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Sample records for polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes

  1. [The phagocytosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes in progressive periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Konopka, T; Zietek, M

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this paper was the evaluation of the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in blood and in gingival pocket fluid in patients suffering from rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) and postjuvenile periodontitis (PJP). Prior to periodontal treatment the authors evaluated the capacity to phagocytose latex particles of peripheral blood neutrophils from 21 patients with RPP, 51 with PJP and 59 healthy subjects (control group) as well as the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in pocket fluid from 21 patients with RPP, 14 with PJP and from 20 healthy subjects. This phagocytic activity was significantly lower in all examined groups in comparison with the control group. A similar evaluation executed 3 months after treatment revealed normal phagocytosis of blood neutrophils from patients with RPP. In patients receiving complementary pharmacotherapy (spiramycine combined with metronidazol), a better improvement of phagocytosis was noted, than that observed in patients treated only surgically. PMID:7481699

  2. [The phagocytosis of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes in progressive periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Konopka, T; Zietek, M

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this paper was the evaluation of the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in blood and in gingival pocket fluid in patients suffering from rapidly progressive periodontitis (RPP) and postjuvenile periodontitis (PJP). Prior to periodontal treatment the authors evaluated the capacity to phagocytose latex particles of peripheral blood neutrophils from 21 patients with RPP, 51 with PJP and 59 healthy subjects (control group) as well as the phagocytic activity of neutrophils in pocket fluid from 21 patients with RPP, 14 with PJP and from 20 healthy subjects. This phagocytic activity was significantly lower in all examined groups in comparison with the control group. A similar evaluation executed 3 months after treatment revealed normal phagocytosis of blood neutrophils from patients with RPP. In patients receiving complementary pharmacotherapy (spiramycine combined with metronidazol), a better improvement of phagocytosis was noted, than that observed in patients treated only surgically.

  3. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocyte chemotactic hyperresponsiveness in a case of canine acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Jensen, A L; Thomsen, M K; Aaes, H; Andreasen, M; Søndergaard, J

    1993-08-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has recently been shown to affect polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocyte (PMN) function and to be secreted by mononuclear cells, indicating that the hormone may be active in an immunophysiologic network, acting as an endo- or paracrine priming agent. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the chemotactic responsiveness of canine peripheral PMN in a dog with acromegaly, caused by spontaneous, progesterone-induced hypersecretion of GH and, secondary to this, a seven-fold increase in insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). The chemotactic responsiveness towards zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) was evaluated at a time when the dog suffered from acromegaly and again 57 days after corrective surgery (ovariohysterectomy). The experiments showed that PMN from the patient exhibited enhanced chemotactic migration that appeared to be associated with the hypersomatotropic condition as judged from the reversibility of the phenomenon. The glucose intolerance and elevated serum alkaline phosphatase that were observed in the acromegalic dog were also shown to be reversible following surgery.

  4. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil function in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Czirják, L; Dankó, K; Sipka, S; Zeher, M; Szegedi, G

    1987-01-01

    In vitro functions of polymorphonuclear (PMN) neutrophils were studied in 20 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS). An increase in the basal chemiluminescence (CL) activity of peripheral blood PMNs was found, suggesting that these cells had been preactivated in vivo. Patients with more extensive skin disease or signs of disease progression tended to have higher basal CL values. Active oxygen products during the respiratory burst may increase the extent of inflammatory and fibrotic processes and could be involved in the endothelial injury in PSS. The stimulatory capacity of CL response was normal in our study. No alterations were found in the opsonised yeast phagocytic activity of granulocytes when compared with control values. The binding of erythrocyte-antibody particles was found also to be normal. A depressed chemotactic activity of PMN cells against zymosan activated serum was also shown. The cause of the decreased chemotaxis of PMNs remains to be elucidated. PMID:3592786

  5. Generation of slow-reacting substance (leukotrienes) by endotoxin and lipid A from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bremm, K D; König, W; Spur, B; Crea, A; Galanos, C

    1984-01-01

    Leukotrienes were released from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes on incubation with endotoxins and lipid A. The analysis was performed by their smooth muscle contracting properties, reversed phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay for leukotrienes C4 and D4. The active component of the lipopolysaccharides seems to be the lipid A portion. PMID:6490085

  6. Interferon-γ activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophil function

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Terri N; Beaman, Blaine L

    2004-01-01

    As current research illuminates the dynamic interplay between the innate and acquired immune responses, the interaction and communication between these two arms has yet to be fully investigated. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) are known critical components of innate and acquired immunity, respectively. However, recent studies have demonstrated that these two components are not entirely isolated. Treatment of PMNs with IFN-γ elicits a variety of responses depending on stimuli and environmental conditions. These responses include increased oxidative burst, differential gene expression, and induction of antigen presentation. Many of these functions have been overlooked in PMNs, which have long been classified as terminal phagocytic cells incapable of protein synthesis. As this review reports, the old definition of the PMN is in need of an update, as these cells have demonstrated their ability to mediate the transition between the innate and acquired immune responses. PMID:15096178

  7. [Advances in researches on polymorphonuclear neutrophil elastase in semen].

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui-xiang; Lu, Kun-gang; Zhang, Hong-ye; Lu, Jin-chun

    2011-11-01

    Reproductive tract infection is one of the important factors of male reproduction. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil elastase (PMNE) in semen, as a marker of male reproductive tract inflammation, especially recessive infection, potentially affects male fertility. The concentration of PMNE in semen is correlated significantly not only with semen white blood cell count and seminal plasma ROS level, but also with the levels of other inflammation related cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha. Furthermore, PMNE has a negative impact on sperm quality by decreasing sperm motility, increasing the percentage of morphologically abnormal sperm and interfering with DNA integrity. PMNE inhibitors in semen can form a compound with PMNE, and the imbalanced proportions of the two may promote the development of chronic inflammation, and consequently lead to male infertility. At present, PMNE in semen is detected mainly by enzyme immunoassay, but this method still needs to be standardized, and the diagnostic standards to be unified. PMID:22141276

  8. MicroRNA-941 Expression in Polymorphonuclear Granulocytes Is Not Related to Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Jesper Brink; Baslund, Bo; Cramer, Elisabeth Præstekjær; Rapin, Nicolas; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Jumonji Domain-Containing Protein 3 (JMJD3)/lysine demethylase 6B (KDM6B) is an epigenetic modulator that removes repressive histone marks on genes. Expression of KDM6B mRNA is elevated in leukocytes from patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and has been suggested to be the reason for higher proteinase 3 (PR3) mRNA expression in these cells due to derepression of PRTN3 gene transcription. MicroRNA-941 (miR-941) has been shown to target KDM6B mRNA and inhibit JMJD3 production. We therefore investigated whether polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs) from patients suffering from granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) have lower expression of miR-941 than healthy control donors as a biological cause for higher JMJD3 levels. We found no significant difference in the degree of maturation of PMNs from GPA patients (n = 8) and healthy controls (n = 11) as determined from cell surface expression of the neutrophil maturation marker CD16 and gene expression profile of FCGR3B. The expression of PRTN3 and KDM6B mRNAs and miR-941 was not significantly different in GPA patients and healthy controls. Transfection of pre-miR-941 into the neutrophil promyelocyte cell line PLB-985 cells did not result in reduction of the KDM6B mRNA level as shown previously in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. The amount of PR3 in PMNs from GPA patients and healthy controls was comparable. In conclusion, we found that PRTN3 mRNA, KDM6B mRNA, and miR-941 expression levels in PMNs do not differ between GPA patients and healthy controls, and that miR-941 does not uniformly regulate KDM6B mRNA levels by inducing degradation of the transcript. Thus, decreased miR-941 expression in PMNs cannot be part of the pathogenesis of GPA. PMID:27755585

  9. Human polymorphonuclear neutrophils specifically recognize and kill cancerous cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Kloecker, Goetz; Fleming, Chris; Bousamra, Michael; Hansen, Richard; Hu, Xiaoling; Ding, Chuanlin; Cai, Yihua; Xiang, Dong; Donninger, Howard; Eaton, John W; Clark, Geoffrey J

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the main effectors of the innate immune system, have rarely been considered as an anticancer therapeutic tool. However, recent investigations using animal models and preliminary clinical studies have highlighted the potential antitumor efficacy of PMNs. In the current study, we find that PMNs from some healthy donors naturally have potent cancer-killing activity against 4 different human cancer cell lines. The killing activity appears to be cancer cell-specific since PMNs did not kill primary normal epithelial cells or an immortalized breast epithelial cell line. Transfecting the immortalized mammary cells with plasmids expressing activated forms of the rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Ras) and teratocarcinoma oncogene 21 (TC21) oncogenes was sufficient to provoke aggressive attack by PMNs. However, transfection with activated Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate (Rac1) was ineffective, suggesting specificity in PMN-targeting of neoplastic cells. Furthermore, PMNs from lung cancer patients were also found to exhibit relatively poor cancer-killing activity compared to the cytolytic activity of the average healthy donor. Taken together, our results suggest that PMN-based treatment regimens may represent a paradigm shift in cancer immunotherapy that may be easily introduced into the clinic to benefit a subset of patients with PMN-vulnerable tumors. PMID:25610737

  10. The Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) stimulates chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hänsch, Gertrud M; Prior, Birgit; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Obst, Ursula; Overhage, Joerg

    2014-06-12

    Cross-talk between bacteria and mammalian cells is increasingly recognized as an important factor, especially during chronic infections. In particular, the interaction of extracellular bacterial signaling molecules with cells of the innate immune response is of special interest. In this context, we investigated whether the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) which is a quorum sensing molecule produced by bacteria and participates in biofilm formation and virulence has any influence on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), the cells of the "first line defense" against bacterial infections. We found that PQS did not enhance the bactericidal activity of PMN and did not induce apoptosis at concentrations up to 100 µM. However, PQS stimulated chemotaxis of PMN in doses of 10-100 µM. This PQS-dependent chemotaxis could be inhibited with SB203580 which blocks MAPkinase p38, suggesting a signaling pathway similar to AHL-12 induction. Using bacterial cell culture supernantants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild-type cells and a PQS-deficient mutant strain support the in vivo relevance of these findings. Since PQS is produced in the early phase of biofilm formation, PMN infiltration could be timely enough to eradicate bacteria before biofilm formation is completed, which confers the bacteria with a relative resistance to host defense mechanisms.

  11. Specific binding, internalization, and degradation of human neutrophil activating factor by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Besemer, J.; Hujber, A.; Kuhn, B. )

    1989-10-15

    The interaction of {sup 125}I-labeled recombinant human neutrophil activating factor (NAF) with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) was studied by means of a radioreceptor assay. The binding was characterized by a rapid transition (t1/2 less than or equal to 1 min) from a pH 3-sensitive state at 4{degree}C to pH 3 resistance at 37{degree}C. This was not caused by internalization of NAF since pH 3-resistant bound iodinated NAF could still be exchanged by an excess of nonlabeled NAF, i.e. was dissociable. Internalized iodinated NAF was processed into trichloroacetic acid-soluble forms. Scatchard transformation of binding isotherms at 4 and 37{degree}C led to nonlinear curves, a finding which is consistent with the expression of two receptor populations, one with high (KD = 11-35 pM) and the other with lower affinity (KD = 640-830 pM) at 4 degrees C. Numbers of the low affinity binding sites were approximately 34,000, and those with high affinity were 5,200/PMN when estimated at 4 degrees C. Binding of iodinated NAF to PMN was specific since it could be competed by an excess of nonlabeled NAF but not by two other activators of PMN function, formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine or human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. In addition to human PMN, NAF also bound specifically to two human monocytic cell lines; however, only the low affinity binding site could be detected on these cells.

  12. Type I interferon transcriptional signature in neutrophils and high frequency of low-density granulocytes are associated with tissue damage in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Bruno Coelho; Marques, Pedro Elias; Leoratti, Fabiana Maria de Souza; Junqueira, Caroline; Pereira, Dhelio Batista; Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro do Valle; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte population in the bloodstream, the primary compartment of Plasmodium sp. infection. Yet, the role of these polymorphonuclear cells in mediating either resistance or pathogenesis of malaria is poorly understood. We report that circulating neutrophils from malaria patients are highly activated, as indicated by a strong type I interferon transcriptional signature, increased expression of surface activation markers, the enhanced release of reactive oxygen species and myeloperoxidase, as well as the high frequency of low-density granulocytes. The activation of neutrophils was associated with increased levels of serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, indicating liver damage. In a rodent malaria model, we observed an intense recruitment of neutrophils to liver sinusoids. Neutrophil migration, IL-1β and chemokine expression as well as liver damage were all dependent on type I interferon signaling. The data suggests that type I interferon signaling have a central role in neutrophil activation and malaria pathogenesis. PMID:26711347

  13. Phorbol myristate acetate receptors in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nishihira, J.; O'Flaherty, J.T.

    1985-11-01

    Resting or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-pretreated neutrophils were disrupted by nitrogen cavitation and were fractionated on Percoll density gradients to identify the subcellular location of PMA receptors. Receptors were found in the cytoplasm of resting cells; neither primary nor secondary granules bound (/sup 3/H)PMA, and the few binding sites located in non-granule membrane fractions appeared to reflect cytosolic contamination. Contrastingly, PMA-pretreated cells lost cytosolic receptors; > 80% of PMA-binding sites were associated with non-granule membranes. Protein kinase C activity similarly shifted from cytosol to membranes after PMA treatment. Indeed, protein kinase C and PMA receptors co-sedimented on Percoll gradients, co-eluted from Ultragel AcA 44 columns loaded with neutrophil cytoplasm, and were identically influenced by various phospholipids. Finally, PMA, mezerein, diacylglycerol, and dialkylglycerol activated protein kinase C with potencies that paralleled their respective abilities to stimulate neutrophil aggregation responses and inhibit (/sup 3/H)PMA binding to whole cells or cytosol. These results fit a model of stimulus-response coupling wherein exogenous PMA or endogenous diacylglycerol solvate in cellular membranes. Cytosolic protein kinase C binds to the intramembranous ligand, forming an active, membrane-associated complex that phosphorylates nearby elements involved in triggering aggregation and other responses.

  14. Positive interaction of thyme (red) essential oil with human polymorphonuclear granulocytes in eradicating intracellular Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Tullio, Vivian; Mandras, Narcisa; Allizond, Valeria; Nostro, Antonia; Roana, Janira; Merlino, Chiara; Banche, Giuliana; Scalas, Daniela; Cuffini, Anna Maria

    2012-10-01

    The essential oils have started to be recognized for their potential antimicrobial role only in recent years. Clinical experience showed that the efficacy of antimicrobial agents depends not only on their direct effect on a given microorganism but also on the functional activity of the host immune system. Since data on the effects of essential oils on the innate immune system are scanty and fragmentary, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of thyme (red) essential oil (EO), at subinhibitory/inhibitory concentrations, on intracellular killing activity by human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs) against Candida albicans. In order to provide a frame of reference for the activity of this EO, its in vitro killing activity in the absence of PMNs was also evaluated.Results showed that EO at subminimal inhibitory (subMIC)/minimal inhibitory (MIC) concentrations significantly enhanced intracellular killing of C. albicans in comparison with EO-free controls and was comparable to the positive control (fluconazole). In in vitro killing assays without PMNs, we observed progressive growth of the yeast cells in the presence of EO subMIC/MIC concentrations. A positive antifungal interaction with phagocytes could explain why this EO, which appeared to be only fungistatic in time-kill assays, had efficacy in killing yeast cells once incubated with PMNs. PMID:22872591

  15. The beetroot component betanin modulates ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Olejnik, Anna; Kostrzewa, Artur; Łuczak, Michał; Jagodziński, Paweł P; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of betanin, one of the beetroot major components, on ROS production, DNA damage and apoptosis in human resting and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate polymorphonuclear neutrophils, one of the key elements of the inflammatory response. Incubation of neutrophils with betanin in the concentration range 2-500 µM resulted in significant inhibition of ROS production (by 15-46%, depending on the ROS detection assay). The antioxidant capacity of betanin was most prominently expressed in the chemiluminescence measurements. This compound decreased also the percentage of DNA in comet tails in stimulated neutrophils, but only at the 24 h time point. In resting neutrophils an increased level of DNA in comet tails was observed. Betanin did not affect the activity of caspase-3, in resting neutrophils, but significantly enhanced the enzyme activity in stimulated neutrophils. The western blot analysis showed, however, an increased level of caspase-3 cleavage products as a result of betanin treatment both in resting and stimulated neutrophils. The results indicate that betanin may be responsible for the effect of beetroot products on neutrophil oxidative metabolism and its consequences, DNA damage and apoptosis. The dose and time dependent effects on these processes require further studies.

  16. Interaction of intact porcine spermatozoa with epithelial cells and neutrophilic granulocytes during uterine passage.

    PubMed

    Taylor, U; Rath, D; Zerbe, H; Schuberth, H J

    2008-04-01

    New insemination techniques allow a tremendous sperm reduction for successful artificial insemination (AI) if highly diluted semen is deposited in the tip of the uterine horn and close to the utero-tubal junction. High sperm losses are known to occur during uterine passage and it was the general question whether specific binding mechanisms are involved. Upon arrival in the uterus, spermatozoa are confronted with mainly two different cell types: uterine epithelial cells (UEC) and neutrophilic granulocytes (polymorphonuclear neutrophil, PMN). As cell-sperm interactions can hardly be observed in vivo, an ex vivo system was established to study the interaction between spermatozoa and the UEC. Uterine segments (10 cm) from freshly slaughtered synchronized juvenile gilts were inseminated for 60 min at 38 degrees C. Thereafter spermatozoa were recovered, counted flow cytometrically and examined for changes in viability and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Significantly less spermatozoa with a functioning MMP and intact plasma membranes could be retrieved (55 +/- 7%), while the number of damaged spermatozoa hardly changed (93 +/- 12%), indicating retention of viable sperm cells in the uterine lumen. The interactions between porcine PMN and spermatozoa (motile, immotile, membrane-damaged) were studied in coincubation assays in vitro. The binding of membrane-damaged sperm cells to PMN was virtually non-existent (3 +/- 2%). Viable and motile spermatozoa attached to PMN without being phagocytosed within 60 min (45 +/- 3%), whereas binding to sodium fluoride (NaF)-immobilized spermatozoa was reduced to 20 +/- 2%. The binding of viable sperm to PMN is most likely not lectin-dependent; although both viable cell types were shown to express a broad range of different lectin-binding sugar residues, none of the lectins tested was able to selectively block PMN-sperm binding significantly. The results of the study suggest that viable spermatozoa are already subject to selective

  17. Fluorescence of neutrophil granulocytes as a biomarker for clozapine use.

    PubMed

    Man, Wai Hong; Ten Berg, Maarten; Wilting, Ingeborg; Huisman, Albert; Cahn, Wiepke; Douma, Jan Willem; den Breeijen, Hanneke; Heerdink, Eibert R; Egberts, Toine; van Solinge, Wouter

    2013-11-01

    Non-adherence to medication is a major issue in the treatment of schizophrenia in general and in particular for those treated with clozapine. A reliable tool to quantify patients long-term adherence to clozapine is currently unavailable. Enhanced FL3 neutrophil granulocyte fluorescence was serendipitously observed in a small population of schizophrenic patients treated with clozapine. The present study was aimed at assessing the association between clozapine use and FL3-fluorescence. A cross-sectional study was performed using data from the Utrecht Patient Oriented Database (UPOD). A total of 38,390 inpatients were included, of which 124 (0.33%) used clozapine. FL3-fluorescence was significantly higher (U=240,179, P<0.001) in clozapine users (mean (SD)=90.5 (11.8)) than in non-users (mean (SD)=69.8 (3.3)). Observed FL3-fluorescence was found to increase with increasing clozapine dose. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.95. Our results confirm the association between use of clozapine and elevated FL3-fluorescence. Further research is needed to unravel the underlying mechanism and to investigate the true potential of FL3-fluorescence as a clozapine-adherence biomarker in clinical practice.

  18. Anaerobiosis increases resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to O2-independent antimicrobial proteins from human polymorphonuclear granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Casey, S G; Shafer, W M; Spitznagel, J K

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA19 to the O2-independent antimicrobial systems of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Acid extracts of polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules (crude granule extracts) and a purified granule protein (57 kilodaltons) were, at low concentrations, bactericidal for gonococci under aerobic conditions that permitted growth. However, they were less effective under anaerobic conditions that imposed bacteriostasis. We found that adding sodium nitrite to reduced growth media permitted the growth of strain FA19 in an anaerobic environment. Under these conditions with nitrite, anaerobic cultures of strain FA19 were no more resistant to the crude granule extract and the 57-kilodalton protein than aerobic cultures. In contrast, Salmonella typhimurium SL-1004, a facultative anaerobe, was readily killed by both the crude granule extract and the 57-kilodalton antimicrobial protein regardless of the presence or absence of free molecular oxygen. This is the first demonstration that an isolated antimicrobial protein from polymorphonuclear leukocyte granules is active against bacteria under anaerobic conditions. Our results also indicated that the efficacy of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte O2-independent killing of N. gonorrhoeae may, in part, be inhibited by bacteriostatic conditions imposed by hypoxia. Images PMID:3917976

  19. Entry of Sanfetrinem into Human Polymorphonuclear Granulocytes and Its Cell-Associated Activity against Intracellular, Penicillin-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Cuffini, Anna Maria; Tullio, Vivian; Bonino, Alessandro; Allocco, Alessandra; Palarchio, Angela Ianni; Carlone, Nicola A.

    1998-01-01

    The entry of antibiotics into phagocytes is necessary for activity against intracellular pathogens. The ability of sanfetrinem, the first member of a new class of antibiotics, to penetrate human polymorphonuclear granulocytes and its consequences upon subsequent phagocytosis and killing of ingested penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae have been evaluated. Sanfetrinem penetrated into human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) at all concentrations tested, with cellular concentration/extracellular concentration ratios of 6.6 to 5.03 and 4.21 when sanfetrinem was used at 0.25 to 0.5 and 1 μg/ml, respectively, within 30 min of incubation. The uptake was complete within 5 min and was not energy dependent, since it was not affected by cell viability, environmental temperature, or the addition of a metabolic inhibitor. At a concentration of one-half the MIC, sanfetrinem significantly enhanced human PMN phagocytosis and increased intracellular bactericidal activity against penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae. Following preexposure of PMNs to a concentration of one-half the MIC of sanfetrinem, there was a significant increase in both phagocytosis and killing compared with that for the controls, indicating the ability of sanfetrinem to interact with biological membranes and remain active within PMNs. Preexposure of streptococci to sanfetrinem made penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae more susceptible to the bactericidal mechanisms of human PMNs than untreated organisms. PMID:9661015

  20. Role of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils in a Murine Model of Chlamydia psittaci-Induced Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Buendía, Antonio J.; Montes de Oca, Roberto; Navarro, Jose A.; Sánchez, Joaquín; Cuello, Francisco; Salinas, Jesús

    1999-01-01

    To assess the role of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in Chlamydia psittaci infection in a pregnant mouse model, pregnant and nonpregnant Swiss OF1 mice were depleted of PMNs by treatment with the RB6-8C5 monoclonal antibody before intraperitoneal infection with C. psittaci serotype 1. Nondepleted mice served as infection controls. Depleted mice aborted earlier and had a much higher mortality rate than nondepleted mice. Bacteriological analysis showed that the number of chlamydiae isolated from the spleens of depleted mice at 5 and 7 days postinfection was 100 times greater than that isolated from nondepleted mice. Histopathological analysis of the placentas of depleted mice showed widespread necrosis of the uteroplacental units, with weak immunoreaction to chlamydial antigen, while the placentas of nondepleted mice showed substantial neutrophil infiltration but no large areas of necrosis, with moderate to strong immunoreaction to chlamydial antigen. The livers of depleted mice showed numerous chlamydial inclusions in the hepatocytes, delayed microgranuloma formation, and in the pregnant animals extensive coagulative periportal necrosis. The livers of nondepleted mice displayed multiple small foci of PMNs and mononuclear cells with microgranuloma formation. Among this group of mice, the pregnant animals always had more hepatic damage than nonpregnant animals. Our results suggest that PMNs play an essential role in the response to C. psittaci primary infection, preventing the uncontrolled multiplication of chlamydiae in the liver and spleen. PMID:10225862

  1. Metabolism of platelet activating factor (PAF) and lyso-PAF in polymorphonuclear granulocytes from severely burned patients.

    PubMed

    Schönfeld, W; Kasimir, S; Köller, M; Erbs, G; Müller, F E; König, W

    1990-12-01

    We studied the metabolism of 3H-platelet activating factor (PAF) and lyso-PAF in human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) from severely burned patients (n = 6) on days 1, 5, 9, 15, and 25 post-trauma. All patients suffered from a severe burn trauma of more than 30% total body surface area. Stimulation of PMN in healthy donors (n = 10) with the Ca-ionophore resulted in the conversion of 3H-lyso-PAF into PAF (18 +/- 2% of total radioactivity) and alkyl-acyl-glycero-phosphorylcholine (alkyl-acyl-GPC, 50 +/- 6%). In burned patients a significantly reduced formation of 3H-PAF was observed between days 1 and 15 post-trauma (day 9: 1 +/- 1%, p less than 0.0001). This pattern was normalized again in patients (n = 5) who survived the trauma after septic periods and was observed during the second week post-trauma. In one patient who succumbed to his injuries a sustained inhibition of PAF formation was observed up to his death. The decreased formation of PAF correlated weakly with the appearance of immature granulocytes within the analyzed cell fraction (ratio of immature cells versus PAF-formation, r = -0.55, p = 0.02).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2258972

  2. Neutrophil kinetics of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced neutropenia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Yuji; Kawagishi, Mayumi; Kusaka, Masaru )

    1990-01-01

    Single injection of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) immediately induced a decrease in the number of circulating neutrophils in rats. This neutropenia occurred 10 minutes after the injection but disappeared 40 minutes after injection. This transient neutropenia was dose-dependently induced by rhG-CSF and also induced by repeated injections. We studied the kinetics of circulating neutrophils in transient neutropenia. rhG-CSF markedly decreased the number of {sup 3}H-diisopropylfluorophosphate ({sup 3}H-DFP) labeled neutrophils in the circulation 10 minutes after injection but the labeled neutrophils recovered to near the control level 40 minutes after the injection. These results indicate that the neutrophil margination accounts for the neutrophenia and the marginated neutrophils return to the circulation.

  3. Effects of Montelukast on free radical production in whole blood and isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in asthmatic children

    PubMed Central

    Al Saadi, Muslim M.; Meo, Sultan Ayoub; Mustafa, Ali; Shafi, Ahmed; Tuwajri, Ali S. Al

    2011-01-01

    Montelukast is a highly selective leukotriene-receptor antagonist (LTRA). It is widely used in the treatment of bronchial asthma, primarily as an adjunct to corticosteroids. Reactive oxygen species (ROSs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma and oxidative stress contributing to the initiation and worsening of inflammatory respiratory disorders, such as asthma. Antioxidant drugs may have a role in minimizing or preventing damage in asthmatic children. The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant effect of montelukast on the production of free radicals in the whole blood and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in asthmatic children. A group of 48 (38 males and 10 females), apparently healthy asthmatic children were recruited with ages ranging between 6 and 14 years. In asthmatic children, base line (premedication) and post medication free radicals activity in the whole blood and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) was determined by measuring chemiluminescence (CL) response through chemiluminescence luminometer. Free radical productions were significantly decreased in the whole blood, when stimulated with Phorbol Myristate Acetate (p < 0.04) and Opsonised Zymosan (p < 0.05). The free radicals were also significantly decreased in isolated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) when stimulated with Opsonised Zymosan (p < 0.05) after the post medication treatment of montelukast in asthmatic children. Montelukast decreased the reactive oxygen species production, both in the whole blood as well as isolated PMNs in asthmatic children. PMID:23960762

  4. Low-Level Laser Therapy Attenuates LPS-Induced Rats Mastitis by Inhibiting Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Yueqiang; HE, Xianjing; HAO, Dandan; YU, Debin; LIANG, Jianbin; QU, Yanpeng; SUN, Dongbo; YANG, Bin; YANG, Keli; WU, Rui; WANG, Jianfa

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on a rat model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mastitis and its underlying molecular mechanisms. The rat model of mastitis was induced by inoculation of LPS through the canals of the mammary gland. The results showed that LPS-induced secretion of IL-1β and IL-8 significantly decreased after LLLT (650 nm, 2.5 mW, 30 mW/cm2). LLLT also inhibited intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and attenuated the LPS-induced decrease of the expression of CD62L and increase of the expression of CD11b. Moreover, LLLT also suppressed LPS-induced polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) entering the alveoli of the mammary gland. The number of PMNs in the mammary alveolus and the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were decreased after LLLT. These results suggested that LLLT therapy is beneficial in decreasing the somatic cell count and improving milk nutritional quality in cows with an intramammary infection. PMID:25452258

  5. Defective polymorphonuclear neutrophil function in dairy cows showing enhanced susceptibility to intramammary infections.

    PubMed

    Cooray, R; Håkansson, L

    1995-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear-neutrophil (PMN) oxidative-burst activity, chemotactic and chemokinetic migratory responses, and surface-adhesion protein expression in a mastitis-prone group of dairy cows were compared with corresponding variables in healthy cows. The cows had a well-documented history of udder infection caused by major mastitis pathogens. Analysis of PMN functions revealed a deficiency in the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence responses that seemed to be associated with the mobilization of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the PMN of the patient group, as compared with the healthy controls. The migratory capacity of the PMN in response to a variety of chemotactic substances was enhanced in the patients. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in the expression of surface-adhesion proteins (CD11a/CD18). It is proposed that the migratory activity of PMN cells was enhanced in order to compensate for their depressed respiratory-burst activity. Studies are under way to assess whether the defective mobilization of MPO in PMN of mastitis-prone cows is an acquired transient defect or a permanent hereditary defect. PMID:8594848

  6. Analysis of Autofluorescence in Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils: A New Tool for Early Infection Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Monsel, Antoine; Lécart, Sandrine; Roquilly, Antoine; Broquet, Alexis; Jacqueline, Cédric; Mirault, Tristan; Troude, Thibaut; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre; Asehnoune, Karim

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosing bacterial infection (BI) remains a challenge for the attending physician. An ex vivo infection model based on human fixed polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) gives an autofluorescence signal that differs significantly between stimulated and unstimulated cells. We took advantage of this property for use in an in vivo pneumonia mouse model and in patients hospitalized with bacterial pneumonia. A 2-fold decrease was observed in autofluorescence intensity for cytospined PMNs from broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) in the pneumonia mouse model and a 2.7-fold decrease was observed in patients with pneumonia when compared with control mice or patients without pneumonia, respectively. This optical method provided an autofluorescence mean intensity cut-off, allowing for easy diagnosis of BI. Originally set up on a confocal microscope, the assay was also effective using a standard epifluorescence microscope. Assessing the autofluorescence of PMNs provides a fast, simple, cheap and reliable method optimizing the efficiency and the time needed for early diagnosis of severe infections. Rationalized therapeutic decisions supported by the results from this method can improve the outcome of patients suspected of having an infection. PMID:24658436

  7. Role of platelet-activating factor in polymorphonuclear neutrophil recruitment in reperfused ischemic rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Montrucchio, G; Alloatti, G; Mariano, F; Comino, A; Cacace, G; Polloni, R; De Filippi, P G; Emanuelli, G; Camussi, G

    1993-02-01

    This study investigated the role of platelet-activating factor in the recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in a rabbit model of cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. The accumulation of PMN was evaluated 2 and 24 hours after removal of 40 minutes of coronary occlusion by morphometric analysis and 111In-labeled PMN infiltration. The administration of two structurally unrelated platelet-activating factor-receptor antagonists (SDZ 63-675, 5 mg/kg body weight, and WEB 2170, 5 mg/kg body weight) before reperfusion significantly reduced the accumulation of PMN, as well as the hemodynamic alterations and the size of necrotic area. Two hours after reperfusion, the percentage of increase of 111In-labeled PMN in transmural central ischemic zone was significantly reduced in rabbits pretreated with SDZ 63-675 (51.4 +/- 7.9) or WEB 2170 (32.4 +/- 8.8) with respect to untreated rabbits (107.6 +/- 13.5). The morphometric analysis of myocardial sections confirmed the reduction of PMN infiltration at 2 hours and demonstrated that at 24 hours the phenomenon was even more significant. In addition, SDZ 63-675 and WEB 2170 prevented early transient bradycardia and hypotension and reduced the infarct size, judged by staining with tetrazolium at 2 and 24 hours after reperfusion, and by histological examination at 24 hours. These results suggest that platelet-activating factor is involved in the accumulation of PMN in the reperfused ischemic myocardium and contributes to the evolution of myocardial injury.

  8. Complement factor H modulates the activation of human neutrophil granulocytes and the generation of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Andrea E; Sándor, Noémi; Kárpáti, Éva; Józsi, Mihály

    2016-04-01

    Factor H (FH) is a major inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement activation in plasma and on certain host surfaces. In addition to being a complement regulator, FH can bind to various cells via specific receptors, including binding to neutrophil granulocytes through complement receptor type 3 (CR3; CD11b/CD18), and modulate their function. The cellular roles of FH are, however, poorly understood. Because neutrophils are important innate immune cells in inflammatory processes and the host defense against pathogens, we aimed at studying the effects of FH on various neutrophil functions, including the generation of extracellular traps. FH co-localized with CD11b on the surface of neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of healthy individuals, and cell-bound FH retained its cofactor activity and enhanced C3b degradation. Soluble FH supported neutrophil migration and immobilized FH induced cell spreading. In addition, immobilized but not soluble FH enhanced IL-8 release from neutrophils. FH alone did not trigger the cells to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), but NET formation induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus fungal β-glucan were inhibited by immobilized, but not by soluble, FH. Moreover, in parallel with NET formation, immobilized FH also inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species induced by PMA and by fibronectin plus β-glucan. Altogether, these data indicate that FH has multiple regulatory roles on neutrophil functions. While it can support the recruitment of neutrophils, FH may also exert anti-inflammatory effects and influence local inflammatory and antimicrobial reactions, and reduce tissue damage by modulating NET formation. PMID:26938503

  9. Sulphatides trigger polymorphonuclear granulocyte spreading on collagen-coated surfaces and inhibit subsequent activation of 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Sud'ina, G F; Brock, T G; Pushkareva, M A; Galkina, S I; Turutin, D V; Peters-Golden, M; Ullrich, V

    2001-01-01

    Sulphatides are sulphate esters of galactocerebrosides that are present on the surfaces of many cell types and act as specific ligands to selectins. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of sulphatides on polymorphonuclear granulocyte (PMN) attachment, spreading and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) metabolism. Sulphatides, but not non-sulphated galactocerebrosides, dose-dependently enhanced attachment to collagen, as measured by the myeloperoxidase assay. Studies with blocking antibodies indicated that the increased attachment was mediated by CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) beta 2 integrin. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that sulphatides also greatly enhanced the degree of cell spreading. In PMNs treated in suspension, sulphatides had no effect on the ionophore A23187-stimulated release of arachidonic acid and the synthesis of 5-LO metabolites. In contrast, in PMNs attached to collagen, the enzymic conversion of arachidonic acid by 5-LO was inhibited by sulphatides. Inhibition of 5-LO metabolism by sulphatides was observed even in the presence of exogenous substrate, suggesting that sulphatides directly inhibited 5-LO action. Consistent with this, sulphatides interfered with ionophore-induced translocation of the 5-LO to the nuclear envelope. Substances competing with sulphatide binding to cells, like dextran sulphate, or a strong inhibitor of cell spreading, like the actin-polymerizing agent jasplakinolide, prevented the effects of sulphatides on PMN attachment and spreading and leukotriene synthesis. We conclude that shape changes occurring in response to sulphatides specifically impair PMN leukotriene synthesis by inhibiting translocation of 5-LO. PMID:11672437

  10. In vitro susceptibility of fungi to killing by neutrophil granulocytes discriminates between primary pathogenicity and opportunism.

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, A; Davis, C E; Schaffner, T; Markert, M; Douglas, H; Braude, A I

    1986-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi, according to their propensity to cause infection of apparently normal individuals, can be grouped into either primary pathogens (e.g., Coccidioides, Histoplasma, Paracoccidioides, Blastomyces, and Sporothrix) or opportunists (e.g., Candida, Mucoraceae, Aspergillus spp., Petriellidium, and Trichosporon). There is, however, no unifying concept explaining the difference between the virulence of the two fungal categories. Previously we have speculated that neutrophils are the common denominator of the high natural resistance to opportunistic fungi. Accordingly, we then compared the susceptibility to killing by neutrophil granulocytes of Histoplasma, Blastomyces, Paracoccidioides, and Sporothrix with that of 14 opportunistic fungi. We found the four virulent dimorphic yeasts, in contrast to opportunistic fungi, to be resistant to killing by neutrophils. Virulent dimorphic yeasts were ingested by neutrophils, and triggered a respiratory burst comparably to opportunists but were less susceptible to hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that differences in the susceptibility to microbicidal products of leukocytes may explain the difference in virulence. Images PMID:3734102

  11. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zilio, Serena; Serafini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer.

  12. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zilio, Serena; Serafini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:27618112

  13. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zilio, Serena; Serafini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:27618112

  14. Phagocytic mechanism of live neutrophilic granulocyte with green fluorescent protein gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Shaoqun; Chen, Weiguo; Zhou, Wei; Luo, Qingming; Zhang, Zhi

    1999-09-01

    The whole process of neutrophilic granulocyte phagocytosis of E.Coli BL21-expressed green fluorescent protein gene was recorded with CCD coupled fluorescence microscopy in a real-time. This process contains of three stages: adhesion, ingestion, and exocytosis. The properties of each stages of phagocytosis were analyzed. The method opened new perspective in continuously observing the specific and non-specific immunity mechanism on alive cell.

  15. Oral polymorphonuclear neutrophil characteristics in relation to oral health: a cross-sectional, observational clinical study.

    PubMed

    Rijkschroeff, Patrick; Jansen, Ineke D C; van der Weijden, Fridus A; Keijser, Bart J F; Loos, Bruno G; Nicu, Elena A

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) have a major role in the innate immune system. However, little is known about PMN contribution in relation to oral health. The objective of this study was to investigate the numbers and functional characteristics of oral PMNs (oPMNs) compared with circulatory PMNs (cPMNs). Oral rinse and venous blood samples were obtained from 268 systemically and orally healthy volunteers in a cross-sectional observational study. PMN counts, cell cycle analysis and cellular activation state were investigated. Also, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was analyzed, with and without bacterial stimulation (Fusobacterium nucleatum). In males, 1.2 × 10(6)±1.0 × 10(6) oPMNs were collected, and showed a tendency to correlate with the levels of gingival bleeding (r=0.215, P=0.008). Comparable oPMNs counts were found among females (1.0 × 10(6)±0.7 × 10(6)). More late-stage apoptotic/necrotic cells were found among the oPMNs (53.1%) compared with the cPMNs (8.5%; P<0.001). Without additional stimulation, oPMNs were more activated than cPMNs, as indicated by higher expression of CD11b, CD63 and CD66b, and higher constitutive ROS levels (P<0.001). Notably, in response to bacterial stimulation, oPMNs released comparable ROS levels as cPMNs (P=0.042). In conclusion, this study provides data on viable oPMNs showing high levels of activation in orally and systemically healthy individuals, free of apparent caries lesions and periodontal disease. These data suggests that although the oPMNs are in a more mature stage of their life cycle compared with the cPMNs, oPMNs are still responsive to stimulation, which indicates their functional potential and possible contribution to a healthy oral ecosystem. PMID:27515277

  16. Cellular Uptake of Two Fluoroketolides, HMR 3562 and HMR 3787, by Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghaffar, H.; Vazifeh, D.; Labro, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed the cellular accumulation of two new fluoroketolides, HMR 3562 and HMR 3787, by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in vitro. Both compounds were rapidly taken up by PMN, with a cellular-to-extracellular concentration ratio (C/E) of about 141 (HMR 3562) and 117 (HMR 3787) at 5 min, and this was followed by a plateau at 60 to 180 min, with a C/E of >300 at 180 min. Both ketolides were mainly located in PMN granules (about 75%) and egressed slowly from loaded cells (about 40% at 60 min), owing to avid reuptake. Uptake was moderately sensitive to external pH, and activation energy was also moderate (about 70 kJ/mol). As with other macrolides and ketolides, the existence of an active transport system was suggested by (i) the strong interindividual variability in uptake kinetics, suggesting variability in the number or activity of a transport protein; (ii) the saturation kinetics characteristic of a carrier-mediated transport system (Vmax, about 2,300 ng/2.5 × 106 PMN/5 min; Km, about 50 μg/ml); (iii) the inhibitory effects of Ni2+ (a blocker of the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger), phorbol myristate acetate (a protein kinase C activator), and H89 (a protein kinase A inhibitor). Although these two ketolides are more related to HMR 3647 (telithromycin), it is interesting that the presence of a fluoride gave these molecules a cellular pharmacokinetics more like those of HMR 3004 than those of HMR 3647. The macrolide transport system has not been yet elucidated, but our data confirm that, despite variations in chemical structure, all erythromycin A derivatives share a transmembrane transport system. PMID:11557472

  17. Expression of CD64 on polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with familial Mediterranean fever

    PubMed Central

    Migita, K; Agematsu, K; Yamazaki, K; Suzuki, A; Yazaki, M; Jiuchi, Y; Miyashita, T; Izumi, Y; Koga, T; Kawakami, A; Eguchi, K

    2011-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and serosal or synovial inflammation. We examined the utility of CD64 (FcγRI) expression in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) as clinical and biological parameters in patients with FMF. We studied 12 Japanese FMF patients (mean age; 22·8 ± 15·5 years, male/female: 2/10), along with rheumatoid arthritis patients (RA, n = 38 male/female: 6/32, mean age; 52·2 ± 15·3 years), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, n = 15 male/female: 0/15, mean age; 38·5 ± 15·9 years) and 12 healthy subjects (male/female: 3/9, mean age; 37·9 ± 17·2 years). CD64 expression on PMNs was determined using flow cytometry. The quantitative expression of CD64 in patients with FMF (2439·6 ± 2215·8 molecules per PMN) was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (547·8 ± 229·5, P = 0·003) or in patients with RA (606·5 ± 228·2, P < 0·0001) and SLE (681·3 ± 281·1, P = 0·004). The increased CD64 expression on PMNs isolated from untreated FMF patients was down-regulated by colchicine treatment. NACHT-LRR-PYD-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) activation using MurNAc-L-Ala-D-isoGln (MDP) resulted in increased CD64 expression on PMNs from healthy subjects. Our results suggest that quantitative measurement of CD64 expression on PMNs can be a valuable tool to discriminate between FMF and autoimmune diseases. PMID:21438869

  18. Role of platelet-activating factor in polymorphonuclear neutrophil recruitment in reperfused ischemic rabbit heart.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Alloatti, G.; Mariano, F.; Comino, A.; Cacace, G.; Polloni, R.; De Filippi, P. G.; Emanuelli, G.; Camussi, G.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the role of platelet-activating factor in the recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in a rabbit model of cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. The accumulation of PMN was evaluated 2 and 24 hours after removal of 40 minutes of coronary occlusion by morphometric analysis and 111In-labeled PMN infiltration. The administration of two structurally unrelated platelet-activating factor-receptor antagonists (SDZ 63-675, 5 mg/kg body weight, and WEB 2170, 5 mg/kg body weight) before reperfusion significantly reduced the accumulation of PMN, as well as the hemodynamic alterations and the size of necrotic area. Two hours after reperfusion, the percentage of increase of 111In-labeled PMN in transmural central ischemic zone was significantly reduced in rabbits pretreated with SDZ 63-675 (51.4 +/- 7.9) or WEB 2170 (32.4 +/- 8.8) with respect to untreated rabbits (107.6 +/- 13.5). The morphometric analysis of myocardial sections confirmed the reduction of PMN infiltration at 2 hours and demonstrated that at 24 hours the phenomenon was even more significant. In addition, SDZ 63-675 and WEB 2170 prevented early transient bradycardia and hypotension and reduced the infarct size, judged by staining with tetrazolium at 2 and 24 hours after reperfusion, and by histological examination at 24 hours. These results suggest that platelet-activating factor is involved in the accumulation of PMN in the reperfused ischemic myocardium and contributes to the evolution of myocardial injury. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8434642

  19. Blood Level of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Leukocytes and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMNL) have an important defensive role against various microorganisms and other agents, but by liberating various substances, first of all the superoxide anion (O 2¯), they can damage the bronchial mucosa and influence the development of bronchial inflammation which is the fundamental of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR). Objective: to show the role of the PMNL for development and level of BHR in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Material and methods: We observed 160 patients with COPD treated in Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Sarajevo during three years :from 2012 to 2014. They were divided into groups and subgroups according to the first registration of BHR in the course of illness and to the number of exacerbations of the disease in one year. The number of blood PMNL was measured in a stable state of disease at the begging and at the end of investigation. Results: The number of blood PMNL was significantly greater in patients with 3 or more exacerbations per one year (p <0.01). Patients with BHR had significantly greater number blood PMNL than patients without BHR (p< 0.05). Patients with 3 exacerbations per year had a statistically significant increase of number of PMNL between first and last examination (p<0.01). Conclusion: There is statistically significant correlation between the number of blood PMNL and the level of BHR in COPD, but future examination need to be done to determine real role and mode of action of PMNL for these processes. PMID:26543311

  20. Effects of Acer okamotoanum sap on the function of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    An, Beum-Soo; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Hyun; Yang, Mhan-Pyo; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-02-01

    Sap is a plant fluid that primarily consists of water and small amounts of mineral elements, sugars, hormones and other nutrients. Acer mono (A. mono) is an endemic Korean mono maple which was recently suggested to have health benefits due to its abundant calcium and magnesium ion content. In the present study, we examined the effects of sap from Acer okamotoanum (A. okamotoanum) on the phagocytic response of mouse neutrophils in vivo and rat and canine neutrophils in vitro. We tested the regulation of phagocytic activity, oxidative burst activity (OBA) and the levels of filamentous polymeric actin (F-actin) in the absence and presence of dexamethasone (DEX) in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that DEX primarily reduced OBA in the mouse neutrophils, and that this was reversed in the presence of the sap. By contrast, the phagocytic activity of the mouse cells was not regulated by either DEX or the sap. Rat and canine polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMNs) responded in vitro to the sap in a similar manner by increasing OBA. However, regulation of phagocytic activity by the sap was different between the species. In canine PMNs, phagocytic activity was enhanced by the sap at a high dose, while it did not significantly modulate this activity in rat PMNs. These findings suggest that the sap of A. okamotoanum stimulates neutrophil activity in the mouse, rat and canine by increasing OBA in vivo and in vitro, and thus may have a potential antimicrobial effect in the PMNs of patients with infections.

  1. The activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and the complement system during immunotherapy with recombinant interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Baars, J W; Hack, C E; Wagstaff, J; Eerenberg-Belmer, A J; Wolbink, G J; Thijs, L G; Strack van Schijndel, R J; van der Vall, H L; Pinedo, H M

    1992-01-01

    The toxicity due to interleukin-2 (IL-2) strongly resembles the clinical picture seen during septic shock. In septic shock activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and the complement system contribute significantly to the pathophysiology of the condition. We therefore investigated whether similar events contributed to the toxicity observed with IL-2. Four patients received seven cycles of escalating dose IL-2 (18.0 to 72.0 X 10(6) IU m-2 day-1) and 16 were treated with 20 cycles of fixed dose IL-2 (12.0 or 18.0 X 10(6) IU m-2 day-1). Toxicity, as judged by hypotension (P = less than 0.005) and capillary leakage (fall in serum albumin 18.2 vs 4.0 gm l-1; P = less than 0.0005 and weight gain 4.0 vs 1.2 kg; P = less than 0.025) were worse with the esc. dose protocol. PMN became activated following IL-2 with mean peak elastase/alpha 1-antitrypsin (E alpha 1 A) and lactoferrin values of 212 (SEM = 37) and 534 (SEM = 92) ng ml-1 respectively occurring 6 h after the IL-2. Peak values for the esc. dose IL-2 group being generally higher than 500 ng ml-1. Activation of the complement cascade was evidenced by a dose dependent elevation of peak C3a values (fixed dose 9.1 (SEM = 0.6); esc. dose 25.7 (SEM = 6.33); P = less than 0.005) on day 5 of IL-2. There was a significant correlation between C3a levels and the degree of hypotention during the first 24 h after IL-2 (r = 0.91) and parameters of capillary leakage such as weight gain and fall in serum albumin (r = 0.71). These data suggest that activation of PMN initiates endothelial cell damage which subsequently leads to activation of the complement cascade. This latter system then contributes to the haemodynamic changes and capillary leakage seen in IL-2 treated patients.

  2. Synergistic Interaction of the Triple Combination of Amphotericin B, Ciprofloxacin, and Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils against Aspergillus fumigatus▿

    PubMed Central

    Stergiopoulou, Theodouli; Meletiadis, Joseph; Sein, Tin; Papaioannidou, Paraskevi; Walsh, Thomas J.; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Aspergillus is damaged by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) by means of nonoxidative and oxidative mechanisms, which may be affected by antifungal and antibacterial agents that patients with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis often receive. The pharmacodynamic interactions among deoxycholate amphotericin B (AMB), ciprofloxacin (CIP), and human PMNs against Aspergillus fumigatus growth are unknown. We therefore studied the interactions between 0.032 to 2.0 μg/ml of AMB, 0.1 to 50 μg/ml of CIP at a fixed AMB/CIP ratio of 1:3.125, and PMNs from six donors at an effector-to-target (E:T) ratio of 400:1 against a clinical A. fumigatus isolate using an XTT metabolic assay and the Bliss independence pharmacodynamic-interaction model. CIP exhibited no antifungal activity alone or in combination with PMNs. Synergy was found between AMB and PMNs, with interaction indices (II) of 0.06 to 0.21; the highest interaction of 21% ± 3.6% was observed at 0.22 ± 0.09 μg/ml of AMB. The AMB and CIP (AMB+CIP) combination was synergistic (II = 0.39) at low AMB concentrations and antagonistic (II = 1.39) at high AMB concentrations, with a maximal synergistic interaction of 16% ± 3.7% observed at 0.16 ± 0.08 μg/ml of AMB. The triple combination AMB+CIP+PMNs was synergistic, with interaction indices of 0.05 to 0.20, and a maximal synergistic interaction of 24% ± 4% was observed at 0.20 ± 0.07 μg/ml of AMB. The increased percentage of Bliss synergy of the triple combination AMB+CIP+PMNs (24% ± 4%) was the product of those of the constituent double combinations AMB+PMNs (21% ± 3.6%) and AMB+CIP (16% ± 3.7%). Thus, the antifungal activity of AMB, at clinically relevant concentrations, was enhanced in combination with PMNs and CIP against A. fumigatus growth in a concentration-dependent manner. PMID:21911564

  3. Granulocyte transfusions for treating infections in people with neutropenia or neutrophil dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon J; Hopewell, Sally; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Massey, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite modern antimicrobials and supportive therapy bacterial and fungal infections are still major complications in people with prolonged disease-related or treatment-related neutropenia. Transfusions of granulocytes have a long history of usage in clinical practice to support and treat severe infection in high-risk groups of patients with neutropenia or neutrophil dysfunction. However, there is considerable current variability in therapeutic granulocyte transfusion practice, and uncertainty about the beneficial effect of transfusions given as an adjunct to antibiotics on mortality. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2005. Objectives To determine the effectiveness and safety of granulocyte transfusions compared to no granulocyte transfusions as adjuncts to antimicrobials for treating infections in people with neutropenia or disorders of neutrophil function aimed at reducing mortality and other adverse outcomes related to infection. Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 2). MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980) and ongoing trial databases to 11 February 2016. Selection criteria RCTs comparing people with neutropenia or disorders of neutrophil dysfunction receiving granulocyte transfusions to treat infection with a control group receiving no granulocyte transfusions. Neonates are the subject of another Cochrane review and were excluded from this review. There was no restriction by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by the Cochrane Collaboration. Main results We identified 10 trials that met the inclusion criteria with a total of 587 participants. We also identified another ongoing trial. These trials were conducted between 1975 and 2015. None of

  4. Low-density granulocytes: a distinct class of neutrophils in systemic autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have renewed the interest on the potential role that neutrophils play in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune conditions. A distinct subset of proinflammatory, low-density granulocytes (LDGs) isolated from the peripheral blood mononuclear cell fractions of patients with SLE has been described. While the origin and role of LDGs needs to be fully characterized, there is evidence that these cells may contribute to lupus pathogenesis and to the development of end-organ damage through heightened proinflammatory responses, altered phagocytic capacity, enhanced ability to synthesize type I interferons, and to kill endothelial cells. Furthermore, these cells readily form neutrophil extracellular traps, a phenomenon that may promote autoantigen externalization and organ damage. This review examines the biology and potential origin of LDGs, describes the ultrastructural characteristics of these cells, and discusses their putative pathogenic role in systemic autoimmune diseases.

  5. Effects of L-citrulline oral supplementation on polymorphonuclear neutrophils oxidative burst and nitric oxide production after exercise.

    PubMed

    Sureda, Antoni; Cordova, Alfredo; Ferrer, Miguel D; Tauler, Pedro; Perez, Gerardo; Tur, Josep A; Pons, Antoni

    2009-09-01

    Seventeen volunteer male professional cyclists were randomly assigned to control or supplemented (6 g L-citrulline-malate) groups and participated in a cycling stage. Blood samples were taken in basal conditions, after the race and 3 h post-race. Citrulline supplementation significantly increased plasma concentration of both arginine and citrulline after the stage only in the supplemented group. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) from controls responded to exercise with a progressive decrease in ROS production. Supplemented PMNs significantly increased ROS production after exercise compared to basal values and diminished to values lower than basal at recovery. PMN nitrite concentration was significantly higher after exercise and recovery only in the supplemented group. Markers of oxidative damage-CK, LDH, malondialdehyde-and DNA damage remained unchanged in both groups. In conclusion, oral L-citrulline administration previous to a cycling stage increases plasma arginine availability for NO synthesis and PMNs priming for oxidative burst without oxidative damage. PMID:19585317

  6. Granulocyte transfusions for preventing infections in people with neutropenia or neutrophil dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Blanco, Patricia; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Massey, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite modern antimicrobials and supportive therapy, bacterial and fungal infections are still major complications in people with prolonged disease-related or therapy-related neutropenia. Since the late 1990s there has been increasing demand for donated granulocyte transfusions to treat or prevent severe infections in people who lack their own functional granulocytes. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2009. Objectives To determine the effectiveness and safety of prophylactic granulocyte transfusions compared with a control population not receiving this intervention for preventing all-cause mortality, mortality due to infection, and evidence of infection due to infection or due to any other cause in people with neutropenia or disorders of neutrophil function. Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 3), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), CINAHL (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980) and ongoing trial databases to April 20 2015. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs comparing people receiving granulocyte transfusions to prevent the development of infection with a control group receiving no granulocyte transfusions. Neonates are the subject of another Cochrane review and were excluded from this review. There was no restriction by outcomes examined, but this review focuses on mortality, mortality due to infection and adverse events. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Main results Twelve trials met the inclusion criteria. One trial is still ongoing, leaving a total of 11 trials eligible involving 653 participants. These trials were conducted between 1978 and 2006 and enrolled participants from fairly comparable patient populations. None of the studies included people with

  7. Neutrophil Granulocytes in Ovarian Cancer - Induction of Epithelial-To-Mesenchymal-Transition and Tumor Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Christine; Darb-Esfahani, Silvia; Meyer, Anne-Sophie; Hübner, Katrin; Rom, Joachim; Sohn, Christof; Braicu, Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid; Hänsch, G. Maria; Gaida, Matthias M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ovarian cancer (OvCa) is a highly aggressive malignoma with a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) is frequently seen, raising the question of their impact on tumor development. In that context, effects of PMN on human ovarian cancer cells were assessed. Methods: Human epithelial ovarian cancer cells were incubated with human PMN, lysate of PMN, or neutrophil elastase. Morphological alterations were observed by time-lapse video-microscopy, and the underlying molecular mechanism was analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blotting. Functional alternations were assessed by an in vitro wound healing assay. In parallel, a large cohort of n=334 primary OvCa tissue samples of various histological subtypes was histologically evaluated. Results: Co-cultivation of cancer cells with either PMN or PMN lysate causes a change of the polygonal epithelial phenotype of the cells towards a spindle shaped morphology, causing a cribriform cell growth. The PMN-induced alteration could be attributed to elastase, a major protease of PMN. Elastase-induced shape change was most likely due to the degradation of membranous E-cadherin, which results in loss of cell contacts and polarity. Moreover, in response to elastase, epithelial cytokeratins were downmodulated, in parallel with a nuclear translocation of β-catenin. These PMN-elastase induced alterations of cells are compatible with an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the cancer cells. Following EMT, the cells displayed a more migratory phenotype. In human biopsies, neutrophil infiltration was seen in 72% of the cases. PMN infiltrates were detected preferentially in areas with low E-cadherin expression. Conclusion: PMN in the microenvironment of OvCa can alter tumor cells towards a mesenchymal and migratory phenotype. PMID:27053953

  8. Alteration of the functional effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on polymorphonuclear leukocytes by membrane-fluidizing agents.

    PubMed Central

    Buescher, E S; McIlheran, S M; Banks, S M; Vadhan-Raj, S

    1990-01-01

    Locomotion and oxidative metabolism of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from 15 patients receiving recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) were examined in vitro. At the end of each GM-CSF treatment course, polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) chemotactic responses were suppressed and no enhancement of formyl-peptide-stimulated superoxide production was observed. The priming of PMN superoxide production normally seen after in vitro GM-CSF exposure was also blunted in these cells. By using control donor PMN, two membrane-fluidizing agents, pentoxifylline and butanol, were shown to normalize suppressed PMN chemotaxis caused by in vitro GM-CSF (1 nM) exposure. Pentoxifylline, but not butanol, also reversed the effects of in vitro GM-CSF on PMN superoxide production. When PMN obtained from six patients at the end of GM-CSF therapy were exposed to pentoxifylline in vitro, the chemotactic suppression typically observed was significantly improved. The data suggest that GM-CSF may affect PMN function via mechanisms involving membrane fluidity or cell deformability or both. PMID:2167293

  9. Endotoxin down-modulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (CD114) on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, U; Homoncik, M; Stohlawetz, P J; Marsik, C; Sieder, A; Eichler, H G; Jilma, B

    2000-07-01

    During infection, the development of nonresponsiveness to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be influenced by the down-modulation of G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) by cytokines. This down-modulation was studied during experimental human endotoxemia. Healthy volunteers received either 2 ng/kg endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS], n=20) or placebo (n=10) in a randomized, controlled trial. Endotoxin infusion increased the mean fluorescence intensity of the neutrophil activation marker CD11b >300% after 1 h (P<.001 vs. placebo). LPS infusion down-modulated G-CSFR expression in as early as 60 min (-17%; P=.001 vs. placebo). Down-modulation was almost maximal at 90 min and persisted for 6 h (-50% from baseline; P<.0001 vs. placebo). Plasma levels of G-CSF started to increase only after G-CSFR down-modulation had occurred and peaked 37-fold above baseline at 4 h (P<.0001 vs. placebo). In conclusion, LPS down-modulates G-CSFR expression in humans, which may render neutrophils less responsive to the effects of G-CSF and, thereby, compromise host defense mechanisms.

  10. Vesicle formation as a result of interaction between polymorphonuclear neutrophils and Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    PubMed

    Chebotar, Igor' V; Konchakova, Evgenia D; Maianskii, Andrey N

    2013-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a major opportunistic pathogen, is a leading cause of biofilm-related infections in clinical practice. Staphylococcal biofilms are highly resistant to antibacterial medicines and immune effector cells. The main result of our work is the discovery of nano-vesicles in the supernatant of the human neutrophil-S. aureus biofilm system. We also found that phospholipase C treatment causes complete destruction of these vesicles. While the addition of proteinase K led to a partial structural disorganization of the vesicles, DNase treatment did not influence the vesicle structure. These observations allowed us to conclude that phospholipids and proteins play a structure-forming role in the formation of these nano-vesicles. The vesicles demonstrated anti-biofilm activities when tested against Staphylococcus epidermidis (strains 178M and 328/5) biofilms, but were ineffective for S. aureus (strains 5983/2, 5663 and 18A) biofilms.

  11. Myocellular enzyme leakage, polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation and delayed onset muscle soreness induced by isokinetic eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Croisier, J L; Camus, G; Deby-Dupont, G; Bertrand, F; Lhermerout, C; Crielaard, J M; Juchmès-Ferir, A; Deby, C; Albert, A; Lamy, M

    1996-01-01

    To address the question of whether delayed onset muscular soreness (DOMS) following intense eccentric muscle contraction could be due to increased production of the arachidonic acid derived product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). 10 healthy male subjects were submitted to eccentric and concentric isokinetic exercises on a Kin Trex device at 60 degrees/s angular velocity. Exercise consisted of 8 stages of 5 maximal contractions of the knee extensor and flexor muscle groups of both legs separated by 1 min rest phases. There was an interval of at least 30 days between eccentric and concentric testing, and the order of the two exercise sessions was randomly assigned. The subjective presence and intensity of DOMS was evaluated using a visual analogue scale, immediately, following 24 h and 48 h after each test. Five blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein: at rest before exercise, immediately after, after 30 min recovery, 24 h and 48 h after the tests. The magnitude of the acute inflammatory response to exercise was assessed by measuring plasma levels of polymorphonuclear elastase ([EL]), myeloperoxidase ([MPO]) and PGE2 ([PGE2]). Using two way analysis of variance, it appeared that only eccentric exercise significantly increased [EL] and DOMS, especially of the hamstring muscles. Furthermore, a significant decrease in eccentric peak torque of this muscle group only was observed on day 2 after eccentric work (- 21%; P < 0.002). Serum activity of creatine kinase and serum concentration of myoglobin increased significantly 24 and 48 h after both exercise tests. However, these variables reached significantly higher values following eccentric contractions 48 h after exercise. Mean [PGE2] in the two exercise modes remained unchanged over time and were practically equal at each time point. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that the magnitude of polymorphonuclear (PMN) activation, muscle damage, and DOMS are greater after eccentric than after concentric muscle

  12. Aspirin Triggered-Lipoxin A4 Reduces the Adhesion of Human Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils to Endothelial Cells Initiated by Preeclamptic Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Villa, AM; Norling, LV; Serhan, CN; Cordero, D; Rojas, M; Cadavid, A

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Preeclampsia is a disorder of pregnancy, characterized by hypertension and proteinuria after 20 weeks of gestation. Here, we evaluated the role of aspirin triggered-lipoxin A4 (ATL, 15-epi-LXA4) on the modulation of the adhesion of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to endothelial cells initiated by preeclamptic plasma. Materials and methods Plasma from preeclamptic, normotensive pregnant, and non-pregnant women were analysed for factors involved in regulating angiogenesis, inflammation and lipid peroxidation. Plasma from preeclamptic women was added to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and the adhesion of PMN (incubated with or without ATL) to cells was evaluated. Results Preeclampsia was associated with some augmented anti-angiogenic, oxidative and pro-inflammatory markers, as well as increasing human PMN-endothelial cell adhesion. This cell adhesion was reduced when human PMN were incubated with ATL prior to addition to endothelial monolayers. Discussions and Conclusions Our results are the starting point for further research on the efficacy and rational use of aspirin in preeclampsia. PMID:22974760

  13. Gonococcal interactions with polymorphonuclear neutrophils: importance of the phagosome for bactericidal activity.

    PubMed Central

    Densen, P; Mandell, G L

    1978-01-01

    Gonococci are capable of attaching to the surface of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). In this location they resist phagocytosis and are not killed by PMN. To delineate the factors involved in the survival of these gonococci, we investigated the interaction of virulent gonococci, which adhere to cells and resist phagocytosis, and avirulent gonococci, which are phagocytized and killed by PMN. In the presence of serum, both virulent and avirulent gonococci associate equally well with PMN and stimulate increases in oxidative metabolism. In the absence of serum virulent gonococci attached to PMN and stimulated PMN oxidative metabolism to a greater extent than avirulent gonococci which did not attach to PMN (P = 0.0009). Therefore, the survival of virulent gonococci attached to the PMN surface is not a result of failure to activate oxidative and bactericidal mechanisms. Both virulent and avirulent gonococci stimulated equivalent PMN specific granule release as measured by the appearance of lactoferrin in the media. Phagocytosis of avirulent gonococci stimulated significantly greater beta-glucuronidase release (P = 0.01) and myeloperoxidase-mediated iodination of protein (P = 0.001) by PMN than attachment of virulent gonococci. In the absence of serum neither type of gonococci stimulated beta-glocuronidase release or protein iodination by PMN. Thus, virulent gonococci fail to stimulate primary granule release by PMN. To further assess the role of attachment versus ingestion on the survival of gonococci, PMN were treated with cytochalasin B to block ingestion. Cytochalasin B-treated PMN were unable to kill either virulent or avirulent gonococci despite normal degranulation stimulated by the latter. The failure of PMN to kill surface-attached gonococci appears to be a consequence of the failure of PMN to enclose the virulent gonococci within a phagosome. The phagocytic vacuole thus plays a critical role in normal PMN bactericidal activity by providing a closed space in

  14. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to healthy volunteers: analysis of the immediate activating effects on circulating neutrophils.

    PubMed

    de Haas, M; Kerst, J M; van der Schoot, C E; Calafat, J; Hack, C E; Nuijens, J H; Roos, D; van Oers, R H; von dem Borne, A E

    1994-12-01

    In four healthy volunteers, we analyzed in detail the immediate in vivo effects on circulating neutrophils of subcutaneous administration of 300 micrograms of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Neutrophil activation was assessed by measurement of degranulation. Mobilization of secretory vesicles was shown by a decrease in leukocyte alkaline phosphatase content of the circulating neutrophils. Furthermore, shortly postinjection, Fc gamma RIII was found to be upregulated from an intracellular pool that we identified by immunoelectron microscopy as secretory vesicles. Intravascular release of specific granules was shown by increased plasma levels of lactoferrin and by upregulation of the expression of CD66b and CD11b on circulating neutrophils. Moreover, measurement of fourfold elevated plasma levels of elastase, bound to its physiologic inhibitor alpha 1-antitrypsin, indicated mobilization of azurophil granules. However, no expression of CD63, a marker of azurophil granules, was observed on circulating neutrophils. G-CSF--induced mobilization of secretory vesicles and specific granules could be mimicked in whole blood cultures in vitro, in contrast to release of azurophil granules. Therefore, we postulate that the most activated neutrophils leave the circulation, as observed shortly postinjection, and undergo subsequent stimulation in the endothelial microenvironment, resulting in mobilization of azurophil granules. Our data demonstrate that G-CSF should be regarded as a potent immediate activator of neutrophils in vivo.

  15. Semen polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocyte elastase as a diagnostic and prognostic marker of genital tract inflammation--a review.

    PubMed

    Zorn, Branko; Sesek-Briski, Alenka; Osredkar, Josko; Meden-Vrtovec, Helena

    2003-01-01

    Elastase is a protease released by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) during the inflammatory process. Since 1987, seminal elastase-inhibitor complex (Ela/alpha1-PI) has been proposed as a marker of male silent genital tract inflammation. Measured by immunoassay in seminal plasma, Ela/alpha1-PI at a cut-off level of > or = 230 microg/l, is useful in the detection of genital tract inflammation. The prevalence of increased seminal Ela/alpha1-PI in infertile men is significantly higher than that observed in fertile men. The Ela/alpha1-PI level is positively correlated with other seminal fluid markers of male genital tract inflammation: reduced semen volume, citric acid, fructose, and increased albumin, complement component C3, caeruloplasmin, immunoglobulins IgG and IgA, and cytokines interleukins-8 and -6. A higher seminal Ela/alpha1-PI level is significantly associated with tubal damage in female partners. After antibiotic therapy, a decrease of Ela/alpha1-PI level is observed. The presence of tubal damage in the partner may negatively affect the response to antibiotic treatment. A higher seminal Ela/alpha1-PI is associated with lower percentage of sperm with single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and better fertilization rate in in vitro fertilization. Besides infertility, the determination of Ela/alpha1-PI is useful to confirm the presence of prostate and other male accessory gland bacterial inflammation. Screening for PMN Ela/alpha1-PI is easy to perform and reproducible and is a reliable quantitative test for diagnosis and prognosis of silent genital tract inflammation of couples. Moreover, sequential determinations allow the follow-up of inflammation during and after therapy.

  16. Aspergillus fumigatus diffusates suppress polymorphonuclear neutrophil phagocytic functions and respiratory burst levels in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, X H; Deng, Y C; Zhong, B Y; Hao, F

    2015-08-10

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is a severe infection that commonly occurs in immunocompromised patients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The present study explores the effect of Aspergillus fumigatus diffusates (AfDs) on phagocytic function and superoxide anion (O2(-)) burst levels in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) from post-HSCT patients. A. fumigatus conidia with or without AfD were used to stimulate the PMN from healthy donor or HSCT patient for two hours. PMN morphology was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. The levels of respiratory burst O2(-) produced by the PMNs were determined by flow cytometry. PMN phagocytic rates and phagocytic indexes were observed and calculated using periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining under a light-field microscope. No difference was found between the PMN phagocytic rates, phagocytic indexes, or O2(-) respiratory burst levels in health donor PMNs following treatments of A. fumigatus conidia with or without AfD. However, significant inhibition of these indices was seen in the PMNs from HSCT patients following treatment of A. fumigatus conidia plus AfD, compared to that with conidium treatment alone (P < 0.05). Therefore, AfD significantly inhibited the phagocytic function of PMNs from HSCT patients, potentially through inhibition of intracellular respiratory burst levels during phagocytosis. This suggests that the reason underlying the greater susceptibility of HSCT patients to aspergillosis might be the existence of AfD in vivo during infection. Further research on the mechanisms by which AfD affects the phagocytic function of PMNs from HSCT patients is therefore of great significance for the prevention of IA.

  17. Modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H; Hovgaard, D; Borregaard, N; Nissen, N I

    1991-04-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been shown to inhibit the chemotaxis and enhance the oxidative burst response of human neutrophils in vitro. The present study describes the effect of recombinant GM-CSF on the neutrophil and monocyte function in patients with lymphoma undergoing GM-CSF treatment. Patients with either Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated with various dosages (2-16 micrograms kg-1 body weight per day for 5 days) of rhGM-CSF by intravenous or subcutaneous route. Prior to and on day 5 of rhGM-CSF treatment, neutrophil and monocyte chemotaxis and chemiluminescence responses to f-Met-Leu-Phe, zymosan activated serum (ZAS) and opsonized zymosan (OZ) were determined. It was observed that chemotactic response of neutrophils to f-Met-Leu-Phe and ZAS was reduced, whereas the chemiluminescence response of both cell types to f-Met-Leu-Phe and zymosan was enhanced by up to 43-fold. rhGM-CSF treatment did not affect degranulation of the neutrophils as measured by release of vitamin B12 binding protein. Degree of modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by rhGM-CSF was independent of rhGM-CSF dosages administered. These data suggest that phagocytic defence system may be enhanced by GM-CSF treatment and that this cytokine may be a useful therapeutic adjunct in compromised patients.

  18. [A quantitative analysis of the ultrastructures of the blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with ischemic heart disease after a session of intravenous laser therapy].

    PubMed

    Khomeriki, S G; Morozov, I A

    1998-01-01

    Circulating neutrophilic granulocytes before and after laser therapy were studied in 10 patients with ischemic heart disease and 5 healthy persons. The patients had severe cytoplasm vacuolization, specific granules number increase, a decrease in thickness of the submembranous actin layer and decrease of surface = volume ratio. Neutrophils indices in patients with ischemic heart disease become closer to those in donor cells after blood irradiation with a helium-neon laser. The results indicate a normalizing effect of helium-neon laser irradiation on the mechanisms of non-specific reactivity in some forms of ischemic heart disease. PMID:9949900

  19. Release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and histamine. II. The cellular origin of human PAF: monocytes, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and basophils.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G; Aglietta, M; Coda, R; Bussolino, F; Piacibello, W; Tetta, C

    1981-01-01

    The origin of platelet activating factor (PAF) from human leucocytes was investigated. Purified monocytes release PAF passively at pH 10.6, when challenged with Ionophore A 23187 or under phagocytic stimuli. Pure preparations of polymorphonuclear neutrophils liberate PAF passively, when challenged with C5a, neutrophil cationic proteins (CP), their carboxypeptidase B derived products (C5a des Arg, CP des Arg) or under phagocytic stimuli. Basophil rich buffy coat cells release PAF when challenged with C5a, CP, anti-IgE (in low amount) or Synacthen concomitantly with basophil degranulation and histamine release. Electron microscopy studies, carried out on Synacthen-stimulated basophil rich buffy coat, provide morphological evidence for platelet-basophil interaction. In conclusion our data demonstrate that PAF can be released from different leucocyte populations. However, the stimuli able to trigger such release appear to have some specificity for the cell target. Images Figure 5 PMID:6161885

  20. [The importance of studying the acid phosphatase of the blood serum and bone marrow lymphoblasts and polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the prognosis of the course of acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Vaiuta, N P; Khaĭfets, L M; Mendeleev, I M

    1988-01-01

    The activity of serum acid phosphatase (AP), bone marrow lymphoblasts and polymorphonuclear neutrophils was studied in 45 ALL patients. Cytochemical coefficients (CCC) and the percentage of positively reacting bone marrow cells were determined. All the patients received programmed polychemotherapy. They were investigated before the start of therapy, during recurrence and at different time of remission (from 1 to 60 mos) during each reinduction cycle. At the climax of ALL the activity of serum AP was increased 2.8-fold, a CCC value for lymphoblastic AP--10-fold, for polymorphonuclear neutrophils--3-fold as compared with normal values. A tendency toward the reduction of indices was noted at different time of remission, the approximation to normal values was noted on the 40th-46th months of remission only. In recurrence development the level of the serum and cellular enzyme as well as the percentage of positively reacting cells significantly exceeded normal values and were close to indices at the climax of disease. The above tendency permitted the use of these tests to evaluate the completeness of remission and to predict recurrences during a follow-up of ALL patients.

