were subjected to both array and independent PCR analyses. Our results confirm that the mitochondrial microarray approach method could accurately detect the dominant animals present in water samples emphasizing the potential for this methodology in the parallel scanning of a large variety of animals normally monitored in fecal source tracking.

  15. Demystified...tissue microarray technology.

    PubMed

    Packeisen, J; Korsching, E; Herbst, H; Boecker, W; Buerger, H

    2003-08-01

    Several "high throughput methods" have been introduced into research and routine laboratories during the past decade. Providing a new approach to the analysis of genomic alterations and RNA or protein expression patterns, these new techniques generate a plethora of new data in a relatively short time, and promise to deliver clues to the diagnosis and treatment of human cancer. Along with these revolutionary developments, new tools for the interpretation of these large sets of data became necessary and are now widely available. Tissue microarray (TMA) technology is one of these new tools. It is based on the idea of applying miniaturisation and a high throughput approach to the analysis of intact tissues. The potential and the scientific value of TMAs in modern research have been demonstrated in a logarithmically increasing number of studies. The spectrum for additional applications is widening rapidly, and comprises quality control in histotechnology, longterm tissue banking, and the continuing education of pathologists. This review covers the basic technical aspects of TMA production and discusses the current and potential future applications of TMA technology.

  16. Integrating Microarray Data and GRNs.

    PubMed

    Koumakis, L; Potamias, G; Tsiknakis, M; Zervakis, M; Moustakis, V

    2016-01-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project and the emergence of high-throughput technologies, a vast amount of molecular and biological data are being produced. Two of the most important and significant data sources come from microarray gene-expression experiments and respective databanks (e,g., Gene Expression Omnibus-GEO (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo)), and from molecular pathways and Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs) stored and curated in public (e.g., Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes-KEGG (http://www.genome.jp/kegg/pathway.html), Reactome (http://www.reactome.org/ReactomeGWT/entrypoint.html)) as well as in commercial repositories (e.g., Ingenuity IPA (http://www.ingenuity.com/products/ipa)). The association of these two sources aims to give new insight in disease understanding and reveal new molecular targets in the treatment of specific phenotypes.Three major research lines and respective efforts that try to utilize and combine data from both of these sources could be identified, namely: (1) de novo reconstruction of GRNs, (2) identification of Gene-signatures, and (3) identification of differentially expressed GRN functional paths (i.e., sub-GRN paths that distinguish between different phenotypes). In this chapter, we give an overview of the existing methods that support the different types of gene-expression and GRN integration with a focus on methodologies that aim to identify phenotype-discriminant GRNs or subnetworks, and we also present our methodology.

  17. EMAAS: An extensible grid-based Rich Internet Application for microarray data analysis and management

    PubMed Central

    Barton, G; Abbott, J; Chiba, N; Huang, DW; Huang, Y; Krznaric, M; Mack-Smith, J; Saleem, A; Sherman, BT; Tiwari, B; Tomlinson, C; Aitman, T; Darlington, J; Game, L; Sternberg, MJE; Butcher, SA

    2008-01-01

    Background Microarray experimentation requires the application of complex analysis methods as well as the use of non-trivial computer technologies to manage the resultant large data sets. This, together with the proliferation of tools and techniques for microarray data analysis, makes it very challenging for a laboratory scientist to keep up-to-date with the latest developments in this field. Our aim was to develop a distributed e-support system for microarray data analysis and management. Results EMAAS (Extensible MicroArray Analysis System) is a multi-user rich internet application (RIA) providing simple, robust access to up-to-date resources for microarray data storage and analysis, combined with integrated tools to optimise real time user support and training. The system leverages the power of distributed computing to perform microarray analyses, and provides seamless access to resources located at various remote facilities. The EMAAS framework allows users to import microarray data from several sources to an underlying database, to pre-process, quality assess and analyse the data, to perform functional analyses, and to track data analysis steps, all through a single easy to use web portal. This interface offers distance support to users both in the form of video tutorials and via live screen feeds using the web conferencing tool EVO. A number of analysis packages, including R-Bioconductor and Affymetrix Power Tools have been integrated on the server side and are available programmatically through the Postgres-PLR library or on grid compute clusters. Integrated distributed resources include the functional annotation tool DAVID, GeneCards and the microarray data repositories GEO, CELSIUS and MiMiR. EMAAS currently supports analysis of Affymetrix 3' and Exon expression arrays, and the system is extensible to cater for other microarray and transcriptomic platforms. Conclusion EMAAS enables users to track and perform microarray data management and analysis tasks

  18. [DNA microarrays in parasitology and medical sciences].

    PubMed

    Jaros, Sławomir

    2006-01-01

    The article presents the current knowledge on the microarray technique and its applications in medical sciences and parasitology. The first part of the article is focused on the technical aspects (microarray preparation, different microarray platforms, probes preparation, hybridization and signal detection). The article also describes possible ways of proceeding during laboratory work on organism of which the genome sequence is not known or has been only partially sequenced. The second part of the review describes how microarray technique have been, or possibly will be, used for better understanding parasite life cycles and development, host-parasite relationship, comparative genomics of virulent organisms, develpoment vaccines against the most virulent parasites and host responses to infection.

  19. Protein Microarrays: Novel Developments and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Berrade, Luis; Garcia, Angie E.

    2011-01-01

    Protein microarray technology possesses some of the greatest potential for providing direct information on protein function and potential drug targets. For example, functional protein microarrays are ideal tools suited for the mapping of biological pathways. They can be used to study most major types of interactions and enzymatic activities that take place in biochemical pathways and have been used for the analysis of simultaneous multiple biomolecular interactions involving protein-protein, protein-lipid, protein-DNA and protein-small molecule interactions. Because of this unique ability to analyze many kinds of molecular interactions en masse, the requirement of very small sample amount and the potential to be miniaturized and automated, protein microarrays are extremely well suited for protein profiling, drug discovery, drug target identification and clinical prognosis and diagnosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent developments in the production, applications and analysis of protein microarrays. PMID:21116694

  20. Development of a DNA microarray for species identification of quarantine aphids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Sun; Choi, Hwalran; Kang, Jinseok; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Lee, Si Hyeock; Lee, Seunghwan; Hwang, Seung Yong

    2013-12-01

    Aphid pests are being brought into Korea as a result of increased crop trading. Aphids exist on growth areas of plants, and thus plant growth is seriously affected by aphid pests. However, aphids are very small and have several sexual morphs and life stages, so it is difficult to identify species on the basis of morphological features. This problem was approached using DNA microarray technology. DNA targets of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene were generated with a fluorescent dye-labelled primer and were hybridised onto a DNA microarray consisting of specific probes. After analysing the signal intensity of the specific probes, the unique patterns from the DNA microarray, consisting of 47 species-specific probes, were obtained to identify 23 aphid species. To confirm the accuracy of the developed DNA microarray, ten individual blind samples were used in blind trials, and the identifications were completely consistent with the sequencing data of all individual blind samples. A microarray has been developed to distinguish aphid species. DNA microarray technology provides a rapid, easy, cost-effective and accurate method for identifying aphid species for pest control management. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Expression and Polymorphism of Watermelon Fruit ESTs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Over 8,000 ESTs were generated for watermelon and were assembled into 4,700 EST-unigenes (http://www.icugi.org). Microarray and Real-Time PCR analyses were used to examine differential expression of 832 of these EST-unigenes in developing and ripening watermelon fruit. RNA was isolated from waterm...

  2. A newly developed DNA microarray is useful to assess induction of cytochromes p450 in the cynomolgus monkey.

    PubMed

    Ise, Ryota; Uehara, Shotaro; Akiyama, Hideo; Kondo, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Kazuhide; Nagata, Ryoichi; Nobumasa, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Yasuhiro

    2011-06-01

    Cytochromes P450 (P450s or CYPs) are a gene family of highly homologous genes and include the CYP1-4 family, which is relevant to drug metabolism. In the cynomolgus monkey (which is frequently used in drug metabolism studies), numerous CYPs (mfCYPs) have been identified in the CYP1-4 family. DNA microarrays are useful for high-throughput screening assays; however, there is a potential problem with cross-hybridization of highly homologous genes in the gene family. This problem might be solved with the use of low-density DNA microarrays, with which specific validation can be performed for the genes on the microarray. We have developed a DNA microarray for the 20 mfCYPs and have evaluated and validated its specificity and usefulness. First, in both DNA microarray and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analyses, hepatic expression of each mfCYP correlated well, and similar tissue expression patterns were observed for five representative mfCYPs, confirming the specificity of the DNA microarray. Second, the usefulness of this DNA microarray was validated by induction analysis of mfCYPs in primary hepatocytes, which successfully detected known responders, but also novel responders (mfCYP2C43, mfCYP2C75, and mfCYP3A5 for rifampicin), as confirmed by qPCR analysis. This DNA microarray can thus be utilized for high-throughput assays during drug development.

  3. Development and application of a fluorescence protein microarray for detecting serum alpha-fetoprotein in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aiying; Yin, Chengzeng; Wang, Zhenshun; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Yuanshun; Li, Ang; Sun, Huanqin; Lin, Dongdong; Li, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Objective To develop a simple, effective, time-saving and low-cost fluorescence protein microarray method for detecting serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Method Non-contact piezoelectric print techniques were applied to fluorescence protein microarray to reduce the cost of prey antibody. Serum samples from patients with HCC and healthy control subjects were collected and evaluated for the presence of AFP using a novel fluorescence protein microarray. To validate the fluorescence protein microarray, serum samples were tested for AFP using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results A total of 110 serum samples from patients with HCC ( n = 65) and healthy control subjects ( n = 45) were analysed. When the AFP cut-off value was set at 20 ng/ml, the fluorescence protein microarray had a sensitivity of 91.67% and a specificity of 93.24% for detecting serum AFP. Serum AFP quantified via fluorescence protein microarray had a similar diagnostic performance compared with ELISA in distinguishing patients with HCC from healthy control subjects (area under receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.906 for fluorescence protein microarray; 0.880 for ELISA). Conclusion A fluorescence protein microarray method was developed for detecting serum AFP in patients with HCC.

  4. Polymorphous light eruption

    MedlinePlus

    Polymorphous light eruption (PMLE) is a common skin reaction in people who are sensitive to sunlight (ultraviolet light). ... Polymorphic light eruption; Photodermatosis; PMLE; Benign summer light eruption

  5. PATMA: parser of archival tissue microarray.

    PubMed

    Roszkowiak, Lukasz; Lopez, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Tissue microarrays are commonly used in modern pathology for cancer tissue evaluation, as it is a very potent technique. Tissue microarray slides are often scanned to perform computer-aided histopathological analysis of the tissue cores. For processing the image, splitting the whole virtual slide into images of individual cores is required. The only way to distinguish cores corresponding to specimens in the tissue microarray is through their arrangement. Unfortunately, distinguishing the correct order of cores is not a trivial task as they are not labelled directly on the slide. The main aim of this study was to create a procedure capable of automatically finding and extracting cores from archival images of the tissue microarrays. This software supports the work of scientists who want to perform further image processing on single cores. The proposed method is an efficient and fast procedure, working in fully automatic or semi-automatic mode. A total of 89% of punches were correctly extracted with automatic selection. With an addition of manual correction, it is possible to fully prepare the whole slide image for extraction in 2 min per tissue microarray. The proposed technique requires minimum skill and time to parse big array of cores from tissue microarray whole slide image into individual core images.

  6. PATMA: parser of archival tissue microarray

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tissue microarrays are commonly used in modern pathology for cancer tissue evaluation, as it is a very potent technique. Tissue microarray slides are often scanned to perform computer-aided histopathological analysis of the tissue cores. For processing the image, splitting the whole virtual slide into images of individual cores is required. The only way to distinguish cores corresponding to specimens in the tissue microarray is through their arrangement. Unfortunately, distinguishing the correct order of cores is not a trivial task as they are not labelled directly on the slide. The main aim of this study was to create a procedure capable of automatically finding and extracting cores from archival images of the tissue microarrays. This software supports the work of scientists who want to perform further image processing on single cores. The proposed method is an efficient and fast procedure, working in fully automatic or semi-automatic mode. A total of 89% of punches were correctly extracted with automatic selection. With an addition of manual correction, it is possible to fully prepare the whole slide image for extraction in 2 min per tissue microarray. The proposed technique requires minimum skill and time to parse big array of cores from tissue microarray whole slide image into individual core images. PMID:27920955

  7. The Impact of Photobleaching on Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    von der Haar, Marcel; Preuß, John-Alexander; von der Haar, Kathrin; Lindner, Patrick; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    DNA-Microarrays have become a potent technology for high-throughput analysis of genetic regulation. However, the wide dynamic range of signal intensities of fluorophore-based microarrays exceeds the dynamic range of a single array scan by far, thus limiting the key benefit of microarray technology: parallelization. The implementation of multi-scan techniques represents a promising approach to overcome these limitations. These techniques are, in turn, limited by the fluorophores’ susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner’s laser light. In this paper the photobleaching characteristics of cyanine-3 and cyanine-5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays are studied. The effects of initial fluorophore intensity as well as laser scanner dependent variables such as the photomultiplier tube’s voltage on bleaching and imaging are investigated. The resulting data is used to develop a model capable of simulating the expected degree of signal intensity reduction caused by photobleaching for each fluorophore individually, allowing for the removal of photobleaching-induced, systematic bias in multi-scan procedures. Single-scan applications also benefit as they rely on pre-scans to determine the optimal scanner settings. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the lab-to-lab comparability of microarray experiment results. PMID:26378589

  8. Analyses of the role of the glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism (rs41423247) as a potential moderator in the association between childhood overweight, psychopathology, and clinical outcomes in Eating Disorders patients: A 6 years follow up study.

    PubMed

    Castellini, Giovanni; Lelli, Lorenzo; Tedde, Andrea; Piaceri, Irene; Bagnoli, Silvia; Lucenteforte, Ersilia; Sorbi, Sandro; Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Hudziak, James J; Nacmias, Benedetta; Ricca, Valdo

    2016-09-30

    Childhood overweight and the SNP rs41423247 of the glucocorticoid receptor gene (GR) were reported to represent predisposing factors for Eating Disorders (EDs). The distribution of the polymorphism was evaluated in 202 EDs patients, and in 116 healthy subjects. The Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV and self-reported questionnaires were administered at the admission to the clinic and at 3 time points (end of a cognitive behavioral therapy, 3 and 6 years follow up). G-allele was associated with childhood overweight, depressive disorder comorbidity, and diagnostic instability. G-allele carriers reporting childhood overweight showed greater frequency of subjective binge eating and emotional eating.

  9. Contributions to Statistical Problems Related to Microarray Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Microarray is a high throughput technology to measure the gene expression. Analysis of microarray data brings many interesting and challenging problems. This thesis consists three studies related to microarray data. First, we propose a Bayesian model for microarray data and use Bayes Factors to identify differentially expressed genes. Second, we…

  10. Contributions to Statistical Problems Related to Microarray Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Microarray is a high throughput technology to measure the gene expression. Analysis of microarray data brings many interesting and challenging problems. This thesis consists three studies related to microarray data. First, we propose a Bayesian model for microarray data and use Bayes Factors to identify differentially expressed genes. Second, we…

  11. The efficacy of microarray screening for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    van Huet, Ramon A. C.; Pierrache, Laurence H.M.; Meester-Smoor, Magda A.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B.; de Wijs, Ilse J.; Collin, Rob W. J.; Hoefsloot, Lies H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy of multiple versions of a commercially available arrayed primer extension (APEX) microarray chip for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). Methods We included 250 probands suspected of arRP who were genetically analyzed with the APEX microarray between January 2008 and November 2013. The mode of inheritance had to be autosomal recessive according to the pedigree (including isolated cases). If the microarray identified a heterozygous mutation, we performed Sanger sequencing of exons and exon–intron boundaries of that specific gene. The efficacy of this microarray chip with the additional Sanger sequencing approach was determined by the percentage of patients that received a molecular diagnosis. We also collected data from genetic tests other than the APEX analysis for arRP to provide a detailed description of the molecular diagnoses in our study cohort. Results The APEX microarray chip for arRP identified the molecular diagnosis in 21 (8.5%) of the patients in our cohort. Additional Sanger sequencing yielded a second mutation in 17 patients (6.8%), thereby establishing the molecular diagnosis. In total, 38 patients (15.2%) received a molecular diagnosis after analysis using the microarray and additional Sanger sequencing approach. Further genetic analyses after a negative result of the arRP microarray (n = 107) resulted in a molecular diagnosis of arRP (n = 23), autosomal dominant RP (n = 5), X-linked RP (n = 2), and choroideremia (n = 1). Conclusions The efficacy of the commercially available APEX microarray chips for arRP appears to be low, most likely caused by the limitations of this technique and the genetic and allelic heterogeneity of RP. Diagnostic yields up to 40% have been reported for next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques that, as expected, thereby outperform targeted APEX analysis. PMID:25999674

  12. Development, Characterization and Experimental Validation of a Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Gene Expression Oligonucleotide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement. PMID:23110046

  13. Development, characterization and experimental validation of a cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) gene expression oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement.

  14. The efficacy of microarray screening for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    van Huet, Ramon A C; Pierrache, Laurence H M; Meester-Smoor, Magda A; Klaver, Caroline C W; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Hoyng, Carel B; de Wijs, Ilse J; Collin, Rob W J; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Klevering, B Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of multiple versions of a commercially available arrayed primer extension (APEX) microarray chip for autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). We included 250 probands suspected of arRP who were genetically analyzed with the APEX microarray between January 2008 and November 2013. The mode of inheritance had to be autosomal recessive according to the pedigree (including isolated cases). If the microarray identified a heterozygous mutation, we performed Sanger sequencing of exons and exon-intron boundaries of that specific gene. The efficacy of this microarray chip with the additional Sanger sequencing approach was determined by the percentage of patients that received a molecular diagnosis. We also collected data from genetic tests other than the APEX analysis for arRP to provide a detailed description of the molecular diagnoses in our study cohort. The APEX microarray chip for arRP identified the molecular diagnosis in 21 (8.5%) of the patients in our cohort. Additional Sanger sequencing yielded a second mutation in 17 patients (6.8%), thereby establishing the molecular diagnosis. In total, 38 patients (15.2%) received a molecular diagnosis after analysis using the microarray and additional Sanger sequencing approach. Further genetic analyses after a negative result of the arRP microarray (n = 107) resulted in a molecular diagnosis of arRP (n = 23), autosomal dominant RP (n = 5), X-linked RP (n = 2), and choroideremia (n = 1). The efficacy of the commercially available APEX microarray chips for arRP appears to be low, most likely caused by the limitations of this technique and the genetic and allelic heterogeneity of RP. Diagnostic yields up to 40% have been reported for next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques that, as expected, thereby outperform targeted APEX analysis.

