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Sample records for polyphenolic caffeic acid

  1. Effect of high pressure on peanut allergens in the presence of polyphenol oxidase and caffeic acid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High pressure (HP) enhances enzymatic reactions. Because polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is an enzyme, and reduces IgE binding of peanut allergens in presence of caffeic acid (CA), we postulated that a further reduction in IgE binding can be achieved, using HP together with PPO and CA. Peanut extracts cont...

  2. Rapid determination of total polyphenolic content in tea samples based on caffeic acid voltammetric behaviour on a disposable graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    David, Iulia Gabriela; Bizgan, Ana-Maria Cristina; Popa, Dana Elena; Buleandra, Mihaela; Moldovan, Zenovia; Badea, Irinel Adriana; Tekiner, Tuğçe Ayça; Basaga, Huveyda; Ciucu, Anton A

    2015-04-15

    The present paper describes the voltammetric behaviour and the quantitative determination of caffeic acid (CA) on a disposable pencil graphite electrode (PGE). The anodic peak current of CA recorded by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) varies linearly with CA concentration in the range 1×10(-7)-3×10(-3) M. The detection and quantification limits were 8.83×10(-8) M and 2.94×10(-7) M caffeic acid, respectively. The mean recoveries of CA from Turkish green, white and black teas were 98.30%, 99.57% and 91.46%. For these three tea types the corresponding total polyphenolic contents (TPCs) evaluated by DPV on PGE were 35.81, 34.59 and 31.21 mg caffeic acid equivalent/g tea, respectively. These TPC values were in good accordance with those obtained by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. The developed DPV on PGE method constitutes a simple and inexpensive tool for the rapid assessment of TPC of tea samples.

  3. Synthesis of caffeic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid molecularly imprinted polymers and their application for the selective extraction of polyphenols from olive mill waste waters.

    PubMed

    Michailof, Chrysa; Manesiotis, Panagiotis; Panayiotou, Costas

    2008-02-22

    Using caffeic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid as templates, two molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared that were used for isolation of polyphenols from olive mill waste water samples (OMWWs) without previous pre-treatment. For the preparation of the caffeic acid MIPs 4-vinylpyridine, allylurea, allylaniline and methacrylic acid were tested as functional monomers, ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate (EDMA), pentaerythritol trimethylacrylate (PETRA) and divinylbenzene 80 (DVB80) as cross-linkers and tetrahydrofuran as porogen. For p-hydroxybenzoic acid 4-vinylpyridine, allylurea and allylaniline were tested as functional monomers, EDMA and PETRA as cross-linkers and acetonitrile as porogen. The performance of the synthesized polymers was evaluated against seven structurally related compounds by means of polymer-based HPLC. The two polymers that presented the most interesting properties were further evaluated by batch rebinding and from the derived isotherms their capacity and binding strength were determined. Using solid-phase extraction (SPE), their ability to recognize and bind the template molecule from an aqueous solution as well as the pH dependence of the binding strength were explored. After establishing the best SPE protocol, an aqueous model mixture of compounds and a raw OMWWs sample were loaded on the two best polymers. The result of the consecutive use of the two polymers on the same sample was explored. It was concluded that acidic conditions favour the recognition abilities of both polymers and that they can be used for a quick and efficient isolation of the polyphenol fraction directly from raw OMWW.

  4. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Sabiha; Akram, Muhammad Rouf; Khan, Shujaat Ali; Azhar, Saira; Mumtaz, Amara; Bin Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a bioactive compound of propolis extract. The literature search elaborates that CAPE possesses antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cytotoxic properties. The principal objective of this review article is to sum up and critically assess the existing data about therapeutic effects of CAPE in different disorders. The findings elaborate that CAPE is a versatile therapeutically active polyphenol and an effective adjuvant of chemotherapy for enhancing therapeutic efficacy and diminishing chemotherapy-induced toxicities. PMID:24971312

  5. Bioactive caffeic acid esters from Glycyrrhiza glabra.

    PubMed

    Dey, Surajit; Deepak, Mundkinajeddu; Setty, Manjunath; D'Souza, Prashanth; Agarwal, Amit; Sangli, Gopal Krishna

    2009-01-01

    Thin layer chromatography bioautography (using DPPH spray reagent) guided fractionation of Glycyrrhiza glabra led to the isolation of two caffeic acid derivative esters, viz. eicosanyl caffeate (1) and docosyl caffeate (2). The two compounds exhibited potent elastase inhibitory activity, with IC(50) values of 0.99 microg mL(-1) and 1.4 microg mL(-1) for 1 and 2, respectively. The compounds also showed moderate antioxidant activity in DPPH and ABTS scavenging assays. The results indicate a possible role of caffeic acid derivatives, in addition to flavonoids in the anti-ulcer properties of G. glabra.

  6. Effect of three edible oils on the intestinal absorption of caffeic acid: An in vivo and in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Prasadani, W Chaturi; Senanayake, Chaturi M; Jayathilaka, Nimanthi; Ekanayake, Sagarika; Seneviratne, Kapila N

    2017-01-01

    Polyphenolic antioxidants are mainly absorbed through passive paracellular permeation regulated by tight junctions. Some fatty acids are known to modulate tight junctions. Fatty acids resulting from the digestion of edible oils may improve the absorption of polyphenolic antioxidants. Therefore, we explored the effect of three edible oils on the intestinal absorption of caffeic acid. Rats were fed with soybean oil and caffeic acid dissolved in distilled water. Caffeic acid contents in the plasma collected up to 1 hr were quantified. The experiment was repeated with coconut oil and olive oil. Component fatty acids of the oils were individually tested in vitro for their effect on permeability of caffeic acid using Caco-2 cell monolayers. Highest absorption of caffeic acid was observed in animals fed with coconut oil. In vitro transport percentages of caffeic acid in 2.5 mmol/L solutions of fatty acids were 22.01±0.12 (lauric), 15.30 ± 0.25 (myristic acid), 13.59 ± 0.35 (linoleic acid), 3.70 ± 0.09 (oleic acid) and 0.10-2.0 (all other fatty acids). Lauric acid and myristic acid are the two major fatty acids present in coconut oil. Therefore, these fatty acids may contribute to the higher absorption of caffeic acid in the presence of coconut oil.

  7. Caffeic acid attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced sickness behaviour and neuroinflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Basu Mallik, Sanchari; Mudgal, Jayesh; Nampoothiri, Madhavan; Hall, Susan; Dukie, Shailendra Anoopkumar-; Grant, Gary; Rao, C Mallikarjuna; Arora, Devinder

    2016-10-06

    Accumulating data links inflammation, oxidative stress and immune system in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorders. Sickness behaviour is a set of behavioural changes that develop during infection, eventually leading to decrease in mobility and depressed behaviour. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces a depression-like state in animals that mimics sickness behaviour. Caffeic acid, a naturally occurring polyphenol, possesses antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study was designed to explore the potential of caffeic acid against LPS-induced sickness behaviour in mice. Caffeic acid (30mg/kg) and imipramine (15mg/kg) were administered orally one hour prior to LPS (1.5mg/kg) challenge. Behavioural assessment was carried out between 1 and 2h and blood samples were collected at 3h post-LPS injection. Additionally, cytokines (brain and serum) and brain oxidative stress markers were estimated. LPS increased the systemic and brain cytokine levels, altered the anti-oxidant defence and produced key signs of sickness behaviour in animals. Caffeic acid treatment significantly reduced the LPS-induced changes, including reduced expression of inflammatory markers in serum and whole brain. Caffeic acid also exerted an anti-oxidant effect, which was evident from the decreased levels of oxidative stress markers in whole brain. Our data suggests that caffeic acid can prevent the neuroinflammation-induced acute and probably the long term neurodegenerative changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stability of caffeic acid phenethyl amide (CAPA) in rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Yang, John; Kerwin, Sean M; Bowman, Phillip D; Stavchansky, Salomon

    2012-05-01

    A validated C₁₈ reverse-phase HPLC method with UV detection at 320 nm was developed and used for the stability evaluation of caffeic acid phenethyl amide (CAPA) and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in rat plasma. CAPA is the amide derivative of CAPE, a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound that has been found to be active in a variety of biological pathways. CAPA has been shown to protect endothelial cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress to a similar degree to CAPE. CAPE has been reported to be rapidly hydrolyzed in rat plasma via esterase enzymes. CAPA is expected to display a longer half-life than CAPE by avoiding hydrolysis via plasma esterases. The stability of CAPA and CAPE in rat plasma was investigated at three temperatures. The half-lives for CAPA were found to be 41.5, 10 and 0.82 h at 25, 37 and 60 °C, respectively. The half-lives for CAPE were found to be 1.95, 0.35 and 0.13 h at 4, 25 and 37 °C, respectively. The energy of activation was found to be 22.1 kcal/mol for CAPA and 14.1 kcal/mol for CAPE. A more stable compound could potentially extend the beneficial effects of CAPE.