  1. The effect of maximal exercise on the activity of neutrophil granulocytes in highly trained athletes in a moderate training period.

    PubMed

    Hack, V; Strobel, G; Rau, J P; Weicker, H

    1992-01-01

    Leucocyte cell counts and the phagocytic and chemotactic activities of neutrophil granulocytes were investigated in highly endurance-trained long-distance runners (n = 10) and triathletes (n = 10) during a moderate training period and compared with untrained subjects (n = 10) before and up to 24 h after a graded exercise to exhaustion on a treadmill. After exercise a leucocytosis was noted with a significant increase in lymphocyte (P < or = 0.01) and neutrophil (P < or = 0.01) counts in all groups. In neutrophils the number of ingested inert latex beads was significantly increased (P < or = 0.01) from 0.21 (SD 0.09) to 0.45 (SD 0.22) in controls, from 0.20 (SD 0.12) to 0.56 (SD 0.16) in long-distance runners and from 0.25 (SD 0.08) to 1.03 (SD 0.42) particles per cell in triathletes 24 h after exercise, compared with resting values. The capability of neutrophils to produce microbicidal reactive oxygen species fell (P < or = 0.05) immediately after exercise in all subjects and then increased by 36 (SD 8)%, 31 (SD 6)% and 19 (SD 9)% in controls, runners and triathletes respectively up to 24 h after exercise (P < or = 0.05) compared with pre-start values. With respect to the absolute number of neutrophils, ingestion capacity, production of superoxide anions and chemotactic activity, no significant differences were found between athletes and control subjects at rest and after exercise.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Surface molecules regulating rolling and adhesion to endothelium of neutrophil granulocytes and MDA-MB-468 breast carcinoma cells and their interaction.

    PubMed

    Strell, C; Lang, K; Niggemann, B; Zaenker, K S; Entschladen, F

    2007-12-01

    The extravasation of leukocytes and tumor cells is a multi-step process with the involvement of various adhesion molecules depending on the three steps rolling, adhesion, and diapedesis. We have developed an in vitro model, by which we investigated the rolling and adhesion of neutrophil granulocytes and MDA-MB-468 human breast carcinoma cells to lung endothelial cells under physiological flow-conditions. We found that norepinephrine had an inhibitory function on the fMLP-promoted adhesion of neutrophil granulocytes due to a down-regulation of beta2-integrin. Furthermore, neutrophil granulocytes serve as linking cells for the interaction of the MDA-MB-468 cells with the endothelium, which are both beta2-integrin negative, but express the beta2-integrin ligand ICAM-1. In addition, we show here that N-cadherin is up-regulated on the endothelial cells and on neutrophil granulocytes in response to fMLP. This up-regulation resulted in a significant increase of adherent MDA-MB-468 cells, which are also N-cadherin positive.

  3. Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Are Necessary for the Recruitment of CD8+ T Cells in the Liver in a Pregnant Mouse Model of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci Serotype 1) Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Oca, Roberto Montes; Buendía, Antonio J.; Del Río, Laura; Sánchez, Joaquín; Salinas, Jesús; Navarro, Jose A.

    2000-01-01

    The role of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in the development of the specific immune response against Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) infection was studied in a pregnant mouse model involving treatment with RB6-8C5 monoclonal antibody. PMN depletion significantly affected the immune response in the liver, in which the T-lymphocyte and F4/80+ cell populations decreased, particularly the CD8+ T-cell population. A Th1-like response, characterized by high levels of gamma interferon without detectable levels of interleukin 4 (IL-4) in serum, was observed in both depleted and nondepleted mice, although an increased production of IL-10 was detected in the depleted group. Our results suggest that PMNs play a very important role in the recruitment of other leukocyte populations to the inflammatory foci but have little influence in the polarization of the immune specific response toward a Th1-like response. PMID:10679002

  4. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are necessary for the recruitment of CD8(+) T cells in the liver in a pregnant mouse model of Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) infection.

    PubMed

    de Oca, R M; Buendía, A J; Del Río, L; Sánchez, J; Salinas, J; Navarro, J A

    2000-03-01

    The role of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in the development of the specific immune response against Chlamydophila abortus (Chlamydia psittaci serotype 1) infection was studied in a pregnant mouse model involving treatment with RB6-8C5 monoclonal antibody. PMN depletion significantly affected the immune response in the liver, in which the T-lymphocyte and F4/80(+) cell populations decreased, particularly the CD8(+) T-cell population. A Th1-like response, characterized by high levels of gamma interferon without detectable levels of interleukin 4 (IL-4) in serum, was observed in both depleted and nondepleted mice, although an increased production of IL-10 was detected in the depleted group. Our results suggest that PMNs play a very important role in the recruitment of other leukocyte populations to the inflammatory foci but have little influence in the polarization of the immune specific response toward a Th1-like response.

  5. TRPC1 regulates fMLP-stimulated migration and chemotaxis of neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, O; Strodthoff, C; Horstmann, M; Nielsen, N; Jung, F; Schimmelpfennig, S; Heitzmann, M; Schwab, A

    2015-09-01

    Neutrophils form the first line of defense of the innate immune system and are rapidly recruited by chemotactic signals to sites of inflammation. Understanding the mechanisms of neutrophil chemotaxis is therefore of great interest for the potential development of new immunoregulatory therapies. It has been shown that members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of cation channels are involved in both cell migration and chemotaxis. In this study, we demonstrate that TRPC1 channels play an important role in fMLP mediated chemotaxis and migration of murine neutrophils. The knock-out of TRPC1 channels leads to an impaired migration, transmigration and chemotaxis of the neutrophils. In contrast, Ca²⁺ influx but not store release after activation of the TRPC1(-/-) neutrophils with fMLP is strongly enhanced. We show that the enhanced Ca²⁺ influx in the TRPC1(-/-) neutrophils is associated with a steepened front to rear gradient of the intracellular Ca²⁺ concentration with higher levels at the cell rear. Taken together, this paper highlights a distinct role of TRPC1 in neutrophil migration and chemotaxis. We propose that TRPC1 controls the activity of further Ca²⁺ influx channels and thus regulates the maintenance of intracellular Ca²⁺ gradients which are critical for cell migration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  6. Prevention of corticosteroid-induced suppression of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte-induced damage of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and gamma interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Roilides, E; Uhlig, K; Venzon, D; Pizzo, P A; Walsh, T J

    1993-01-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) are a critical line of defense against Aspergillus fumigatus infection. Increased frequency of invasive aspergillosis has been observed in patients receiving corticosteroids, suggesting a deleterious effect of these compounds on PMN antifungal function. To investigate this hypothesis and to determine the potential preventive utility of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), the effects of hydrocortisone (HCS) and dexamethasone (DXS) on PMN-induced damage of Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae were studied with or without pretreatment of PMNs with G-CSF and IFN-gamma. PMNs treated with HCS (> or = 3,000 microM) or DXS (> or = 10 microM) during a 2-h colorimetric tetrazolium metabolic assay (using methylthiotetrazolium) showed suppressed percentage of hyphal damage (P < 0.02). In addition, both HCS (> or = 30 microM) and DXS (> or = 1 microM) significantly suppressed oxidative burst measured as superoxide anion release by PMNs in response to opsonized and nonopsonized hyphae as well as to N-formylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine. Pretreatment of PMNs with G-CSF (4,000 U/ml) and/or IFN-gamma (100 and 1,000 U/ml) for 90 min prevented the suppression of hyphal damage that occurred in the presence of HCS (3,000 microM; P < 0.01) or DXS (10 microM; P < or = 0.001). G-CSF (4,000 U/ml) and IFN-gamma (100 U/ml) combined had an additive effect on increasing the antifungal activity of HCS-treated but not of DXS-treated PMNs compared with IFN-gamma alone (P = 0.015). Thus, these findings reveal that corticosteroids impair PMN function in response to A. fumigatus and that G-CSF and IFN-gamma prevent this impairment. PMID:7691757

  7. Incipient UV-Induced Structural Changes in Neutrophil Granulocytes: Morphometric and Texture Analysis of Two-Dimensional Digital Images.

    PubMed

    Grbatinić, Ivan; Milošević, Nebojša T

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the ability and consequent significance of fractal and lacunarity analysis together with computational morphometric and gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) analysis in detecting subtle initial UVB-induced chromatin and cytosolic changes in neutrophil granulocytes. In addition, the direction and potential significance of the observed changes is speculated. Feulgen-stained neutrophils are pictured and their digitalized images are analyzed in specialized software for digital image processing and ImageJ analysis. Significant statistical difference is observed (p0.05). For other parameters there was mostly high statistical significance (p>0.05). Significant unmatched correlations were found as sensitive markers of early morphological changes in cells exposed to UV light. In addition, the correlation between nuclear area and entropy was determined and was highly significant (p<0.001). UVB light, due to its high absorbance by DNA molecules, leads to double behavior of the cells. On one hand, cells start to rearrange but on the other UV light starts very early to immediately damage the cell. All these processes are very subtle in their intensity and GLCM analysis and computational imaging methods based on fractal geometry, i.e. fractal and morphometric analysis, in particular their combination, are very sensitive for detecting and describing these early chromatin changes.

  8. A novel class of autoantigens of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis: the lysosomal membrane glycoprotein h-lamp-2 in neutrophil granulocytes and a related membrane protein in glomerular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis (NCGN) is frequently associated with circulating antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA). It is established that ANCA are specific for soluble enzymes of granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMN), such as myeloperoxidase (MPO) or protease 3 (PR3). The purpose of this study was to identify membrane proteins of PMNs, and/or glomerular cells, as additional autoantigenic ANCA targets. When membrane protein fractions were prepared from PMNs and isolated human glomeruli, and immunoblotted with ANCA sera of NCGN patients, two bands with apparent molecular masses of 170 and 80-110 kD (gp170/80-110) were labeled in PMNs, and a 130-kD glycoprotein (gp130) in glomeruli. Gp130 was purified, and monoclonal and rabbit antibodies (Abs) were produced which showed the same double specificity as the patient's ANCA. Using these probes, evidence was provided that gp170/80-110 is identical with human lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (h-lamp-2), because both proteins were immunologically cross-reactive and screening of a cDNA expression library from human promyelocytic leukemia cells with anti- gp130 Ab yielded a clone derived from h-lamp-2. Gp170/80-110 was localized primarily in granule membranes of resting PMNs, and was translocated to the cell surfaces by activation with FMLP. By contrast, gp130 was localized in the surface membranes of endothelial cells of human glomerular and renal interstitial capillaries, rather than in lysosomes, as found for h-lamp-2. Potential clinical relevance of autoantibodies to gp170/80-110 and gp130 was assessed in a preliminary trial, in which ANCA sera of patients (n = 16) with NCGN were probed with purified or recombinant antigens. Specific reactivity was detected in approximately 90% of cases with active phases of NCGN, and frequently also in combination with autoantibodies specific for PR3 or MPO. Collectively, these data provide evidence that h-lamp-2 in PMNs and a

  9. Triple Therapy with First Generation Protease Inhibitors for Hepatitis C Markedly Impairs Function of Neutrophil Granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Spindelboeck, Walter; Horvath, Angela; Tawdrous, Monika; Schmerböck, Bianca; Zettel, Gabriele; Posch, Andreas; Streit, Andrea; Jurse, Petra; Lemesch, Sandra; Horn, Martin; Wuensch, Gerit; Stiegler, Philipp; Stauber, Rudolf E; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    First-generation HCV protease inhibitors represent a milestone in antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC), but substantially increased rates of viral clearance are offset by increased rates of infection and infection-associated deaths, especially of patients with advanced liver disease. We aimed to assess whether first generation protease inhibitors interfere with neutrophil function. We included 108 consecutive, retrospective CHC patients and 44 consecutive, prospective CHC patients who were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin with or without protease inhibitors according to the guidelines in the period of November 2012 to June 2015. 33 healthy volunteers served as controls. Infection data were evaluated in all patients. Neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst, elastase and diamine oxidase levels during 12 weeks of triple (n = 23) or dual therapy (n = 21) were studied in the prospective part. In the retro- and prospective cohorts patients experiencing clinically relevant infections were significantly more frequent during protease inhibitor therapy (31% and 26%) than during therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin (13% and 0%). Neutrophil phagocytosis decreased to 40% of baseline with addition of protease inhibitors to P/R but recovered 6 months after end of treatment. Protease inhibitors also seemed to reduce serum elastase levels but did not impact on gut permeability. Impaired neutrophil function during triple therapy with first generation HCV protease inhibitors may explain the high infection rate associated to these treatments and be of relevance for treatment success and patient survival. PMID:26938078

  10. Triple Therapy with First Generation Protease Inhibitors for Hepatitis C Markedly Impairs Function of Neutrophil Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tawdrous, Monika; Schmerböck, Bianca; Zettel, Gabriele; Posch, Andreas; Streit, Andrea; Jurse, Petra; Lemesch, Sandra; Horn, Martin; Wuensch, Gerit; Stiegler, Philipp; Stauber, Rudolf E.; Leber, Bettina; Stadlbauer, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    First-generation HCV protease inhibitors represent a milestone in antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection (CHC), but substantially increased rates of viral clearance are offset by increased rates of infection and infection-associated deaths, especially of patients with advanced liver disease. We aimed to assess whether first generation protease inhibitors interfere with neutrophil function. We included 108 consecutive, retrospective CHC patients and 44 consecutive, prospective CHC patients who were treated with peginterferon and ribavirin with or without protease inhibitors according to the guidelines in the period of November 2012 to June 2015. 33 healthy volunteers served as controls. Infection data were evaluated in all patients. Neutrophil phagocytosis, oxidative burst, elastase and diamine oxidase levels during 12 weeks of triple (n = 23) or dual therapy (n = 21) were studied in the prospective part. In the retro- and prospective cohorts patients experiencing clinically relevant infections were significantly more frequent during protease inhibitor therapy (31% and 26%) than during therapy with peginterferon and ribavirin (13% and 0%). Neutrophil phagocytosis decreased to 40% of baseline with addition of protease inhibitors to P/R but recovered 6 months after end of treatment. Protease inhibitors also seemed to reduce serum elastase levels but did not impact on gut permeability. Impaired neutrophil function during triple therapy with first generation HCV protease inhibitors may explain the high infection rate associated to these treatments and be of relevance for treatment success and patient survival. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02545400 ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02545335 PMID:26938078

  11. Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Abrikossova, Natalia; Skoglund, Caroline; Ahrén, Maria; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2012-07-11

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd(2)O(3)) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd(2)O(3) nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  12. Effects of gadolinium oxide nanoparticles on the oxidative burst from human neutrophil granulocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrikossova, Natalia; Skoglund, Caroline; Ahrén, Maria; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Uvdal, Kajsa

    2012-07-01

    We have previously shown that gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) nanoparticles are promising candidates to be used as contrast agents in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging applications. In this study, these nanoparticles were investigated in a cellular system, as possible probes for visualization and targeting intended for bioimaging applications. We evaluated the impact of the presence of Gd2O3 nanoparticles on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human neutrophils, by means of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Three sets of Gd2O3 nanoparticles were studied, i.e. as synthesized, dialyzed and both PEG-functionalized and dialyzed Gd2O3 nanoparticles. In addition, neutrophil morphology was evaluated by fluorescent staining of the actin cytoskeleton and fluorescence microscopy. We show that surface modification of these nanoparticles with polyethylene glycol (PEG) is essential in order to increase their biocompatibility. We observed that the as synthesized nanoparticles markedly decreased the ROS production from neutrophils challenged with prey (opsonized yeast particles) compared to controls without nanoparticles. After functionalization and dialysis, more moderate inhibitory effects were observed at a corresponding concentration of gadolinium. At lower gadolinium concentration the response was similar to that of the control cells. We suggest that the diethylene glycol (DEG) present in the as synthesized nanoparticle preparation is responsible for the inhibitory effects on the neutrophil oxidative burst. Indeed, in the present study we also show that even a low concentration of DEG, 0.3%, severely inhibits neutrophil function. In summary, the low cellular response upon PEG-functionalized Gd2O3 nanoparticle exposure indicates that these nanoparticles are promising candidates for MR-imaging purposes.

  13. Cell acidification in apoptosis: granulocyte colony-stimulating factor delays programmed cell death in neutrophils by up-regulating the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase.

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, R A; Giesing, H A; Zhu, J Y; Engler, R L; Babior, B M

    1995-01-01

    Neutrophils in tissue culture spontaneously undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis), a process characterized by well-defined morphological alterations affecting the cell nucleus. We found that these morphological changes were preceded by intracellular acidification and that acidification and the apoptotic changes in nuclear morphology were both delayed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Among the agents that defend neutrophils against intracellular acidification is a vacuolar H(+)-ATPase that pumps protons out of the cytosol. When this proton pump was inhibited by bafilomycin A1, G-CSF no longer protected the neutrophils against apoptosis. We conclude that G-CSF delays apoptosis in neutrophils by up-regulating the cells' vacuolar H(+)-ATPase and that intracellular acidification is an early event in the apoptosis program. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7541139

  14. Identification of CD68(+) neutrophil granulocytes in in vitro model of acute inflammation and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Amanzada, Ahmad; Malik, Ihtzaz Ahmed; Blaschke, Martina; Khan, Sajjad; Rahman, Hazir; Ramadori, Giuliano; Moriconi, Federico

    2013-01-01

    CD-68 is widely regarded as a selective marker for human monocytes and macrophages and is commonly used in human pathology studies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of CD-68 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), neutrophil granulocytes (NGs) and in inflamed intestinal tissue samples for comparison. PBMCs and NGs were isolated from heparinized human blood samples. Intestinal biopsies were obtained during routine endoscopic procedures from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), e.g. ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by real-time RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Both PBMCs and NGs preparations contained cells that were positive for CD-68 and either neutrophil elastase (NE), or myeloperoxidase (MPO). CD-68(+)/NE(-)/MPO(-) cells were regarded as monocytes. CD-68 mRNA expression was detected in PBMCs and NGs preparations. With Western blot and by performing immunoprecipitation of cell lysate, we could clearly detect CD-68 in NGs, U-937, THP-1, Hep-G2, Jurkat cells and PBMCs. Identification of inflammatory cells in acutely inflamed colonic mucosa obtained from patients with IBD revealed a strong accumulation of CD-68(+)/MPO(+) cells compared to normal colonic mucosa. The uptake of the marker by phagocytosis was excluded by performing a double staining with CD-163/NE and CD-163/MPO in PBMCs, NGs cultures and in inflamed colonic mucosa. These results identify CD-68(+) NGs in peripheral blood and inflamed colonic mucosa. CD-68 is not only a marker for the macrophages-monocytes but also for NGs.

  15. Granulocytes in Ocular HSV-1 Infection: Opposing Roles of Mast Cells and Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Derek J.; Zheng, Min; Conrady, Christopher D.; Carr, Daniel J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The contributions of mast cells (MCs) to immunologic defense against pathogens in the eye are unknown. We have characterized pericorneal MCs as tissue-resident innate sentinels and determined their impact on the immune response to herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1), a common ocular pathogen. Methods. The impact of mast cells on the immune response to HSV-1 infection was investigated using MC-deficient KitW-sh mice. Virus titers, inflammatory cytokine production, eicosanoid profiles, cellular immune responses, and ocular pathology were evaluated and compared with C57BL/6J mice during an acute corneal HSV-1 infection. Results. Corneas of KitW-sh mice have higher viral titers, increased edema, and greater leukocyte infiltration following HSV-1 infection. Following infection, cytokine profiles were slightly elevated overall in KitW-sh mice. Eicosanoid profiles were remarkably different only when comparing uninfected corneas from both groups. Neutrophils within infected corneas expressed HSV-1 antigen, lytic genes, and served as a disease-causing vector when adoptively transferred into immunocompromised animals. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells did not infiltrate into the cornea or suppress the expansion, recruitment, or cytokine production by CD8+ T cells following acute HSV-1 infection. Conclusions. Collectively, these findings provide new insight into host defense in the cornea and the pathogenesis of HSV-1 infection by identifying previously unacknowledged MCs as protective innate sentinels for infection of the ocular surface and reinforcing that neutrophils are detrimental to corneal infection. PMID:26066745

  16. Anti-SSB/La is one of the antineutrophil autoantibodies responsible for neutropenia and functional impairment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, S-C; Yu, H-S; Lin, W-W; Sun, K-H; Tsai, C-Y; Huang, D-F; Tsai, Y-Y; Yu, C-L

    2003-01-01

    Decreased number and impaired functions of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) due to the presence of anti-PMN autoantibodies in the serum render patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptible to bacterial infections. However, the cognate antigens and pathological mechanisms of anti-PMN autoantibodies in SLE are rarely reported in the literature. In this study, we found approximately 20% of SLE sera contained anti-PMN autoantibodies detected by human PMN-coated cellular ELISA. A membrane protein with molecular weight of 50 kDa was identified as the cognate antigen of anti-PMN in Western blot after membrane-biotinylation and streptavidin column elution. The 50 kDa molecule was proved to be SSB/La after immunoscreening, molecular cloning and nucleotide sequencing of the gene from the human leucocyte cDNA library. Human anti-SSB/La autoantibodies purified from active SLE sera passing through the recombinant SSB/La conjugated Sepharose 4B affinity column could bind and penetrate into normal human PMN. Functional analysis revealed that the anti-SSB/La autoantibodies exerted a number of potent effects on human PMN, including suppressed phagocytosis, accelerated apoptosis and enhanced IL-8 production. These in vitro results suggest that anti-SSB/La is one of the anti-PMN autoantibodies capable of penetrating into PMN and responsible for neutropenia and functional impairment of PMN in patients with SLE. PMID:12605705

  17. The quorum-sensing molecule N-3-oxododecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) enhances the host defence by activating human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN).

    PubMed

    Wagner, Christof; Zimmermann, Sabine; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Hug, Friederike; Prior, Birgit; Obst, Ursula; Hänsch, Gertrud Maria

    2007-01-01

    The P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecule N-3-oxododecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) interacts not only with bacteria, but also with mammalian cells, among others with those of the immune defence system. We focussed on the possible interaction of 3OC12-HSL with human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), because these cells are the first to enter an infected site. We found that 3OC12-HSL attracts PMN, and up-regulates expression of receptors known to be involved in host defence, including the adhesion proteins CD11b/CD18 and the immunoglobulin receptors CD16 and CD64. Furthermore, the uptake of bacteria (phagocytosis), which is crucial for an efficient defence against infection, was enhanced. Thus, recognising and responding to 3OC12-HSL not only attracts the PMN to the site of a developing biofilm, but also reinforces their defence mechanisms, and hence could be a means to control the infection in an early stage and to prevent biofilm formation.

  18. Septic Shock in Advanced Age: Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Altered Molecular Signatures in Neutrophil Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Vieira da Silva Pellegrina, Diogo; Severino, Patricia; Vieira Barbeiro, Hermes; Maziero Andreghetto, Flávia; Tadeu Velasco, Irineu; Possolo de Souza, Heraldo; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira César; Reis, Eduardo Moraes; Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is one of the highest causes of mortality in hospitalized people and a common complication in both surgical and clinical patients admitted to hospital for non-infectious reasons. Sepsis is especially common in older people and its incidence is likely to increase substantially as a population ages. Despite its increased prevalence and mortality in older people, immune responses in the elderly during septic shock appear similar to that in younger patients. The purpose of this study was to conduct a genome-wide gene expression analysis of circulating neutrophils from old and young septic patients to better understand how aged individuals respond to severe infectious insult. We detected several genes whose expression could be used to differentiate immune responses of the elderly from those of young people, including genes related to oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial dysfunction and TGF-β signaling, among others. Our results identify major molecular pathways that are particularly affected in the elderly during sepsis, which might have a pivotal role in worsening clinical outcomes compared with young people with sepsis. PMID:26047321

  19. Functionally and morphologically distinct populations of extracellular vesicles produced by human neutrophilic granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Lőrincz, Ákos M; Schütte, Maria; Timár, Csaba I; Veres, Daniel S; Kittel, Ágnes; McLeish, Kenneth R; Merchant, Michael L; Ligeti, Erzsébet

    2015-10-01

    EVs in the microvesicle size range released during spontaneous death of human neutrophils were characterized and their properties compared with previously described EVs with antibacterial effect (aEVs, generated on specific activation) or produced spontaneously (sEVs). The 3 vesicle populations overlapped in size and in part of the constituent proteins were stained with annexin V and were impermeable to PI. However, none of them produced superoxide. In contrast, remarkable differences were observed in the morphology, abundance of proteins, and antibacterial function. EVs formed spontaneously in 30 min (sEVs) were more similar to EVs released during spontaneous death in 1-3 d than to EVs formed in 30 min on stimulation of opsonin receptors (aEVs). Spontaneously generated EVs had no antibacterial effect despite their large number and protein content. We hypothesized 2 parallel mechanisms: one that proceeds spontaneously and produces EVs without antibacterial effect and another process that is triggered by opsonin receptors and results in differential sorting of proteins into EVs with antibacterial capacity. Our results call attention to the functional and morphologic heterogeneity within the microvesicle/ectosome fraction of EVs.

  20. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration to HIV-infected subjects augments reduced leukotriene synthesis and anticryptococcal activity in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, M J; Phare, S M; George, S; Peters-Golden, M; Kazanjian, P H

    1998-01-01

    Neutrophil (PMN) dysfunction occurs in HIV infection. Leukotrienes (LT) are mediators derived from the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway that play a role in host defense and are synthesized by PMN. We investigated the synthesis of LT by PMN from HIV-infected subjects. There was a reduction (4.0+/-1.3% of control) in LT synthesis in PMN from HIV-infected compared with normal subjects. This was associated with reduced expression of 5-LO-activating protein (31.2+/-9.6% of normal), but not of 5-LO itself. Since HIV does not directly infect PMN, we considered that these effects were due to reduced release of cytokines, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). We examined the effect of G-CSF treatment (300 microgram daily for 5 d) on eight HIV-infected subjects. PMN were studied in vitro before therapy (day 1) and on days 4 and 7. LTB4 synthesis was increased on day 4 of G-CSF treatment, and returned toward day 1 levels on day 7. 5-LO and 5-LO-activating protein expression were increased in parallel. As a functional correlate to this increase in PMN LT synthesis by G-CSF, we examined the effects on killing of Cryptococcus neoformans. Anticryptococcal activity of PMN from HIV-infected subjects was less than that of PMN from normal subjects. G-CSF treatment improved fungistatic activity of PMN. This increase in antifungal activity was attenuated by in vitro treatment with the LT synthesis inhibitor, MK-886. In conclusion, PMN from HIV-infected subjects demonstrate reduced 5-LO metabolism and antifungal activity in vitro, which was reversed by in vivo G-CSF therapy. PMID:9710433

  1. Transdifferentiation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to dendritic-like cells at the site of inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis: evidence for activation by T cells

    PubMed Central

    Iking-Konert, C; Ostendorf, B; Sander, O; Jost, M; Wagner, C; Joosten, L; Schneider, M; Hansch, G

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate infiltrated cells in the synovial fluid (SF) of inflamed joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with special reference to polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and their interaction with T cells. Methods: Expression on PMN of activation associated receptors CD14, CD64, CD83, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II was examined in the SF of 15 patients with RA, as were the infiltrated T cells. SF cytokines were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To mimic the in vivo situation, co-culture experiments were carried out using PMN and T cells of healthy donors. Results: The SF contained activated T lymphocytes and abundant PMN. SF PMN expression of CD14 and CD64 was enhanced compared with peripheral blood. Of special interest was the observation that only the SF PMN expressed MHC class II antigens and CD83. Exposure to SF, which contained considerable amounts of cytokines (for example, interferon γ (IFNγ), tumour necrosis factor α, and interleukin 2), induced a similar receptor pattern on blood derived PMN of healthy donors. Furthermore, PMN acquired MHC class II and CD83 within 24 to 48 hours, when co-cultured with autologous T cells or T cell lines. This effect was also achieved by T cell supernatants, was dependent on protein synthesis, and could be inhibited by antibodies against IFNγ. Conclusions: SF PMN from patients with RA undergo major alterations, including transdifferentiation to cells with dendritic-like characteristics, probably induced by T cell derived cytokines. Because MHC class II positive PMN are known to activate T cells, the mutual activation of PMN and T cells might contribute to the perpetuation of the local inflammatory process, and eventually to the destructive process in RA. PMID:15778239

  2. Neutrophil-Related Gene Expression And Low-Density Granulocytes Associated with Disease Activity and Response to Treatment in ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, Peter C.; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Xu, Lijing; Lim, Noha; Gao, Zhong; Asare, Adam L.; Specks, Ulrich; Stone, John H.; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert F.; Langford, Carol A.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Kallenberg, Cees G.M.; St Clair, E. William; Tchao, Nadia K.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Phippard, Deborah J.; Merkel, Peter A.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Monach, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To discover biomarkers involved in the pathophysiology of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) and determine if low-density granulocytes (LDGs) contribute to gene expression signatures in AAV. Methods The source of clinical data and linked biospecimens was a randomized controlled treatment trial in AAV. RNA-sequencing of whole blood from patients with AAV was performed during active disease at the baseline visit (BL) and during remission 6 months later (6M). Gene expression was compared between patients who met versus did not meet the primary trial outcome of clinical remission at 6M (responders vs. nonresponders). Measurement of neutrophil-related gene expression was confirmed in PBMCs to validate findings in whole blood. A negative selection strategy isolated LDGs from PBMC fractions. Results Differential expression between responders (n=77) and nonresponders (n=35) was detected in 2,346 transcripts at BL visit (p<0.05). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering demonstrated a cluster of granulocyte-related genes, including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 (PR3). A granulocyte multi-gene composite score was significantly higher in nonresponders than responders (p<0.01) and during active disease compared to remission (p<0.01). This signature strongly overlapped an LDG signature identified previously in lupus (FDRGSEA<0.01). Transcription of PR3 measured in PBMCs was associated with active disease and treatment response (p<0.01). LDGs isolated from patients with AAV spontaneously formed neutrophil extracellular traps containing PR3 and MPO. Conclusions In AAV an increased expression of a granulocyte gene signature is associated with disease activity and decreased response to treatment. The source of this signature is likely LDGs, a potentially pathogenic cell type in AAV. PMID:25891759

  3. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates the expression of the 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of leukotrienes in human blood neutrophils chiefly relies on the activity of two enzymes, phospholipase A2 and 5-lipoxygenase (5- LO). In turn, the activation of the 5-LO requires the participation of a recently characterized membrane-bound protein, the 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP). In this study, we have investigated conditions under which FLAP expression in neutrophils may be modulated. Of several cytokines tested, only granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (and to a lesser extent tumor necrosis factor alpha) significantly increased expression of FLAP. GM-CSF increased FLAP mRNA steady-state levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The stimulatory effect of GM-CSF on FLAP mRNA was inhibited by prior treatment of the cells with the transcription inhibitor, actinomycin D, and pretreatment of the cells with the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, failed to prevent the increase in FLAP mRNA induced by GM-CSF. The accumulation of newly synthesized FLAP, as determined by immunoprecipitation after incorporation of 35S-labeled amino acids, was also increased after incubation of neutrophils with GM-CSF. In addition, the total level of FLAP protein was increased in GM-CSF- treated neutrophils, as determined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by Western blot. GM-CSF did not alter the stability of the FLAP protein, indicating that the effect of GM-CSF on FLAP accumulation was the consequence of increased de novo synthesis as opposed to decreased degradation of FLAP. Finally, incubation of neutrophils with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone directly stimulated the upregulation of FLAP mRNA and protein, and enhanced the effect of GM-CSF. Taken together, these data demonstrate that FLAP expression may be upmodulated after appropriate stimulation of neutrophils. The increase in FLAP expression induced by GM-CSF in inflammatory conditions could confer upon neutrophils a prolonged capacity to synthesize

  4. Survival and differentiation defects contribute to neutropenia in glucose-6-phosphatase-β (G6PC3) deficiency in a model of mouse neutrophil granulocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gautam, S; Kirschnek, S; Gentle, I E; Kopiniok, C; Henneke, P; Häcker, H; Malleret, L; Belaaouaj, A; Häcker, G

    2013-08-01

    Differentiation of neutrophil granulocytes (neutrophils) occurs through several steps in the bone marrow and requires a coordinate regulation of factors determining survival and lineage-specific development. A number of genes are known whose deficiency disrupts neutrophil generation in humans and in mice. One of the proteins encoded by these genes, glucose-6-phosphatase-β (G6PC3), is involved in glucose metabolism. G6PC3 deficiency causes neutropenia in humans and in mice, linked to enhanced apoptosis and ER stress. We used a model of conditional Hoxb8 expression to test molecular and functional differentiation as well as survival defects in neutrophils from G6PC3(-/-) mice. Progenitor lines were established and differentiated into neutrophils when Hoxb8 was turned off. G6PC3(-/-) progenitor cells underwent substantial apoptosis when differentiation was started. Transgenic expression of Bcl-XL rescued survival; however, Bcl-XL-protected differentiated cells showed reduced proliferation, immaturity and functional deficiency such as altered MAP kinase signaling and reduced cytokine secretion. Impaired glucose utilization was found and was associated with ER stress and apoptosis, associated with the upregulation of Bim and Bax; downregulation of Bim protected against apoptosis during differentiation. ER-stress further caused a profound loss of expression and secretion of the main neutrophil product neutrophil elastase during differentiation. Transplantation of wild-type Hoxb8-progenitor cells into irradiated mice allowed differentiation into neutrophils in the bone marrow in vivo. Transplantation of G6PC3(-/-) cells yielded few mature neutrophils in bone marrow and peripheral blood. Transgenic Bcl-XL permitted differentiation of G6PC3(-/-) cells in vivo. However, functional deficiencies and differentiation abnormalities remained. Differentiation of macrophages from Hoxb8-dependent progenitors was only slightly disturbed. A combination of defects in differentiation

  5. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Signaling in Regulating Neutrophil Antifungal Activity and the Oxidative Burst During Respiratory Fungal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Shinji; Jhingran, Anupam; Dhingra, Sourabh; Salem, Anand; Cramer, Robert A; Hohl, Tobias M

    2016-04-15

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a critical role in regulating myeloid cell host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling plays an essential role in antifungal defense against Aspergillus fumigatus. Mice that lack the GM-CSF receptor β chain (GM-CSFRβ) developed invasive hyphal growth and exhibited impaired survival after pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus conidia. GM-CSFRβ signaling regulated the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to infected lungs, but not the recruitment of effector neutrophils. Cell-intrinsic GM-CSFRβ signaling mediated neutrophil and inflammatory monocyte antifungal activity, because lung GM-CSFRβ(-/-) leukocytes exhibited impaired conidial killing compared with GM-CSFRβ(+/+) counterparts in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice. GM-CSFRβ(-/-) neutrophils exhibited reduced (hydrogenated) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity in vivo. Conversely, administration of recombinant GM-CSF enhanced neutrophil NADPH oxidase function, conidiacidal activity, and lung fungal clearance in A. fumigatus-challenged mice. Thus, our study illustrates the functional role of GM-CSFRβ signaling on lung myeloid cell responses against inhaled A. fumigatus conidia and demonstrates a benefit for systemic GM-CSF administration. PMID:26908736

  6. Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rH GM-CSF) regulates f Met-Leu-Phe receptors on human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Y H; Lopez, A F; Marasco, W A; Lucas, C M; Wong, G G; Burns, G F; Vadas, M A

    1988-01-01

    The regulation of mature human neutrophil function by recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rH GM-CSF) was studied. Preincubation of neutrophils with this CSF did not stimulate superoxide anion directly but enhanced the subsequent release of superoxide anion in response to stimulation with the bacterial product formylmethionylleucyl-phenylalanine (f Met-Leu-Phe). Enhanced superoxide anion production was evident by 5 min and reached a plateau at 30 min. In contrast, neutrophils preincubated with rH GM-CSF exhibited reduced chemotaxis under agarose in response to a gradient of f Met-Leu-Phe. The inhibition of neutrophil migration was dependent on the dose of rH GM-CSF and exhibited a time-course similar to the effect on superoxide production. Binding studies of f Met-Leu-[3H]Phe to purified human neutrophils revealed heterogeneous binding to unstimulated cells. Two affinity components were identified. The high-affinity component consisted of approximately 2000 sites/cell and had an average Kd of 4 +/- 2 nM (n = 6). The low-affinity component consisted of approximately 40,000 sites/cell and had an average Kd of 220 +/- 130 nM (n = 6). rH GM-CSF caused conversion to a linear Scatchard plot showing no significant change in total binding sites but a single Kd of 30 +/- 10 nM. These data indicate that rH GM-CSF may influence neutrophil responses to f Met-Leu-Phe by regulating the affinity of f Met-Leu-Phe receptors. PMID:2842255

  7. Effect of the level of maternal energy intake prepartum on immunometabolic markers, polymorphonuclear leukocyte function, and neutrophil gene network expression in neonatal Holstein heifer calves.

    PubMed

    Osorio, J S; Trevisi, E; Ballou, M A; Bertoni, G; Drackley, J K; Loor, J J

    2013-06-01

    A conventional approach in dairy cow nutrition programs during late gestation is to feed moderate-energy diets. The effects of the maternal plane of nutrition on immune function and metabolism in newborn calves are largely unknown. Holstein cows (n=20) were fed a controlled-energy (CON) diet (1.24 Mcal/kg) for the entire dry period (~50 d) or the CON diet during the first 29 d of the dry period followed by a moderate-energy (OVE) diet (1.47 Mcal/kg) during the last 21 d prepartum. All calves were weighed at birth before first colostrum intake. Calves chosen for this study (n=6 per maternal diet) had blood samples harvested before colostrum feeding (d 0) and at 2 and 7 d of age. Blood samples were used to determine metabolites, acute-phase proteins, oxidative stress markers, hormones, phagocytic capacity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and monocytes, and total RNA was isolated from PMN. Calves from OVE dams weighed, on average, 5kg less at birth (44.0 vs. 48.6kg) than calves from CON dams. Blood glucose concentration in OVE calves had a more pronounced increase between 0 and 2 d than CON, at which point phagocytosis by PMN averaged 85% in OVE and 62% in CON. Compared with CON, calves from OVE had greater expression of TLR4, but lower expression of PPARA and PPARD at birth. Expression of PPARG and RXRA decreased between 0 and 2 d in both groups. Concentrations of leptin, cholesterol, ceruloplasmin, reactive oxygen metabolites, myeloperoxidase, retinol, tocopherol, IgG, and total protein, as well as expression of SOD2 and SELL increased markedly by 2 d in both groups; whereas, cortisol, albumin, acid-soluble protein, NEFA, insulin, as well as expression of IL6, TLR4, IL1R2, LTC4S, and ALOX5 decreased by 2 d. By 7 d of age, the concentration of haptoglobin was greater than precolostrum and was lower for OVE than CON calves. Our data provide evidence for a carry-over effect of maternal energy overfeeding during the last 3 wk before calving on some measurements of

  8. Membrane Transfer from Mononuclear Cells to Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Transduces Cell Survival and Activation Signals in the Recipient Cells via Anti-Extrinsic Apoptotic and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ko-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Han; Shen, Chieh-Yu; Kuo, Yu-Min; Yu, Chia-Li; Hsieh, Song-Chou

    2016-01-01

    The biological significance of membrane transfer (trogocytosis) between polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and mononuclear cells (MNCs) remains unclear. We investigated the biological/immunological effects and molecular basis of trogocytosis among various immune cells in healthy individuals and patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). By flow cytometry, we determined that molecules in the immunological synapse, including HLA class-I and-II, CD11b and LFA-1, along with CXCR1, are exchanged among autologous PMNs, CD4+ T cells, and U937 cells (monocytes) after cell-cell contact. Small interfering RNA knockdown of the integrin adhesion molecule CD11a in U937 unexpectedly enhanced the level of total membrane transfer from U937 to PMN cells. Functionally, phagocytosis and IL-8 production by PMNs were enhanced after co-culture with T cells. Total membrane transfer from CD4+ T to PMNs delayed PMN apoptosis by suppressing the extrinsic apoptotic molecules, BAX, MYC and caspase 8. This enhancement of activities of PMNs by T cells was found to be mediated via p38- and P44/42-Akt-MAP kinase pathways and inhibited by the actin-polymerization inhibitor, latrunculin B, the clathrin inhibitor, Pitstop-2, and human immunoglobulin G, but not by the caveolin inhibitor, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. In addition, membrane transfer from PMNs enhanced IL-2 production by recipient anti-CD3/anti-CD28 activated MNCs, and this was suppressed by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (PD98059) and protein kinase C (Rottlerin). Of clinical significance, decreased total membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs in patients with active SLE suppressed mononuclear IL-2 production. In conclusion, membrane transfer from MNCs to PMNs, mainly at the immunological synapse, transduces survival and activation signals to enhance PMN functions and is dependent on actin polymerization, clathrin activation, and Fcγ receptors, while membrane transfer from PMNs to MNCs depends on MAP kinase and

  9. Cloning, bacterial expression and biological characterization of recombinant human granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 and differential expression of granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 and epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activating peptide-78 mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Froyen, G; Proost, P; Ronsse, I; Mitera, T; Haelens, A; Wuyts, A; Opdenakker, G; Van Damme, J; Billiau, A

    1997-02-01

    Human osteosarcoma cells secrete a novel C-X-C chemokine called granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2), which was previously identified by amino acid sequencing of the purified natural protein. In order to understand the role of this new protein in inflammatory reactions, we cloned GCP-2 DNA sequences to generate recombinant protein and specific DNA probes and primers. By means of PCR on cloned cDNA of osteosarcoma cells induced by interleukin-1 beta and fibroblasts induced by lipopolysaccharide plus dsRNA, the complete coding domain of GCP-2 was isolated. This sequence was cloned into the bacterial expression vector pHEN1 and, after induction, GCP-2 was secreted into the periplasm of Escherichia coli. Recombinant GCP-2 (rGCP-2) was purified and characterized by SDS/PAGE as a monomeric 6.5-kDa protein and by amino-terminal sequencing. The chemoattractive potency of GCP-2 for neutrophilic granulocytes was about 10-times less than that of interleukin-8 and the minimal effective dose was 10 ng/ml. However, at optimal dose (100 ng/ml) the maximal chemotactic response was comparable with that of interleukin-8. Both characteristics correspond with those of natural GCP-2. In addition, intracellular calcium release in neutrophils by recombinant GCP-2 was achieved with as little as 10 ng/ml. Quantitation studies using reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction revealed higher GCP-2 mRNA production in normal fibroblasts than in tumor cells. When compared with epithelial-cell-derived neutrophil-activating peptide-78 (ENA-78) mRNA, the GCP-2 mRNA levels were higher in all cell lines tested. In addition, GCP-2 and ENA-78 expression seem to be differentially regulated in that phorbol ester and lipopolysaccharide have opposing effects on their mRNA induction in diploid fibroblasts and epithelial cells, respectively. Interleukin-1 was demonstrated to be a general inducer for both chemokines, while interferon-gamma down-regulates their mRNA expression. The

  10. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: Comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J.G.; Marceau, François

    2013-07-15

    Many cationic drugs are concentrated in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping), with an ensuing vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. In solid tissues, there is evidence that phagocytic cells, e.g., histiocytes, preferentially concentrate cationic drugs. We hypothesized that peripheral blood leukocytes could differentially take up a fluorescent model cation, quinacrine, depending on their phagocytic competence. Quinacrine transport parameters were determined in purified or total leukocyte suspensions at 37 °C. Purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, essentially neutrophils) exhibited a quinacrine uptake velocity inferior to that of lymphocytes, but a consistently higher affinity (apparent K{sub M} 1.1 vs. 6.3 μM, respectively). However, the vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 prevented quinacrine transport or initiated its release in either cell type. PMNLs capture most of the quinacrine added at low concentrations to fresh peripheral blood leukocytes compared with lymphocytes and monocytes (cytofluorometry). Accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II occurred rapidly and at low drug concentrations in quinacrine-treated PMNLs (significant at ≥ 2.5 μM, ≥ 2 h). Lymphocytes contained more LAMP1 than PMNLs, suggesting that the mass of lysosomes and late endosomes is a determinant of quinacrine uptake V{sub max}. PMNLs, however, exhibited the highest capacity for pinocytosis (uptake of fluorescent dextran into endosomes). The selectivity of quinacrine distribution in peripheral blood leukocytes may be determined by the collaboration of a non-concentrating plasma membrane transport mechanism, tentatively identified as pinocytosis in PMNLs, with V-ATPase-mediated concentration. Intracellular reservoirs of cationic drugs are a potential source of toxicity (e.g., loss of lysosomal function in phagocytes). - Highlights: • Quinacrine is concentrated in acidic organelles via V-ATPase-mediated ion

  11. Type 1 Diabetes Prone NOD Mice Have Diminished Cxcr1 mRNA Expression in Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils and CD4+ T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Haurogné, Karine; Pavlovic, Marija; Rogniaux, Hélène; Bach, Jean-Marie; Lieubeau, Blandine

    2015-01-01

    In humans, CXCR1 and CXCR2 are two homologous proteins that bind ELR+ chemokines. Both receptors play fundamental roles in neutrophil functions such as migration and reactive oxygen species production. Mouse Cxcr1 and Cxcr2 genes are located in an insulin-dependent diabetes genetic susceptibility locus. The non obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a spontaneous well-described animal model for insulin-dependent type 1 diabetes. In this disease, insulin deficiency results from the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells by autoreactive T lymphocytes. This slow-progressing disease is dependent on both environmental and genetic factors. Here, we report descriptive data about the Cxcr1 gene in NOD mice. We demonstrate decreased expression of mRNA for Cxcr1 in neutrophils and CD4+ lymphocytes isolated from NOD mice compared to other strains, related to reduced NOD Cxcr1 gene promoter activity. Looking for Cxcr1 protein, we next analyze the membrane proteome of murine neutrophils by mass spectrometry. Although Cxcr2 protein is clearly found in murine neutrophils, we did not find evidence of Cxcr1 peptides using this method. Nevertheless, in view of recently-published experimental data obtained in NOD mice, we argue for possible Cxcr1 involvement in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:26230114

  12. Specificity of indium-111 granulocyte scanning and fecal excretion measurement in inflammatory bowel disease--an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Price, Y.E.; Peters, A.M.; Lavender, J.P.; Wright, N.A.; Hodgson, H.J.

    1985-12-01

    The validity of /sup 111/In granulocyte scanning and fecal excretion measurement, as a reflection of loss of cells into the gastrointestinal tract, was studied using an autoradiographic technique in 11 patients in whom /sup 111/In granulocyte scan and colonoscopy were carried out simultaneously. /sup 111/In granulocytes were injected 1.5-4 hr prior to colonoscopy, and intraluminal fluid, mucosal brushings, and colonic biopsies were collected during the colonoscopy. In two patients with no histological evidence of inflammatory bowel disease, and four patients with clinically and histologically inactive inflammatory bowel disease, no /sup 111/Indium was detected in fluid, brushing, or biopsies. In five patients with active disease, 85% of the /sup 111/In activity in colonic fluid was precipitated by low-speed centrifugation. Autoradiography confirmed that the label remained attached to whole granulocytes in colonic fluid and mucosal brushings. Studies on biopsies, at intervals up to 4 1/2 hr following labeled granulocyte injection, demonstrated labeled polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) on the inflamed epithelial surface, with occasional cells in crypt abscesses by 110 min. We conclude that the techniques of /sup 111/In granulocyte scanning and fecal counting in patients with IBD are specifically measuring cell loss; labeled PMNs are capable of migrating through the gastrointestinal mucosa, in active disease, within 2 hr of administration.

  13. The Small Breathing Amplitude at the Upper Lobes Favors the Attraction of Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lesions and Helps to Understand the Evolution toward Active Disease in An Individual-Based Model

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Pere-Joan; Prats, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) can induce two kinds of lesions, namely proliferative and exudative. The former are based on the presence of macrophages with controlled induction of intragranulomatous necrosis, and are even able to stop its physical progression, thus avoiding the induction of active tuberculosis (TB). In contrast, the most significant characteristic of exudative lesions is their massive infiltration with polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), which favor enlargement of the lesions and extracellular growth of the bacilli. We have built an individual-based model (IBM) (known as “TBPATCH”) using the NetLogo interface to better understand the progression from Mtb infection to TB. We have tested four main factors previously identified as being able to favor the infiltration of Mtb-infected lesions with PMNs, namely the tolerability of infected macrophages to the bacillary load; the capacity to modulate the Th17 response; the breathing amplitude (BAM) (large or small in the lower and upper lobes respectively), which influences bacillary drainage at the alveoli; and the encapsulation of Mtb-infected lesions by the interlobular septae that structure the pulmonary parenchyma into secondary lobes. Overall, although all the factors analyzed play some role, the small BAM is the major factor determining whether Mtb-infected lesions become exudative, and thus induce TB, thereby helping to understand why this usually takes place in the upper lobes. This information will be very useful for the design of future prophylactic and therapeutic approaches against TB. PMID:27065951

  14. Transcellular migration of neutrophil granulocytes through the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier after infection with Streptococcus suis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A critical point during the course of bacterial meningitis is the excessive influx of polymorphnuclear neutrophils (PMNs) from the blood into the brain. Both paracellular and transcellular routes of leukocyte transmigration through the blood-brain barrier have been described in CNS diseases so far. Thus, we investigated the mechanism of PMN transmigration through the blood-CSF barrier under inflammatory conditions. Methods In an "inverted" Transwell culture model of the blood-CSF barrier, the zoonotic agent Streptococcus suis (S. suis) was used to stimulate porcine choroid plexus epithelial cells (PCPECs) specifically from the physiologically relevant basolateral side. Barrier function was analyzed by measuring TEER and TR-dextran-flux, and tight junction morphology was investigated by immunofluorescence. Route and mechanism of PMN transmigration were determined by immunofluorescence, electron microscopy and FACS analysis. Quantitative real time-PCR was used to determine expression levels of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Results Here, we show that the transmigration of PMNs through PCPECs was significantly higher after stimulation with TNFα or infection with S. suis strain 10 compared to its non-encapsulated mutant. Barrier function was not significantly affected by PMN migration alone, but in combination with S. suis infection. Tight junction and cytoskeletal actin reorganisation were also observed after stimulation with S. suis or TNFα. Most strikingly, PMNs preferentially migrated across PCPECs via the transcellular route. Extensive sequential analyses of the PMN transmigration process with Apotome®-imaging and electron microscopy revealed that paracellular migrating PMNs stop just before tight junctions. Interestingly, PMNs subsequently appeared to proceed by transcellular migration via funnel-like structures developing from the apical membrane. It is noteworthy that some PMNs contained bacteria during the transmigration process. Flow cytometric and

  15. Mouse neutrophilic granulocytes express mRNA encoding the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) as well as many other macrophage-specific transcripts and can transdifferentiate into macrophages in vitro in response to CSF-1.

    PubMed

    Sasmono, R Tedjo; Ehrnsperger, Achim; Cronau, Stephen L; Ravasi, Timothy; Kandane, Rangi; Hickey, Michael J; Cook, Andrew D; Himes, S Roy; Hamilton, John A; Hume, David A

    2007-07-01

    The differentiation of macrophages from their progenitors is controlled by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1), which binds to a receptor (CSF-1R) encoded by the c-fms proto-oncogene. We have previously used the promoter region of the CSF-1R gene to direct expression of an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter gene to resident macrophage populations in transgenic mice. In this paper, we show that the EGFP reporter is also expressed in all granulocytes detected with the Gr-1 antibody, which binds to Ly-6C and Ly-6G or with a Ly-6G-specific antibody. Transgene expression reflects the presence of CSF-1R mRNA but not CSF-1R protein. The same pattern is observed with the macrophage-specific F4/80 marker. Based on these findings, we performed a comparative array profiling of highly purified granulocytes and macrophages. The patterns of mRNA expression differed predominantly through granulocyte-specific expression of a small subset of transcription factors (Egr1, HoxB7, STAT3), known abundant granulocyte proteins (e.g., S100A8, S100A9, neutrophil elastase), and specific receptors (fMLP, G-CSF). These findings suggested that appropriate stimuli might mediate rapid interconversion of the major myeloid cell types, for example, in inflammation. In keeping with this hypothesis, we showed that purified Ly-6G-positive granulocytes express CSF-1R after overnight culture and can subsequently differentiate to form F4/80-positive macrophages in response to CSF-1.

  16. High affinity capture and concentration of quinacrine in polymorphonuclear neutrophils via vacuolar ATPase-mediated ion trapping: comparison with other peripheral blood leukocytes and implications for the distribution of cationic drugs.

    PubMed

    Roy, Caroline; Gagné, Valérie; Fernandes, Maria J G; Marceau, François

    2013-07-15

    Many cationic drugs are concentrated in acidic cell compartments due to low retro-diffusion of the protonated molecule (ion trapping), with an ensuing vacuolar and autophagic cytopathology. In solid tissues, there is evidence that phagocytic cells, e.g., histiocytes, preferentially concentrate cationic drugs. We hypothesized that peripheral blood leukocytes could differentially take up a fluorescent model cation, quinacrine, depending on their phagocytic competence. Quinacrine transport parameters were determined in purified or total leukocyte suspensions at 37 °C. Purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, essentially neutrophils) exhibited a quinacrine uptake velocity inferior to that of lymphocytes, but a consistently higher affinity (apparent KM 1.1 vs. 6.3 μM, respectively). However, the vacuolar (V)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1 prevented quinacrine transport or initiated its release in either cell type. PMNLs capture most of the quinacrine added at low concentrations to fresh peripheral blood leukocytes compared with lymphocytes and monocytes (cytofluorometry). Accumulation of the autophagy marker LC3-II occurred rapidly and at low drug concentrations in quinacrine-treated PMNLs (significant at ≥2.5 μM, ≥2 h). Lymphocytes contained more LAMP1 than PMNLs, suggesting that the mass of lysosomes and late endosomes is a determinant of quinacrine uptake Vmax. PMNLs, however, exhibited the highest capacity for pinocytosis (uptake of fluorescent dextran into endosomes). The selectivity of quinacrine distribution in peripheral blood leukocytes may be determined by the collaboration of a non-concentrating plasma membrane transport mechanism, tentatively identified as pinocytosis in PMNLs, with V-ATPase-mediated concentration. Intracellular reservoirs of cationic drugs are a potential source of toxicity (e.g., loss of lysosomal function in phagocytes).

  17. Differential lytic and agglutinating activity of the anti-Lewis(x) monoclonal antibody FC-2.15 on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils and MCF-7 breast tumor cells. In vitro and ex vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Capurro, M; Ballaré, C; Bover, L; Portela, P; Mordoh, J

    1999-01-01

    The Lewis(x) (Le(x)) trisaccharide (CD15) linked to proteins and glycolipids is highly expressed on the surface of normal human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and several human neoplasias, such as breast and gastrointestinal carcinomas and chronic myeloid leukemias. FC-2.15 is an IgM murine mAb that specifically recognizes Le(x) and has been previously shown to mediate the in vitro lysis of Le(x)(+) cells by human complement. In a phase I clinical trial of FC-2.15, a temporary neutropenia was the main toxicity, and antitumor responses were observed. In order to characterize FC-2.15 further and determine the physiological relevance of Le(x) binding, the reactivity of FC-2.15 on PMN was investigated under several conditions. Flow cytometry revealed a strong reactivity of FC-2.15 with almost 100% of PMN, and Scatchard analysis demonstrated an affinity constant of 5.14 x 10(9) M(-1) and 1.11 x 10(6) antigen sites/cell. In vitro, the binding of Le(x) epitopes by FC-2.15 induced PMN homotypic aggregation, only 28.4 +/- 4.1% remaining as single cells. When PMN and the Le(x)(+) MCF-7 breast cancer cells were co-incubated, FC-2.15 induced heterotypic aggregation. In 51Cr-release assays employing human complement, FC-2.15 lysed 93.4 +/- 7.9% of PMN and 87.8 +/- 10.7% of MCF-7 cells. However, when the effect of FC-2.15 was tested in ex vivo circulating blood, no lytic activity against PMN was detected, whereas MCF-7 cells were still lysed. Blood smears demonstrated that FC-2.15 induced PMN agglutination and heterotypic aggregates when MCF-7 cells were present. A pretreatment of PMN with colchicine impaired PMN agglutination both in vitro (single PMN = 81.15 +/- 4.35%) and in ex vivo circulating blood. In the latter condition, FC-2.15-lytic activity was restored, suggesting that PMN homotypic aggregation by FC-2.15, but not lysis, is dependent on microtubule integrity and that PMN agglutination hinders their lysis. Moreover, when 51Cr-release assays were performed

  18. Cyclic AMP-elevating agents down-regulate the oxidative burst induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in adherent neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Ottonello, L; Morone, M P; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    1995-01-01

    Human neutrophils, plated on fibronectin-precoated wells, were found to release large quantities of superoxide anion (O2-) in response to GM-CSF. O2- production was reduced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the phosphodiesterase type IV (PDE IV) inhibitor RO 20-1724. Both agents are known to increase intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels by inducing its production (PGE2) or blocking its catabolism (RO 20-1724). When added in combination, PGE2 and RO 20-1724 had a marked synergistic inhibitory effect, which was reproduced by replacing PGE2 with a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, i.e. forskolin (FK). Moreover, the neutrophil response to GM-CSF was inhibited by a membrane-permeable analogue of cAMP in a dose-dependent manner. As GM-CSF and PGE2 are known to be generated at tissue sites of inflammation, the results suggest the existence of a PGE2-dependent regulatory pathway potentially capable of controlling the neutrophil response to GM-CSF, in turn limiting the risk of local oxidative tissue injury. Moreover, owing to its susceptibility to amplification by RO 20-1724, the PGE2-dependent pathway and in particular PDE-IV may represent a pharmacological target to reduce the generation of histotoxic oxidants by GM-CSF-responding neutrophils. PMID:7664497

  19. Technical advance: monitoring the trafficking of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes during the course of tissue inflammation by noninvasive 19F MRI.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Jacoby, Christoph; Ding, Zhaoping; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation results in the recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes, which is crucial for the healing process. In the present study, we used (19)F MRI to monitor in vivo the infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes from the onset of inflammation to the resolution and healing phase. Matrigel, with or without LPS, was s.c.-implanted into C57BL/6 mice. This resulted in a focal inflammation lasting over a period of 20 days, with constantly decreasing LPS levels in doped matrigel plugs. After i.v. administration of (19)F containing contrast agent, (19)F MRI revealed a zonular (19)F signal in the periphery of LPS containing matrigel plugs, which was not observed in control plugs. Analysis of the (19)F signal over the observation period demonstrated the strongest (19)F signal after 24 h, which decreased to nearly zero after 20 days. The (19)F signal was mirrored by the amount of leukocytes in the matrigel, with neutrophils dominating at early time-points and macrophages at later time-points. Both populations were shown to take up the (19)F contrast agent. In conclusion, (19)F MRI, in combination with the matrigel/LPS model, permits the noninvasive analysis of neutrophil and monocyte infiltration over the complete course of inflammation in vivo. PMID:24319285

  20. Technical advance: monitoring the trafficking of neutrophil granulocytes and monocytes during the course of tissue inflammation by noninvasive 19F MRI.

    PubMed

    Temme, Sebastian; Jacoby, Christoph; Ding, Zhaoping; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Schrader, Jürgen; Flögel, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation results in the recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes, which is crucial for the healing process. In the present study, we used (19)F MRI to monitor in vivo the infiltration of neutrophils and monocytes from the onset of inflammation to the resolution and healing phase. Matrigel, with or without LPS, was s.c.-implanted into C57BL/6 mice. This resulted in a focal inflammation lasting over a period of 20 days, with constantly decreasing LPS levels in doped matrigel plugs. After i.v. administration of (19)F containing contrast agent, (19)F MRI revealed a zonular (19)F signal in the periphery of LPS containing matrigel plugs, which was not observed in control plugs. Analysis of the (19)F signal over the observation period demonstrated the strongest (19)F signal after 24 h, which decreased to nearly zero after 20 days. The (19)F signal was mirrored by the amount of leukocytes in the matrigel, with neutrophils dominating at early time-points and macrophages at later time-points. Both populations were shown to take up the (19)F contrast agent. In conclusion, (19)F MRI, in combination with the matrigel/LPS model, permits the noninvasive analysis of neutrophil and monocyte infiltration over the complete course of inflammation in vivo.

  1. On the maturation rate of the neutrophil.

    PubMed

    Zajicek, G; Shohat, M; Polliack, A

    1984-05-01

    Fifty-three maturing bone marrow cells of the granulocyte cell series stained with Giemsa stain and magnified 1,000 times were scanned by a "computerized microscope" consisting of a LSI-11/23 microprocessor and a black-and-white video camera attached to a "frame grabber ." Each sampled cell was digitized into 70 X 70 pixels, each pixel representing 0.04 micron of the real image. The pixel gray values ranged between 0 and 255. Zero stood for white, 255 represented black, while the numbers in between stood for the various shades of gray. The cells represented six different stages of granulocytic maturation: myeloblast, promyelocyte, myelocyte, metamyelocyte , band form, and polymorphonuclear granulocyte. A discriminant analysis program selected 19 features best distinguishing between the six different cell types and computed five canonical discriminant functions defining a Space in which maturation was studied. In the Space, distance between two cells serves as a measure of similarity. The closer two cells are, the more similar they are and vice versa. This measure was applied here to express the degree of similarity between the neutrophil maturation classes, and since they represent states in the neutrophil life history, it is applicable also as a yardstick for the quantitation of differentiation. In the Space, the life history of a cell is represented by a trajectory originating in the myeloblast and terminating in the granulocyte state. Displacement along the trajectory represents cell maturation that is expressed relatively to the least differentiated state of the myeloblast. The further a cell from this state the more mature it is. The same yardstick also serves for differentiation rate estimates represented in the Space by displacement velocities that are derived from the known "transit times" of a cell in each state. The methodology is also applied for cell production estimates. Unlike other "computerized microscopes" serving for cell classification, the

  2. Chorioretinitis with a combined defect in T and B lymphocytes and granulocytes. A new syndrome successfully treated with dialyzable leukocyte extracts (transfer factor).

    PubMed

    Kyong, C U; Wilson, G B; Fudenberg, H H; Goust, J M; Richardson, P; Echerd, J

    1980-06-01

    A patient with immune deficiency, recurrent pyogenic infections and active chorioretinitis is described; in addition to agammaglobulinemia, both quantitative and qualitative T-cell deficiencies were documented. Furthermore, the patient's granulocytes (polymorphonuclear leukocytes), although normal in their bactericidal capacity for Staphylococcus, responded poorly to both leukocyte migration inhibition factor and neutrophil immobilizing factor obtained from normal cells. The immunologic features of this patient appear to comprise a new syndrome. Remarkable diminution of the ocular lesions and increased visual acuity occurred within two months after the initiation of therapy with dialyzable leukocyte extracts (transfer factor). Concurrent testing of the patient's cell-mediated immunity showed increased numbers of circulating T lymphocytes and improved T-cell function following dialyzable leukocyte extract [DLE] therapy. The dramatic clinical results indicate that similar therapy may prove to be beneficial in other patients with chorioretinitis and T-cell deficiency. PMID:6992573

  3. Canine granulocytic anaplasmosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Carrade, D D; Foley, J E; Borjesson, D L; Sykes, J E

    2009-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging pathogen of humans, horses, and dogs worldwide that is transmitted by Ixodid ticks and maintained in a variety of small wild mammal species. Recent studies suggest that multiple strains of A. phagocytophilum may be circulating in wild and domestic animal populations, and these strains may have differential host tropisms and pathogenicity. The organism infects and survives within neutrophils by disabling key neutrophil functions, including neutrophil motility, phagocytosis, the oxidative burst mechanism, and neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions, as well as interfering with neutrophil apoptosis. Coinfections with other tick-borne pathogens may occur, especially Borrelia burgdorferi. A. phagocytophilum causes an acute febrile illness in dogs with lethargy and inappetence. Less frequent signs include lameness, coughing, polydipsia, intermittent vomiting, and hemorrhages. Diagnosis is based on finding morulae within granulocytes in the peripheral blood, the combination of acute and convalescent serology using immunofluorescent antibody techniques, and detection of the DNA of A. phagocytophilum using specific polymerase chain reaction assays. Whether persistent infection or reinfection with A. phagocytophilum occurs after natural infection requires additional study, with most reports suggesting that anaplasmosis is a self-limiting disease in dogs that responds well to a 2-week course of doxycycline therapy.

  4. Giardia duodenalis Infection Reduces Granulocyte Infiltration in an In Vivo Model of Bacterial Toxin-Induced Colitis and Attenuates Inflammation in Human Intestinal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, James A.; Motta, Jean-Paul; Schenck, L. Patrick; Hirota, Simon A.; Beck, Paul L.; Buret, Andre G.

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) is a predominant cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that may lead to post-infectious functional gastrointestinal disorders. Although Giardia-infected individuals could carry as much as 106 trophozoites per centimetre of gut, their intestinal mucosa is devoid of overt signs of inflammation. Recent studies have shown that in endemic countries where bacterial infectious diseases are common, Giardia infections can protect against the development of diarrheal disease and fever. Conversely, separate observations have indicated Giardia infections may enhance the severity of diarrheal disease from a co-infecting pathogen. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes or neutrophils (PMNs) are granulocytic, innate immune cells characteristic of acute intestinal inflammatory responses against bacterial pathogens that contribute to the development of diarrheal disease following recruitment into intestinal tissues. Giardia cathepsin B cysteine proteases have been shown to attenuate PMN chemotaxis towards IL-8/CXCL8, suggesting Giardia targets PMN accumulation. However, the ability of Giardia infections to attenuate PMN accumulation in vivo and how in turn this effect may alter the host inflammatory response in the intestine has yet to be demonstrated. Herein, we report that Giardia infection attenuates granulocyte tissue infiltration induced by intra-rectal instillation of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B in an isolate-dependent manner. This attenuation of granulocyte infiltration into colonic tissues paralled decreased expression of several cytokines associated with the recruitment of PMNs. Giardia trophozoite isolates that attenuated granulocyte infiltration in vivo also decreased protein expression of cytokines released from inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues collected from patients with active Crohn’s disease, including several cytokines associated with PMN recruitment. These results demonstrate for the first time that certain

  5. Effect of immobilized granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on hemopoietic precursors of various classes during cytostatic-induced myelosuppression.

    PubMed

    Dygai, A M; Skurikhin, E G; Andreeva, T V; Madonov, P G; Vereshagin, E I; Kinsht, D N; Pershina, O V; Khmelevskaya, E S

    2010-09-01

    Experiments were performed on the model of cytostatic myelosuppression induced by cyclophosphamide. We compared the effect of immobilized granulocyte CSF (the preparation was created in Russia) and reference standard preparation of granulocyte CSF on the development of neutrophilic leukopenia and hemopoietic precursors of various classes. It was found that preparations of granulocyte CSF decreased the duration and degree of peripheral blood neutropenia. The granulocytopoiesis-stimulating effect was related to stimulation of multipotent hemopoietic precursors, granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte precursors, and granulocyte precursors. Induction of division and maturation of multipotent hemopoietic precursors, granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte precursors, and granulocyte precursors and recovery of cellularity of the granulocytic hemopoietic stem after administration of immobilized granulocyte CSF were observed at later terms compared to treatment with the reference preparation of granulocyte CSF.

  6. Increased FasL expression correlates with apoptotic changes in granulocytes cultured with oxidized clozapine

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Zaheed; Almeciga, Ingrid; Delgado, Julio C.; Clavijo, Olga P.; Castro, Januario E.; Belalcazar, Viviana; Pinto, Clara; Zuniga, Joaquin; Romero, Viviana; Yunis, Edmond J. . E-mail: edmond_yunis@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-08-01

    Clozapine has been associated with a 1% incidence of agranulocytosis. The formation of an oxidized intermediate clozapine metabolite has been implicated in direct polymorphonuclear (PMN) toxicity. We utilized two separate systems to analyze the role of oxidized clozapine in inducing apoptosis in treated cells. Human PMN cells incubated with clozapine (0-10 {mu}M) in the presence of 0.1 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} demonstrated a progressive decrease of surface CD16 expression along with increased apoptosis. RT-PCR analysis showed decreased CD16 but increased FasL gene expression in clozapine-treated PMN cells. No change in constitutive Fas expression was observed in treated cells. In HL-60 cells induced to differentiate with retinoic acid (RA), a similar increase in FasL expression, but no associated changes in CD16 gene expression, was observed following clozapine treatments. Our results demonstrate increased FasL gene expression in oxidized clozapine-induced apoptotic neutrophils suggesting that apoptosis in granulocytes treated with clozapine involves Fas/FasL interaction that initiates a cascade of events leading to clozapine-induced agranulocytosis.

  7. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor in neutropenic patients with infective endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Borgbjerg, B. M.; Hovgaard, D.; Laursen, J. B.; Aldershvile, J.

    1998-01-01

    A well known complication in the treatment of infectious endocarditis is development of neutropenia caused by treatment with antibiotics in high concentrations over long periods. Neutropenia often necessitates discontinuation of antibiotic treatment. Three patients with infectious endocarditis who developed neutropenia are reported. The patients were treated with granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a haematopoietic growth factor that stimulates neutrophils. G-CSF induced an immediate increase in white blood cell count, primarily neutrophils. G-CSF may be effective in ameliorating neutropenia in patients who receive antibiotics for treatment of infectious endocarditis.

 Keywords: granulocyte colony stimulating factor;  neutropenia;  endocarditis PMID:9505928

  8. The clinical presentation and therapy of diseases related to anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA).

    PubMed

    Weiner, Maria; Segelmark, Mårten

    2016-10-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are a family of autoantibodies that react with proteins predominantly expressed in cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs). ANCA was initially detected using indirect immunofluorescence, allowing for different patterns such as p-ANCA (perinuclear) and c-ANCA (cytoplasmic) to be distinguished. Today it is common to detect the antibodies by immunochemical assays such as ELISA using purified proteins as antigens. The strongest association with ANCA is found in the pauci-immune small vessel vasculitides granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). There is compelling evidence that ANCA contributes to the pathogenesis in these conditions. ANCA also occurs in 30%-40% of patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) and anti-GBM disease, but is uncommon in other forms of vasculitis. ANCA with different specificities have been described with varying frequencies in diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, endocarditis, chronic infections and hematopoietic malignancies. ANCA can also develop as an adverse event during pharmacological treatment. These entities are treated quite differently, with therapies ranging from immunosuppressive agents over antibiotics to simply removing the causative drug. A positive ANCA test thus requires a careful diagnostic work-up. PMID:27481040

  9. The clinical presentation and therapy of diseases related to anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA).

    PubMed

    Weiner, Maria; Segelmark, Mårten

    2016-10-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are a family of autoantibodies that react with proteins predominantly expressed in cytoplasmic granules of polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs). ANCA was initially detected using indirect immunofluorescence, allowing for different patterns such as p-ANCA (perinuclear) and c-ANCA (cytoplasmic) to be distinguished. Today it is common to detect the antibodies by immunochemical assays such as ELISA using purified proteins as antigens. The strongest association with ANCA is found in the pauci-immune small vessel vasculitides granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA). There is compelling evidence that ANCA contributes to the pathogenesis in these conditions. ANCA also occurs in 30%-40% of patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA) and anti-GBM disease, but is uncommon in other forms of vasculitis. ANCA with different specificities have been described with varying frequencies in diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, endocarditis, chronic infections and hematopoietic malignancies. ANCA can also develop as an adverse event during pharmacological treatment. These entities are treated quite differently, with therapies ranging from immunosuppressive agents over antibiotics to simply removing the causative drug. A positive ANCA test thus requires a careful diagnostic work-up.

  10. Inactivation of α2-Macroglobulin by Activated Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Croisier, J.-L.; Camus, G.; Brumioul, D.; Mathy-Hartert, M.; Sondag, D.; Deby, C.; Lamy, M.

    1994-01-01

    The proteolytic activity of trypsin releases the dye Remazol Brilliant Blue from its high molecular weight substrate, the skin powder (Hide Powder Azure, Sigma), with an increase in absorbance at 595 nm. Active α2- macroglobulin (80 μg/ml) totally inhibits the proteolytic activity of trypsin (14 μg/ml) by trapping this protease. But after a 20 min incubation of α2-macroglobulin at 37°C with 2 × 106 human polymorphonuclear leukocytes activated by N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (10−7 M) and cytochalasin B (10−8 M), 100% of trypsin activity was recovered, indicating a total inactivation of α2-macroglobuHn. Incubation with granulocyte myeloperoxidase also inactivates α2-macroglobulin. Hypochlorous acid, a by-product of myeloperoxidase activity, at a concentration of 10−7 M also inactivates α2-macroglobulin, which indicates that an important cause of α2-macroglobulin inactivation by activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes could be the activity of myeloperoxidase. PMID:18472929

  11. Does tuftsin alter phagocytosis by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, M.R.; DeChatelet, L.R.; Shirley, P.S.; Cooper, M.R.