  15. MIMAS: an innovative tool for network-based high density oligonucleotide microarray data management and annotation

    PubMed Central

    Hermida, Leandro; Schaad, Olivier; Demougin, Philippe; Descombes, Patrick; Primig, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background The high-density oligonucleotide microarray (GeneChip) is an important tool for molecular biological research aiming at large-scale detection of small nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA and genome-wide analysis of mRNA concentrations. Local array data management solutions are instrumental for efficient processing of the results and for subsequent uploading of data and annotations to a global certified data repository at the EBI (ArrayExpress) or the NCBI (GeneOmnibus). Description To facilitate and accelerate annotation of high-throughput expression profiling experiments, the Microarray Information Management and Annotation System (MIMAS) was developed. The system is fully compliant with the Minimal Information About a Microarray Experiment (MIAME) convention. MIMAS provides life scientists with a highly flexible and focused GeneChip data storage and annotation platform essential for subsequent analysis and interpretation of experimental results with clustering and mining tools. The system software can be downloaded for academic use upon request. Conclusion MIMAS implements a novel concept for nation-wide GeneChip data management whereby a network of facilities is centered on one data node directly connected to the European certified public microarray data repository located at the EBI. The solution proposed may serve as a prototype approach to array data management between research institutes organized in a consortium. PMID:16597336

  16. Simultaneous detection of multiple fish pathogens using a naked-eye readable DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-I; Hung, Pei-Hsin; Wu, Chia-Che; Cheng, Ta Chih; Tsai, Jyh-Ming; Lin, King-Jung; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2012-01-01

    We coupled 16S rDNA PCR and DNA hybridization technology to construct a microarray for simultaneous detection and discrimination of eight fish pathogens (Aeromonas hydrophila, Edwardsiella tarda, Flavobacterium columnare, Lactococcus garvieae, Photobacterium damselae, Pseudomonas anguilliseptica, Streptococcus iniae and Vibrio anguillarum) commonly encountered in aquaculture. The array comprised short oligonucleotide probes (30 mer) complementary to the polymorphic regions of 16S rRNA genes for the target pathogens. Targets annealed to the microarray probes were reacted with streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase and nitro blue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3'-indolylphosphate, p-toluidine salt (NBT/BCIP), resulting in blue spots that are easily visualized by the naked eye. Testing was performed against a total of 168 bacterial strains, i.e., 26 representative collection strains, 81 isolates of target fish pathogens, and 61 ecologically or phylogenetically related strains. The results showed that each probe consistently identified its corresponding target strain with 100% specificity. The detection limit of the microarray was estimated to be in the range of 1 pg for genomic DNA and 10(3) CFU/mL for pure pathogen cultures. These high specificity and sensitivity results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNA microarrays in the diagnostic detection of fish pathogens.

  17. Informatics Enhanced SNP Microarray Analysis of 30 Miscarriage Samples Compared to Routine Cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Lathi, Ruth B.; Loring, Megan; Massie, Jamie A. M.; Demko, Zachary P.; Johnson, David; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Gemelos, George; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The metaphase karyotype is often used as a diagnostic tool in the setting of early miscarriage; however this technique has several limitations. We evaluate a new technique for karyotyping that uses single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (SNP). This technique was compared in a blinded, prospective fashion, to the traditional metaphase karyotype. Methods Patients undergoing dilation and curettage for first trimester miscarriage between February and August 2010 were enrolled. Samples of chorionic villi were equally divided and sent for microarray testing in parallel with routine cytogenetic testing. Results Thirty samples were analyzed, with only four discordant results. Discordant results occurred when the entire genome was duplicated or when a balanced rearrangement was present. Cytogenetic karyotyping took an average of 29 days while microarray-based karytoyping took an average of 12 days. Conclusions Molecular karyotyping of POC after missed abortion using SNP microarray analysis allows for the ability to detect maternal cell contamination and provides rapid results with good concordance to standard cytogenetic analysis. PMID:22403611

  18. Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Fish Pathogens Using a Naked-Eye Readable DNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chin-I; Hung, Pei-Hsin; Wu, Chia-Che; Cheng, Ta Chih; Tsai, Jyh-Ming; Lin, King-Jung; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2012-01-01

    We coupled 16S rDNA PCR and DNA hybridization technology to construct a microarray for simultaneous detection and discrimination of eight fish pathogens (Aeromonas hydrophila, Edwardsiella tarda, Flavobacterium columnare, Lactococcus garvieae, Photobacterium damselae, Pseudomonas anguilliseptica, Streptococcus iniae and Vibrio anguillarum) commonly encountered in aquaculture. The array comprised short oligonucleotide probes (30 mer) complementary to the polymorphic regions of 16S rRNA genes for the target pathogens. Targets annealed to the microarray probes were reacted with streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase and nitro blue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3′-indolylphosphate, p-toluidine salt (NBT/BCIP), resulting in blue spots that are easily visualized by the naked eye. Testing was performed against a total of 168 bacterial strains, i.e., 26 representative collection strains, 81 isolates of target fish pathogens, and 61 ecologically or phylogenetically related strains. The results showed that each probe consistently identified its corresponding target strain with 100% specificity. The detection limit of the microarray was estimated to be in the range of 1 pg for genomic DNA and 103 CFU/mL for pure pathogen cultures. These high specificity and sensitivity results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNA microarrays in the diagnostic detection of fish pathogens. PMID:22736973

  19. Selective recognition of DNA from olive leaves and olive oil by PNA and modified-PNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Stefano; Calabretta, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Tullia; Sforza, Stefano; Arcioni, Sergio; Baldoni, Luciana; Corradini, Roberto; Marchelli, Rosangela

    2012-01-01

    PNA probes for the specific detection of DNA from olive oil samples by microarray technology were developed. The presence of as low as 5% refined hazelnut (Corylus avellana) oil in extra-virgin olive oil (Olea europaea L.) could be detected by using a PNA microarray. A set of two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the Actin gene of Olive was chosen as a model for evaluating the ability of PNA probes for discriminating olive cultivars. Both unmodified and C2-modified PNAs bearing an arginine side-chain were used, the latter showing higher sequence specificity. DNA extracted from leaves of three different cultivars (Ogliarola leccese, Canino and Frantoio) could be easily discriminated using a microarray with unmodified PNA probes, whereas discrimination of DNA from oil samples was more challenging, and could be obtained only by using chiral PNA probes.

  20. Selective recognition of DNA from olive leaves and olive oil by PNA and modified-PNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Stefano; Calabretta, Alessandro; Tedeschi, Tullia; Sforza, Stefano; Arcioni, Sergio; Baldoni, Luciana; Corradini, Roberto; Marchelli, Rosangela

    2012-01-01

    PNA probes for the specific detection of DNA from olive oil samples by microarray technology were developed. The presence of as low as 5% refined hazelnut (Corylus avellana) oil in extra-virgin olive oil (Olea europaea L.) could be detected by using a PNA microarray. A set of two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the Actin gene of Olive was chosen as a model for evaluating the ability of PNA probes for discriminating olive cultivars. Both unmodified and C2-modified PNAs bearing an arginine side-chain were used, the latter showing higher sequence specificity. DNA extracted from leaves of three different cultivars (Ogliarola leccese, Canino and Frantoio) could be easily discriminated using a microarray with unmodified PNA probes, whereas discrimination of DNA from oil samples was more challenging, and could be obtained only by using chiral PNA probes. PMID:22772038

  1. Probe-Level Analysis of Expression Microarrays Characterizes Isoform-Specific Degradation during Mouse Oocyte Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Salisbury, Jesse; Hutchison, Keith W.; Wigglesworth, Karen; Eppig, John J.; Graber, Joel H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene expression microarrays have provided many insights into changes in gene expression patterns between different tissue types, developmental stages, and disease states. Analyses of these data focused primarily measuring the relative abundance of transcripts of a gene, while treating most or all transcript isoforms as equivalent. Differences in the selection between transcript isoforms can, however, represent critical changes to either the protein product or the posttranscriptional regulation of the transcript. Novel analyses on existing microarray data provide fresh insights and new interpretations into transcriptome-wide changes in expression. Methodology A probe-level analysis of existing gene expression arrays revealed differences in mRNA processing, primarily affecting the 3′-untranslated region. Working with the example of microarrays drawn from a transcriptionally silent period of mouse oocyte development, probe-level analysis (implemented here as rmodel) identified genes whose transcript isoforms have differing stabilities. Comparison of micorarrays measuring cDNA generated from oligo-dT and random primers revealed further differences in the polyadenylation status of some transcripts. Additional analysis provided evidence for sequence-targeted cleavage, including putative targeting sequences, as one mechanism of degradation for several hundred transcripts in the maturing oocyte. Conclusions The capability of probe-level analysis to elicit novel findings from existing expression microarray data was demonstrated. The characterization of differences in stability between transcript isoforms in maturing mouse oocytes provided some mechanistic details of degradation. Similar analysis of existing archives of expression microarray data will likely provide similar discoveries. PMID:19834616

  2. Rapid microarray-based genotyping of Chlamydia spp. strains from clinical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Konrad; Ruettger, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic Chlamydia (C.) psittaci and C. trachomatis strains can be genotyped based on variations in the ompA genomic locus. In the present chapter, we describe rapid genotyping assays for both chlamydial agents using the ArrayStrip™ (AS) microarray platform. The test is targeting multiple discriminatory sites in the variable domains of the ompA gene by using 35 (C. psittaci) and 61 (C. trachomatis) oligonucleotide probes representing genotype-specific polymorphisms. In addition to discrimination among the established genotypes, this approach allows identification of atypical strains that were not accessible to typing using previously established techniques, such as PCR-RFLP or serotyping. The present DNA microarray assay can be conducted directly on clinical tissue samples and is suitable for tracing epidemiological chains and exploring the dissemination of particular genotypes. The procedure is easy to handle and economically affordable, and it allows genotyping of up to 32 clinical samples per day, thus lending itself for routine diagnosis as well.

  3. Chromosomal Microarray versus Karyotyping for Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wapner, Ronald J.; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C.; Eng, Christine M.; Zachary, Julia M.; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D.; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A.; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Ledbetter, David H.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Jackson, Laird

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Methods Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. Results We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down’s syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. Conclusions In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.) PMID:23215555

  4. Chromosomal microarray versus karyotyping for prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wapner, Ronald J; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C; Eng, Christine M; Zachary, Julia M; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N; Thom, Elizabeth A; Beaudet, Arthur L; Ledbetter, David H; Shaffer, Lisa G; Jackson, Laird

    2012-12-06

    Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down's syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.).

  5. High-throughput marker discovery in melon using a self-designed oligo microarray

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Genetic maps constitute the basis of breeding programs for many agricultural organisms. The creation of these maps is dependent on marker discovery. Melon, among other crops, is still lagging in genomic resources, limiting the ability to discover new markers in a high-throughput fashion. One of the methods used to search for molecular markers is DNA hybridization to microarrays. Microarray hybridization of DNA from different accessions can reveal differences between them--single-feature polymorphisms (SFPs). These SFPs can be used as markers for breeding purposes, or they can be converted to conventional markers by sequencing. This method has been utilized in a few different plants to discover genetic variation, using Affymetrix arrays that exist for only a few organisms. We applied this approach with some modifications for marker discovery in melon. Results Using a custom-designed oligonucleotide microarray based on a partial EST collection of melon, we discovered 6184 putative SFPs between the parents of our mapping population. Validation by sequencing of 245 SFPs from the two parents showed a sensitivity of around 79%. Most SFPs (81%) contained single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Testing the SFPs on another mapping population of melon confirmed that many of them are conserved. Conclusion Thousands of new SFPs that can be used for genetic mapping and molecular-assisted breeding in melon were discovered using a custom-designed oligo microarray. A portion of these SFPs are conserved and can be used in different breeding populations. Although improvement of the discovery rate is still needed, this approach is applicable to many agricultural systems with limited genomic resources. PMID:20426811

  6. RECOVERING FILTER-BASED MICROARRAY DATA FOR PATHWAYS ANALYSIS USING A MULTIPOINT ALIGNMENT STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of commercial microarrays are rapidly becoming the method of choice for profiling gene expression and assessing various disease states. Research Genetics has provided a series of well defined biological and software tools to the research community for these analyses. Th...

  7. Isolation of Coxiella burnetii by a centrifugation shell-vial assay from ticks collected in Cyprus: detection by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses.

    PubMed

    Spyridaki, Ioanna; Psaroulaki, Anna; Loukaides, Fidias; Antoniou, Maria; Hadjichristodolou, Christos; Tselentis, Yannis

    2002-01-01

    Ticks are the principal vectors and reservoirs of Coxiella burnetii. The identification of isolates is necessary for understanding the clinical diversity of Q fever in different geographic areas. This is the first report of isolation of C. burnetii from ticks by the shell-vial assay and by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of this pathogen in ticks. Of 141 ticks collected in Cyprus (Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Hyalloma spp.), 10% were found to be infected with C. burnetii. Three ticks were positive by hemolymph test, and 11 triturated ticks were positive by nested PCR. Three isolates were obtained by the centrifugation shell-vial technique. Analysis by PCR, then restriction fragment length polymorphism showed that the 3 Cyprus isolates had identical restriction profiles to reference strains Nine Mile and Q212. The methods described are useful in studying the epidemiology and ecology of C. burnetii.

  8. Performing custom microRNA microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Zeng, Yan

    2011-10-28

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a large family of ˜ 22 nucleotides (nt) long RNA molecules that are widely expressed in eukaryotes (1). Complex genomes encode at least hundreds of miRNAs, which primarily inhibit the expression of a vast number of target genes post-transcriptionally (2, 3). miRNAs control a broad range of biological processes (1). In addition, altered miRNA expression has been associated with human diseases such as cancers, and miRNAs may serve as biomarkers for diseases and prognosis (4, 5). It is important, therefore, to understand the expression and functions of miRNAs under many different conditions. Three major approaches have been employed to profile miRNA expression: real-time PCR, microarray, and deep sequencing. The technique of miRNA microarray has the advantage of being high-throughput, generally less expensive, and most of the experimental and analysis steps can be carried out in a molecular biology laboratory at most universities, medical schools and associated hospitals. Here, we describe a method for performing custom miRNA microarray experiments. A miRNA probe set will be printed on glass slides to produce miRNA microarrays. RNA is isolated using a method or reagent that preserves small RNA species, and then labeled with a fluorescence dye. As a control, reference DNA oligonucleotides corresponding to a subset of miRNAs are also labeled with a different fluorescence dye. The reference DNA will serve to demonstrate the quality of the slide and hybridization and will also be used for data normalization. The RNA and DNA are mixed and hybridized to a microarray slide containing probes for most of the miRNAs in the database. After washing, the slide is scanned to obtain images, and intensities of the individual spots quantified. These raw signals will be further processed and analyzed as the expression data of the corresponding miRNAs. Microarray slides can be stripped and regenerated to reduce the cost of microarrays and to enhance the

  9. Structural analysis of hepatitis C RNA genome using DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Martell, María; Briones, Carlos; de Vicente, Aránzazu; Piron, María; Esteban, Juan I.; Esteban, Rafael; Guardia, Jaime; Gómez, Jordi

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have tried to identify specific nucleotide sequences in the quasispecies of hepatitis C virus (HCV) that determine resistance or sensitivity to interferon (IFN) therapy, unfortunately without conclusive results. Although viral proteins represent the most evident phenotype of the virus, genomic RNA sequences determine secondary and tertiary structures which are also part of the viral phenotype and can be involved in important biological roles. In this work, a method of RNA structure analysis has been developed based on the hybridization of labelled HCV transcripts to microarrays of complementary DNA oligonucleotides. Hybridizations were carried out at non-denaturing conditions, using appropriate temperature and buffer composition to allow binding to the immobilized probes of the RNA transcript without disturbing its secondary/tertiary structural motifs. Oligonucleotides printed onto the microarray covered the entire 5′ non-coding region (5′NCR), the first three-quarters of the core region, the E2–NS2 junction and the first 400 nt of the NS3 region. We document the use of this methodology to analyse the structural degree of a large region of HCV genomic RNA in two genotypes associated with different responses to IFN treatment. The results reported here show different structural degree along the genome regions analysed, and differential hybridization patterns for distinct genotypes in NS2 and NS3 HCV regions. PMID:15247323

  10. Microbial forensics: fiber optic microarray subtyping of Bacillus anthracis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Jason R. E.

    2009-05-01

    The past decade has seen increased development and subsequent adoption of rapid molecular techniques involving DNA analysis for detection of pathogenic microorganisms, also termed microbial forensics. The continued accumulation of microbial sequence information in genomic databases now better positions the field of high-throughput DNA analysis to proceed in a more manageable fashion. The potential to build off of these databases exists as technology continues to develop, which will enable more rapid, cost effective analyses. This wealth of genetic information, along with new technologies, has the potential to better address some of the current problems and solve the key issues involved in DNA analysis of pathogenic microorganisms. To this end, a high density fiber optic microarray has been employed, housing numerous DNA sequences simultaneously for detection of various pathogenic microorganisms, including Bacillus anthracis, among others. Each organism is analyzed with multiple sequences and can be sub-typed against other closely related organisms. For public health labs, real-time PCR methods have been developed as an initial preliminary screen, but culture and growth are still considered the gold standard. Technologies employing higher throughput than these standard methods are better suited to capitalize on the limitless potential garnered from the sequence information. Microarray analyses are one such format positioned to exploit this potential, and our array platform is reusable, allowing repetitive tests on a single array, providing an increase in throughput and decrease in cost, along with a certainty of detection, down to the individual strain level.

