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Sample records for polynucleotide phosphorylase function

  1. Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Protects Escherichia coli against Oxidative Stress†

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jinhua; Jiang, Zhe; Liu, Min; Gong, Xin; Wu, Shaohui; Burns, Christopher M.; Li, Zhongwei

    2009-01-01

    Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) primarily functions in RNA degradation. It is an exoribonuclease and integral component of the multienzyme RNA degradosome complex [Carpousis et al. (1994) Cell 76, 889]. PNPase was previously shown to specifically bind a synthetic RNA containing the oxidative lesion 8-hydroxyguanine (8-oxoG) [Hayakawa et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 9977], suggesting a possible role in removing oxidatively damaged RNA. Here we show that PNPase binds to RNA molecules of natural sequence that were oxidatively damaged by treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) postsynthetically. PNPase bound oxidized RNA with higher affinity than untreated RNA of the same sequence, raising the possibility that it may act against a wide variety of lesions. The importance of such a protective role is illustrated by the observation that, under conditions known to cause oxidative damage to cytoplasmic components, PNPase-deficient cells are less viable than wild-type cells. Further, when challenged with H2O2, PNPase-deficient cells accumulate 8-oxoG in cellular RNA to a greater extent than wild-type cells, suggesting that this RNase functions in minimizing oxidized RNA in vivo. Introducing the pnp gene encoding PNPase rescues defects in growth and RNA quality of the pnp mutant cells. Our results also suggest that protection against oxidative stress is an intrinsic function of PNPase because association with the RNA degradosome or with RNA helicase B (RhlB) is not required. PMID:19219992

  2. Further characterization of the polynucleotide phosphorylase of Micrococcus luteus

    PubMed Central

    Letendre, Carol H.; Singer, Maxine F.

    1975-01-01

    The purification of polynucleotide phosphorylase from Micrococcus luteus by chromatography on phosphocellulose columns is described. This procedure offers several advantages over previous procedures. Previously determined molecular weights for Form-I enzyme and Form-T enzyme derived from Form-I by limited tryptic hydrolysis were confirmed as 2.7 and 2.3 × 105, respectively. Form-I appears homogeneous in the ultracentrifuge, but multiple active protein species are separable by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The multiple species are probably the result of proteolysis. On polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions, Form-T yielded a single size of subunit of 71,000 daltons, and Form-I yielded several bands of different molecular sizes. These results differ from earlier determinations. The amino acid compositions of Form-I and Form-T are reported. Form-I contains only between 8 and 10 cysteine residues per molecule and Form-T half that many. Images PMID:1121422

  3. Neisseria meningitidis Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Affects Aggregation, Adhesion, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Engman, Jakob; Negrea, Aurel; Sigurlásdóttir, Sara; Geörg, Miriam; Eriksson, Jens; Eriksson, Olaspers Sara; Kuwae, Asaomi; Sjölinder, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis autoaggregation is an important step during attachment to human cells. Aggregation is mediated by type IV pili and can be modulated by accessory pilus proteins, such as PilX, and posttranslational modifications of the major pilus subunit PilE. The mechanisms underlying the regulation of aggregation remain poorly characterized. Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is a 3′–5′ exonuclease that is involved in RNA turnover and the regulation of small RNAs. In this study, we biochemically confirm that NMC0710 is the N. meningitidis PNPase, and we characterize its role in N. meningitidis pathogenesis. We show that deletion of the gene encoding PNPase leads to hyperaggregation and increased adhesion to epithelial cells. The aggregation induced was found to be dependent on pili and to be mediated by excessive pilus bundling. PNPase expression was induced following bacterial attachment to human cells. Deletion of PNPase led to global transcriptional changes and the differential regulation of 469 genes. We also demonstrate that PNPase is required for full virulence in an in vivo model of N. meningitidis infection. The present study shows that PNPase negatively affects aggregation, adhesion, and virulence in N. meningitidis. PMID:26930706

  4. Human polynucleotide phosphorylase (hPNPase old-35): an RNA degradation enzyme with pleiotrophic biological effects.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B

    2006-05-01

    Identification of small inhibitory RNAs and microRNA established that regulation of RNA metabolism plays an essential role in controlling intracellular biochemical processes. Interferons induce a number of RNA degradation enzymes involved in innate immunity by degrading viral RNAs. We cloned human polynucleotide phosphorylase (hPNPase(old-35)), a type I interferon-inducible 3'-5' exoribonuclease, as a transcript induced during terminal differentiation and senescence, two physiological processes marked by irreversible growth arrest. Our studies in the last four years show that hPNPase(old-35) plays an essential role in mediating IFN-mediated growth inhibition and its upregulation might mediate chronic inflammatory pathological processes during aging. The present review recaps these findings and provides a framework for the future understanding of the versatile functions of this interesting molecule. PMID:16687933

  5. Polynucleotide phosphorylase negatively controls spv virulence gene expression in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Ygberg, Sofia Eriksson; Clements, Mark O; Rytkönen, Anne; Thompson, Arthur; Holden, David W; Hinton, Jay C D; Rhen, Mikael

    2006-02-01

    Mutational inactivation of the cold-shock-associated exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase; encoded by the pnp gene) in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was previously shown to enable the bacteria to cause chronic infection and to affect the bacterial replication in BALB/c mice (M. O. Clements et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99:8784-8789, 2002). Here, we report that PNPase deficiency results in increased expression of Salmonella plasmid virulence (spv) genes under in vitro growth conditions that allow induction of spv expression. Furthermore, whole-genome microarray-based transcriptome analyses of bacteria growing inside murine macrophage-like J774.A.1 cells revealed six genes as being significantly up-regulated in the PNPase-deficient background, which included spvABC, rtcB, entC, and STM2236. Mutational inactivation of the spvR regulator diminished the increased expression of spv observed in the pnp mutant background, implying that PNPase acts upstream of or at the level of SpvR. Finally, competition experiments revealed that the growth advantage of the pnp mutant in BALB/c mice was dependent on spvR as well. Combined, our results support the idea that in S. enterica PNPase, apart from being a regulator of the cold shock response, also functions in tuning the expression of virulence genes and bacterial fitness during infection. PMID:16428774

  6. A conserved loop in polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) essential for both RNA and ADP/phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Mazzantini, Elisa; Nardini, Marco; Regonesi, Maria Elena; Greco, Claudio; Briani, Federica; De Gioia, Luca; Dehò, Gianni; Tortora, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) reversibly catalyzes RNA phosphorolysis and polymerization of nucleoside diphosphates. Its homotrimeric structure forms a central channel where RNA is accommodated. Each protomer core is formed by two paralogous RNase PH domains: PNPase1, whose function is largely unknown, hosts a conserved FFRR loop interacting with RNA, whereas PNPase2 bears the putative catalytic site, ∼20 Å away from the FFRR loop. To date, little is known regarding PNPase catalytic mechanism. We analyzed the kinetic properties of two Escherichia coli PNPase mutants in the FFRR loop (R79A and R80A), which exhibited a dramatic increase in Km for ADP/Pi binding, but not for poly(A), suggesting that the two residues may be essential for binding ADP and Pi. However, both mutants were severely impaired in shifting RNA electrophoretic mobility, implying that the two arginines contribute also to RNA binding. Additional interactions between RNA and other PNPase domains (such as KH and S1) may preserve the enzymatic activity in R79A and R80A mutants. Inspection of enzyme structure showed that PNPase has evolved a long-range acting hydrogen bonding network that connects the FFRR loop with the catalytic site via the F380 residue. This hypothesis was supported by mutation analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of PNPase domains and RNase PH suggests that such network is a unique feature of PNPase1 domain, which coevolved with the paralogous PNPase2 domain.

  7. Preparation, proteolysis and reversible oxidation of highly purified Azotobacter vinelandii polynucleotide phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Gajda, A. T.; de Behrens, G. Zaror; Fitt, P. S.

    1970-01-01

    1. A new method has been developed for the preparation in good yield of highly purified Azotobacter vinelandii polynucleotide phosphorylase in its reduced form. 2. Aging or digestion with trypsin causes the enzyme to develop a primer requirement that is not eliminated by β-mercaptoethanol. 3. The development of a primer requirement is accompanied by marked changes of the electrophoretic mobility of the enzyme in polyacrylamide gels. 4. The enzyme is inactivated by aerial oxidation or thiol-specific reagents. The lost activity is restored by β-mercaptoethanol, but not by oligonucleotide primers. PMID:5495150

  8. Polynucleotide phosphorylase has an impact on cell biology of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Nabila; Tresse, Odile; Rivoal, Katell; Chevret, Didier; Nonglaton, Quentin; Burns, Christopher M.; Prévost, Hervé; Cappelier, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), encoded by the pnp gene, is known to degrade mRNA, mediating post-transcriptional regulation and may affect cellular functions. The role of PNPase is pleiotropic. As orthologs of the two major ribonucleases (RNase E and RNase II) of Escherichia coli are missing in the Campylobacter jejuni genome, in the current study the focus has been on the C. jejuni ortholog of PNPase. The effect of PNPase mutation on C. jejuni phenotypes and proteome was investigated. The inactivation of the pnp gene reduced significantly the ability of C. jejuni to adhere and to invade Ht-29 cells. Moreover, the pnp mutant strain exhibited a decrease in C. jejuni swimming ability and chick colonization. To explain effects of PNPase on C. jejuni 81-176 phenotype, the proteome of the pnp mutant and parental strains were compared. Overall, little variation in protein production was observed. Despite the predicted role of PNPase in mRNA regulation, the pnp mutation did not induce profound proteomic changes suggesting that other ribonucleases in C. jejuni might ensure this biological function in the absence of PNPase. Nevertheless, synthesis of proteins which are involved in virulence (LuxS, PEB3), motility (N-acetylneuraminic acid synthetase), stress-response (KatA, DnaK, Hsp90), and translation system (EF-Tu, EF-G) were modified in the pnp mutant strain suggesting a more specific role of PNPase in C. jejuni. In conclusion, PNPase deficiency induces limited but important consequences on C. jejuni biology that could explain swimming limitation, chick colonization delay, and the decrease of cell adhesion/invasion ability. PMID:22919622

  9. Bacillus subtilis polynucleotide phosphorylase 3'-to-5' DNase activity is involved in DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Paula P; Carrasco, Begoña; Sanchez, Humberto; Deikus, Gintaras; Bechhofer, David H; Alonso, Juan C

    2009-07-01

    In the presence of Mn(2+), an activity in a preparation of purified Bacillus subtilis RecN degrades single-stranded (ss) DNA with a 3' --> 5' polarity. This activity is not associated with RecN itself, because RecN purified from cells lacking polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) does not show the exonuclease activity. We show here that, in the presence of Mn(2+) and low-level inorganic phosphate (P(i)), PNPase degrades ssDNA. The limited end-processing of DNA is regulated by ATP and is inactive in the presence of Mg(2+) or high-level P(i). In contrast, the RNase activity of PNPase requires Mg(2+) and P(i), suggesting that PNPase degradation of RNA and ssDNA occur by mutually exclusive mechanisms. A null pnpA mutation (DeltapnpA) is not epistatic with Delta recA, but is epistatic with DeltarecN and Delta ku, which by themselves are non-epistatic. The addA5, Delta recO, Delta recQ (Delta recJ), Delta recU and Delta recG mutations (representative of different epistatic groups), in the context of DeltapnpA, demonstrate gain- or loss-of-function by inactivation of repair-by-recombination, depending on acute or chronic exposure to the damaging agent and the nature of the DNA lesion. Our data suggest that PNPase is involved in various nucleic acid metabolic pathways, and its limited ssDNA exonuclease activity plays an important role in RecA-dependent and RecA-independent repair pathways. PMID:19433509

  10. Defects in polynucleotide phosphorylase impairs virulence in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Zhu, Mei-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is reported to regulate virulence in Salmonella, Yersinia sp. and Campylobacter jejuni, yet its role in Escherichia coli O157:H7 has not been investigated. To gain insights into its roles in E. coli O157:H7 virulence, pnp deletion mutants were generated and the major virulence factors were compared to their parental wild type strains. Deletion of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 dramatically decreased stx2 mRNA expression and Stx2 protein production, and impaired lambdoid prophage activation in E. coli O157:H7. Quantitative PCR further confirmed that the Stx2 phage lytic growth was repressed by pnp deletion. Consistent with reduced Stx2 production and Stx2 phage activation, the transcriptional levels of genes involved in phage lysis and replication were down-regulated. In addition, disruption of pnp in E. coli O157:H7 decreased its adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells as well as cattle colonic explant tissues. On the other hand, PNPase inactivation in E. coli O157:H7 enhanced Tir protein content and the transcription of type three secretion system components, including genes encoding intimin, Tir, and EspB as well as locus of enterocyte and effacement positive regulator, Ler. Collectively, data indicate that PNPase has pleiotropic effects on the virulence of E. coli O157:H7. PMID:26347717

  11. Cold-temperature induction of Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase occurs by reversal of its autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Beran, R K; Simons, R W

    2001-01-01

    When Escherichia coli cells are shifted to low temperatures (e.g. 15 degrees C), growth halts while the 'cold shock response' (CSR) genes are induced, after which growth resumes. One CSR gene, pnp, encodes polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), a 3'-exoribonuclease and component of the RNA degradosome. At 37 degrees C, ribonuclease III (RNase III, encoded by rnc) cleaves the pnp untranslated leader, whereupon PNPase represses its own translation by an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that PNPase cold-temperature induction involves several post-transcriptional events, all of which require the intact pnp mRNA leader. The bulk of induction results from reversal of autoregulation at a step subsequent to RNase III cleavage of the pnp leader. We also found that pnp translation occurs throughout cold-temperature adaptation, whereas lacZ(+) translation was delayed. This difference is striking, as both mRNAs are greatly stabilized upon the shift to 15 degrees C. However, unlike the lacZ(+) mRNA, which remains stable during adaptation, pnp mRNA decay accelerates. Together with other evidence, these results suggest that mRNA is generally stabilized upon a shift to cold temperatures, but that a CSR mRNA-specific decay process is initiated during adaptation.

  12. A mutation in polynucleotide phosphorylase from Escherichia coli impairing RNA binding and degradosome stability

    PubMed Central

    Regonesi, Maria Elena; Briani, Federica; Ghetta, Andrea; Zangrossi, Sandro; Ghisotti, Daniela; Tortora, Paolo; Dehò, Gianni

    2004-01-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), a 3′ to 5′ exonuclease encoded by pnp, plays a key role in Escherichia coli RNA decay. The enzyme, made of three identical 711 amino acid subunits, may also be assembled in the RNA degradosome, a heteromultimeric complex involved in RNA degradation. PNPase autogenously regulates its expression by promoting the decay of pnp mRNA, supposedly by binding at the 5′-untranslated leader region of an RNase III-processed form of this transcript. The KH and S1 RNA-binding domains at the C-terminus of the protein (amino acids 552–711) are thought to be involved in pnp mRNA recognition. Here we show that a G454D substitution in E.coli PNPase impairs autogenous regulation whereas it does not affect the catalytic activities of the enzyme. Although the mutation maps outside of the KH and S1 RNA-binding domains, analysis of the mutant protein revealed a defective RNA binding, thus suggesting that other determinants may be involved in PNPase–RNA interactions. The mutation also caused a looser association with the degradosome and an abnormal electrophoretic mobility in native gels. The latter feature suggests an altered structural conformation of PNPase, which may account for the properties of the mutant protein. PMID:14963263

  13. RNase E forms a complex with polynucleotide phosphorylase in cyanobacteria via a cyanobacterial-specific nonapeptide in the noncatalytic region.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ju-Yuan; Deng, Xue-Mei; Li, Feng-Pu; Wang, Li; Huang, Qiao-Yun; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Wen-Li

    2014-04-01

    RNase E, a central component involved in bacterial RNA metabolism, usually has a highly conserved N-terminal catalytic domain but an extremely divergent C-terminal domain. While the C-terminal domain of RNase E in Escherichia coli recruits other components to form an RNA degradation complex, it is unknown if a similar function can be found for RNase E in other organisms due to the divergent feature of this domain. Here, we provide evidence showing that RNase E forms a complex with another essential ribonuclease-the polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase)-in cyanobacteria, a group of ecologically important and phylogenetically ancient organisms. Sequence alignment for all cyanobacterial RNase E proteins revealed several conserved and variable subregions in their noncatalytic domains. One such subregion, an extremely conserved nonapeptide (RRRRRRSSA) located near the very end of RNase E, serves as the PNPase recognition site in both the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC7120 and the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803. These results indicate that RNase E and PNPase form a ribonuclease complex via a common mechanism in cyanobacteria. The PNPase-recognition motif in cyanobacterial RNase E is distinct from those previously identified in Proteobacteria, implying a mechanism of coevolution for PNPase and RNase E in different organisms.

  14. Identification of Genes Potentially Regulated by Human Polynucleotide Phosphorylase (hPNPaseold-35) Using Melanoma as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Sokhi, Upneet K.; Bacolod, Manny D.; Dasgupta, Santanu; Emdad, Luni; Das, Swadesh K.; Dumur, Catherine I.; Miles, Michael F.; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    Human Polynucleotide Phosphorylase (hPNPaseold-35 or PNPT1) is an evolutionarily conserved 3′→5′ exoribonuclease implicated in the regulation of numerous physiological processes including maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis, mtRNA import and aging-associated inflammation. From an RNase perspective, little is known about the RNA or miRNA species it targets for degradation or whose expression it regulates; except for c-myc and miR-221. To further elucidate the functional implications of hPNPaseold-35 in cellular physiology, we knocked-down and overexpressed hPNPaseold-35 in human melanoma cells and performed gene expression analyses to identify differentially expressed transcripts. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that knockdown of hPNPaseold-35 resulted in significant gene expression changes associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and cholesterol biosynthesis; whereas overexpression of hPNPaseold-35 caused global changes in cell-cycle related functions. Additionally, comparative gene expression analyses between our hPNPaseold-35 knockdown and overexpression datasets allowed us to identify 77 potential “direct” and 61 potential “indirect” targets of hPNPaseold-35 which formed correlated networks enriched for cell-cycle and wound healing functional association, respectively. These results provide a comprehensive database of genes responsive to hPNPaseold-35 expression levels; along with the identification new potential candidate genes offering fresh insight into cellular pathways regulated by PNPT1 and which may be used in the future for possible therapeutic intervention in mitochondrial- or inflammation-associated disease phenotypes. PMID:24143183

  15. Interaction of Bacillus subtilis Polynucleotide Phosphorylase and RNase Y: STRUCTURAL MAPPING AND EFFECT ON mRNA TURNOVER.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Elizabeth; Alabi, Shanique; Liu, Bo; Schlessinger, Avner; Bechhofer, David H

    2016-03-25

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), a 3'-to-5' phosphorolytic exoribonuclease, is thought to be the primary enzyme responsible for turnover ofBacillus subtilismRNA. The role of PNPase inB. subtilismRNA decay has been analyzed previously by comparison of mRNA profiles in a wild-type strainversusa strain that is deleted forpnpA, the gene encoding PNPase. Recent studies have provided evidence for a degradosome-like complex inB. subtilisthat is built around the major decay-initiating endonuclease, RNase Y, and there is ample evidence for a strong interaction between PNPase and RNase Y. The role of the PNPase-RNase Y interaction in the exonucleolytic function of PNPase needs to be clarified. We sought to construct aB. subtilisstrain containing a catalytically active PNPase that could not interact with RNase Y. Mapping studies of the PNPase-RNase Y interaction were guided by a homology model ofB. subtilisPNPase based on the known structure of theEscherichia coliPNPase in complex with an RNase E peptide. Mutations inB. subtilisresidues predicted to be involved in RNase Y binding showed a loss of PNPase-RNase Y interaction. Two mRNAs whose decay is dependent on RNase Y and PNPase were examined in strains containing full-length PNPase that was either catalytically active but unable to interact with RNase Y, or catalytically inactive but able to interact with RNase Y. At least for these two mRNAs, disruption of the PNPase-RNase Y interaction did not appear to affect mRNA turnover.

  16. Crystal structure of Caulobacter crescentus polynucleotide phosphorylase reveals a mechanism of RNA substrate channelling and RNA degradosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Steven W; Gubbey, Tobias; Hug, Isabelle; Jenal, Urs; Luisi, Ben F

    2012-04-01

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) is an exoribonuclease that cleaves single-stranded RNA substrates with 3'-5' directionality and processive behaviour. Its ring-like, trimeric architecture creates a central channel where phosphorolytic active sites reside. One face of the ring is decorated with RNA-binding K-homology (KH) and S1 domains, but exactly how these domains help to direct the 3' end of single-stranded RNA substrates towards the active sites is an unsolved puzzle. Insight into this process is provided by our crystal structures of RNA-bound and apo Caulobacter crescentus PNPase. In the RNA-free form, the S1 domains adopt a 'splayed' conformation that may facilitate capture of RNA substrates. In the RNA-bound structure, the three KH domains collectively close upon the RNA and direct the 3' end towards a constricted aperture at the entrance of the central channel. The KH domains make non-equivalent interactions with the RNA, and there is a marked asymmetry within the catalytic core of the enzyme. On the basis of these data, we propose that structural non-equivalence, induced upon RNA binding, helps to channel substrate to the active sites through mechanical ratcheting. Structural and biochemical analyses also reveal the basis for PNPase association with RNase E in the multi-enzyme RNA degradosome assembly of the α-proteobacteria.

  17. Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Regulates Multiple Virulence Factors and the Stabilities of Small RNAs RsmY/Z in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ronghao; Weng, Yuding; Zhu, Feng; Jin, Yongxin; Liu, Chang; Pan, Xiaolei; Xia, Bin; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation enables bacteria to quickly response to environmental stresses. Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), which contains an N-terminal catalytic core and C-terminal RNA binding KH-S1 domains, is involved in RNA processing. Here we demonstrate that in Pseudomonas aeruginosa the KH-S1 domains of PNPase are required for the type III secretion system (T3SS) and bacterial virulence. Transcriptome analysis revealed a pleiotropic role of PNPase in gene regulation. Particularly, the RNA level of exsA was decreased in the ΔKH-S1 mutant, which was responsible for the reduced T3SS expression. Meanwhile, the pilus biosynthesis genes were down regulated and the type VI secretion system (T6SS) genes were up regulated in the ΔKH-S1 mutant, which were caused by increased levels of small RNAs, RsmY, and RsmZ. Further studies revealed that deletion of the KH-S1 domains did not affect the transcription of RsmY/Z, but increased their stabilities. An in vivo pull-down and in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated a direct interaction between RsmY/Z and the KH-S1 fragment. Overall, this study reveals the roles of PNPase in the regulation of virulence factors and stabilities of small RNAs in P. aeruginosa. PMID:26973625

  18. RNA Processing Factor 7 and Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Are Necessary for Processing and Stability of nad2 mRNA in Arabidopsis Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Birgit; Zendler, Daniel; Binder, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Post-transcriptional maturation of plant mitochondrial transcripts requires several steps. Among these, the generation of mature 5′ ends is still one of the most enigmatic processes. Toward a characterization of proteins involved in 5′ processing of mitochondrial transcripts in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we now analyzed 5′ maturation of nad2 transcripts. Based on natural genetic variation affecting 5′ ends of nad2 transcripts in ecotype Can-0 and complementation studies we now identified RNA processing factor 7, which takes part in the generation of the 5′ terminus of the mature nad2 mRNA. RPF7 is a relatively short regular P-class pentatricopeptide repeat protein comprising seven canonical P repeats and a single short S repeat. The corresponding allele in Can-0 encodes a truncated version of this protein lacking two C-terminal repeats, which are essential for the function of RPF7. Furthermore we established transgenic plants expressing artifical microRNAs targeting the mitochondrial polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), which results in substantial reduction of the PNPase mRNA levels and strong knockdown of this gene. Detailed quantitative studies of 5′ and 3′ extended nad2 precursor RNAs in these knockdown plants as well as in the rpf7–1 knockout mutant suggest that 5′ processing contributes to the stability of mitochondrial transcripts in plants. PMID:25181358

  19. Properties and functions of the storage sites of glycogen phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yasushi; Fujii, Yuta; Taniguchi, Motoi

    2015-06-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is biologically active as a dimer of identical subunits. Each subunit has two distinct maltooligosaccharide binding sites: a storage site and a catalytic site. Our characterization of the properties of these sites suggested that GP activity consists of two activities: (i) binding to the glycogen molecule and (ii) phosphorolysis of the non-reducing-end glucose residues. Activity (i) is mainly due to the activities of the two storage sites, which depended on the ionic strength of the medium and were directly inhibited by cyclodextrins (CDs). Activity (i) is of benefit to GP because a high concentration of non-reducing-end glucose residues is localized on the surface of the glycogen molecule. Activity (ii), the total activity of the two catalytic sites, exhibited relatively little ionic strength dependence. Because the combined activity of (i) and (ii) is deduced using glycogen as an assay substrate, the sole activity of (ii) must be measured using small maltooligosyl-substrates. By using a very low concentration of pyridylaminated maltohexaose, we demonstrated that the GP catalytic sites are active even in the presence of CDs, and that the actions of the catalytic site and the storage site are independent of each other.

  20. Detection of single-copy functional genes in prokaryotic cells by two-pass TSA-FISH with polynucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Shuji; Hasegawa, Takuya; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Harada, Hideki; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Kubota, Kengo

    2012-02-01

    In situ detection of functional genes with single-cell resolution is currently of interest to microbiologists. Here, we developed a two-pass tyramide signal amplification (TSA)-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol with PCR-derived polynucleotide probes for the detection of single-copy genes in prokaryotic cells. The mcrA gene and the apsA gene in methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria, respectively, were targeted. The protocol showed bright fluorescence with a good signal-to-noise ratio and achieved a high efficiency of detection (>98%). The discrimination threshold was approximately 82-89% sequence identity. Microorganisms possessing the mcrA or apsA gene in anaerobic sludge samples were successfully detected by two-pass TSA-FISH with polynucleotide probes. The developed protocol is useful for identifying single microbial cells based on functional gene sequences.

  1. Structure-Function Analysis of the 3' Phosphatase Component of T4 Polynucleotide Kinase/phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu,H.; Smith, P.; Wang, L.; Shuman, S.

    2007-01-01

    T4 polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (Pnkp) exemplifies a family of bifunctional enzymes with 5'-kinase and 3' phosphatase activities that function in nucleic acid repair. T4 Pnkp is a homotetramer of a 301-aa polypeptide, which consists of an N-terminal kinase domain of the P-loop phosphotransferase superfamily and a C-terminal phosphatase domain of the DxD acylphosphatase superfamily. The homotetramer is formed via pairs of phosphatase-phosphatase and kinase-kinase homodimer interfaces. Here we identify four side chains-Asp187, Ser211, Lys258, and Asp277-that are required for 3' phosphatase activity. Alanine mutations at these positions abolished phosphatase activity without affecting kinase function or tetramerization. Conservative substitutions of asparagine or glutamate for Asp187 did not revive the 3' phosphatase, nor did arginine or glutamine substitutions for Lys258. Threonine in lieu of Ser211 and glutamate in lieu of Asp277 restored full activity, whereas asparagine at position 277 had no salutary effect. We report a 3.0 A crystal structure of the Pnkp tetramer, in which a sulfate ion is coordinated between Arg246 and Arg279 in a position that we propose mimics one of the penultimate phosphodiesters (5'NpNpNp-3') of the polynucleotide 3'-PO(4) substrate. The amalgam of mutational and structural data engenders a plausible catalytic mechanism for the phosphatase that includes covalent catalysis (via Asp165), general acid-base catalysis (via Asp167), metal coordination (by Asp165, Asp277 and Asp278), and transition state stabilization (via Lys258, Ser211, backbone amides, and the divalent cation). Other critical side chains play architectural roles (Arg176, Asp187, Arg213, Asp254). To probe the role of oligomerization in phosphatase function, we introduced six double-alanine cluster mutations at the phosphatase-phosphatase domain interface, two of which (R297A-Q295A and E292A-D300A) converted Pnkp from a tetramer to a dimer and ablated phosphatase activity.

  2. The experimental type 2 diabetes therapy glycogen phosphorylase inhibition can impair aerobic muscle function during prolonged contraction.

    PubMed

    Baker, David J; Greenhaff, Paul L; MacInnes, Alan; Timmons, James A

    2006-06-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase inhibition represents a promising strategy to suppress inappropriate hepatic glucose output, while muscle glycogen is a major source of fuel during contraction. Glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors (GPi) currently being investigated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes do not demonstrate hepatic versus muscle glycogen phosphorylase isoform selectivity and may therefore impair patient aerobic exercise capabilities. Skeletal muscle energy metabolism and function are not impaired by GPi during high-intensity contraction in rat skeletal muscle; however, it is unknown whether glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors would impair function during prolonged lower-intensity contraction. Utilizing a novel red cell-perfused rodent gastrocnemius-plantaris-soleus system, muscle was pretreated for 60 min with either 3 micromol/l free drug GPi (n=8) or vehicle control (n=7). During 60 min of aerobic contraction, GPi treatment resulted in approximately 35% greater fatigue. Muscle glycogen phosphorylase a form (P<0.01) and maximal activity (P<0.01) were reduced in the GPi group, and postcontraction glycogen (121.8 +/- 16.1 vs. 168.3 +/- 8.5 mmol/kg dry muscle, P<0.05) was greater. Furthermore, lower muscle lactate efflux and glucose uptake (P<0.01), yet higher muscle Vo(2), support the conclusion that carbohydrate utilization was impaired during contraction. Our data provide new confirmation that muscle glycogen plays an essential role during submaximal contraction. Given the critical role of exercise prescription in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, it will be important to monitor endurance capacity during the clinical evaluation of nonselective GPi. Alternatively, greater effort should be devoted toward the discovery of hepatic-selective GPi, hepatic-specific drug delivery strategies, and/or alternative strategies for controlling excess hepatic glucose production in type 2 diabetes.

  3. Polymer phosphorylases: clues to the emergence of non-replicative and replicative polymers.

    PubMed

    Freire, Miguel Angel

    2011-12-01

    Polymer formation is arguably one of the essential factors that allowed the emergence, stabilisation and spread of life on Earth. Consequently, studies concerning biopolymers could shed light on the origins of life itself. Of particular interest are RNA and polysaccharide polymers, the archetypes of the contrasting proposed evolutionary scenarios and their respective polymerases. Nucleic acid polymerases were hypothesised, before their discovery, to have a functional similarity with glycogen phosphorylase. Further identification and characterisation of nucleic acid polymerases; particularly of polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), provided experimental evidence for the initial premise. Once discovered, frequent similarities were found between PNPase and glycogen phosphorylase, in terms of catalytic features and biochemical properties. As a result, PNPase was seen as a model of primitive polymerase and used in laboratory precellular systems. Paradoxically, however, these similarities were not sufficient as an argument in favour of an ancestral common polymerisation mechanism prior to polysaccharides and polyribonucleotides. Here we present an overview of the common features shared by polymer phosphorylases, with new proposals for the emergence of polysaccharide and RNA polymers.

  4. Structural studies of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase: towards a new specific empirical scoring function.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Luis Fernando Saraiva Macedo; Caceres, Rafael Andrade; Vivan, Ana Luiza; Gava, Lisandra Marques; Dias, Raquel; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diogenes Santiago; de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2008-11-01

    Human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (HsPNP) is a target for inhibitor development aiming at T-cell immune response modulation. In this work, we report the development of a new set of empirical scoring functions and its application to evaluate binding affinities and docking results. To test these new functions, we solved the structure of HsPNP and 2-mercapto-4(3H)-quinazolinone (HsPNP:MQU) binary complex at 2.7A resolution using synchrotron radiation, and used these functions to predict ligand position obtained in docking simulations. We also employed molecular dynamics simulations to analyze HsPNP in two conditions, as apoenzyme and in the binary complex form, in order to assess the structural features responsible for stability. Analysis of the structural differences between systems provides explanation for inhibitor binding. The use of these scoring functions to evaluate binding affinities and molecular docking results may be used to guide future efforts on virtual screening focused on HsPNP.

  5. Coupled isothermal polynucleotide amplification and translation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A cell-free system for polynucleotide amplification and translation is disclosed. Also disclosed are methods for using the system and a composition which allows the various components of the system to function under a common set of reaction conditions.

  6. Characterization of the Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase Polymorphism rs7023954 - Incidence and Effects on Enzymatic Function in Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Limm, Katharina; Dettmer, Katja; Reinders, Jörg; Oefner, Peter J.; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) supports melanoma development and progression through accumulation of its substrate 5’-methylthioadenosine (MTA), which leads amongst others to a constitutive inhibition of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) and activation of the transcription factor AP-1 via the receptor ADORA2B. Genetic association studies have also suggested that genetic polymorphism in MTAP may modulate the risk of melanoma. Here, we investigated the only globally common non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) reported to date for MTAP. The SNP rs7023954 is located in exon 3 (c.166G>A), and leads to the conservative substitution of one branched-chain amino acid residue (valine) for another (isoleucine) at position 56 (p.Val56Ile). Whereas genotype frequencies in normal and primary melanoma tissues or cell lines were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium based on cDNA amplicon sequencing, a marked (P = 0.00019) deviation was observed in metastatic melanoma tissues and cell lines due to a deficit of heterozygotes. Enzyme assays conducted on the co-dominantly expressed alleles revealed no difference in the conversion rate of MTA to adenine and 5-methylthioribose-1-phosphate, indicating that this known enzymatic activity does not modulate the tumor suppressive function of MTAP. PMID:27479139

  7. [Purine nucleoside phosphorylase].

    PubMed

    Pogosian, L G; Akopian, Zh I

    2013-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is one of the most important enzymes of the purine metabolism, wich promotes the recycling of purine bases. Nowadays is the actual to search for effective inhibitors of this enzyme which is necessary for creation T-cell immunodeficient status of the organism in the organs and tissues transplantation, and chemotherapy of a number pathologies as well. For their successful practical application necessary to conduct in-depth and comprehensive study of the enzyme, namely a structure, functions, and an affinity of the reaction mechanism. In the review the contemporary achievements in the study of PNP from various biological objects are presented. New data describing the structure of PNP are summarised and analysed. The physiological role of the enzyme is discussed. The enzyme basic reaction mechanisms and actions are considered. The studies on enzyme physicochemical, kinetic, and catalytic research are presented. PMID:24479338

  8. Functional characterization of sucrose phosphorylase and scrR, a regulator of sucrose metabolism in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Januana S; Abdi, Reihaneh; Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Schwab, Clarissa; Gänzle, Michael G

    2013-12-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri harbours alternative enzymes for sucrose metabolism, sucrose phosphorylase, fructansucrases, and glucansucrases. Sucrose phosphorylase and fructansucrases additionally contribute to raffinose metabolism. Glucansucrases and fructansucrases produce exopolysaccharides as alternative to sucrose hydrolysis. L. reuteri LTH5448 expresses a levansucrase (ftfA) and sucrose phosphorylase (scrP), both are inducible by sucrose. This study determined the contribution of scrP to sucrose and raffinose metabolism in L. reuteri LTH5448, and elucidated the role of scrR in regulation sucrose metabolism. Disruption of scrP and scrR was achieved by double crossover mutagenesis. L. reuteri LTH5448, LTH5448ΔscrP and LTH5448ΔscrR were characterized with respect to growth and metabolite formation with glucose, sucrose, or raffinose as sole carbon source. Inactivation of scrR led to constitutive transcription of scrP and ftfA, demonstrating that scrR is negative regulator. L. reuteri LTH5448 and the LTH5448ΔscrP or LTH5448ΔscrR mutant strains did not differ with respect to glucose, sucrose or raffinose utilization. However, L. reuteri LTH5448ΔscrP produced more levan, indicating that the lack of sucrose phosphorylase is compensated by an increased metabolic flux through levansucrase. In conclusion, the presence of alternate pathways for sucrose and raffinose metabolism and their regulation indicate that these substrates, which are abundant in plants, are preferred carbohydrate sources for L. reuteri. PMID:24010626

  9. Polynucleotides. LVII. Synthesis and properties of poly (2'-chloro-2'-deoxyinosinic acid).

    PubMed Central

    Kakiuchi, N; Fukui, T; Ikehara, M

    1979-01-01

    Poly (2'-chloro-2'-deoxyinosinic acid) [poly(Icl)] was synthesized from Icl 5'-DP by polymerization with polynucleotide phosphorylase. UV absorption properties of poly(Icl) are very similar to those of poly(I). Poly(Icl) adopted a multi-stranded ordered form in the presence of 0.95M Na ion. The Tm value of this form was 36 degrees, which resembles that of poly(I) quadruple-stranded form at high salt. CD spectra also suggested presence of these two forms. Upon mixing with poly(C), poly-(Icl) forms a double-stranded 1 : 1 complex, which had very similar Tm-log[Na+] relationship to that of poly(I) . poly(C). Thus it was concluded that the chlorine substitution at 2'-position of the polynucleotide had the similar effect to OH on physical properties of polynucleotides. PMID:461198

  10. Method for creating polynucleotide and polypeptide sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Frances (Inventor); Shao, Zhixin (Inventor); Volkov, Alexander (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The invention provides methods for evolving a polynucleotide toward acquisition of a desired property. Such methods entail incubating a population of parental polynucleotide variants under conditions to generate annealed polynucleotides comprising heteroduplexes. The heteroduplexes are then exposed to a cellular DNA repair system to convert the heteroduplexes to parental polynucleotide variants or recombined polynucleotide variants. The resulting polynucleotides are then screened or selected for the desired property.

  11. Enzymatic characterization of AMP phosphorylase and ribose-1,5-bisphosphate isomerase functioning in an archaeal AMP metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Aono, Riku; Sato, Takaaki; Yano, Ayumu; Yoshida, Shosuke; Nishitani, Yuichi; Miki, Kunio; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2012-12-01

    AMP phosphorylase (AMPpase), ribose-1,5-bisphosphate (R15P) isomerase, and type III ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) have been proposed to constitute a novel pathway involved in AMP metabolism in the Archaea. Here we performed a biochemical examination of AMPpase and R15P isomerase from Thermococcus kodakarensis. R15P isomerase was specific for the α-anomer of R15P and did not recognize other sugar compounds. We observed that activity was extremely low with the substrate R15P alone but was dramatically activated in the presence of AMP. Using AMP-activated R15P isomerase, we reevaluated the substrate specificity of AMPpase. AMPpase exhibited phosphorylase activity toward CMP and UMP in addition to AMP. The [S]-v plot (plot of velocity versus substrate concentration) of the enzyme toward AMP was sigmoidal, with an increase in activity observed at concentrations higher than approximately 3 mM. The behavior of the two enzymes toward AMP indicates that the pathway is intrinsically designed to prevent excess degradation of intracellular AMP. We further examined the formation of 3-phosphoglycerate from AMP, CMP, and UMP in T. kodakarensis cell extracts. 3-Phosphoglycerate generation was observed from AMP alone, and from CMP or UMP in the presence of dAMP, which also activates R15P isomerase. 3-Phosphoglycerate was not formed when 2-carboxyarabinitol 1,5-bisphosphate, a Rubisco inhibitor, was added. The results strongly suggest that these enzymes are actually involved in the conversion of nucleoside monophosphates to 3-phosphoglycerate in T. kodakarensis.

  12. Sequencing and characterization of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase genes from Spodoptera exigua and analysis of their function in starvation and excessive sugar intake.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin; Xu, Qi; Zou, Qi; Fang, Qi; Wang, Shigui; Ye, Gongyin

    2012-06-01

    Glycogen and trehalose are important energy source and key regulation factors in the development of many organisms' pass through energy metabolism, including bacteria, fungi, and insects. To study glycogen metabolism pathway in Spodoptera exigua, first cDNAs for glycogen synthase (SpoexGS) and glycogen phosphorylase (SpoexGP) were cloned from S. exigua. SpoexGS cDNA contains an open reading frame of 2,010 nucleotides encoding a protein of 669 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 76.19 kDa and a pI of 5.84. SpoexGP contains an open reading frame of 2,946 nucleotides, which encodes a protein of 841 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of approximately 96.63 kDa and a pI of 6.03. Second, Northern blotting revealed that SpoexGS and SpoexGP mRNAs were expressed in brain, fat body, mid-gut, Malpighian tubules, spermary, and tracheae of S. exigua. Expression patterns for SpoexGS and SpoexGP mRNAs were similar in fat body, but differed in whole body at different developmental stages. The last, under starvation conditions, SpoexGS and SpoexGP transcript expression rapidly decreased with increasing starvation time. When the starvation stress was removed, SpoexGS and SpoexGP mRNA levels were lower in the groups starved for 6 and 12 h than in the 24-h starvation and control groups. Treatment with excessive sugar intake led to higher levels of SpoexGS and SpoexGP transcripts after 12 h compared to the control group. These findings provide new data on the tissue distribution, expression patterns, and potential function of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase proteins.

  13. Structural analyses reveal two distinct families of nucleoside phosphorylases.

    PubMed Central

    Pugmire, Matthew J; Ealick, Steven E

    2002-01-01

    The reversible phosphorolysis of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides is an important biochemical reaction in the salvage pathway, which provides an alternative to the de novo purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Structural studies in our laboratory and by others have revealed that only two folds exist that catalyse the phosphorolysis of all nucleosides, and provide the basis for defining two families of nucleoside phosphorylases. The first family (nucleoside phosphorylase-I) includes enzymes that share a common single-domain subunit, with either a trimeric or a hexameric quaternary structure, and accept a range of both purine and pyrimidine nucleoside substrates. Despite differences in substrate specificity, amino acid sequence and quaternary structure, all members of this family share a characteristic subunit topology. We have also carried out a sequence motif study that identified regions of the common subunit fold that are functionally significant in differentiating the various members of the nucleoside phosphorylase-I family. Although the substrate-binding sites are arranged similarly for all members of the nucleoside phosphorylase-I family, a comparison of the active sites from the known structures of this family indicates significant differences between the trimeric and hexameric family members. Sequence comparisons also suggest structural identity between the nucleoside phosphorylase-I family and both 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase and AMP nucleosidase. Members of the second family of nucleoside phosphorylases (nucleoside phosphorylase-II) share a common two-domain subunit fold and a dimeric quaternary structure, share a significant level of sequence identity (>30%) and are specific for pyrimidine nucleosides. Members of this second family accept both thymidine and uridine substrates in lower organisms, but are specific for thymidine in mammals and other higher organisms. A possible relationship between nucleoside

  14. Nicotinamide riboside and nicotinic acid riboside salvage in fungi and mammals. Quantitative basis for Urh1 and purine nucleoside phosphorylase function in NAD+ metabolism.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Christensen, Kathryn C; Gazzaniga, Francesca; Pletnev, Alexandre A; Brenner, Charles

    2009-01-01

    NAD+ is a co-enzyme for hydride transfer enzymes and an essential substrate of ADP-ribose transfer enzymes and sirtuins, the type III protein lysine deacetylases related to yeast Sir2. Supplementation of yeast cells with nicotinamide riboside extends replicative lifespan and increases Sir2-dependent gene silencing by virtue of increasing net NAD+ synthesis. Nicotinamide riboside elevates NAD+ levels via the nicotinamide riboside kinase pathway and by a pathway initiated by splitting the nucleoside into a nicotinamide base followed by nicotinamide salvage. Genetic evidence has established that uridine hydrolase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and methylthioadenosine phosphorylase are required for Nrk-independent utilization of nicotinamide riboside in yeast. Here we show that mammalian purine nucleoside phosphorylase but not methylthioadenosine phosphorylase is responsible for mammalian nicotinamide riboside kinase-independent nicotinamide riboside utilization. We demonstrate that so-called uridine hydrolase is 100-fold more active as a nicotinamide riboside hydrolase than as a uridine hydrolase and that uridine hydrolase and mammalian purine nucleoside phosphorylase cleave nicotinic acid riboside, whereas the yeast phosphorylase has little activity on nicotinic acid riboside. Finally, we show that yeast nicotinic acid riboside utilization largely depends on uridine hydrolase and nicotinamide riboside kinase and that nicotinic acid riboside bioavailability is increased by ester modification. PMID:19001417

  15. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  16. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding the same

    SciTech Connect

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-09-09

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the cellobiohydrolase variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the cellobiohydrolase variants.

  17. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2013-09-24

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  18. Functional and Structural Characterization of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase from Kluyveromyces lactis and Its Potential Applications in Reducing Purine Content in Food

    PubMed Central

    Mahor, Durga; Priyanka, Anu; Prasad, Gandham S; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of foods and beverages with high purine content increases the risk of hyperuricemia, which causes gout and can lead to cardiovascular, renal, and other metabolic disorders. As patients often find dietary restrictions challenging, enzymatically lowering purine content in popular foods and beverages offers a safe and attractive strategy to control hyperuricemia. Here, we report structurally and functionally characterized purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Kluyveromyces lactis (KlacPNP), a key enzyme involved in the purine degradation pathway. We report a 1.97 Å resolution crystal structure of homotrimeric KlacPNP with an intrinsically bound hypoxanthine in the active site. KlacPNP belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase-I (NP-I) family, and it specifically utilizes 6-oxopurine substrates in the following order: inosine > guanosine > xanthosine, but is inactive towards adenosine. To engineer enzymes with broad substrate specificity, we created two point variants, KlacPNPN256D and KlacPNPN256E, by replacing the catalytically active Asn256 with Asp and Glu, respectively, based on structural and comparative sequence analysis. KlacPNPN256D not only displayed broad substrate specificity by utilizing both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines in the order adenosine > inosine > xanthosine > guanosine, but also displayed reversal of substrate specificity. In contrast, KlacPNPN256E was highly specific to inosine and could not utilize other tested substrates. Beer consumption is associated with increased risk of developing gout, owing to its high purine content. Here, we demonstrate that KlacPNP and KlacPNPN256D could be used to catalyze a key reaction involved in lowering beer purine content. Biochemical properties of these enzymes such as activity across a wide pH range, optimum activity at about 25°C, and stability for months at about 8°C, make them suitable candidates for food and beverage industries. Since KlacPNPN256D has broad substrate specificity, a

  19. Function of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate in glycogen phosphorylase: a model study using 6-fluoro-5'-deoxypyridoxal- and 5'-deoxypyridoxal-reconstituted enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.C.; Scott, R.D.; Graves, D.J.

    1987-01-27

    A new vitamin B/sub 6/ analogue, 6-fluoro-5'-deoxypyridoxal (6-FDPL), was synthesized and characterized. This analogue, as well as 6-fluoropyridoxal (6-FPAL), 6-fluoropyridoxal phosphate (6-FPLP), and 6-fluoropyridoxine, showed positive heteronuclear /sup 1/H-/sup 18/F nuclear Overhauser effects between the 5'-protons and the 6-fluorine. Apophosphorylase reconstituted with 6-FDLP showed 1% of the activity of the native enzyme in the presence of phosphite. The kinetic pattern, apparent pH optimum of activity, and the activity-temperature dependency of the 6-FDPL-enzyme were virtually identical with those of phosphorylase reconstituted with the parent compound, 6-FPAL except the K/sub m/ of phosphite toward the 6-FDPL-enzyme was 9 times higher than that with the 6-FPAL-enzyme and the 6-FDPL-enzyme showed a lower V/sub max/ value. Phosphorylase reconstituted with 5'-deoxypyridoxal (DPL) also showed activity in the presence of phosphite. The kinetics and the temperature-activity dependency of this reconstituted enzyme were investigated. /sup 19/F nuclear magnetic resonance studies showed that the binding of glucose 1-phosphate to a 6-FDPL-enzyme-adenosine 5'-phosphate (AMP) complex shifted the /sup 19/F signal 0.6 ppm upfield, whereas a 2.1 ppm change was observed when the 6-FPAL-enzyme-AMP formed a complex with glucose 1-phosphate. Analysis of the activation parameters, activation enthalpy and activation entropy, of the reaction of glycogen degradation catalyzed by phosphorylase containing pyridoxal phosphate, 6-FDPL, pyridoxal, or DPL showed that modifications of the coenzyme molecule affected only the activation entropy, not the activation enthalpy. Results of this study indicate that the protein structure surrounding the coenzyme molecule, as well as the coenzyme configuration, is altered upon the binding of ligands.

  20. Nanoparticulate systems for polynucleotide delivery

    PubMed Central

    Basarkar, Ashwin; Singh, Jagdish

    2007-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendously influenced gene therapy research in recent years. Nanometer-size systems have been extensively investigated for delivering genes at both local and systemic levels. These systems offer several advantages in terms of tissue penetrability, cellular uptake, systemic circulation, and cell targeting as compared to larger systems. They can protect the polynucleotide from a variety of degradative and destabilizing factors and enhance delivery efficiency to the cells. A variety of polymeric and non-polymeric nanoparticles have been investigated in an effort to maximize the delivery efficiency while minimizing the toxic effects. This article provides a review on the most commonly used nanoparticulate systems for gene delivery. We have discussed frequently used polymers, such as, polyethyleneimine, poly (lactide-co-glycolide), chitosan, as well as non-polymeric materials such as cationic lipids and metallic nanoparticles. The advantages and limitations of each system have been elaborated. PMID:18019834

  1. Agouti polynucleotide compositions and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Woychik, Richard P.; Bultman, Scott J.; Michaud, Edward J.

    2003-02-04

    Disclosed are methods and compositions comprising novel agouti polypeptides and the polynucleotides which encode them. Also disclosed are DNA segments encoding these proteins derived from human and murine cell lines, and the use of these polynucleotides and polypeptides in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Methods, compositions, kits, and devices are also provided for identifying compounds which are inhibitors of agouti activity, and for altering fatty acid synthetase activity and intracellular calcium levels in transformed cells.

  2. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-07-15

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  3. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-06-24

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  4. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-06-24

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-07-08

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  6. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-07-15

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  7. Polypeptides having endoglucanse activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-07-08

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  8. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  9. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-10-27

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  10. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-11-17

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  11. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-11-17

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  12. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-03-10

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  13. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2016-06-28

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  14. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  15. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activitiy and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan; Duan, Junxin

    2015-12-15

    The present invention provides isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also provides nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  16. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Tang, Lan

    2015-09-22

    The present invention provides isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also provides nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cell comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  17. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-07-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  18. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-02-10

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  19. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-07-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  20. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-08-18

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  1. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Yu; Duan, Junxin; Tang, Lan; Wu, Wenping

    2015-06-09

    Provided are isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. Also provided are nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  2. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan

    2015-07-14

    The present invention provides isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also provides nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  3. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Yu; Tang, Lan; Henriksen, Svend Hostgaard Bang

    2016-05-17

    The present invention provides isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also provides nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  4. Cyclin Polynucleotides, Polypeptides And Uses Thereof.

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, Keith S.; Tao, Yumin; Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Gregory, Carolyn A.; Hoerster, George J.; McElver, John A.

    2003-02-11

    The invention provides isolated polynucleotides and their encoded proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation. The invention further provides recombinant expression cassettes, host cells, transgenic plants, and antibody compositions. The present invention provides methods and compositions relating to altering cell cycle protein content and/or composition of plants.

  5. Glycal Formation in Crystals of Uridine Phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Debamita; O’Leary, Sen E.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta; Bu, Weiming; Toms, Angela; Settembre, Ethan C.; Sanders, Jennie M.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-06-22

    Uridine phosphorylase is a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway. This enzyme catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate (or 2{prime}-deoxyuridine to 2{prime}-deoxyribose 1-phosphate). Here we report the structure of hexameric Escherichia coli uridine phosphorylase treated with 5-fluorouridine and sulfate and dimeric bovine uridine phosphorylase treated with 5-fluoro-2{prime}-deoxyuridine or uridine, plus sulfate. In each case the electron density shows three separate species corresponding to the pyrimidine base, sulfate, and a ribosyl species, which can be modeled as a glycal. In the structures of the glycal complexes, the fluorouracil O2 atom is appropriately positioned to act as the base required for glycal formation via deprotonation at C2{prime}. Crystals of bovine uridine phosphorylase treated with 2{prime}-deoxyuridine and sulfate show intact nucleoside. NMR time course studies demonstrate that uridine phosphorylase can catalyze the hydrolysis of the fluorinated nucleosides in the absence of phosphate or sulfate, without the release of intermediates or enzyme inactivation. These results add a previously unencountered mechanistic motif to the body of information on glycal formation by enzymes catalyzing the cleavage of glycosyl bonds.

  6. Fetal-onset severe skeletal muscle glycogenosis associated with phosphorylase-b kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bührer, C; van Landeghem, F; Brück, W; Felderhoff-Müser, U; Vorgerd, M; Obladen, M

    2000-04-01

    We report on a premature newborn girl delivered after 32 weeks of gestation by cesarean section after sparse limb movements, fetal tachycardia and late heart rate decelerations had suggested fetal distress. Following 1 day of mechanical ventilation, adequate pulmonary gas exchange was achieved by spontaneous breathing. Main symptoms were virtually complete absence of spontaneous movements, increased flexor tonus of the extremities, and hypotonia of the trunk. Inability to suck or swallow required nasogastric gavage feeding. There were no hypoglycemic episodes. Echocardiography revealed normal myocardial function. Creatine kinase was 237 U/I at 2 days of life, declining to normal values thereafter. Muscle biopsy revealed increased glycogen storage with subsarcolemmal glycogen deposits and low phosphorylase-a activity while total phosphorylase was normal after in vitro activation, suggestive of phosphorylase-b kinase deficiency. No mutation was detected in exon 1 of the myophosphorylase gene. No psychomotor development was observed, and the infant died of central apnea at 3 months of age.

  7. Restriction/modification polypeptides, polynucleotides, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Westpheling, Janet; Chung, DaeHwan; Huddleston, Jennifer; Farkas, Joel A

    2015-02-24

    The present invention relates to the discovery of a novel restriction/modification system in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii. The discovered restriction enzyme is a HaeIII-like restriction enzyme that possesses a thermophilic activity profile. The restriction/modification system also includes a methyltransferase, M.CbeI, that methylates at least one cytosine residue in the CbeI recognition sequence to m.sup.4C. Thus, the invention provides, in various aspects, isolated CbeI or M.CbeI polypeptides, or biologically active fragments thereof; isolated polynucleotides that encode the CbeI or M.CbeI polypeptides or biologically active fragments thereof, including expression vectors that include such polynucleotide sequences; methods of digesting DNA using a CbeI polypeptide; methods of treating a DNA molecule using a M.CbeI polypeptide; and methods of transforming a Caldicellulosiruptor cell.

  8. Activation of Phosphorylase Kinase by Physiological Temperature.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Julio E; Thompson, Jackie A; Rimmer, Mary Ashley; Nadeau, Owen W; Carlson, Gerald M

    2015-12-29

    In the six decades since its discovery, phosphorylase kinase (PhK) from rabbit skeletal muscle has usually been studied at 30 °C; in fact, not a single study has examined functions of PhK at a rabbit's body temperature, which is nearly 10 °C greater. Thus, we have examined aspects of the activity, regulation, and structure of PhK at temperatures between 0 and 40 °C. Between 0 and 30 °C, the activity at pH 6.8 of nonphosphorylated PhK predictably increased; however, between 30 and 40 °C, there was a dramatic jump in its activity, resulting in the nonactivated enzyme having a far greater activity at body temperature than was previously realized. This anomalous change in properties between 30 and 40 °C was observed for multiple functions, and both stimulation (by ADP and phosphorylation) and inhibition (by orthophosphate) were considerably less pronounced at 40 °C than at 30 °C. In general, the allosteric control of PhK's activity is definitely more subtle at body temperature. Changes in behavior related to activity at 40 °C and its control can be explained by the near disappearance of hysteresis at physiological temperature. In important ways, the picture of PhK that has emerged from six decades of study at temperatures of ≤30 °C does not coincide with that of the enzyme studied at physiological temperature. The probable underlying mechanism for the dramatic increase in PhK's activity between 30 and 40 °C is an abrupt change in the conformations of the regulatory β and catalytic γ subunits between these two temperatures.

  9. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2016-05-31

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  10. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Yu; Duan, Junxin; Tang, Lan; Wu, Wenping

    2016-06-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  11. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Paul; Golightly, Elizabeth

    2011-06-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  12. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Morant, Marc D; Patkar, Shamkant; Ding, Hanshu

    2013-11-12

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  13. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Paul; Golightly, Elizabeth

    2007-07-17

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  14. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Paul; Golightly, Elizabeth

    2012-11-27

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  15. Polynucleotides encoding polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Paul; Golightly, Elizabeth

    2010-03-02

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  16. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2015-03-10

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  17. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2015-01-27

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  18. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Morant, Marc

    2014-01-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity, beta-xylosidase, or beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  19. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj [Bagsvaed, DK

    2014-01-07

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The inventino also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  20. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ye; Harris, Paul; Tang, Lan; Wu, Wenping

    2013-11-19

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  1. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Lopez De Leon, Alfredo; Merino, Sandra

    2007-05-22

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  2. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj; Shagasi, Tarana

    2015-06-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity, catalytic domains, cellulose binding domains and polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides, catalytic domains or cellulose binding domains. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides, catalytic domains or cellulose binding domains.

  3. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2013-06-18

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  4. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Maiyuran, Suchindra; Kramer, Randall; Harris, Paul

    2013-10-29

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2014-10-21

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  6. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan

    2015-11-20

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  7. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Morant, Marc D.; Harris, Paul

    2015-10-13

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  8. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2015-11-17

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  9. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Morant, Marc Dominique

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity, beta-xylosidase activity, or beta-glucosidase and beta-xylosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  10. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Hanshu, Ding

    2012-10-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  11. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Harris, Paul; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael; Ding, Hanshu; Vlasenko, Elena

    2010-11-02

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  12. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2010-12-14

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  13. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Ding, Hanshu; Brown, Kimberly

    2012-06-26

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  14. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Ding, Hanshu; Brown, Kimberly

    2011-10-25

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  15. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Lopez de Leon, Alfredo; Rey, Michael

    2012-09-18

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  16. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Schnorr, Kirk; Kramer, Randall

    2016-08-09

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  17. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Schnorr, Kirk; Kramer, Randall

    2016-04-05

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  18. Polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Spodsberg, Nikolaj

    2016-02-23

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having endoglucanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  19. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Joergensen, Christian; Kramer, Randall

    2014-09-16

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  20. Polypeptides having xylanase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Ding, Hanshu

    2013-04-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having xylanase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  1. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Jorgensen, Christian Isak; Kramer, Randall

    2013-12-24

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  2. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Jorgensen, Christian Isak; Kramer, Randall

    2012-04-03

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  3. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Wu, Wenping; Kramer, Randall

    2013-11-19

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  4. Polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan; Harris, Paul; Wu, Wenping

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellobiohydrolase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  5. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Zhang, Yu; Jorgensen, Christian Isak; Kramer, Randall

    2013-04-16

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  6. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Junxin; Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Wu, Wenping; Quinlan, Jason; Kramer, Randall

    2013-06-18

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  7. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Junxin; Liu, Ye; Tang, Lan; Wu, Wenping; Quinlan, Jason; Kramer, Randall

    2012-03-27

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  8. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Lan; Liu, Ye; Duan, Junxin; Wu, Wenping; Kramer, Randall

    2014-10-21

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  9. Two Additional Phosphorylases in Developing Maize Seeds 12

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, C. Y.; Nelson, O. E.

    1969-01-01

    Two additional phosphorylases (III and IV) have been detected in developing seeds of maize. Phosphorylase IV is found only in the embryo (with scutellum). It is also present in the embryo of the germinating seed where its activity is 90-fold greater than the activity in the developing embryo 22 days after pollination. Phosphorylase IV is eluted from a DEAE-cellulose column in the same fraction as phosphorylase I of the endosperm, and the 2 enzymes are similar in many respects. Phosphorylase IV is distinguished from phosphorylase I by electrophoretic mobility, by pH optimum, and because its properties are not affected by the shrunken-4 mutation. Phosphorylase III is found both in the endosperms and embryos of developing seeds. Activity for this enzyme is not detected in crude homogenates nor eluates from a DEAE-cellulose column apparently because it complexes with a non-dialyzable, heat-labile inhibitor. High activity is found after protamine sulfate fractionation. Phosphorylase III is bound to protamine sulfate and is then removed by washing with 0.3 m phosphate buffer. Phosphorylase III activity in the endosperm is not detectable 8 days after pollination but is present 12 days after pollination. Phosphorylase III differs from phosphorylases I, II, and IV in several respects—pH optimum, pH-independent ATP inhibition, time of appearance in the endosperm, and because purine and pyrimidine nucleotides are equally inhibitory. In common with phosphorylase II, phosphorylase III apparently does not require a primer to initiate the synthesis of an amylose-like polymer. PMID:5774172

  10. The crystal structure and activity of a putative trypanosomal nucleoside phosphorylase reveal it to be a homodimeric uridine phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric T.; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Gillespie, J. Robert; Mueller, Natascha; Napuli, Alberto J.; Arif, Jennifer A.; Ross, Jenni; Arakaki, Tracy L.; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Zucker, Frank; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases and uridine phosphorylases are closely related enzymes involved in purine and pyrimidine salvage, respectively, which catalyze the removal of the ribosyl moiety from nucleosides so that the nucleotide base may be recycled. Parasitic protozoa generally are incapable of de novo purine biosynthesis so the purine salvage pathway is of potential therapeutic interest. Information about pyrimidine biosynthesis in these organisms is much more limited. Though all seem to carry at least a subset of enzymes from each pathway, the dependency on de novo pyrimidine synthesis versus salvage varies from organism to organism and even from one growth stage to another. We have structurally and biochemically characterized a putative nucleoside phosphorylase from the pathogenic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei and find that it is a homodimeric uridine phosphorylase. This is the first characterization of a uridine phosphorylase from a trypanosomal source despite this activity being observed decades ago. Although this gene was broadly annotated as a putative nucleoside phosphorylase, it was widely inferred to be a purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Our characterization of this trypanosomal enzyme shows that it is possible to distinguish between purine and uridine phosphorylase activity at the sequence level based on the absence or presence of a characteristic uridine phosphorylase-specificity insert. We suggest that this recognizable feature may aid in proper annotation of the substrate specificity of enzymes in the nucleoside phosphorylase family. PMID:20070944

  11. Concerted action of two subunits of the functional dimer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uridine phosphorylase derived from a comparison of the C212S mutant and the wild-type enzyme.

    PubMed

    Safonova, T N; Mordkovich, N N; Veiko, V P; Okorokova, N A; Manuvera, V A; Dorovatovskii, P V; Popov, V O; Polyakov, K M

    2016-02-01

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP; EC 2.4.2.3), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine-salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate. The structure of the C212S mutant of uridine phosphorylase from the facultatively aerobic Gram-negative γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SoUP) was determined at 1.68 Å resolution. A comparison of the structures of the mutant and the wild-type enzyme showed that one dimer in the mutant hexamer differs from all other dimers in the mutant and wild-type SoUP (both in the free form and in complex with uridine). The key difference is the `maximum open' state of one of the subunits comprising this dimer, which has not been observed previously for uridine phosphorylases. Some conformational features of the SoUP dimer that provide access of the substrate into the active site are revealed. The binding of the substrate was shown to require the concerted action of two subunits of the dimer. The changes in the three-dimensional structure induced by the C212S mutation account for the lower affinity of the mutant for inorganic phosphate, while the affinity for uridine remains unchanged.

  12. Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins having cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Oda, Michael N.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2007-05-29

    Functional Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins, having one or more cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same, can be used to modulate paraoxonase's arylesterase activity. These ApoA-I mutant proteins can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute phase response and other inflammatory related diseases. The invention also includes modifications and optimizations of the ApoA-I nucleotide sequence for purposes of increasing protein expression and optimization.

  13. Myoglobinuria and Skeletal Muscle Phosphorylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, J. C.; Hobbs, W. K.; Greenblatt, J.

    1966-01-01

    Investigation of a patient complaining of exercise-induced dark urine, pain, stiffness and tenderness of skeletal muscle revealed findings characteristic of McArdle's disease. The dark urine was attributable to the excretion of myoglobin, and an ischemic exercise test failed to demonstrate the usual rise and fall in blood lactate and pyruvate. Enzyme assays of skeletal muscle showed an absence of phosphorylase, a slight increase in phosphorylase b kinase and a slight decrease in phosphoglucomutase. Chemical and histochemical analyses demonstrated an increase in the skeletal muscle glycogen content and an enlargement of the muscle cells. No abnormality of liver glycogen metabolism was found. In the absence of specific therapy, an effective and practical form of treatment is reduction of exercise below the threshold of symptoms. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:4952390

  14. Nucleic acid-like structures. II - Polynucleotide analogues as possible primitive precursors of nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Alan W.; Visscher, J.; Bakker, C. G.; Niessen, J.

    1987-01-01

    Activated derivatives of purine-containing deoxynucleoside- diphosphates spontaneously oligomerize to produce pyrophosphate- linked oligodeoxynucleotide analogs. These analogs are of potential interest as models of primitive, polynucleotide precursors. The efficiency of oligomerization (ImpdGpIm and ImpdApIm much greater than ImpdIpIm) appears to reflect a combination of stacking forces and the specific geometric orientations of the stacked units. Under favorable conditions, chain lengths greater than 20 have been obtained for oligomers containing pdGp in the absence of a template. In the presence of a complementary template, the activated derivatives of pdGp and pdAp oligomerize much more extensively. An acyclo-analog of G has also been shown to undergo template-directed oligomerization on poly(C). These observations suggest the possibility that primitive information transfer might have evolved in much simpler systems and that this function was taken over by polynucleotides at a later stage in evolution.