    1982-03-01

    The physiological significance of the putative phagocytosis-promoting peptide, tuftsin, was investigated by measurement of chemiluminescence generated during phagocytosis and by assay of the uptake of radiolabeled bacteria. Researchers found no differences in either assay when reasearchers compared serum from splenectomized patients (which purportedly lacks tuftsin) with normal serum. Further, there was no difference when serum from splenectomized patients was employed in the presence of absence of exogenous tuftsin. Similar results were obtained under a variety of conditions, utilizing three different challenge particles with varying particle-cell ratios and serum from 20 different splenectomized patients. These results do not agree with the hypothesis that tuftsin plays a major role in promoting phagocytosis.

  12. Cell surface antigens detected on mature and leukemic granulocytic populations by cytotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Drew, S I; Carter, B M; Terasaki, P I; Naiem, F; Nathanson, D S; Abromowitz, B; Gale, R P

    1978-08-01

    Using a microcytotoxicity assay, the serological reactivity of human granulocytes, namely neutrophils and eosinophils, and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells and cultured CML cell lines (K562, NALM-1) were examined. Mature granulocyte forms and cord granulocytes are readily lysed by specific granulocyte cytotoxins that do not react with random T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, red blood cells, or platelets. Furthermore, certain antisera were preferentially cytotoxic for eosinophil-enriched populations. Granulocytotoxin detected antigens on one of three CML blast cell populations tested and K562, but failed to react with NALM-1. By cytotoxicity, mature granulocytes were poor targets for B2-microglobulin and the appropriate HLA antisera although both sera types are absorbed with granulocytes. Furthermore, granulocytes did not possess B-lymphocytes (Ia-like) or blood group A, B, and Rh (D) antigens. Except for K562, both HLA and heterologous B-lymphocyte antisera were cytotoxic for the CML blast cell populations tested.

  13. Fucose-binding Lotus tetragonolobus lectin binds to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and induces a chemotactic response.

    PubMed

    VanEpps, D E; Tung, K S

    1977-09-01

    Fucose-binding L. tetragonolobus lectin to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and induces a chemotactic response. Both surface binding and chemotaxis are inhibited by free fucose but not by fructose, mannose, or galactose. The lectin-binding sites on PMN are unrelated to the A, B, or O blood group antigen. Utilization of this lectin should be a useful tool in isolating PMN membrane components and in analyzing the mechanism of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:330752

  14. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) production in hemorrhagic shock requires both the ischemic and resuscitation phase.

    PubMed

    Hierholzer, C; Kelly, E; Billiar, T R; Tweardy, D J

    1997-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is the cytokine that is critical for polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocyte (PMN) production as well as being a potent agonist of PMN activation. We have recently reported that in the lung and the liver of rats resuscitated after hemorrhagic shock (HS) G-CSF mRNA expression is induced. It is not known if both phases of HS, the ischemic and the reperfusion phase, are required for G-CSF mRNA induction. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that the upregulation of G-CSF mRNA expression is the consequence of HS followed by resuscitation and that ischemia alone is insufficient to induce G-CSF mRNA expression in the affected organs. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to resuscitated and unresuscitated shock protocols of varying severity. Control animals were subjected to anesthesia and all surgical preparations except for hemorrhage. Lungs and livers were isolated and their RNA extracted. Using semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), we demonstrated that G-CSF mRNA was induced in the lung and liver of shock animals above the level observed in control animals. Upregulation of G-CSF mRNA relative to controls occurred only in animals undergoing resuscitated HS and not in ones subjected to unresuscitated HS. These results indicate that G-CSF production specific for the hemorrhage component of shock is dependent on resuscitation. As a consequence, the production of this cytokine may be decreased through modifications in the resuscitation protocols.

  15. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration via P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important for inflammation in addition to thrombosis. Platelets promote the adhesion of neutrophils [polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs)] to the endothelium; P-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL)-1 have been suggested to participate in these i...

  16. Animal models of human granulocyte diseases.

    PubMed

    Schäffer, Alejandro A; Klein, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    In vivo animal models have proven very useful to the understanding of basic biologic pathways of the immune system, a prerequisite for the development of innovate therapies. This article addresses currently available models for defined human monogenetic defects of neutrophil granulocytes, including murine, zebrafish, and larger mammalian species. Strengths and weaknesses of each system are summarized, and clinical investigators may thus be inspired to develop further lines of research to improve diagnosis and therapy by use of the appropriate animal model system. PMID:23351993

  17. Neutrophil ageing is regulated by the microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dachuan; Chen, Grace; Manwani, Deepa; Mortha, Arthur; Xu, Chunliang; Faith, Jeremiah J.; Burk, Robert D.; Kunisaki, Yuya; Jang, Jung-Eun; Scheiermann, Christoph; Merad, Miriam; Frenette, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils provide immune protection against pathogens but also may promote tissue injury in inflammatory diseases1,2. Although neutrophils are generally considered as a relatively homogeneous population, evidence for heterogeneity is emerging3,4. Under steady-state conditions, neutrophil heterogeneity may arise from ageing and the replenishment by newly released neutrophils from the bone marrow5. Aged neutrophils up-regulate CXCR4, a receptor allowing their clearance in the bone marrow6,7, with feedback inhibition of neutrophil production via the IL17/G-CSF axis8, and rhythmic modulation of the haematopoietic stem cell niche5. The aged subset also expresses low levels of L-selectin (CD62L)5,9. Previous studies have suggested that in vitro-aged neutrophils exhibit impaired migration and reduced pro-inflammatory properties6,10. Here, we show using in vivo ageing analyses that the neutrophil pro-inflammatory activity correlates positively with their ageing in the circulation. Aged neutrophils represent an overly active subset exhibiting enhanced αMβ2 integrin (Mac-1) activation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation under inflammatory conditions. Neutrophil ageing is driven by the microbiota via Toll-like receptors (TLRs)- and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (Myd88)-mediated signalling pathways. Depletion of the microbiota significantly reduces the number of circulating aged neutrophils and dramatically improves the pathogenesis and inflammation-related organ damage in models of sickle cell disease or endotoxin-induced septic shock. These results thus identify an unprecedented role for the microbiota in regulating a disease-promoting neutrophil subset. PMID:26374999

  18. Major neutrophil functions subverted by Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ingar; Hajishengallis, George

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) constitute an integrated component of the innate host defense in the gingival sulcus/periodontal pocket. However, the keystone periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has in the course of evolution developed a number of capacities to subvert this defense to its own advantage. The present review describes the major mechanisms that P. gingivalis uses to subvert neutrophil homeostasis, such as impaired recruitment and chemotaxis, resistance to granule-derived antimicrobial agents and to the oxidative burst, inhibition of phagocytic killing while promoting a nutritionally favorable inflammatory response, and delay of neutrophil apoptosis. Studies in animal models have shown that at least some of these mechanisms promote the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal polymicrobial community, thereby leading to inflammation and bone loss. It is apparent that neutrophil-P. gingivalis interactions and subversion of innate immunity are key contributing factors to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. PMID:26993626

  19. Effect of in vivo infusion of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on immune function.

    PubMed

    Valente, John F; Alexander, J Wesley; Li, Bing-Guo; Noel, J Gregory; Custer, David A; Ogle, James D; Ogle, Cora K

    2002-01-01

    As the applications of hematopoietic growth factors increase, their complex impact on host defense and immune responses continues to unfold. The effect of the administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on bacterial defense, proliferation of lymphocytes, and cytokine production by lymphocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was studied. The effect of G-CSF administration on the phenotype of the cells in the major hematopoietic organs was studied as well. ACI rats were given 10 mg/kg/day G-CSF or vehicle daily for 4 days. Isolated bone marrow neutrophils and enterocytes from treated animals showed a greater bactericidal activity than controls. Proliferation of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes and PBMC was reduced in G-CSF-treated animals. The production of proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) by lymphocytes and PBMC was reduced by G-CSF pretreatment. G-CSF administration caused an increase in IL-4 (Th2 cytokine) release and a decrease in interferon-gamma (IFNgamma, Th1 cytokine) release by mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. Cytometric analysis of cells in the progenitor cell region indicated a large increase in immature cells in the bone marrow of G-CSF-treated animals compared with sham along with an increase in B cells and a decrease in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). In addition, cytometric analysis showed a large increase in PMNs in blood and splenocytes of the treated animals compared with sham. This study confirms and extends previous observations that G-CSF administration has a number of effects that might simultaneously enhance host defense while reducing the risk of developing uncontrolled systemic inflammation. This may also be efficacious in prolonging graft survival and reducing graft vs. host disease.

  20. Uptake of antibiotics by human polymorphonuclear leukocyte cytoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, W.L.; King-Thompson, N.L. , Decatur, GA )

    1990-06-01

    Enucleated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN cytoplasts), which have no nuclei and only a few granules, retain many of the functions of intact neutrophils. To better define the mechanisms and intracellular sites of antimicrobial agent accumulation in human neutrophils, we studied the antibiotic uptake process in PMN cytoplasts. Entry of eight radiolabeled antibiotics into PMN cytoplasts was determined by means of a velocity gradient centrifugation technique. Uptakes of these antibiotics by cytoplasts were compared with our findings in intact PMN. Penicillin entered both intact PMN and cytoplasts poorly. Metronidazole achieved a concentration in cytoplasts (and PMN) equal to or somewhat less than the extracellular concentration. Chloramphenicol, a lipid-soluble drug, and trimethoprim were concentrated three- to fourfold by cytoplasts. An unusual finding was that trimethroprim, unlike other tested antibiotics, was accumulated by cytoplasts more readily at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. After an initial rapid association with cytoplasts, cell-associated imipenem declined progressively with time. Clindamycin and two macrolide antibiotics (roxithromycin, erythromycin) were concentrated 7- to 14-fold by cytoplasts. This indicates that cytoplasmic granules are not essential for accumulation of these drugs. Adenosine inhibited cytoplast uptake of clindamycin, which enters intact phagocytic cells by the membrane nucleoside transport system. Roxithromycin uptake by cytoplasts was inhibited by phagocytosis, which may reduce the number of cell membrane sites available for the transport of macrolides. These studies have added to our understanding of uptake mechanisms for antibiotics which are highly concentrated in phagocytes.

  1. Major neutrophil functions subverted by Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Hajishengallis, George

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) constitute an integrated component of the innate host defense in the gingival sulcus/periodontal pocket. However, the keystone periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has in the course of evolution developed a number of capacities to subvert this defense to its own advantage. The present review describes the major mechanisms that P. gingivalis uses to subvert neutrophil homeostasis, such as impaired recruitment and chemotaxis, resistance to granule-derived antimicrobial agents and to the oxidative burst, inhibition of phagocytic killing while promoting a nutritionally favorable inflammatory response, and delay of neutrophil apoptosis. Studies in animal models have shown that at least some of these mechanisms promote the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal polymicrobial community, thereby leading to inflammation and bone loss. It is apparent that neutrophil–P. gingivalis interactions and subversion of innate immunity are key contributing factors to the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. PMID:26993626

  2. The role of neutrophils in the immune system: an overview.

    PubMed

    Malech, Harry L; Deleo, Frank R; Quinn, Mark T

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils, also known as polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), have long been considered as the short-lived, nonspecific white cells that form pus-and also happen to kill invading microbes. Indeed, neutrophils were often neglected (and largely not considered) as immune cells. This historic view of neutrophils has changed considerably over the past several decades, and we know now that, in addition to playing the predominant role in the clearance of bacteria and fungi, they play a major role in shaping the host response to infection and immune system homeostasis. The change in our view of the role of neutrophils in the immune system has been due in large part to the study of these cells in vitro. Such work has been made possible by new and/or improved methods and approaches used to investigate neutrophils. These methods are the focus of this volume.

  3. Receptor and non-receptor mediated formation of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide in neutrophils of intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Manhart, N; Oismüller, C; Lassnig, A; Spittler, A; Sautner, T; Götzinger, P; Függer, R; Roth, E

    1998-11-27

    Generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) has been implicated in tissue damage in a variety of disease states including sepsis and trauma. On the other hand, generation of ROI in polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) presents a crucial element in the defence of the host against invading microorganisms. In the present study we investigated the generation of superoxide anions (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by neutrophils (PMN)5 of 17 critically ill patients treated at a intensive care unit (ICU) after polytrauma (n = 6), heart operation (n = 6) or during septic shock (n = 5) using flow cytometry. O2- production of PMN from ICU patients was significantly lower (p < 0.01) than that in healthy volunteers (HV) during non-receptor mediated stimulation with phorbol-myristate-acetate (PMA) but higher (p < 0.001) during receptor mediated stimulation with formylmethionine-leucine-phenylalanine (FMLP). H2O2 generation of PMN from ICU patients was increased after stimulation with FMLP (p < 0.01) and remained unchanged after stimulation with PMA. Patients in septic shock had lower O2(-)-generation of PMN than did injured patients and patients after heart operations. We conclude that receptor mediated formation of O2- and H2O2 is stimulated in ICU patients. However, in patients in septic shock O2(-)-generation decreases, which potentially might contribute to the immunoparalysis present in septic shock.

  4. Interaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease and elastase with human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kharazmi, A; Döring, G; Høiby, N; Valerius, N H

    1984-01-01

    Little is known about the interaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular products and human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The present study was designed to examine the effect of alkaline protease and elastase purified from P. aeruginosa on human neutrophil function. Neutrophil chemotaxis, oxygen consumption, glucose oxidation, superoxide production, and nitro blue tetrazolium reduction were studied. It was found that alkaline protease and elastase at fairly low concentrations (0.05 and 0.0025 micrograms/ml, respectively) inhibited chemotaxis. The inhibitory effect of both enzymes was increased at higher concentrations. The chemotaxis of preincubated and washed cells was also inhibited. Alkaline protease but not elastase inhibited opsonized zymosan-stimulated neutrophil oxygen consumption, whereas neither of the enzymes had any effect on glucose oxidation and nitro blue tetrazolium-reducing activity of stimulated neutrophils. The data on superoxide production ability of the cells indicated that the cells preincubated with enzyme and washed were capable of producing superoxide equal to the amount produced by untreated cells when they were stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate or zymosan. However, when elastase was present in the reaction mixture, the reduction of cytochrome c as a measure of superoxide production was inhibited. Inhibition of neutrophil function, particularly chemotaxis, will have important bearing on the escape of the microorganism from the phagocytic defense system of the host. The role of these products in localized infections and avascular areas such as skin burns, cornea, and, at least initially, in chronic lung colonization in cystic fibrosis patients becomes important.

  5. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks `outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  6. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks 'outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  7. [MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF NEUTROPHILS AND EOSINOPHILS GRANULES IN SAPPHIRE MINKS].

    PubMed

    Uzenbaeva, L B; Kizhina, A G; Ilyukha, V A

    2015-01-01

    It has been established that sapphire minks have abnormality of subcellular structure of blood and bone marrow neutrophils and eosinophils. The abnormality consists in forming of abnormal "giant" granules. The si- ze and the number of abnormal granules significantly change during maturation of leucocytes in bone marrow. We have found differences between abnormal granules forming in neutrophils and eosinophils that depend on the maturing stage and the cells life cycle duration as well as morphofunctional features of these granulocytes. PMID:26863773

  8. Impaired killing of Candida albicans by granulocytes mobilized for transfusion purposes: a role for granule components

    PubMed Central

    Gazendam, Roel P.; van de Geer, Annemarie; van Hamme, John L.; Tool, Anton T.J.; van Rees, Dieke J.; Aarts, Cathelijn E.M.; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; van Alphen, Floris; Verkuijlen, Paul; Meijer, Alexander B.; Janssen, Hans; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte transfusions are used to treat neutropenic patients with life-threatening bacterial or fungal infections that do not respond to anti-microbial drugs. Donor neutrophils that have been mobilized with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dexamethasone are functional in terms of antibacterial activity, but less is known about their fungal killing capacity. We investigated the neutrophil-mediated cytotoxic response against C. albicans and A. fumigatus in detail. Whereas G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils appeared less mature as compared to neutrophils from untreated controls, these cells exhibited normal ROS production by the NADPH oxidase system and an unaltered granule mobilization capacity upon stimulation. G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils efficiently inhibited A. fumigatus germination and killed Aspergillus and Candida hyphae, but the killing of C. albicans yeasts was distinctly impaired. Following normal Candida phagocytosis, analysis by mass spectrometry of purified phagosomes after fusion with granules demonstrated that major constituents of the antimicrobial granule components, including major basic protein (MBP), were reduced. Purified MBP showed candidacidal activity, and neutrophil-like Crisp-Cas9 NB4-KO-MBP differentiated into phagocytes were impaired in Candida killing. Together, these findings indicate that G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils for transfusion purposes have a selectively impaired capacity to kill Candida yeasts, as a consequence of an altered neutrophil granular content. PMID:26802050

  9. Impaired killing of Candida albicans by granulocytes mobilized for transfusion purposes: a role for granule components.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Roel P; van de Geer, Annemarie; van Hamme, John L; Tool, Anton T J; van Rees, Dieke J; Aarts, Cathelijn E M; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; van Alphen, Floris; Verkuijlen, Paul; Meijer, Alexander B; Janssen, Hans; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-05-01

    Granulocyte transfusions are used to treat neutropenic patients with life-threatening bacterial or fungal infections that do not respond to anti-microbial drugs. Donor neutrophils that have been mobilized with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and dexamethasone are functional in terms of antibacterial activity, but less is known about their fungal killing capacity. We investigated the neutrophil-mediated cytotoxic response against C. albicans and A. fumigatus in detail. Whereas G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils appeared less mature as compared to neutrophils from untreated controls, these cells exhibited normal ROS production by the NADPH oxidase system and an unaltered granule mobilization capacity upon stimulation. G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils efficiently inhibited A. fumigatus germination and killed Aspergillus and Candida hyphae, but the killing of C. albicans yeasts was distinctly impaired. Following normal Candida phagocytosis, analysis by mass spectrometry of purified phagosomes after fusion with granules demonstrated that major constituents of the antimicrobial granule components, including major basic protein (MBP), were reduced. Purified MBP showed candidacidal activity, and neutrophil-like Crisp-Cas9 NB4-KO-MBP differentiated into phagocytes were impaired in Candida killing. Together, these findings indicate that G-CSF/dexamethasone-mobilized neutrophils for transfusion purposes have a selectively impaired capacity to kill Candida yeasts, as a consequence of an altered neutrophil granular content. PMID:26802050

  10. Granulocyte-associated IgG in neutropenic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Cines, D.B.; Passero, F.; Guerry, D.; Bina, M.; Dusak, B.; Schreiber, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    We applied a radiolabeled antiglobulin test to a study of patients with a variety of neutropenic disorders. After defining the nature of the interaction of radiolabeled anti-IgG with the neutrophil, we studied 16 patients with neutropenia of uncertain etiology and adequate bone marrow granulocyte precursors. Twelve of these 16 patients had increased neutrophil-associated IgG (PMN-IgG). Patients with the highest levels of PMN-IgG had the lowest neutrophil counts. The majority of patients with neutropenia and increased PMN-IgG had an underlying immunologic disorder that included immune thrombocytopenic purpura in 5 patients and autoimmune hemolytic anemia in 1 patient. In some patients, elevated PMN-IgG preceded other evidence for immunologic disease. The direct antiglobulin test helped to distinguish neutropenic patients with increased PMN-IgG both from patients with neutropenia due to a known nonimmune disorder and from nonneutropenic patients with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosis. Each of four patients with increased neutrophil-associated IgG treated with systemic corticosteroids responded clinically with an associated fall in neutrophil IgG and a rise in the circulating neutrophil count. The radiolabeled antiglobulin test appears useful in defining a subpopulation of patients with neutropenia due to an underlying immunologic disorder.

  11. Granulocyte-associated IgG in neutropenic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Cines, D.B.; Passero, F.; Guerry, D. IV; Bina, M.; Dusak, B.; Schreiber, A.D

    1982-01-01

    We applied a radiolabeled antiglobulin test to a study of patients with a variety of neutropenic disorders. After defining the nature of the interaction of radiolabeled anti-IgG with the neutrophil, we studied 16 patients with neutropenia of uncertain etiology and adequate bone marrow granulocyte precursors. Twelve of these 16 patients had increased neutrophil-associated IgG (PMN-IgG). Patients with the highest levels of PMN-IgG had the lowest neutrophil counts. The majority of patients with neutropenia and increased PMN-IgG had an underlying immunologic disorder that included immune thrombocytopenic purpura in 5 patients and autoimmune hemolytic anemia in 1 patient. In some patients, elevated PMN-IgG preceded other evidence for immunologic disease. The direct antiglobulin test helped to distinguish neutropenic patients with increased PMN-IgG both from patients with neutropenia due to a known nonimmune disorder and from noneutropenic patients with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosis. Each of four patients with increased neutrophil-associated IgG treated with systemic corticosteroids responded clinically with an associated fall in neutrophil IgG and a rise in the circulating neutrophil count. The radiolabeled antiglobulin test appears useful in defining a subpopulation of patients with neutropenia due to an underlying immunologic disorder.

  12. Thalidomide inhibits granulocyte responses in healthy humans after ex vivo stimulation with bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Juffermans, N P; Verbon, A; Schultz, M J; Hack, C E; van Deventer, S J; Speelman, P; van der Poll, T

    2001-05-01

    Ingestion of thalidomide was associated with a reduction in the upregulation of the granulocyte activation marker CD11b and a reduced capacity to release elastase and lactoferrin after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or lipoteichoic acid. A single oral dose of thalidomide attenuates neutrophil activation upon ex vivo stimulation with bacterial antigens.

  13. Bactericidal capacity of phorbol myristate acetate-treated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Wang-Iverson, P; Pryzwansky, K B; Spitznagel, J K; Cooney, M H

    1978-01-01

    Thus far, the functional capacity of phorbol myristate acetate- (PMA)-treated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes has been undefined. PMA induced exocytosis of lactoferrin, the specific granule marker, but not of myeloperoxidase, the azurophil granule marker. This phenomenon was demonstrated both biochemically and with fluorescent antibody conjugates. PMA-treated neutrophils contained virtually no specific granules when viewed by electron microscopy. Separation of the granule classes by linear sucrose density gradient centrifugation revealed the loss, from PMA-treated neutrophils, of lactoferrin and the specific granule (D20(20) = 1.89) band usually resolved from normal neutrophils. Cells treated with PMA appeared to retain those functions normally associated with intraleukocytic microbicidal action. The hexose monophosphate shunt activated by phagocytic challenge was present in PMA-treated neutrophils. As demonstrated by electron microscopy, the azurophil granules of these cells appeared intact, and they retained the capacity for degranulation with translocation of myeloperoxidase to the site of phagocytized Escherichia coli. The PMA-treated neutrophils also remained capable of degrading the ingested microorganisms. PMA-treated neutrophils exhibited a decrease in phagocytic ability at all levels of bacterial challenge. In the presence of a high multiplicity of bacteria they demonstrated an impairment in killing. These same cells were able to kill low multiplicities of E. coli as well as control cells. It thus appeared that the loss of the specific granules, plus other undefined PMA-induced alterations, impaired neither the viability of these neutrophils nor their killing ability in the presence of a modest phagocytic challenge. Images PMID:730386

  14. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in neutrophil fate.

    PubMed

    Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Ohayon, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    The life span of a neutrophil is a tightly regulated process as extended survival is beneficial for pathogen elimination and cell death necessary to prevent cytotoxic content release from activated neutrophils at the inflammatory site. Therefore, the control between survival and death must be a dynamic process. We have previously described that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which is known as a nuclear protein pivotal in DNA synthesis, is a key element in controlling neutrophil survival through its association with procaspases. Contrary to the dogma which asserted that PCNA has a strictly nuclear function, in mature neutrophils, PCNA is present exclusively within the cytosol due to its nuclear export at the end of the granulocytic differentiation. More recent studies are consistent with the notion that the cytosolic scaffold of PCNA is aimed at modulating neutrophil fate rather than simply preventing death. Ultimately, targeting neutrophil survival might have important applications not just in the field of immunology and inflammation, but also in hematology and transfusion. The neutrophil emerges as a unique and powerful cellular model to unravel the basic mechanisms governing the cell cycle-independent functions of PCNA and should be considered as a leader of the pack. PMID:27558345

  15. Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ermert, David; Niemiec, Maria J; Röhm, Marc; Glenthøj, Andreas; Borregaard, Niels; Urban, Constantin F

    2013-08-01

    Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, is able to grow as budding yeasts or filamentous forms, such as hyphae. The ability to switch morphology has been attributed a crucial role for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. To mimic disseminated candidiasis in humans, the mouse is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We revealed that murine neutrophils exhibited a significantly lower ability to kill C. albicans than their human counterparts. Strikingly, C. albicans yeast cells formed germ tubes upon internalization by murine neutrophils, eventually rupturing the neutrophil membrane and thereby, killing the phagocyte. On the contrary, growth and subsequent escape of C. albicans are blocked inside human neutrophils. According to our findings, this blockage in human neutrophils might be a result of higher levels of MPO activity and the presence of α-defensins. We therefore outline differences in antifungal immune defense between humans and mouse strains, which facilitates a more accurate interpretation of in vivo results.

  16. Sequential morphological and quantitative changes in blood and bone marrow neutrophils in dogs with acute inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Gossett, K A; MacWilliams, P S; Cleghorn, B

    1985-01-01

    Blood and bone marrow morphology were studied sequentially in dogs during experimental inflammation induced by intramuscular injection of turpentine. Depletion of the bone marrow storage pool of mature neutrophils and an increase in mitotic activity and number of early granulocyte precursors were evident within 24 hours. During the next three days, intense granulocytic hyperplasia resulted in replenishment of the bone marrow storage pool. Neutrophils with foamy vacuolation and increased basophilia of the cytoplasm (toxic neutrophils) were present in the blood by eight hours postinjection. The number of toxic neutrophils paralleled the intensity of clinical signs and changes in rectal temperature but not the number of band neutrophils. This indicates that changes in number of toxic neutrophils in sequential leukograms can be a prognostic indicator in dogs with severe inflammation. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:4041973

  17. [Granulocyte alkaline phosphatase--a biomarker of chronic benzene exposure].

    PubMed

    Khristeva, V; Meshkov, T

    1994-01-01

    In tracing the cellular population status in the peripheral blood of workers, exposed to benzene, was included and cytochemical determination of the alkaline phosphatase activity in leucocytes. This enzyme is accepted as marker of the neutrophilic granulocytes, as maturation of the cells and their antibacterial activity are parallel to the cytochemical activity of the enzyme. 78 workers from the coke-chemical production from state firm "Kremikovtsi" and 41 workers from the production "Benzene" and "Isopropylbenzene"--Oil Chemical Plant, Burgas are included. The benzene concentrations in the air of the working places in all productions are in the range of 5 to 50 mg/m3. For cytochemical determination of the alkaline phosphatase activity is used the method of L. Kaplow and phosphatase index was calculated. It was established that in 98.4% of all examined the alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited to different rate, as from 46.5% [61 workers] it is zero. In considerably lower percentage of workers were established and other deviations: leucocytosis or leucopenia, neutropenia, increased percent of band neutrophils and toxic granules. The results of the investigation of the granulocyte population show that from all indices, the activity of granulocyte alkaline phosphatase demonstrates most convincing the early myelotoxic effect of benzene.

  18. Impairment of polymorphonuclear leucocyte function in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and with lymphadenopathy syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarin, A; Uberti Foppa, C; Galli, M; Mantovani, A; Poli, G; Franzetti, F; Nóvati, R

    1986-01-01

    Granulocyte functions were studied in 20 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), 20 subjects with lymphadenopathy syndrome (LAS) and 15 symptom-free drug addicts (SFDA). Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMNL) phagocytosis and killing of C. albicans appeared normal in homosexual men with AIDS, while drug addicts with AIDS or LAS and SFDA showed a significant defect of these functions as compared to healthy controls. Migration of PMNL in response to a chemoattractant was normal in SFDA, but markedly defective both in LAS and in AIDS patients. In the AIDS group no significant differences were evident between homosexual men and drug addicts. We conclude that defective PMNL phagocytosis and killing, unlike defective migration, are somehow related to drug abuse rather than to infection with the causative agent of the immunodeficiency. PMID:3791696

  19. Circulating granulocyte lifespan in compensated alcohol-related cirrhosis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Potts, Jonathan R; Farahi, Neda; Heard, Sarah; Chilvers, Edwin R; Verma, Sumita; Peters, Adrien M

    2016-09-01

    Although granulocyte dysfunction is known to occur in cirrhosis, in vivo studies of granulocyte lifespan have not previously been performed. The normal circulating granulocyte survival half-time (G - t½), determined using indium-111 ((111)In)-radiolabeled granulocytes, is ~7 h. In this pilot study, we aimed to measure the in vivo G - t½ in compensated alcohol-related cirrhosis. Sequential venous blood samples were obtained in abstinent subjects with alcohol-related cirrhosis over 24 h post injection (PI) of minimally manipulated (111)In-radiolabeled autologous mixed leukocytes. Purified granulocytes were isolated from each sample using a magnetic microbead-antibody technique positively selecting for the marker CD15. Granulocyte-associated radioactivity was expressed relative to peak activity, plotted over time, and G - t½ estimated from data up to 12 h PI This was compared with normal neutrophil half-time (N - t½), determined using a similar method specifically selecting neutrophils in healthy controls at a collaborating center. Seven patients with cirrhosis (six male, aged 57.8 ± 9.4 years, all Child-Pugh class A) and seven normal controls (three male, 64.4 ± 5.6 years) were studied. Peripheral blood neutrophil counts were similar in both groups (4.6 (3.5 - 5.5) × 10(9)/L vs. 2.8 (2.7 - 4.4) × 10(9)/L, respectively, P = 0.277). G - t½ in cirrhosis was significantly lower than N - t½ in controls (2.7 ± 0.5 h vs. 4.4 ± 1.0 h, P = 0.007). Transient rises in granulocyte and neutrophil-associated activities occurred in four patients from each group, typically earlier in cirrhosis (4-6 h PI) than in controls (8-10 h), suggesting recirculation of radiolabeled cells released from an unidentified focus. Reduced in vivo granulocyte survival in compensated alcohol-related cirrhosis is a novel finding and potentially another mechanism for immune dysfunction in chronic liver disease. Larger studies are needed to

  20. Monoclonal antibodies specific for human monocytes, granulocytes and endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Hogg, N; MacDonald, S; Slusarenko, M; Beverley, P C

    1984-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies against antigens of human myeloid cells have been produced and thoroughly characterized in terms of their reactions with peripheral blood cells, cell lines, nine lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues and the polypeptides with which they react. UCHM1 and SmO identify antigens present on the majority of blood monocytes and a variable, but lower, proportion of tissue macrophages. From their morphology and location in tissues, these cells appear to be recirculating monocytes. SMO antigen is also present on platelets. In addition, both antibodies stained endothelial cells, SMO in all tissues examined and UCHM1 variably. Biochemical investigation indicated that the UCHM1 antigen is a protein of 52,000 MW while the SMO antigen could not be indentified. The antibodies TG1 and 28 identify antigens mainly present on granulocytes. While mAb 28 reacted with neutrophils, TG1 also stained eosinophils and stained strongly a proportion of monocytes. TG1 also reacted variably with some non-haemopoietic cell lines. Both antibodies reacted predominantly with granulocytes in tissue sections. MAb TG1 precipitated a single polypeptide of 156,000 MW from monocytes and granulocytes, while mAb 28 precipitated non-convalently associated polypeptides of 83,000 and 155,000 MW from granulocytes but only a single molecule from monocytes, corresponding to the lower MW chain of 83,000. The epitope with which mAb 28 reacts appears not to be exposed on the surface of intact monocytes. This suggests that a similar or identical 83,000 MW molecule is made by both neutrophils and monocytes, but that its expression differs according to cell type. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:6389324

  1. Swell activated chloride channel function in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Michael D.; Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2009-04-17

    Non-excitable cells such as neutrophil granulocytes are the archetypal inflammatory immune cell involved in critical functions of the innate immune system. The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential. For continuous function of the NADPH oxidase, I{sub e} has to be balanced to preserve electroneutrality, if not; sufficient depolarisation would prevent electrons from leaving the cell and neutrophil function would be abrogated. Subsequently, the depolarisation generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase I{sub e} must be counteracted by ion transport. The finding that depolarisation required counter-ions to compensate electron transport was followed by the observation that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the NADPH oxidase membrane depolarisation. In this mini review, we discuss the research findings that revealed the essential role of swell activated chloride channels in human neutrophil function.

  2. Effects of endothelin ETA receptor antagonism on granulocyte and lymphocyte accumulation in LPS-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, André L F; Rae, Giles A; Henriques, Maria das Graças M O

    2004-07-01

    Endothelin peptides play active roles in different aspects of inflammation. This study investigates the contribution of endogenous endothelins to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) pulmonary inflammation by assessing the influence of ET(A) receptor antagonism on leukocyte accumulation, granulocyte adhesion molecule expression, and chemokine/cytokine modulation. Local pretreatment with BQ-123 or A-127722 (150 pmol), two selective and chemically unrelated endothelin ET(A) receptor antagonists, inhibits neutrophil and eosinophil accumulation in LPS-induced pleurisy at 24 h but not neutrophil migration at 4 h. The effect of endothelin antagonism on neutrophil accumulation at 24 h was concomitant with inhibition of eosinophil and CD4 and CD8 T lymphocyte influx. It is surprising that the ET(A) receptor blockade did not inhibit the accumulation of gammadelta T lymphocytes, cells that are important for granulocyte recruitment in this model. Blockade of ET(A) receptors did not influence the expression of adhesion molecules (CD11b, CD49d) on granulocytes but abrogated the increase in tumor necrosis factor alpha levels 4 h after LPS stimulation and also markedly inhibited increases in levels of interleukin-6 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine/CXC chemokine ligand 1 but not eotaxin/chemokine ligand 11. Thus, acting via ET(A) receptors, endogenous endothelins play an important role in early cytokine/chemokine production and on granulocyte and lymphocyte mobilization in LPS-induced pleurisy.

  3. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes increase glomerular albumin permeability via hypohalous acid.

    PubMed

    Li, J Z; Sharma, R; Dileepan, K N; Savin, V J

    1994-10-01

    Acute glomerulonephritis is characterized by the presence of neutrophils within glomeruli and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other ROS including hypothalous acids have been implicated in PMN mediated injury. To determine the role of specific ROS in PMN mediated glomerular injury, isolated rat glomeruli were incubated for 30 minutes at 37 degrees C with H2O2, with H2O2 and myeloperoxidase, or with activated PMNs. Scavengers of ROS were included in some experiments. PMNs were harvested from rat peritoneal cavity and activated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Glomerular albumin permeability (Palbumin) was calculated from the volume response to an oncotic gradient. Palbumin of glomeruli incubated with H2O2 (10(-3) or 10(-1) M) was not increased, while Palbumin after incubation with H2O2 and MPO was markedly increased (0.94 +/- 0.004). Palbumin after incubation with PMA, or with non-activated PMNs was not different from that of control glomeruli, Palbumin of the glomeruli incubated with activated PMNs increased (0.85 +/- 0.01, P < 0.001). This increase in Palbumin was inhibited by superoxide dismutase, catalase, or taurine (Palbumin = 0.035 +/- 0.06, -0.39 +/- 0.10, 0.028 +/- 0.06, respectively) and ameliorated by sodium azide (Palbumin = 0.21 +/- 0.03). In contrast, dimethyl sulfoxide did not prevent the increase in Palbumin (Palbumin = 0.92 +/- 0.01). Our results show that the hypohalous acid derived from that of H2O2-MPO-halide system is capable of increasing Palbumin. We conclude that hypohalous acid may be the primary mediator of the immediate increase in glomerular protein permeability induced by PMNs. PMID:7861697

  4. Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Bakken, Johan S.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA), a deer tick transmitted rickettsial infection caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum, is a common cause of undifferentiated fever in the Northeast and Upper Midwest U.S. Patients are often initially diagnosed with a mild viral infection, and illness readily resolves in most cases. However, as many as 3% may develop life threatening complications and nearly 1% die from the infection. A history of tick bite and a high degree of clinical suspicion thus warrant consideration for doxycycline treatment in both adults and children, even in the absence of known tick bite, a negative blood film examination, or pending results of specific A. phagocytophilum diagnostic tests such as paired serology or PCR on acute phase blood. Antibody tests and titers should not be used to monitor active infection as detectable antibodies can remain present for years. Moreover, persistent infection has never been reported. While co-infections with Borrelia burgdorferi and Babesia microti occur, there is little evidence to suggest synergism of disease or a role for A. phagocytophilum in chronic illness. Preventive measures include avoiding tick-infested areas, use of tick repellents, and careful searches of skin to remove attached ticks; no vaccine is available. PMID:25999228

  5. The Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor has a dual role in neuronal and vascular plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Stephanie; Peters, Sebastian; Pitzer, Claudia; Resch, Herbert; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Schneider, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a growth factor that has originally been identified several decades ago as a hematopoietic factor required mainly for the generation of neutrophilic granulocytes, and is in clinical use for that. More recently, it has been discovered that G-CSF also plays a role in the brain as a growth factor for neurons and neural stem cells, and as a factor involved in the plasticity of the vasculature. We review and discuss these dual properties in view of the neuroregenerative potential of this growth factor. PMID:26301221

  6. Promoting apoptosis of neutrophils and phagocytosis by macrophages: novel strategies in the resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Martin, Katherine R; Ohayon, Delphine; Witko-Sarsat, Veronique

    2015-01-01

    Acute inflammation is the body's response to infection or injury, characterised by the rapid infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils to the site of injury followed by monocytes, which differentiate locally into macrophages. The latter are essential for the removal of effete neutrophils and provided that the harmful agent is eliminated, removal of neutrophils will lead to the resolution of inflammation. Perturbations in this process result in the persistence of inflammation and close control of pathways associated with resolution are necessary to avoid chronic inflammation, autoimmunity, or both. As our understanding of these processes increase, drugs able to trigger pro-resolution pathways may represent an effective strategy for treating chronic inflammatory diseases.

  7. Inhibition of peripheral blood neutrophil oxidative burst in periodontitis patients with a homeopathic medication Traumeel S

    PubMed Central

    žilinskas, Juozas; žekonis, Jonas; žekonis, Gediminas; Šadzevičienė, Renata; Sapragonienė, Marija; Navickaitė, Justina; Barzdžiukaitė, Ingrida

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The anti-inflammatory effects of a homeopathic remedy, Traumeel S, have been observed in experimental and clinical studies; however, its antioxidant properties have not been elucidated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant effects of Traumeel S on peripheral blood neutrophils in patients with periodontitis. Material/Methods The study was performed using venous blood of 22 individuals with chronic periodontitis and 21 healthy subjects. The antioxidant effects of Traumeel S on the production of reactive oxygen species by unstimulated and stimulated with unopsonized E. coli neutrophils were investigated using luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence (CL). Results Polymorphonuclear leukocytes of periodontitis patients produced higher levels (p<0.01) of light output of lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence and significantly reduced (p<0.01) light output of luminol-dependent chemiluminescence than analogous cells of healthy subjects. Highly diluted (10−4 of the stem solution) Traumeel S significantly (by approximately 50%) reduced superoxide-induced oxidation of lucigenin by unstimulated and stimulated with unopsonized E. coli polymorphonuclear leukocytes of periodontitis patients and had a tendency to intensify luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Preincubation of the unstimulated and stimulated with unopsonized E. coli polymorphonuclear leukocytes of healthy subjects with Traumeel S exerts no inhibitory action on the luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence of the above-mentioned cells. Conclusions This study indicates that Traumeel S may significantly reduce production of superoxide anion by unstimulated and stimulated peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils of periodontitis patients. PMID:21525811

  8. Differential stimulation by oxygen-free-radical-altered immunoglobulin G of the production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Kleinveld, H A; Sluiter, W; Boonman, A M; Swaak, A J; Hack, C E; Koster, J F

    1991-04-01

    1. The effect of free-radical-altered IgG (monomer and polymer u.v.-irradiated IgG), compared with that of native and heat-aggregated IgG, on the production rate of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide by granulocytes (polymorphonuclear leucocytes) from normal blood and granulocytes obtained from the blood and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis was studied. 2. Similar rates of superoxide production by granulocytes from normal blood at rest and in the presence of any form of IgG were found. In contrast, the rate of hydrogen peroxide production could be stimulated in a dose-dependent fashion by monomer or polymer u.v.-irradiated IgG. 3. The stimulatory effect of free-radical-altered IgG on the rate of hydrogen peroxide production did not occur in the presence of 2-deoxyglucose, which deprives the NADPH:O2 oxidoreductase of its substrate NADPH by inhibition of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway. This points to a stimulatory effect on the direct divalent reduction of oxygen without intermediate superoxide production by this enzyme complex. 4. Granulocytes obtained from the blood and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis reacted differently to polymer u.v.-irradiated IgG. In the presence of this stimulus the rate of release of both superoxide and hydrogen peroxide was increased. Furthermore, these granulocytes synthesized superoxide and hydrogen peroxide at a higher rate than did granulocytes from normal blood in the presence of serum-treated zymosan but not in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate. 5. Taken together, these results indicate that the rate of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production by the granulocyte NADPH:O2 oxidoreductase depends on the pathological condition of the donor and the type of stimulus used.

  9. [Missing granulocytic infiltrate in pityriasis versicolor--indication of specific anti-inflammatory activity of the pathogen?].

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, N; Bär, Silja; Mayser, P

    2005-01-01

    The yeast Malassezia furfur is a part of the resident flora of human skin. It causes various diseases such as pityriasis versicolor, which hardly shows signs of inflammation despite marked clinical symptoms (e.g. hypopigmentation). The pathophysiology related morphological picture might give a clue to this phenomenon. As a part of the literature data are controversial, the present study compared the inflammatory infiltrate of pityriasis versicolor with that of tinea corporis in 40 human skin preparations each from diagnostic specimens. All preparations were stained with HE and PAS. Neutrophilic granulocytes were counted in the HE stain, and hyphae and spores in the PAS stain. The number of counted cells was related to the size of the respective area and the values were compared between pityriasis and tinea corporis. Significantly, more neutrophilic granulocytes were found with tinea corporis (P > 0.01), while they were virtually not demonstrable with pityriasis versicolor. It is surprising that fungal load in the stratum corneum is significantly higher with pityriasis versicolor (P > 0.01). Obviously the immune response involving neutrophilic granulocytes does not occur despite high bacterial load. This might be explained by reduced immunogenicity because of high content of lipids in the cell membrane. Furthermore, pityriarubins that are produced during tryptophan metabolism might be involved, which, in a stimulus-dependent manner, can suppress the ROS production of neutrophilic granulocytes in vivo.

  10. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte kinetics in experimentally induced keratitis.

    PubMed

    Chusid, M J; Davis, S D

    1985-02-01

    The movement of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) into inflamed corneas was studied using a quantitative technique to measure PMNL chemotaxis in vivo. Our studies suggested that, in this model, most PMNLs enter the cornea through limbal vessels. A variety of bacterial agents, including viable bacteria, killed bacteria, culture filtrates, and endotoxin, were found to induce a significant corneal inflammatory response. Of the agents tested, viable Pseudomonas aeruginosa produced greatest inflammation. Host factors (serum, PMNLs) also induced movement of PMNLs into corneas, but only after preincubation with activating agents. Normal serum, resting PMNLs, and PMNL lysates derived from resting cells did not promote PMNL corneal ingress. These studies provide further insight into the movement of PMNLs into the inflamed cornea and information that may be of use in developing techniques to inhibit the corneal inflammatory response. PMID:3977698

  11. Flow cytometry evidence of human granulocytes interaction with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes: effect of nanoparticle charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renò, Filippo; Carniato, Fabio; Rizzi, Manuela; Olivero, Francesco; Pittarella, Pamela; Marchese, Leonardo

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) entering the human body are immediately confronted with the innate part of human immune system. In particular, monocyte and neutrophil granulocytes readily clear particles by phagocytosis, even if in the case of NPs the uptake mechanism may be classified as macropinocytosis. Among engineered nanoparticles, in the last years, siliceous materials have emerged as promising materials for several applications ranging from catalysis to biomedical. The polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) are nanodimensional, easily synthesizable molecular compounds and POSS-based systems are promising carriers for biological molecules. In this work, the ability of human granulocytes to uptake positively and negatively charged POSS was measured using a simple flow cytometry analysis based on cell size modifications. The data obtained showed that after a 30 min exposure only positive NPs were uptaken by human granulocyte using both macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated mechanisms as demonstrated by uptake inhibition mediated by amiloride and chlorpromazine.

  12. Francisella tularensis alters human neutrophil gene expression: insights into the molecular basis of delayed neutrophil apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Justin T; Bandyopadhyay, Sarmistha; Kobayashi, Scott D; McCracken, Jenna; Whitney, Adeline R; Deleo, Frank R; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrated recently that Francisella tularensis profoundly impairs human neutrophil apoptosis, but how this is achieved is largely unknown. Herein we used human oligonucleotide microarrays to test the hypothesis that changes in neutrophil gene expression contribute to this phenotype, and now demonstrate that F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) caused significant changes in neutrophil gene expression over a 24-hour time period relative to the uninfected controls. Of approximately 47,000 genes analyzed, 3,435 were significantly up- or downregulated by LVS, including 365 unique genes associated with apoptosis and cell survival. Specific targets in this category included genes asso-ciated with the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways (CFLAR, TNFAIP3, TNFRSF10D, SOD2, BCL2A1, BIRC4, PIM2, TNFSF10, TNFRSF10C, CASP2 and CASP8) and genes that act via the NFĸB pathway and other mechanisms to prolong cell viability (NFKB1, NFKB2 and RELA, IL1B, CAST, CDK2,GADD45B, BCL3, BIRC3, CDK2, IL1A, PBEF1, IL6, CXCL1, CCL4 and VEGF). The microarray data were confirmed by qPCR and pathway analysis. Moreover, we demonstrate that the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein remained abundant in polymorphonuclear leukocytes over 48 h of LVS infection, whereas BAX mRNA and protein were progressively downregulated. These data strongly suggest that antiapoptotic and prosurvival mechanisms collaborate to sustain the viability of F. tularensis--infected neutrophils. PMID:22986450

  13. [Leucosis diagnosis in cattle using the Sudan black B staining method on granulocytes and monocytes].

    PubMed

    Rademacher, R; Vanásek, J; Sodomková, D

    1979-11-01

    In the peripheral blood of healthy cattle and cattle suffering from leucosis a positive reaction with Sudan black B was found in neutrophilic and eosinophilic granulocytes: in healthy cattle at an intensity from ++ to ++++, and in cattle suffering from leucosis it was somewhat slighter (++ to +++). This finding can, to a certain extent, help in the distinguishing of reactive lymphocytosis from the leucosis of cattle. Compared with granulocytes the reaction of monocytes is markedly weaker: in healthy cattle at an intensity from 0 to (++), and in diseased cattle from 0 to (+++). In the bone marrow there is a significantly weaker reaction to Sudan black B in the group of large cells (neutrophilic and eosinophilic promyelocytes and myelocytes); in the group of healthy and diseases cattle the reaction is weaker than in neutrophilic and eosinophilic granulocytes of the peripheral blood. The reaction obtained with Sudan black B for lipids can be used as an aid for the distinguishing of cells of the myeloid, monocytic, and lymphoid order of peripheral blood and bone marrow in cattle leucosis. PMID:92849

  14. Regulation of polymorphonuclear cell activation by thrombopoietin.

    PubMed Central

    Brizzi, M F; Battaglia, E; Rosso, A; Strippoli, P; Montrucchio, G; Camussi, G; Pegoraro, L

    1997-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) regulates early and late stages of platelet formation as well as platelet activation. TPO exerts its effects by binding to the receptor, encoded by the protooncogene c-mpl, that is expressed in a large number of cells of hematopoietic origin. In this study, we evaluated the expression of c-Mpl and the effects of TPO on human polymorphonuclear cells (PMN). We demonstrate that PMN express the TPO receptor c-Mpl and that TPO induces STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and the formation of a serum inducible element complex containing STAT1. The analysis of biological effects of TPO on PMN demonstrated that TPO, at concentrations of 1-10 ng/ml, primes the response of PMN to n-formyl-met-leu-phe (FMLP) by inducing an early oxidative burst. TPO-induced priming on FMLP-stimulated PMN was also detected on the tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 28 kD. Moreover, we demonstrated that TPO by itself was able to stimulate, at doses ranging from 0.05 to 10 ng/ml, early release and delayed synthesis of interleukin 8 (IL-8). Thus, our data indicate that, in addition to sustaining megakaryocytopoiesis, TPO may have an important role in regulating PMN activation. PMID:9120001

  15. Chemotactic peptide receptor modulation in polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The binding of the chemotactic peptide N- formylnorleucylleucylphenylalanine (FNLLP) to its receptor on rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) modulates the number of available peptide receptors. Incubation with FNLLP decreases subsequent binding capacity, a phenomenon that has been termed receptor down regulation. Down regulation of the chemotactic peptide receptor is concentration dependent in both the rate and extent of receptor loss. The dose response parallels that of FNLLP binding to the recptor. The time- course is rapid; even at concentrations of FNLLP as low as 3 x 10(-9) M, the new equilibrium concentration of receptors is reached within 15 min. Down regulation is temperature dependent, but does occur even at 4 degrees C. Concomitant with down regulation, some of the peptide becomes irreversibly cell associated. At 4 degrees C, there is a small accumulation of nondissociable peptide that rapidly reaches a plateau. At higher temperatures, accumulation of nondissociable peptide continues after the rceptor number has reached equilibrium, and the amount accumulated can exceed the initial number of receptors by as much as 300%. The dose response of peptide uptake at 37 degrees C reflects that of binding, suggesting that it is receptor mediated. This uptake may occur via a pinocytosis mechanism. Although PMNs have not been considered to be pinocytic, the addition of FNLLP causes a fourfold stimulation of the rate of pinocytosis as measured by the uptake of [3H]sucrose. PMID:7391138

  16. Granulocytic nuclear differentiation of lamin B receptor-deficient mouse EPRO cells

    PubMed Central

    Zwerger, Monika; Herrmann, Harald; Gaines, Peter; Olins, Ada L.; Olins, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Lamin B receptor (LBR) is an integral protein of the inner nuclear membrane. Recent studies have demonstrated that genetic deficiency of LBR during granulopoiesis results in hypolobulation of the mature neutrophil nucleus, as observed in human Pelger-Huët anomaly (PHA) and mouse ichthyosis (ic). In this study we have utilized differentiated promyelocytes (EPRO cells) that were derived from the bone marrow of homozygous and heterozygous ichthyosis mice to examine changes to the expression of nuclear envelope proteins and heterochromatin structure that result from deficient LBR expression. Materials and Methods Wildtype (+/+), heterozygous (+/ic) and homozygous (ic/ic) granulocytic forms of EPRO cells were analyzed for the expression of multiple lamins and inner nuclear envelope proteins by immunostaining and immunoblotting techniques. The heterochromatin architecture was also examined by immunostaining for histone lysine methylation. Results Wildtype (+/+) and heterozygous (+/ic) granulocytic forms revealed ring-shaped nuclei and contained LBR within the nuclear envelope; ic/ic granulocytes exhibited smaller ovoid nuclei devoid of LBR. The pericentric heterochromatin of undifferentiated and granulocytic ic/ic cells was condensed into larger spots and shifted away from the nuclear envelope, compared to +/+ and +/ic cell forms. Lamin A/C, which is normally not present in mature granulocytes, was significantly elevated in LBR-deficient EPRO cells. Conclusions Our observations suggest roles for LBR during granulopoiesis which may involve augmenting nuclear membrane growth, facilitating compartmentalization of heterochromatin and promoting down-regulation of lamin A/C expression. PMID:18495328

  17. Low-Density Granulocytes Are Elevated in Mycobacterial Infection and Associated with the Severity of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yating; Ye, Jianqing; Luo, Qing; Huang, Zhikun; Peng, Yiping; Xiong, Guoliang; Guo, Yang; Jiang, Hong; Li, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health problem caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Numerous studies have established a close correlation between the development of tuberculosis and the roles of neutrophils. Recently, a distinct population of CD15+ granulocytes was found to be present in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) fraction in humans. This population of granulocytes, termed low-density granulocytes (LDGs), was reported to be elevated and associated with disease activity or severity in a number of different conditions including SLE, asthma and HIV infection. However, both the frequency and clinical significance of LDGs associated with tuberculosis are unclear. Here we determined LDG levels and made comparisons between subjects with active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and healthy controls, between PTB patients with mild-to-moderate disease and patients with advanced disease, and among PTB patients following anti-tuberculous therapy of varying durations. The direct correlation between M. tuberculosis infection and LDG levels was confirmed by in vitro infection of whole peripheral blood and isolated granulocytes with mycobacteria. Our results demonstrated that PBMCs in PTB patients contained significantly elevated percentages of LDGs compared with control subjects. LDGs in tuberculosis expressed higher levels of activation markers compared to normal-density granulocytes (NDGs). M. tuberculosis induced the generation of LDGs in both whole blood and isolated NDGs from control subjects, which suggests that LDGs associated with M. tuberculosis infection are likely to originate from in situ activation. Furthermore, our results revealed that the frequency of LDGs is associated with the severity of tuberculosis. PMID:27073889

  18. Neutrophil extracellular traps: how to generate and visualize them.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Volker; Laube, Britta; Abu Abed, Ulrike; Goosmann, Christian; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2010-02-24

    Neutrophil granulocytes are the most abundant group of leukocytes in the peripheral blood. As professional phagocytes, they engulf bacteria and kill them intracellularly when their antimicrobial granules fuse with the phagosome. We found that neutrophils have an additional way of killing microorganisms: upon activation, they release granule proteins and chromatin that together form extracellular fibers that bind pathogens. These novel structures, or Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs), degrade virulence factors and kill bacteria, fungi and parasites. The structural backbone of NETs is DNA, and they are quickly degraded in the presence of DNases. Thus, bacteria expressing DNases are more virulent. Using correlative microscopy combining TEM, SEM, immunofluorescence and live cell imaging techniques, we could show that upon stimulation, the nuclei of neutrophils lose their shape and the eu- and heterochromatin homogenize. Later, the nuclear envelope and the granule membranes disintegrate allowing the mixing of NET components. Finally, the NETs are released as the cell membrane breaks. This cell death program (NETosis) is distinct from apoptosis and necrosis and depends on the generation of Reactive Oxygen Species by NADPH oxidase. Neutrophil extracellular traps are abundant at sites of acute inflammation. NETs appear to be a form of innate immune response that bind microorganisms, prevent them from spreading, and ensure a high local concentration of antimicrobial agents to degrade virulence factors and kill pathogens thus allowing neutrophils to fulfill their antimicrobial function even beyond their life span. There is increasing evidence, however, that NETs are also involved in diseases that range from auto-immune syndromes to infertility. We describe methods to isolate Neutrophil Granulocytes from peripheral human blood and stimulate them to form NETs. Also we include protocols to visualize the NETs in light and electron microscopy.

  19. Neutrophil secondary necrosis is induced by LL-37 derived from cathelicidin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhifang; Cherryholmes, Gregory; Shively, John E

    2008-09-01

    Neutrophils represent the most common granulocyte subtype present in blood. The short half-life of circulating neutrophils is regulated by spontaneous apoptosis, and tissue infiltrating neutrophils die by apoptosis and secondary necrosis. The mechanism of neutrophil apoptosis has been the subject of many studies; however, the mechanism of neutrophil secondary necrosis is less clear. Human cathelicidin cationic peptide 18, proteolytically processed to its active form, LL-37, is secreted by neutrophils and epithelial cells and shown to have effects in addition to bacterial lysis. We demonstrate here that LL-37 affects neutrophil lifespan by the pathway of secondary necrosis, rapidly converting annexin V-positive (AV(+)), propidium iodide-negative (PI(-); apoptotic) cells into PI(+) (necrotic) cells with the release of IL-8, IL-1R antagonist, ATP, and intact granules. The effects of LL-37 on apoptotic neutrophils are neither energy-dependent nor affected by pretreatment with G-CSF, GM-CSF, TNF-alpha, and LPS and are partially inhibited by human serum. Moreover, LL-37 decreases CXCR2 expression of AV(-)PI(-) (live) neutrophils, suggesting an effect on the neutrophil response to its chemotactic factors, including IL-8. Thus, the lifespan and inflammatory functions of neutrophils are directly affected by LL-37.

  20. Neutrophils in the tumor microenvironment: trying to heal the wound that cannot heal.

    PubMed

    Singel, Kelly L; Segal, Brahm H

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils are the first responders to infection and injury and are critical for antimicrobial host defense. Through the generation of reactive oxidants, activation of granular constituents and neutrophil extracellular traps, neutrophils target microbes and prevent their dissemination. While these pathways are beneficial in the context of trauma and infection, their off-target effects in the context of tumor are variable. Tumor-derived factors have been shown to reprogram the marrow, skewing toward the expansion of myelopoiesis. This can result in stimulation of both neutrophilic leukocytosis and the release of immature granulocytic populations that accumulate in circulation and in the tumor microenvironment. While activated neutrophils have been shown to kill tumor cells, there is growing evidence for neutrophil activation driving tumor progression and metastasis through a number of pathways, including stimulation of thrombosis and angiogenesis, stromal remodeling, and impairment of T cell-dependent anti-tumor immunity. There is also growing appreciation of neutrophil heterogeneity in cancer, with distinct neutrophil populations promoting cancer control or progression. In addition to the effects of tumor on neutrophil responses, anti-neoplastic treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy, and growth factors, can influence neutrophil responses. Future directions for research are expected to result in more mechanistic knowledge of neutrophil biology in the tumor microenvironment that may be exploited as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27558344

  1. Interleukin-8 production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes from patients with chronic infected leg ulcers treated with Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Peral, M C; Rachid, M M; Gobbato, N M; Huaman Martinez, M A; Valdez, J C

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial infection impairs the healing process, promoting the chronicity of inflammation and wounds. Because antibiotics fail to eradicate bacteria, especially in biofilm form, new therapeutic modalities may be required. In the present study, the effectiveness of bacteriotherapy with Lactobacillus plantarum on infected chronic venous ulcers was investigated and its effects on interleukin (IL)-8 production by cells from the ulcer bed and neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood that were previously challenged in vitro with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and L. plantarum were studied. Topical application of L. plantarum culture to lesions (25-60 cm(2)) of 14 diabetic and 20 non-diabetic patients induced debridement, granulation tissue formation and total healing after 30 days in 43% diabetics and in 50% non-diabetics. No significant differences between the groups were observed. The cells from ulcer beds collected after treatment with L. plantarum for 10 days showed a decrease in the percentage of polymorphonuclear, apoptotic and necrotic cells and an enhancement of IL-8 production. IL-8 production by isolated neutrophils from these patients was compared with that in diabetics without ulcers, as well as normal subjects under basal conditions, and after infection of polymorphonuclear cells with P. aeruginosa preincubated either with or without L. plantarum. The basal values in diabetic and ulcer patients were higher than normal (p <0.001) and were increased by P. aeruginosa infection in normal, diabetics (p <0.001) and non-diabetics with ulcers (p <0.01). Preincubation with L. plantarum decreased IL-8 production in patients with ulcers non-diabetic and diabetic (p <0.001). Lactobacillus plantarum treatment reduced wound bacterial load, neutrophils, apoptotic and necrotic cells, modified IL-8 production and induced wound healing.

  2. Interference with the oxidative response of neutrophils by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Perry, F E; Elson, C J; Greenham, L W; Catterall, J R

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Pneumococcal infections are still a major clinical problem. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (neutrophils) are considered to have a key role in the host's defence against Streptococcus pneumoniae but the mechanisms by which they kill the pneumococcus remain unclear. As reactive oxygen species are regarded as a major antimicrobial defence of phagocytes an attempt has been made to establish their role in the response of neutrophils to S pneumoniae. METHODS--S pneumoniae isolated from patients with bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia were incubated with neutrophils in suspension and superoxide production was measured by reduction of ferricytochrome c. RESULTS--S pneumoniae did not stimulate superoxide production alone or in the presence of normal human serum. Spontaneous superoxide production by neutrophils was actually abrogated by S pneumoniae, as was the powerful respiratory burst stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate. This phenomenon depended on both the dose and the viability of the bacteria. With S pneumoniae in the logarithmic phase of growth inhibitory activity was confined to the organisms themselves but with organisms undergoing autolysis it was also present in filtered supernatants, suggesting that the inhibitory activity can be attributed to a factor released during autolysis. CONCLUSIONS--S pneumoniae can interfere with the respiratory burst of neutrophils. This property may help to explain the pathogenicity of the organism. PMID:8390109

  3. The in vivo behavior of granulocytes labeled with indium-111 in a canine model of pneumococcal pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Lichter, J.P.; Konopka, R.G.; Hartman, M.T.; Moser, K.M.; Spragg, R.G.

    1984-04-01

    Use of (/sup 111/In)granulocytes in the study of pulmonary inflammation requires study of their in vivo behavior. To study the pulmonary deposition of these cells and their ability to migrate from the capillary to the alveolus, we injected (/sup 111/In)granulocytes into dogs 24 h after the induction of a right lower lobe pneumococcal pneumonia. Using external imaging, we found rapid clearance of (/sup 111/In)granulocytes from the uninvolved lung (with a residual radioactivity of 24.5 +/- 4.2% at 4 h). In contrast, 83 +/- 12.4% of the initial radioactivity was present in inflamed lung at 4 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the inflamed lung was more cellular than that from control lung, contained a greater fraction of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (82 +/- 4.1% versus 20 +/- 6.2%), and much greater cell-associated radioactivity (ratio of 423:1, inflamed to control). Autoradiography disclosed that this radioactivity was localized to consolidated alveoli and was not prominently distributed in arterioles or venules or in airways larger than 0.6 mm. We conclude that (/sup 111/In)granulocytes are biologically active in the setting of acute lung inflammation.

  4. Subcellular localization and properties of lipase activities in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Hack, N J; Smith, G P; Peters, T J

    1985-03-01

    A fluorimetric assay for lipase activity has been optimized for measurement of the enzyme in human neutrophils. Activity was maximal at acid (4.5) and alkaline (9.5) pH, although there was also a neutral peak of activity at pH 6.5. Neutrophils were homogenised in isotonic sucrose and subjected to analytical subcellular fractionation by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The gradient fractions were assayed for acid, neutral and alkaline lipase activity and for the principal organelle marker enzymes. Neutral lipase showed a unimodal distribution with an equilibrium density of 1.19 g . cm-3, corresponding to the distribution of particulate leucine aminopeptidase. Acid and alkaline lipase activities showed very similar distribution profiles to each other with both soluble components and a broad peak of particulate activity. The broad modal density of 1.19-1.22 g . cm-3 suggests that acid and alkaline lipase activities could be localised to more than one population of cytoplasmic granule. Fractionation experiments with neutrophils homogenised in sucrose medium containing digitonin confirmed the localisation of neutral lipase and leucine aminopeptidase to the same cytoplasmic granule, and suggested that at least part of the acid lipase activity was localised to the specific granule. No lipase activity could be attributed to the alkaline phosphatase-containing granule. Neutrophils were isolated from control subjects, patients with chronic granulocytic leukaemia and women in the third trimester of pregnancy. The specific activity of acid, neutral and alkaline lipase, and leucine aminopeptidase, in contrast to that of alkaline phosphatase, were similar in the three patient groups.

  5. How neutrophils kill fungi.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Roel P; van de Geer, Annemarie; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the prevention of invasive fungal infections. Whereas mouse studies have demonstrated the role of various neutrophil pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs), signal transduction pathways, and cytotoxicity in the murine antifungal immune response, much less is known about the killing of fungi by human neutrophils. Recently, novel primary immunodeficiencies have been identified in patients with a susceptibility to fungal infections. These human 'knock-out' neutrophils expand our knowledge to understand the role of PRRs and signaling in human fungal killing. From the studies with these patients it is becoming clear that neutrophils employ fundamentally distinct mechanisms to kill Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus. PMID:27558342

  6. Granulocytes in helminth infection -- who is calling the shots?

    PubMed

    Makepeace, B L; Martin, C; Turner, J D; Specht, S

    2012-01-01

    Helminths are parasitic organisms that can be broadly described as "worms" due to their elongated body plan, but which otherwise differ in shape, development, migratory routes and the predilection site of the adults and larvae. They are divided into three major groups: trematodes (flukes), which are leaf-shaped, hermaphroditic (except for blood flukes) flatworms with oral and ventral suckers; cestodes (tapeworms), which are segmented, hermaphroditic flatworms that inhabit the intestinal lumen; and nematodes (roundworms), which are dioecious, cylindrical parasites that inhabit intestinal and peripheral tissue sites. Helminths exhibit a sublime co-evolution with the host's immune system that has enabled them to successfully colonize almost all multicellular species present in every geographical environment, including over two billion humans. In the face of this challenge, the host immune system has evolved to strike a delicate balance between attempts to neutralize the infectious assault versus limitation of damage to host tissues. Among the most important cell types during helminthic invasion are granulocytes: eosinophils, neutrophils and basophils. Depending on the specific context, these leukocytes may have pivotal roles in host protection, immunopathology, or facilitation of helminth establishment. This review provides an overview of the function of granulocytes in helminthic infections.

  7. LACTOFERRIN, AN IRON-BINBING PROTEIN NI NEUTROPHILIC LEUKOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Masson, P. L.; Heremans, J. F.; Schonne, E.

    1969-01-01

    Lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein previously shown to occur in many external secretions, is identified as one of the major proteins present in human and guinea pig neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The identification of this protein in leukocyte extracts was based upon a comparison of its electrophoretic, antigenic, and iron-combining properties with the corresponding properties of the same protein isolated from human and guinea pig milk. Immunochemical quantitations showed that lactoferrin occurs in human neutrophilic leukocytes at the concentration of 3 µg per 106 cells. Tissue cultures from guinea pig bone marrow and spleen actively synthesized the protein, as shown both by net production of lactoferrin and incorporation of labeled amino acids into the protein. Immunohistochemical data indicate that lactoferrin first appears in myeloid cells at the stage of the promyelocyte. PMID:4979954

  8. Pathophysiology of neutrophil-mediated extracellular redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Jaganjac, Morana; Cipak, Ana; Schaur, Rudolf Joerg; Zarkovic, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocyte leukocytes (neutrophils) play fundamental role in the innate immune response. In the presence of adequate stimuli, neutrophils release excessive amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may induce cell and tissue injury. Oxidative burst of neutrophils acts as a double-edged sword. It may contribute to the pathology of atherosclerosis and brain injury but is also necessary in resolving infections. Moreover, neutrophil-derived ROS may also have both a tumor promoting and tumor suppressing role. ROS have a specific activities and diffusion distance, which is related to their short lifetime. Therefore, the manner in which ROS will act depends on the cells targeted and the intra- and extracellular levels of individual ROS, which can further cause production of reactive aldehydes like 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) that act as a second messengers of ROS. In this review we discuss the influence of neutrophil mediated extracellular redox reactions in ischemia reperfusion injury, transplant rejection and chronic diseases (atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer). At the end a brief overview of cellular mechanisms to maintain ROS homeostasis is given.

  9. Survival of transfused CD18-positive granulocytes and their chemiluminescent response in a heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Sakurai, N; Matsuki, S; Miura, T; Nioka, K; Kociba, G J

    1998-02-01

    Granulocyte transfusion (GT) was performed in an 8-month-old heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) to monitor the changes in transfused CD18-positive neutrophils and associated neutrophil chemiluminescent (CL) response in beta 2-integrin-deficient host. The CD18-positive neutrophils were detected in blood from the BLAD heifer during the first 3 hr after 2.6 x 10(9) cells were infused by GT, and disappeared by 5 hr after GT. The CL response of neutrophils was increased 1.7 to 2.8-fold in the BLAD heifer during the first 3 hr after GT, thereafter CL response decreased gradually from 2 to 5 hr after GT. PMID:9524955

  10. Dimethylfumarate Impairs Neutrophil Functions.

    PubMed

    Müller, Susen; Behnen, Martina; Bieber, Katja; Möller, Sonja; Hellberg, Lars; Witte, Mareike; Hänsel, Martin; Zillikens, Detlef; Solbach, Werner; Laskay, Tamás; Ludwig, Ralf J

    2016-01-01

    Host defense against pathogens relies on neutrophil activation. Inadequate neutrophil activation is often associated with chronic inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils also constitute a significant portion of infiltrating cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, for example, psoriasis and multiple sclerosis. Fumarates improve the latter diseases, which so far has been attributed to the effects on lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Here, we focused on the effects of dimethylfumarate (DMF) on neutrophils. In vitro, DMF inhibited neutrophil activation, including changes in surface marker expression, reactive oxygen species production, formation of neutrophil extracellular traps, and migration. Phagocytic ability and autoantibody-induced, neutrophil-dependent tissue injury ex vivo was also impaired by DMF. Regarding the mode of action, DMF modulates-in a stimulus-dependent manner-neutrophil activation using the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathways. For in vivo validation, mouse models of epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, an organ-specific autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies to type VII collagen, were employed. In the presence of DMF, blistering induced by injection of anti-type VII collagen antibodies into mice was significantly impaired. DMF treatment of mice with clinically already-manifested epidermolysis bullosa acquisita led to disease improvement. Collectively, we demonstrate a profound inhibitory activity of DMF on neutrophil functions. These findings encourage wider use of DMF in patients with neutrophil-mediated diseases. PMID:26763431

  11. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  12. Technical advance: autofluorescence-based sorting: rapid and nonperturbing isolation of ultrapure neutrophils to determine cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Dorward, David A; Lucas, Christopher D; Alessandri, Ana L; Marwick, John A; Rossi, Fiona; Dransfield, Ian; Haslett, Christopher; Dhaliwal, Kevin; Rossi, Adriano G

    2013-07-01

    The technical limitations of isolating neutrophils without contaminating leukocytes, while concurrently minimizing neutrophil activation, is a barrier to determining specific neutrophil functions. We aimed to assess the use of FACS for generating highly pure quiescent neutrophil populations in an antibody-free environment. Peripheral blood human granulocytes and murine bone marrow-derived neutrophils were isolated by discontinuous Percoll gradient and flow-sorted using FSC/SSC profiles and differences in autofluorescence. Postsort purity was assessed by morphological analysis and flow cytometry. Neutrophil activation was measured in unstimulated-unsorted and sorted cells and in response to fMLF, LTB4, and PAF by measuring shape change, CD62L, and CD11b expression; intracellular calcium flux; and chemotaxis. Cytokine production by human neutrophils was also determined. Postsort human neutrophil purity was 99.95% (sem=0.03; n=11; morphological analysis), and 99.68% were CD16(+ve) (sem=0.06; n=11), with similar results achieved for murine neutrophils. Flow sorting did not alter neutrophil activation or chemotaxis, relative to presorted cells, and no differences in response to agonists were observed. Stimulated neutrophils produced IL-1β, although to a lesser degree than CXCL8/IL-8. The exploitation of the difference in autofluorescence between neutrophils and eosinophils by FACS is a quick and effective method for generating highly purified populations for subsequent in vitro study.

  13. Binding inhibition of type 1 fimbriae to human granulocytes: a flow cytometric inhibition assay using trivalent cluster mannosides.

    PubMed

    Horst, A K; Kötter, S; Lindhorst, T K; Ludwig, A; Brandt, E; Wagener, C

    2001-12-01

    The binding of type 1 fimbriae from Escherichia coli to vital human neutrophilic granulocytes was inhibited by synthetic trivalent cluster mannosides. Binding of type 1 fimbriae was measured in a flow cytometric assay. Based on the molarity of mannosyl residues, the clusters exceed the inhibitory potency of methyl alpha-D-mannoside by a factor of more than 1,000 and the inhibitory potency of p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-mannoside by a factor of more than 10. The inhibition studies indicate that the trivalent cluster mannosides are very potent inhibitors of the binding of type 1 fimbriae to human neutrophilic granulocytes. Based on their defined structure, cluster mannosides are well suited for characterizing the molecular interactions of mannose-sensitive fimbriae with their cell membrane receptors.

  14. Apoptotic neutrophils in the circulation of patients with glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD1b).

    PubMed

    Kuijpers, Taco W; Maianski, Nikolai A; Tool, Anton T J; Smit, G Peter A; Rake, Jan Peter; Roos, Dirk; Visser, Gepke

    2003-06-15

    Glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD1b) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, and growth retardation, and associated-for unknown reasons- with neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction. In 5 GSD1b patients in whom nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase activity and chemotaxis were defective, we found that the majority of circulating granulocytes bound Annexin-V. The neutrophils showed signs of apoptosis with increased caspase activity, condensed nuclei, and perinuclear clustering of mitochondria to which the proapoptotic Bcl-2 member Bax had translocated already. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) addition to in vitro cultures did not rescue the GSD1b neutrophils from apoptosis as occurs with G-CSF-treated control neutrophils. Moreover, the 2 GSD1b patients on G-CSF treatment did not show significantly lower levels of apoptotic neutrophils in the bloodstream. Current understanding of neutrophil apoptosis and the accompanying functional demise suggests that GSD1b granulocytes are dysfunctional because they are apoptotic. PMID:12576310

  15. Elevated neutrophil elastase and acrolein-protein adducts are associated with W256 regression.

    PubMed

    Jaganjac, M; Poljak-Blazi, M; Schaur, R J; Zarkovic, K; Borovic, S; Cipak, A; Cindric, M; Uchida, K; Waeg, G; Zarkovic, N

    2012-11-01

    The involvement of granulocytes in immune response against cancer is not well understood. Depending on the cytokine milieu in which they act and on their oxidative burst, granulocytes may play either an inhibitory or stimulatory role in tumour growth. Unsaturated fatty acids, essential components of cellular membranes and storage lipids, are susceptible to granulocyte-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS can induce lipid peroxidation (LPO) resulting in the destruction of biomembranes. Thus, murine W256 tumour progressing and tumour regressing animal models were used to study the involvement of plasma inflammatory mediators and oxidative burst of circulating granulocytes in malignant destruction and detrimental tumour growth. The involvement of LPO-derived aldehydes (i.e. acrolein, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and malondialdehyde) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) appearance in the granulocyte anti-cancer response were further evaluated. The results obtained revealed a significant increase in neutrophil elastase in animals with regressing tumour. Furthermore, the presence of MPO in tumour microenvironment was accompanied by the formation of acrolein only 5 h after tumour transplantation and its presence increased during tumour regression. Later, at an early stage of tumour regression, the presence of other LPO-derived aldehydes were also observed. The results obtained suggest that elevated neutrophil elastase and initiation of LPO may play an important role in the tumour development leading to tumour regression.