  11. Sequencing of the intergenic 16S-23S rRNA spacer (ITS) region of Mollicutes species and their identification using microarray-based assay and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Volokhov, Dmitriy V; George, Joseph; Liu, Sue X; Ikonomi, Pranvera; Anderson, Christine; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2006-08-01

    We have completed sequencing the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region of most known Mycoplasma , Acholeplasma , Ureaplasma , Mesoplasma , and Spiroplasma species. Analysis of the sequence data revealed a significant interspecies variability and low intraspecies polymorphism of the ITS region among Mollicutes . This finding enabled the application of a combined polymerase chain reaction-microarray technology for identifying Mollicutes species. The microarray included individual species-specific oligonucleotide probes for characterizing human Mollicutes species and other species known to be common cell line contaminants. Evaluation of the microarray was conducted using multiple, previously characterized, Mollicutes species. The microarray analysis of the samples used demonstrated a highly specific assay, which is capable of rapid and accurate discrimination among Mollicutes species.

  12. JOB ANALYSES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JONES, HAROLD E.

    THE JOB ANALYSES WERE COMPOSED FROM ACTIVITY RECORDS KEPT BY EACH PROFESSIONAL EXTENSION WORKER IN KANSAS. JOB ANALYSES ARE GIVEN FOR THE ADMINISTRATION (DIRECTOR, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, SATE LEADERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS), EXTENSION SPECIALISTS, DISTRICT AGENTS, AND COUNTY EXTENSION AGENTS. DISCUSSION OF…

  13. Evaluation of one- and two-color gene expression arrays for microbial comparative genome hybridization analyses in routine applications.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Roland; Joseph, Biju; Gerlach, Gabriele; Schramm-Glück, Anja; Engelhard, Kathrin; Frosch, Matthias; Müller, Tobias; Schoen, Christoph

    2010-09-01

    DNA microarray technology has already revolutionized basic research in infectious diseases, and whole-genome sequencing efforts have allowed for the fabrication of tailor-made spotted microarrays for an increasing number of bacterial pathogens. However, the application of microarrays in diagnostic microbiology is currently hampered by the high costs associated with microarray experiments and the specialized equipment needed. Here, we show that a thorough bioinformatic postprocessing of the microarray design to reduce the amount of unspecific noise also allows the reliable use of spotted gene expression microarrays for gene content analyses. We further demonstrate that the use of only single-color labeling to halve the costs for dye-labeled nucleotides results in only a moderate decrease in overall specificity and sensitivity. Therefore, gene expression microarrays using only single-color labeling can also reliably be used for gene content analyses, thus reducing the costs for potential routine applications such as genome-based pathogen detection or strain typing.

  14. Microarray Data Analysis and Mining Tools

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Saravanakumar; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2011-01-01

    Microarrays are one of the latest breakthroughs in experimental molecular biology that allow monitoring the expression levels of tens of thousands of genes simultaneously. Arrays have been applied to studies in gene expression, genome mapping, SNP discrimination, transcription factor activity, toxicity, pathogen identification and many other applications. In this paper we concentrate on discussing various bioinformatics tools used for microarray data mining tasks with its underlying algorithms, web resources and relevant reference. We emphasize this paper mainly for digital biologists to get an aware about the plethora of tools and programs available for microarray data analysis. First, we report the common data mining applications such as selecting differentially expressed genes, clustering, and classification. Next, we focused on gene expression based knowledge discovery studies such as transcription factor binding site analysis, pathway analysis, protein- protein interaction network analysis and gene enrichment analysis. PMID:21584183

  15. Microarray data analysis and mining tools.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Saravanakumar; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2011-04-22

    Microarrays are one of the latest breakthroughs in experimental molecular biology that allow monitoring the expression levels of tens of thousands of genes simultaneously. Arrays have been applied to studies in gene expression, genome mapping, SNP discrimination, transcription factor activity, toxicity, pathogen identification and many other applications. In this paper we concentrate on discussing various bioinformatics tools used for microarray data mining tasks with its underlying algorithms, web resources and relevant reference. We emphasize this paper mainly for digital biologists to get an aware about the plethora of tools and programs available for microarray data analysis. First, we report the common data mining applications such as selecting differentially expressed genes, clustering, and classification. Next, we focused on gene expression based knowledge discovery studies such as transcription factor binding site analysis, pathway analysis, protein- protein interaction network analysis and gene enrichment analysis.

  16. Posttranslational Modification Assays on Functional Protein Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Neiswinger, Johnathan; Uzoma, Ijeoma; Cox, Eric; Rho, HeeSool; Jeong, Jun Seop; Zhu, Heng

    2016-10-03

    Protein microarray technology provides a straightforward yet powerful strategy for identifying substrates of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and studying the specificity of the enzymes that catalyze these reactions. Protein microarray assays can be designed for individual enzymes or a mixture to establish connections between enzymes and substrates. Assays for four well-known PTMs-phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation, and SUMOylation-have been developed and are described here for use on functional protein microarrays. Phosphorylation and acetylation require a single enzyme and are easily adapted for use on an array. The ubiquitylation and SUMOylation cascades are very similar, and the combination of the E1, E2, and E3 enzymes plus ubiquitin or SUMO protein and ATP is sufficient for in vitro modification of many substrates.

  17. Designing microarray phantoms for hyperspectral imaging validation

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Matthew L.; Lee, Ji Youn; Samarov, Daniel V.; Allen, David W.; Litorja, Maritoni; Nossal, Ralph; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2012-01-01

    The design and fabrication of custom-tailored microarrays for use as phantoms in the characterization of hyperspectral imaging systems is described. Corresponding analysis methods for biologically relevant samples are also discussed. An image-based phantom design was used to program a microarrayer robot to print prescribed mixtures of dyes onto microscope slides. The resulting arrays were imaged by a hyperspectral imaging microscope. The shape of the spots results in significant scattering signals, which can be used to test image analysis algorithms. Separation of the scattering signals allowed elucidation of individual dye spectra. In addition, spectral fitting of the absorbance spectra of complex dye mixtures was performed in order to determine local dye concentrations. Such microarray phantoms provide a robust testing platform for comparisons of hyperspectral imaging acquisition and analysis methods. PMID:22741076

  18. Using Kepler for Tool Integration in Microarray Analysis Workflows.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zhuohui; Stowe, Jennifer C; Altintas, Ilkay; McCulloch, Andrew D; Zambon, Alexander C

    Increasing numbers of genomic technologies are leading to massive amounts of genomic data, all of which requires complex analysis. More and more bioinformatics analysis tools are being developed by scientist to simplify these analyses. However, different pipelines have been developed using different software environments. This makes integrations of these diverse bioinformatics tools difficult. Kepler provides an open source environment to integrate these disparate packages. Using Kepler, we integrated several external tools including Bioconductor packages, AltAnalyze, a python-based open source tool, and R-based comparison tool to build an automated workflow to meta-analyze both online and local microarray data. The automated workflow connects the integrated tools seamlessly, delivers data flow between the tools smoothly, and hence improves efficiency and accuracy of complex data analyses. Our workflow exemplifies the usage of Kepler as a scientific workflow platform for bioinformatics pipelines.

  19. Reverse transfected cell microarrays in infectious disease research.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Andreas; Jochmann, Ramona; Kuhn, Elisabeth; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Chudasama, Priya; Stürzl, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Several human pathogenic viruses encode large genomes with often more than 100 genes. Viral pathogenicity is determined by carefully orchestrated co-operative activities of several different viral genes which trigger the phenotypic functions of the infected cells. Systematic analyses of these complex interactions require high-throughput transfection technology. Here we have provided a laboratory manual for the reverse transfected cell microarray (RTCM; alternative name: cell chip) as a high-throughput transfection procedure, which has been successfully applied for the systematic analyses of single and combination effects of genes encoded by the human herpesvirus-8 on the NF-kappaB signal transduction pathway. In order to quantitatively determine the effects of viral genes in transfected cells, protocols for the use of GFP as an indicator gene and for indirect immunofluorescence staining of cellular target proteins have been included. RTCM provides a useful methodological approach to investigate systematically combination effects of viral genes on cellular functions.

  20. High throughput screening of starch structures using carbohydrate microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Tanackovic, Vanja; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Krunic, Susanne Langgaard; Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Willats, William George Tycho; Blennow, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study we introduce the starch-recognising carbohydrate binding module family 20 (CBM20) from Aspergillus niger for screening biological variations in starch molecular structure using high throughput carbohydrate microarray technology. Defined linear, branched and phosphorylated maltooligosaccharides, pure starch samples including a variety of different structures with variations in the amylopectin branching pattern, amylose content and phosphate content, enzymatically modified starches and glycogen were included. Using this technique, different important structures, including amylose content and branching degrees could be differentiated in a high throughput fashion. The screening method was validated using transgenic barley grain analysed during development and subjected to germination. Typically, extreme branching or linearity were detected less than normal starch structures. The method offers the potential for rapidly analysing resistant and slowly digested dietary starches. PMID:27468930

  1. Parallel classification and feature selection in microarray data using SPRINT

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Lawrence; Sloan, Terence M.; Mewissen, Muriel; Ghazal, Peter; Forster, Thorsten; Piotrowski, Michal; Trew, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The statistical language R is favoured by many biostatisticians for processing microarray data. In recent times, the quantity of data that can be obtained in experiments has risen significantly, making previously fast analyses time consuming or even not possible at all with the existing software infrastructure. High performance computing (HPC) systems offer a solution to these problems but at the expense of increased complexity for the end user. The Simple Parallel R Interface is a library for R that aims to reduce the complexity of using HPC systems by providing biostatisticians with drop-in parallelised replacements of existing R functions. In this paper we describe parallel implementations of two popular techniques: exploratory clustering analyses using the random forest classifier and feature selection through identification of differentially expressed genes using the rank product method. PMID:24883047

  2. Identification of prognostic relevant chromosomal abnormalities in chronic lymphocytic leukemia using microarray-based genomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Kroef, Marian Jpl; van den Berg, Eva; Olde Weghuis, Daniel; Geurts van Kessel, Ad; Pfundt, Rolph; Linssen-Wiersma, Matty; Benjamins, Marloes; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; Groenen, Patricia Jta; Simons, Annet

    2014-01-09

    Characteristic genomic abnormalities in patients with B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have been shown to provide important prognostic information. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), currently used in clinical diagnostics of CLL, are targeted tests aimed at specific genomic loci. Microarray-based genomic profiling is a new high-resolution tool that enables genome-wide analyses. The aim of this study was to compare two recently launched genomic microarray platforms, i.e., the CytoScan HD Array (Affymetrix) and the HumanOmniExpress Array (Illumina), with FISH and MLPA to ascertain whether these latter tests can be replaced by either one of the microarray platforms in a clinical diagnostic setting. Microarray-based genomic profiling and FISH were performed in all 28 CLL patients. For an unbiased comparison of the performance of both microarray platforms 9 patients were evaluated on both platforms, resulting in the identification of exactly identical genomic aberrations. To evaluate the detection limit of the microarray platforms we included 7 patients in which the genomic abnormalities were present in a relatively low percentage of the cells (range 5-28%) as previously determined by FISH. We found that both microarray platforms allowed the detection of copy number abnormalities present in as few as 16% of the cells. In addition, we found that microarray-based genomic profiling allowed the identification of genomic abnormalities that could not be detected by FISH and/or MLPA, including a focal TP53 loss and copy neutral losses of heterozygosity of chromosome 17p. From our results we conclude that although the microarray platforms exhibit a somewhat lower limit of detection compared to FISH, they still allow the detection of copy number abnormalities present in as few as 16% of the cells. By applying similar interpretation criteria, the results obtained from both platforms were comparable. In

  3. Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

    2011-11-29

    DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to

  4. Protein Microarrays for the Detection of Biothreats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Amy E.

    Although protein microarrays have proven to be an important tool in proteomics research, the technology is emerging as useful for public health and defense applications. Recent progress in the measurement and characterization of biothreat agents is reviewed in this chapter. Details concerning validation of various protein microarray formats, from contact-printed sandwich assays to supported lipid bilayers, are presented. The reviewed technologies have important implications for in vitro characterization of toxin-ligand interactions, serotyping of bacteria, screening of potential biothreat inhibitors, and as core components of biosensors, among others, research and engineering applications.

  5. The use of microarrays in microbial ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, G.L.; He, Z.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Zhou, J.

    2009-09-15

    Microarrays have proven to be a useful and high-throughput method to provide targeted DNA sequence information for up to many thousands of specific genetic regions in a single test. A microarray consists of multiple DNA oligonucleotide probes that, under high stringency conditions, hybridize only to specific complementary nucleic acid sequences (targets). A fluorescent signal indicates the presence and, in many cases, the abundance of genetic regions of interest. In this chapter we will look at how microarrays are used in microbial ecology, especially with the recent increase in microbial community DNA sequence data. Of particular interest to microbial ecologists, phylogenetic microarrays are used for the analysis of phylotypes in a community and functional gene arrays are used for the analysis of functional genes, and, by inference, phylotypes in environmental samples. A phylogenetic microarray that has been developed by the Andersen laboratory, the PhyloChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that targets the known diversity within the 16S rRNA gene to determine microbial community composition. Using multiple, confirmatory probes to increase the confidence of detection and a mismatch probe for every perfect match probe to minimize the effect of cross-hybridization by non-target regions, the PhyloChip is able to simultaneously identify any of thousands of taxa present in an environmental sample. The PhyloChip is shown to reveal greater diversity within a community than rRNA gene sequencing due to the placement of the entire gene product on the microarray compared with the analysis of up to thousands of individual molecules by traditional sequencing methods. A functional gene array that has been developed by the Zhou laboratory, the GeoChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that dynamically identifies functional activities of multiple members within a community. The recent version of GeoChip contains more than 24,000 50mer

  6. MicroRNA expression profiling using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Love, Cassandra; Dave, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs which are able to regulate gene expression at both the transcriptional and translational levels. There is a growing recognition of the role of microRNAs in nearly every tissue type and cellular process. Thus there is an increasing need for accurate quantitation of microRNA expression in a variety of tissues. Microarrays provide a robust method for the examination of microRNA expression. In this chapter, we describe detailed methods for the use of microarrays to measure microRNA expression and discuss methods for the analysis of microRNA expression data.

  7. Overview of DNA microarrays: types, applications, and their future.

    PubMed

    Bumgarner, Roger

    2013-01-01

    This unit provides an overview of DNA microarrays. Microarrays are a technology in which thousands of nucleic acids are bound to a surface and are used to measure the relative concentration of nucleic acid sequences in a mixture via hybridization and subsequent detection of the hybridization events. This overview first discusses the history of microarrays and the antecedent technologies that led to their development. This is followed by discussion of the methods of manufacture of microarrays and the most common biological applications. The unit ends with a brief description of the limitations of microarrays and discusses how microarrays are being rapidly replaced by DNA sequencing technologies.

  8. Analysis of High-Throughput ELISA Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-02-23

    Our research group develops analytical methods and software for the high-throughput analysis of quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays. ELISA microarrays differ from DNA microarrays in several fundamental aspects and most algorithms for analysis of DNA microarray data are not applicable to ELISA microarrays. In this review, we provide an overview of the steps involved in ELISA microarray data analysis and how the statistically sound algorithms we have developed provide an integrated software suite to address the needs of each data-processing step. The algorithms discussed are available in a set of open-source software tools (http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT).

  9. Development and application of a microarray meter tool to optimize microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Rouse, Richard JD; Field, Katrine; Lapira, Jennifer; Lee, Allen; Wick, Ivan; Eckhardt, Colleen; Bhasker, C Ramana; Soverchia, Laura; Hardiman, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Background Successful microarray experimentation requires a complex interplay between the slide chemistry, the printing pins, the nucleic acid probes and targets, and the hybridization milieu. Optimization of these parameters and a careful evaluation of emerging slide chemistries are a prerequisite to any large scale array fabrication effort. We have developed a 'microarray meter' tool which assesses the inherent variations associated with microarray measurement prior to embarking on large scale projects. Findings The microarray meter consists of nucleic acid targets (reference and dynamic range control) and probe components. Different plate designs containing identical probe material were formulated to accommodate different robotic and pin designs. We examined the variability in probe quality and quantity (as judged by the amount of DNA printed and remaining post-hybridization) using three robots equipped with capillary printing pins. Discussion The generation of microarray data with minimal variation requires consistent quality control of the (DNA microarray) manufacturing and experimental processes. Spot reproducibility is a measure primarily of the variations associated with printing. The microarray meter assesses array quality by measuring the DNA content for every feature. It provides a post-hybridization analysis of array quality by scoring probe performance using three metrics, a) a measure of variability in the signal intensities, b) a measure of the signal dynamic range and c) a measure of variability of the spot morphologies. PMID:18710498

  10. Development of a 16S rRNA gene-based prototype microarray for the detection of selected actinomycetes genera.

    PubMed

    Kyselková, Martina; Kopecký, Jan; Felföldi, Tamás; Cermák, Ladislav; Omelka, Marek; Grundmann, Geneviève L; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Ságová-Marecková, Markéta

    2008-10-01

    Actinomycetes are known for their secondary metabolites, which have been successfully used as drugs in human and veterinary medicines. However, information on the distribution of this group of Gram-positive bacteria in diverse ecosystems and a comprehension of their activities in ecosystem processes are still scarce. We have developed a 16S rRNA-based taxonomic microarray that targets key actinomycetes at the genus level. In total, 113 actinomycete 16S rRNA probes, corresponding to 55 of the 202 described genera, were designed. The microarray accuracy was evaluated by comparing signal intensities with probe/target-weighted mismatch values and the Gibbs energy of the probe/target duplex formation by hybridizing 17 non-actinomycete and 29 actinomycete strains/clones with the probe set. The validation proved that the probe set was specific, with only 1.3% of false results. The incomplete coverage of actinomycetes by a genus-specific probe was caused by the limited number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in databases or insufficient 16S rRNA gene polymorphism. The microarray enabled discrimination between actinomycete communities from three forest soil samples collected at one site. Cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes from one of the soil samples confirmed the microarray results. We propose that this newly constructed microarray will be a valuable tool for genus-level comparisons of actinomycete communities in various ecological conditions.