  15. Recombination of polynucleotide sequences using random or defined primers

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Affholter, Joseph A.; Zhao, Huimin H; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2000-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  16. Recombination of polynucleotide sequences using random or defined primers

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Affholter, Joseph A.; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2001-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  17. Oligo/Polynucleotide-Based Gene Modification: Strategies and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, R. Geoffrey; Kim, Soya

    2011-01-01

    Oligonucleotide- and polynucleotide-based gene modification strategies were developed as an alternative to transgene-based and classical gene targeting-based gene therapy approaches for treatment of genetic disorders. Unlike the transgene-based strategies, oligo/polynucleotide gene targeting approaches maintain gene integrity and the relationship between the protein coding and gene-specific regulatory sequences. Oligo/polynucleotide-based gene modification also has several advantages over classical vector-based homologous recombination approaches. These include essentially complete homology to the target sequence and the potential to rapidly engineer patient-specific oligo/polynucleotide gene modification reagents. Several oligo/polynucleotide-based approaches have been shown to successfully mediate sequence-specific modification of genomic DNA in mammalian cells. The strategies involve the use of polynucleotide small DNA fragments, triplex-forming oligonucleotides, and single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides to mediate homologous exchange. The primary focus of this review will be on the mechanistic aspects of the small fragment homologous replacement, triplex-forming oligonucleotide-mediated, and single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated gene modification strategies as it relates to their therapeutic potential. PMID:21417933

  18. Effect of polynucleotides on the dimerization of glycine. [abiological protein synthesis in primitive earth conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizutani, H.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1981-01-01

    Results from experiments to determine the effect of polynucleotides on abiological formation of peptide bonds are reported. The reaction between glycine molecules in an aqueous phase in the presence of a condensing agent was chosen as a model, with polyphosphates being selected as the condensing agent for biologically relevant peptide formation. Four types of polynucleotides were used: polygluanic acid (G), polyuridic acid (U), polyadenylic acid (A), and polycytidylic acid (C); the effects of small anions, acetate, chloride, and phosphate, were also studied. Procedures are given, including concentrations, pH, and incubation time, and the type of amino acid analyzer. The diglycine yields were, in order of most to least: G, C, A, U, and are diagrammed as a function of time; rate of formation followed the same order of magnitude as the final yields. Anion presence displayed no discernible effect. The results are taken to indicate that polynucleotides do have an effect on the formation of peptide bonds, an effect significant in the understanding of chemical evolution.

  19. Modified 5-fluorouracil: Uridine phosphorylase inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkov, A. A.; Shchekotikhin, A. A.; Shtil, A. A.; Sotnichenko, S. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a medication widely used in chemotherapy to treat various types of cancer. Being a substrate for the reverse reaction catalyzed by uridine phosphorylase (UPase), 5-FU serves as a promising prototype molecule (molecular scaffold) for the design of a selective UPase inhibitor that enhances the antitumor activity of 5-FU and exhibits intrinsic cytostatic effects on cancer cells. The chemical formula of the new compound, which binds to the uracil-binding site and, in the presence of a phosphate anion, to the phosphate-binding site of UPase, is proposed and investigated by molecular simulation methods.

  20. [The use of nucleolytic enzymes (ribonucleases, polynucleotide phosphorylases and endonuclease from Serratia marcescens) for producing initial blocks of synthetic endoribonucleases].

    PubMed

    Kliagina, V P; Sedel'nikova, E A; Smolianinova, O A; Soboleva, I A; Khabarova, M I; Zhenodarova, S M

    1992-01-01

    The simplest variant of synthetic substrate-ribozyme complex has been proposed. The schemes of potential ribozyme "subunits" synthesis have been worked out: R1--GCUUGAAACAAA; R2--AAAAACUGAUGAAAGC. The macroscale synthesis of dinucleoside monophosphate ApU, GpC, CpU catalyzed by immobilized ribonucleases of different specificity and preparation of oligoadenylates by hydrolysis of poly-A in the presence of endonuclease Serratia marcescens, as well the synthesis of conservative sequences of potential ribozyme such as ApUpG, CpUpG, GpApU, ApApApG and others have been described.

  1. Regulation of synthase phosphatase and phosphorylase phosphatase in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Tan, A W; Nuttall, F Q

    1976-08-12

    Using substrates purified from liver, the apparent Km values of synthase phosphatase ([UDPglucose--glycogen glucosyltransferase-D]phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.42) and phosphorylase phosphatase (phosphorylase a phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.17) were found to be 0.7 and 60 units/ml respectively. The maximal velocity of phosphorylase phosphatase was more than a 100 times that of synthase phosphatase. In adrenalectomized, fasted animals there was a complete loss of synthase phosphatase but only a slight decrease in phosphorylase phosphatase when activity was measured using endogenous substrates in a concentrated liver extract. When assayed under optimal conditions with purified substrates, both activities were present but had decreased to very low levels. Mixing experiments indicated that synthase D present in the extract of adrenalectomized fasted animals was altered such that it was no longer a substrate for synthase phosphatase from normal rats. Phosphorylase a substrate on the other hand was unaltered and readily converted. When glucose was given in vivo, no change in percent of synthase in the I form was seen in adrenalectomized rats but the percent of phosphorylase in the a form was reduced. Precipitation of protein from an extract of normal fed rats with ethanol produced a large activation of phosphorylase phosphatase activity with no corresponding increase in synthase phosphatase activity. Despite the low phosphorylase phosphatase present in extracts of adrenalectomized fasted animals, ethanol precipitation increased activity to the same high level as obtained in the normal fed rats. Synthase phosphatase and phosphorylase phosphatase activities were also decreased in normal fasted, diabetic fed and fasted, and adrenalectomized fed rats. Both enzymes recovered in the same manner temporally after oral glucose administration to adrenalectomized, fasted rats. These results suggest an integrated regulatory mechanism for the two phosphatase.

  2. Three-dimensional structure of E. Coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase at 0.99 Å resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. I.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2016-03-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases (PNPs) catalyze the reversible phosphorolysis of nucleosides and are key enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism. They are essential for normal cell function and can catalyze the transglycosylation. Crystals of E. coli PNP were grown in microgravity by the capillary counterdiffusion method through a gel layer. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined by the molecular-replacement method at 0.99 Å resolution. The structural features are considered, and the structure of E. coli PNP is compared with the structures of the free enzyme and its complexes with purine base derivatives established earlier. A comparison of the environment of the purine base in the complex of PNP with formycin A and of the pyrimidine base in the complex of uridine phosphorylase with thymidine revealed the main structural features of the base-binding sites. Coordinates of the atomic model determined with high accuracy were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB_ID: 4RJ2).

  3. Synthetic polynucleotides as endosomolytic agents and bioenergy sources.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hana; Lee, Young Ju; Bae, You Han; Kang, Han Chang

    2015-10-28

    Nucleotides (NTs), such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and guanosine triphosphate (GTP), are signaling and bioenergy molecules to mediate a range of cellular pathways. We recently reported their significant endosomolytic activity. To evaluate whether polymeric NTs keep endosomolytic and bioenergetic functions of NTs in drug delivery and cell survival, NTs were polymerized by a coupling reaction to form polynucleotides (pNTs: pATP and pGTP) with their molecular weights around 500kDa. The cellular toxicity, indicated by IC50, of pNT was as low as that of corresponding monomeric NT. pNTs were degraded by an intracellular enzyme, alkaline phosphatase. Introduction of pNTs in a polycation-gene complex (polyplex) enhanced the extent of gene expression in cancerous, non-cancerous, and stem cells, up to 1500-fold higher than that of pNT-free polyplex. In addition, cells stored in a pATP solution resulted in a significantly higher survival rate (e.g., up to 20% increase) when exposed to low temperatures than pATP-free solution. The presence of pNT in polyplexes prevented the reduction of transfection efficiency induced by a low temperature. The findings in this study suggest that endosomolytic and bioenergetic pNTs serve as a non-toxic gene carrier component and protect cells from a cold shock or energy depletion.

  4. The Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Uridine Phosphorylase Reveals a Distinct Subfamily of Nucleoside Phosphorylases

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Timothy H.; Christoffersen, S.; Allan, Paula W.; Parker, William B.; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I.; Terreni, M.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-09-20

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an ?/? monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is {approx}7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.

  5. Immobilized phosphorylase for synthesis of polysaccharides from glucose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Continuous processes for enzymatic production of carbohydrates from glucose are discussed. Key reactant in process is identified as phosphorylase which catalyzes reversible formation or degradation of polysaccharide. Chemical compounds and reactions to synthesize polysaccharides are analyzed.

  6. Isolated Polynucleotides and Methods of Promoting a Morphology in a Fungus

    DOEpatents

    Lasure, Linda L [Fall City, WA; Dai, Ziyu [Richland, WA

    2008-10-21

    The invention includes isolated polynucleotide molecules that are differentially expressed in a native fungus exhibiting a first morphology relative to the native fungus exhibiting a second morphology. The invention includes a method of enhancing a bioprocess utilizing a fungus. A transformed fungus is produced by transforming a fungus with a recombinant polynucleotide molecule. The recombinant polynucleotide molecule contains an isolated polynucleotide sequence linked operably to a promoter. The polynucleotide sequence is expressed to promote a first morphology. The first morphology of the transformed fungus enhances a bioprocess relative to the bioprocess utilizing a second morphology.

  7. Structure analysis of archaeal AMP phosphorylase reveals two unique modes of dimerization.

    PubMed

    Nishitani, Yuichi; Aono, Riku; Nakamura, Akira; Sato, Takaaki; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Miki, Kunio

    2013-08-01

    AMP phosphorylase (AMPpase) catalyzes the initial reaction in a novel AMP metabolic pathway recently found in archaea, converting AMP and phosphate into adenine and ribose 1,5-bisphosphate. Gel-filtration chromatography revealed that AMPpase from Thermococcus kodakarensis (Tk-AMPpase) forms an exceptionally large macromolecular structure (>40-mers) in solution. To investigate its unique multimerization feature, we determined the first crystal structures of Tk-AMPpase, in the apo-form and in complex with substrates. Structures of two truncated forms of Tk-AMPpase (Tk-AMPpaseΔN84 and Tk-AMPpaseΔC10) clarified that this multimerization is achieved by two dimer interfaces within a single molecule: one by the central domain and the other by the C-terminal domain, which consists of an unexpected domain-swapping interaction. The N-terminal domain, characteristic of archaeal enzymes, is essential for enzymatic activity, participating in multimerization as well as domain closure of the active site upon substrate binding. Moreover, biochemical analysis demonstrated that the macromolecular assembly of Tk-AMPpase contributes to its high thermostability, essential for an enzyme from a hyperthermophile. Our findings unveil a unique archaeal nucleotide phosphorylase that is distinct in both function and structure from previously known members of the nucleoside phosphorylase II family.

  8. Methods of using viral replicase polynucleotides and polypeptides

    DOEpatents

    Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Lowe, Keith S.; Bailey, Matthew A.; Gregory, Carolyn A.; Hoerster, George J.; Larkins, Brian A.; Dilkes, Brian R.; Burnett, Ronald; Woo, Young Min

    2007-12-18

    The invention provides novel methods of using viral replicase polypeptides and polynucleotides. Included are methods for increasing transformation frequencies, increasing crop yield, providing a positive growth advantage, modulating cell division, transiently modulating cell division, and for providing a means of positive selection.

  9. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability ( R work = 16.2, R free = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  10. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A. Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (R{sub work} = 16.2, R{sub free} = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  11. Thymidine phosphorylase expression in Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Dada, M A; Boshoff, C H; Comley, M A; Turley, H; Schneider, J W; Chetty, R; Gatter, K C

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the immunohistochemical distribution of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) in all clinicopathological subtypes of Kaposi sarcoma. METHODS: Thirty two biopsy specimens of Kaposi sarcoma (29 patients) were studied. Six of these patients represented classic, six endemic, eight HIV associated, seven post-immunosuppression/transplant related, and two unclassified variants of Kaposi sarcoma. The average age was 49 years (range 22-83 years) and the male: female ratio 24:5. Four samples of angiosarcoma and one of spindle cell haemangio-endothelioma were stained in parallel. All specimens were fixed in formalin, embedded in paraffin wax and processed routinely. Immunohistochemistry was carried out using an antibody directed against CD31 (JC70) and the monoclonal antibody P-GF.44C against TP. RESULTS: All biopsy specimens showed immunoexpression for TP. The spindle cell component stained more strongly than newly formed endothelium lined vessels and normal, resident vessels at a distance from the lesions. CONCLUSIONS: The strong immunoexpression of TP suggests up-regulation of TP and a role for TP in angiogensis in Kaposi sarcoma. The mechanism for the up-regulation of TP remains unknown, but viral infections may trigger it. The differential staining of the various cell components of Kaposi sarcoma also suggest that TP either plays a role in the differentiation and maturation of Kaposi sarcoma or is a reflection of such changes. Images PMID:8707955

  12. Crystallographic and docking studies of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ducati, Rodrigo G; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diógenes S; de Azevedo, Walter F

    2010-07-01

    This work describes for the first time the structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtPNP) in complex with sulfate and its natural substrate, 2'-deoxyguanosine, and its application to virtual screening. We report docking studies of a set of molecules against this structure. Application of polynomial empirical scoring function was able to rank docking solutions with good predicting power which opens the possibility to apply this new criterion to analyze docking solutions and screen small-molecule databases for new chemical entities to inhibit MtPNP.

  13. A novel GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase involved in quality control of the nucleoside diphosphate sugar pool in Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals.

    PubMed

    Adler, Lital N; Gomez, Tara A; Clarke, Steven G; Linster, Carole L

    2011-06-17

    The plant VTC2 gene encodes GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase, a rate-limiting enzyme in plant vitamin C biosynthesis. Genes encoding apparent orthologs of VTC2 exist in both mammals, which produce vitamin C by a distinct metabolic pathway, and in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans where vitamin C biosynthesis has not been demonstrated. We have now expressed cDNAs of the human and worm VTC2 homolog genes (C15orf58 and C10F3.4, respectively) and found that the purified proteins also display GDP-hexose phosphorylase activity. However, as opposed to the plant enzyme, the major reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is the phosphorolysis of GDP-D-glucose to GDP and D-glucose 1-phosphate. We detected activities with similar substrate specificity in worm and mouse tissue extracts. The highest expression of GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase was found in the nervous and male reproductive systems. A C. elegans C10F3.4 deletion strain was found to totally lack GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase activity; this activity was also found to be decreased in human HEK293T cells transfected with siRNAs against the human C15orf58 gene. These observations confirm the identification of the worm C10F3.4 and the human C15orf58 gene expression products as the GDP-D-glucose phosphorylases of these organisms. Significantly, we found an accumulation of GDP-D-glucose in the C10F3.4 mutant worms, suggesting that the GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase may function to remove GDP-D-glucose formed by GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme that has previously been shown to lack specificity for its physiological D-mannose 1-phosphate substrate. We propose that such removal may prevent the misincorporation of glucosyl residues for mannosyl residues into the glycoconjugates of worms and mammals.

  14. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase and beta-xylosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Morant, Marc Dominique

    2014-05-06

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity, beta-xylosidase activity, or beta-glucosidase and beta-xylosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  15. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and beta-xylosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Morant, Marc Dominique

    2014-04-29

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity, beta-xylosidase activity, or beta-glucosidase and beta-xylosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  16. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and beta-xylosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Morant, Marc Dominique

    2014-05-06

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity, beta-xylosidase activity, or beta-glucosidase and beta-xylosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  17. Polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul

    2013-12-17

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having beta-glucosidase activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods of producing and using the polypeptides.

  18. Structural basis for the mechanism of inhibition of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkov, A. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Sotnichenko, S. E.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2010-01-15

    The three-dimensional structures of three complexes of Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase with the inhibitor 2,2'-anhydrouridine, the substrate PO{sub 4}, and with both the inhibitor 2,2'-anhydrouridine and the substrate PO{sub 4} (a binary complex) were studied in detail by X-ray diffraction. The structures of the complexes were refined at 2.38, 1.5, and 1.75 A resolution, respectively. Changes in the three-dimensional structure of the subunits in different crystal structures are considered depending on the presence or absence of the inhibitor molecule and (or) the phosphate ion in the active site of the enzyme. The presence of the phosphate ion in the phosphate-binding site was found to substantially change the orientations of the side chains of the amino-acid residues Arg30, Arg91, and Arg48 coordinated to this ion. A comparison showed that the highly flexible loop L9 is unstable. The atomic coordinates of the refined structures of the complexes and the corresponding structure factors were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (their PDB ID codes are 3DD0 and 3C74). The experimental data on the spatial reorganization of the active site caused by changes in its functional state from the unligated to the completely inhibited state suggest the structural basis for the mechanism of inhibition of Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase.

  19. Stimulating effect of phosphatidic acid on autophosphorylation of phosphorylase kinase.

    PubMed

    Negami, A I; Sasaki, H; Yamamura, H

    1985-09-16

    Autophosphorylation of phosphorylase kinase from rabbit skeletal muscle was stimulated by acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidyl-serine. PA stimulated an initial velocity of autophosphorylation 3.8-fold. When fully autophosphorylated, about 11 mol of phosphate per tetramer (alpha beta gamma delta) were incorporated in the presence of PA and about 6.5 mol in the absence of PA. In the presence of PA (100 micrograms/ml), there was a concomitant enhancement of its kinase activity about 25-fold at pH 6.8. PA (100 micrograms/ml) sharply decreased an apparent Ka for Ca2+ on autophosphorylation from 4.0 X 10(-5) M to 1.0 X 10(-6) M. Available evidence indicates that the Ca2+-activated, PA-dependent autophosphorylation of phosphorylase kinase shows an ability to stimulate glycogen breakdown.

  20. Electronic excited States of polynucleotides: a study by electroabsorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Stanislaw; Luchowski, Rafal

    2007-02-01

    Electroabsorption spectra were obtained for single-stranded polynucleotides poly(U), poly(C), poly(A), and poly(G) in glycerol/water glass at low temperature, and the differences in permanent dipole moment (Deltamu) and polarizability (Deltaalpha) were estimated for several spectral ranges covering the lowest energy absorption band around 260 nm. In each spectral range, the electrooptical parameters associated with apparent features in the absorption spectrum exhibit distinct values representing either a dominant single transition or the resultant value for a group of a relatively narrow cluster of overlapping transitions. The estimated spacing in energy between electronic origins of these transitions is larger than the electronic coupling within the Coulombic interaction model which is usually adopted in computational studies. The electroabsorption data allow us to distinguish a weak electronic transition associated with a wing in polynucleotide absorption spectra, at an energy below the electronic origin in absorption spectra of monomeric nucleobases. In poly(C) and poly(G), these low-energy transitions are related to increased values of Deltamu and Deltaalpha, possibly indicating a weak involvement of charge resonance in the respective excited states. A model capable of explaining the origin of low-energy excited states, based on the interaction of pipi* and npi* transitions in neighboring bases, is introduced and briefly discussed on the grounds of point dipole interaction. PMID:17266277

  1. Characterization of individual polynucleotide molecules using a membrane channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasianowicz, J. J.; Brandin, E.; Branton, D.; Deamer, D. W.

    1996-01-01

    We show that an electric field can drive single-stranded RNA and DNA molecules through a 2.6-nm diameter ion channel in a lipid bilayer membrane. Because the channel diameter can accommodate only a single strand of RNA or DNA, each polymer traverses the membrane as an extended chain that partially blocks the channel. The passage of each molecule is detected as a transient decrease of ionic current whose duration is proportional to polymer length. Channel blockades can therefore be used to measure polynucleotide length. With further improvements, the method could in principle provide direct, high-speed detection of the sequence of bases in single molecules of DNA or RNA.

  2. Natural flavonoids as antidiabetic agents. The binding of gallic and ellagic acids to glycogen phosphorylase b.

    PubMed

    Kyriakis, Efthimios; Stravodimos, George A; Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Skamnaki, Vassiliki T; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2015-07-01

    We present a study on the binding of gallic acid and its dimer ellagic acid to glycogen phosphorylase (GP). Ellagic acid is a potent inhibitor with Kis of 13.4 and 7.5 μM, in contrast to gallic acid which displays Kis of 1.7 and 3.9 mM for GPb and GPa, respectively. Both compounds are competitive inhibitors with respect to the substrate, glucose-1-phoshate, and non-competitive to the allosteric activator, AMP. However, only ellagic acid functions with glucose in a strongly synergistic mode. The crystal structures of the GPb-gallic acid and GPb-ellagic acid complexes were determined at high resolution, revealing that both ligands bind to the inhibitor binding site of the enzyme and highlight the structural basis for the significant difference in their inhibitory potency.

  3. Computer-generated Model of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) is an important target enzyme for the design of anti-cancer and immunosuppressive drugs. Bacterial PNP, which is slightly different from the human enzyme, is used to synthesize chemotherapuautic agents. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the bacterial PNP molecule is useful in efforts to engineer different types of PNP enzymes, that can be used to produce new chemotherapeutic agents. This picture shows a computer model of bacterial PNP, which looks a lot like a display of colorful ribbons. Principal Investigator was Charles Bugg.

  4. Substrate specificity of pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases of NP-II family probed by X-ray crystallography and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Prokofev, I. I.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases, which are widely used in the biotechnological production of nucleosides, have different substrate specificity for pyrimidine nucleosides. An interesting feature of these enzymes is that the three-dimensional structure of thymidine-specific nucleoside phosphorylase is similar to the structure of nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase. The three-dimensional structures of thymidine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium and nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Bacillus subtilis in complexes with a sulfate anion were determined for the first time by X-ray crystallography. An analysis of the structural differences between these enzymes demonstrated that Lys108, which is involved in the phosphate binding in pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase, corresponds to Met111 in thymidine phosphorylases. This difference results in a decrease in the charge on one of the hydroxyl oxygens of the phosphate anion in thymidine phosphorylase and facilitates the catalysis through SN2 nucleophilic substitution. Based on the results of X-ray crystallography, the virtual screening was performed for identifying a potent inhibitor (anticancer agent) of nonspecific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase, which does not bind to thymidine phosphorylase. The molecular dynamics simulation revealed the stable binding of the discovered compound—2-pyrimidin-2-yl-1H-imidazole-4-carboxylic acid—to the active site of pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  5. Structural bases for N-glycan processing by mannoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Ladevèze, Simon; Cioci, Gianluca; Roblin, Pierre; Mourey, Lionel; Tranier, Samuel; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle

    2015-06-01

    The first crystal structure of Uhgb_MP, a β-1,4-mannopyranosyl-chitobiose phosphorylase belonging to the GH130 family which is involved in N-glycan degradation by human gut bacteria, was solved at 1.85 Å resolution in the apo form and in complex with mannose and N-acetylglucosamine. SAXS and crystal structure analysis revealed a hexameric structure, a specific feature of GH130 enzymes among other glycoside phosphorylases. Mapping of the -1 and +1 subsites in the presence of phosphate confirmed the conserved Asp104 as the general acid/base catalytic residue, which is in agreement with a single-step reaction mechanism involving Man O3 assistance for proton transfer. Analysis of this structure, the first to be solved for a member of the GH130_2 subfamily, revealed Met67, Phe203 and the Gly121-Pro125 loop as the main determinants of the specificity of Uhgb_MP and its homologues towards the N-glycan core oligosaccharides and mannan, and the molecular bases of the key role played by GH130 enzymes in the catabolism of dietary fibre and host glycans.

  6. Structural bases for N-glycan processing by mannoside phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Ladevèze, Simon; Cioci, Gianluca; Roblin, Pierre; Mourey, Lionel; Tranier, Samuel; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    The first crystal structure of Uhgb_MP, a β-1,4-mannopyranosyl-chitobiose phosphorylase belonging to the GH130 family which is involved in N-glycan degradation by human gut bacteria, was solved at 1.85 Å resolution in the apo form and in complex with mannose and N-acetylglucosamine. SAXS and crystal structure analysis revealed a hexameric structure, a specific feature of GH130 enzymes among other glycoside phosphorylases. Mapping of the −1 and +1 subsites in the presence of phosphate confirmed the conserved Asp104 as the general acid/base catalytic residue, which is in agreement with a single-step reaction mechanism involving Man O3 assistance for proton transfer. Analysis of this structure, the first to be solved for a member of the GH130_2 subfamily, revealed Met67, Phe203 and the Gly121–Pro125 loop as the main determinants of the specificity of Uhgb_MP and its homologues towards the N-glycan core oligosaccharides and mannan, and the molecular bases of the key role played by GH130 enzymes in the catabolism of dietary fibre and host glycans. PMID:26057673

  7. The Protein Interaction of RNA Helicase B (RhlB) and Polynucleotide Phosphorylase (PNPase) Contributes to the Homeostatic Control of Cysteine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yi-Ting; Chiou, Ni-Ting; Gogiraju, Rajinikanth; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2015-12-11

    PNPase, one of the major enzymes with 3' to 5' single-stranded RNA degradation and processing activities, can interact with the RNA helicase RhlB independently of RNA degradosome formation in Escherichia coli. Here, we report that loss of interaction between RhlB and PNPase impacts cysteine homeostasis in E. coli. By random mutagenesis, we identified a mutant RhlB(P238L) that loses 75% of its ability to interact with PNPase but retains normal interaction with RNase E and RNA, in addition to exhibiting normal helicase activity. Applying microarray analyses to an E. coli strain with impaired RNA degradosome formation, we investigated the biological consequences of a weakened interaction between RhlB and PNPase. We found significant increases in 11 of 14 genes involved in cysteine biosynthesis. Subsequent Northern blot analyses showed that the up-regulated transcripts were the result of stabilization of the cysB transcript encoding a transcriptional activator for the cys operons. Furthermore, Northern blots of PNPase or RhlB mutants showed that RhlB-PNPase plays both a catalytic and structural role in regulating cysB degradation. Cells expressing the RhlB(P238L) mutant exhibited an increase in intracellular cysteine and an enhanced anti-oxidative response. Collectively, this study suggests a mechanism by which bacteria use the PNPase-RhlB exosome-like complex to combat oxidative stress by modulating cysB mRNA degradation.

  8. The structural basis for substrate recognition by mammalian polynucleotide kinase 3’ phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Garces, Fernando; Pearl, Laurence H.; Oliver, Antony W.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian polynucleotide kinase 3’ phosphatase (PNK) plays a key role in the repair of DNA damage, functioning as part of both the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and base-excision repair (BER) pathways. Through its two catalytic activities, PNK ensures that DNA termini are compatible with extension and ligation by either removing 3’-phosphates from, or by phosphorylating 5’-hydroxyl groups on, the ribose sugar of the DNA backbone. We have now determined crystal structures of murine PNK with DNA molecules bound to both of its active sites. The structure of ssDNA engaged with the 3’-phosphatase domain suggests a mechanism of substrate interaction that assists DNA end-seeking. The structure of dsDNA bound to the 5’-kinase domain reveals a mechanism of DNA bending that facilitates recognition of DNA-ends in the context of single-strand and double-strand breaks, and suggests a close functional cooperation in substrate recognition between the kinase and phosphatase active sites. PMID:22055185

  9. Journey of poly-nucleotides through OmpF porin.

    PubMed

    Hadi-Alijanvand, Hamid; Rouhani, Maryam

    2015-05-21

    OmpF is an abundant porin in many bacteria which attracts attention as a promising biological nanopore for DNA sequencing. We study the interactions of OmpF with pentameric poly-nucleotides (poly-Ns) in silico. The poly-N molecule is forced to translocate through the lumen of OmpF. Subsequently, the structural and dynamical effects of translocation steps on protein and poly-N molecules are explored in detail. The external loops of OmpF are introduced as the main region for discrimination of poly-Ns based on their organic bases. Structural network analyses of OmpF in the presence or absence of poly-Ns characterize special residues in the structural network of porin. These residues pave the way for engineering OmpF protein. The poly-N-specific pattern of OmpF's local conductance is detected in the current study. Computing the potential of mean force for translocation steps, we define the energetic barrier ahead of poly-N to move through OmpF's lumen. We suggest that fast translocation of the examined poly-N molecules through OmpF seems unattainable by small external driving forces. Our computational results suggest some abilities for OmpF porin like OmpF's potential for being used in poly-N sequencing.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of McArdle's disease (muscle glycogen phosphorylase deficiency). RNA and DNA analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Gautron, S; Daegelen, D; Mennecier, F; Dubocq, D; Kahn, A; Dreyfus, J C

    1987-01-01

    Lack of muscle glycogen phosphorylase activity leads to McArdle's disease, a rare metabolic myopathy. To investigate its molecular basis at the nucleic acid level, we isolated muscle phosphorylase cDNA clones from a human cDNA library in Escherichia coli plasmid pBR 322. Subcloning of one insertion of M13 bacteriophage permitted its definite identification by sequencing. Northern blot experiments revealed one specific messenger RNA of 3.4 kilobases found uniquely in tissues expressing muscle phosphorylase. We show that McArdle's disease exhibits a molecular heterogeneity at the messenger RNA level. In eight unrelated cases of McArdle's disease in which no inactive proteins had been detected, we assayed muscle biopsies for phosphorylase mRNA by Northern blotting. In five cases, no muscle phosphorylase mRNA could be detected, while in three other cases, normal length mRNA was present in lower amounts. Moreover, Southern blot analysis of DNA isolated from white blood cells in four McArdle patients revealed no major deletion or rearrangements of the phosphorylase gene as compared with controls. Images PMID:3466902

  11. KIAA1199 interacts with glycogen phosphorylase kinase β-subunit (PHKB) to promote glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Masato; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Togashi, Yosuke; Sakai, Kazuko; De Velasco, Marco A; Tomida, Shuta; Nishio, Kazuto

    2014-08-30

    The KIAA1199 gene was first discovered to be associated with non-syndromic hearing loss. Recently, several reports have shown that the up-regulation of KIAA1199 is associated with cancer cell migration or invasion and a poor prognosis. These findings indicate that KIAA1199 may be a novel target for cancer therapy. Therefore, we explored in detail the function of KIAA1199 in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the interaction of KIAA1199 protein with intracellular proteins in cancer cells. To this end, we expressed KIAA1199-MBP fusion protein and performed a pull-down assay. In addition, KIAA1199-overexpressing cancer cell lines were constructed using a retroviral vector and were used for further experiments. A pull-down analysis showed that the glycogen phosphorylase kinase β-subunit (PHKB) interacted with the C-terminal region of KIAA1199 protein. Furthermore, we observed the interaction of KIAA1199 with glycogen phosphorylase brain form (PYGB) under serum-free conditions. The interaction promoted glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival. Our findings indicate that KIAA1199 plays an important role in glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival and that it may represent a novel target for cancer therapy.

  12. KIAA1199 interacts with glycogen phosphorylase kinase β-subunit (PHKB) to promote glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Terashima, Masato; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Togashi, Yosuke; Sakai, Kazuko; De Velasco, Marco A.; Tomida, Shuta; Nishio, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    The KIAA1199 gene was first discovered to be associated with non-syndromic hearing loss. Recently, several reports have shown that the up-regulation of KIAA1199 is associated with cancer cell migration or invasion and a poor prognosis. These findings indicate that KIAA1199 may be a novel target for cancer therapy. Therefore, we explored in detail the function of KIAA1199 in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the interaction of KIAA1199 protein with intracellular proteins in cancer cells. To this end, we expressed KIAA1199-MBP fusion protein and performed a pull-down assay. In addition, KIAA1199-overexpressing cancer cell lines were constructed using a retroviral vector and were used for further experiments. A pull-down analysis showed that the glycogen phosphorylase kinase β-subunit (PHKB) interacted with the C-terminal region of KIAA1199 protein. Furthermore, we observed the interaction of KIAA1199 with glycogen phosphorylase brain form (PYGB) under serum-free conditions. The interaction promoted glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival. Our findings indicate that KIAA1199 plays an important role in glycogen breakdown and cancer cell survival and that it may represent a novel target for cancer therapy. PMID:25051373

  13. Insights into Brain Glycogen Metabolism: THE STRUCTURE OF HUMAN BRAIN GLYCOGEN PHOSPHORYLASE.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cécile; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Duval, Romain; Xu, Ximing; Cocaign, Angélique; Léger, Thibaut; Woffendin, Gary; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Etchebest, Catherine; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2016-08-26

    Brain glycogen metabolism plays a critical role in major brain functions such as learning or memory consolidation. However, alteration of glycogen metabolism and glycogen accumulation in the brain contributes to neurodegeneration as observed in Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a key enzyme in glycogen metabolism, catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen mobilization. Moreover, the allosteric regulation of the three GP isozymes (muscle, liver, and brain) by metabolites and phosphorylation, in response to hormonal signaling, fine-tunes glycogenolysis to fulfill energetic and metabolic requirements. Whereas the structures of muscle and liver GPs have been known for decades, the structure of brain GP (bGP) has remained elusive despite its critical role in brain glycogen metabolism. Here, we report the crystal structure of human bGP in complex with PEG 400 (2.5 Å) and in complex with its allosteric activator AMP (3.4 Å). These structures demonstrate that bGP has a closer structural relationship with muscle GP, which is also activated by AMP, contrary to liver GP, which is not. Importantly, despite the structural similarities between human bGP and the two other mammalian isozymes, the bGP structures reveal molecular features unique to the brain isozyme that provide a deeper understanding of the differences in the activation properties of these allosteric enzymes by the allosteric effector AMP. Overall, our study further supports that the distinct structural and regulatory properties of GP isozymes contribute to the different functions of muscle, liver, and brain glycogen. PMID:27402852

  14. Central nervous system dysfunction and erythrocyte guanosine triphosphate depletion in purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Simmonds, H A; Fairbanks, L D; Morris, G S; Morgan, G; Watson, A R; Timms, P; Singh, B

    1987-01-01

    Developmental retardation was a prominent clinical feature in six infants from three kindreds deficient in the enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and was present before development of T cell immunodeficiency. Guanosine triphosphate (GTP) depletion was noted in the erythrocytes of all surviving homozygotes and was of equivalent magnitude to that found in the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (complete hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) deficiency). The similarity between the neurological complications in both disorders indicates that the two major clinical consequences of complete PNP deficiency have differing aetiologies: neurological effects resulting from deficiency of the PNP enzyme products, which are the substrates for HGPRT, leading to functional deficiency of this enzyme. immunodeficiency caused by accumulation of the PNP enzyme substrates, one of which, deoxyguanosine, is toxic to T cells. These studies show the need to consider PNP deficiency (suggested by the finding of hypouricaemia) in patients with neurological dysfunction, as well as in T cell immunodeficiency. They suggest an important role for GTP in normal central nervous system function. PMID:2439024

  15. Isoform-selective regulation of glycogen phosphorylase by energy deprivation and phosphorylation in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Müller, Margit S; Pedersen, Sofie E; Walls, Anne B; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse K

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is activated to degrade glycogen in response to different stimuli, to support both the astrocyte's own metabolic demand and the metabolic needs of neurons. The regulatory mechanism allowing such a glycogenolytic response to distinct triggers remains incompletely understood. In the present study, we used siRNA-mediated differential knockdown of the two isoforms of GP expressed in astrocytes, muscle isoform (GPMM), and brain isoform (GPBB), to analyze isoform-specific regulatory characteristics in a cellular setting. Subsequently, we tested the response of each isoform to phosphorylation, triggered by incubation with norepinephrine (NE), and to AMP, increased by glucose deprivation in cells in which expression of one GP isoform had been silenced. Successful knockdown was demonstrated on the protein level by Western blot, and on a functional level by determination of glycogen content showing an increase in glycogen levels following knockdown of either GPMM or GPBB. NE triggered glycogenolysis within 15 min in control cells and after GPBB knockdown. However, astrocytes in which expression of GPMM had been silenced showed a delay in response to NE, with glycogen levels significantly reduced only after 60 min. In contrast, allosteric activation of GP by AMP, induced by glucose deprivation, seemed to mainly affect GPBB, as only knockdown of GPBB, but not of GPMM, delayed the glycogenolytic response to glucose deprivation. Our results indicate that the two GP isoforms expressed in astrocytes respond to different physiological triggers, therefore conferring distinct metabolic functions of brain glycogen.

  16. Insights into Brain Glycogen Metabolism: THE STRUCTURE OF HUMAN BRAIN GLYCOGEN PHOSPHORYLASE.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cécile; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Duval, Romain; Xu, Ximing; Cocaign, Angélique; Léger, Thibaut; Woffendin, Gary; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Etchebest, Catherine; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2016-08-26

    Brain glycogen metabolism plays a critical role in major brain functions such as learning or memory consolidation. However, alteration of glycogen metabolism and glycogen accumulation in the brain contributes to neurodegeneration as observed in Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a key enzyme in glycogen metabolism, catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen mobilization. Moreover, the allosteric regulation of the three GP isozymes (muscle, liver, and brain) by metabolites and phosphorylation, in response to hormonal signaling, fine-tunes glycogenolysis to fulfill energetic and metabolic requirements. Whereas the structures of muscle and liver GPs have been known for decades, the structure of brain GP (bGP) has remained elusive despite its critical role in brain glycogen metabolism. Here, we report the crystal structure of human bGP in complex with PEG 400 (2.5 Å) and in complex with its allosteric activator AMP (3.4 Å). These structures demonstrate that bGP has a closer structural relationship with muscle GP, which is also activated by AMP, contrary to liver GP, which is not. Importantly, despite the structural similarities between human bGP and the two other mammalian isozymes, the bGP structures reveal molecular features unique to the brain isozyme that provide a deeper understanding of the differences in the activation properties of these allosteric enzymes by the allosteric effector AMP. Overall, our study further supports that the distinct structural and regulatory properties of GP isozymes contribute to the different functions of muscle, liver, and brain glycogen.

  17. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli maltodextrin phosphorylase provides an explanation for the activity without control in this basic archetype of a phosphorylase.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, K A; Schinzel, R; Palm, D; Johnson, L N

    1997-01-01

    In animals, glycogen phosphorylase (GP) exists in an inactive (T state) and an active (R state) equilibrium that can be altered by allosteric effectors or covalent modification. In Escherichia coli, the activity of maltodextrin phosphorylase (MalP) is controlled by induction at the level of gene expression, and the enzyme exhibits no regulatory properties. We report the crystal structure of E. coli maltodextrin phosphorylase refined to 2.4 A resolution. The molecule consists of a dimer with 796 amino acids per monomer, with 46% sequence identity to the mammalian enzyme. The overall structure of MalP shows a similar fold to GP and the catalytic sites are highly conserved. However, the relative orientation of the two subunits in E. coli MalP is different from both the T and R state GP structures, and there are significant changes at the subunit-subunit interfaces. The sequence changes result in loss of each of the control sites present in rabbit muscle GP. As a result of the changes at the subunit interface, the 280s loop, which in T state GP acts as a gate to control access to the catalytic site, is held in an open conformation in MalP. The open access to the conserved catalytic site provides an explanation for the activity without control in this basic archetype of a phosphorylase. PMID:9009262

  18. Multiple cellobiohydrolases and cellobiose phosphorylases cooperate in the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 8 to degrade cellooligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Devendran, Saravanan; Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M.; Evans, Anton F.; Iakiviak, Michael; Kwon, In Hyuk; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Digestion of plant cell wall polysaccharides is important in energy capture in the gastrointestinal tract of many herbivorous and omnivorous mammals, including humans and ruminants. The members of the genus Ruminococcus are found in both the ruminant and human gastrointestinal tract, where they show versatility in degrading both hemicellulose and cellulose. The available genome sequence of Ruminococcus albus 8, a common inhabitant of the cow rumen, alludes to a bacterium well-endowed with genes that target degradation of various plant cell wall components. The mechanisms by which R. albus 8 employs to degrade these recalcitrant materials are, however, not clearly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that R. albus 8 elaborates multiple cellobiohydrolases with multi-modular architectures that overall enhance the catalytic activity and versatility of the enzymes. Furthermore, our analyses show that two cellobiose phosphorylases encoded by R. albus 8 can function synergistically with a cognate cellobiohydrolase and endoglucanase to completely release, from a cellulosic substrate, glucose which can then be fermented by the bacterium for production of energy and cellular building blocks. We further use transcriptomic analysis to confirm the over-expression of the biochemically characterized enzymes during growth of the bacterium on cellulosic substrates compared to cellobiose. PMID:27748409

  19. The kinetic mechanism of Human Thymidine Phosphorylase - a molecular target for cancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Deves, Candida; Rostirolla, Diana Carolina; Martinelli, Leonardo Kras Borges; Bizarro, Cristiano Valim; Santos, Diogenes Santiago; Basso, Luiz Augusto

    2014-03-01

    Human Thymidine Phosphorylase (HTP), also known as the platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) or gliostatin, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of thymidine (dThd) to thymine and 2-deoxy-α-d-ribose-1-phosphate (2dR1P). HTP is a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway involved in dThd homeostasis in cells. HTP is a target for anticancer drug development as its enzymatic activity promotes angiogenesis. Here, we describe cloning, expression, and purification to homogeneity of recombinant TYMP-encoded HTP. Peptide fingerprinting and the molecular mass value of the homogenous protein confirmed its identity as HTP assessed by mass spectrometry. Size exclusion chromatography showed that HTP is a dimer in solution. Kinetic studies revealed that HTP displayed substrate inhibition for dThd. Initial velocity and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies suggest that HTP catalysis follows a rapid-equilibrium random bi-bi kinetic mechanism. ITC measurements also showed that dThd and Pi binding are favorable processes. The pH-rate profiles indicated that maximal enzyme activity was achieved at low pH values. Functional groups with apparent pK values of 5.2 and 9.0 are involved in dThd binding and groups with pK values of 6.1 and 7.8 are involved in phosphate binding. PMID:24407036

  20. Multiple cellobiohydrolases and cellobiose phosphorylases cooperate in the ruminal bacterium Ruminococcus albus 8 to degrade cellooligosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devendran, Saravanan; Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M.; Evans, Anton F.; Iakiviak, Michael; Kwon, In Hyuk; Mackie, Roderick I.; Cann, Isaac

    2016-10-01

    Digestion of plant cell wall polysaccharides is important in energy capture in the gastrointestinal tract of many herbivorous and omnivorous mammals, including humans and ruminants. The members of the genus Ruminococcus are found in both the ruminant and human gastrointestinal tract, where they show versatility in degrading both hemicellulose and cellulose. The available genome sequence of Ruminococcus albus 8, a common inhabitant of the cow rumen, alludes to a bacterium well-endowed with genes that target degradation of various plant cell wall components. The mechanisms by which R. albus 8 employs to degrade these recalcitrant materials are, however, not clearly understood. In this report, we demonstrate that R. albus 8 elaborates multiple cellobiohydrolases with multi-modular architectures that overall enhance the catalytic activity and versatility of the enzymes. Furthermore, our analyses show that two cellobiose phosphorylases encoded by R. albus 8 can function synergistically with a cognate cellobiohydrolase and endoglucanase to completely release, from a cellulosic substrate, glucose which can then be fermented by the bacterium for production of energy and cellular building blocks. We further use transcriptomic analysis to confirm the over-expression of the biochemically characterized enzymes during growth of the bacterium on cellulosic substrates compared to cellobiose.

  1. Crystal structure and molecular dynamics studies of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase complexed with 7-deazaguanine.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Rafael Andrade; Timmers, Luis Fernando Saraiva Macedo; Pauli, Ivani; Gava, Lisandra Marques; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2010-03-01

    In humans, purine nucleoside phosphorylase (HsPNP) is responsible for degradation of deoxyguanosine, and genetic deficiency of this enzyme leads to profound T-cell mediated immunosuppression. HsPNP is a target for inhibitor development aiming at T-cell immune response modulation. Here we report the crystal structure of HsPNP in complex with 7-deazaguanine (HsPNP:7DG) at 2.75 A. Molecular dynamics simulations were employed to assess the structural features of HsPNP in both free form and in complex with 7DG. Our results show that some regions, responsible for entrance and exit of substrate, present a conformational variability, which is dissected by dynamics simulation analysis. Enzymatic assays were also carried out and revealed that 7-deazaguanine presents a lower inhibitory activity against HsPNP (K(i)=200 microM). The present structure may be employed in both structure-based design of PNP inhibitors and in development of specific empirical scoring functions.

  2. The essential role of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Barbara A.; Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan; Morrison, Carl; Mohler, James; Phillips, James G.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic epithelial cells secrete high levels of acetylated polyamines into the prostatic lumen. This distinctive characteristic places added strain on the connected pathways, which are forced to increase metabolite production to maintain pools. The methionine salvage pathway recycles the one-carbon unit lost to polyamine biosynthesis back to the methionine cycle, allowing for replenishment of SAM pools providing a mechanism to help mitigate metabolic stress associated with high flux through these pathways. The rate-limiting enzyme involved in this process is methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), which, although commonly deleted in many cancers, is protected in prostate cancer. We report near universal retention of MTAP expression in a panel of human prostate cancer cell lines as well as patient samples. Upon metabolic perturbation, prostate cancer cell lines upregulate MTAP and this correlates with recovery of SAM levels. Furthermore, in a mouse model of prostate cancer we find that both normal prostate and diseased prostate maintain higher SAM levels than other tissues, even under increased metabolic stress. Finally, we show that knockdown of MTAP, both genetically and pharmacologically, blocks androgen sensitive prostate cancer growth in vivo. Our findings strongly suggest that the methionine salvage pathway is a major player in homeostatic regulation of metabolite pools in prostate cancer due to their high level of flux through the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. Therefore, this pathway, and specifically the MTAP enzyme, is an attractive therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26910893

  3. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase polymorphism in the genus Littorina (Prosobranchia: Mollusca).

    PubMed

    Knight, A J; Ward, R D

    1986-06-01

    Examination of eight Atlantic species of the genus Littorina by starch gel electrophoresis of purine nucleoside phosphorylase revealed extensive polymorphism within the L. saxatilis complex. In this group, four alleles have been identified. Heterozygotes are four banded, and thus, as in vertebrates, the enzyme is likely to be a trimer. Breeding experiments confirmed the genetic interpretation of the phenotype patterns. Where species of the saxatilis complex [L. saxatilis (=L. rudis), L. arcana, L. nigrolineata, L. neglecta] are sympatric, there are sometimes significant allele frequency differences between them. A fifth allele was present at a high frequency in L. obtusata and L. mariae, and L. littorea and L. neritoides each possessed unique alleles. A total of eight alleles was identified. Densitometric scanning of heterozygote patterns pointed to activity differences between alleles and also showed that, while the heterotrimeric bands were never less intense than the homotrimeric bands, the heterotrimeric bands were sometimes less intense than expected. It is not clear whether this represents nonrandom association of subunits, decreased stability of heterotrimers, or simply an artifact of the staining and quantifying process. PMID:3091000

  4. Vorinostat synergises with capecitabine through upregulation of thymidine phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Di Gennaro, E; Piro, G; Chianese, M I; Franco, R; Cintio, A Di; Moccia, T; Luciano, A; de Ruggiero, I; Bruzzese, F; Avallone, A; Arra, C; Budillon, A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Potentiation of anticancer activity of capecitabine is required to improve its therapeutic index. In colorectal cancer (CRC) cells, we evaluated whether the histone deacetylase-inhibitor vorinostat may induce synergistic antitumour effects in combination with capecitabine by modulating the expression of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), a key enzyme in the conversion of capecitabine to 5-florouracil (5-FU), and thymidylate synthase (TS), the target of 5-FU. Methods: Expression of TP and TS was measured by real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Knockdown of TP was performed by specific small interfering RNA. Antitumour activity of vorinostat was assessed in vitro in combination with the capecitabine active metabolite deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5′-DFUR) according to the Chou and Talay method and by evaluating apoptosis as well as in xenografts-bearing nude mice in combination with capecitabine. Results: Vorinostat induced both in vitro and in vivo upregulation of TP as well as downregulation of TS in cancer cells, but not in ex vivo treated peripheral blood lymphocytes. Combined treatment with vorinostat and 5′-DFUR resulted in a synergistic antiproliferative effect and increased apoptotic cell death in vitro. This latter effect was impaired in cells where TP was knocked. In vivo, vorinostat plus capecitabine potently inhibited tumour growth, increased apoptosis and prolonged survival compared with control or single-agent treatments. Conclusions: Overall, this study suggests that the combination of vorinostat and capecitabine is an innovative antitumour strategy and warrants further clinical evaluation for the treatment of CRC. PMID:21045833

  5. Thymidine phosphorylase, 2-deoxy-D-ribose and angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, N S; Bicknell, R

    1998-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the term used to describe the formation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature. In order to attract new vessels, a tissue must release an endothelial-cell chemoattractant. 2-Deoxy-D-ribose is produced in vivo by the catalytic action of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) on thymidine and has recently been identified as an endothelial-cell chemoattractant and angiogenesis-inducing factor. TP, previously known only for its role in nucleotide salvage, is now known to be angiogenic. TP expression is elevated in many solid tumours and in chronically inflamed tissues, both known areas of active angiogenesis. There is evidence that TP is also involved in physiological angiogenesis such as endometrial angiogenesis during the menstrual cycle. The majority of known endothelial-cell chemoattractants are polypeptides that bind to endothelial-cell-surface receptors. In contrast, 2-deoxy-D-ribose appears to lack a cell-surface receptor. Glucose is another sugar that acts as an endothelial-cell chemoattractant. The migratory activity of glucose is blocked by ouabain. It is possible that 2-deoxy-D-ribose and glucose stimulate endothelial-cell migration via a similar mechanistic pathway. PMID:9693094

  6. Inhibition and Structure of Toxoplasma gondii Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Teraya M.; Cassera, María B.; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Zhan, Chenyang; Merino, Emilio F.; Evans, Gary B.; Tyler, Peter C.; Almo, Steven C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii is a purine auxotroph that relies on purine salvage for proliferation. We have optimized T. gondii purine nucleoside phosphorylase (TgPNP) stability and crystallized TgPNP with phosphate and immucillin-H, a transition-state analogue that has high affinity for the enzyme. Immucillin-H bound to TgPNP with a dissociation constant of 370 pM, the highest affinity of 11 immucillins selected to probe the catalytic site. The specificity for transition-state analogues indicated an early dissociative transition state for TgPNP. Compared to Plasmodium falciparum PNP, large substituents surrounding the 5′-hydroxyl group of inhibitors demonstrate reduced capacity for TgPNP inhibition. Catalytic discrimination against large 5′ groups is consistent with the inability of TgPNP to catalyze the phosphorolysis of 5′-methylthioinosine to hypoxanthine. In contrast to mammalian PNP, the 2′-hydroxyl group is crucial for inhibitor binding in the catalytic site of TgPNP. This first crystal structure of TgPNP describes the basis for discrimination against 5′-methylthioinosine and similarly 5′-hydroxy-substituted immucillins; structural differences reflect the unique adaptations of purine salvage pathways of Apicomplexa. PMID:24585883

  7. The GH130 Family of Mannoside Phosphorylases Contains Glycoside Hydrolases That Target β-1,2-Mannosidic Linkages in Candida Mannan*

    PubMed Central

    Cuskin, Fiona; Baslé, Arnaud; Ladevèze, Simon; Day, Alison M.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Davies, Gideon J.; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle; Lowe, Elisabeth C.

    2015-01-01

    The depolymerization of complex glycans is an important biological process that is of considerable interest to environmentally relevant industries. β-Mannose is a major component of plant structural polysaccharides and eukaryotic N-glycans. These linkages are primarily cleaved by glycoside hydrolases, although recently, a family of glycoside phosphorylases, GH130, have also been shown to target β-1,2- and β-1,4-mannosidic linkages. In these phosphorylases, bond cleavage was mediated by a single displacement reaction in which phosphate functions as the catalytic nucleophile. A cohort of GH130 enzymes, however, lack the conserved basic residues that bind the phosphate nucleophile, and it was proposed that these enzymes function as glycoside hydrolases. Here we show that two Bacteroides enzymes, BT3780 and BACOVA_03624, which lack the phosphate binding residues, are indeed β-mannosidases that hydrolyze β-1,2-mannosidic linkages through an inverting mechanism. Because the genes encoding these enzymes are located in genetic loci that orchestrate the depolymerization of yeast α-mannans, it is likely that the two enzymes target the β-1,2-mannose residues that cap the glycan produced by Candida albicans. The crystal structure of BT3780 in complex with mannose bound in the −1 and +1 subsites showed that a pair of glutamates, Glu227 and Glu268, hydrogen bond to O1 of α-mannose, and either of these residues may function as the catalytic base. The candidate catalytic acid and the other residues that interact with the active site mannose are conserved in both GH130 mannoside phosphorylases and β-1,2-mannosidases. Functional phylogeny identified a conserved lysine, Lys199 in BT3780, as a key specificity determinant for β-1,2-mannosidic linkages. PMID:26286752

  8. Structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Grenha, Rosa; Levdikov, Vladimir M.; Fogg, Mark J.; Blagova, Elena V.; Brannigan, James A. Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Wilson, Keith S.

    2005-05-01

    The crystal structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from B. anthracis was solved by X-ray crystallography using molecular replacement and refined at a resolution of 2.24 Å. Protein structures from the causative agent of anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) are being determined as part of a structural genomics programme. Amongst initial candidates for crystallographic analysis are enzymes involved in nucleotide biosynthesis, since these are recognized as potential targets in antibacterial therapy. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase is a key enzyme in the purine-salvage pathway. The crystal structure of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (DeoD) from B. anthracis has been solved by molecular replacement at 2.24 Å resolution and refined to an R factor of 18.4%. This is the first report of a DeoD structure from a Gram-positive bacterium.

  9. Glycogen phosphorylase sequences from the amitochondriate protists, Trichomonas vaginalis, Mastigamoeba balamuthi, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Müller, Miklós

    2003-01-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase genes or messages from four amitochondriate eukaryotes, Trichomonas vaginalis, Mastigamoeba balamuthi, Entamoeba histolytica (two genes) and Giardia intestinalis, have been isolated and sequenced. The sequences of the amitochondriate protist enzymes appear to share a most recent common ancestor. The clade containing these sequences is closest to that of another protist, the slime mold (Dictyostelium discoideum), and is more closely related to fungal and plant phosphorylases than to mammalian and eubacterial homologs. Structure-based amino acid alignment shows conservation of the residues and domains involved in catalysis and allosteric regulation by glucose 6-phosphate but high divergence at domains involved in phosphorylation-dependent regulation and AMP binding in fungi and animals. Protist phosphorylases, as their prokaryotic and plant counterparts, are probably not regulated by phosphorylation.

  10. Characterization and crystal structure determination of β-1,2-mannobiose phosphorylase from Listeria innocua.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Tomohiro; Nihira, Takanori; Chiku, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Erika; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Nishimoto, Mamoru; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2015-12-21

    Glycoside hydrolase family 130 consists of phosphorylases and hydrolases for β-mannosides. Here, we characterized β-1,2-mannobiose phosphorylase from Listeria innocua (Lin0857) and determined its crystal structures complexed with β-1,2-linked mannooligosaccharides. β-1,2-Mannotriose was bound in a U-shape, interacting with a phosphate analog at both ends. Lin0857 has a unique dimer structure connected by a loop, and a significant open-close loop displacement was observed for substrate entry. A long loop, which is exclusively present in Lin0857, covers the active site to limit the pocket size. A structural basis for substrate recognition and phosphorolysis was provided.

  11. Probing the interaction of spermine and 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine with DNA polynucleotides: a comparative biophysical and thermodynamic investigation.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Ayesha; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2014-05-01

    The interaction of spermine and its analogue, 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine with four double stranded DNA polynucleotides has been studied to understand the structural and thermodynamic basis of the binding. The efficacy and specificity of DNA binding of this analogue has not yet been revealed. The energetics of the interaction was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, UV-thermal melting and ethidium bromide displacement assay have been employed to characterize the association. Circular dichroism studies showed that 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine caused a stronger structural perturbation in the polynucleotides. Among the adenine-thymine polynucleotides the alternating polynucleotide was more preferred by naphthyl acetyl spermine compared to the preference of spermine for the homo sequence. The higher melting stabilization revealed by the optical melting and differential scanning calorimetry results suggested that the binding of 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine increased the melting temperature and the total standard molar enthalpy of the transition of adenine-thymine polynucleotides. Microcalorimetry results revealed that unlike spermine the binding of 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine was endothermic. The interaction was characterized by total enthalpy-entropy compensation and high standard molar heat capacity values. There are differences in the mode of association of 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine and spermine. 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine binds with an enhanced affinity with the adenine-thymine hetero polynucleotide. Thus, the result suggests the importance of polyamine analogues and their ability to interfere with normal polyamine interactions.

  12. An evaluation of indirubin analogues as phosphorylase kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Begum, Jaida; Skamnaki, Vassiliki T; Moffatt, Colin; Bischler, Nicolas; Sarrou, Josephine; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Leonidas, Demetres D; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Hayes, Joseph M

    2015-09-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PhK) has been linked with a number of conditions such as glycogen storage diseases, psoriasis, type 2 diabetes and more recently, cancer (Camus et al., 2012 [6]). However, with few reported structural studies on PhK inhibitors, this hinders a structure based drug design approach. In this study, the inhibitory potential of 38 indirubin analogues have been investigated. 11 of these ligands had IC50 values in the range 0.170-0.360μM, with indirubin-3'-acetoxime (1c) the most potent. 7-Bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (13b), an antitumor compound which induces caspase-independent cell-death (Ribas et al., 2006 [20]) is revealed as a specific inhibitor of PhK (IC50=1.8μM). Binding assay experiments performed using both PhK-holo and PhK-γtrnc confirmed the inhibitory effects to arise from binding at the kinase domain (γ subunit). High level computations using QM/MM-PBSA binding free energy calculations were in good agreement with experimental binding data, as determined using statistical analysis, and support binding at the ATP-binding site. The value of a QM description for the binding of halogenated ligands exhibiting σ-hole effects is highlighted. A new statistical metric, the 'sum of the modified logarithm of ranks' (SMLR), has been defined which measures performance of a model for both the "early recognition" (ranking earlier/higher) of active compounds and their relative ordering by potency. Through a detailed structure activity relationship analysis considering other kinases (CDK2, CDK5 and GSK-3α/β), 6'(Z) and 7(L) indirubin substitutions have been identified to achieve selective PhK inhibition. The key PhK binding site residues involved can also be targeted using other ligand scaffolds in future work. PMID:26364215

  13. An evaluation of indirubin analogues as phosphorylase kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Begum, Jaida; Skamnaki, Vassiliki T; Moffatt, Colin; Bischler, Nicolas; Sarrou, Josephine; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Leonidas, Demetres D; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Hayes, Joseph M

    2015-09-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PhK) has been linked with a number of conditions such as glycogen storage diseases, psoriasis, type 2 diabetes and more recently, cancer (Camus et al., 2012 [6]). However, with few reported structural studies on PhK inhibitors, this hinders a structure based drug design approach. In this study, the inhibitory potential of 38 indirubin analogues have been investigated. 11 of these ligands had IC50 values in the range 0.170-0.360μM, with indirubin-3'-acetoxime (1c) the most potent. 7-Bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (13b), an antitumor compound which induces caspase-independent cell-death (Ribas et al., 2006 [20]) is revealed as a specific inhibitor of PhK (IC50=1.8μM). Binding assay experiments performed using both PhK-holo and PhK-γtrnc confirmed the inhibitory effects to arise from binding at the kinase domain (γ subunit). High level computations using QM/MM-PBSA binding free energy calculations were in good agreement with experimental binding data, as determined using statistical analysis, and support binding at the ATP-binding site. The value of a QM description for the binding of halogenated ligands exhibiting σ-hole effects is highlighted. A new statistical metric, the 'sum of the modified logarithm of ranks' (SMLR), has been defined which measures performance of a model for both the "early recognition" (ranking earlier/higher) of active compounds and their relative ordering by potency. Through a detailed structure activity relationship analysis considering other kinases (CDK2, CDK5 and GSK-3α/β), 6'(Z) and 7(L) indirubin substitutions have been identified to achieve selective PhK inhibition. The key PhK binding site residues involved can also be targeted using other ligand scaffolds in future work.

  14. Quantitative Analysis of the Nanopore Translocation Dynamics of Simple Structured Polynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Schink, Severin; Renner, Stephan; Alim, Karen; Arnaut, Vera; Simmel, Friedrich C.; Gerland, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Nanopore translocation experiments are increasingly applied to probe the secondary structures of RNA and DNA molecules. Here, we report two vital steps toward establishing nanopore translocation as a tool for the systematic and quantitative analysis of polynucleotide folding: 1), Using α-hemolysin pores and a diverse set of different DNA hairpins, we demonstrate that backward nanopore force spectroscopy is particularly well suited for quantitative analysis. In contrast to forward translocation from the vestibule side of the pore, backward translocation times do not appear to be significantly affected by pore-DNA interactions. 2), We develop and verify experimentally a versatile mesoscopic theoretical framework for the quantitative analysis of translocation experiments with structured polynucleotides. The underlying model is based on sequence-dependent free energy landscapes constructed using the known thermodynamic parameters for polynucleotide basepairing. This approach limits the adjustable parameters to a small set of sequence-independent parameters. After parameter calibration, the theoretical model predicts the translocation dynamics of new sequences. These predictions can be leveraged to generate a baseline expectation even for more complicated structures where the assumptions underlying the one-dimensional free energy landscape may no longer be satisfied. Taken together, backward translocation through α-hemolysin pores combined with mesoscopic theoretical modeling is a promising approach for label-free single-molecule analysis of DNA and RNA folding. PMID:22225801

  15. Methylthioinosine Phosphorylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Structure and Annotation of a Novel Enzyme in Quorum Sensing†

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Rong; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Almo, Steven C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2011-01-01

    The PA3004 gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was originally annotated as a 5’-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP). However, the PA3004 encoded protein uses 5’-methylthioinosine (MTI) as a preferred substrate and represents the only known example of a specific MTI phosphorylase (MTIP). MTIP does not utilize 5’-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Inosine is a weak substrate with a kcat/Km value 290-fold less than MTI and is the second best substrate identified. The crystal structure of P. aeruginosa MTIP (PaMTIP) in complex with hypoxanthine was determined to 2.8 Å resolution and revealed a three-fold symmetric homotrimer. The methylthioribose and phosphate binding regions of PaMTIP are similar to MTAPs, and the purine binding region is similar to that of purine nucleoside phosphorylases (PNPs). The catabolism of MTA in P. aeruginosa involves deamination to MTI and phosphorolysis to hypoxanthine (MTA → MTI → hypoxanthine). This pathway also exists in Plasmodium falciparum, where the purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PfPNP) acts on both inosine and MTI. Three tight-binding transition state analogue inhibitors of PaMTIP are identified with dissociation constants in the picomolar range. Inhibitor specificity suggests an early dissociative transition state for PaMTIP. Quorum sensing molecules are associated with MTA metabolism in bacterial pathogens suggesting PaMTIP as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:21197954

  16. Regulation of glycogen synthase and phosphorylase during recovery from high-intensity exercise in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bräu, L; Ferreira, L D; Nikolovski, S; Raja, G; Palmer, T N; Fournier, P A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the phosphorylation state of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase in the regulation of muscle glycogen repletion in fasted animals recovering from high-intensity exercise. Groups of rats were swum to exhaustion and allowed to recover for up to 120 min without access to food. Swimming to exhaustion caused substantial glycogen breakdown and lactate accumulation in the red, white and mixed gastrocnemius muscles, whereas the glycogen content in the soleus muscle remained stable. During the first 40 min of recovery, significant repletion of glycogen occurred in all muscles examined except the soleus muscle. At the onset of recovery, the activity ratios and fractional velocities of glycogen synthase in the red, white and mixed gastrocnemius muscles were higher than basal, but returned to pre-exercise levels within 20 min after exercise. In contrast, after exercise the activity ratios of glycogen phosphorylase in the same muscles were lower than basal, and increased to pre-exercise levels within 20 min. This pattern of changes in glycogen synthase and phosphorylase activities, never reported before, suggests that the integrated regulation of the phosphorylation state of both glycogen synthase and phosphorylase might be involved in the control of glycogen deposition after high-intensity exercise. PMID:9078277

  17. Role of phosphorylase in the mechanism of potato minituber storage cell changes during clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedukha, O.; Shnyukova, E.

    The differences between the cytochemical reaction intensity and activity of phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1) and carbohydrate content in storage parenchyma cells of Solanum tuberosum L. (cv Adreta) minitubers grown for 30 days in the horizontal clinostate (2 rev/min) and in the control have been studied by electroncytochemical and biochemical methods. It is established an acceleration of minitubers formation and storage parenchyma cell differentiation at clinorotation. Electroncytochemical investigation of phosphorylase activity localization in the storage parenchyma cells of minitubers grown in control and at clinorotation showed the product of the reaction as electron-dense precipitate was marked plastids. Intensity and density of precipitate was increase in stroma of plastids and on starch grain surface during of intensive growth of starch in amyloplast (on 10- and 20-days of the minituber formation) of clinorotated minitubers in comparison with that in the control. The precipitate amount was decreased in the plastids on 30 day of growth in both variants. Using biochemical methods it is found that activity of phosphorylase and content of mono- and disaccharide and also starch content changed in minitubers formed during clinorotation and in the control. Data obtained are discussed regarding the possible mechanism of phosphorylase activity change and the role of mono- and disaccharide in acceleration of storage organ formation during clinorotation.

  18. Anopheles gambiae Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase: Catalysis, Structure, and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor,E.; Rinaldo-Matthis, A.; Li, L.; Ghanem, M.; Hazleton, K.; Cassera, M.; Almo, S.; Schramm, V.

    2007-01-01

    The purine salvage pathway of Anopheles gambiae, a mosquito that transmits malaria, has been identified in genome searches on the basis of sequence homology with characterized enzymes. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a target for the development of therapeutic agents in humans and purine auxotrophs, including malarial parasites. The PNP from Anopheles gambiae (AgPNP) was expressed in Escherichia coli and compared to the PNPs from Homo sapiens (HsPNP) and Plasmodium falciparum (PfPNP). AgPNP has kcat values of 54 and 41 s-1 for 2'-deoxyinosine and inosine, its preferred substrates, and 1.0 s-1 for guanosine. However, the chemical step is fast for AgPNP at 226 s-1 for guanosine in pre-steady-state studies. 5'-Deaza-1'-aza-2'-deoxy-1'-(9-methylene)-Immucillin-H (DADMe-ImmH) is a transition-state mimic for a 2'-deoxyinosine ribocation with a fully dissociated N-ribosidic bond and is a slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitor with a dissociation constant of 3.5 pM. This is the tightest-binding inhibitor known for any PNP, with a remarkable Km/Ki* of 5.4 x 107, and is consistent with enzymatic transition state predictions of enhanced transition-state analogue binding in enzymes with enhanced catalytic efficiency. Deoxyguanosine is a weaker substrate than deoxyinosine, and DADMe-Immucillin-G is less tightly bound than DADMe-ImmH, with a dissociation constant of 23 pM for AgPNP as compared to 7 pM for HsPNP. The crystal structure of AgPNP was determined in complex with DADMe-ImmH and phosphate to a resolution of 2.2 Angstroms to reveal the differences in substrate and inhibitor specificity. The distance from the N1' cation to the phosphate O4 anion is shorter in the AgPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}PO4 complex than in HsPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmH{center_dot}SO4, offering one explanation for the stronger inhibitory effect of DADMe-ImmH for AgPNP.