  9. Caffeic acid derivatives from Bupleurum chinense

    PubMed Central

    Haghi, G.; Hatami, A.; Mehran, M.; Hosseini, H.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, caffeic acid (CA) and its three derivatives including 3-caffeoylquinic acid (3-CQA, neochlorogenic acid), 4-caffeoylquinic acid (4-CQA, cryptochlorogenic acid), and 5-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA, chlorogenic acid) were identified in Bupleurum chinense aerial parts using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with photodiode array (PDA) detector, reference compounds and chemical reactions. Separation was performed on a C18 column using gradient elution with 4% (v/v) aqueous acetic acid and acetonitrile as mobile phase at ambient temperature. In addition, the flavonoid aglycones were characterized and quantified after acid hydrolysis of the plant material. The flavonols profile showed quercetin (0.36 g per 100 g), kaempferol (1.11 g per 100 g) and isorhamnetin (0.16 g per 100 g). Total phenolic and total flavonoid contents ranged from 7.3 to 18.7% and 0.58 to 2.72% in dry plant material, respectively. PMID:25657804

  10. Caffeic acid attenuates oxidative stress, learning and memory deficit in intra-cerebroventricular streptozotocin induced experimental dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Rahul; Kaundal, Madhu; Bansal, Vikas; Samardeep

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in cognitive decline as seen during normal aging and in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Caffeic acid, a polyphenolic compound, has been reported to possess potent antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. The role of caffeic acid in experimental dementia is not fully understood. Thus the present study was designed to investigate the therapeutic potential of caffeic acid in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced experimental dementia of Alzheimer's type in rats. Streptozotocin (STZ) was administered intracerebroventrically (ICV) on day 1 and 3 (3mg/kg, ICV bilaterally) in Wistar rats. Caffeic acid was administered (10, 20 and 40mg/kg/day p.o.) 1h following STZ infusion upto 21st day. Morris water maze and object recognition task were used to assess learning and memory in rats. Terminally, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and the levels of oxido-nitrosative stress markers were determined in cortical and hippocampal brain regions of rats. STZ produced significant (p<0.001) learning and memory impairment, oxido-nitrosative stress and cholinergic deficit in rats. Whereas, caffeic acid treatment significantly (p<0.001) and dose dependently attenuated STZ induced behavioral and biochemical abnormalities in rats. The observed cognitive improvement following caffeic acid in STZ treated rats may be due to its antioxidant activity and restoration of cholinergic functions. Our results suggest the therapeutic potential of caffeic acid in cognitive disorders such as AD.

  11. Heterologous production of caffeic acid from tyrosine in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, J L; Araújo, R G; Prather, K L J; Kluskens, L D; Rodrigues, L R

    2015-04-01

    Caffeic acid is a plant secondary metabolite and its biological synthesis has attracted increased attention due to its beneficial effects on human health. In this study, Escherichia coli was engineered for the production of caffeic acid using tyrosine as the initial precursor of the pathway. The pathway design included tyrosine ammonia lyase (TAL) from Rhodotorula glutinis to convert tyrosine to p-coumaric acid and 4-coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) from Saccharothrix espanaensis or cytochrome P450 CYP199A2 from Rhodopseudomonas palustris to convert p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid. The genes were codon-optimized and different combinations of plasmids were used to improve the titer of caffeic acid. TAL was able to efficiently convert 3mM of tyrosine to p-coumaric acid with the highest production obtained being 2.62mM (472mg/L). CYP199A2 exhibited higher catalytic activity towards p-coumaric acid than C3H. The highest caffeic acid production obtained using TAL and CYP199A2 and TAL and C3H was 1.56mM (280mg/L) and 1mM (180mg/L), respectively. This is the first study that shows caffeic acid production using CYP199A2 and tyrosine as the initial precursor. This study suggests the possibility of further producing more complex plant secondary metabolites like flavonoids and curcuminoids.

  12. Cytoprotective Effect of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) and Catechol Ring-Fluorinated CAPE Derivatives Against Menadione-Induced Oxidative Stress in Human Endothelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-31

    chlorogenic acid , and rosmari- nic acid did not display any cytoprotective effect in this assay at 15 lM (data not shown). Within the same pas- sage of HUVEC...Cytoprotective effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and catechol ring-fluorinated CAPE derivatives against menadione-induced oxidative...accepted 13 March 2006 Available online 31 March 2006 Abstract—Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a natural polyphenolic compound with many

  13. Caffeic acid derivatives in the roots of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius).

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Makiko; Yan, Xiaojun; Ono, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Mitsuru; Nagata, Tadahiro; Nakanishi, Tateo

    2003-01-29

    Five caffeic acid derivatives were found in the roots of yacon, Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. and Endl.) H. Robinson, Asteraceae, as the major water-soluble phenolic compounds. The structures of these compounds were determined by analysis of spectroscopic data. Two of these were chlorogenic acid (3-caffeoylquinic acid) and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, common phenolic compounds in plants of the family Asteraceae. Three were esters of caffeic acid with the hydroxy groups of aldaric acid, derived from hexose. The structure of the aldaric moiety was determined by hydrolysis and comparison of NMR spectra with those of standard aldaric acids. The compounds were novel caffeic acid esters of altraric acid: 2,4- or 3,5-dicaffeoylaltraric acid, 2,5-dicaffeoylaltraric acid, and 2,3,5- or 2,4,5-tricaffeoylaltraric acid.

  14. Engineering alfalfa to accumulate useful caffeic acid derivatives and characterization of hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA transferases from legumes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Some forages crops, such as red clover, accumulate high levels of caffeic acid derivatives. Oxidation of these o-diphenols to quinones by endogenous polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) and the subsequent reactions of these quinones (probably with endogenous plant proteases) result in a significant reduction ...

  15. Hormetins, antioxidants and prooxidants: defining quercetin-, caffeic acid- and rosmarinic acid-mediated life extension in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Pietsch, Kerstin; Saul, Nadine; Chakrabarti, Shumon; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R; Menzel, Ralph; Steinberg, Christian E W

    2011-08-01

    Quercetin, Caffeic- and Rosmarinic acid exposure extend lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans. This comparative study uncovers basic common and contrasting underlying mechanisms: For all three compounds, life extension was characterized by hormetic dose response curves, but hsp-level expression was variable. Quercetin and Rosmarinic acid both suppressed bacterial growth; however, antibacterial properties were not the dominant reason for life extension. Exposure to Quercetin, Caffeic- and Rosmarinic acid resulted in reduced body size, altered lipid-metabolism and a tendency towards a delay in reproductive timing; however the total number of offspring was not affected. An indirect dietary restriction effect, provoked by either chemo-repulsion or diminished pharyngeal pumping was rejected. Quercetin and Caffeic acid were shown to increase the antioxidative capacity in vivo and, by means of a lipofuscin assay, reduce the oxidative damage in the nematodes. Finally, it was possible to demonstrate that the life and thermotolerance enhancing properties of Caffeic- and Rosmarinic acid both rely on osr-1, sek-1, sir-2.1 and unc-43 plus daf-16 in the case of Caffeic acid. Taken together, hormesis, in vivo antioxidative/prooxidative properties, modulation of genetic players, as well as the re-allocation of energy all contribute (to some extent and dependent on the polyphenol) to life extension.

  16. Effects of caffeic acid on cisplatin-induced hair cell damage in HEI-OC1 auditory cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, June; Kim, Shin Hye; Rah, Yoon Chan; Chae, Sung Won; Lee, Jong Dae; Md, Byung Don Lee; Park, Moo Kyun

    2014-12-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used anticancer chemotherapeutic agent. However, it is notorious for its ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity due to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Caffeic acid is a naturally occurring polyphenol present in honey that is known to reduce the generation of oxygen-derived free radicals. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the protective effects and mechanism underlying the effect of caffeic acid on cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in HEI-OC1 auditory cell lines. Cell viability was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis was determined by Hoechst 33258 staining and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining. Cell cycle stages were analyzed by flow cytometry. The radical-scavenging activity of caffeic acid was assessed using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. The expression levels of caspase-3, -8, and -9, as well as the activity of caspase-3, were evaluated. Caffeic acid showed a protective effect against cisplatin-induced HEI-OC1 cell damage as demonstrated by the MTT assay. Caffeic acid decreased cell death by apoptosis and necrosis. Caffeic acid showed strong scavenging activity against the radical DPPH and decreased intracellular ROS production. Caffeic acid decreased the expression of caspase-3 and -8 and increased the activity of caspase-3. Caffeic acid attenuated cisplatin-induced hair cell loss in HEI-OC1 cell lines; these effects were mediated by its radical scavenging activity and inhibition of apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of inhibitory effects of caffeic acid and quercetin on human liver cytochrome p450 activities.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Himanshu; Jana, Snehasis

    2014-12-01

    When herbal drugs and conventional allopathic drugs are used together, they can interact in our body which can lead to the potential for herb-drug interactions. This work was conducted to evaluate the herb-drug interaction potential of caffeic acid and quercetin mediated by cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition. Human liver microsomes (HLMs) were added to each selective probe substrates of cytochrome P450 enzymes with or without of caffeic acid and quercetin. IC50 , Ki values, and the types of inhibition were determined. Both caffeic acid and quercetin were potent competitive inhibitors of CYP1A2 (Ki = 1.16 and 0.93 μM, respectively) and CYP2C9 (Ki = 0.95 and 1.67 μM, respectively). Caffeic acid was a potent competitive inhibitor of CYP2D6 (Ki = 1.10 μM) and a weak inhibitor of CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 (IC50  > 100 μM). Quercetin was a potent competitive inhibitor of CYP 2C19 and CYP3A4 (Ki = 1.74 and 4.12 μM, respectively) and a moderate competitive inhibitor of CYP2D6 (Ki = 18.72 μM). These findings might be helpful for safe and effective use of polyphenols in clinical practice. Our data indicated that it is necessary to study the in vivo interactions between drugs and pharmaceuticals with dietary polyphenols. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Caffeic Acid Derivatives in Dried Lamiaceae and Echinacea purpurea Products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The concentrations of caffeic acid derivatives within Lamiaceae and Echinacea (herb, spice, tea, and dietary supplement forms) readily available in the U.S. marketplace (n=72) were determined. After the first identification of chicoric acid in Ocimum basilicum (basil), the extent to which chicoric a...