  11. A Review of Feature Selection and Feature Extraction Methods Applied on Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Hira, Zena M.; Gillies, Duncan F.

    2015-01-01

    We summarise various ways of performing dimensionality reduction on high-dimensional microarray data. Many different feature selection and feature extraction methods exist and they are being widely used. All these methods aim to remove redundant and irrelevant features so that classification of new instances will be more accurate. A popular source of data is microarrays, a biological platform for gathering gene expressions. Analysing microarrays can be difficult due to the size of the data they provide. In addition the complicated relations among the different genes make analysis more difficult and removing excess features can improve the quality of the results. We present some of the most popular methods for selecting significant features and provide a comparison between them. Their advantages and disadvantages are outlined in order to provide a clearer idea of when to use each one of them for saving computational time and resources. PMID:26170834

  12. Construction of citrus gene coexpression networks from microarray data using random matrix theory.

    PubMed

    Du, Dongliang; Rawat, Nidhi; Deng, Zhanao; Gmitter, Fred G

    2015-01-01

    After the sequencing of citrus genomes, gene function annotation is becoming a new challenge. Gene coexpression analysis can be employed for function annotation using publicly available microarray data sets. In this study, 230 sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) microarrays were used to construct seven coexpression networks, including one condition-independent and six condition-dependent (Citrus canker, Huanglongbing, leaves, flavedo, albedo, and flesh) networks. In total, these networks contain 37 633 edges among 6256 nodes (genes), which accounts for 52.11% measurable genes of the citrus microarray. Then, these networks were partitioned into functional modules using the Markov Cluster Algorithm. Significantly enriched Gene Ontology biological process terms and KEGG pathway terms were detected for 343 and 60 modules, respectively. Finally, independent verification of these networks was performed using another expression data of 371 genes. This study provides new targets for further functional analyses in citrus.

  13. Construction of citrus gene coexpression networks from microarray data using random matrix theory

    PubMed Central

    Du, Dongliang; Rawat, Nidhi; Deng, Zhanao; Gmitter, Fred G.

    2015-01-01

    After the sequencing of citrus genomes, gene function annotation is becoming a new challenge. Gene coexpression analysis can be employed for function annotation using publicly available microarray data sets. In this study, 230 sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) microarrays were used to construct seven coexpression networks, including one condition-independent and six condition-dependent (Citrus canker, Huanglongbing, leaves, flavedo, albedo, and flesh) networks. In total, these networks contain 37 633 edges among 6256 nodes (genes), which accounts for 52.11% measurable genes of the citrus microarray. Then, these networks were partitioned into functional modules using the Markov Cluster Algorithm. Significantly enriched Gene Ontology biological process terms and KEGG pathway terms were detected for 343 and 60 modules, respectively. Finally, independent verification of these networks was performed using another expression data of 371 genes. This study provides new targets for further functional analyses in citrus. PMID:26504573

  14. Validation of a Chromosomal Microarray for Prenatal Diagnosis Using a Prospective Cohort of Pregnancies with Increased Risk for Chromosome Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Wright, Dale; Carey, Louise; Battersby, Siobhan; Nguyen, Thuy; Clarke, Melanie; Nash, Benjamin; Gulesserian, Elee; Cross, Jill; Darmanian, Artur

    2016-12-01

    Validation of a chromosomal microarray for improved prenatal diagnosis for chromosomal abnormalities among high-risk pregnancies. A cohort of 213 pregnancies was investigated by chromosomal microarray and the results were compared with quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (QF-PCR), karyotype, and 850K single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray results. The detection limit of mosaicism was determined by assaying different trisomy mosaic constructs down to ∼12%. Imprecision estimates from replicates of mean log2 ratio values for a 200 kb deletion and 400 kb duplication were determined by evaluating the coefficient of variation (CV%). Excluding pregnancies with aneuploidy, the chromosomal microarray detected 19/213 (8.9%) pregnancies with copy number abnormalities. These were classified as pathogenic in 11/213 (5.2%) cases, as variants of uncertain significance in 4/213 (1.9%) cases, and as likely benign in 4/213 (1.9%) cases. In 15/213 (7.0%) pregnancies, these abnormalities were not detectable by karyotype. Importantly, 8/11 (72.7%) of the pathogenic abnormalities detected by chromosomal microarray were only detectable by this modality. There were no false-positive results and only eight false-negative results. The chromosomal microarray showed excellent sensitivity (96.2%) and specificity (100.0%). The lower detection limit for mosaicism was ∼12%. Imprecision for the 0.2 Mb deletion (11.6 CV%) and 0.4 Mb duplication (5.9 CV%) was very low. This chromosomal microarray showed excellent diagnostic performance with improved detection rates compared to karyotyping for prenatal diagnosis of clinically relevant fetal chromosomal abnormalities.

  15. Seasonal diversity of planktonic protists in Southwestern Alberta rivers over a 1-year period as revealed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and 18S rRNA gene library analyses.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Matthew C; Selinger, L Brent; Inglis, G Douglas

    2012-08-01

    The temporal dynamics of planktonic protists in river water have received limited attention despite their ecological significance and recent studies linking phagotrophic protists to the persistence of human-pathogenic bacteria. Using molecular-based techniques targeting the 18S rRNA gene, we studied the seasonal diversity of planktonic protists in Southwestern Alberta rivers (Oldman River Basin) over a 1-year period. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) data revealed distinct shifts in protistan community profiles that corresponded to season rather than geographical location. Community structures were examined by using clone library analysis; HaeIII restriction profiles of 18S rRNA gene amplicons were used to remove prevalent solanaceous plant clones prior to sequencing. Sanger sequencing of the V1-to-V3 region of the 18S rRNA gene libraries from spring, summer, fall, and winter supported the T-RFLP results and showed marked seasonal differences in the protistan community structure. The spring library was dominated by Chloroplastidae (29.8%), Centrohelida (28.1%), and Alveolata (25.5%), while the summer and fall libraries contained primarily fungal clones (83.0% and 88.0%, respectively). Alveolata (35.6%), Euglenozoa (24.4%), Chloroplastida (15.6%), and Fungi (15.6%) dominated the winter library. These data demonstrate that planktonic protists, including protozoa, are abundant in river water in Southwestern Alberta and that conspicuous seasonal shifts occur in the community structure.

  16. Apparent genetic difference between hypothyroid patients with blocking-type thyrotropin receptor antibody and those without, as shown by restriction fragement length polymorphism analyses of HLA-DP loci

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Daisuke; Sugawa, Hideo; Akamizu, Takashi; Mori, Toru ); Sato, Kaoru; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Tsuji, Kimiyoshi ); Maeda, Masahiro )

    1993-09-01

    HLA types in Japanese patients with primary hypothyroidism were analyzed to see whether those with blocking-type TSH receptor antibody (TSH-R BAb M) differed genetically from those with idiopathic myxedema (IM). HLA typings of -A, -B, -C, -DR, and -DQ (73 antigens) were performed serologically, and those of -D and -DP (29 antigens) were analyzed by the restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Thirty patients were studied with TSH-R BAb M, and 28 with IM. The data were analyzed and compared with previous results from 88 Graves' patients, 46 Hashimoto patients, and 186 control subjects. Overall, 192 patients with 4 autoimmune thyroid disorders showed a decrease in -Aw19 and an increase in -DQw4 (corrected P < 0.05) and significant associations of -Aw33, -Bw46, -Cw3, -DRw8, -DR9, and -DQw3. In TSH-R BAb M patients, increases in -B35, -Bw60, and -Dw8 and decreases in -DR4 and -DPw2 were seen, whereas IM patients showed increased -DPw2, -Bw61, and -Dw23. In comparisons between TSH-R-BAb M and IM, the difference in -DPw2 was highly significant. HLA-B35 differed significantly in these 2 types of hypothyroidism. In conclusion, TSH-R BAb M patients have decreased frequency of -DPw2 and are genetically similar to Graves' disease, whereas IM patients are characterized by high frequency of -DPw2 and are genetically similar to Hashimoto's thyroiditis. 39 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Seasonal Diversity of Planktonic Protists in Southwestern Alberta Rivers over a 1-Year Period as Revealed by Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and 18S rRNA Gene Library Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Matthew C.; Selinger, L. Brent

    2012-01-01

    The temporal dynamics of planktonic protists in river water have received limited attention despite their ecological significance and recent studies linking phagotrophic protists to the persistence of human-pathogenic bacteria. Using molecular-based techniques targeting the 18S rRNA gene, we studied the seasonal diversity of planktonic protists in Southwestern Alberta rivers (Oldman River Basin) over a 1-year period. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling analysis of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) data revealed distinct shifts in protistan community profiles that corresponded to season rather than geographical location. Community structures were examined by using clone library analysis; HaeIII restriction profiles of 18S rRNA gene amplicons were used to remove prevalent solanaceous plant clones prior to sequencing. Sanger sequencing of the V1-to-V3 region of the 18S rRNA gene libraries from spring, summer, fall, and winter supported the T-RFLP results and showed marked seasonal differences in the protistan community structure. The spring library was dominated by Chloroplastidae (29.8%), Centrohelida (28.1%), and Alveolata (25.5%), while the summer and fall libraries contained primarily fungal clones (83.0% and 88.0%, respectively). Alveolata (35.6%), Euglenozoa (24.4%), Chloroplastida (15.6%), and Fungi (15.6%) dominated the winter library. These data demonstrate that planktonic protists, including protozoa, are abundant in river water in Southwestern Alberta and that conspicuous seasonal shifts occur in the community structure. PMID:22685143

  18. BASE--2nd generation software for microarray data management and analysis.

    PubMed

    Vallon-Christersson, Johan; Nordborg, Nicklas; Svensson, Martin; Häkkinen, Jari

    2009-10-12

    Microarray experiments are increasing in size and samples are collected asynchronously over long time. Available data are re-analysed as more samples are hybridized. Systematic use of collected data requires tracking of biomaterials, array information, raw data, and assembly of annotations. To meet the information tracking and data analysis challenges in microarray experiments we reimplemented and improved BASE version 1.2. The new BASE presented in this report is a comprehensive annotable local microarray data repository and analysis application providing researchers with an efficient information management and analysis tool. The information management system tracks all material from biosource, via sample and through extraction and labelling to raw data and analysis. All items in BASE can be annotated and the annotations can be used as experimental factors in downstream analysis. BASE stores all microarray experiment related data regardless if analysis tools for specific techniques or data formats are readily available. The BASE team is committed to continue improving and extending BASE to make it usable for even more experimental setups and techniques, and we encourage other groups to target their specific needs leveraging on the infrastructure provided by BASE. BASE is a comprehensive management application for information, data, and analysis of microarray experiments, available as free open source software at http://base.thep.lu.se under the terms of the GPLv3 license.

  19. A proposed metric for assessing the measurement quality of individual microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoungmi; Page, Grier P; Beasley, T Mark; Barnes, Stephen; Scheirer, Katherine E; Allison, David B

    2006-01-01

    Background High-density microarray technology is increasingly applied to study gene expression levels on a large scale. Microarray experiments rely on several critical steps that may introduce error and uncertainty in analyses. These steps include mRNA sample extraction, amplification and labeling, hybridization, and scanning. In some cases this may be manifested as systematic spatial variation on the surface of microarray in which expression measurements within an individual array may vary as a function of geographic position on the array surface. Results We hypothesized that an index of the degree of spatiality of gene expression measurements associated with their physical geographic locations on an array could indicate the summary of the physical reliability of the microarray. We introduced a novel way to formulate this index using a statistical analysis tool. Our approach regressed gene expression intensity measurements on a polynomial response surface of the microarray's Cartesian coordinates. We demonstrated this method using a fixed model and presented results from real and simulated datasets. Conclusion We demonstrated the potential of such a quantitative metric for assessing the reliability of individual arrays. Moreover, we showed that this procedure can be incorporated into laboratory practice as a means to set quality control specifications and as a tool to determine whether an array has sufficient quality to be retained in terms of spatial correlation of gene expression measurements. PMID:16430768

  20. Chemical substitution in silica polymorph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. V.; Steele, I. M.

    1984-01-01

    Ion and electron probe analyses are presented for trace elements (Al, Na, K, Li, Ti) in quartz, tridymite, cristobalite and melanophlogite. Quartz and melanophlogite show low levels of trace elements relative to tridymite and cristobalite. The previously determined alpha-beta inversion temperature decreases as the Al content of quartz increases. For all silica polymorphs, Al is greater than or equal to Na + K + Li on an atom basis, with the excess Al probably balanced by H.

  1. Analytical Protein Microarrays: Advancements Towards Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Ursula

    2017-01-29

    Protein microarrays represent a powerful technology with the potential to serve as tools for the detection of a broad range of analytes in numerous applications such as diagnostics, drug development, food safety, and environmental monitoring. Key features of analytical protein microarrays include high throughput and relatively low costs due to minimal reagent consumption, multiplexing, fast kinetics and hence measurements, and the possibility of functional integration. So far, especially fundamental studies in molecular and cell biology have been conducted using protein microarrays, while the potential for clinical, notably point-of-care applications is not yet fully utilized. The question arises what features have to be implemented and what improvements have to be made in order to fully exploit the technology. In the past we have identified various obstacles that have to be overcome in order to promote protein microarray technology in the diagnostic field. Issues that need significant improvement to make the technology more attractive for the diagnostic market are for instance: too low sensitivity and deficiency in reproducibility, inadequate analysis time, lack of high-quality antibodies and validated reagents, lack of automation and portable instruments, and cost of instruments necessary for chip production and read-out. The scope of the paper at hand is to review approaches to solve these problems.

  2. Analytical Protein Microarrays: Advancements Towards Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Protein microarrays represent a powerful technology with the potential to serve as tools for the detection of a broad range of analytes in numerous applications such as diagnostics, drug development, food safety, and environmental monitoring. Key features of analytical protein microarrays include high throughput and relatively low costs due to minimal reagent consumption, multiplexing, fast kinetics and hence measurements, and the possibility of functional integration. So far, especially fundamental studies in molecular and cell biology have been conducted using protein microarrays, while the potential for clinical, notably point-of-care applications is not yet fully utilized. The question arises what features have to be implemented and what improvements have to be made in order to fully exploit the technology. In the past we have identified various obstacles that have to be overcome in order to promote protein microarray technology in the diagnostic field. Issues that need significant improvement to make the technology more attractive for the diagnostic market are for instance: too low sensitivity and deficiency in reproducibility, inadequate analysis time, lack of high-quality antibodies and validated reagents, lack of automation and portable instruments, and cost of instruments necessary for chip production and read-out. The scope of the paper at hand is to review approaches to solve these problems. PMID:28146048

  3. Microarrays (DNA Chips) for the Classroom Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy; Sussman, Michael; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Nienhuis, James; Krysan, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and optimized the necessary laboratory materials to make DNA microarray technology accessible to all high school students at a fraction of both cost and data size. The primary component is a DNA chip/array that students "print" by hand and then analyze using research tools that have been adapted for classroom use. The…

  4. MICROARRAY DATA ANALYSIS USING MULTIPLE STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray Data Analysis Using Multiple Statistical Models

    Wenjun Bao1, Judith E. Schmid1, Amber K. Goetz1, Ming Ouyang2, William J. Welsh2,Andrew I. Brooks3,4, ChiYi Chu3,Mitsunori Ogihara3,4, Yinhe Cheng5, David J. Dix1. 1National Health and Environmental Effects Researc...

  5. Raman-based microarray readout: a review.

    PubMed

    Haisch, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    For a quarter of a century, microarrays have been part of the routine analytical toolbox. Label-based fluorescence detection is still the commonest optical readout strategy. Since the 1990s, a continuously increasing number of label-based as well as label-free experiments on Raman-based microarray readout concepts have been reported. This review summarizes the possible concepts and methods and their advantages and challenges. A common label-based strategy is based on the binding of selective receptors as well as Raman reporter molecules to plasmonic nanoparticles in a sandwich immunoassay, which results in surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals of the reporter molecule. Alternatively, capture of the analytes can be performed by receptors on a microarray surface. Addition of plasmonic nanoparticles again leads to a surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal, not of a label but directly of the analyte. This approach is mostly proposed for bacteria and cell detection. However, although many promising readout strategies have been discussed in numerous publications, rarely have any of them made the step from proof of concept to a practical application, let alone routine use. Graphical Abstract Possible realization of a SERS (Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering) system for microarray readout.

  6. DISC-BASED IMMUNOASSAY MICROARRAYS. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology as applied to areas that include genomics, diagnostics, environmental, and drug discovery, is an interesting research topic for which different chip-based devices have been developed. As an alternative, we have explored the principle of compact disc-based...

  7. Microarrays (DNA Chips) for the Classroom Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy; Sussman, Michael; BonDurant, Sandra Splinter; Nienhuis, James; Krysan, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    We have developed and optimized the necessary laboratory materials to make DNA microarray technology accessible to all high school students at a fraction of both cost and data size. The primary component is a DNA chip/array that students "print" by hand and then analyze using research tools that have been adapted for classroom use. The…

  8. Annotating nonspecific SAGE tags with microarray data.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xijin; Jung, Yong-Chul; Wu, Qingfa; Kibbe, Warren A; Wang, San Ming

    2006-01-01

    SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) detects transcripts by extracting short tags from the transcripts. Because of the limited length, many SAGE tags are shared by transcripts from different genes. Relying on sequence information in the general gene expression database has limited power to solve this problem due to the highly heterogeneous nature of the deposited sequences. Considering that the complexity of gene expression at a single tissue level should be much simpler than that in the general expression database, we reasoned that by restricting gene expression to tissue level, the accuracy of gene annotation for the nonspecific SAGE tags should be significantly improved. To test the idea, we developed a tissue-specific SAGE annotation database based on microarray data (). This database contains microarray expression information represented as UniGene clusters for 73 normal human tissues and 18 cancer tissues and cell lines. The nonspecific SAGE tag is first matched to the database by the same tissue type used by both SAGE and microarray analysis; then the multiple UniGene clusters assigned to the nonspecific SAGE tag are searched in the database under the matched tissue type. The UniGene cluster presented solely or at higher expression levels in the database is annotated to represent the specific gene for the nonspecific SAGE tags. The accuracy of gene annotation by this database was largely confirmed by experimental data. Our study shows that microarray data provide a useful source for annotating the nonspecific SAGE tags.