  19. Thymidine phosphorylase induces angiogenesis in vivo and in vitro: an evaluation of possible mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sellers, Lynda A; Matheson, Hugh B; Fan, Tai-Ping D

    2003-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is elevated in the plasma of cancer patients, and has been implicated in pathophysiological angiogenesis. However, the downstream signals underlying this implication remain obscure. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of TP on the neovascularisation response in vitro and in vivo. Both TP and its catalytic product, 2-deoxy-D-ribose-1-phosphate, and downstream 2-deoxy-D-ribose (2-DDR) promoted endothelial tubulogenesis in vitro, and the regeneration of a wounded monolayer of endothelial cells without exerting any mitogenic effect. In vivo, both TP and 2-DDR promoted the development of functional vasculature into an avascular sponge. A TP inhibitor, 6-amino-5-chlorouracil, was able to partially reverse the effects of TP, but had no effect on the 2-DDR-induced angiogenesis. Enhanced monolayer regeneration was observed with TP-cDNA-transfected bladder carcinoma cells. The transfection of TP-cDNA, however, did not confer any proliferative advantage. The regeneration of TP overexpressing cells was associated with a time-dependent expression of the enzyme haeme-oxygenase (HO-1). The present study demonstrates that both TP and its ribose-sugar metabolites induce angiogenesis by mediating a cohesive interplay between carcinoma and endothelial cells. The induction of HO-1 in TP-transfected cells suggests that it could be a possible downstream signal for the angiogenic effects of TP. Furthermore, reducing sugars have been shown to induce oxidative stress, and ribose could be a possible cause for the upregulation of HO-1, which has been implicated in the release of angiogenic factors. Therefore, we postulate that 2-DDR could be mediating the angiogenic effects of TP possibly through an oxidative stress mechanism and additionally getting integrated in the endothelial metabolic machinery. PMID:12770927

  20. Identification and hydropathic characterization of structural features affecting sequence specificity for doxorubicin intercalation into DNA double-stranded polynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, G E; Scarsdale, J N; Fornari, F A

    1998-10-15

    The computer molecular modeling program HINT (Hydropathic INTeractions), an empirical hydropathic force field function that includes hydrogen bonding, coulombic and hydrophobic terms, was used to study sequence-selective doxorubicin binding/intercalation in the 64 unique CAxy, CGxy, TAxy, TGxy base pair quartet combinations. The CAAT quartet sequence is shown to have the highest binding score of the 64 combinations. Of the two regularly alternating polynucleotides, d(CGCGCG)2and d(TATATA)2, the HINT calculated binding scores reveal doxorubicin binds preferentially to d(TATATA)2. Although interactions of the chromophore with the DNA base pairs defining the intercalation site [I-1] [I+1] and the neighboring [I+2] base pair are predominant, the results obtained with HINT indicate that the base pair [I+3] contributes significantly to the sequence selectivity of doxorubicin by providing an additional hydrogen bonding opportunity for the N3' ammonium of the daunosamine sugar moiety in approximately 25% of the sequences. This observation, that interactions involving a base pair [I+3] distal to the intercalation site play a significant role in stabilizing/destabilizing the intercalation of doxorubicin into the various DNA sequences, has not been previously reported. In general terms, this work shows that molecular modeling and careful analysis of molecular interactions can have a significant role in designing and evaluating nucleotides and antineoplastic agents. PMID:9753742

  1. Identification and hydropathic characterization of structural features affecting sequence specificity for doxorubicin intercalation into DNA double-stranded polynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Kellogg, G E; Scarsdale, J N; Fornari, F A

    1998-01-01

    The computer molecular modeling program HINT (Hydropathic INTeractions), an empirical hydropathic force field function that includes hydrogen bonding, coulombic and hydrophobic terms, was used to study sequence-selective doxorubicin binding/intercalation in the 64 unique CAxy, CGxy, TAxy, TGxy base pair quartet combinations. The CAAT quartet sequence is shown to have the highest binding score of the 64 combinations. Of the two regularly alternating polynucleotides, d(CGCGCG)2and d(TATATA)2, the HINT calculated binding scores reveal doxorubicin binds preferentially to d(TATATA)2. Although interactions of the chromophore with the DNA base pairs defining the intercalation site [I-1] [I+1] and the neighboring [I+2] base pair are predominant, the results obtained with HINT indicate that the base pair [I+3] contributes significantly to the sequence selectivity of doxorubicin by providing an additional hydrogen bonding opportunity for the N3' ammonium of the daunosamine sugar moiety in approximately 25% of the sequences. This observation, that interactions involving a base pair [I+3] distal to the intercalation site play a significant role in stabilizing/destabilizing the intercalation of doxorubicin into the various DNA sequences, has not been previously reported. In general terms, this work shows that molecular modeling and careful analysis of molecular interactions can have a significant role in designing and evaluating nucleotides and antineoplastic agents. PMID:9753742

  2. Rice Endosperm Starch Phosphorylase (Pho1) Assembles with Disproportionating Enzyme (Dpe1) to Form a Protein Complex That Enhances Synthesis of Malto-oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seon-Kap; Koper, Kaan; Satoh, Hikaru; Okita, Thomas W

    2016-09-16

    Starch synthesis in cereal grain endosperm is dependent on the concerted actions of many enzymes. The starch plastidial phosphorylase (Pho1) plays an important role in the initiation of starch synthesis and in the maturation of starch granule in developing rice seeds. Prior evidence has suggested that the rice enzyme, OsPho1, may have a physical/functional interaction with other starch biosynthetic enzymes. Pulldown experiments showed that OsPho1 as well as OsPho1 devoid of its L80 region, a peptide unique to higher plant phosphorylases, captures disproportionating enzyme (OsDpe1). Interaction of the latter enzyme form with OsDpe1 indicates that the putative regulatory L80 is not responsible for multienzyme assembly. This heterotypic enzyme complex, determined at a molar ratio of 1:1, was validated by reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation studies of native seed proteins and by co-elution chromatographic and co-migration electrophoretic patterns of these enzymes in rice seed extracts. The OsPho1-OsDpe1 complex utilized a broader range of substrates for enhanced synthesis of larger maltooligosaccharides than each individual enzyme and significantly elevated the substrate affinities of OsPho1 at 30 °C. Moreover, the assembly with OsDpe1 enables OsPho1 to utilize products of transglycosylation reactions involving G1 and G3, sugars that it cannot catalyze directly. PMID:27502283

  3. Mutation of the Plastidial α-Glucan Phosphorylase Gene in Rice Affects the Synthesis and Structure of Starch in the Endosperm[W

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Hikaru; Shibahara, Kensuke; Tokunaga, Takashi; Nishi, Aiko; Tasaki, Mikako; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Okita, Thomas W.; Kaneko, Nanae; Fujita, Naoko; Yoshida, Mayumi; Hosaka, Yuko; Sato, Aya; Utsumi, Yoshinori; Ohdan, Takashi; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2008-01-01

    Plastidial phosphorylase (Pho1) accounts for ∼96% of the total phosphorylase activity in developing rice (Oryza sativa) seeds. From mutant stocks induced by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea treatment, we identified plants with mutations in the Pho1 gene that are deficient in Pho1. Strikingly, the size of mature seeds and the starch content in these mutants showed considerable variation, ranging from shrunken to pseudonormal. The loss of Pho1 caused smaller starch granules to accumulate and modified the amylopectin structure. Variation in the morphological and biochemical phenotype of individual seeds was common to all 15 pho1-independent homozygous mutant lines studied, indicating that this phenotype was caused solely by the genetic defect. The phenotype of the pho1 mutation was temperature dependent. While the mutant plants grown at 30°C produced mainly plump seeds at maturity, most of the seeds from plants grown at 20°C were shrunken, with a significant proportion showing severe reduction in starch accumulation. These results strongly suggest that Pho1 plays a crucial role in starch biosynthesis in rice endosperm at low temperatures and that one or more other factors can complement the function of Pho1 at high temperatures. PMID:18621947

  4. Impact of Oxidative Stress on Ascorbate Biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas via Regulation of the VTC2 Gene Encoding a GDP-l-galactose Phosphorylase*

    PubMed Central

    Urzica, Eugen I.; Adler, Lital N.; Page, M. Dudley; Linster, Carole L.; Arbing, Mark A.; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    The l-galactose (Smirnoff-Wheeler) pathway represents the major route to l-ascorbic acid (vitamin C) biosynthesis in higher plants. Arabidopsis thaliana VTC2 and its paralogue VTC5 function as GDP-l-galactose phosphorylases converting GDP-l-galactose to l-galactose-1-P, thus catalyzing the first committed step in the biosynthesis of l-ascorbate. Here we report that the l-galactose pathway of ascorbate biosynthesis described in higher plants is conserved in green algae. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii genome encodes all the enzymes required for vitamin C biosynthesis via the l-galactose pathway. We have characterized recombinant C. reinhardtii VTC2 as an active GDP-l-galactose phosphorylase. C. reinhardtii cells exposed to oxidative stress show increased VTC2 mRNA and l-ascorbate levels. Genes encoding enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione system (e.g. ascorbate peroxidase, manganese superoxide dismutase, and dehydroascorbate reductase) are also up-regulated in response to increased oxidative stress. These results indicate that C. reinhardtii VTC2, like its plant homologs, is a highly regulated enzyme in ascorbate biosynthesis in green algae and that, together with the ascorbate recycling system, the l-galactose pathway represents the major route for providing protective levels of ascorbate in oxidatively stressed algal cells. PMID:22393048

  5. Trapping of DNA-reactive metabolites of therapeutic or carcinogenic agents by /sup 14/C-labeled synthetic polynucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, J.R.; Ludlum, D.B.

    1982-08-01

    Many substances which do not react with DNA directly are metabolized into important DNA-modifying intermediates. We have devised a method for trapping these intermediates with /sup 14/C-labeled nucleosides contained in a synthetic polynucleotide. The polynucleotide structure protects the labeled nucleoside from metabolism; thus, it is unaltered when the polymer is incubated with a drug-metabolizing system. However, when the polymer is incubated with this system and a compound which can be metabolized into a reactive species, these intermediates are trapped by the /sup 14/C-labeled nucleoside and subsequently are detected as new peaks of radioactivity in a digest of the labeled polynucleotide. This system has been used to detect reactive intermediates of cyclophosphamide generated by a liver homogenate.

  6. Simultaneous detection of kinase and phosphatase activities of polynucleotide kinase using molecular beacon probes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changbei; Fang, Hefei; Wang, Kemin; Xia, Kun; Chen, Hanchun; He, Hailun; Zeng, Weimin

    2013-12-15

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of DNA by polynucleotide kinase (PNK) has an important role in DNA damage repair, replication, and recombination. Traditionally, it is assayed by denaturing gel electrophoresis and autoradiography, which are tedious and not sensitive. We report on the development of a sensitive and simple method for PNK assay based on DNA ligation using a molecular beacon. Enzyme activity of PNK is measured down to a limit of 0.002 unit/ml. The method not only provides a universal platform for simultaneous monitoring of kinase and phosphatase activities, but also shows great potential in biological research, drug discovery, and clinical diagnostics.

  7. Purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from E. coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abramchik, Yu. A. Timofeev, V. I. Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2015-07-15

    Crystals of E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase were grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one crystal at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility to 0.99 Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P2{sub 1} and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = 74.1 Å, b = 110.2 Å, c = 88.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 111.08°. The crystal contains six subunits of the enzyme comprising a hexamer per asymmetric unit. The hexamer is the biological active form of E. coli. purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  8. Diastereoselective Synthesis of Glycosyl Phosphates by Using a Phosphorylase-Phosphatase Combination Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wildberger, Patricia; Pfeiffer, Martin; Brecker, Lothar; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2015-12-21

    Sugar phosphates play an important role in metabolism and signaling, but also as constituents of macromolecular structures. Selective phosphorylation of sugars is chemically difficult, particularly at the anomeric center. We report phosphatase-catalyzed diastereoselective "anomeric" phosphorylation of various aldose substrates with α-D-glucose 1-phosphate, derived from phosphorylase-catalyzed conversion of sucrose and inorganic phosphate, as the phosphoryl donor. Simultaneous and sequential two-step transformations by the phosphorylase-phosphatase combination catalyst yielded glycosyl phosphates of defined anomeric configuration in yields of up to 70 % based on the phosphate applied to the reaction. An efficient enzyme-assisted purification of the glycosyl phosphate products from reaction mixtures was established.

  9. L-Enantiomers of Transition State Analogue Inhibitors Bound to Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldo-Matthis,A.; Murkin, A.; Ramagopal, U.; Clinch, K.; Mee, S.; Evans, G.; Tyler, P.; Furneaux, R.; Almo, S.; Schramm, v.

    2008-01-01

    Human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) was crystallized with transition-state analogue inhibitors Immucillin-H and DADMe-Immucillin-H synthesized with ribosyl mimics of l-stereochemistry. The inhibitors demonstrate that major driving forces for tight binding of these analogues are the leaving group interaction and the cationic mimicry of the transition state, even though large geometric changes occur with d-Immucillins and l-Immucillins bound to human PNP.

  10. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of cellobiose phosphorylase from Cellulomonas uda.

    PubMed

    Van Hoorebeke, Annelies; Stout, Jan; Kyndt, John; De Groeve, Manu; Dix, Ina; Desmet, Tom; Soetaert, Wim; Van Beeumen, Jozef; Savvides, Savvas N

    2010-03-01

    Disaccharide phosphorylases are able to catalyze both the synthesis and the breakdown of disaccharides and have thus emerged as attractive platforms for tailor-made sugar synthesis. Cellobiose phosphorylase from Cellulomonas uda (CPCuda) is an enzyme that belongs to glycoside hydrolase family 94 and catalyzes the reversible breakdown of cellobiose [beta-D-glucopyranosyl-(1,4)-D-glucopyranose] to alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate and D-glucose. Crystals of ligand-free recombinant CPCuda and of its complexes with substrates and reaction products yielded complete X-ray diffraction data sets to high resolution using synchrotron radiation but suffered from significant variability in diffraction quality. In at least one case an intriguing space-group transition from a primitive monoclinic to a primitive orthorhombic lattice was observed during data collection. The structure of CPCuda was determined by maximum-likelihood molecular replacement, thus establishing a starting point for an investigation of the structural and mechanistic determinants of disaccharide phosphorylase activity.

  11. [Properties of sucrose phosphorylase from recombinant Escherichia coli and enzymatic synthesis of alpha-arbutin].

    PubMed

    Wan, Yuejia; Ma, Jiangfeng; Xu, Rong; He, Aiyong; Jiang, Min; Chen, Kequan; Jiang, Yin

    2012-12-01

    Sucrose phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.7, Sucrose phosphorylase, SPase) can be produced by recombinant strain Escherichia coli Rosetta(DE3)/Pet-SPase. Crude enzyme was obtained from the cells by the high pressure disruption and centrifugation. Sucrose phosphorylase was purified by Ni-NTA affinity column chromatography and desalted by ultrafiltration. The specific enzyme activity was 1.1-fold higher than that of the crude enzyme, and recovery rate was 82.7%. The purified recombinant SPase had a band of 59 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Thermostability of the enzyme was shown at temperatures up to 37 degrees C, and pH stability between pH 6.0 and 6.7. The optimum temperature and pH were 37 degrees C and 6.7, respectively. The K(m) of SPase for sucrose was 7.3 mmol/L, and Vmax was 0.2 micromol/(min x mg). Besides, alpha-arbutin was synthesized from sucrose and hydroquinone by transglucosylation with recombinant SPase. The optimal conditions for synthesis of alpha-arbutin were 200 U/mL of recombinant SPase, 20% of sucrose, and 1.6% hydroquinone at pH 6-6.5 and 25 degrees C for 21 h. Under these conditions, alpha-arbutin was obtained with a 78.3% molar yield with respect to hydroquinone, and the concentration of alpha-arbutin was about 31 g/L.

  12. High phosphorylase activity is correlated with increased potato minituber formation and starch content during extended clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedukha, O. M.; Schnyukova, E. I.; Leach, J. E.

    2003-05-01

    The major purpose of these experiments were to investigate growth of potato storage organs and starch synthesis in minitubers at slow horizontal clinorotation (2 rpm), which partly mimics microgravity, and a secondary goal was to study the activity and localization of phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1) in storage parenchyma under these conditions. Miniplants of Solanum tuberosum L. (cv Adreta) were grown in culture for 30 days for both the vertical control and the horizontal clinorotation. During long-term clinorotation, an acceleration of minituber formation, and an increase of amyloplast number and size in storage parenchyma cells, as well as increased starch content, was observed in the minitubers. The differences among cytochemical reaction intensity, activity of phosphorylase, and carbohydrate content in storage parenchyma cells of minitubers grown in a horizontal clinostat were established by electron-cytochemical and biochemical methods. It is shown that high phosphorylase activity is correlated with increased starch content during extended clinorotation. The results demonstrate the increase in carbohydrate metabolism and possible accelerated growth of storage organs under the influence of microgravity, as mimicked by clinorotation; therefore, clinorotation can be used as a basis for future studies on mechanisms of starch synthesis under microgravity.

  13. Glycogen phosphorylase is involved in stress endurance and biofilm formation in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Anat; Castro-Sowinski, Susana; Lerner, Hadas; Okon, Yaacov; Burdman, Saul

    2009-11-01

    Here we report the identification of a glycogen phosphorylase (glgP) gene in the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, Sp7, and the characterization of a glgP marker exchange mutant of this strain. The glgP mutant showed a twofold reduction of glycogen phosphorylase activity and an increased glycogen accumulation as compared with wild-type Sp7, indicating that the identified gene indeed encodes a protein with glycogen phosphorylase activity. Interestingly, the glgP mutant had higher survival rates than the wild type after exposure to starvation, desiccation and osmotic pressure. The mutant was shown to be compromised in its biofilm formation ability. Analysis of the exopolysaccharide sugar composition of the glgP mutant revealed a decrease in the amount of glucose, accompanied by increases in rhamnose, fucose and ribose, as compared with the Sp7 exopolysaccharide. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates GlgP activity in A. brasilense, and shows that glycogen accumulation may play an important role in the stress endurance of this bacterium.

  14. FR258900, a potential anti-hyperglycemic drug, binds at the allosteric site of glycogen phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Tiraidis, Costas; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Zographos, Spyros E.; Leonidas, Demetres D.; Gimisis, Thanasis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G.

    2007-01-01

    FR258900 has been discovered as a novel inhibitor of human liver glycogen phosphorylase a and proved to suppress hepatic glycogen breakdown and reduce plasma glucose concentrations in diabetic mice models. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the cocrystallized rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b–FR258900 complex and refined it to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure demonstrates that the inhibitor binds at the allosteric activator site, where the physiological activator AMP binds. The contacts from FR258900 to glycogen phosphorylase are dominated by nonpolar van der Waals interactions with Gln71, Gln72, Phe196, and Val45′ (from the symmetry-related subunit), and also by ionic interactions from the carboxylate groups to the three arginine residues (Arg242, Arg309, and Arg310) that form the allosteric phosphate-recognition subsite. The binding of FR258900 to the protein promotes conformational changes that stabilize an inactive T-state quaternary conformation of the enzyme. The ligand-binding mode is different from those of the potent phenoxy-phthalate and acyl urea inhibitors, previously described, illustrating the broad specificity of the allosteric site. PMID:17600143

  15. Some properties of the irreversible complexes of nitracrine (ledakrin, C-283) with polynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Gniazdowski, M; Ciesielska, E; Szmigiero, L

    1981-03-15

    In the presence of sulfhydryl compounds an anticancer drug nitracrine (NA), 1-nitro-9-aminoalkylacridine derivative forms strong, probably covalent complexes with DNA. It has been found that it binds with similar efficiency to RNA and DNA exhibiting a certain preference for single-stranded structure. At NA/polynucleotide ratio of 0.15 and nucleic acids concentration 100 microgram/ml the numbers of drug molecules bound per 10(3) nucleotides were about 10--13 for native calf thymus DNA, 19--28 for denatured DNA and 23--36 for RNA. Some base specificity to guanine is observed both in polydeoxyribo- and polyribonucleotides. The complexes of NA with DNA and double-stranded synthetic polynucleotides exhibit decreased transcriptional template activity in bacterial RNA synthesis in vitro system except poly(A) synthesis on poly(dA) x poly(dT) which is insensitive to the drug. The drug binding in vitro leads to cross-link formation in DNA as shown by means of ultraviolet spectrophotometry and hydroxylapatite chromatography of heat-denatured NA-DNA complexes. The amount of the double bonds introduced by the drug is however relatively low as compared with cross-linking of irradiated 8-methoxy-psoralen-DNA (MOP-DNA) complexes. PMID:6161711

  16. Dihedral-based segment identification and classification of biopolymers II: polynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gabor; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-01-27

    In an accompanying paper (Nagy, G.; Oostenbrink, C. Dihedral-based segment identification and classification of biopolymers I: Proteins. J. Chem. Inf. Model. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ci400541d), we introduce a new algorithm for structure classification of biopolymeric structures based on main-chain dihedral angles. The DISICL algorithm (short for DIhedral-based Segment Identification and CLassification) classifies segments of structures containing two central residues. Here, we introduce the DISICL library for polynucleotides, which is based on the dihedral angles ε, ζ, and χ for the two central residues of a three-nucleotide segment of a single strand. Seventeen distinct structural classes are defined for nucleotide structures, some of which--to our knowledge--were not described previously in other structure classification algorithms. In particular, DISICL also classifies noncanonical single-stranded structural elements. DISICL is applied to databases of DNA and RNA structures containing 80,000 and 180,000 segments, respectively. The classifications according to DISICL are compared to those of another popular classification scheme in terms of the amount of classified nucleotides, average occurrence and length of structural elements, and pairwise matches of the classifications. While the detailed classification of DISICL adds sensitivity to a structure analysis, it can be readily reduced to eight simplified classes providing a more general overview of the secondary structure in polynucleotides. PMID:24364355

  17. Dihedral-based segment identification and classification of biopolymers II: polynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gabor; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2014-01-27

    In an accompanying paper (Nagy, G.; Oostenbrink, C. Dihedral-based segment identification and classification of biopolymers I: Proteins. J. Chem. Inf. Model. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ci400541d), we introduce a new algorithm for structure classification of biopolymeric structures based on main-chain dihedral angles. The DISICL algorithm (short for DIhedral-based Segment Identification and CLassification) classifies segments of structures containing two central residues. Here, we introduce the DISICL library for polynucleotides, which is based on the dihedral angles ε, ζ, and χ for the two central residues of a three-nucleotide segment of a single strand. Seventeen distinct structural classes are defined for nucleotide structures, some of which--to our knowledge--were not described previously in other structure classification algorithms. In particular, DISICL also classifies noncanonical single-stranded structural elements. DISICL is applied to databases of DNA and RNA structures containing 80,000 and 180,000 segments, respectively. The classifications according to DISICL are compared to those of another popular classification scheme in terms of the amount of classified nucleotides, average occurrence and length of structural elements, and pairwise matches of the classifications. While the detailed classification of DISICL adds sensitivity to a structure analysis, it can be readily reduced to eight simplified classes providing a more general overview of the secondary structure in polynucleotides.

  18. Dihedral-Based Segment Identification and Classification of Biopolymers II: Polynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In an accompanying paper (Nagy, G.; Oostenbrink, C. Dihedral-based segment identification and classification of biopolymers I: Proteins. J. Chem. Inf. Model. 2013, DOI: 10.1021/ci400541d), we introduce a new algorithm for structure classification of biopolymeric structures based on main-chain dihedral angles. The DISICL algorithm (short for DIhedral-based Segment Identification and CLassification) classifies segments of structures containing two central residues. Here, we introduce the DISICL library for polynucleotides, which is based on the dihedral angles ε, ζ, and χ for the two central residues of a three-nucleotide segment of a single strand. Seventeen distinct structural classes are defined for nucleotide structures, some of which—to our knowledge—were not described previously in other structure classification algorithms. In particular, DISICL also classifies noncanonical single-stranded structural elements. DISICL is applied to databases of DNA and RNA structures containing 80,000 and 180,000 segments, respectively. The classifications according to DISICL are compared to those of another popular classification scheme in terms of the amount of classified nucleotides, average occurrence and length of structural elements, and pairwise matches of the classifications. While the detailed classification of DISICL adds sensitivity to a structure analysis, it can be readily reduced to eight simplified classes providing a more general overview of the secondary structure in polynucleotides. PMID:24364355

  19. The role of the mammalian DNA end-processing enzyme polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Arpita; Saha, Saikat; Chakraborty, Anirban; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Mandal, Santi M; Neves-Carvalho, Andreia; Liu, Yongping; Pandita, Raj K; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Hegde, Pavana M; Boldogh, Istvan; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Koeppen, Arnulf H; Pandita, Tej K; Maciel, Patricia; Sarkar, Partha S; Hazra, Tapas K

    2015-01-01

    DNA strand-breaks (SBs) with non-ligatable ends are generated by ionizing radiation, oxidative stress, various chemotherapeutic agents, and also as base excision repair (BER) intermediates. Several neurological diseases have already been identified as being due to a deficiency in DNA end-processing activities. Two common dirty ends, 3'-P and 5'-OH, are processed by mammalian polynucleotide kinase 3'-phosphatase (PNKP), a bifunctional enzyme with 3'-phosphatase and 5'-kinase activities. We have made the unexpected observation that PNKP stably associates with Ataxin-3 (ATXN3), a polyglutamine repeat-containing protein mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), also known as Machado-Joseph Disease (MJD). This disease is one of the most common dominantly inherited ataxias worldwide; the defect in SCA3 is due to CAG repeat expansion (from the normal 14-41 to 55-82 repeats) in the ATXN3 coding region. However, how the expanded form gains its toxic function is still not clearly understood. Here we report that purified wild-type (WT) ATXN3 stimulates, and by contrast the mutant form specifically inhibits, PNKP's 3' phosphatase activity in vitro. ATXN3-deficient cells also show decreased PNKP activity. Furthermore, transgenic mice conditionally expressing the pathological form of human ATXN3 also showed decreased 3'-phosphatase activity of PNKP, mostly in the deep cerebellar nuclei, one of the most affected regions in MJD patients' brain. Finally, long amplicon quantitative PCR analysis of human MJD patients' brain samples showed a significant accumulation of DNA strand breaks. Our results thus indicate that the accumulation of DNA strand breaks due to functional deficiency of PNKP is etiologically linked to the pathogenesis of SCA3/MJD. PMID:25633985

  20. Isolation, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase crystallized with 2,2′-anhydrouridine

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeev, Vladimir I.; Lashkov, Alexander A.; Gabdoulkhakov, Azat G.; Pavlyuk, Bogdan Ph.; Kachalova, Galina S.; Betzel, Christian

    2007-10-01

    S. typhimurium uridine phosphorylase has been isolated and crystallized in the presence of ligand. Uridine phosphorylase (UPh; EC 2.4.2.3) is a member of the pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase family of enzymes which catalyzes the phosphorolytic cleavage of the C—N glycoside bond of uridine, with the formation of ribose 1-phosphate and uracil. This enzyme has been shown to be important in the activation and catabolism of fluoropyrimidines. Modulation of its enzymatic activity may affect the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. The structural investigation of the bacterial uridine phosphorylases, both unliganded and complexed with substrate/product analogues and inhibitors, may help in understanding the catalytic mechanism of the phosphorolytic cleavage of uridine. Salmonella typhimurium uridine phosphorylase has been crystallized with 2,2′-anhydrouridine. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.15 Å. Preliminary analysis of the diffraction data indicates that the crystal belongs to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 88.52, b = 123.98, c = 133.52 Å. The solvent content is 45.51%, assuming the presence of one hexamer molecule per asymmetric unit.

  1. Alpha-glucan phosphorylase from Escherichia coli. Cloning of the gene, and purification and characterization of the protein.

    PubMed

    Yu, F; Jen, Y; Takeuchi, E; Inouye, M; Nakayama, H; Tagaya, M; Fukui, T

    1988-09-25

    By using a synthetic oligonucleotide probe identical to a part of the gene for the Escherichia coli major outer membrane lipoprotein, we have cloned a gene from E. coli chromosomal DNA. However, the cloned gene was not one of the lipoprotein genes. The amino acid sequence deduced from its nucleotide sequence shows extensive similarities instead to alpha-glucan phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1). The gene, glgP, is located immediately downstream from glgA, the gene for glycogen synthase. The glgP gene was inserted into pUC9 vector and expressed in the presence of the lac inducer. The gene product was purified to apparent homogeneity as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In all chromatographies, the protein was eluted accompanied by a low phosphorylase activity. The final preparation showed phosphorolytic activity to various alpha-glucans, although the specific activity was extremely low compared to other alpha-glucan phosphorylases under the standard assay conditions. Its enzymatic activity, however, increased almost linearly as the concentration of glucan increased, reaching a value comparable with those of other phosphorylases. The amino acid sequence deduced was compared with those of alpha-glucan phosphorylases from other sources. PMID:3047129

  2. Computer Simulations Reveal Substrate Specificity of Glycosidic Bond Cleavage in Native and Mutant Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Hopmann, Kathrin Helen; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-04-12

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of purine ribonucleosides and 2'-deoxyribonucleosides, yielding the purine base and (2'-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate as products. While this enzyme has been extensively studied, several questions with respect to the catalytic mechanism have remained largely unanswered. The role of the phosphate and key amino acid residues in the catalytic reaction as well as the purine ring protonation state is elucidated using density functional theory calculations and extensive empirical valence bond (EVB) simulations. Free energy surfaces for adenosine, inosine, and guanosine are fitted to ab initio data and yield quantitative agreement with experimental data when the surfaces are used to model the corresponding enzymatic reactions. The cognate substrates 6-aminopurines (inosine and guanosine) interact with PNP through extensive hydrogen bonding, but the substrate specificity is found to be a direct result of the electrostatic preorganization energy along the reaction coordinate. Asn243 has previously been identified as a key residue providing substrate specificity. Mutation of Asn243 to Asp has dramatic effects on the substrate specificity, making 6-amino- and 6-oxopurines equally good as substrates. The principal effect of this particular mutation is the change in the electrostatic preorganization energy between the native enzyme and the Asn243Asp mutant, clearly favoring adenosine over inosine and guanosine. Thus, the EVB simulations show that this particular mutation affects the electrostatic preorganization of the active site, which in turn can explain the substrate specificity. PMID:26985580

  3. Crystal growth of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase, carboxypeptidase t, and thymidine phosphorylase on the international space station by the capillary counter-diffusion method

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranova, I. P. Smirnova, E. A.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Chupova, L. A.; Esipov, R. S.; Akparov, V. Kh.; Timofeev, V. I.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2011-09-15

    Crystals of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, thymidine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli, carboxypeptidase T from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris and its mutant forms, and crystals of complexes of these proteins with functional ligands and inhibitors were grown by the capillary counter-diffusion method in the Japanese Experimental Module Kibo on the International Space Station. The high-resolution X-ray diffraction data sets suitable for the determination of high-resolution three-dimensional structures of these proteins were collected from the grown crystals on the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The conditions of crystal growth for the proteins and the data-collection statistics are reported. The crystals grown in microgravity diffracted to a higher resolution than crystals of the same proteins grown on Earth.

  4. Crystal growth of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase, carboxypeptidase t, and thymidine phosphorylase on the international space station by the capillary counter-diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuranova, I. P.; Smirnova, E. A.; Abramchik, Yu. A.; Chupova, L. A.; Esipov, R. S.; Akparov, V. Kh.; Timofeev, V. I.; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2011-09-01

    Crystals of phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, thymidine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli, carboxypeptidase T from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris and its mutant forms, and crystals of complexes of these proteins with functional ligands and inhibitors were grown by the capillary counter-diffusion method in the Japanese Experimental Module Kibo on the International Space Station. The high-resolution X-ray diffraction data sets suitable for the determination of high-resolution three-dimensional structures of these proteins were collected from the grown crystals on the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. The conditions of crystal growth for the proteins and the data-collection statistics are reported. The crystals grown in microgravity diffracted to a higher resolution than crystals of the same proteins grown on Earth.

  5. Synthesis of tartaric acid analogues of FR258900 and their evaluation as glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Varga, Gergely; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Juhász, László; Somsák, László

    2013-03-15

    Di-O-cinnamoylated, -p-coumaroylated, and -feruloylated d-, l- and meso-tartaric acids were synthesized as analogues of the natural product FR258900, a glycogen phosphorylase (GP) inhibitor with in vivo antihyperglycaemic activity. The new compounds inhibited rabbit muscle GP in the low micromolar range, and bound to the allosteric site of the enzyme. The best inhibitor was 2,3-di-O-feruloyl meso-tartaric acid and had Ki values of 2.0μM against AMP (competitive) and 3.36μM against glucose-1-phosphate (non-competitive).

  6. Compositions and methods involving methyladenosine phosphorylase in the diagnosis and treatment of proliferative disorders

    DOEpatents

    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2007-03-20

    Disclosed are novel nucleic acid and peptide compositions comprising methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) and methods of use for MTAP amino acid sequences and DNA segments comprising MTAP in the diagnosis of human cancers and development of MTAP-specific antibodies. Also disclosed are methods for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors and other proliferative cell disorders, and identification of tumor suppressor genes and gene products from the human 9p21-p22 chromosome region. Such methods are useful in the diagnosis of multiple tumor types such as bladder cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, brain tumors, lymphomas, gliomas, melanomas, and leukemias.

  7. Methylthioadenosine phosphorylase compositions and methods of use in the diagnosis and treatment of proliferative disorders

    DOEpatents

    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2005-03-22

    Disclosed are novel nucleic acid and peptide compositions comprising methythlioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) and methods of use for MTAP amino acid sequences and DNA segments comprising MTAP in the diagnosis of human cancers and development of MTAP-specific antibodies. Also disclosed are methods for the diagnosis and treatment of tumors and other proliferative cell disorders, and idenification tumor suppressor genes and gene products from the human 9p21-p22 chromosome region. Such methods are useful in the diagnosis of multiple tumor types such as bladder cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, brain tumors, lymphomas, gliomas, melanomas, and leukemias.

  8. Structures of bacterial polynucleotide kinase in a michaelis complex with nucleoside triphosphate (NTP)-Mg2+ and 5'-OH RNA and a mixed substrate-product complex with NTP-Mg2+ and a 5'-phosphorylated oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Das, Ushati; Wang, Li Kai; Smith, Paul; Munir, Annum; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-12-01

    Clostridium thermocellum polynucleotide kinase (CthPnk), the 5'-end-healing module of a bacterial RNA repair system, catalyzes reversible phosphoryl transfer from a nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) donor to a 5'-OH polynucleotide acceptor, either DNA or RNA. Here we report the 1.5-Å crystal structure of CthPnk-D38N in a Michaelis complex with GTP-Mg(2+) and a 5'-OH RNA oligonucleotide. The RNA-binding mode of CthPnk is different from that of the metazoan RNA kinase Clp1. CthPnk makes hydrogen bonds to the ribose 2'-hydroxyls of the 5' terminal nucleoside, via Gln51, and the penultimate nucleoside, via Gln83. The 5'-terminal nucleobase is sandwiched by Gln51 and Val129. Mutating Gln51 or Val129 to alanine reduced kinase specific activity 3-fold. Ser37 and Thr80 donate functionally redundant hydrogen bonds to the terminal phosphodiester; a S37A-T80A double mutation reduced kinase activity 50-fold. Crystallization of catalytically active CthPnk with GTP-Mg(2+) and a 5'-OH DNA yielded a mixed substrate-product complex with GTP-Mg(2+) and 5'-PO4 DNA, wherein the product 5' phosphate group is displaced by the NTP γ phosphate and the local architecture of the acceptor site is perturbed. PMID:25266383

  9. Intrarticular treatment of osteoartropaty knee with polynucleotides: a pilot study with medium-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Saggini, R; Di Stefano, A; Cavezza, T; Saladino, G; Bellomo, R G

    2013-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is a major cause of disability in the elderly. Many therapies are nowadays available, ranging from non-pharmacologic to pharmacological approaches like visco-supplementation, oral supplements or topical treatments, but a flawless treatment is still to be found. Visco-supplementation represents a valid treatment option for reducing pain associated with knee osteoarthritis and improving function in the affected joint. Many literature data report on the efficacy and safety profiles of hyaluronic acid in knee osteoarthritis, however the efficacy of intra-articular hyaluronic acid remains controversial, in fact while several clinical trials claimed a disease-modifying effect for hyaluronic acid, subsequent meta-analyses have cast doubts on this fact. The ideal intra-articular treatment for osteoarthritis should not only provide a mechanical protection of the cartilage surface, but also restore condrocytes’ homeostasis by restoring the physiological articular micro-environment and supplying nutrients. In this perspective an innovative medical product made up of polynucleotides (Condrotide) has been developed. The aim of this study is to test the 2-months efficacy in pain relief and improving function of intra-articular injections of Condrotide in patients with knee osteoarthritis or with grade III or IV chondropathy. Ninety-five subjects (33 men, 62 women), aged between 53 and 80, were included between May 2011 to July 2012. All subjects received intra-articular injections of Condrotide and were evaluated with the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the NRS scale for pain assessment, the measurement of the range of motion (R.O.M.). In all subjects a significant improvement was found in KOOS score after 60 days. The mean global NRS pain decreased in both groups and there was also a R.O.M. improvement. These results show that the intra-articular administration of nucleotides in subjects with both severe knee arthritis and chondropathy

  10. Purification and characterization of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from developing embryos of Hyalomma dromedarii.

    PubMed

    Kamel, M Y; Fahmy, A S; Ghazy, A H; Mohamed, M A

    1991-04-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Hyalomma dromedarii, the camel tick, was purified to apparent homogeneity. A molecular weight of 56,000 - 58,000 was estimated for both the native and denatured enzyme, suggesting that the enzyme is monomeric. Unlike purine nucleoside phosphorylase preparations from other tissues, the H. dromedarii enzyme was unstable in the presence of beta-mercaptoethanol. The enzyme had a sharp pH optimum at pH 6.5. It catalyzed the phosphorolysis and arsenolysis of ribo- and deoxyribo-nucleosides of hypoxanthine and guanine, but not of adenine or pyrimidine nucleosides. The Km values of the enzyme at the optimal pH for inosine, deoxyinosine, guanosine, and deoxyguanosine were 0.31, 0.67, 0.55, and 0.33 mM, respectively. Inactivation and kinetic studies suggested that histidine and cysteine residues were essential for activity. The pKa values determined for catalytic ionizable groups were 6-7 and 8-9. The enzyme was completely inactivated by thiol reagents and reactivated by excess beta-mercaptoethanol. The enzyme was also susceptible to pH-dependent photooxidation in the presence of methylene blue, implicating histidine. Initial velocity studies showed an intersecting pattern of double-reciprocal plots of the data, consistent with a sequential mechanism. PMID:1905141

  11. Structural determinants of the 5'-methylthioinosine specificity of Plasmodium purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Teraya M; Ting, Li-Min; Zhan, Chenyang; Shi, Wuxian; Zheng, Renjian; Almo, Steven C; Kim, Kami

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites rely upon purine salvage for survival. Plasmodium purine nucleoside phosphorylase is part of the streamlined Plasmodium purine salvage pathway that leads to the phosphorylysis of both purines and 5'-methylthiopurines, byproducts of polyamine synthesis. We have explored structural features in Plasmodium falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PfPNP) that affect efficiency of catalysis as well as those that make it suitable for dual specificity. We used site directed mutagenesis to identify residues critical for PfPNP catalytic activity as well as critical residues within a hydrophobic pocket required for accommodation of the 5'-methylthio group. Kinetic analysis data shows that several mutants had disrupted binding of the 5'-methylthio group while retaining activity for inosine. A triple PfPNP mutant that mimics Toxoplasma gondii PNP had significant loss of 5'-methylthio activity with retention of inosine activity. Crystallographic investigation of the triple mutant PfPNP with Tyr160Phe, Val66Ile, andVal73Ile in complex with the transition state inhibitor immucillin H reveals fewer hydrogen bond interactions for the inhibitor in the hydrophobic pocket. PMID:24416224

  12. Enzymatic Properties and Substrate Specificity of the Trehalose Phosphorylase from Caldanaerobacter subterraneus▿

    PubMed Central

    Van der Borght, Jef; Chen, Chao; Hoflack, Lieve; Van Renterghem, Lucas; Desmet, Tom; Soetaert, Wim

    2011-01-01

    A putative glycoside phosphorylase from Caldanaerobacter subterraneus subsp. pacificus was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, after codon optimization and chemical synthesis of the encoding gene. The enzyme was purified by His tag chromatography and was found to be specifically active toward trehalose, with an optimal temperature of 80°C. In addition, no loss of activity could be detected after 1 h of incubation at 65°C, which means that it is the most stable trehalose phosphorylase reported so far. The substrate specificity was investigated in detail by measuring the relative activity on a range of alternative acceptors, applied in the reverse synthetic reaction, and determining the kinetic parameters for the best acceptors. These results were rationalized based on the enzyme-substrate interactions observed in a homology model with a docked ligand. The specificity for the orientation of the acceptor's hydroxyl groups was found to decrease in the following order: C-3 > C-2 > C-4. This results in a particularly high activity on the monosaccharides d-fucose, d-xylose, l-arabinose, and d-galactose, as well as on l-fucose. However, determination of the kinetic parameters revealed that these acceptors bind less tightly in the active site than the natural acceptor d-glucose, resulting in drastically increased Km values. Nevertheless, the enzyme's high thermostability and broad acceptor specificity make it a valuable candidate for industrial disaccharide synthesis. PMID:21803886

  13. Structural determinants of the 5'-methylthioinosine specificity of Plasmodium purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Teraya M; Ting, Li-Min; Zhan, Chenyang; Shi, Wuxian; Zheng, Renjian; Almo, Steven C; Kim, Kami

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites rely upon purine salvage for survival. Plasmodium purine nucleoside phosphorylase is part of the streamlined Plasmodium purine salvage pathway that leads to the phosphorylysis of both purines and 5'-methylthiopurines, byproducts of polyamine synthesis. We have explored structural features in Plasmodium falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PfPNP) that affect efficiency of catalysis as well as those that make it suitable for dual specificity. We used site directed mutagenesis to identify residues critical for PfPNP catalytic activity as well as critical residues within a hydrophobic pocket required for accommodation of the 5'-methylthio group. Kinetic analysis data shows that several mutants had disrupted binding of the 5'-methylthio group while retaining activity for inosine. A triple PfPNP mutant that mimics Toxoplasma gondii PNP had significant loss of 5'-methylthio activity with retention of inosine activity. Crystallographic investigation of the triple mutant PfPNP with Tyr160Phe, Val66Ile, andVal73Ile in complex with the transition state inhibitor immucillin H reveals fewer hydrogen bond interactions for the inhibitor in the hydrophobic pocket.

  14. Adsorption and enzyme activity of sucrose phosphorylase on lipid Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett films.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Jefferson Muniz; Caseli, Luciano

    2014-04-01

    The production of bioelectronic devices, including biosensors, can be conducted using enzymes immobilized in ultrathin solid films, for which preserving the enzymatic catalytic activity is crucial for optimal performance. In this sense, nanostructured films that allow for control over molecular architectures are of interest. In this paper, we investigate the adsorption of sucrose phosphorylase onto Langmuir monolayers of the phospholipid dimyristoylphosphatidic acid, which caused the surface pressure isotherms to expand. With polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), the amide bands from the enzyme could be identified, with the C-N and C=O dipole moments lying parallel to the air-water interface. Structuring of the enzyme into an α-helix was noted, and this structure was preserved when the mixed enzyme-phospholipid monolayer was transferred in the form of a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film. The latter was demonstrated with measurements of the catalytic activity of sucrose phosphorylase, which presented the highest enzyme activity for multilayer LB film. The approach presented in this study not only allows for optimized catalytic activity toward sucrose but also permits to explain why certain film architectures exhibit superior performance.

  15. Regulation of phosphorylase kinase by low concentrations of Ca ions upon muscle contraction: the connection between metabolism and muscle contraction and the connection between muscle physiology and Ca-dependent signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    OZAWA, Eijiro

    2011-01-01

    It had long been one of the crucial questions in muscle physiology how glycogenolysis is regulated in connection with muscle contraction, when we found the answer to this question in the last half of the 1960s. By that time, the two principal currents of muscle physiology, namely, the metabolic flow starting from glycogen and the mechanisms of muscle contraction, had already been clarified at the molecular level thanks to our senior researchers. Thus, the final question we had to answer was how to connect these two currents. We found that low concentrations of Ca ions (10−7–10−4 M) released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum for the regulation of muscle contraction simultaneously reversibly activate phosphorylase kinase, the enzyme regulating glycogenolysis. Moreover, we found that adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cyclic AMP), which is already known to activate muscle phosphorylase kinase, is not effective in the absence of such concentrations of Ca ions. Thus, cyclic AMP is not effective by itself alone and only modifies the activation process in the presence of Ca ions (at that time, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase had not yet been identified). After a while, it turned out that our works have not only provided the solution to the above problem on muscle physiology, but have also been considered as the first report of Ca-dependent protein phosphorylation, which is one of the central problems in current cell biology. Phosphorylase kinase is the first protein kinase to phosphorylate a protein resulting in the change in the function of the phosphorylated protein, as shown by Krebs and Fischer. Our works further showed that this protein kinase is regulated in a Ca-dependent manner. Accordingly, our works introduced the concept of low concentrations of Ca ions, which were first identified as the regulatory substance of muscle contraction, to the vast field of Ca biology including signal transduction. PMID:21986313

  16. Inhibition and Structure of Trichomonas vaginalis Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase with Picomolar Transition State Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldo-Matthis,A.; Wing, C.; Ghanem, M.; Deng, H.; Wu, P.; Gupta, A.; Tyler, P.; Evans, G.; Furneaux, R.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasitic protozoan purine auxotroph possessing a unique purine salvage pathway consisting of a bacterial type purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and a purine nucleoside kinase. Thus, T. vaginalis PNP (TvPNP) functions in the reverse direction relative to the PNPs in other organisms. Immucillin-A (ImmA) and DADMe-Immucillin-A (DADMe-ImmA) are transition stte mimics of adenosine with geometric and electrostatic features that resemble early and late transition states of adenosine at the transition state stabilized by TvPNP. ImmA demonstrates slow-onset tight-binding inhibition with TvPNP, to give an equilibrium dissociation constant of 87 pM, an inhibitor release half-time of 17.2 min, and a K{sub m}/K{sub d} ratio of 70,100. DADMe-ImmA resembles a late ribooxacarbenium ion transition state for TvPNP to give a dissociation constant of 30 pM, an inhibitor release half-time of 64 min, and a K{sub m}/K{sub d} ratio of 203,300. The tight binding of DADMe-ImmA supports a late S{sub N}1 transition state. Despite their tight binding to TvPNP, ImmA and DADMe-ImmA are weak inhibitors of human and P. falciparum PNPs. The crystal structures of the TvPNP-ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4} and TvPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4} ternary complexes differ from previous structures with substrate anologues. The tight binding with DADMe-ImmA is in part due to a 2.7 {angstrom} ionic interaction between a PO{sub 4} oxygen and the N1 cation of the hydroxypyrrolidine and is weaker in the TvPNP{center_dot}ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4} structure at 3.5 {angstrom}. However, the TvPNP{center_dot}ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4} structure includes hydrogen bonds between the 2'-hydroxyl and the protein that are not present in TvPNP{center_dot}DADMe-ImmA{center_dot}PO{sub 4}. These structures explain why DADMe-ImmA binds tighter than ImmA. Immucillin-H is a 12 nM inhibitor of TvPNP but a 56 pM inhibitor of human PNP. And this difference is explained by isotope

  17. Phosphorylation of polynucleotide kinase/ phosphatase by DNA-dependent protein kinase and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated regulates its association with sites of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Zolner, Angela E.; Abdou, Ismail; Ye, Ruiqiong; Mani, Rajam S.; Fanta, Mesfin; Yu, Yaping; Douglas, Pauline; Tahbaz, Nasser; Fang, Shujuan; Dobbs, Tracey; Wang, Chen; Morrice, Nick; Hendzel, Michael J.; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Human polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNKP) is a dual specificity 5′-DNA kinase/3′-DNA phosphatase, with roles in base excision repair, DNA single-strand break repair and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ); yet precisely how PNKP functions in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) remains unclear. We demonstrate that PNKP is phosphorylated by the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) in vitro. The major phosphorylation site for both kinases was serine 114, with serine 126 being a minor site. Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced phosphorylation of cellular PNKP on S114 was ATM dependent, whereas phosphorylation of PNKP on S126 required both ATM and DNA-PK. Inactivation of DNA-PK and/or ATM led to reduced PNKP at DNA damage sites in vivo. Cells expressing PNKP with alanine or aspartic acid at serines 114 and 126 were modestly radiosensitive and IR enhanced the association of PNKP with XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV; however, this interaction was not affected by mutation of PNKP phosphorylation sites. Purified PNKP protein with mutation of serines 114 and 126 had decreased DNA kinase and DNA phosphatase activities and reduced affinity for DNA in vitro. Together, our results reveal that IR-induced phosphorylation of PNKP by ATM and DNA-PK regulates PNKP function at DSBs. PMID:21824916

  18. Phosphorylation of polynucleotide kinase/ phosphatase by DNA-dependent protein kinase and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated regulates its association with sites of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Zolner, Angela E; Abdou, Ismail; Ye, Ruiqiong; Mani, Rajam S; Fanta, Mesfin; Yu, Yaping; Douglas, Pauline; Tahbaz, Nasser; Fang, Shujuan; Dobbs, Tracey; Wang, Chen; Morrice, Nick; Hendzel, Michael J; Weinfeld, Michael; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2011-11-01

    Human polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNKP) is a dual specificity 5'-DNA kinase/3'-DNA phosphatase, with roles in base excision repair, DNA single-strand break repair and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ); yet precisely how PNKP functions in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) remains unclear. We demonstrate that PNKP is phosphorylated by the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) in vitro. The major phosphorylation site for both kinases was serine 114, with serine 126 being a minor site. Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced phosphorylation of cellular PNKP on S114 was ATM dependent, whereas phosphorylation of PNKP on S126 required both ATM and DNA-PK. Inactivation of DNA-PK and/or ATM led to reduced PNKP at DNA damage sites in vivo. Cells expressing PNKP with alanine or aspartic acid at serines 114 and 126 were modestly radiosensitive and IR enhanced the association of PNKP with XRCC4 and DNA ligase IV; however, this interaction was not affected by mutation of PNKP phosphorylation sites. Purified PNKP protein with mutation of serines 114 and 126 had decreased DNA kinase and DNA phosphatase activities and reduced affinity for DNA in vitro. Together, our results reveal that IR-induced phosphorylation of PNKP by ATM and DNA-PK regulates PNKP function at DSBs.

  19. Condensation of activated diguanylates on a Poly/C/ template. [prebiotic polynucleotide replication mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrmann, R.; Bridson, P. K.; Orgel, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    The metal-ion catalysis of the oligomerization of activated diguanylate isomers on a polycytidylic acid template is studied in an investigation of possible early prebiotic polynucleotide replication mechanisms. The 5'-imidazolides of diguanylates linked 2' to 5' or 3' to 5' were reacted with polyC in a 1-methylimidazole or a 2,6-lutidine buffer in the presence of a Zn(+2) or a Pb(+2) catalyst, and reaction products were determined by paper chromatography, paper electrophoresis and liquid chromatography. In the lutidine buffer, the presence of both the Zn(+2) catalyst and the polyC template is found to result in the production of 3'-5' linked oligomers with up to 10 diguanylate units, and from diguanylates in the presence of the monomer. In the reactions conducted in the 1-methylimidazole buffer, the addition of Pb(+2) is found to lead to less marked increases in oligomerization in the presence of template, with approximately equal proportions of 2'-5' and 3'-5' oligomers formed from the 2'-5' substrate and mainly 3'-5' bonds from the 3'-5' linked dimer.

  20. Enzymatic Glycosylation of Phenolic Antioxidants: Phosphorylase-Mediated Synthesis and Characterization.

    PubMed

    De Winter, Karel; Dewitte, Griet; Dirks-Hofmeister, Mareike E; De Laet, Sylvie; Pelantová, Helena; Křen, Vladimír; Desmet, Tom

    2015-11-25

    Although numerous biologically active molecules exist as glycosides in nature, information on the activity, stability, and solubility of glycosylated antioxidants is rather limited to date. In this work, a wide variety of antioxidants were glycosylated using different phosphorylase enzymes. The resulting antioxidant library, containing α/β-glucosides, different regioisomers, cellobiosides, and cellotriosides, was then characterized. Glycosylation was found to significantly increase the solubility and stability of all evaluated compounds. Despite decreased radical-scavenging abilities, most glycosides were identified to be potent antioxidants, outperforming the commonly used 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methylphenol (BHT). Moreover, the point of attachment, the anomeric configuration, and the glycosidic chain length were found to influence the properties of these phenolic glycosides.

  1. Enzymatic Glycosylation of Phenolic Antioxidants: Phosphorylase-Mediated Synthesis and Characterization.

    PubMed

    De Winter, Karel; Dewitte, Griet; Dirks-Hofmeister, Mareike E; De Laet, Sylvie; Pelantová, Helena; Křen, Vladimír; Desmet, Tom

    2015-11-25

    Although numerous biologically active molecules exist as glycosides in nature, information on the activity, stability, and solubility of glycosylated antioxidants is rather limited to date. In this work, a wide variety of antioxidants were glycosylated using different phosphorylase enzymes. The resulting antioxidant library, containing α/β-glucosides, different regioisomers, cellobiosides, and cellotriosides, was then characterized. Glycosylation was found to significantly increase the solubility and stability of all evaluated compounds. Despite decreased radical-scavenging abilities, most glycosides were identified to be potent antioxidants, outperforming the commonly used 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-methylphenol (BHT). Moreover, the point of attachment, the anomeric configuration, and the glycosidic chain length were found to influence the properties of these phenolic glycosides. PMID:26540621

  2. The ligand binding mechanism to purine nucleoside phosphorylase elucidated via molecular dynamics and machine learning

    PubMed Central

    Decherchi, Sergio; Berteotti, Anna; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Rocchia, Walter; Cavalli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The study of biomolecular interactions between a drug and its biological target is of paramount importance for the design of novel bioactive compounds. In this paper, we report on the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and machine learning to study the binding mechanism of a transition state analogue (DADMe–immucillin-H) to the purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) enzyme. Microsecond-long MD simulations allow us to observe several binding events, following different dynamical routes and reaching diverse binding configurations. These simulations are used to estimate kinetic and thermodynamic quantities, such as kon and binding free energy, obtaining a good agreement with available experimental data. In addition, we advance a hypothesis for the slow-onset inhibition mechanism of DADMe–immucillin-H against PNP. Combining extensive MD simulations with machine learning algorithms could therefore be a fruitful approach for capturing key aspects of drug–target recognition and binding. PMID:25625196

  3. Evaluation of capillary chromatographic supports for immobilized human purine nucleoside phosphorylase in frontal affinity chromatography studies.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Temporini, Caterina; Calleri, Enrica; Bruni, Giovanna; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra; Massolini, Gabriella

    2014-04-18

    The aim of this work was to optimize the preparation of a capillary human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (HsPNP) immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) for characterization and affinity screening studies of new inhibitors by frontal affinity chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (FAC-MS). For this purpose two monolithic supports, a Chromolith Speed Rod (0.1mm I.D.×5cm) and a methacrylate-based monolithic epoxy polymeric capillary column (0.25mm I.D.×5cm) with epoxy reactive groups were considered and compared to an IMER previously developed using an open fused silica capillary. Each HsPNP-IMER was characterized in terms of catalytic activity using Inosine as standard substrate. Furthermore, they were also explored for affinity ranking experiments. Kd determination was carried out with the based fused silica HsPNP-IMER and the results are herein discussed.

  4. Structure of cellobiose phosphorylase from Clostridium thermocellum in complex with phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Fox, Brian G.; Phillips, George N.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a cellulosome-producing bacterium that is able to efficiently degrade and utilize cellulose as a sole carbon source. Cellobiose phosphorylase (CBP) plays a critical role in cellulose degradation by catalyzing the reversible phosphate-dependent hydrolysis of cellobiose, the major product of cellulose degradation, into α-d-glucose 1-phosphate and d-glucose. CBP from C. thermocellum is a modular enzyme composed of four domains [N-­terminal domain, helical linker, (α/α)6-barrel domain and C-terminal domain] and is a member of glycoside hydrolase family 94. The 2.4 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of C. thermocellum CBP reveals the residues involved in coordinating the catalytic phosphate as well as the residues that are likely to be involved in substrate binding and discrimination. PMID:22102229

  5. Elucidating the evolutionary history and expression patterns of nucleoside phosphorylase paralogs (vegetative storage proteins) in Populus and the plant kingdom

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nucleoside phosphorylases (NPs) have been extensively investigated in human and bacterial systems for their role in metabolic nucleotide salvaging and links to oncogenesis. In plants, NP-like proteins have not been comprehensively studied, likely because there is no evidence of a metabolic function in nucleoside salvage. However, in the forest trees genus Populus a family of NP-like proteins function as an important ecophysiological adaptation for inter- and intra-seasonal nitrogen storage and cycling. Results We conducted phylogenetic analyses to determine the distribution and evolution of NP-like proteins in plants. These analyses revealed two major clusters of NP-like proteins in plants. Group I proteins were encoded by genes across a wide range of plant taxa while proteins encoded by Group II genes were dominated by species belonging to the order Malpighiales and included the Populus Bark Storage Protein (BSP) and WIN4-like proteins. Additionally, we evaluated the NP-like genes in Populus by examining the transcript abundance of the 13 NP-like genes found in the Populus genome in various tissues of plants exposed to long-day (LD) and short-day (SD) photoperiods. We found that all 13 of the Populus NP-like genes belonging to either Group I or II are expressed in various tissues in both LD and SD conditions. Tests of natural selection and expression evolution analysis of the Populus genes suggests that divergence in gene expression may have occurred recently during the evolution of Populus, which supports the adaptive maintenance models. Lastly, in silico analysis of cis-regulatory elements in the promoters of the 13 NP-like genes in Populus revealed common regulatory elements known to be involved in light regulation, stress/pathogenesis and phytohormone responses. Conclusion In Populus, the evolution of the NP-like protein and gene family has been shaped by duplication events and natural selection. Expression data suggest that previously

  6. Elevated thymidine phosphorylase activity in psoriatic lesions accounts for the apparent presence of an epidermal growth inhibitor, but is not in itself growth inhibitory

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerberg, C.; Fisher, G.J.; Voorhees, J.J.; Cooper, K.D. )

    1991-08-01

    An apparent tissue-specific growth inhibitor, or chalone, obtained from psoriatic lesions was tentatively identified in the 100-kDa fraction based upon inhibition of DNA synthesis, as measured by (3H)-thymidine uptake by a squamous cell carcinoma cell line, SCC 38. This fraction, however, failed to inhibit SCC 38 cell growth when assessed directly in a neutral red uptake assay. Characterization of the inhibitor of (3H)-thymidine uptake revealed it to have biochemical properties identical to thymidine phosphorylase: (1) molecular weight close to 100 kDa, (2) isoelectric point of 4.2, and (3) thymidine phosphorylase enzyme activity. Thus, the authors conclude that its ability to inhibit (3H)-thymidine uptake was due to thymidine catabolism rather than inhibition of DNA synthesis or growth inhibition. Examination of thymidine phosphorylase activity in keratome biopsies from psoriatic and normal skin demonstrated a twentyfold increase in activity in psoriatic lesions relative to non-lesional or normal skin. This increase in metabolism of thymidine was due to thymidine phosphorylase rather than uridine phosphorylase activity. The correlation between increased thymidine phosphorylase activity and increased keratinocyte proliferation in vitro (cultured) and in vivo (psoriasis), suggests that this enzyme may play a critical role in providing the thymidine necessary for keratinocyte proliferation.

  7. Crystal Structure of Xanthomonas AvrRxo1-ORF1, a Type III Effector with a Polynucleotide Kinase Domain, and Its Interactor AvrRxo1-ORF2.

    PubMed

    Han, Qian; Zhou, Changhe; Wu, Shuchi; Liu, Yi; Triplett, Lindsay; Miao, Jiamin; Tokuhisa, James; Deblais, Loïc; Robinson, Howard; Leach, Jan E; Li, Jianyong; Zhao, Bingyu

    2015-10-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) causes bacterial leaf streak (BLS) disease on rice plants. Xoc delivers a type III effector AvrRxo1-ORF1 into rice plant cells that can be recognized by disease resistance (R) protein Rxo1, and triggers resistance to BLS disease. However, the mechanism and virulence role of AvrRxo1 is not known. In the genome of Xoc, AvrRxo1-ORF1 is adjacent to another gene AvrRxo1-ORF2, which was predicted to encode a molecular chaperone of AvrRxo1-ORF1. We report the co-purification and crystallization of the AvrRxo1-ORF1:AvrRxo1-ORF2 tetramer complex at 1.64 Å resolution. AvrRxo1-ORF1 has a T4 polynucleotide kinase domain, and expression of AvrRxo1-ORF1 suppresses bacterial growth in a manner dependent on the kinase motif. Although AvrRxo1-ORF2 binds AvrRxo1-ORF1, it is structurally different from typical effector-binding chaperones, in that it has a distinct fold containing a novel kinase-binding domain. AvrRxo1-ORF2 functions to suppress the bacteriostatic activity of AvrRxo1-ORF1 in bacterial cells.

  8. Sensitive detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity based on coupled exonuclease reaction and nicking enzyme-assisted fluorescence signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ting; Wang, Xiuzhong; Lu, Tingting; Liu, Xiaojuan; Li, Feng

    2014-05-01

    As a prominent member of the 5'-kinase family, T4 polynucleotide kinase (PNK) plays an important role in gene function regulations, and the study of PNK activity and its potential inhibitors is significant for research related to the DNA phosphorylation process. Here, we proposed a novel strategy for the detection of PNK activity and its inhibition, which combines exonuclease enzyme reaction and nicking enzyme-assisted fluorescence signal amplification. Through recycling cleavage of DNA fluorescence probe for signal amplification, a highly sensitive PNK sensing platform is developed, and a very low detection limit of 0.05 mU/mL is achieved, which is better than or comparable to that of the previously reported PNK assays. The present approach adopts a simple separation-free procedure in which the enzyme assay is conducted in homogeneous solutions. Additionally, the inhibitory effects of several known kinase inhibitors on PNK have been successfully detected. Since the proposed assay exhibits the advantages of high sensitivity and simplicity, it holds great potential in providing a promising platform for convenient and highly sensitive detection of PNK activity and its inhibitors.

  9. One-step highly sensitive florescence detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity and biological small molecules by ligation-nicking coupled reaction-mediated signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Zhao, Yongxi; Qi, Lin; Fan, Chunhai

    2013-09-15

    DNA phosphorylation, catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK), plays significant regulatory roles in many biological events. Herein, using T4 PNK as a model target, we describe a one-step, highly sensitive, simple and rapid fluorescence approach for monitoring its activity and inhibition. This innovative strategy is inspired by the great amplification capability of ligation-nicking coupled reaction-mediated signal amplification. In the presence of T4 PNK, one of two short oligonucleotides complementary to the loop sequence of molecular beacon (MB) are phosphorylated, and then ligated with the other by DNA ligase. Upon formation of the stable duplex between the ligated DNA and MB, the fluorescence is restored and further significantly amplified through nicking endonuclease assisted cleavage of multiple MBs. Meanwhile, the cleavage of MBs will also generate new nicks to initiate the ligation reaction. Eventually, a maximum fluorescence enhancement is obtained when the ligation and nicking process reached a dynamic equilibrium. As compared to those of the existing approaches except for the assay based on single nanoparticle counting, all limited to 1:1 signal transduction function, the sensitivity (0.00001U/mL) of the proposed strategy is 100-1700 times higher. The application of the sensing system in complex biological matrix and screening of T4 PNK inhibition are demonstrated with satisfactory results. Moreover, this approach is also successfully used to detect biological small molecules such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and can be further extended for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) detection.

  10. Redesign of the Active Site of Sucrose Phosphorylase through a Clash-Induced Cascade of Loop Shifts.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Michael; Grimm, Clemens; Seibel, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose phosphorylases have been applied in the enzymatic production of glycosylated compounds for decades. However, several desirable acceptors, such as flavonoids or stilbenoids, that exhibit diverse antimicrobial, anticarcinogenic or antioxidant properties, remain poor substrates. The Q345F exchange in sucrose phosphorylase from Bifidobacterium adolescentis allows efficient glucosylation of resveratrol, (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin in yields of up to 97 % whereas the wild-type enzyme favours sucrose hydrolysis. Three previously undescribed products are made available. The crystal structure of the variant reveals a widened access channel with a hydrophobic aromatic surface that is likely to contribute to the improved activity towards aromatic acceptors. The generation of this channel can be explained in terms of a cascade of structural changes arising from the Q345F exchange. The observed mechanisms are likely to be relevant for the design of other tailor-made enzymes.

  11. Synthesis of α(1→4)-linked non-natural mannoglucans by α-glucan phosphorylase-catalyzed enzymatic copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Baba, Ryotaro; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kadokawa, Jun-Ichi

    2016-10-20

    α-Glucan phosphorylase catalyzes enzymatic polymerization of α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) as a monomer from a maltooligosaccharide primer to produce α(1→4)-glucan, i.e., amylose, with liberating inorganic phosphate (Pi). Because of quite weak specificity for the recognition of substrates by thermostable α-glucan phosphorylase (from Aquifex aeolicus VF5), in this study, we investigated the enzymatic copolymerization of Glc-1-P with its analogue monomer, α-d-mannose 1-phosphate (Man-1-P) under the conditions for removal of Pi as the precipitate with ammonium and magnesium in ammonia buffer containing Mg(2+) ion to produce α(1→4)-linked non-natural mannoglucans composed of Glc/Man units. The reaction was conducted in different feed ratios using the maltotriose primer at 40°C for 7days. The MALDI-TOF mass and (1)H NMR spectra of the products fully supported the mannoglucan structures.

  12. Slow translocation of polynucleotides and their discrimination by α-hemolysin inside a single track-etched nanopore designed by atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Aguilar, Simon; Balme, Sébastien; Chaaya, Adib Abou; Bechelany, Mikhael; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Janot, Jean-Marc; Pochat-Bohatier, Celine; Miele, Philippe; Dejardin, Philippe

    2013-10-21

    We report the formation of a hybrid biological/artificial nanopore by the direct insertion of non-modified α-hemolysin at the entrance of a high aspect ratio (length/diameter) biomimetic nanopore. In this robust hybrid system, the protein exhibits the same polynucleotide discrimination properties as in the biological membrane and the polynucleotide dwell time is strongly increased. This nanopore is very promising for DNA sequencing applications where the high DNA translocation velocity and the fragility of the support are the main bottlenecks.