  16. Elevated neutrophil elastase and acrolein-protein adducts are associated with W256 regression

    PubMed Central

    Jaganjac, M; Poljak-Blazi, M; Schaur, R J; Zarkovic, K; Borovic, S; Cipak, A; Cindric, M; Uchida, K; Waeg, G; Zarkovic, N

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of granulocytes in immune response against cancer is not well understood. Depending on the cytokine milieu in which they act and on their oxidative burst, granulocytes may play either an inhibitory or stimulatory role in tumour growth. Unsaturated fatty acids, essential components of cellular membranes and storage lipids, are susceptible to granulocyte-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS can induce lipid peroxidation (LPO) resulting in the destruction of biomembranes. Thus, murine W256 tumour progressing and tumour regressing animal models were used to study the involvement of plasma inflammatory mediators and oxidative burst of circulating granulocytes in malignant destruction and detrimental tumour growth. The involvement of LPO-derived aldehydes (i.e. acrolein, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and malondialdehyde) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) appearance in the granulocyte anti-cancer response were further evaluated. The results obtained revealed a significant increase in neutrophil elastase in animals with regressing tumour. Furthermore, the presence of MPO in tumour microenvironment was accompanied by the formation of acrolein only 5 h after tumour transplantation and its presence increased during tumour regression. Later, at an early stage of tumour regression, the presence of other LPO-derived aldehydes were also observed. The results obtained suggest that elevated neutrophil elastase and initiation of LPO may play an important role in the tumour development leading to tumour regression. PMID:23039888

  17. Neutrophil Depletion Attenuates Placental Ischemia-Induced Hypertension in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Regal, Jean F.; Lillegard, Kathryn E.; Bauer, Ashley J.; Elmquist, Barbara J.; Loeks-Johnson, Alex C.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is characterized by reduced placental perfusion with placental ischemia and hypertension during pregnancy. Preeclamptic women also exhibit a heightened inflammatory state and greater number of neutrophils in the vasculature compared to normal pregnancy. Since neutrophils are associated with tissue injury and inflammation, we hypothesized that neutrophils are critical to placental ischemia-induced hypertension and fetal demise. Using the reduced uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) model of placental ischemia-induced hypertension in the rat, we determined the effect of neutrophil depletion on blood pressure and fetal resorptions. Neutrophils were depleted with repeated injections of polyclonal rabbit anti-rat polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) antibody (antiPMN). Rats received either antiPMN or normal rabbit serum (Control) on 13.5, 15.5, 17.5, and 18.5 days post conception (dpc). On 14.5 dpc, rats underwent either Sham surgery or clip placement on ovarian arteries and abdominal aorta to reduce uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP). On 18.5 dpc, carotid arterial catheters were placed and mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured on 19.5 dpc. Neutrophil-depleted rats had reduced circulating neutrophils from 14.5 to 19.5 dpc compared to Control, as well as decreased neutrophils in lung and placenta on 19.5 dpc. MAP increased in RUPP Control vs Sham Control rats, and neutrophil depletion attenuated this increase in MAP in RUPP rats without any effect on Sham rats. The RUPP-induced increase in fetal resorptions and complement activation product C3a were not affected by neutrophil depletion. Thus, these data are the first to indicate that neutrophils play an important role in RUPP hypertension and that cells of the innate immune system may significantly contribute to pregnancy-induced hypertension. PMID:26135305

  18. High Throughput Measurement of Extracellular DNA Release and Quantitative NET Formation in Human Neutrophils In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Sil, Payel; Yoo, Dae-Goon; Floyd, Madison; Gingerich, Aaron; Rada, Balazs

    2016-06-18

    Neutrophil granulocytes are the most abundant leukocytes in the human blood. Neutrophils are the first to arrive at the site of infection. Neutrophils developed several antimicrobial mechanisms including phagocytosis, degranulation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs consist of a DNA scaffold decorated with histones and several granule markers including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and human neutrophil elastase (HNE). NET release is an active process involving characteristic morphological changes of neutrophils leading to expulsion of their DNA into the extracellular space. NETs are essential to fight microbes, but uncontrolled release of NETs has been associated with several disorders. To learn more about the clinical relevance and the mechanism of NET formation, there is a need to have reliable tools capable of NET quantitation. Here three methods are presented that can assess NET release from human neutrophils in vitro. The first one is a high throughput assay to measure extracellular DNA release from human neutrophils using a membrane impermeable DNA-binding dye. In addition, two other methods are described capable of quantitating NET formation by measuring levels of NET-specific MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes. These microplate-based methods in combination provide great tools to efficiently study the mechanism and regulation of NET formation of human neutrophils.

  19. Netting neutrophils induce endothelial damage, infiltrate tissues, and expose immunostimulatory molecules in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Eneida; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Berthier, Celine C; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Khandpur, Ritika; Lin, Andrew M; Rubin, Cory J; Zhao, Wenpu; Olsen, Stephen H; Klinker, Matthew; Shealy, David; Denny, Michael F; Plumas, Joel; Chaperot, Laurence; Kretzler, Matthias; Bruce, Allen T; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2011-07-01

    An abnormal neutrophil subset has been identified in the PBMC fractions from lupus patients. We have proposed that these low-density granulocytes (LDGs) play an important role in lupus pathogenesis by damaging endothelial cells and synthesizing increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFNs. To directly establish LDGs as a distinct neutrophil subset, their gene array profiles were compared with those of autologous normal-density neutrophils and control neutrophils. LDGs significantly overexpress mRNA of various immunostimulatory bactericidal proteins and alarmins, relative to lupus and control neutrophils. In contrast, gene profiles of lupus normal-density neutrophils do not differ from those of controls. LDGs have heightened capacity to synthesize neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs), which display increased externalization of bactericidal, immunostimulatory proteins, and autoantigens, including LL-37, IL-17, and dsDNA. Through NETosis, LDGs have increased capacity to kill endothelial cells and to stimulate IFN-α synthesis by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Affected skin and kidneys from lupus patients are infiltrated by netting neutrophils, which expose LL-37 and dsDNA. Tissue NETosis is associated with increased anti-dsDNA in sera. These results expand the potential pathogenic roles of aberrant lupus neutrophils and suggest that dysregulation of NET formation and its subsequent responses may play a prominent deleterious role.

  20. High Throughput Measurement of Extracellular DNA Release and Quantitative NET Formation in Human Neutrophils In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Sil, Payel; Yoo, Dae-Goon; Floyd, Madison; Gingerich, Aaron; Rada, Balazs

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocytes are the most abundant leukocytes in the human blood. Neutrophils are the first to arrive at the site of infection. Neutrophils developed several antimicrobial mechanisms including phagocytosis, degranulation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs consist of a DNA scaffold decorated with histones and several granule markers including myeloperoxidase (MPO) and human neutrophil elastase (HNE). NET release is an active process involving characteristic morphological changes of neutrophils leading to expulsion of their DNA into the extracellular space. NETs are essential to fight microbes, but uncontrolled release of NETs has been associated with several disorders. To learn more about the clinical relevance and the mechanism of NET formation, there is a need to have reliable tools capable of NET quantitation. Here three methods are presented that can assess NET release from human neutrophils in vitro. The first one is a high throughput assay to measure extracellular DNA release from human neutrophils using a membrane impermeable DNA-binding dye. In addition, two other methods are described capable of quantitating NET formation by measuring levels of NET-specific MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes. These microplate-based methods in combination provide great tools to efficiently study the mechanism and regulation of NET formation of human neutrophils. PMID:27404503

  1. Monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils under inflammatory conditions via MKK6 activation

    PubMed Central

    Köffel, René; Meshcheryakova, Anastasia; Warszawska, Joanna; Hennig, Annika; Wagner, Karin; Jörgl, Almut; Gubi, Daniela; Moser, Doris; Hladik, Anastasiya; Hoffmann, Ulrike; Fischer, Michael B.; van den Berg, Wim; Koenders, Marije; Scheinecker, Clemens; Gesslbauer, Bernhard; Knapp, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    During inflammation, neutrophils are rapidly mobilized from the bone marrow storage pool into peripheral blood (PB) to enter lesional sites, where most rapidly undergo apoptosis. Monocytes constitute a second wave of inflammatory immigrates, giving rise to long-lived macrophages and dendritic cell subsets. According to descriptive immunophenotypic and cell culture studies, neutrophils may directly “transdifferentiate” into monocytes/macrophages. We provide mechanistic data in human and murine models supporting the existence of this cellular pathway. First, the inflammatory signal–induced MKK6-p38MAPK cascade activates a monocyte differentiation program in human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor–dependent neutrophils. Second, adoptively transferred neutrophils isolated from G-CSF–pretreated mice rapidly acquired monocyte characteristics in response to inflammatory signals in vivo. Consistently, inflammatory signals led to the recruitment of osteoclast progenitor cell potential from ex vivo–isolated G-CSF–mobilized human blood neutrophils. Monocytic cell differentiation potential was retained in left-shifted band-stage neutrophils but lost in neutrophils from steady-state PB. MKK6-p38MAPK signaling in HL60 model cells led to diminishment of the transcription factor C/EBPα, which enabled the induction of a monocytic cell differentiation program. Gene profiling confirmed lineage conversion from band-stage neutrophils to monocytic cells. Therefore, inflammatory signals relayed by the MKK6-p38MAPK cascade induce monocytic cell differentiation from band-stage neutrophils. PMID:25214442

  2. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A regulates bone marrow granulocyte trafficking during pulmonary inflammatory disease in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Takeshita, W.M.; Gushiken, V.O.; Ferreira-Duarte, A.P.; Pinheiro-Torres, A.S.; Roncalho-Buck, I.A.; Squebola-Cola, D.M.; Mello, G.C.; Anhê, G.F.; Antunes, E.; DeSouza, I.A.

    2015-09-15

    Pulmonary neutrophil infiltration produced by Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) airway exposure is accompanied by marked granulocyte accumulation in bone marrow (BM). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of BM cell accumulation, and trafficking to circulating blood and lung tissue after SEA airway exposure. Male BALB/C mice were intranasally exposed to SEA (1 μg), and at 4, 12 and 24 h thereafter, BM, circulating blood, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue were collected. Adhesion of BM granulocytes and flow cytometry for MAC-1, LFA1-α and VLA-4 and cytokine and/or chemokine levels were assayed after SEA-airway exposure. Prior exposure to SEA promoted a marked PMN influx to BAL and lung tissue, which was accompanied by increased counts of immature and/or mature neutrophils and eosinophils in BM, along with blood neutrophilia. Airway exposure to SEA enhanced BM neutrophil MAC-1 expression, and adhesion to VCAM-1 and/or ICAM-1-coated plates. Elevated levels of GM-CSF, G-CSF, INF-γ, TNF-α, KC/CXCL-1 and SDF-1α were detected in BM after SEA exposure. SEA exposure increased production of eosinopoietic cytokines (eotaxin and IL-5) and BM eosinophil VLA-4 expression, but it failed to affect eosinophil adhesion to VCAM-1 and ICAM-1. In conclusion, BM neutrophil accumulation after SEA exposure takes place by integrated action of cytokines and/or chemokines, enhancing the adhesive responses of BM neutrophils and its trafficking to lung tissues, leading to acute lung injury. BM eosinophil accumulation in SEA-induced acute lung injury may occur via increased eosinopoietic cytokines and VLA-4 expression. - Highlights: • Airway exposure to SEA causes acute lung inflammation. • SEA induces accumulation of bone marrow (BM) in immature and mature neutrophils. • SEA increases BM granulocyte or BM PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, and MAC-1 expression. • SEA induces BM elevations of CXCL-1, INF-γ, TNF-α, GM-CSF, G-CSF and

  3. GRANULOCYTE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR: MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF ACTION DURING STEADY STATE AND ‘EMERGENCY’ HEMATOPOIESIS

    PubMed Central

    Panopoulos, Athanasia D.; Watowich, Stephanie S.

    2008-01-01

    Neutrophils are phagocytes whose principal function is to maintain anti-bacterial immunity. Neutrophils ingest and kill invading bacteria, releasing cytotoxic, chemotactic and inflammatory mediators at sites of infection. This serves to control the immediate host immune response and attract other cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, which are important for establishing long-term adaptive immunity. Neutrophils thus contribute to both the initiation and the maintenance of inflammation at sites of infection. Aberrant neutrophil activity is deleterious; suppressed responses can cause extreme susceptibility to infection while overactivation can lead to excessive inflammation and tissue damage. This review will focus on neutrophil regulation by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), the principal cytokine controlling neutrophil development and function. The review will emphasize the molecular aspects of G-CSF-driven granulopoiesis in steady state (healthy) conditions and during demand-driven or ‘emergency’ conditions elicited by infection or clinical administration of G-CSF. Understanding the molecular control of granulopoiesis will aid in the development of new approaches designed to treat disorders of neutrophil production and function. PMID:18400509

  4. Neutrophils in cancer.

    PubMed

    Treffers, Louise W; Hiemstra, Ida H; Kuijpers, Taco W; van den Berg, Timo K; Matlung, Hanke L

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in cancer. This does not only relate to the well-established prognostic value of the presence of neutrophils, either in the blood or in tumor tissue, in the context of cancer progression or for the monitoring of therapy, but also to their active role in the progression of cancer. In the current review, we describe what is known in general about the role of neutrophils in cancer. What is emerging is a complex, rather heterogeneous picture with both pro- and anti-tumorigenic roles, which apparently differs with cancer type and disease stage. Furthermore, we will discuss the well-known role of neutrophils as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and also on the role of neutrophils as important effector cells during antibody therapy in cancer. It is clear that neutrophils contribute substantially to cancer progression in multiple ways, and this includes both direct effects on the cancer cells and indirect effect on the tumor microenvironment. While in many cases neutrophils have been shown to promote tumor progression, for instance by acting as MDSC, there are also protective effects, particularly when antibody immunotherapy is performed. A better understanding of the role of neutrophils is likely to provide opportunities for immunomodulation and for improving the treatment of cancer patients. PMID:27558343

  5. Age-dependent alterations of Fc gamma receptor-mediated effector functions of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fülöp, T; Fóris, G; Wórum, I; Leövey, A

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the effector functions in polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL), harvested from blood of young and aged healthy subjects of both sexes, were studied. FC gamma-receptor (Fc gamma R)-mediated incorporation of IgG coated 51Cr-HRBC significantly increased in the aged male group, while the phagocytosis of pre-opsonized fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans) was independent of both the age and sex. However, the intracellular killing capacity of neutrophils obtained from aged male subjects significantly decreased toward 51Cr-labelled c. albicans. The antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was also impaired with ageing in both sexes. The age-dependent decrease in the effector functions of PMNL may be explained, among others, by the fact that during yeast cell incorporation the increased cAMP level does not return to the basic level in the old group. On the other hand, the cGMP level which increased in PMNL of aged subjects does not show any progressive increase as in the young subjects, but remains unchanged. The oxidative metabolism producing free radicals being necessary for the effective intracellular killing and ADCC diminished in PMNL of aged subjects of both sexes. The above findings indicate that the adaptation of cyclic nucleotide system and the oxidative burst to the cell activation becomes impaired with ageing. PMID:2994926

  6. Neutrophils in the pathogenesis and manifestations of SLE.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Mariana J

    2011-09-27

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of unclear etiology that affects mostly women of childbearing age. Profound abnormalities in both innate and adaptive immunity triggered by genetic and environmental factors are well documented to play an important part in the pathogenesis of SLE. Nonetheless, the role of neutrophils--the most abundant immune cell type--in the pathology of this disease has been unclear. Over the past decade, compelling evidence has emerged that implicates neutrophils in the initiation and perpetuation of SLE and also in the resultant organ damage frequently observed in patients with this disease. SLE-derived low-density granulocytes (LDGs) induce vascular damage and synthesize increased amounts of type I interferons and, as such, could play a prominent part in the pathogenesis of SLE. Furthermore, increased cell death and enhanced extracellular trap formation observed in SLE-derived neutrophils might have key roles in the induction of autoimmunity and the development of organ damage in patients with SLE. Together, these events could have significant deleterious effects and promote aberrant immune responses in this disease. This Review highlights the role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of SLE, with a particular focus on the putative deleterious effects of LDGs and neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

  7. Myeloperoxidase Stimulates Neutrophil Degranulation.

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A; Vasilyev, V B; Cherenkevich, S N; Panasenko, O M

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase, heme enzyme of azurophilic granules in neutrophils, is released into the extracellular space in the inflammation foci. In neutrophils, it stimulates a dose-dependent release of lactoferrin (a protein of specific granules), lysozyme (a protein of specific and azurophilic granules), and elastase (a protein of azurophilic granules). 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, a potent inhibitor of peroxidase activity of myeloperoxidase, produced no effect on neutrophil degranulation. Using signal transduction inhibitors (genistein, methoxyverapamil, wortmannin, and NiCl2), we demonstrated that myeloperoxidase-induced degranulation of neutrophils resulted from enzyme interaction with the plasma membrane and depends on activation of tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), and calcium signaling. Myeloperoxidase modified by oxidative/halogenation stress (chlorinated and monomeric forms of the enzyme) lost the potency to activate neutrophil degranulation. PMID:27597056

  8. Role of brain transmigrating neutrophils in depression-like behavior during systemic infection.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Valles, A; Aguliar-Valles, A; Kim, J; Jung, S; Woodside, B; Luheshi, G N

    2014-05-01

    Peripheral inflammation induces transmigration of interleukin (IL)-1β-expressing neutrophils to the brain. We investigated the possibility that this presents a new route of immune-to-brain communication by assessing their role in sickness behaviors relevant for mood disorders. Mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) developed despair-like behavior, and administration of an anti-polymorphonuclear antibody abolished LPS-induced despair-like and asocial behaviors, which correlated with the levels of IL-1β expression in the brain. These behavioral changes were directly mediated by the energy-regulating hormone, leptin. Increasing the concentration of endogenous leptin during obesity exacerbated, whereas its neutralization using a specific antiserum attenuated sickness behaviors and importantly the neutrophil transmigrating process. Our results indicate a role for peripheral neutrophils in conveying inflammatory signals to the brain, which appears to be dependent on the energy status of the organism. This constitutes a novel mechanism of immune-to-brain communication relevant to mood disorders.

  9. Improved viability and activity of neutrophils differentiated from HL-60 cells by co-culture with adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yoon Shin; Lim, Goh-Woon; Cho, Kyung-Ah; Woo, So-Youn; Shin, Meeyoung; Yoo, Eun-Sun; Chan Ra, Jeong; Ryu, Kyung-Ha

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of neutrophils with AD-MSC retained cell survival and proliferation and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum starved conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC increased functions of neutrophil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC promoted the viability of neutrophils by enhancing respiratory burst through the expression of IFN-{alpha}, G-CSF, and TGF-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD-MSC can be used to improve immunity for neutropenia treatment. -- Abstract: Neutropenia is a principal complication of cancer treatment. We investigated the supportive effect of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AD-MSCs) on the viability and function of neutrophils. Neutrophils were derived from HL-60 cells by dimethylformamide stimulation and cultured with or without AD-MSCs under serum-starved conditions to evaluate neutrophil survival, proliferation, and function. Serum starvation resulted in the apoptosis of neutrophils and decreased cell survival. The co-culture of neutrophils and AD-MSCs resulted in cell survival and inhibited neutrophil apoptosis under serum-starved conditions. The survival rate of neutrophils was prolonged up to 72 h, and the expression levels of interferon (IFN)-{alpha}, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} in AD-MSCs were increased after co-culture with neutrophils. AD-MSCs promoted the viability of neutrophils by inhibiting apoptosis as well as enhancing respiratory burst, which could potentially be mediated by the increased expression of IFN-{alpha}, G-CSF, and TGF-{beta}. Thus, we conclude that the use of AD-MSCs may be a promising cell-based therapy for increasing immunity by accelerating neutrophil function.

  10. Effects of pyocyanine, a phenazine dye from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, on oxidative burst and bacterial killing in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, P K; Krohn, K; Mühlradt, P F

    1989-01-01

    The effects of pyocyanine (phenazinium, 1-hydroxy-5-methyl-hydroxide, inner salt) on oxidative burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes were studied by several different approaches. In a cell- and enzyme-free system, pyocyanine oxidized NADPH. The reduced pyocyanine could be measured by its reaction with ferricytochrome c. It was shown by this assay that resting as well as phorbol myristate acetate- or zymosan-stimulated granulocytes reduced pyocyanine. The effect was independent of mitochondria, as cytoplasts were similarly active. Measurement of the hexose monophosphate shunt in intact granulocytes in the presence of pyocyanine indicated a concentration-dependent activation of the shunt without the generation of O2-, suggesting that pyocyanine oxidizes NADPH to NADP+ when it enters granulocytes. Intracellular NADPH in granulocytes was indeed lowered by almost 40% after incubation with pyocyanine. It is by this shuttling of reduction equivalents, leading to the partial depletion of NADPH, that pyocyanine affects the observed concentration-dependent partial inhibition of the phorbol myristate acetate- and zymosan-stimulated generation of O2-. A further consequence was that the intracellular killing of Staphylococcus aureus was also partially suppressed, particularly at higher loads of granulocytes with bacteria. Phagocytosis was not inhibited by pyocyanine concentrations as high as 500 microM. Pyocyanine did not affect the intracellular killing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The possible relevance of these findings to the course of mixed hospital infections in immunocompromised patients is discussed. PMID:2547716

  11. Granulocytic ehrlichiosis in dogs from North Carolina and Virginia.

    PubMed

    Goldman, E E; Breitschwerdt, E B; Grindem, C B; Hegarty, B C; Walls, J J; Dumler, J S

    1998-01-01

    Medical records of 3 dogs from North Carolina and 3 dogs from Virginia with ehrlichial morulae in circulating neutrophils were studied retrospectively. Two clinically distinct disease syndromes, including chronic, moderate to severe anemia (n = 3) and polyarthritis (n = 2) were associated with canine granulocytic ehrlichiosis (CGE) in these dogs. One dog was clinically healthy, and abnormalities were not detected during physical examination. Clinical signs were nonspecific and included fever, lethargy, anorexia, vomiting, and diarrhea. The most frequent laboratory abnormalities were normocytic normochromic nonregenerative anemia, moderate thrombocytopenia with large platelets, lymphopenia, and eosinopenia. Considerable variability was found in the serologic responses to Ehrlichia equi, Ehrlichia canis, and Ehrlichia chaffeensis antigens among the 5 dogs for which stored sera were available for indirect fluorescent antibody testing. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of portions of the 16S rRNA gene from blood (collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) of 1 severely anemic dog (dog 3) and 1 polyarthritic dog (dog 4) resulted in DNA sequences nearly identical to the GenBank accessions for Ehrlichia ewingii. The DNA sequence from a 3rd dog (dog 5) was most similar to that of E. canis. Serologic or molecular results support the possibility of E. ewingii, E. equi, and E. canis coinfection or serologic cross-reactivity among canine granulocytic and monocytic Ehrlichia species in dogs from North Carolina and Virginia. Variability in response to tetracycline or doxycycline treatment was noted in these dogs, with more rapid resolution of signs in dogs with polyarthritis. We report the 1st cases of CGE in dogs from North Carolina and Virginia, including recognition of CGE in a healthy dog.

  12. Cyclic oscillation of blood neutrophils in a patient with multiple myeloma

    SciTech Connect

    Chikkappa, G.; Chanana, A.D.; Chandra, P.; Cronkite, E.P.; Thompson, K.H.

    1980-01-01

    A patient with multiple myeloma developed periodic blood neutropenia (periodicity of 15 to 25 days) after 3 yr of intermittent treatment with cytotoxic agents. Peaks of serum colony-stimulating activity (CSA) level coincided with valleys of blood neutrophils. Fraction of marrow neutrophils in the multiplicative pool was high during blood neutrophil valleys and low during neutrophil peaks. In contrast, the maturation storage pool exhibited the reverse pattern. An increased fraction of marrow neutrophilic cells in the multiplicative pool was in active proliferation during a blood neutrophil valley and a decreased fraction during a blood neutrophil peak. These findings suggest that the marrow granulopoiesis was regulated through CSA. The defect causing the periodicity was probably related to the reduced number of neutrophils in the marrow maturation storge pool, which in turn may be related to a reduced and/or defective granulocytic stem cell pool size consiquent to the long-term administration of cytotoxic drugs and/or infiltration of the marrow by myeloma cells.

  13. Recovery of neutrophil apoptosis by ectoine: a new strategy against lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sydlik, Ulrich; Peuschel, Henrike; Paunel-Görgülü, Adnana; Keymel, Stefanie; Krämer, Ursula; Weissenberg, Alexander; Kroker, Matthias; Seghrouchni, Samira; Heiss, Christian; Windolf, Joachim; Bilstein, Andreas; Kelm, Malte; Krutmann, Jean; Unfried, Klaus

    2013-02-01

    The life span of neutrophilic granulocytes has a determining impact on the intensity and duration of neutrophil driven lung inflammation. Based on the compatible solute ectoine, we aimed to prevent anti-apoptotic reactions in neutrophils triggered by the inflammatory microenvironment in the lung. Neutrophils from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and control individuals were exposed to inflammatory mediators and xenobiotics in the presence or absence of ectoine. The in vivo relevance of this approach was tested in xenobiotic-induced lung inflammation in rats. The reduction of apoptosis rates of ex vivo-exposed neutrophils from all study groups was significantly restored in the presence of ectoine. However, natural apoptosis rates not altered by inflammatory stimuli were not changed by ectoine. Mechanistic analyses demonstrated the preventive effect of ectoine on the induction of anti-apoptotic signalling. Neutrophilic lung inflammation induced by single or multiple expositions of animals to environmental particles was reduced after the therapeutic intervention with ectoine. Analyses of neutrophils from bronchoalveolar lavage indicate that the in vivo effect is due to the restoration of neutrophil apoptosis. Ectoine, a compound of the highly compliant group of compatible solutes, demonstrates a reproducible and robust effect on the resolution of lung inflammation.

  14. Influence of sublingual immunotherapy on the expression of Mac-1 integrin in neutrophils from asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Ciepiela, Olga; Zawadzka-Krajewska, Anna; Kotula, Iwona; Pyrzak, Beata; Demkow, Urszula

    2013-01-01

    Asthma can be effectively treated with sublingual immunotherapy. The influence of -sublingual immunotherapy on the function of granulocytes in asthmatic patients is largely unknown. Mac-1 integrin is a transmembrane protein containing α (CD11b) and β (CD18) chains. High expression of the complex is found on the surface of neutrophils, NK cells, and macrophages. CD11b/CD18 may bind to CD23, ICAM-1, ICAM-2, and ICAM-4. It plays a crucial role in diapedesis of neutrophils. The aim of the present study was to assess Mac-1 expression on neutrophils from asthmatic children before and after sublingual immunotherapy. Twenty five children aged of 8.1 ± 3.1 suffering from atopic asthma and allergic rhinitis, shortlisted for specific immunotherapy, served as the study group. Fifteen healthy individuals, aged 9.8 ± 3.4, served as a control group. The assessment of CD11b and CD18 expression on cells from peripheral blood was performed with a flow cytometer. The tests were performed before and after 12 months of sublingual immunotherapy. In the asthmatic children, 98.08 (90.79-99.12)% of Mac-1 positive neutrophils were detected. The group was divided into two subgroups: of more than 98% and less than 95% of neutrophils with CD11b/CD18 expression in the sample. After immunotherapy, the percentage of Mac-1 positive granulocytes increased to 99.60 (99.29-99.68)%, p = 0.01. In the control group, 90.56 (87.08-88.86)% granulocytes were Mac-1 positive, p = 0.002. We conclude that sublingual immunotherapy strongly influences the function of the immunological system, including Mac-1 expression on neutrophils.

  15. Plasma myeloperoxidase level and polymorphonuclear leukocyte activation in horses suffering from large intestinal obstruction requiring surgery: preliminary results.

    PubMed Central

    Grulke, S; Benbarek, H; Caudron, I; Deby-Dupont, G; Mathy-Hartert, M; Farnir, F; Deby, C; Lamy, M; Serteyn, D

    1999-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a specific enzyme of neutrophil azurophilic granules with a strong oxidative activity. Thanks to a radioimmunoassay of equine myeloperoxidase, the authors have observed a significantly higher plasma level of MPO in horses operated for strangulation obstruction of the large intestine (n = 6) than in horses suffering from a non-strangulating displacement of the large intestine (n = 9). For the 2 groups, 3 phases were distinguished: reception (P1), intensive care (P2) and terminal phase (P3). The mean peak values of MPO for these phases were 121.6 ng/mL (P1), 168.6 ng/mL (P2), and 107.0 ng/mL (P3) for the non-strangulating group, and 242.6 ng/mL (P1); 426.0 ng/mL (P2), and 379.5 ng/mL (P3) for the strangulation group. The variations of the mean peak values of plasma MPO were significantly different between the 2 groups and between the different phases. A significant increase of the least square means of MPO was observed between P1 and P2. A significant decrease of the least square means of the number of circulating leukocytes was observed between P1 and P3. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation could play a major role in the pathogenesis of acute abdominal disease and endotoxic shock. PMID:10369573

  16. Poly(ethylene glycol)-containing hydrogels modulate α-defensin release from polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocyte recruitment.

    PubMed

    Lieberthal, Tyler Jacob; Cohen, Hannah Caitlin; Kao, W John

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) release granule proteins as the first line of defense against bacteria and set up chemotactic gradients that result in monocyte infiltration to the site of injury. Although well established, the role of biomaterials in regulating adherent PMN degranulation and subsequent PMN-monocyte paracrine interactions is less clear. The aim of this study was to determine how biomaterials affect the degranulation of selected biomarkers and downstream monocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-containing hydrogels (PEG and an interpenetrating network of PEG and gelatin) promote the release of the α-defensins human neutrophil peptides 1-3, but not azurocidin or monocyte chemotactic protein-1. Although human neutrophil peptides 1-3 are monocyte chemoattractants, no subsequent effects on monocyte transmigration are observed in static conditions. Under flow conditions, monocyte adhesion on human umbilical vein endothelial cells stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-α is elevated in the presence of granule proteins from PMNs adherent on polydimethylsiloxane, but not from PMNs cultured on PEG hydrogels. These results suggest that PEG promotes PMN antimicrobial capacity without enhanced monocyte recruitment.

  17. Clinically effective monoclonal antibody 3F8 mediates nonoxidative lysis of human neuroectodermal tumor cells by polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Kushner, B H; Cheung, N K

    1991-09-15

    Most studies of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) have supported oxidative lytic processes. This may be because the studies used nonhuman or nonneoplastic cells that were highly sensitive to reactive oxygen species or were small enough to be phagocytosed by PMN. We therefore investigated whether oxygen radicals participate in PMN cytotoxicity toward human neuroectodermal solid tumor cells sensitized by 3F8, which is an anti-ganglioside GD2 murine IgG3 monoclonal antibody with documented anticancer activity in humans. A 4-h 51Cr release assay was used to assess tumor cell lysis by hydrogen peroxide, superoxide, and hypochlorite. Nine of 11 GD2(+) human melanoma and neuroblastoma cell lines had equal or greater resistance to these oxidants as compared to a GD2(-) human carcinoma line (SKBr1-III) found by others (and confirmed by us) to be significantly more resistant to oxidative lysis than a murine cell line (P388D1) representative of those commonly used in cytotoxicity assays. To facilitate detection of oxidant-mediated lysis, subsequent studies of 3F8-mediated ADCC used GD2(+) targets that were relatively sensitive and others that were relatively resistant to oxygen radicals. Normal PMN and PMN obtained from children with chronic granulomatous disease, which do not generate reactive oxygen species, were equally effective in ADCC. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, which primes oxidative responses of normal but not of chronic granulomatous disease PMN, enhanced ADCC by both kinds of PMN. During ADCC of 3F8-sensitized targets, with or without granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, GD2(-) "innocent bystander" tumor cells (including P388D1) were not lysed, a finding consistent with unimportant extracellular release of cytotoxic mediators. Finally, antioxidant and antimyeloperoxidase moieties did not block ADCC. We conclude that oxidants are not key factors in 3F8-mediated lysis by PMN of

  18. The lymph node neutrophil.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Henry R; Chtanova, Tatyana

    2016-04-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs provide a specialized microenvironment tailored to foster communication between cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. These interactions allow immune cells to coordinate multilayered defense against pathogens. Until recently dendritic cells and macrophages were thought to comprise the main innate immune cell subsets responsible for delivering signals that drive the adaptive immune response, while the function of neutrophils was largely confined to the innate immune system. However, the discovery of neutrophils in lymph nodes has raised the question of whether neutrophils might play a more extensive role not only in innate immunity per se, but also in coordinating the interactions between innate and adaptive immune responses. In this review we discuss the mechanisms and consequences of neutrophil recruitment to lymph nodes and how this recruitment influences subsequent immune responses both in situ and at distant sites. PMID:27025975

  19. Metabolic regulation of neutrophil spreading, membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes) formation and intracellular pH upon adhesion to fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Galkina, Svetlana I. . E-mail: galkina@genebee.msu.su; Sud'ina, Galina F.; Klein, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Circulating leukocytes have a round cell shape and roll along vessel walls. However, metabolic disorders can lead them to adhere to the endothelium and spread (flatten). We studied the metabolic regulation of adhesion, spreading and intracellular pH (pHi) of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes) upon adhesion to fibronectin-coated substrata. Resting neutrophils adhered and spread on fibronectin. An increase in pHi accompanied neutrophil spreading. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation or inhibition of P- and F-type ATPases affected neither neutrophil spreading nor pHi. Inhibition of glucose metabolism or V-ATPase impaired neutrophil spreading, blocked the increase in the pHi and induced extrusion of membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes), anchoring cells to substrata. Omission of extracellular Na{sup +} and inhibition of chloride channels caused a similar effect. We propose that these tubulovesicular extensions represent protrusions of exocytotic trafficking, supplying the plasma membrane of neutrophils with ion exchange mechanisms and additional membrane for spreading. Glucose metabolism and V-type ATPase could affect fusion of exocytotic trafficking with the plasma membrane, thus controlling neutrophil adhesive state and pHi. Cl{sup -} efflux through chloride channels and Na{sup +} influx seem to be involved in the regulation of the V-ATPase by carrying out charge compensation for the proton-pumping activity and through V-ATPase in regulation of neutrophil spreading and pHi.

  20. Inhibitory effect of curcuminoids and tetrahydrocurcuminoids on equine activated neutrophils and myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Franck, T; Kohnen, S; Grulke, S; Neven, P; Goutman, Y; Peters, F; Pirotte, B; Deby-Dupont, G; Serteyn, D

    2008-01-01

    In the horse, the inflammation response to various pathologies (intestinal strangulations, laminitis, etc.) involves an excessive stimulation of the polymorphonuclear neutrophils releasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). The aim of the present work was to study the effect of natural polyphenols, curcuminoids and tetrahydrocurcuminoids (THC) on isolated stimulated equine neutrophils and on the activity of purified MPO. The ROS production and the release of MPO by activated neutrophils were measured by chemiluminescence and ELISA techniques, respectively. The activity of purified MPO was measured by studying its nitration, chlorination or oxidation capacity and by using an original method called SIEFED allowing the study of drug interaction with the enzyme without interferences of the medium. Curcuminoids and THC had dose-dependent inhibitory effects on ROS production and MPO release by activated neutrophils and on purified MPO activity. We suggest that the higher efficacy of curcuminoids versus THC could be explained, at least partially, by its chemical structure: the conjugated double bounds and the plane structure of curcuminoids made easier the neutralization of the radical species generated by activated neutrophils and the interaction of the drug with the active site of MPO. These inhibitory effects of curcuminoids on the oxidant activity of equine neutrophils and on MPO activity open therapeutic perspectives in equine pathologies with excessive inflammatory reactions.

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis infection of oral epithelium inhibits neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    PubMed Central

    Madianos, P N; Papapanou, P N; Sandros, J

    1997-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are inflammatory disorders caused by microorganisms of dental plaque that colonize the gingival sulcus and, subsequently, the periodontal pocket. As in other mucosal infections, the host response to plaque bacteria is characterized by an influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to the gingival crevice. Neutrophil migration through the epithelial lining of the gingival pocket is thought to be the first line of defense against plaque bacteria. In order to model this phenomenon in vitro, we used the oral epithelial cell line KB and human PMNs in the Transwell system and examined the impact of Porphyromonas gingivalis-epithelial cell interactions on subsequent PMN transepithelial migration. We demonstrate here that P. gingivalis infection of oral epithelial cells failed to trigger transmigration of PMNs. Furthermore, it significantly inhibited neutrophil transmigration actively induced by stimuli such as N-formylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine, interleukin-8 (IL-8), and the intestinal pathogen enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. The ability of P. gingivalis to block PMN transmigration was strongly positively correlated with the ability to adhere to and invade epithelial cells. In addition, P. gingivalis attenuated the production of IL-8 and the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 by epithelial cells. The ability of P. gingivalis to block neutrophil migration across an intact epithelial barrier may critically impair the potential of the host to confront the bacterial challenge and thus may play an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. PMID:9316996

  2. Neutrophil dynamics in the blood and milk of crossbred cows naturally infected with Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Dilip K.; Kushwah, Mohar Singh; Kaur, Mandheer; Dang, Ajay K.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was designed to evaluate the neutrophil dynamics in terms of the functional competence during subclinical mastitis (SCM) and clinical mastitis (CM). Materials and Methods: A total of 146 Karan fries cows were screened and were divided into three groups as control (n=12), SCM, n=12 and CM, n=12 groups on the basis of California mastitis test scoring, bacteriological evaluation, gross and morphological changes in milk and by counting milk somatic cell count (SCC). Both blood and milk polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) were isolated in the study. Phagocytic activity (PA) was studied by spectrophotometrically; neutrophil extracelluar traps (NETs) were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); CD44 was quantified by flow cytometry and apoptosis was studied by fluorescent microscopy. Results: Significantly (p<0.05) higher SCC, PA was found in milk of CM cows as compared to SCM and control cows. Significantly lower (p<0.05) apoptosis was observed in PMNs isolated from both blood and milk of CM group of cows when compared to control and SCM group. The milk neutrophils of CM group of cows formed NETs as evidenced from the SEM images. Surface expression of CD44 revealed a significantly (p<0.05) lower expression in milk neutrophils of CM group of cows when compared to SCM and control group of cows. Conclusion: The study indicated a positive correlation between delayed neutrophil apoptosis, persistent staying of neutrophils at the site of infection along with formation of NETs as the strategies to fight against the pathogens in the udder during Staphylococcal mastitis. The study forms a strong base for future molecular research in terms of neutrophil recruitment and neutrophil removal from the site of infection. PMID:27047094

  3. Marked alterations of neutrophil functions during sepsis-induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Demaret, Julie; Venet, Fabienne; Friggeri, Arnaud; Cazalis, Marie-Angélique; Plassais, Jonathan; Jallades, Laurent; Malcus, Christophe; Poitevin-Later, Françoise; Textoris, Julien; Lepape, Alain; Monneret, Guillaume

    2015-12-01

    Severe septic syndromes deeply impair innate and adaptive immunity and are responsible for sepsis-induced immunosuppression. Although neutrophils represent the first line of defense against infection, little is known about their phenotype and functions a few days after sepsis, when the immunosuppressive phase is maximal (i.e., between d 3 and 8). The objective of the present study was to perform, for the first time, a global evaluation of neutrophil alterations in immunosuppressed septic patients (at d 3-4 and d 6-8) using phenotypic and functional studies. In addition, the potential association of these parameters and deleterious outcomes was assessed. Peripheral blood was collected from 43 septic shock patients and compared with that of 23 healthy controls. In the septic patients, our results highlight a markedly altered neutrophil chemotaxis (functional and chemokine receptor expressions), oxidative burst, and lactoferrin content and an increased number of circulating immature granulocytes (i.e., CD10(dim)CD16(dim)). These aspects were associated with an increased risk of death after septic shock. In contrast, phagocytosis and activation capacities were conserved. To conclude, circulating neutrophils present with phenotypic, functional, and morphologic alterations a few days after sepsis onset. These dysfunctions might participate in the deleterious role of sepsis-induced immunosuppression. The present results open new perspectives in the mechanisms favoring nosocomial infections after septic shock. They deserve to be further investigated in a larger clinical study and in animal models recapitulating these alterations. PMID:26224052

  4. Hemopathologic consequences of protracted gamma irradiation: alterations in granulocyte reserves and granulocyte mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.; Cullen, S.M.; Kaspar, L.V.; Tolle, D.V.; Fritz, T.E.

    1980-07-01

    Aplastic anemia and myelogenous leukemia are prominent pathologic effects in beagles exposed to continuous, daily, low-dose gamma irradiation. In the present work, granulocyte reserves and related mobilization functions have been sequentially assessed by the endotoxin stress assay during the preclinical and clinical phases of these hemopoietic disorders. Characteristic patterns of granulocyte reserve mobilization are described that reflect given stages of pathologic progression. For radiation-induced leukemia, a five-stage pattern has been proposed. In contrast, a simple pattern of progressive, time-dependent contraction of granulocyte reserves and mobilization capacity was noted in the development of terminal aplastic anemia. Early preclinical phases of radiation-induced leukemia appear to involve an extensive depletion of the granulocyte reserves (phase I) during the first approx. 200 days of exposure followed by a partial renewal of the reserves and associated mobilization functions between approx. 200 and 400 days (phase II). Sustained, subnormal granulocyte mobilizations (phase III) following endotoxin stress typify the responses of dogs during the intermediate phase, whereas late preclinical, preleukemic stages (phase IV) are characterized by a further expansion of the reserves and in the mobilization capacities, particularly of the less mature granulocytes. Such late alterations in the pattern of granulocyte mobilization, together with other noted cellular aberrancies in the peripheral blood and marrow, appear to indicate leukemia (phase V) onset.

  5. Neutrophil swarming: an essential process of the neutrophil tissue response.

    PubMed

    Kienle, Korbinian; Lämmermann, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil infiltration into inflamed and infected tissues is a fundamental process of the innate immune response. While neutrophil interactions with the blood vessel wall have been intensely studied over the last decades, neutrophil dynamics beyond the vasculature have for a long time remained poorly investigated. Recent intravital microscopy studies of neutrophil populations directly at the site of tissue damage or microbial invasion have changed our perspective on neutrophil responses within tissues. Swarm-like migration patterns of neutrophils, referred to as 'neutrophil swarming', have been detected in diverse tissues under conditions of sterile inflammation and infection with various pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and parasites. Current work has begun to unravel the molecular pathways choreographing the sequential phases of highly coordinated chemotaxis followed by neutrophil accumulation and the formation of substantial neutrophil clusters. It is now clear that intercellular communication among neutrophils amplifies their recruitment in a feed-forward manner, which provides them with a level of self-organization during neutrophil swarming. This review will summarize recent developments and current concepts on neutrophil swarming, an important process of the neutrophil tissue response with a critical role in maintaining the balance between host protection and inflammation-driven tissue destruction. PMID:27558329

  6. Cytotoxic immigration of granulocytes into megakaryocytes as a late consequence of irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, W.; Alabi, R.; Nothdurft, W.; Fliedner, T.M.

    1994-05-01

    The immigration of neutrophilic granulocytes into megakaryocyte was studied in the bone marrow of normal and X-irradiated beagle under various exposure conditions. Two groups of dogs received homogeneous total-body irradiation. One group received a dose of 1.6 Gy and the other received a dose of 2.4 Gy (midline tissue). A third group was irradiated from the left side of the body only. This exposure resulted in an inhomogeneous total-body irradiation (entrance dose 3.8 Gy, exit dose 0.9 Gy). A fourth group of animals received partial-body irradiation with a dose of 11.7 Gy delivered to the anterior two-thirds of the body, thereby subjecting about 70% of the hemopoietic marrow to irradiation. Dogs of a fifth group remained unexposed to irradiation and served as controls. The marrow was analyzed in sections of the ribs approximately 1 year after irradiation. The total number of megakaryocytes in one section was evaluated. The number of megakaryocytes showing granulocytes in their cytoplasm was determined and expressed as a percentage. This phenomenon can be explained as cytotoxic immigration of granulocytes into megakaryocytes. It was observed in approximately 1-2 of the megakaryocytes in the marrow of normal dogs. One year after irradiation the value increased of normal dogs. One year after irradiation the value increased to 10-26%. It was observed that neutrophilic granuloytes penetrated only into the large mature megakaryocytes in which the nuclei were most pyknotic. This phenomenon may be considered as a late effect of irradiation. 15 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte motility in men with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, C T; Fennell, M; Brewerton, D A

    1989-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) response to a chemotactic or chemokinetic stimulus is enhanced in men with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This effect does not parallel the severity of disease activity or the size of the acute phase response, and it is independent of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment. Polymorph function is normal in HLA-B27 positive brothers of probands with AS and in other HLA-B27 positive individuals in the absence of disease. Polymorph motility is also normal in patients with psoriasis vulgaris or Crohn's disease, indicating that enhanced PMN motility is not a non-specific consequence of all inflammatory disorders. PMID:2784306

  8. Are soluble factors relevant for polymorphonuclear leukocyte dysregulation in septicemia?

    PubMed Central

    Wenisch, C; Graninger, W

    1995-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) of twelve patients with gram-negative septicemia exhibited a decreased capacity to phagocytize Escherichia coli and generate reactive oxygen products which normalized within 7 days of treatment. Ex vivo exchange of plasma from age-, sex-, and blood-group-identical normal controls resulted in an increase of both phagocytic capacity and reactive oxygen intermediate generation in PMNs of septicemic patients and transiently reduced phagocytosis and reactive oxygen intermediate production in PMNs of normal controls. These results suggest that extrinsic factors are crucial for PMN function. PMID:7697538

  9. Interaction of Bovine Peripheral Blood Polymorphonuclear Cells and Leptospira Species; Innate Responses in the Natural Bovine Reservoir Host

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Welder, Jennifer H.; Frank, Ami T.; Hornsby, Richard L.; Olsen, Steven C.; Alt, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Cattle are the reservoir hosts of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo, and can also be reservoir hosts of other Leptospira species such as L. kirschneri, and Leptospira interrogans. As a reservoir host, cattle shed Leptospira, infecting other animals, including humans. Previous studies with human and murine neutrophils have shown activation of neutrophil extracellular trap or NET formation, and upregulation of inflammatory mediators by neutrophils in the presence of Leptospira. Humans, companion animals and most widely studied models of Leptospirosis are of acute infection, hallmarked by systemic inflammatory response, neutrophilia, and septicemia. In contrast, cattle exhibit chronic infection with few outward clinical signs aside from reproductive failure. Taking into consideration that there is host species variation in innate immunity, especially in pathogen recognition and response, the interaction of bovine peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) and several Leptospira strains was evaluated. Studies including bovine-adapted strains, human pathogen strains, a saprophyte and inactivated organisms. Incubation of PMNs with Leptospira did induce slight activation of neutrophil NETs, greater than unstimulated cells but less than the quantity from E. coli P4 stimulated PMNs. Very low but significant from non-stimulated, levels of reactive oxygen peroxides were produced in the presence of all Leptospira strains and E. coli P4. Similarly, significant levels of reactive nitrogen intermediaries (NO2) was produced from PMNs when incubated with the Leptospira strains and greater quantities in the presence of E. coli P4. PMNs incubated with Leptospira induced RNA transcripts of IL-1β, MIP-1α, and TNF-α, with greater amounts induced by live organisms when compared to heat-inactivated leptospires. Transcript for inflammatory cytokine IL-8 was also induced, at similar levels regardless of Leptospira strain or viability. However, incubation of Leptospira strains

  10. Interaction of Bovine Peripheral Blood Polymorphonuclear Cells and Leptospira Species; Innate Responses in the Natural Bovine Reservoir Host.

    PubMed

    Wilson-Welder, Jennifer H; Frank, Ami T; Hornsby, Richard L; Olsen, Steven C; Alt, David P

    2016-01-01

    Cattle are the reservoir hosts of Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Hardjo, and can also be reservoir hosts of other Leptospira species such as L. kirschneri, and Leptospira interrogans. As a reservoir host, cattle shed Leptospira, infecting other animals, including humans. Previous studies with human and murine neutrophils have shown activation of neutrophil extracellular trap or NET formation, and upregulation of inflammatory mediators by neutrophils in the presence of Leptospira. Humans, companion animals and most widely studied models of Leptospirosis are of acute infection, hallmarked by systemic inflammatory response, neutrophilia, and septicemia. In contrast, cattle exhibit chronic infection with few outward clinical signs aside from reproductive failure. Taking into consideration that there is host species variation in innate immunity, especially in pathogen recognition and response, the interaction of bovine peripheral blood polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) and several Leptospira strains was evaluated. Studies including bovine-adapted strains, human pathogen strains, a saprophyte and inactivated organisms. Incubation of PMNs with Leptospira did induce slight activation of neutrophil NETs, greater than unstimulated cells but less than the quantity from E. coli P4 stimulated PMNs. Very low but significant from non-stimulated, levels of reactive oxygen peroxides were produced in the presence of all Leptospira strains and E. coli P4. Similarly, significant levels of reactive nitrogen intermediaries (NO2) was produced from PMNs when incubated with the Leptospira strains and greater quantities in the presence of E. coli P4. PMNs incubated with Leptospira induced RNA transcripts of IL-1β, MIP-1α, and TNF-α, with greater amounts induced by live organisms when compared to heat-inactivated leptospires. Transcript for inflammatory cytokine IL-8 was also induced, at similar levels regardless of Leptospira strain or viability. However, incubation of Leptospira strains

  11. NET formation induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis isolates measured as release of myeloperoxidase-DNA and neutrophil elastase-DNA complexes.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Dae-goon; Floyd, Madison; Winn, Matthew; Moskowitz, Samuel M; Rada, Balázs

    2014-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease is characterized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and recruitment of neutrophil granulocytes. Neutrophil granule components (myeloperoxidase (MPO), human neutrophil elastase (HNE)), extracellular DNA and P. aeruginosa can all be found in the CF respiratory tract and have all been associated with worsening CF lung function. Pseudomonas-induced formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) offers a likely mechanism for release of MPO, HNE and DNA from neutrophils. NETs are composed of a DNA backbone decorated with granule proteins like MPO and HNE. Here we sought to examine whether CF clinical isolates of Pseudomonas are capable of inducing NET release from human neutrophil granulocytes. We used two methods to quantify NETs. We modified a previously employed ELISA that detects MPO-DNA complexes and established a new HNE-DNA ELISA. We show that these methods reliably quantify MPO-DNA and HNE-DNA complexes, measures of NET formation. We have found that CF isolates of P. aeruginosa stimulate robust respiratory burst and NET release in human neutrophils. By comparing paired "early" and "late" bacterial isolates obtained from the same CF patient we have found that early isolates induced significantly more NET release than late isolates. Our data support that Pseudomonas-induced NET release represents an important mechanism for release of neutrophil-derived CF inflammatory mediators, and confirm that decreased induction of NET formation is required for long-term adaptation of P. aeruginosa to CF airways.

  12. Clostridium perfringens α-Toxin Impairs Innate Immunity via Inhibition of Neutrophil Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Takehara, Masaya; Takagishi, Teruhisa; Seike, Soshi; Ohtani, Kaori; Kobayashi, Keiko; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Shimizu, Tohru; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Although granulopoiesis is accelerated to suppress bacteria during infection, some bacteria can still cause life-threatening infections, but the mechanism behind this remains unclear. In this study, we found that mature neutrophils in bone marrow cells (BMCs) were decreased in C. perfringens-infected mice and also after injection of virulence factor α-toxin. C. perfringens infection interfered with the replenishment of mature neutrophils in the peripheral circulation and the accumulation of neutrophils at C. perfringens-infected sites in an α-toxin-dependent manner. Measurements of bacterial colony-forming units in C. perfringens-infected muscle revealed that α-toxin inhibited a reduction in the load of C. perfringens. In vitro treatment of isolated BMCs with α-toxin (phospholipase C) revealed that α-toxin directly decreased mature neutrophils. α-Toxin did not influence the viability of isolated mature neutrophils, while simultaneous treatment of BMCs with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor attenuated the reduction of mature neutrophils by α-toxin. Together, our results illustrate that impairment of the innate immune system by the inhibition of neutrophil differentiation is crucial for the pathogenesis of C. perfringens to promote disease to a life-threatening infection, which provides new insight to understand how pathogenic bacteria evade the host immune system. PMID:27306065

  13. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes inhibit Aspergillus fumigatus conidial growth by lactoferrin-mediated iron depletion.

    PubMed

    Zarember, Kol A; Sugui, Janyce A; Chang, Yun C; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Gallin, John I

    2007-05-15

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a common mold, rarely infects humans, except during prolonged neutropenia or in cases of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the NADPH oxidase that normally produces fungicidal reactive oxygen species. Filamentous hyphae of Aspergillus are killed by normal, but not CGD polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN); however, the few studies on PMN-mediated host defenses against infectious conidia (spores) of this organism have yielded conflicting results, some showing that PMN do not inhibit conidial growth, with others showing that they do, most likely using reactive oxygen species. Given that CGD patients are exposed daily to hundreds of viable A. fumigatus conidia, yet considerable numbers of them survive years without infection, we reasoned that PMN use ROS-independent mechanisms to combat Aspergillus. We show that human PMN from both normal controls and CGD patients are equipotent at arresting the growth of Aspergillus conidia in vitro, indicating the presence of a reactive oxygen species-independent factor(s). Cell-free supernatants of degranulated normal and CGD neutrophils both suppressed fungal growth and were found to be rich in lactoferrin, an abundant PMN secondary granule protein. Purified iron-poor lactoferrin at concentrations occurring in PMN supernatants (and reported in human mucosal secretions in vivo) decreased fungal growth, whereas saturation of lactoferrin or PMN supernatants with iron, or testing in the presence of excess iron in the form of ferritin, completely abolished activity against conidia. These results demonstrate that PMN lactoferrin sequestration of iron is important for host defense against Aspergillus. PMID:17475866

  14. The effect of an NADH oxidase inhibitor (hydrocortisone) on polymorphonuclear leukocyte bactericidal activity

    PubMed Central

    Mandell, Gerald L.; Rubin, Walter; Hook, Edward W.

    1970-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from patients with chronic granulomatous disease of childhood have impaired bactericidal activity and are deficient in diphosphopyridine nucleotide, reduced form of, (NADH) oxidase. Since hydrocortisone had been shown to inhibit NADH oxidation, experiments were undertaken to determine the effect of hydrocortisone on several parameters of human PMN function. The phagocytic and bactericidal capacity of PMN with or without hydrocortisone (2.1 mM) was determined by quantitation of cell-free, cell-associated, and total bacteria. Phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus and several gram-negative rods was unimpaired by the presence of hydrocortisone in the media. In contrast, killing of bacteria was markedly impaired by hydrocortisone. After 30 min of incubation, there were 20-400 times as many bacteria surviving in hydrocortisone-treated PMN as in simultaneously run controls without hydrocortisone. The defect of intracellular killing noted in the presence of hydrocortisone was not related to impaired degranulation. Quantitative kinetic studies of degranulation revealed no difference in the release of granule associated acid phosphatase in hydrocortisone-treated and control PMN after phagocytosis. Electron microscopy of PMN also indicated that the presence of hydrocortisone had no effect on the extent of degranulation after phagocytosis. These observations were confirmed by studies using histochemical techniques to detect lysosomal enzymes. After phagocytosis, hydrocortisone-treated PMN demonstrated less NADH oxidase activity, oxygen consumption, and hydrogen peroxide production than postphagocytic control PMN. In addition, Nitro blue tetrazolium dye reduction was diminished in hydrocortisone-treated PMN. Thus, impairment of NADH oxidase activity in normal human PMN by hydrocortisone results in reduced intracellular killing of bacteria, diminished postphagocytic oxygen consumption, decreased ability to reduce Nitro blue tetrazolium, and

  15. Genetically Determined Susceptibility to Tuberculosis in Mice Causally Involves Accelerated and Enhanced Recruitment of Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Christine; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Lang, Roland; Brandau, Sven; Hermann, Corinna; Ehlers, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Classical twin studies and recent linkage analyses of African populations have revealed a potential involvement of host genetic factors in susceptibility or resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In order to identify the candidate genes involved and test their causal implication, we capitalized on the mouse model of tuberculosis, since inbred mouse strains also differ substantially in their susceptibility to infection. Two susceptible and two resistant mouse strains were aerogenically infected with 1,000 CFU of M. tuberculosis, and the regulation of gene expression was examined by Affymetrix GeneChip U74A array with total lung RNA 2 and 4 weeks postinfection. Four weeks after infection, 96 genes, many of which are involved in inflammatory cell recruitment and activation, were regulated in common. One hundred seven genes were differentially regulated in susceptible mouse strains, whereas 43 genes were differentially expressed only in resistant mice. Data mining revealed a bias towards the expression of genes involved in granulocyte pathophysiology in susceptible mice, such as an upregulation of those for the neutrophil chemoattractant LIX (CXCL5), interleukin 17 receptor, phosphoinositide kinase 3 delta, or gamma interferon-inducible protein 10. Following M. tuberculosis challenge in both airways or peritoneum, granulocytes were recruited significantly faster and at higher numbers in susceptible than in resistant mice. When granulocytes were efficiently depleted by either of two regimens at the onset of infection, only susceptible mice survived aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis significantly longer than control mice. We conclude that initially enhanced recruitment of granulocytes contributes to susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:16790804

  16. Evaluation of granulocytic ehrlichiosis in dogs of Missouri, including serologic status to Ehrlichia canis, Ehrlichia equi and Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Stockham, S L; Schmidt, D A; Curtis, K S; Schauf, B G; Tyler, J W; Simpson, S T

    1992-01-01

    Canine granulocytic ehrlichiosis was diagnosed in 37 dogs by finding ehrlichial morulae in 0.1 to 26.2% of their blood neutrophils and eosinophils. All 37 dogs had clinical signs of arthritis or muscular stiffness. Titer to Ehrlichia canis was determined in sera from 31 of the 37 dogs; 25 dogs had titer ranging from 1:20 to 1:5,120. In the other 6 dogs, titer to E canis was less than 1:10. The most common hematologic abnormality in these dogs, other than rickettsiemia, was thrombocytopenia. Granulocytes infected with ehrlichial organisms were not found in another 10 dogs that had clinical signs of arthritis or muscular stiffness. Of these 10 dogs, 3 had titer to E canis ranging from 1:40 to 1:320. Titer in the other 7 dogs was less than 1:10. Ehrlichial morulae were not found in the granulocytes of 18 healthy dogs. Of these 18 dogs, 9 had titer to E canis ranging from 1:20 to 1:5,120. Titer in the other 9 dogs was less than 1:10 Titer to Borrelia burgdorferi was determined in dogs with granulocytic ehrlichiosis, arthritic dogs without detected rickettsiemia, and in healthy dogs. Low titer determined by 2 laboratories was considered to be nonspecific reaction in all 3 groups of dogs and, thus, did not indicate that the arthritic disorders were attributable to canine borreliosis. PMID:1539918

  17. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  18. Opsonic requirements for phagocytosis of Legionella micdadei by polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Steffensen, D O; Weinbaum, D L; Dowling, J N

    1985-01-01

    The roles of the classical and alternative pathways of complement activation and of antibody in the phagocytosis of Legionella micdadei by polymorphonuclear leukocytes were studied. Normal serum was treated with the appropriate chelators or with heat to inactivate the classical, alternate, or both pathways of complement activation. Normal and complement-depleted sera with or without antibody were employed as opsonins for L. micdadei in phagocytosis assays. There was no difference in the phagocytosis of L. micdadei promoted by normal serum and either C4-deficient serum or serum in which the classical pathway had been inactivated. Both normal and classical pathway-deficient sera promoted significantly greater phagocytosis than did sera in which the alternate pathway or both the alternate and classical pathways had been inactivated. Thus, polymorphonuclear leukocyte phagocytosis of L. micdadei in the absence of antibody required an intact alternate pathway. Specific antibody partially restored opsonization to sera deficient in the alternate or both complement pathways, but phagocytosis was still significantly less than that with the alternate pathway intact. PMID:4030099

  19. Ozone-induced acute tracheobronchial epithelial injury: relationship to granulocyte emigration in the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, D.M.; Hubbard, W.C.; Wong, V.; Wu, R.; Pinkerton, K.; Plopper, C.G. )

    1992-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between granulocyte emigration and epithelial injury in specific airway generations of the tracheobronchial tree following short-term ozone exposure, we exposed rhesus monkeys for 8 h to 0.00 (controls) or 0.96 ppm ozone with post-exposure periods of 1, 12, 24, 72, and 168 h in filtered air before necropsy. There were five control and three exposed monkeys for each of the post-exposure times for a total of 20 monkeys. Neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood and labeled with 111In-tropolonate were infused in the cephalic vein in unanesthetized monkeys (except the 1-h group) 4 to 5 h before necropsy. The trachea and microdissected bronchi (fourth and ninth generations) and respiratory bronchioles (fifteenth generation) from the right upper lobe of each monkey were examined by electron microscopy. Labeled neutrophil influx into lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was maximal at 12 h and returned to baseline by 24 h after exposure. This was in contrast to total neutrophils in BALF, which were significantly elevated through 24 h after exposure but returned to baseline by 72 h. Lavage protein was significantly elevated at 24 h after exposure but was at control levels at all other times. Morphometric observations showed epithelial necrosis at 1 and 12 h in the trachea and bronchioles but continued to be observed in significant numbers at 24 h after exposure in bronchi. A significant increase in the labeling index of epithelial cells was observed at 12 h only in bronchi. Epithelial necrosis and repair was associated with the presence of granulocytes in the epithelium and interstitium of all airway levels. However, eosinophils were maximally increased in the epithelium and interstitium of bronchi at 24 h after exposure when epithelial necrosis was maximal in these airways and when lavage protein was significantly elevated.

  20. Influenza A virus-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte dysfunction in the pathogenesis of experimental pneumococcal otitis media.

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, J S; Giebink, G S; Quie, P G

    1982-01-01

    The role of influenza A virus-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte and eustachian tube dysfunction in the pathogenesis of acute purulent otitis media was studied in chinchillas. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte function, middle ear pressure, and the incidence of pneumococcal otitis media were observed after intranasal inoculation with influenza A virus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or both. Results showed that depressed negative middle ear pressure and polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemiluminescence and chemotactic activity occurred after influenza inoculation, but not after inoculation with pneumococcus alone. The greatest incidence of pneumococcal otitis media occurred when the pneumococcus was inoculated just before the time of influenza-induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte dysfunction and negative middle ear pressure. Animals that had unilateral tympanostomy tubes placed before inoculation of influenza with pneumococcus showed no difference in the occurrence of pneumococcal otitis media in ventilated and nonventilated ears, suggesting that polymorphonuclear leukocyte dysfunction contributes more to the pathogenesis of pneumococcal otitis media than does negative middle ear pressure in this animal model. PMID:7076299

  1. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 regulates granulopoiesis by inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hao; Shively, John E

    2010-10-29

    Although carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1) is an activation marker for neutrophils and delays neutrophil apoptosis, the role of CEACAM1 in granulopoiesis and neutrophil-dependent host immune responses has not been investigated. CEACAM1 expression correlated with granulocytic differentiation, and Ceacam1(-/-) mice developed neutrophilia because of loss of the Src-homology-phosphatase-1 (SHP-1)-dependent inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat3) pathway provided by CEACAM1. Moreover, Ceacam1(-/-) mice were hypersensitive to Listeria Monocytogenes (LM) infection with an accelerated mortality. Reintroduction of CEACAM1 into Ceacam1(-/-) bone marrow restored normal granulopoiesis and host sensitivity to LM infection, while mutation of its immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) abrogated this restoration. shRNA-mediated reduction of Stat3 amounts rescued normal granulopoiesis, attenuating host sensitivity to LM infection in Ceacam1(-/-) mice. Thus, CEACAM1 acted as a coinhibitory receptor for G-CSFR regulating granulopoiesis and host innate immune response to bacterial infections.

  2. FMLP activates Ras and Raf in human neutrophils. Potential role in activation of MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, G S; Avdi, N; Buhl, A M; Suzuki, N; Johnson, G L

    1994-01-01

    Chemoattractants bind to seven transmembrane-spanning, G-protein-linked receptors on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and induce a variety of functional responses, including activation of microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase. Although the pathways by which MAP kinases are activated in neutrophils are unknown, we hypothesized that activation of the Ras/Raf pathway leading to activation of MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) would be induced by the chemoattractant f-met-leu-phe. Human neutrophils exposed to 10 nM FMLP for 30 s exhibited an MAP kinase kinase activity coeluting with MEK-1. Immunoprecipitation of Raf-1 kinase after stimulation with FMLP revealed an activity that phosphorylated MEK, was detectable at 30 s, and peaked at 2-3 min. Immunoprecipitation of Ras from both intact neutrophils labeled with [32P]orthophosphate and electropermeabilized neutrophils incubated with [32P]GTP was used to determine that FMLP treatment was associated with activation of Ras. Activation of both Ras and Raf was inhibited by treatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin, indicating predominant linkage to the Gi2 protein. Although phorbol esters activated Raf, activation induced by FMLP appeared independent of protein kinase C, further suggesting that Gi2 was linked to Ras and Raf independent of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. Dibutyryl cAMP, which inhibits many neutrophil functional responses, blocked the activation of Raf by FMLP, suggesting that interruption of the Raf/MAP kinase pathway influences neutrophil responses to chemoattractants. These data suggest that Gi2-mediated receptor regulation of the Ras/Raf/MAP kinase pathway is a primary response to chemoattractants. Images PMID:8040337

  3. Differences in leukocyte differentiation molecule abundances on domestic sheep (Ovis aries) and bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) neutrophils identified by flow cytometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abundance was assessed by utilizing a panel of cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) tested in this study. Characterization of multichannel autofluorescence of eosinophils permitted cell-type specific gating of granulocytes for quantification of LDMs on neutrophils and eosinophils by indirect,...

  4. Infection-induced NETosis is a dynamic process involving neutrophil multitasking in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yipp, Bryan G; Petri, Björn; Salina, Davide; Jenne, Craig N; Scott, Brittney N V; Zbytnuik, Lori D; Pittman, Keir; Asaduzzaman, Muhammad; Wu, Kaiyu; Meijndert, H Christopher; Malawista, Stephen E; de Boisfleury Chevance, Anne; Zhang, Kunyan; Conly, John; Kubes, Paul

    2012-09-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are released as neutrophils die in vitro in a process requiring hours, leaving a temporal gap that invasive microbes may exploit. Neutrophils capable of migration and phagocytosis while undergoing NETosis have not been documented. During Gram-positive skin infections, we directly visualized live polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) in vivo rapidly releasing NETs, which prevented systemic bacterial dissemination. NETosis occurred during crawling, thereby casting large areas of NETs. NET-releasing PMNs developed diffuse decondensed nuclei, ultimately becoming devoid of DNA. Cells with abnormal nuclei showed unusual crawling behavior highlighted by erratic pseudopods and hyperpolarization consistent with the nucleus being a fulcrum for crawling. A requirement for both Toll-like receptor 2 and complement-mediated opsonization tightly regulated NET release. Additionally, live human PMNs injected into mouse skin developed decondensed nuclei and formed NETS in vivo, and intact anuclear neutrophils were abundant in Gram-positive human abscesses. Therefore early in infection NETosis involves neutrophils that do not undergo lysis and retain the ability to multitask.

  5. The Neutrophil Nucleus and Its Role in Neutrophilic Function.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Leonardo Olivieri; Aquino, Elaine Nascimento; Neves, Anne Caroline Dias; Fontes, Wagner

    2015-09-01

    The cell nucleus plays a key role in differentiation processes in eukaryotic cells. It is not the nucleus in particular, but the organization of the genes and their remodeling that provides the data for the adjustments to be made according to the medium. The neutrophil nucleus has a different morphology. It is a multi-lobed nucleus where some researchers argue no longer function. However, studies indicate that it is very probable the occurrence of chromatin remodeling during activation steps. It may be that the human neutrophil nucleus also contributes to the mobility of neutrophils through thin tissue spaces. Questions like these will be discussed in this small review. The topics include morphology of human neutrophil nucleus, maturation process and modifications of the neutrophil nucleus, neutrophil activation and chromatin modifications, causes and consequences of multi-lobulated segmented morphology, and importance of the nucleus in the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

  6. T(H)2 cytokines modulate the IL-9R expression on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stéphane; Takhar, Manrit Kaur; Shan, Lianyu; Hayglass, Kent T; Simons, F Estelle; Gounni, Abdelilah S

    2009-06-26

    Interleukin (IL)-9 is associated with key pathological features of asthma such as airway hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction and mucus production. Inflammatory responses mediated by IL-9 rely on the expression of the IL-9R which has been reported on lung epithelial cells, T lymphocytes and recently on airway granulocyte infiltrates. In this study, we assessed the regulatory and constitutive cell surface expression of the IL-9Ralpha in unfractionated and purified human neutrophils from atopic asthmatics, atopic non-asthmatics and healthy normal controls. We demonstrate that T(H)2 cytokines (IL-4 or IL-13) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) up-regulated mRNA and cell surface expression levels of the IL-9Ralpha in primary human and HL-60 differentiated neutrophils. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-kappaB did not affect T(H)2-mediated IL-9Ralpha expression in human neutrophils although IFN-gamma and IL-10 down-regulated IL-9Ralpha expression when co-incubated with IL-4, IL-13 or GM-CSF. Collectively, our results reveal a regulatory function for IFN-gamma and IL-10 on modulating the inducible IL-9Ralpha expression levels on peripheral blood neutrophils by T(H)2 cytokines. PMID:19401191

  7. T(H)2 cytokines modulate the IL-9R expression on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stéphane; Takhar, Manrit Kaur; Shan, Lianyu; Hayglass, Kent T; Simons, F Estelle; Gounni, Abdelilah S

    2009-06-26

    Interleukin (IL)-9 is associated with key pathological features of asthma such as airway hyperresponsiveness, bronchoconstriction and mucus production. Inflammatory responses mediated by IL-9 rely on the expression of the IL-9R which has been reported on lung epithelial cells, T lymphocytes and recently on airway granulocyte infiltrates. In this study, we assessed the regulatory and constitutive cell surface expression of the IL-9Ralpha in unfractionated and purified human neutrophils from atopic asthmatics, atopic non-asthmatics and healthy normal controls. We demonstrate that T(H)2 cytokines (IL-4 or IL-13) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) up-regulated mRNA and cell surface expression levels of the IL-9Ralpha in primary human and HL-60 differentiated neutrophils. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-kappaB did not affect T(H)2-mediated IL-9Ralpha expression in human neutrophils although IFN-gamma and IL-10 down-regulated IL-9Ralpha expression when co-incubated with IL-4, IL-13 or GM-CSF. Collectively, our results reveal a regulatory function for IFN-gamma and IL-10 on modulating the inducible IL-9Ralpha expression levels on peripheral blood neutrophils by T(H)2 cytokines.

  8. Cytokines derived from cultured skeletal muscle cells after mechanical strain promote neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer M; Pizza, Francis X

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that cytokines derived from differentiated skeletal muscle cells in culture induce neutrophil chemotaxis after mechanical strain. Flexible-bottom plates with cultured human muscle cells attached were exposed to mechanical strain regimens (ST) of 0, 10, 30, 50, or 70 kPa of negative pressure. Conditioned media were tested for the ability to induce chemotaxis of human blood neutrophils in vitro and for a marker of muscle cell injury (lactate dehydrogenase). Conditioned media promoted neutrophil chemotaxis in a manner that was related both to the degree of strain and to the magnitude of muscle cell injury (ST 70 > ST 50 > ST 30). Protein profiling using a multiplex cytokine assay revealed that mechanical strain increased the presence of IL-8, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1, and IL-6 in conditioned media. We also detected 14 other cytokines in conditioned media from control cultures that did not respond to mechanical strain. Neutralization of IL-8 and GM-CSF completely inhibited the chemotactic response for ST 30 and ST 50 and reduced the chemotactic response for ST 70 by 40% and 47%, respectively. Neutralization of MCP-1 or IL-6 did not reduce chemotaxis after ST 70. This study enhances our understanding of the immunobiology of skeletal muscle by revealing that skeletal muscle cell-derived IL-8 and GM-CSF promote neutrophil chemotaxis after injurious mechanical strain.