  9. Microarray technology: a promising tool in nutrigenomics.

    PubMed

    Masotti, Andrea; Da Sacco, Letizia; Bottazzo, Gian Franco; Alisi, Anna

    2010-08-01

    Microarray technology is a powerful tool for the global evaluation of gene expression profiles in tissues and for understanding many of the factors controlling the regulation of gene transcription. This technique not only provides a considerable amount of information on markers and predictive factors that may potentially characterize a specific clinical picture, but also promises new applications for therapy. One of the most recent applications of microarrays concerns nutritional genomics. Nutritional genomics, known as nutrigenomics, aims to identify and understand mechanisms of molecular interaction between nutrients and/or other dietary bioactive compounds and the genome. Actually, many nutrigenomic studies utilize new approaches such as microarrays, genomics, and bioinformatics to understand how nutrients influence gene expression. The coupling of these new technologies with nutrigenomics promises to lead to improvements in diet and health. In fact, it may provide new information which can be used to ameliorate dietary regimens and to discover novel natural agents for the treatment of important diseases such as diabetes and cancer. This critical review gives an overview of the clinical relevance of a nutritional approach to several important diseases, and proposes the use of microarray for nutrigenomic studies.

  10. DISC-BASED IMMUNOASSAY MICROARRAYS. (R825433)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray technology as applied to areas that include genomics, diagnostics, environmental, and drug discovery, is an interesting research topic for which different chip-based devices have been developed. As an alternative, we have explored the principle of compact disc-based...

  11. MICROARRAY DATA ANALYSIS USING MULTIPLE STATISTICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microarray Data Analysis Using Multiple Statistical Models

    Wenjun Bao1, Judith E. Schmid1, Amber K. Goetz1, Ming Ouyang2, William J. Welsh2,Andrew I. Brooks3,4, ChiYi Chu3,Mitsunori Ogihara3,4, Yinhe Cheng5, David J. Dix1. 1National Health and Environmental Effects Researc...

  12. Strategy for the design of custom cDNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Matthias G O; Cortes, Lizette M; Lorenz, Juergen J; Liu, Edison T

    2003-06-01

    DNA microarrays are valuable but expensive tools for expression profiling of cells, tissues, and organs. The design of custom microarrays leads to cost reduction without necessarily compromising their biological value. Here we present a strategy for designing custom cDNA microarrays and constructed a microarray for mouse immunology research (ImmunoChip). The strategy used interrogates expressed sequence tag databases available in the public domain but overcomes many of the problems encountered. Immunologically relevant clusters were selected based on the expression of expressed sequence tags in relevant libraries. Selected clusters were organized in modules, and the best representative clones were identified. When tested, this microarray was found to have minimal clone identity errors or phage contamination and identified molecular signatures of lymphoid cell lines. Our proposed design of custom microarrays avoids probe redundancy, allows the organization of the chip to optimize chip production, and reduces microarray production costs. The strategy described is also useful for the design of oligonucleotide microarrays.

  13. PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR PROCESSING AND ANALYZING SPOTTED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thoughtful data analysis is as important as experimental design, biological sample quality, and appropriate experimental procedures for making microarrays a useful supplement to traditional toxicology. In the present study, spotted oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile...

  14. A Method of Microarray Data Storage Using Array Data Type

    PubMed Central

    Tsoi, Lam C.; Zheng, W. Jim

    2009-01-01

    A well-designed microarray database can provide valuable information on gene expression levels. However, designing an efficient microarray database with minimum space usage is not an easy task since designers need to integrate the microarray data with the information of genes, probe annotation, and the descriptions of each microarray experiment. Developing better methods to store microarray data can greatly improve the efficiency and usefulness of such data. A new schema is proposed to store microarray data by using array data type in an object-relational database management system – PostgreSQL. The implemented database can store all the microarray data from the same chip in an array data structure. The variable length array data type in PostgreSQL can store microarray data from same chip. The implementation of our schema can help to increase the data retrieval and space efficiency. PMID:17392028

  15. PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR PROCESSING AND ANALYZING SPOTTED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thoughtful data analysis is as important as experimental design, biological sample quality, and appropriate experimental procedures for making microarrays a useful supplement to traditional toxicology. In the present study, spotted oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile...

  16. Analyses of genes encoding Theileria parva p104 and polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) reveal evidence of the presence of cattle-type alleles in the South African T. parva population.

    PubMed

    Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Collins, Nicola E; Oosthuizen, Marinda C; Troskie, Milana; Potgieter, Frederick T; Coetzer, Jacobus A W; Geysen, Dirk

    2011-09-27

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR products (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing of the variable region of the p104 and PIM genes was performed on samples obtained from South African T. parva parasites originating from cattle on farms with suspected theileriosis and from buffalo. p104 and PIM PCR-RFLP profiles similar to those of the T. parva Muguga stock, an isolate that causes ECF in Kenya, were obtained from three of seven cattle samples collected on a farm near Ladysmith in KwaZulu-Natal Province. Amino acid sequences of the p104 and PIM genes from two of these samples were almost identical to the T. parva Muguga p104 and PIM sequences. This result supports findings from a recent p67 study in which p67 alleles similar to those of the T. parva Muguga stock were identified from the same samples. While these results suggest the presence of a cattle-derived T. parva parasite, reports of cattle-to-cattle transmission could not be substantiated and ECF was not diagnosed on this farm. Although extensive diversity of p104 and PIM gene sequences from South African T. parva isolates was demonstrated, no sequences identical to known cattle-type p104 and PIM alleles were identified from any of the buffalo T. parva samples analyzed. 'Mixed' PIM alleles containing both cattle- and buffalo-type amino acid motifs were identified for the first time, and there appeared to be selection of cattle-type and 'mixed'-type PIM sequences in the cattle samples examined.

  17. Rivastigmine hydrogen tartrate polymorphs: Solid-state characterisation of transition and polymorphic conversion via milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro, Maria Inês; Simon, Alice; Cabral, Lúcio Mendes; de Sousa, Valéria Pereira; Healy, Anne Marie

    2015-11-01

    Rivastigmine (RHT) is an active pharmaceutical ingredient that is used for the treatment of mild to moderately severe dementia in Alzheimer's disease, and is known to present two polymorphic forms and to amorphise upon granulation. To date there is no information in the scientific or patent literature on polymorphic transition and stability. Hence, the aim of the current study was to gain a fundamental understanding of the polymorphic forms by (1) evaluating RHT thermodynamic stability (monotropy or enantiotropy) and (2) investigating the potential for polymorphic transformation upon milling. The two polymorphic and amorphous forms were characterised using X-ray powder diffractometry, thermal analyses, infra-red spectroscopy and water sorption analysis. The polymorphic transition was found to be spontaneous (ΔG0 < 0) and exothermic (ΔH0 < 0), indicative of a monotropic polymorph pair. The kinetic studies showed a fast initial polymorphic transition characterised by a heterogeneous nucleation, followed by a slow crystal growth. Ball milling can be used to promote the polymorphic transition and for the production of RHT amorphous form.

  18. Feature extraction and signal processing for nylon DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, F; Rougemont, J; Loriod, B; Bourgeois, A; Loï, L; Bertucci, F; Hingamp, P; Houlgatte, R; Granjeaud, S

    2004-01-01

    Background High-density DNA microarrays require automatic feature extraction methodologies and softwares. These can be a potential source of non-reproducibility of gene expression measurements. Variation in feature location or in signal integration methodology may be a significant contribution to the observed variance in gene expression levels. Results We explore sources of variability in feature extraction from DNA microarrays on Nylon membrane with radioactive detection. We introduce a mathematical model of the signal emission and derive methods for correcting biases such as overshining, saturation or variation in probe amount. We also provide a quality metric which can be used qualitatively to flag weak or untrusted signals or quantitatively to modulate the weight of each experiment or gene in higher level analyses (clustering or discriminant analysis). Conclusions Our novel feature extraction methodology, based on a mathematical model of the radioactive emission, reduces variability due to saturation, neighbourhood effects and variable probe amount. Furthermore, we provide a fully automatic feature extraction software, BZScan, which implements the algorithms described in this paper. PMID:15222896

  19. Identifying new human oocyte marker genes: a microarray approach

    PubMed Central

    Gasca, Stephan; Pellestor, Franck; Assou, Said; Loup, Vanessa; Anahory, Tal; Dechaud, Hervé; De Vos, John; Hamamah, Samir

    2007-01-01

    Efficiency in classical IVF (cIVF) techniques is still impaired by poor implantation and pregnancy rates after embryo transfer. This is mostly due to a lack of reliable criteria for the selection of embryos with sufficient development potential. Several studies have provided evidence that some genes’ expression levels could be used as objective markers of oocytes and embryos competence and of their capacity to sustain a successful pregnancy. These analyses usually used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to look at small sets of pre-selected genes. However, microarray approaches permit to identify a wider range of cellular marker genes. Thus they allow the identification of additional and perhaps more suited genes that could serve as embryo selection markers. Microarray screenings of circa 30 000 genes on U133P Affymetrix™ gene chips made it possible to establish the expression profile of these genes as well as other related genes in human oocytes and cumulus cells. In this study, we identified new potential regulators and marker genes such as BARD1, RBL2, RBBP7, BUB3 or BUB1B, which are involved in oocyte maturation. PMID:17298719

  20. Identifying new human oocyte marker genes: a microarray approach.

    PubMed

    Gasca, Stéphan; Pellestor, Franck; Assou, Saïd; Loup, Vanessa; Anahory, Tal; Dechaud, Hervé; De Vos, John; Hamamah, Samir

    2007-02-01

    The efficacy of classical IVF techniques is still impaired by poor implantation and pregnancy rates after embryo transfer. This is mainly due to a lack of reliable criteria for the selection of embryos with sufficient development potential. Several studies have provided evidence that some gene expression levels could be used as objective markers of oocyte and embryo competence and capacity to sustain a successful pregnancy. These analyses usually use reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to look at small sets of pre-selected genes. However, microarray approaches allow the identification of a wider range of cellular marker genes which could include additional and perhaps more suitable genes that could serve as embryo selection markers. Microarray screenings of around 30,000 genes on U133P Affymetrix gene chips made it possible to establish the expression profile of these genes as well as other related genes in human oocytes and cumulus cells. This study identifies new potential regulators and marker genes such as BARD1, RBL2, RBBP7, BUB3 or BUB1B, which are involved in oocyte maturation.

  1. Identifying Fishes through DNA Barcodes and Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kochzius, Marc; Seidel, Christian; Antoniou, Aglaia; Botla, Sandeep Kumar; Campo, Daniel; Cariani, Alessia; Vazquez, Eva Garcia; Hauschild, Janet; Hervet, Caroline; Hjörleifsdottir, Sigridur; Hreggvidsson, Gudmundur; Kappel, Kristina; Landi, Monica; Magoulas, Antonios; Marteinsson, Viggo; Nölte, Manfred; Planes, Serge; Tinti, Fausto; Turan, Cemal; Venugopal, Moleyur N.; Weber, Hannes; Blohm, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Background International fish trade reached an import value of 62.8 billion Euro in 2006, of which 44.6% are covered by the European Union. Species identification is a key problem throughout the life cycle of fishes: from eggs and larvae to adults in fisheries research and control, as well as processed fish products in consumer protection. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aims to evaluate the applicability of the three mitochondrial genes 16S rRNA (16S), cytochrome b (cyt b), and cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) for the identification of 50 European marine fish species by combining techniques of “DNA barcoding” and microarrays. In a DNA barcoding approach, neighbour Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees of 369 16S, 212 cyt b, and 447 COI sequences indicated that cyt b and COI are suitable for unambiguous identification, whereas 16S failed to discriminate closely related flatfish and gurnard species. In course of probe design for DNA microarray development, each of the markers yielded a high number of potentially species-specific probes in silico, although many of them were rejected based on microarray hybridisation experiments. None of the markers provided probes to discriminate the sibling flatfish and gurnard species. However, since 16S-probes were less negatively influenced by the “position of label” effect and showed the lowest rejection rate and the highest mean signal intensity, 16S is more suitable for DNA microarray probe design than cty b and COI. The large portion of rejected COI-probes after hybridisation experiments (>90%) renders the DNA barcoding marker as rather unsuitable for this high-throughput technology. Conclusions/Significance Based on these data, a DNA microarray containing 64 functional oligonucleotide probes for the identification of 30 out of the 50 fish species investigated was developed. It represents the next step towards an automated and easy-to-handle method to identify fish, ichthyoplankton, and fish products. PMID

  2. Design of a covalently bonded glycosphingolipid microarray.

    PubMed

    Arigi, Emma; Blixt, Ola; Buschard, Karsten; Clausen, Henrik; Levery, Steven B

    2012-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are well known ubiquitous constituents of all eukaryotic cell membranes, yet their normal biological functions are not fully understood. As with other glycoconjugates and saccharides, solid phase display on microarrays potentially provides an effective platform for in vitro study of their functional interactions. However, with few exceptions, the most widely used microarray platforms display only the glycan moiety of GSLs, which not only ignores potential modulating effects of the lipid aglycone, but inherently limits the scope of application, excluding, for example, the major classes of plant and fungal GSLs. In this work, a prototype "universal" GSL-based covalent microarray has been designed, and preliminary evaluation of its potential utility in assaying protein-GSL binding interactions investigated. An essential step in development involved the enzymatic release of the fatty acyl moiety of the ceramide aglycone of selected mammalian GSLs with sphingolipid N-deacylase (SCDase). Derivatization of the free amino group of a typical lyso-GSL, lyso-G(M1), with a prototype linker assembled from succinimidyl-[(N-maleimidopropionamido)-diethyleneglycol] ester and 2-mercaptoethylamine, was also tested. Underivatized or linker-derivatized lyso-GSL were then immobilized on N-hydroxysuccinimide- or epoxide-activated glass microarray slides and probed with carbohydrate binding proteins of known or partially known specificities (i.e., cholera toxin B-chain; peanut agglutinin, a monoclonal antibody to sulfatide, Sulph 1; and a polyclonal antiserum reactive to asialo-G(M2)). Preliminary evaluation of the method indicated successful immobilization of the GSLs, and selective binding of test probes. The potential utility of this methodology for designing covalent microarrays that incorporate GSLs for serodiagnosis is discussed.

  3. Methods in molecular cardiology: microarray technology

    PubMed Central

    van den Bosch, B.; Doevendans, P.A.; Lips, D.; Smeets, H.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    It has become more and more evident that changes in expression levels of genes can play an important role in cardiovascular diseases. Specific gene expression profiles may explain, for example, the pathophysiology of myocardial hypertrophy and pump failure and may provide clues for therapeutic interventions. Knowledge of gene expression patterns can also be applied for diagnostic and prognostic purposes, in which differences in gene activity can be used for classification. DNA microarray technology has become the method of choice to simultaneously study the expression of many different genes in a single assay. Each microarray contains many thousands of different DNA sequences attached to a glass slide. The amount of messenger RNA, which is a measure of gene activity, is compared for each gene on the microarray by labelling the mRNA with different fluorescently labelled nucleotides (Cy3 or Cy5) for the test and reference samples. After hybridisation to the microarray the relative amounts of a particular gene transcript in the two samples can be determined by measuring the signal intensities for the fluorescent groups (Cy3 and Cy5) and calculating signal ratios. This paper describes the development of in-house microarray technology, using commercially available cDNA collections. Several technical approaches will be compared and an overview of the pitfalls and possibilities will be presented. The technology will be explained in the context of our project to determine gene expression differences between normal, hypertrophic and failing heart. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 9 PMID:25696214

  4. Comparison of gene expression microarray data with count-based RNA measurements informs microarray interpretation.

    PubMed

    Richard, Arianne C; Lyons, Paul A; Peters, James E; Biasci, Daniele; Flint, Shaun M; Lee, James C; McKinney, Eoin F; Siegel, Richard M; Smith, Kenneth G C

    2014-08-04

    Although numerous investigations have compared gene expression microarray platforms, preprocessing methods and batch correction algorithms using constructed spike-in or dilution datasets, there remains a paucity of studies examining the properties of microarray data using diverse biological samples. Most microarray experiments seek to identify subtle differences between samples with variable background noise, a scenario poorly represented by constructed datasets. Thus, microarray users lack important information regarding the complexities introduced in real-world experimental settings. The recent development of a multiplexed, digital technology for nucleic acid measurement enables counting of individual RNA molecules without amplification and, for the first time, permits such a study. Using a set of human leukocyte subset RNA samples, we compared previously acquired microarray expression values with RNA molecule counts determined by the nCounter Analysis System (NanoString Technologies) in selected genes. We found that gene measurements across samples correlated well between the two platforms, particularly for high-variance genes, while genes deemed unexpressed by the nCounter generally had both low expression and low variance on the microarray. Confirming previous findings from spike-in and dilution datasets, this "gold-standard" comparison demonstrated signal compression that varied dramatically by expression level and, to a lesser extent, by dataset. Most importantly, examination of three different cell types revealed that noise levels differed across tissues. Microarray measurements generally correlate with relative RNA molecule counts within optimal ranges but suffer from expression-dependent accuracy bias and precision that varies across datasets. We urge microarray users to consider expression-level effects in signal interpretation and to evaluate noise properties in each dataset independently.