  13. A WS2 nanosheet based sensing platform for highly sensitive detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase and its inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jia; Tang, Li-Juan; Xi, Qiang; Li, Xi-Ping; Yu, Ru-Qin; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Chu, Xia

    2014-05-01

    DNA phosphorylation, catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK), plays significant regulatory roles in many biological events. Here, a novel fluorescent nanosensor based on phosphorylation-specific exonuclease reaction and efficient fluorescence quenching of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by a WS2 nanosheet has been developed for monitoring the activity of PNK using T4 polynucleotide kinase (T4 PNK) as a model target. The fluorescent dye-labeled double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) remains highly fluorescent when mixed with WS2 nanosheets because of the weak adsorption of dsDNA on WS2 nanosheets. While dsDNA is phosphorylated by T4 PNK, it can be specifically degraded by λ exonuclease, producing ssDNA strongly adsorbed on WS2 nanosheets with greatly quenched fluorescence. Because of the high quenching efficiency of WS2 nanosheets, the developed platform presents excellent performance with a wide linear range, low detection limit and high signal-to-background ratio. Additionally, inhibition effects from adenosine diphosphate, ammonium sulfate, and sodium chloride have been investigated. The method may provide a universal platform for PNK activity monitoring and inhibitor screening in drug discovery and clinic diagnostics.DNA phosphorylation, catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK), plays significant regulatory roles in many biological events. Here, a novel fluorescent nanosensor based on phosphorylation-specific exonuclease reaction and efficient fluorescence quenching of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) by a WS2 nanosheet has been developed for monitoring the activity of PNK using T4 polynucleotide kinase (T4 PNK) as a model target. The fluorescent dye-labeled double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) remains highly fluorescent when mixed with WS2 nanosheets because of the weak adsorption of dsDNA on WS2 nanosheets. While dsDNA is phosphorylated by T4 PNK, it can be specifically degraded by λ exonuclease, producing ssDNA strongly adsorbed on WS2 nanosheets with greatly quenched fluorescence

  14. Polynucleotide kinase as a potential target for enhancing cytotoxicity by ionizing radiation and topoisomerase I inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, N. K.; Karimi-Busheri, F.; Rasouli-Nia, A.; Mani, R.; Dianov, G.; Glover, J. N. M.; Weinfeld, M.

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of many antineoplastic agents is due to their capacity to damage DNA and there is evidence indicating that DNA repair contributes to the cellular resistance to such agents. DNA strand breaks constitute a significant proportion of the lesions generated by a broad range of genotoxic agents, either directly, or during the course of DNA repair. Strand breaks that are caused by many agents including ionizing radiation, topoisomerase I inhibitors, and DNA repair glycosylases such as NEIL1 and NEIL2, often contain 5’-hydroxyl and/or 3’-phosphate termini. These ends must be converted to 5’-phosphate and 3’-hydroxyl termini in order to allow DNA polymerases and ligases to catalyze repair synthesis and strand rejoining. A key enzyme involved in this end-processing is polynucleotide kinase (PNK), which possesses two enzyme activities, a DNA 5’-kinase activity and a 3’-phosphatase activity. PNK participates in the single-strand break repair pathway and the non-homologous end joining pathway for double-strand break repair. RNAi-mediated down-regulation of PNK renders cells more sensitive to ionizing radiation and camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. Structural analysis of PNK revealed the protein is composed of three domains, the kinase domain at the C-terminus, the phosphatase domain in the centre and a forkhead associated (FHA) domain at the N-terminus. The FHA domain plays a critical role in the binding of PNK to other DNA repair proteins. Thus each PNK domain may be a suitable target for small molecule inhibition to effectively reduce resistance to ionizing radiation and topoisomerase I inhibitors. PMID:18473721

  15. Highly specific fluorescence detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity via photo-induced electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Tao, Mangjuan; Shi, Zhilu; Cheng, Rui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Baoxin; Jin, Yan

    2015-09-15

    Sensitive and reliable study of the activity of polynucleotide kinase (PNK) and its potential inhibitors is of great importance for biochemical interaction related to DNA phosphorylation as well as development of kinase-targeted drug discovery. To achieve facile and reliable detection of PNK activity, we report here a novel fluorescence method for PNK assay based on a combination of exonuclease cleavage reaction and photo-induced electron transfer (PIET) by using T4 PNK as a model target. The fluorescence of 3'-carboxyfluorescein-labeled DNA probe (FDNA) is effectively quenched by deoxyguanosines at the 5' end of its complementary DNA (cDNA) due to an effective PIET between deoxyguanosines and fluorophore. Whereas FDNA/cDNA hybrid is phosphorylated by PNK and then immediately cleaved by lambda exonuclease (λ exo), fluorescence is greatly restored due to the break of PIET. This homogeneous PNK activity assay does not require a complex design by taking advantage of the quenching ability of deoxyguanosines, making the proposed strategy facile and cost-effective. The activity of PNK can be sensitively detected in the range of 0.005 to 10 U mL(-1) with a detection limit of 2.1×10(-3) U mL(-1). Research on inhibition efficiency of different inhibitors demonstrated that it can be explored to evaluate inhibition capacity of inhibitors. The application for detection of PNK activity in complex matrix achieved satisfactory results. Therefore, this PIET strategy opens a promising avenue for studying T4 PNK activity as well as evaluating PNK inhibitors, which is of great importance for discovering kinase-targeted drugs. PMID:26050629

  16. The binding of D-gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone to glycogen phosphorylase. Kinetic, ultracentrifugation and crystallographic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, A C; Oikonomakos, N G; Leonidas, D D; Bernet, B; Beer, D; Vasella, A

    1991-01-01

    Combined kinetic, ultracentrifugation and X-ray-crystallographic studies have characterized the effect of the beta-glucosidase inhibitor gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone on the catalytic and structural properties of glycogen phosphorylase. In the direction of glycogen synthesis, gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone was found to competitively inhibit both the b (Ki 0.92 mM) and the alpha form of the enzyme (Ki 0.76 mM) with respect to glucose 1-phosphate in synergism with caffeine. In the direction of glycogen breakdown, gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone was found to inhibit phosphorylase b in a non-competitive mode with respect to phosphate, and no synergism with caffeine could be demonstrated. Ultracentrifugation and crystallization experiments demonstrated that gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone was able to induce dissociation of tetrameric phosphorylase alpha and stabilization of the dimeric T-state conformation. A crystallographic binding study with 100 mM-gluconohydroximo-1,5-lactone at 0.24 nm (2.4 A) resolution showed a major peak at the catalytic site, and no significant conformational changes were observed. Analysis of the electron-density map indicated that the ligand adopts a chair conformation. The results are discussed with reference to the ability of the catalytic site of the enzyme to distinguish between two or more conformations of the glucopyranose ring. PMID:1900987

  17. Discovery of Two β-1,2-Mannoside Phosphorylases Showing Different Chain-Length Specificities from Thermoanaerobacter sp. X-514

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Erika; Nishimoto, Mamoru; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Ohtsubo, Ken'ichi; Nakai, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    We characterized Teth514_1788 and Teth514_1789, belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 130, from Thermoanaerobacter sp. X-514. These two enzymes catalyzed the synthesis of 1,2-β-oligomannan using β-1,2-mannobiose and d-mannose as the optimal acceptors, respectively, in the presence of the donor α-d-mannose 1-phosphate. Kinetic analysis of the phosphorolytic reaction toward 1,2-β-oligomannan revealed that these enzymes followed a typical sequential Bi Bi mechanism. The kinetic parameters of the phosphorolysis of 1,2-β-oligomannan indicate that Teth514_1788 and Teth514_1789 prefer 1,2-β-oligomannans containing a DP ≥3 and β-1,2-Man2, respectively. These results indicate that the two enzymes are novel inverting phosphorylases that exhibit distinct chain-length specificities toward 1,2-β-oligomannan. Here, we propose 1,2-β-oligomannan:phosphate α-d-mannosyltransferase as the systematic name and 1,2-β-oligomannan phosphorylase as the short name for Teth514_1788 and β-1,2-mannobiose:phosphate α-d-mannosyltransferase as the systematic name and β-1,2-mannobiose phosphorylase as the short name for Teth514_1789. PMID:25500577

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of Vibrio cholerae uridine phosphorylase in complex with 6-methyluracil

    PubMed Central

    Prokofev, Igor I.; Lashkov, Alexander A.; Gabdulkhakov, Azat G.; Dontsova, Mariya V.; Seregina, Tatyana A.; Mironov, Alexander S.; Betzel, Christian; Mikhailov, Al’bert M.

    2014-01-01

    Uridine phosphorylase catalyzes the phosphorolysis of ribonucleosides, with the nitrogenous base and ribose 1-phosphate as products. Additionally, it catalyzes the reverse reaction of the synthesis of ribonucleosides from ribose 1-phosphate and a nitrogenous base. However, the enzyme does not catalyze the synthesis of nucleosides when the substrate is a nitrogenous base substituted at the 6-­position, such as 6-methyluracil (6-MU). In order to explain this fact, it is essential to investigate the three-dimensional structure of the complex of 6-MU with uridine phosphorylase. 6-MU is a pharmaceutical agent that improves tissue nutrition and enhances cell regeneration by normalization of nucleotide exchange in humans. 6-MU is used for the treatment of diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including infectious diseases. Here, procedures to obtain the uridine phosphorylase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae (VchUPh), purification of this enzyme, crystallization of the complex of VchUPh with 6-MU, and X-ray data collection and preliminary X-ray analysis of the VchUPh–6-MU complex at atomic resolution are reported. PMID:24419619

  19. Measurement of the turnover of glycogen phosphorylase by GC/MS using stable isotope derivatives of pyridoxine (vitamin B6).

    PubMed Central

    Beynon, R J; Leyland, D M; Evershed, R P; Edwards, R H; Coburn, S P

    1996-01-01

    The majority of vitamin B6 in the body is in skeletal muscle, bound as the cofactor pyridoxal 5'-phosphate to one abundant protein, glycogen phosphorylase. Previous work has established that radiolabelled vitamin B6 can be used as a turnover label for glycogen phosphorylase. In this study, a stable isotope derivative of pyridoxine ¿dideuterated pyridoxine; 3-hydroxy-4-(hydroxymethyl) -5-[hydroxymethyl-2H2]-2-methylpyridine¿ ([2H2]PN) has been used as a metabolic tracer to study the kinetics of labelling of the body pools of vitamin B6 in mice. A non-invasive method was developed in which the isotope abundance of the urinary excretory product of vitamin B6 metabolism, 4-pyridoxic acid, was analysed by GC/MS. The change in isotope abundance of urinary 4-pyridoxic acid following administration of [2H2]PN reflects the kinetics of labelling of the body pools of vitamin B6, and yields, non-invasively, the rate of degradation of glycogen phosphorylase. PMID:8713093

  20. Self-association of the alpha subunit of phosphorylase kinase as determined by two-hybrid screening.

    PubMed

    Ayers, N A; Wilkinson, D A; Fitzgerald, T J; Carlson, G M

    1999-12-10

    The structural organization of the (alphabetagammadelta)(4) phosphorylase kinase complex has been studied using the yeast two-hybrid screen for the purpose of elucidating regions of alpha subunit interactions. By screening a rabbit skeletal muscle cDNA library with residues 1-1059 of the alpha subunit of phosphorylase kinase, we have isolated 16 interacting, independent, yet overlapping transcripts of the alpha subunit containing its C-terminal region. Domain mapping of binary interactions between alpha constructs revealed two regions involved in the self-association of the alpha subunit: residues 833-854, a previously unrecognized leucine zipper, and an unspecified region within residues 1015-1237. The cognate binding partner for the latter domain has been inferred to lie within the stretch from residues 864-1059. Indirect evidence from the literature suggests that the interacting domains contained within the latter two, overlapping regions may be further narrowed to the stretches from 1057 to 1237 and from 864 to 971. Cross-linking of the nonactivated holoenzyme with N-(gamma-maleimidobutyroxy)sulfosuccin-imide ester produced intramolecularly cross-linked alpha-alpha dimers, consistent with portions of two alpha subunits in the holoenyzme being in sufficient proximity to associate. This is the first report to identify potential areas of contact between the alpha subunits of phosphorylase kinase. Additionally, issues regarding the general utility of two-hybrid screening as a method for studying homodimeric interactions are discussed. PMID:10585434

  1. A purine nucleoside phosphorylase in Solanum tuberosum L. (potato) with specificity for cytokinins contributes to the duration of tuber endodormancy.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Jennifer R; Warnes, Barbara J; Newell, Christine A; Thomson, Jamie C P; James, Celia M; Turnbull, Colin G N; Hanke, David E

    2014-03-01

    StCKP1 (Solanum tuberosum cytokinin riboside phosphorylase) catalyses the interconversion of the N9-riboside form of the plant hormone CK (cytokinin), a subset of purines, with its most active free base form. StCKP1 prefers CK to unsubstituted aminopurines. The protein was discovered as a CK-binding activity in extracts of tuberizing potato stolon tips, from which it was isolated by affinity chromatography. The N-terminal amino acid sequence matched the translation product of a set of ESTs, enabling a complete mRNA sequence to be obtained by RACE-PCR. The predicted polypeptide includes a cleavable signal peptide and motifs for purine nucleoside phosphorylase activity. The expressed protein was assayed for purine nucleoside phosphorylase activity against CKs and adenine/adenosine. Isopentenyladenine, trans-zeatin, dihydrozeatin and adenine were converted into ribosides in the presence of ribose 1-phosphate. In the opposite direction, isopentenyladenosine, trans-zeatin riboside, dihydrozeatin riboside and adenosine were converted into their free bases in the presence of Pi. StCKP1 had no detectable ribohydrolase activity. Evidence is presented that StCKP1 is active in tubers as a negative regulator of CKs, prolonging endodormancy by a chill-reversible mechanism.

  2. Slow translocation of polynucleotides and their discrimination by α-hemolysin inside a single track-etched nanopore designed by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabello-Aguilar, Simon; Balme, Sébastien; Chaaya, Adib Abou; Bechelany, Mikhael; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Janot, Jean-Marc; Pochat-Bohatier, Celine; Miele, Philippe; Dejardin, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    We report the formation of a hybrid biological/artificial nanopore by the direct insertion of non-modified α-hemolysin at the entrance of a high aspect ratio (length/diameter) biomimetic nanopore. In this robust hybrid system, the protein exhibits the same polynucleotide discrimination properties as in the biological membrane and the polynucleotide dwell time is strongly increased. This nanopore is very promising for DNA sequencing applications where the high DNA translocation velocity and the fragility of the support are the main bottlenecks.We report the formation of a hybrid biological/artificial nanopore by the direct insertion of non-modified α-hemolysin at the entrance of a high aspect ratio (length/diameter) biomimetic nanopore. In this robust hybrid system, the protein exhibits the same polynucleotide discrimination properties as in the biological membrane and the polynucleotide dwell time is strongly increased. This nanopore is very promising for DNA sequencing applications where the high DNA translocation velocity and the fragility of the support are the main bottlenecks. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials, nanopore fabrication and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03683a

  3. Detection of polynucleotide kinase activity by using a gold electrode modified with magnetic microspheres coated with titanium dioxide nanoparticles and a DNA dendrimer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangfeng; Chen, Ling; He, Xiuping; Zhu, Yanhong; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2014-08-21

    In this paper, we have designed a signal amplified method for the electrochemical determination of polynucleotide kinase activity. It is based on (a) the peroxidase-like activity of magnetite microspheres (MNPs), (b) the specific recognition capabilities of titanium dioxide (TiO2) with the phosphate groups of the capture probe and (c) the DNA dendrimer structure for signal amplification. MNPs coated with TiO2 (TMNPs) were prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. TMNP-DNA dendrimers were formed by the hybridization of captured nucleic acids with a link probe. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were carried out to study the electrocatalytic process. The formation of the TMNP-DNA dendrimer structures was related to the phosphorylated capture probe and further to the activity of polynucleotide kinase, which was the base of the polynucleotide kinase detection. The TMNP-DNA dendrimer based biosensor showed sensitive detection of polynucleotide kinase with a satisfying result; a low detection of 0.003 U mL(-1) and wide linear range of 0.01 to 30 U mL(-1) were achieved. Additionally, the present TMNP-DNA dendrimer based biosensor also demonstrated excellent selectivity, stability and reproducibility. PMID:24918936

  4. A glycogen phosphorylase inhibitor selectively enhances local rates of glucose utilization in brain during sensory stimulation of conscious rats: implications for glycogen turnover.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Gerald A; Ball, Kelly K; Cruz, Nancy F

    2007-07-01

    Glycogen is degraded during brain activation but its role and contribution to functional energetics in normal activated brain have not been established. In the present study, glycogen utilization in brain of normal conscious rats during sensory stimulation was assessed by three approaches, change in concentration, release of (14)C from pre-labeled glycogen and compensatory increase in utilization of blood glucose (CMR(glc)) evoked by treatment with a glycogen phosphorylase inhibitor. Glycogen level fell in cortex, (14)C release increased in three structures and inhibitor treatment caused regionally selective compensatory increases in CMR(glc) over and above the activation-induced rise in vehicle-treated rats. The compensatory rise in CMR(glc) was highest in sensory-parietal cortex where it corresponded to about half of the stimulus-induced rise in CMR(glcf) in vehicle-treated rats; this response did not correlate with metabolic rate, stimulus-induced rise in CMR(glc) or sequential station in sensory pathway. Thus, glycogen is an active fuel for specific structures in normal activated brain, not simply an emergency fuel depot and flux-generated pyruvate greatly exceeded net accumulation of lactate or net consumption of glycogen during activation. The metabolic fate of glycogen is unknown, but adding glycogen to the fuel consumed during activation would contribute to a fall in CMR(O2)/CMR(glc) ratio.

  5. Rac1 Protein Regulates Glycogen Phosphorylase Activation and Controls Interleukin (IL)-2-dependent T Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Arrizabalaga, Onetsine; Lacerda, Hadriano M.; Zubiaga, Ana M.; Zugaza, José L.

    2012-01-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family have been implicated in important cellular processes such as cell migration and adhesion, protein secretion, and/or gene transcription. In the lymphoid system, these GTPases participate in the signaling cascades that are activated after engagement of antigen receptors. However, little is known about the role that Rho GTPases play in IL-2-mediated responses. Here, we show that IL-2 induces Rac1 activation in Kit 225 T cells. We identified by mass spectrometry the muscle isoform of glycogen phosphorylase (PYGM) as a novel Rac1 effector molecule in IL-2-stimulated cells. The interaction between the active form of Rac1 (Rac1-GTP) and PYGM was established directly through a domain comprising amino acids 191–270 of PYGM that exhibits significant homology with the Rac binding domain of PAK1. The integrity of this region was crucial for PYGM activation. Importantly, IL-2-dependent cellular proliferation was inhibited upon blocking both the activation of Rac1 and the activity of PYGM. These results reveal a new role for Rac1 in cell signaling, showing that this GTPase triggers T cell proliferation upon IL-2 stimulation by associating with PYGM and modulating its enzymatic activity. PMID:22337875

  6. Thymidine phosphorylase exerts complex effects on bone resorption and formation in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Du, Juan; He, Jin; Lin, Pei; Amini, Behrang; Starbuck, Michael W; Novane, Nora; Shah, Jatin J; Davis, Richard E; Hou, Jian; Gagel, Robert F; Yang, Jing

    2016-08-24

    Myelomatous bone disease is characterized by the development of lytic bone lesions and a concomitant reduction in bone formation, leading to chronic bone pain and fractures. To understand the underlying mechanism, we investigated the contribution of myeloma-expressed thymidine phosphorylase (TP) to bone lesions. In osteoblast progenitors, TP up-regulated the methylation of RUNX2 and osterix, leading to decreased bone formation. In osteoclast progenitors, TP up-regulated the methylation of IRF8 and thereby enhanced expression of NFATc1 (nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 protein), leading to increased bone resorption. TP reversibly catalyzes thymidine into thymine and 2-deoxy-d-ribose (2DDR). Myeloma-secreted 2DDR bound to integrin αVβ3/α5β1 in the progenitors, activated PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt signaling, and increased DNMT3A (DNA methyltransferase 3A) expression, resulting in hypermethylation of RUNX2, osterix, and IRF8 This study elucidates an important mechanism for myeloma-induced bone lesions, suggesting that targeting TP may be a viable approach to healing resorbed bone in patients. Because TP overexpression is common in bone-metastatic tumors, our findings could have additional mechanistic implications. PMID:27559096

  7. Identification of the maize amyloplast stromal 112-kD protein as a plastidic starch phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Mu, H H; Wasserman, B P; Carman, G M

    2001-01-01

    Amyloplast is the site of starch synthesis in the storage tissue of maize (Zea mays). The amyloplast stroma contains an enriched group of proteins when compared with the whole endosperm. Proteins with molecular masses of 76 and 85 kD have been identified as starch synthase I and starch branching enzyme IIb, respectively. A 112-kD protein was isolated from the stromal fraction by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to tryptic digestion and amino acid sequence analysis. Three peptide sequences showed high identity to plastidic forms of starch phosphorylase (SP) from sweet potato, potato, and spinach. SP activity was identified in the amyloplast stromal fraction and was enriched 4-fold when compared with the activity in the whole endosperm fraction. Native and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses showed that SP activity was associated with the amyloplast stromal 112-kD protein. In addition, antibodies raised against the potato plastidic SP recognized the amyloplast stromal 112-kD protein. The amyloplast stromal 112-kD SP was expressed in whole endosperm isolated from maize harvested 9 to 24 d after pollination. Results of affinity electrophoresis and enzyme kinetic analyses showed that the amyloplast stromal 112-kD SP preferred amylopectin over glycogen as a substrate in the synthetic reaction. The maize shrunken-4 mutant had reduced SP activity due to a decrease of the amyloplast stromal 112-kD enzyme.

  8. Multiple disulfide bridges modulate conformational stability and flexibility in hyperthermophilic archaeal purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Bagarolo, Maria Libera; Porcelli, Marina; Martino, Elisa; Feller, Georges; Cacciapuoti, Giovanna

    2015-10-01

    5'-Deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase from Sulfolobus solfataricus is a hexameric hyperthermophilic protein containing in each subunit two pairs of disulfide bridges, a CXC motif, and one free cysteine. The contribution of each disulfide bridge to the protein conformational stability and flexibility has been assessed by comparing the thermal unfolding and the limited proteolysis of the wild-type enzyme and its variants obtained by site-directed mutagenesis of the seven cysteine residues. All variants catalyzed efficiently MTA cleavage with specific activity similar to the wild-type enzyme. The elimination of all cysteine residues caused a substantial decrease of ΔHcal (850 kcal/mol) and Tmax (39°C) with respect to the wild-type indicating that all cysteine pairs and especially the CXC motif significantly contribute to the enzyme thermal stability. Disulfide bond Cys200-Cys262 and the CXC motif weakly affected protein flexibility while the elimination of the disulfide bond Cys138-Cys205 lead to an increased protease susceptibility. Experimental evidence from limited proteolysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing and nonreducing conditions also allowed to propose a stabilizing role for the free Cys164.

  9. Regulation of glycogen metabolism in cultured human muscles by the glycogen phosphorylase inhibitor CP-91149.

    PubMed Central

    Lerín, Carlos; Montell, Eulàlia; Nolasco, Teresa; García-Rocha, Mar; Guinovart, Joan J; Gómez-Foix, Anna M

    2004-01-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of liver GP (glycogen phosphorylase), which is currently being studied as a treatment for Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes, may affect muscle glycogen metabolism. In the present study, we analysed the effects of the GP inhibitor CP-91149 on non-engineered or GP-overexpressing cultured human muscle cells. We found that CP-91149 treatment decreased muscle GP activity by (1) converting the phosphorylated AMP-independent a form into the dephosphorylated AMP-dependent b form and (2) inhibiting GP a activity and AMP-mediated GP b activation. Dephosphorylation of GP was exerted, irrespective of incubation of the cells with glucose, whereas inhibition of its activity was synergic with glucose. As expected, CP-91149 impaired the glycogenolysis induced by glucose deprivation. CP-91149 also promoted the dephosphorylation and activation of GS (glycogen synthase) in non-engineered or GP-overexpressing cultured human muscle cells, but exclusively in glucose-deprived cells. However, this inhibitor did not activate GS in glucose-deprived but glycogen-replete cells overexpressing PTG (protein targeting to glycogen), thus suggesting that glycogen inhibits the CP-91149-mediated activation of GS. Consistently, CP-91149 promoted glycogen resynthesis, but not its overaccumulation. Hence, treatment with CP-91149 impairs muscle glycogen breakdown, but enhances its recovery, which may be useful for the treatment of Type II (insulin-dependent) diabetes. PMID:14651477

  10. Brain isoform glycogen phosphorylase as a novel hepatic progenitor cell marker.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Wen; Chiu, Chien-Chang; Liang, Ja-Der; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Huang, Guan-Tarn; Yu, Ming-Jiun; Lee, Hsuan-Shu

    2015-01-01

    An appropriate liver-specific progenitor cell marker is a stepping stone in liver regenerative medicine. Here, we report brain isoform glycogen phosphorylase (GPBB) as a novel liver progenitor cell marker. GPBB was identified in a protein complex precipitated by a monoclonal antibody Ligab generated from a rat liver progenitor cell line Lig-8. Immunoblotting results show that GPBB was expressed in two liver progenitor cell lines Lig-8 and WB-F344. The levels of GPBB expression decreased in the WB-F344 cells under sodium butyrate (SB)-induced cell differentiation, consistent with roles of GPBB as a liver progenitor cell marker. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated GPBB knockdown followed by glucose deprivation test shows that GPBB aids in liver progenitor cell survival under low glucose conditions. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated GPBB knockdown followed by SB-induced cell differentiation shows that reducing GPBB expression delayed liver progenitor cell differentiation. We conclude that GPBB is a novel liver progenitor cell marker, which facilitates liver progenitor cell survival under low glucose conditions and cell differentiation. PMID:25826279

  11. Crystal structure and molecular dynamics studies of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis associated with acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Caceres, Rafael A; Timmers, Luís F S M; Ducati, Rodrigo G; da Silva, Diego O N; Basso, Luiz A; de Azevedo, Walter F; Santos, Diógenes S

    2012-01-01

    Consumption has been a scourge of mankind since ancient times. This illness has charged a high price to human lives. Many efforts have been made to defeat Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt). The M. tuberculosis purine nucleoside phosphorylase (MtPNP) is considered an interesting target to pursuit new potential inhibitors, inasmuch it belongs to the purine salvage pathway and its activity might be involved in the mycobacterial latency process. Here we present the MtPNP crystallographic structure associated with acyclovir and phosphate (MtPNP:ACY:PO(4)) at 2.10 Å resolution. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to dissect MtPNP:ACY:PO(4) structural features, and the influence of the ligand in the binding pocket stability. Our results revealed that the ligand leads to active site lost of stability, in agreement with experimental results, which demonstrate a considerable inhibitory activity against MtPNP (K(i) = 150 nM). Furthermore, we observed that some residues which are important in the proper ligand's anchor into the human homologous enzyme do not present the same importance to MtPNP. Therewithal, these findings contribute to the search of new specific inhibitors for MtPNP, since peculiarities between the mycobacterial and human enzyme binding sites have been identified, making a structural-based drug design feasible.

  12. Substrate specificity and kinetic mechanism of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ducati, Rodrigo G; Santos, Diógenes S; Basso, Luiz A

    2009-06-15

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtPNP) is numbered among targets for persistence of the causative agent of tuberculosis. Here, it is shown that MtPNP is more specific to natural 6-oxopurine nucleosides and synthetic compounds, and does not catalyze the phosphorolysis of adenosine. Initial velocity, product inhibition and equilibrium binding data suggest that MtPNP catalyzes 2'-deoxyguanosine (2dGuo) phosphorolysis by a steady-state ordered bi bi kinetic mechanism, in which inorganic phosphate (P(i)) binds first followed by 2dGuo, and ribose 1-phosphate dissociates first followed by guanine. pH-rate profiles indicated a general acid as being essential for both catalysis and 2dGuo binding, and that deprotonation of a group abolishes P(i) binding. Proton inventory and solvent deuterium isotope effects indicate that a single solvent proton transfer makes a modest contribution to the rate-limiting step. Pre-steady-state kinetic data indicate that product release appears to contribute to the rate-limiting step for MtPNP-catalyzed reaction.

  13. Capillary bioreactors based on human purine nucleoside phosphorylase: a new approach for ligands identification and characterization.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Donato, Augusto José; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diógenes Santiago; Cardoso, Carmen Lucia; Cass, Quezia Bezerra

    2012-04-01

    The enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a target for the discovery of new lead compounds employed on the treatment severe T-cell mediated disorders. Within this context, the development of new, direct, and reliable methods for ligands screening is an important task. This paper describes the preparation of fused silica capillaries human PNP (HsPNP) immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER). The activity of the obtained IMER is monitored on line in a multidimensional liquid chromatography system, by the quantification of the product formed throughout the enzymatic reaction. The K(M) value for the immobilized enzyme was about twofold higher than that measured for the enzyme in solution (255 ± 29.2 μM and 133 ± 14.9 μM, respectively). A new fourth-generation immucillin derivative (DI4G; IC(50)=40.6 ± 0.36 nM), previously identified and characterized in HsPNP free enzyme assays, was used to validate the IMER as a screening method for HsPNP ligands. The validated method was also used for mechanistic studies with this inhibitor. This new approach is a valuable tool to PNP ligand screening, since it directly measures the hypoxanthine released by inosine phosphorolysis, thus furnishing more reliable results than those one used in a coupled enzymatic spectrophotometric assay.

  14. EXPRESSION PATTERNS OF THE GLYCOGEN PHOSPHORYLASE GENE RELATED TO LARVAL DIAPAUSE IN Ostrinia furnacalis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianqing; Zhang, Honggang; Edwards, Martin; Wang, Zhenying; Bai, Shuxiong; He, Kanglai

    2016-04-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) acts in the first step in release of glucose from glycogen, a form of energy storage for most organisms. To investigate the characteristics and expression pattern of GP gene (Ofgp) in the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée), larvae, we cloned and analyzed tissue transcription of Ofgp. The results indicate that the open reading frame (ORF) is 2,526 bp, encoding 841 amino acid. The calculated three-dimensional structure shows 33 α-helices and 24 β-sheets. Ofgp transcription levels varied significantly during the second to fifth instars under long-day (28 °C, 16:8 L:D photoperiod, and 70-80% relative humidity (RH)) and short-day (24.5 °C, 11:13 L:D photoperiod, and 70-80% RH) conditions, remained low during the prediapause phase, and then increased after about 36 d under short-day photoperiod. In the larvae reared under long-day condition, hemolymph ranked the highest in the transcript level of Ofgp. The highest transcription was recorded in the fat body and was lower in the other tissues in larvae reared under short-day condition. We found that Ofgp transcription increased linearly from October 2012 to January 2013. The transcript level was negatively correlated with environmental temperature. We infer the higher Ofgp transcription may enhance the cold hardiness of the diapause larvae. PMID:26748939

  15. Surface Induced Dissociation Yields Quaternary Substructure of Refractory Noncovalent Phosphorylase B and Glutamate Dehydrogenase Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xin; Zhou, Mowei; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2014-03-01

    Ion mobility (IM) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) coupled with native MS are useful for studying noncovalent protein complexes. Collision induced dissociation (CID) is the most common MS/MS dissociation method. However, some protein complexes, including glycogen phosphorylase B kinase (PHB) and L-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) examined in this study, are resistant to dissociation by CID at the maximum collision energy available in the instrument. Surface induced dissociation (SID) was applied to dissociate the two refractory protein complexes. Different charge state precursor ions of the two complexes were examined by CID and SID. The PHB dimer was successfully dissociated to monomers and the GDH hexamer formed trimeric subcomplexes that are informative of its quaternary structure. The unfolding of the precursor and the percentages of the distinct products suggest that the dissociation pathways vary for different charge states. The precursors at lower charge states (+21 for PHB dimer and +27 for GDH hexamer) produce a higher percentage of folded fragments and dissociate more symmetrically than the precusors at higher charge states (+29 for PHB dimer and +39 for GDH hexamer). The precursors at lower charge state may be more native-like than the higher charge state because a higher percentage of folded fragments and a lower percentage of highly charged unfolded fragments are detected. The combination of SID and charge reduction is shown to be a powerful tool for quaternary structure analysis of refractory noncovalent protein complexes, as illustrated by the data for PHB dimer and GDH hexamer.

  16. Effects of thymidine phosphorylase on tumor aggressiveness and 5-fluorouracil sensitivity in cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thanasai, Jongkonnee; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Jearanaikoon, Patcharee; Sripa, Banchob; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Tantimavanich, Srisurang; Miwa, Masanao

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the role of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) in cholangiocarcinoma using small interfering RNA (siRNA). METHODS: A human cholangiocarcinoma-derived cell line KKU-M139, which has a naturally high level of endogenous TP, had TP expression transiently knocked down using siRNA. Cell growth, migration, in vitro angiogenesis, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity were assayed in TP knockdown and wild-type cell lines. RESULTS: TP mRNA and protein expression were decreased by 87.1% ± 0.49% and 72.5% ± 3.2%, respectively, compared with control cells. Inhibition of TP significantly decreased migration of KKU-M139, and suppressed migration and tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. siRNA also reduced the ability of TP to resist hypoxia-induced apoptosis, while suppression of TP reduced the sensitivity of KKU-M139 to 5-fluorouracil. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of TP may be beneficial in decreasing angiogenesis-dependent growth and migration of cholangiocarcinoma but may diminish the response to 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. PMID:20355241

  17. Production and application of a rare disaccharide using sucrose phosphorylase from Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kenji; Yoshihara, Akihide; Furumoto, Toshio; Takata, Goro

    2015-06-01

    Sucrose phosphorylase (SPase) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides exhibited activity towards eight ketohexoses, which behaved as D-glucosyl acceptors, and α-D-glucose-1-phosphate (G1P), which behaved as a donor. All eight of these ketohexoses were subsequently transformed into the corresponding d-glucosyl-ketohexoses. Of the eight ketohexoses evaluated in the current study, d-allulose behaved as the best substrate for SPase, and the resulting d-glucosyl-d-alluloside product was found to be a non-reducing sugar with a specific optical rotation of [α]D(20) + 74.36°. D-Glucosyl-D-alluloside was identified as α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-β-D-allulofuranoside by NMR analysis. D-Glucosyl-D-alluloside exhibited an inhibitory activity towards an invertase from yeast with a Km value of 50 mM, where it behaved as a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 9.2 mM. D-Glucosyl-D-alluloside was also successfully produced from sucrose using SPase and D-tagatose 3-epimerase. This process also allowed for the production of G1P from sucrose and d-allulose from D-fructose, which suggested that this method could be used to prepare d-glucosyl-d-alluloside without the need for expensive reagents such as G1P and d-allulose. PMID:25499751

  18. Binding of IKe gene 5 protein to polynucleotides. Fluorescence binding experiments of IKe gene 5 protein and mutual cooperativity of IKe and M13 gene 5 proteins.

    PubMed

    de Jong, E A; Harmsen, B J; Konings, R N; Hilbers, C W

    1987-04-01

    Fluorescence studies of the binding of IKe gene 5 protein to various polynucleotides were performed to obtain insight into the question as to what extent the binding characteristics of the gene 5 proteins of the IKe and M13 phages resemble and/or differ from each other. The fluorescence of IKe gene 5 protein is quenched 60% upon binding to most polynucleotides. At moderate salt concentrations, i.e., below 1 M salt, the binding stoichiometry is 4.0 +/- 0.5 nucleotides per IKe gene 5 protein monomer. The affinity of the protein for homopolynucleotides depends strongly on sugar and base type; in order of increasing affinities we find poly(rC) less than poly(dA) less than poly(rA) less than poly(dI) less than poly(rU) less than poly(dU) less than poly(dT). For most polynucleotides studied, the affinity depends linearly on the salt concentration: [d log (Kint omega)]/(d log [M+]) = -3. The binding is highly cooperative. The cooperativity parameter omega, as deduced from protein titration curves, is 300 +/- 150 and appears independent of the type of polynucleotide studied. Estimation of this binding parameter from salt titrations of gene 5 protein-polynucleotide complexes results in systematically higher values. A comparison of the binding data of the IKe and M13 gene 5 proteins shows that the fluorescence quenching, stoichiometry, order of binding affinities, and cooperativity in the binding are similar for both proteins. From this it is concluded that at least the DNA binding grooves of both proteins must show a close resemblance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. The alpha and beta subunits of phosphorylase kinase are homologous: cDNA cloning and primary structure of the beta subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Kilimann, M W; Zander, N F; Kuhn, C C; Crabb, J W; Meyer, H E; Heilmeyer, L M

    1988-01-01

    We have cloned cDNA molecules encoding the beta subunit of phosphorylase kinase (ATP:phosphorylase-b phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.38) from rabbit fast-twitch skeletal muscle and have determined the complete primary structure of the polypeptide by a combination of peptide and DNA sequencing. In the mature beta subunit, the initial methionine is replaced by an acetyl group. The subunit is composed of 1092 amino acids and has a calculated molecular mass of 125,205 Da. Alignment of its sequence with the alpha subunit of phosphorylase kinase reveals extensive regions of homology, but each molecule also possesses unique sequences. Two of the three phosphorylation sites known for the beta subunit and all seven phosphorylation sites known for the alpha subunit are located in these unique domains. Images PMID:3200826

  20. Physiological aggregation of maltodextrin phosphorylase from Pyrococcus furiosus and its application in a process of batch starch degradation to alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Nahálka, Jozef

    2008-04-01

    Maltodextrin phosphorylase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PF1535) was fused with the cellulose-binding domain of Clostridium cellulovorans serving as an aggregation module. After molecular cloning of the corresponding gene fusion construct and controlled expression in Escherichia coli BL21, 83% of total maltodextrin phosphorylase activity (0.24 U/mg of dry cell weight) was displayed in active inclusion bodies. These active inclusion bodies were easily isolated by nonionic detergent treatment and directly used for maltodextrin conversion to alpha-D-glucose-1-phosphate in a repetitive batch mode. Only 10% of enzyme activity was lost after ten conversion cycles at optimum conditions.

  1. The phosphate site of trehalose phosphorylase from Schizophyllum commune probed by site-directed mutagenesis and chemical rescue studies.

    PubMed

    Goedl, Christiane; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2008-03-01

    Schizophyllum communealpha,alpha-trehalose phosphorylase utilizes a glycosyltransferase-like catalytic mechanism to convert its disaccharide substrate into alpha-d-glucose 1-phosphate and alpha-d-glucose. Recruitment of phosphate by the free enzyme induces alpha,alpha-trehalose binding recognition and promotes the catalytic steps. Like the structurally related glycogen phosphorylase and other retaining glycosyltransferases of fold family GT-B, the trehalose phosphorylase contains an Arg507-XXXX-Lys512 consensus motif (where X is any amino acid) comprising key residues of its putative phosphate-binding sub-site. Loss of wild-type catalytic efficiency for reaction with phosphate (kcat/Km=21,000 m(-1).s(-1)) was dramatic (>or=10(7)-fold) in purified Arg507-->Ala (R507A) and Lys512-->Ala (K512A) enzymes, reflecting a corresponding change of comparable magnitude in kcat (Arg507) and Km (Lys512). External amine and guanidine derivatives selectively enhanced the activity of the K512A mutant and the R507A mutant respectively. Analysis of the pH dependence of chemical rescue of the K512A mutant by propargylamine suggested that unprotonated amine in combination with H2PO4-, the protonic form of phosphate presumably utilized in enzymatic catalysis, caused restoration of activity. Transition state-like inhibition of the wild-type enzyme A by vanadate in combination with alpha,alpha-trehalose (Ki=0.4 microm) was completely disrupted in the R507A mutant but only weakened in the K512A mutant (Ki=300 microm). Phosphate (50 mm) enhanced the basal hydrolase activity of the K512A mutant toward alpha,alpha-trehalose by 60% but caused its total suppression in wild-type and R507A enzymes. The results portray differential roles for the side chains of Lys512 and Arg507 in trehalose phosphorylase catalysis, reactant state binding of phosphate and selective stabilization of the transition state respectively. PMID:18205830

  2. Liver glycogen storage diseases due to phosphorylase system deficiencies: diagnosis thanks to non invasive blood enzymatic and molecular studies.

    PubMed

    Davit-Spraul, Anne; Piraud, Monique; Dobbelaere, Dries; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Labrune, Philippe; Habes, Dalila; Bernard, Olivier; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Baussan, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) due to a deficient hepatic phosphorylase system defines a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that mainly manifests in children. We investigated 45 unrelated children in whom a liver GSD VI or IX was suspected on the basis of clinical symptoms including hepatomegaly, increased serum transaminases, postprandial lactatemia and/or mild fasting hypoglycemia. Liver phosphorylase and phosphorylase b kinase activities studied in peripheral blood cells allowed to suspect diagnosis in 37 cases but was uninformative in 5. Sequencing of liver phosphorylase genes was useful to establish an accurate diagnosis. Causative mutations were found either in the PYGL (11 patients), PHKA2 (26 patients), PHKG2 (three patients) or in the PHKB (three patients) genes. Eleven novel disease causative mutations, five missense (p.N188K, p.D228Y, p.P382L, p.R491H, p.L500R) and six truncating mutations (c.501_502ins361pb, c.528+2T>C, c.856-29_c.1518+614del, c.1620+1G>C, p.E703del and c.2313-1G>T) were identified in the PYGL gene. Seventeen novel disease causative mutations, ten missense (p.A42P, p.Q95R, p.G131D, p.G131V, p.Q134R, p.G187R, p.G300V, p.G300A, p.C326Y, p.W820G) and seven truncating (c.537+5G>A, p.G396DfsX28, p.Q404X, p.N653X, p.L855PfsX87, and two large deletions) were identified in the PHKA2 gene. Four novel truncating mutations (p.R168X, p.Q287X, p.I268PfsX12 and c.272-1G>C) were identified in the PHKG2 gene and three (c.573_577del, p.R364X, c.2427+3A>G) in the PHKB gene. Patients with PHKG2 mutations evolved towards cirrhosis. Molecular analysis of GSD VI or IX genes allows to confirm diagnosis suspected on the basis of enzymatic analysis and to establish diagnosis and avoid liver biopsy when enzymatic studies are not informative in blood cells.

  3. Independent Loss of Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase (MTAP) in Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Wesley J; Kalaivani, Nithyha P; Jones, Christine L; Roper, Catherine; Tung, Lam; Lee, Jae Jin; Thomas, Bjorn R; Tosi, Isabella; Ferreira, Silvia; Beyers, Carl Z; McKenzie, Robert C T; Butler, Rosie M; Lorenc, Anna; Whittaker, Sean J; Mitchell, Tracey J

    2016-06-01

    Methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) and the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A-CDKN2B are frequently deleted in malignancies. The specific role of MTAP in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma subgroups, mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), is unknown. In 213 skin samples from patients with MF/SS, MTAP copy number loss (34%) was more frequent than CDKN2A (12%) in all cutaneous T-cell lymphoma stages using quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Importantly, in early stage MF, MTAP loss occurred independently of CDKN2A loss in 37% of samples. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with SS, codeletion with CDKN2A occurred in 18% of samples but loss of MTAP alone was uncommon. In CD4(+) cells from SS, reduced MTAP mRNA expression correlated with MTAP copy number loss (P < 0.01) but reduced MTAP expression was also detected in the absence of copy number loss. Deep sequencing of MTAP/CDKN2A-CDKN2B loci in 77 peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA samples from patients with SS did not show any nonsynonymous mutations, but read-depth analysis suggested focal deletions consistent with MTAP and CDKN2A copy number loss detected with quantitative reverse transcription PCR. In a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cell line, promoter hypermethylation was shown to downregulate MTAP expression and may represent a mechanism of MTAP inactivation. In conclusion, our findings suggest that there may be selection in early stages of MF for MTAP deletion within the cutaneous tumor microenvironment.

  4. Four Generations of Transition State Analogues for Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Shi, W; Rinaldo-Mathis, A; Tyler, P; Evans, G; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) stops growth of activated T-cells and the formation of 6-oxypurine bases, making it a target for leukemia, autoimmune disorders, and gout. Four generations of ribocation transition-state mimics bound to PNP are structurally characterized. Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 58 pM, first-generation) contains an iminoribitol cation with four asymmetric carbons. DADMe-Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 9 pM, second-generation), uses a methylene-bridged dihydroxypyrrolidine cation with two asymmetric centers. DATMe-Immucillin-H (K*{sub i} = 9 pM, third-generation) contains an open-chain amino alcohol cation with two asymmetric carbons. SerMe-ImmH (K*{sub i} = 5 pM, fourth-generation) uses achiral dihydroxyaminoalcohol seramide as the ribocation mimic. Crystal structures of PNPs establish features of tight binding to be; (1) ion-pair formation between bound phosphate (or its mimic) and inhibitor cation, (2) leaving-group interactions to N1, O6, and N7 of 9-deazahypoxanthine, (3) interaction between phosphate and inhibitor hydroxyl groups, and (4) His257 interacting with the 5{prime}-hydroxyl group. The first generation analogue is an imperfect fit to the catalytic site with a long ion pair distance between the iminoribitol and bound phosphate and weaker interactions to the leaving group. Increasing the ribocation to leaving-group distance in the second- to fourth-generation analogues provides powerful binding interactions and a facile synthetic route to powerful inhibitors. Despite chemical diversity in the four generations of transition-state analogues, the catalytic site geometry is almost the same for all analogues. Multiple solutions in transition-state analogue design are available to convert the energy of catalytic rate enhancement to binding energy in human PNP.

  5. Liver as a source for thymidine phosphorylase replacement in mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Boschetti, Elisa; D'Alessandro, Roberto; Bianco, Francesca; Carelli, Valerio; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Pinna, Antonio D; Del Gaudio, Massimo; Rinaldi, Rita; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Pironi, Loris; Rhoden, Kerry; Tugnoli, Vitaliano; Casali, Carlo; De Giorgio, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is a rare autosomal recessive mitochondrial disease associated with mutations in the nuclear TYMP gene. As a result, the thymidine phosphorylase (TP) enzyme activity is markedly reduced leading to toxic accumulation of thymidine and therefore altered mitochondrial DNA. MNGIE is characterized by severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, neurological impairment, reduced life expectancy and poor quality of life. There are limited therapeutic options for MNGIE. In the attempt to restore TP activity, allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as cellular source of TP. The results of this approach on ∼ 20 MNGIE patients showed gastrointestinal and neurological improvement, although the 5-year mortality rate is about 70%. In this study we tested whether the liver may serve as an alternative source of TP. We investigated 11 patients (7M; 35-55 years) who underwent hepatic resection for focal disorders. Margins of normal liver tissue were processed to identify, quantify and localize the TP protein by Western Blot, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry, and to evaluate TYMP mRNA expression by qPCR. Western Blot identified TP in liver with a TP/GAPDH ratio of 0.9 ± 0.5. ELISA estimated TP content as 0.5 ± 0.07 ng/μg of total protein. TP was identified in both nuclei and cytoplasm of hepatocytes and sinusoidal lining cells. Finally, TYMP mRNA was expressed in the liver. Overall, our study demonstrates that the liver is an important source of TP. Orthotopic liver transplantation may be considered as a therapeutic alternative for MNGIE patients.

  6. Conformational States of Human Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase at Rest, at Work and with Transition State Analogues†

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Achelle A.; Tipton, Jeremiah D.; Brenowitz, Michael D.; Emmett, Mark R.; Marshall, Alan G.; Evans, Gary B.; Tyler, Peter C.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2010-01-01

    Human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a homotrimer binding tightly to the transition state analogues Immucillin-H (ImmH, Kd = 56 pM) and DATMe-ImmH-Immucillin-H (DATMe-ImmH, Kd = 8.6 pM). ImmH binds with a larger entropic penalty than DATMe-ImmH, a chemically more flexible inhibitor. The testable hypothesis is that PNP conformational states are more relaxed (dynamic) with DATMe-ImmH, despite tighter binding than with ImmH. PNP conformations are probed by peptide amide deuterium exchange (HDX) using liquid chromatography high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and by sedimentation rates. Catalytically equilibrating Michaelis complexes (PNP•PO4•Inosine ↔ PNP•Hx•R-1-P) and inhibited complexes (PNP•PO4•DATMe-ImmH and PNP•PO4•ImmH) show protection from HDX at 9, 13 and 15 sites per subunit relative to resting PNP (PNP•PO4) in extended incubations. The PNP•PO4•ImmH complex is more compact (by sedimentation rate) than the other complexes. HDX kinetic analysis of ligand-protected sites corresponds to peptides near the catalytic sites. HDX and sedimentation results establish that PNP protein conformation (dynamic motion) correlates more closely to entropy of binding than to affinity. Catalytically active turnover with saturated substrate sites causes less change in HDX and sedimentation rates than binding of transition state analogues. DATMe-ImmH more closely mimics the transition of human PNP than does ImmH, and achieves strong binding interactions at the catalytic site while causing relatively modest alterations of the protein dynamic motion. Transition state analogues causing the most rigid, closed protein conformation are therefore not necessarily the most tightly bound. Close mimics of the transition state are hypothesized to retain enzymatic dynamic motions related to transition state formation. PMID:20108972

  7. Transition Path Sampling Study of the Reaction Catalyzed by Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Saen-oon, Suwipa; Schramm, Vern L.; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    The Transition Path Sampling (TPS) method is a powerful technique for studying rare events in complex systems, that allows description of reactive events in atomic detail without prior knowledge of reaction coordinates and transition states. We have applied TPS in combination with a hybrid Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical (QM/MM) method to study the enzyme human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (hPNP). This enzyme catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of 6-oxypurine (deoxy)nucleosides to generate the corresponding purine base and (deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Hundreds of reactive trajectories were generated. Analysis of this transition path ensembles provides insight into the detailed mechanistic dynamics of reaction in the enzyme. Our studies have indicated a reaction mechanism involving the cleavage of the N-ribosidic bond to form transition states with substantial ribooxacarbenium ion character, that is then followed by conformational changes in the enzyme and the ribosyl group leading to migration of the anomeric carbon of the ribosyl group toward phosphate to form the product ribose 1-phosphate. This latter process is crucial in PNP, because several strong H-bonds form between active site residues in order to capture and align the phosphate nucleophile. Calculations of the commitment probability along reactive paths demonstrated the presence of a broad energy barrier at the transition state. Analysis of these transition state structures showed that bond-breaking and bond-forming distances are not a good choice for the reaction coordinate, but that the pseudorotational phase of the ribose ring is also a significant variable. PMID:20664707

  8. Characterization and Prognostic Significance of Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase Deficiency in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Hong-Lin; Lee, Ying-En; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Lee, Sung-Wei; Chen, Tzu-Ju; Li, Chien-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Identification of cancer-associated genes by genomic profiling contributes to the elucidation of tumor development and progression. The methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) gene, located at chromosome 9p21, plays a critical role in tumorigenicity and disease progression in a wide variety of cancers. However, the prognostic impact of MTAP in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remains obscured. Through data mining from published transcriptomic database, MTAP was first identified as a differentially downregulated gene in NPC. In this study, our aim was to evaluate the expression of MTAP in NPC and to clarify its prognostic significance. MTAP immunohistochemistry was retrospectively performed and analyzed in biopsy specimens from 124 NPC patients who received standard treatment without distant metastasis at initial diagnosis. The immunoexpression status was correlated with the clinicopathological variables, disease-specific survival (DSS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to measure MTAP gene dosage. In some cases, we also performed methylation-specific PCR and pyrosequencing to assess the status of promoter methylation. MTAP deficiency was significantly associated with advanced tumor stages (P = 0.023) and univariately predictive of adverse outcomes for DSS, DMFS, and LRFS. In the multivariate comparison, MTAP deficiency still remained prognostically independent to portend worse DSS (P = 0.021, hazard ratio = 1.870) and DMFS (P = 0.009, hazard ratio = 2.154), together with advanced AJCC stages III to IV. Homozygous deletion or promoter methylation of MTAP gene were identified to be significantly associated with MTAP protein deficiency (P < 0.001). MTAP deficiency was correlated with an aggressive phenotype and independently predictive of worse DSS and DMFS, suggesting its role in disease progression and as an

  9. Cryoelectron microscopy reveals new features in the three-dimensional structure of phosphorylase kinase.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Owen W; Gogol, Edward P; Carlson, Gerald M

    2005-04-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PhK), a regulatory enzyme in the cascade activation of glycogenolysis, is a 1.3-MDa hexadecameric complex, (alphabetagammadelta)(4). PhK comprises two arched octameric (alphabetagammadelta)(2) lobes that are oriented back-to-back with overall D(2) symmetry and connected by small bridges. These interlobal bridges, arguably the most questionable structural component of PhK, are one of several structural features that potentially are artifactually generated or altered by conventional sample preparation techniques for electron microscopy (EM). To minimize such artifacts, we have solved by cryoEM the first three-dimensional (3D) structure of nonactivated PhK from images of frozen hydrated molecules of the kinase. Minimal dose electron micrographs of PhK in vitreous ice revealed particles in a multitude of orientations. A simple model was used to orient the individual images for 3D reconstruction, followed by multiple rounds of refinement. Three-dimensional reconstruction of nonactivated PhK from approximately 5000 particles revealed a bridged, bilobal molecule with a resolution estimated by Fourier shell correlation analysis at 25 A. This new structure suggests that several prominent features observed in the structure of PhK derived from negatively stained particles arise as artifacts of specimen preparation. In comparison to the structure from negative staining, the cryoEM structure shows three important differences: (1) a dihedral angle between the two lobes of approximately 90 degrees instead of 68 degrees, (2) a compact rather than extended structure for the lobes, and (3) the presence of four, rather than two, connecting bridges, which provides the first direct evidence for these components as authentic elements of the kinase solution structure. PMID:15741332

  10. Regulation of the Dictyostelium glycogen phosphorylase 2 gene by cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Sucic, J F; Selmin, O; Rutherford, C L

    1993-01-01

    A crucial developmental event in the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum, is glycogen degradation. The enzyme that catalyzes this degradation, glycogen phosphorylase 2 (gp-2), is developmentally regulated and cAMP appears to be involved in this regulation. We have examined several aspects of the cAMP regulation of gp-2. We show that addition of exogenous cAMP to aggregation competent amoebae induced the appearance of gp-2 mRNA. The induction of gp-2 mRNA occurred within 1 and 1.5 h after the initial exposure to cAMP. Exposure to exogenous cAMP concentrations as low as 1.0 microM could induce gp-2 mRNA. We also examined the molecular mechanism through which cAMP induction of gp-2 occurs. Induction of gp-2 appears to result from a mechanism that does not require intracellular cAMP signaling, and may occur directly through a cAMP binding protein without the requirement of any intracellular signalling. We also examined the promoter region of the gp-2 gene for cis-acting elements that are involved in the cAMP regulation of gp-2. A series of deletions of the promoter were fused to a luciferase reporter gene and then analyzed for cAMP responsiveness. The results indicated that a region from -258 nucleotides to the transcriptional start site is sufficient for essentially full activity and appears to carry all necessary cis-acting sites for cAMP induction. Further deletion of 58 nucleotides from the 5' end, results in fivefold less activity in the presence of cAMP. Deletion of the next 104 nucleotides eliminates the cAMP response entirely. PMID:8222346

  11. Independent Loss of Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase (MTAP) in Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Woollard, Wesley J; Kalaivani, Nithyha P; Jones, Christine L; Roper, Catherine; Tung, Lam; Lee, Jae Jin; Thomas, Bjorn R; Tosi, Isabella; Ferreira, Silvia; Beyers, Carl Z; McKenzie, Robert C T; Butler, Rosie M; Lorenc, Anna; Whittaker, Sean J; Mitchell, Tracey J

    2016-06-01

    Methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) and the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A-CDKN2B are frequently deleted in malignancies. The specific role of MTAP in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma subgroups, mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), is unknown. In 213 skin samples from patients with MF/SS, MTAP copy number loss (34%) was more frequent than CDKN2A (12%) in all cutaneous T-cell lymphoma stages using quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Importantly, in early stage MF, MTAP loss occurred independently of CDKN2A loss in 37% of samples. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with SS, codeletion with CDKN2A occurred in 18% of samples but loss of MTAP alone was uncommon. In CD4(+) cells from SS, reduced MTAP mRNA expression correlated with MTAP copy number loss (P < 0.01) but reduced MTAP expression was also detected in the absence of copy number loss. Deep sequencing of MTAP/CDKN2A-CDKN2B loci in 77 peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA samples from patients with SS did not show any nonsynonymous mutations, but read-depth analysis suggested focal deletions consistent with MTAP and CDKN2A copy number loss detected with quantitative reverse transcription PCR. In a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cell line, promoter hypermethylation was shown to downregulate MTAP expression and may represent a mechanism of MTAP inactivation. In conclusion, our findings suggest that there may be selection in early stages of MF for MTAP deletion within the cutaneous tumor microenvironment. PMID:26872600

  12. Interaction between adenovirus DNA-binding protein and single-stranded polynucleotides studied by circular dichroism and ultraviolet absorption.

    PubMed

    van Amerongen, H; van Grondelle, R; van der Vliet, P C

    1987-07-28

    The adenovirus DNA-binding protein (AdDBP) is a multifunctional protein required for viral DNA replication and control of transcription. We have studied the binding of AdDBP to single-stranded M13 DNA and to the homopolynucleotides poly(rA), poly(dA), and poly(dT) by means of circular dichroism (CD) and optical density (OD) measurements. The binding to all these polynucleotides was strong and nearly stoichiometric. Titration experiments showed that the size of the binding site is 9-11 nucleotides long for M13 DNA, poly(dA), and poly(rA). A higher value (15.0 +/- 0.8) was found for poly(dT). Pronounced changes in the circular dichroism and optical density spectra were observed upon binding of AdDBP. In general, both the positive peak around 260-270 nm and the negative peak around 240-250 nm in the CD spectra decreased in intensity, and a shift of the crossover point to longer wavelengths was found. The OD spectra observed upon binding of AdDBP are remarkably similar to those obtained with prokaryotic helix-destabilizing proteins like bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein and fd gene 5 protein. The data can best be interpreted by assuming that the AdDBP-polynucleotide complex has a regular, rigid, and extended configuration that satifies two criteria: (1) a considerable tilt of the bases in combination with (2) a small rotation per base and/or a shift of the bases closer to the helix axis.

  13. Time-resolved fluorescence of bacteriophage Pf1 DNA-binding protein. Determination of oligonucleotide and polynucleotide binding parameters.

    PubMed

    Kneale, G G; Wijnaendts van Resandt, R W

    1985-05-15

    The binding of oligonucleotides and polynucleotides to the Pf1 DNA-binding protein was followed by fluorescence spectral shift and lifetime measurements, which gave an anomalous value for the stoichiometry of binding. The anomaly was investigated in detail using fluorescence depolarisation to measure the aggregation during the titration and showed that all the fluorescence parameters are related to the specific aggregation of dimers on ligand binding. At saturation, complexes of the protein with the octanucleotide d(GCGTTGCG) and the hexadecanucleotide (dT)16 have rotational correlation times, phi, of 50 ns and 85 ns, corresponding to protein tetramers and octamers, respectively. In the presence of the tetranucleotide d(CGCA) the protein remains as the native dimer (phi = 19 ns). The titration curves could be analysed in terms of two non-equivalent binding sites, with binding constants K1 and K2. Comparison of K1 values for oligonucleotide binding leads to an estimated (single-site) intrinsic binding constant Kint approximately equal to 3 X 10(4) M-1 and a cooperativity parameter omega approximately equal to 100, in agreement with the apparent binding constant Kapp approximately equal to 3 X 10(6) M-1 for polynucleotides. Binding to the second site on the protein dimer is greatly reduced and cannot be determined accurately. The results suggest that the protein dimers bind cooperatively by lateral association along the DNA and that occupation of only one of the two DNA-binding sites of the protein dimers is sufficient to stabilize the nucleoprotein complexes.

  14. Synthesis of α(1→4)-linked non-natural mannoglucans by α-glucan phosphorylase-catalyzed enzymatic copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Baba, Ryotaro; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kadokawa, Jun-Ichi

    2016-10-20

    α-Glucan phosphorylase catalyzes enzymatic polymerization of α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) as a monomer from a maltooligosaccharide primer to produce α(1→4)-glucan, i.e., amylose, with liberating inorganic phosphate (Pi). Because of quite weak specificity for the recognition of substrates by thermostable α-glucan phosphorylase (from Aquifex aeolicus VF5), in this study, we investigated the enzymatic copolymerization of Glc-1-P with its analogue monomer, α-d-mannose 1-phosphate (Man-1-P) under the conditions for removal of Pi as the precipitate with ammonium and magnesium in ammonia buffer containing Mg(2+) ion to produce α(1→4)-linked non-natural mannoglucans composed of Glc/Man units. The reaction was conducted in different feed ratios using the maltotriose primer at 40°C for 7days. The MALDI-TOF mass and (1)H NMR spectra of the products fully supported the mannoglucan structures. PMID:27474652

  15. Quantitative description of the absorption spectra of the coenzyme in glycogen phosphorylases based on log-normal distribution curves.

    PubMed Central

    Donoso, J; Muñoz, F; Garcia Blanco, F

    1993-01-01

    The absorption spectra of the coenzyme [pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)] in glycogen phosphorylase a (GPha), glycogen phosphorylase b (GPhb) and of the latter bound to various effectors and substrates were analysed on the basis of log-normal distribution curves. The results obtained showed that the ionization state of the PLP and GPha environment differs from that of GPhb. This divergence was interpreted in terms of tautomeric equilibria between some forms of the Schiff base of PLP and enzymic Lys-679. The ionic forms are slightly more predominant in GPha than they are in GPhb, so ionic and/or hydrogen-bonding interactions between the aromatic ring of PLP and GPha must be stronger than with GPhb. This confirms the purely structural role of the aromatic ring of the coenzyme. Binding of GPhb to AMP and Mg2+ results in the coenzyme adopting a similar state as in GPha. On the other hand, binding to IMP gives rise to no detectable changes in the tautomeric equilibrium of the coenzyme. PMID:8503849

  16. Glucose-derived spiro-isoxazolines are anti-hyperglycemic agents against type 2 diabetes through glycogen phosphorylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Goyard, David; Kónya, Bálint; Chajistamatiou, Aikaterini S; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Leroy, Jérémy; Balzarin, Sophie; Tournier, Michel; Tousch, Didier; Petit, Pierre; Duret, Cédric; Maurel, Patrick; Somsák, László; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Praly, Jean-Pierre; Azay-Milhau, Jacqueline; Vidal, Sébastien

    2016-01-27

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is a target for the treatment of hyperglycaemia in the context of type 2 diabetes. This enzyme is responsible for the depolymerization of glycogen into glucose thereby affecting the levels of glucose in the blood stream. Twelve new d-glucopyranosylidene-spiro-isoxazolines have been prepared from O-peracylated exo-D-glucals by regio- and stereoselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of nitrile oxides generated in situ by treatment of the corresponding oximes with bleach. This mild and direct procedure appeared to be applicable to a broad range of substrates. The corresponding O-unprotected spiro-isoxazolines were evaluated as glycogen phosphorylase (GP) inhibitors and exhibited IC50 values ranging from 1 to 800 μM. Selected inhibitors were further evaluated in vitro using rat and human hepatocytes and exhibited significant inhibitory properties in the primary cell culture. Interestingly, when tested with human hepatocytes, the tetra-O-acetylated spiro-isoxazoline bearing a 2-naphthyl residue showed a much lower IC50 value (2.5 μM), compared to that of the O-unprotected analog (19.95 μM). The most promising compounds were investigated in Zucker fa/fa rat model in acute and sub-chronic assays and decreased hepatic glucose production, which is known to be elevated in type 2 diabetes. This indicates that glucose-based spiro-isoxazolines can be considered as anti-hyperglycemic agents in the context of type 2 diabetes.

  17. Anthranilimide-based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes: 1. Identification of 1-amino-1-cycloalkyl carboxylic acid headgroups

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, Steven M.; Banker, Pierette; Bickett, David M.; Carter, H. Luke; Clancy, Daphne C.; Dickerson, Scott H.; Dwornik, Kate A.; Garrido, Dulce M.; Golden, Pamela L.; Nolte, Robert T.; Peat, Andrew J.; Sheckler, Lauren R.; Tavares, Francis X.; Thomson, Stephen A.; Wang, Liping; Weiel, James E.

    2009-05-15

    Optimization of the amino acid residue within a series of anthranilimide-based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors is described. These studies culminated in the identification of anthranilimides 16 and 22 which displayed potent in vitro inhibition of GPa in addition to reduced inhibition of CYP2C9 and excellent pharmacokinetic properties.

  18. Expression of a cDNA for the catalytic subunit of skeletal-muscle phosphorylase kinase in transfected 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cawley, K C; Akita, C G; Walsh, D A

    1989-01-01

    Phosphorylase kinase is a multimeric enzyme of composition (alpha, beta, gamma, delta)4 whose catalytic activity resides in the gamma-subunit. As an approach to understand further its regulation, a cDNA for the gamma-subunit of phosphorylase kinase (gamma PhK) has been cloned into a mammalian expression vector behind the mouse metallothionein-1 promoter. NIH 3T3 cells were co-transfected with this construct (pEV gamma PhK) and pSV2neo, G418-resistant clones were selected, and several were found to have stably incorporated the gamma-subunit cDNA into their genomic DNA. Phosphorylase kinase activity was clearly present in extracts from cultures of pEV gamma PhK-transformed cells and increased several-fold after 24 h of incubation with Zn2+, whereas it was undetectable in the parent 3T3 cells. A significant, but variable, proportion (15-70%) of the activity was Ca2+-dependent. We conclude that the phosphorylase kinase activity expressed by the cells transformed with pEV gamma PhK is due to free gamma-subunit and gamma-subunit associated with cellular calmodulin, which replaces the delta-subunit normally associated with the gamma-subunit in the holoenzyme. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2481439

  19. Calf spleen purine nucleoside phosphorylase: complex kinetic mechanism, hydrolysis of 7-methylguanosine, and oligomeric state in solution.