  19. A caffeic acid mediated facile synthesis of silver nanoparticles with powerful anti-cancer activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dawei; Dou, Dandan; Ge, Lin; Huang, Zhihai; Wang, Liping; Gu, Ning

    2015-10-01

    Green synthesis, especially in biological processes, has gained more attention with increasing application of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in biomedical fields. However, the biologically synthesized AgNPs have been to be anomalous in size and shape in most cases, as well as exhibiting certain difficulties when used in therapy. We used caffeic acid, a naturally plant polyphenol, to prepare the AgNPs in the current study and also evaluated their anti-cancer activity against the human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Results showed that the AgNPs could rapidly and simply be synthesized using caffeic acid as both a reducing agent and stabilizer. The synthesized AgNPs possessed characteristics of having small size, narrow distribution and high surface negative charge, as well as being stable in aqueous solution. Furthermore, the AgNPs could enter cells and effectively inhibit viability of tumor cells via induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, a caffeic acid mediated facile method was successfully developed to prepare the AgNPs as a potential alternative agent for human hepatoma therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ternary choline chloride/caffeic acid/ethylene glycol deep eutectic solvent as both a monomer and template in a molecularly imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Najing; Liu, Xiao; Li, Liteng; Tang, Baokun; Row, Kyung Ho

    2017-05-01

    A molecularly imprinted polymer based on a ternary deep eutectic solvent comprised of choline chloride/caffeic acid/ethylene glycol was prepared. The caffeic acid in the ternary deep eutectic solvent was used as both a monomer and template. The molecularly imprinted polymer based on the ternary deep eutectic solvent was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis, atomic force microscopy, and elemental analysis. A series of molecularly imprinted polymers based on choline chloride/caffeic acid/ethylene glycol with different molar ratios was prepared and applied to the molecular recognition of polyphenols. A comparison of the recognition ability of molecularly imprinted polymers to polyphenols revealed that the choline chloride/caffeic acid/ethylene glycol (1:0.4:1, molar ratio) molecularly imprinted polymer had the best molecular recognition effect with 132 μg/g of protocatechuic acid, 104 μg/g of catechins, 80 μg/g of epicatechin, and 123 μg/g of caffeic acid in 6 h, as well as good molecular recognition ability for polyphenols from a Radix Asteris sample. These results show that the ternary deep eutectic solvent based molecularly imprinted polymer is a potential medium that can be applied to drug purification, drug delivery, and drug analysis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Caffeic acid protects hydrogen peroxide induced cell damage in WI-38 human lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Kyoung Hwa; Zhang, Rui; Piao, Meijing; Chae, Sungwook; Kim, Kil Nam; Jeon, You Jin; Park, Doek Bae; You, Ho Jin; Kim, Jin Sook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2006-09-01

    Cytoprotective effect of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxy cinnamic acid) on human lung fibroblast (WI-38) cells against hydrogen peroxide induced damage was investigated. Caffeic acid was found to scavenge intracellular reactive oxygen species, and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical, and thus prevented lipid peroxidation. The caffeic acid protected cell damage of WI-38 cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), via the activation of extracellular signal regulated kinase protein. Caffeic acid increased the activity of catalase and its protein expression. Hence, from the present study, it is suggestive that caffeic acid protects WI-38 cells against H2O2 damage by enhancing the cellular antioxidant activity.

  2. Induction of Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptotic Response of Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cells (Detroit 562) by Caffeic Acid and Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Tanasiewicz, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Natural polyphenols have been observed to possess antiproliferative properties. The effects, including apoptotic potential of bioactive phenolic compounds, caffeic acid (CA) and its derivative caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human head and neck squamous carcinoma cells (HNSCC) line (Detroit 562) were investigated and compared. Cancer cells apoptosis rates and cell cycle arrests were analysed by flow cytometry. Exposure to CA and CAPE was found to result in a dose-dependent decrease in the viability of Detroit 562 cells at different levels. CA/CAPE treatment did significantly affect the viability of Detroit 562 cells (MTT results). CAPE-mediated loss of viability occurred at lower doses and was more pronounced, with the concentrations which inhibit the growth of cells by 50% estimated at 201.43 μM (CA) and 83.25 μM (CAPE). Dead Cell Assay with Annexin V labelling demonstrated that CA and CAPE treatment of Detroit 562 cells resulted in an induction of apoptosis at 50 μM and 100 μM doses. The rise of mainly late apoptosis was observed for 100 μM dose and CA/CAPE treatment did affect the distribution of cells in G0/G1 phase. A combination of different phenolic compounds, potentially with chemotherapeutics, could be considered as an anticancer drug. PMID:28167973

  3. Caffeic acid directly targets ERK1/2 to attenuate solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ge; Fu, Yang; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Zhu, Feng; Yao, Ke; Li, Haitao; Chen, Hanyong; Li, Wei; Lim, Do Young; Sheng, Yuqiao; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Ziming; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) is a well-known phenolic phytochemical present in coffee and reportedly has anticancer activities. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and targeted proteins involved in the suppression of carcinogenesis by caffeic acid are not fully understood. In this study, we report that caffeic acid significantly inhibits colony formation of human skin cancer cells and EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of HaCaT cells dose-dependently. Caffeic acid topically applied to dorsal mouse skin significantly suppressed tumor incidence and volume in a solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis mouse model. A substantial reduction of phosphorylation in mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling was observed in mice treated with caffeic acid either before or after solar UV exposure. Caffeic acid directly interacted with ERK1/2 and inhibited ERK1/2 activities in vitro. Importantly, we resolved the co-crystal structure of ERK2 complexed with caffeic acid. Caffeic acid interacted directly with ERK2 at amino acid residues Q105, D106 and M108. Moreover, A431 cells expressing knockdown of ERK2 lost sensitivity to caffeic acid in a skin cancer xenograft mouse model. Taken together, our results suggest that caffeic acid exerts chemopreventive activity against solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis by targeting ERK1 and 2. PMID:25104643

  4. Caffeic acid treatment alters the extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis in platelets and lymphocytes of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Javed; Spanevello, Roselia Maria; Pimentel, Victor Camera; Gutierres, Jessié; Thomé, Gustavo; Cardoso, Andreia; Zanini, Daniela; Martins, Caroline; Palma, Heloisa Einloft; Bagatini, Margarete Dulce; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Schmatz, Roberta; Leal, Cláudio Alberto Martins; da Costa, Pauline; Morsch, Vera Maria; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of caffeic acid on ectonucleotidase activities such as NTPDase (nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase), Ecto-NPP (nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase), 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) in platelets and lymphocytes of rats, as well as in the profile of platelet aggregation. Animals were divided into five groups: I (control); II (oil); III (caffeic acid 10 mg/kg); IV (caffeic acid 50 mg/kg); and V (caffeic acid 100 mg/kg). Animals were treated with caffeic acid diluted in oil for 30 days. In platelets, caffeic acid decreased the ATP hydrolysis and increased ADP hydrolysis in groups III, IV and V when compared to control (P<0.05). The 5'-nucleotidase activity was decreased, while E-NPP and ADA activities were increased in platelets of rats of groups III, IV and V (P<0.05). Caffeic acid reduced significantly the platelet aggregation in the animals of groups III, IV and V in relation to group I (P<0.05). In lymphocytes, the NTPDase and ADA activities were increased in all groups treated with caffeic acid when compared to control (P<0.05). These findings demonstrated that the enzymes were altered in tissues by caffeic acid and this compound decreased the platelet aggregation suggesting that caffeic acid should be considered a potentially therapeutic agent in disorders related to the purinergic system.

  5. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE): correlation of structure and antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Göçer, Hülya; Gülçin, Ilhami

    2011-12-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a plant polyphenolic concentrated in honeybee propolis, has been found to be biologically active in a variety of pathways. The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant activity of CAPE using different methods such as total antioxidant activity by the thiocyanate method, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid radicals, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radicals, N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride radicals and superoxide anion radicals scavenging activities, reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) chelating activities. CAPE showed 97.9% inhibition on lipid peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion. On the other hand, butylated hydroxyanisole, butylated hydroxytoluene, α-tocopherol and trolox indicated an inhibition of 87.3, 97.6, 75.3 and 90.3% on peroxidation in the same system, respectively.

  6. Stabilization of caffeic acid derivatives in Echinacea purpurea L. glycerin extract.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Chantal; Gafner, Stefan; Batcha, Laura L; Angerhofer, Cindy K

    2002-07-03

    Recent work has shown that enzymatic degradation and oxidation of cichoric acid and other caffeic derivatives occurs in Echinacea preparations. However, very little is known as to the means of stabilizing these phytopreparations. To stabilize the glycerin extract of Echinacea purpurea, we have evaluated the effects of 3 natural antioxidants (citric acid, malic acid, and hibiscus extract) on the stability of the major caffeic acid derivatives (caftaric acid, caffeic acid, cichoric acid, and 2-O-feruloyl-tartaric acid). Chlorogenic acid, which normally occurs in an ethanol extract of E. purpurea, was not present in the glycerin extract. The caffeic acid derivatives, with the exception of 2-O-feruloyl-tartaric acid, were subject to degradation in the control sample. 2-O-Feruloyl-tartaric acid was stable during the whole testing period. All antioxidant treatments greatly improved the stability of caffeic acid derivatives. Stability was dependent upon the concentration of antioxidant added.