  5. Micro-Analyzer: automatic preprocessing of Affymetrix microarray data.

    PubMed

    Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2013-08-01

    A current trend in genomics is the investigation of the cell mechanism using different technologies, in order to explain the relationship among genes, molecular processes and diseases. For instance, the combined use of gene-expression arrays and genomic arrays has been demonstrated as an effective instrument in clinical practice. Consequently, in a single experiment different kind of microarrays may be used, resulting in the production of different types of binary data (images and textual raw data). The analysis of microarray data requires an initial preprocessing phase, that makes raw data suitable for use on existing analysis platforms, such as the TIGR M4 (TM4) Suite. An additional challenge to be faced by emerging data analysis platforms is the ability to treat in a combined way those different microarray formats coupled with clinical data. In fact, resulting integrated data may include both numerical and symbolic data (e.g. gene expression and SNPs regarding molecular data), as well as temporal data (e.g. the response to a drug, time to progression and survival rate), regarding clinical data. Raw data preprocessing is a crucial step in analysis but is often performed in a manual and error prone way using different software tools. Thus novel, platform independent, and possibly open source tools enabling the semi-automatic preprocessing and annotation of different microarray data are needed. The paper presents Micro-Analyzer (Microarray Analyzer), a cross-platform tool for the automatic normalization, summarization and annotation of Affymetrix gene expression and SNP binary data. It represents the evolution of the μ-CS tool, extending the preprocessing to SNP arrays that were not allowed in μ-CS. The Micro-Analyzer is provided as a Java standalone tool and enables users to read, preprocess and analyse binary microarray data (gene expression and SNPs) by invoking TM4 platform. It avoids: (i) the manual invocation of external tools (e.g. the Affymetrix Power

  6. Sociopolitical Analyses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Galen, Jane, Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue of the serial "Educational Foundations" contains four articles devoted to the topic of "Sociopolitical Analyses." In "An Interview with Peter L. McLaren," Mary Leach presented the views of Peter L. McLaren on topics of local and national discourses, values, and the politics of difference. Landon E.…

  7. Optimal cDNA microarray design using expressed sequence tags for organisms with limited genomic information

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yian A; Mckillen, David J; Wu, Shuyuan; Jenny, Matthew J; Chapman, Robert; Gross, Paul S; Warr, Gregory W; Almeida, Jonas S

    2004-01-01

    Background Expression microarrays are increasingly used to characterize environmental responses and host-parasite interactions for many different organisms. Probe selection for cDNA microarrays using expressed sequence tags (ESTs) is challenging due to high sequence redundancy and potential cross-hybridization between paralogous genes. In organisms with limited genomic information, like marine organisms, this challenge is even greater due to annotation uncertainty. No general tool is available for cDNA microarray probe selection for these organisms. Therefore, the goal of the design procedure described here is to select a subset of ESTs that will minimize sequence redundancy and characterize potential cross-hybridization while providing functionally representative probes. Results Sequence similarity between ESTs, quantified by the E-value of pair-wise alignment, was used as a surrogate for expected hybridization between corresponding sequences. Using this value as a measure of dissimilarity, sequence redundancy reduction was performed by hierarchical cluster analyses. The choice of how many microarray probes to retain was made based on an index developed for this research: a sequence diversity index (SDI) within a sequence diversity plot (SDP). This index tracked the decreasing within-cluster sequence diversity as the number of clusters increased. For a given stage in the agglomeration procedure, the EST having the highest similarity to all the other sequences within each cluster, the centroid EST, was selected as a microarray probe. A small dataset of ESTs from Atlantic white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus) was used to test this algorithm so that the detailed results could be examined. The functional representative level of the selected probes was quantified using Gene Ontology (GO) annotations. Conclusions For organisms with limited genomic information, combining hierarchical clustering methods to analyze ESTs can yield an optimal cDNA microarray design. If

  8. Innovative integrated system for real-time measurement of hybridization and melting on standard format microarrays.

    PubMed

    Marcy, Yann; Cousin, Pierre-Yves; Rattier, Maxime; Cerovic, Gordana; Escalier, Guilhem; Béna, Gilles; Guéron, Maurice; McDonagh, Lorcan; le Boulaire, Françoise; Bénisty, Henri; Weisbuch, Claude; Avarre, Jean-Christophe

    2008-06-01

    Despite the great popularity and potential of microarrays, their use for research and clinical applications is still hampered by lengthy and costly design and optimization processes, mainly because the technology relies on the end point measurement of hybridization. Thus, the ability to monitor many hybridization events on a standard microarray slide in real time would greatly expand the use and benefit of this technology, as it would give access to better prediction of probe performance and improved optimization of hybridization parameters. Although real-time hybridization and thermal denaturation measurements have been reported, a complete walk-away system compatible with the standard format of microarrays is still unavailable. To address this issue, we have designed a biochip tool that combines a hybridization station with active mixing capability and temperature control together with a fluorescence reader in a single compact benchtop instrument. This integrated live hybridization machine (LHM) allows measuring in real time the hybridization of target DNA to thousands of probes simultaneously and provides excellent levels of detection and superior sequence discrimination. Here we show on an environmental single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) model system that the LHM enables a variety of experiments unachievable with conventional biochip tools.

  9. MICB Allele Genotyping on Microarrays by Improving the Specificity of Extension Primers

    PubMed Central

    Baek, In-Cheol; Jang, Jung-Pil; Choi, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene B (MICB) encodes a ligand for activating NKG2D that expressed in natural killer cells, γδ T cells, and αβ CD8+ T cells, which is associated with autoimmune diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases. Here, we have established a system for genotyping MICB alleles using allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) on microarrays. Thirty-six high quality, allele-specific extension primers were evaluated using strict and reliable cut-off values using mean fluorescence intensity (MFI), whereby an MFI >30,000 represented a positive signal and an MFI <10,000 represented a negative signal. Eight allele-specific extension primers were found to be false positives, five of which were improved by adjusting their length, and three of which were optimized by refractory modification. The MICB alleles (*002:01, *003, *005:02/*010, *005:03, *008, *009N, *018, and *024) present in the quality control panel could be exactly defined by 22 allele-specific extension primers. MICB genotypes that were identified by ASPE on microarrays were in full concordance with those identified by PCR-sequence-based typing. In conclusion, we have developed a method for genotyping MICB alleles using ASPE on microarrays; which can be applicable for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism typing studies of population and disease associations. PMID:26569110

  10. Use of DNA Microarrays for Rapid Genotyping of TEM Beta-Lactamases That Confer Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Verena; Ezaki, Satoshi; Susa, Milorad; Knabbe, Cornelius; Schmid, Rolf. D.; Bachmann, Till T.

    2004-01-01

    Standard clinical procedures for pathogen resistance identification are laborious and usually require 2 days of cultivation before the resistance can be determined unequivocally. In contrast, clinicians and patients face increasing threats from antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria in terms of their frequencies and levels of resistance. A major class of microbial resistance stems from the occurrence of beta-lactamases, which, if mutated, can cause the severe extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) or inhibitor-resistant TEM (IRT) phenotype, which cause resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins, monobactams, and beta-lactamase inhibitors. We describe an oligonucleotide microarray for identification of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 96% of the TEM beta-lactamase variants described to date which are related to the ESBL and/or IRT phenotype. The target DNA, originating from Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, and Klebsiella pneumoniae cells isolated from clinical samples, was amplified and fluorescently labeled by PCR with consensus primers in the presence of cyanine 5-labeled nucleotides. The total assay, including PCR, hybridization, and image analysis, could be performed in 3.5 h. The microarray results were validated by standard clinical procedures. The microarray outperformed the standard procedures in terms of assay time and the depth of information provided. In conclusion, this array offers an attractive option for the identification and epidemiologic monitoring of TEM beta-lactamases in the routine clinical diagnostic laboratory. PMID:15297528

  11. Microarray chip development using infrared imaging for the identification of catfish species.

    PubMed

    Handy, Sara M; Chizhikov, Vladimir; Yakes, Betsy Jean; Paul, Stephen Z; Deeds, Jonathan R; Mossoba, Magdi M

    2014-01-01

    Several families of catfish species are extensively aquacultured around the world; however, only those from the family Ictaluridae can be labeled as catfish in the United States. Non-Ictalurid catfish species that are marketed as "catfish" in the USA are considered misbranded. Misbranding in general has led to an increased interest in developing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based methods such as DNA barcoding, polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism, and DNA microarrays with fluorescence detection for the identification of fish species. In this proof-of-concept study, DNA microarrays coupled with a newly developed mid-infrared imaging detection method were applied to the identification of seven species of catfish for the first time. Species-specific DNA probes targeting three regions per species of the cytochrome c oxidase 1 (barcoding) gene were developed and printed as microarrays on glass slides. Deoxyribonucleic acid targets labeled with biotin were hybridized to their complementary probes using a strategy that allowed the selective formation of a silver layer on hybridized spots needed for detection. Using this three-probe format, the seven species were all identified correctly, even when a limited number of false positive spots were observed. Raman spectroscopy was employed to further characterize the arrays.

  12. Y-chromosomal SNPs in Finno-Ugric-speaking populations analyzed by minisequencing on microarrays.

    PubMed

    Raitio, M; Lindroos, K; Laukkanen, M; Pastinen, T; Sistonen, P; Sajantila, A; Syvänen, A C

    2001-03-01

    An increasing number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the Y chromosome are being identified. To utilize the full potential of the SNP markers in population genetic studies, new genotyping methods with high throughput are required. We describe a microarray system based on the minisequencing single nucleotide primer extension principle for multiplex genotyping of Y-chromosomal SNP markers. The system was applied for screening a panel of 25 Y-chromosomal SNPs in a unique collection of samples representing five Finno--Ugric populations. The specific minisequencing reaction provides 5-fold to infinite discrimination between the Y-chromosomal genotypes, and the microarray format of the system allows parallel and simultaneous analysis of large numbers of SNPs and samples. In addition to the SNP markers, five Y-chromosomal microsatellite loci were typed. Altogether 10,000 genotypes were generated to assess the genetic diversity in these population samples. Six of the 25 SNP markers (M9, Tat, SRY10831, M17, M12, 92R7) were polymorphic in the analyzed populations, yielding six distinct SNP haplotypes. The microsatellite data were used to study the genetic structure of two major SNP haplotypes in the Finns and the Saami in more detail. We found that the most common haplotypes are shared between the Finns and the Saami, and that the SNP haplotypes show regional differences within the Finns and the Saami, which supports the hypothesis of two separate settlement waves to Finland.

  13. Gene microarray data analysis using parallel point-symmetry-based clustering.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anasua; Maulik, Ujjwal

    2015-01-01

    Identification of co-expressed genes is the central goal in microarray gene expression analysis. Point-symmetry-based clustering is an important unsupervised learning technique for recognising symmetrical convex- or non-convex-shaped clusters. To enable fast clustering of large microarray data, we propose a distributed time-efficient scalable approach for point-symmetry-based K-Means algorithm. A natural basis for analysing gene expression data using symmetry-based algorithm is to group together genes with similar symmetrical expression patterns. This new parallel implementation also satisfies linear speedup in timing without sacrificing the quality of clustering solution on large microarray data sets. The parallel point-symmetry-based K-Means algorithm is compared with another new parallel symmetry-based K-Means and existing parallel K-Means over eight artificial and benchmark microarray data sets, to demonstrate its superiority, in both timing and validity. The statistical analysis is also performed to establish the significance of this message-passing-interface based point-symmetry K-Means implementation. We also analysed the biological relevance of clustering solutions.

  14. Candidate genes for the progression of malignant gliomas identified by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Bozinov, Oliver; Köhler, Sylvia; Samans, Birgit; Benes, Ludwig; Miller, Dorothea; Ritter, Markus; Sure, Ulrich; Bertalanffy, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Malignant astrocytomas of World Health Organization (WHO) grade III or IV have a reduced median survival time, and possible pathways have been described for the progression of anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastomas, but the molecular basis of malignant astrocytoma progression is still poorly understood. Microarray analysis provides the chance to accelerate studies by comparison of the expression of thousands of genes in these tumours and consequently identify targeting genes. We compared the transcriptional profile of 4,608 genes in tumours of 15 patients including 6 anaplastic astrocytomas (WHO grade III) and 9 glioblastomas (WHO grade IV) using microarray analysis. The microarray data were corroborated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of two selected genes. We identified 166 gene alterations with a fold change of 2 and higher whose mRNA levels differed (absolute value of the t statistic of 1.96) between the two malignant glioma groups. Further analyses confirmed same transcription directions for Olig2 and IL-13Ralpha2 in anaplastic astrocytomas as compared to glioblastomas. Microarray analyses with a close binary question reveal numerous interesting candidate genes, which need further histochemical testing after selection for confirmation. IL-13Ralpha2 and Olig2 have been identified and confirmed to be interesting candidate genes whose differential expression likely plays a role in malignant progression of astrocytomas.

  15. Biostatistical Considerations of the Use of Genomic DNA Reference in Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; Zhu, Mengxia; Wu, Liyou; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    Using genomic DNA as common reference in microarray experiments has recently been tested by different laboratories (2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 20, 24-26). While some reported that experimental results of microarrays using genomic DNA reference conforms nicely to those obtained by cDNA: cDNA co-hybridization method, others acquired poor results. We hypothesize that these conflicting reports could be resolved by biostatistical analyses. To test it, microarray experiments were performed in a -proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis. Pair-wise comparison of three experimental conditions was obtained either by direct cDNA: cDNA co-hybridization, or by indirect calculation through a Shewanella genomic DNA reference. Several major biostatistical techniques were exploited to reduce the amount of inconsistency between both methods and the results were assessed. We discovered that imposing the constraint of minimal number of replicates, logarithmic transformation and random error analyses could significantly improve the data quality. Therefore, it is useful to adopt these biostatistical techniques for microarray data analysis using genomic DNA as reference.

  16. A High-Density Genetic Map with Array-Based Markers Facilitates Structural and Quantitative Trait Locus Analyses of the Common Wheat Genome

    PubMed Central

    Iehisa, Julio Cesar Masaru; Ohno, Ryoko; Kimura, Tatsuro; Enoki, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Satoru; Okamoto, Yuki; Nasuda, Shuhei; Takumi, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    The large genome and allohexaploidy of common wheat have complicated construction of a high-density genetic map. Although improvements in the throughput of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have made it possible to obtain a large amount of genotyping data for an entire mapping population by direct sequencing, including hexaploid wheat, a significant number of missing data points are often apparent due to the low coverage of sequencing. In the present study, a microarray-based polymorphism detection system was developed using NGS data obtained from complexity-reduced genomic DNA of two common wheat cultivars, Chinese Spring (CS) and Mironovskaya 808. After design and selection of polymorphic probes, 13,056 new markers were added to the linkage map of a recombinant inbred mapping population between CS and Mironovskaya 808. On average, 2.49 missing data points per marker were observed in the 201 recombinant inbred lines, with a maximum of 42. Around 40% of the new markers were derived from genic regions and 11% from repetitive regions. The low number of retroelements indicated that the new polymorphic markers were mainly derived from the less repetitive region of the wheat genome. Around 25% of the mapped sequences were useful for alignment with the physical map of barley. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses of 14 agronomically important traits related to flowering, spikes, and seeds demonstrated that the new high-density map showed improved QTL detection, resolution, and accuracy over the original simple sequence repeat map. PMID:24972598

  17. Sequence polymorphisms cause many false cis eQTLs.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Rudi; Terpstra, Peter; Li, Yang; Breitling, Rainer; Nap, Jan-Peter; Jansen, Ritsert C

    2007-07-18

    Many investigations have reported the successful mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for gene expression phenotypes (eQTLs). Local eQTLs, where expression phenotypes map to the genes themselves, are of especially great interest, because they are direct candidates for previously mapped physiological QTLs. Here we show that many mapped local eQTLs in genetical genomics experiments do not reflect actual expression differences caused by sequence polymorphisms in cis-acting factors changing mRNA levels. Instead they indicate hybridization differences caused by sequence polymorphisms in the mRNA region that is targeted by the microarray probes. Many such polymorphisms can be detected by a sensitive and novel statistical approach that takes the individual probe signals into account. Applying this approach to recent mouse and human eQTL data, we demonstrate that indeed many local eQTLs are falsely reported as "cis-acting" or "cis" and can be successfully detected and eliminated with this approach.

  18. Analysis of Mycobacterium leprae gene expression using DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Akama, Takeshi; Tanigawa, Kazunari; Kawashima, Akira; Wu, Huhehasi; Ishii, Norihisa; Suzuki, Koichi

    2010-10-01

    Mycobacterium leprae, the causative agent of leprosy, does not grow under in vitro condition, making molecular analysis of this bacterium difficult. For this reason, bacteriological information regarding M. leprae gene function is limited compared with other mycobacterium species. In this study, we performed DNA microarray analysis to clarify the RNA expression profile of the Thai53 strain of M. leprae grown in footpads of hypertensive nude rats (SHR/NCrj-rnu). Of 1605 M. leprae genes, 315 showed signal intensity twofold higher than the median. These genes include Acyl-CoA metabolic enzymes and drug metabolic enzymes, which might be related to the virulence of M. leprae. In addition, consecutive RNA expression profile and in silico analyses enabled identification of possible operons within the M. leprae genome. The present results will shed light on M. leprae gene function and further our understanding of the pathogenesis of leprosy.

  19. Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Ratta, Barkha; Kumar, Ajay; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips is gaining momentum in recent years. Hence, it is possible to design customized microarray chip for viruses infecting livestock in India. Customized microarray chips identified Bovine herpes virus-1 (BHV-1), Canine Adeno Virus-1 (CAV-1), and Canine Parvo Virus-2 (CPV-2) in clinical samples. Microarray identified specific probes were further confirmed using RT-PCR in all clinical and known samples. Therefore, the application of microarray chips during viral disease outbreaks in Indian livestock is possible where conventional methods are unsuitable. It should be noted that customized application requires a detailed cost efficiency calculation.