    PubMed

    Bzowska, Agnieszka

    2002-04-29

    The active enzyme form was found to be a homotrimer, no active monomers were observed. Only in the presence of an extremely high orthophosphate concentration (0.5 M) or at a low enzyme concentration (0.2 microg/ml) with no ligands present a small fraction of the enzyme is probably in a dissociated and/or non-active form. The specific activity is invariant over a broad enzyme concentration range (0.017 microg/ml-0.29 mg/ml). At concentrations below 0.9 microg/ml and in the absence of ligands the enzyme tends to loose its catalytic activity, while in the presence of any substrate or at higher concentrations it was found to be active as a trimer. In the absence of phosphate the enzyme catalyses the hydrolysis of 7-methylguanosine (m7Guo) with a catalytic rate constant 1.3x10(-3) x s(-1) as compared with the rate of 38 s(-1) for the phosphorolysis of this nucleoside. The initial pre-steady-state phase of the phosphorolysis of m7Guo, 70 s(-1), is almost twice faster than the steady-state rate and indicates that the rate-limiting step is subsequent to the glycosidic bond cleavage. Complex kinetic behaviour with substrates of phosphorolytic direction (various nucleosides and orthophosphate) was observed; data for phosphate as the variable substrate with inosine and guanosine, but not with their 7-methyl counterparts, might be interpreted as two binding sites with different affinities, or as a negative cooperativity. However, the titration of the enzyme intrinsic fluorescence with 0.2 microM-30 mM phosphate is consistent with only one dissociation constant for phosphate, K(d)=220+/-120 microM. Protective effects of ligands on the thermal inactivation of the enzyme indicate that all substrates of the phosphorolytic and the synthetic reactions are able to form binary complexes with the calf spleen purine nucleoside phosphorylase. The purine bases, guanine and hypoxanthine, bind strongly with dissociation constants of about 0.1 microM, while all other ligands studied

  20. Structure and Mechanism of an ADP-Glucose Phosphorylase from Arabidopsis thaliana†,‡

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jason G.; Arabshahi, Abolfazl; Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Ruzicka, Frank J.; Frey, Perry A.; Phillips, George N.

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the At5g18200.1 protein has been solved to a nominal resolution of 2.30 Å. The structure has a histidine triad (HIT)-like fold containing two distinct HIT-like motifs. The sequence of At5g18200.1 indicates a distant family relationship to the Escherichia coli galactose-1-P uridylyltransferase (GalT): the determined structure of the At5g18200.1 protein confirms this relationship. The At5g18200.1 protein does not demonstrate GalT activity but instead catalyzes adenylyltransfer in the reaction of ADP-glucose with various phosphates. The best acceptor among those evaluated is phosphate itself, thus the At5g18200.1 enzyme appears to be an ADP-glucose phosphorylase. The enzyme catalyzes the exchange of 14C between ADP-[14C]glucose and glucose-1-P in the absence of phosphate. The steady state kinetics of exchange follows the ping pong bi bi kinetic mechanism, with kcat = 4.1 s−1 and Km-values of 1.4 µM and 83 µM for ADP-[14C]glucose and glucose-1-P, respectively, at pH 8.5 and 25 °C. The overall reaction of ADP-glucose with phosphate to produce ADP and glucose-1-P follows ping pong bi bi steady state kinetics, with kcat = 2.7 s−1 and Km-values of 6.9 µM and 90 µM for ADP-glucose and phosphate, respectively, at pH 8.5 and 25 °C. The kinetics are consistent with a double displacement mechanism that involves a covalent adenylyl-enzyme intermediate. The X-ray crystal structure of this intermediate was solved to 1.83 Å resolution, and shows the AMP-group bonded to His186. The value of Keq in the direction of ADP and glucose-1-P formation is 5.0 at pH 7.0 and 25 °C in the absence of a divalent metal ion, and it is 40 in the presence of 1 mM MgCl2. PMID:16519510

  1. Different patterns of stromal and cancer cell thymidine phosphorylase reactivity in non-small-cell lung cancer: impact on tumour neoangiogenesis and survival.

    PubMed Central

    Koukourakis, M. I.; Giatromanolaki, A.; Kakolyris, S.; O'Byrne, K. J.; Apostolikas, N.; Skarlatos, J.; Gatter, K. C.; Harris, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    Angiogenesis is recognized as an important step in tumour pathogenesis that is related to invasion and metastatic spread and which consequently results in poor clinical outcome. In this study, we have examined the role of tumour stroma-activated fibroblasts and macrophage infiltration in the development of the angiogenic and metastatic phenotype in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 141 cases of early stage I-II NSCLC treated with surgery alone were analysed. The JC-70 (anti-CD31) MAb was used for the assessment of vascular grade. The P-GF.44C MAb was used to assess thymidine phosphorylase (TP) reactivity in cancer cells, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. Cancer cell TP overexpression related to high vascular grade and to advanced T stage (P = 0.0004 and P = 0.02). Expression of TP in stromal fibroblasts also correlated with high angiogenesis (P = 0.01), but was independent of cancer cell expression. Fibroblast TP overexpression was related to abundant stroma (P = 0.003), suggesting that TP may be a marker of active stroma. Moreover, intense macrophage infiltration was associated with fibroblast TP reactivity, regardless of the amount of stroma, suggesting that macrophages may be a major contributor to TP expression in stroma. Survival analysis showed that cancer cell TP overexpression was related to poor prognosis (P = 0.005). Although stroma TP is related to angiogenesis, in the low vascular grade group it defined a group of patients with better prognosis (P = 0.02). It may be that fibroblast TP reactivity is an indirect marker of tumour infiltration by functional macrophages, which have an antitumour effect. We conclude that stromal macrophage and fibroblast TP reactivity may have an important role in non-small-cell lung cancer behaviour. Understanding the role of stromal fibroblasts and inflammatory cells and their interaction with oncoprotein expression is essential for the elucidation of lung cancer pathogenesis. Images Figure 1 PMID:9635852

  2. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry of phosphorylase B ions generated with supercharging reagents but in charge-reducing buffer.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Christopher J; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Loo, Joseph A; de la Mora, Juan Fernandez

    2010-11-01

    We investigate whether "supercharging" reagents able to shift the charge state distributions (CSDs) of electrosprayed protein ions upward also influence gas-phase protein structure. A differential mobility analyzer and a mass spectrometer are combined in series (DMA-MS) to measure the mass and mobility of monomer and multimeric phosphorylase B ions (monomer molecular weight ∼97 kDa) in atmospheric pressure air. Proteins are electrosprayed from charge-reducing triethylammonium formate in water (pH = 6.8) with and without the addition of the supercharging reagent tetramethylene sulfone (sulfolane). Because the DMA measures ion mobility prior to collisional heating or declustering, it probes the structure of supercharged protein ions immediately following solvent (water) evaporation. As in prior studies, the addition of sulfolane is found to drastically increase both the mean and maximum charge state of phosphorylase B ions. Ions from all protein n-mers were found to yield mobilities that, for a given charge state, were ∼6-10% higher in the absence of sulfolane. We find that the mobility decrease which arises with sulfolane is substantially smaller than that typically observed for folded-to-unfolded transitions in protein ions (where a ∼60% decrease in mobility is typical), suggesting that supercharging reagents do not cause structural protein modifications in solution as large as noted recently by Williams and colleagues [E. R. Williams et al., J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom., 2010, 21, 1762-1774]. In fact, the measurements described here indicate that the modest mobility decrease observed can be partly attributed to sulfolane trapping within the protein ions during DMA measurements, and probably also in solution. As the most abundant peaks in measured mass-mobility spectra for ions produced with and without sulfolane correspond to non-covalently bound phosphorylase B dimers, we find that in spite of a change in mobility/cross section, sulfolane addition does not

  3. The binding of β-d-glucopyranosyl-thiosemicarbazone derivatives to glycogen phosphorylase: A new class of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Tenchiu Deleanu, Alia-Cristina; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Charavgi, Maria-Despoina; Kostas, Ioannis D; Zographos, Spyros E; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2010-11-15

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In the process of structure based drug design for GP, a group of 15 aromatic aldehyde 4-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)thiosemicarbazones have been synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b (GPb) by kinetic studies. These compounds are competitive inhibitors of GPb with respect to α-d-glucose-1-phosphate with IC(50) values ranging from 5.7 to 524.3μM. In order to elucidate the structural basis of their inhibition, the crystal structures of these compounds in complex with GPb at 1.95-2.23Å resolution were determined. The complex structures reveal that the inhibitors are accommodated at the catalytic site with the glucopyranosyl moiety at approximately the same position as α-d-glucose and stabilize the T conformation of the 280s loop. The thiosemicarbazone part of the studied glucosyl thiosemicarbazones possess a moiety derived from substituted benzaldehydes with NO(2), F, Cl, Br, OH, OMe, CF(3), or Me at the ortho-, meta- or para-position of the aromatic ring as well as a moiety derived from 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde. These fit tightly into the β-pocket, a side channel from the catalytic site with no access to the bulk solvent. The differences in their inhibitory potency can be interpreted in terms of variations in the interactions of the aldehyde-derived moiety with protein residues in the β-pocket. In addition, 14 out of the 15 studied inhibitors were found bound at the new allosteric site of the enzyme.

  4. Crystal Structure and Substrate Recognition of Cellobionic Acid Phosphorylase, Which Plays a Key Role in Oxidative Cellulose Degradation by Microbes*

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Young-Woo; Nihira, Takanori; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Saito, Yuka; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    The microbial oxidative cellulose degradation system is attracting significant research attention after the recent discovery of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases. A primary product of the oxidative and hydrolytic cellulose degradation system is cellobionic acid (CbA), the aldonic acid form of cellobiose. We previously demonstrated that the intracellular enzyme belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 94 from cellulolytic fungus and bacterium is cellobionic acid phosphorylase (CBAP), which catalyzes reversible phosphorolysis of CbA into glucose 1-phosphate and gluconic acid (GlcA). In this report, we describe the biochemical characterization and the three-dimensional structure of CBAP from the marine cellulolytic bacterium Saccharophagus degradans. Structures of ligand-free and complex forms with CbA, GlcA, and a synthetic disaccharide product from glucuronic acid were determined at resolutions of up to 1.6 Å. The active site is located near the dimer interface. At subsite +1, the carboxylate group of GlcA and CbA is recognized by Arg-609 and Lys-613. Additionally, one residue from the neighboring protomer (Gln-190) is involved in the carboxylate recognition of GlcA. A mutational analysis indicated that these residues are critical for the binding and catalysis of the aldonic and uronic acid acceptors GlcA and glucuronic acid. Structural and sequence comparisons with other glycoside hydrolase family 94 phosphorylases revealed that CBAPs have a unique subsite +1 with a distinct amino acid residue conservation pattern at this site. This study provides molecular insight into the energetically efficient metabolic pathway of oxidized sugars that links the oxidative cellulolytic pathway to the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways in cellulolytic microbes. PMID:26041776

  5. Thymidine phosphorylase in cancer cells stimulates human endothelial cell migration and invasion by the secretion of angiogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Bijnsdorp, I V; Capriotti, F; Kruyt, F A E; Losekoot, N; Fukushima, M; Griffioen, A W; Thijssen, V L; Peters, G J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is often overexpressed in tumours and has a role in tumour aggressiveness and angiogenesis. Here, we determined whether TP increased tumour invasion and whether TP-expressing cancer cells stimulated angiogenesis. Methods: Angiogenesis was studied by exposing endothelial cells (HUVECs) to conditioned medium (CM) derived from cancer cells with high (Colo320TP1=CT-CM, RT112/TP=RT-CM) and no TP expression after which migration (wound-healing-assay) and invasion (transwell-assay) were determined. The involvement of several angiogenic factors were examined by RT–PCR, ELISA and blocking antibodies. Results: Tumour invasion was not dependent on intrinsic TP expression. The CT-CM and RT-CM stimulated HUVEC-migration and invasion by about 15 and 40%, respectively. Inhibition by 10 μ TPI and 100 μ L-dR, blocked migration and reduced the invasion by 50–70%. Thymidine phosphorylase activity in HUVECs was increased by CT-CM. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed a higher mRNA expression of bFGF (Colo320TP1), IL-8 (RT112/TP) and TNF-α, but not VEGF. Blocking antibodies targeting these factors decreased the migration and invasion that was induced by the CT-CM and RT-CM, except for IL-8 in CT-CM and bFGF in RT-CM. Conclusion: In our cell line panels, TP did not increase the tumour invasion, but stimulated the migration and invasion of HUVECs by two different mechanisms. Hence, TP targeting seems to provide a potential additional strategy in the field of anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:21386840

  6. Glucose-derived spiro-isoxazolines are anti-hyperglycemic agents against type 2 diabetes through glycogen phosphorylase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Goyard, David; Kónya, Bálint; Chajistamatiou, Aikaterini S; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Leroy, Jérémy; Balzarin, Sophie; Tournier, Michel; Tousch, Didier; Petit, Pierre; Duret, Cédric; Maurel, Patrick; Somsák, László; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Praly, Jean-Pierre; Azay-Milhau, Jacqueline; Vidal, Sébastien

    2016-01-27

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is a target for the treatment of hyperglycaemia in the context of type 2 diabetes. This enzyme is responsible for the depolymerization of glycogen into glucose thereby affecting the levels of glucose in the blood stream. Twelve new d-glucopyranosylidene-spiro-isoxazolines have been prepared from O-peracylated exo-D-glucals by regio- and stereoselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of nitrile oxides generated in situ by treatment of the corresponding oximes with bleach. This mild and direct procedure appeared to be applicable to a broad range of substrates. The corresponding O-unprotected spiro-isoxazolines were evaluated as glycogen phosphorylase (GP) inhibitors and exhibited IC50 values ranging from 1 to 800 μM. Selected inhibitors were further evaluated in vitro using rat and human hepatocytes and exhibited significant inhibitory properties in the primary cell culture. Interestingly, when tested with human hepatocytes, the tetra-O-acetylated spiro-isoxazoline bearing a 2-naphthyl residue showed a much lower IC50 value (2.5 μM), compared to that of the O-unprotected analog (19.95 μM). The most promising compounds were investigated in Zucker fa/fa rat model in acute and sub-chronic assays and decreased hepatic glucose production, which is known to be elevated in type 2 diabetes. This indicates that glucose-based spiro-isoxazolines can be considered as anti-hyperglycemic agents in the context of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26708111

  7. Highly sensitive detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity by coupling split DNAzyme and ligation-triggered DNAzyme cascade amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shufeng; Ming, Jingjing; Lin, Ying; Wang, Chunfeng; Cheng, Chuanbin; Liu, Tao; Wang, Li

    2014-05-15

    In current study, a dual strategy for sensitive detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase (T4 PNK) activity was proposed, which combined split DNAzyme-based background reduction with ligation-triggered DNAzyme cascade for signal amplification. The 8-17 DNAzyme is split into two separate oligonucleotide fragments, which can be separately hybridized to the template DNA to form a ligatable nick after one of the fragments is phosphorylated at the 5at the yl by T4 PNK. With the further addition of Escherichia coli DNA ligase, the two oligonucleotides can be ligated to produce the activated 8-17 DNAzyme, the amount of which is positively related to the activity of T4 PNK. The signal amplification can be achieved through the cyclic cleavage of 8-17 DNAzyme toward the molecular beacon substrate, resulting in an evident fluorescence signal enhancement. The current dual strategy can significantly improve the detection sensitivity of the sensing systems, resulting in a detection limit of 0.001 U mL(-1) for T4 PNK activity, which is superior or comparable to the reported methods. Furthermore, the inhibition effects of adenosine diphosphate and sodium hydrogen phosphate on T4 PNK activity have also been demonstrated with satisfactory results. The current method may be further developed as a universal protocol for monitoring activity and inhibition of nucleotide kinase, and may show the huge potentials in biological process researches, drug discovery, and clinic diagnostics.

  8. Highly sensitive fluorescence assay of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity and inhibition via enzyme-assisted signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Tao, Mangjuan; Zhang, Jing; Jin, Yan; Li, Baoxin

    2014-11-01

    DNA phosphorylation catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK) is an indispensable process in the repair, replication, and recombination of nucleic acids. Here, an enzyme-assisted amplification strategy was developed for the ultrasensitive monitoring activity and inhibition of T4 PNK. A hairpin oligonucleotide (hpDNA) was designed as a probe whose stem can be degraded from the 5' to 3' direction by lambda exonuclease (λ exo) when its 5' end is phosphorylated by PNK. So, the 3' stem and loop part of hpDNA was released as an initiator strand to open a molecular beacon (MB) that was designed as a fluorescence reporter, leading to a fluorescence restoration. Then, the initiator strand was released again by the nicking endonuclease (Nt.BbvCI) to hybridize with another MB, resulting in a cyclic reaction and accumulation of fluorescence signal. Based on enzyme-assisted amplification, PNK activity can be sensitively and rapidly detected with a detection limit of 1.0×10(-4)U/ml, which is superior to those of most existing approaches. Furthermore, the application of the proposed strategy for screening PNK inhibitors also demonstrated satisfactory results. Therefore, it provided a promising platform for monitoring activity and inhibition of PNK as well as for studying the activity of other nucleases.

  9. Spectroscopic and calorimetric investigations on the binding of phenazinium dyes safranine-O and phenosafranine to double stranded RNA polynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Saha, Baishakhi; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2016-08-01

    RNA targeting through small molecules that can selectively bind specific RNA structures is an important current strategy in therapeutic drug development. Towards this strategy a comparative study on the interaction of two phenazinium dyes, safranine-O and phenosafranine to double stranded RNAs, poly(I).poly(C), poly(A).poly(U) and poly(C).poly(G) was performed. Spectrophotometric and spectrofluorimetric studies revealed non-cooperative binding of the dyes to the duplex RNA with binding constants of the order 10(5)M(-1) with a higher affinity of safranine-O to poly(I).poly(C) followed by poly(A).poly(U) and poly(C).poly(G). Anisotropy and fluorescence quenching results confirmed an intercalation mode of binding for the dyes on these RNAs. Binding induced conformational changes in the RNA polynucleotides were revealed from circular dichroism data. Thermal melting study and DSC experiments demonstrated stabilization of dye-RNA complexes. Calorimetric studies revealed that the binding was accompanied by a large positive entropy term with a small negative enthalpy contributions. Significant hydrophobic forces in the complexation of the double stranded RNAs with the dyes were confirmed from the negative heat capacity changes. Enthalpy-entropy compensation was also observed in the binding. Parsing of the Gibbs energy suggested a larger non-electrostatic contribution in all the cases. The results presented here may be helpful to design new types of RNA-based therapeutic agents. PMID:27236048

  10. Product and rate determinations with chemically activated nucleotides in the presence of various prebiotic materials, including other mono- and polynucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Alberas, D. J.; Rosenbach, M. T.; Bernasconi, C. F.; Chang, S.

    1991-01-01

    We are investigating the reactions of ImpN's in the presence of a number of prebiotically plausible materials, such as metal ions, phosphate, amines and other nucleotides and hope to learn more about the stability/reactivity of ImpN's in a prebiotic aqueous environment. We find that, in the presence of phosphate, ImpN's form substantial amounts of diphosphate nucleotides. These diphosphate nucleotides are not very good substrates for template directed reactions, but are chemically activated and are known to revert to the phosphoimidazolides in the presence of imidazole under solid state conditions. With respect to our studies of the oligomerization reaction, the determination of the dimerization rate constant of a specific ImpN (guanosine 5'-phospho 2 methylimidazolide) both in the absence and the presence of the template leads to the conclusion that at 37 C the dimerization is not template directed, although the subsequent polymerization steps are. In other words, this specific polynucleotide synthesizing system favors the elongation of oligonucleotides as compared with the formation of dimers and trimers. This favoring of the synthesis of long as opposed to short oligonucleotides may be regarded as a rudimentary example of natural selection at the molecular level.

  11. Polysaccharide fraction from higher plants which strongly interacts with the cytosolic phosphorylase isozyme. I. Isolation and characterization. [Spinacia oleracea L. ; Pisum sativum L

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yi; Steup, M. )

    1990-11-01

    From leaves of Spinacia oleracea L. or from Pisum sativum L. and from cotyledons of germinating pea seeds a high molecular weight polysaccharide fraction was isolated. The apparent size of the fraction, as determined by gel filtration, was similar to that of dextran blue. Following acid hydrolysis the monomer content of the polysaccharide preparation was studied using high pressure liquid and thin layer chromatography. Glucose, galactose, arabinose, and ribose were the main monosaccharide compounds. The native polysaccharide preparation interacted strongly with the cytosolic isozyme of phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1). Interaction with the plastidic phosphorylase isozyme(s) was by far weaker. Interaction with the cytosolic isozyme was demonstrated by affinity electrophoresis, kinetic measurements, and by {sup 14}C-labeling experiments in which the glucosyl transfer from ({sup 14}C)glucose 1-phosphate to the polysaccharide preparation was monitored.

  12. Microwave-assisted synthesis of C-8 aryl and heteroaryl inosines and determination of their inhibitory activities against Plasmodium falciparum purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Gigante, Alba; Priego, Eva-María; Sánchez-Carrasco, Paula; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis Miguel; Vande Voorde, Johan; Camarasa, María-José; Balzarini, Jan; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús

    2014-07-23

    8-Arylinosines have been scarcely studied for therapeutic purposes, probably due to difficulties in their synthesis. The recently described direct arylation reaction at position 8 of purine nucleosides has been employed to synthesize a series of 8-aryl and 8-pyridylinosines. These compounds have been studied for hydrolytic stability and subjected to biological evaluation. Three compounds have shown a pronounced specific inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum-encoded purine nucleoside phosphorylase, an important target for antimalarial chemotherapy. PMID:24929343

  13. Anthranilimide based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Part 3: X-ray crystallographic characterization, core and urea optimization and in vivo efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Stephen A.; Banker, Pierette; Bickett, D. Mark; Boucheron, Joyce A.; Carter, H. Luke; Clancy, Daphne C.; Cooper, Joel P.; Dickerson, Scott H.; Garrido, Dulce M.; Nolte, Robert T.; Peat, Andrew J.; Sheckler, Lauren R.; Sparks, Steven M.; Tavares, Francis X.; Wang, Liping; Wang, Tony Y.; Weiel, James E.

    2009-05-15

    Key binding interactions of the anthranilimide based glycogen phosphorylase a (GPa) inhibitor 2 from X-ray crystallography studies are described. This series of compounds bind to the AMP site of GP. Using the binding information the core and the phenyl urea moieties were optimized. This work culminated in the identification of compounds with single nanomolar potency as well as in vivo efficacy in a diabetic model.

  14. Three-dimensional structures of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis at 1.4 Å resolution and its complex with an antibacterial drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Uridine phosphorylases play an essential role in the cellular metabolism of some antibacterial agents. Acute infectious diseases (bubonic plague, yersiniosis, pseudotuberculosis, etc., caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia) are treated using both sulfanilamide medicines and antibiotics, including trimethoprim. The action of an antibiotic on a bacterial cell is determined primarily by the character of its interactions with cellular components, including those which are not targets (for example, with pyrimidine phosphorylases). This type of interaction should be taken into account in designing drugs. The three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) with the free active site was determined for the first time by X-ray crystallography and refined at 1.40 Å resolution (DPI = 0.062 Å; ID PDB: 4OF4). The structure of the complex of YptUPh with the bacteriostatic drug trimethoprim was studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics methods. The trimethoprim molecule was shown to be buffered by the enzyme YptUPh, resulting in a decrease in the efficiency of the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia with trimethoprim.

  15. Effects of eugenol-reduced clove extract on glycogen phosphorylase b and the development of diabetes in db/db mice.

    PubMed

    Sanae, Fujiko; Kamiyama, Ogusa; Ikeda-Obatake, Kyoko; Higashi, Yasuhiko; Asano, Naoki; Adachi, Isao; Kato, Atsushi

    2014-02-01

    We found that the 50% aqueous EtOH extract of clove (Syzygium aromaticum) had potent dose-dependent inhibitory activity toward glycogen phosphorylase b and glucagon-stimulated glucose production in primary rat hepatocytes. Among the components, eugeniin inhibited glycogen phosphorylase b and glucagon-stimulated glucose production in primary rat hepatocytes, with IC50 values of 0.14 and 4.7 μM, respectively. In sharp contrast, eugenol showed no significant inhibition toward glycogen phosphorylase b, even at a concentration of 400 μM. Eugenol-reduced clove extracts (erCE) were prepared and when fed to a db/db mouse they clearly suppressed the blood glucose and HbA1c levels. Furthermore, plasma triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acid levels in 5% and 10% erCE-fed db/db mice were significantly lowered, compared with control db/db mice without erCE supplementation. These results suggested that dietary supplementation with the erCE could beneficially modify glucose and lipid metabolism and contribute to the prevention of the progress of hyperglycemia and metabolic syndrome.

  16. Reaction of phosphorylase-a with α-D-glucose 1-phosphate and maltodextrin acceptors to give products with degree of polymerization 6-89.

    PubMed

    Kazłowski, Bartosz; Ko, Yuan-Tih

    2014-06-15

    A series of linear glucan saccharides (GS) with defined quantity and degree of polymerization (DP) were synthesized from α-d-glucose 1-phosphate (α-d-Glc 1-P) by phosphorylase-a. The GS product fractions with average DP 11, 22, 38, 52, 60, 70, and 79 were measured by HPSEC-ELSD system. Then the same seven fractions were resolved into individual peaks with DP: 6-14, 10-32, 27-55, 37-67, 44-75, 49-83 and 53-89 by HPAEC-PAD system. Results showed that measurement of α-d-Glc 1-P amount consuming during GS synthesis by both systems enable calculation of reaction yield. The reaction yield for the 24h biosynthesis of the GS product was 25.3% (measured by HPSEC-ELSD) or 29.1% (measured by HPAEC-PAD). The HPSEC-ELSD and HPAEC-PAD systems were also successfully used for phosphorylase-a activity measurement in order to perform its kinetic characterization. This study established feasible systems for preparation of various sizes of the GS with defined DP and quantity as well as characterization of phosphorylase-a kinetics.

  17. A cobalt oxyhydroxide nanoflake-based nanoprobe for the sensitive fluorescence detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity and inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Yao; Yang, Yuan; Yu, Ru-Qin; Chen, Ting-Ting; Chu, Xia

    2016-04-01

    Phosphorylation of nucleic acids with 5'-OH termini catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK) is an inevitable process and has been implicated in many important cellular events. Here, we found for the first time that there was a significant difference in the adsorbent ability of cobalt oxyhydroxide (CoOOH) nanoflakes between single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), which resulted in the fluorescent dye-labeled dsDNA still retaining strong fluorescence emission, while the fluorescence signal of ssDNA was significantly quenched by CoOOH nanoflakes. Based on this discovery, we developed a CoOOH nanoflake-based nanoprobe for the fluorescence sensing of T4 PNK activity and its inhibition by combining it with λ exonuclease cleavage reaction. In the presence of T4 PNK, dye-labeled dsDNA was phosphorylated and then cleaved by λ exonuclease to generate ssDNA, which could adsorb on the CoOOH nanoflakes and whose fluorescence was quenched by CoOOH nanoflakes. Due to the high quenching property of CoOOH nanoflakes as an efficient energy acceptor, a sensitive and selective sensing approach with satisfactory performance for T4 PNK sensing in a complex biological matrix has been successfully constructed and applied to the screening of inhibitors. The developed approach may potentially provide a new platform for further research, clinical diagnosis, and drug discovery of nucleotide kinase related diseases.Phosphorylation of nucleic acids with 5'-OH termini catalyzed by polynucleotide kinase (PNK) is an inevitable process and has been implicated in many important cellular events. Here, we found for the first time that there was a significant difference in the adsorbent ability of cobalt oxyhydroxide (CoOOH) nanoflakes between single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), which resulted in the fluorescent dye-labeled dsDNA still retaining strong fluorescence emission, while the fluorescence signal of ssDNA was significantly quenched by Co

  18. Cyclic up-regulation fluorescence of pyrene excimer for studying polynucleotide kinase activity based on dual amplification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Gao, Yanfang; Li, Baoxin; Jin, Yan

    2016-06-15

    Due to its important biological and clinical roles of polynucleotide kinase (PNK), accurate monitoring of PNK activity and inhibition is highly desirable. Herein, a homogeneous and sensitive fluorescence assay has been proposed for the detection of PNK activity by integrating target recycling signal amplification of DNA toehold strand displacement reaction (TSDR) with gamma-cyclodextrin (γ-CD) enhancement of pyrene excimer. A label-free hairpin DNA1 (H1) and two singly pyrene-labelled DNA, H2 and H3, are designed. Accompanying the occurrence of the efficient enzyme reactions, namely phosphorylation-actuated λ exonuclease reaction, a single-stranded DNA as a trigger DNA (tDNA) of TSDR can be released from H1. Then, tDNA drives circulatory interactions between H2 and H3 to continuously form H2/H3 duplex, resulting in formation of pyrene excimer and a "turn on" fluorescence signal of pyrene excimer. Furthermore, the fluorescence of pyrene excimer is further amplified by introducing gamma-cyclodextrin (γ-CD), which can regulate the space proximity of two pyrene molecules. Thus, TSDR-induced cyclic formation of pyrene excimer and γ-CD enhancement can specifically up-regulate the fluorescence of pyrene excimer for detection of PNK activity, the detection limit is 9.3 × 10(-5)UmL(-1), which is superior to those of most existing approaches. Moreover, the proposed strategy can also be successfully utilized to study inhibition efficiency of different PNK inhibitors as well. Therefore, a dual amplification approach is provided for nucleic acid phosphorylation related researches. PMID:26807522

  19. Spectroscopic analysis of the interaction of Escherichia coli DNA-dependent RNA polymerase with T7 DNA and synthetic polynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Reisbig, R R; Woody, A Y; Woody, R W

    1979-11-25

    We have studied the circular dichroism and ultraviolet difference spectra of T7 bacteriophage DNA and various synthetic polynucleotides upon addition of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. When RNA polymerase binds nonspecifically to T7 DNA, the CD spectrum shows a decrease in the maximum at 272 but no detectable changes in other regions of the spectrum. This CD change can be compared with those associated with known conformational changes in DNA. Nonspecific binding to RNA polymerase leads to an increase in the winding angle, theta, in T7 DNA. The CD and UV difference spectra for poly[d(A-T)] at 4 degrees C show similar effects. At 25 degrees C, binding of RNA polymerase to poly[d(A-T)] leads to hyperchromicity at 263 nm and to significant changes in CD. These effects are consistent with an opening of the double helix, i.e. melting of a short region of the DNA. The hyperchromicity observed at 263 nm for poly[d(A-T)] is used to determine the number of base pairs disrupted in the binding of RNA polymerase holoenzyme. The melting effect involves about 10 base pairs/RNA polymerase molecule. Changes in the CD of poly(dT) and poly(dA) on binding to RNA polymerase suggest an unstacking of the bases with a change in the backbone conformation. This is further confirmed by the UV difference spectra. We also show direct evidence for differences in the template binding site between holo- and core enzyme, presumably induced by the sigma subunit. By titration of the enzyme with poly(dT) the physical site size of RNA polymerase on single-stranded DNA is approximately equal to 30 bases for both holo- and core enzyme. Titration of poly[d(A-T)] with polymerase places the figure at approximately equal to 28 base pairs for double-stranded DNA.

  20. The maximum activities of hexokinase, phosphorylase, phosphofructokinase, glycerol phosphate dehydrogenases, lactate dehydrogenase, octopine dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, nucleoside diphosphatekinase, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase and arginine kinase in relation to carbohydrate utilization in muscles from marine invertebrates.

    PubMed Central

    Zammit, V A; Newsholme, E A

    1976-01-01

    Comparison of the activities of hexokinase, phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase in muscles from marine invertebrates indicates that they can be divided into three groups. First, the activities of the three enzymes are low in coelenterate muscles, catch muscles of molluscs and muscles of echinoderms; this indicates a low rate of carbohydrate (and energy) utilization by these muscles. Secondly, high activities of phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase relative to those of hexokinase are found in, for example, lobster abdominal and scallop snap muscles; this indicates that these muscles depend largely on anaerobic degradation of glycogen for energy production. Thirdly, high activities of hexokinase are found in the radular muscles of prosobranch molluscs and the fin muscles of squids; this indicates a high capacity for glucose utilization, which is consistent with the high activities of enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in these muscles [Alp, Newsholme & Zammit (1976) Biochem. J. 154, 689-700]. 2. The activities of lactate dehydrogenase, octopine dehydrogenase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, cytosolic and mitochondrial glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase were measured in order to provide a qualitative indication of the importance of different processes for oxidation of glycolytically formed NADH. The muscles are divided into four groups: those that have a high activity of lactate dehydrogenase relative to the activities of phosphofructokinase (e.g. crustacean muscles); those that have high activities of octopine dehydrogenase but low activities of lactate dehydrogenase (e.g. scallop snap muscle); those that have moderate activities of both lactate dehydrogenase and octopine dehydrogenase (radular muscles of prosobranchs), and those that have low activities of both lactate dehydrogenase and octopine dehydrogenase, but which possess activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (oyster adductor muscles). It is

  1. Structural and biochemical analysis of the phosphate donor specificity of the polynucleotide kinase component of the bacterial pnkp•hen1 RNA repair system.

    PubMed

    Das, Ushati; Wang, Li Kai; Smith, Paul; Shuman, Stewart

    2013-07-01

    Clostridium thermocellum Pnkp is the end-healing and end-sealing subunit of a bacterial RNA repair system. CthPnkp is composed of three catalytic modules: an N-terminal 5'-OH polynucleotide kinase, a central 2',3' phosphatase, and a C-terminal ligase. The crystal structure of the kinase domain bound to ATP•Mg(2+) revealed a rich network of ionic and hydrogen-bonding contacts to the α, β, and γ phosphates. By contrast, there are no enzymic contacts to the ribose and none with the adenine base other than a π-cation interaction with Arg116. Here we report that the enzyme uses ATP, GTP, CTP, UTP, or dATP as a phosphate donor for the 5'-OH kinase reaction. The enzyme also catalyzes the reverse reaction, in which a polynucleotide 5'-PO4 group is transferred to ADP, GDP, CDP, UDP, or dADP to form the corresponding NTP. We report new crystal structures of the kinase in complexes with GTP, CTP, UTP, and dATP in which the respective nucleobases are stacked on Arg116 but make no other enzymic contacts. Mutating Arg116 to alanine elicits a 10-fold increase in Km for ATP but has little effect on kcat. These findings illuminate the basis for nonspecific donor nucleotide utilization by a P-loop phosphotransferase. PMID:23721485

  2. Bis[(1S)-1 4-azanediyl-1-(9-deazaadenin-9-yl)-1 4-dideoxy-5-methylsulfanyl-D-ribitol] tetrakis(hydrochloride) monohydrate: structure DFT energy and ligand docking results of a potent methylthioadenosine phosphorylase inhibitor found in different

    SciTech Connect

    G Gainsford; G Evans; K Johnston; M Seth

    2011-12-31

    The title compound, abbreviated as 5'ThiomethylImmA, is a potent inhibitor of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase [Singh et al. (2004). Biochemistry, 43, 9-18]. The synchrotron study reported here shows that the hydrochloride salt crystallizes with two independent, nearly superimposable, dications as a monohydrate with formula 2C{sub 12}H{sub 19}N{sub 5}O{sub 2}S{sup 2+}{center_dot}4Cl{sup -}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O. Hydrogen bonding utilizing the H atoms of the dication is found to favor certain molecular conformations in the salt, which are significantly different from those found as bound in the enzyme. Ligand docking studies starting from either of these dications or related neutral structures successfully place the conformationally revised structures in the enzyme active site but only under particular hydrogen-bonding and molecular flexibility criteria. Density functional theory calculations verify the energy similarity of the indendent cations and confirm the significant energy cost of the required conformation change to the enzyme bound form. The results suggest the using crystallographically determined free ligand coordinates as starting parameters for modelling may have serious limitations.

  3. Light and abiotic stresses regulate the expression of GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase and levels of ascorbic acid in two kiwifruit genotypes via light-responsive and stress-inducible cis-elements in their promoters.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Liang, Dong; Li, Mingjun; Ma, Fengwang

    2013-09-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) plays an essential role in plants by protecting cells against oxidative damage. GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP) is the first committed gene for AsA synthesis. Our research examined AsA levels, regulation of GGP gene expression, and how these are related to abiotic stresses in two species of Actinidia (kiwifruit). When leaves were subjected to continuous darkness or light, ABA or MeJA, heat, or a hypoxic environment, we found some correlation between the relative levels of GGP mRNA and AsA concentrations. In transformed tobacco plants, activity of the GGP promoter was induced by all of these treatments. However, the degree of inducibility in the two kiwifruit species differed among the GGP promoter deletions. We deduced that the G-box motif, a light-responsive element, may have an important function in regulating GGP transcripts under various light conditions in both A. deliciosa and A. eriantha. Other elements such as ABRE, the CGTCA motif, and HSE might also control the promoter activities of GGP in kiwifruit. Altogether, these data suggest that GGP expression in the two kiwifruit species is regulated by light or abiotic stress via the relative cis-elements in their promoters. Furthermore, GGP has a critical role in modulating AsA concentrations in kiwifruit species under abiotic stresses.

  4. Properties of a glycogen like polysaccharide produced by a mutant of Escherichia coli lacking glycogen synthase and maltodextrin phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ji-Yun; Kim, Min-Gyu; Kim, Young-Wan; Ban, Hyun-Seung; Won, Mi-Sun; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2016-01-20

    Escherichia coli mutant TBP38 lacks glycogen synthase (GlgA) and maltodextrin phosphorylase (MalP). When grown on maltose in fed-batch fermentation TBP38 accumulated more than 50-fold higher glycogen-type polysaccharide than its parental strain. The polysaccharides were extracted at different growth stages and migrated as one peak in size-exclusion chromatography. TBP38 produced polysaccharides ranging 2.6 × 10(6)-4.6 × 10(6)Da. A ratio of short side-chains (DP ≦ 12) in the polysaccharides was greater than 50%, and number-average degree of polymerization varied from 9.8 to 8.4. The polysaccharides showed 70-290 times greater water-solubility than amylopectin. Km values using porcine and human pancreatic α-amylases with polysaccharides were 2- to 4-fold larger than that of amylopectin. kcat values were similar for both α-amylases. The TBP38 polysaccharides had 40-60% lower digestibility to amyloglucosidase than amylopectin. Intriguingly, the polysaccharides showed strong immunostimulating effects on mouse macrophage cell comparable to lipopolysaccharides. The lipopolysaccharide contamination levels were too low to account for this effect. PMID:26572397

  5. Transition state analogue inhibitors of human methylthioadenosine phosphorylase and bacterial methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase incorporating acyclic ribooxacarbenium ion mimics

    PubMed Central

    Clinch, Keith; Evans, Gary B.; Fröhlich, Richard F. G.; Gulab, Shivali A.; Gutierrez, Jemy A.; Mason, Jennifer M.; Schramm, Vern L.; Tyler, Peter C.; Woolhouse, Anthony D.

    2012-01-01

    Several acyclic hydroxy-methylthio-amines with 3 to 5 carbon atoms were prepared and coupled via a methylene link to 9-deazaadenine. The products were tested for inhibition against human MTAP and E. coli and N. meningitidis MTANs and gave Ki values as low as 0.23 nM. These results were compared to those obtained with 1st and 2nd generation inhibitors (1S)-1-(9-deazaadenin-9-yl)-1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-5-methylthio-d-ribitol (MT-Immucillin-A, 3) and (3R,4S)-1-[9-deazaadenin-9-yl)methyl]3-hydroxy-4-methylthiomethylpyrrolidine (MT-DADMe-Immucillin-A, 4). The best inhibitors were found to exhibit binding affinities of approximately 2- to 4-fold those of 3 but were significantly weaker than 4. Cleavage of the 2,3 carbon–carbon bond in MT-Immucillin-A (3) gave an acyclic product (79) with a 21,500 fold loss of activity against E. coli MTAN. In another case, N-methylation of a side chain secondary amine resulted in a 250-fold loss of activity against the same enzyme [(±)-65 vs (±)-68]. The inhibition results were also contrasted with those acyclic derivatives previously prepared as inhibitors for a related enzyme, purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), where some inhibitors in the latter case were found to be more potent than their cyclic counterparts. PMID:22854195

  6. Development of a capillary electrophoresis method for analyzing adenosine deaminase and purine nucleoside phosphorylase and its application in inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yanfei; Li, Youxin; Bao, James J

    2016-08-01

    A novel capillary electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for simultaneous analysis of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) in red blood cells (RBCs). The developed method considered and took advantage of the natural conversion from the ADA product, inosine to hypoxanthine. The transformation ratio was introduced for ADA and PNP analysis to obtain more reliable results. After optimizing the enzymatic incubation and electrophoresis separation conditions, the determined activities of ADA and PNP in 12 human RBCs were 0.237-0.833 U/ml and 9.013-10.453 U/ml packed cells, respectively. The analysis of ADA in mice RBCs indicated that there was an apparent activity difference between healthy and hepatoma mice. In addition, the proposed method was also successfully applied in the inhibitor screening from nine traditional Chinese medicines, and data showed that ADA activities were strongly inhibited by Rhizoma Chuanxiong and Angelica sinensis. The inhibition effect of Angelica sinensis on ADA is first reported here and could also inhibit PNP activity. PMID:27173606

  7. Isotope-specific and amino acid-specific heavy atom substitutions alter barrier crossing in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Javier; Schramm, Vern L

    2015-09-01

    Computational chemistry predicts that atomic motions on the femtosecond timescale are coupled to transition-state formation (barrier-crossing) in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). The prediction is experimentally supported by slowed catalytic site chemistry in isotopically labeled PNP (13C, 15N, and 2H). However, other explanations are possible, including altered volume or bond polarization from carbon-deuterium bonds or propagation of the femtosecond bond motions into slower (nanoseconds to milliseconds) motions of the larger protein architecture to alter catalytic site chemistry. We address these possibilities by analysis of chemistry rates in isotope-specific labeled PNPs. Catalytic site chemistry was slowed for both [2H]PNP and [13C, 15N]PNP in proportion to their altered protein masses. Secondary effects emanating from carbon-deuterium bond properties can therefore be eliminated. Heavy-enzyme mass effects were probed for local or global contributions to catalytic site chemistry by generating [15N, 2H]His8-PNP. Of the eight His per subunit, three participate in contacts to the bound reactants and five are remote from the catalytic sites. [15N, 2H]His8-PNP had reduced catalytic site chemistry larger than proportional to the enzymatic mass difference. Altered barrier crossing when only His are heavy supports local catalytic site femtosecond perturbations coupled to transition-state formation. Isotope-specific and amino acid specific labels extend the use of heavy enzyme methods to distinguish global from local isotope effects.

  8. Isotope-specific and amino acid-specific heavy atom substitutions alter barrier crossing in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Javier; Schramm, Vern L

    2015-09-01

    Computational chemistry predicts that atomic motions on the femtosecond timescale are coupled to transition-state formation (barrier-crossing) in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). The prediction is experimentally supported by slowed catalytic site chemistry in isotopically labeled PNP (13C, 15N, and 2H). However, other explanations are possible, including altered volume or bond polarization from carbon-deuterium bonds or propagation of the femtosecond bond motions into slower (nanoseconds to milliseconds) motions of the larger protein architecture to alter catalytic site chemistry. We address these possibilities by analysis of chemistry rates in isotope-specific labeled PNPs. Catalytic site chemistry was slowed for both [2H]PNP and [13C, 15N]PNP in proportion to their altered protein masses. Secondary effects emanating from carbon-deuterium bond properties can therefore be eliminated. Heavy-enzyme mass effects were probed for local or global contributions to catalytic site chemistry by generating [15N, 2H]His8-PNP. Of the eight His per subunit, three participate in contacts to the bound reactants and five are remote from the catalytic sites. [15N, 2H]His8-PNP had reduced catalytic site chemistry larger than proportional to the enzymatic mass difference. Altered barrier crossing when only His are heavy supports local catalytic site femtosecond perturbations coupled to transition-state formation. Isotope-specific and amino acid specific labels extend the use of heavy enzyme methods to distinguish global from local isotope effects. PMID:26305965

  9. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase and xanthine oxidase activities in erythrocytes and plasma from marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Pérez-Milicua, Myrna Barjau; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal-Vertiz, Jaime A; de la Rosa, Alejandro; Vázquez-Medina, José P; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and xanthine oxidase (XO) are key enzymes involved in the purine salvage pathway. PNP metabolizes purine bases to synthetize purine nucleotides whereas XO catalyzes the oxidation of purines to uric acid. In humans, PNP activity is reported to be high in erythrocytes and XO activity to be low in plasma; however, XO activity increases after ischemic events. XO activity in plasma of northern elephant seals has been reported during prolonged fasting and rest and voluntary associated apneas. The objective of this study was to analyze circulating PNP and XO activities in marine mammals adapted to tolerate repeated cycles of ischemia/reperfusion associated with diving (bottlenose dolphin, northern elephant seal) in comparison with semiaquatic (river otter) and terrestrial mammals (human, pig). PNP activities in plasma and erythrocytes, as well as XO activity in plasma, from all species were quantified by spectrophotometry. No clear relationship in circulating PNP or XO activity could be established between marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals. Erythrocytes from bottlenose dolphins and humans are highly permeable to nucleosides and glucose, intraerythrocyte PNP activity may be related to a release of purine nucleotides from the liver. High-energy costs will probably mean a higher ATP degradation rate in river otters, as compared to northern elephant seals or dolphins. Lower erythrocyte PNP activity and elevated plasma XO activity in northern elephant seal could be associated with fasting and/or sleep- and dive-associated apneas.

  10. Identification of the Maize Amyloplast Stromal 112-kD Protein as a Plastidic Starch Phosphorylase12

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Mu, Helen He; Wasserman, Bruce P.; Carman, George M.

    2001-01-01

    Amyloplast is the site of starch synthesis in the storage tissue of maize (Zea mays). The amyloplast stroma contains an enriched group of proteins when compared with the whole endosperm. Proteins with molecular masses of 76 and 85 kD have been identified as starch synthase I and starch branching enzyme IIb, respectively. A 112-kD protein was isolated from the stromal fraction by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to tryptic digestion and amino acid sequence analysis. Three peptide sequences showed high identity to plastidic forms of starch phosphorylase (SP) from sweet potato, potato, and spinach. SP activity was identified in the amyloplast stromal fraction and was enriched 4-fold when compared with the activity in the whole endosperm fraction. Native and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses showed that SP activity was associated with the amyloplast stromal 112-kD protein. In addition, antibodies raised against the potato plastidic SP recognized the amyloplast stromal 112-kD protein. The amyloplast stromal 112-kD SP was expressed in whole endosperm isolated from maize harvested 9 to 24 d after pollination. Results of affinity electrophoresis and enzyme kinetic analyses showed that the amyloplast stromal 112-kD SP preferred amylopectin over glycogen as a substrate in the synthetic reaction. The maize shrunken-4 mutant had reduced SP activity due to a decrease of the amyloplast stromal 112-kD enzyme. PMID:11154342

  11. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase and the enzymatic antioxidant defense system in breast milk from women with different levels of arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Labrada-Martagón, Vanessa; Bitzer-Quintero, Oscar Kurt; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía Celina

    2015-05-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is an ubiquitous enzyme which plays an important role in arsenic (As) detoxification. As is a toxic metalloid present in air, soil and water; is abundant in the environment and is readily transferred along the trophic chain, being found even in human breast milk. Milk is the main nutrient source for the growth and development of neonates. Information on breast milk synthesis and its potential defense mechanism against As toxicity is scarce. In this study, PNP and antioxidant enzymes activities, as well as glutathione (GSH) and total arsenic (TAs) concentrations, were quantified in breast milk samples. PNP, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) activities and GSH concentration were determined spectrophotometrically; TAs concentration ([TAs]) was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Data suggest an increase in PNP activity (median = 0.034 U mg protein-1) in the presence of TAs (median = 1.16 g L(-1)). To explain the possible association of PNP activity in breast milk with the activity of the antioxidant enzymes as well as with GSH and TAs concentrations, generalized linear models were built. In the adjusted model, GPx and GR activities showed a statistically significant (p<0.01) association with PNP activity. These results may suggest that PNP activity increases in the presence of TAs as part of the detoxification mechanism in breast milk.

  12. A study on the interaction of rhodamine B with methylthioadenosine phosphorylase protein sourced from an Antarctic soil metagenomic library.

    PubMed

    Bartasun, Paulina; Cieśliński, Hubert; Bujacz, Anna; Wierzbicka-Woś, Anna; Kur, Józef

    2013-01-01

    The presented study examines the phenomenon of the fluorescence under UV light excitation (312 nm) of E. coli cells expressing a novel metagenomic-derived putative methylthioadenosine phosphorylase gene, called rsfp, grown on LB agar supplemented with a fluorescent dye rhodamine B. For this purpose, an rsfp gene was cloned and expressed in an LMG194 E. coli strain using an arabinose promoter. The resulting RSFP protein was purified and its UV-VIS absorbance spectrum and emission spectrum were assayed. Simultaneously, the same spectroscopic studies were carried out for rhodamine B in the absence or presence of RSFP protein or native E. coli proteins, respectively. The results of the spectroscopic studies suggested that the fluorescence of E. coli cells expressing rsfp gene under UV illumination is due to the interaction of rhodamine B molecules with the RSFP protein. Finally, this interaction was proved by a crystallographic study and then by site-directed mutagenesis of rsfp gene sequence. The crystal structures of RSFP apo form (1.98 Å) and complex RSFP/RB (1.90 Å) show a trimer of RSFP molecules located on the crystallographic six fold screw axis. The RSFP complex with rhodamine B revealed the binding site for RB, in the pocket located on the interface between symmetry related monomers.

  13. Activity of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase in normal and cirrhotic rat liver during glycogen synthesis from glucose or fructose.

    PubMed

    Bezborodkina, Natalia N; Chestnova, Anna Yu; Okovity, Sergey V; Kudryavtsev, Boris N

    2014-03-01

    Cirrhotic patients often demonstrate glucose intolerance, one of the possible causes being a decreased glycogen-synthesizing capacity of the liver. At the same time, information about the rates of glycogen synthesis in the cirrhotic liver is scanty and contradictory. We studied the dynamics of glycogen accumulation and the activity of glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) in the course of 120min after per os administration of glucose or fructose to fasted rats with CCl4-cirrhosis or fasted normal rats. Blood serum and liver pieces were sampled for examinations. In the normal rat liver administration of glucose/fructose initiated a fast accumulation of glycogen, while in the cirrhotic liver glycogen was accumulated with a 20min delay and at a lower rate. In the normal liver GS activity rose sharply and GPa activity dropped in the beginning of glycogen synthesis, but 60min later a high synthesis rate was sustained at the background of a high GS and GPa activity. Contrariwise, in the cirrhotic liver glycogen was accumulated at the background of a decreased GS activity and a low GPa activity. Refeeding with fructose resulted in a faster increase in the GS activity in both the normal and the cirrhotic liver than refeeding with glucose. To conclude, the rate of glycogen synthesis in the cirrhotic liver is lower than in the normal one, the difference being probably associated with a low GS activity.

  14. Design of vectors for efficient expression of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase in skin fibroblasts from enzyme-deficient humans

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, W.R.A.; Miller, A.D.

    1988-09-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency is an inherited disorder associated with a severe immune defect that is fatal. Enzyme replacement therapy is an attractive approach to treatment of this disease. To this aim the authors constructed retroviral vectors containing a human PNP cDNA and a selectable gene encoding neomycin phosphotransferase. PNP expression was controlled by either the early promoter from simian virus 40, the immediate early promoter from human cytomegalovirus, or the retroviral promoter. Cultured skin fibroblasts from two unrelated PNP-deficient patients that were infected with these vectors expressed mean PNP activities of 0.03, 0.74, and 5.9 /mu/mol/hr per mg of protein, respectively. The latter infectants had PNP activities eight times the level of 0.74 /mu/mol/hr per mg of protein observed in normal skin fibroblasts, enabling rapid metabolism of exogenous deoxyguanosine, the cytotoxic metabolite that accumulates in the plasma of PNP-deficient patients. These experiments indicate that viral long terminal repeat was the strongest promoter for expression of PNP and suggest the potential of human skin fibroblasts as vehicles for therapeutic gene expression.

  15. The kinetic mechanism of human uridine phosphorylase 1: Towards the development of enzyme inhibitors for cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Renck, Daiana; Ducati, Rodrigo G; Palma, Mario S; Santos, Diógenes S; Basso, Luiz A

    2010-05-01

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP) is a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzing the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose-1-phosphate (R1P). The human UP type 1 (hUP1) is a molecular target for the design of inhibitors intended to boost endogenous uridine levels to rescue normal tissues from the toxicity of fluoropyrimidine nucleoside chemotherapeutic agents, such as capecitabine and 5-fluorouracil. Here, we describe a method to obtain homogeneous recombinant hUP1, and present initial velocity, product inhibition, and equilibrium binding data. These results suggest that hUP1 catalyzes uridine phosphorolysis by a steady-state ordered bi bi kinetic mechanism, in which inorganic phosphate binds first followed by the binding of uridine, and uracil dissociates first, followed by R1P release. Fluorescence titration at equilibrium showed cooperative binding of either P(i) or R1P binding to hUP1. Amino acid residues involved in either catalysis or substrate binding were proposed based on pH-rate profiles.

  16. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase and xanthine oxidase activities in erythrocytes and plasma from marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Pérez-Milicua, Myrna Barjau; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal-Vertiz, Jaime A; de la Rosa, Alejandro; Vázquez-Medina, José P; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and xanthine oxidase (XO) are key enzymes involved in the purine salvage pathway. PNP metabolizes purine bases to synthetize purine nucleotides whereas XO catalyzes the oxidation of purines to uric acid. In humans, PNP activity is reported to be high in erythrocytes and XO activity to be low in plasma; however, XO activity increases after ischemic events. XO activity in plasma of northern elephant seals has been reported during prolonged fasting and rest and voluntary associated apneas. The objective of this study was to analyze circulating PNP and XO activities in marine mammals adapted to tolerate repeated cycles of ischemia/reperfusion associated with diving (bottlenose dolphin, northern elephant seal) in comparison with semiaquatic (river otter) and terrestrial mammals (human, pig). PNP activities in plasma and erythrocytes, as well as XO activity in plasma, from all species were quantified by spectrophotometry. No clear relationship in circulating PNP or XO activity could be established between marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals. Erythrocytes from bottlenose dolphins and humans are highly permeable to nucleosides and glucose, intraerythrocyte PNP activity may be related to a release of purine nucleotides from the liver. High-energy costs will probably mean a higher ATP degradation rate in river otters, as compared to northern elephant seals or dolphins. Lower erythrocyte PNP activity and elevated plasma XO activity in northern elephant seal could be associated with fasting and/or sleep- and dive-associated apneas. PMID:24530799

  17. Isotope-specific and amino acid-specific heavy atom substitutions alter barrier crossing in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Javier; Schramm, Vern L.

    2015-01-01

    Computational chemistry predicts that atomic motions on the femtosecond timescale are coupled to transition-state formation (barrier-crossing) in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). The prediction is experimentally supported by slowed catalytic site chemistry in isotopically labeled PNP (13C, 15N, and 2H). However, other explanations are possible, including altered volume or bond polarization from carbon-deuterium bonds or propagation of the femtosecond bond motions into slower (nanoseconds to milliseconds) motions of the larger protein architecture to alter catalytic site chemistry. We address these possibilities by analysis of chemistry rates in isotope-specific labeled PNPs. Catalytic site chemistry was slowed for both [2H]PNP and [13C, 15N]PNP in proportion to their altered protein masses. Secondary effects emanating from carbon–deuterium bond properties can therefore be eliminated. Heavy-enzyme mass effects were probed for local or global contributions to catalytic site chemistry by generating [15N, 2H]His8-PNP. Of the eight His per subunit, three participate in contacts to the bound reactants and five are remote from the catalytic sites. [15N, 2H]His8-PNP had reduced catalytic site chemistry larger than proportional to the enzymatic mass difference. Altered barrier crossing when only His are heavy supports local catalytic site femtosecond perturbations coupled to transition-state formation. Isotope-specific and amino acid specific labels extend the use of heavy enzyme methods to distinguish global from local isotope effects. PMID:26305965

  18. A Ca(2+)-dependent global conformational change in the 3D structure of phosphorylase kinase obtained from electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Owen W; Carlson, Gerald M; Gogol, Edward P

    2002-01-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PhK), a Ca(2+)-dependent regulatory enzyme of the glycogenolytic cascade in skeletal muscle, is a 1.3 MDa hexadecameric oligomer comprising four copies of four distinct subunits, termed alpha, beta, gamma, and delta, the last being endogenous calmodulin. The structures of both nonactivated and Ca(2+)-activated PhK were determined to elucidate Ca(2+)-induced structural changes associated with PhK's activation. Reconstructions of both conformers of the kinase, each including over 11,000 particles, yielded bridged, bilobal structures with resolutions estimated by Fourier shell correlation at 24 A using a 0.5 correlation cutoff, or at 18 A by the 3sigma (corrected for D(2) symmetry) threshold curve. Extensive Ca(2+)-induced structural changes were observed in regions encompassing both the lobes and bridges, consistent with changes in subunit interactions upon activation. The relative placement of the alpha, beta, gamma, and delta subunits in the nonactivated three-dimensional structure, relying upon previous two-dimensional localizations, is in agreement with the known effects of Ca(2+) on subunit conformations and interactions in the PhK complex. PMID:11796107

  19. Site-Selective Ribosylation of Fluorescent Nucleobase Analogs Using Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase as a Catalyst: Effects of Point Mutations.

    PubMed

    Stachelska-Wierzchowska, Alicja; Wierzchowski, Jacek; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata

    2015-12-28

    Enzymatic ribosylation of fluorescent 8-azapurine derivatives, like 8-azaguanine and 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine, with purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) as a catalyst, leads to N9, N8, and N7-ribosides. The final proportion of the products may be modulated by point mutations in the enzyme active site. As an example, ribosylation of the latter substrate by wild-type calf PNP gives N7- and N8-ribosides, while the N243D mutant directs the ribosyl substitution at N9- and N7-positions. The same mutant allows synthesis of the fluorescent N7-β-d-ribosyl-8-azaguanine. The mutated form of the E. coli PNP, D204N, can be utilized to obtain non-typical ribosides of 8-azaadenine and 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine as well. The N7- and N8-ribosides of the 8-azapurines can be analytically useful, as illustrated by N7-β-d-ribosyl-2,6-diamino-8-azapurine, which is a good fluorogenic substrate for mammalian forms of PNP, including human blood PNP, while the N8-riboside is selective to the E. coli enzyme.

  20. Increasing free-energy (ATP) conservation in maltose-grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae by expression of a heterologous maltose phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    de Kok, Stefan; Yilmaz, Duygu; Suir, Erwin; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2011-09-01

    Increasing free-energy conservation from the conversion of substrate into product is crucial for further development of many biotechnological processes. In theory, replacing the hydrolysis of disaccharides by a phosphorolytic cleavage reaction provides an opportunity to increase the ATP yield on the disaccharide. To test this concept, we first deleted the native maltose metabolism genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The knockout strain showed no maltose-transport activity and a very low residual maltase activity (0.03 μmol mg protein(-1)min(-1)). Expression of a maltose phosphorylase gene from Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis and the MAL11 maltose-transporter gene resulted in relatively slow growth (μ(aerobic) 0.09 ± 0.03 h(-1)). Co-expression of Lactococcus lactis β-phosphoglucomutase accelerated maltose utilization via this route (μ(aerobic) 0.21 ± 0.01 h(-1), μ(anaerobic) 0.10 ± 0.00 h(-1)). Replacing maltose hydrolysis with phosphorolysis increased the anaerobic biomass yield on maltose in anaerobic maltose-limited chemostat cultures by 26%, thus demonstrating the potential of phosphorolysis to improve the free-energy conservation of disaccharide metabolism in industrial microorganisms.

  1. Fluorescence studies of the binding of bacteriophage M13 gene V mutant proteins to polynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Stassen, A P; Harmsen, B J; Schoenmakers, J G; Hilbers, C W; Konings, R N

    1992-06-15

    This investigation describes how the binding characteristics of the single-stranded DNA-binding protein encoded by gene V of bacteriophage M13, are affected by single-site amino acid substitutions. The series of mutant proteins tested includes mutations in the purported monomer-monomer interaction region as well as mutations in the DNA-binding domain at positions which are thought to be functionally involved in monomer-monomer interaction or single-stranded DNA binding. The characteristics of the binding of the mutant proteins to the homopolynucleotides poly(dA), poly(dU) and poly(dT), were studied by means of fluorescence-titration experiments. The binding stoichiometry and fluorescence quenching of the mutant proteins are equal to, or lower than, the wild-type gene V protein values. In addition, all proteins measured bind a more-or-less co-operative manner to single-stranded DNA. The binding affinities for poly(dA) decrease in the following order: Y61H greater than wild-type greater than F68L and R16H greater than Y41F and Y41H greater than F73L greater than R21C greater than Y34H greater than G18D/Y56H. Possible explanations for the observed differences are discussed. The conservation of binding affinity, also for mutations in the single-stranded DNA-binding domain, suggests that the binding to homopolynucleotides is largely non-specific.

  2. Astrocytic glycogenolysis: mechanisms and functions.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Leif; Xu, Junnan; Song, Dan; Du, Ting; Li, Baoman; Yan, Enzhi; Peng, Liang

    2015-02-01

    Until the demonstration little more than 20 years ago that glycogenolysis occurs during normal whisker stimulation glycogenolysis was regarded as a relatively uninteresting emergency procedure. Since then, a series of important astrocytic functions has been shown to be critically dependent on glycogenolytic activity to support the signaling mechanisms necessary for these functions to operate. This applies to glutamate formation and uptake and to release of ATP as a transmitter, stimulated by other transmitters or elevated K(+) concentrations and affecting not only other astrocytes but also most other brain cells. It is also relevant for astrocytic K(+) uptake both during the period when the extracellular K(+) concentration is still elevated after neuronal excitation, and capable of stimulating glycogenolytic activity, and during the subsequent undershoot after intense neuronal activity, when glycogenolysis may be stimulated by noradrenaline. Both elevated K(+) concentrations and several transmitters, including the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and vasopressin increase free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in astrocytes, which stimulates phosphorylase kinase so that it activates the transformation of the inactive glycogen phosphorylase a to the active phosphorylase b. Contrary to common belief cyclic AMP plays at most a facilitatory role, and only when free cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration is also increased. Cyclic AMP is not increased during activation of glycogenolysis by either elevated K(+) concentrations or the stimulation of the serotonergic 5-HT(2B) receptor. Not all agents that stimulate glycogenolysis do so by directly activating phophorylase kinase--some do so by activating processes requiring glycogenolysis, e.g. for synthesis of glutamate. PMID:24744118

  3. Diadenosine 5',5'''-P1, P4-tetraphosphate alpha, beta-phosphorylase from yeast supports nucleoside diphosphate-phosphate exchange.

    PubMed

    Guranowski, A; Blanquet, S

    1986-05-01

    Homogeneous diadenosine 5',5'''-P1,P4-tetraphosphate alpha, beta-phosphorylase (Ap4A-phosphorylase), the enzyme recently found in yeast (Guranowski, A., and Blanquet, S. (1985) J. Biol. Chem. 260, 3542-3547) catalyzes an exchange reaction between the beta-phosphate of nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) and orthophosphate from the medium (Pi). The common purine and pyrimidine ribonucleoside diphosphates as well as ADP analogs modified either in aglycone, sugar, or at the anhydride bond beta-position are substrates. The Km and rate values for the NDP-Pi exchange reaction were estimated at pH optima. These optima are 6.5 for UDP, 7.0 for ADP or CDP, and 8.0 for GDP. In the presence of 10 mM K2HPO4, 0.1 mM EDTA, and 100 mM Hepes/KOH (pH 7.0), the Km for ADP is 0.7 mM with a rate constant at saturating ADP of 96 s-1. The Km value for orthophosphate is 2 mM. In the NDP-Pi exchange reaction, phosphate can be substituted with arsenate and apparent arsenolysis of NDPs yields corresponding nucleoside monophosphates. The same pH optimum of 6.5 is found for arsenolysis of ADP, GDP, and CDP. Whereas the Ap4A phosphorylase sulfhydryl groups are essential for catalyzing the Ap4A phosphorolysis, the NDP-Pi exchange reactions, and the arsenolysis of NDPs, the divalent metal ions (Mg2+, Mn2+, Ca2+, Co2+, and Cd2+), which had been shown to be essential cofactors of the former reaction, are not required for the two latter ones. Used at concentrations which are optimum for Ap4A phosphorolysis, the cations (particularly Mg2+ and Cd2+) inhibit the NDP-Pi exchange and the arsenolysis of NDPs. Interestingly, the Ap4A phosphorylase exhibits higher specificity for adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) than for any other NDP tested. The V/Km ratio is almost 5-fold higher with APS than with ADP. However, in the presence of orthophosphate, the APS is irreversibly converted to ADP. Thus, the enzyme displays a property already attributed to ADP-sulfurylase (EC 2.7.7.5), (Grunberg-Manago, M., Del Campillo

  4. Computational Methods for De novo Protein Design and its Applications to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1, Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase, Ubiquitin Specific Protease 7, and Histone Demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Bellows, M.L.; Floudas, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of computational de novo protein design methods, highlighting recent advances and successes. Four protein systems are described that are important targets for drug design: human immunodeficiency virus 1, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, ubiquitin specific protease 7, and histone demethylases. Target areas for drug design for each protein are described, along with known inhibitors, focusing on peptidic inhibitors, but also describing some small-molecule inhibitors. Computational design methods that have been employed in elucidating these inhibitors for each protein are outlined, along with steps that can be taken in order to apply computational protein design to a system that has mainly used experimental methods to date. PMID:20210752

  5. In vitro effect of fenugreek extracts on intestinal sodium-dependent glucose uptake and hepatic glycogen phosphorylase A.