  9. Systemic LPS injection leads to granulocyte influx into normal and injured brain: effects of ICAM-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bohatschek, M; Werner, A; Raivich, G

    2001-11-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) constituents of the gram-negative bacterial wall are among the most potent activators of inflammation. In the current study, we examined the effect of subcutaneous injection of Escherichia coli LPS on leukocyte influx into the normal and injured brain using endogenous peroxidase (EP). Normal brain parenchyma does not contain granulocytes and this does not change after indirect trauma, in facial axotomy. However, systemic injection of 1 mg LPS led to a gradual appearance of EP-positive parenchymal granulocytes within 12 h, with a maximum at 1-4 days after injection. Facial axotomy (day 14) led to a further 50-300% increase in granulocyte number. Of the five mouse strains tested in the current study, four--Balb/C, FVB, C57Bl/6, and C3H/N--showed vigorous granulocyte influx (60-90 cells per 20-microm section in axotomized facial nucleus, 20-40 cells per section on the contralateral side). The influx was an order of magnitude lower in the SJL mice. The peroxidase-positive cells were immunoreactive for neutrophil antigen 7/4 and alpha M beta 2 integrin, were negative for IBA1 (monocytes) and CD3 (T cells), and could be prelabeled by subcutaneous injection with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC), confirming their origin as blood-borne granulocytes. All RITC-positive cells were IBA1 negative. This influx of granulocytes was accompanied by a disruption of the blood-brain barrier to albumin and induction of the cell adhesion molecule ICAM-1 on affected blood vessels. Transgenic deletion of ICAM-1 led to a more than 50% reduction in the number of infiltrating granulocytes compared to litter-matched wild-type controls, in normal brain as well as in axotomized facial motor nucleus. In summary, systemic injection of LPS leads to invasion of granulocytes into the mouse brain and a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier to blood-borne cells and to soluble molecules. Moreover, this mechanism may play a pathogenic role in the etiology of meningitis and in

  10. Hematologic improvement in dogs with parvovirus infection treated with recombinant canine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Duffy, A; Dow, S; Ogilvie, G; Rao, S; Hackett, T

    2010-08-01

    Previously, dogs with canine parvovirus-induced neutropenia have not responded to treatment with recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF). However, recombinant canine G-CSF (rcG-CSF) has not been previously evaluated for treatment of parvovirus-induced neutropenia in dogs. We assessed the effectiveness of rcG-CSF in dogs with parvovirus-induced neutropenia with a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized clinical trial. Endpoints of our study were time to recovery of WBC and neutrophil counts, and duration of hospitalization. 28 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia were treated with rcG-CSF and outcomes were compared to those of 34 dogs with parvovirus and neutropenia not treated with rcG-CSF. We found that mean WBC and neutrophil counts were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the 28 dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to disease-matched dogs not treated with rcG-CSF. In addition, the mean duration of hospitalization was reduced (P = 0.01) in rcG-CSF treated dogs compared to untreated dogs. However, survival times were decreased in dogs treated with rcG-CSF compared to untreated dogs. These results suggest that treatment with rcG-CSF was effective in stimulating neutrophil recovery and shortening the duration of hospitalization in dogs with parvovirus infection, but indicate the need for additional studies to evaluate overall safety of the treatment.

  11. Pentoxifylline attenuates neutrophil activation in experimental endotoxemia in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    van Leenen, D; van der Poll, T; Levi, M; ten Cate, H; van Deventer, S J; Hack, C E; Aarden, L A; ten Cate, J W

    1993-08-15

    Costimulation of neutrophils and cytokines may play an important role in organ injury in sepsis. Pentoxifylline inhibits various neutrophil functions in vitro, and attenuates endotoxin-induced production of TNF in both in vitro and in vivo models. To assess the effect of pentoxifylline on neutrophil activation in endotoxemia, nine adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) were i.v. injected with saline (n = 2), Escherichia coli endotoxin (4 ng/kg; n = 4), or E. coli endotoxin (4 ng/kg) in combination with pentoxifylline (500 mg/3 h, starting 30 min before the endotoxin injection; n = 3). Serial blood samples were obtained for measurements of leukocyte counts and the granulocytic proteinases elastase complexed with alpha 1-antitrypsin and lactoferrin, and cytokines during the next 5 h. No changes were observed in the saline-treated chimpanzees. Endotoxin induced a marked leukocytosis and neutrophilia, which were slightly reduced by pentoxifylline. In contrast, pentoxifylline almost completely prevented endotoxin-induced neutrophil degranulation: peak elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin was 164 +/- 21 ng/ml (mean +/- SE) after endotoxin alone, vs 71 +/- 7 ng/ml after endotoxin with pentoxifylline (t = 3 h; p < 0.05); peak lactoferrin was 329 +/- 15 and 182 +/- 5 ng/ml, respectively (t = 5 h; p < 0.05). Pentoxifylline also inhibited the endotoxin-induced release of TNF (271 +/- 26 vs 55 +/- 23 pg/ml at t = 1.5 h; p < 0.05) and IL-6 (225 +/- 42 vs 73 +/- 25 pg/ml at t = 2 h; p < 0.05). IL-8 release was not significantly inhibited by pentoxifylline. In none of the animals activation of the C system could be detected. We conclude that pentoxifylline attenuates neutrophil activation in endotoxemia in chimpanzees, probably in part by inhibiting the release of TNF.

  12. A Combretastatin-Mediated Decrease in Neutrophil Concentration in Peripheral Blood and the Impact on the Anti-Tumor Activity of This Drug in Two Different Murine Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Anja Bille; Wittenborn, Thomas; Brems-Eskildsen, Anne Sofie; Laurberg, Tinne; Bertelsen, Lotte Bonde; Nielsen, Thomas; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Møller, Bjarne Kuno; Horsman, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The vascular disrupting agent combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4P) induces fluctuations in peripheral blood neutrophil concentration. Because neutrophils have the potential to induce both vascular damage and angiogenesis we analyzed neutrophil involvement in the anti-tumoral effects of CA4P in C3H mammary carcinomas in CDF1 mice and in SCCVII squamous cell carcinomas in C3H/HeN mice. Flow cytometry analyses of peripheral blood before and up to 144 h after CA4P administration (25 and 250 mg/kg) revealed a decrease 1 h after treatment, followed by an early (3–6 h) and a late (>72 h) increase in the granulocyte concentration. We suggest that the early increase (3–6 h) in granulocyte concentration was caused by the initial decrease at 1 h and found that the late increase was associated with tumor size, and hence independent of CA4P. No alterations in neutrophil infiltration into the C3H tumor after CA4P treatment (25 and 250 mg/kg) were found. Correspondingly, neutrophil depletion in vivo, using an anti-neutrophil antibody, followed by CA4P treatment (25 mg/kg) did not increase the necrotic fraction in C3H tumors significantly. However, by increasing the CA4P dose to 250 mg/kg we found a significant increase of 359% in necrotic fraction when compared to neutrophil-depleted mice; in mice with no neutrophil depletion CA4P induced an 89% change indicating that the presence of neutrophils reduced the effect of CA4P. In contrast, neither CA4P nor 1A8 affected the necrotic fraction in the SCCVII tumors significantly. Hence, we suggest that the initial decrease in granulocyte concentration was caused by non-tumor-specific recruitment of neutrophils and that neutrophils may attenuate CA4P-mediated anti-tumor effect in some tumor models. PMID:25299269

  13. Type 2 Interleukin-4 Receptor Signaling in Neutrophils Antagonizes Their Expansion and Migration during Infection and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Woytschak, Janine; Keller, Nadia; Krieg, Carsten; Impellizzieri, Daniela; Thompson, Robert W; Wynn, Thomas A; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; Boyman, Onur

    2016-07-19

    Neutrophils are the first immune cells recruited to sites of inflammation and infection. However, patients with allergic disorders such as atopic dermatitis show a paucity of skin neutrophils and are prone to bacterial skin infections, suggesting that allergic inflammation curtails neutrophil responses. Here we have shown that the type 2 cell signature cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4) hampers neutrophil expansion and migration by antagonizing granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and chemokine receptor-mediated signals. Cutaneous bacterial infection in mice was exacerbated by IL-4 signaling and improved with IL-4 inhibition, each outcome inversely correlating with neutrophil migration to skin. Likewise, systemic bacterial infection was worsened by heightened IL-4 activity, with IL-4 restricting G-CSF-induced neutrophil expansion and migration to tissues by affecting CXCR2-CXCR4 chemokine signaling in neutrophils. These effects were dependent on IL-4 acting through type 2 IL-4 receptors on neutrophils. Thus, targeting IL-4 might be beneficial in neutropenic conditions with increased susceptibility to bacterial infections. PMID:27438770

  14. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte dysfunction associated with feline leukaemia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M G; Duska, G O; Stiff, M I; Lafrado, L J; Olsen, R G

    1986-10-01

    The chemiluminescent characteristics of enriched (greater than 95%) peripheral blood polymorphonuclear leukocyte populations (PMN) from normal and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV)-infected cats were investigated. FeLV-infected cats demonstrated a significantly lower (P less than 0.001) PMN chemiluminescent response when compared to the response of normal age-matched controls. Normal PMN treated with FeLV-infected cat serum exhibited a depressed response in comparison to control cells. A titration of serum from infected cats supplemented with normal serum revealed a titratable suppression of chemiluminescence with increasing concentration of serum from the infected cats. However, PMN from FeLV-infected cats treated with normal serum displayed a slight increase in chemiluminescence over the same cells in autologous serum. The addition of inactivated FeLV to normal PMN caused a titratable decrease in chemiluminescence.

  15. Polymorphonuclear cell motility, ankylosing spondylitis, and HLA B27.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, C T; Fordham, J N; Currey, H L

    1984-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) function was studied in 29 subjects with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Of these, 20 were HLA B27+ve and 9 B27-ve. There were 30 controls and, of these, 15 were B27+ve. Random and directed cell migration was measured by 2 techniques: migration through a micropore filter and migration under an agar film. The chemo-attractant was either case in-activated serum or zymosan-activated serum. By both techniques directed motility was increased in subjects with B27 or with AS when compared to the B27-ve controls. This suggests that the disease AS and the possession of B27 are both associated with increased PMN motility. PMID:6608924

  16. Inhibition of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis by oxygenated sterol compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.I.; Bass, J.; Yachnin, S.

    1980-07-01

    When preincubated with certain oxygenated sterol compounds in lipoprotein-depleted serum (20% (vol/vol)), human polymorphonuclear leukocytes show inhibition of chemotaxis toward the synthetic dipeptide N-formylmethionylphenylalinine without alteration of random movement or loss of cell viability. These effects can occur at sterol concentrations as low as 6.25 ..mu..M and after as little as 5 min of preincubation, but they are increased at higher concentrations and longer preincubation times. The inhibition can be almost completely reversed by preincubation in lipoprotein-replete serum (human AB serum, 20% (vol/vol)) and may be partially corrected by addition of free cholesterol (0.125 mM) to the medium. These effects are unlikely to be due to inhibition of cellular sterol synthesis, competition for chemotaxin membrane binding sites, or deactivation of the leukocytes but they may be a consequence of insertion of the sterol molecule into the leukocyte plasma membranes.

  17. Macrophage and polymorphonuclear leukocyte function in patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cameron, D J; Durst, G G; Majeski, J A

    1985-01-01

    Monocyte derived macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) isolated from the peripheral blood of thirteen patients with Alzheimer disease were studied for their cytotoxic effects on a sensitive allogenic tumor target. PMN cells from 11 of the 13 patients with Alzheimer disease were able to kill the tumor cells. In addition, the macrophages from 12 of the 13 Alzheimer disease patients were cytotoxic towards the tumor targets. Four of these patients possessed a plasma inhibitory factor which was capable of suppressing macrophage mediated cytotoxicity. When the lymphocytes from these patients were studied for their ability to be stimulated with the specific antigen, streptokinase, to produce macrophage activating factor (MAF), only 5 of the 13 patients studied possessed lymphocytes which were capable of producing MAF. Thus, the only immunological defect in Alzheimer disease patients which was observed in this study was in the ability of the lymphocytes to synthesize MAF. PMID:4084662

  18. Nerve growth factor: stimulation of polymorphonuclear leukocyte chemotaxis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Gee, A P; Boyle, M D; Munger, K L; Lawman, M J; Young, M

    1983-01-01

    Topical application of mouse nerve growth factor (NGF) to superficial skin wounds of mice has previously been shown to accelerate the rate of wound contraction. Results of the present study reveal that NGF in the presence of plasma is also chemotactic for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in vitro, and the concentration of NGF required for this effect is similar to that which stimulates ganglionic neurite outgrowth. This property does not arise from liberation of the C5a fragment of complement, nor does it require the known enzymic activity of NGF. (NGF inactivated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate is equally active.) We conclude that NGF can display biological effects on cells of nonneural origin and function, and this feature might play a role in the early inflammatory response to injury. PMID:6580641

  19. Phospholipid turnover during phagocytosis in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    PubMed Central

    García Gil, Merche; Alonso, Fernando; Alvarez Chiva, Vicente; Sánchez Crespo, Mariano; Mato, José M.

    1982-01-01

    We have previously observed that the phagocytosis of zymosan particles coated with complement by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes is accompanied by a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by transmethylation [García Gil, Alonso, Sánchez Crespo & Mato (1981) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 101, 740–748]. The present studies show that phosphatidylcholine synthesis by a cholinephosphotransferase reaction is enhanced, up to 3-fold, during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear cells. This effect was tested by both measuring the incorporation of radioactivity into phosphatidylcholine in cells labelled with [Me-14C]choline, and by assaying the activity of CDP-choline:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase. The time course of CDP-choline:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase activation by zymosan mirrors the inhibition of phospholipid methyltransferase activity previously reported. The extent of incorporation of radioactivity into phosphatidylcholine induced by various doses of zymosan correlates with the physiological response of the cells to this stimulus. This effect was specific for phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine turnover was not affected by zymosan. The purpose of this enhanced phosphatidylcholine synthesis is not to provide phospholipid molecules rich in arachidonic acid. The present studies show that about 80% of the arachidonic acid generated in response to zymosan derives from phosphatidylinositol. A transient accumulation of arachidonoyldiacylglycerol has also been observed, which indicates that a phospholipase C is responsible, at least in part, for the generation of arachidonic acid. Finally, isobutylmethylxanthine and quinacrine, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol turnover, inhibit both arachidonic acid generation and phagocytosis, indicating a function for this pathway during this process. PMID:6181780

  20. Origin and Role of a Subset of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils with Antigen-Presenting Cell Features in Early-Stage Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sunil; Bhojnagarwala, Pratik S; O'Brien, Shaun; Moon, Edmund K; Garfall, Alfred L; Rao, Abhishek S; Quatromoni, Jon G; Stephen, Tom Li; Litzky, Leslie; Deshpande, Charuhas; Feldman, Michael D; Hancock, Wayne W; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R; Albelda, Steven M; Eruslanov, Evgeniy B

    2016-07-11

    Based on studies in mouse tumor models, granulocytes appear to play a tumor-promoting role. However, there are limited data about the phenotype and function of tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) in humans. Here, we identify a subset of TANs that exhibited characteristics of both neutrophils and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in early-stage human lung cancer. These APC-like "hybrid neutrophils," which originate from CD11b(+)CD15(hi)CD10(-)CD16(low) immature progenitors, are able to cross-present antigens, as well as trigger and augment anti-tumor T cell responses. Interferon-γ and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor are requisite factors in the tumor that, working through the Ikaros transcription factor, synergistically exert their APC-promoting effects on the progenitors. Overall, these data demonstrate the existence of a specialized TAN subset with anti-tumor capabilities in human cancer.

  1. IL-17 attenuates the anti-apoptotic effects of GM-CSF in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stéphane; Saffar, Arash Shoja; Shan, Lianyu; Gounni, Abdelilah Soussi

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-17A is a pleiotropic, pro-inflammatory cytokine that is implicated in chronic inflammatory and degenerative disorders. IL-17 has been demonstrated to link activated T-lymphocyte with the recruitment of neutrophils at sites of inflammation, however whether IL-17 can mediate neutrophil survival and subsequently affect inflammatory responses has not fully been elucidated. In our study, we demonstrate that human peripheral blood and HL-60 differentiated neutrophils express mRNA and cell surface IL-17A receptor. IL-17A does not affect the rate of spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis, however significantly decreased granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-mediated survival by antagonizing the signal transduction pathways of p38, Erk1/2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5B. These events were associated with reduced myeloid cell lymphoma-1 (Mcl-1) protein levels, increased translocation and aggregation of Bax to mitochondria, decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential and in an increase in caspase-3/7 activity. These events were independent of increased Fas or soluble Fas ligand expression levels. Taken together, our findings suggest that IL-17 may regulate neutrophil homeostasis and favor the resolution of inflamed tissues by attenuating the delay in neutrophil apoptosis induced by inflammatory cytokines.

  2. Therapeutic exercise attenuates neutrophilic lung injury and skeletal muscle wasting

    PubMed Central

    Files, D. Clark; Liu, Chun; Pereyra, Andrea; Wang, Zhong-Min; Aggarwal, Neil R.; D’Alessio, Franco R.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Mock, Jason R.; Singer, Benjamin D.; Feng, Xin; Yammani, Raghunatha R.; Zhang, Tan; Lee, Amy L.; Philpott, Sydney; Lussier, Stephanie; Purcell, Lina; Chou, Jeff; Seeds, Michael; King, Landon S.; Morris, Peter E.; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Early mobilization of critically ill patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has emerged as a therapeutic strategy that improves patient outcomes, such as the duration of mechanical ventilation and muscle strength. Despite the apparent efficacy of early mobility programs, their use in clinical practice is limited outside of specialized centers and clinical trials. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying mobility therapy, we exercised acute lung injury (ALI) mice for 2 days after the instillation of lipopolysaccharides into their lungs. We found that a short duration of moderate intensity exercise in ALI mice attenuated muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1)–mediated atrophy of the limb and respiratory muscles and improved limb muscle force generation. Exercise also limited the influx of neutrophils into the alveolar space through modulation of a coordinated systemic neutrophil chemokine response. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) concentrations were systemically reduced by exercise in ALI mice, and in vivo blockade of the G-CSF receptor recapitulated the lung exercise phenotype in ALI mice. Additionally, plasma G-CSF concentrations in humans with acute respiratory failure (ARF) undergoing early mobility therapy showed greater decrements over time compared to control ARF patients. Together, these data provide a mechanism whereby early mobility therapy attenuates muscle wasting and limits ongoing alveolar neutrophilia through modulation of systemic neutrophil chemokines in lung-injured mice and humans. PMID:25761888

  3. Therapeutic exercise attenuates neutrophilic lung injury and skeletal muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Files, D Clark; Liu, Chun; Pereyra, Andrea; Wang, Zhong-Min; Aggarwal, Neil R; D'Alessio, Franco R; Garibaldi, Brian T; Mock, Jason R; Singer, Benjamin D; Feng, Xin; Yammani, Raghunatha R; Zhang, Tan; Lee, Amy L; Philpott, Sydney; Lussier, Stephanie; Purcell, Lina; Chou, Jeff; Seeds, Michael; King, Landon S; Morris, Peter E; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-03-11

    Early mobilization of critically ill patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has emerged as a therapeutic strategy that improves patient outcomes, such as the duration of mechanical ventilation and muscle strength. Despite the apparent efficacy of early mobility programs, their use in clinical practice is limited outside of specialized centers and clinical trials. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying mobility therapy, we exercised acute lung injury (ALI) mice for 2 days after the instillation of lipopolysaccharides into their lungs. We found that a short duration of moderate intensity exercise in ALI mice attenuated muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1)-mediated atrophy of the limb and respiratory muscles and improved limb muscle force generation. Exercise also limited the influx of neutrophils into the alveolar space through modulation of a coordinated systemic neutrophil chemokine response. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) concentrations were systemically reduced by exercise in ALI mice, and in vivo blockade of the G-CSF receptor recapitulated the lung exercise phenotype in ALI mice. Additionally, plasma G-CSF concentrations in humans with acute respiratory failure (ARF) undergoing early mobility therapy showed greater decrements over time compared to control ARF patients. Together, these data provide a mechanism whereby early mobility therapy attenuates muscle wasting and limits ongoing alveolar neutrophilia through modulation of systemic neutrophil chemokines in lung-injured mice and humans. PMID:25761888

  4. (TH) diazepam binding to human granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, P.A.; Cundall, R.L.; Rolfe, B.

    1985-07-08

    (TH)-diazepam binds to sites on human granulocyte membranes, with little or no binding to platelets or lymphocytes. These (TH)-diazepam binding sites are of the peripheral type, being strongly inhibited by R05-4864 (Ki=6.23nM) but only weakly by clonazepam (Ki=14 M). Binding of (TH) diazepam at 0 is saturable, specific and stereoselective. Scatchard analysis indicates a single class of sites with Bmax of 109 +/- 17f moles per mg of protein and K/sub D/ of 3.07 +/- 0.53nM. Hill plots of saturation experiments gave straight lines with a mean Hill coefficient of 1.03 +/- 0.014. Binding is time dependent and reversible and it varies linearly with granulocyte protein concentration over the range 0.025-0.300 mg of protein. 11 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  5. Expression of IL-17A concentration and effector functions of peripheral blood neutrophils in food allergy hypersensitivity patients.

    PubMed

    Żbikowska-Gotz, Magdalena; Pałgan, Krzysztof; Gawrońska-Ukleja, Ewa; Kuźmiński, Andrzej; Przybyszewski, Michał; Socha, Ewa; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2016-03-01

    Lymphocytes Th17 and other types of immune system cells produce IL17. By induction of cytokines and chemokines, the IL17 cytokine is involved in mechanisms of allergic reaction with participation of neutrophil granulocytes. It affects activation, recruitment, and migration of neutrophils to the tissues, regulating inflammatory reaction intensity. Excited neutrophils secrete inter alia elastase and reactive oxygen species (ROS)--significant mediators of inflammation process responsible for tissues damage.The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentrations of serum interleukin 17A, serum neutrophil elastase, and ROS production by neutrophils in patients with food allergy.The study included 30 patients with food allergy diagnosed based on interview, clinical symptoms, positive SPT, placebo controlled double-blind oral provocation trial, and the presence of asIgE in blood serum against selected food allergens using fluoro-immuno-enzymatic method FEIA UNICap 100. The control group consisted of 10 healthy volunteers. The concentrations of IL17A were determined in all patients using ELISA method with eBioscience kits, and elastase using BenderMed Systems kits. Chemiluminescence of non-stimulated neutrophils was evaluated using luminol-dependent kinetic method for 40 min on Luminoskan (Labsystems luminometer).The results of serum IL-17A concentrations and the values of chemiluminescence obtained by non-activated neutrophils, as well as elastase concentrations, were higher in patients with food allergic hypersensitivity compared to healthy volunteers.This study demonstrates a significance of IL-17A and activated neutrophil granulocytes in the course of diseases with food allergic hypersensitivity. PMID:26684636

  6. Granulocytic sarcoma with expression of CD30.

    PubMed Central

    Fickers, M; Theunissen, P

    1996-01-01

    A case of a young man with a spinal epidural tumour, initially diagnosed as large cell anaplastic malignant lymphoma, is reported. The tumour consisted of poorly differentiated cells showing immunoreactivity with antibodies directed against CD30 and CD45. Ten months later the patient developed acute myeloid leukaemia. The histological slides of the epidural tumour were reviewed, including additional enzymochemical and immunochemical stains. As the tumour showed immunoreactivity for myeloperoxidase and chloroacetate esterase, it was reclassified as a granulocytic sarcoma. Images PMID:9038763

  7. [Value of the study of the functional potential of neutrophils in suppurative, septic and allergic diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Nesterova, I V; Svetlichnaia, M A

    1989-01-01

    A method for measuring the content of cationic proteins in neutrophil granulocytes of the peripheral blood was employed in patients with pyoseptic (n = 12) and allergic (n = 28) diseases during the exposure to composite infections in vitro. The method enables one to assess the functional potentialities of the cells in mobilizing the internal reserves and the readiness for the trigger of the cellular granular apparatus, for instance during real or predicted exposure of the child to bacterial infections. The determination of the functional potentialities of neutrophil phagocytes can be used as a test for the appraisal of the gravity of allergic and pyoseptic processes as well as for predicting outcomes of pyoseptic diseases.

  8. CFTR RECRUITMENT TO PHAGOSOMES IN NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Song, Kejing; Painter, Richard G.; Aiken, Martha; Reiser, Jakob; Stanton, Bruce A.; Nauseef, William M.; Wang, Guoshun

    2013-01-01

    Optimal microbicidal activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) relies on generation of toxic agents such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in phagosomes. HOCl formation requires H2O2 produced by the NADPH oxidase, myeloperoxidase derived from azurophilic granules, and chloride ion. Chloride transport from cytoplasm into phagosomes requires chloride channels which include cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated chloride channel. However, the phagosomal targeting of CFTR in PMN has not been defined. Using human peripheral blood PMN, we determined that ~95–99% of LAMP-1 positive mature phagosomes were CFTR-positive, as judged by immunostaining and flow cytometric analysis. To establish a model cell system to evaluate CFTR phagosomal recruitment, we stably expressed EGFP alone, EGFP-wt-CFTR and EGFP-ΔF508-CFTR fusion proteins in promyelocytic PLB-985 cells, respectively. After differentiation into neutrophil-like cells, CFTR presentation to phagosomes was examined. EGFP-wt-CFTR was observed to associate with phagosomes and co-localize with LAMP-1. Flow cytometric analysis of the isolated phagosomes indicated that such a phagosomal targeting was determined by the CFTR portion of the fusion protein. In contrast, significantly less EGFP-ΔF508-CFTR was found in phagosomes, indicating a defective targeting of the molecule to the organelle. Importantly, CFTR corrector compound VRT-325 facilitated the recruitment of ΔF508-CFTR to phagosomes. These data demonstrate the possibility of pharmacologic correction of impaired recruitment of mutant CFTR, thereby providing a potential means to augment chloride supply to the phagosomes of PMN in patients with cystic fibrosis to enhance their microbicidal function. PMID:23486169

  9. Neutrophil function in children with kwashiorkor.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, K; Douglas, S D

    1976-09-01

    Peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) function has been investigated for 46 children with kwashiorkor (without overt infection) in the Ivory Coast, West Africa. In vitro chemotactic response, candidacidal activity, and kinetic studies of metabolism during phagocytosis have been performed. Postphagocytic morphological events were evaluated by electron microscopy. The reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT), measurement of enzyme activities, activity of glycolysis, and hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) activity were assessed. The extent of iodide incorporation into trichloracetic acid (TCA)-precipitable protein by phagocytizing PMN'S and thyroid hormone degradation were measured. Chemotactic response was reduced at early time intervals (30, 60, and 120 minutes) and reached control values after 180 minutes. Whereas PMN's of controls killed 32.13 +/- 11.10 per cent of Candida albicans after 60 minutes, PMN's from kwashiorkor patients killed 18.55 +/- 7.74 per cent (p less than 0.01). HMS activity for resting PMN's of kwashiorkor children was higher than for controls, and during particle ingestion the extent of stimulation was comparable to controls. Electron microscopic assessment of phagocytic vacuole formation and degranulation showed no difference between PMN's from kwashiorkor and and control subjects. Incorporation of 131 I into TCA-precipitable proteins by phagocytizing PMN's from kwashiorkor children was reduced in compraison to controls, with either viable or heat-killed lactobacilli. No impairment in thyroxine (T4) degradation was observed for PMN's from kwashiorkor cases. PMS's from kwashiorkor patients show toxic granules, Dohle bodies, evidence of high baseline NBT reduction, and glucose decarboxylation. Functional studies indicate impaired kinetics of chemotaxis, diminished candidacidal activity, and reduced iodination. Enzymatic activities of resting cells are normal. Lactate production, HMS activity during phagocytosis, and morphological

  10. Effect of chronic alcohol feeding on the ultrastructure of rat peripheral blood neutrophils: a morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Todorović, V; Koko, V; Lacković, V; Milin, J; Varagić, J

    1994-03-01

    Morphometric methods were used to analyze the ultrastructural characteristics of peripheral blood polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in 10 rats chronically consuming ethanol and 20 rats fed an isoenergetic standard diet (10 ad libitum and 10 pair fed control rats). Morphometric measurements were made, after a 4-month experimental period, of the following: the profile area of the cell, nucleus and cytoplasm; nucleus to cell profile area; volume density of the nucleus, cytoplasm, mitochondria, Golgi system, endoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasmic granules; number of mitochondria per cell profile; number of cytoplasmic granules per cell profile and per micron2 of cytoplasm, as well as the azurophilic to specific granule ratio and mean diameter of granules. A significant decrease in cell profile area and cytoplasm profile area was shown in ethanol-treated rats. The volume density of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum nearly doubled during ethanol abuse. The results also showed that there were highly significant effects of ethanol on the total number of cytoplasmic granules per cell. In addition, changes were observed in mitochondria such as clumping, elongation, swelling and disruption of cristae, as well as changes in the topographic distribution of granules in the cytoplasm such as registration of cytoplasmic areas with numerous granules and areas with a smaller number or without any granules. Some neutrophils of ethanol-treated rats had autophagic vacuoles. The results indicate some ultrastructural abnormalities of PMN in chronic experimental alcoholism that may be related to polymorphonuclear phagocyte dysfunction. PMID:8189745

  11. Eosinophils versus Neutrophils in Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Bass, David A.; Szejda, Pamela

    1979-01-01

    Eosinophil leukocytes have been reported to have a major role in host defense against invasive, migratory phases of helminth infestations, yet the relative larvicidal abilities of eosinophils and neutrophils have not been thoroughly examined. This study examined the killing of newborn (migratory phase) larvae of Trichinella spiralis during incubation by human granulocytes in vitro. The assay employed cultue of larvae with cells, sera, and reagents in microtiter wells with direct counting of surviving larvae after incubation. Killed larvae appeared to be lysed. Verification of the microplate assay was obtained by demonstrating complete loss of infectivity of larvae incubated with leukocytes and immune serum. In the presence of optimal immune serum concentrations, purified neutrophils or eosinophils achieved ≥95% killing of larvae at cell:larva ratios of 2,000:1 or greater. Fresh normal serum prompted slight (19%) killing by leukocytes at a cell:larva ratio of 9,000:1. Cells plus heat-inactivated normal serum and all sera preparations in the absence of leukocytes killed <8% of the larvae. The activity of immune serum was opsonic. Cells adhered to larvae that had been preincubated in immune serum, and immunofluorescent studies indicated that such preopsonized larvae were coated with immunoglobulin (Ig)G. However, preopsonized larvae lost opsonic activity and surface IgG during incubation for 3 h in medium lacking immune serum. The rate of killing was dependent on the cell:larva ratio; at high leukocyte concentrations (4,200:1), 99% were killed within 7 h; at lower cell:larva ratios, killing increased steadily during a 20-h incubation period. Killing was inhibited by 20 μg catalase, 5 μg/ml cytochalasin B, or 5μM colchicine, but was unchanged by superoxide dismutase and was enhanced by azide or cyanide. Leukocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease, lacking ability to mount a normal oxidative response, demonstrated a markedly suppressed larvicidal

  12. Role of the Yersinia pestis Ail protein in preventing a protective polymorphonuclear leukocyte response during bubonic plague.

    PubMed

    Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Jarrett, Clayton O; Callison, Julie A; Gardner, Donald; Buchanan, Susan K; Plano, Gregory V

    2011-12-01

    The ability of Yersinia pestis to forestall the mammalian innate immune response is a fundamental aspect of plague pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the effect of Ail, a 17-kDa outer membrane protein that protects Y. pestis against complement-mediated lysis, on bubonic plague pathogenesis in mice and rats. The Y. pestis ail mutant was attenuated for virulence in both rodent models. The attenuation was greater in rats than in mice, which correlates with the ability of normal rat serum, but not mouse serum, to kill ail-negative Y. pestis in vitro. Intradermal infection with the ail mutant resulted in an atypical, subacute form of bubonic plague associated with extensive recruitment of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN or neutrophils) to the site of infection in the draining lymph node and the formation of large purulent abscesses that contained the bacteria. Systemic spread and mortality were greatly attenuated, however, and a productive adaptive immune response was generated after high-dose challenge, as evidenced by high serum antibody levels against Y. pestis F1 antigen. The Y. pestis Ail protein is an important bubonic plague virulence factor that inhibits the innate immune response, in particular the recruitment of a protective PMN response to the infected lymph node.

  13. Granulocyte defects and opioid receptors in chronic exposure to heroin or methadone in humans.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, A; Mazzucchelli, I; Fossati, G; Gritti, D; Fea, M; Ricevuti, G

    1994-11-01

    In order to elucidate better the immunological effect of opioid abuse in the absence of HIV infection as a confounding factor, granulocyte function was investigated in three groups of HIV-negative subjects, including 20 active parenteral heroin abusers (H), 20 long-term methadone-maintained former opiate abusers (M) and 20 healthy controls (C). Chemotaxis to N-formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP), casein and activated plasma were markedly and similarly reduced (approx. 50%) in both H and M groups, as was true for superoxide production after fMLP and PMA stimulation, 47% decrease of C values. Polymorphonuclear (PMN) of H and M subjects also exhibited a very marked and similar reduction in the expression of CD11b/CD18 integrin receptors after fMLP treatment, with values that were less than 10% of those in controls, as observed by flow cytometry. In parallel, PMN of H and M individuals presented an approximately four-fold increase in opioid receptors numbers compared to controls, a significant inverse correlation existing between the increase in opiate receptors and defective chemotaxis. The possible mechanism underlying the observed changes in PMN of H and M individuals is discussed.

  14. Granulocyte and monocyte adsorption apheresis as an effective treatment for Reiter disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshifuku, A; Oyama, K; Ibusuki, A; Kawasaki, M; Sakanoue, M; Matsushita, S; Kawai, K; Kawahara, K; Maruyama, I; Kanekura, T

    2012-04-01

    Reiter disease (RD) is characterized by a triad of sterile arthritis, urethritis and conjunctivitis. The conditions occur concomitantly or sequentially, and are associated with mucocutaneous features such as circinate balanitis and stomatitis. Arthritis usually occurs in attacks followed by recovery, but it sometimes progresses to permanent damage of the affected joints. Because the symptoms of this disorder are attributable to activated neutrophils, we assessed the efficacy of granulocyte and monocyte adsorption apheresis (GCAP) in a 73-year-old man with RD who had skin rashes on his penis, scrotum and right hand, with severe arthralgia. The patient's skin rash and joint pain responded dramatically to five sessions of GCAP delivered at intervals of 5 days. We present a detailed description of the patient and discuss the mechanisms of GCAP, and suggest that GCAP may be useful for treating RD.

  15. Efficacy of granulocyte and monocyte adsorption apheresis for treatment of palmoplantar pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Tomomi; Tawada, Chisato; Mizutani, Yoko; Doi, Tomoaki; Yoshida, Shozo; Ogura, Shinji; Seishima, Mariko

    2014-06-01

    Palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP) is characterized by neutrophilic pustules with erythema, which are limited to the hands and feet. Although granulocyte and monocyte adsorption apheresis (GMA) has shown remarkable effects on generalized pustular psoriasis, there are few reports of PPP treated with GMA. We treated three refractory PPP patients using GMA weekly for 5 weeks. The skin eruptions were assessed by a 5-grade score for scales, pustules, and erythema. GMA decreased the total grade from 9 to 2 in patients 1 and 2, and from 7 to 3 in patient 3. The GMA effects were estimated to be excellent in all three patients. Pustule formation and pain disappeared in all cases. The treatment effect lasted for at least 5 months after GMA. GMA was also effective for relieving the arthralgia in one patient, but it recurred at 6 weeks. Based on these findings, GMA could be an effective therapy for refractory PPP.

  16. Neutrophil kinetics in the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Deubelbeiss, K A; Dancey, J T; Harker, L A; Finch, C A

    1975-01-01

    The production of neutrophils in dogs has been estimated from the number of postmitotic neutrophils in the marrow and the transit time of a [3H]-thymidine pulse. The number of postmitotic neutrophils was derived from the erythron iron turnover measurement of erythroid number and the neutrophil-erythroid ratio in bone marrow sections. The mean value for marrow postmitotic neutrophils in dogs was 5.61 plus or minus 0.56 times 10-9 cells/kg. The mean transit time of these neutrophils was calculated to be 82.1 h. A marrow production of 1.65 times 10-9 neutrophils/kg/day was calculated from these data. The turnover of circulating neutrophils was measured by [3H]thymidine and [32P]diisopropylphospho-fluoridate (DF32P) labeling of blood neutrophils. [3H]-Thymidine labeling gave a calculated recovery of 65 per cent, a t1/2 disappearance time of 6.7 h, and a calculated turnover of 1.66 times 10-9 cells/kg/day. Corresponding results with DF32P tagging were 51 per cent, 5.4 h, and 2.89 times 10-9 cells/kg/day. The discrepancy between these two tags persisted in doubly tagged cells and was considered to be due to elution of DF32P. PMID:1120785

  17. Biologic and immunohistochemical analysis of interleukin-6 expression in vivo. Constitutive and induced expression in murine polymorphonuclear and mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Terebuh, P. D.; Otterness, I. G.; Strieter, R. M.; Lincoln, P. M.; Danforth, J. M.; Kunkel, S. L.; Chensue, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is considered an important multifunctional cytokine involved in the regulation of a variety of cellular responses, including the induction of acute-phase protein synthesis, lymphocyte activation, and hematopoiesis. In vitro studies have identified many cells that can produce IL-6, but the cellular sources under physiologic conditions have yet to be identified. Using immunoaffinity purified goat anti-murine IL-6, the authors performed immunohistochemical studies to localize cells expressing IL-6 in selected organs of normal and endotoxin challenged NIH-Swiss outbred mice. In the blood, findings were correlated with cell-associated bioactivity using the standard B9 cell proliferation assay. In normal mice, constitutive expression was seen in granulocytes, monocytes and their precursors as well as in bone marrow and splenic stromal macrophages. Hepatic macrophages were negative, as were lymphocytes, megakaryocytes, erythroid precursors, and endothelial cells. In the absence of significant serum levels of IL-6, cell-associated IL-6 bioactivity was detected in circulating polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), but not lymphocytes. After endotoxin challenge, there was a threefold increase in PMN IL-6 content from 1 to 3 hours followed by almost complete depletion at 6 hours. This correlated well with a threefold increase of IL-6 mRNA in the bone marrow followed by a decrease at 6 hours. This pattern also correlated with serum levels of IL-6, which peaked at 3 hours and dropped significantly by 6 hours. By 24 hours, cell-associated IL-6 showed recovery with no increase in serum levels. In vivo findings showing IL-6 expression in bone marrow macrophages support in vitro studies suggesting a role for IL-6 in hematopoiesis. Furthermore, PMNs as well as macrophages are likely important sources of IL-6 during inflammatory and septic states. Images Figure 1 Figure 5 PMID:1372159

  18. Granulocyte migration in uncomplicated intestinal anastomosis in man

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Gibson, R.; Guest, J.; Spencer, J.; Lavender, J.P.; Hodgson, H.J.

    1986-03-01

    We have investigated the presence, duration, and clinical significance of granulocyte accumulation, using indium-111 granulocyte scanning, in patients following uncomplicated intestinal anastomosis. Eight patients underwent intestinal resection and anastomosis (right hemicolectomy, 5; sigmoid colectomy, 2; ileal resection, 1) for carcinoma, angiodysplasia, or perforation. All patients had an uneventful postoperative course, with no evidence of any leakage or infection. Indium-111 granulocyte scan and abdominal ultrasound were performed 7-20 days (12 +/- 4.7 means +/- SD) following surgery. Indium-111 granulocyte scan showed the presence of labeled granulocytes at the site of anastomosis in all patients. In three of eight, cells subsequently passed into the lumen of the bowel. In contrast, granulocytes were not visualized along the abdominal incision. Thus, in contrast to skin wounds, granulocytes continue migrating into the intestinal wall in areas of anastomosis for at least up to 20 days following surgical trauma. They may play a significant role both in healing the anastomosis and in preventing systemic bacterial infection. Moreover, indium-111 granulocyte scans following intestinal surgery should be interpreted with care, and the presence of labeled granulocytes around anastomoses does not necessarily indicate abscess formation.

  19. A Randomized Controlled Phase III Trial of Recombinant Human Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (Filgrastim) for Treatment of Severe Chronic Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Dale, David C.; Bonilla, Mary Ann; Davis, Mark W.; Nakanishi, Arline M.; Hammond, William P.; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Wang, Winfred; Jakubowski, Ann; Winton, Elliott; Lalezari, Parviz; Robinson, William; Glaspy, John A.; Emerson, Steve; Gabrilove, Janice; Vincent, Martha; Boxer, Laurence A.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with idiopathic, cyclic, and congenital neutropenia have recurrent severe bacterial infections. One hundred twenty-three patients with recurrent infections and severe chronic neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count < 0.5 × 109/L) due to these diseases were enrolled in this multi-center phase III trial. They were randomized to either immediately beginning recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (filgrastim) (3.45 to 11.50 μg/kg/d, subcutaneously) or entering a 4-month observation period followed by filgrastim administration. Blood neutrophil counts, bone marrow (BM) cell histology, and incidence and duration of infection-related events were monitored. Of the 123 patients enrolled, 120 received filgrastim. On therapy, 108 patients had a median absolute neutrophil count of ≥ 1.5 × 109/L. Examination of BM aspirates showed increased proportions of maturing neutrophils. Infection-related events were significantly decreased (P < .05) with approximately 50% reduction in the incidence and duration of infection-related events and almost 70% reduction in duration of antibiotic use. Asymptomatic splenic enlargement occurred frequently: adverse events frequently reported were bone pain, headache, and rash, which were generally mild and easily manageable. These data indicate that treatment of patients with severe chronic neutropenia with filgrastim results in a stimulation of BM production and maturation of neutrophils, an increase in circulating neutrophils, and a reduction in infection-related events. PMID:8490166

  20. Annexin A1 and the Resolution of Inflammation: Modulation of Neutrophil Recruitment, Apoptosis, and Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Michelle Amantéa; Vago, Juliana Priscila; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Sousa, Lirlândia Pires

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils (also named polymorphonuclear leukocytes or PMN) are essential components of the immune system, rapidly recruited to sites of inflammation, providing the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Since neutrophils can also cause tissue damage, their fine-tuned regulation at the inflammatory site is required for proper resolution of inflammation. Annexin A1 (AnxA1), also known as lipocortin-1, is an endogenous glucocorticoid-regulated protein, which is able to counterregulate the inflammatory events restoring homeostasis. AnxA1 and its mimetic peptides inhibit neutrophil tissue accumulation by reducing leukocyte infiltration and activating neutrophil apoptosis. AnxA1 also promotes monocyte recruitment and clearance of apoptotic leukocytes by macrophages. More recently, some evidence has suggested the ability of AnxA1 to induce macrophage reprogramming toward a resolving phenotype, resulting in reduced production of proinflammatory cytokines and increased release of immunosuppressive and proresolving molecules. The combination of these mechanisms results in an effective resolution of inflammation, pointing to AnxA1 as a promising tool for the development of new therapeutic strategies to treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:26885535

  1. Neutrophils extracellular traps damage Naegleria fowleri trophozoites opsonized with human IgG.

    PubMed

    Contis-Montes de Oca, A; Carrasco-Yépez, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Pacheco-Yépez, J; Bonilla-Lemus, P; Pérez-López, J; Rojas-Hernández, S

    2016-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri infects humans through the nasal mucosa causing a disease in the central nervous system known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) play a critical role in the early phase of N. fowleri infection. Recently, a new biological defence mechanism called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has been attracting attention. NETs are composed of nuclear DNA combined with histones and antibacterial proteins, and these structures are released from the cell to direct its antimicrobial attack. In this work, we evaluate the capacity of N. fowleri to induce the liberation of NETs by human PMN cells. Neutrophils were cocultured with unopsonized or IgG-opsonized N. fowleri trophozoites. DNA, histone, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase (NE) were stained, and the formation of NETs was evaluated by confocal microscopy and by quantifying the levels of extracellular DNA. Our results showed N. fowleri induce the liberation of NETs including release of MPO and NE by human PMN cells as exposure interaction time is increased, but N. fowleri trophozoites evaded killing. However, when trophozoites were opsonized, they were susceptible to the neutrophils activity. Therefore, our study suggests that antibody-mediated PMNs activation through NET formation may be crucial for antimicrobial responses against N. fowleri.

  2. Neutrophils extracellular traps damage Naegleria fowleri trophozoites opsonized with human IgG.

    PubMed

    Contis-Montes de Oca, A; Carrasco-Yépez, M; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Pacheco-Yépez, J; Bonilla-Lemus, P; Pérez-López, J; Rojas-Hernández, S

    2016-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri infects humans through the nasal mucosa causing a disease in the central nervous system known as primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) play a critical role in the early phase of N. fowleri infection. Recently, a new biological defence mechanism called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has been attracting attention. NETs are composed of nuclear DNA combined with histones and antibacterial proteins, and these structures are released from the cell to direct its antimicrobial attack. In this work, we evaluate the capacity of N. fowleri to induce the liberation of NETs by human PMN cells. Neutrophils were cocultured with unopsonized or IgG-opsonized N. fowleri trophozoites. DNA, histone, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and neutrophil elastase (NE) were stained, and the formation of NETs was evaluated by confocal microscopy and by quantifying the levels of extracellular DNA. Our results showed N. fowleri induce the liberation of NETs including release of MPO and NE by human PMN cells as exposure interaction time is increased, but N. fowleri trophozoites evaded killing. However, when trophozoites were opsonized, they were susceptible to the neutrophils activity. Therefore, our study suggests that antibody-mediated PMNs activation through NET formation may be crucial for antimicrobial responses against N. fowleri. PMID:27189133

  3. Gcsf-Chr19 promotes neutrophil migration to damaged tissue through blood vessels in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Galdames, Jorge A; Zuñiga-Traslaviña, Constanza; Reyes, Ariel E; Feijóo, Carmen G

    2014-07-01

    G-CSF is an essential cytokine that regulates proliferation and differentiation of granulocytes from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. In mammals G-CSF has been identified as a key factor that promotes the release of neutrophils from the bone marrow into the blood circulation. In silico analysis indicates that zebrafish has two gcsf genes, gcsf-chr12 in chromosome 12 and gcsf-chr19 in chromosome 19. Gcsf-Chr12 participates in emergency myelopoiesis, but, in contrast to its mammalian orthologue, is not involved in neutrophil migration toward damaged tissue. In turn, the function of Gcsf-Chr19 has not been examined yet. In this study, we analyzed the role of Gcsf-Chr19 in regulating neutrophil migration toward the wound. Our results indicated that during the first h after caudal fin transection, neutrophils migrate from the hematopoietic tissue toward the injury, using the extracellular matrix as a substrate. Later, between 3 and 4 h postdamage, the recruitment mainly occurs through the bloodstream, and only a few neutrophils still use the extracellular matrix to migrate. During this process, the transcriptional levels of gcsf-chr19 are considerably increased, reaching a peak 1 h postdamage. The knockdown of Gcsf-chr19 indicated that the percentage of neutrophils that reach the wound decreased after the first h postinjury, suggesting that the knockdown specifically affects neutrophils that travel to the wound through blood vessels. Together, our data provide novel information about the regulation of neutrophil migration in zebrafish, positioning Gcsf-Chr19 as a key signal during the course of an inflammatory process triggered by severe damage.

  4. Dendritic Cells Take up and Present Antigens from Viable and Apoptotic Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, Carlos; Suarez, Natalia; Oñate, Carmen; Perez-Gracia, Jose L.; Martinez-Forero, Ivan; Hervas-Stubbs, Sandra; Rodriguez, Inmaculada; Perez, Guiomar; Bolaños, Elixabet; Palazon, Asis; de Sanmamed, Miguel Fernandez; Morales-Kastresana, Aizea; Gonzalez, Alvaro; Melero, Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are endowed with the ability to cross-present antigens from other cell types to cognate T cells. DC are poised to meet polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) as a result of being co-attracted by interleukin-8 (IL-8), for instance as produced by tumor cells or infected tissue. Human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow-derived DC can readily internalize viable or UV-irradiated PMNs. Such internalization was abrogated at 4°C and partly inhibited by anti-CD18 mAb. In mice, DC which had internalized PMNs containing electroporated ovalbumin (OVA) protein, were able to cross-present the antigen to CD8 (OT-1) and CD4 (OT-2) TCR-transgenic T cells. Moreover, in humans, tumor cell debris is internalized by PMNs and the tumor-cell material can be subsequently taken up from the immunomagnetically re-isolated PMNs by DC. Importantly, if human neutrophils had endocytosed bacteria, they were able to trigger the maturation program of the DC. Moreover, when mouse PMNs with E. coli in their interior are co-injected in the foot pad with DC, many DC loaded with fluorescent material from the PMNs reach draining lymph nodes. Using CT26 (H-2d) mouse tumor cells, it was observed that if tumor cells are intracellularly loaded with OVA protein and UV-irradiated, they become phagocytic prey of H-2d PMNs. If such PMNs, that cannot present antigens to OT-1 T cells, are immunomagnetically re-isolated and phagocytosed by H-2b DC, such DC productively cross-present OVA antigen determinants to OT-1 T cells. Cross-presentation to adoptively transferred OT-1 lymphocytes at draining lymph nodes also take place when OVA-loaded PMNs (H-2d) are coinjected in the footpad of mice with autologous DC (H-2b). In summary, our results indicate that antigens phagocytosed by short-lived PMNs can be in turn internalized and productively cross-presented by DC. PMID:22206007

  5. Automated segmentation and tracking of non-rigid objects in time-lapse microscopy videos of polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Brandes, Susanne; Mokhtari, Zeinab; Essig, Fabian; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2015-02-01

    Time-lapse microscopy is an important technique to study the dynamics of various biological processes. The labor-intensive manual analysis of microscopy videos is increasingly replaced by automated segmentation and tracking methods. These methods are often limited to certain cell morphologies and/or cell stainings. In this paper, we present an automated segmentation and tracking framework that does not have these restrictions. In particular, our framework handles highly variable cell shapes and does not rely on any cell stainings. Our segmentation approach is based on a combination of spatial and temporal image variations to detect moving cells in microscopy videos. This method yields a sensitivity of 99% and a precision of 95% in object detection. The tracking of cells consists of different steps, starting from single-cell tracking based on a nearest-neighbor-approach, detection of cell-cell interactions and splitting of cell clusters, and finally combining tracklets using methods from graph theory. The segmentation and tracking framework was applied to synthetic as well as experimental datasets with varying cell densities implying different numbers of cell-cell interactions. We established a validation framework to measure the performance of our tracking technique. The cell tracking accuracy was found to be >99% for all datasets indicating a high accuracy for connecting the detected cells between different time points. PMID:25465844

  6. The role of neutrophilic mediators in acute inflammation of the gut

    SciTech Connect

    von Ritter, C.

    1988-01-01

    Activation of granulocytes within the lamina propria by luminally derived bacterial products may represent an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. One objective of this thesis was to determine the effects of luminal perfusion with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), a bacterial product that attracts and activates granulocytes, on mucosal permeability in different regions of the rat small intestine and colon. Mucosal permeability was measured using the blood-to-lumen clearance of {sup 51}Cr-EDTA during luminal perfusion with FMLP dissolved in Tyrode's solution. Of the bowel segments studied, mucosal permeability was significantly increased only in the distal 10 cm of the ileum. In order to define the role of neutrophilic oxidants in FMLP-induced ileitis, we evaluated the protective effect of several free radical scavengers and antioxidant enzymes. Pretreatment with the either superoxide dismutase or catalase had no effect on the FMLP-induced increase in mucosal permeability. However, treatment with either Mn-desferrioxamine, PZ51, desferrioxamine, or dimethylsulfoxide significantly attenuated FMLP-induced mucosal damage. Non-oxidative toxins released from activated neutrophil may be another mechanism by which FMLP increases mucosal permeability. In order to investigate the role of neutrophilic proteases in FMLP-induced ileitis, the effects of the nonspecific protease inhibitor soybean trypsin inhibitor, and the elastase inhibitors MeOSuc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-CH{sub 2}Cl(MAAPV) and Eglin C on the FMLP-induced increases in {sup 51}Cr-EDTA clearance were determined.

  7. Aggregation of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes during phagocytosis of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Henricks, P A; van der Tol, M E; Verhoef, J

    1984-01-01

    The process of aggregation of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) during the uptake of bacteria was studied. Radiolabelled S. aureus were opsonized in different sera, washed, resuspended in buffer and added to the PMN. Uptake of the bacteria and aggregation of the PMN were measured simultaneously. Maximal aggregation occurred within 6 min, when 5 X 10(6) PMN had phagocytosed 2.5 X 10(8) S. aureus. Also the effects of serum concentrations and different sera for opsonization of the bacteria on PMN aggregation were studied. Despite normal uptake, aggregation of PMN was low when bacteria were opsonized in complement-deficient sera. Furthermore when PMN were treated with pronase to inactivate complement receptors on the cell surface of the PMN, and bacteria preopsonized in immune serum were added, no change in uptake occurred, although the degree of aggregation halved compared to control PMN. So, interaction between the bacteria and the complement receptor of the PMN cell membrane is needed for triggering the process of aggregation. By using dansylcadaverin and diphenylamine to modulate lysosomal enzyme release, azide or PMN from a chronic granulomatous disease patient to study the effect of the formation of oxygen species, and theophylline, DB-cAMP or 8 Br-cAMP to increase cAMP levels, it was concluded that aggregation of PMN during phagocytosis was not dependent on oxygen metabolism, degranulation or cAMP levels of PMN. PMID:6086503

  8. Effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Silberstein, C.F.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of lead on the killing mechanisms of rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) were investigated, using male Long-Evans rats exposed to 1% lead acetate in the drinking water for varying periods of time to achieve blood lead levels ranging from 20-200 ..mu..g/dl. Studies of PMN bacterial and fungal killing activity, chemotaxis and phagocytosis demonstrated that: 1) bactericidal activity of PMN from rats exposed to lead was not altered; 2) chemotactic activity remained within normal limits; 3) the phagocytic ability of the PMN also remained unaltered. In addition to these normal findings, one major abnormality was demonstrated: a significant decrease in the ability of PMN from rats exposed to lead to kill Candida albicans. This defect was not related to age or to length of exposure. It could not be produced by addition of lead to the test system in vitro. Further investigation revealed significant decreases in PMN glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, catalase, and myeloperoxidase activities. These data support two possible mechanisms for the abnormal fungicidal activity of PMN from lead-exposed rats: decrease in ability to reduce oxygen to active metabolites, or reduction in myeloperoxidase activity due to diminshed synthesis of the heme moiety required for its function.

  9. The role of granulocytes in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Palmblad, J

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils secrete of variety of biologically active compounds, especially when they accumulate at sites of inflammation. Secretory products are delivered to the tissues both by exocytosis of cytoplasmic granules and by metabolic events taking place at the plasma membrane. The release of lysosomal constituents, such as lactoferrin, elastase and collagenases, is associated with the regulation of the turnover of neutrophils, their participation and activity in the inflammatory reaction, and breakdown of cartilage and connective tissues, for example. Generation of cytotoxic oxygen radicals and compounds, e.g. the superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and the hydroxyl radical, is initiated by many inflammatory mediators. These two systems, either individually or in collaboration, can cause damage to many types of structures. For instance, when endothelial cells are injured, increased vascular permeability may occur. If such injury involves the pulmonary capillary system a respiratory distress syndrome may supervene. Leukotrienes are potent mediators of inflammation, formed in neutrophils after exposure to various other chemotactic or perturbating compounds. Leukotriene B4 is the most potent of the hitherto described compounds, being a promotor of neutrophil adherence, aggregation and chemotaxis in vitro of similar potency as the formylated synthetic chemotactic peptides, e.g. fMLP, and as the C5a fragment. However, the ability of LTB4 to induce a release of lysosomal enzymes is only half of that of fMLP, and, finally, the capacity to initiate a chemiluminescence response, being a measure of the oxidative metabolism, is only one-tenth of that of fMLP. Thus, leukotrienes of the B series seem to be a signal system whereby activated neutrophils can recruit cellular reinforcements, and, possibly, to act as an intracellular, second messenger system.

  10. Similar activation state of neutrophils in sputum of asthma patients irrespective of sputum eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Tak, T; Hilvering, B; Tesselaar, K; Koenderman, L

    2015-11-01

    Inflammatory phenotypes of asthma are associated with differences in disease characteristics. It is unknown whether these inflammatory phenotypes are reflected by the activation status of neutrophils in blood and sputum. We obtained peripheral blood and induced sputum from 21 asthma patients and stratified our samples based on sputum eosinophilia resulting in two groups (>3% eosinophils: n = 13, <3%: n = 8). Eosinophils and neutrophils from blood and sputum were analysed for expression of activation and degranulation markers by flow cytometry. Data were analysed by both classical, non-parametric statistics and a multi-dimensional approach, using principal component analysis (PCA). Patients with sputum eosinophilia were characterized by increased asthma control questionnaire (ACQ) scores and blood eosinophil counts. Both sputum neutrophils and eosinophils displayed an activated and degranulated phenotype compared to cells obtained from blood. Specifically, degranulation of all granule types was detected in sputum cells, combined with an increased expression of the activation markers (activated) Mac-1 (CD11b), programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) (CD274) and a decreased expression of CD62L. CD69 expression was only increased on sputum eosinophils. Surface marker expression of neutrophils was similar in the presence or absence of eosinophilia, either by single or multi-dimensional analysis. Sputum neutrophils were highly activated and degranulated irrespective of sputum eosinophilia. Therefore, we conclude that differences in granulocyte activation in sputum and/or blood are not associated with clinical differences in the two groups of asthma patients. The finding of PD-L1 expression on sputum granulocytes suggests an immunomodulatory role of these cells in the tissue.

  11. Febrile-range hyperthermia augments pulmonary neutrophil recruitment and amplifies pulmonary oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hasday, Jeffrey D; Garrison, Allen; Singh, Ishwar S; Standiford, Theodore; Ellis, Garrettson S; Rao, Srinivas; He, Ju-Ren; Rice, Penny; Frank, Mariah; Goldblum, Simeon E; Viscardi, Rose M

    2003-06-01

    Febrile-range hyperthermia (FRH) improves survival in experimental infections by accelerating pathogen clearance, but may also increase collateral tissue injury. We hypothesized that FRH would worsen the outcome of inflammation stimulated by a non-replicating agonist and tested this hypothesis in a murine model of pulmonary oxygen toxicity. Using a conscious, temperature-controlled mouse model, we showed that maintaining a core temperature at FRH (39 degrees C to 40 degrees C) rather than at euthermic levels (36.5 degrees C to 37 degrees C) during hyperoxia exposure accelerated lethal pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, reduced the inspired oxygen threshold for lethality, induced expression of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, and expanded the circulating neutrophil pool. In these same mice, FRH augmented pulmonary expression of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines, KC and LPS-induced CXC chemokine, enhanced recruitment of neutrophils, and changed the histological pattern of lung injury to a neutrophilic interstitial pneumonitis. Immunoblockade of CXC receptor-2 abrogated neutrophil recruitment, reduced pulmonary vascular injury, and delayed death. These combined data demonstrate that FRH may enlist distinct mediators and effector cells to profoundly shift the host response to a defined injurious stimulus, in part by augmenting delivery of neutrophils to sites of inflammation, such as may occur in infections. In certain conditions, such as in the hyperoxic lung, this process may be deleterious.

  12. Neutrophil cell death, activation and bacterial infection in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Watt, A; Courtney, J; Moore, J; Ennis, M; Elborn, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterised by chronic endobronchial bacterial infection and neutrophil mediated inflammation. Neutrophil apoptosis is essential for the resolution of inflammation. This study assessed the relationship between levels of neutrophil apoptosis and sputum microbiology in matched clinically stable patients with CF. Methods: Sputum was induced from 34 patients (nine with no Gram negative infection, 10 colonised with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 with Burkholderia cenocepacia, and five with other infections). Apoptotic neutrophils measured by flow cytometric Annexin V/propidium iodide staining and morphology were similar in all groups. Results: Patients infected with P aeruginosa or B cenocepacia had a significantly lower percentage of viable neutrophils in the sputum than those with no Gram negative infection (Kruskal-Wallis p = 0.01, median (interquartile range (IQR)) 14.2% (9.4–21.6), 15.8% (12.3–19.5), and 48.4% (23.0–66.4); p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively). They also had significantly higher levels of secondary necrotic granulocytes in sputum than patients with no Gram negative infection (Kruskal-Wallis p<0.0001, median (IQR) 55.5% (48.4–64.5), 50.4% (44.6–61.9), and 24.8% (14.4–30.5); p<0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively). Neutrophils (x106/g sputum) in P aeruginosa infected patients (Kruskal-Wallis p = 0.05, median (IQR) 6.3 (3.5–12.7)) and B cenocepacia infected patients (5.7 (1.5–14.5)) were significantly higher than in the group with no Gram negative infection (0.5 (0.5–4.3), p = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Conclusion: These results suggest that cell death and clearance may be altered in patients with CF colonised with P aeruginosa and B cenocepacia compared with those with no Gram negative infection. PMID:16061707

  13. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Presenting as Intracerebral Granulocytic Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, E; Thirumavalavan; Sowrirajan

    2015-10-01

    The CNS involvement of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is more commonly manifest as meningeal involvement. Rarely it may present as intravascular tumor aggregates called granulocytic sarcoma which presents as intracranial hemorrhage. We are presenting a case of intracranial, intra-parenchymal granulocytic sarcoma (other names: chloroma, extramedullary myeloblastoma), presenting as acute hemiplegia without cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27608697

  14. Locomotion of granulocytes on an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Doroszewski, J; Lewandowska, K; Wierzbicki, W

    1986-01-01

    The paper presents a quantitative study of the trajectories of rat granulocytes (PMNs) migrating on a glass surface inclined at various angles, i.e. under the action of gravitational force component parallel to the plane. The action of the force of the order of 5 X 10(-13) N (component parallel to the plane inclined at 80 degrees) accompanied by the decrease of a gravitational component perpendicular to the surface does not disrupt the adhesion contact of migrating PMNs with the serum coated glass surface. Under the action of the external force parallel to the surface, the PMNs exhibit a tendency to migrate in the direction of the force vector and the angles between elementary segments (steps) of cell trajectories are smaller in comparison with migration on a horizontal plane (0 degrees inclination). It has been found that the mean velocity of motion of PMNs locomoting on a steep slope (70 degrees and 80 degrees) is greater in comparison with the migration velocity on a horizontal surface. The increase of velocity concerns not only cells migrating in the downward direction, but also those which move upwards. Possible mechanisms of the influence of external force on direction and rate of migration of granulocytes are discussed, namely modification of adhesion force, stimulation of cell motile activity, individual variability of cell adhesive and migration properties, shortening of transient locomotory adhesions.

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species, Granulocytes, and NETosis.

    PubMed

    Araźna, Magdalena; Pruchniak, Michał P; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    When pathogens invade the body, neutrophils create the first line of defense. Basic weaponry consists of phagocytosis and degranulation, but these cells have yet another ace in the sleeve, a unique strategy in which invading microorganisms are being destroyed. These cellular warriors are able to release nuclear chromatin and form extracellular structure, known as neutrophil extracellular traps (NET). NET formation is connected with the presence of free radicals. Research has shown that inhibition of free radical formation leads to suppression of NET release. The exact mechanisms controlling cooperation of free radicals with NET still remain unclear. New investigations in this field may contribute to discovery of NET etiology and put a new light on related disorders. PMID:25310939

  16. Effects of antiretroviral dideoxynucleosides on polymorphonuclear leukocyte function.

    PubMed Central

    Roilides, E; Venzon, D; Pizzo, P A; Rubin, M

    1990-01-01

    Dideoxynucleosides (zidovudine[AZT], dideoxycytidine[ddC], and dideoxyinosine[ddI]) are promising new agents for the management of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections. In light of recent data demonstrating defects in the polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) bactericidal activity of HIV-1-infected patients and since many chemotherapeutic agents affect PMN function, we examined their effects on the function of PMNs from both healthy and HIV-1-infected individuals in vitro. AZT (0.1 to 25 microM), ddC (0.01 to 1 microM), and ddI (0.2 to 50 microM) had no effect on viability, chemotaxis to N-fromylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine, phagocytosis of Candida albicans or Staphylococcus aureus, or superoxide production following stimulation by N-formylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine. Killing of C. albicans was not affected by AZT but was enhanced by 0.1 and 1 microM ddc (a 1 microM, killing was 26.0 +/- 2.02% compared with 17.0 +/- 0.73% for controls: P = 0.006) and 0.2 to 50 microM ddI (at 10 microM, killing was 25.0 +/- 0.68% compared with 17.8 +/- 0.91% for controls; P = 0.002). Killing of S. aureus was unchanged by AZT and ddC but was significantly enhanced by ddI at 0.2 to 20 microM (at 2 microM, killing was 71.2 +/- 5.57% compared with 51.4 +/- 6.29% for controls; P = 0.0045). In addition, the preexisting defective bactericidal capacity of PMNs from HIV-1-infected patients was enhanced by ddI (P less than 0.025). Potential enhancement by these dideoxynucleosides of certain PMN functions of HIV-1-infected patients deserves further study. PMID:2178334

  17. Neutrophil Functions in Periodontal Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Vieyra, Ricarda; Rosales, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Oral tissues are constantly exposed to damage from the mechanical effort of eating and to microorganisms, mostly bacteria. In healthy gingiva tissue remodeling and a balance between bacteria and innate immune cells are maintained. However, excess of bacteria biofilm (plaque) creates an inflammation state that recruits more immune cells, mainly neutrophils to the gingiva. Neutrophils create a barrier for bacteria to reach inside tissues. When neutrophils are insufficient, bacteria thrive causing more inflammation that has been associated with systemic effects on other conditions such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. But paradoxically when neutrophils persist, they can also promote a chronic inflammatory state that leads to periodontitis, a condition that leads to damage of the bone-supporting tissues. In periodontitis, bone loss is a serious complication. How a neutrophil balance is needed for maintaining healthy oral tissues is the focus of this review. We present recent evidence on how alterations in neutrophil number and function can lead to inflammatory bone loss, and how some oral bacteria signal neutrophils to block their antimicrobial functions and promote an inflammatory state. Also, based on this new information, novel therapeutic approaches are discussed. PMID:27019855

  18. Circumventing Y. pestis Virulence by Early Recruitment of Neutrophils to the Lungs during Pneumonic Plague.

    PubMed

    Vagima, Yaron; Zauberman, Ayelet; Levy, Yinon; Gur, David; Tidhar, Avital; Aftalion, Moshe; Shafferman, Avigdor; Mamroud, Emanuelle

    2015-05-01

    Pneumonic plague is a fatal disease caused by Yersinia pestis that is associated with a delayed immune response in the lungs. Because neutrophils are the first immune cells recruited to sites of infection, we investigated the mechanisms responsible for their delayed homing to the lung. During the first 24 hr after pulmonary infection with a fully virulent Y. pestis strain, no significant changes were observed in the lungs in the levels of neutrophils infiltrate, expression of adhesion molecules, or the expression of the major neutrophil chemoattractants keratinocyte cell-derived chemokine (KC), macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). In contrast, early induction of chemokines, rapid neutrophil infiltration and a reduced bacterial burden were observed in the lungs of mice infected with an avirulent Y. pestis strain. In vitro infection of lung-derived cell-lines with a YopJ mutant revealed the involvement of YopJ in the inhibition of chemoattractants expression. However, the recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs of mice infected with the mutant was still delayed and associated with rapid bacterial propagation and mortality. Interestingly, whereas KC, MIP-2 and G-CSF mRNA levels in the lungs were up-regulated early after infection with the mutant, their protein levels remained constant, suggesting that Y. pestis may employ additional mechanisms to suppress early chemoattractants induction in the lung. It therefore seems that prevention of the early influx of neutrophils to the lungs is of major importance for Y. pestis virulence. Indeed, pulmonary instillation of KC and MIP-2 to G-CSF-treated mice infected with Y. pestis led to rapid homing of neutrophils to the lung followed by a reduction in bacterial counts at 24 hr post-infection and improved survival rates. These observations shed new light on the virulence mechanisms of Y. pestis during pneumonic plague, and have implications for the development of novel

  19. Ubiquitin-proteasome-rich cytoplasmic structures in neutrophils of patients with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Necchi, Vittorio; Minelli, Antonella; Sommi, Patrizia; Vitali, Agostina; Caruso, Roberta; Longoni, Daniela; Frau, Maria Rita; Nasi, Cristina; De Gregorio, Fabiola; Zecca, Marco; Ricci, Vittorio; Danesino, Cesare; Solcia, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    those in mutated Shwachman–Diamond syndrome patients. Conclusions Particulate cytoplasmic structures are a prominent feature of neutrophils from patients with Shwachman–Diamond syndrome. They may help us to understand the mechanism of granulocyte dysfunction and the neoplastic risk of the disease. PMID:22271888

  20. The new genetics of chronic neutrophilic leukemia and atypical CML: implications for diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Maxson, Julia E.; George, Tracy I.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Although activation of tyrosine kinase pathways is a shared theme among myeloproliferative neoplasms, the pathogenetic basis of chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) has remained elusive. Recently, we identified high-frequency oncogenic mutations in the granulocyte-colony stimulating factor receptor (CSF3R) in CNL and in some patients with atypical chronic myeloid leukemia. Inhibition of Janus kinase 2 or SRC kinase signaling downstream of mutated CSF3R is feasible and should be explored therapeutically. Herein, we discuss the potential impact of these findings for the classification and treatment of these disorders. PMID:23896413

  1. Brief review on the effect of low-power laser irradiation on neutrophils with emphasis on emerging fungal infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperandio, F. F.; Bani, G. M. A. C.; Mendes, A. C. S. C.; Brigagão, M. R. P. L.; Santos, G. B.; Malaquias, L. C. C.; Chavasco, J. K.; Verinaud, L. M.; Burger, E.

    2015-03-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) participate in an active way in the innate immunity developed after the fungal infection paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Nevertheless, the sole participation of neutrophils is not sufficient to eradicate PCM`s pathogenic fungus: Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb). In that way, we aimed to develop a treatment capable of stimulating PMN to the site of injury through low-level laser therapy (LLLT). (LLLT) is safe to use and has not been linked to microorganism resistance so far; in addition, based on previous studies we understand that LLLT may be useful to treat several medical conditions through the stimulation and activation of certain types of cells. This brief review is based on the novel attempt of activating PMN against a fungal infection.

  2. Ability of goat milk to modulate healthy human peripheral blood lymphomonocyte and polymorphonuclear cell function: in vitro effects and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Jirillo, F; Martemucci, G; D'Alessandro, A G; Panaro, M A; Cianciulli, A; Superbo, M; Jirillo, E; Magrone, T

    2010-01-01

    The in vitro effects of goat's milk from different sources (Jonica, Saanen, and Priska breeds plus a commercial preparation) on healthy human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were evaluated in terms of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokine release. According to the incubation time (24 h or 48 h) used all milks could induce release of NO from monocytes. In this context, however, in the presence of a commercial milk preparation inhibition of lypopolysaccharide (LPS)-induce NO generation was evident. Also polymorphonuclear cells stimulated with the various milks released detectable amounts of NO. In the case of Priska milk inhibition of LPS-mediated NO generation was observed. Despite a broad array of cytokines tested [Interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-alpha, Transforming Growth Factor-beta and Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor] only IL-10, TNF-alpha, and IL-6 were released by PBMCs upon stimulation with various milks. Taken together, these data indicate that goat's milk for its capacity to produce NO may exert a cardioprotective and anti-atherogenic effect in consumers. Moreover, induction of proinflammatory (TNF-alpha and IL-6) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines suggests the ability of this milk to maintain immune homeostasis in the immunocompromised host (e.g., aged people).

  3. Neutrophil elastase activity in differentiating HL-60 promyelocytes is decreased by culture with ethanol and elastase deficient neutrophils are produced in alcoholics

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, C.; Christianson, R.; Pratt, P.; Lynn, W.

    1987-05-01

    Serum-free culture of HL-60 in the presence of recombinant Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor in four days elicits a five-fold increase in esterolytic neutrophil elastase (NE) like activity measured with methoxy-succinyl-ala-ala-pro-val p-nitroanilide and purified NE standard but does not cause terminal differentiation. Simultaneous exposure to 0.2, 0.4, or 0.6% (vol./vol.) ethanol blocks this increase in NE activity. Exposure to 0.85% ethanol promotes terminal differentiation to elastase-deficient granulocytes which as been described using DMSO. To ascertain if ethanol may have similar effects on granulocytic differentiation in vivo, they compared oxidase and elastase activities of PMN's in male alcoholics on a binge (ethanol > 200 mg/dl.). In 29 patients an average of 872 (+/- 237) (SD) ng./10/sup 6/ PMN's of active NE was found compared to 1571 (+/- 177) in 13 controls. Patients admitted for treatment of alcoholism had similar NE activity in 3-4 days, showed a slight increase in activity within one week and had NE activity comparable to controls within 2-3 weeks. These findings support the previous observation that smoking related emphysema is less prevalent and severe in patients who regularly consume alcohol. They conclude that ethanol may visibly alter responsiveness of promyelocytic precursors to regulatory differentiating factors.

  4. Neutrophils prevent extracellular colonization of the liver microvasculature by Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Conlan, J W

    1996-03-01

    The early course of hepatic infection with the facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen Salmonella typhimurium was examined in control mice and in mice selectively depleted of neutrophils by treatment with a granulocyte-specific monoclonal antibody. The results show that >200-fold more salmonellae were recovered in livers of the latter group of mice than in livers of the former group by 24 h of parenterally initiated infection. Comparative histological examination of the livers from both groups of mice indicated that neutrophils participate in early anti-Salmonella defense in the liver in part by aborting infection in permissive hepatocytes and by inhibiting extracellular bacterial colonization of the hepatic microvasculature. It is shown in addition that systemic salmonellosis was also severely exacerbated in neutropenic mice infected intragastrically with the pathogen.