  20. Integrated analysis of microarray data and gene function information.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yan; Zhou, Mi; Wong, Wing Hung

    2004-01-01

    Microarray data should be interpreted in the context of existing biological knowledge. Here we present integrated analysis of microarray data and gene function classification data using homogeneity analysis. Homogeneity analysis is a graphical multivariate statistical method for analyzing categorical data. It converts categorical data into graphical display. By simultaneously quantifying the microarray-derived gene groups and gene function categories, it captures the complex relations between biological information derived from microarray data and the existing knowledge about the gene function. Thus, homogeneity analysis provides a mathematical framework for integrating the analysis of microarray data and the existing biological knowledge.

  1. Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Brijesh S; Pokhriyal, Mayank; Ratta, Barkha; Kumar, Ajay; Saxena, Meeta; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Viral diagnosis in Indian livestock using customized microarray chips is gaining momentum in recent years. Hence, it is possible to design customized microarray chip for viruses infecting livestock in India. Customized microarray chips identified Bovine herpes virus-1 (BHV-1), Canine Adeno Virus-1 (CAV-1), and Canine Parvo Virus-2 (CPV-2) in clinical samples. Microarray identified specific probes were further confirmed using RT-PCR in all clinical and known samples. Therefore, the application of microarray chips during viral disease outbreaks in Indian livestock is possible where conventional methods are unsuitable. It should be noted that customized application requires a detailed cost efficiency calculation. PMID:26912948

  2. A whole-genome mouse BAC microarray with 1-Mb resolution for analysis of DNA copy number changes by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yeun-Jun; Jonkers, Jos; Kitson, Hannah; Fiegler, Heike; Humphray, Sean; Scott, Carol; Hunt, Sarah; Yu, Yuejin; Nishijima, Ichiko; Velds, Arno; Holstege, Henne; Carter, Nigel; Bradley, Allan

    2004-01-01

    Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) has become a powerful method for the genome-wide detection of chromosomal imbalances. Although BAC microarrays have been used for mouse CGH studies, the resolving power of these analyses was limited because high-density whole-genome mouse BAC microarrays were not available. We therefore developed a mouse BAC microarray containing 2803 unique BAC clones from mouse genomic libraries at 1-Mb intervals. For the general amplification of BAC clone DNA prior to spotting, we designed a set of three novel degenerate oligonucleotide-primed (DOP) PCR primers that preferentially amplify mouse genomic sequences while minimizing unwanted amplification of contaminating Escherichia coli DNA. The resulting 3K mouse BAC microarrays reproducibly identified DNA copy number alterations in cell lines and primary tumors, such as single-copy deletions, regional amplifications, and aneuploidy.

  3. A process for analysis of microarray comparative genomics hybridisation studies for bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Ben; Wu, Guanghui; Woodward, Martin J; Anjum, Muna F

    2008-01-01

    Background Microarray based comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) experiments have been used to study numerous biological problems including understanding genome plasticity in pathogenic bacteria. Typically such experiments produce large data sets that are difficult for biologists to handle. Although there are some programmes available for interpretation of bacterial transcriptomics data and CGH microarray data for looking at genetic stability in oncogenes, there are none specifically to understand the mosaic nature of bacterial genomes. Consequently a bottle neck still persists in accurate processing and mathematical analysis of these data. To address this shortfall we have produced a simple and robust CGH microarray data analysis process that may be automated in the future to understand bacterial genomic diversity. Results The process involves five steps: cleaning, normalisation, estimating gene presence and absence or divergence, validation, and analysis of data from test against three reference strains simultaneously. Each stage of the process is described and we have compared a number of methods available for characterising bacterial genomic diversity, for calculating the cut-off between gene presence and absence or divergence, and shown that a simple dynamic approach using a kernel density estimator performed better than both established, as well as a more sophisticated mixture modelling technique. We have also shown that current methods commonly used for CGH microarray analysis in tumour and cancer cell lines are not appropriate for analysing our data. Conclusion After carrying out the analysis and validation for three sequenced Escherichia coli strains, CGH microarray data from 19 E. coli O157 pathogenic test strains were used to demonstrate the benefits of applying this simple and robust process to CGH microarray studies using bacterial genomes. PMID:18230148

  4. Molecular diagnosis and prognosis with DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Wiltgen, Marco; Tilz, Gernot P

    2011-05-01

    Microarray analysis makes it possible to determine thousands of gene expression values simultaneously. Changes in gene expression, as a response to diseases, can be detected allowing a better understanding and differentiation of diseases at a molecular level. By comparing different kinds of tissue, for example healthy tissue and cancer tissue, the microarray analysis indicates induced gene activity, repressed gene activity or when there is no change in the gene activity level. Fundamental patterns in gene expression are extracted by several clustering and machine learning algorithms. Certain kinds of cancer can be divided into subtypes, with different clinical outcomes, by their specific gene expression patterns. This enables a better diagnosis and tailoring of individual patient treatments.

  5. Detecting outlier samples in microarray data.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Albert D; Hung, Yeung Sam

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of detecting outlier samples with highly different expression patterns in microarray data. Although outliers are not common, they appear even in widely used benchmark data sets and can negatively affect microarray data analysis. It is important to identify outliers in order to explore underlying experimental or biological problems and remove erroneous data. We propose an outlier detection method based on principal component analysis (PCA) and robust estimation of Mahalanobis distances that is fully automatic. We demonstrate that our outlier detection method identifies biologically significant outliers with high accuracy and that outlier removal improves the prediction accuracy of classifiers. Our outlier detection method is closely related to existing robust PCA methods, so we compare our outlier detection method to a prominent robust PCA method.

  6. Plasmonically amplified fluorescence bioassay with microarray format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogalic, S.; Hageneder, S.; Ctortecka, C.; Bauch, M.; Khan, I.; Preininger, Claudia; Sauer, U.; Dostalek, J.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal in bioassays with microarray detection format is reported. A crossed relief diffraction grating was designed to couple an excitation laser beam to surface plasmons at the wavelength overlapping with the absorption and emission bands of fluorophore Dy647 that was used as a label. The surface of periodically corrugated sensor chip was coated with surface plasmon-supporting gold layer and a thin SU8 polymer film carrying epoxy groups. These groups were employed for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies at arrays of spots. The plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal on the developed microarray chip was tested by using interleukin 8 sandwich immunoassay. The readout was performed ex situ after drying the chip by using a commercial scanner with high numerical aperture collecting lens. Obtained results reveal the enhancement of fluorescence signal by a factor of 5 when compared to a regular glass chip.

  7. Respiratory Tularemia: Francisella Tularensis and Microarray Probe Designing

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Payam; Mammina, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Francisella tularensis (F. tularensis) is the etiological microorganism for tularemia. There are different forms of tularemia such as respiratory tularemia. Respiratory tularemia is the most severe form of tularemia with a high rate of mortality; if not treated. Therefore, traditional microbiological tools and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) are not useful for a rapid, reliable, accurate, sensitive and specific diagnosis. But, DNA microarray technology does. DNA microarray technology needs to appropriate microarray probe designing. Objective: The main goal of this original article was to design suitable long oligo microarray probes for detection and identification of F. tularensis. Method: For performing this research, the complete genomes of F. tularensis subsp. tularensis FSC198, F. tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS, F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica, F. tularensis subsp. novicida (F. novicida U112), and F. philomiragia subsp. philomiragia ATCC 25017 were studied via NCBI BLAST tool, GView and PanSeq Servers and finally the microarray probes were produced and processed via AlleleID 7.7 software and Oligoanalyzer tool, respectively. Results: In this in silico investigation, a number of long oligo microarray probes were designed for detecting and identifying F. tularensis. Among these probes, 15 probes were recognized as the best candidates for microarray chip designing. Conclusion: Calibrated microarray probes reduce the biasis of DNA microarray technology as an advanced, rapid, accurate and cost-effective molecular diagnostic tool with high specificity and sensitivity. Professional microarray probe designing provides us with much more facility and flexibility regarding preparation of a microarray diagnostic chip. PMID:28077973

  8. Respiratory Tularemia: Francisella Tularensis and Microarray Probe Designing.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Reza; Behzadi, Payam; Mammina, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis (F. tularensis) is the etiological microorganism for tularemia. There are different forms of tularemia such as respiratory tularemia. Respiratory tularemia is the most severe form of tularemia with a high rate of mortality; if not treated. Therefore, traditional microbiological tools and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) are not useful for a rapid, reliable, accurate, sensitive and specific diagnosis. But, DNA microarray technology does. DNA microarray technology needs to appropriate microarray probe designing. The main goal of this original article was to design suitable long oligo microarray probes for detection and identification of F. tularensis. For performing this research, the complete genomes of F. tularensis subsp. tularensis FSC198, F. tularensis subsp. holarctica LVS, F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica, F. tularensis subsp. novicida (F. novicida U112), and F. philomiragia subsp. philomiragia ATCC 25017 were studied via NCBI BLAST tool, GView and PanSeq Servers and finally the microarray probes were produced and processed via AlleleID 7.7 software and Oligoanalyzer tool, respectively. In this in silico investigation, a number of long oligo microarray probes were designed for detecting and identifying F. tularensis. Among these probes, 15 probes were recognized as the best candidates for microarray chip designing. Calibrated microarray probes reduce the biasis of DNA microarray technology as an advanced, rapid, accurate and cost-effective molecular diagnostic tool with high specificity and sensitivity. Professional microarray probe designing provides us with much more facility and flexibility regarding preparation of a microarray diagnostic chip.

  9. PMD: A Resource for Archiving and Analyzing Protein Microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhaowei; Huang, Likun; Zhang, Hainan; Li, Yang; Guo, Shujuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shi-hua; Chen, Ziqing; Wang, Jingfang; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2016-01-01

    Protein microarray is a powerful technology for both basic research and clinical study. However, because there is no database specifically tailored for protein microarray, the majority of the valuable original protein microarray data is still not publically accessible. To address this issue, we constructed Protein Microarray Database (PMD), which is specifically designed for archiving and analyzing protein microarray data. In PMD, users can easily browse and search the entire database by experimental name, protein microarray type, and sample information. Additionally, PMD integrates several data analysis tools and provides an automated data analysis pipeline for users. With just one click, users can obtain a comprehensive analysis report for their protein microarray data. The report includes preliminary data analysis, such as data normalization, candidate identification, and an in-depth bioinformatics analysis of the candidates, which include functional annotation, pathway analysis, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. PMD is now freely available at www.proteinmicroarray.cn. PMID:26813635

  10. PMD: A Resource for Archiving and Analyzing Protein Microarray data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhaowei; Huang, Likun; Zhang, Hainan; Li, Yang; Guo, Shujuan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Shi-Hua; Chen, Ziqing; Wang, Jingfang; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2016-01-27

    Protein microarray is a powerful technology for both basic research and clinical study. However, because there is no database specifically tailored for protein microarray, the majority of the valuable original protein microarray data is still not publically accessible. To address this issue, we constructed Protein Microarray Database (PMD), which is specifically designed for archiving and analyzing protein microarray data. In PMD, users can easily browse and search the entire database by experimental name, protein microarray type, and sample information. Additionally, PMD integrates several data analysis tools and provides an automated data analysis pipeline for users. With just one click, users can obtain a comprehensive analysis report for their protein microarray data. The report includes preliminary data analysis, such as data normalization, candidate identification, and an in-depth bioinformatics analysis of the candidates, which include functional annotation, pathway analysis, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. PMD is now freely available at www.proteinmicroarray.cn.

  11. An Affymetrix Microarray Design for Microbial Genotyping

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Pagotto, F. 2004. Selective discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes epidemic strains by a mixed-genome DNA microarray compared to discrimination by...Legionella pneumophila Paris 399 Legionella pneumophila pneumophila 5 Listeria innocua Clip 11262 105 Listeria ivanoviiI ATCC 19119 5 Listeria ...monocytogenes monocytogenes 10 Listeria monocytogenes APRT EGD-e 5 Listeria monocytogenes HPT 4b 2365 10 Listeria monocytogenes HPT EGD-e 5 Listeria

  12. Ultrahigh density microarrays of solid samples.

    PubMed

    LeBaron, Matthew J; Crismon, Heidi R; Utama, Fransiscus E; Neilson, Lynn M; Sultan, Ahmed S; Johnson, Kevin J; Andersson, Eva C; Rui, Hallgeir

    2005-07-01

    We present a sectioning and bonding technology to make ultrahigh density microarrays of solid samples, cutting edge matrix assembly (CEMA). Maximized array density is achieved by a scaffold-free, self-supporting construction with rectangular array features that are incrementally scalable. This platform technology facilitates arrays of >10,000 tissue features on a standard glass slide, inclusion of unique sample identifiers for improved manual or automated tracking, and oriented arraying of stratified or polarized samples.

  13. High-Throughput Enzyme Kinetics Using Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-11-01

    We report a microanalytical method to study enzyme kinetics. The technique involves immobilizing horseradish peroxidase on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)- coated glass slide in a microarray format, followed by applying substrate solution onto the enzyme microarray. Enzyme molecules are immobilized on the PLL-coated glass slide through electrostatic interactions, and no further modification of the enzyme or glass slide is needed. In situ detection of the products generated on the enzyme spots is made possible by monitoring the light intensity of each spot using a scientific-grade charged-coupled device (CCD). Reactions of substrate solutions of various types and concentrations can be carried out sequentially on one enzyme microarray. To account for the loss of enzyme from washing in between runs, a standard substrate solution is used for calibration. Substantially reduced amounts of substrate solution are consumed for each reaction on each enzyme spot. The Michaelis constant K{sub m} obtained by using this method is comparable to the result for homogeneous solutions. Absorbance detection allows universal monitoring, and no chemical modification of the substrate is needed. High-throughput studies of native enzyme kinetics for multiple enzymes are therefore possible in a simple, rapid, and low-cost manner.

  14. Methods for fabricating microarrays of motile bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rozhok, Sergey; Shen, Clifton K-F; Littler, Pey-Lih H; Fan, Zhifang; Liu, Chang; Mirkin, Chad A; Holz, Richard C

    2005-04-01

    Motile bacterial cell microarrays were fabricated by attaching Escherichia coli K-12 cells onto predesigned 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid patterned microarrays, which were covalently functionalized with E. coli antibodies or poly-L-lysine. By utilizing 11-mercaptoundecyl-penta(ethylene glycol) or 11-mercapto-1-undecanol as passivating molecules, nonspecific binding of E. coli was significantly reduced. Microcontact printing and dip-pen nanolithography were used to prepare microarrays for bacterial adhesion, which was studied by optical fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. These data indicate that single motile E. coli can be attached to predesigned line or dot features and binding can occur via the cell body or the flagella of bacteria. Adherent bacteria are viable (remain alive and motile after adhesion to patterned surface features) for more than four hours. Individual motile bacterial cells can be placed onto predesigned surface features that are at least 1.3 microm in diameter or larger. The importance of controlling the adhesion of single bacterial cell to a surface is discussed with regard to biomotor design.

  15. A New Distribution Family for Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Kelmansky, Diana Mabel; Ricci, Lila

    2017-02-10

    The traditional approach with microarray data has been to apply transformations that approximately normalize them, with the drawback of losing the original scale. The alternative stand point taken here is to search for models that fit the data, characterized by the presence of negative values, preserving their scale; one advantage of this strategy is that it facilitates a direct interpretation of the results. A new family of distributions named gpower-normal indexed by p∈R is introduced and it is proven that these variables become normal or truncated normal when a suitable gpower transformation is applied. Expressions are given for moments and quantiles, in terms of the truncated normal density. This new family can be used to model asymmetric data that include non-positive values, as required for microarray analysis. Moreover, it has been proven that the gpower-normal family is a special case of pseudo-dispersion models, inheriting all the good properties of these models, such as asymptotic normality for small variances. A combined maximum likelihood method is proposed to estimate the model parameters, and it is applied to microarray and contamination data. Rcodes are available from the authors upon request.

  16. Integrated microfluidic biochips for DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Robin Hui; Dill, Kilian; Fuji, H Sho; McShea, Andy

    2006-03-01

    A fully integrated and self-contained microfluidic biochip device has been developed to automate the fluidic handling steps required to perform a gene expression study of the human leukemia cell line (K-562). The device consists of a DNA microarray semiconductor chip with 12,000 features and a microfluidic cartridge that consists of microfluidic pumps, mixers, valves, fluid channels and reagent storage chambers. Microarray hybridization and subsequent fluidic handling and reactions (including a number of washing and labeling steps) were performed in this fully automated and miniature device before fluorescent image scanning of the microarray chip. Electrochemical micropumps were integrated in the cartridge to provide pumping of liquid solutions. A micromixing technique based on gas bubbling generated by electrochemical micropumps was developed. Low-cost check valves were implemented in the cartridge to prevent cross-talk of the stored reagents. A single-color transcriptional analysis of K-562 cells with a series of calibration controls (spiked-in controls) was performed to characterize this new platform with regard to sensitivity, specificity and dynamic range. The device detected sample RNAs with a concentration as low as 0.375 pM. Detection was quantitative over more than 3 orders of magnitude. Experiments also demonstrated that chip-to-chip variability was low, indicating that the integrated microfluidic devices eliminate manual fluidic handling steps that can be a significant source of variability in genomic analysis.

  17. Development and Applications of the Lectin Microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Kuno, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The lectin microarray is an emerging technology for glycomics. It has already found maximum use in diverse fields of glycobiology by providing simple procedures for differential glycan profiling in a rapid and high-throughput manner. Since its first appearance in the literature in 2005, many application methods have been developed essentially on the same platform, comprising a series of glycan-binding proteins immobilized on an appropriate substrate such as a glass slide. Because the lectin microarray strategy does not require prior liberation of glycans from the core protein in glycoprotein analysis, it should encourage researchers not familiar with glycotechnology to use glycan analysis in future work. This feasibility should provide a broader range of experimental scientists with good opportunities to investigate novel aspects of glycoscience. Applications of the technology include not only basic sciences but also the growing fields of bio-industry. This chapter describes first the essence of glycan profiling and the basic fabrication of the lectin microarray for this purpose. In the latter part the focus is on diverse applications to both structural and functional glycomics, with emphasis on the wide applicability now available with this new technology. Finally, the importance of developing advanced lectin engineering is discussed.