    PubMed

    Al-Habori, M; Raman, A; Lawrence, M J; Skett, P

    2001-01-01

    Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L. seed) is a food with traditional medicinal use in diabetes. Beneficial effects have been demonstrated in diabetic animals and both insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. Effects of a lipid extract A, crude ethanolic extract B, further sub-fractions of B (saponin-free C, saponin D and sapogenin E) and a gum fibre fraction F on intestinal sodium-dependent glucose uptake were investigated in vitro using rabbit intestinal brush border membrane vesicles. All fractions except A inhibited glucose-uptake at 0.33 and/or 3.3 mg/mL (p < 0.001). Greatest inhibition was observed with fractions D and E. Diosgenin and trigonelline (compounds reported in fenugreek) also inhibited glucose-uptake (IC50 values approximately 3 mg/ml, equivalent to 8 mM and 19 mM respectively) but did not account for the activity of the crude extracts. Fenugreek extracts had no effect on basal levels of glycogen phosphorylase a (HGPa) activity in rat hepatocyte suspensions. However fractions C and E caused a marginal but statistically significant inhibition (18.9 and 15.1% respectively, p < 0.05) of glucagon induction of this enzyme suggesting a glucagon-antagonist effect. Diosgenin (1.65 mg/ml; 4 mM) inhibited glucagon-induced HGPa activity by 20% (p < 0.05), and was more effective than trigonelline (non significant inhibition of 9.4% at 1.65 mg/ml, 10 mM). PMID:12369721

  6. The role of glycogen phosphorylase in the regulation of glycogenolysis by insulin and glucagon in isolated eel (Anguilla rostrata) hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Foster, G D; Moon, T W

    1990-07-01

    The effects of porcine, scombroid, and salmon insulins, and bovine and anglerfish glucagons on glycogen depletion and glycogen phosphorylase (GPase) activities were examined in freshly isolated American eel (Anguilla rostrata) hepatocytes. Eel liver GPase in crude homogenates was activated (increase in % GPase a) by phosphorylating conditions and was rapidly inactivated (less than 1 h) when a phosphatase inhibitor (fluoride) was absent. Caffeine inhibits, and AMP activates, the b form of GPase consistent with their effects on rat liver GPase. Both mammalian and fish glucagons increased glucose production in eel hepatocytes, but had more ambiguous effects on glycogen levels and GPase activities. The magnitude of bovine glucagon effects were dependent on the initial glycogen content of the cells; only at glycogen concentrations less than approximately 70 μmoles.g(-1) did glucagon significantly increase % GPase a. Anglerfish glucagon significantly increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentrations by 90% at 10(-7) M, but had no effects at 10(-9) M and 10(-8) M. Scombroid and salmon insulins maintained hepatocyte glycogen concentrations and decreased glucose production, with these effects more pronounced at low (10(-9) to 10(-8) M) rather than high (10(-7) M) hormone concentrations. Porcine and salmon insulins decreased total GPase and % GPase a activities, and salmon insulin decreased CAMP levels, but only at 10(-8) M (by 44%).Glycogen is, therefore, depleted by glucagon and maintained by insulin in freshly isolated American eel hepatocytes, and these changes are accomplished, at least in part, by changes in the activities of GPase. Changes in cAMP do not explain all of the observed hormone effects. PMID:24220919

  7. Preoperative Chemoradiation for Rectal Cancer Using Capecitabine and Celecoxib Correlated With Posttreatment Assessment of Thymidylate Synthase and Thymidine Phosphorylase Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Unger, Keith R.; Romney, Davis A.; Koc, Mehmet; Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Friel, Charles M.; Foley, E.F.; Rich, Tyvin A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Thymidylate synthase (TS) and thymidine phosphorylase (TP) expression have been shown to be predictors of response to therapy. The toxicity, efficacy, surgical morbidity, and immunohistochemical TS and TP expression were assessed in surgical resection specimens after preoperative chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with clinical stage I to III rectal adenocarcinoma received preoperative chemoradiation and underwent surgical resection 6 weeks later. Results: Posttreatment tumor stages were T1 to T2 and N0 in 30% of patients; T3 to T4 and N0 in 30% of patients; and T1 to T3 and N1 to N2 in 15% of patients. Pathologic complete response (pCR) was evident in 25% and tumor regression occurred in a total of 80% of patients. Anal sphincter-sparing surgery was performed in 80% of cases. Acute and perioperative complications were minimal, with no grade 3/4 toxicity or treatment breaks. Pelvic control was obtained in 90% of patients. With a median follow-up of 65.5 months (range, 8-80 months), the 6-year actuarial survival rate was 75%. Local failure was significantly associated with nonresponse to therapy and with high TS and low TP expression (p = 0.008 and p = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions: The combination of capecitabine, celecoxib, and x-radiation therapy yields excellent response: a 25% pathologic pCR, no acute grade 3/4 toxicity, and minimal surgical morbidity. Nonresponders expressed significantly increased TS levels and decreased TP levels in posttreatment resection specimens compared to responders.

  8. Efficient electrogene therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma treatment using the bacterial purine nucleoside phosphorylase suicide gene with fludarabine.

    PubMed

    Deharvengt, Sophie; Rejiba, Soukaina; Wack, Séverine; Aprahamian, Marc; Hajri, Amor

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential of electrogene therapy with the bacterial purine nucleoside phosphorylase gene (ePNP), on pancreatic carcinoma (PC) large tumors. The in vivo electroporation (EP) conditions and efficacy were investigated on both subcutaneous xenografts of human PC cells in immunocompromised mice and orthotopic intrapancreatic grafts of rat PC cells in syngenic rats. After intratumoral injection of naked plasmid DNA, EP was performed using a two-needle array with 25-msec pulses and either a 300 V/cm field strength for subcutaneous or a 500 V/cm field strength for orthotopic PC, parameters providing the best electrotransfer as reflected by the measurements of both luciferase activity and ePNP mRNA. As expected, tumors developed sensitivity to prodrug treatment (6-methylpurine deoxyribose or fludarabine phosphate). We observed both significant inhibition of tumor growth and extended survival of treated mice. In fact, after prodrug treatment, PC growth in the subcutaneous model was delayed by 50-70% for ePNP-expressing tumors. In an orthotopic pancreatic tumor model, the animal survival was significantly prolonged after ePNP electrogene transfer followed by fludarabine treatment, with one animal out of 10 being tumor-free 6 months thereafter. The current study demonstrates for the first time on PC the in vivo feasibility of electrogene transfer and its therapeutic efficiency using the suicide gene/prodrug system, ePNP/fludarabine. These findings suggest that electrogene therapy strategy must be considered for pancreatic cancer treatment, particularly at advanced stages of the disease. PMID:17487360

  9. Selective photoregulation of the activity of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, two key enzymes in glycogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Lobo, Mireia; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume; Fita, Ignacio; Velasco, Dolores; Guinovart, Joan J; Ferrer, Joan C

    2015-07-14

    Glycogen is a polymer of α-1,4- and α-1,6-linked glucose units that provides a readily available source of energy in living organisms. Glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) are the two enzymes that control, respectively, the synthesis and degradation of this polysaccharide and constitute adequate pharmacological targets to modulate cellular glycogen levels, by means of inhibition of their catalytic activity. Here we report on the synthesis and biological evaluation of a selective inhibitor that consists of an azobenzene moiety glycosidically linked to the anomeric carbon of a glucose molecule. In the ground state, the more stable (E)-isomer of the azobenzene glucoside had a slight inhibitory effect on rat muscle GP (RMGP, IC50 = 4.9 mM) and Escherichia coli GS (EcGS, IC50 = 1.6 mM). After irradiation and subsequent conversion to the (Z)-form, the inhibitory potency of the azobenzene glucoside did not significantly change for RMGP (IC50 = 2.4 mM), while its effect on EcGS increased 50-fold (IC50 = 32 μM). Sucrose synthase 4 from potatoes, a glycosyltransferase that does not operate on glycogen, was only slightly inhibited by the (E)-isomer (IC50 = 0.73 mM). These findings could be rationalized on the basis of kinetic and computer-aided docking analysis, which indicated that both isomers of the azobenzene glucoside mimic the EcGS acceptor substrate and exert their inhibitory effect by binding to the glycogen subsite in the active center of the enzyme. The ability to selectively photoregulate the catalytic activity of key enzymes of glycogen metabolism may represent a new approach for the treatment of glycogen metabolism disorders.

  10. Ca2+-induced structural changes in phosphorylase kinase detected by small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Priddy, Timothy S; MacDonald, Brian A; Heller, William T; Nadeau, Owen W; Trewhella, Jill; Carlson, Gerald M

    2005-04-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PhK), a 1.3-MDa (alphabetagammadelta)(4) hexadecameric complex, is a Ca(2+)-dependent regulatory enzyme in the cascade activation of glycogenolysis. PhK comprises two arched (alphabetagammadelta)(2) octameric lobes that are oriented back-to-back with overall D(2) symmetry and joined by connecting bridges. From chemical cross-linking and electron microscopy, it is known that the binding of Ca(2+) by PhK perturbs the structure of all its subunits and promotes redistribution of density throughout both its lobes and bridges; however, little is known concerning the interrelationship of these effects. To measure structural changes induced by Ca(2+) in the PhK complex in solution, small-angle X-ray scattering was performed on nonactivated and Ca(2+)-activated PhK. Although the overall dimensions of the complex were not affected by Ca(2+), the cation did promote a shift in the distribution of the scattering density within the hydrated volume occupied by the PhK molecule, indicating a Ca(2+)-induced conformational change. Computer-generated models, based on elements of the known structure of PhK from electron microscopy, were constructed to aid in the interpretation of the scattering data. Models containing two ellipsoids and four cylinders to represent, respectively, the lobes and bridges of the PhK complex provided theoretical scattering profiles that accurately fit the experimental data. Structural differences between the models representing the nonactivated and Ca(2+)-activated conformers of PhK are consistent with Ca(2+)-induced conformational changes in both the lobes and the interlobal bridges.

  11. Ca2+-induced structural changes in phosphorylase kinase detected by small-angle x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Priddy, Timothy S.; Macdonald, Brian A.; Heller, William T; Nadeau, Owen W.; Trewhella, Jill; Carlson, Gerald M.

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PhK), a 1.3-MDa ({alpha}{beta}{gamma}{delta}){sub 4} hexadecameric complex, is a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent regulatory enzyme in the cascade activation of glycogenolysis. PhK comprises two arched ({alpha}{beta}{gamma}{delta}){sub 2} octameric lobes that are oriented back-to-back with overall D{sub 2} symmetry and joined by connecting bridges. From chemical cross-linking and electron microscopy, it is known that the binding of Ca{sup 2+} by PhK perturbs the structure of all its subunits and promotes redistribution of density throughout both its lobes and bridges; however, little is known concerning the interrelationship of these effects. To measure structural changes induced by Ca{sup 2+} in the PhK complex in solution, small-angle X-ray scattering was performed on nonactivated and Ca{sup 2+}-activated PhK. Although the overall dimensions of the complex were not affected by Ca{sup 2+}, the cation did promote a shift in the distribution of the scattering density within the hydrated volume occupied by the PhK molecule, indicating a Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational change. Computer-generated models, based on elements of the known structure of PhK from electron microscopy, were constructed to aid in the interpretation of the scattering data. Models containing two ellipsoids and four cylinders to represent, respectively, the lobes and bridges of the PhK complex provided theoretical scattering profiles that accurately fit the experimental data. Structural differences between the models representing the nonactivated and Ca{sup 2+}-activated conformers of PhK are consistent with Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes in both the lobes and the interlobal bridges.

  12. Calf spleen purine nucleoside phosphorylase: structure of its ternary complex with an N(7)-acycloguanosine inhibitor and a phosphate anion.

    PubMed

    Luić, M; Koellner, G; Shugar, D; Saenger, W; Bzowska, A

    2001-01-01

    The calf spleen purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) ternary complex with an N(7)-acycloguanosine inhibitor and a phosphate ion has been crystallized in the cubic space group P2(1)3, with unit-cell parameter a = 94.11 A and one monomer per asymmetric unit. X-ray diffraction data were collected using synchrotron radiation (Station X31, EMBL Outstation, DESY, Hamburg). The crystal structure was refined to a resolution of 2.2 A and R and R(free) values of 17.5 and 24.5%, respectively. The acyclonucleoside inhibitor is bound in the active site in an inverted ('upside-down') orientation of the purine base compared with natural substrates. The side chain of Asp243 forms two hydrogen bonds with the base ring: N(delta) donates a hydrogen to N(3) and O(delta) accepts a hydrogen from the guanine N(2)-amino group. N(1)--H of the base is hydrogen bonded to O(epsilon) of Glu201, while N(9) accepts a hydrogen bond from Thr242 O(gamma). In addition, a water molecule (W417) bridges the N(2)-amino group of the base and O(epsilon) of Glu201. In the phosphate-binding site, a phosphate ion is bound to Ser33, His64, Arg84, His86, Ala116 and Ser220. The acyclic chain of the N(7)-acycloguanosine inhibitor is in a folded conformation and together with a water molecule (W388) occupies the pentose-binding site, with possible hydrogen bonds to Tyr88 O(eta) and His257 N(delta 1). This new binding mode fully accounts for the previously observed substrate properties of 7-beta-D-ribofuranosides of hypoxanthine and guanine. It also provides a new starting point for the design of inhibitors of PNP for therapeutic and other applications.

  13. sup 32 P-postlabeling detection of thymine glycols: evaluation of adduct recoveries after enhancement with affinity chromatography, nuclease P1, nuclease S1, and polynucleotide kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, M.V.; Bleicher, W.T.; Blackburn, G.R. )

    1991-04-01

    Thymine glycol (Tg) is a product of DNA damage by oxygen radicals generated by oxidative mutagens and carcinogens and ionizing radiation. The highly sensitive {sup 32}P-postlabeling assay was validated and optimized for the measurement of Tg generated in vitro by the reaction of dTp or calf thymus DNA with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}). Adduct detection was enhanced by purification of Tg adducts using phenylboronate affinity chromatography or by preferential dephosphorylation of unmodified 3'-nucleotides with nuclease P1, nuclease S1, or polynucleotide kinase; Tg nucleotides were found to be resistant to limited enzymatic 3'-dephosphorylation. Two adducts were seen with OsO{sub 4}-modified dTp, which may have been cis-Tg adducts, because they were retained on a phenylboronate column, and because OsO{sub 4} selectively forms cis-Tg adducts. With OsO{sub 4}-modified DNA, several adducts were detected, two major derivatives of which coincided chromatographically with those seen in OsO{sub 4}-modified dTp. The recoveries of major adducts were similar before and after enrichment by different methods, indicating that Tg adducts were resistant to enzymatic dephosphorylation. The efficacy of labeling of the two major Tg adducts by polynucleotide kinase was optimal at 60 microM ATP and higher, whereas it was about 3%, 50%, and 80% of the optimal rate at 2, 10, and 30 microM, respectively. This was in contrast to our previous finding that only 0.25 microM ATP was needed for optimal labeling of benzoquinone-DNA adducts.

  14. Overexpression of the Starch Phosphorylase-Like Gene (PHO3) in Lotus japonicus has a Profound Effect on the Growth of Plants and Reduction of Transitory Starch Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shanshan; Tang, Yuehui; Chen, Yaping; Wu, Pingzhi; Li, Meiru; Wu, Guojiang; Jiang, Huawu

    2016-01-01

    Two isoforms of starch phosphorylase (PHO; EC 2.4.1.1), plastidic PHO1 and cytosolic PHO2, have been found in all plants studied to date. Another starch phosphorylase-like gene, PHO3, which is an ortholog of Chlamydomonas PHOB, has been detected in some plant lineages. In this study, we identified three PHO isoform (LjPHO) genes in the Lotus japonicus genome. Expression of the LjPHO3 gene was observed in all tissues tested in L. japonicus, and the LjPHO3 protein was located in the chloroplast. Overexpression of LjPHO3 in L. japonicus resulted in a drastic decline in starch granule sizes and starch content in leaves. The LjPHO3 overexpression transgenic seedlings were smaller, and showed decreased pollen fertility and seed set rate. Our results suggest that LjPHO3 may participate in transitory starch metabolism in L. japonicus leaves, but its catalytic properties remain to be studied.

  15. Overexpression of the Starch Phosphorylase-Like Gene (PHO3) in Lotus japonicus has a Profound Effect on the Growth of Plants and Reduction of Transitory Starch Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shanshan; Tang, Yuehui; Chen, Yaping; Wu, Pingzhi; Li, Meiru; Wu, Guojiang; Jiang, Huawu

    2016-01-01

    Two isoforms of starch phosphorylase (PHO; EC 2.4.1.1), plastidic PHO1 and cytosolic PHO2, have been found in all plants studied to date. Another starch phosphorylase-like gene, PHO3, which is an ortholog of Chlamydomonas PHOB, has been detected in some plant lineages. In this study, we identified three PHO isoform (LjPHO) genes in the Lotus japonicus genome. Expression of the LjPHO3 gene was observed in all tissues tested in L. japonicus, and the LjPHO3 protein was located in the chloroplast. Overexpression of LjPHO3 in L. japonicus resulted in a drastic decline in starch granule sizes and starch content in leaves. The LjPHO3 overexpression transgenic seedlings were smaller, and showed decreased pollen fertility and seed set rate. Our results suggest that LjPHO3 may participate in transitory starch metabolism in L. japonicus leaves, but its catalytic properties remain to be studied. PMID:27630651

  16. Overexpression of the Starch Phosphorylase-Like Gene (PHO3) in Lotus japonicus has a Profound Effect on the Growth of Plants and Reduction of Transitory Starch Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shanshan; Tang, Yuehui; Chen, Yaping; Wu, Pingzhi; Li, Meiru; Wu, Guojiang; Jiang, Huawu

    2016-01-01

    Two isoforms of starch phosphorylase (PHO; EC 2.4.1.1), plastidic PHO1 and cytosolic PHO2, have been found in all plants studied to date. Another starch phosphorylase-like gene, PHO3, which is an ortholog of Chlamydomonas PHOB, has been detected in some plant lineages. In this study, we identified three PHO isoform (LjPHO) genes in the Lotus japonicus genome. Expression of the LjPHO3 gene was observed in all tissues tested in L. japonicus, and the LjPHO3 protein was located in the chloroplast. Overexpression of LjPHO3 in L. japonicus resulted in a drastic decline in starch granule sizes and starch content in leaves. The LjPHO3 overexpression transgenic seedlings were smaller, and showed decreased pollen fertility and seed set rate. Our results suggest that LjPHO3 may participate in transitory starch metabolism in L. japonicus leaves, but its catalytic properties remain to be studied. PMID:27630651

  17. Association of tumour necrosis factor alpha and its receptors with thymidine phosphorylase expression in invasive breast carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Leek, R. D.; Landers, R.; Fox, S. B.; Ng, F.; Harris, A. L.; Lewis, C. E.

    1998-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential requirement for tumour growth and metastasis and is regulated by a complex network of factors produced by both stromal cells and neoplastic cells within solid tumours. The cytokine tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and the enzyme thymidine phosphorylase (TP) are two factors known to promote tumour angiogenesis. We have demonstrated recently that high numbers of tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) are significantly associated with increased tumour angiogenesis and poor prognosis in invasive carcinoma of the breast. We have also shown that TAMs are a major source of TNF-alpha in invasive breast carcinomas, and that macrophage-like stromal cells as well as tumour cells synthesize TP in such tumours. However, little is known of the factors that regulate the production or activity of these factors in the tumour microenvironment. As TNF-alpha has been shown to up-regulate TP expression in tumour cells in vitro we performed an immunohistochemical study to investigate the possibility that TNF-alpha may be involved in the regulation of TP expression by malignant breast epithelial cells in vivo. To do this, we used a cocktail of non-neutralizing monoclonal anti-TNF-alpha antibodies to visualize both TNF-alpha-expressing macrophages and TNF-alpha bound to its receptors on tumour cells and endothelial cells in a series of 93 invasive carcinomas of the breast. A semiquantitative grading system was then used to compare these staining patterns with that for TP in the same biopsies. TNF-alpha immunoreactivity was also compared with various important tumour variables known to relate to outcome in this disease (microvessel density, node status, grade, stage, receptor status and macrophage infiltration), as well as relapse-free and overall survival data for these patients. Our data show significant positive correlations between TNF-alpha bound to its receptors on tumour cells and: (1) TP protein production by tumour cells, and (2) axillary lymph

  18. In silico analysis of the three-dimensional structures of the homodimer of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis in the ligand-free state and in a complex with 5-fluorouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkov, A. A. Sotnichenko, S. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2013-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis is an acute infectious disease characterized by a lesion of the gastrointestinal tract. A positive therapeutic effect can be achieved by selectively suppressing the activity of uridine phosphorylase from the causative agent of the disease Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The synergistic effect of a combination of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil and antimicrobial drugs, which block the synthesis of pyrimidine bases, on the cells of pathogenic protozoa and bacteria is described in the literature. The three-dimensional structures of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) both in the ligand-free state and in complexes with pharmacological agents are unknown, which hinders the search for and design of selective inhibitors of YptUPh. The three-dimensional structure of the ligand-free homodimer of YptUPh was determined by homology-based molecular modeling. The three-dimensional structure of the subunit of the YptUPh molecule belongs to {alpha}/{beta} proteins, and its topology is a three-layer {alpha}/{beta}/{alpha} sandwich. The subunit monomer of the YptUPh molecule consists of 38% helices and 24% {beta} strands. A model of the homodimer structure of YptUPh in a complex with 5-FU was obtained by the molecular docking. The position of 5-FU in the active site of the molecule is very consistent with the known data on the X-ray diffraction structures of other bacterial uridine phosphorylases (the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium (StUPh) with 5-FU, ID PDB: 4E1V and the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli (EcUPh) with 5-FU and ribose 1-phosphate, ID PDB: 1RXC).

  19. In silico analysis of the three-dimensional structures of the homodimer of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis in the ligand-free state and in a complex with 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkov, A. A.; Sotnichenko, S. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    Pseudotuberculosis is an acute infectious disease characterized by a lesion of the gastrointestinal tract. A positive therapeutic effect can be achieved by selectively suppressing the activity of uridine phosphorylase from the causative agent of the disease Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The synergistic effect of a combination of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil and antimicrobial drugs, which block the synthesis of pyrimidine bases, on the cells of pathogenic protozoa and bacteria is described in the literature. The three-dimensional structures of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) both in the ligand-free state and in complexes with pharmacological agents are unknown, which hinders the search for and design of selective inhibitors of YptUPh. The three-dimensional structure of the ligand-free homodimer of YptUPh was determined by homology-based molecular modeling. The three-dimensional structure of the subunit of the YptUPh molecule belongs to α/β proteins, and its topology is a three-layer α/β/α sandwich. The subunit monomer of the YptUPh molecule consists of 38% helices and 24% β strands. A model of the homodimer structure of YptUPh in a complex with 5-FU was obtained by the molecular docking. The position of 5-FU in the active site of the molecule is very consistent with the known data on the X-ray diffraction structures of other bacterial uridine phosphorylases (the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium ( StUPh) with 5-FU, ID PDB: 4E1V and the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli ( EcUPh) with 5-FU and ribose 1-phosphate, ID PDB: 1RXC).

  20. Study of the hydrolysis and ionization constants of Schiff base from pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and n-hexylamine in partially aqueous solvents. An application to phosphorylase b.

    PubMed Central

    Donoso, J; Muñoz, F; García Del Vado, A; Echevarría, G; García Blanco, F

    1986-01-01

    Formation and hydrolysis rate constants as well as equilibrium constants of the Schiff base derived from pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and n-hexylamine were determined between pH 3.5 and 7.5 in ethanol/water mixtures (3:17, v/v, and 49:1, v/v). The results indicate that solvent polarity scarcely alters the values of these constants but that they are dependent on the pH. Spectrophotometric titration of this Schiff base was also carried out. We found that a pKa value of 6.1, attributed in high-polarity media to protonation of the pyridine nitrogen atom, is independent of solvent polarity, whereas the pKa of the monoprotonated form of the imine falls from 12.5 in ethanol/water (3:17) to 11.3 in ethanol/water (49:1). Fitting of the experimental results for the hydrolysis to a theoretical model indicates the existence of a group with a pKa value of 6.1 that is crucial in the variation of kinetic constant of hydrolysis with pH. Studies of the reactivity of the coenzyme (pyridoxal 5'-phosphate) of glycogen phosphorylase b with hydroxylamine show that this reaction only occurs when the pH value of solution is below 6.5 and the hydrolysis of imine bond has started. We propose that the decrease in activity of phosphorylase b when the pH value is less than 6.2 must be caused by the cleavage of enzyme-coenzyme binding and that this may be related with protonation of the pyridine nitrogen atom of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. PMID:3099764

  1. A synthetic oligonucleotide probe and a cloned polynucleotide probe based on the yopA gene for detection and enumeration of virulent Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Kapperud, G; Dommarsnes, K; Skurnik, M; Hornes, E

    1990-01-01

    We compared a synthetically produced 19-mer oligonucleotide probe with a polynucleotide probe consisting of a cloned fragment of the virulence gene yopA for their relative efficiencies in identification and enumeration of virulent Yersinia enterocolitica. The probes were used in DNA-DNA colony hybridization assays to differentiate 70 Yersinia strains with known plasmid profiles. All 19 strains harboring the 40- to 50-megadalton virulence plasmid were positive in the hybridization assay, whereas their isogenic derivatives lacking this plasmid were negative. Both probes correctly identified plasmid-bearing variants of Y. enterocolitica serogroups O:3, O:5,27, O:8, O:9, O:13, and O:21 from three continents. In contrast, none of the probes hybridized with DNA from 32 environmental yersiniae belonging to 26 serogroups not associated with disease. Colony hybridization was used to detect and enumerate virulent Y. enterocolitica in three artificially contaminated food samples. Despite a large background of indigenous bacteria (3 x 10(4) CFU), the efficiency of enumeration ranged from 33 to 82%. The use of nylon filters did not impair the growth of virulent yersiniae. Both probes showed a perfect concordance in their specific differentiation and enumeration of virulent Y. enterocolitica. DNA colony hybridization with these two probes permitted rapid and reliable identification of all common pathogenic serogroups without the need for enrichment or esoteric identification protocols.

  2. One-strand oligonucleotide probe for fluorescent label-free "turn-on" detection of T4 polynucleotide kinase activity and its inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fu; Wang, Guangfeng; Shi, Dongmin; Sun, Yue; Sha, Liang; Qiu, Yuwei; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2015-08-21

    Thioflavin T (ThT), as one of the most exciting fluorogenic molecules, boasts the "molecular-rotor" ability to induce DNA sequences containing guanine repeats to fold into G-quadruplex structures. It has been demonstrated to sense this change by its remarkable fluorescence enhancement. In this work, taking T4 polynucleotide kinase (PNK) as a model, the ThT/G-quadruplex based platform and λexonuclease (λexo) cleavage reaction were combined to design a label-free "turn-on" strategy for fast, simple and accurate detection of T4 PNK activity and its inhibition. In the presence of T4 PNK, the designed thioflavin T based molecular beacon (TMB) DNA probe could be phosphorylated and then digested by the cleavage of λexo, releasing the G-quartets. These then bound to ThT to form ThT/G-quadruplexes with an obvious fluorescence generation, for the "turn-on" detection of T4 PNK. In comparison to traditional methods, the proposed TMB probe is convenient, requiring no sophisticated labeling and separation processes and displaying high analytical performance. It exhibits a satisfying detection result for the activity of T4 PNK with a low detection limit of 0.001 U mL(-1). This is not only meaningful for further research on disease-related biochemical processes, but also valuable for molecular-target therapies.

  3. Colorimetric assay for T4 polynucleotide kinase activity based on the horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme combined with λ exonuclease cleavage.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cheng; Yan, Chunyan; Jiang, Jianhui; Yu, Ruqin

    2013-03-01

    T4 polynucleotide kinase (PNK) plays a critical role in various cellular events. Here, we describe a novel colorimetric strategy for estimating the activity of PNK and screening its inhibitors taking advantage of the efficient cleavage of λ exonuclease and the horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme (HRPzyme) signal amplification. A label-free hairpin DNA with the sequence of HRPzyme was utilized in the assay. The 5'-hydroxyl terminal of the hairpin DNA was firstly phosphorylated in the presence of PNK and then digested by λ exonuclease. As a result, the blocked 'HRPzyme' sequence of the hairpin DNA was released due to the removal of its completely complementary sequence. Using this strategy, the assay for PNK activity was successfully translated into the detection of HRPzyme. Because of the completely blocking and efficiently releasing of HRPzyme, the colorimetric method exhibited an excellent performance in PNK analysis with a low detection limit of 0.06 U mL(-1) and a wide detection range from 0.06 to 100 U mL(-1). Additionally, the effects of different inhibitors on PNK activity were also evaluated. The proposed strategy holds great potential in the development of high-throughput phosphorylation investigation as well as in the screening of the related drugs.

  4. Conformational changes of DNA in the presence of 12-s-12 gemini surfactants (s=2 and 10). Role of the spacer's length in the interaction surfactant-polynucleotide.

    PubMed

    García, J P; Marrón, E; Martín, V I; Moyá, M L; Lopez-Cornejo, P

    2014-06-01

    A multifaceted study on the interaction of calf-thymus DNA with two different cationic gemini surfactants alkanediyl-α-ω-bis(dodecyldimethyl-amonium)bromide, 12-s-12,2Br(-) (with s=2, G2, and 10, G10) was carried out. The measurements were done at different molar ratios X=[surfactant]/[DNA]. Results show two different conformational changes in DNA: a first compaction of the polynucleotide corresponding to a partial conformational (not total) change of DNA from an extended coil state to a globular state that happens at the lower molar ratio X. A second change corresponds to a breaking of the partial condensation, that is, the transition from the compacted state to a new more extended conformation (for the higher X values) different to the initial extension. According to circular dichroism spectra and dynamic light scattering measurements, this new state of DNA seems to be similar to a ψ-phase. Measurements confirm that interactions involved in the compaction are different to those previously obtained for the analog surfactant CTAB. X values at which the conformational changes happen depend on the length of the spacer in the surfactant along with the charge of the polar heads.

  5. Regulation of glycogen breakdown and its consequences for skeletal muscle function after training.

    PubMed

    Katz, Abram; Westerblad, Håkan

    2014-10-01

    Repeated bouts of physical exercise, i.e., training, induce mitochondrial biogenesis and result in improved physical performance and attenuation of glycogen breakdown during submaximal exercise. It has been suggested that as a consequence of the increased mitochondrial volume, a smaller degree of metabolic stress (e.g., smaller increases in ADP and Pi) is required to maintain mitochondrial respiration in the trained state during exercise at the same absolute intensity. The lower degree of Pi accumulation is believed to account for the diminished glycogen breakdown, since Pi is a substrate for glycogen phosphorylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for glycogenolysis. However, in this review, we present an alternative explanation for the diminished glycogen breakdown. Thus, the lower degree of metabolic stress after training is also associated with smaller increases in AMP (free concentration during contraction at specific intracellular sites) and this results in less activation of phosphorylase b (the non-phosphorylated form of phosphorylase), resulting in diminished glycogen breakdown. Concomitantly, the smaller accumulation of Pi, which interferes with cross-bridge function and intracellular Ca(2+) handling, contributes to the increased fatigue resistance. The delay in glycogen depletion also contributes to enhanced performance during prolonged exercise by functioning as an energy reserve.

  6. Phosphorylase re-expression, increase in the force of contraction and decreased fatigue following notexin-induced muscle damage and regeneration in the ovine model of McArdle disease.

    PubMed

    Howell, J McC; Walker, K R; Creed, K E; Dunton, E; Davies, L; Quinlivan, R; Karpati, G

    2014-02-01

    McArdle disease is caused by a deficiency of myophosphorylase and currently a satisfactory treatment is not available. The injection of notexin into, or the layering of notexin onto, the muscles of affected sheep resulted in necrosis followed by regeneration of muscle fibres with the expression of both non-muscle isoforms of phosphorylase within the fibres and a reduction of the amount of glycogen in the muscle with an increase in the strength of contraction and a decrease in fatiguability in the muscle fibres. The sustained re-expression of both the brain and liver isoforms of phosphorylase within the muscle fibres provides further emphasis that strategies to enhance the re-expression of these isoforms should be investigated as a possible treatment for McArdle disease.

  7. Photooxidation of guanine by a ruthenium dipyridophenazine complex intercalated in a double-stranded polynucleotide monitored directly by picosecond visible and infrared transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Elias, Benjamin; Creely, Caitriona; Doorley, Gerard W; Feeney, Martin M; Moucheron, Cécile; Kirsch-DeMesmaeker, Andrée; Dyer, Joanne; Grills, David C; George, Michael W; Matousek, Pavel; Parker, Anthony W; Towrie, Michael; Kelly, John M

    2008-01-01

    Transient species formed by photoexcitation (400 nm) of [Ru(dppz)(tap)2]2+ (1) (dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine; tap=1,4,5,8-tetraazaphenanthrene) in aqueous solution and when intercalated into a double-stranded synthetic polynucleotide, [poly(dG-dC)]2, have been observed on a picosecond timescale by both visible transient absorption (allowing monitoring of the metal complex intermediates) and transient infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy (allowing direct study of the DNA nucleobases). By contrast with its behavior when free in aqueous solution, excitation of 1 when bound to [poly(dG-dC)]2 causes a strong increase in absorbance at 515 nm due to formation of the reduced complex [Ru(dppz)(tap)2]+ (rate constant=(2.0+/-0.2) x 10(9) s(-1)). The subsequent reformation of 1 proceeds with a rate constant of (1.1+/-0.2) x 10(8) s(-1). When the process is carried out in D2O, the rates of formation and removal of [Ru(dppz)(tap)2]+ are reduced (rate constants (1.5+/-0.3) x 10(9) and (0.7+/-0.2) x 10(8) s(-1) respectively) consistent with proton-coupled electron transfer processes. Picosecond transient IR measurements in the 1540-1720 cm(-1) region in D2O solution confirm that the reduction of 1 intercalated into [poly(dG-dC)]2 is accompanied by bleaching of IR ground-state bands of guanine (1690 cm(-1)) and cytosine (1656 cm(-1)), each with similar rate constants.

  8. Role of Human DNA Glycosylase Nei-like 2 (NEIL2) and Single Strand Break Repair Protein Polynucleotide Kinase 3′-Phosphatase in Maintenance of Mitochondrial Genome*

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Santi M.; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Chatterjee, Arpita; Hegde, Pavana M.; Szczesny, Bartosz; Banerjee, Dibyendu; Boldogh, Istvan; Gao, Rui; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Sarkar, Partha S.; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2012-01-01

    The repair of reactive oxygen species-induced base lesions and single strand breaks (SSBs) in the nuclear genome via the base excision (BER) and SSB repair (SSBR) pathways, respectively, is well characterize, and important for maintaining genomic integrity. However, the role of mitochondrial (mt) BER and SSBR proteins in mt genome maintenance is not completely clear. Here we show the presence of the oxidized base-specific DNA glycosylase Nei-like 2 (NEIL2) and the DNA end-processing enzyme polynucleotide kinase 3′-phosphatase (PNKP) in purified human mitochondrial extracts (MEs). Confocal microscopy revealed co-localization of PNKP and NEIL2 with the mitochondrion-specific protein cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (MT-CO2). Further, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed association of NEIL2 and PNKP with the mitochondrial genes MT-CO2 and MT-CO3 (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3); importantly, both enzymes also associated with the mitochondrion-specific DNA polymerase γ. In cell association of NEIL2 and PNKP with polymerase γ was further confirmed by proximity ligation assays. PNKP-depleted ME showed a significant decrease in both BER and SSBR activities, and PNKP was found to be the major 3′-phosphatase in human ME. Furthermore, individual depletion of NEIL2 and PNKP in human HEK293 cells caused increased levels of oxidized bases and SSBs in the mt genome, respectively. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the critical role of NEIL2 and PNKP in maintenance of the mammalian mitochondrial genome. PMID:22130663

  9. The chemoenzymatic synthesis of clofarabine and related 2'-deoxyfluoroarabinosyl nucleosides: the electronic and stereochemical factors determining substrate recognition by E. coli nucleoside phosphorylases.

    PubMed

    Fateev, Ilja V; Antonov, Konstantin V; Konstantinova, Irina D; Muravyova, Tatyana I; Seela, Frank; Esipov, Roman S; Miroshnikov, Anatoly I; Mikhailopulo, Igor A

    2014-01-01

    Two approaches to the synthesis of 2-chloro-9-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-β-D-arabinofuranosyl)adenine (1, clofarabine) were studied. The first approach consists in the chemical synthesis of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-α-D-arabinofuranose-1-phosphate (12a, (2F)Ara-1P) via three step conversion of 1,3,5-tri-O-benzoyl-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-α-D-arabinofuranose (9) into the phosphate 12a without isolation of intermediary products. Condensation of 12a with 2-chloroadenine catalyzed by the recombinant E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) resulted in the formation of clofarabine in 67% yield. The reaction was also studied with a number of purine bases (2-aminoadenine and hypoxanthine), their analogues (5-aza-7-deazaguanine and 8-aza-7-deazahypoxanthine) and thymine. The results were compared with those of a similar reaction with α-D-arabinofuranose-1-phosphate (13a, Ara-1P). Differences of the reactivity of various substrates were analyzed by ab initio calculations in terms of the electronic structure (natural purines vs analogues) and stereochemical features ((2F)Ara-1P vs Ara-1P) of the studied compounds to determine the substrate recognition by E. coli nucleoside phosphorylases. The second approach starts with the cascade one-pot enzymatic transformation of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose into the phosphate 12a, followed by its condensation with 2-chloroadenine thereby affording clofarabine in ca. 48% yield in 24 h. The following recombinant E. coli enzymes catalyze the sequential conversion of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose into the phosphate 12a: ribokinase (2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinofuranose-5-phosphate), phosphopentomutase (PPN; no 1,6-diphosphates of D-hexoses as co-factors required) (12a), and finally PNP. The substrate activities of D-arabinose, D-ribose and D-xylose in the similar cascade syntheses of the relevant 2-chloroadenine nucleosides were studied and compared with the activities of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose. As expected, D-ribose exhibited the best substrate activity

  10. The green alga Scenedesmus obliquus contains both diadenosine 5',5'''-P1,P4-tetraphosphate (asymmetrical) pyrophosphohydrolase and phosphorylase activities.

    PubMed Central

    McLennan, A G; Mayers, E; Hankin, S; Thorne, N M; Prescott, M; Powls, R

    1994-01-01

    Diadenosine 5',5'''-P1,P4-tetraphosphate (Ap4A) phosphorylase and Ap4A pyrophosphohydrolase activities have been purified from extracts of the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. Both activities were also detected in Scenedesmus brasiliensis, Scenedesmus quadricauda and in Chlorella vulgaris. This is the first time that both types of enzyme have been detected in the same species. The Ap4A phosphorylase has a molecular mass of 46-48 kDa, a broad pH optimum between 7.5 and 9.5, and requires a divalent ion for activity (Mg2+ > Co2+ > Ca2+ = Mn2+ = Cd2+ > Zn2+). It degrades substrates with at least four phosphate groups and always produces a nucleoside 5'-diphosphate product. The Km values for Ap4A and Pi are 5.3 microM and 160 microM, respectively, and kcat. = 1.8 s-1. Arsenate, vanadate, molybdate, chromate and tungstate can substitute for phosphate. The enzyme also catalyses Ap4A synthesis (Keq. = [Ap4A] [Pi]/[ATP][ADP] = 9 x 10(-4)) and ADP arsenolysis. The Ap4A hydrolase has a molecular mass of 26-28 kDa, an alkaline pH optimum of 8.8-9.8, and prefers Zn2+ as the stimulatory ion (Zn2+ > Mg2+ > Mn2+ > Co2+ > Cd2+). It degrades substrates with at least four phosphate groups, having a slight preference for Ap5A, and always produces a nucleoside 5'-triphosphate product. The Km value for Ap4A is 6.6 microM and kcat. = 1.3 s-1. It is inhibited competitively by adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate (Ki = 0.67 microM) and non-competitively by fluoride (Ki = 150 microM). A 50-54 kDa dinucleoside 5',5'''-P1,P3-triphosphate (Ap3A) pyrophosphohydrolase was also detected in S. obliquus, S. quadricauda and C. vulgaris. The corresponding enzyme in S. brasiliensis (> 100 kDa) may be a dimer Images Figure 2 PMID:8198532

  11. Examining the role of phosphate in glycosyl transfer reactions of Cellulomonas uda cellobiose phosphorylase using D-glucal as donor substrate.

    PubMed

    Wildberger, Patricia; Brecker, Lothar; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2012-07-15

    Cellobiose phosphorylase from Cellulomonas uda (CuCPase) is shown to utilize D-glucal as slow alternative donor substrate for stereospecific glycosyl transfer to inorganic phosphate, giving 2-deoxy-α-D-glucose 1-phosphate as the product. When performed in D(2)O, enzymatic phosphorolysis of D-glucal proceeds with incorporation of deuterium in equatorial position at C-2, implying a stereochemical course of reaction where substrate becomes protonated from below its six-membered ring through stereoselective re side attack at C-2. The proposed catalytic mechanism, which is supported by results of docking studies, involves direct protonation of D-glucal by the enzyme-bound phosphate, which then performs nucleophilic attack on the reactive C-1 of donor substrate. When offered D-glucose next to D-glucal and phosphate, CuCPase produces 2-deoxy-β-D-glucosyl-(1→4)-D-glucose and 2-deoxy-α-D-glucose 1-phosphate in a ratio governed by mass action of the two acceptor substrates present. Enzymatic synthesis of 2-deoxy-β-D-glucosyl-(1→4)-D-glucose is effectively promoted by catalytic concentrations of phosphate, suggesting that catalytic reaction proceeds through a quaternary complex of CuCPase, D-glucal, phosphate, and D-glucose. Conversion of D-glucal and phosphate presents a convenient single-step synthesis of 2-deoxy-α-D-glucose 1-phosphate that is difficult to prepare chemically.

  12. Cloning and expression patterns of the brine shrimp (Artemia sinica) glycogen phosphorylase (GPase) gene during development and in response to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Hou, Ming; Wang, Ting; Chen, Yifei; Lv, Ying; Li, Zengrong; Zhang, Rui; Xin, Wenting; Zou, Xiangyang; Hou, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen serves as a metabolic reserve and is involved in macromolecular synthesis. Glycogen phosphorylase (GPase) is a key enzyme involved in intracellular glycogen catabolism, catalyzing the first step in glycogen degradation. In the diapause, GPase catalyzes glycogen into the closely related molecule, sorbitol. In this study, the full-length cDNA of the GPase gene (2,790 bp) was isolated from Artemia sinica for the first time by rapid amplification of cDNA ends technology. The GPase gene encoded a protein of 853 amino acids belonging to the Glycosyltransferase GTB type superfamily. The expression pattern and location of GPase were investigated at various stages during the embryonic development of A. sinica using real-time PCR and in situ hybridization. High GPase expression was detected at the 0 and 5 h stages. Subsequently, expression declined and was maintained at a low level during the stages from 10 to 40 h following by a small increase at day 3. Expression was downregulated at temperatures ranging from 25 to 20 °C and was subsequently upregulated in the range 15-5 °C. In situ hybridization assays showed wide distribution of the GPase gene during different developmental stages. From the results of this study, we conclude that the GPase gene expression is stress-related and might play an important role in Artemia development and metabolism. PMID:24323193

  13. Reduction of the plastidial phosphorylase in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) reveals impact on storage starch structure during growth at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Orawetz, Tom; Malinova, Irina; Orzechowski, Slawomir; Fettke, Joerg

    2016-03-01

    Tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), one of the most important crops, are a prominent example for an efficient production of storage starch. Nevertheless, the synthesis of this storage starch is not completely understood. The plastidial phosphorylase (Pho1; EC 2.4.1.1) catalyzes the reversible transfer of glucosyl residues from glucose-1-phosphate to the non-reducing end of α-glucans with the release of orthophosphate. Thus, the enzyme is in principle able to act during starch synthesis. However, so far under normal growth conditions no alterations in tuber starch metabolism were observed. Based on analyses of other species and also from in vitro experiments with potato tuber slices it was supposed, that Pho1 has a stronger impact on starch metabolism, when plants grow under low temperature conditions. Therefore, we analyzed the starch content, granule size, as well as the internal structure of starch granules isolated from potato plants grown under low temperatures. Besides wild type, transgenic potato plants with a strong reduction in the Pho1 activity were analyzed. No significant alterations in starch content and granule size were detected. In contrast, when plants were cultivated at low temperatures the chain length distributions of the starch granules were altered. Thus, the granules contained more short glucan chains. That was not observed in the transgenic plants, revealing that Pho1 in wild type is involved in the formation of the short glucan chains, at least at low temperatures. PMID:26828405

  14. Probing the mechanism of purine nucleoside phosphorylase by steady-state kinetic studies and ligand binding characterization determined by fluorimetric titrations.

    PubMed

    Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Bzowska, Agnieszka

    2006-05-01

    Reversible reaction catalyzed by trimeric purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from Cellulomonas sp. with typical and non-typical substrates, including product inhibition patterns of both reaction directions, and interactions of the enzyme with bisubstrate analogue inhibitors, were investigated by the steady-state kinetic methods and fluorimetric titrations. The ligand chromophores exist most probably as neutral species, and not N(1)-H monoanions, in the complex with PNP, as shown by determination of inhibition constants vs. pH. This supports the mechanism in which hydrogen bond interaction of N(1)-H with Glu204 is crucial in the catalytic process. Stoichiometry of ligand binding, with possible exception of hypoxanthine, is three molecules per enzyme trimer. Kinetic experiments show that in principle the Michaelis-Menten model could not properly describe the reaction. However, this model seems to hold for certain experimental conditions. Data presented here are supported by earlier findings obtained by means of fluorimetric titrations and protective effects of ligands on thermal inactivation of the enzyme. All results are consistent with the following mechanism for trimeric PNPs: (i) random binding of substrates, (ii) potent binding and slow release of some reaction products leading to the circumstances that the chemical step is not the slowest one and that rapid-equilibrium assumptions do not hold, (iii) a dual role of phosphate--a substrate and also a reaction modifier.

  15. Thymidine phosphorylase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α expression in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer: association with response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuhan; Lai, Hao; Qin, Yuzhou; Chen, Jiansi; Lin, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether pretreatment status of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF-1α) could predict pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy with oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOXART) and outcomes for clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients. A total of 180 patients diagnosed with clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. The status of TP, and HIF-1α were determined in pretreatment biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Tumor response was assessed in resected regimens using the tumor regression grade system and TNM staging system. 5-year disease free survival (DFS) and 5-year overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method and were compared by the log-rank test. Over expression of TP and low expression of HIF-1α were associated with pathologic response to XELOXART and better outcomes (DFS and OS) in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer patients (P < 0.05). Our result suggested that pretreatment status of TP and HIF-1α were found to predict pathologic response and outcomes in clinical stage II/III rectal cancer received XELOXART. Additional well-designed, large sample, multicenter, prospective studies are needed to confirm the result of this study.

  16. Increased sensitivity to glucose starvation correlates with downregulation of glycogen phosphorylase isoform PYGB in tumor cell lines resistant to 2-deoxy-d-glucose

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Katherine B.; Kurtoglu, Metin; Leung, Howard J.; Liu, Huaping; Gao, Ningguo; Lehrman, Mark A.; Murray, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Background As tumors evolve, they upregulate glucose metabolism while also encountering intermittent periods of glucose deprivation. Here, we investigate mechanisms by which pancreatic cancer cells respond to therapeutic (2-deoxy-d-glucose, 2-DG) and physiologic (glucose starvation, GS) forms of glucose restriction. Methods From a tumor cell line (1420) that is unusually sensitive to 2-DG under normoxia, low (14DG2)- and high (14DG5)-dose resistant cell lines were selected and used to probe the metabolic pathways involved with their response to different forms of glucose deprivation. Results Muted induction of the unfolded protein response was found to correlate with resistance to 2-DG. Additionally, 14DG2 displayed reduced 2-DG uptake, while 14DG5 was cross-resistant to tunicamycin, suggesting it has enhanced ability to manage glycosylation defects. Conversely, 2-DG-resistant cell lines were more sensitive than their parental cell line to GS, which coincided with lowered levels of glycogen phosphorylase (PYGB) and reduced breakdown of glycogen to glucose in the 2-DG-resistant cell lines. Moreover, by inhibiting PYGB in the parental cell line, sensitivity to GS was increased. Conclusions Overall, the data demonstrate that the manner in which glucose is restricted in tumor cells, i.e., therapeutic or physiologic, leads to differential biological responses involving distinct glucose metabolic pathways. Moreover, in evolving tumors where glucose restriction occurs, the identification of PYGB as a metabolic target may have clinical application. PMID:24292700

  17. Acylated Carrageenan Changes the Physicochemical Properties of Mixed Enzyme-Lipid Ultrathin Films and Enhances the Catalytic Properties of Sucrose Phosphorylase Nanostructured as Smart Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Jefferson M; Pavinatto, Adriana; Nobre, Thatyane M; Caseli, Luciano

    2016-06-23

    Control over the catalytic activity of enzymes is important to construct biosensors with a wide range of detectability and higher stability. For this, immobilization of enzymes on solid supports as nanostructured films is a current approach that permits easy control of the molecular architecture as well as tuning of the properties. In this article, we employed acylated carrageenan (AC) mixed with phospholipids at the air-water interface to facilitate the adsorption of the enzyme sucrose phosphorylase (SP). AC stabilized the adsorption of SP at the phospholipid monolayer, as detected by tensiometry, by which thermodynamic parameters could be inferred from the surface pressure-area isotherm. Also, infrared spectroscopy applied in situ over the monolayer showed that the AC-phospholipid system not only permitted the enzyme to be adsorbed but also helped conserve its secondary structure. The mixed monolayers were then transferred onto solid supports as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films and investigated with transfer ratio, quartz crystal microbalance, fluorescence spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The enzyme activity of the LB film was then determined, revealing that although there was an expected reduction in activity in relation to the homogeneous environment the activity could be better preserved after 1 month, revealing enhanced stability. PMID:27249064

  18. Synthetic, enzyme kinetic, and protein crystallographic studies of C-β-d-glucopyranosyl pyrroles and imidazoles reveal and explain low nanomolar inhibition of human liver glycogen phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Bokor, Éva; Kun, Sándor; Stravodimos, George A; Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Leonidas, Demetres D; Juhász-Tóth, Éva; Szakács, Andrea; Batta, Gyula; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Somsák, László

    2016-11-10

    C-β-d-Glucopyranosyl pyrrole derivatives were prepared in the reactions of pyrrole, 2-, and 3-aryl-pyrroles with O-peracetylated β-d-glucopyranosyl trichloroacetimidate, while 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyl) indole was obtained by a cross coupling of O-perbenzylated β-d-glucopyranosyl acetylene with N-tosyl-2-iodoaniline followed by spontaneous ring closure. An improved synthesis of O-perbenzoylated 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyl) imidazoles was achieved by reacting C-glucopyranosyl formimidates with α-aminoketones. The deprotected compounds were assayed with isoforms of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) to show no activity of the pyrroles against rabbit muscle GPb. The imidazoles proved to be the best known glucose derived inhibitors of not only the muscle enzymes (both a and b) but also of the pharmacologically relevant human liver GPa (Ki = 156 and 26 nM for the 4(5)-phenyl and -(2-naphthyl) derivatives, respectively). An X-ray crystallographic study of the rmGPb-imidazole complexes revealed structural features of the strong binding, and also allowed to explain the absence of inhibition for the pyrrole derivatives. PMID:27522507

  19. Valproic acid potentiates the anticancer activity of capecitabine in vitro and in vivo in breast cancer models via induction of thymidine phosphorylase expression

    PubMed Central

    Terranova-Barberio, Manuela; Roca, Maria Serena; Zotti, Andrea Ilaria; Leone, Alessandra; Bruzzese, Francesca; Vitagliano, Carlo; Scogliamiglio, Giosuè; Russo, Domenico; D'Angelo, Giovanni; Franco, Renato; Budillon, Alfredo; Di Gennaro, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with metastatic breast cancer remains poor, and thus novel therapeutic approaches are needed. Capecitabine, which is commonly used for metastatic breast cancer in different settings, is an inactive prodrug that takes advantage of elevated levels of thymidine phosphorylase (TP), a key enzyme that is required for its conversion to 5-fluororacil, in tumors. We demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), including low anticonvulsant dosage of VPA, induced the dose- and time-dependent up-regulation of TP transcript and protein expression in breast cancer cells, but not in the non-tumorigenic breast MCF-10A cell line. Through the use of siRNA or isoform-specific HDACi, we demonstrated that HDAC3 is the main isoform whose inhibition is involved in the modulation of TP. The combined treatment with capecitabine and HDACi, including valproic acid (VPA), resulted in synergistic/additive antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in breast cancer cells but not in TP-knockout cells, both in vitro and in vivo, highlighting the crucial role of TP in the synergism observed. Overall, this study suggests that the combination of HDACi (e.g., VPA) and capecitabine is an innovative antitumor strategy that warrants further clinical evaluation for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26735339

  20. Comparative analysis of three-dimensional structures of homodimers of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium in the unligated state and in a complex with potassium ion

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkov, A. A.; Zhukhlistova, N. E.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2009-03-15

    The spatial organization of the homodimer of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium (St UPh) was determined with high accuracy. The structure was refined at 1.80 A resolution to R{sub work} = 16.1% and R{sub free} = 20.0%. The rms deviations for the bond lengths, bond angles, and chiral angles are 0.006 A, 1.042{sup o}, and 0.071{sup o}, respectively. The coordinate error estimated by the Luzzati plot is 0.166 A. The coordinate error based on the maximum likelihood is 0.199 A. A comparative analysis of the spatial organization of the homodimer in two independently refined structures and the structure of the homodimer St UPh in the complex with a K{sup +} ion was performed. The substrate-binding sites in the homodimers StUPhs in the unligated state were found to act asynchronously. In the presence of a potassium ion, the three-dimensional structures of the subunits in the homodimer are virtually identical, which is apparently of importance for the synchronous action of both substrate-binding sites. The atomic coordinates of the refined structure of the homodimer and structure factors have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB ID code 3DPS).

  1. Analysis of cytosolic heteroglycans from leaves of transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants that under- or overexpress the Pho 2 phosphorylase isozyme.

    PubMed

    Fettke, Joerg; Poeste, Simon; Eckermann, Nora; Tiessen, Axel; Pauly, Markus; Geigenberger, Peter; Steup, Martin

    2005-12-01

    During starch degradation, chloroplasts export neutral sugars into the cytosol where they appear to enter a complex glycan metabolism. Interactions between glycans and glucosyl transferases residing in the cytosol were studied by analyzing transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) plants that possess either decreased or elevated levels of the cytosolic (Pho 2) phosphorylase isoform. Water-soluble heteroglycans (SHGs) were isolated from these plants and were characterized. SHG contains, as major constituents, arabinose, rhamnose, galactose and glucose. Non-aqueous fractionation combined with other separation techniques revealed a distinct pool of the SHG that is located in the cytosol. Under in vitro conditions, the cytosolic heteroglycans act as glucosyl acceptor selectively for Pho 2. Acceptor sites were characterized by a specific hydrolytic degradation following the Pho 2-catalyzed glucosyl transfer. The size distribution of the cytosolic SHG increased during the dark period, indicating a distinct metabolic activity related to net starch degradation. Antisense inhibition of Pho 2 resulted in increased glucosyl and rhamnosyl contents of the glycans. Overexpression of Pho 2 decreased the content of both residues. Compared with the wild type, in both types of transgenic plants the size of the cytosolic glycans was increased.

  2. The transition state analog inhibitor of Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) Immucillin-H arrests bone loss in rat periodontal disease models.

    PubMed

    Deves, Candida; de Assunção, Thiago Milech; Ducati, Rodrigo Gay; Campos, Maria Martha; Basso, Luiz Augusto; Santos, Diogenes Santiago; Batista, Eraldo L

    2013-01-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is a purine-metabolizing enzyme that catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of 6-oxypurine (deoxy)nucleosides to their respective bases and (deoxy)ribose-1-phosphate. It is a key enzyme in the purine salvage pathway of mammalian cells. The present investigation sought to determine whether the PNP transition state analog inhibitor (Immucillin-H) arrests bone loss in two models of induced periodontal disease in rats. Periodontal disease was induced in rats using ligature or LPS injection followed by administration of Immucillin-H for direct analysis of bone loss, histology and TRAP staining. In vitro osteoclast differentiation and activation of T CD4+ cells in the presence of Immucillin-H were carried out for assessment of RANKL expression, PNP and Cathepsin K activity. Immucillin-H inhibited bone loss induced by ligatures and LPS, leading to a reduced number of infiltrating osteoclasts and inflammatory cells. In vitro assays revealed that Immucillin-H could not directly abrogate differentiation of osteoclast precursor cells, but affected lymphocyte-mediated osteoclastogenesis. On the other hand, incubation of pre-activated T CD4+ with Immucillin-H decreased RANKL secretion with no compromise of cell viability. The PNP transition state analog Immucillin-H arrests bone loss mediated by T CD4+ cells with no direct effect on osteoclasts. PNP inhibitor may have an impact in the treatment of diseases characterized by the presence of pathogens and imbalances of bone metabolism.

  3. Fatal infantile cardiac glycogenosis with phosphorylase kinase deficiency and a mutation in the gamma2-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Akman, Hasan O; Sampayo, James N; Ross, Fiona A; Scott, John W; Wilson, Gregory; Benson, Lee; Bruno, Claudio; Shanske, Sara; Hardie, D Grahame; Dimauro, Salvatore

    2007-10-01

    A 10-wk-old infant girl with severe hypertrophy of the septal and atrial walls by cardiac ultrasound, developed progressive ventricular wall thickening and died of aspiration pneumonia at 5 mo of age. Postmortem examination revealed ventricular hypertrophy and massive atrial wall thickening due to glycogen accumulation. A skeletal muscle biopsy showed increased free glycogen and decreased activity of phosphorylase b kinase (PHK). The report of a pathogenic mutation (R531Q) in the gene (PRKAG2) encoding the gamma2 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in three infants with congenital hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, glycogen storage, and "pseudo PHK deficiency" prompted us to screen this gene in our patient. We found a novel (R384T) heterozygous mutation in PRKAG2, affecting an arginine residue in the N-terminal AMP-binding domain. Like R531Q, this mutation reduces the binding of AMP and ATP to the isolated nucleotide-binding domains, and prevents activation of the heterotrimer by metabolic stress in intact cells. The mutation was not found in DNA from the patient's father, the only available parent, and is likely to have arisen de novo. Our studies confirm that mutations in PRKAG2 can cause fatal infantile cardiomyopathy, often associated with apparent PHK deficiency.

  4. New approach to pharmacophore mapping and QSAR analysis using inductive logic programming. Application to thermolysin inhibitors and glycogen phosphorylase B inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Marchand-Geneste, Nathalie; Watson, Kimberly A; Alsberg, Bjørn K; King, Ross D

    2002-01-17

    A key problem in QSAR is the selection of appropriate descriptors to form accurate regression equations for the compounds under study. Inductive logic programming (ILP) algorithms are a class of machine-learning algorithms that have been successfully applied to a number of SAR problems. Unlike other QSAR methods, which use attributes to describe chemical structure, ILP uses relations. This gives ILP the advantages of not requiring explicit superimposition of individual compounds in a dataset, of dealing naturally with multiple conformations, and of using a language much closer to that used normally by chemists. We unify ILP and standard regression techniques to give a QSAR method that has the strength of ILP at describing steric structure with the familiarity and power of regression methods. Complex pharmacophores, correlating with activity, were identified and used as new indicator variables, along with the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) prediction, to form predictive regression equations. We compared the formation of 3D-QSARs using standard CoMFA with the use of ILP on the well-studied thermolysin zinc protease inhibitor dataset and a glycogen phosphorylase inhibitor dataset. In each case the addition of ILP variables produced statistically better results (P < 0.01 for thermolysin and P < 0.05 for GP datasets) than the CoMFA analysis. Moreover, the new ILP variables were not found to increase the complexity of the final QSAR equations and gave possible insight into the binding mechanism of the ligand-protein complex under study.

  5. Reduction of the plastidial phosphorylase in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) reveals impact on storage starch structure during growth at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Orawetz, Tom; Malinova, Irina; Orzechowski, Slawomir; Fettke, Joerg

    2016-03-01

    Tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), one of the most important crops, are a prominent example for an efficient production of storage starch. Nevertheless, the synthesis of this storage starch is not completely understood. The plastidial phosphorylase (Pho1; EC 2.4.1.1) catalyzes the reversible transfer of glucosyl residues from glucose-1-phosphate to the non-reducing end of α-glucans with the release of orthophosphate. Thus, the enzyme is in principle able to act during starch synthesis. However, so far under normal growth conditions no alterations in tuber starch metabolism were observed. Based on analyses of other species and also from in vitro experiments with potato tuber slices it was supposed, that Pho1 has a stronger impact on starch metabolism, when plants grow under low temperature conditions. Therefore, we analyzed the starch content, granule size, as well as the internal structure of starch granules isolated from potato plants grown under low temperatures. Besides wild type, transgenic potato plants with a strong reduction in the Pho1 activity were analyzed. No significant alterations in starch content and granule size were detected. In contrast, when plants were cultivated at low temperatures the chain length distributions of the starch granules were altered. Thus, the granules contained more short glucan chains. That was not observed in the transgenic plants, revealing that Pho1 in wild type is involved in the formation of the short glucan chains, at least at low temperatures.

  6. Thymidine phosphorylase expression in metastatic sites is predictive for response in patients with colorectal cancer treated with continuous oral capecitabine and biweekly oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Petrioli, Roberto; Bargagli, Gianluca; Lazzi, Stefano; Pascucci, Alessandra; Francini, Edoardo; Bellan, Cristiana; Conca, Raffaele; Martellucci, Ignazio; Fiaschi, Anna Ida; Lorenzi, Bruno; Francini, Guido

    2010-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the activity and safety profile of biweekly oxaliplatin combined with continuous oral capecitabine in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. A secondary endpoint was to investigate the correlation between thymidylate synthase and thymidine phosphorylase (TP) expression in metastatic tissues and tumor response. Forty-one patients received oral capecitabine 1331 mg/m every day combined with intravenous oxaliplatin 85 mg/m every 2 weeks. The overall response rate was 58.5% [95% confidence interval (CI): 43.3-73.6%], the median progression-free survival 9.4 months (95% CI: 7.7-11.2 months) and the median survival 22.3 months (95% CI: 16.1-27.5 months). There were no grade 4 toxicities, and grade 3 toxicity was also uncommon. High TP expression in metastatic tissue was significantly associated with response to treatment (P=0.019), and also with a trend towards a better median progression-free survival and overall survival compared with patients expressing low TP (P=0.056; P=0.073). This study suggests that biweekly oxaliplatin and continuous oral capecitabine is an active and well-tolerated chemotherapy regimen in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Moreover, these findings add to a growing body of evidence that patients with high levels of intratumoral TP expression are the ideal candidates for capecitabine-based chemotherapy. PMID:20016369

  7. Guanine polynucleotides are self-antigens for human natural autoantibodies and are significantly reduced in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Fattal, Ittai; Shental, Noam; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Molad, Yair; Gabrielli, Armando; Pokroy-Shapira, Elisheva; Oren, Shirly; Livneh, Avi; Langevitz, Pnina; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Sarig, Ofer; Margalit, Raanan; Gafter, Uzi; Domany, Eytan; Cohen, Irun R

    2015-11-01

    In the course of investigating anti-DNA autoantibodies, we examined IgM and IgG antibodies to poly-G and other oligonucleotides in the sera of healthy persons and those diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma (SSc), or pemphigus vulgaris (PV); we used an antigen microarray and informatic analysis. We now report that all of the 135 humans studied, irrespective of health or autoimmune disease, manifested relatively high amounts of IgG antibodies binding to the 20-mer G oligonucleotide (G20); no participants entirely lacked this reactivity. IgG antibodies to homo-nucleotides A20, C20 or T20 were present only in the sera of SLE patients who were positive for antibodies to dsDNA. The prevalence of anti-G20 antibodies led us to survey human, mouse and Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) genomes for runs of T20 and G20 or more: runs of T20 appear > 170,000 times compared with only 93 runs of G20 or more in the human genome; of these runs, 40 were close to brain-associated genes. Mouse and fruit fly genomes showed significantly lower T20/G20 ratios than did human genomes. Moreover, sera from both healthy and SLE mice contained relatively little or no anti-G20 antibodies; so natural anti-G20 antibodies appear to be characteristic of humans. These unexpected observations invite investigation of the immune functions of anti-G20 antibodies in human health and disease and of runs of G20 in the human genome.

  8. Glycogen phosphorylase as a target for type 2 diabetes: synthetic, biochemical, structural and computational evaluation of novel N-acyl-N´-(β-D-glucopyranosyl) urea inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Parmenopoulou, Vanessa; Bakalov, Dimitar N; Snelgrove, Laura; Stravodimos, George A; Chatzileontiadou, Demetra S M; Manta, Stella; Panagiotopoulou, Angeliki; Hayes, Joseph M; Komiotis, Dimitri; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a validated target for the development of anti-hyperglycaemic agents, has been targeted for the design of novel glycopyranosylamine inhibitors. Exploiting the two most potent inhibitors from our previous study of N-acyl-β-D-glucopyranosylamines (Parmenopoulou et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem. 2014, 22, 4810), we have extended the linking group to -NHCONHCO- between the glucose moiety and the aliphatic/aromatic substituent in the GP catalytic site β-cavity. The N-acyl-N´-(β-D-glucopyranosyl) urea inhibitors were synthesized and their efficiency assessed by biochemical methods, revealing inhibition constant values of 4.95 µM and 2.53 µM. Crystal structures of GP in complex with these inhibitors were determined and analyzed, providing data for further structure based design efforts. A novel Linear Response - Molecular Mechanics Coulomb Surface Area (LR-MM-CBSA) method has been developed which relates predicted and experimental binding free energies for a training set of N-acyl-N´-(β-D-glucopyranosyl) urea ligands with a correlation coefficient R(2) of 0.89 and leave-one-out cross-validation (LOO-cv) Q(2) statistic of 0.79. The method has significant applications to direct future lead optimization studies, where ligand entropy loss on binding is revealed as a key factor to be considered. ADMET property predictions revealed that apart from potential permeability issues, the synthesized N-acyl-N´-(β-D-glucopyranosyl) urea inhibitors have drug-like potential without any toxicity warnings.

  9. 6-Methylpurine derived sugar modified nucleosides: Synthesis and in vivo antitumor activity in D54 tumor expressing M64V-Escherichia coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Abdalla E A; Abou-Elkhair, Reham A I; Parker, William B; Allan, Paula W; Secrist, John A

    2016-01-27

    Impressive antitumor activity has been observed with fludarabine phosphate against tumors that express Escherichia coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) due to the liberation of 2-fluoroadenine in the tumor tissue. 6-Methylpurine (MeP) is another cytotoxic adenine analog that does not exhibit selectivity when administered systemically, and could be very useful in a gene therapy approach to cancer treatment involving E. coli PNP. The prototype MeP releasing prodrug 9-(2-deoxy-β-d-ribofuranosyl)-6-methylpurine (1) [MeP-dR] has demonstrated good activity against tumors expressing E. coli PNP, but its antitumor activity is limited due to toxicity resulting from the generation of MeP from gut bacteria. Therefore, we have embarked on a medicinal chemistry program to identify a combination of non-toxic MeP prodrugs and non-human adenosine glycosidic bond cleaving enzymes. The two best MeP-based substrates with M64V-E coli PNP, a mutant which was engineered to tolerate modification at the 5'-position of adenosine and its analogs, were 9-(6-deoxy-α-l-talofuranosyl)-6-methylpurine (3) [methyl(talo)-MeP-R] and 9-(α-l-lyxofuranosyl)6-methylpurine (4) [lyxo-MeP-R]. The detailed synthesis methyl(talo)-MeP-R and lyxo-MeP-R, and the evaluation of their substrate activity with 4 enzymes not normally associated with cancer patients is described. In addition, we have determined the intraperitoneal pharmacokinetic (ip-PK) properties of methyl(talo)-MeP-R and have determined its in vivo bystander activity in mice bearing D54 tumors that express M64V PNP. The observed good in vivo bystander activity of [methyl(talo)-MeP-R/M64V-E coli PNP combination suggests that these agents could be useful for the treatment of cancer.