  7. Fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular simulation on the interaction of caffeic acid with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuhong; Duan, Lili; Ma, Qiang; Lv, Zizheng; Ruohua, Zhu; Zhang, Zhuoyong

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular simulation were explored to study the interaction between caffeic acid and human serum albumin (HSA). The experimental results indicated that the fluorescence quenching mechanism between caffeic acid and HSA is a static quenching, which was proved again by the analysis of fluorescence lifetime by time-correlated single photon counting. The binding process is spontaneous and the hydrophobic force is the main force between caffeic acid and HSA. In addition, the binding of caffeic acid to HSA was modeled by molecular dynamics simulations. The root mean square deviations, root mean square fluctuations, radius of gyration and the number of hydrogen bonds of the molecular dynamic (MD) simulation process were analyzed. Both experimental and modeling results demonstrated strong binding between HSA and caffeic acid. HSA had a slight conformational change when it binds with caffeic acid. The obtained information is useful for HSA drug design. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Synthesis, Preliminary Bioevaluation and Computational Analysis of Caffeic Acid Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqian; Fu, Jianjun; Shan, Lei; Sun, Qingyan; Zhang, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    A series of caffeic acid amides were designed, synthesized and evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity. Most of them exhibited promising anti-inflammatory activity against nitric oxide (NO) generation in murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. A 3D pharmacophore model was created based on the biological results for further structural optimization. Moreover, predication of the potential targets was also carried out by the PharmMapper server. These amide analogues represent a promising class of anti-inflammatory scaffold for further exploration and target identification. PMID:24857914

  9. Synthesis of a series of caffeic acid phenethyl amide (CAPA) fluorinated derivatives: comparison of cytoprotective effects to caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE).

    PubMed

    Yang, John; Marriner, Gwendolyn A; Wang, Xinyu; Bowman, Phillip D; Kerwin, Sean M; Stavchansky, Salomon

    2010-07-15

    A series of catechol ring-fluorinated derivatives of caffeic acid phenethyl amide (CAPA) were synthesized and screened for cytoprotective activity against H2O2 induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). CAPA and three fluorinated analogs were found to be significantly cytoprotective when compared to control, with no significant difference in cytoprotection between caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and CAPA.

  10. Retention of caffeic acid derivatives in dried Echinacea purpurea.

    PubMed

    Kim, H O; Durance, T D; Scaman, C H; Kitts, D D

    2000-09-01

    Different drying methods were applied to fresh Canadian-grown Echinacea purpurea flowers to determine optimal drying procedures for preserving caffeic acid derivatives. Fresh flowers of E. purpurea were dried by freeze-drying (FD), vacuum microwave drying with full vacuum (VMD), and air-drying (AD) at 25, 40, and 70 degrees C. Using HPLC, chicoric acid and caftaric acid levels were quantitated in dried flowers. These acids were significantly affected by the drying method conditions used. Although significant (p < 0.05) loss of chicoric acid was observed when flowers were stored at high moisture, VMD flowers with a low moisture content retained the highest levels of chicoric acid and caftaric acid similar to FD flowers. Flowers that were AD at 25 degrees C retained about 50%, while those dried by AD at 70 degrees C resulted in the lowest retention of these acids. Although flowers dried by AD at 40 degrees C retained relatively high amounts of chicoric acid and caftaric acid, the time (55 h) required to reach optimal drying was considerably longer than that (47 min) for VMD.

  11. Effects of caffeic acid on learning deficits in a model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunliang; Wang, Yutong; Li, Jinfeng; Hua, Linlin; Han, Bing; Zhang, Yuzhen; Yang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Zhilei; Bai, Hongying; Yin, Honglei; Lou, Jiyu

    2016-09-01

    Caffeic acid is a type of phenolic acid and organic acid. It is found in food (such as tomatoes, carrots, strawberries, blueberries and wheat), beverages (such as wine, tea, coffee and apple juice) as well as Chinese herbal medicines. In the present study, we examined the effects of caffeic acid on learning deficits in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rats were randomly divided into three groups: i) control group, ii) AD model group and iii) caffeic acid group. Caffeic acid significantly rescued learning deficits and increased cognitive function in the rats with AD as demonstrated by the Morris water maze task. Furthermore, caffeic acid administration resulted in a significant decrease in acetylcholinesterase activity and nitrite generation in the rats with AD compared with the AD model group. Furthermore, caffeic acid suppressed oxidative stress, inflammation, nuclear factor‑κB‑p65 protein expression and caspase‑3 activity as well as regulating the protein expression of p53 and phosphorylated (p-)p38 MAPK expression in the rats with AD. These experimental results indicate that the beneficial effects of caffeic acid on learning deficits in a model of AD were due to the suppression of oxidative stress and inflammation through the p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

  12. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester extends survival of a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fontanilla, C V; Wei, X; Zhao, L; Johnstone, B; Pascuzzi, R M; Farlow, M R; Du, Y

    2012-03-15

    There is currently very limited effective pharmacological treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Recent evidence suggests that caffeic acid phenethyl ester has strong anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-neuronal death properties; thus, the present study tested the effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester in mice expressing a mutant superoxide dismutase (SOD1(G93A)) linked to human amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Administration of caffeic acid phenethyl ester after symptom onset significantly increased the post-onset survival and lifespan of SOD1(G93A) mice. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis detected less activation of microglia and astrocytes and higher motor neuron counts at an early symptomatic stage (7 days following onset) in the spinal cords of SOD1(G93A) mice given caffeic acid phenethyl ester treatment. Additionally, lower levels of phosphorylated p38, a mitogen-activated protein kinase that is involved in both inflammation and neuronal death, were observed in the spinal cords of SOD1(G93A) mice treated with caffeic acid phenethyl ester for 7 days. These results indicate that caffeic acid phenethyl ester may represent a novel and effective therapeutic for the treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and these significant neuroprotective effects observed in a commonly used amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse model validate the therapeutic potential of caffeic acid phenethyl ester for slowing disease progression by attenuating the neuroinflammation and motor neuron cell death associated with clinical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis pathology. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative Determination of Fluorinated Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Derivative From Rat Blood Plasma by Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-06

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a plant-derived polyphenolic compound (Fig. 1), is a component of bee propolis . Propolis has been used as a folk...analytical methods have been documented. These include an HPLC-UV determination of CAPE from a propolis -containing gel [13], HPLC-ESI-MS measurement...of CAPE from crude propolis [14], and HPLC- ESI-MS/MS analysis of CAPE in biological samples [15]. In this paper, we developed a method using ultra

  14. Biotransformation of cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid by plant cell cultures of Eucalyptus perriniana.

    PubMed

    Katsuragi, Hisashi; Shimoda, Kei; Kubota, Naoji; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Hamada, Hatsuyuki; Hamada, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Biotransformations of phenylpropanoids such as cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid were investigated with plant-cultured cells of Eucalyptus perriniana. The plant-cultured cells of E. perriniana converted cinnamic acid into cinnamic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, p-coumaric acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid. p-Coumaric acid was converted into 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid, p-coumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, a new compound, caffeic acid, and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid. On the other hand, incubation of caffeic acid with cultured E. perriniana cells gave 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 3-O-(6-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, a new compound, 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, ferulic acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid. 4-O-β-D-Glucopyranosylferulic acid, ferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester were isolated from E. perriniana cells treated with ferulic acid.

  15. Formation of volatile chemicals from thermal degradation of less volatile coffee components: quinic acid, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed

    Moon, Joon-Kwan; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2010-05-12

    The less volatile constituents of coffee beans (quinic acid, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid) were roasted under a stream of nitrogen, air, or helium. The volatile degradation compounds formed were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Caffeic acid produced the greatest amount of total volatiles. Quinic acid and chlorogenic acid produced a greater number of volatiles under the nitrogen stream than under the air stream. These results suggest that the presence of oxygen does not play an important role in the formation of volatile compounds by the heat degradation of these chemicals. 2,5-Dimethylfuran formed in relatively large amounts (59.8-2231.0 microg/g) in the samples obtained from quinic acid and chlorogenic acid but was not found in the samples from caffeic acid. Furfuryl alcohol was found in the quinic acid (259.9 microg/g) and caffeic acid (174.4 microg/g) samples roasted under a nitrogen stream but not in the chlorogenic sample. The three acids used in the present study do not contain a nitrogen atom, yet nitrogen-containing heterocyclic compounds, pyridine, pyrrole, and pyrazines, were recovered. Phenol and its derivatives were identified in the largest quantities. The amounts of total phenols ranged from 60.6 microg/g (quinic acid under helium) to 89893.7 microg/g (caffeic acid under helium). It was proposed that phenol was formed mainly from quinic acid and that catechols were formed from caffeic acid. Formation of catechol from caffeic acid under anaerobic condition indicates that the reaction participating in catechol formation was not oxidative degradation.

  16. Evolution of polyphenols and organic acids during the fermentation of apple cider.

    PubMed

    Ye, Mengqi; Yue, Tianli; Yuan, Yahong

    2014-11-01

    Polyphenols and organic acids are important constitutes in the cider because they greatly contribute to organoleptic quality. The determination of their changes is important for monitoring the fermentation process for purposes of quality control. In this study, the evolution of polyphenols and organic acids was monitored throughout the cider fermentation process. The samples were taken periodically and the polyphenols and organic acids contents were determined using HPLC methods. The contents of polyphenols and organic acids were in constant change. After fermentation, the content of (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, chlorogenic acid, cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, gallic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rutin and phloridzin decreased by different degrees, while protocatechuic acid increased after fermentation. The content of organic acids was also affected by fermentation. Malic acid, lactic acid, quinic acid, pyruvic acid and citric acid showed different levels of increase, but succinic acid content decreased. The contents of polyphenols and organic acids were affected by fermentation. Their changing profiles during fermentation process were dependent on the type of phenolic compounds and organic acids studied. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Turkyilmaz, Serdar; Alhan, Etem; Ercin, Cengiz; Kural Vanizor, Birgul; Kaklikkaya, Nese; Ates, Burhan; Erdogan, Selim; Topaloglu, Serdar

    2008-03-01

    This study investigated the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP) induced by glycodeoxycholic acid in rats. CAPE, an active component of honeybee propolis, has previously been determined to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and anticancer activities. Forty-eight rats were divided into four groups of 12. Group 1 animals received intraductal saline and intravenous saline infusion treatment. Group 2 was given intraductal saline and intraperitoneal CAPE infusion treatment. ANP was induced in the animals in group 3 (ANP with saline infusion), and group 4 had induced ANP plus CAPE infusion treatment (ANP with CAPE infusion). Sampling was performed 48 h after treatment. ANP induction significantly increased mortality rate, pancreatic necrosis, and bacterial infection in pancreatic and extrapancreatic organs. ANP also increased levels of amylase and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in serum, increased levels of urea and lactate dehydrogenase in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL LDH), increased the activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in pancreas and lung tissue, and decreased the serum calcium levels. The use of CAPE did not significantly reduce the mortality rate but significantly reduced the ALT and BAL LDH levels, the activities of MPO and MDA in the pancreas, the activity of MDA in the lungs, and pancreatic damage. The administration of CAPE did not reduce the bacterial infection. These results indicate that CAPE had beneficial effects on the course of ANP in rats and suggest that CAPE shows promise as a treatment for ANP.