  5. Deficient Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in Patients Undergoing Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Jared W.; Cody, Mark J.; McManus, Meghann P.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Schiffman, Joshua D.; Yost, Christian Con

    2016-01-01

    Overwhelming infection causes significant morbidity and mortality among patients treated with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for primary immune deficiencies, syndromes of bone marrow failure, or cancer. The polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN; neutrophil) is the first responder to microbial invasion and acts within the innate immune system to contain and clear infections. PMNs contain, and possibly clear, infections in part by forming neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs are extensive lattices of extracellular DNA and decondensed chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins and degradative enzymes, such as histones, myeloperoxidase, and neutrophil elastase. They trap and contain microbes, including bacteria and fungi, and may directly affect extracellular microbial killing. Whether or not deficient NET formation contributes to the increased risk for overwhelming infection in patients undergoing BMT remains incompletely characterized, especially in the pediatric population. We examined NET formation in vitro in PMNs isolated from 24 patients who had undergone BMT for 13 different clinical indications. For these 24 study participants, the median age was 7 years. For 6 of the 24 patients, we examined NET formation by PMNs isolated from serial, peripheral blood samples drawn at three different clinical time points: pre-BMT, pre-engraftment, and post-engraftment. We found decreased NET formation by PMNs isolated from patients prior to BMT and during the pre-engraftment and post-engraftment phases, with decreased NET formation compared with healthy control PMNs detected even out to 199 days after their BMT. This decrease in NET formation after BMT did not result from neutrophil developmental immaturity as we demonstrated that >80% of the PMNs tested using flow cytometry expressed both CD10 and CD16 as markers of terminal differentiation along the neutrophilic lineage. These pilot study results mandate further exploration regarding the mechanisms or factors

  6. Deficient Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in Patients Undergoing Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Jared W; Cody, Mark J; McManus, Meghann P; Pulsipher, Michael A; Schiffman, Joshua D; Yost, Christian Con

    2016-01-01

    Overwhelming infection causes significant morbidity and mortality among patients treated with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for primary immune deficiencies, syndromes of bone marrow failure, or cancer. The polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN; neutrophil) is the first responder to microbial invasion and acts within the innate immune system to contain and clear infections. PMNs contain, and possibly clear, infections in part by forming neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs are extensive lattices of extracellular DNA and decondensed chromatin decorated with antimicrobial proteins and degradative enzymes, such as histones, myeloperoxidase, and neutrophil elastase. They trap and contain microbes, including bacteria and fungi, and may directly affect extracellular microbial killing. Whether or not deficient NET formation contributes to the increased risk for overwhelming infection in patients undergoing BMT remains incompletely characterized, especially in the pediatric population. We examined NET formation in vitro in PMNs isolated from 24 patients who had undergone BMT for 13 different clinical indications. For these 24 study participants, the median age was 7 years. For 6 of the 24 patients, we examined NET formation by PMNs isolated from serial, peripheral blood samples drawn at three different clinical time points: pre-BMT, pre-engraftment, and post-engraftment. We found decreased NET formation by PMNs isolated from patients prior to BMT and during the pre-engraftment and post-engraftment phases, with decreased NET formation compared with healthy control PMNs detected even out to 199 days after their BMT. This decrease in NET formation after BMT did not result from neutrophil developmental immaturity as we demonstrated that >80% of the PMNs tested using flow cytometry expressed both CD10 and CD16 as markers of terminal differentiation along the neutrophilic lineage. These pilot study results mandate further exploration regarding the mechanisms or factors

  7. Rabbit neutrophil chemotactic protein (NCP) activates both CXCR1 and CXCR2 and is the functional homologue for human CXCL6.

    PubMed

    Catusse, Julie; Struyf, Sofie; Wuyts, Anja; Weyler, Myke; Loos, Tamara; Gijsbers, Klara; Gouwy, Mieke; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Jo

    2004-11-15

    Neutrophil chemotactic protein (NCP) is a rabbit CXC chemokine with activating and chemotactic properties on neutrophilic granulocytes. Although its selective activity on neutrophils is demonstrated, its interactions with specific chemokine receptors are not defined. For further functional characterization, NCP was chemically synthesized and was found to be equipotent as natural NCP in neutrophil chemotaxis. To identify its human homologue, we separately expressed two potential rabbit NCP receptors (CXCR1 and CXCR2) in Jurkat cells. Pure synthetic NCP was equally efficient to promote chemotaxis through either rabbit CXCR1 or CXCR2. Moreover, chemotaxis assays on rabbit CXCR1 and CXCR2 transfectants showed that NCP uses the same receptors as interleukin-8 (IL-8), a major rabbit CXC chemokine, but not rabbit GROalpha, which only recognized CXCR2. In addition, specific inhibitors for CXCR1 or CXCR2 reduced rabbit neutrophil chemotaxis induced by NCP and rabbit IL-8. Furthermore, NCP and the structurally related human CXCR1/CXCR2 agonist CXCL6/GCP-2 (granulocyte chemotactic protein-2) cross-desensitized each other in intracellular calcium release assays on human neutrophils, further indicating that both chemokines share the same receptors. The inflammatory role of NCP was also evidenced by its potent granulocytosis inducing capacity in rabbits upon systemic administration. This study provides in vitro and in vivo evidences that NCP is the functional rabbit homologue for human CXCL6/GCP-2 rather than the most related CXCR2 agonist CXCL5/ENA-78 (epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activating peptide-78). It is concluded that the rabbit is a better model to study human neutrophil activation compared to mice, which lack CXCL8/IL-8.

  8. Histiocytoid neutrophilic dermatoses and panniculitides: variations on a theme.

    PubMed

    Chow, Stephen; Pasternak, Sylvia; Green, Peter; Tremaine, Robert; Reardon, Michael; Murray, Scott; Northgrave, Stacey; Walsh, Noreen

    2007-08-01

    Requena et al, in their article titled "Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome," in 2005, established that the dermal infiltrate in some patients with Sweet's syndrome is composed of histiocyte-like immature myeloid cells, not polymorphonuclear leukocytes as is the norm. With this premise in mind, we report on 6 cases of inflammatory skin disease in which the common denominator was a dermal and/or subcutaneous infiltrate of histiocytoid myeloid cells in patients with new-onset cutaneous eruptions and systemic symptoms. The cases were diverse clinically and microscopically, fell short of the criteria necessary for a diagnosis of classical Sweet's syndrome, and were difficult to categorize at the outset. The systemic manifestations ranged from malaise alone to a combination of fever, chills, night sweats, and polyarthralgia. The clinical morphology of the cutaneous eruptions varied from being papulovesicular in 1 patient to mainly consisting of erythematous plaques and nodules in the remainder. The dermatologists' differential diagnoses included Sweet's syndrome in 3 cases, a drug eruption in 2, and other entities such as erythema nodosum and Well's syndrome. Biopsies in all cases revealed a dermal and/or subcutaneous infiltrate composed predominantly of mononuclear histiocytoid cells of myeloid origin. With the benefit of detailed clinicopathologic correlation, the cases were classified for the purpose of this report as follows: Sweet's-like neutrophilic dermatosis, histiocytoid (3 cases); subcutaneous Sweet's syndrome, histiocytoid (2 cases); histiocytoid neutrophilic dermatosis, unspecified (1 case). In addition, we describe a further instructive case that exhibited overlap with those in the series but proved ultimately to represent leukemia cutis. The spectrum of observations in this report supports and expands the original concept of histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome. PMID:17667165

  9. Role of secretory events in modulating human neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Gallin, J I; Wright, D G; Schiffmann, E

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) locomotion and the exocytosis of neutrophil cytoplasmic granules was studied by assessing these processes in cells migrating through micropore filters and by measuring the effects of degranulating stimuli on PMN chemotaxis, orientation, adhesiveness, and ability to bind the chemoattractant f-Met-Leu-[3H]Phe. Studies of cells migrating through cellulose nitrate filters indicated that concentrations of f-Met-Leu-Phe optimal for exocytosis were greater than those optimal for chemotaxis and actually inhibited cell migration. In other studies incubation of PMNs with concentrations of secretagogues causing exocytosis of 30% or greater PMN lysozyme increased cell adhesiveness and inhibited chemotaxis. PMNs that had secreted more than 30% lysozyme appeared round, did not orient in a gradient of chemoattractant, and were capable of significantly less f-Met-Leu-[3H]Phe binding than were control cells. The decreased binding of f-Met-Leu-Phe was not associated with hydrolysis of chemotactic peptide by washed cells, although peptide hydrolysis was caused by cell products secreted extracellularly after vigorous exocytosis. In contrast, when only 10--15% cellular lysozyme was released f-Met-Leu-Phe binding was enhanced significantly and there was no depression of chemotaxis. The data indicate limited exocytosis of intracellular granule contents is associated with increased availability of PMN cehmotactic factor receptors. Vigorous exocytosis is associated with inactivation of chemotactic responsiveness related to increase cell adhesiveness, decreased PMN binding of chemotactic factors, and to hydrolysis of chemoattractants by factors secreted extracellularly. PMID:372235

  10. Treatment of methimazole-induced severe aplastic anemia with recombinant human granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor and glucocorticosteroids.

    PubMed

    López-Karpovitch, X; Ulloa-Aguirre, A; von Eiff, C; Hurtado-Monroy, R; Alanis, A

    1992-01-01

    The in vivo response to recombinant human granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (rHu GM-CSF) in facilitating the reconstitution of granulomonopoiesis was evaluated in a patient with Graves' disease who developed severe aplastic anemia during methimazole therapy. After 10 days of treatment with rHu GM-CSF, the neutrophil and monocyte counts rose to 1.65 x 10(9)/l and 0.41 x 10(9)/l, respectively. However, the patient was still dependent on erythrocyte and platelet transfusions. Two days after rHu GM-CSF withdrawal, the neutrophil count dropped off to 0.41 x 10(9)/l.rHu GM-CSF was reinitiated for 2 days along with glucocorticosteroids. With this combined therapeutic approach, the neutrophil count returned to normal and remained stable, and both Hb and platelet values began to improve. It is concluded that the combination of rHu GM-CSF and glucocorticosteroids can be used as a therapeutic option that may lead to beneficial results in drug-induced aplastic anemia.

  11. Protective effect of recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in leukocytopenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, T.; Okamura, S.; Okada, K.; Suga, A.; Shimono, N.; Ohhara, N.; Hirota, Y.; Sawae, Y.; Niho, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rmGM-CSF) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in ICR mice were investigated. Mice were treated with cyclophosphamide (CPA) and were then injected intraperitoneally with rmGM-CSF three times daily, beginning on the day after CPA treatment, for 7 days. The number of peripheral blood leukocytes in both CPA- and rmGM-CSF-treated mice and control CPA-treated mice reached a nadir on day 4, when P. aeruginosa was injected intraperitoneally. The administration of rmGM-CSF significantly increased the proportion of survivors among mice infected with a lethal dose of P. aeruginosa. This effect was further analyzed by monitoring sequential changes in leukocyte count and bacterial growth in various organs. The number of bacteria in the peritoneal cavities, peripheral blood samples, and livers of GM-CSF-treated mice decreased to an undetectable level after a transient increase, and the number was significantly lower than that in control mice. In GM-CSF-treated mice, the neutrophil levels in peripheral blood started to increase 5 days after CPA administration and were consistently higher than those in controls. Furthermore, the neutrophils in GM-CSF-treated mice were more mature morphologically. Thus, the prophylactic effect of rmGM-CSF against P. aeruginosa infection may result from a rapid recovery of myelopoiesis and a partial enhancement of mature neutrophil function. PMID:2656523

  12. Regulation of Human Neutrophil Apoptosis and Lifespan in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Jenna M; Allen, Lee-Ann H

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils (also called polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMNs) are the most abundant white blood cells in humans and play a central role in innate host defense. Another distinguishing feature of PMNs is their short lifespan. Specifically, these cells survive for less than 24 hours in the bloodstream and are inherently pre-programed to die by constitutive apoptosis. Recent data indicate that this process is regulated by intracellular signaling and changes in gene expression that define an “apoptosis differentiation program.” Infection typically accelerates neutrophil turnover, and as such, phagocytosis-induced cell death (PICD) and subsequent clearance of the corpses by macrophages are essential for control of infection and resolution of the inflammatory response. Herein we reprise recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of neutrophil apoptosis with a focus on regulatory factors and pathway intermediates that are specific to this cell type. In addition, we summarize mechanisms whereby perturbation of PMN death contributes directly to the pathogenesis of many infectious and inflammatory disease states. PMID:25278783

  13. Local Generation of Kynurenines Mediates Inhibition of Neutrophil Chemotaxis by Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Loughman, Jennifer A.; Yarbrough, Melanie L.; Tiemann, Kristin M.

    2016-01-01

    During epithelial infections, pathogenic bacteria employ an array of strategies to attenuate and evade host immune responses, including the influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN; neutrophils). Among the most common bacterial infections in humans are those of the urinary tract, caused chiefly by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). During the establishment of bacterial cystitis, UPEC suppresses innate responses via multiple independent strategies. We recently described UPEC attenuation of PMN trafficking to the urinary bladder through pathogen-specific local induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a tryptophan catabolic enzyme previously shown to have regulatory activity only in adaptive immunity. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which IDO induction attenuates PMN migration. Local tryptophan limitation, by which IDO is known to influence T cell longevity and proliferation, was not involved in its effect on PMN trafficking. Instead, metabolites in the IDO pathway, particularly l-kynurenine, directly suppressed PMN transepithelial migration and induced an attached, spread morphology in PMN both at rest and in the presence of chemotactic stimuli. Finally, kynurenines represent known ligands of the mammalian aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and UPEC infection of Ahr−/− mice recapitulated the derepressed PMN recruitment observed previously in Ido1−/− mice. UPEC therefore suppresses neutrophil migration early in bacterial cystitis by eliciting an IDO-mediated increase in local production of kynurenines, which act through the AHR to impair neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:26857571

  14. Evidence that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caspase-4 activation occur in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis can result from activation of three major pathways: the extrinsic, the intrinsic, and the most recently identified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated pathway. While the two former pathways are known to be operational in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the existence of the ER stress-mediated pathway, generally involving caspase-4, has never been reported in these cells. Recently, we have documented that arsenic trioxide (ATO) induced apoptosis in human PMNs by a mechanism that needs to be further investigated. In this study, using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we present evidence of ER alterations in PMNs activated by the ER stress inducer arsenic trioxide (ATO). Several key players of the unfolded protein response, including GRP78, GADD153, ATF6, XBP1 and eIF2alpha are expressed and activated in PMNs treated with ATO or other ER stress inducers. Although caspase-4 is expressed and activated in neutrophils, treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not attenuate the pro-apoptotic effect of ATO at a concentration that reverses caspase-4 processing and activation. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway operates in human neutrophils.

  15. Neutrophil Elastase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Groutas, William C.; Dou, Dengfeng; Alliston, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) constitutes a worldwide health problem. There is currently an urgent and unmet need for the development of small molecule therapeutics capable of blocking and/or reversing the progression of the disorder. Recent studies have greatly illuminated our understanding of the multiple pathogenic processes associated with COPD. Of paramount importance is the key role played by proteases, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and inflammation. Insights gained from these studies have made possible the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. Areas covered An overview of major developments in COPD research with emphasis on low molecular weight neutrophil elastase inhibitors is described in this review. Expert opinion Great strides have been made toward our understanding of the biochemical and cellular events associated with COPD. However, our knowledge regarding the inter-relationships among the multiple pathogenic mechanisms and their mediators involved is till limited. The problem is further compounded by the unavailability of suitable validated biomarkers for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. The complexity of COPD suggests that effective therapeutic interventions may require the administration of more than one agent such as, for instance, an HNE or MMP-12 inhibitor with an anti-inflammatory agent such as a phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor, or a dual function agent capable of disrupting the cycle of proteolysis, apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress PMID:21235378

  16. AUTOINFLAMMATORY PUSTULAR NEUTROPHILIC DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Haley B.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inflammatory pustular dermatoses constitute a spectrum of non-infectious conditions ranging from localized involvement to generalized disease with associated acute systemic inflammation and multi-organ involvement. Despite the variability in extent and severity of cutaneous presentation, each of these diseases is characterized by non-infectious neutrophilic intra-epidermal microabscesses. Many share systemic findings including fever, elevated inflammatory markers, inflammatory bowel disease and/or osteoarticular involvement, suggesting potential common pathogenic links (Figure 1). The recent discoveries of several genes responsible for heritable pustular diseases have revealed a distinct link between pustular skin disease and regulation of innate immunity. These genetic advances have led to a deeper exploration of common pathways in pustular skin disease and offer the potential for a new era of biologic therapy which targets these shared pathways. This chapter provides a new categorization of inflammatory pustular dermatoses in the context of recent genetic and biologic insights. We will discuss recently-described monogenic diseases with pustular phenotypes, including deficiency of IL-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), deficiency of the IL-36 receptor antagonist (DITRA), CARD14-associated pustular psoriasis (CAMPS), and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, acne (PAPA). We will then discuss how these new genetic advancements may inform how we view previously described pustular diseases, including pustular psoriasis and its clinical variants, with a focus on historical classification by clinical phenotype. PMID:23827244

  17. Isolation and Properties of Phagocytic Vesicles from Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stossel, Thomas P.; Pollard, Thomas D.; Mason, Robert J.; Vaughan, Martha

    1971-01-01

    A method for the isolation of intact phagocytic vesicles from guinea pig peritoneal-exudate granulocytes and human peripheral-blood leukocytes is presented. After leukocytes ingested the particles of a stable emulsion of paraffin oil, the uningested emulsion was washed away and the cells were homogenized. The homogenate was placed in the middle of a three-step discontinuous sucrose gradient and centrifuged for 1 hr at 100,000 g. The phagocytic vesicles, containing the low density paraffin-oil particles, were simultaneously washed and collected by floatation, while the other organelles, chiefly granules, sedimented through the lower wash layer, and the particle-free supernatant remained in the middle of the gradient. Emulsion particles stained with Oil Red O were employed to assay the rate of phagocytosis and to mark the location of the particles in subcellular fractions. The dye was extracted from washed cells or cell fractions with dioxane and colorimetrically quantified. The purity of phagocytic vesicles obtained by this method was assessed by electron microscopy, chemical analysis, and assay of enzyme composition. Granule-associated enzymes, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, β-glucuronidase, and peroxidase were present in the phagocytic vesicles and originated from the granules. Cyanide-resistant NADH (reduced form of diphosphopyridine nucleotide) oxidase was also found. Enzymes associated with the vesicles exhibited latency to Triton X-100. Uptake of particles and the transfer of total protein and phospholipid into phagocytic vesicles occurred simultaneously Accumulation of acid and alkaline phosphatase in the vesicles continued until phagocytosis ceased. Peroxidase, NADH oxidase, and β-glucuronidase activities in the phagocytic vesicles, on the other hand, were maximal by 30 min and increased little thereafter even when phagocytosis was still going on. Images PMID:4106463

  18. Attenuation of human neutrophil migration and function by uropathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Loughman, Jennifer A.; Hunstad, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The establishment of bacterial infections at mucosal epithelial surfaces is determined by the balance of virulence attributes of the pathogen with the activity of innate host defenses. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are key responders in many bacterial infections, but the mechanisms by which pathogens subvert these early responses to establish infection are largely undefined. Here, we model early interactions between human PMN and the primary cause of urinary tract infections, namely uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). Our objective was to define virulence phenotypes of uropathogens that permit evasion of PMN activity. We show that UPEC strains, as compared with laboratory and commensal E. coli, resist phagocytic killing and dampen the production of antimicrobial reactive oxygen species by PMN. Analysis of the transcriptional responses of PMN to E. coli strains revealed that UPEC exposure downregulates the expression of PMN genes that direct proinflammatory signaling and PMN chemotaxis, adhesion, and migration. Consistent with these data, UPEC attenuated transepithelial neutrophil recruitment in an in vitro model of acute infection and in a murine model of bacterial cystitis. We propose that these UPEC strategies are important in the establishment of epithelial infection, and that the findings are germane to bacterial infections at other epithelial surfaces. PMID:21315174

  19. Pathogenic Neisseria hitchhike on the uropod of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Söderholm, Niklas; Vielfort, Katarina; Hultenby, Kjell; Aro, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are important components of the human innate immune system and are rapidly recruited at the site of bacterial infection. Despite the effective phagocytic activity of PMNs, Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections are characterized by high survival within PMNs. We reveal a novel type IV pilus-mediated adherence of pathogenic Neisseria to the uropod (the rear) of polarized PMNs. The direct pilus-uropod interaction was visualized by scanning electron microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We showed that N. meningitidis adhesion to the PMN uropod depended on both pilus-associated proteins PilC1 and PilC2, while N. gonorrhoeae adhesion did not. Bacterial adhesion elicited accumulation of the complement regulator CD46, but not I-domain-containing integrins, beneath the adherent bacterial microcolony. Electrographs and live-cell imaging of PMNs suggested that bacterial adherence to the uropod is followed by internalization into PMNs via the uropod. We also present data showing that pathogenic Neisseria can hitchhike on PMNs to hide from their phagocytic activity as well as to facilitate the spread of the pathogen through the epithelial cell layer.

  20. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase in acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, I; Gajda, R

    1994-01-01

    The activity of alpha-amylase was measured in isolated granulocytes, serum and urine of 35 patients with acute appendicitis. The measurements were performed before operation and on the 7th day after operation. Slightly increased activity of alpha-amylase was found in the serum and urine of 15 patients. On the 7th day after operation the activity of this enzyme reached normal value. The activity of granulocyte alpha-amylase was elevated in 22 patients. In 2 of them the increased activity still maintained on the 7th day after operation. Positive correlation between the serum and granulocyte alpha-amylase activities was found. These observations allow to conclude that granulocytes are the source of increased alpha-amylase activity in the serum of patients with acute appendicitis.

  1. CXCR4+ granulocytes reflect fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Carevic, Melanie; Singh, Anurag; Rieber, Nikolaus; Eickmeier, Olaf; Griese, Matthias; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis airways are frequently colonised with fungi. However, the interaction of these fungi with immune cells and the clinical relevance in cystic fibrosis lung disease are incompletely understood.We characterised granulocytes in airway fluids and peripheral blood from cystic fibrosis patients with and without fungal colonisation, non-cystic fibrosis disease controls and healthy control subjects cross-sectionally and longitudinally and correlated these findings with lung function parameters.Cystic fibrosis patients with chronic fungal colonisation by Aspergillus fumigatus were characterised by an accumulation of a distinct granulocyte subset, expressing the HIV coreceptor CXCR4. Percentages of airway CXCR4(+) granulocytes correlated with lung disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis.These studies demonstrate that chronic fungal colonisation with A. fumigatus in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with CXCR4(+) airway granulocytes, which may serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease. PMID:25929952

  2. CXCR4+ granulocytes reflect fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Carevic, Melanie; Singh, Anurag; Rieber, Nikolaus; Eickmeier, Olaf; Griese, Matthias; Hector, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik

    2015-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis airways are frequently colonised with fungi. However, the interaction of these fungi with immune cells and the clinical relevance in cystic fibrosis lung disease are incompletely understood.We characterised granulocytes in airway fluids and peripheral blood from cystic fibrosis patients with and without fungal colonisation, non-cystic fibrosis disease controls and healthy control subjects cross-sectionally and longitudinally and correlated these findings with lung function parameters.Cystic fibrosis patients with chronic fungal colonisation by Aspergillus fumigatus were characterised by an accumulation of a distinct granulocyte subset, expressing the HIV coreceptor CXCR4. Percentages of airway CXCR4(+) granulocytes correlated with lung disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis.These studies demonstrate that chronic fungal colonisation with A. fumigatus in cystic fibrosis patients is associated with CXCR4(+) airway granulocytes, which may serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target in fungal cystic fibrosis lung disease.

  3. IL-1 Coordinates the Neutrophil Response to C. albicans in the Oral Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Altmeier, Simon; Toska, Albulena; Sparber, Florian; Teijeira, Alvaro; Halin, Cornelia; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salomé

    2016-09-01

    Mucosal infections with Candida albicans belong to the most frequent forms of fungal diseases. Host protection is conferred by cellular immunity; however, the induction of antifungal immunity is not well understood. Using a mouse model of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) we show that interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling is critical for fungal control at the onset of infection through its impact on neutrophils at two levels. We demonstrate that both the recruitment of circulating neutrophils to the site of infection and the mobilization of newly generated neutrophils from the bone marrow depended on IL-1R. Consistently, IL-1R-deficient mice displayed impaired chemokine production at the site of infection and defective secretion of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the circulation in response to C. albicans. Strikingly, endothelial cells were identified as the primary cellular source of G-CSF during OPC, which responded to IL-1α that was released from keratinocytes in the infected tissue. The IL-1-dependent crosstalk between two different cellular subsets of the nonhematopoietic compartment was confirmed in vitro using a novel murine tongue-derived keratinocyte cell line and an established endothelial cell line. These data establish a new link between IL-1 and granulopoiesis in the context of fungal infection. Together, we identified two complementary mechanisms coordinating the neutrophil response in the oral mucosa, which is critical for preventing fungal growth and dissemination, and thus protects the host from disease. PMID:27632536

  4. Calcium signalling in human neutrophil cell lines is not affected by low-frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Golbach, Lieke A; Philippi, John G M; Cuppen, Jan J M; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2015-09-01

    We are increasingly exposed to low-frequency electromagnetic fields (LF EMFs) by electrical devices and power lines, but if and how these fields interact with living cells remains a matter of debate. This study aimed to investigate the potential effect of LF EMF exposure on calcium signalling in neutrophils. In neutrophilic granulocytes, activation of G-protein coupled receptors leads to efflux of calcium from calcium stores and influx of extracellular calcium via specialised calcium channels. The cytoplasmic rise of calcium induces cytoskeleton rearrangements, modified gene expression patterns, and cell migration. If LF EMF modulates intracellular calcium signalling, this will influence cellular behaviour and may eventually lead to health problems. We found that calcium mobilisation upon chemotactic stimulation was not altered after a short 30 min or long-term LF EMF exposure in human neutrophil-like cell lines HL-60 or PLB-985. Neither of the two investigated wave forms (Immunent and 50 Hz sine wave) at three magnetic flux densities (5 μT, 300 μT, and 500 μT) altered calcium signalling in vitro. Gene-expression patterns of calcium-signalling related genes also did not show any significant changes after exposure. Furthermore, analysis of the phenotypical appearance of microvilli by scanning electron microscopy revealed no alterations induced by LF EMF exposure. The findings above indicate that exposure to 50 Hz sinusoidal or Immunent LF EMF will not affect calcium signalling in neutrophils in vitro.

  5. Adipose triglyceride lipase acts on neutrophil lipid droplets to regulate substrate availability for lipid mediator synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Schlager, Stefanie; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Jandl, Katharina; Frei, Robert; Vujic, Nemanja; Kolb, Dagmar; Strohmaier, Heimo; Dorow, Juliane; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Rosenberger, Angelika; Wölfler, Albert; Lass, Achim; Kershaw, Erin E.; Ceglarek, Uta; Dichlberger, Andrea; Heinemann, Akos; Kratky, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    In humans, mutations in ATGL lead to TG accumulation in LDs of most tissues and cells, including peripheral blood leukocytes. This pathologic condition is called Jordans’ anomaly, in which functional consequences have not been investigated. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that ATGL plays a role in leukocyte LD metabolism and immune cell function. Similar to humans with loss-of-function mutations in ATGL, we found that global and myeloid-specific Atgl−/− mice exhibit Jordans’ anomaly with increased abundance of intracellular TG-rich LDs in neutrophil granulocytes. In a model of inflammatory peritonitis, lipid accumulation was also observed in monocytes and macrophages but not in eosinophils or lymphocytes. Neutrophils from Atgl−/− mice showed enhanced immune responses in vitro, which were more prominent in cells from global compared with myeloid-specific Atgl−/− mice. Mechanistically, ATGL−/− as well as pharmacological inhibition of ATGL led to an impaired release of lipid mediators from neutrophils. These findings demonstrate that the release of lipid mediators is dependent on the liberation of precursor molecules from the TG-rich pool of LDs by ATGL. Our data provide mechanistic insights into Jordans’ anomaly in neutrophils and suggest that ATGL is a potent regulator of immune cell function and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26109679

  6. IL-1 Coordinates the Neutrophil Response to C. albicans in the Oral Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Altmeier, Simon; Toska, Albulena; Sparber, Florian; Teijeira, Alvaro; Halin, Cornelia; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salomé

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal infections with Candida albicans belong to the most frequent forms of fungal diseases. Host protection is conferred by cellular immunity; however, the induction of antifungal immunity is not well understood. Using a mouse model of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) we show that interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling is critical for fungal control at the onset of infection through its impact on neutrophils at two levels. We demonstrate that both the recruitment of circulating neutrophils to the site of infection and the mobilization of newly generated neutrophils from the bone marrow depended on IL-1R. Consistently, IL-1R-deficient mice displayed impaired chemokine production at the site of infection and defective secretion of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the circulation in response to C. albicans. Strikingly, endothelial cells were identified as the primary cellular source of G-CSF during OPC, which responded to IL-1α that was released from keratinocytes in the infected tissue. The IL-1-dependent crosstalk between two different cellular subsets of the nonhematopoietic compartment was confirmed in vitro using a novel murine tongue-derived keratinocyte cell line and an established endothelial cell line. These data establish a new link between IL-1 and granulopoiesis in the context of fungal infection. Together, we identified two complementary mechanisms coordinating the neutrophil response in the oral mucosa, which is critical for preventing fungal growth and dissemination, and thus protects the host from disease. PMID:27632536

  7. EFFECTS OF SHIGA TOXIN ON ISOLATED PORCINE GRANULOCYTES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Shiga toxin (Stx) binding to polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) is hypothesized to play a role in the pathogenesis of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) disease in humans. Pigs are an excellent model for studying the role of PMN in STEC disease because, like humans, they are ...

  8. Simultaneous use of electrochemistry and chemiluminescence to detect reactive oxygen species produced by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Shleev, Sergey; Wetterö, Jonas; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2008-12-01

    A novel approach for the simultaneous optical and electrochemical detection of biologically produced reactive oxygen species has been developed and applied. The set-up consists of a luminol-dependent chemiluminescence assay combined with two amperometric biosensors sensitive to superoxide anion radicals (O(2)(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), respectively. The method permits direct, real-time in vitro determination of both extra- and intracellular O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2) produced by human neutrophil granulocytes. The rate of O(2)(-) production by stimulated neutrophils was calculated to about 10(-17)mol s(-1) per single cell. With inhibited NADPH oxidase, a distinct extracellular release of H(2)O(2) instead of O(2)(-) was obtained from stimulated neutrophils with the rate of about 3 x 10(-18)mol s(-1) per single cell. When the H(2)O(2) release was discontinued, fast H(2)O(2) utilisation was observed. Direct interaction with and possibly attachment of neutrophils to redox protein-modified gold electrodes, resulted in a spontaneous respiratory burst in the population of cells closely associated to the electrode surface. Hence, further stimulation of human neutrophils with a potent receptor agonist (fMLF) did not significantly increase the O(2)(-) sensitive amperometric response. By contrast, the H(2)O(2) sensitive biosensor, based on an HRP-modified graphite electrode, was able to reflect the bulk concentration of H(2)O(2), produced by stimulated neutrophils and would be very useful in modestly equipped biomedical research laboratories. In summary, the system would also be appropriate for assessment of several other metabolites in different cell types, and tissues of varying complexity, with only minor electrode modifications.

  9. Neutrophils Oppose Uterine Epithelial Carcinogenesis via Debridement of Hypoxic Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Blaisdell, Adam; Crequer, Amandine; Columbus, Devin; Daikoku, Takiko; Mittal, Khush; Dey, Sudhansu K; Erlebacher, Adrian

    2015-12-14

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are largely considered to foster cancer development despite wielding an arsenal of cytotoxic agents. Using a mouse model of PTEN-deficient uterine cancer, we describe a surprising inhibitory role for PMNs in epithelial carcinogenesis. By inducing tumor cell detachment from the basement membrane, PMNs impeded early-stage tumor growth and retarded malignant progression. Unexpectedly, PMN recruitment and tumor growth control occurred independently of lymphocytes and cellular senescence and instead ensued as part of the tumor's intrinsic inflammatory response to hypoxia. In humans, a PMN gene signature correlated with improved survival in several cancer subtypes, including PTEN-deficient uterine cancer. These findings provide insight into tumor-associated PMNs and reveal a context-specific capacity for PMNs to directly combat tumorigenesis.

  10. Glibenclamide impairs responses of neutrophils against Burkholderia pseudomallei by reduction of intracellular glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Kewcharoenwong, Chidchamai; Rinchai, Darawan; Nithichanon, Arnone; Bancroft, Gregory J.; Ato, Manabu; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana

    2016-01-01

    The major risk factor for melioidosis, an infectious disease caused by B. pseudomallei, is diabetes mellitus. More than half of diabetic melioidosis patients in Thailand were prescribed glibenclamide. Recent evidence demonstrates that glibenclamide reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine production by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) of diabetic individuals in response to this bacterial infection. However, the mechanisms by which glibenclamide affects cytokine production are unknown. We found that PMNs from glibenclamide-treated diabetic individuals infected with live B. pseudomallei in vitro showed lower free glutathione (GSH) levels compared with those of healthy individuals. Glibenclamide decreased GSH levels and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) of PMNs after exposed to live B. pseudomallei. Moreover, glibenclamide reduced cytokine production and migration capacity of infected PMNs, whereas GSH could restore these functions. Taken together, our data show a link between the effect of glibenclamide on GSH and PMN functions in response to B. pseudomallei that may contribute to the susceptibility of diabetic individuals to B. pseudomallei infection. PMID:27713554

  11. Granulocytes impose a tight bottleneck upon the gut luminal pathogen population during Salmonella typhimurium colitis.

    PubMed

    Maier, Lisa; Diard, Médéric; Sellin, Mikael E; Chouffane, Elsa-Sarah; Trautwein-Weidner, Kerstin; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Slack, Emma; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Stecher, Bärbel; Loverdo, Claude; Regoes, Roland R; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-12-01

    Topological, chemical and immunological barriers are thought to limit infection by enteropathogenic bacteria. However, in many cases these barriers and their consequences for the infection process remain incompletely understood. Here, we employed a mouse model for Salmonella colitis and a mixed inoculum approach to identify barriers limiting the gut luminal pathogen population. Mice were infected via the oral route with wild type S. Typhimurium (S. Tm) and/or mixtures of phenotypically identical but differentially tagged S. Tm strains ("WITS", wild-type isogenic tagged strains), which can be individually tracked by quantitative real-time PCR. WITS dilution experiments identified a substantial loss in tag/genetic diversity within the gut luminal S. Tm population by days 2-4 post infection. The diversity-loss was not attributable to overgrowth by S. Tm mutants, but required inflammation, Gr-1+ cells (mainly neutrophilic granulocytes) and most likely NADPH-oxidase-mediated defense, but not iNOS. Mathematical modelling indicated that inflammation inflicts a bottleneck transiently restricting the gut luminal S. Tm population to approximately 6000 cells and plating experiments verified a transient, inflammation- and Gr-1+ cell-dependent dip in the gut luminal S. Tm population at day 2 post infection. We conclude that granulocytes, an important clinical hallmark of S. Tm-induced inflammation, impose a drastic bottleneck upon the pathogen population. This extends the current view of inflammation-fuelled gut-luminal Salmonella growth by establishing the host response in the intestinal lumen as a double-edged sword, fostering and diminishing colonization in a dynamic equilibrium. Our work identifies a potent immune defense against gut infection and reveals a potential Achilles' heel of the infection process which might be targeted for therapy.

  12. Granulocytes Impose a Tight Bottleneck upon the Gut Luminal Pathogen Population during Salmonella Typhimurium Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Lisa; Diard, Médéric; Sellin, Mikael E.; Chouffane, Elsa-Sarah; Trautwein-Weidner, Kerstin; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Slack, Emma; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Stecher, Bärbel; Loverdo, Claude; Regoes, Roland R.; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    Topological, chemical and immunological barriers are thought to limit infection by enteropathogenic bacteria. However, in many cases these barriers and their consequences for the infection process remain incompletely understood. Here, we employed a mouse model for Salmonella colitis and a mixed inoculum approach to identify barriers limiting the gut luminal pathogen population. Mice were infected via the oral route with wild type S. Typhimurium (S. Tm) and/or mixtures of phenotypically identical but differentially tagged S. Tm strains (“WITS”, wild-type isogenic tagged strains), which can be individually tracked by quantitative real-time PCR. WITS dilution experiments identified a substantial loss in tag/genetic diversity within the gut luminal S. Tm population by days 2–4 post infection. The diversity-loss was not attributable to overgrowth by S. Tm mutants, but required inflammation, Gr-1+ cells (mainly neutrophilic granulocytes) and most likely NADPH-oxidase-mediated defense, but not iNOS. Mathematical modelling indicated that inflammation inflicts a bottleneck transiently restricting the gut luminal S. Tm population to approximately 6000 cells and plating experiments verified a transient, inflammation- and Gr-1+ cell-dependent dip in the gut luminal S. Tm population at day 2 post infection. We conclude that granulocytes, an important clinical hallmark of S. Tm-induced inflammation, impose a drastic bottleneck upon the pathogen population. This extends the current view of inflammation-fuelled gut-luminal Salmonella growth by establishing the host response in the intestinal lumen as a double-edged sword, fostering and diminishing colonization in a dynamic equilibrium. Our work identifies a potent immune defense against gut infection and reveals a potential Achilles' heel of the infection process which might be targeted for therapy. PMID:25522364

  13. Alterations of the respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from diabetic children. A chemiluminescence study.

    PubMed

    Kantar, A; Wilkins, G; Swoboda, B; Littarru, G P; Bertoli, E; Catassi, C; Coppa, G; Giorgi, P L

    1990-05-01

    The respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was investigated in 24 children with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and 24 healthy controls. This oxygen dependent, membrane associated process generates a number of toxic oxygen metabolites which are implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial damage. The activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was studied in terms of luminol amplified chemiluminescence. It was found that the resting luminol amplified chemiluminescence activity of isolated polymorphonuclear leukocytes from diabetic children was significantly higher than that of controls (342,000 +/- 174,000 cpm vs. 165,000 +/- 82,000 cpm, p less than 0.01). The addition of respiratory burst inhibitors caused a significant reduction of basal chemiluminescence (greater than 80%). When the ratio of phorbol myristate acetate stimulated activity to basal activity was calculated and used as an activation index, it was found to be significantly reduced in diabetics relative to controls (4.29 +/- 2.46 vs. 8.34 +/- 3.21, p less than 0.01). These observations suggest that increased release of toxic oxygen metabolites from polymorphonuclear leukocytes in diabetic subjects may play a role in the development of diabetic angiopathies. PMID:2166990

  14. Neutrophil functional disorder in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mironska, K

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil functional disorders thought to be uncommon, yet important as a cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and children. During the first years of life, when the immune system is still not completely mature, when the viral infections are frequent and antibiotic overuse can damage and alter the immune response, the inadequate nutrition followed with iron deficient anemia and malnutrition can lead the child`s organism in state of immunodeficiency. Sometimes is difficult to distinguish at the beginning weather the cause of patient suffering from frequent infections is existing of primary immunodeficiency disorder or the cause of the immunodeficiency state is just from exogenous factors. Fortunately, primary immune deficiencies are rare diseases and only 6-7% of all of them, due to the neutrophilic functional disorders. Unfortunately, many exogenous and environmental factors have influence to the immune system, and the percentage of secondary caused neutrophilic functional disorders is much higher and should be considered when children are investigated for immunodeficiency. So, when to suspect neutrophil functional disorder? The hallmarks for diseases related to the neutrophilic functional disorders are discussed in this article.

  15. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs. PMID:27698656

  16. Neutrophils in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Juan; Xiao, Yang; Xu, Aimin; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2016-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that afflicts millions of people worldwide. It occurs as the consequence of destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells triggered by genetic and environmental factors. The initiation and progression of the disease involves a complicated interaction between β-cells and immune cells of both innate and adaptive systems. Immune cells, such as T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, have been well documented to play crucial roles in type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. However, the particular actions of neutrophils, which are the most plentiful immune cell type and the first immune cells responding to inflammation, in the etiology of this disease might indeed be unfairly ignored. Progress over the past decades shows that neutrophils might have essential effects on the onset and perpetuation of type 1 diabetes. Neutrophil-derived cytotoxic substances, including degranulation products, cytokines, reactive oxygen species and extracellular traps that are released during the process of neutrophil maturation or activation, could cause destruction to islet cells. In addition, these cells can initiate diabetogenic T cell response and promote type 1 diabetes development through cell-cell interactions with other immune and non-immune cells. Furthermore, relevant antineutrophil therapies have been shown to delay and dampen the progression of insulitis and autoimmune diabetes. Here, we discuss the relationship between neutrophils and autoimmune type 1 diabetes from the aforementioned aspects to better understand the roles of these cells in the initiation and development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27181374

  17. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Go Viral

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils extracellular traps (NETs) in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell death, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand, disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently, it was recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs.

  18. Inhibition of Neutrophils by Hypertonic Saline Involves Pannexin-1, CD39, CD73, and Other Ectonucleotidases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Bao, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Woehrle, Tobias; Sumi, Yuka; Ledderose, Stephan; Li, Xiaoou; Ledderose, Carola; Junger, Wolfgang G

    2015-09-01

    Hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation has been studied as a possible strategy to reduce polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) activation and tissue damage in trauma patients. Hypertonic saline blocks PMNs by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors. Here, we studied the underlying mechanisms in search of possible reasons for the inconsistent results of recent clinical trials with HS resuscitation. Purified human PMNs or PMNs in whole blood were treated with HS to simulate hypertonicity levels found after HS resuscitation (40 mmol/L beyond isotonic levels). Adenosine triphosphate release was measured with a luciferase assay. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation was assessed by measuring oxidative burst. The pannexin-1 (panx1) inhibitor panx1 and the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) blocked ATP release from PMNs in purified and whole blood preparations, indicating that HS releases ATP via panx1 and gap junction channels. Hypertonic saline blocked N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe-induced PMN activation by 40% in purified PMN preparations and by 60% in whole blood. These inhibitory effects were abolished by panx1 but only partially reduced by CBX, which indicates that panx1 has a central role in the immunomodulatory effects of HS. Inhibition of the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73 abolished the suppressive effect of HS on purified PMN cultures but only partially reduced the effect of HS in whole blood. These findings suggest redundant mechanisms in whole blood that may strengthen the immunomodulatory effect of HS in vivo. We conclude that HS resuscitation exerts anti-inflammatory effects that involve panx1, CD39, CD73, and other ectonucleotidases, which produce the adenosine that blocks PMNs by stimulating their A2a receptors. Our findings shed new light on the immunomodulatory mechanisms of HS and suggest possible new strategies to improve the clinical efficacy of hypertonic resuscitation.

  19. Concurrent activation of granulocytes and osteoclasts in busulfan-suppressed bone marrow in response to transplantation of a mammary carcinoma in mice.

    PubMed

    McCracken, C H; Lottsfeldt, J L; Lee, M Y

    1988-05-01

    Transplantation of CE mammary adenocarcinoma (CE maca) into normal mice produces both neutrophilia and hypercalcemia due to osteoclastic bone resorption. In order to explore the physiology of osteoclast formation in vivo, the time course of neutrophilia and osteoclast development was examined in mice that had been pretreated with busulfan prior to the CE maca implantation. Busulfan-treated tumor-bearing mice (BUTUM), busulfan-treated control mice (BUCON), tumor-bearing mice with no busulfan (TUM), and normal controls (CON) were sacrificed on days 4, 7, 11, 14, and 17 after tumor implantation. Leukocyte counts, serum calcium levels, marrow cellularity, and marrow colony-forming units (CFU) were determined. Osteoclasts were quantified histologically by the osteoclast: endosteum ratio (OER). BUCON bone marrow was hypoplastic with CFU remaining significantly lower than that of controls over the course of the experiment. In contrast, BUTUM marrow CFU increased dramatically with the growth of the tumor. The most predominant increase was observed in neutrophilic CFU. Development of hypercalcemia closely paralleled neutrophilia in both TUM and BUTUM mice, although these changes were significantly delayed in the BUTUM group. The neutrophil count and serum calcium levels remained within normal control levels for BUCON mice. The OER correlated with serum calcium, and it closely paralleled the neutrophil count in TUM and BUTUM mice. These results clearly indicated the stimulation of bone marrow neutrophilic granulocyte progenitors and osteoclasts by the CE maca, indicating that the bone marrow is the primary target of this tumor. There may be a closely related mechanism in osteoclast and granulocyte stimulation by one or more CE maca factors. PMID:3360066

  20. The microbiota regulates neutrophil homeostasis and host resistance to Escherichia coli K1 sepsis in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Hitesh S; Liu, Yuhong; Menkiti, Ogechukwu R; Mei, Junjie; Dai, Ning; O'Leary, Claire E; Oliver, Paula M; Kolls, Jay K; Weiser, Jeffrey N; Worthen, G Scott

    2014-05-01

    Neonatal colonization by microbes, which begins immediately after birth, is influenced by gestational age and the mother's microbiota and is modified by exposure to antibiotics. In neonates, prolonged duration of antibiotic therapy is associated with increased risk of late-onset sepsis (LOS), a disorder controlled by neutrophils. A role for the microbiota in regulating neutrophil development and susceptibility to sepsis in the neonate remains unclear. We exposed pregnant mouse dams to antibiotics in drinking water to limit transfer of maternal microbes to the neonates. Antibiotic exposure of dams decreased the total number and composition of microbes in the intestine of the neonates. This was associated with decreased numbers of circulating and bone marrow neutrophils and granulocyte/macrophage-restricted progenitor cells in the bone marrow of antibiotic-treated and germ-free neonates. Antibiotic exposure of dams reduced the number of interleukin-17 (IL-17)-producing cells in the intestine and production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Granulocytopenia was associated with impaired host defense and increased susceptibility to Escherichia coli K1 and Klebsiella pneumoniae sepsis in antibiotic-treated neonates, which could be partially reversed by administration of G-CSF. Transfer of a normal microbiota into antibiotic-treated neonates induced IL-17 production by group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in the intestine, increasing plasma G-CSF levels and neutrophil numbers in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)- and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)-dependent manner and restored IL-17-dependent resistance to sepsis. Specific depletion of ILCs prevented IL-17- and G-CSF-dependent granulocytosis and resistance to sepsis. These data support a role for the intestinal microbiota in regulation of granulocytosis, neutrophil homeostasis and host resistance to sepsis in neonates.

  1. Role of Serum Amyloid A, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor, and Bone Marrow Granulocyte-Monocyte Precursor Expansion in Segmented Filamentous Bacterium-Mediated Protection from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Stacey L; Saleh, Mahmoud; Cowardin, Carrie A; Buonomo, Erica; Noor, Zannatun; Watanabe, Koji; Abhyankar, Mayuresh; Lajoie, Stephane; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Petri, William A

    2016-10-01

    Intestinal segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) protect from ameba infection, and protection is transferable with bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDCs). SFB cause an increase in serum amyloid A (SAA), suggesting that SAA might mediate SFB's effects on BMDCs. Here we further explored the role of bone marrow in SFB-mediated protection. Transient gut colonization with SFB or SAA administration alone transiently increased the H3K27 histone demethylase Jmjd3, persistently increased bone marrow Csf2ra expression and granulocyte monocyte precursors (GMPs), and protected from ameba infection. Pharmacologic inhibition of Jmjd3 H3K27 demethylase activity during SAA treatment or blockade of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling in SFB-colonized mice prevented GMP expansion, decreased gut neutrophils, and blocked protection from ameba infection. These results indicate that alteration of the microbiota and systemic exposure to SAA can influence myelopoiesis and susceptibility to amebiasis via epigenetic mechanisms. Gut microbiota-marrow communication is a previously unrecognized mechanism of innate protection from infection. PMID:27456830

  2. Insulin-like growth factor-1 delays Fas-mediated apoptosis in human neutrophils through the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Himpe, Eddy; Degaillier, Céline; Coppens, Astrid; Kooijman, Ron

    2008-10-01

    Apoptosis of human neutrophils is a crucial mechanism for the resolution of inflammation. We previously showed that insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) delays spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis without influencing the secretion of cytokines by these cells. In the present study, we further addressed the role of IGF1 in regulating neutrophil survival in the presence of other factors present during inflammation, and the mechanism involved in delaying apoptosis. We show that IGF1 delays neutrophil apoptosis triggered by the agonistic anti-Fas antibody CH11 and that the effect of IGF1 is comparable in magnitude to that of the acknowledged anti-apoptotic cytokines interferon-gamma (IFNG) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF; now known as CSF2). Furthermore, IGF1 exerted additional effects on cell survival in the presence of these cytokines. IGF1 did not affect Fas expression or activation by anti-Fas of caspase-8, but inhibited the depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane. Inhibitor studies indicate that the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) pathway, but not the MEK-ERK pathway, mediates the effects of IGF1. However, in contrast to CSF2, IGF1 did not induce phosphorylation and translocation to the membrane of AKT, the canonical downstream target of PI3K. We therefore speculate that other downstream targets of PI3K are involved in the delay of neutrophil apoptosis by IGF1, possibly through stabilization of the mitochondrial membrane.

  3. Search for CEA-like molecules in polymorphonuclear leukocytes of non-human primates using monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jantscheff, P; Indzhiia, L V; Micheel, B

    1986-01-01

    The monoclonal anti-CEA antibody ZIK-A42-A/C1 which reacts with NCA of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was found to bind also to polymorphonuclear blood leukocytes of the following non-human primates tested: hamadryas baboon (Papio hamadryas), stump-tailed monkey (Macaca arctoides), pig-tailed monkey (Macaca nemestrina), and rhesus monkey (Macaca mulata). No binding was observed to mononuclear blood leukocytes. It was concluded that non-human primates contain CEA-like substances in their polymorphonuclear leukocytes as humans do and that these substances carry some identical epitopes.

  4. The requirement for membrane sialic acid in the stimulation of superoxide production during phagocytosis by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The effect of desialylation on phagocytosis of latex particles and oxidative metabolism of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was studied. Removal of 20% total leukocyte sialic acid by bacterial neuraminidase had no effect on phagocytosis of latex particles and phagocytosis- associated activation of hexose monophosphate shunt in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. In contrast, desialylation prevented the stimulation of superoxide production either by phagocytosis or by concanavalin A. It is concluded that membrane sialic acid is essential for the stimulation of superoxide production by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. PMID:178821

  5. Increased platelet aggregation and in vivo platelet activation after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration. A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Spiel, Alexander O; Bartko, Johann; Schwameis, Michael; Firbas, Christa; Siller-Matula, Jolanta; Schuetz, Matthias; Weigl, Manuela; Jilma, Bernd

    2011-04-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) stimulates the bone marrow to produce granulocytes and stem cells and is widely used to accelerate neutrophil recovery after chemotherapy. Interestingly, specific G-CSF receptors have been demonstrated not only on myeloid cells, but also on platelets. Data on the effects of G-CSF on platelet function are limited and partly conflicting. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of G-CSF on platelet aggregation and in vivo platelet activation. Seventy-eight, healthy volunteers were enrolled into this randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Subjects received 5 μg/kg methionyl human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (r-metHuG-CSF, filgrastim) or placebo subcutaneously for four days. We determined platelet aggregation with a whole blood impedance aggregometer with various, clinically relevant platelet agonists (adenosine diphosphate [ADP], collagen, arachidonic acid [AA], ristocetin and thrombin receptor activating peptide 6 [TRAP]). Filgrastim injection significantly enhanced ADP (+40%), collagen (+60%) and AA (+75%)-induced platelet aggregation (all p<0.01 as compared to placebo and p<0.001 as compared to baseline). In addition, G-CSF enhanced ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (+18%) whereas TRAP-induced platelet aggregation decreased slightly (-14%) in response to filgrastim. While baseline aggregation with all agonists was only slightly but insignificantly higher in women than in men, this sex difference was enhanced by G-CSF treatment, and became most pronounced for ADP after five days (p<0.001). Enhanced platelet aggregation translated into a 75% increase in platelet activation as measured by circulating soluble P-selectin. G-CSF enhances platelet aggregation and activation in humans. This may put patients suffering from cardiovascular disease and cancer at risk for thrombotic events. PMID:21301783

  6. Neutrophil-Derived Proteases in the Microenvironment of Pancreatic Cancer -Active Players in Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Klaus; Gaida, Matthias M.

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fibro-inflammatory microenvironment, consisting of activated pancreatic stellate cells, extracellular matrix proteins, and a variety of inflammatory cells, such as T cells, macrophages, or neutrophils. Tumor-infiltrating immune cells, which are found in nearly all cancers, including PDAC, often fail to eliminate the tumor, but conversely can promote its progression by altering the tumor microenvironment. Pancreatic cancer cells are able to attract polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) via tumor secreted chemokines and in human PDAC, PMN infiltrates can be observed in the vicinity of tumor cells and in the desmoplastic tumor stroma, which correlate with undifferentiated tumor growth and poor prognosis. The behavior of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils in the tumor micromilieu is not yet understood at a mechanistic level. It has been shown that PMN have the potential to kill tumor cells, either directly or by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, but on the other side various adverse effects of PMN, such as promotion of aggressive tumor growth with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and increased metastatic potential, have been described. Recent therapeutic approaches for PDAC focus not only the tumor cell itself, but also elements of the tumor microenvironment. Therefore, the role of PMN and their derived products (e.g. cytokines, proteases) as a new vein for a therapeutic target should be critically evaluated in this context. This review summarizes the current understanding of the interplay between proteases of tumor-infiltrating neutrophils and pancreatic tumor cells and elements of the desmoplastic stroma. PMID:26929737

  7. Neutrophil activation by Candida glabrata but not Candida albicans promotes fungal uptake by monocytes.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Seána; Essig, Fabian; Hünniger, Kerstin; Mokhtari, Zeinab; Bauer, Laura; Lehnert, Teresa; Brandes, Susanne; Häder, Antje; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Martin, Ronny; Figge, Marc Thilo; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-09-01

    Candida albicans and Candida glabrata account for the majority of candidiasis cases worldwide. Although both species are in the same genus, they differ in key virulence attributes. Within this work, live cell imaging was used to examine the dynamics of neutrophil activation after confrontation with either C. albicans or C. glabrata. Analyses revealed higher phagocytosis rates of C. albicans than C. glabrata that resulted in stronger PMN (polymorphonuclear cells) activation by C. albicans. Furthermore, we observed differences in the secretion of chemokines, indicating chemotactic differences in PMN signalling towards recruitment of further immune cells upon confrontation with Candida spp. Supernatants from co-incubations of neutrophils with C. glabrata primarily attracted monocytes and increased the phagocytosis of C. glabrata by monocytes. In contrast, PMN activation by C. albicans resulted in recruitment of more neutrophils. Two complex infection models confirmed distinct targeting of immune cell populations by the two Candida spp.: In a human whole blood infection model, C. glabrata was more effectively taken up by monocytes than C. albicans and histopathological analyses of murine model infections confirmed primarily monocytic infiltrates in C. glabrata kidney infection in contrast to PMN-dominated infiltrates in C. albicans infection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the human opportunistic fungi C. albicans and C. glabrata are differentially recognized by neutrophils and one outcome of this differential recognition is the preferential uptake of C. glabrata by monocytes.

  8. Activation of tracheal smooth muscle responsiveness by fMLP-treated HL-60 cells and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Munoz, N M; Hamann, K J; Vita, A; Cozzi, P J; Baranowski, S; Solway, J; Leff, A R

    1993-03-01

    We assessed the effects of cultured human promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) isolated from peripheral human blood on tracheal smooth muscle responsiveness in 40 male Hartley guinea pigs. Undifferentiated HL-60 cells (16-25 passages) were activated in vitro by incubation with 1 microM f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP), and force of contraction was measured isometrically using an in situ preparation of tracheal smooth muscle. Increasing concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh; 10(-10) to 10(-6) mol/cm2 tracheal surface) were applied topically to the epithelial surface pretreated with 4 x 10(6) fMLP-activated HL-60 cells, 4 x 10(6) fMLP-activated neutrophils, 4 x 10(6) sham-activated HL-60 cells, fMLP+vehicle, or vehicle control. Topical application of fMLP-activated HL-60 cells caused a maximum active tension (AT) of 1.13 +/- 0.2 g/cm after 5 min; fMLP-activated neutrophils, sham-activated HL-60 cells, or fMLP+vehicle had no effect. The fMLP-activated HL-60 cells also caused substantial augmentation of tracheal contraction to ACh (P < 0.05 vs. sham-activated cells for all concentrations > 10(-9) mol/cm2). Although fMLP treatment caused 247 +/- 28% increase from baseline level in O2-. production, neither direct contraction nor augmentation of muscarinic stimulation was demonstrated after topical application of 4 x 10(6) neutrophils. In 12 other preparations, fMLP-activated HL-60 cells were pretreated with either 10 microM indomethacin (Indo) or 100 microM A63162, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor. Pretreatment with Indo caused complete blockade of direct tracheal contraction and 88 +/- 13% blockade of muscarinic augmentation; there was no effect after A63162.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8460711

  9. Large-Scale Hematopoietic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Provides Granulocytes or Macrophages for Cell Replacement Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lachmann, Nico; Ackermann, Mania; Frenzel, Eileen; Liebhaber, Steffi; Brennig, Sebastian; Happle, Christine; Hoffmann, Dirk; Klimenkova, Olga; Lüttge, Doreen; Buchegger, Theresa; Kühnel, Mark Philipp; Schambach, Axel; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Figueiredo, Constanca; Hansen, Gesine; Skokowa, Julia; Moritz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Interleukin-3 (IL-3) is capable of supporting the proliferation of a broad range of hematopoietic cell types, whereas granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and macrophage CSF (M-CSF) represent critical cytokines in myeloid differentiation. When this was investigated in a pluripotent-stem-cell-based hematopoietic differentiation model, IL-3/G-CSF or IL-3/M-CSF exposure resulted in the continuous generation of myeloid cells from an intermediate myeloid-cell-forming complex containing CD34+ clonogenic progenitor cells for more than 2 months. Whereas IL-3/G-CSF directed differentiation toward CD45+CD11b+CD15+CD16+CD66b+ granulocytic cells of various differentiation stages up to a segmented morphology displaying the capacity of cytokine-directed migration, respiratory burst response, and neutrophil-extracellular-trap formation, exposure to IL-3/M-CSF resulted in CD45+CD11b+CD14+CD163+CD68+ monocyte/macrophage-type cells capable of phagocytosis and cytokine secretion. Hence, we show here that myeloid specification of human pluripotent stem cells by IL-3/G-CSF or IL-3/M-CSF allows for prolonged and large-scale production of myeloid cells, and thus is suited for cell-fate and disease-modeling studies as well as gene- and cell-therapy applications. PMID:25680479

  10. Radiation Therapy for Chloroma (Granulocytic Sarcoma)

    SciTech Connect

    Bakst, Richard; Wolden, Suzanne; Yahalom, Joachim

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: Chloroma (granulocytic sarcoma) is a rare, extramedullary tumor of immature myeloid cells related to acute nonlymphocytic leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Radiation therapy (RT) is often used in the treatment of chloromas; however, modern studies of RT are lacking. We reviewed our experience to analyze treatment response, disease control, and toxicity associated with RT to develop treatment algorithm recommendations for patients with chloroma. Patients and Methods: Thirty-eight patients who underwent treatment for chloromas at our institution between February 1990 and June 2010 were identified and their medical records were reviewed and analyzed. Results: The majority of patients that presented with chloroma at the time of initial leukemia diagnosis (78%) have not received RT because it regressed after initial chemotherapy. Yet most patients that relapsed or remained with chloroma after chemotherapy are in the RT cohort (90%). Thirty-three courses of RT were administered to 22 patients. Radiation subsite breakdown was: 39% head and neck, 24% extremity, 9% spine, 9% brain, 6% genitourinary, 6% breast, 3% pelvis, and 3% genitourinary. Median dose was 20 (6-36) Gy. Kaplan-Meier estimates of progression-free survival and overall survival in the RT cohort were 39% and 43%, respectively, at 5 years. At a median follow-up of 11 months since RT, only 1 patient developed progressive disease at the irradiated site and 4 patients developed chloromas at other sites. RT was well tolerated without significant acute or late effects and provided symptom relief in 95% of cases. Conclusions: The majority of patients with chloromas were referred for RT when there was extramedullary progression, marrow relapse, or rapid symptom relief required. RT resulted in excellent local disease control and palliation of symptoms without significant toxicity. We recommend irradiating chloromas to at least 20 Gy, and propose 24 Gy in 12 fractions as an appropriate regimen.

  11. Cytokine-like effects of prolactin in human mononuclear and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Dogusan, Z; Hooghe, R; Verdood, P; Hooghe-Peters, E L

    2001-11-01

    Some biochemical events following the binding of prolactin (PRL) to its receptor in normal human leukocytes were investigated. PRL enhanced JAK2 phosphorylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) but not in granulocytes. PRL also induced phosphorylation of Stat-5 in PBMC and Stat-1 in granulocytes. Subsequent binding of Stat-5- and of Stat-1-like molecules to a GAS responsive element from the beta-casein promoter was detected by EMSA. p38 MAPK (but not p42/p44 MAPK) was activated by PRL in both leukocyte populations. PRL induced iNOS and CIS mRNA expression in granulocytes. Increased expression of IRF-1 and SOCS-2 was observed in granulocytes and of SOCS-3 and iNOS in PBMC. Similar effects were obtained with ovine and human PRL. Antiserum to PRL reduced iNOS and IRF-1 expression induced by PRL in granulocytes and reduced iNOS expression in PBMC. Also, pretreatment of granulocytes with a p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB 203580) prevented in part PRL-induced iNOS and IRF-1 expression. In PBMC, the p38 inhibitor decreased PRL-induced iNOS gene expression. These results indicate that PRL-induced gene regulation in leukocytes requires the activation of at least two different pathways: the Stat and the MAP kinase pathways. Moreover, although PRL activates Stat in both leukocyte types, signal transduction is different in granulocytes and in PBMC. Most importantly, PRL modulates the expression of genes crucial to leukocyte function. The present findings reinforce the concept that PRL has "cytokine-like" activity in human leukocytes.

  12. Effects of in vitro insulin and 2,4-thiazolidinedione on the function of neutrophils harvested from blood of cows in different physiological states.

    PubMed

    Revelo, X S; Waldron, M R

    2010-09-01

    Neutrophils [polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMNL)] were isolated from 26 Holstein cows in different physiological states (12+/-1.7 d prepartum, n=8; 7+/-0 d postpartum, n=9; 253+/-25.2 d postpartum, n=9) and incubated in vitro for 120 min in a factorial arrangement of treatments with 0, 1.5, or 15 ng/mL of bovine insulin and 0 or 300 microg/mL of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma ligand 2,4-thiazolidinedione (TZD). Following the incubations, PMNL functional assays were performed to determine treatment effects on proxies for total, extracellular, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and phagocytic killing abilities. The ROS production of PMNL collected from cows at 7 d postpartum was reduced compared with that of PMNL from midlactation and prepartum cows, but neutrophil extracellular trap expression was 23 and 36% greater in PMNL from prepartum cows compared with that in PMNL from midlactation and postpartum cows, respectively. Insulin had no effect on PMNL functional assay results. In contrast, TZD inhibited a measurement of total ROS production by 89%, increased extracellular superoxide generation by 43%, but had no effect on the intracellular ROS measured. Interestingly, TZD did not alter the ability of the PMNL to release neutrophil extracellular traps and engulf or kill Staphylococcus aureus. These findings suggest a possible anti-inflammatory effect of TZD that may result in reduced extracellular oxidative damage with maintenance of PMNL antimicrobial activity.

  13. Study of neutrophils isolated from peripheral blood of patients suffering from aggressive periodontitis at the cellular level: Receptors and cytoskeletal reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Saswati; Kundu, Debabrata

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) has been associated with polymorphonuclear leukocyte's (PMNL) dysfunction and periodontal pathogens possess variety of virulence factors that can impair PMNL's function. This study investigated the possible association between defective neutrophil adhesion and β2 -integrin expression and defective neutrophil migration and actin polymerization level in the peripheral blood of neutrophils from the patients with AgP. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 individuals both male and female, age ranges between 13 – 48 years, were included in the study. Healthy controls (group I, n=10), chronic periodontitis (ChP) (group II, n=10), and AgP (group III, n=10), all without any systemic diseases and non-smokers, were recruited. Peripheral blood samples were taken and β2 -integrin expression and actin polymerization levels were estimated by using fluorescence activated cell sorter analysis. Results: In AgP cases, both average values (β2 -integrin and actin level) were significantly less than that of normal subjects (<0.001). But for ChP cases, only the average value of actin level is significantly lower than that of normal subjects (<0.025). Conclusion: Lower β2 -integrin expression in the AgP cases signifies lower neutrophil adhesion in AgP cases than normal, and the lower average value of actin polymerization for the AgP cases suggest lower migration capacity of neutrophils in AgP cases than normal. PMID:22628965

  14. Enhancement of human polymorphonuclear leukocyte adherence to plastic and endothelium by phorbol myristate acetate. Comparison with human C5a.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, R. O.; Wysolmerski, R. B.; Lagunoff, D.

    1986-01-01

    The adherence of circulating neutrophils to vascular endothelium represents a necessary step in the chemotactic emigration of neutrophils to extravascular inflammatory sites. Studies of neutrophil adherence induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) were undertaken to determine the ability of a nonchemotactic neutrophil stimulus to provoke increased adherence. The authors found that the adherence of human neutrophils to plastic surfaces or confluent monolayers of endothelial cells is enhanced in a concentration-dependent fashion by exposure of neutrophils to PMA. The effect of PMA concentration (0.1-5.0 ng/ml) on increased neutrophil adherence parallels that observed for superoxide anion generation and release of lysosomal enzymes from specific granules. Whereas complement C5a-treated neutrophils exhibited a fourfold to fivefold increase in adherence to endothelial cells, PMA-treated neutrophils showed a 10-fold to 20-fold increase. The ability of PMA to cause increased neutrophil adherence to endothelium appeared to be directed primarily at the neutrophil. Pretreatment of neutrophils with PMA was as effective as coincubation in causing increased adherence to plastic surfaces or confluent cultured endothelial cells, but pretreatment of endothelial cells with PMA failed to promote neutrophil adherence. Alteration of neutrophil cytoskeletal structures by cytochalasin B treatment did not prevent subsequent PMA-stimulated neutrophil adherence. These results demonstrate that increased neutrophil adherence to surfaces can be induced by a nonchemotactic stimulus and that neutrophil adherence is independent of organized microfilaments. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:3789092

  15. Neutral serine proteases of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) exercise tissue-degrading and microbial-killing effects. The spectrum of NSP-mediated functions grows continuously, not least because of methodological progress. Sensitive and specific FRET substrates were developed to study the proteolytic activity of each NSP member. Advanced biochemical methods are beginning to characterize common and specific NSP substrates. The resulting novel information indicates that NSPs contribute not only to genuine inflammatory neutrophil functions but also to autoimmunity, metabolic conditions, and cancer. Tight regulatory mechanisms control the proteolytic potential of NSPs. However, not all NSP functions depend on their enzymatic activity. Proteinase-3 (PR3) is somewhat unique among the NSPs for PR3 functions as an autoantigen. Patients with small-vessel vasculitis develop autoantibodies to PR3 that bind their target antigens on the neutrophil surface and trigger neutrophil activation. These activated cells subsequently contribute to vascular necrosis with life-threatening multiorgan failure. This article discusses various aspects of NSP biology and highlights translational aspects with strong clinical implications. PMID:27558338

  16. H2O2 Release from Human Granulocytes during Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Root, Richard K.; Metcalf, Julia A.

    1977-01-01

    Normal and cytochalasin B-treated human granulocytes have been studied to determine some of the interrelationships between phagocytosis-induced respiration and superoxide and hydrogen peroxide formation and release into the extracellular medium by intact cells. By using the scopoletin fluorescent assay to continuously monitor extracellular hydrogen peroxide concentrations during contact of cells with opsonized staphylococci, it was demonstrated that the superoxide scavengers ferricytochrome c and nitroblue tetrazolium significantly reduced the amount of H2O2 released with time from normal cells but did not abolish it. This inhibitory effect was reversed by the simultaneous addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD), whereas the addition of SOD alone increased the amount of detectable H2O2 in the medium. The addition of sodium azide markedly inhibited myeloperoxidase-H2O2-dependent protein iodination and more than doubled H2O2 release, including the residual amount remaining after exposure of the cells to ferricytochrome c, suggesting its origin from an intracellular pool shared by several pathways for H2O2 catabolism. When cells were pretreated with cytochalasin B and opsonized bacteria added, reduced oxygen consumption was observed, but this was in parallel to a reduction in specific binding of organisms to the cells when compared to normal. Under the influence of inhibited phagosome formation by cytochalasin B, the cells released an increased amount of superoxide and peroxide into the extracellular medium relative to oxygen consumption, and all detectable peroxide release could be inhibited by the addition of ferricytochrome c. Decreased H2O2 production in the presence of this compound could not be ascribed to diminished bacterial binding, decreased oxidase activity, or increased H2O2 catabolism and was reversed by the simultaneous addition of SOD. Furthermore, SOD and ferricytochrome c had similar effects on another H2O2-dependent reaction, protein iodination, in

  17. Intracranial granulocytic sarcoma: two cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huanyu; Wang, Hong; Ma, Quanfeng; Chen, Yiyang

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial granulocytic sarcoma was a relatively rare tumor composed of myeloid blasts and/or immature myeloid cells in an extramedullary site which is associated with acute/chronic myeloid leukemia. In this paper, two cases of intracranial granulocytic sarcoma, one male aged 36 and one 28-year-old female, were reported to improve the diagnosis and treatment of such diseases. Diagnostic and treatment procedures for them were retrospectively summarized and relevant literature reviews were combined. Pathological biopsy was conducted to validate the diagnosis. Surgical resections in combination with chemotherapy were performed. The differential diagnosis of intracranial granulocytic sarcoma from malignant lymphomas and alternative small round cell malignancy was confirmed by biopsy and immunohistochemistry. PMID:26770615

  18. Peeking into the secret life of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Li, Jackson LiangYao; Ng, Lai Guan

    2012-09-01

    The migration of neutrophils between tissue compartments is an important aspect of innate immune surveillance. This process is regulated by a cascade of cellular and molecular signals to avoid unnecessary crowding of neutrophils at the periphery, to allow rapid mobilization of neutrophils in response to inflammatory stimuli, and to return to a state of homeostasis after the response. Intravital microscopy approaches have been fundamental in unraveling many aspects of neutrophil behavior, providing important mechanistic information on the processes involved in basal and disease states. Here, we provide a broad overview of the current state of research on neutrophil biology, describing the processes in the typical life cycle of neutrophils, from their first appearance in the bone marrow until their eventual destruction. We will focus on novel aspects of neutrophil behavior, which had previously been elusive until their recent elucidation by advanced intravital microscopy techniques. PMID:22407577

  19. Effect of human polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes on chromosomal and plasmid DNA of Escherichia coli. Role of acid DNase

    SciTech Connect

    Rozenberg-Arska, M.; van Strijp, J.A.; Hoekstra, W.P.; Verhoef, J.

    1984-05-01

    Phagocytosis and killing by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes are important host resistance factors against invading microorganisms. Evidence showing that killing is rapidly followed by degradation of bacterial components is limited. Therefore, we studied the fate of Escherichia coli DNA following phagocytosis of E. coli by polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes. (/sup 3/H)Thymidine-labeled, unencapsulated E. coli PC2166 and E. coli 048K1 were incubated in serum, washed, and added to leukocytes. Uptake and killing of the bacteria and degradation of DNA were measured. Although phagocytosis and killing by mononuclear leukocytes was less efficient than that by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, only mononuclear leukocytes were able to degrade E. coli PC2166 DNA. Within 2 h, 60% of the radioactivity added to mononuclear leukocytes was released into the supernate, of which 40% was acid soluble. DNA of E. coli 048K1 was not degraded. To further analyze the capacity of mononuclear leukocytes to degrade E. coli DNA, chromosomal and plasmid DNA was isolated from ingested bacteria and subjected to agarose gel-electrophoresis. Only chromosomal DNA was degraded after phagocytosis. Plasmid DNA of E. coli carrying a gene coding for ampicillin resistance remained intact for a 2-h period after ingestion, and was still able to transform recipient E. coli cells after this period. Although we observed no DNA degradation during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear leukocytes, lysates of both polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes contained acid-DNase activity with a pH optimum of 4.9. However, the DNase activity of mononuclear leukocytes was 20 times higher than that of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. No difference was observed between DNase activity from polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes from a chronic granulomatous disease patient with DNase activity from control polymorphonuclear and mononuclear leukocytes.