  10. Radiation-Induced Thymidine Phosphorylase Upregulation in Rectal Cancer Is Mediated by Tumor-Associated Macrophages by Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 From Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae-Dong; Li Ge; Song, Kyoung-Sub; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Jun-Sang; Kim, Jong-Seok; Yun, Eun-Jin; Park, Jong-Il; Park, Hae-Duck; Hwang, Byung-Doo; Lim, Kyu Yoon, Wan-Hee

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: The mechanisms of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) regulation induced by radiation therapy (XRT) in various tumors are poorly understood. We investigated the effect and mechanisms of preoperative XRT on TP expression in rectal cancer tissues. Methods and Materials: TP expression and CD68 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels in rectal cancer tissues and cancer cell lines were evaluated before and after XRT in Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunoassay, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction studies. Isolated peripheral blood monocytes were used in the study of chemotaxis under the influence of MCP-1 released by irradiated colon cancer cells. Results: Expression of TP was significantly elevated by 9 Gy of XRT in most rectal cancer tissues but not by higher doses of XRT. In keeping with the close correlation of the increase in both TP expression and the number of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), anti-TP immunoreactivity was found in the CD68-positive TAMs and not the neoplastic cells. Expression of MCP-1 was increased in most cases after XRT, and this increase was strongly correlated with TP expression. However, this increase in MCP-1 expression occurred in tumor cells and not stromal cells. The XRT upregulated MCP-1 mRNA and also triggered the release of MCP-1 protein from cultured colon cancer cells. The supernatant of irradiated colon cancer cells showed strong chemotactic activity for monocyte migration, but this activity was completely abolished by neutralizing antibody. Conclusions: Use of XRT induces MCP-1 expression in cancer cells, which causes circulating monocytes to be recruited into TAMs, which then upregulate TP expression in rectal cancer tissues.

  11. Increased cytotoxicity and bystander effect of 5-fluorouracil and 5′-deoxy-5-fluorouridine in human colorectal cancer cells transfected with thymidine phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Evrard, A; Cuq, P; Ciccolini, J; Vian, L; Cano, J-P

    1999-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and 5′-deoxy-5-fluorouridine (5′-DFUR), a prodrug of 5-FU, are anticancer agents activated by thymidine phosphorylase (TP). Transfecting the human TP cDNA into cancer cells in order to sensitize them to these pyrimidine antimetabolites may be an important approach in human cancer gene therapy research. In this study, an expression vector containing the human TP cDNA (pcTP5) was transfected into LS174T human colon carcinoma cells. Eight stable transfectants were randomly selected and analysed. The cytotoxic effects of 5-FU and 5′-DFUR were higher in TP-transfected cells as compared to wild-type cells. The maximal decreases in the IC50 were 80-fold for 5-FU and 40-fold for 5′-DFUR. The increase in sensitivity to these pyrimidines of TP-transfected cells significantly correlated with the increase in both TP activity and TP expression. Transfected clone LS174T-c2 but not wild-type cells exhibited formation of [3H]FdUMP from [3H]5-FU. In addition the LS174T-c2 clone enhanced the cytotoxic effect of 5′-DFUR, but also that of 5-FU, towards co-cultured parental cells. For both anti-cancer agents, this bystander effect did not require cell–cell contact. These results show that both 5-FU or 5′-DFUR could be used together with a TP-suicide vector in cancer gene therapy. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10468288

  12. The angiogenic factor platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor/thymidine phosphorylase is up-regulated in breast cancer epithelium and endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, S. B.; Westwood, M.; Moghaddam, A.; Comley, M.; Turley, H.; Whitehouse, R. M.; Bicknell, R.; Gatter, K. C.; Harris, A. L.

    1996-01-01

    Tumour angiogenesis is a complex multistep process regulated by a number of angiogenic factors. One such factor, platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor has recently been shown to be thymidine phosphorylase (TP). TP catalyses the reversible phosphorylation of thymidine to deoxyribose-1-phosphate and thymine. Although known to be generally elevated in tumours, the expression of this enzyme in breast carcinomas is unknown. Therefore, we used ribonuclease protection assays and immunohistochemistry to examine the expression of TP in 240 primary breast carcinomas. Nuclear and/or cytoplasmic TP expression was observed in the neoplastic tumour epithelium in 53% of tumours. Immunoreactivity was also often present in the stromal, inflammatory and endothelial cell elements. Although endothelial cell staining was usually focal, immunoreactivity was observed in 61% of tumours and was prominent at the tumour periphery, an area where tumour angiogenesis is most active. Tumour cell TP expression was significantly inversely correlated with grade (P = 0.05) and size (P = 0.003) but no association was observed with other tumour variables. These findings suggest that TP is important for remodelling the existing vasculature early in tumour development, consistent with its chemotactic non-mitogenic properties, and that additional angiogenic factors are more important for other angiogenic processes like endothelial cell proliferation. Relapse-free survival was higher in node-positive patients with elevated TP (P = 0.05) but not in other patient groups. This might be due to the potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents like methotrexate by TP. Therefore, this enzyme might be a prediction marker for response to chemotherapy. Images Figure 1 PMID:8562330

  13. Induction of thymidine phosphorylase as a pharmacodynamic end-point in patients with advanced carcinoma treated with 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid and interferon alpha

    PubMed Central

    Braybrooke, J P; Propper, D J; O’Byrne, K J; Koukourakis, M I; Patterson, A V; Houlbrook, S; Love, S D; Varcoe, S; Taylor, M; Ganesan, T S; Talbot, D C; Harris, A L

    2000-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is an essential enzyme for the biochemical activation of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Interferon upregulates TP in vivo, although the dose and schedule of interferon for optimal biomodulation of 5-FU is not known. In this study, TP activity was measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from patients with advanced carcinoma receiving treatment with 5-FU and folinic acid. Cohorts of patients were treated with interferon alpha (IFNα), immediately prior to 5-FU/folinic acid, at doses of 3 MIU m–2, 9 MIU m–2and 18 MIUm–2. IFNα was administered on day 0 cycle two, day –1 and day 0 cycle three and day –2, day –1 and day 0 cycle four. A fourth cohort was treated with IFNα 9 MIU m–2three times per week from cycle 2 onwards. Twenty-one patients were entered into the study with 19 evaluable for response. Six patients (32%) had stable disease and 13 (68%) progressive disease. There were no grade-IV toxicities. TP activity was detected in PBLs from all patients with wide interpatient variability in constitutive TP activity prior to chemotherapy, and in response to IFNα. 5-FU/folinic acid alone did not induce TP activity but a single dose of IFNα led to upregulation of TP within 2 h of administration with a further increase by 24 h (signed rank test, P = 0.006). TP activity remained elevated for at least 13 days (signed rank test, P = 0.02). There were no significant differences in TP activity between schedules or with additional doses of IFNα. A single dose of IFNα as low as 3 MIU m–2can cause sustained elevation of PBL TP activity in vivo indicating that biochemical markers are important pharmacodynamic endpoints for developing optimal schedules of IFNα for biomodulation of 5-FU. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10901374

  14. N-Acetylglucosaminidases from CAZy Family GH3 Are Really Glycoside Phosphorylases, Thereby Explaining Their Use of Histidine as an Acid/Base Catalyst in Place of Glutamic Acid*

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Spencer S.; Blaukopf, Markus; Withers, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    CAZy glycoside hydrolase family GH3 consists primarily of stereochemistry-retaining β-glucosidases but also contains a subfamily of β-N-acetylglucosaminidases. Enzymes from this subfamily were recently shown to use a histidine residue within a His-Asp dyad contained in a signature sequence as their catalytic acid/base residue. Reasons for their use of His rather than the Glu or Asp found in other glycosidases were not apparent. Through studies on a representative member, the Nag3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Cellulomonas fimi, we now show that these enzymes act preferentially as glycoside phosphorylases. Their need to accommodate an anionic nucleophile within the enzyme active site explains why histidine is used as an acid/base catalyst in place of the anionic glutamate seen in other GH3 family members. Kinetic and mechanistic studies reveal that these enzymes also employ a double-displacement mechanism involving a covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, which was directly detected by mass spectrometry. Phosphate has no effect on the rates of formation of the glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, but it accelerates turnover of the N-acetylglucosaminyl-enzyme intermediate ∼3-fold, while accelerating turnover of the glucosyl-enzyme intermediate several hundredfold. These represent the first reported examples of retaining β-glycoside phosphorylases, and the first instance of free β-GlcNAc-1-phosphate in a biological context. PMID:25533455

  15. N-acetylglucosaminidases from CAZy family GH3 are really glycoside phosphorylases, thereby explaining their use of histidine as an acid/base catalyst in place of glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Spencer S; Blaukopf, Markus; Withers, Stephen G

    2015-02-20

    CAZy glycoside hydrolase family GH3 consists primarily of stereochemistry-retaining β-glucosidases but also contains a subfamily of β-N-acetylglucosaminidases. Enzymes from this subfamily were recently shown to use a histidine residue within a His-Asp dyad contained in a signature sequence as their catalytic acid/base residue. Reasons for their use of His rather than the Glu or Asp found in other glycosidases were not apparent. Through studies on a representative member, the Nag3 β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Cellulomonas fimi, we now show that these enzymes act preferentially as glycoside phosphorylases. Their need to accommodate an anionic nucleophile within the enzyme active site explains why histidine is used as an acid/base catalyst in place of the anionic glutamate seen in other GH3 family members. Kinetic and mechanistic studies reveal that these enzymes also employ a double-displacement mechanism involving a covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, which was directly detected by mass spectrometry. Phosphate has no effect on the rates of formation of the glycosyl-enzyme intermediate, but it accelerates turnover of the N-acetylglucosaminyl-enzyme intermediate ∼3-fold, while accelerating turnover of the glucosyl-enzyme intermediate several hundredfold. These represent the first reported examples of retaining β-glycoside phosphorylases, and the first instance of free β-GlcNAc-1-phosphate in a biological context.

  16. [Interaction of negative (CytT) and positive (cAMP-CRP) regulation in the promoter region of the uridine phosphorylase (udp) gene in Escherichia coli K-12].

    PubMed

    Mironov, A S; Nechaeva, G D; Sukhodolets, V V

    1989-03-01

    Interaction of negative (CytR) and positive (cAMP-CRP) control in the promoter region of the uridine phosphorylase (udp) gene of Escherichia coli has been studied by using udp-lac operon fusions in which the structural lacZ gene is expressed from the wild type promoter udpP+ or from mutant promoters udpP1 and udpP18. The specific activity of beta-galactosidase was examined in these fusions in cytR+ and cytR- backgrounds after introduction of specific mutations in crp locus, crp* and crp(a) altering interaction of CRP protein with catabolite-sensitive promoters. The data obtained using crp* mutation confirm the proposed model of the udp gene regulation, according to which CytR repressor protein interferes with CRP binding site in the promoter-operator region of the udp gene and thereby prevents the positive action of cAMP-CRP complex on the udp expression. Additional data in favor of this model were obtained using crp(a) mutation which most probably alters the structure of CRP protein in such a way that it exhibits more high affinity to the udp promoter, as compared to the CytR repressor protein. Indeed, taken by itself, the crp(a) mutation did not lead to any increase in the expression of udpP+-lac fusion under the conditions of cAMP limitation (on glucose-grown cells), in spite of whether or not the CytR repressor was present. However, when combined with the ptsG mutation or when cells were grown on succinate medium, complete constitutive expression of udpP+-lac fusion is observed, even in the presence of the cytR gene product. The effect of the crp(a) mutation was virtually the same in strains harboring udpP1-lac fusion. These data are in accordance with suggestion that udpP1 is a mutation in the site of the promoter-operator region that responds to the cytR gene product, while the corresponding binding site for CRP protein is still unaltered in this mutant. On the other hand, the crp(a) mutation causes only slight alteration in the expression of udpP18-lac

  17. Dual activity of certain HIT-proteins: A. thaliana Hint4 and C. elegans DcpS act on adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate as hydrolases (forming AMP) and as phosphorylases (forming ADP).

    PubMed

    Guranowski, Andrzej; Wojdyła, Anna Maria; Zimny, Jarosław; Wypijewska, Anna; Kowalska, Joanna; Jemielity, Jacek; Davis, Richard E; Bieganowski, Paweł

    2010-01-01

    Histidine triad (HIT)-family proteins interact with different mono- and dinucleotides and catalyze their hydrolysis. During a study of the substrate specificity of seven HIT-family proteins, we have shown that each can act as a sulfohydrolase, catalyzing the liberation of AMP from adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS or SO(4)-pA). However, in the presence of orthophosphate, Arabidopsis thaliana Hint4 and Caenorhabditis elegans DcpS also behaved as APS phosphorylases, forming ADP. Low pH promoted the phosphorolytic and high pH the hydrolytic activities. These proteins, and in particular Hint4, also catalyzed hydrolysis or phosphorolysis of some other adenylyl-derivatives but at lower rates than those for APS cleavage. A mechanism for these activities is proposed and the possible role of some HIT-proteins in APS metabolism is discussed. PMID:19896942

  18. Crystal structure of calf spleen purine nucleoside phosphorylase with two full trimers in the asymmetric unit: important implications for the mechanism of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bzowska, Agnieszka; Koellner, Gertraud; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata; Stroh, Albrecht; Raszewski, Grzegorz; Holý, Antonin; Steiner, Thomas; Frank, Joachim

    2004-09-17

    The crystal structure of the binary complex of trimeric purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) from calf spleen with the acyclic nucleoside phosphonate inhibitor 2,6-diamino-(S)-9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)propyl]purine ((S)-PMPDAP) is determined at 2.3A resolution in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1). Crystallization in this space group, which is observed for the first time with a calf spleen PNP crystal structure, is obtained in the presence of calcium atoms. In contrast to the previously described cubic space group P2(1)3, two independent trimers are observed in the asymmetric unit, hence possible differences between monomers forming the biologically active trimer could be detected, if present. Such differences would be expected due to third-of-the-sites binding documented for transition-state events and inhibitors. However, no differences are noted, and binding stoichiometry of three inhibitor molecules per enzyme trimer is observed in the crystal structure, and in the parallel solution studies using isothermal titration calorimetry and spectrofluorimetric titrations. Presence of phosphate was shown to modify binding stoichiometry of hypoxanthine. Therefore, the enzyme was also crystallized in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) in the presence of (S)-PMPDAP and phosphate, and the resulting structure of the binary PNP/(S)-PMPDAP complex was refined at 2.05A resolution. No qualitative differences between complexes obtained with and without the presence of phosphate were detected, except for the hydrogen bond contact of Arg84 and a phosphonate group, which is observed only in the former complex in three out of six independent monomers. Possible hydrogen bonds observed in the enzyme complexed with (S)-PMPDAP, in particular a putative hydrogen bonding contact N(1)-H cdots, three dots, centered Glu201, indicate that the inhibitor binds in a tautomeric or ionic form in which position N(1) acts as a hydrogen bond donor. This points to a crucial role of this hydrogen bond in defining

  19. Ground and excited state interactions of metalloporphyrin PtTMPyP4 with polynucleotides [poly(dG-dC)]2 and [poly(dA-dT)]2.

    PubMed

    Keane, Páraic M; Kelly, John M

    2016-08-01

    The ground- and excited-state interactions of Pt(ii) meso-tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridyl)porphyrin (PtTMPyP4) with polynucleotides [poly(dG-dC)]2 and [poly(dA-dT)]2 have been investigated using UV/visible, circular dichroism, and steady-state and time-resolved emission spectroscopy. PtTMPyP4 intercalates into [poly(dG-dC)]2 with K∼ 10(6) M(-1). When bound to [poly(dG-dC)]2 in aerated solution there is a six-fold emission enhancement with 18 nm red-shift in emission maximum. Emission lifetimes are biexponential. In the presence of [poly(dA-dT)]2 at least two distinct groove-binding modes are observed, depending on the binding ratio. In [poly(dA-dT)]2 the emission intensity increases by a maximum factor of 17 with no shift in the emission spectrum. Three exponentials were required for lifetime fitting. The lower extent of emission enhancement in the presence of [poly(dG-dC)]2 suggests that a slow electron transfer may take place to guanine, which is significantly less efficient than that previously observed for PtTMPyP4 in the presence of guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP). The results are compared to those previously recorded with free base H2TMPyP4.

  20. [Display of 8-hydroxy-GTP substrate properties of UTP in the reaction of polynucleotide synthesis catalyzed by RNA-polymerase from Escherichia coli in the presence of poly[d(AT).d(AT)] template].

    PubMed

    Bruskov, V I; Kuklina, O V

    1988-01-01

    8-oxy-GTP was obtained via reaction of GTP with ascorbic acid and addition of hydrogen peroxide. 8-oxy-GTP is recognized and displays substrate properties of UTP on substitution of 8-oxy-GTP for UTP in polynucleotide synthesis catalyzed by E. coli RNA polymerase on a poly[d(A-T)].poly[d(A-T)] template. Such incorporation does not take place at equimolar quantities of GTP and 8-Br-GTP. The incorporation of 8-oxy-GTP instead of UTP, is 2.5-3 times higher upon replacement of Mg2+ by Mn2+ ions. The dinucleotide ApU serving as an initiator rises the incorporation level of 8-oxy-GTP both for Mg2+ and Mn2+ ions. 8-oxy-GTP slightly inhibits poly[r(A-U)] synthesis, but UTP strongly inhibits the incorporation of 8-oxy-GTP. [alpha-32P] 8-oxy-GTP is incorporated mainly instead of UTP, but it can be incorporated also during the substitution of 8-oxy-GTP for ATP.

  1. Uncoupling of 3'-phosphatase and 5'-kinase functions in budding yeast. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA 3'-phosphatase (TPP1).

    PubMed

    Vance, J R; Wilson, T E

    2001-05-01

    Polynucleotide kinase is a bifunctional enzyme containing both DNA 3'-phosphatase and 5'-kinase activities seemingly suited to the coupled repair of single-strand nicks in which the phosphate has remained with the 3'-base. We show that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to repair transformed dephosphorylated linear plasmids by non-homologous end joining with considerable efficiency independently of the end-processing polymerase Pol4p. Homology searches and biochemical assays did not reveal a 5'-kinase that would account for this repair, however. Instead, open reading frame YMR156C (here named TPP1) is shown to encode only a polynucleotide kinase-type 3'-phosphatase. Tpp1p bears extensive similarity to the ancient L-2-halo-acid dehalogenase and DDDD phosphohydrolase superfamilies, but is specific for double-stranded DNA. It is present at high levels in cell extracts in a functional form and so does not represent a pseudogene. Moreover, the phosphatase-only nature of this gene is shared by Saccharomyces mikatae YMR156C and Arabidopsis thaliana K15M2.3. Repair of 3'-phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl lesions is thus uncoupled in budding yeast as compared with metazoans. Repair of transformed dephosphorylated plasmids, and 5'-hydroxyl blocking lesions more generally, likely proceeds by a cycle of base removal and resynthesis.

  2. Glycolytic potential and activity of adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK), glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) in steer carcasses with normal (<5.8) or high (>5.9) 24h pH determined in M. longissimus dorsi.

    PubMed

    Apaoblaza, A; Galaz, A; Strobel, P; Ramírez-Reveco, A; Jeréz-Timaure, N; Gallo, C

    2015-03-01

    Muscle glycogen concentration (MGC) and lactate (LA), activity of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE), glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) were determined at 0.5h (T0) and 24h (T24) post-mortem in Longissimus dorsi samples from 38 steers that produced high pH (>5.9) and normal pH (<5.8) carcasses at 24h postmortem. MGC, LA and glycolytic potential were higher (P<0.05) in normal pH carcasses. GDE activity was similar (P>0.05) in both pH categories. GP activity increased between T0 and T24 only in normal pH carcasses. AMPK activity was four times higher in normal pH v/s high pH carcasses, without changing its activity over time. Results reinforce the idea that differences in postmortem glycogenolytic/glycolytic flow in L. dorsi of steers showing normal v/s high muscle pH at 24h, could be explained not only by the higher initial MGC in normal pH carcasses, but also by a high and sustained activity of AMPK and an increased GP activity at 24h postmortem.

  3. High-syn conformation of uridine and asymmetry of the hexameric molecule revealed in the high-resolution structures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uridine phosphorylase in the free form and in complex with uridine.

    PubMed

    Safonova, Tatyana N; Mikhailov, Sergey N; Veiko, Vladimir P; Mordkovich, Nadezhda N; Manuvera, Valentin A; Alekseev, Cyril S; Kovalchuk, Mikhail V; Popov, Vladimir O; Polyakov, Konstantin M

    2014-12-01

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP; EC 2.4.2.3), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine-salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate. Expression of UP from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SoUP) was performed in Escherichia coli. The high-resolution X-ray structure of SoUP was solved in the free form and in complex with uridine. A crystal of SoUP in the free form was grown under microgravity and diffracted to ultrahigh resolution. Both forms of SoUP contained sulfate instead of phosphate in the active site owing to the presence of ammonium sulfate in the crystallization solution. The latter can be considered as a good mimic of phosphate. In the complex, uridine adopts a high-syn conformation with a nearly planar ribose ring and is present only in one subunit of the hexamer. A comparison of the structures of SoUP in the free form and in complex with the natural substrate uridine showed that the subunits of the hexamer are not identical, with the active sites having either an open or a closed conformation. In the monomers with the closed conformation, the active sites in which uridine is absent contain a glycerol molecule mimicking the ribose moiety of uridine.

  4. Killing of cancer cells through the use of eukaryotic expression vectors harbouring genes encoding nucleases and ribonuclease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Elena M

    2015-05-01

    Cancer gene therapy vectors are promising tools for killing cancer cells with the purpose of eradicating malignant tumours entirely. Different delivery methods of vectors into the cancer cells, including both non-viral and viral, as well as promoters for the targeted expression of genes encoding anticancer proteins were developed for effective and selective killing of cancer cells without harming healthy cells. Many vectors have been created to kill cancer cells, and some vectors suppress malignant tumours with high efficiency. This review is focused on vectors bearing genes for nucleases such as deoxyribonucleases (caspase-activated DNase, deoxyribonuclease I-like 3, endonuclease G) and ribonucleases (human polynucleotide phosphorylase, ribonuclease L, α-sarcin, barnase), as well as vectors harbouring gene encoding ribonuclease inhibitor. The data concerning the functionality and the efficacy of such vectors are presented.

  5. Structures of bacterial polynucleotide kinase in a Michaelis complex with GTP•Mg2+ and 5'-OH oligonucleotide and a product complex with GDP•Mg2+ and 5'-PO4 oligonucleotide reveal a mechanism of general acid-base catalysis and the determinants of phosphoacceptor recognition.

    PubMed

    Das, Ushati; Wang, Li Kai; Smith, Paul; Jacewicz, Agata; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum polynucleotide kinase (CthPnk), the 5' end-healing module of a bacterial RNA repair system, catalyzes reversible phosphoryl transfer from an NTP donor to a 5'-OH polynucleotide acceptor. Here we report the crystal structures of CthPnk-D38N in a Michaelis complex with GTP•Mg(2+) and a 5'-OH oligonucleotide and a product complex with GDP•Mg(2+) and a 5'-PO4 oligonucleotide. The O5' nucleophile is situated 3.0 Å from the GTP γ phosphorus in the Michaelis complex, where it is coordinated by Asn38 and is apical to the bridging β phosphate oxygen of the GDP leaving group. In the product complex, the transferred phosphate has undergone stereochemical inversion and Asn38 coordinates the 5'-bridging phosphate oxygen of the oligonucleotide. The D38N enzyme is poised for catalysis, but cannot execute because it lacks Asp38-hereby implicated as the essential general base catalyst that abstracts a proton from the 5'-OH during the kinase reaction. Asp38 serves as a general acid catalyst during the 'reverse kinase' reaction by donating a proton to the O5' leaving group of the 5'-PO4 strand. The acceptor strand binding mode of CthPnk is distinct from that of bacteriophage T4 Pnk. PMID:24150947

  6. Structures of bacterial polynucleotide kinase in a Michaelis complex with GTP•Mg2+ and 5'-OH oligonucleotide and a product complex with GDP•Mg2+ and 5'-PO4 oligonucleotide reveal a mechanism of general acid-base catalysis and the determinants of phosphoacceptor recognition.

    PubMed

    Das, Ushati; Wang, Li Kai; Smith, Paul; Jacewicz, Agata; Shuman, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum polynucleotide kinase (CthPnk), the 5' end-healing module of a bacterial RNA repair system, catalyzes reversible phosphoryl transfer from an NTP donor to a 5'-OH polynucleotide acceptor. Here we report the crystal structures of CthPnk-D38N in a Michaelis complex with GTP•Mg(2+) and a 5'-OH oligonucleotide and a product complex with GDP•Mg(2+) and a 5'-PO4 oligonucleotide. The O5' nucleophile is situated 3.0 Å from the GTP γ phosphorus in the Michaelis complex, where it is coordinated by Asn38 and is apical to the bridging β phosphate oxygen of the GDP leaving group. In the product complex, the transferred phosphate has undergone stereochemical inversion and Asn38 coordinates the 5'-bridging phosphate oxygen of the oligonucleotide. The D38N enzyme is poised for catalysis, but cannot execute because it lacks Asp38-hereby implicated as the essential general base catalyst that abstracts a proton from the 5'-OH during the kinase reaction. Asp38 serves as a general acid catalyst during the 'reverse kinase' reaction by donating a proton to the O5' leaving group of the 5'-PO4 strand. The acceptor strand binding mode of CthPnk is distinct from that of bacteriophage T4 Pnk.

  7. Magnesium ion catalyzed P-N bond hydrolysis in imidazolide-activated nucleotides - Relevance to template-directed synthesis of polynucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Bernasconi, Claude F.; Doodokyan, Donald L.; Alberas, Diann J.

    1989-01-01

    Results are presented from a detailed study of the P-N bond hydrolysis in guanosine 5-prime-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) and in guanosine 5-prime-imidazolide (ImpG) in the presence of 0-0.50 M Mg(2+). Pseudo-first-order rate constants of these compounds were obtained as a function of Mg(2+) concentration, for pH values between 6 and 10 and 37 C. It was found that Mg(2+) catalysis was most effective at pH 10, where a 15-fold increase in hydrolysis was achieved in 0.02 M Mg; at 0.2 M, a 115-fold increase was observed. Implication of these results for the mechanism of template-directed oligomerization is discussed.

  8. Allosteric inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase a by the potential antidiabetic drug 3-isopropyl 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-1-ethyl-2-methyl-pyridine-3,5,6-tricarbo xylate.

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomakos, N. G.; Tsitsanou, K. E.; Zographos, S. E.; Skamnaki, V. T.; Goldmann, S.; Bischoff, H.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of the potential antidiabetic drug (-)(S)-3-isopropyl 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-1-ethyl-2-methyl-pyridine-3,5,6-tricarbox ylate (W1807) on the catalytic and structural properties of glycogen phosphorylase a has been studied. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is an allosteric enzyme whose activity is primarily controlled by reversible phosphorylation of Ser14 of the dephosphorylated enzyme (GPb, less active, predominantly T-state) to form the phosphorylated enzyme (GPa, more active, predominantly R-state). Upon conversion of GPb to GPa, the N-terminal tail (residues 5-22), which carries the Ser14(P), changes its conformation into a distorted 3(10) helix and its contacts from intrasubunit to intersubunit. This alteration causes a series of tertiary and quaternary conformational changes that lead to activation of the enzyme through opening access to the catalytic site. As part of a screening process to identify compounds that might contribute to the regulation of glycogen metabolism in the noninsulin dependent diabetes diseased state, W1807 has been found as the most potent inhibitor of GPb (Ki = 1.6 nM) that binds at the allosteric site of T-state GPb and produces further conformational changes, characteristic of a T'-like state. Kinetics show W1807 is a potent competitive inhibitor of GPa (-AMP) (Ki = 10.8 nM) and of GPa (+1 mM AMP) (Ki = 19.4 microM) with respect to glucose 1-phosphate and acts in synergism with glucose. To elucidate the structural features that contribute to the binding, the structures of GPa in the T-state conformation in complex with glucose and in complex with both glucose and W1807 have been determined at 100 K to 2.0 A and 2.1 A resolution, and refined to crystallographic R-values of 0.179 (R(free) = 0.230) and 0.189 (R(free) = 0.263), respectively. W1807 binds tightly at the allosteric site and induces substantial conformational changes both in the vicinity of the allosteric site and the subunit interface. A disordering of the N

  9. In vitro selection of functional nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. S.; Szostak, J. W.

    1999-01-01

    In vitro selection allows rare functional RNA or DNA molecules to be isolated from pools of over 10(15) different sequences. This approach has been used to identify RNA and DNA ligands for numerous small molecules, and recent three-dimensional structure solutions have revealed the basis for ligand recognition in several cases. By selecting high-affinity and -specificity nucleic acid ligands for proteins, promising new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents have been identified. Selection experiments have also been carried out to identify ribozymes that catalyze a variety of chemical transformations, including RNA cleavage, ligation, and synthesis, as well as alkylation and acyl-transfer reactions and N-glycosidic and peptide bond formation. The existence of such RNA enzymes supports the notion that ribozymes could have directed a primitive metabolism before the evolution of protein synthesis. New in vitro protein selection techniques should allow for a direct comparison of the frequency of ligand binding and catalytic structures in pools of random sequence polynucleotides versus polypeptides.

  10. Polynucleotides encoding anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-01-11

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  11. Polynucleotides encoding TRF1 binding proteins

    DOEpatents

    Campisi, Judith; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a novel telomere associated protein (Trf1-interacting nuclear protein 2 "Tin2") that hinders the binding of Trf1 to its specific telomere repeat sequence and mediates the formation of a Tin2-Trf1-telomeric DNA complex that limits telomerase access to the telomere. Also included are the corresponding nucleic acids that encode the Tin2 of the present invention, as well as mutants of Tin2. Methods of making, purifying and using Tin2 of the present invention are described. In addition, drug screening assays to identify drugs that mimic and/or complement the effect of Tin2 are presented.

  12. The structure of a glycogen phosphorylase glucopyranose spirohydantoin complex at 1.8 A resolution and 100 K: the role of the water structure and its contribution to binding.

    PubMed Central

    Gregoriou, M.; Noble, M. E.; Watson, K. A.; Garman, E. F.; Krulle, T. M.; de la Fuente, C.; Fleet, G. W.; Oikonomakos, N. G.; Johnson, L. N.

    1998-01-01

    A glucopyranose spirohydantoin (a pyranose analogue of the potent herbicide, hydantocidin) has been identified as the highest affinity glucose analogue inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase b (GPb). In order to elucidate the structural features that contribute to the binding, the structures of GPb in the native T state conformation and in complex with glucopyranose spirohydantoin have been determined at 100 K to 2.0 A and 1.8 A resolution, respectively, and refined to crystallographic R values of 0.197 (R[free] 0.248) and 0.182 (R[free] 0.229), respectively. The low temperature structure of GPb is almost identical to that of the previously determined room temperature structure, apart from a decrease in overall atomic temperature factors ((B) room temperature GPb = 34.9 A2; (B) 100 K GPb = 23.4 A2). The glucopyranose spirohydantoin inhibitor (Ki = 3.0 microM) binds at the catalytic site and induces small changes in two key regions of the protein: the 280s loop (residues 281-286) that results in a decrease in mobility of this region, and the 380s loop (residues 377-385) that undergoes more significant shifts in order to optimize contact to the ligand. The hydantoin group, that is responsible for increasing the affinity of the glucose compound by a factor of 10(3), makes only one hydrogen bond to the protein, from one of its NH groups to the main chain oxygen of His377. The other polar groups of the hydantoin group form hydrogen bonds to five water molecules. These waters are involved in extensive networks of hydrogen bonds and appear to be an integral part of the protein structure. Analysis of the water structure at the catalytic site of the native enzyme, shows that five waters are displaced by ligand binding and that there is a significant decrease in mobility of the remaining waters on formation of the GPb-hydantoin complex. The ability of the inhibitor to exploit existing waters, to displace waters and to recruit new waters appears to be important for the high

  13. Kinetic studies of HPr, HPr(H15D), HPr(H15E), and HPr(His approximately P) phosphorylation by the Streptococcus salivarius HPr(Ser) kinase/phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Casabon, Israël; Couture, Manon; Vaillancourt, Katy; Vadeboncoeur, Christian

    2009-11-17

    HPr is a central protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase transport system (PTS). In streptococci, HPr can be phosphorylated at His(15) at the expense of PEP by enzyme I (EI) of the PTS, producing HPr(His approximately P). HPr can also be phosphorylated at Ser(46) by the ATP-dependent HPr(Ser) kinase/phosphorylase (HprK/P), producing HPr(Ser-P). Lastly, HPr can be phosphorylated on both residues, producing HPr(Ser-P)(His approximately P) (HPr-P2). We report here a study on the phosphorylation of Streptococcus salivarius HPr, HPr(H15D), HPr(H15E), and HPr(His approximately P) by HprK/P to assess the involvement of HprK/P in the synthesis of HPr-P2 in streptococcal cells. We first developed a spectrophotometric method for measuring HprK/P kinase activity. Using this assay, we found that the K(m) of HprK/P for HPr at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C was approximately 110 muM, with a specificity constant (k(cat)/K(m)) of 1.7 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). The specificity constants for HPr(H15D) and HPr(H15E) were approximately 13 times lower. Kinetic studies conducted under conditions where HPr(His approximately P) was stable (i.e., pH 8.6 and 15 degrees C) showed that HPr(His approximately P) was a poorer substrate for HprK/P than HPr(H15D), the k(cat)/K(m) for HPr(H15D) and HPr(His approximately P) being approximately 9 and 26 times lower than that for HPr, respectively. Our results suggested that (i) the inefficiency of the phosphorylation of HPr(His approximately P) by HprK/P results from the presence of a negative charge at position 15 as well as from other structural elements and (ii) the contribution of streptococcal HprK/P to the synthesis of HPr-P2 in vivo is marginal. PMID:19824696

  14. Genetics Home Reference: purine nucleoside phosphorylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... immune protection from foreign invaders such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Affected individuals are prone to repeated and persistent infections that can be very serious or life-threatening. These infections are often caused by "opportunistic" ...

  15. Pnp gene modification for improved xylose utilization in Zymomonas

    DOEpatents

    Caimi, Perry G G; Qi, Min; Tao, Luan; Viitanen, Paul V; Yang, Jianjun

    2014-12-16

    The endogenous pnp gene encoding polynucleotide phosphorylase in the Zymomonas genome was identified as a target for modification to provide improved xylose utilizing cells for ethanol production. The cells are in addition genetically modified to have increased expression of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (RPI) activity, as compared to cells without this genetic modification, and are not limited in xylose isomerase activity in the absence of the pnp modification.

  16. PredictProtein—an open resource for online prediction of protein structural and functional features

    PubMed Central

    Yachdav, Guy; Kloppmann, Edda; Kajan, Laszlo; Hecht, Maximilian; Goldberg, Tatyana; Hamp, Tobias; Hönigschmid, Peter; Schafferhans, Andrea; Roos, Manfred; Bernhofer, Michael; Richter, Lothar; Ashkenazy, Haim; Punta, Marco; Schlessinger, Avner; Bromberg, Yana; Schneider, Reinhard; Vriend, Gerrit; Sander, Chris; Ben-Tal, Nir; Rost, Burkhard

    2014-01-01

    PredictProtein is a meta-service for sequence analysis that has been predicting structural and functional features of proteins since 1992. Queried with a protein sequence it returns: multiple sequence alignments, predicted aspects of structure (secondary structure, solvent accessibility, transmembrane helices (TMSEG) and strands, coiled-coil regions, disulfide bonds and disordered regions) and function. The service incorporates analysis methods for the identification of functional regions (ConSurf), homology-based inference of Gene Ontology terms (metastudent), comprehensive subcellular localization prediction (LocTree3), protein–protein binding sites (ISIS2), protein–polynucleotide binding sites (SomeNA) and predictions of the effect of point mutations (non-synonymous SNPs) on protein function (SNAP2). Our goal has always been to develop a system optimized to meet the demands of experimentalists not highly experienced in bioinformatics. To this end, the PredictProtein results are presented as both text and a series of intuitive, interactive and visually appealing figures. The web server and sources are available at http://ppopen.rostlab.org. PMID:24799431

  17. Glycogen function in adult central and peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Evans, Richard D; Brown, Angus M; Ransom, Bruce R

    2013-08-01

    We studied the roles of glycogen in axonal pathways of the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). By using electrophysiological recordings, in combination with biochemical glycogen assay, it was possible to determine whether glycogen was crucial to axon function under different conditions. Glycogen was present both in mouse optic nerve (MON) and in mouse sciatic nerve (MSN). Aglycemia caused loss of the compound action potential (CAP) in both pathways after a latency of 15 min (MON) and 120 min for myelinated axons (A fibers) in the MSN. With the exception of unmyelinated axons (C fibers) in the MSN, CAP decline began when usable glycogen was exhausted. Glycogen was located in astrocytes in the MON and in myelinating Schwann cells in the MSN; it was absent from the Schwann cells surrounding unmyelinated C fibers. In MON, astrocytic glycogen is metabolized to lactate and "shuttled" to axons to support metabolism. The ability of lactate to support A fiber conduction in the absence of glucose suggests a common pathway in both the CNS and the PNS. Lactate is released from MON and MSN in substantial quantities. That lactate levels fall in MSN in the presence of diaminobenzidine, which inhibits glycogen phosphorylase, strongly suggests that glycogen metabolism contributes to lactate release under resting conditions. Glycogen is a "backup" energy substrate in both the CNS and the PNS and, beyond sustaining excitability during glucose deprivation, has the capacity to subsidize the axonal energy demands during times of intense activity in the presence of glucose.

  18. SNPs in genes functional in starch-sugar interconversion associate with natural variation of tuber starch and sugar content of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Lena; Nader-Nieto, Anna Camila; Schönhals, Elske Maria; Walkemeier, Birgit; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2014-10-01

    Starch accumulation and breakdown are vital processes in plant storage organs such as seeds, roots, and tubers. In tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) a small fraction of starch is converted into the reducing sugars glucose and fructose. Reducing sugars accumulate in response to cold temperatures. Even small quantities of reducing sugars affect negatively the quality of processed products such as chips and French fries. Tuber starch and sugar content are inversely correlated complex traits that are controlled by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Based on in silico annotation of the potato genome sequence, 123 loci are involved in starch-sugar interconversion, approximately half of which have been previously cloned and characterized. By means of candidate gene association mapping, we identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight genes known to have key functions in starch-sugar interconversion, which were diagnostic for increased tuber starch and/or decreased sugar content and vice versa. Most positive or negative effects of SNPs on tuber-reducing sugar content were reproducible in two different collections of potato cultivars. The diagnostic SNP markers are useful for breeding applications. An allele of the plastidic starch phosphorylase PHO1a associated with increased tuber starch content was cloned as full-length cDNA and characterized. The PHO1a-HA allele has several amino acid changes, one of which is unique among all known starch/glycogen phosphorylases. This mutation might cause reduced enzyme activity due to impaired formation of the active dimers, thereby limiting starch breakdown. PMID:25081979

  19. SNPs in genes functional in starch-sugar interconversion associate with natural variation of tuber starch and sugar content of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Lena; Nader-Nieto, Anna Camila; Schönhals, Elske Maria; Walkemeier, Birgit; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2014-07-31

    Starch accumulation and breakdown are vital processes in plant storage organs such as seeds, roots, and tubers. In tubers of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) a small fraction of starch is converted into the reducing sugars glucose and fructose. Reducing sugars accumulate in response to cold temperatures. Even small quantities of reducing sugars affect negatively the quality of processed products such as chips and French fries. Tuber starch and sugar content are inversely correlated complex traits that are controlled by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Based on in silico annotation of the potato genome sequence, 123 loci are involved in starch-sugar interconversion, approximately half of which have been previously cloned and characterized. By means of candidate gene association mapping, we identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight genes known to have key functions in starch-sugar interconversion, which were diagnostic for increased tuber starch and/or decreased sugar content and vice versa. Most positive or negative effects of SNPs on tuber-reducing sugar content were reproducible in two different collections of potato cultivars. The diagnostic SNP markers are useful for breeding applications. An allele of the plastidic starch phosphorylase PHO1a associated with increased tuber starch content was cloned as full-length cDNA and characterized. The PHO1a-HA allele has several amino acid changes, one of which is unique among all known starch/glycogen phosphorylases. This mutation might cause reduced enzyme activity due to impaired formation of the active dimers, thereby limiting starch breakdown.

  20. A phase III, randomized, double-blind, matched-pairs, active-controlled clinical trial and preclinical animal study to compare the durability, efficacy and safety between polynucleotide filler and hyaluronic acid filler in the correction of crow's feet: a new concept of regenerative filler.

    PubMed

    Pak, Chang Sik; Lee, Jongho; Lee, Hobin; Jeong, Jaehoon; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jeong, Jinwook; Choi, Hyeyeon; Kim, Byunghwi; Oh, Sujin; Kim, Iksoo; Heo, Chan Yeong

    2014-11-01

    The Rejuran® is a new filler product made from purified polynucleotides. Here we present data from an animal study and a clinical trial to examine the durability, efficacy and safety of the Rejuran® on crow's feet. For the animal study, 25 mice were divided into three groups: Group 1 received phosphate buffered saline (PBS); Group 2 were treated with Yvoire®; and Group 3 were treated with Rejuran®. The durability and efficacy of each treatment were assessed by microscopy and staining. In the clinical trial, 72 patients were randomized to receive Rejuran® treatment for crow's feet on one side and Yvoire-Hydro® on the contralateral side, at a ratio of 1:1. Repeated treatments were performed every two weeks for a total of three times, over a total of 12 weeks' observation. All injections and observations of efficacy and safety were performed by the same two investigators. In the animal study, the Rejuran® group showed similar durability and inflammatory response to the Yvoire® group. Upon efficacy assessment, the Rejuran® group showed the greatest elasticity and collagen composition, and a significant difference in skin surface roughness and wrinkle depth. In the clinical trial, the primary and secondary objective efficacy outcome measure showed no statistical significance between the two groups, and in safety outcomes there were no unexpected adverse effects. Our data suggest that the Rejuran®, as a new regenerative filler, can be useful to reduce wrinkles, by showing evidence for its efficacy and safety.

  1. Bacterial/archaeal/organellar polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Bijoy K; Kushner, Sidney R

    2011-01-01

    Although the first poly(A) polymerase (PAP) was discovered in Escherichia coli in 1962, the study of polyadenylation in bacteria was largely ignored for the next 30 years. However, with the identification of the structural gene for E. coli PAP I in 1992, it became possible to analyze polyadenylation using both biochemical and genetic approaches. Subsequently, it has been shown that polyadenylation plays a multifunctional role in prokaryotic RNA metabolism. Although the bulk of our current understanding of prokaryotic polyadenylation comes from studies on E. coli, recent limited experiments with Cyanobacteria, organelles, and Archaea have widened our view on the diversity, complexity, and universality of the polyadenylation process. For example, the identification of polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), a reversible phosphorolytic enzyme that is highly conserved in bacteria, as an additional PAP in E. coli caught everyone by surprise. In fact, PNPase has now been shown to be the source of post-transcriptional RNA modifications in a wide range of cells of prokaryotic origin including those that lack a eubacterial PAP homolog. Accordingly, the past few years have witnessed increased interest in the mechanism and role of post-transcriptional modifications in all species of prokaryotic origin. However, the fact that many of the poly(A) tails are very short and unstable as well as the presence of polynucleotide tails has posed significant technical challenges to the scientific community trying to unravel the mystery of polyadenylation in prokaryotes. This review discusses the current state of knowledge regarding polyadenylation and its functions in bacteria, organelles, and Archaea.

  2. Integrative self-assembly of functional hybrid nanoconstructs by inorganic wrapping of single biomolecules, biomolecule arrays and organic supramolecular assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Avinash J.; Li, Mei; Mann, Stephen

    2013-07-01

    Synthesis of functional hybrid nanoscale objects has been a core focus of the rapidly progressing field of nanomaterials science. In particular, there has been significant interest in the integration of evolutionally optimized biological systems such as proteins, DNA, virus particles and cells with functional inorganic building blocks to construct mesoscopic architectures and nanostructured materials. However, in many cases the fragile nature of the biomolecules seriously constrains their potential applications. As a consequence, there is an on-going quest for the development of novel strategies to modulate the thermal and chemical stabilities, and performance of biomolecules under adverse conditions. This feature article highlights new methods of ``inorganic molecular wrapping'' of single or multiple protein molecules, individual double-stranded DNA helices, lipid bilayer vesicles and self-assembled organic dye superstructures using inorganic building blocks to produce bio-inorganic nanoconstructs with core-shell type structures. We show that spatial isolation of the functional biological nanostructures as ``armour-plated'' enzyme molecules or polynucleotide strands not only maintains their intact structure and biochemical properties, but also enables the fabrication of novel hybrid nanomaterials for potential applications in diverse areas of bionanotechnology.

  3. Non-coding Y RNAs as tethers and gates

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Sandra L; Belair, Cedric; Boccitto, Marco; Chen, Xinguo; Sim, Soyeong; Taylor, David W; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) called Y RNAs are abundant components of both animal cells and a variety of bacteria. In all species examined, these ~100 nt RNAs are bound to the Ro 60 kDa (Ro60) autoantigen, a ring-shaped protein that also binds misfolded ncRNAs in some vertebrate nuclei. Although the function of Ro60 RNPs has been mysterious, we recently reported that a bacterial Y RNA tethers Ro60 to the 3′ to 5′ exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) to form RYPER (Ro60/Y RNA/PNPase Exoribonuclease RNP), a new RNA degradation machine. PNPase is a homotrimeric ring that degrades single-stranded RNA, and Y RNA-mediated tethering of Ro60 increases the effectiveness of PNPase in degrading structured RNAs. Single particle electron microscopy of RYPER suggests that RNA threads through the Ro60 ring into the PNPase cavity. Further studies indicate that Y RNAs may also act as gates to regulate entry of RNA substrates into the Ro60 channel. These findings reveal novel functions for Y RNAs and raise questions about how the bacterial findings relate to the roles of these ncRNAs in animal cells. Here we review the literature on Y RNAs, highlighting their close relationship with Ro60 proteins and the hypothesis that these ncRNAs function generally to tether Ro60 rings to diverse RNA-binding proteins. PMID:24036917

  4. Wave-function functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Xiaoyin; Slamet, Marlina; Sahni, Viraht

    2010-04-15

    We extend our prior work on the construction of variational wave functions {psi} that are functionals of functions {chi}:{psi}={psi}[{chi}] rather than simply being functions. In this manner, the space of variations is expanded over those of traditional variational wave functions. In this article we perform the constrained search over the functions {chi} chosen such that the functional {psi}[{chi}] satisfies simultaneously the constraints of normalization and the exact expectation value of an arbitrary single- or two-particle Hermitian operator, while also leading to a rigorous upper bound to the energy. As such the wave function functional is accurate not only in the region of space in which the principal contributions to the energy arise but also in the other region of the space represented by the Hermitian operator. To demonstrate the efficacy of these ideas, we apply such a constrained search to the ground state of the negative ion of atomic hydrogen H{sup -}, the helium atom He, and its positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+}. The operators W whose expectations are obtained exactly are the sum of the single-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub i}r{sub i}{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, W={Sigma}{sub i{delta}}(r{sub i}), W=-(1/2){Sigma}{sub i{nabla}i}{sup 2}, and the two-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub n}u{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r{sub i}-r{sub j}|. Comparisons with the method of Lagrangian multipliers and of other constructions of wave-function functionals are made. Finally, we present further insights into the construction of wave-function functionals by studying a previously proposed construction of functionals {psi}[{chi}] that lead to the exact expectation of arbitrary Hermitian operators. We discover that analogous to the solutions of the Schroedinger equation, there exist {psi}[{chi}] that are unphysical in that they lead to singular values for the expectations. We also explain the origin of the singularity.

  5. Wanderings in biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Lengyel, Peter

    2014-07-11

    My Ph.D. thesis in the laboratory of Severo Ochoa at New York University School of Medicine in 1962 included the determination of the nucleotide compositions of codons specifying amino acids. The experiments were based on the use of random copolyribonucleotides (synthesized by polynucleotide phosphorylase) as messenger RNA in a cell-free protein-synthesizing system. At Yale University, where I joined the faculty, my co-workers and I first studied the mechanisms of protein synthesis. Thereafter, we explored the interferons (IFNs), which were discovered as antiviral defense agents but were revealed to be components of a highly complex multifunctional system. We isolated pure IFNs and characterized IFN-activated genes, the proteins they encode, and their functions. We concentrated on a cluster of IFN-activated genes, the p200 cluster, which arose by repeated gene duplications and which encodes a large family of highly multifunctional proteins. For example, the murine protein p204 can be activated in numerous tissues by distinct transcription factors. It modulates cell proliferation and the differentiation of a variety of tissues by binding to many proteins. p204 also inhibits the activities of wild-type Ras proteins and Ras oncoproteins.

  6. Novel role for RNase PH in the degradation of structured RNA.

    PubMed

    Jain, Chaitanya

    2012-08-01

    Escherichia coli contains multiple 3' to 5' RNases, of which two, RNase PH and polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase), use inorganic phosphate as a nucleophile to catalyze RNA cleavage. It is known that an absence of these two enzymes causes growth defects, but the basis for these defects has remained undefined. To further an understanding of the function of these enzymes, the degradation pattern of different cellular RNAs was analyzed. It was observed that an absence of both enzymes results in the appearance of novel mRNA degradation fragments. Such fragments were also observed in strains containing mutations in RNase R and PNPase, enzymes whose collective absence is known to cause an accumulation of structured RNA fragments. Additional experiments indicated that the growth defects of strains containing RNase R and PNPase mutations were exacerbated upon RNase PH removal. Taken together, these observations suggested that RNase PH could play a role in structured RNA degradation. Biochemical experiments with RNase PH demonstrated that this enzyme digests through RNA duplexes of moderate stability. In addition, mapping and sequence analysis of an mRNA degradation fragment that accumulates in the absence of the phosphorolytic enzymes revealed the presence of an extended stem-loop motif at the 3' end. Overall, these results indicate that RNase PH plays a novel role in the degradation of structured RNAs and provides a potential explanation for the growth defects caused by an absence of the phosphorolytic RNases.

  7. The small RNA SraG participates in PNPase homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Fanette; Gasiorowski, Elise; Gracia, Celine; Ballouche, Mathieu; Caillet, Joel; Marchais, Antonin; Hajnsdorf, Eliane

    2016-10-01

    The rpsO-pnp operon encodes ribosomal protein S15 and polynucleotide phosphorylase, a major 3'-5' exoribonuclease involved in mRNA decay in Escherichia coli The gene for the SraG small RNA is located between the coding regions of the rpsO and pnp genes, and it is transcribed in the opposite direction relative to the two genes. No function has been assigned to SraG. Multiple levels of post-transcriptional regulation have been demonstrated for the rpsO-pnp operon. Here we show that SraG is a new factor affecting pnp expression. SraG overexpression results in a reduction of pnp expression and a destabilization of pnp mRNA; in contrast, inhibition of SraG transcription results in a higher level of the pnp transcript. Furthermore, in vitro experiments indicate that SraG inhibits translation initiation of pnp Together, these observations demonstrate that SraG participates in the post-transcriptional control of pnp by a direct antisense interaction between SraG and PNPase RNAs. Our data reveal a new level of regulation in the expression of this major exoribonuclease.

  8. Comparative sequence analysis of ribonucleases HII, III, II PH and D.

    PubMed Central

    Mian, I S

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli ribonucleases (RNases) HII, III, II, PH and D have been used to characterise new and known viral, bacterial, archaeal and eucaryotic sequences similar to these endo- (HII and III) and exoribonucleases (II, PH and D). Statistical models, hidden Markov models (HMMs), were created for the RNase HII, III, II and PH and D families as well as a double-stranded RNA binding domain present in RNase III. Results suggest that the RNase D family, which includes Werner syndrome protein and the 100 kDa antigenic component of the human polymyositis scleroderma (PMSCL) autoantigen, is a 3'-->5' exoribonuclease structurally and functionally related to the 3'-->5' exodeoxyribonuclease domain of DNA polymerases. Polynucleotide phosphorylases and the RNase PH family, which includes the 75 kDa PMSCL autoantigen, possess a common domain suggesting similar structures and mechanisms of action for these 3'-->5' phosphorolytic enzymes. Examination of HMM-generated multiple sequences alignments for each family suggest amino acids that may be important for their structure, substrate binding and/or catalysis. PMID:9241229

  9. Characterization of the biochemical properties of Campylobacter jejuni RNase III

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Nabila; Saramago, Margarida; Matos, Rute G.; Prévost, Hervé; Arraiano, Cecília M.

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a foodborne bacterial pathogen, which is now considered as a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis. The information regarding ribonucleases in C. jejuni is very scarce but there are hints that they can be instrumental in virulence mechanisms. Namely, PNPase (polynucleotide phosphorylase) was shown to allow survival of C. jejuni in refrigerated conditions, to facilitate bacterial swimming, cell adhesion, colonization and invasion. In several microorganisms PNPase synthesis is auto-controlled in an RNase III (ribonuclease III)-dependent mechanism. Thereby, we have cloned, overexpressed, purified and characterized Cj-RNase III (C. jejuni RNase III). We have demonstrated that Cj-RNase III is able to complement an Escherichia coli rnc-deficient strain in 30S rRNA processing and PNPase regulation. Cj-RNase III was shown to be active in an unexpectedly large range of conditions, and Mn2+ seems to be its preferred co-factor, contrarily to what was described for other RNase III orthologues. The results lead us to speculate that Cj-RNase III may have an important role under a Mn2+-rich environment. Mutational analysis strengthened the function of some residues in the catalytic mechanism of action of RNase III, which was shown to be conserved. PMID:24073828

  10. An RNA Degradation Machine Sculpted by Ro Autoantigen and Noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinguo; Taylor, David W.; Fowler, Casey C.; Galan, Jorge E.; Wang, Hong-Wei; Wolin, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Many bacteria contain an ortholog of the Ro autoantigen, a ring-shaped protein that binds noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) called Y RNAs. In the only studied bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans, the Ro ortholog Rsr functions in heat stress-induced rRNA maturation and starvation-induced rRNA decay. However, the mechanism by which this conserved protein and its associated ncRNAs act has been obscure. We report that Rsr and the exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) form an RNA degradation machine that is scaffolded by Y RNA. Single-particle electron microscopy, followed by docking of atomic models into the reconstruction, suggests that Rsr channels single-stranded RNA into the PNPase cavity. Biochemical assays reveal that Rsr and Y RNA adapt PNPase for effective degradation of structured RNAs. A Ro ortholog and ncRNA also associate with PNPase in Salmonella Typhimurium. Our studies identify a new ribonucleoprotein machine and demonstrate that ncRNA, by tethering a protein cofactor, can alter the substrate specificity of an enzyme. PMID:23540697

  11. The adsorption of nucleotides and polynucleotides on montmorillonite clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, James P.; Ertem, Gözen; Agarwal, Vipin K.

    1989-03-01

    The binding of adenine derivatives to Na+-montmorillonite increases in the order 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, 5'-ADP

  12. Reducing nontemplated 3' nucleotide addition to polynucleotide transcripts

    DOEpatents

    Kao, C. Cheng

    2000-01-01

    Non-template 3' nucleotide addition to a transcript is reduced by transcribing a transcript from a template comprising an ultimate and/or penultimate 5' ribose having a C'2 substituent such as methoxy, which reduces non-template 3' nucleotide addition to the transcript. The methods are shown to be applicable to a wide variety of polymerases, including Taq, T7 RNA polymerase, etc.

  13. The origin of polynucleotide-directed protein synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    1989-01-01

    If protein synthesis evolved in an RNA world it was probably preceded by simpler processes by means of which interaction with amino acids conferred selective advantage on replicating RNA molecules. It is suggested that at first the simple attachment of amino acids to the 2'(3') termini of RNA templates favored initiation of replication at the end of the template rather than at internal positions. The second stage in the evolution of protein synthesis would probably have been the association of pairs of charged RNA adaptors in such a way as to favor noncoded formation of peptides. Only after this process had become efficient could coded synthesis have begun.

  14. Expansin polynucleotides, related polypeptides and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.; Wu, Yajun

    2006-02-21

    The present invention relates to beta expansin polypeptides, nucleotide sequences encoding the same and regulatory elements and their use in altering cell wall structure in plants. Nucleic acid constructs comprising a beta expansin sequence operably linked to a promoter, or other regulatory sequence are disclosed as well as vectors, plant cells, plants, and transformed seeds containing such constructs are provided. Methods for the use of such constructs in repressing or inducing expression of a beta expansin sequences in a plant are also provided as well as methods for harvesting transgenic expansin proteins. In addition, methods are provided for inhibiting or improving cell wall structure in plants by repression or induction of expansin sequences in plants.

  15. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Dotson, William D.; Greenier, Jennifer; Ding, Hanshu

    2009-05-19

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated nucleic acids encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleic acids as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  16. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Dotson, William D.; Greenier, Jennifer; Ding, Hanshu

    2007-09-18

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated nucleic acids encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleic acids as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  17. Approximating Functions with Exponential Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of approximating a function with a linear combination of exponential functions of the form e[superscript x], e[superscript 2x], ... is considered as a parallel development to the notion of Taylor polynomials which approximate a function with a linear combination of power function terms. The sinusoidal functions sin "x" and cos "x"…

  18. Glycogen metabolism protects against metabolic insult to preserve carotid body function during glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Andrew P; Turner, Philip J; Carter, Paul; Leadbeater, Wendy; Ray, Clare J; Hauton, David; Buckler, Keith J; Kumar, Prem

    2014-10-15

    The view that the carotid body (CB) type I cells are direct physiological sensors of hypoglycaemia is challenged by the finding that the basal sensory neuronal outflow from the whole organ is unchanged in response to low glucose. The reason for this difference in viewpoint and how the whole CB maintains its metabolic integrity when exposed to low glucose is unknown. Here we show that, in the intact superfused rat CB, basal sensory neuronal activity was sustained during glucose deprivation for 29.1 ± 1.2 min, before irreversible failure following a brief period of excitation. Graded increases in the basal discharge induced by reducing the superfusate PO2 led to proportional decreases in the time to the pre-failure excitation during glucose deprivation which was dependent on a complete run-down in glycolysis and a fall in cellular energy status. A similar ability to withstand prolonged glucose deprivation was observed in isolated type I cells. Electron micrographs and immunofluorescence staining of rat CB sections revealed the presence of glycogen granules and the glycogen conversion enzymes glycogen synthase I and glycogen phosphorylase BB, dispersed throughout the type I cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, pharmacological attenuation of glycogenolysis and functional depletion of glycogen both significantly reduced the time to glycolytic run-down by ∼33 and 65%, respectively. These findings suggest that type I cell glycogen metabolism allows for the continuation of glycolysis and the maintenance of CB sensory neuronal output in periods of restricted glucose delivery and this may act as a key protective mechanism for the organ during hypoglycaemia. The ability, or otherwise, to preserve energetic status may thus account for variation in the reported capacity of the CB to sense physiological glucose concentrations and may even underlie its function during pathological states associated with augmented CB discharge.

  19. Enzymatic synthesis of polymers containing nicotinamide mononucleotide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Rihe

    1995-01-01

    Nicotinamide mononucleoside 5'-diphosphate in its reduced form is an excellent substrate for polynucleotide phosphorylase from Micrococcus luteus both in de novo polymerization reactions and in primer extension reactions. The oxidized form of the diphosphate is a much less efficient substrate; it can be used to extend primers but does not oligomerize in the absence of a primer. The cyanide adduct of the oxidized substrate, like the reduced substrate, polymerizes efficiently. Loss of cyanide yields high molecular weight polymers of the oxidized form. Terminal transferase from calf thymus accepts nicotinamide mononucleoside 5'-triphosphate as a substrate and efficiently adds one residue to the 3'-end of an oligodeoxynucleotide. T4 polynucleotide kinase accepts oligomers of nicotinamide mononucleotide as substrates. However, RNA polymerases do not incorporate nicotinamide mononucleoside 5'-triphosphate into products on any of the templates that we used.

  20. Enzymatic Synthesis of Polymers Containing Nicotinamide Mononucleotide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Rihe; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1995-01-01

    Nicotinamide mononucleoside 5'-diphosphate in its reduced form is an excellent substrate for polynucleotide phosphorylase from Micrococcus luteus both in de novo polymerization reactions and in primer extension reactions. The oxidized form of the diphosphate is a much less efficient substrate; it can be used to extend primers but does not oligomerize in the absence of a primer. The cyanide adduct of the oxidized substrate, like the reduced substrate, polymerizes efficiently. Loss of cyanide yields high molecular weight polymers of the oxidized form. Terminal transferase from calf thymus accepts nicotinamide mononucleoside 5'-triphosphate as a substrate and efficiently adds one residue to the 3'-end of an oligodeoxynucleotide. T4 polynucleotide kinase accepts oligomers of nicotinamide mononucleotide as substrates. However, RNA polymerases do not incorporate nicotinamide mononucleoside 5'-triphosphate into products on any of the templates that we used.

  1. Structural basis for the regulatory function of a complex zinc-binding domain in a replicative arterivirus helicase resembling a nonsense-mediated mRNA decay helicase

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zengqin; Lehmann, Kathleen C.; Li, Xiaorong; Feng, Chong; Wang, Guoqiang; Zhang, Qi; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Yu, Lin; Zhang, Xingliang; Feng, Wenhai; Wu, Wei; Gong, Peng; Tao, Ye; Posthuma, Clara C.; Snijder, Eric J.; Gorbalenya, Alexander E.; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2014-01-01

    All positive-stranded RNA viruses with genomes >∼7 kb encode helicases, which generally are poorly characterized. The core of the nidovirus superfamily 1 helicase (HEL1) is associated with a unique N-terminal zinc-binding domain (ZBD) that was previously implicated in helicase regulation, genome replication and subgenomic mRNA synthesis. The high-resolution structure of the arterivirus helicase (nsp10), alone and in complex with a polynucleotide substrate, now provides first insights into the structural basis for nidovirus helicase function. A previously uncharacterized domain 1B connects HEL1 domains 1A and 2A to a long linker of ZBD, which further consists of a novel RING-like module and treble-clef zinc finger, together coordinating three Zn atoms. On substrate binding, major conformational changes were evident outside the HEL1 domains, notably in domain 1B. Structural characterization, mutagenesis and biochemistry revealed that helicase activity depends on the extensive relay of interactions between the ZBD and HEL1 domains. The arterivirus helicase structurally resembles the cellular Upf1 helicase, suggesting that nidoviruses may also use their helicases for post-transcriptional quality control of their large RNA genomes. PMID:24369429

  2. Bluegill virus is a ribovirus of positive-strand polarity.

    PubMed

    Robin, J; Larivière-Durand, C

    1983-01-01

    RNA was extracted from purified Bluegill virus (BGV) and fractionated onto a poly (U)-Sepharose-4 B column. More than 70 per cent of this RNA became bound and could be subsequently eluted from the column. By polynucleotide phosphorylase digestion, the poly (A) sequences were located at the 3'-terminus of the RNA. This RNA and purified BGV RNA were infectious as shown by plaque assay titration of the virus produced. Furthermore, we were unable to detect RNA polymerase activity in preparations of BGV. These results indicate that the genome in the BGV particle is a positive-strand RNA.

  3. Functional analysis of bifidobacterial promoters in Bifidobacterium longum and Escherichia coli using the α-galactosidase gene as a reporter.

    PubMed

    Sakanaka, Mikiyasu; Tamai, Saki; Hirayama, Yosuke; Onodera, Ai; Koguchi, Hiroka; Kano, Yasunobu; Yokota, Atsushi; Fukiya, Satoru

    2014-11-01

    Heterologous gene expression in bifidobacteria requires weak, strong, and inducible promoters depending on the objectives of different expression studies. Weak promoters in Escherichia coli can also be desirable for stable heterologous gene cloning. Here, we developed a reporter system using the Bifidobacterium longum α-galactosidase gene and investigated the activity and inducibility of seven bifidobacterial promoters in B. longum and their activities in E. coli. These studies revealed diverse promoter activities. Three promoters were highly active in B. longum, but only slightly active in E. coli. Among these, two phosphoketolase gene (xfp) promoters exhibited strong activity in B. longum cells grown on glucose. In contrast, the promoter activity of the fructose transporter operon (fruEKFG) was strongly induced by carbohydrates other than glucose, including fructose, xylose, and ribose. These promoters will allow strong or highly inducible expression in bifidobacteria and stable gene cloning in E. coli. In contrast to the functions of these promoters, the promoter of sucrose-utilization operon cscBA showed very high activity in E. coli but low activity in B. longum. Other three promoters were functional in both B. longum and E. coli. In particular, two sucrose phosphorylase gene (scrP) promoters showed inducible activity by sucrose and raffinose in B. longum, indicating their applicability for regulated expression studies. The diverse promoter functions revealed in this study will contribute to enabling the regulated expression of heterologous genes in bifidobacteria research.