  18. Caffeic acid production enhancement by engineering a phenylalanine over-producing Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qin; Lin, Yuheng; Yan, Yajun

    2013-12-01

    Caffeic acid is a plant-specific phenylpropanoic acid with multiple health-improving effects reported, and its therapeutic derivatives have also been studied throughout the last decade. To meet its market need and achieve high-level production, microbial production of caffeic acid approaches have been developed in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli. In our previous work, we have established the first artificial pathway that realized de novo production of caffeic acid using E. coli endogenous 4-hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylase (4HP3H). In this work, we exploited the catalytic potential of 4HPA3H in the whole-cell bioconversion study and produced 3.82 g/L (461.12 mg/L/OD) caffeic acid from p-coumaric acid, a direct precursor. We further engineered a phenylalanine over-producer into a tyrosine over-producer and then introduced the artificial pathway. After adjusting the expression strategy and optimizing the inoculants timing, de novo production of caffeic acid reached 766.68 mg/L. Both results from the direct precursor and simple carbon sources represent the highest titers of caffeic acid from microbial production so far.

  19. Synthesis, Evaluation of Anticancer Activity and QSAR Study of Heterocyclic Esters of Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Hajmohamad Ebrahim Ketabforoosh, Shima; Amini, Mohsen; Vosooghi, Mohsen; Shafiee, Abbas; Azizi, Ebrahim; Kobarfard, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) suppresses the growth of transformed cells such as human breast cancer cells, hepatocarcinoma , myeloid leukemia, colorectal cancer cells, fibrosarcoma, glioma and melanoma. A group of heterocyclic esters of caffeic acid was synthesized using Mitsunobu reaction and the esters were subjected to further structural modification by electrooxidation of the catechol ring of caffeic acid esters in the presence of sodium benzenesulfinate and sodium toluensulfinate as nucleophiles. Both heterocyclic esters of caffeic acid and their arylsulfonyl derivatives were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity against HeLa, SK-OV-3, and HT-29 cancer cell lines. HeLa cells showed the highest sensitivity to the compounds and heterocyclic esters with no substituent on catechol ring showed better activity compared to their substituted counterparts. QSAR studies reemphasized the importance of molecular shape of the compounds for their cytotoxic activity. PMID:24523750

  20. Kinetic studies on the hydroxylation of p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid by spinach-beet phenolase.

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, R J; Vaughan, P F

    1975-01-01

    1. A spectrophotometric assay is described that enables the hydroxylation of p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid, catalysed by spinach-beet phenolase, to be followed continuously. 2. Initial-velocity and inhibitor studies indicate that the order of substrate addition is oxygen, p-coumaric acid and electron donor, with an irreversible step separating the binding of each substrate. 3. Caffeic acid is most likely to act as electron donor at the active site; other electron donors, such as ascorbic acid, NADH and dimethyltetrahydropteridine, function mainly to recycle cofactor amounts of caffeic acid. 4. A reaction scheme, consistent with these data, is proposed. PMID:170916

  1. Consumption of some polyphenols reduces fecal deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid, the secondary bile acids of risk factors of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Yunkyung; Haraguchi, Tomoaki; Iwanaga, Sumie; Tomotake, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yukako; Mineo, Shigeru; Moriyama, Akiho; Inoue, Junji; Kato, Norihisa

    2009-09-23

    This study was performed to examine the effect of dietary polyphenols on fecal secondary bile acids, such as deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid, the risk factors of colon cancer, in rats fed a high-fat diet. In experiment 1, rats were fed a 30% beef tallow diet containing 0.5% polyphenols for 3 weeks. Dietary curcumin and caffeic acid significantly reduced the fecal concentration of deoxycholic acid. Dietary caffeic acid, catechin, rutin, and ellagic acid significantly reduced fecal lithocholic acid. Fecal hyodeoxycholic acid, a metabolite of lithocholic acid, was markedly lowered by dietary curcumin, caffeic acid, catechin, and rutin. In experiment 2, rats were fed a 30 or 5% beef tallow diet with or without the addition of 0.5% curcumin. In the rats without receiving curcumin, the fecal level of deoxycholic acid was significantly higher in the high-fat diet group than in the low-fat diet group. Fecal deoxycholic acid was significantly reduced by dietary curcumin in the high-fat diets but not in the low-fat diets. The results suggest novel effects of some polyphenols favorable for colon health by reducing secondary bile acids in animals fed a high-fat diet.

  2. Preparation and characterization of SPION functionalized via caffeic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykal, A.; Amir, Md.; Günerb, S.; Sözeri, H.

    2015-12-01

    Caffeic acid coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION-CFA) was synthesized by reflux method. The structural, spectroscopic and magnetic properties were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) techniques. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TG) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed the presence of CA on the surface of SPION. The theoretical analyzes performed on recorded room temperature VSM spectrum confirmed the formation of superparamagnetic nature of SPION-CFA. The particle size dependent Langevin function was applied to determine the average magnetic particle dimension (Dmag) around 11.93 nm. In accordance, the average crystallite and particle sizes were obtained as 11.40 nm and ~12.00 nm from XRD and TEM measurements. The extrapolated specific saturation magnetization (σs) is 44.11 emu/g and measured magnetic moment is 1.83 μB. These parameters assign small order of magnetization for NPs with respect to bulk Fe3O4. Magnetic anisotropy was offered as uniaxial and calculated effective anisotropy constant (Keff) is 34.82×104 Erg/g. The size-dependent saturation magnetization suggests the existence of a magnetically inactive layer as 1.035 nm for SPION-CFA.

  3. Antioxidant Activity of Caffeic Acid through a Novel Mechanism under UVA Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hiroko; Iwahashi, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    Effect of caffeic acid on the formation of hydroxyl radicals was examined during xanthone-mediated photosensitization. The reaction was performed on irradiation (λ = 365 nm) of the standard reaction mixture containing 15 µM xanthone, 0.1 M 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) and 20 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) with spin trapping. Caffeic acid inhibited the formation of hydroxyl radicals. Caffeic acid hardly scavenged both hydroxyl radicals and superoxide radicals under conditions employed in this paper in spite of its ability to act as a hydrogen donor or a reagent for the aromatic hydroxylation, because high concentration of DMPO trapped hydroxyl radicals overwhelmingly. Furthermore, caffeic acid inhibited the formation of hydroxyl radicals in the standard reaction mixture with EDTA under UVA irradiation. Accordingly, the inhibitory effect of caffeic acid on the formation of hydroxyl radicals in the standard reaction mixture under UVA irradiation is not due to its ability to chelate iron. Thus, the inhibitory effect of caffeic acid seems to occur in the standard reaction mixture under UVA irradiation through a novel antioxidation activity, i.e., ability to quench the exited xanthone. PMID:19590707

  4. Reduction of the DNA damages, Hepatoprotective Effect and Antioxidant Potential of the Coconut Water, ascorbic and Caffeic Acids in Oxidative Stress Mediated by Ethanol.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Vanderson S; Dantas, Lucas S; Chaves, Adriano B; Pinto, Isabella F D; Silva, Railmara P DA; Otsuka, Felipe A M; Santos, Rodrigo B; Santos, Aline C; Trindade, Danielle J; Matos, Humberto R

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic disorders such as steatosis and alcoholic steatohepatitis are common diseases that affect thousands of people around the globe. This study aims to identify the main phenol compounds using a new HPLC-ESI+-MS/MS method, to evaluate some oxidative stress parameters and the hepatoprotective action of green dwarf coconut water, caffeic and ascorbic acids on the liver and serum of rats treated with ethanol. The results showed five polyphenols in the lyophilized coconut water spiked with standards: chlorogenic acid (0.18 µM), caffeic acid (1.1 µM), methyl caffeate (0.03 µM), quercetin (0.08 µM) and ferulic acid (0.02 µM) isomers. In the animals, the activity of the serum γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GT) was reduced to 1.8 I.U/L in the coconut water group, 3.6 I.U/L in the ascorbic acid group and 2.9 I.U/L in the caffeic acid groups, when compared with the ethanol group (5.1 I.U/L, p<0.05). Still in liver, the DNA analysis demonstrated a decrease of oxidized bases compared to ethanol group of 36.2% and 48.0% for pretreated and post treated coconut water group respectively, 42.5% for the caffeic acid group, and 34.5% for the ascorbic acid group. The ascorbic acid was efficient in inhibiting the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in the liver by 16.5% in comparison with the ethanol group. These data indicate that the green dwarf coconut water, caffeic and ascorbic acids have antioxidant, hepatoprotective and reduced DNA damage properties, thus decreasing the oxidative stress induced by ethanol metabolism.