  20. Isolated abdominal aortitis following administration of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF).

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward B; Grosu, Roy; Landau, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    G-CSF is a myeloid growth factor produced by monocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Clinical uses of G-CSF includes mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells from healthy donors before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, acceleration of neutrophil recovery following chemotherapy, and in the management of neutropenia due to other causes including AIDS and genetic disorders of granulocyte production. G-CSF is well tolerated and reports to be safe in healthy donors, although follow-up studies are limited in duration (D'Souza et al. in Transfus Med Rev 22(4):280-290, 2008).Isolated abdominal aortitis (IAA) is a rare disorder most commonly caused by the large-vessel vasculitides giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis, although it may also be associated with several other rheumatologic diseases and infections (Gornik and Creager in Circulation 117:3039-3051, 2008). To our knowledge, there only two cases have been published of IAA occurring in patients who had received G-CSF therapy (Dariea et al. in Rev Med Interne 25(3):225-229, 2004; Adiga et al. in Clin Drug Investig 29:821-825, 2009).We describe a case of a 55-year-old male, with peripheral vascular disease who after receiving Neupogen (G-CSF) developed a latent case of IAA. After further investigation and exclusion of other possible causative factors, we conclude that the most probable etiology is induction by G-CSF.

  1. Circulating colony-forming units of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    López-Karpovitch, X; Cardiel, M; Cardenas, R; Piedras, J; Alarcón-Segovia, D

    1989-01-01

    In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, in vitro bone marrow (BM) colony-forming units of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages (CFU-GM) are decreased, suggesting that granulomonopoietic failure may play an important role in the mechanism of peripheral blood (PB) depletion of neutrophils and monocytes. No information concerning CFU-GM in PB of patients with SLE is available. The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether SLE itself and the inactive or active stage of disease would modify the number of GFU-GM in PB samples from 20 treatment-free SLE women, 12 inactive and eight active. CFU-GM growth was significantly decreased in both inactive (P = 0.018) and active (P = 0.008) SLE patients as compared with controls (n = 8). The difference in CFU-GM growth between SLE groups was not significant. These results indicate that the number of circulating CFU-GM is significantly reduced in patients with SLE regardless of disease activity or remission. PMID:2766577

  2. Isolated abdominal aortitis following administration of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF).

    PubMed

    Miller, Edward B; Grosu, Roy; Landau, Zvi

    2016-06-01

    G-CSF is a myeloid growth factor produced by monocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Clinical uses of G-CSF includes mobilization of peripheral blood progenitor cells from healthy donors before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, acceleration of neutrophil recovery following chemotherapy, and in the management of neutropenia due to other causes including AIDS and genetic disorders of granulocyte production. G-CSF is well tolerated and reports to be safe in healthy donors, although follow-up studies are limited in duration (D'Souza et al. in Transfus Med Rev 22(4):280-290, 2008).Isolated abdominal aortitis (IAA) is a rare disorder most commonly caused by the large-vessel vasculitides giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu arteritis, although it may also be associated with several other rheumatologic diseases and infections (Gornik and Creager in Circulation 117:3039-3051, 2008). To our knowledge, there only two cases have been published of IAA occurring in patients who had received G-CSF therapy (Dariea et al. in Rev Med Interne 25(3):225-229, 2004; Adiga et al. in Clin Drug Investig 29:821-825, 2009).We describe a case of a 55-year-old male, with peripheral vascular disease who after receiving Neupogen (G-CSF) developed a latent case of IAA. After further investigation and exclusion of other possible causative factors, we conclude that the most probable etiology is induction by G-CSF. PMID:27094941

  3. Neutrophil extracellular traps - the dark side of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Ole E; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were discovered as extracellular strands of decondensed DNA in complex with histones and granule proteins, which were expelled from dying neutrophils to ensnare and kill microbes. NETs are formed during infection in vivo by mechanisms different from those originally described in vitro. Citrullination of histones by peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4) is central for NET formation in vivo. NETs may spur formation of autoantibodies and may also serve as scaffolds for thrombosis, thereby providing a link among infection, autoimmunity, and thrombosis. In this review, we present the mechanisms by which NETs are formed and discuss the physiological and pathophysiological consequences of NET formation. We conclude that NETs may be of more importance in autoimmunity and thrombosis than in innate immune defense.

  4. Cell transit analysis of ligand-induced stiffening of polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nossal, R

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical treatment of the mechanical behavior of transiently bonded polymer networks is used to interpret measurements of the pressure-induced passage of plant cells through microporous membranes. Cell transit times are inferred to be proportional to the instantaneous shear modulus of the cell cortex, a parameters that we then relate to properties of the cortical F-actin matrix. These theoretical results are used to analyze published data on chemoattractant-induced changes of rigidity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. We thereby rationalize previously noted, peculiar, power-law logarithmic dependences of transit time on ligand concentration. As a consequence, we are able to deduce a linear relationship between the extent of F-actin polymerization and the logarithm of the chemoattractant concentration. The latter is examined with regard to the G-protein activation that is known to occur when chemoattractants bind to receptors on the surfaces of polymorphonuclear cells. PMID:9726956

  5. ASSOCIATION OF THE ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE OF RABBIT POLYMORPHONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES WITH THE MEMBRANE OF THE SPECIFIC GRANULES

    PubMed Central

    Bretz, Ursula; Baggiolini, Marco

    1973-01-01

    The localization of alkaline phosphatase in the specific granules of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes was investigated. The results obtained suggest very strongly that alkaline phosphatase is a component of the granule membrane. The enzyme remains attached to the membrane upon disruption of the granules by the use of detergents or by hypotonic shock and subsequent extraction with sodium sulfate, and can be isolated together with fragments of the granule membrane by isopycnic equilibration. Treatment of the granules with high amounts of Triton-X-100, sodium deoxycholate, or hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide releases the enzyme in soluble form. In polymorphonuclear leukocyte homogenates, lysis of the granules is needed in order to render alkaline phosphatase fully accessible to substrates. This suggests that the catalytic site of the enzyme is exposed at the inner face of the granule membrane. PMID:4761336

  6. Platelet serotonin release by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes stimulated by cotton dust bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Holt, P. G.; Holt, Barbara J.; Beijer, Lena; Rylander, R.

    1983-01-01

    The release of serotonin from platelets was examined using polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) from normal volunteers. The stimulating agents emplyed were zymosan and heat-killed bacteria from Enterobacter agglomerans, which is commonly found in cotton dust. Optimal conditions for release were established. Both zymosan and E. agglomerans yielded a release of serotonin of an equal magnitude. The data are discussed in relation to the pathogenesis of respiratory disease associated with occupational exposure to cotton dust. PMID:6831770

  7. Reaction of the human granulocyte system in successfully treated bacterial bronchopneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kruszewski, J; Szczylik, C; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W

    1982-01-01

    The behaviour of peripheral blood granulocyte pools, nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by granulocytes, migration of granulocytes out of skin windows, serum muramidase activity and bone marrow reserve of granulocytes during uncomplicated bronchopneumonia were studied. The time course of changes in these parameters during infection was established, and suggests maximal changes on day 2 of infection with gradual regression until 30 days after the disease onset, when they disappear. PMID:7037862

  8. Effect of cigarette smoke extract on the polymorphonuclear leukocytes chemiluminescence: influence of a filter containing glutathione.

    PubMed

    Zappacosta, B; Persichilli, S; Minucci, A; Fasanella, S; Scribano, D; Giardina, B; De Sole, P

    2005-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is known to be a risk factor for several chronic and neoplastic diseases. Many compounds formed by cigarette burning, ranging from particulate materials to water solutes and gaseous extracts, are considered to be noxious agents, and many biochemical and molecular mechanisms have been proposed for the toxic effects of cigarette smoke. The oral cavity and the upper respiratory tract represent the first contact areas for smoke compounds; even a single cigarette can produce marked effects on some components of the oral cavity, either chemical compounds, such as glutathione and enzymes, or cellular elements, such as polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Several studies suggest a protective role of glutathione against the noxious effects of tobacco smoke; the sulphydril groups of glutathione, in fact, could react with some smoke products, such as unsaturated aldehydes, leading to the formation of harmless intermediate compounds and simultaneously preventing the inactivation of metabolically essential molecules, such as some enzymes. In this paper we analyse the effect of a filter containing glutathione on the respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes exposed to aqueous extract of cigarette smoke, measuring their chemiluminescence activity. The results of this paper indicate that the GSH-containing filter has a likely protective effect against the inhibition of cigarette smoke extract on polymorphonuclear leukocyte activity.

  9. Randomized Trial of Two Dosages of Prophylactic Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor after Induction Chemotherapy in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Hiroto; Cao, Xueyuan; Pounds, Stanley; Pui, Ching-Hon; Rubnit, Jeffrey E.; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Razzouk, Bassem I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is effective in accelerating neutrophil recovery after intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the optimal G-CSF dosage for patients with AML has not been determined. To our knowledge, G-CSF dosages have not been compared in a randomized AML study. Methods Patients enrolled on the St. Jude AML97 protocol who remained on study after window therapy were eligible to participate. The effect of the dosage of G-CSF given after induction chemotherapy courses 1 and 2 was analyzed in 46 patients randomly assigned in a double-blinded manner to receive 5 or 10 μg/kg/day of G-CSF. The number of days of G-CSF treatment, neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count < 0.5 × 109/L), and hospitalization; the number of episodes of febrile neutropenia, grade 2-4 infection, and antimicrobial therapy; transfusion requirements; the cost of supportive care; and survival were compared between the two study arms. Results We found no statistically significant difference between the two arms in any of the endpoints measured. Conclusions The higher G-CSF dosage (10 μg/kg/day) offers no greater benefit than the lower dosage (5 μg/kg/day) in patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for AML. PMID:21381017

  10. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation.

  11. A PPARγ AGONIST ENHANCES BACTERIAL CLEARANCE THROUGH NEUTROPHIL EXTRACELLULAR TRAP FORMATION AND IMPROVES SURVIVAL IN SEPSIS.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Cláudia V; Campbell, Clarissa; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano F; Molinaro, Raphael; Cody, Mark J; Yost, Christian C; Bozza, Patricia T; Zimmerman, Guy A; Weyrich, Andrew S; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Silva, Adriana R

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the inflammatory response against infection contributes to mortality in sepsis. Inflammation provides critical host defense, but it can cause tissue damage, multiple organ failure, and death. Because the nuclear transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) exhibits therapeutic potential, we characterized the role of PPARγ in sepsis. We analyzed severity of clinical signs, survival rates, cytokine production, leukocyte influx, and bacterial clearance in a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis in Swiss mice. The PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone treatment improved clinical status and mortality, while increasing IL-10 production and decreasing TNF-α and IL-6 levels, and peritoneal neutrophil accumulation 24 h after CLP. We noted increased bacterial killing in rosiglitazone treated mice, correlated with increased generation of reactive oxygen species. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) incubated with LPS or Escherichia coli and rosiglitazone increased peritoneal neutrophil extracellular trap (NET)-mediated bacterial killing, an effect reversed by the PPARγ antagonist (GW 9662) treatment. Rosiglitazone also enhanced the release of histones by PMN, a surrogate marker of NET formation, effect abolished by GW 9662. Rosiglitazone modulated the inflammatory response and increased bacterial clearance through PPARγ activation and NET formation, combining immunomodulatory and host-dependent anti-bacterial effects and, therefore, warrants further study as a potential therapeutic agent in sepsis. PMID:26618986

  12. Activity of lung neutrophils and matrix metalloproteinases in cyclophosphamide-treated mice with experimental sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Mark; Carmel, Julie; Kaplan, Viktoria; Livne, Erella; Krausz, Michael M

    2004-01-01

    Sepsis in patients receiving chemotherapy may result in acute respiratory distress syndrome, despite decreased number of blood neutrophils [polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs)]. In the present study, we investigated the correlation of cyclophosphamide (CY)-induced neutropenia with the destructive potential of lung PMN in respect to formation of septic acute lung injury (ALI). Mice were treated with 250 mg/kg of CY or saline (control) and subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham operation. ALI was verified by histological examination. Lung PMNs and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were assessed by flow cytometry and gelatin zymography. CLP in CY-treated mice induced a typical lung injury. Despite profound neutropenia, CY treatment did not attenuate CLP-induced ALI. This might relate to only a partial suppression of PMN: CY has significantly reduced PMN influx into the lungs (P = 0.008) and suppressed their oxidative metabolism, but had no suppressive effect on degranulation (P = 0.227) and even induced MMP-9 activity (P = 0.0003). In CY-untreated animals, peak of CLP-induced ALI coincided with massive PMN influx (P = 0.013), their maximal degranulation (P = 0.014) and activation of lung MMP-9 (P = 0.002). These findings may indicate an important role of the residual lung PMN and activation of MMP-9 in septic lung injury during CY chemotherapy. PMID:15255968

  13. Thymoquinone strongly inhibits fMLF-induced neutrophil functions and exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boudiaf, Kaouthar; Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Belambri, Sahra Amel; Marie, Jean-Claude; Derradji, Yacine; Benboubetra, Mustapha; El-Benna, Jamel; Dang, Pham My-Chan

    2016-03-15

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils are key players in host defense against pathogens through the robust production of superoxide anion by the NADPH oxidase and the release of antibacterial proteins from granules. However, inappropriate release of these agents in the extracellular environment induces severe tissue injury, thereby contributing to the physiopathology of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders. Many studies have been carried out to identify molecules capable of inhibiting phagocyte functions, in particular superoxide anion production, for therapeutic purposes. In the present study, we show that thymoquinone (TQ), the major component of the volatile oil from Nigella sativa (black cumin) seeds strongly inhibits fMLF-induced superoxide production and granules exocytosis in neutrophils. The inhibition of superoxide anion was not due to a scavenger effect, as TQ did not inhibit superoxide anion produced by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system. Interestingly, TQ impaired the phosphorylation on Ser-304 and Ser-328 of p47(PHOX), a cytosolic subunit of the NADPH oxidase. TQ also attenuated specific and azurophilic granule exocytosis in fMLF-stimulated neutrophils as evidenced by decreased cell surface expression of gp91(PHOX) and CD11b, and release of myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, both the PKC and MAPK pathways, which are involved in p47(PHOX) phosphorylation and granules exocytosis, respectively, were inhibited by TQ in fMLF-stimulated neutrophils. Finally, in a model of pleurisy induced by λ-carrageenan in rats, TQ reduced neutrophil accumulation in the pleural space, showing that it not only inhibits PMN functions in vitro, but also exhibits anti-inflammatory properties in vivo. Thus, TQ possesses promising anti-inflammatory therapeutic potential. PMID:26774451

  14. New Aspects on the Structure of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and In Vitro Generation

    PubMed Central

    Krautgartner, Wolf-Dietrich; Klappacher, Michaela; Kofler, Barbara; Steinbacher, Peter; Vitkov, Ljubomir; Grabcanovic-Musija, Fikreta; Studnicka, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils have in recent years attracted new attention due to their ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These web-like extracellular structures deriving from nuclear chromatin have been depicted in ambiguous roles between antimicrobial defence and host tissue damage. NETs consist of DNA strands of varying thickness and are decorated with microbicidal and cytotoxic proteins. Their principal structure has in recent years been characterised at molecular and ultrastructural levels but many features that are of direct relevance to cytotoxicity are still incompletely understood. These include the extent of chromatin decondensation during NET formation and the relative amounts and spatial distribution of the microbicidal components within the NET. In the present work, we analyse the structure of NETs found in induced sputum of patients with acutely exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using confocal laser microscopy and electron microscopy. In vitro induced NETs from human neutrophils serve for purposes of comparison and extended analysis of NET structure. Results demonstrate that COPD sputa are characterised by the pronounced presence of NETs and NETotic neutrophils. We provide new evidence that chromatin decondensation during NETosis is most extensive and generates substantial amounts of double-helix DNA in ‘beads-on-a-string’ conformation. New information is also presented on the abundance and location of neutrophil elastase (NE) and citrullinated histone H3 (citH3). NE occurs in high densities in nearly all non-fibrous constituents of the NETs while citH3 is much less abundant. We conclude from the results that (i) NETosis is an integral part of COPD pathology; this is relevant to all future research on the etiology and therapy of the disease; and that (ii) release of ‘beads-on-a-string’ DNA studded with non-citrullinated histones is a common feature of in vivo NETosis; this is of relevance to both

  15. New aspects on the structure of neutrophil extracellular traps from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in vitro generation.

    PubMed

    Obermayer, Astrid; Stoiber, Walter; Krautgartner, Wolf-Dietrich; Klappacher, Michaela; Kofler, Barbara; Steinbacher, Peter; Vitkov, Ljubomir; Grabcanovic-Musija, Fikreta; Studnicka, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils have in recent years attracted new attention due to their ability to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These web-like extracellular structures deriving from nuclear chromatin have been depicted in ambiguous roles between antimicrobial defence and host tissue damage. NETs consist of DNA strands of varying thickness and are decorated with microbicidal and cytotoxic proteins. Their principal structure has in recent years been characterised at molecular and ultrastructural levels but many features that are of direct relevance to cytotoxicity are still incompletely understood. These include the extent of chromatin decondensation during NET formation and the relative amounts and spatial distribution of the microbicidal components within the NET. In the present work, we analyse the structure of NETs found in induced sputum of patients with acutely exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) using confocal laser microscopy and electron microscopy. In vitro induced NETs from human neutrophils serve for purposes of comparison and extended analysis of NET structure. Results demonstrate that COPD sputa are characterised by the pronounced presence of NETs and NETotic neutrophils. We provide new evidence that chromatin decondensation during NETosis is most extensive and generates substantial amounts of double-helix DNA in 'beads-on-a-string' conformation. New information is also presented on the abundance and location of neutrophil elastase (NE) and citrullinated histone H3 (citH3). NE occurs in high densities in nearly all non-fibrous constituents of the NETs while citH3 is much less abundant. We conclude from the results that (i) NETosis is an integral part of COPD pathology; this is relevant to all future research on the etiology and therapy of the disease; and that (ii) release of 'beads-on-a-string' DNA studded with non-citrullinated histones is a common feature of in vivo NETosis; this is of relevance to both the

  16. Immunostimulation using granulocyte- and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Schefold, Joerg C

    2011-01-01

    Sepsis is associated with failure of multiple organs, including failure of the immune system. The resulting 'sepsis-associated immunosuppression' resembles a state of immunological anergy that is characterized by repeated 'infectious hits', prolonged multiple-organ failure, and death. As a consequence, adjunctive treatment approaches using measures of immunostimulation with colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) were tested in animal experiments and clinical trials. Herein, data from randomized clinical trials will be discussed in the context of a recently published meta-analysis investigating the effects of granulocyte- and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor therapy in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock.

  17. Human neutrophil-mediated nonoxidative antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Mambula, S S; Simons, E R; Hastey, R; Selsted, M E; Levitz, S M

    2000-11-01

    It has long been appreciated that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) kill Cryptococcus neoformans, at least in part via generation of fungicidal oxidants. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of nonoxidative mechanisms to the inhibition and killing of C. neoformans. Treatment of human PMN with inhibitors and scavengers of respiratory burst oxidants only partially reversed anticryptococcal activity, suggesting that both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms were operative. To define the mediators of nonoxidative anticryptococcal activity, PMN were fractionated into cytoplasmic, primary (azurophil) granule, and secondary (specific) granule fractions. Incubation of C. neoformans with these fractions for 18 h resulted in percent inhibition of growth of 67.4 +/- 3.4, 84.6 +/- 4.4, and 29.2 +/- 10.5 (mean +/- standard error, n = 3), respectively. Anticryptococcal activity of the cytoplasmic fraction was abrogated by zinc and depletion of calprotectin. Antifungal activity of the primary granules was significantly reduced by pronase treatment, boiling, high ionic strength, and magnesium but not calcium. Fractionation of the primary granules by reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography on a C(4) column over an acetonitrile gradient revealed multiple peaks with anticryptococcal activity. Of these, peaks 1 and 6 had substantial fungistatic and fungicidal activity. Peak 1 was identified by acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and mass spectroscopy as human neutrophil proteins (defensins) 1 to 3. Analysis of peak 6 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE revealed multiple bands. Thus, human PMN have nonoxidative anticryptococcal activity residing principally in their cytoplasmic and primary granule fractions. Calprotectin mediates the cytoplasmic activity, whereas multiple proteins, including defensins, are responsible for activity of the primary granules. PMID:11035733

  18. Synergy of interleukin 1 and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: in vivo stimulation of stem-cell recovery and hematopoietic regeneration following 5-fluorouracil treatment of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.A.S.; Warren, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    The human bladder carcinoma cell line 5637 produces hematopoietic growth factors (granulocyte and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF and GM-CSF)) and hemopoietin 1, which synergizes with CSFs to stimulate colony formation by primitive hematopoietic stem cells in 5-fluorouracil-treated mouse bone marrow. Molecular and functional properties of hemopoietin 1 identified it as identical to interleukin 1..cap alpha.. (IL-1..cap alpha..). When bone marrow cells from 5-fluorouracil-treated mice were cultured in suspension for 7 days with recombinant human IL-1..cap alpha.. and/or G-CSF, it was found that the two factors synergized to enhance recovery of myelopoietic cells and colony-forming cells of both high and low proliferative potential. G-CSF alone did not sustain these populations, but the combination had greater-than-additive stimulating capacity. In vivo, 5-fluorouracil (150 mg/kg) produced profound myelosuppression and delayed neutrophil regeneration for up to 2 weeks in C3H/HeJ mice. Daily administration of recombinant human G-CSF or human IL-1..cap alpha.. accelerated recovery of stem cells, progenitor cells, and blood neutrophils by up to 4 days in 5-fluorouracil-treated C3H/HeJ and B6D2F/sub 1/ mice. The combination of IL-1..cap alpha.. and G-CSF acted synergistically, reducing neutropenia and accelerating recovery of normal neutrophil numbers by up to 7 days. These results indicate the possible therapeutic potential of combination therapy with IL-1 and hematopoietic growth factors such as G-CSF in the treatment of chemotherapy- or radiation-induced myelosuppression.

  19. Indium-granulocyte scanning in the painful prosthetic joint

    SciTech Connect

    Pring, D.J.; Henderson, R.G.; Keshavarzian, A.; Rivett, A.G.; Krausz, T.; Coombs, R.R.; Lavender, J.P.

    1986-07-01

    The value of indium-111-labeled granulocyte scanning to determine the presence of infection was assessed in 50 prosthetic joints (41 of which were painful) in 40 patients. Granulocytes were obtained from the patients' blood and labeled in plasma with indium 111 tropolonate. Abnormal accumulation of indium 111 in the region of the prosthesis was noted. Proven infection occurred in 11 prostheses, and all of the infections were detected by indium-111-labeled granulocyte scanning. Nineteen were not infected (including nine asymptomatic controls) and only two produced false-positive scans. This represents a specificity of 89.5%, sensitivity of 100%, and overall accuracy of 93.2%. These results compare favorably with plain radiography. There was no radiologic evidence of infection in three of the infected prostheses, and 10 of the noninfected prostheses had some radiologic features that suggested sepsis. We conclude that indium-granulocyte scanning can reliably detect or exclude infection in painful prosthetic joints and should prove useful in clinical management.

  20. Nested PCR Assay for Detection of Granulocytic Ehrlichiae

    PubMed Central

    Massung, Robert F.; Slater, Kim; Owens, Jessica H.; Nicholson, William L.; Mather, Thomas N.; Solberg, Victoria B.; Olson, James G.

    1998-01-01

    A sensitive and specific nested PCR assay was developed for the detection of granulocytic ehrlichiae. The assay amplifies the 16S rRNA gene and was used to examine acute-phase EDTA-blood and serum samples obtained from seven humans with clinical presentations compatible with human granulocytic ehrlichiosis. Five of the seven suspected cases were positive by the PCR assay using DNA extracted from whole blood as the template, compared with a serologic assay that identified only one positive sample. The PCR assay using DNA extracted from the corresponding serum samples as the template identified three positive samples. The sensitivity of the assay on human samples was examined, and the limit of detection was shown to be fewer than 2 copies of the 16S rRNA gene. The application of the assay to nonhuman samples demonstrated products amplified from template DNA extracted from Ixodes scapularis ticks collected in Rhode Island and from EDTA-blood specimens obtained from white-tailed deer in Maryland. All PCR products were sequenced and identified as specific to granulocytic ehrlichiae. A putative variant granulocytic ehrlichia 16S rRNA gene sequence was detected among products amplified from both the ticks and the deer blood specimens. PMID:9542943

  1. Increased expression of low density granulocytes in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients correlates with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Midgley, A; Beresford, M W

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophils are implicated in a wide range of non-infectious inflammatory conditions. A subset of neutrophils in the peripheral circulation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients has been described and termed low density granulocytes (LDGs). This study investigates the expression of LDG in juvenile-onset SLE (JSLE) patients compared to controls, and any correlations with disease activity.Neutrophils and LDGs were isolated from JSLE (n = 13) and paediatric non-inflammatory control patients (n = 12). Cell populations were assessed and compared using flow cytometry and morphological analysis. Standard clinical data, which included disease activity markers/scores, were collected for each patient.Significantly increased LDG expression (%mean ± SEM, range) was observed in JSLE patients (10.4 ± 3.26, 3.41-36.3) compared to controls (2.4 ± 0.44, 0.36-5.27; p = 0.005). A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between LDG expression and the British Isles Lupus Activity Group (correlation coefficient 0.685; p = 0.010) and SLE Disease Activity Index (correlation coefficient 0.567; p = 0.043) and the biomarker of dsDNA-antibodies (correlation coefficient 0.590; p = 0.043).Here we observe increased expression in LDGs in JSLE patients, which correlate with dsDNA antibody concentration and scores of disease activity. These correlations indicate that the increased LDG expression observed in this study may have a potential role in the pathogenesis of JSLE, and may be a useful biomarker.

  2. Age-related impairment of GM-CSF-induced signalling in neutrophils: role of SHP-1 and SOCS proteins.

    PubMed

    Tortorella, Cosimo; Simone, Olivia; Piazzolla, Giuseppina; Stella, Isabella; Antonaci, Salvatore

    2007-08-01

    Functional activities of mature human neutrophils are strongly influenced by the pro-inflammatory cytokine granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Accordingly, a defective response to GM-CSF might have dramatic consequences for neutrophil functions and the host defence against infections. Such an event is most likely to occur in senescence. A number of studies have, in fact, reported an impairment of the GM-CSF capacity to prime and/or to activate respiratory burst, as well as to delay apoptotic events, in neutrophils from elderly individuals. In the last 2 decades many efforts have been made to explore at molecular levels the mechanism underlying these defects. Recent studies let us depict a scenario in which an increased activity of inhibitory molecules, such as Src homology domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS), is responsible for the age-related failure of GM-CSF to stimulate neutrophil functions via inhibition of Lyn-, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)- and signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)-dependent pathways. The control of SHP-1 and/or SOCS activity might therefore be an important therapeutic target for the restoration of normal immune responses during senescence.

  3. Neutrophil function in gram-negative rod bacteremia. The interaction between phagocytic cells, infecting organisms, and humoral factors.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, R J; Young, L S

    1976-01-01

    To assess the phagocytic and bactericidal function of neutrophils in the acute stages of gram-negative rod bacteremia, cells from 30 nonleukopenic patients were studied in a test system utilizing plasma obtained simultaneously with culture-positive blood, the autologous infecting strain, and two laboratory test strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results were compared to those obtained with normal neutrophils and plasma. Patient and control plasma were simultaneously tested with each source of phagocytic cells to localize any abnormalities. Four patients had a defect against their infecting strain, 33% of the inoculum phagocytized and killed versus 80% by controls. In these cases differences were localized to the patients' plasma, as normal plasma tested with patients' cells reversed the defect. Thus, four patients had impaired opsonization when compared to normal controls, but we also observed that 11 of 30 bacteremic isolates, all Escherichia coli, showed absolute or relative resistance to phagocytosis in the patient and control assay system. No intrinsic granulocyte killing abnormalities were noted. There was poor correlation between results obtained with infecting strains compared to laboratory test organisms. We conclude that in patients without evidence of an inherited neutrophil bactericidal disorder, recurrent infection, or treatment with cytotoxic drugs, intrinsic bactericidal defects are uncommon at the onset of gram-negative bacteremia, and impaired opsonization is the most commonly encountered cause of neutrophil dysfunction. PMID:819460

  4. Nicotine is Chemotactic for Neutrophils and Enhances Neutrophil Responsiveness to Chemotactic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totti, Noel; McCusker, Kevin T.; Campbell, Edward J.; Griffin, Gail L.; Senior, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Neutrophils contribute to chronic bronchitis and pulmonary emphysema associated with cigarette smoking. Nicotine was found to be chemotactic for human neutrophils but not monocytes, with a peak activity at ~ 31 micromolar. In lower concentrations (comparable to those in smokers' plasma), nicotine enhanced the response of neutrophils to two chemotactic peptides. In contrast to most other chemoattractants for neutrophils, however, nicotine did not affect degranulation or superoxide production. Nicotine thus may promote inflammation and consequent lung injury in smokers.

  5. Platelets may inhibit leucotriene biosynthesis by human neutrophils at the integrin level.

    PubMed

    Chabannes, Bernard; Moliere, Patrick; Merhi-Soussi, Faten; Poubelle, Patrice E; Lagarde, Michel

    2003-04-01

    Polymorphonuclear leucocytes and blood platelets co-operate in several pathophysiological processes, and arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites produced in response to the activation of these cells are potent mediators of their functions. We studied the role of platelets in the formation of 5-lipoxygenase products from AA by autologous neutrophils, especially the chemotactic agent leucotriene (LT) B4. The formation of all products, namely 5-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), LTB4 and the other LTA4-derived metabolites, in response to the calcium ionophore A23187 was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography. All the 5-lipoxygenase products were significantly diminished by physiological concentrations of platelets. This inhibitory effect was lost when platelets were previously degranulated by thrombin in non-aggregating conditions. Peptides containing the Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser or His-His-Leu-Gly-Gly-Ala-Lys-Gln-Ala-Gly-Asp-Val sequence, which prevent the adhesion of platelets to neutrophils via the fibrinogen released from platelet granules and the integrin glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, markedly decreased the inhibitory effect of non-degranulated platelets. The production of transcellular metabolites of AA such as LTC4, the dual 5- and 12-lipoxygenase product 5,12-diHETE and lipoxins could not account for the decreased formation of 5-HETE and LTA4-derived metabolites. It is concluded that platelets may inhibit the neutrophil 5-lipoxygenase activity at the integrin level and in turn may play a role in slowing down the production of LTB4 in the course of inflammation.

  6. Immunomodulation by neutrophil myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide: differential susceptibility of human lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    el-Hag, A; Lipsky, P E; Bennett, M; Clark, R A

    1986-05-01

    The coexistence of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes in tumor masses and inflammatory tissues suggests the possibility of interaction between secreted neutrophil products and nearby lymphocytes. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of neutrophil myeloperoxidase and H2O2 on lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes were exposed to myeloperoxidase, an H2O2-generating system (glucose + glucose oxidase), and a halide, and were then tested for functional activities. Natural killer activity against K562 cells, lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens, and generation of immunoglobulin-secreting cells were all susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The degree as well as the mechanism of suppression was dependent on the glucose oxidase concentration (i.e., the rate of H2O2 delivery). At low H2O2 flux, myeloperoxidase was essential for induction of lymphocyte suppression; as the rate of H2O2 generation increased, suppression became myeloperoxidase-independent and was mediated by H2O2 alone. Various lymphocyte functions were differentially susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The proliferative response to poke-weed mitogen was the least sensitive, whereas antibody formation was the most sensitive. Proliferative responses to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin as well as natural killer activity displayed intermediate degrees of susceptibility. In all assays, lymphocyte viability was greater than 90%. Removal of monocytes from mononuclear leukocytes by adherence to glass increased susceptibility of lymphocytes to oxidative injury. Monocytes in proportions within the range present in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes protected lymphocyte functions against oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. This study demonstrates a differential susceptibility of various immune functions to oxidative injury by the neutrophil products myeloperoxidase and H2O2, and shows, in

  7. Biomaterial surface-dependent neutrophil mobility.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Doerschuk, Claire M; Anderson, James M; Marchant, Roger E

    2004-06-15

    Compromised neutrophil function in the presence of an implanted biomaterial may represent an important mechanism that allows for the development of implant-associated infections. Here, human neutrophil mobility has been investigated on a polyurethane (ChronoFlex AR), a hydrophobic surface consisting of an octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) self-assembled monolayer, and a glass reference material. Neutrophil mobility was quantified, based on cell movement speed and persistence time obtained from time-lapse optical microscopy, while neutrophil cytoskeletal structures and morphology were visualized using confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Our results show that material surface properties affect neutrophil-surface interactions, as reflected by morphological changes, and the mobility of neutrophils stimulated by N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). In the absence of adsorbed plasma proteins, the mobility of stimulated neutrophils increased with increasing material hydrophobicity from glass, to polyurethane, to OTS. The opposite trend was observed in the presence of adsorbed plasma proteins, such that neutrophil mobility increased with decreasing material hydrophobicity. Analysis of the results showed that the mobility of fMLP-stimulated neutrophils cells was inversely related to the extent of cell spreading on the materials. PMID:15162402

  8. Two neutrophilic dermatoses captured simultaneously on histology

    PubMed Central

    Wlodek, Christina; Bhatt, Nidhi; Kennedy, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    A number of neutrophilic dermatoses are associated with malignancies and their treatment. These rarely occur together in the same patient. A Caucasian 72-year-old male was treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with chemotherapy including daunorubicin and cytarabine. Within 48 hours of commencing treatment, he developed pyrexia and, two days later, disseminated non-tender pink plaques on the limbs and trunk. A skin biopsy showed a dermal interstitial infiltrate of lymphocytes, histiocytoid cells and predominantly neutrophils. This extended into the subcutis, where a neutrophilic lobular panniculitis was seen. These findings are consistent with Sweet’s syndrome. In addition, a neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltrate was also present around eccrine coils and lower ducts. The eccrine epithelium showed squamous metaplasia with dyskeratosis and sloughing into the lumen. These latter findings are consistent with neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis (NEH). These two histologically distinct entities form part of the neutrophilic dermatoses that have been described in oncology patients with reports of concurrent or sequential occurrence of various neutrophilic dermatoses in the same patient. Ours, however, is only the second reported case of simultaneously captured Sweet’s and NEH in the setting of AML. The most likely explanation is that of an epiphenomenon, whereby the neutrophilic infiltrate extended around the sweat glands in the context of the neutrophilic dermatosis. PMID:27648385

  9. Two neutrophilic dermatoses captured simultaneously on histology.

    PubMed

    Wlodek, Christina; Bhatt, Nidhi; Kennedy, Cameron

    2016-07-01

    A number of neutrophilic dermatoses are associated with malignancies and their treatment. These rarely occur together in the same patient. A Caucasian 72-year-old male was treated for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with chemotherapy including daunorubicin and cytarabine. Within 48 hours of commencing treatment, he developed pyrexia and, two days later, disseminated non-tender pink plaques on the limbs and trunk. A skin biopsy showed a dermal interstitial infiltrate of lymphocytes, histiocytoid cells and predominantly neutrophils. This extended into the subcutis, where a neutrophilic lobular panniculitis was seen. These findings are consistent with Sweet's syndrome. In addition, a neutrophilic and lymphocytic infiltrate was also present around eccrine coils and lower ducts. The eccrine epithelium showed squamous metaplasia with dyskeratosis and sloughing into the lumen. These latter findings are consistent with neutrophilic eccrine hidradenitis (NEH). These two histologically distinct entities form part of the neutrophilic dermatoses that have been described in oncology patients with reports of concurrent or sequential occurrence of various neutrophilic dermatoses in the same patient. Ours, however, is only the second reported case of simultaneously captured Sweet's and NEH in the setting of AML. The most likely explanation is that of an epiphenomenon, whereby the neutrophilic infiltrate extended around the sweat glands in the context of the neutrophilic dermatosis. PMID:27648385

  10. Elevated granulocyte strontium in inflammatory arthritides is related to the inflammatory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Haellgren, R.; Svensson, K.; Johansson, E.; Lindh, U.

    1984-12-01

    Total cellular strontium and calcium were measured by the nuclear microprobe technique. Increased mass fraction of both elements was found in granulocytes isolated from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis and other kinds of inflammatory arthritides. Increased granulocyte calcium but only marginally elevated granulocyte strontium was demonstrated in patients with scleroderma. The granulocyte accumulation of strontium and calcium seems to be linked to the degree of inflammatory activity, because the granulocyte content of both elements was positively correlated to the plasma concentration of acute-phase proteins. Corticosteroid therapy induced a marked reduction of granulocyte strontium but a more modest decrease of granulocyte calcium. The serum levels of strontium and calcium were within the normal ranges in all patients and were not significantly altered by corticosteroids. 21 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Glibenclamide reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine production by neutrophils of diabetes patients in response to bacterial infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kewcharoenwong, Chidchamai; Rinchai, Darawan; Utispan, Kusumawadee; Suwannasaen, Duangchan; Bancroft, Gregory J.; Ato, Manabu; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana

    2013-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for melioidosis, which is caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. Our previous study has shown that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) from diabetic subjects exhibited decreased functions in response to B. pseudomallei. Here we investigated the mechanisms regulating cytokine secretion of PMNs from diabetic patients which might contribute to patient susceptibility to bacterial infections. Purified PMNs from diabetic patients who had been treated with glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker for anti-diabetes therapy), showed reduction of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 secretion when exposed to B. pseudomallei. Additionally, reduction of these pro-inflammatory cytokines occurred when PMNs from diabetic patients were treated in vitro with glibenclamide. These findings suggest that glibenclamide might be responsible for the increased susceptibility of diabetic patients, with poor glycemic control, to bacterial infections as a result of its effect on reducing IL-1β production by PMNs.

  12. Interleukin-8 in Hodgkin's disease. Preferential expression by reactive cells and association with neutrophil density.

    PubMed Central

    Foss, H. D.; Herbst, H.; Gottstein, S.; Demel, G.; Araujó, I.; Stein, H.

    1996-01-01

    Hodgkin's disease (HD) shows rare neoplastic Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells embedded in an abundant reactive infiltrate containing, among other cell types, neutrophilic granulocytes. Interleukin (IL)-8 is chemotactic for neutrophils. The expression of IL-8 was tested by in situ hybridization with 35S-labeled IL-8-specific RNA probes on 38 cases of HD. Reactive lesions, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas of B and T phenotype, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis served as controls. IL-8 expression was observed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells in 3 of 33 cases of classical HD and in reactive cells in 20 of 33 HD cases as evidenced by combined isotopic in situ hybridization and immunohistology for the demonstration of cell-type-characteristic antigens or enzyme histochemistry for chloroacetate esterase. IL-8-positive cells were more numerous in cases of nodular sclerosing HD as compared with the mixed cellularity histotype (P = 0.01). The number of IL-8-positive cells and the density of neutrophils were positively correlated (P < 0. 01). In 5 cases of lymphocyte-predominant HD, IL-8 expression was not displayed. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cases contained IL-8 transcripts only in 1 of 23 cases in sparse reactive cells. In 4 of 7 cases of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, IL-8-specific signals were displayed in S100-negative cells. In conclusion, IL-8 expression in HD is largely confined to reactive cells and associated with infiltration by neutrophils. Elaboration of other cytokines by Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells and reactive cells may explain the frequent expression of this cytokine in HD, particularly in the nodular sclerosing type. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8644863

  13. Elevated neutrophil membrane expression of proteinase 3 is dependent upon CD177 expression

    PubMed Central

    Abdgawad, M; Gunnarsson, L; Bengtsson, A A; Geborek, P; Nilsson, L; Segelmark, M; Hellmark, T

    2010-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is a major autoantigen in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA)-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV), and the proportion of neutrophils expressing PR3 on their membrane (mPR3+) is increased in AASV. We have shown recently that mPR3 and CD177 are expressed on the same cells in healthy individuals. In this study we try to elucidate mechanisms behind the increased mPR3 expression in AASV and its relationship to CD177. All neutrophils in all individuals were either double-positive or double-negative for mPR3 and CD177. The proportion of double-positive neutrophils was increased significantly in AASV and systemic lupus erythematosus patients. The proportion of mPR3+/CD177+ cells was not correlated to general inflammation, renal function, age, sex, drug treatment and levels of circulating PR3. AASV patients had normal levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Pro-PR3 was found to constitute 10% of circulating PR3 but none of the mPR3. We found increased mRNA levels of both PR3 and CD177 in AASV, but they did not correlate with the proportion of double-positive cells. In cells sorted based on membrane expression, CD177–mRNA was several-fold higher in mPR3+ cells. When exogenous PR3 was added to CD177-transfected U937 cells, only CD177+ cells bound PR3 to their membrane. In conclusion, the increased membrane expression of PR3 found in AASV is not linked directly to circulating PR3 or PR3 gene transcription, but is dependent upon CD177 expression and correlated with the transcription of the CD177 gene. PMID:20491791

  14. [Nitroblue tetrazolium reduction by the neutrophils of the cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood and by the monocytic-reticular cells of the cerebrospinal fluid in neuroinfections].

    PubMed

    Kucharska-Demczuk, K

    1980-01-01

    Using the method of Park et al. the author studied spontaneous and stimulated NBT reduction by neutrophil granulocytes in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood, and by monocytic-reticular cells in the cerebrospinal fluid of the patients with bacterial and viral meningitis and meningismus. The author performed 333 investigations in 74 patients. Significantly higher mean values of the index of spontaneous and stimulated NBT reduction by the granulocytes and cerebrospinal fluid were observed in cases of bacterial meningitis as compared with the granulocytes of the peripheral blood in healthy subjects. It was demonstrated that in patients with bacterial meningitis blood and fluid granulocytes showed a similar phagocytic acitivty independent of the humoral environment. In the patients with bacterial and viral meningitis the monocytic-reticular cells the cerebrospinal fluid showed a similar, sometimes high, phagocytic activity depending on the phase and severity of the disease. On the otherhand, in most cases of meningismus these cells failed to manifest any phagocytic and bactericidal activity. In only few isolated cells in the fluid weak NBT reduction was observed. The obtained results of investigations showed the usefulness of the NBT test not only for the differential diagnosis of the aetiology of neuroinfections but also for the assessment of immune processes taking place in the nervous system.

  15. Transendothelial migration enhances integrin-dependent human neutrophil chemokinesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils induces phenotypic changes that influence the interactions of neutrophils with extravascular tissue components. To assess the influence of transmigration on neutrophil chemokinetic motility, we used polyethylene glycol hydrogels covalently modified with spec...

  16. Nuclear segmentation, condensation and bilateral symmetry in polymorphonuclear leukocytes reflect genomic order and favor immunologic function.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Jyoti P; Walther, Joachim U

    2013-01-01

    Segmentation, condensation and bilateral symmetry of the nuclei of polymorphonuclear leukocytes seem related to their function. Segmentation of the nuclei into two or more lobes and their condensation facilitate their passage (diapedesis) through the endothelial layer of blood vessels to the extravasal space and subsequent locomotion through the interstitial compartment of different tissues. Bilateral symmetry of these nuclei along with their association to the cytoskeletal fibers contribute to their efficiency in locomotion by alignment of the axis of nuclear symmetry to the axis of cellular polarity, which orients towards the direction of locomotion in response to cytokines and other stimuli. Observations of the cytogenetic facets of intranuclear order support these assumptions.

  17. Leukotriene B/sub 4/ production by stimulated whole blood: comparative studies with isolated polymorphonuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gresele, P.; Arnout, J.; Coene, M.C.; Deckmyn, H.; Vermylen, J.

    1986-05-29

    A new method was developed to study leukotriene B/sub 4/ (LTB/sub 4/) production by stimulated whole blood. The calcium ionophore A23187 and serum-treated zymosan induced LTB/sub 4/ production, measured by radioimmunoassay, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The pattern of LTB/sub 4/ production by whole blood differed markedly from that observed with isolated, purified polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Higher levels of LTB/sub 4/ were reached and maintained in whole blood. The system allowed to detect drug effects on LTB/sub 4/ takes into account the complex interactions between different cell types which can modulate LTB/sub 4/ metabolism.

  18. Ocular microbiota and polymorphonuclear leucocyte recruitment during overnight contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, F; Willcox, M D; Sansey, N; Holden, B A

    1997-05-01

    Bacterial colonization of the ocular surface and contact lens (CL) and recruitment of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) during overnight CL wear was examined in 11 asymptomatic wearers. The ocular surface was more frequently colonized than the CL, with commensal bacteria (P < 0.05). Following sleep, more bacteria were recovered from the CL compared with daily use (P < 0.05), and fewer PMN were recruited compared to sleep without CL wear (P < 0.05). Overnight CL wear may inhibit physiological PMN recruitment to the cornea by preventing their access, by modifying the chemotactic signal or by altering the activation state of the recruited cells.

  19. Neutrophil apoptosis: a marker of disease severity in sepsis and sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fialkow, Léa; Fochesatto Filho, Luciano; Bozzetti, Mary C; Milani, Adriana R; Rodrigues Filho, Edison M; Ladniuk, Roberta M; Pierozan, Paula; de Moura, Rafaela M; Prolla, João C; Vachon, Eric; Downey, Gregory P

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Apoptosis of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear neutrophils [PMNs]) may limit inflammatory injury in sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the relationship between the severity of sepsis and extent of PMN apoptosis and the effect of superimposed ARDS is unknown. The objective of this study was to correlate neutrophil apoptosis with the severity of sepsis and sepsis-induced ARDS. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted in intensive care units of three tertiary hospitals in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. Fifty-seven patients with sepsis (uncomplicated sepsis, septic shock, and sepsis-induced ARDS) and 64 controls were enrolled. Venous peripheral blood was collected from patients with sepsis within 24 hours of diagnosis. All surgical groups, including controls, had their blood drawn 24 hours after surgery. Control patients on mechanical ventilation had blood collected within 24 hours of initiation of mechanical ventilation. Healthy controls were blood donors. Neutrophils were isolated, and incubated ex vivo, and apoptosis was determined by light microscopy on cytospun preparations. The differences among groups were assessed by analysis of variance with Tukeys. Results In medical patients, the mean percentage of neutrophil apoptosis (± standard error of the mean [SEM]) was lower in sepsis-induced ARDS (28% ± 3.3%; n = 9) when compared with uncomplicated sepsis (57% ± 3.2%; n = 8; p < 0.001), mechanical ventilation without infection, sepsis, or ARDS (53% ± 3.0%; n = 11; p < 0.001) and healthy controls (69% ± 1.1%; n = 33; p < 0.001) but did not differ from septic shock (38% ± 3.7%; n = 12; p = 0.13). In surgical patients with sepsis, the percentage of neutrophil apoptosis was lower for all groups when compared with surgical controls (52% ± 3.6%; n = 11; p < 0.001). Conclusion In medical patients with sepsis, neutrophil apoptosis is inversely proportional to the severity of sepsis and thus may be a marker of the severity of

  20. A Radical Break: Restraining Neutrophil Migration.

    PubMed

    Renkawitz, Jörg; Sixt, Michael

    2016-09-12

    When neutrophils infiltrate a site of inflammation, they have to stop at the right place to exert their effector function. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Wang et al. (2016) show that neutrophils sense reactive oxygen species via the TRPM2 channel to arrest migration at their target site. PMID:27623379

  1. Mechanotransduction in neutrophil activation and deactivation.

    PubMed

    Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Toepfner, Nicole; Chilvers, Edwin R; Guck, Jochen

    2015-11-01

    Mechanotransduction refers to the processes through which cells sense mechanical stimuli by converting them to biochemical signals and, thus, eliciting specific cellular responses. Cells sense mechanical stimuli from their 3D environment, including the extracellular matrix, neighboring cells and other mechanical forces. Incidentally, the emerging concept of mechanical homeostasis,long term or chronic regulation of mechanical properties, seems to apply to neutrophils in a peculiar manner, owing to neutrophils' ability to dynamically switch between the activated/primed and deactivated/deprimed states. While neutrophil activation has been known for over a century, its deactivation is a relatively recent discovery. Even more intriguing is the reversibility of neutrophil activation and deactivation. We review and critically evaluate recent findings that suggest physiological roles for neutrophil activation and deactivation and discuss possible mechanisms by which mechanical stimuli can drive the oscillation of neutrophils between the activated and resting states. We highlight several molecules that have been identified in neutrophil mechanotransduction, including cell adhesion and transmembrane receptors, cytoskeletal and ion channel molecules. The physiological and pathophysiological implications of such mechanically induced signal transduction in neutrophils are highlighted as a basis for future work. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology. PMID:26211453

  2. Neutrophil survival in the death zone.

    PubMed

    Croker, Ben A

    2014-01-16

    In this issue of Blood, Thompson et al reveal a key role for hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2a in the adaptation of neutrophils to hypoxia. Tissue hypoxia is a common feature of trauma and inflammation. Infiltrating neutrophils must adapt to this low-oxygen environment to satisfy the metabolic and functional demands of an immune response.

  3. Chronic neutrophilic leukaemia and plasma cell-related neutrophilic leukaemoid reactions.

    PubMed

    Bain, Barbara J; Ahmad, Shahzaib

    2015-11-01

    Many cases reported as 'chronic neutrophilic leukaemia' have had an associated plasma cell neoplasm. Recent evidence suggests that the great majority of such cases represent a neutrophilic leukaemoid reaction to the underlying multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. We have analysed all accessible reported cases to clarify the likely diagnosis and to ascertain whether toxic granulation, Döhle bodies and an increased neutrophil alkaline phosphatase score were useful in making a distinction between chronic neutrophilic leukaemia and a neutrophilic leukaemoid reaction. We established that all these changes occur in both conditions. Toxic granulation and Döhle bodies are more consistently present in leukaemoid reactions but also occur quite frequently in chronic neutrophilic leukaemia. The neutrophil alkaline phosphatase score is increased in both conditions and is of no value in making a distinction.

  4. In vivo kinetics of 111indium-labelled autologous granulocytes following i.v. administration of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF).

    PubMed

    Hovgaard, D; Schifter, S; Rabøl, A; Mortensen, B T; Nissen, N I

    1992-04-01

    Administration of both glycosylated and non-glycosylated recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) induces an immediate transient granulocytopenia of 1-3 hours' duration. In order to explore this phenomenon, granulocytes were labelled with 111Indium and the effect on the kinetics of granulocytes after administration of rhGM-CSF was studied in 10 previously untreated patients with malignant lymphoma. For both types and doses of rhGM-CSF, a significant and dramatic accumulation of the 111Indium-labelled granulocytes was observed in the lung within a few minutes after i.v. injection of rhGM-CSF. The accumulation of radioactivity coincided with the pronounced and transient granulocytopenia in peripheral blood. The 111Indium-labelled granulocytes later reappeared in the peripheral blood, indicating reversible pulmonary vascular margination of the granulocytes. Half-life of labelled granulocytes after reappearance was comparable to half-life values under normal conditions. The transient accumulation of granulocytes in the pulmonary vessels seems not to be of clinical importance in the management of patients, but it may to some degree explain previously described side-effects, such as transient hypoxemia ("first-dose" reaction) following administration of rhGM-CSF.

  5. Inhibition of tumor growth by elimination of granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    As observed for many types of cancers, heritable variants of ultraviolet light-induced tumors often grow more aggressively than the parental tumors. The aggressive growth of some variants is due to the loss of a T cell-recognized tumor-specific antigen; however, other variants retain such antigens. We have analyzed an antigen retention variant and found that the variant tumor cells grow at the same rate as the parental tumor cells in vitro, but grew more rapidly than the parental cells in the T cell-deficient host. The growth of the variant cells was stimulated in vitro by factors released from tumor-induced leukocytes and by several defined growth factors. In addition, the variant cancer cells actually attracted more leukocytes in vitro than the parental cells. Furthermore, elimination of granulocytes in vivo in nude mice by a specific antigranulocyte antibody inhibited the growth of the variant cancer, indicating that this tumor requires granulocytes for rapid growth. PMID:7807024

  6. Separation of granulocytes from whole blood by leukoadhesion, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Capillary glass tubes are investigated for the separation and retrieval of large quantities of viable granulocytes and monocytes from whole blood on a continuous basis from a single donor. This effort represented the feasibility demonstration of a three phase program for development of a capillary tube cell separation device. The activity included the analysis and parametric laboratory testing with subscale models required to design a prototype device. Capillary tubes 40 cm long with a nominal 0.030 cm internal diameter yielded the highest total process efficiency. Recovery efficiencies as high as 89% of the adhering cell population were obtained. Granulocyte phagocytosis of latex particles indicated approximately 90% viability. Monocytes recovered from the separation column retained their capability to stimulate human bone marrow colony growth, as demonstrated in an in vitro cell culture assay.

  7. Biphasic control of polymorphonuclear cell migration by Kupffer cells. Effect of exposure to metabolic products of ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Fainsilber, Z.; Feinman, L.; Shaw, S.; Lieber, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of the Kupffer cells in the regulation of the inflammatory reaction seen in alcoholic hepatitis, rat liver Kupffer cells were cultured and exposed to products of ethanol metabolism. The resultant supernatants were tested to study their ability to stimulate or inhibit polymorphonuclear cell chemotaxis. Kupffer cells produced increased chemokinetic activity for human polymorphonuclear leukocytes; when incubated with soluble products of microsomal peroxidation, the Kupffer cells engendered more chemokinetic activity than that produced by untreated Kupffer cells. When Kupffer cells were incubated with acetaldehyde, the chemokinetic activity that appeared in the supernatant did not differ from control. Chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear cells was not observed when the Kupffer cell supernatants were tested by checkerboard analysis.

  8. How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Leliefeld, Pieter H. C.; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell–cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes. PMID:26441976

  9. How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Leliefeld, Pieter H C; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell-cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes. PMID:26441976

  10. Neutrophil uptake of vaccinia virus in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    West, B.C.; Eschete, M.L.; Cox, M.E.; King, J.W.

    1987-10-01

    We studied human neutrophils for uptake of vaccinia virus. Uptake was determined radiometrically and by electron microscopy. Vaccinia virus was labeled with /sup 14/C or /sup 3/H, incubated with neutrophils, and quantified in neutrophil pellets in a new radiometric phagocytosis assay. Better results were obtained from assays of (/sup 3/H)thymidine-labeled virus; uptake increased through 1 hr and then plateaued. Phagocytosis of 3H-labeled Staphylococcus aureus was normal. Uptake of virus was serum dependent. Hexose monophosphate shunt activity was measured by two methods. No /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from (/sup 14/C)1-glucose accompanied uptake of vaccinia virus, in contrast to the respiratory burst accompanying bacterial phagocytosis. Electron microscopy showed intact to slightly digested intraphagolysosomal vaccinia virus. Pock reduction assay showed a decrease in viral content due to neutrophils until 6 hr of incubation, when a modest but significant increase was observed. Thus, neutrophil uptake of vaccinia virus is distinguished from bacterial phagocytosis.

  11. Dynamic interactions of neutrophils and biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hirschfeld, Josefine

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of microbial infections in humans are biofilm-associated and difficult to treat, as biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and protect themselves from external threats in various ways. Biofilms are tenaciously attached to surfaces and impede the ability of host defense molecules and cells to penetrate them. On the other hand, some biofilms are beneficial for the host and contain protective microorganisms. Microbes in biofilms express pathogen-associated molecular patterns and epitopes that can be recognized by innate immune cells and opsonins, leading to activation of neutrophils and other leukocytes. Neutrophils are part of the first line of defense and have multiple antimicrobial strategies allowing them to attack pathogenic biofilms. Objective/design In this paper, interaction modes of neutrophils with biofilms are reviewed. Antimicrobial strategies of neutrophils and the counteractions of the biofilm communities, with special attention to oral biofilms, are presented. Moreover, possible adverse effects of neutrophil activity and their biofilm-promoting side effects are discussed. Results/conclusion Biofilms are partially, but not entirely, protected against neutrophil assault, which include the processes of phagocytosis, degranulation, and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps. However, virulence factors of microorganisms, microbial composition, and properties of the extracellular matrix determine whether a biofilm and subsequent microbial spread can be controlled by neutrophils and other host defense factors. Besides, neutrophils may inadvertently contribute to the physical and ecological stability of biofilms by promoting selection of more resistant strains. Moreover, neutrophil enzymes can degrade collagen and other proteins and, as a result, cause harm to the host tissues. These parameters could be crucial factors in the onset of periodontal inflammation and the subsequent tissue breakdown. PMID:25523872

  12. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    PubMed

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity. PMID:27036091

  13. [Technic and clinical use of radioactive labelling of autologous granulocytes].

    PubMed

    Strobl-Jäger, E; Kolbe, H; Ludwig, H; Sinzinger, H

    1988-02-01

    Gamma-camera imaging after injection of radiolabelled autologous leucocytes can be very helpful in the diagnosis, localization and further clinical treatment of inflammatory diseases. We present a technique allowing sterile separation of white blood cells and labelling with 99mTc-phytate or -oxine and with 111In-oxine, -oxine sulphate or -tropolone. The method is non-invasive and the radiation dose amounts to less than 80 mrad using 100 microCi 111Indium. The use of radiolabelled granulocytes is of particular diagnostic value in patients with septicaemia of unknown origin. Whole body scanning allows not only visualization of enhanced splenic uptake in septicaemia, but also localization of an inflammatory process. Preferential indications for a diagnostic approach using radiolabelled granulocytes are inflammatory abdominal processes which cannot easily be documented by means of other non-invasive techniques, such as inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's diseases and ulcerative colitis), arthritic processes and abscesses of the liver and spleen, as well as subphrenic and retroperitoneal abscesses. Untreated osteomyelitis can be located with the help of labelled granulocytes, but in patients treated with antibiotics a false negative result is obtained in approximately 50% of cases for as yet unknown reasons, even in the presence of a still active osteomyelitic process.

  14. The Role of Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor in the Neutrophilia Observed in the Fetal Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Romero, Roberto; Berry, Stanley M.; Hassan, Sonia S.; Yoon, Bo Hyun; Edwin, Samuel; Mazor, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Fetal neutrophilia is present in two-thirds of cases with the fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS). The mechanisms responsible for this finding have not been elucidated. Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) is the primary physiologic regulator of neutrophil production and plays a key role in the rapid generation and release of neutrophils in stressful conditions (i.e., infection). The objective of this study was to determine: 1) whether FIRS was associated with changes in fetal plasma G-CSF concentrations; and 2) if fetal plasma G-CSF concentrations correlated with fetal neutrophil counts, chorioamnionitis, neonatal morbidity/mortality and cordocentesis-to-delivery interval. STUDY DESIGN Percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling was performed in a population of patients with preterm labor (n=107). A fetal plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) concentration >11 pg/mL was used to define FIRS. Cord blood G-CSF was measured by a sensitive and specific immunoassay. An absolute neutrophil count was determined and corrected for gestational age. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard model were employed. RESULTS 1) G-CSF was detected in all fetal blood samples; 2) fetuses with FIRS had a higher median fetal plasma G-CSF concentration than those without FIRS (p<0.001); 3) a fetal plasma G-CSF concentration ≥134 pg/mL (derived from an ROC curve) was associated with a shorter cordocentesis-to-delivery interval, a higher frequency of chorioamnionitis (clinical and histological), intra-amniotic infection, and composite neonatal morbidity/mortality than a fetal plasma concentration below this cut-off; and 4) a fetal plasma G-CSF concentration ≥134 pg/mL was associated with a shorter cordocentesis-to-delivery interval (hazard ratio 3.2; 95% confidence interval 1.8-5.8) after adjusting for confounders. CONCLUSIONS 1) G-CSF concentrations are higher in the peripheral blood of fetuses with FIRS than in

  15. Tumour Cell Lines HT-29 and FaDu Produce Proinflammatory Cytokines and Activate Neutrophils In Vitro: Possible Applications for Neutrophil-Based Antitumour Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Brú, Antonio; Souto, Juan-Carlos; Alcolea, Sonia; Antón, Rosa; Remacha, Angel; Camacho, Mercedes; Soler, Marta; Brú, Isabel; Porres, Amelia; Vila, Luis

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) can exert severe antineoplastic effects. Cross-talk between tumour cells and endothelial cells (ECs) is necessary for the accumulation of PMN around a tumour. This work reports the ability of two PMN-sensitive, human, permanent cell lines—colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) and pharyngeal squamous-cell carcinoma (FaDu) cells—to act as inflammatory foci. PMNs were cytotoxic to both lines, the adhesion of the PMNs to the tumour cells being important in this effect. The tumour cells released appreciable amounts of IL-8 and GROα, and induced the transmigration of PMN through human microvascular-EC monolayers. Conditioning media associated with both lines induced the adhesion of PMN and the surface expression of ICAM-1 in microvascular-EC. In addition, FaDu-conditioning-medium strongly induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines by microvascular-EC. These results support the idea that tumour cells might normally induce a potent acute inflammatory response, leading to their own destruction. PMID:20169105

  16. The effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in preclinical models of infection and acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Marshall, John C

    2005-12-01

    The cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a potent endogenous trigger for the release of neutrophils from bone marrow stores and for their activation for enhanced antimicrobial activity. G-CSF has been widely evaluated in preclinical models of acute illness, with generally promising though divergent results. A recombinant G-CSF molecule has recently undergone clinical trials to assess its efficacy as an adjuvant therapy in community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia, however, these studies failed to provide convincing evidence of benefit. We undertook a systematic review of the published literature reporting the effects of modulation of G-CSF in preclinical in vivo models to determine whether evidence of differential efficacy might explain the disappointing results of human studies and point to disease states that might be more likely to benefit from G-CSF therapy. G-CSF has been evaluated in 86 such studies involving a variety of different models. The strongest evidence of benefit was seen in studies involving intraperitoneal challenge with live organisms; benefit was evident whether the agent was given before or after challenge. G-CSF demonstrates anti-inflammatory activity in models of systemic challenge with viable organisms or endotoxin, but only when the agent is given before challenge; evidence of benefit after challenge was minimal. Preclinical models of intrapulmonary challenge only show efficacy when the cytokine is administered before the infectious challenge, and suggested harm in gram-negative pneumonia resulting from challenge with Escherichia coli or Klebsiella. There is little evidence for therapeutic efficacy in noninfectious models of acute illness. We conclude that the most promising populations for evaluation of G-CSF are neutropenic patients with invasive infection and patients with intra-abdominal infection, particularly those with the syndrome of tertiary, or recurrent, peritonitis. Significant variability in the design

  17. Use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: a survey among Italian medical oncologists.

    PubMed

    Danova, Marco; Rosti, Giovanni; De Placido, Sabino; Bencardino, Katia; Venturini, Marco

    2005-12-01

    In October 2003, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) published its own guidelines on the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). The present survey was conducted during the same period with the aim of collecting data on the current use of G-CSF to provide a starting point for future evaluations of the implementation of AIOM guidelines. From October 2003 to January 2004, 1591 AIOM members were asked to complete a questionnaire based on specific clinical scenarios, regarding the use of G-CSF for primary and secondary prophylaxis and treatment of neutropenia. The rate of response was 22%. For primary prophylaxis, the majority of physicians avoid using G-CSF, with no difference in cases of adjuvant, curative or palliative chemotherapy (CT). In fact, 67.2% to 74.9% would 'rarely or never' use G-CSF in the proposed clinical scenarios. In chemosensitive tumors, rather than reducing CT doses, 55.7% would use G-CSF as a secondary prophylaxis after afebrile neutropenia (AN), and 68.8% after febrile neutropenia (FN). In elderly patients experiencing FN, 35.7% would reduce the adjuvant CT doses and 23.1% would change the regimen. Most oncologists would use G-CSF to treat neutropenia, and the median duration of G-CSF treatment is less than 1 week and would depend on neutrophil count. Our survey shows that Italian oncologists are particularly oriented towards the use of G-CSF in clinical practice to maintain the CT dose intensity, and are sensitive to the prevention and treatment of not only FN, but also AN. Finally, Italian medical oncologists appear to be very cautious in introducing G-CSF when treating elderly patients. PMID:16273232

  18. Recombinant human interleukin-3: pharmacokinetics after intravenous and subcutaneous bolus injection and effects on granulocyte kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hovgaard, D J; Folke, M; Mortensen, B T; Nissen, N I

    1994-08-01

    The pharmacokinetics of E. coli derived recombinant human interleukin-3 (rhIL-3) was studied following intravenous (i.v.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) bolus injection of rhIL-3. After i.v. bolus injection in eight patients, serum peak levels of 34.5-135.0 ng/ml were reached, followed by a rapid decline with a t1/2 alpha of 17 +/- 2 min and a t1/2 beta of 59 +/- 7 min. After s.c. bolus injection in five patients, the absorption was more prolonged with peak serum levels reached at 2.8 +/- 0.4 h. Elimination was also more protracted, and serum base-line levels were reached at 14-24 h. The immediate effect of rhIL-3 on peripheral white blood cells was less pronounced and more variable than previously found for G- or GM-CSF. Following i.v. administration, neutrophils showed a moderate drop to median 64% of initial values (range 42-85%) at median 30 min after injection (range 15-60 min) followed by an increase at 24 h to 69-288% of initial values. Eosinophils dropped to a median nadir of 34% and then gradually increased to maximum values in the range 135-720% at 18-24 h. The effect of rhIL-3 was further examined following i.v. injection of autologous 111Indium-labelled granulocytes in six patients. In steady state, i.v. injection of rhIL-3 caused a moderate drop in 111Indium activity of peripheral blood within 20 min without tendency to subsequent recovery. No change occurred in the activity recorded over the lungs and liver. The activity over the spleen decreased moderately in two patients. These results are strikingly different from those previously obtained after i.v. injection of rhGM-CSF.

  19. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte histamine receptors: occurrence in cell surface clusters and their redistribution during locomotion.

    PubMed Central

    Petty, H R; Francis, J W

    1986-01-01

    A univalent and bioactive fluorescent derivative of histamine bound to the surface of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes; free histamine was found to compete with this derivative for binding sites. Histamine H2-receptor specificity was indicated by binding inhibition experiments using cimetidine (H2-specific) but not diphenhydramine (H1-specific). Video-intensification fluorescence microscopy was used to determine the distribution of histamine receptors in living polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Receptors appeared as randomly distributed clusters upon stationary cells. During random locomotion, receptors were restricted to the ends of pseudopods, whereas chemotaxis led to receptor localization at lamellipodia and uropods. Ligand-receptor complexes were restricted to the cell surface, as shown by quenching exterior fluorescence with crystal violet. Therefore, pinocytic uptake cannot account for the observed receptor localization or clustering. As a further control, the lipid analog 1,1-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine remained uniformly distributed during all conditions. Histamine-mediated inhibition of adherence may be related to formation of ligand-receptor membrane domains at adherence sites. Images PMID:3459177

  20. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) can allow treatment with clozapine in a patient with severe benign ethnic neutropaenia (BEN): a case report.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Benjamin W J; Williams, Hugh R J; Gee, Siobhan H; Whiskey, Eromona; Rodrigues, Joseph P; Mijovic, Aleksandar; MacCabe, James H

    2012-09-01

    Clozapine is the treatment of choice for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but it is associated with a risk of neutropaenia and agranulocytosis. Clozapine use is regulated by mandatory blood monitoring in the UK, requiring cessation of treatment should the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) drop below specified values. Benign reductions in the ANC in non-white populations are common, and this can preclude a patient from receiving treatment with clozapine. A diagnosis of benign ethnic neutropaenia can reduce these treatment restrictions (UK specific), but the degree of neutropaenia can be significant enough to still prevent treatment. In this report, we show that response to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be quite variable and difficult to predict, but with careful monitoring it can be used to increase the ANC count and allow continued treatment with clozapine.

  1. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) can allow treatment with clozapine in a patient with severe benign ethnic neutropaenia (BEN): a case report.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Benjamin W J; Williams, Hugh R J; Gee, Siobhan H; Whiskey, Eromona; Rodrigues, Joseph P; Mijovic, Aleksandar; MacCabe, James H

    2012-09-01

    Clozapine is the treatment of choice for treatment-resistant schizophrenia, but it is associated with a risk of neutropaenia and agranulocytosis. Clozapine use is regulated by mandatory blood monitoring in the UK, requiring cessation of treatment should the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) drop below specified values. Benign reductions in the ANC in non-white populations are common, and this can preclude a patient from receiving treatment with clozapine. A diagnosis of benign ethnic neutropaenia can reduce these treatment restrictions (UK specific), but the degree of neutropaenia can be significant enough to still prevent treatment. In this report, we show that response to granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be quite variable and difficult to predict, but with careful monitoring it can be used to increase the ANC count and allow continued treatment with clozapine. PMID:22719015

  2. Platelet–neutrophil interactions under thromboinflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Kim, Kyungho; Barazia, Andrew; Tseng, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Platelets primarily mediate hemostasis and thrombosis, whereas leukocytes are responsible for immune responses. Since platelets interact with leukocytes at the site of vascular injury, thrombosis and vascular inflammation are closely intertwined and occur consecutively. Recent studies using real-time imaging technology demonstrated that platelet–neutrophil interactions on the activated endothelium are an important determinant of microvascular occlusion during thromboinflammatory disease in which inflammation is coupled to thrombosis. Although the major receptors and counter receptors have been identified, it remains poorly understood how heterotypic platelet–neutrophil interactions are regulated under disease conditions. This review discusses our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of platelet– neutrophil interactions in thromboinflammatory disease. PMID:25650236

  3. Accelerated neutrophil apoptosis in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pitrak, D L; Tsai, H C; Mullane, K M; Sutton, S H; Stevens, P

    1996-01-01

    Neutrophil (PMNL) function defects occur as a consequence of HIV infection. This study examined PMNL apoptosis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) to determine if accelerated apoptosis contributes to impaired function. PMNL were isolated from 10 HIV-infected patients with CD4+ lymphocyte counts < 200/mm3 without signs of active infection and 7 healthy volunteers. PMNL were stained with acridine orange and ethidium bromide after 0, 3, 6, and 18 h in culture, and examined for the morphologic changes of apoptosis and viability by fluorescent microscopy. Apoptosis was also demonstrated by electron microscopy, flow cytometry, and DNA gel electrophoresis. Apoptosis was minimal at 0 h, but PMNL from AIDS patients exhibited significantly greater apoptosis than controls at 3 h (22.5+/-11.5 vs. 8.9+/-6.9%, P = 0.015), 6 h (38.1+/-14.2 vs. 18.1+/-4.5%, P = 0.003), and 18 h (71.3+/-19.0 vs. 38.8+/-16.7%, P = 0.002). Viabilities were > or = 88.0% for both groups from 0-6 h, but by 18 h viability was significantly decreased for the HIV group (58.8+/-12.4 vs. 83.5+/-10.4%, P = 0.001) due to an increase in non-viable apoptotic cells. Incubation with serum from AIDS patients had no effect on control PMNL, and incubation with control serum did not reduce the rate of apoptosis of PMNL from AIDS patients. Incubation with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in vitro significantly decreased apoptosis for PMNL from AIDS patients. PMNL from patients with AIDS exhibit markedly accelerated apoptosis ex vivo. In vivo, apoptosis and functional impairment of PMNL may contribute to the risk of secondary infections, and cytokine therapy may be of potential clinical benefit in this circumstance. PMID:8981916

  4. Key role for neutrophils in radiation-induced antitumor immune responses: Potentiation with G-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Tsuguhide; Pop, Laurentiu M.; Laine, Aaron; Iyengar, Puneeth; Vitetta, Ellen S.; Hannan, Raquibul

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT), a major modality for treating localized tumors, can induce tumor regression outside the radiation field through an abscopal effect that is thought to involve the immune system. Our studies were designed to understand the early immunological effects of RT in the tumor microenvironment using several syngeneic mouse tumor models. We observed that RT induced sterile inflammation with a rapid and transient infiltration of CD11b+Gr-1high+ neutrophils into the tumors. RT-recruited tumor-associated neutrophils (RT-Ns) exhibited an increased production of reactive oxygen species and induced apoptosis of tumor cells. Tumor infiltration of RT-Ns resulted in sterile inflammation and, eventually, the activation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells, their recruitment into the tumor site, and tumor regression. Finally, the concurrent administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced RT-mediated antitumor activity by activating RT-Ns. Our results suggest that the combination of RT and G-CSF should be further evaluated in preclinical and clinical settings. PMID:27651484

  5. Subcellular localization and dynamics of Mac-1 (alpha m beta 2) in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Sengeløv, H; Kjeldsen, L; Diamond, M S; Springer, T A; Borregaard, N

    1993-01-01

    The subcellular localization of Mac-1 was determined in resting and stimulated human neutrophils after disruption by nitrogen cavitation and fractionation on two-layer Percoll density gradients. Light membranes were further separated by high voltage free flow electrophoresis. Mac-1 was determined by an ELISA with monoclonal antibodies that were specific for the alpha-chain (CD11b). In unstimulated neutrophils, 75% of Mac-1 colocalized with specific granules including gelatinase granules, 20% with secretory vesicles and the rest with plasma membranes. Stimulation with nanomolar concentrations of FMLP resulted in the translocation of Mac-1 from secretory vesicles to the plasma membrane, and only minimal translocation from specific granules and gelatinase granules. Stimulation with PMA or Ionomycin resulted in full translocation of Mac-1 from secretory vesicles and gelatinase granules to the plasma membrane, and partial translocation of Mac-1 from specific granules. These findings were corroborated by flow cytometry, which demonstrated a 6-10-fold increase in the surface membrane content of Mac-1 in response to stimulation with FMLP, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor, IL-8, leukotriene B4, platelet-activating factor, TNF-alpha, and zymosan-activated serum, and a 25-fold increase in response to Ionomycin. Thus, secretory vesicles constitute the most important reservoir of Mac-1 that is incorporated into the plasma membrane during stimulation with inflammatory mediators. PMID:8376598

  6. Neutrophils recruited to sites of infection protect from virus challenge by releasing neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Jenne, Craig N; Wong, Connie H Y; Zemp, Franz J; McDonald, Braedon; Rahman, Masmudur M; Forsyth, Peter A; McFadden, Grant; Kubes, Paul

    2013-02-13

    Neutrophils mediate bacterial clearance through various mechanisms, including the release of mesh-like DNA structures or neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that capture bacteria. Although neutrophils are also recruited to sites of viral infection, their role in antiviral innate immunity is less clear. We show that systemic administration of virus analogs or poxvirus infection induces neutrophil recruitment to the liver microvasculature and the release of NETs that protect host cells from virus infection. After systemic intravenous poxvirus challenge, mice exhibit thrombocytopenia and the recruitment of both neutrophils and platelets to the liver vasculature. Circulating platelets interact with, roll along, and adhere to the surface of adherent neutrophils, forming large, dynamic aggregates. These interactions facilitate the release of NETs within the liver vasculature that are able to protect host cells from poxvirus infection. These findings highlight the role of NETs and early tissue-wide responses in preventing viral infection.