  4. Downregulated MTAP expression in myxofibrosarcoma: A characterization of inactivating mechanisms, tumor suppressive function, and therapeutic relevance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chien-Feng; Fang, Fu-Min; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chen, Li-Tzong; Wang, Jun-Wen; Tsai, Jen-Wei; Yu, Shih Chen; Wang, Yu-Hui; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Huang, Hsuan-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Myxofibrosarcomas are genetically complex and involve recurrently deleted chromosome 9p, for which we characterized the pathogenically relevant target(s) using genomic profiling. In 12 of the 15 samples, we detected complete or partial losses of 9p. The only aggressiveness-associated, differentially lost region was 9p21.3, spanning the potential inactivated methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) that exhibited homozygous (4/15) or hemizygous (3/15) deletions. In independent samples, MTAP gene status was assessed using quantitative- and methylation-specific PCR assays, and immunoexpression was evaluated. We applied MTAP reexpression or knockdown to elucidate the functional roles of MTAP and the therapeutic potential of L-alanosine in MTAP-preserved and MTAP-deficient myxofibrosarcoma cell lines and xenografts. MTAP protein deficiency (37%) was associated with MTAP gene inactivation (P < 0.001) by homozygous deletion or promoter methylation, and independently portended unfavorable metastasis-free survival (P = 0.0318) and disease-specific survival (P = 0.014). Among the MTAP-deficient cases, the homozygous deletion of MTAP predicted adverse outcome. In MTAP-deficient cells, MTAP reexpression inhibited cell migration and invasion, proliferation, and anchorage-independent colony formation and downregulated cyclin D1. This approach also attenuated the tube-forming abilities of human umbilical venous endothelial cells, attributable to the transcriptional repression of MMP-9, and abrogated the susceptibility to L-alanosine. The inhibiting effects of MTAP expression on tumor growth, angiogenesis, and the induction of apoptosis by L-alanosine were validated using MTAP-reexpressing xenografts and reverted using RNA interference in MTAP-preserved cells. In conclusion, homozygous deletion primarily accounts for the adverse prognostic impact of MTAP deficiency and confers the biological aggressiveness and susceptibility to L-alanosine in myxofibrosarcomas. PMID:25426549

  5. Pyrimidine Biosynthesis Is Not an Essential Function for Trypanosoma brucei Bloodstream Forms

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Jane C.; Donachie, Anne; Morrison, Liam J.; de Koning, Harry P.

    2013-01-01

    Background African trypanosomes are capable of both pyrimidine biosynthesis and salvage of preformed pyrimidines from the host, but it is unknown whether either process is essential to the parasite. Methodology/Principal Findings Pyrimidine requirements for growth were investigated using strictly pyrimidine-free media, with or without single added pyrimidine sources. Growth rates of wild-type bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei were unchanged in pyrimidine-free medium. The essentiality of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway was studied by knocking out the PYR6-5 locus that produces a fusion product of orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRT) and Orotidine Monophosphate Decarboxylase (OMPDCase). The pyrimidine auxotroph was dependent on a suitable extracellular pyrimidine source. Pyrimidine starvation was rapidly lethal and non-reversible, causing incomplete DNA content in new cells. The phenotype could be rescued by addition of uracil; supplementation with uridine, 2′deoxyuridine, and cytidine allowed a diminished growth rate and density. PYR6-5−/− trypanosomes were more sensitive to pyrimidine antimetabolites and displayed increased uracil transport rates and uridine phosphorylase activity. Pyrimidine auxotrophs were able to infect mice although the infection developed much more slowly than infection with the parental, prototrophic trypanosome line. Conclusions/Significance Pyrimidine salvage was not an essential function for bloodstream T. b. brucei. However, trypanosomes lacking de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis are completely dependent on an extracellular pyrimidine source, strongly preferring uracil, and display reduced infectivity. As T. brucei are able to salvage sufficient pyrimidines from the host environment, the pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway is not a viable drug target, although any interruption of pyrimidine supply was lethal. PMID:23505454

  6. Glycosphingolipid Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lingwood, Clifford A.

    2011-01-01

    The combination of carbohydrate and lipid generates unusual molecules in which the two distinctive halves of the glycoconjugate influence the function of each other. Membrane glycolipids can act as primary receptors for carbohydrate binding proteins to mediate transmembrane signaling despite restriction to the outer bilayer leaflet. The extensive heterogeneity of the lipid moiety plays a significant, but still largely unknown, role in glycosphingolipid function. Potential interplay between glycolipids and their fatty acid isoforms, together with their preferential interaction with cholesterol, generates a complex mechanism for the regulation of their function in cellular physiology. PMID:21555406

  7. Molecular evolution accompanying functional divergence of duplicated genes along the plant starch biosynthesis pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Starch is the main source of carbon storage in the Archaeplastida. The starch biosynthesis pathway (sbp) emerged from cytosolic glycogen metabolism shortly after plastid endosymbiosis and was redirected to the plastid stroma during the green lineage divergence. The SBP is a complex network of genes, most of which are members of large multigene families. While some gene duplications occurred in the Archaeplastida ancestor, most were generated during the sbp redirection process, and the remaining few paralogs were generated through compartmentalization or tissue specialization during the evolution of the land plants. In the present study, we tested models of duplicated gene evolution in order to understand the evolutionary forces that have led to the development of SBP in angiosperms. We combined phylogenetic analyses and tests on the rates of evolution along branches emerging from major duplication events in six gene families encoding sbp enzymes. Results We found evidence of positive selection along branches following cytosolic or plastidial specialization in two starch phosphorylases and identified numerous residues that exhibited changes in volume, polarity or charge. Starch synthases, branching and debranching enzymes functional specializations were also accompanied by accelerated evolution. However, none of the sites targeted by selection corresponded to known functional domains, catalytic or regulatory. Interestingly, among the 13 duplications tested, 7 exhibited evidence of positive selection in both branches emerging from the duplication, 2 in only one branch, and 4 in none of the branches. Conclusions The majority of duplications were followed by accelerated evolution targeting specific residues along both branches. This pattern was consistent with the optimization of the two sub-functions originally fulfilled by the ancestral gene before duplication. Our results thereby provide strong support to the so-called “Escape from Adaptive Conflict

  8. Elementary Functions

    1986-05-01

    The ALTERNATIVE LIBRARY is a library of elementary functions prepared for use with the standard FORTRAN compiler under 4.2 BSD UNIX as an alternative to the standard system library. The library offers improved accuracy as well as additional capabilities. It includes routines ASIN, ACOS, COSH, EXP, LOG, LOG10, POW, SIN, COS, SINH, TAN, and TANH. These alternative routines have slightly modified domains and slightly different responses to invalid arguments. Four routines, not part of themore » standard library, are provided: ADX(X,N), a double-precision function that returns the double-precision argument X scaled by 2 raised to the Nth power; INTXP(X), an integer function that returns as a signed integer the exponent of the double-precision argument X; SETXP(X,N), a double-precision function that returns the double-precision argument X with its exponent replaced by N; and DCOTAN(X), a double-precision function that returns the cotangent of the double-precision argument X, where X is given in radians.« less

  9. Proteins associated with RNase E in a multicomponent ribonucleolytic complex.

    PubMed Central

    Miczak, A; Kaberdin, V R; Wei, C L; Lin-Chao, S

    1996-01-01

    The Escherichia coli endoribonuclease RNase E is essential for RNA processing and degradation. Earlier work provided evidence that RNase E exists intracellularly as part of a multicomponent complex and that one of the components of this complex is a 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease, polynucleotide phosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.8). To isolate and identify other components of the RNase E complex, FLAG-epitope-tagged RNase E (FLAG-Rne) fusion protein was purified on a monoclonal antibody-conjugated agarose column. The FLAG-Rne fusion protein, eluted by competition with the synthetic FLAG peptide, was found to be associated with other proteins. N-terminal sequencing of these proteins revealed the presence in the RNase E complex not only of polynucleotide phosphorylase but also of DnaK, RNA helicase, and enolase (EC 4.2.1.11). Another protein associated only with epitope-tagged temperature-sensitive (Rne-3071) mutant RNase E but not with the wild-type enzyme is GroEL. The FLAG-Rne complex has RNase E activity in vivo and in vitro. The relative amount of proteins associated with wild-type and Rne-3071 expressed at an elevated temperature differed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8632981

  10. Functional hyposplenism

    PubMed Central

    Kirkineska, L; Perifanis, V; Vasiliadis, T

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Functional hyposplenism is a condition accompanying many diseases such as sickle cell disease, celiac disease, alcoholic liver disease, hepatic cirrhosis, lymphomas and autoimmune disorders. It is characterised mostly by defective immune responses against infectious agents, especially encapsulated organisms, since the spleen is thought to play an important role in the production and maturation of B-memory lymphocytes and other substances like opsonins, both of which are considered crucial elements of the immune system for fighting infections. It is also associated with thrombocytosis, which might lead to thromboembolic events. Functional hyposplenism is diagnosed by the presence of Howell-Jolly bodies and pitted erythrocytes in the peripheral blood smear, and by nuclear imaging modalities such as spleen scintigraphy with the use of Technetium-99m and/or spleen scintigraphy with the use of heat-damaged Technetium-99m labeled erythrocytes. Severe infections accompanying functional hyposplenism can lead to the overwhelming post infection syndrome, which can often be fatal. Identifying patients with functional hyposplenism is important because simple measures such as vaccination against common infective microorganisms (e.g. Streptococcus pneumonia, Neisseria meningitides and Haemophilous influenzae) and antibiotic therapy when needed are considered beneficial in diminishing the frequency and gravity of the infections accompanying the syndrome. PMID:25125944

  11. Functional characterization of three (GH13) branching enzymes involved in cyanobacterial starch biosynthesis from Cyanobacterium sp. NBRC 102756.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryuichiro; Koide, Keiichi; Hayashi, Mari; Suzuki, Tomoko; Sawada, Takayuki; Ohdan, Takashi; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko; Suzuki, Eiji

    2015-05-01

    Starch and glycogen are widespread storage polysaccharides in bacteria, plants, and animals. Recently, some cyanobacteria were found to accumulate water-insoluble α-glucan similar to amylopectin rather than glycogen, the latter of which is more commonly produced in these organisms. The amylopectin-producing species including Cyanobacterium sp. NBRC 102756 invariably have three branching enzyme (BE) homologs, BE1, BE2, and BE3, all belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 13. Multiple BE isoforms in prokaryotes have not been previously studied. In the present work, we carried out functional characterization of these enzymes expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzymes were all active, although the specific activity of BE3 was much lower than those of BE1 and BE2. After the incubation of the enzymes with amylopectin or amylose, the reaction products were analyzed by fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate capillary electrophoresis method. BE1 and BE2 showed similar chain-length preference to BEIIb isoform of rice (Oryza sativa L.), while the catalytic specificity of BE3 was similar to that of rice BEI. These results indicate that starch-producing cyanobacteria have both type-I BE (BE3) and type-II BEs (BE1 and BE2) in terms of chain-length preferences, as is the case of plants. All BE isoforms were active against phosphorylase limit dextrin, in which outer branches had been uniformly diminished to 4 glucose residues. Based on its catalytic properties, BE3 was assumed to have a role to transfer the glucan chain bearing branch(es) to give rise to a newly growing unit, or cluster as observed in amylopectin molecule.

  12. Functional and Structural Analysis of a β-Glucosidase Involved in β-1,2-Glucan Metabolism in Listeria innocua

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Abe, Koichi; Takahashi, Yuta; Sugimoto, Naohisa; Toyoizumi, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Taguchi, Hayao

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of β-1,2-glucan in nature, few β-1,2-glucan degrading enzymes have been reported to date. Recently, the Lin1839 protein from Listeria innocua was identified as a 1,2-β-oligoglucan phosphorylase. Since the adjacent lin1840 gene in the gene cluster encodes a putative glycoside hydrolase family 3 β-glucosidase, we hypothesized that Lin1840 is also involved in β-1,2-glucan dissimilation. Here we report the functional and structural analysis of Lin1840. A recombinant Lin1840 protein (Lin1840r) showed the highest hydrolytic activity toward sophorose (Glc-β-1,2-Glc) among β-1,2-glucooligosaccharides, suggesting that Lin1840 is a β-glucosidase involved in sophorose degradation. The enzyme also rapidly hydrolyzed laminaribiose (β-1,3), but not cellobiose (β-1,4) or gentiobiose (β-1,6) among β-linked gluco-disaccharides. We determined the crystal structures of Lin1840r in complexes with sophorose and laminaribiose as productive binding forms. In these structures, Arg572 forms many hydrogen bonds with sophorose and laminaribiose at subsite +1, which seems to be a key factor for substrate selectivity. The opposite side of subsite +1 from Arg572 is connected to a large empty space appearing to be subsite +2 for the binding of sophorotriose (Glc-β-1,2-Glc-β-1,2-Glc) in spite of the higher Km value for sophorotriose than that for sophorose. The conformations of sophorose and laminaribiose are almost the same on the Arg572 side but differ on the subsite +2 side that provides no interaction with a substrate. Therefore, Lin1840r is unable to distinguish between sophorose and laminaribiose as substrates. These results provide the first mechanistic insights into β-1,2-glucooligosaccharide recognition by β-glucosidase. PMID:26886583

  13. Functional and Structural Analysis of a β-Glucosidase Involved in β-1,2-Glucan Metabolism in Listeria innocua.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masahiro; Yoshida, Ryuta; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Abe, Koichi; Takahashi, Yuta; Sugimoto, Naohisa; Toyoizumi, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Taguchi, Hayao

    2016-01-01

    Despite the presence of β-1,2-glucan in nature, few β-1,2-glucan degrading enzymes have been reported to date. Recently, the Lin1839 protein from Listeria innocua was identified as a 1,2-β-oligoglucan phosphorylase. Since the adjacent lin1840 gene in the gene cluster encodes a putative glycoside hydrolase family 3 β-glucosidase, we hypothesized that Lin1840 is also involved in β-1,2-glucan dissimilation. Here we report the functional and structural analysis of Lin1840. A recombinant Lin1840 protein (Lin1840r) showed the highest hydrolytic activity toward sophorose (Glc-β-1,2-Glc) among β-1,2-glucooligosaccharides, suggesting that Lin1840 is a β-glucosidase involved in sophorose degradation. The enzyme also rapidly hydrolyzed laminaribiose (β-1,3), but not cellobiose (β-1,4) or gentiobiose (β-1,6) among β-linked gluco-disaccharides. We determined the crystal structures of Lin1840r in complexes with sophorose and laminaribiose as productive binding forms. In these structures, Arg572 forms many hydrogen bonds with sophorose and laminaribiose at subsite +1, which seems to be a key factor for substrate selectivity. The opposite side of subsite +1 from Arg572 is connected to a large empty space appearing to be subsite +2 for the binding of sophorotriose (Glc-β-1,2-Glc-β-1,2-Glc) in spite of the higher Km value for sophorotriose than that for sophorose. The conformations of sophorose and laminaribiose are almost the same on the Arg572 side but differ on the subsite +2 side that provides no interaction with a substrate. Therefore, Lin1840r is unable to distinguish between sophorose and laminaribiose as substrates. These results provide the first mechanistic insights into β-1,2-glucooligosaccharide recognition by β-glucosidase.

  14. A PNPase dependent CRISPR System in Listeria.

    PubMed

    Sesto, Nina; Touchon, Marie; Andrade, José Marques; Kondo, Jiro; Rocha, Eduardo P C; Arraiano, Cecilia Maria; Archambaud, Cristel; Westhof, Éric; Romby, Pascale; Cossart, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is emerging as a model organism to study RNA-mediated regulation in pathogenic bacteria. A class of non-coding RNAs called CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) has been described to confer bacterial resistance against invading bacteriophages and conjugative plasmids. CRISPR function relies on the activity of CRISPR associated (cas) genes that encode a large family of proteins with nuclease or helicase activities and DNA and RNA binding domains. Here, we characterized a CRISPR element (RliB) that is expressed and processed in the L. monocytogenes strain EGD-e, which is completely devoid of cas genes. Structural probing revealed that RliB has an unexpected secondary structure comprising basepair interactions between the repeats and the adjacent spacers in place of canonical hairpins formed by the palindromic repeats. Moreover, in contrast to other CRISPR-Cas systems identified in Listeria, RliB-CRISPR is ubiquitously present among Listeria genomes at the same genomic locus and is never associated with the cas genes. We showed that RliB-CRISPR is a substrate for the endogenously encoded polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) enzyme. The spacers of the different Listeria RliB-CRISPRs share many sequences with temperate and virulent phages. Furthermore, we show that a cas-less RliB-CRISPR lowers the acquisition frequency of a plasmid carrying the matching protospacer, provided that trans encoded cas genes of a second CRISPR-Cas system are present in the genome. Importantly, we show that PNPase is required for RliB-CRISPR mediated DNA interference. Altogether, our data reveal a yet undescribed CRISPR system whose both processing and activity depend on PNPase, highlighting a new and unexpected function for PNPase in "CRISPRology".

  15. A PNPase Dependent CRISPR System in Listeria

    PubMed Central

    Sesto, Nina; Touchon, Marie; Andrade, José Marques; Kondo, Jiro; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Arraiano, Cecilia Maria; Archambaud, Cristel; Westhof, Éric; Romby, Pascale; Cossart, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is emerging as a model organism to study RNA-mediated regulation in pathogenic bacteria. A class of non-coding RNAs called CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) has been described to confer bacterial resistance against invading bacteriophages and conjugative plasmids. CRISPR function relies on the activity of CRISPR associated (cas) genes that encode a large family of proteins with nuclease or helicase activities and DNA and RNA binding domains. Here, we characterized a CRISPR element (RliB) that is expressed and processed in the L. monocytogenes strain EGD-e, which is completely devoid of cas genes. Structural probing revealed that RliB has an unexpected secondary structure comprising basepair interactions between the repeats and the adjacent spacers in place of canonical hairpins formed by the palindromic repeats. Moreover, in contrast to other CRISPR-Cas systems identified in Listeria, RliB-CRISPR is ubiquitously present among Listeria genomes at the same genomic locus and is never associated with the cas genes. We showed that RliB-CRISPR is a substrate for the endogenously encoded polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) enzyme. The spacers of the different Listeria RliB-CRISPRs share many sequences with temperate and virulent phages. Furthermore, we show that a cas-less RliB-CRISPR lowers the acquisition frequency of a plasmid carrying the matching protospacer, provided that trans encoded cas genes of a second CRISPR-Cas system are present in the genome. Importantly, we show that PNPase is required for RliB-CRISPR mediated DNA interference. Altogether, our data reveal a yet undescribed CRISPR system whose both processing and activity depend on PNPase, highlighting a new and unexpected function for PNPase in “CRISPRology”. PMID:24415952

  16. Functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Brun, Rita; Kuo, Braden

    2010-05-01

    Dyspepsia is a common term used for a heterogeneous group of abdominal symptoms. Functional dyspepsia (FD) is the focus of this review. The 2006 Rome III criteria defined FD and its subgroups, postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) and epigastric pain syndrome (EPS). FD is a very common condition with a high prevalence throughout the world, adversely affecting the quality of life of patients. The pathophysiology of FD has been under investigation during the past two decades. Multiple mechanisms such as abnormal gastric emptying, visceral hypersensitivity, impaired gastric accommodation, and central nervous system factors are likely involved. Several tests are available for the assessment of various physiologic functions possibly involved in the pathogenesis of FD, and some of these could be used in clinical practice, helping to understand the abnormalities underlining patients' complaints. Currently, the possibilities of pharmacological therapy for FD are still limited, however, experience of using prokinetics, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), and several alternative techniques has been accumulated. The different combinations of alterations in physiologic gastrointestinal and central nervous system functions result in the very heterogeneous nature of FD so combined approaches to these patients could be beneficial in challenging cases. PMID:21180597

  17. Pyrococcus furiosus strains and methods of using same

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscomb, Gina L; Farkas, Joel Andrew; Adams, Michael W. W.; Westpheling, Janet

    2015-01-06

    Provided herein are methods for transforming a Pyrococcus furiosus with a polynucleotide. In one embodiment, the method includes contacting a P. furiosus with a polynucleotide under conditions suitable for uptake of the polynucleotide by the P. furiosus, and identifying transformants at a frequency of, for instance, at least 10.sup.3 transformants per microgram DNA. Also provided are isolated Pyrococcus furiosus having the characteristics of Pyrococcus furiosus COM1, and plasmids that include an origin of replication that functions in a Pyrococcus furiosus. The plasmid is stable in a recipient P. furiosus without selection for more than 100 generations and is structurally unchanged after replication in P. furiosus for more than 100 generations.

  18. Raptor ablation in skeletal muscle decreases Cav1.1 expression and affects the function of the excitation-contraction coupling supramolecular complex.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Rubén J; Mosca, Barbara; Treves, Susan; Maj, Marcin; Bergamelli, Leda; Calderon, Juan C; Bentzinger, C Florian; Romanino, Klaas; Hall, Michael N; Rüegg, Markus A; Delbono, Osvaldo; Caputo, Carlo; Zorzato, Francesco

    2015-02-15

    The protein mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase regulating a number of biochemical pathways controlling cell growth. mTOR exists in two complexes termed mTORC1 and mTORC2. Regulatory associated protein of mTOR (raptor) is associated with mTORC1 and is essential for its function. Ablation of raptor in skeletal muscle results in several phenotypic changes including decreased life expectancy, increased glycogen deposits and alterations of the twitch kinetics of slow fibres. In the present paper, we show that in muscle-specific raptor knockout (RamKO), the bulk of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is mainly associated in its cAMP-non-stimulated form with sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes. In addition, 3[H]-ryanodine and 3[H]-PN200-110 equilibrium binding show a ryanodine to dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) ratio of 0.79 and 1.35 for wild-type (WT) and raptor KO skeletal muscle membranes respectively. Peak amplitude and time to peak of the global calcium transients evoked by supramaximal field stimulation were not different between WT and raptor KO. However, the increase in the voltage sensor-uncoupled RyRs leads to an increase of both frequency and mass of elementary calcium release events (ECRE) induced by hyper-osmotic shock in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibres from raptor KO. The present study shows that the protein composition and function of the molecular machinery involved in skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling is affected by mTORC1 signalling.

  19. Raptor ablation in skeletal muscle decreases Cav1.1 expression and affects the function of the excitation–contraction coupling supramolecular complex

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Rubén J.; Mosca, Barbara; Treves, Susan; Maj, Marcin; Bergamelli, Leda; Calderon, Juan C.; Bentzinger, C. Florian; Romanino, Klaas; Hall, Michael N.; Rüegg, Markus A.; Delbono, Osvaldo; Caputo, Carlo; Zorzato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The protein mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase regulating a number of biochemical pathways controlling cell growth. mTOR exists in two complexes termed mTORC1 and mTORC2. Regulatory associated protein of mTOR (raptor) is associated with mTORC1 and is essential for its function. Ablation of raptor in skeletal muscle results in several phenotypic changes including decreased life expectancy, increased glycogen deposits and alterations of the twitch kinetics of slow fibres. In the present paper, we show that in muscle-specific raptor knockout (RamKO), the bulk of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) is mainly associated in its cAMP-non-stimulated form with sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes. In addition, 3[H]–ryanodine and 3[H]–PN200-110 equilibrium binding show a ryanodine to dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) ratio of 0.79 and 1.35 for wild-type (WT) and raptor KO skeletal muscle membranes respectively. Peak amplitude and time to peak of the global calcium transients evoked by supramaximal field stimulation were not different between WT and raptor KO. However, the increase in the voltage sensor-uncoupled RyRs leads to an increase of both frequency and mass of elementary calcium release events (ECRE) induced by hyper-osmotic shock in flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibres from raptor KO. The present study shows that the protein composition and function of the molecular machinery involved in skeletal muscle excitation–contraction (E–C) coupling is affected by mTORC1 signalling. PMID:25431931

  20. Executive Functions

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Adele

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) make possible mentally playing with ideas; taking the time to think before acting; meeting novel, unanticipated challenges; resisting temptations; and staying focused. Core EFs are inhibition [response inhibition (self-control—resisting temptations and resisting acting impulsively) and interference control (selective attention and cognitive inhibition)], working memory, and cognitive flexibility (including creatively thinking “outside the box,” seeing anything from different perspectives, and quickly and flexibly adapting to changed circumstances). The developmental progression and representative measures of each are discussed. Controversies are addressed (e.g., the relation between EFs and fluid intelligence, self-regulation, executive attention, and effortful control, and the relation between working memory and inhibition and attention). The importance of social, emotional, and physical health for cognitive health is discussed because stress, lack of sleep, loneliness, or lack of exercise each impair EFs. That EFs are trainable and can be improved with practice is addressed, including diverse methods tried thus far. PMID:23020641

  1. Effects of salicylic acid on post-ischaemic ventricular function and purine efflux in isolated mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Farthing, Don; Gehr, Lynne; Karnes, H Thomas; Sica, Domenic; Gehr, Todd; Larus, Terri; Farthing, Christine; Xi, Lei

    2007-01-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Various plasma concentrations of aspirin and its predominant metabolite, salicylic acid, are required for its antiarthritic (1.5-2.5 mM), anti-inflammatory (0.5-5.0 mM) or antiplatelet (0.18-0.36 mM) actions. A recent study demonstrated the inhibitory effects of both aspirin and salicylic acid on oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthesis in isolated rat cardiac mitochondria in a dose-dependent manner (0-10 mM concentration range). In this context, the present study was conducted to determine the effects of salicylic acid on inosine efflux (a potential biomarker of acute cardiac ischaemia) as well as cardiac contractile function in the isolated mouse heart following 20 min of zero-flow global ischaemia. Inosine efflux was found at significantly higher concentrations in ischaemic hearts perfused with Krebs buffer fortified with 1.0 mM salicylic acid compared with those without salicylic acid (12575+/-3319 vs. 1437+/-348 ng ml(-1) min(-1), mean+/-SEM, n=6 per group, p<0.01). These results indicate that 1.0 mM salicylic acid potentiates 8.8-fold ATP nucleotide purine catabolism into its metabolites (e.g. inosine, hypoxanthine). Salicylic acid (0.1 or 1.0 mM) did not appreciably inhibit purine nucleoside phosphorylase (the enzyme converts inosine to hypoxanthine) suggesting the augmented inosine efflux was due to the salicylic acid effect on upstream elements of cellular respiration. Whereas post-ischaemic cardiac function was further depressed by 1.0 mM salicylic acid, perfusion with 0.1 mM salicylic acid led to a remarkable functional improvement despite moderately increased inosine efflux (2.7-fold). We conclude that inosine is a sensitive biomarker for detecting cardiac ischaemia and salicylic acid-induced effects on cellular respiration. However, the inosine efflux level appears to be a poor predictor of the individual post-ischaemic cardiac functional recovery in this ex vivo

  2. Effects of salicylic acid on post-ischaemic ventricular function and purine efflux in isolated mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Farthing, Don; Gehr, Lynne; Karnes, H Thomas; Sica, Domenic; Gehr, Todd; Larus, Terri; Farthing, Christine; Xi, Lei

    2007-01-01

    Acetyl salicylic acid (aspirin) is one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Various plasma concentrations of aspirin and its predominant metabolite, salicylic acid, are required for its antiarthritic (1.5-2.5 mM), anti-inflammatory (0.5-5.0 mM) or antiplatelet (0.18-0.36 mM) actions. A recent study demonstrated the inhibitory effects of both aspirin and salicylic acid on oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthesis in isolated rat cardiac mitochondria in a dose-dependent manner (0-10 mM concentration range). In this context, the present study was conducted to determine the effects of salicylic acid on inosine efflux (a potential biomarker of acute cardiac ischaemia) as well as cardiac contractile function in the isolated mouse heart following 20 min of zero-flow global ischaemia. Inosine efflux was found at significantly higher concentrations in ischaemic hearts perfused with Krebs buffer fortified with 1.0 mM salicylic acid compared with those without salicylic acid (12575+/-3319 vs. 1437+/-348 ng ml(-1) min(-1), mean+/-SEM, n=6 per group, p<0.01). These results indicate that 1.0 mM salicylic acid potentiates 8.8-fold ATP nucleotide purine catabolism into its metabolites (e.g. inosine, hypoxanthine). Salicylic acid (0.1 or 1.0 mM) did not appreciably inhibit purine nucleoside phosphorylase (the enzyme converts inosine to hypoxanthine) suggesting the augmented inosine efflux was due to the salicylic acid effect on upstream elements of cellular respiration. Whereas post-ischaemic cardiac function was further depressed by 1.0 mM salicylic acid, perfusion with 0.1 mM salicylic acid led to a remarkable functional improvement despite moderately increased inosine efflux (2.7-fold). We conclude that inosine is a sensitive biomarker for detecting cardiac ischaemia and salicylic acid-induced effects on cellular respiration. However, the inosine efflux level appears to be a poor predictor of the individual post-ischaemic cardiac functional recovery in this ex vivo

  3. Hint, Fhit and GalT: Function, Structure, Evolution and Mechanism of Three Branches of the Histidine Triad Superfamily of Nucleotide Hydrolases and Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Charles

    2008-01-01

    HIT (histidine triad)1 proteins, named for a motif related to the sequence HφHφHφφ, (φ a hydrophobic amino acid) are a superfamily of nucleotide hydrolases and transferases, which act on the α-phosphate of ribonucleotides, and contain a ∼30 kDa domain that is typically either a homodimer of ∼15 kDa polypeptides with two active-sites or an internally, imperfectly repeated polypeptide that retains a single HIT active site. On the basis of sequence, substrate specificity, structure, evolution and mechanism, HIT proteins can be classified into the Hint branch, which consists of adenosine 5′-monophosphoramide hydrolases, the Fhit branch, which consists of diadenosine polyphosphate hydrolases, and the GalT branch, which consists of specific nucleoside monophosphate transferases including galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase, diadenosine tetraphosphate phosphorylase, and adenylylsulfate:phosphate adenylytransferase. At least one human representative of each branch is lost in human diseases. Aprataxin, a Hint branch hydrolase, is mutated in ataxia-oculomotor apraxia syndrome. Fhit is lost early in development of many epithelially derived tumors. GalT is deficient in galactosemia. Additionally, ASW is an avian Hint family member that has evolved to have unusual gene expression properties and the complete loss of its nucleotide binding-site. The potential roles of ASW and Hint in avian sexual development are discussed in an accompanying manuscript. Here we review what is known about biological activities of HIT proteins, the structural and biochemical bases for their functions, and propose a new enzyme mechanism for Hint and Fhit that may account for the differences between HIT hydrolases and transferases. PMID:12119013

  4. Bayesian Function-on-Function Regression for Multilevel Functional Data

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Mark J.; Coull, Brent A.; Versace, Francesco; Cinciripini, Paul; Morris, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Medical and public health research increasingly involves the collection of complex and high dimensional data. In particular, functional data—where the unit of observation is a curve or set of curves that are finely sampled over a grid—is frequently obtained. Moreover, researchers often sample multiple curves per person resulting in repeated functional measures. A common question is how to analyze the relationship between two functional variables. We propose a general function-on-function regression model for repeatedly sampled functional data on a fine grid, presenting a simple model as well as a more extensive mixed model framework, and introducing various functional Bayesian inferential procedures that account for multiple testing. We examine these models via simulation and a data analysis with data from a study that used event-related potentials to examine how the brain processes various types of images. PMID:25787146

  5. Functional Training Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siff, Mel C.

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that though functional training is vital in all sporting preparation, it is only one aspect of the overall process. The paper defines functional training; discusses facets of functionality, functionality and balancing drills, and functional training and periodization; and concludes that functionality is best defined in terms of the outcome…

  6. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed by characteristic symptoms for at least 12 weeks during the preceding 12 months in the absence of a structural or biochemical explanation. The irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal bloating, functional constipation, and functional diarrhea are distinguished by symptom-based diagnostic criteria. Unspecified FBD lacks criteria for the other FBDs. Diagnostic testing is individualized, depending on patient age, primary symptom characteristics, and other clinical and laboratory features. Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is defined as either the FAP syndrome, which requires at least six months of pain with poor relation to gut function and loss of daily activities, or unspecified FAP, which lacks criteria for the FAP syndrome. An organic cause for the pain must be excluded, but aspects of the patient's pain behavior are of primary importance. Treatment of the FBDs relies upon confident diagnosis, explanation, and reassurance. Diet alteration, drug treatment, and psychotherapy may be beneficial, depending on the symptoms and psychological features.


Keywords: functional bowel disorder; functional constipation; functional diarrhea; irritable bowel syndrome; functional abdominal pain; functional abdominal bloating; Rome II PMID:10457044

  7. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Villena, Carla; Sanz, Pascual; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP). To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyzed the functionality of the different protein binding domains of one of these glycogen targeting subunits, namely PPP1R3D (R6) and studied how binding properties of different domains affect its glycogenic properties. We have found that the PP1 binding domain of R6 comprises a conserved RVXF motif (R102VRF) located at the N-terminus of the protein. We have also identified a region located at the C-terminus of R6 (W267DNND) that is involved in binding to the PP1 glycogenic substrates. Our results indicate that although binding to PP1 and glycogenic substrates are independent processes, impairment of any of them results in lack of glycogenic activity of R6. In addition, we have characterized a novel site of regulation in R6 that is involved in binding to 14-3-3 proteins (RARS74LP). We present evidence indicating that when binding of R6 to 14-3-3 proteins is prevented, R6 displays hyper-glycogenic activity although is rapidly degraded by the lysosomal pathway. These results define binding to 14-3-3 proteins as an additional pathway in the control of the glycogenic properties of R6.

  8. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... herbal supplements you are taking. What are normal ranges for liver function tests? Normal ranges for liver function tests can vary by age, ... other factors. Laboratory test results usually provide normal ranges for each liver function test with your results. ...

  9. Wave-function functionals for the density

    SciTech Connect

    Slamet, Marlina; Pan Xiaoyin; Sahni, Viraht

    2011-11-15

    We extend the idea of the constrained-search variational method for the construction of wave-function functionals {psi}[{chi}] of functions {chi}. The search is constrained to those functions {chi} such that {psi}[{chi}] reproduces the density {rho}(r) while simultaneously leading to an upper bound to the energy. The functionals are thereby normalized and automatically satisfy the electron-nucleus coalescence condition. The functionals {psi}[{chi}] are also constructed to satisfy the electron-electron coalescence condition. The method is applied to the ground state of the helium atom to construct functionals {psi}[{chi}] that reproduce the density as given by the Kinoshita correlated wave function. The expectation of single-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub i}r{sub i}{sup n}, n=-2,-1,1,2, W={Sigma}{sub i}{delta}(r{sub i}) are exact, as must be the case. The expectations of the kinetic energy operator W=-(1/2){Sigma}{sub i}{nabla}{sub i}{sup 2}, the two-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub n}u{sup n}, n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r{sub i}-r{sub j}|, and the energy are accurate. We note that the construction of such functionals {psi}[{chi}] is an application of the Levy-Lieb constrained-search definition of density functional theory. It is thereby possible to rigorously determine which functional {psi}[{chi}] is closer to the true wave function.

  10. Interactions with polynucleotides and antitumor activity of amidino and imidazolinyl substituted 2-phenylbenzothiazole mesylates.

    PubMed

    Racané, Livio; Stojković, Ranko; Tralić-Kulenović, Vesna; Cerić, Helena; Đaković, Marijana; Ester, Katja; Krpan, Ana Mišir; Stojković, Marijana Radić

    2014-10-30

    Based on previously reported antiproliferative activity screening, four most promising disubstituted 2-phenylbenzothiazole hydrochlorides were chosen for detailed study. Water solubility, as well as liphophilicity/hydrophilicity balance of organic core were modified by conversion to mesylate salts. For purpose of structure/activity studies their structures were determined by X-ray structure analysis. Detailed analysis of interactions of new compounds with double stranded (ds-) DNA/RNA by UV/Vis and CD titrations, thermal melting and viscometry experiments revealed that most of studied compounds intercalate into ds-RNA but bind into minor groove of AT-DNA, and agglomerate along GC-DNA. Furthermore, compounds also interact with ss-RNA, but only amino-imidazolinyl 2-phenylbenzothiazole, 4b displayed well defined orientation and dominant binding mode (by induced CD signals) with poly A and poly G. Besides, in vitro investigations revealed moderate to high antiproliferative activity of benzothiazoles against seven human cancer cell lines, while in some cases (HTC 116, SW620, MIA PaCa-2) high correlation between the type of the amidino group and cytotoxic activity was observed.

  11. Conformation-dependent restraints for polynucleotides: I. Clustering of the geometry of the phosphodiester group.

    PubMed

    Kowiel, Marcin; Brzezinski, Dariusz; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2016-09-30

    The refinement of macromolecular structures is usually aided by prior stereochemical knowledge in the form of geometrical restraints. Such restraints are also used for the flexible sugar-phosphate backbones of nucleic acids. However, recent highly accurate structural studies of DNA suggest that the phosphate bond angles may have inadequate description in the existing stereochemical dictionaries. In this paper, we analyze the bonding deformations of the phosphodiester groups in the Cambridge Structural Database, cluster the studied fragments into six conformation-related categories and propose a revised set of restraints for the O-P-O bond angles and distances. The proposed restraints have been positively validated against data from the Nucleic Acid Database and an ultrahigh-resolution Z-DNA structure in the Protein Data Bank. Additionally, the manual classification of PO4 geometry is compared with geometrical clusters automatically discovered by machine learning methods. The machine learning cluster analysis provides useful insights and a practical example for general applications of clustering algorithms for automatic discovery of hidden patterns of molecular geometry. Finally, we describe the implementation and application of a public-domain web server for automatic generation of the proposed restraints.

  12. Conformation-dependent restraints for polynucleotides: I. Clustering of the geometry of the phosphodiester group

    PubMed Central

    Kowiel, Marcin; Brzezinski, Dariusz; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    The refinement of macromolecular structures is usually aided by prior stereochemical knowledge in the form of geometrical restraints. Such restraints are also used for the flexible sugar-phosphate backbones of nucleic acids. However, recent highly accurate structural studies of DNA suggest that the phosphate bond angles may have inadequate description in the existing stereochemical dictionaries. In this paper, we analyze the bonding deformations of the phosphodiester groups in the Cambridge Structural Database, cluster the studied fragments into six conformation-related categories and propose a revised set of restraints for the O-P-O bond angles and distances. The proposed restraints have been positively validated against data from the Nucleic Acid Database and an ultrahigh-resolution Z-DNA structure in the Protein Data Bank. Additionally, the manual classification of PO4 geometry is compared with geometrical clusters automatically discovered by machine learning methods. The machine learning cluster analysis provides useful insights and a practical example for general applications of clustering algorithms for automatic discovery of hidden patterns of molecular geometry. Finally, we describe the implementation and application of a public-domain web server for automatic generation of the proposed restraints. PMID:27521371

  13. A Polynucleotide Repeat Expansion Causing Temperature-Sensitivity Persists in Wild Irish Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tabib, Amanda; Vishwanathan, Sailaja; Seleznev, Andrei; McKeown, Peter C.; Downing, Tim; Dent, Craig; Sanchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Colling, Luana; Spillane, Charles; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Triplet repeat expansions underlie several human genetic diseases such as Huntington's disease and Friedreich's ataxia. Although such mutations are primarily known from humans, a triplet expansion associated genetic defect has also been reported at the IIL1 locus in the Bur-0 accession of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The IIL1 triplet expansion is an example of cryptic genetic variation as its phenotypic effects are seen only under genetic or environmental perturbation, with high temperatures resulting in a growth defect. Here we demonstrate that the IIL1 triplet expansion associated growth defect is not a general stress response and is specific to particular environmental perturbations. We also confirm and map genetic modifiers that suppress the effect of IIL1 triplet repeat expansion. By collecting and analyzing accessions from the island of Ireland, we recover the repeat expansion in wild populations suggesting that the repeat expansion has persisted at least 60 years in Ireland. Through genome-wide genotyping, we show that the repeat expansion is present in diverse Irish populations. Our findings indicate that even deleterious alleles can persist in populations if their effect is conditional. Our study demonstrates that analysis of groups of wild populations is a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of cryptic genetic variation.

  14. A Polynucleotide Repeat Expansion Causing Temperature-Sensitivity Persists in Wild Irish Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tabib, Amanda; Vishwanathan, Sailaja; Seleznev, Andrei; McKeown, Peter C; Downing, Tim; Dent, Craig; Sanchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Colling, Luana; Spillane, Charles; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Triplet repeat expansions underlie several human genetic diseases such as Huntington's disease and Friedreich's ataxia. Although such mutations are primarily known from humans, a triplet expansion associated genetic defect has also been reported at the IIL1 locus in the Bur-0 accession of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The IIL1 triplet expansion is an example of cryptic genetic variation as its phenotypic effects are seen only under genetic or environmental perturbation, with high temperatures resulting in a growth defect. Here we demonstrate that the IIL1 triplet expansion associated growth defect is not a general stress response and is specific to particular environmental perturbations. We also confirm and map genetic modifiers that suppress the effect of IIL1 triplet repeat expansion. By collecting and analyzing accessions from the island of Ireland, we recover the repeat expansion in wild populations suggesting that the repeat expansion has persisted at least 60 years in Ireland. Through genome-wide genotyping, we show that the repeat expansion is present in diverse Irish populations. Our findings indicate that even deleterious alleles can persist in populations if their effect is conditional. Our study demonstrates that analysis of groups of wild populations is a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of cryptic genetic variation. PMID:27630650

  15. Conformation-dependent restraints for polynucleotides: I. Clustering of the geometry of the phosphodiester group.

    PubMed

    Kowiel, Marcin; Brzezinski, Dariusz; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2016-09-30

    The refinement of macromolecular structures is usually aided by prior stereochemical knowledge in the form of geometrical restraints. Such restraints are also used for the flexible sugar-phosphate backbones of nucleic acids. However, recent highly accurate structural studies of DNA suggest that the phosphate bond angles may have inadequate description in the existing stereochemical dictionaries. In this paper, we analyze the bonding deformations of the phosphodiester groups in the Cambridge Structural Database, cluster the studied fragments into six conformation-related categories and propose a revised set of restraints for the O-P-O bond angles and distances. The proposed restraints have been positively validated against data from the Nucleic Acid Database and an ultrahigh-resolution Z-DNA structure in the Protein Data Bank. Additionally, the manual classification of PO4 geometry is compared with geometrical clusters automatically discovered by machine learning methods. The machine learning cluster analysis provides useful insights and a practical example for general applications of clustering algorithms for automatic discovery of hidden patterns of molecular geometry. Finally, we describe the implementation and application of a public-domain web server for automatic generation of the proposed restraints. PMID:27521371

  16. A Polynucleotide Repeat Expansion Causing Temperature-Sensitivity Persists in Wild Irish Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Tabib, Amanda; Vishwanathan, Sailaja; Seleznev, Andrei; McKeown, Peter C.; Downing, Tim; Dent, Craig; Sanchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Colling, Luana; Spillane, Charles; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Triplet repeat expansions underlie several human genetic diseases such as Huntington's disease and Friedreich's ataxia. Although such mutations are primarily known from humans, a triplet expansion associated genetic defect has also been reported at the IIL1 locus in the Bur-0 accession of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The IIL1 triplet expansion is an example of cryptic genetic variation as its phenotypic effects are seen only under genetic or environmental perturbation, with high temperatures resulting in a growth defect. Here we demonstrate that the IIL1 triplet expansion associated growth defect is not a general stress response and is specific to particular environmental perturbations. We also confirm and map genetic modifiers that suppress the effect of IIL1 triplet repeat expansion. By collecting and analyzing accessions from the island of Ireland, we recover the repeat expansion in wild populations suggesting that the repeat expansion has persisted at least 60 years in Ireland. Through genome-wide genotyping, we show that the repeat expansion is present in diverse Irish populations. Our findings indicate that even deleterious alleles can persist in populations if their effect is conditional. Our study demonstrates that analysis of groups of wild populations is a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of cryptic genetic variation. PMID:27630650

  17. A Polynucleotide Repeat Expansion Causing Temperature-Sensitivity Persists in Wild Irish Accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Tabib, Amanda; Vishwanathan, Sailaja; Seleznev, Andrei; McKeown, Peter C; Downing, Tim; Dent, Craig; Sanchez-Bermejo, Eduardo; Colling, Luana; Spillane, Charles; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Triplet repeat expansions underlie several human genetic diseases such as Huntington's disease and Friedreich's ataxia. Although such mutations are primarily known from humans, a triplet expansion associated genetic defect has also been reported at the IIL1 locus in the Bur-0 accession of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The IIL1 triplet expansion is an example of cryptic genetic variation as its phenotypic effects are seen only under genetic or environmental perturbation, with high temperatures resulting in a growth defect. Here we demonstrate that the IIL1 triplet expansion associated growth defect is not a general stress response and is specific to particular environmental perturbations. We also confirm and map genetic modifiers that suppress the effect of IIL1 triplet repeat expansion. By collecting and analyzing accessions from the island of Ireland, we recover the repeat expansion in wild populations suggesting that the repeat expansion has persisted at least 60 years in Ireland. Through genome-wide genotyping, we show that the repeat expansion is present in diverse Irish populations. Our findings indicate that even deleterious alleles can persist in populations if their effect is conditional. Our study demonstrates that analysis of groups of wild populations is a powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of cryptic genetic variation.

  18. The biogeochemical cycle of the adsorbed template. II - Selective adsorption of mononucleotides on adsorbed polynucleotide templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazard, Daniel; Lahav, Noam; Orenberg, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the verification of the specific interaction step of the 'adsorbed template' biogeochemical cycle, a simple model for a primitive prebiotic replication system. The experimental system consisted of gypsum as the mineral to which an oligonucleotide template attaches (Poly-C or Poly-U) and (5-prime)-AMP, (5-prime)-GMP, (5-prime)-CMP and (5-prime)-UMP as the interacting biomonomers. When Poly-C or Poly-U were used as adsorbed templates, (5-prime)-GMP and (5-prime)-AMP, respectively, were observed to be the most strongly adsorbed species.

  19. Preparation and properties of poly 2'-O-ethylcytidylic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Kielanowska, M; Shugar, D

    1976-01-01

    Poly 2'0-ethylcytidylic acid (poly (Ce)) was prepared by polymerization of 2'-0-ethylcytidine-5'-pyrophosphate with Escherichia coli polynucleotide phosphorylase in the presence of Mn++, and its properties compared with those of poly (rC), poly (Cm) and poly (dC). The neutral form of pOLY (Ce) exhibits properties similar to those of poly (rC) and poly (Cm). It also forms an acid twin-stranded helix with a transition pH of 5.9 in 0.1 M NaCl. The neutral form readily forms a double-stranded helical complex with poly (rI). Relative to poly (Cm), replacement of the 2'-0-methyl by 2-0-ethyl leads to increased enhancement of the thermal stabilities of both the acid helical form of poly (Ce) and its complex with poly (rI). PMID:5710

  20. Production of RNA by a polymerase protein encapsulated within phospholipid vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Breaker, R. R.; Joyce, G. F.; Deamer, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Catalyzed polymerization reactions represent a primary anabolic activity of all cells. It can be assumed that early cells carried out such reactions, in which macromolecular catalysts were encapsulated within some type of boundary membrane. In the experiments described here, we show that a template-independent RNA polymerase (polynucleotide phosphorylase) can be encapsulated in dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles without substrate. When the substrate adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was provided externally, long-chain RNA polymers were synthesized within the vesicles. Substrate flux was maximized by maintaining the vesicles at the phase transition temperature of the component lipid. A protease was introduced externally as an additional control. Free enzyme was inactivated under identical conditions. RNA products were visualized in situ by ethidium bromide fluorescence. The products were harvested from the liposomes, radiolabeled, and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Encapsulated catalysts represent a model for primitive cellular systems in which an RNA polymerase was entrapped within a protected microenvironment.

  1. Identification of endonucleolytic cleavage sites involved in decay of Escherichia coli trxA mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Arraiano, C; Yancey, S D; Kushner, S R

    1993-01-01

    The degradation of individual mRNAs in Escherichia coli has been studied through the use of a multiple mutant carrying the pnp-7 (polynucleotide phosphorylase), rnb-500 (RNase II), and rne-1 (RNase E) alleles. In this triple mutant, discrete mRNA breakdown products are stabilized in vivo at the nonpermissive temperature (Arraiano, C. M., S. D. Yancey, and S. R. Kushner, J. Bacteriol. 170:4625-4633, 1988). In the case of thioredoxin (trxA) mRNA decay, degradation fragments accumulated at early times after a shift to the nonpermissive temperature. Using Northern (RNA) blots, S1 nuclease analysis, and primer extensions, we identified a series of specific endonucleolytic cleavage sites that occur throughout the transcript in both the triple mutant and a wild-type control. The implications of the complex decay patterns observed are discussed. Images PMID:7679384

  2. The origin and early evolution of nucleic acid polymerases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazcano, A.; Cappello, R.; Valverde, V.; Llaca, V.; Oro, J.

    1992-01-01

    The hypothesis that vestiges of the ancestral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase involved in the replication of RNA genomes of Archean cells are present in the eubacterial RNA-polymerase beta-prime subunit and its homologues is discussed. It is shown that, in the DNA-dependent RNA polymerases from three cellular lineages, a very conserved sequence of eight amino acids, also found in a small RNA-binding site previously described for the E. coli polynucleotide phosphorylase and the S1 ribosomal protein, is present. The optimal conditions for the replicase activity of the avian-myeloblastosis-virus reverse transcriptase are presented. The evolutionary significance of the in vitro modifications of substrate and template specificities of RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases is discussed.

  3. Sampling functions for geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.; Lunquist, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A set of spherical sampling functions is defined such that they are related to spherical-harmonic functions in the same way that the sampling functions of information theory are related to sine and cosine functions. An orderly distribution of (N + 1) squared sampling points on a sphere is given, for which the (N + 1) squared spherical sampling functions span the same linear manifold as do the spherical-harmonic functions through degree N. The transformations between the spherical sampling functions and the spherical-harmonic functions are given by recurrence relations. The spherical sampling functions of two arguments are extended to three arguments and to nonspherical reference surfaces. Typical applications of this formalism to geophysical topics are sketched.

  4. Insights into xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri biofilm through proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (X. a. pv. citri) causes citrus canker that can result in defoliation and premature fruit drop with significant production losses worldwide. Biofilm formation is an important process in bacterial pathogens and several lines of evidence suggest that in X. a. pv. citri this process is a requirement to achieve maximal virulence since it has a major role in host interactions. In this study, proteomics was used to gain further insights into the functions of biofilms. Results In order to identify differentially expressed proteins, a comparative proteomic study using 2D difference gel electrophoresis was carried out on X. a. pv. citri mature biofilm and planktonic cells. The biofilm proteome showed major variations in the composition of outer membrane proteins and receptor or transport proteins. Among them, several porins and TonB-dependent receptor were differentially regulated in the biofilm compared to the planktonic cells, indicating that these proteins may serve in maintaining specific membrane-associated functions including signaling and cellular homeostasis. In biofilms, UDP-glucose dehydrogenase with a major role in exopolysaccharide production and the non-fimbrial adhesin YapH involved in adherence were over-expressed, while a polynucleotide phosphorylase that was demonstrated to negatively control biofilm formation in E. coli was down-regulated. In addition, several proteins involved in protein synthesis, folding and stabilization were up-regulated in biofilms. Interestingly, some proteins related to energy production, such as ATP-synthase were down-regulated in biofilms. Moreover, a number of enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were differentially expressed. In addition, X. a. pv. citri biofilms also showed down-regulation of several antioxidant enzymes. The respective gene expression patterns of several identified proteins in both X. a. pv. citri mature biofilm and planktonic cells were evaluated by quantitative

  5. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  6. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... food, store energy, and remove poisons. Liver function tests are blood tests that check to see how well your liver ... hepatitis and cirrhosis. You may have liver function tests as part of a regular checkup. Or you ...

  7. Functional Task Test (FTT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Peters, Brian T.; Rescheke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott; Lawrence, Emily; Koffman, Igor; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Spiering, Barry A.; Feeback, Daniel L.; Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Lee, Stuart M.C.; Arzeno, Natalia; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ryder, Jeffrey; Garcia, Yamil; Guilliams, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Functional Task Test (FTT), an interdisciplinary testing regimen that has been developed to evaluate astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. The objectives of the project are: (1) to develop a set of functional tasks that represent critical mission tasks for the Constellation Program, (2) determine the ability to perform these tasks after space flight, (3) Identify the key physiological factors that contribute to functional decrements and (4) Use this information to develop targeted countermeasures.

  8. Pain and Hand Function.

    PubMed

    Howland, Nicholas; Lopez, Mariela; Zhang, Andrew Y

    2016-02-01

    Pain is a unique somatosensory perception that can dramatically affect our ability to function. It is also a necessary perception, without which we would do irreparable damage to ourselves. In this article, the authors assess the impact of pain on function of the hand. Pain can be categorized into acute pain, chronic pain, and neuropathic pain. Hand function and objective measurements of hand function are analyzed as well as the impact of different types of pain on each of these areas.

  9. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  10. Two Functions of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Carol Fleisher

    1977-01-01

    Author advocates the view that meaning is necessarily dependent upon the communicative function of language and examines the objections, particularly those of Noam Chomsky, to this view. Argues that while Chomsky disagrees with the idea that communication is the essential function of language, he implicitly agrees that it has a function.…

  11. What Is Functionalism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Elizabeth; MacWhinney, Brian

    A defense of functionalism in linguistics, and more specifically the competition model of linguistic performance, examines six misconceptions about the functionalist approach. Functionalism is defined as the belief that the forms of natural languages are created, governed, constrained, acquired, and used for communicative functions. Functionalism…

  12. Functioning Mathematically: 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, David

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the first part of the closing address given by the author to the 2007 Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM) Easter conference at Loughborough. In his closing address, the author focuses on functioning mathematically as opposed to functional mathematics. His view of functional mathematics is that the focus is on someone…

  13. Piecing Together Piecewise Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Sybrina L.

    1997-01-01

    Presents an activity to teach piecewise functions using wax paper and rectangular grids. Helps students understand the idea of different pieces by literally "piecing" together a new type of mathematical function. Also describes a followup activity and explains how piecewise functions can be graphed using graphing calculators. (NB)

  14. Measuring Attitude Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Deborah S.; Kristiansen, Connie M.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the Attitude Functions Inventory (AFI), which assesses the extent to which a person's attitude fulfills each of four psychological functions. Reports findings of a study, involving 249 undergraduates, that tested the construct validity of the AFI. Suggests that the AFI provides conceptually meaningful measures of the functions of…

  15. Cross-functional systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Many companies, including Xerox and Texas Instruments, are using cross functional systems to deal with the increasingly complex and competitive business environment. However, few firms within the aerospace industry appear to be aware of the significant benefits that cross functional systems can provide. Those benefits are examined and a flexible methodology is discussed that companies can use to identify and develop cross functional systems that will help improve organizational performance. In addition, some of the managerial issues are addressed that cross functional systems may raise and specific examples are used to explore networking's contributions to cross functional systems.

  16. Learn About Neuromuscular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Muscular Atrophy (Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease) Phosphofructokinase Deficiency Phosphoglycerate Kinase Deficiency Phosphoglycerate Mutase Deficiency Phosphorylase Deficiency Phosphorylase Deficiency Polymyositis ( ...

  17. On genetic map functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hongyu; Speed, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    Various genetic map functions have been proposed to infer the unobservable genetic distance between two loci from the observable recombination fraction between them. Some map functions were found to fit data better than others. When there are more than three markers, multilocus recombination probabilities cannot be uniquely determined by the defining property of map functions, and different methods have been proposed to permit the use of map functions to analyze multilocus data. If for a given map function, there is a probability model for recombination that can give rise to it, then joint recombination probabilities can be deduced from this model. This provides another way to use map functions in multilocus analysis. In this paper we show that stationary renewal processes give rise to most of the map functions in the literature. Furthermore, we show that the interevent distributions of these renewal processes can all be approximated quite well by gamma distributions. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Functional Explanation and the Function of Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombrozo, Tania; Carey, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Teleological explanations (TEs) account for the existence or properties of an entity in terms of a function: we have hearts because they pump blood, and telephones for communication. While many teleological explanations seem appropriate, others are clearly not warranted--for example, that rain exists for plants to grow. Five experiments explore…

  19. Functionalized nanoparticles for AMF-induced gene and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Souvik

    The properties and broad applications of nano-magnetic colloids have generated much interest in recent years. Specially, Fe3O4 nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention since their magnetic properties can be used for hyperthermia treatment or drug targeting. For example, enhanced levels of intracellular gene delivery can be achieved using Fe3O4 nano-vectors in the presence of an external magnetic field, a process known as 'magnetofection'. The low cytotoxicity, tunable particle size, ease of surface functionalization, and ability to generate thermal energy using an external alternating magnetic field (AMF) are properties have propelled Fe3O4 research to the forefront of nanoparticle research. The strategy of nanoparticle-mediated, AMF-induced heat generation has been used to effect intracellular hyperthermia. One application of this 'magnetic hyperthermia' is heat activated local delivery of a therapeutic effector (e.g.; drug or polynucleotide). This thesis describes the development of a magnetic nano-vector for AMF-induced, heat-activated pDNA and small molecule delivery. The use of heat-inducible vectors, such as heat shock protein ( hsp) genes, is a promising mode of gene therapy that would restrict gene expression to a local region by focusing a heat stimulus only at a target region. We thus aimed to design an Fe3O4 nanoparticle-mediated gene transfer vehicle for AMF-induced localized gene expression. We opted to use 'click' oximation techniques to assemble the magnetic gene transfer vector. Chapter 2 describes the synthesis, characterization, and transfection studies of the oxime ether lipid-based nano-magnetic vectors MLP and dMLP. The synthesis and characterization of a novel series of quaternary ammonium aminooxy reagents (2.1--2.4) is described. These cationic aminooxy compounds were loaded onto nanoparticles for ligation with carbonyl groups and also to impart a net positive charge on the nanoparticle surface. Our studies indicated that the

  20. Functional Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B; Newman, Nancy J

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Neurologists frequently evaluate patients complaining of vision loss, especially when the patient has been examined by an ophthalmologist who has found no ocular disease. A significant proportion of patients presenting to the neurologist with visual complaints will have non-organic or functional visual loss. While there are examination techniques which can aid in the detection and diagnosis of functional visual loss, the frequency with which functional visual loss occurs concomitantly with organic disease warrants substantial caution on the part of the clinician. Furthermore, purely functional visual loss is never a diagnosis of exclusion, and must be supported by positive findings on examination that demonstrate normal visual function. The relationship of true psychological disease and functional visual loss is unclear and most patients respond well to simple reassurance. PMID:20638000

  1. Function photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Bai-Jun; Yang, Jing-Hai; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Ba, Nuo; Wu, Yi-Heng; Wang, Qing-Cai

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new kind of function photonic crystals (PCs), whose refractive index is a function of space position. Conventional PCs structure grows from two materials, A and B, with different dielectric constants εA and εB. Based on Fermat principle, we give the motion equations of light in one-dimensional, two-dimensional and three-dimensional function photonic crystals. For one-dimensional function photonic crystals, we give the dispersion relation, band gap structure and transmissivity, and compare them with conventional photonic crystals, and we find the following: (1) For the vertical and non-vertical incidence light of function photonic crystals, there are band gap structures, and for only the vertical incidence light, the conventional PCs have band gap structures. (2) By choosing various refractive index distribution functions n( z), we can obtain more wider or more narrower band gap structure than conventional photonic crystals.

  2. Symbolic function network.

    PubMed

    Eskander, George S; Atiya, Amir F

    2009-05-01

    In this paper a model called symbolic function network (SFN) is introduced; that is based on using elementary functions (for example powers, the exponential function, and the logarithm) as building blocks. The proposed method uses these building blocks to synthesize a function that best fits the training data in a regression framework. The resulting network is of the form of a tree, where adding nodes horizontally means having a summation of elementary functions and adding nodes vertically means concatenating elementary functions. Several new algorithms were proposed to construct the tree based on the concepts of forward greedy search and backward greedy search, together with applying the steepest descent concept. The method is tested on a number of examples and it is shown to exhibit good performance.

  3. Time functions revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Albert

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we revisit our joint work with Antonio Siconolfi on time functions. We will give a brief introduction to the subject. We will then show how to construct a Lipschitz time function in a simplified setting. We will end with a new result showing that the Aubry set is not an artifact of our proof of existence of time functions for stably causal manifolds.

  4. Balance Function Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Researchers at the Balance Function Laboratory and Clinic at the Minneapolis (MN) Neuroscience Institute on the Abbot Northwestern Hospital Campus are using a rotational chair (technically a "sinusoidal harmonic acceleration system") originally developed by NASA to investigate vestibular (inner ear) function in weightlessness to diagnose and treat patients with balance function disorders. Manufactured by ICS Medical Corporation, Schaumberg, IL, the chair system turns a patient and monitors his or her responses to rotational stimulation.

  5. Photon structure function

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1980-11-01

    Theoretical understanding of the photon structure function is reviewed. As an illustration of the pointlike component, the parton model is briefly discussed. However, the systematic study of the photon structure function is presented through the framework of the operator product expansion. Perturbative QCD is used as the theoretical basis for the calculation of leading contributions to the operator product expansion. The influence of higher order QCD effects on these results is discussed. Recent results for the polarized structure functions are discussed.

  6. THYROID FUNCTION IN DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Boral, G. C.; Ghosh, A. B.; Pal, S. K; Ghosh, K. K.; Nandi, D. N.

    1980-01-01

    SUMMARY Studies on thyroid functions were performed on patients suffering from depression and compared with normal control group. 31 different cases of depression were studied for their thyroid function andshowed a diminished level of T3 and T4 with a concomitant rise in TSH level. When the female population of these 31 cases was compared with their male counterparts the females showed a significantly lower thyroidal functional status than the males. PMID:22058497

  7. Functional foreign accent syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Omay; Ludwig, Lea; Davenport, Richard; Stone, Jon

    2016-10-01

    Foreign accent syndrome (FAS) is a rare disorder where the affected person speaks in an accent that the listener perceives as foreign. Although most cases have left hemisphere lesions, some may be functional. We describe a case of functional FAS and present a video of her speech. We identify characteristics that help to distinguish functional from structural cases. These include preceding motor disturbances causing the maladaptive speech response, inconsistencies in accent production, the adoption of unusual mannerisms in speech and the speech disturbances being transient and reversible. We conclude that FAS is a complex disorder encompassing both functional and structural causes. PMID:27234850

  8. Functional Nausea in Children.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Katja; Di Lorenzo, Carlo

    2016-03-01

    Chronic nausea is a highly prevalent, bothersome, and difficult-to-treat symptom among adolescents. When chronic nausea presents as the predominant symptom and is not associated with any underlying disease, it may be considered a functional gastrointestinal disorder and named "functional nausea." The clinical features of functional nausea and its association with comorbid conditions provide clues to the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. These may include gastrointestinal motor and sensory disturbances, autonomic imbalance, altered central nervous system pathways, or a combination of these. This review summarizes the current knowledge on mechanisms and treatment strategies for chronic, functional nausea in children.

  9. Renormalization group functional equations

    SciTech Connect

    Curtright, Thomas L.; Zachos, Cosmas K.

    2011-03-15

    Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories and to gain insight into the interplay between continuous and discrete rescaling. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {sigma} functions and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale and zeroes of {beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

  10. Fluorescent sensor for mercury

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zidong; Lee, Jung Heon; Lu, Yi

    2011-11-22

    The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

  11. Differential Person Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, George; Alsmadi, Abdalla

    In many testing situations, differential item functioning (DIF) is a potentially serious problem. It occurs when a test item appears to be easier for one group of examinees than another even after controlling for overall skill level. Differential person functioning (DPF) can occur when "items" can be considered raters and the persons are the…

  12. Pulmonary Function Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ranu, Harpreet; Wilde, Michael; Madden, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications. PMID:22347750

  13. Program Computes Thermodynamic Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1994-01-01

    PAC91 is latest in PAC (Properties and Coefficients) series. Two principal features are to provide means of (1) generating theoretical thermodynamic functions from molecular constants and (2) least-squares fitting of these functions to empirical equations. PAC91 written in FORTRAN 77 to be machine-independent.

  14. Platelet Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the clotting process in the body ( in vivo ). A person with normal platelet function test results may still experience excessive bleeding or inappropriate clotting during and after a surgery. Most samples for platelet function testing are only stable for a very short period ...

  15. Immune function in PTSD.

    PubMed

    Altemus, Margaret; Dhabhar, Firdaus S; Yang, Ruirong

    2006-07-01

    Disturbed regulation of both the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and sympathoadrenomedullary system in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suggests that immune function, which is modulated by these systems, may also be dysregulated. Two dermatologic, in vivo measures of immune function, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and skin barrier function recovery, were examined in female subjects with PTSD and compared to measures in healthy female comparison subjects. In addition, at the time of DTH test placement, circulating numbers of lymphocyte subtypes were assessed. In separate studies, the effects of acute psychological stress on DTH and skin barrier function recovery were examined in healthy volunteer subjects. Both DTH and barrier function recovery were enhanced in women with PTSD. These findings contrast with the effects of acute stress in healthy control subjects, which was associated with suppression of DTH responses and skin barrier function recovery. There was no difference between subjects with PTSD and healthy control subjects in proportions of circulating lymphocyte subsets or in expression of the lymphocyte markers CD62, CD25, and CD45RO/CD45RA. These results suggest that cell-mediated immune function is enhanced in individuals with PTSD, a condition that imposes chronic physiologic and mental stress on sufferers. These findings contrast with suppression of DTH and skin barrier function recovery in healthy volunteers in response to acute psychological stress.

  16. The Gamow functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagnino, M.; Gadella, M.; Id Betán, R.; Laura, R.

    2001-04-01

    We present a formalism that represents pure states, mixtures and generalized states as functionals on an algebra containing the observables of the system. Along these states, there are other functionals that decay exponentially at all times and therefore can be used to describe resonance phenomena.

  17. The Planck Radiation Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Russell D.

    1985-01-01

    Blackbody radiation is used as an example to illustrate that oversimplification in teaching quantum ideas can result in later misunderstanding. Although textbooks give Planck's distribution function in terms of wavelength, there are actually 12 different radiation functions. Some of the more interesting ones are given and discussed. (JN)

  18. Mapping Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Rosen, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Cognitive functions are fundamental to being human. Although tremendous progress has been made in the science of cognition using neuroimaging, the clinical applications of neuroimaging are just beginning to be realized. A unifying theme of this chapter is the concept that a more complete understanding of cognition only comes through integration of multimodal structural and functional imaging technologies. PMID:17983964

  19. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  20. Antigravitational Functional System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorogovtsev, V. N.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is the description of the main components and basic functioning principles of the antigravitational functional system (AFS). Methods: literary review and theoretical analysis of the neurogenic regulation functional system. The concept of a functional system was formulated in the beginning of the 20th century. Functional system was described as dynamic, self-organizing, central-peripheral functional integration structures of the nervous system whose activity was aiming at achieving adaptive useful results. The main difference between functional system and proposed regulating principles is the physiological mechanism presence of the prospective result prediction (action result acceptor). Action is programmed for defined result receiving. This is anticipatory regulation principle. Using this principle AFS provides timely cardiovascular system preparing for its impending functional conditions changes. It seems that gravity intolerance in the beginning and after space flight is related with AFS regulation peculiarities. There is a necessity for the AFS advanced study. It is very important to create safe and comfort conditions for astronauts adaptation during gravitational loading changes as well as for certain diseases prophylaxis on the Earth.