  5. Effects of caffeic and chlorogenic acids on the rat skeletal system.

    PubMed

    Folwarczna, J; Pytlik, M; Zych, M; Cegieła, U; Nowinska, B; Kaczmarczyk-Sedlak, I; Sliwinski, L; Trzeciak, H; Trzeciak, H I

    2015-02-01

    Caffeic acid, predominantly as esters linked to quinic acid (chlorogenic acids), is a phenolic acid present at high levels in coffee. The aim of the study was to investigate effects of caffeic and chlorogenic acids on the skeletal system of female rats with normal estrogen levels and estrogen-deficient. Caffeic acid (5 and 50 mg/kg p.o. daily) and chlorogenic acid (100 mg/kg p.o. daily) were administered for 4 weeks to non-ovariectomized and bilaterally ovariectomized mature Wistar rats, and their effects were compared with appropriate controls. Moreover, estradiol (0.2 mg/kg p.o. daily) was administered to ovariectomized rats. Bone turnover markers, mass, mineralization and mechanical properties were examined. Although caffeic acid at a low dose exerted some unfavorable effects on the skeletal system, at high doses, caffeic and chlorogenic acids slightly increased mineralization in the tibia and improved mechanical properties of the femoral diaphysis (compact bone). Unlike estradiol, they did not counteract the worsening of the tibial metaphysis bone strength (cancellous bone) and increases in osteocalcin concentration induced by estrogen deficiency. High doses of the phenolic acids slightly favorably affected the rat skeletal system independently of the estrogen status.

  6. Grape skins (Vitis vinifera L.) catalyze the in vitro enzymatic hydroxylation of p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid.

    PubMed

    Arnous, Anis; Meyer, Anne S

    2009-12-01

    The ability of grape skins to catalyze in vitro conversion of p-coumaric acid to the more potent antioxidant caffeic acid was studied. Addition of different concentrations of p-coumaric to red grape skins (Cabernet Sauvignon) resulted in formation of caffeic acid. This caffeic acid formation (Y) correlated positively and linearly to p-coumaric acid consumption (X): Y = 0.5 X + 9.5; R (2) = 0.96, P < 0.0001. The kinetics of caffeic acid formation with time in response to initial p-coumaric acid levels and at different grape skin concentrations, indicated that the grape skins harboured an o-hydroxylation activity, proposedly a monophenol- or a flavonoid 3'-monooxygenase activity (EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.14.13.21). The K (m) of this crude o-hydroxylation activity in the red grape skin was 0.5 mM with p-coumaric acid.

  7. Caffeic acid, tyrosol and p-coumaric acid are potent inhibitors of 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Vauzour, David; Corona, Giulia; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2010-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by a progressive and selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Recent investigations have shown that conjugates such as the 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine, possess strong neurotoxicity and may contribute to the underlying progression of the disease pathology. Although the neuroprotective actions of flavonoids are well reported, that of hydroxycinnamates and other phenolic acids is less established. We show that the hydroxycinnamates caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid, the hydroxyphenethyl alcohol, tyrosol, and a Champagne wine extract rich in these components protect neurons against injury induced by 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine in vitro. The protection induced by these polyphenols was equal to or greater than that observed for the flavonoids, (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and quercetin. For example, p-coumaric acid evoked significantly more protection at 1muM (64.0+/-3.1%) than both (-)-epicatechin (46.0+/-4.1%, p<0.05) and (+)-catechin (13.1+/-3.0%, p<0.001) at the same concentration. These data indicate that hydroxycinnamates, phenolic acids and phenolic alcohol are also capable of inducing neuroprotective effects to a similar extent to that seen with flavonoids.

  8. Administration of caffeic acid worsened bone mechanical properties in female rats.

    PubMed

    Zych, Maria; Folwarczna, Joanna; Pytlik, Maria; Sliwiński, Leszek; Gołden, Magdalena A; Burczyk, Jan; Trzeciak, Henryk I

    2010-03-01

    Natural phenolic acids, commonly present in plants that are normally consumed in the diet, have been reported to exert antiresorptive and/or bone formation increasing activity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of ferulic, caffeic, P-coumaric, and chlorogenic acids on the skeletal system of normal, mature female rats. The phenolic acids (10 mg/kg p. o. daily for 4 weeks) were administered to 3-month-old female Wistar Cmd:(WI)WU rats. Bone mass, mineral and calcium content, macrometric and histomorphometric parameters, and mechanical properties were examined. Phenolic acids had differential effects on the rat skeletal system. Although none of them affected bone macrometric parameters, mass and mineralization, all of them increased the width of femoral trabeculae. Administration of caffeic acid worsened bone mechanical properties (decreasing ultimate load sustained by the femur in three-point bending test). In conclusion, high intake of caffeic acid may unfavorably affect the skeletal system.

  9. Comparison of Two Components of Propolis: Caffeic Acid (CA) and Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) Induce Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest of Breast Cancer Cells MDA-MB-231.

    PubMed

    Kabała-Dzik, Agata; Rzepecka-Stojko, Anna; Kubina, Robert; Jastrzębska-Stojko, Żaneta; Stojko, Rafał; Wojtyczka, Robert Dariusz; Stojko, Jerzy

    2017-09-15

    Studies show that caffeic acid (CA) and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) are compounds with potent chemopreventive effects. Breast cancer is a common form of aggressive cancer among women worldwide. This study shows a comparison of CA and CAPE activity on triple-negative human caucasian breast adenocarcinoma line cells (MDA-MB-231). MDA-MB-231 cells were treated by CA and CAPE with doses of from 10 to 100 µM, for periods of 24 h and 48 h. Cytotoxicity MTT tests, apoptosis by Annexin V, and cell cycle with Dead Cell Assays were performed. Cytotoxic activity was greater for CAPE compared to CA (both incubation times, same dosage). IC50 values for CAPE were 27.84 µM (24 h) and 15.83 µM (48 h) and for CA > 10,000 µM (24 h) and > 1000 µM (48 h). Polyphenols induced apoptosis, while CAPE (dose dependently), induced a higher apoptotic effect. CAPE also induced cell cycle arrest in S phase (time and dose dependently), CA did it only for 50 and 100 µM. A dose dependent decline was seen for the G0/G1 phase (CAPE, 48 h), as well as elimination of phase G2/M by 100 µM of CAPE (only mild effect for CA). Comparing CA and CAPE activity on MDA-MB-231, CAPE clearly showed better activity for the same dosages and experiment times.

  10. Catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol with gold nanoparticles synthesized by caffeic acid.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yu Seon; Ahn, Eun-Young; Park, Jisu; Kim, Tae Yoon; Hong, Jee Eun; Kim, Kyeongsoon; Park, Yohan; Park, Youmie

    2017-12-01

    In this study, various concentrations of caffeic acid (CA) were used to synthesize gold nanoparticles (CA-AuNPs) in order to evaluate their catalytic activity in the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction. To facilitate catalytic activity, caffeic acid was removed by centrifugation after synthesizing CA-AuNPs. The catalytic activity of CA-AuNPs was compared with that of centrifuged CA-AuNPs (cf-CA-AuNPs). Notably, cf-CA-AuNPs exhibited up to 6.41-fold higher catalytic activity compared with CA-AuNPs. The catalytic activity was dependent on the caffeic acid concentration, and the lowest concentration (0.08 mM) produced CA-AuNPs with the highest catalytic activity. The catalytic activities of both CA-AuNPs and cf-CA-AuNPs decreased with increasing caffeic acid concentration. Furthermore, a conversion yield of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the reaction mixture was determined to be 99.8% using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The product, 4-aminophenol, was purified from the reaction mixture, and its structure was confirmed by (1)H-NMR. It can be concluded that the removal of the reducing agent, caffeic acid in the present study, significantly enhanced the catalytic activity of CA-AuNPs in the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction.

  11. Catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol with gold nanoparticles synthesized by caffeic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Yu Seon; Ahn, Eun-Young; Park, Jisu; Kim, Tae Yoon; Hong, Jee Eun; Kim, Kyeongsoon; Park, Yohan; Park, Youmie

    2017-01-01

    In this study, various concentrations of caffeic acid (CA) were used to synthesize gold nanoparticles (CA-AuNPs) in order to evaluate their catalytic activity in the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction. To facilitate catalytic activity, caffeic acid was removed by centrifugation after synthesizing CA-AuNPs. The catalytic activity of CA-AuNPs was compared with that of centrifuged CA-AuNPs ( cf-CA-AuNPs). Notably, cf-CA-AuNPs exhibited up to 6.41-fold higher catalytic activity compared with CA-AuNPs. The catalytic activity was dependent on the caffeic acid concentration, and the lowest concentration (0.08 mM) produced CA-AuNPs with the highest catalytic activity. The catalytic activities of both CA-AuNPs and cf-CA-AuNPs decreased with increasing caffeic acid concentration. Furthermore, a conversion yield of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the reaction mixture was determined to be 99.8% using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The product, 4-aminophenol, was purified from the reaction mixture, and its structure was confirmed by 1H-NMR. It can be concluded that the removal of the reducing agent, caffeic acid in the present study, significantly enhanced the catalytic activity of CA-AuNPs in the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction.

  12. Some polyphenols inhibit the formation of pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical in the reaction mixture of linoleic acid hydroperoxide with ferrous ions.