  18. Metadata management and semantics in microarray repositories.

    PubMed

    Kocabaş, F; Can, T; Baykal, N

    2011-12-01

    The number of microarray and other high-throughput experiments on primary repositories keeps increasing as do the size and complexity of the results in response to biomedical investigations. Initiatives have been started on standardization of content, object model, exchange format and ontology. However, there are backlogs and inability to exchange data between microarray repositories, which indicate that there is a great need for a standard format and data management. We have introduced a metadata framework that includes a metadata card and semantic nets that make experimental results visible, understandable and usable. These are encoded in syntax encoding schemes and represented in RDF (Resource Description Frame-word), can be integrated with other metadata cards and semantic nets, and can be exchanged, shared and queried. We demonstrated the performance and potential benefits through a case study on a selected microarray repository. We concluded that the backlogs can be reduced and that exchange of information and asking of knowledge discovery questions can become possible with the use of this metadata framework.

  19. Metadata Management and Semantics in Microarray Repositories

    PubMed Central

    Kocabaş, F; Can, T; Baykal, N

    2011-01-01

    The number of microarray and other high-throughput experiments on primary repositories keeps increasing as do the size and complexity of the results in response to biomedical investigations. Initiatives have been started on standardization of content, object model, exchange format and ontology. However, there are backlogs and inability to exchange data between microarray repositories, which indicate that there is a great need for a standard format and data management. We have introduced a metadata framework that includes a metadata card and semantic nets that make experimental results visible, understandable and usable. These are encoded in syntax encoding schemes and represented in RDF (Resource Description Frame-word), can be integrated with other metadata cards and semantic nets, and can be exchanged, shared and queried. We demonstrated the performance and potential benefits through a case study on a selected microarray repository. We concluded that the backlogs can be reduced and that exchange of information and asking of knowledge discovery questions can become possible with the use of this metadata framework. PMID:24052712

  20. Differential modulation of Bordetella pertussis virulence genes as evidenced by DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Hot, D; Antoine, R; Renauld-Mongénie, G; Caro, V; Hennuy, B; Levillain, E; Huot, L; Wittmann, G; Poncet, D; Jacob-Dubuisson, F; Guyard, C; Rimlinger, F; Aujame, L; Godfroid, E; Guiso, N; Quentin-Millet, M-J; Lemoine, Y; Locht, C

    2003-07-01

    The production of most factors involved in Bordetella pertussis virulence is controlled by a two-component regulatory system termed BvgA/S. In the Bvg+ phase virulence-activated genes (vags) are expressed, and virulence-repressed genes (vrgs) are down-regulated. The expression of these genes can also be modulated by MgSO(4) or nicotinic acid. In this study we used microarrays to analyse the influence of BvgA/S or modulation on the expression of nearly 200 selected genes. With the exception of one vrg, all previously known vags and vrgs were correctly assigned as such, and the microarray analyses identified several new vags and vrgs, including genes coding for putative autotransporters, two-component systems, extracellular sigma factors, the adenylate cyclase accessory genes cyaBDE, and two genes coding for components of a type III secretion system. For most of the new vrgs and vags the results of the microarray analyses were confirmed by RT-PCR analysis and/or lacZfusions. The degree of regulation and modulation varied between genes, and showed a continuum from strongly BvgA/S-activated genes to strongly BvgA/S-repressed genes. The microarray analyses also led to the identification of a subset of vags and vrgs that are differentially regulated and modulated by MgSO(4) or nicotinic acid, indicating that these genes may be targets for multiple regulatory circuits. For example, the expression of bilA, a gene predicted to encode an intimin-like protein, was found to be activated by BvgA/S and up-modulated by nicotinic acid. Furthermore, surprisingly, in the strain analysed here, which produces only type 2 fimbriae, the fim3 gene was identified as a vrg, while fim2 was confirmed to be a vag.

  1. Population Screening for Hemoglobinopathy Profiling: Is the Development of a Microarray Worthwhile?

    PubMed

    Kambouris, Manousos E

    2016-08-01

    In order to perform affordable and expedient whole population scans for the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) involved in hemoglobinopathies, microarrays based on single nucleotide extension (SNE) might prove advantageous to whole genome/exome sequencing in terms of cost, speed, interpretation and discretion as they focus on a very small part of the tested genome. The development of a microarray assay entails most of the cost, to be deferred by the massive use of the end product. A microarray assay development project, involving multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR), labeling, hybridization and scanning/scoring steps is presented as a paradigm of objective bug ratios expected to such procedures and of ways to cope with them. Qualification of the microarray genotypes needs a reference method, which may still be restriction digestion or other, as sequencing remains an expensive commodity. Optimization of wet steps should also be followed by careful and perhaps individualized dye excitation and in silico scoring rules, taking into consideration decay and bleaching effects that perplex development. The strategy of successive elimination of problems, a top-bottom procedure, which had been used and is usually preferred by developing agencies, might have been erroneous; a bottom-up course to delineate issues in different levels, although more laborious, might be the correct choice, especially as software and robotic hardware, high throughput tools become more mature and available. The testing for interlocus compatibility, specificity and robustness is demanding and warranted only in the case of steady, high volume use of an assay for territorial, national or international use.

  2. Systematic analysis of T7 RNA polymerase based in vitro linear RNA amplification for use in microarray experiments.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jörg; Buness, Andreas; Huber, Wolfgang; Volz, Joachim; Kioschis, Petra; Hafner, Mathias; Poustka, Annemarie; Sültmann, Holger

    2004-04-30

    The requirement of a large amount of high-quality RNA is a major limiting factor for microarray experiments using biopsies. An average microarray experiment requires 10-100 microg of RNA. However, due to their small size, most biopsies do not yield this amount. Several different approaches for RNA amplification in vitro have been described and applied for microarray studies. In most of these, systematic analyses of the potential bias introduced by the enzymatic modifications are lacking. We examined the sources of error introduced by the T7 RNA polymerase based RNA amplification method through hybridisation studies on microarrays and performed statistical analysis of the parameters that need to be evaluated prior to routine laboratory use. The results demonstrate that amplification of the RNA has no systematic influence on the outcome of the microarray experiment. Although variations in differential expression between amplified and total RNA hybridisations can be observed, RNA amplification is reproducible, and there is no evidence that it introduces a large systematic bias. Our results underline the utility of the T7 based RNA amplification for use in microarray experiments provided that all samples under study are equally treated.

  3. Systematic analysis of T7 RNA polymerase based in vitro linear RNA amplification for use in microarray experiments

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jörg; Buneß, Andreas; Huber, Wolfgang; Volz, Joachim; Kioschis, Petra; Hafner, Mathias; Poustka, Annemarie; Sültmann, Holger

    2004-01-01

    Background The requirement of a large amount of high-quality RNA is a major limiting factor for microarray experiments using biopsies. An average microarray experiment requires 10–100 μg of RNA. However, due to their small size, most biopsies do not yield this amount. Several different approaches for RNA amplification in vitro have been described and applied for microarray studies. In most of these, systematic analyses of the potential bias introduced by the enzymatic modifications are lacking. Results We examined the sources of error introduced by the T7 RNA polymerase based RNA amplification method through hybridisation studies on microarrays and performed statistical analysis of the parameters that need to be evaluated prior to routine laboratory use. The results demonstrate that amplification of the RNA has no systematic influence on the outcome of the microarray experiment. Although variations in differential expression between amplified and total RNA hybridisations can be observed, RNA amplification is reproducible, and there is no evidence that it introduces a large systematic bias. Conclusions Our results underline the utility of the T7 based RNA amplification for use in microarray experiments provided that all samples under study are equally treated. PMID:15119961

  4. The microarray explorer tool for data mining of cDNA microarrays: application for the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Lemkin, P F; Thornwall, G C; Walton, K D; Hennighausen, L

    2000-11-15

    The Microarray Explorer (MAExplorer) is a versatile Java-based data mining bioinformatic tool for analyzing quantitative cDNA expression profiles across multiple microarray platforms and DNA labeling systems. It may be run as either a stand-alone application or as a Web browser applet over the Internet. With this program it is possible to (i) analyze the expression of individual genes, (ii) analyze the expression of gene families and clusters, (iii) compare expression patterns and (iv) directly access other genomic databases for clones of interest. Data may be downloaded as required from a Web server or in the case of the stand-alone version, reside on the user's computer. Analyses are performed in real-time and may be viewed and directly manipulated in images, reports, scatter plots, histograms, expression profile plots and cluster analyses plots. A key feature is the clone data filter for constraining a working set of clones to those passing a variety of user-specified logical and statistical tests. Reports may be generated with hypertext Web access to UniGene, GenBank and other Internet databases for sets of clones found to be of interest. Users may save their explorations on the Web server or local computer and later recall or share them with other scientists in this groupware Web environment. The emphasis on direct manipulation of clones and sets of clones in graphics and tables provides a high level of interaction with the data, making it easier for investigators to test ideas when looking for patterns. We have used the MAExplorer to profile gene expression patterns of 1500 duplicated genes isolated from mouse mammary tissue. We have identified genes that are preferentially expressed during pregnancy and during lactation. One gene we identified, carbonic anhydrase III, is highly expressed in mammary tissue from virgin and pregnant mice and in gene knock-out mice with underdeveloped mammary epithelium. Other genes, which include those encoding milk proteins

  5. DNA Microarray for Detection of Gastrointestinal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Miguel A.; Soto-del Río, María de los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 103 virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  6. DNA microarray for detection of gastrointestinal viruses.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Miguel A; Soto-Del Río, María de Los Dolores; Gutiérrez, Rosa María; Chiu, Charles Y; Greninger, Alexander L; Contreras, Juan Francisco; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F; Isa, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis is a clinical illness of humans and other animals that is characterized by vomiting and diarrhea and caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses. An increasing number of viral species have been associated with gastroenteritis or have been found in stool samples as new molecular tools have been developed. In this work, a DNA microarray capable in theory of parallel detection of more than 100 viral species was developed and tested. Initial validation was done with 10 different virus species, and an additional 5 species were validated using clinical samples. Detection limits of 1 × 10(3) virus particles of Human adenovirus C (HAdV), Human astrovirus (HAstV), and group A Rotavirus (RV-A) were established. Furthermore, when exogenous RNA was added, the limit for RV-A detection decreased by one log. In a small group of clinical samples from children with gastroenteritis (n = 76), the microarray detected at least one viral species in 92% of the samples. Single infection was identified in 63 samples (83%), and coinfection with more than one virus was identified in 7 samples (9%). The most abundant virus species were RV-A (58%), followed by Anellovirus (15.8%), HAstV (6.6%), HAdV (5.3%), Norwalk virus (6.6%), Human enterovirus (HEV) (9.2%), Human parechovirus (1.3%), Sapporo virus (1.3%), and Human bocavirus (1.3%). To further test the specificity and sensitivity of the microarray, the results were verified by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detection of 5 gastrointestinal viruses. The RT-PCR assay detected a virus in 59 samples (78%). The microarray showed good performance for detection of RV-A, HAstV, and calicivirus, while the sensitivity for HAdV and HEV was low. Furthermore, some discrepancies in detection of mixed infections were observed and were addressed by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) of the viruses involved. It was observed that differences in the amount of genetic material favored the detection of the most abundant

  7. Prevalent Polymorphism in Thyroid Hormone-Activating Enzyme Leaves a Genetic Fingerprint That Underlies Associated Clinical Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    McAninch, Elizabeth A.; Jo, Sungro; Preite, Nailliw Z.; Farkas, Erzsébet; Mohácsik, Petra; Fekete, Csaba; Egri, Péter; Gereben, Balázs; Li, Yan; Deng, Youping; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Zevenbergen, Chantal; Peeters, Robin P.; Mash, Deborah C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: A common polymorphism in the gene encoding the activating deiodinase (Thr92Ala-D2) is known to be associated with quality of life in millions of patients with hypothyroidism and with several organ-specific conditions. This polymorphism results in a single amino acid change within the D2 molecule where its susceptibility to ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation is regulated. Objective: To define the molecular mechanisms underlying associated conditions in carriers of the Thr92Ala-D2 polymorphism. Design, Setting, Patients: Microarray analyses of 19 postmortem human cerebral cortex samples were performed to establish a foundation for molecular studies via a cell model of HEK-293 cells stably expressing Thr92 or Ala92 D2. Results: The cerebral cortex of Thr92Ala-D2 carriers exhibits a transcriptional fingerprint that includes sets of genes involved in CNS diseases, ubiquitin, mitochondrial dysfunction (chromosomal genes encoding mitochondrial proteins), inflammation, apoptosis, DNA repair, and growth factor signaling. Similar findings were made in Ala92-D2-expressing HEK-293 cells and in both cases there was no evidence that thyroid hormone signaling was affected ie, the expression level of T3-responsive genes was unchanged, but that several other genes were differentially regulated. The combined microarray analyses (brain/cells) led to the development of an 81-gene classifier that correctly predicts the genotype of homozygous brain samples. In contrast to Thr92-D2, Ala92-D2 exhibits longer half-life and was consistently found in the Golgi. A number of Golgi-related genes were down-regulated in Ala92-D2-expressing cells, but were normalized after 24-h-treatment with the antioxidant N-acetylecysteine. Conclusions: Ala92-D2 accumulates in the Golgi, where its presence and/or ensuing oxidative stress disrupts basic cellular functions and increases pre-apoptosis. These findings are reminiscent to disease mechanisms observed in other neurodegenerative

  8. Personalised proteome analysis by means of protein microarrays made from individual patient samples

    PubMed Central

    Syafrizayanti; Lueong, Smiths S.; Di, Cuixia; Schaefer, Jonas V.; Plückthun, Andreas; Hoheisel, Jörg D.

    2017-01-01

    DNA sequencing has advanced to a state that permits studying the genomes of individual patients as nearly a matter of routine. Towards analysing a tissue’s protein content in a similar manner, we established a method for the production of microarrays that represent full-length proteins as they are encoded in individual specimens, exhibiting the particular variations, such as mutations or splice variations, present in these samples. From total RNA isolates, each transcript is copied to a specific location on the array by an on-chip polymerase elongation reaction, followed by in situ cell-free transcription and translation. These microarrays permit parallel analyses of variations in protein structure and interaction that are specific to particular samples. PMID:28045055

  9. Transcriptomic Analyses on the Role of Nitric Oxide in Plant Disease Resistance.

    PubMed

    Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Begara-Morales, Juan C; Luque, Francisco; Padilla, María N; Jiménez-Ruiz, Jaime; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Fierro-Risco, Jesús; Barroso, Juan B

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous molecule having key roles in many physiological processes such as germination, growth, development and senescence. It has been also shown the important role of NO as a signaling molecule in the response to a wide variety of stress situations, including both biotic and abiotic stress conditions. In the last few years, a growing number of studies have focused on NO-cell targets by several approaches such as transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. This review is centered on offering an update about the principal medium- and large-scale transcriptomic analyses performed with several NO donors including microarray, cDNA-amplification fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and high throughput sequencing (RNA-seq technology) approaches mainly focused on the role of this reactive nitrogen species in relation to plant disease resistance. Different putative NO-responsive genes have been identified in different plant tissues and plant species by application of several NO donors suggesting the implication of NO-responsive genes with plant adaptive responses to biotic stress processes. Finally, it is also provided an overview about common transcription factor-binding sites of NO-responsive genes and the need to further analyze the different NO-targets by other omics studies.

  10. Thermodynamically optimal whole-genome tiling microarray design and validation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyejin; Chou, Hui-Hsien

    2016-06-13

    Microarray is an efficient apparatus to interrogate the whole transcriptome of species. Microarray can be designed according to annotated gene sets, but the resulted microarrays cannot be used to identify novel transcripts and this design method is not applicable to unannotated species. Alternatively, a whole-genome tiling microarray can be designed using only genomic sequences without gene annotations, and it can be used to detect novel RNA transcripts as well as known genes. The difficulty with tiling microarray design lies in the tradeoff between probe-specificity and coverage of the genome. Sequence comparison methods based on BLAST or similar software are commonly employed in microarray design, but they cannot precisely determine the subtle thermodynamic competition between probe targets and partially matched probe nontargets during hybridizations. Using the whole-genome thermodynamic analysis software PICKY to design tiling microarrays, we can achieve maximum whole-genome coverage allowable under the thermodynamic constraints of each target genome. The resulted tiling microarrays are thermodynamically optimal in the sense that all selected probes share the same melting temperature separation range between their targets and closest nontargets, and no additional probes can be added without violating the specificity of the microarray to the target genome. This new design method was used to create two whole-genome tiling microarrays for Escherichia coli MG1655 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 and the experiment results validated the design.

  11. MiMiR – an integrated platform for microarray data sharing, mining and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Chris; Thimma, Manjula; Alexandrakis, Stelios; Castillo, Tito; Dennis, Jayne L; Brooks, Anthony; Bradley, Thomas; Turnbull, Carly; Blaveri, Ekaterini; Barton, Geraint; Chiba, Norie; Maratou, Klio; Soutter, Pat; Aitman, Tim; Game, Laurence

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite considerable efforts within the microarray community for standardising data format, content and description, microarray technologies present major challenges in managing, sharing, analysing and re-using the large amount of data generated locally or internationally. Additionally, it is recognised that inconsistent and low quality experimental annotation in public data repositories significantly compromises the re-use of microarray data for meta-analysis. MiMiR, the Microarray data Mining Resource was designed to tackle some of these limitations and challenges. Here we present new software components and enhancements to the original infrastructure that increase accessibility, utility and opportunities for large scale mining of experimental and clinical data. Results A user friendly Online Annotation Tool allows researchers to submit detailed experimental information via the web at the time of data generation rather than at the time of publication. This ensures the easy access and high accuracy of meta-data collected. Experiments are programmatically built in the MiMiR database from the submitted information and details are systematically curated and further annotated by a team of trained annotators using a new Curation and Annotation Tool. Clinical information can be annotated and coded wit