  7. [Successful treatment of an overwhelming infection with granulocyte transfusion in severe aplastic anemia patient undergoing allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Kazuma, Yasuhiro; Ono, Yuichiro; Yonetani, Noboru; Imai, Yukihiro; Kawakami, Manabu; Hashimoto, Hisako; Ishikawa, Takayuki

    2016-04-01

    A 19-year-old woman complaining of fever and a sore throat was diagnosed with very severe aplastic anemia (AA) by bone marrow examination at a local hospital. Despite administration of antibiotics and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to treat the soft tissue infection in her neck, her neutrophil count showed no increase. Because emergent allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) was necessary, she was referred to our hospital. On admission, computed tomography revealed right-sided severe pharyngitis and lymphadenitis causing tracheal stenosis, and emergent intubation was required the next day. Granulocyte transfusion therapy (GTX) from related donors coupled with broad-spectrum antibiotic administration controlled the otherwise overwhelming infection. The patient received allogeneic peripheral blood SCT using a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. After allogeneic SCT, successful engraftment was obtained. She was discharged from the hospital 59 days after allogeneic SCT. She remains alive and well, as of the latest follow up. This case clearly demonstrates that GTX is useful for controlling severe infection and enables patients with severe AA to receive allogeneic SCT safely. PMID:27169447

  8. Pristane-induced granulocyte recruitment promotes phenotypic conversion of macrophages and protects against diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage in Mac-1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yiqin; Tsuboi, Naotake; Furuhashi, Kazuhiro; Du, Qiuna; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maeda, Kayaho; Kosugi, Tomoki; Matsuo, Seiichi; Maruyama, Shoichi

    2014-11-15

    Diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage (DPH) is an uncommon but critical complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. Peritoneal administration of 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (pristane) can recapitulate a lupus-like syndrome in mice, which can develop into DPH within a few weeks, especially in C57BL/6 mice. Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18), a leukocyte adhesion molecule, is known to play a role in inflammation by regulating migration of leukocytes into injured tissue. In this study, we aimed to clarify the role of Mac-1 in pristane-induced DPH, using Mac-1(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice on a C57BL/6 background. After pristane injection, Mac-1(-/-) mice showed reduced prevalence of DPH and attenuated peritonitis compared with WT mice. Analysis of the peritoneal lavage on days 5 and 10 after pristane treatment revealed increased numbers of eosinophils and alternatively activated macrophages, but decreased numbers of neutrophils and classically activated macrophages in Mac-1(-/-) mice compared with WT. Enhanced production of IL-4 and IL-13, both key mediators of macrophage polarization toward the mannose receptor(+) (MMR(+)) phenotype, was observed in the peritoneal cavity of Mac-1(-/-) mice. Depletion of neutrophils and eosinophils or adoptive transfer of classically activated macrophages resulted in the exacerbation of pristane-mediated DPH in both WT and Mac-1(-/-) mice. Moreover, peritoneal transfer of F4/80(high)MMR(+) alternatively activated macrophages successfully reduced the prevalence of DPH in WT mice. Collectively, Mac-1 promoted acute inflammatory responses in the peritoneal cavity and the lungs by downregulating granulocyte migration and subsequent phenotypic conversion of macrophages in a pristane-induced systemic lupus erythematosus model.

  9. Influence of local anesthetics upon human polymorphonuclear leukocyte function in vitro. Reduction of lysosomal enzyme release and superoxide anion production.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, I M; Lind, S; Hoffstein, S; Weissmann, G

    1977-08-01

    Cationic local anesthetics have been reported to influence cellular responses to surface stimuli by interfering with the function of microtubules and microfilaments. Since unimpaired microtubule and microfilament functions are required by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in order to respond normally to surface stimulation, we have studied effects of the local anesthetic, tetracaine on the function and morphology of these cells in vitro. Tetracaine (0.25--1.0 mM) significantly reduced extracellular release of the lysosomal enzymes, beta-glucuronidase and lysozyme from polymorphonuclear leukocytes exposed to serum-treated zymosan (a particulate stimulus), zymosan-treated serum (a soluble stimulus), and to the surface-active lectin, concanavalin A. Tetracaine also significantly reduced superoixde anion production (superoxide dismutase-inhibitable cytochrome c reduction) by these cells. Tetrancaine was not cytotoxic and its effects could be reversed completely by washing cells once with buffer. Electron microscope examination of tetracaine-treated cells revealed marked alterations of surface membranes. Microtubules and microfilaments appeared normal in "resting" polymorphonuclear leukocytes, but the increase in microtubules normally observed in stimulated cells was not seen after tetracaine treatment. These results suggest that tetracaine interferes with those interactions between immune reactants and the polymorphonuclear leukocyte cell surface which provoke exocytosis and increased oxidative metabolism.

  10. Neutrophil Extracellular Trap-Associated Protein Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome Is Enhanced in Lupus Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kahlenberg, J. Michelle; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Smith, Carolyne K.; Kaplan, Mariana J.

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent an important defense mechanism against microorganisms. Clearance of NETs is impaired in a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), while NETosis is increased in neutrophils and, particularly, in low-density granulocytes derived from lupus patients. NETs are toxic to the endothelium, expose immunostimulatory molecules, activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells and may participate in organ damage through incompletely characterized pathways. In order to better understand the role of NETs in fostering dysregulated inflammation, we examined inflammasome activation in response to NETs or to LL-37, an antibacterial protein externalized on the NETs. Both NETs and LL-37 activate caspase-1, the central enzyme of the inflammasome, in both human and murine macrophages, resulting in release of active IL-1β and IL-18. LL-37 activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome utilizes P2×7 receptor-mediated potassium efflux. NET and LL-37-mediated activation of the inflammasome is enhanced in macrophages derived from lupus patients. In turn, IL-18 is able to stimulate NETosis in human neutrophils. These results suggest that enhanced formation of NETs in lupus patients can lead to increased inflammasome activation in adjacent macrophages. This leads to release of inflammatory cytokines which further stimulate NETosis, resulting in a feed-forward inflammatory loop that could potentially lead to disease flares and/or organ damage. PMID:23267025

  11. Neutrophil extracellular trap-associated protein activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome is enhanced in lupus macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kahlenberg, J Michelle; Carmona-Rivera, Carmelo; Smith, Carolyne K; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2013-02-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) represent an important defense mechanism against microorganisms. Clearance of NETs is impaired in a subset of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and NETosis is increased in neutrophils and, particularly, in low-density granulocytes derived from lupus patients. NETs are toxic to the endothelium, expose immunostimulatory molecules, activate plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and may participate in organ damage through incompletely characterized pathways. To better understand the role of NETs in fostering dysregulated inflammation, we examined inflammasome activation in response to NETs or to LL-37, an antibacterial protein externalized on NETs. Both NETs and LL-37 activate caspase-1, the central enzyme of the inflammasome, in both human and murine macrophages, resulting in release of active IL-1β and IL-18. LL-37 activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome utilizes P2X7 receptor-mediated potassium efflux. NET and LL-37-mediated activation of the inflammasome is enhanced in macrophages derived from lupus patients. In turn, IL-18 is able to stimulate NETosis in human neutrophils. These results suggest that enhanced formation of NETs in lupus patients can lead to increased inflammasome activation in adjacent macrophages. This leads to release of inflammatory cytokines that further stimulate NETosis, resulting in a feed-forward inflammatory loop that could potentially lead to disease flares and/or organ damage.

  12. Extracellular Fibrils of Pathogenic Yeast Cryptococcus gattii Are Important for Ecological Niche, Murine Virulence and Human Neutrophil Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Deborah J.; Ren, Ping; Raina, Ramesh; Dong, Yimin; Behr, Melissa J.; McEwen, Bruce F.; Bowser, Samuel S.; Samsonoff, William A.; Chaturvedi, Sudha; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2010-01-01

    Cryptococcus gattii, an emerging fungal pathogen of humans and animals, is found on a variety of trees in tropical and temperate regions. The ecological niche and virulence of this yeast remain poorly defined. We used Arabidopsis thaliana plants and plant-derived substrates to model C. gattii in its natural habitat. Yeast cells readily colonized scratch-wounded plant leaves and formed distinctive extracellular fibrils (40–100 nm diameter ×500–3000 nm length). Extracellular fibrils were observed on live plants and plant-derived substrates by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by high voltage- EM (HVEM). Only encapsulated yeast cells formed extracellular fibrils as a capsule-deficient C. gattii mutant completely lacked fibrils. Cells deficient in environmental sensing only formed disorganized extracellular fibrils as apparent from experiments with a C. gattii STE12α mutant. C. gattii cells with extracellular fibrils were more virulent in murine model of pulmonary and systemic cryptococcosis than cells lacking fibrils. C. gattii cells with extracellular fibrils were also significantly more resistant to killing by human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in vitro even though these PMN produced elaborate neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These observations suggest that extracellular fibril formation could be a structural adaptation of C. gattii for cell-to-cell, cell-to-substrate and/or cell-to- phagocyte communications. Such ecological adaptation of C. gattii could play roles in enhanced virulence in mammalian hosts at least initially via inhibition of host PMN– mediated killing. PMID:20539754

  13. Store-operated calcium signaling in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Regina A; Lowell, Clifford A

    2015-10-01

    Calcium signals in neutrophils are initiated by a variety of cell-surface receptors, including formyl peptide and other GPCRs, FcRs, and integrins. The predominant pathway by which calcium enters immune cells is termed SOCE, whereby plasma membrane CRAC channels allow influx of extracellular calcium into the cytoplasm when intracellular ER stores are depleted. The identification of 2 key families of SOCE regulators, STIM calcium "sensors" and ORAI calcium channels, has allowed for genetic manipulation of SOCE pathways and provided valuable insight into the molecular mechanism of calcium signaling in immune cells, including neutrophils. This review focuses on our current knowledge of the molecules involved in neutrophil SOCE and how study of these molecules has further informed our understanding of the role of calcium signaling in neutrophil activation.

  14. [Effect of erythromycin on neutrophil adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Kusano, S; Mukae, H; Morikawa, T; Asai, T; Sawa, H; Morikawa, N; Oda, H; Sakito, O; Shukuwa, C; Senju, R

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of erythromycin (EM) in chronic lower respiratory tract diseases including diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) has been reported. In this study we investigated the effect of EM on peripheral neutrophil adhesion molecules such as LFA-1 and Mac-1 obtained from six healthy subjects. Pretreatment of neutrophils with each concentration (10 ng/ml approximately 100 micrograms/ml) of EM resulted in no significant reduction in the expression of LFA-1 alpha, beta and Mac-1. Moreover, EM had no capability of reducing these expressions even when neutrophils were pretreated with 1 microgram/ml of EM at time from 0 to 60 min. These findings indicate that EM does not directly reduce the expression of LFA-1 alpha, beta and Mac-1 on peripheral neutrophil obtained from healthy subjects. PMID:8450276

  15. Neutrophils in asthma--a review.

    PubMed

    Ciepiela, Olga; Ostafin, Magdalena; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease, with an array of cells involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. The role of neutrophils in the development of bronchial asthma is found to be complex, as they may trigger activation of immunocompetent cells and are a potent source of free oxygen radicals and enzymes participating in airway remodeling. The review highlights the role of neutrophils in bronchial asthma.

  16. Granulocytic sarcoma masquerading as Ewing's sarcoma: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Haresh, Kunhi Parambath; Joshi, Nikhil; Gupta, Chaitali; Prabhakar, Ramachandran; Sharma, Daya Nand; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Rath, Goura Kishor

    2008-01-01

    An eleven-year-old boy presented with a swelling in his left elbow. Radiologically the features were that of an Ewing's sarcoma involving the ulna. Histopathology showed small round cell tumor strongly positive for Monoclonal Imperial Cancer research fund 2 (MIC2) antigen. Similar cells in the bone marrow were involved with MIC2 positivity. The patient developed skin lesions, which on biopsy were found to be chloromas. The initial biopsies were reevaluated with special stains revealing granulocytic sarcomas in acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as Ewing's due to its MIC2 positivity. The possibility of myeloid neoplasms should be considered routinely with known MIC2 positive round cell tumors. PMID:18923208

  17. Accuracy of Diagnosis of Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis in China.

    PubMed

    Wormser, Gary P

    2016-10-01

    In 2008, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) was reported from China. However, the clinical and laboratory findings, including reports of nosocomial transmission, were inconsistent with those reported for HGA in the United States. In 2012, it was demonstrated that the patients described in the 2008 report had all been infected with a newly discovered bunyavirus, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus, which causes an illness with the same clinical features described for the patients in the 2008 report. This finding raises the question of HGA misdiagnosis in China and establishes the need for further studies to determine whether HGA occurs there. PMID:27648639

  18. Accuracy of Diagnosis of Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis in China

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) was reported from China. However, the clinical and laboratory findings, including reports of nosocomial transmission, were inconsistent with those reported for HGA in the United States. In 2012, it was demonstrated that the patients described in the 2008 report had all been infected with a newly discovered bunyavirus, severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus, which causes an illness with the same clinical features described for the patients in the 2008 report. This finding raises the question of HGA misdiagnosis in China and establishes the need for further studies to determine whether HGA occurs there. PMID:27648639

  19. The atypical antipsychotic clozapine selectively inhibits interleukin 8 (IL-8)-induced neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Capannolo, Marta; Fasciani, Irene; Romeo, Stefania; Aloisi, Gabriella; Rossi, Mario; Bellio, Pierangelo; Celenza, Giuseppe; Cinque, Benedetta; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Scarselli, Marco; Maggio, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Clozapine is the most effective antipsychotic to date, but its benefits are counterbalanced by the risk of severe hematological effects. In this study, we analyzed whether clozapine inhibits polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte chemotaxis. We found that clozapine, within the therapeutic concentration range, potently and selectively inhibits PMN chemotaxis induced by interleukin 8 (IL-8), a chemokine inducing neutrophil migration. The effect was not due to its action at dopamine, serotonin and muscarinic receptors, or to a direct antagonism to IL-8 receptors. Furthermore, clozapine did not inhibit PMN chemotaxis by its presumed toxic mechanism. In fact, after an overnight incubation in cell culture, the drug did not increase the physiological PMN apoptosis. An interference of clozapine with the autocrine release of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a secondary chemoattractant secreted by neutrophils in response to the primary chemoattractant IL-8, was hypothesized. In agreement with this hypothesis, clozapine attenuated the IL-8-induced release of LTB4 in PMNs. A series of experiments with an antagonist of the LTB4 receptor, U75302, and an inhibitor of LTB4 synthesis, zileuton, provided support to this conjecture. Intriguingly MK-571, an inhibitor of the multi-drug resistance protein MRP4, playing a pivotal role in effluxing LTB4, completely blocked PMN chemotaxis induced by IL-8, but gave conflicting results when tested for its ability to reduce LTB4 release, increasing LTB4 efflux by itself but reducing the release when in combination with IL-8. The reduction of PMN chemotaxis due to clozapine could predispose patients to infections. Whether this effect is a prelude to clozapine agranulocytosis requires further investigation.

  20. Endothelin-1 downregulates sperm phagocytosis by neutrophils in vitro: A physiological implication in bovine oviduct immunity

    PubMed Central

    MAREY, Mohamed Ali; YOUSEF, Mohamed Samy; LIU, Jinghui; MORITA, Kazuhiro; SASAKI, Motoki; HAYAKAWA, Hiroyuki; SHIMIZU, Takashi; ELSHAHAWY, Ibrahim I.; MIYAMOTO, Akio

    2016-01-01

    The oviduct is an active contractile tube that provides the proper environment for sperm transport, capacitation and survival. Oviductal contractions are regulated by autocrine/paracrine secretion of several factors, such as prostaglandins (PGs) and endothelin-1 (EDN-1). We have previously shown that during the preovulatory stage, sperm are exposed to polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) in the bovine oviduct, and the bovine oviduct epithelial cells (BOECs) secrete molecules including PGE2 that suppress sperm phagocytosis by PMNs in vitro. In this study, we investigated the possible effects of EDN-1 on the phagocytic activity of PMNs toward sperm. The local concentrations of EDN-1 in oviduct fluid and BOEC culture medium ranged from 10–10 to 10–11 M as determined by EIA. Phagocytosis and superoxide production were assayed by co-incubation of sperm pretreated to induce capacitation with PMNs exposed to EDN-1 (0, 10–11, 10–10, 10–9, and 10–8 M) for 2 h. EDN-1 suppressed dose dependently (10–11 to 10–8 M) the phagocytic activity for sperm and superoxide production of PMNs in response to capacitated sperm. Moreover, this suppression was eliminated by an ETB receptor antagonist (BQ-788). EDN-1 suppressed mRNA expression of EDN-1 and ETB but not ETA receptors in PMNs, suggesting the ETB receptor-mediated pathway. Scanning electron microscopic observation revealed that incubation of PMNs with EDN-1 (10–9 M) completely suppressed the formation of DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps for sperm entanglement. The results provide evidence indicating that EDN-1 may be involved in the protection of sperm from phagocytosis by PMNs in the bovine oviduct, supporting sperm survival until fertilization. PMID:26781611

  1. Multiple organ damage caused by tumor necrosis factor and prevented by prior neutrophil depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Mallick, A.A.; Ishizaka, A.; Stephens, K.E.; Hatherill, J.R.; Tazelaar, H.D.; Raffin, T.A. )

    1989-05-01

    The effect of TNF on nonpulmonary multiple organ damage (MOD) was studied. Since polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) are thought to play an important role in septic or TNF-induced MOD, we investigated both neutrophil sufficient (PMN+) and neutropenic (PMN-) guinea pigs. Sepsis was induced by Escherichia coli administration (2 x 10(9)/kg) or recombinant human TNF (1.4 x 10(6) U/kg) was infused into PMN+ and PMN- guinea pigs. During necropsy, the PMN+/TNF and PMN+/E coli animals exhibited marked damage in the adrenal glands, kidneys and liver as evidenced by hemorrhage, congestion, and PMN sequestration on histopathologic examination. There was also increased tissue albumin accumulation in the adrenal glands, kidneys, spleen, heart, and liver as demonstrated by {sup 125}I-labeled albumin determinations. In contrast, the PMN-/TNF group did not reveal histopathologic damage in any organ system and there was no abnormal organ accumulation of {sup 125}I-albumin. However, in PMN-/E coli animals, marked histopathologic damage in the adrenal glands and liver was evident. Furthermore, there were marked accumulations of {sup 125}I-albumin in the adrenals, heart, kidneys, liver, and spleen. Moreover, the PMN-/E coli guinea pigs had a much greater accumulation (p less than 0.01) of {sup 125}I-albumin in the kidneys than any other group including the PMN+/E coli group. Thus, nonpulmonary MOD in guinea pigs is caused by TNF administration and can be prevented by PMN depletion. However, while E coli administration also caused marked nonpulmonary MOD in neutrophil sufficient guinea pigs, equivalent or greater damage was produced in neutropenic animals. This suggests that while TNF-induced MOD may be primarily mediated by PMN, E coli-induced MOD seems to be mediated by more than PMN.

  2. Neutrophil extracellular traps downregulate lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Lorena; Bignon, Alexandre; Gueguen, Claire; de Chaisemartin, Luc; Gorges, Roseline; Sandré, Catherine; Mascarell, Laurent; Balabanian, Karl; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Pallardy, Marc; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2014-12-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) play a central role in inflammation and participate in its control, notably by modulating dendritic cell (DC) functions via soluble mediators or cell-cell contacts. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) released by PMN could play a role in this context. To evaluate NET effects on DC maturation, we developed a model based on monocyte-derived DC (moDC) and calibrated NETs isolated from fresh human PMN. We found that isolated NETs alone had no discernable effect on moDC. In contrast, they downregulated LPS-induced moDC maturation, as shown by decreased surface expression of HLA-DR, CD80, CD83, and CD86, and by downregulated cytokine production (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, IL-23), with no increase in the expression of tolerogenic DC genes. Moreover, the presence of NETs during moDC maturation diminished the capacity of these moDC to induce T lymphocyte proliferation in both autologous and allogeneic conditions, and modulated CD4(+) T lymphocyte polarization by promoting the production of Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13) and reducing that of Th1 and Th17 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-17). Interestingly, the expression and activities of the lymphoid chemokine receptors CCR7 and CXCR4 on moDC were not altered when moDC matured in the presence of NETs. Together, these findings reveal a new role for NETs in adaptive immune responses, modulating some moDC functions and thereby participating in the control of inflammation.

  3. Effects of Alchornea cordifolia on elastase and superoxide anion produced by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kouakou-Siransy, Gisèle; Sahpaz, Sevser; Nguessan, G Irié; Datté, Jacques Yao; Brou, Jérome Kablan; Gressier, Bernard; Bailleul, François

    2010-02-01

    The ability of Alchornea cordifolia (Schum. and Thonn.) Müll. Arg. (Euphorbiaceae) leaves to inhibit human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and superoxide anion (O(2)(*-)) activities was evaluated on aqueous and ethyl acetate extracts as they allow for a targeted extraction of polyphenols. The direct effect of A. cordifolia extracts on HNE and O(2)(*-) was assessed in an acellular system. Results showed that extracts scavenge HNE and O(2)(*-) in a dose-dependent manner. Better activity was exhibited by the ethyl acetate extract with lower IC(50) (2.2 and 4. 1 mg/L for HNE and O(2)(*-), respectively) than for the aqueous extract. Cellular systems including isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) were investigated to assess the effect of extracts on PMN metabolism. PMN were stimulated with 4beta-phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), calcium ionophore (CaI), or N-formyl-methionyl-leucine-phenylalanine (fMLP), each stimulant having its own stimulation pathway. From the IC(50) obtained, it can be concluded that A. cordifolia reduces HNE and O(2)(*-) liberation. Furthermore it was demonstrated that A. cordifolia extracts have no cytotoxic activity on PMN by measuring release of the cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. As the ethyl acetate extract offers a higher rate of total phenols than the aqueous extract as well as better scavenging activity, it can be supposed that polyphenols, which are well known for their potent antioxidant and antielastase activity, are implicated in the activity of the plant. Phenolic substances such as quercetin, myricetin-3-glucopyranoside, myricetin-3-rhamnopyranoside, and proanthocyanidin A2 were identified in the ethyl acetate extract. In conclusion, the study provides proof of ethnomedical claims and partly explains the mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory action of A. cordifolia leaves. PMID:20645828

  4. Differential expression of pentraxin 3 in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Razvina, Olga; Jiang, Shuying; Matsubara, Koichi; Ohashi, Riuko; Hasegawa, Go; Aoyama, Takashi; Daigo, Kenji; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Hamakubo, Takao; Naito, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    Pentraxins belong to the superfamily of conserved proteins that are characterized by a cyclic multimeric structure. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a long pentraxin which can be produced by different cell types upon exposure to various inflammatory signals. Inside the neutrophil PTX3 is stored in form of granules localized in the cytoplasm. Neutrophilic granules are divided into three types: azurophilic (primary) granules, specific (secondary) granules and gelatinase (tertiary) granules. PTX3 has been considered to be localized in specific (secondary) granules. Immunofluorescent analyses using confocal laser microscopic examination were performed to clarify the localization of all three groups of granules within the cytoplasm of the mature neutrophils and neutrophils stimulated with IL-8. Furthermore, PTX3 was localized in primary granules of promyelocyte cell line HL-60. As a result, we suggest that PTX3 is localized not only in specific granules, but is also partly expressed in primary and tertiary granules. After the stimulation with IL-8, irregular reticular structures called neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were formed, three types of granules were trapped by NETs and PTX3 showed partial colocalization with these granular components. PTX3 localized in all three types of granules in neutrophils may play important roles in host defense.

  5. Determination of phagocytosis of /sup 32/P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus by bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Dulin, A.M.; Paape, M.J.; Weinland, B.T.

    1984-04-01

    A procedure for the measurement of phagocytosis by bovine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) of /sup 32/P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus was modified so that a larger number of samples could be compared in a single run, and smaller volumes of sample, PMN, and /sup 32/P-labeled S aureus could be used. Results were highly reproducible, with a coefficient of variation between duplicate determinations of less than or equal to 2%. Lysostaphin was prepared from the supernatant of S staphylolyticus and was compared with a commercially available preparation. Effects of lysostaphin on PMN and influence of incubation media on release of /sup 32/P from /sup 32/P-labeled S aureus by lysostaphin were examined.

  6. Actions of gallic esters on the arachidonic acid metabolism of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Christow, S; Luther, H; Ludwig, P; Gruner, S; Schewe, T

    1991-04-01

    Gallic esters with a varying chain length of its alcohol moiety produced strong inhibition of the conversion of [1-14C]-arachidonic acid to 5S-hydroxy-6E,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE) by isolated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Octyl gallate and decyl gallate were the most powerful inhibitors with a concentration of half-inhibition of about 1 mumol . 1-1. Additionally these compounds caused however at 10 mumol . 1-1 a complete inhibition of the incorporation of arachidonic acid in triacylglycerols and phospholipids which is assumed to be a consequence of the damage to the energy metabolism of the cells. In contrast, the other gallic esters enhance the incorporation of arachidonic acid in the ester lipids in addition to moderate inhibition of the 5-lipoxygenase pathway.

  7. Correlation between phagocytic activity and metabolic response of polymorphonuclear leukocytes toward different strains of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Rottini, G; Dri, P; Soranzo, M R; Patriarca, P

    1975-01-01

    The bactericidal activity, the phagocytic capacity, and the metabolic stimulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes challenged with different strains of Escherichia coli were studied. It was found that only two strains out of 10 tested stimulated the oxygen consumption and carbohydrate metabolism of leukocytes and were readily killed by the phagocytes. The lack of killing of the other eight strains was shown to be due to absent or poor phagocytosis rather than to resistance to intracellular killing. Evidence was presented that the surface K antigen plays an important role in conferring antiphagocytic properties to some strains of E. coli. It was suggested that K antigen acts by interfering with the early step of the phagocytic process, that is, the attachment step. PMID:1090529

  8. Activation of the lipoxygenase pathway in the methionine enkephalin induced respiratory burst in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, J.T.; Foris, G.; Fulop, T. Jr.; Paragh, G.; Plotnikoff, N.P.

    1988-01-01

    In comparative studies of f-met-Leu-Phe (FMLP) and methionine enkephalin (ME) induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) stimulation the following results were obtained: (i) both FMLP and ME increased the intracellular killing (IK) capability of human PMNLs probably through NADPH oxidase activation, (ii) the ME-induced respiratory burst (RB) differed from the chemotactic peptide FMLP-triggered superoxide generation because the former was not accompanied by the activation of the glutathione system and the duration of the superoxide production was prolonged. The reaction was dependent on lipoxygenation, was potentiated by indomethacin (IM) and was inhibited by nordihidro-guairetic acid (NDGA), (iii) both /sup 14/C-arachidonic acid release and leukotriene B/sub 4/ (LTB/sub 4/) synthesis of ME-treated PMNLs were elevated as compared to those of FMLP triggered cells. Their results suggest that lipoxygenation and even an increased LTB/sub 4/ synthesis are involved in the ME-induced RB of leukocytes.

  9. Dammarane triterpene saponin from Bacopa monniera as the superoxide inhibitor in polymorphonuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Pawar, R; Gopalakrishnan, C; Bhutani, K K

    2001-11-01

    The hydroalcoholic extract of the whole plant of Bacopa monniera Wettst. (Scrophulariaceae), exhibited an inhibitory effect on superoxide released from polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells in the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) assay. The major saponin bacoside A(3) was found to be responsible for this effect in the herb. This compound showed 85, 91.66, 91.66, and 83 % inhibitions of NBT reduction at the concentrations of 200, 100, 50, and 25 microg/ml, respectively, with an IC(50) value of 10.22 microg/ml. These inhibitory effects were compared with those of the standard positive controls, quercetin and ascorbic acid with IC(50) of 111 and 14.16 microg/ml, respectively. Another major saponin bacopasaponin C was found to be much less potent as compared to bacoside A(3) whereas the remaining two mixtures of saponins were found to be inactive.

  10. The effects of space flight on polymorphonuclear leukocyte response experiment MA-032

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    In a series of studies performed at intervals from 30 day before flight to 30 days after recovery, blood samples were obtained from the three astronauts of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project and from eight control subjects. To determine the effects of space flight on polymorphonuclear leukocytes, tests were performed on blood samples obtained as quickly as possible after splashdown and on the day following recovery. The astronauts' inhalation of propellant gases and the inception of corticosteroid therapy 1 day after recovery provided an additional opportunity to investigate the possible effects of these factors on leukocyte function. Data were obtained during each time period on the total leukocyte count, differential count, leukocyte adhesion, leukocyte migration and chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and histochemical staining for leukocyte acid and alkaline phosphatase. These observations present a variety of in vitro correlates to white blood cell function within the body. Taken together, they serve as a reasonable approximation of the effects of space flight on leukocyte function.

  11. Impairment of chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes from lead acid battery workers.

    PubMed

    Governa, M; Valentino, M; Visona, I; Scielso, R

    1988-06-01

    Since lead impairs in vitro the functions of macrophagic cells, we have studied the chemotactic activity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) obtained from lead acid battery workers who were removed from exposure one month before, because they had an abnormal lead absorption. Controls were 18 age matched subjects without any history of occupational lead exposure. Both lead acid battery workers and controls had no alterations of the blood haematological and metabolic parameters. Chemotaxis was carried on in Boyden chambers using zymosan activated serum as chemotactic stimulus. The chemotactic indexes are 56.4 +/- 8.7 in acid battery workers and 75.6 +/- in controls. The difference, which is statistically significant, shows that lead workers have an impairment of PMNs chemotactic activity.

  12. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide enhances polymorphonuclear leukocyte function independent of changes in intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Klein, J B; Payne, V; Schepers, T M; McLeish, K R

    1990-10-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) enhanced expression of C3bi receptors (CR3), phagocytosis of opsonized bacteria, and subsequent hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The role of changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in LPS-induced priming was examined by determining the effect of modulators of intracellular calcium on enhanced PMN function, determining the ability of calcium ionophores to reproduce the effects of LPS, and measuring PMN [Ca2+]i following addition of LPS. Inhibition of intracellular calcium-dependent processes with TMB-8 or quin-2 blocked all three measures of LPS-induced priming. LPS did not stimulate an increase in [Ca2+]i, and calcium ionophores failed to reproduce the effect of LPS. Maintenance of [Ca2+]i is necessary for LPS priming, but an increase in [Ca2+]i is not a component of the signal transduction pathway leading to PMN priming by LPS.

  13. Vero cytotoxin binding to polymorphonuclear leukocytes among households with children with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    te Loo, D M; Heuvelink, A E; de Boer, E; Nauta, J; van der Walle, J; Schröder, C; van Hinsbergh, V W; Chart, H; van de Kar, N C; van den Heuvel, L P

    2001-08-15

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the leading cause of acute renal failure in childhood, can be caused by different serotypes of vero cytotoxin (VT; i.e., Shiga toxin)-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC). Recently, VT was shown to bind to polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) in the systemic circulation of patients with HUS. This study investigated whether VT bound to PMNL could be detected in persons in households with patients with HUS. Serum antibodies against E. coli O157 and, when available, fecal samples from patients with HUS and household members were studied for the presence of VTEC infection. The circulating PMNL of 82% of the household members were positive for VT, whereas stool and/or serum examination showed only 21% positivity. Thus, current methods underestimate the number of infected persons in households with patients with HUS.

  14. DNA damage and apoptosis in blood neutrophils of inflammatory bowel disease patients and in Caco-2 cells in vitro exposed to betanin.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Olejnik, Anna; Dobrowolska-Zachwieja, Agnieszka; Łuczak, Michał; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic, relapsing, inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and continuing colonic inflammation is considered an important risk factor in the development of colorectal cancer. Our previous studies showed that beetroot (Beta vulgaris var. rubra) products and their major component betanin modulate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils of healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of betanin on the oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis in neutrophils isolated from blood of patients with inflammatory bowel disease--ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The results were compared with those obtained in colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 cells. Betanin treatment at the concentration of 100 μM for 24 h increased DNA damage assessed by comet assay in IBD patients' neutrophils. A similar effect although less pronounced was observed in Caco-2 cells. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with H2O2 caused a 4-fold increase of DNA strand breaks in comparison to untreated cells, but pre-treatment with betanin reduced DNA damage in these cells. Betanin also induced procaspase-3 cleavage and caspase-3 activity accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, indicating its pro-apoptotic activity. These results suggest that betanin may support mechanisms that lead to the release of ROS and apoptotic cell death. In this way betanin may exert anti-inflammatory and potentially cancer preventive activity. PMID:27117102

  15. DNA damage and apoptosis in blood neutrophils of inflammatory bowel disease patients and in Caco-2 cells in vitro exposed to betanin.

    PubMed

    Zielińska-Przyjemska, Małgorzata; Olejnik, Anna; Dobrowolska-Zachwieja, Agnieszka; Łuczak, Michał; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2016-04-06

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic, relapsing, inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and continuing colonic inflammation is considered an important risk factor in the development of colorectal cancer. Our previous studies showed that beetroot (Beta vulgaris var. rubra) products and their major component betanin modulate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA damage in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils of healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of betanin on the oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis in neutrophils isolated from blood of patients with inflammatory bowel disease--ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). The results were compared with those obtained in colon carcinoma-derived Caco-2 cells. Betanin treatment at the concentration of 100 μM for 24 h increased DNA damage assessed by comet assay in IBD patients' neutrophils. A similar effect although less pronounced was observed in Caco-2 cells. Treatment of Caco-2 cells with H2O2 caused a 4-fold increase of DNA strand breaks in comparison to untreated cells, but pre-treatment with betanin reduced DNA damage in these cells. Betanin also induced procaspase-3 cleavage and caspase-3 activity accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, indicating its pro-apoptotic activity. These results suggest that betanin may support mechanisms that lead to the release of ROS and apoptotic cell death. In this way betanin may exert anti-inflammatory and potentially cancer preventive activity.

  16. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-04-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for loss of white blood cells (WBCs), which are the body's main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved WBC loss, specifically neutrophils, in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated, irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well as internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses.

  17. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for white blood cell (WBC) loss, which are the body’s main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved white blood cell (WBC), specifically neutrophil, loss in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses. PMID:25909052

  18. IL-23/IL-17/G-CSF pathway is associated with granulocyte recruitment to the lung during African swine fever.

    PubMed

    Karalyan, Z; Voskanyan, H; Ter-Pogossyan, Z; Saroyan, D; Karalova, E

    2016-10-15

    The interleukin (IL)-23/IL-17 pathway plays a crucial role in various forms of inflammation but its function in acute African swine fever (ASF) is not well understood. Thus, in this study, we aimed to find out whether IL-23/IL-17/G-CSF is released in acute ASF and what function it may have. The present study revealed that the production of IL-17 and IL-23 were significantly increased in the sera of ASFV infected pigs. Using ELISA, we found that the serum levels of IL-23 and IL-17 have overexpressed in ASF virus infected pigs compared with healthy controls. The levels of IL-17 and IL-23 increase in the early stages and the levels of G-CSF and C - reactive protein in the later stages of ASF. Simultaneously, with the increase of the levels of IL-23/IL-17 extravasation of granular leukocytes in the tissue (diapedesis) is observed. Diapedesis can explain the neutropenia that we identified previously in the terminal stages of ASF. The increase in serum levels of IL-23/IL-17 is preceded by enhanced migration of neutrophils in tissues, and the last one is preceded by neutropenia. The increase in serum levels of G-CSF has compensatory nature, directed on stimulation of proliferation of granulocytes. Taken together, our results revealed an overexpression of the IL-23/IL-17 axis in the ASF virus infected pigs, suggesting that it may be a crucial pathway in the diapedesis at ASF. PMID:27590426

  19. Oxidative burst and neutrophil elastase contribute to clearance of Aspergillus fumigatus pneumonia in mice.

    PubMed

    Prüfer, Steve; Weber, Michael; Stein, Pamela; Bosmann, Markus; Stassen, Michael; Kreft, Andreas; Schild, Hansjörg; Radsak, Markus P

    2014-02-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) are important for the control of invasive aspergillosis (IA), a major threat to immunocompromised individuals. For clearance of Aspergillus fumigatus infections, PMN employ their potent oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms. To clarify the relative contribution of these mechanisms, we analyzed p47(phox-/-), gp91(phox-/-) and elastase (ELA) deficient mice (ELANE) after intratracheal infection with A. fumigatus. Infected p47(phox-/-) and gp91(phox-/-) mice died within 4 days and had a significant higher fungal burden in the lungs compared to wild-type controls. Interestingly, the survival of ELANE mice after infection was unimpaired suggesting that ELA is not essential here. Nevertheless, A. fumigatus clearance was delayed in ELANE mice indicating a partial contribution of ELA to fungal immunity. Comparing p47(phox-/-), gp91(phox-/-) or ELANE mice for PMN activation and recruitment to the lungs, we were unable to detect significant differences in vitro or in vivo among mutant or wild-type strains suggesting intact PMN functionality of basic effector mechanisms. Fungal killing in vitro by ELA deficient PMN was comparably reduced as in p47(phox-/-) and gp91(phox-/-) deficient PMN corroborating the importance of oxidative and non-oxidative PMN mechanisms for the control of fungal outgrowth. Taken together, this suggests that intact oxidative as well as non-oxidative PMN effector functions are highly relevant for the control of A. fumigatus infections in vitro and in vivo. While ELA contributes to clearance of A. fumigatus, the oxidative functions are essential for survival.

  20. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis. PMID:27617009

  1. Effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the neutrophil myeloperoxidase system of horses.

    PubMed

    Minguet, Grégory; Franck, Thierry; Joris, Jean; Ceusters, Justine; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange; Serteyn, Didier; Sandersen, Charlotte

    2015-05-15

    Volatile anaesthestics have shown to modulate the oxidative response of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). We investigated the effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the degranulation of total and active myeloperoxidase (MPO) from horse PMNs and their direct interaction with MPO activity. Whole blood from horse was incubated in 1 and 2 minimal alveolar concentrations (MAC) of isoflurane or sevoflurane for 1h and PMNs were stimulated with cytochalasin B (CB) plus N-formyl-méthionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). After stimulation, the plasma was collected to measure total and active MPO by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and specific immunological extraction followed by enzymatic detection (SIEFED) respectively. The effects of 1 and 2 MAC of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the peroxidase and chlorination activity of pure MPO were assessed by fluorescence using Amplex red and 3'-(p-aminophenyl) fluorescein (APF) respectively and in parallel with a SIEFED assay to estimate the potential interaction of the anaesthetics with the enzyme. Although isoflurane and sevoflurane had inconsistent effects on total MPO release, both volatile agents reduced active MPO release and showed a direct inhibition on the peroxidase and the chlorination activity of the enzyme. A persistent interaction between MPO and anaesthetics was evidenced with isoflurane but not with sevoflurane.

  2. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis. PMID:27617009

  3. Suilysin Stimulates the Release of Heparin Binding Protein from Neutrophils and Increases Vascular Permeability in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolong; Xie, Wenlong; Wu, Kai; Li, Ping; Ren, Zhiqiang; Li, Lin; Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2016-01-01

    Most of the deaths that occurred during two large outbreaks of Streptococcus suis infections in 1998 and 2005 in China were caused by streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), which is characterized by increased vascular permeability. Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is thought to mediate the vascular leakage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the detailed mechanism underlying the release of HBP and the vascular leakage induced by S. suis. Significantly higher serum levels of HBP were detected in Chinese patients with STSS than in patients with meningitis or healthy controls. Suilysin (SLY) is an exotoxin secreted by the highly virulent strain 05ZYH33, and it stimulated the release of HBP from the polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mediated vascular leakage in mice. The release of HBP induced by SLY was caused by a calcium influx-dependent degranulation. Analyses using a pharmacological approach revealed that the release of HBP induced by SLY was related to Toll-like receptor 4, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. It was also dependent on a G protein-coupled seven-membrane spanning receptor. The results of this study provide new insights into the vascular leakage in STSS associated with non-Group A streptococci, which could lead to the discovery of potential therapeutic targets for STSS associated with S. suis.

  4. Neisseria gonorrhoeae phagosomes delay fusion with primary granules to enhance bacterial survival inside human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M Brittany; Criss, Alison K

    2013-08-01

    Symptomatic infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) promotes inflammation driven by polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs, neutrophils), yet some Gc survive PMN exposure during infection. Here we report a novel mechanism of gonococcal resistance to PMNs: Gc phagosomes avoid maturation into phagolysosomes by delayed fusion with primary (azurophilic) granules, which contain antimicrobial components including serine proteases. Reduced phagosome-primary granule fusion was observed in gonorrheal exudates and human PMNs infected ex vivo. Delayed phagosome-granule fusion could be overcome by opsonizing Gc with immunoglobulin. Using bacterial viability dyes along with antibodies to primary granules revealed that Gc survival in PMNs correlated with early residence in primary granule-negative phagosomes. However, when Gc was killed prior to PMN exposure, dead bacteria were also found in primary granule-negative phagosomes. These results suggest that Gc surface characteristics, rather than active bacterial processes, influence phagosome maturation and that Gc death inside PMNs occurs after phagosome-granule fusion. Ectopically increasing primary granule-phagosome fusion, by immunoglobulin opsonization or PMN treatment with lysophosphatidylcholine, reduced intracellular Gc viability, which was attributed in part to serine protease activity. We conclude that one method for Gc to avoid PMN clearance in acute gonorrhoea is by delaying primary granule-phagosome fusion, thus preventing formation of a degradative phagolysosome. PMID:23374609

  5. Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases Protect against Oxidative Stress in Staphylococcus aureus Encountering Exogenous Oxidants and Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yun Yun; Schwartz, Jamie; Bloomberg, Sarah; Boyd, Jeffrey M; Horswill, Alexander R.; Nauseef, William M.

    2013-01-01

    To establish infection successfully, S. aureus must evade clearance by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). We studied the expression and regulation of the methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msr) that are involved in the repair of oxidized staphylococcal proteins and investigated their influence over the fate of S. aureus exposed to oxidants or PMN. We evaluated a mutant deficient in msrA1 and msrB for susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid and PMN. The expression of msrA1 in wild-type bacteria ingested by human PMN was assessed by real-time PCR. The regulation of msr was studied by screening a library of two-component regulatory system (TCS) mutants for altered msr responses. Relative to the wild-type, bacteria deficient in Msr were more susceptible to oxidants and to PMN. Upregulation of staphylococcal msrA1 occurred within the phagosomes of normal PMN and PMN deficient in NADPH oxidase activity. Furthermore, PMN granule-rich extract stimulated the upregulation of msrA1. Modulation of msrA1 within PMN was shown to be partly dependent on the VraSR TCS. Msr contributes to staphylococcal responses to oxidative attack and PMN. Our study highlights a novel interaction between the oxidative protein repair pathway and the VraSR TCS that is involved in cell wall homeostasis. PMID:24247266

  6. Neutrophil Interactions with Epithelial Expressed ICAM-1 Enhances Intestinal Mucosal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Sumagin, R; Brazil, JC; Nava, P; Nishio, H; Alam, A; Luissint, AC; Weber, DA; Neish, AS; Nusrat, A; Parkos, CA

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of gastrointestinal tract inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease, is polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) transepithelial migration (TEM) and accumulation in the gut lumen. PMN accumulation within the intestinal mucosa contributes to tissue injury. While epithelial infiltration by large numbers of PMNs results in mucosal injury, we found that PMN interactions with luminal epithelial membrane receptors may also play a role in wound healing. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a PMN ligand that is upregulated on apical surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells under inflammatory conditions. In our study, increased expression of ICAM-1 resulted in enhanced PMN binding to the apical epithelium, which was associated with reduced PMN apoptosis. Following TEM, PMN adhesion to ICAM-1 resulted in activation of Akt and β-catenin signaling, increased epithelial-cell proliferation, and wound healing. Such responses were ICAM-1 dependent as engagement of epithelial ICAM-1 by antibody-mediated cross-linking yielded similar results. Furthermore, using an in-vivo biopsy-based, colonic-mucosal-injury model, we demonstrated epithelial ICAM-1 plays an important role in activation of epithelial Akt and β-catenin signaling and wound healing. These findings suggest that post-migrated PMNs within the intestinal lumen can regulate epithelial homeostasis, thereby identifying ICAM-1 as a potential therapeutic target for promoting mucosal wound healing. PMID:26732677

  7. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and reproductive medicine: A review

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Marcelo Borges; Costa, Fabrício DA Silva; Barini, Ricardo; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been proposed to improve pregnancy outcomes in reproductive medicine. Objective: A systematic review of the current use of G-CSF in patients who have difficulty conceiving and maintaining pregnancy was performed. Materials and Methods: Two electronic databases (PubMed/ Medline and Scopus) were searched. Study selection, data extraction and quality assessment were performed in duplicate. The subject codes used were granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, G-CSF, recurrent miscarriage, IVF failure, and endometrium. Results: The search of electronic databases resulted in 215 citations (PubMed/ Medline: 139 and Scopus: 76), of which 38 were present in both databases. Of the remaining 177 publications, seven studies were included in the present review. Conclusion: Treatment with G-CSF is a novel proposal for immune therapy in patients with recurrent miscarriage and implantation failure following cycles of IVF. However, a larger number of well-designed studies are required for this treatment to be established. PMID:26131007

  8. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor reverts vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Squadrito, F; Altavilla, D; Squadrito, G; Campo, G M; Ioculano, M; Serranò, M; Minutoli, L; Arlotta, M; Musolino, C; Saitta, A; Caputi, A P

    1997-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the vascular effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rh G-CSF) in a rat model of irreversible vascular failure. Male anesthetized rats were subjected to the clamping of the splanchnic arteries for 45 min. This surgical procedure resulted in an irreversible state of shock (splanchnic artery occlusion shock) characterized by high mortality rate (0% survival, 120 min following the release of clamps), a profound hypotension and vascular dysfunction consisting of a marked hyporeactivity to phenylephrine (PE 1 nM-10 microM) of aortic rings. Administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (20 micrograms/kg i.v. 5 min after the release of occlusion) increased survival rate (90% 4 h after the release of occlusion), blunted the profound hypotension and reverted the marked vascular dysfunction. Finally, rh G-CSF inhibited the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase in peritoneal macrophages activated with endotoxin. Our data suggest that rh G-CSF may influence vascular function when low-flow states occur.

  9. Granulocytic ehrlichiosis and tick infestation in mountain lions in California.

    PubMed

    Foley, J E; Foley, P; Jecker, M; Swift, P K; Madigan, J E

    1999-10-01

    Forty-seven mountain lions (Puma concolor) collected year-round in 1996 to 1998 from the Sierra Nevada foothills, the northern coast ranges, and in Monterey County (California, USA) were examined for infestation with Ixodes pacificus and Dermacentor variabilis ticks. Ticks were found predominantly in winter and spring. The seroprevalence of granulocytic ehrlichiae (GE) antibodies (Ehrlichia equi or the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis) was 17% and the PCR-prevalence of DNA characteristic of GE in blood was 16%. There were eight polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-positive but seronegative mountain lions, one that was PCR-positive and seropositive, and eight that were PCR-negative and seropositive. Nineteen percent of engorged tick pools from mountain lions were PCR-positive. Because mountain lions inhabit tick-infested habitat and are frequently bitten by I. pacificus, surveillance for GE antibodies and DNA in mountain lions and other vertebrate hosts may be useful as indicators for geographical regions in which humans are at risk of GE infection. PMID:10574529

  10. Immunoscintigraphic localization of inflammatory lesions: concept, radiolabelling and in vitro testing of a granulocyte specific antibody.

    PubMed

    Andres, R Y; Schubiger, P A; Tiefenauer, L; Seybold, K; Locher, J T; Mach, J P; Buchegger, F

    1988-01-01

    Current nuclear medicine techniques for the localization of inflammatory processes are based on injection of 111In labelled autologous granulocytes which need to be isolated and radiolabelled in vitro before reinjection. A new technique is presented here that obviates the need for cell isolation by the direct intravenous injection of a granulocyte specific 123I labelled monoclonal antibody. In this publication the basic parameters of the antibody granulocyte interaction are described. Antibody binding does not inhibit vital functions of the granulocytes, such as chemotaxis and superoxide generation. Scatchard analysis of binding data reveals an apparent affinity of the antibody for granulocytes of 6.8 X 10(9) l/mol and approximately 7.1 X 10(4) binding sites per cell. Due to the high specificity of the antibody, the only expected interference is from CEA producing tumors.

  11. Superoxide Anion Production by Human Neutrophils Activated by Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Ouk

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2.-) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis. PMID:24039294

  12. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis. PMID:24039294

  13. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis.

  14. Neutrophils in Cancer: Two Sides of the Same Coin

    PubMed Central

    Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in blood and are considered to be the first line of defense during inflammation and infections. In addition, neutrophils are also found infiltrating many types of tumors. Tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) have relevant roles in malignant disease. Indeed neutrophils may be potent antitumor effector cells. However, increasing clinical evidence shows TANs correlate with poor prognosis. The tumor microenvironment controls neutrophil recruitment and in turn TANs help tumor progression. Hence, TANs can be beneficial or detrimental to the host. It is the purpose of this review to highlight these two sides of the neutrophil coin in cancer and to describe recent studies that provide some light on the mechanisms for neutrophil recruitment to the tumor, for neutrophils supporting tumor progression, and for neutrophil activation to enhance their antitumor functions. PMID:26819959

  15. Differences in leukocyte differentiation molecule abundances on domestic sheep (Ovis aries) and bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) neutrophils identified by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Highland, Margaret A; Schneider, David A; White, Stephen N; Madsen-Bouterse, Sally A; Knowles, Donald P; Davis, William C

    2016-06-01

    Although both domestic sheep (DS) and bighorn sheep (BHS) are affected by similar respiratory bacterial pathogens, experimental and field data indicate BHS are more susceptible to pneumonia. Cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for use in flow cytometry (FC) are valuable reagents for interspecies comparative immune system analyses. This study describes cross-reactive mAbs that recognize leukocyte differentiation molecules (LDMs) and major histocompatibility complex antigens on DS and BHS leukocytes. Characterization of multichannel eosinophil autofluorescence in this study permitted cell-type specific gating of granulocytes for evaluating LDMs, specifically on neutrophils, by single-label FC. Evaluation of relative abundances of LDMs by flow cytometry revealed greater CD11a, CD11b, CD18 (β2 integrins) and CD 172a (SIRPα) on DS neutrophils and greater CD14 (lipopolysaccharide receptor) on BHS neutrophils. Greater CD25 (IL-2) was identified on BHS lymphocytes following Concavalin A stimulation. While DS and BHS have similar total peripheral blood leukocyte counts, BHS have proportionately more neutrophils.

  16. Anaplasma phagocytophilum up-regulates some anti-apoptotic genes in neutrophils and pro-inflammatory genes in mononuclear cells of sheep.

    PubMed

    Woldehiwet, Z; Yavari, C

    2014-05-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum, the causative agent of tick-borne fever (TBF) in sheep and cattle and human granulocytic anaplasmosis, has the unique ability to selectively infect and multiply within the hostile environment of the neutrophil. Previous studies have shown that sheep with TBF are more susceptible to other infections and that infected neutrophils have reduced phagocytic ability and delayed apoptosis. This suggests that survival of A. phagocytophilum in these short-lived cells involves the ability to subvert or resist their bacterial killing, but also to modify the host cells such that the host cells survive long after infection. The present study shows that infection of sheep by A. phagocytophilum is characterized by up-regulation of some anti-apoptotic genes (BCL2, BIRC3 and CFLAR) in neutrophils and up-regulation of genes encoding the pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in mononuclear cells during the period of bacteraemia. Infection with A. phagocytophilum was also characterized by significant up-regulation of CYBB, which is associated with the respiratory burst of neutrophils. PMID:24602324

  17. [Two cases of malignant lymphoma with high fever and C-reactive protein (CRP) elevation after treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)].

    PubMed

    Kanbayashi, Yuko; Mukoyama, Naoki; Nishida, Katsuji; Shimizu, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Nomura, Kenichi; Horiike, Shigeo; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2006-01-01

    We present two cases of malignant lymphoma that developed a high fever that eventually reached an extremely high 38.9 degrees C. The C-reactive protein( CRP) elevation also climbed to a very high 12.2 mg/dl after treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). In the one case, after stem cells were mobilized with CHASER therapy (cyclophosphamide, cytarabine, etoposide, dexamethasone and rituximab) followed by G-CSF (filgrastim 600 microg/day) subcutaneous daily, the serum CRP level rose to a maximum of 5.6 mg/dl, with a maximum fever elevation of 38.9 degrees C. In the other case, after the subject was given CHASE therapy followed by subcutaneous treatment with G-CSF (filgrastim 75 microg/day) daily, the maximum serum CRP level was 12.2 mg/dl along with a maximum fever of 38.9 degrees C. Although no infection was found in either case, multiple antibacterial agents were ineffective;after discontinuation of G-CSF, fever dissipated and the serum CRP level became negative. G-CSF induces the proliferation and differentiation of neutrophils and also causes the mobilization of mature neutrophils from hematopoietic tissues. With the increasing propensity to G-CSF, we must keep in mind the possibility of such adverse reactions so as to serve the overall best interests of the patient.

  18. Neutrophils and neutrophil extracellular traps orchestrate initiation and resolution of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Jonas; Knopf, Jasmin; Maueröder, Christian; Kienhöfer, Deborah; Leppkes, Moritz; Herrmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils, the most abundant leukocytes in the human body, are considered to be the first line of defense in the fight against microorganisms. In this fight neutrophils employ weaponry such as reactive oxygen species produced via the NADPH oxidase complex 2 together with the release of intracellular granules containing antimicrobial agents. The discovery that activated neutrophils release decondensed chromatin as DNase-sensitive neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) lead to a renewed interest in these leukocytes and the function of NETs in vivo. In this review, we will focus on desirable as well as detrimental features of NETs by the example of gout and pancreatitis. In our models we observed that neutrophils drive the initiation of inflammation and are required for the resolution of inflammation. PMID:27586795

  19. Nonopsonic phagocytosis of nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa by human neutrophils and monocyte-derived macrophages is correlated with bacterial piliation and hydrophobicity.

    PubMed Central

    Speert, D P; Loh, B A; Cabral, D A; Salit, I E

    1986-01-01

    We have shown previously that some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from patients with cystic fibrosis are phagocytized by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the absence of serum opsonins. The purpose of this study was to identify the bacterial features which render certain strains susceptible to nonopsonic phagocytosis. Three strains were phagocytized by human neutrophils and monocyte-derived macrophages, and two were not, as determined by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence, visual inspection of stained smears, and bactericidal assay. Strains that were phagocytized formed pellicles when grown in static broth, but the phagocytosis-resistant strains did not. The phagocytosis-susceptible strains were more heavily piliated and more hydrophobic than the resistant strains. Bacteria exposed to heat (60 degrees C) or UV irradiation were depiliated, as assessed by electron microscopy, and rendered resistant to phagocytosis. When P. aeruginosa was grown on agar, it was piliated, hydrophobic, and susceptible to nonopsonic phagocytosis, but when grown to stationary phase in shaken broth, it was nonpiliated, less hydrophobic, and resistant to phagocytosis. It appears that nonopsonic phagocytosis of certain P. aeruginosa strains by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages is facilitated by hydrophobic interactions which may be determined in part by pili. PMID:2873104

  20. Enhancement of innate immunity with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor did not mitigate disease in pigs infected with a highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strain.

    PubMed

    Schlink, Sarah N; Lager, Kelly M; Brockmeier, Susan L; Loving, Crystal L; Miller, Laura C; Vorwald, Ann C; Yang, Han-Chun; Kehrli, Marcus E; Faaberg, Kay S

    2016-10-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is responsible for one of the most economically important diseases in swine worldwide. It causes reproductive failure in sows and pneumonia in pigs that predisposes them to secondary bacterial infections. Methods to control PRRSV and/or limit secondary bacterial infections are desired to reduce the impact of this virus on animal health. Neutrophils play a major role in combatting infection; they can act as phagocytes as well as produce and release lytic enzymes that have potent antimicrobial effects leading to the destruction and clearance of bacterial pathogens. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a cytokine that controls the production, differentiation and function of granulocytes (including neutrophils) from the bone marrow. Recent work from our laboratory has shown that encoding porcine G-CSF in a replication-defective adenovirus (Ad5-G-CSF) and delivering a single dose to pigs induced a neutrophilia lasting more than two weeks. As secondary bacterial infection is a common occurrence following PRRSV infection, particularly following challenge with highly pathogenic (HP)-PRRSV, the aim of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a single prophylactic dose of adenovirus-encoded G-CSF to mitigate secondary bacterial disease associated with HP-PRRSV infection. Administration of Ad5-G-CSF induced a significant neutrophilia as expected. However, between 1 and 2days following HP-PRRSV challenge the number of circulating neutrophils decreased dramatically in the HP-PRRSV infected group, but not the non-infected Ad5-G-CSF group. Ad5-G-CSF administration induced monocytosis as well, which was also reduced by HP-PRRSV challenge. There was no difference in the progression of disease between the Ad5-G-CSF and Ad5-empty groups following HP-PRRSV challenge, with pneumonia and systemic bacterial infection occurring in both treatment groups. Given the impact of HP-PRRSV infection on the

  1. Identification of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSCs) in the peripheral blood of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Olivia; Spina, Cecilia; Mimiola, Elda; Cassaro, Adriana; Malerba, Giovanni; Todeschini, Giuseppe; Perbellini, Omar; Scupoli, Maria; Carli, Giuseppe; Facchinelli, Davide; Cassatella, Marco; Scapini, Patrizia; Tecchio, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Human granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSCs) have been described as low-density immunosuppressive CD66b+CD33dimHLA-DR-granulocytes that co-purify with mononuclear cells after density gradient centrifugation of blood from cancer patients. The role of G-MDSCs in Hodgkin (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) remains unclear. The percentage and immunophenotype of CD66b+CD33dimHLA-DR-cells were analyzed in PBMCs from HL and B-cell NHL patients (n = 124) and healthy donors (n = 48). The immunosuppressive functions of these cells were tested in vitro. Correlations between CD66b+CD33dimHLA-DR-cells and patient clinicopathological features and outcome, were evaluated. CD66b+CD33dimHLA-DR-cells were increased in PBMCs from HL and B-cell NHL patients as compared to healthy donors: 2.18 (0.02–70.92) vs 0.42 (0.04–2.97), p < 0.0001. Their percentage remained significantly higher even considering HL (n = 31), indolent (n = 31) and aggressive (n = 62) B-cell NHL patients separately: 1.54 (0.28–26.34), 2.15 (0.02–20.08), and 2.96 (0.25–70.92), respectively, p < 0.0001. CD66b+CD33dimHLA-DR-cells in patient PBMCs were mostly composed of mature CD11b+CD16+ low-density neutrophils in an activated status, as revealed by their higher CD11b and CD66b expression as compared to conventionally isolated (normal-density) autologous or healthy donor neutrophils. The in vitro depletion of CD66b+ cells from patient PBMCs restored the proliferation of autologous T cells. Higher frequencies of CD66b+CD33dimHLA-DR− G-MDSCs correlated significantly with unfavorable prognostic index scores and a shorter freedom from disease progression. PBMCs from HL and B-cell NHL patients contain a population of CD66b+CD33dimHLA-DR− G-MDSCs, mostly composed of activated low-density neutrophils with immunosuppressive properties. These findings disclose a previously unknown G-MDSC-mediated mechanism of immune-escape in lymphomas, therefore anticipating possible targets for therapeutic

  2. Neutrophil Leukocyte: Combustive Microbicidal Action and Chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Allen, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil leukocytes protect against a varied and complex array of microbes by providing microbicidal action that is simple, potent, and focused. Neutrophils provide such action via redox reactions that change the frontier orbitals of oxygen (O2) facilitating combustion. The spin conservation rules define the symmetry barrier that prevents direct reaction of diradical O2 with nonradical molecules, explaining why combustion is not spontaneous. In burning, the spin barrier is overcome when energy causes homolytic bond cleavage producing radicals capable of reacting with diradical O2 to yield oxygenated radical products that further participate in reactive propagation. Neutrophil mediated combustion is by a different pathway. Changing the spin quantum state of O2 removes the symmetry restriction to reaction. Electronically excited singlet molecular oxygen ((1)O2(*)) is a potent electrophilic reactant with a finite lifetime that restricts its radius of reactivity and focuses combustive action on the target microbe. The resulting exergonic dioxygenation reactions produce electronically excited carbonyls that relax by light emission, that is, chemiluminescence. This overview of neutrophil combustive microbicidal action takes the perspectives of spin conservation and bosonic-fermionic frontier orbital considerations. The necessary principles of particle physics and quantum mechanics are developed and integrated into a fundamental explanation of neutrophil microbicidal metabolism.

  3. Exercise, training and neutrophil microbicidal activity.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Telford, R D; Mason, I B; Weidemann, M J

    1990-06-01

    The concentration in human plasma of putative neutrophil-"priming" cytokines like endogenous pyrogens is known to increase significantly in response to moderate exercise (11). This is characteristic of an acute-phase response. The ability of blood neutrophils isolated from both trained and untrained human subjects (n = 11, 9) to produce microbicidal reactive oxygen species was determined using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence both before and after one hour of aerobic exercise at 60% VO2max. Irrespective of training and stimulus concentration, exercise nearly always caused significant "priming" of the capacity of neutrophils to produce H2O2 and HOCl upon stimulation with opsonized zymosan (P less than 0.01); however, compared to their untrained counterparts, the activity of cells isolated from trained individuals was depressed about 50% at unit stimulus concentration, both before and after exercise (P less than 0.075), whilst remaining unaltered at saturating concentrations. Although neutrophil oxygenation activity is only one parameter that contributes to immunological status, regular episodes of moderate exercise may increase resistance to infection by priming the "killing capacity" of neutrophils. In contrast, prolonged periods of intensive training may lead to increased susceptibility to common infections by diminishing this activity. PMID:2115507

  4. Methoxatin (PQQ) in guinea-pig neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Bishop, A; Paz, M A; Gallop, P M; Karnovsky, M L

    1994-10-01

    PQQ, also called methoxatin, has been isolated from guinea-pig neutrophils. The organic cations diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and diphenyliodonium (BPI) and the aromatic o-diamine 4,5-dimethylphenylenediamine (DIMPDA) sequester synthetic PQQ and inhibit its redox-cycling activity in a model system. Standards were made of adducts of tritiated PQQ with unlabeled DIMPDA and of unlabeled PQQ with tritiated DPI or DIMPDA. PQQ adducts were isolated from guinea-pig neutrophils with each of the tritiated inhibitors. They were separated and defined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Tiron, a disodium benzene disulphonic acid, broke the DPI-PQQ adduct isolated from neutrophils and released free PQQ. Both DPI and DIMPDA, as well as BPI, blocked O2.- release by stimulated neutrophils. The blockade exerted by these inhibitors was released by the addition of PQQ to the cell suspensions. The data demonstrate the presence of PQQ in guinea-pig neutrophils and suggest that it has a possible role, direct or indirect, in the O2.(-)-producing respiratory burst.

  5. Stimulation of neutrophils by tumor necrosis factor

    SciTech Connect

    Klebanoff, S.J.; Vadas, M.A.; Harlan, J.M.; Sparks, L.H.; Gamble, J.R.; Agosti, J.M.; Waltersdorph, A.M.

    1986-06-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was shown to be a weak direct stimulus of the neutrophil respiratory burst and degranulation. The stimulation, as measured by iodination, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production, and lysozyme release, was considerably increased by the presence of unopsonized zymosan in the reaction mixture, an effect which was associated with the increased ingestion of the zymosan. TNF does not act as an opsonin but, rather, reacts with the neutrophil to increase its phagocytic activity. TNF-dependent phagocytosis, as measured indirectly by iodination, is inhibited by monoclonal antibodies (Mab) 60.1 and 60.3, which recognize different epitopes on the C3bi receptor/adherence-promoting surface glycoprotein of neutrophils. Other neutrophil stimulants, namely N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, and phorbol myristic acetate, also increase iodination in the presence of zymosan; as with TNF, the effect of these stimulants is inhibited by Mab 60.1 and 60.3, whereas, in contrast to that of TNF, their stimulation of iodination is unaffected by an Mab directed against TNF. TNF may be a natural stimulant of neutrophils which promotes adherence to endothelial cells and to particles, leading to increased phagocytosis, respiratory burst activity, and degranulation.

  6. Blocking neutrophil diapedesis prevents hemorrhage during thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Hillgruber, Carina; Pöppelmann, Birgit; Weishaupt, Carsten; Steingräber, Annika Kathrin; Wessel, Florian; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Gessner, J. Engelbert; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous organ hemorrhage is the major complication in thrombocytopenia with a potential fatal outcome. However, the exact mechanisms regulating vascular integrity are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that neutrophils recruited to inflammatory sites are the cellular culprits inducing thrombocytopenic tissue hemorrhage. Exposure of thrombocytopenic mice to UVB light provokes cutaneous petechial bleeding. This phenomenon is also observed in immune-thrombocytopenic patients when tested for UVB tolerance. Mechanistically, we show, analyzing several inflammatory models, that it is neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier that is responsible for the bleeding defect. First, bleeding is triggered by neutrophil-mediated mechanisms, which act downstream of capturing, adhesion, and crawling on the blood vessel wall and require Gαi signaling in neutrophils. Second, mutating Y731 in the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin, known to selectively affect leukocyte diapedesis, but not the induction of vascular permeability, attenuates bleeding. Third, and in line with this, simply destabilizing endothelial junctions by histamine did not trigger bleeding. We conclude that specifically targeting neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier may represent a new therapeutic avenue to prevent fatal bleeding in immune-thrombocytopenic patients. PMID:26169941

  7. Neutrophil Leukocyte: Combustive Microbicidal Action and Chemiluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil leukocytes protect against a varied and complex array of microbes by providing microbicidal action that is simple, potent, and focused. Neutrophils provide such action via redox reactions that change the frontier orbitals of oxygen (O2) facilitating combustion. The spin conservation rules define the symmetry barrier that prevents direct reaction of diradical O2 with nonradical molecules, explaining why combustion is not spontaneous. In burning, the spin barrier is overcome when energy causes homolytic bond cleavage producing radicals capable of reacting with diradical O2 to yield oxygenated radical products that further participate in reactive propagation. Neutrophil mediated combustion is by a different pathway. Changing the spin quantum state of O2 removes the symmetry restriction to reaction. Electronically excited singlet molecular oxygen (1O2*) is a potent electrophilic reactant with a finite lifetime that restricts its radius of reactivity and focuses combustive action on the target microbe. The resulting exergonic dioxygenation reactions produce electronically excited carbonyls that relax by light emission, that is, chemiluminescence. This overview of neutrophil combustive microbicidal action takes the perspectives of spin conservation and bosonic-fermionic frontier orbital considerations. The necessary principles of particle physics and quantum mechanics are developed and integrated into a fundamental explanation of neutrophil microbicidal metabolism. PMID:26783542

  8. Antiinflammatory effects of endotoxin. Inhibition of rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocyte responses to complement (C5)-derived peptides in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, J. T.; Hartiala, K. T.; Webster, R. O.; Howes, E. L.; Goldstein, I. M.

    1983-01-01

    Although capable of provoking a variety of inflammatory effects, endotoxin (bacterial lipopolysaccharide) paradoxically has been reported to be antiinflammatory. The authors have found that single intravenous injections of Escherichia coli endotoxin, 24 hours before challenge, inhibit almost completely the vascular permeability changes and exudation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes induced in rabbit skin by reversed passive Arthus reactions. Whereas intravenous injections of endotoxin also caused modest inhibition of the vascular permeability changes induced in rabbit skin by the synthetic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), exudation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was unaffected. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes from rabbits given single injected doses of endotoxin exhibited markedly diminished chemotactic and degranulation responses to complement (C5)-derived peptides in vitro. Responses of these cells to FMLP, however, were normal. These data suggest that selective suppression of polymorphonuclear leukocyte responses to C5-derived peptides accounts, in part, for the antiinflammatory effects of endotoxin. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:6228151

  9. Autocrine enhancement of leukotriene synthesis by endogenous leukotriene B4 and platelet-activating factor in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, P. P.; McColl, S. R.; Braquet, P.; Borgeat, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4), two potent lipid mediators synthesized by activated neutrophils, are known to stimulate several neutrophil functional responses. In this study, we have determined that endogenous LTB4 and PAF exert autocrine effects on LT synthesis, as well as the underlying mechanism involved. 2. Pretreatment of neutrophils with either pertussis toxin (PT), or with receptor antagonists for LTB4 and PAF, resulted in an inhibition of LT synthesis induced by calcium ionophore, A23187. This inhibition was most marked at submaximal (100-300 nM) A23187 concentrations, whilst it was least at ionophore concentrations which induce maximal LT synthesis (1-3 microM). Thus newly-synthesized PAF and LTB4 can enhance LT synthesis induced by A23187 under conditions where the LT-generating system is not fully activated. 3. In recombinant human (rh) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-primed neutrophils, LT synthesis in response to chemoattractants (fMet-Leu-Phe or rhC5a) was also significantly inhibited by the LTB4 receptor antagonist, and to a lesser extent by PAF receptor antagonists. 4. Further investigation revealed that LTB4 and/or PAF exert their effects on LT synthesis via an effect on arachidonic acid (AA) availability, as opposed to 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) activation. Indeed, the receptor antagonists, as well as PT, inhibited LT synthesis and AA release to a similar extent, whereas 5-LO activation (assessed with an exogenous 5-LO substrate) was virtually unaffected under the same conditions. Accordingly, we showed that addition of exogenous LTB4 could enhance AA availability in response to chemoattractant challenge in rhGM-CSF-primed cells, without significantly affecting the 5-LO activation status.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8019762

  10. Ozone-induced IL-17A and neutrophilic airway inflammation is orchestrated by the caspase-1-IL-1 cascade

    PubMed Central

    Che, Luanqing; Jin, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Lai, Tianwen; Zhou, Hongbin; Xia, Lixia; Tian, Baoping; Zhao, Yun; Liu, Juan; Wu, Yinfang; Wu, Yanping; Du, Jie; Li, Wen; Ying, Songmin; Chen, Zhihua; Shen, Huahao

    2016-01-01

    Ozone is a common environmental air pollutant leading to respiratory illness. The mechanisms regulating ozone-induced airway inflammation remain poorly understood. We hypothesize that ozone-triggered inflammasome activation and interleukin (IL)-1 production regulate neutrophilic airway inflammation through IL-17A. Pulmonary neutrophilic inflammation was induced by extended (72 h) low-dose (0.7 ppm) exposure to ozone. IL-1 receptor 1 (Il1r1)−/−, Il17a−/− mice and the caspase-1 inhibitor acetyl-YVAD-chloromethylketone (Ac-YVAD-cmk) were used for in vivo studies. Cellular inflammation and protein levels in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF), cytokines, and IL-17A-producing γδT-cells, as well as mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) release, and inflammasome activation in lung macrophages were analyzed. Ozone-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation, accompanied an increased production of IL-1β, IL-18, IL-17A, Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), Interferon-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10) and BALF protein in the lung. Ozone-induced IL-17A production was predominantly in γδT-cells, and Il17a-knockout mice exhibited reduced airway inflammation. Lung macrophages from ozone-exposed mice exhibited higher levels of mitochondrial ROS, enhanced cytosolic mtDNA, increased caspase-1 activation, and higher production of IL-1β. Il1r1-knockout mice or treatment with Ac-YVAD-cmk decreased the IL-17A production and subsequent airway inflammation. Taken together, we demonstrate that ozone-induced IL-17A and neutrophilic airway inflammation is orchestrated by the caspase-1-IL-1 cascade. PMID:26739627

  11. [The effect of hemosorbents on the structure of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in man].

    PubMed

    Iakubovskaia, R I; Ivanova, L M; Nemtsova, E R; Vorotyntsev, A P; Vavilov, M P

    1992-01-01

    The effect of various hemosorbents (HS)--carbon and textile--on the structure of neutrophils has been studied in vitro. It has been shown that the mechanism of cell degranulation is universal on various HS and does not depend on the anticoagulant used or on blood donor diseases. The degree of degranulation both for primary and for secondary granules increases with the prolongation of blood contact with HS, directly depends on HS--blood ratio and is determined mainly by the type of HS: degranulation on textile HS is considerably greater than that on carbon HS. Degranulation was confirmed by elevated blood plasma concentration of lactoferrin, a specific marker of secondary neutrophil granules. It is suggested that cell degranulation on HS leading to a considerable posthemosorption increase in the blood plasma level of biologically active intracellular components is essential in the process responsible for correcting hemosorption effect in different diseases.

  12. Decreased apoptosis of beta 2- integrin-deficient bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, Hajime; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Teraoka, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kenji; T