    PubMed Central

    Iwahashi, H

    2000-01-01

    Effects of some polyphenols and their related compounds (chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, quinic acid, ferulic acid, gallic acid, D-(+)-catechin, D-(-)-catechin, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoic acid, salicylic acid, L-dopa, dopamine, L-adrenaline, L-noradrenaline, o-dihydroxybenzene, m-dihydroxybenzene, and p-dihydroxybenzene) on the formation of 13-hydroperoxide octadecadienoic (13-HPODE) acid-derived radicals (pentyl radical and octanoic acid radical) were examined. The ESR spin trapping showed that chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, gallic acid, D-(+)-catechin, D-(-)-catechin, L-dopa, dopamine, L-adrenaline, L-noradrenaline, and o-dihydroxybenzene inhibited the overall formation of 13-HPODE acid-derived radicals in the reaction mixture of 13-HPODE with ferrous ions. The ESR peak heights of alpha-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone (4-POBN)/13-HPODE-derived radical adducts decreased to 46+/-4% (chlorogenic acid), 54+/-2% (caffeic acid), 49+/-2% (gallic acid), 55+/-1% [D-(+)-catechin], 60+/-3% [D-(-)-catechin], 42+/-1% (L-dopa), 30+/-2% (dopamine), 49+/-2% (L-adrenaline), 24+/-2% (L-noradrenaline), and 54+/-5% (o-dihydroxybenzene) of the control, respectively. The high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance (HPLC-ESR) and high performance liquid chromatography-electron spin resonance-mass spectrometries (HPLC-ESR-MS) showed that caffeic acid inhibited the formation of octanoic acid radical and pentyl radical to 42+/-2% and 52+/-7% of the control, respectively. On the other hand, the polyphenols and their related compounds had few inhibitory effects on the radical formation in the presence of EDTA. Visible absorbance measurement revealed that all the polyphenols exhibiting the inhibitory effect chelate ferrous ions. Above results indicated that the chelation of ferrous ion is essential to the inhibitory effects of the polyphenols. PMID:10677343

  13. Potential cytoprotection: antioxidant defence by caffeic acid phenethyl ester against free radical-induced damage of lipids, DNA, and proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Chen, Lixiang; Wu, Weimin; Long, Yuan; Wang, Rui

    2008-05-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be a major cause of cellular injuries in a variety of chronic health problems, such as carcinogenesis and neurodegenerative disorders. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), derived from the propolis of honeybee hives, possesses a variety of biological and pharmacological properties including antioxidant and anticancer activity. In the present study, we focused on the diverse antioxidative functionalities of CAPE and its related polyphenolic acid esters on cellular macromolecules in vitro. The effects on human erythrocyte membrane ghost lipid peroxidation, plasmid pBR322 DNA, and protein damage initiated by the water-soluble initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) were monitored by formation of hydroperoxides and by DNA nicking assay, single-cell alkaline electrophoresis, and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Our results showed that CAPE and its related polyphenolic acid esters elicited remarkable inhibitory effects on erythrocyte membrane lipid peroxidation, cellular DNA strand breakage, and protein fragmentation. The results suggest that CAPE is a potent exogenous cytoprotective and antigenotoxic agent against cell oxidative damage that could be used as a template for designing novel drugs to combat diseases induced by oxidative stress components, such as various types of cancer.

  14. Caffeic acid affects early growth, and morphogenetic response of hypocotyl cuttings of mung bean (Phaseolus aureus).

    PubMed

    Batish, Daizy R; Singh, Harminder Pal; Kaur, Shalinder; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar; Yadav, Surender Singh

    2008-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is one of the most common cinnamic acids ubiquitously present in plants and implicated in a variety of interactions including allelopathy among plants and microbes. This study investigated the possible interference of CA with root growth and the process of rhizogenesis in hypocotyl cuttings of mung bean (Phaseolus aureus=Vigna radiata). Results indicated that CA (0-1000 microM) significantly suppressed root growth of mung bean, and impaired adventitious root formation and root length in the mung bean hypocotyl cuttings. Further investigations into the role of CA in hampering root formation indicated its interference with the biochemical processes involved in rooting process at the three stages - root initiation (third day; RI), root expression (fifth day; RE), and post-expression (seventh day; PE) - of rhizogenesis. CA caused significant changes in the activities of proteases, peroxidases (PODs), and polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) during root development and decreased the content of total endogenous phenolics (TP) in the hypocotyl cuttings. The enhanced activity of PODs and PPOs, though, relates to lignification and/or phenolic metabolism during rhizogenesis; yet their protective role to CA-induced stress, especially during the PE phase, is not ruled out. At 1000 microM CA, where rooting was significantly affected, TP content was very high during the RI phase, thus indicating its non-utilization. The study concludes that CA interferes with the rooting potential of mung bean hypocotyl cuttings by altering the activities of PODs and PPOs and the endogenous TP content that play a key role in rhizogenesis.

  15. Induction of hepatocyte growth factor production in human dermal fibroblasts by caffeic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kurisu, Manami; Nakasone, Rie; Miyamae, Yusaku; Matsuura, Daisuke; Kanatani, Hirotoshi; Yano, Shingo; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic activities in epithelial cells. Induction of HGF production may be involved in organ regeneration, wound healing and embryogenesis. In this study, we examined the effects of caffeic acid derivatives including 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (1) and acteoside (2) on HGF production in Neonatal Normal Human Dermal Fibroblasts (NHDF). Both 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (1) and acteoside (2) significantly induced HGF production dose-dependent manner. To know the important substructure for HGF production activity, we next investigated the effect of the partial structure of these caffeic acid derivatives. From the results, caffeic acid (3) showed strong activity on the promotion of HGF production, while hydroxytyrosol (4) and quinic acid (5) didn't show any activity. Our findings suggest that the caffeoyl moiety of caffeic acid derivatives is essential for accelerated production of HGF. The compound which has the caffeoyl moiety may be useful for the treatment of some intractable organ disease.

  16. Terpenoids, flavonoids and caffeic acid derivatives from Salvia viridis L. cvar. Blue Jeans.

    PubMed

    Rungsimakan, Supattra; Rowan, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    Three diterpenoids, 1-oxomicrostegiol (1), viroxocin (2), viridoquinone (3), were isolated from the roots of Salvia viridis L. cvar. Blue Jeans. Five known diterpenoids, microstegiol (4), 7α-acetoxy-14-hydroxy-8,13-abietadiene-11,12-dione (5; 7-O-acetylhorminone tautomer), 7α,14-dihydroxy-8,13-abietadiene-11,12-dione (6; horminone tautomer), ferruginol and salvinolonyl 12-methyl ether (7) were also found in the roots together with 1-docosyl ferulate (8), and a mixture of 2-(4'-alkoxyphenyl) ethyl alkanoates (9). Two lupane triterpenoids, 2α-acetoxy-lup-20(29)-en-3β-ol (10), and 3β-acetoxy-lup-20(29)-en-2α-ol (11) were found in the aerial parts together with known compounds, lup-20(29)-ene-2α,3β-diol (12), ursolic acid, oleanolic acid, β-sitosterol and β-sitosterol glucoside. A known phenylpropanoid, trans-verbascoside (or acteoside; 13), was the main constituent in the polar fraction of the aerial part, and it is now reported in the genus Salvia for the first time. Other polyphenolic compounds were cis-verbascoside (14), leucosceptoside A (15), martynoside (16), caffeic acid, 6-O-caffeoyl-glucose (18), rosmarinic acid, salidroside, luteolin-7-O-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-galactopyranoside, luteolin-7-O-β-galactopyranoside, luteolin-7-O-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-glucopyranoside, luteolin-7-O-β-glucopyranoside, and apigenin-7-O-β-glucopyranoside. The structures were determined by 1D-, 2D-NMR and HR-ESI-MS techniques. Compounds 6, 10, ferruginol, ursolic acid and oleanolic acid exhibited antibacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis (ATCC 775) with MIC 50 μM, 25 μM, 50 μM, 12.5 μM, 12.5 μM respectively. Ferruginol, ursolic acid and oleanolic acid were also active against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6571), and Bacillus cereus (ATCC 2599) with MIC 12.5-50 μM. 4 was also active against S.aureus (ATCC 6571) with MIC 50 μM. These values are consistent with previous studies on the antimicrobial activity of Salvia diterpenoids. Copyright

  17. [Anti-inflammatory effect of Urtica dioica folia extract in comparison to caffeic malic acid].

    PubMed

    Obertreis, B; Giller, K; Teucher, T; Behnke, B; Schmitz, H

    1996-01-01

    Urtica dioica extract is a traditionary used adjuvant therapeutic in rheumatoid arthritis. The antiphlogistic effects of the urtica dioica folia extract IDS 23 (Extractum Urticae dioicae foliorum) and the main phenolic ingredient caffeic malic acid were tested concerning the inhibitory potential on biosynthesis of arachidonic acid metabolites in vitro. The caffeic malic acid was isolated from Urtica folia extract using gel exclusion- and high performance liquid chromatography and identified by mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. Concerning the 5-lipoxygenase products IDS 23 showed a partial inhibitory effect. The isolated phenolic acid inhibited the synthesis of the leukotriene B4 in a concentration dependent manner. The concentration for halfmaximal inhibition (IC50) was 83 microns/ml in the used assay. IDS 23 showed a strong concentration dependent inhibition of the synthesis of cyclooxygenase derived reactions. The IC50 were 92 micrograms/ml for IDS 23 and 38 micrograms/ml for the caffeic malic acid. Calculating the content in IDS 23 the caffeic malic acid is a possible but not the only active ingredient of the plant extract in the tested assay systems. It is demonstrated that the phenolic component showed a different enzymatic target compared with IDS 23. The antiphlogistic effects observed in vitro may give an explanation for the pharmacological and clinical effects of IDS 23 in therapie of rheumatoid diseases.

  18. Antioxidant Activity of Caffeic Acid against Iron-Induced Free Radical Generation—A Chemical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C.; Maurício, Ângelo Q.; Rettori, Daniel; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is a phenolic compound widely found in coffee beans with known beneficial effects in vivo. Many studies showed that CA has anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, antibacterial and anti-carcinogenic properties, which could be linked to its antioxidant activity. Taking in consideration the reported in vitro antioxidant mechanism of other polyphenols, our working hypothesis was that the CA antioxidant activity could be related to its metal-chelating property. With that in mind, we sought to investigate the chemical antioxidant mechanism of CA against in vitro iron-induced oxidative damage under different assay conditions. CA was able to prevent hydroxyl radical formation promoted by the classical Fenton reaction, as determined by 2-deoxyribose (2-DR) oxidative degradation and DMPO hydroxylation. In addition to its ability to prevent hydroxyl radical formation, CA had a great inhibition of membrane lipid peroxidation. In the lipid peroxidation assays CA acted as both metal-chelator and as hydrogen donor, preventing the deleterious action promoted by lipid-derived peroxyl and alkoxyl radicals. Our results indicate that the observed antioxidant effects were mostly due to the formation of iron-CA complexes, which are able to prevent 2-DR oxidation and DMPO hydroxylation. Noteworthy, the formation of iron-CA complexes and prevention of oxidative damage was directly related to the pH of the medium, showing better antioxidant activity at higher pH values. Moreover, in the presence of lipid membranes the antioxidant potency of CA was much higher, indicating its enhanced effectiveness in a hydrophobic environment. Overall, our results show that CA acts as an antioxidant through an iron chelating mechanism, preventing the formation of free hydroxyl radicals and, therefore, inhibiting Fenton-induced oxidative damage. The chemical properties of CA described here—in association with its reported signaling effects—could be an explanation to its beneficial effects

  19. Antioxidant Activity of Caffeic Acid against Iron-Induced Free Radical Generation--A Chemical Approach.

    PubMed

    Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C; Maurício, Ângelo Q; Rettori, Daniel; Alonso, Antonio; Hermes-Lima, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is a phenolic compound widely found in coffee beans with known beneficial effects in vivo. Many studies showed that CA has anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, antibacterial and anti-carcinogenic properties, which could be linked to its antioxidant activity. Taking in consideration the reported in vitro antioxidant mechanism of other polyphenols, our working hypothesis was that the CA antioxidant activity could be related to its metal-chelating property. With that in mind, we sought to investigate the chemical antioxidant mechanism of CA against in vitro iron-induced oxidative damage under different assay conditions. CA was able to prevent hydroxyl radical formation promoted by the classical Fenton reaction, as determined by 2-deoxyribose (2-DR) oxidative degradation and DMPO hydroxylation. In addition to its ability to prevent hydroxyl radical formation, CA had a great inhibition of membrane lipid peroxidation. In the lipid peroxidation assays CA acted as both metal-chelator and as hydrogen donor, preventing the deleterious action promoted by lipid-derived peroxyl and alkoxyl radicals. Our results indicate that the observed antioxidant effects were mostly due to the formation of iron-CA complexes, which are able to prevent 2-DR oxidation and DMPO hydroxylation. Noteworthy, the formation of iron-CA complexes and prevention of oxidative damage was directly related to the pH of the medium, showing better antioxidant activity at higher pH values. Moreover, in the presence of lipid membranes the antioxidant potency of CA was much higher, indicating its enhanced effectiveness in a hydrophobic environment. Overall, our results show that CA acts as an antioxidant through an iron chelating mechanism, preventing the formation of free hydroxyl radicals and, therefore, inhibiting Fenton-induced oxidative damage. The chemical properties of CA described here--in association with its reported signaling effects--could be an explanation to its beneficial effects

  20. Antimicrobial and enhancement of the antibiotic activity by phenolic compounds: Gallic acid, caffeic acid and pyrogallol.

    PubMed

    Lima, Valéria N; Oliveira-Tintino, Cícera D M; Santos, Enaide S; Morais, Luís P; Tintino, Saulo R; Freitas, Thiago S; Geraldo, Yuri S; Pereira, Raimundo L S; Cruz, Rafael P; Menezes, Irwin R A; Coutinho, Henrique D M

    2016-10-01

    The indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs has increased the spectrum of exposure of these organisms. In our studies, these phenolic compounds were evaluated: gallic acid, caffeic acid and pyrogallol. The antibacterial, antifungal and modulatory of antibiotic activities of these compounds were assayed using microdilution method of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) to bacteria and Minimum Fungicide Concentration (MFC) to fungi. The modulation was made by comparisons of the MIC and MFC of the compounds alone and combined with drugs against bacteria and fungi respectively, using a sub-inhibitory concentration of 128 μg/mL of substances (MIC/8). All substances not demonstrated clinically relevant antibacterial activity with a MIC above ≥1024 μg/mL. As a result, we observed that the caffeic acid presented a potentiating antibacterial effect over the 3 groups of bacteria studied. Pyrogallol showed a synergistic effect with two of the antibiotics tested, but only against Staphylococcus aureus. In general, caffeic acid was the substance that presented with the greatest number of antibiotics and with the greatest number of bacteria. In relation to the antifungal activity of all the compounds, the verified results were ≥1024 μg/mL, not demonstrating significant activity. Regarding potentiation of the effect of fluconazole, was observed synergistic effect only when assayed against Candida tropicalis, with all substances. Therefore, as can be seen, the compounds presented as substances that can be promising potentiating agents of antimicrobial drugs, even though they do not have direct antibacterial and antifungal action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Prooxidant DNA breakage induced by caffeic acid in human peripheral lymphocytes: Involvement of endogenous copper and a putative mechanism for anticancer properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bhat, S.H.; Azmi, A.S.; Hadi, S.M. . E-mail: smhadi@vsnl.com

    2007-02-01

    Plant-derived dietary material contains several classes of polyphenols such as flavonoids, curcuminoids, stilbenes and hydroxycinnamic acids. They are recognized as naturally occurring antioxidants but also act as prooxidants catalyzing cellular DNA degradation in the presence of transition metal ions such as copper. Earlier we have shown that the stilbene resveratrol is able to mobilize endogenous copper ions leading to oxidative breakage of cellular DNA. In this paper, we show that caffeic acid (a hydroxycinnamic acid), which is a major constituent of coffee, is also capable of DNA breakage in human peripheral lymphocytes. Incubation of lymphocytes with neocuproine inhibited the DNA degradation confirming that Cu(I) is an intermediate in the DNA cleavage reaction. Further, we have also shown that caffeic acid generates oxidative stress in lymphocytes, which is inhibited by scavengers of reactive oxygen species and neocuproine. These results are in further support of our hypothesis that anticancer mechanism of plant polyphenols involves mobilization of endogenous copper, possibly chromatin bound copper, and the consequent prooxidant action.

  2. A Continuous, Quantitative Fluorescent Assay for Plant Caffeic acid O-Methyltransferases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant caffeic acid O-methyltransferases (COMTs) use s-adenosylmethionine (ado-met), as a methyl donor to transmethylate their preferred (phenolic) substrates in-vivo, and will generally utilize a range of phenolic compounds in-vitro. Collazo et al. (2005; Analytical Biochemistry 342: 86-92) have pu...

  3. Functional characterization of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in Brachypodium distachyon.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lignin is a significant recalcitrant in the conversion of plant biomass to bioethanol. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyze key steps in the pathway of lignin monomer biosynthesis. Brown midrib mutants in Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor with impaired...

  4. In vitro study of caffeic acid-bovine serum albumin interaction.

    PubMed

    Adzet, T; Camarasa, J; Escubedo, E; Merlos, M

    1988-01-01

    Caffeic acid, a natural product with pharmacological properties, such as DOPA-decarboxylase and 5-lipooxygenase inhibition, has been tested in vitro for its binding ratio to bovine serum albumin. This study was carried out by means of four analytical methods. Equilibrium dialysis has been proved to be the most reliable in determination of total binding sites, while acid precipitation has been evaluated as a model of irreversible binding. A binding ratio between 61 and 95% was observed, also varying according the caffeic acid and albumin concentration, pH and protein conformation. Binding constants were calculated by mathematical fitting to a hyperbolic plot. Other cinnamic acids non-o-diphenolic (ferulic acid, m- and p-coumaric acids) have been proved to have a binding ratio to bovine serum albumin of less than 10%.

  5. Galantamine potentiates the protective effect of rofecoxib and caffeic acid against intrahippocampal Kainic acid-induced cognitive dysfunction in rat.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Prakash, Atish; Pahwa, Deeksha

    2011-05-30

    Role of neuroinflammatory mediators particularly cyclooxygenase (COX), lipoxygenase (LOX), have been well suggested in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Rofecoxib is a selective cyclooxygenase 2 enzymes belongs to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, commonly called as coxibs. Whereas, caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) is one of the natural phenolic compounds and reported to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity as one of mechanisms. Present study has been designed to investigate the effects of rofecoxib, caffeic acid and its potentiation by galantamine against intrahippocampal kainic acid-induced cognitive impairment, oxidative damage and mitochondrial respiratory enzyme alterations in rats. Kainic acid (KA) was administrated in the hippocampus region of rat brain. Various behavioral (locomotor activity and memory performances were assessed by using actophotometer and Morris water maze respectively) followed by oxidative stress, mitochondrial enzyme complex were assessed. Intrahippocampal administration of KA significantly impaired locomotor activity, memory performance, mitochondrial enzyme complexes and caused oxidative stress as compared to sham treatment. Rofecoxib (5 and 10mg/kg), caffeic acid (5 and 10mg/kg), Gal (2.5 and 5mg/kg) treatment for 14 days significantly improved locomotor activity, memory retention and oxidative defense (as evidenced by decrease lipid peroxidation, nitrite, increased superoxide dismutase activity and redox ratio) in hippocampus. Besides, alterations in the levels of mitochondrial enzymes and acetylcholine esterase enzyme were significantly restored by rofecoxib and caffeic acid as compared to control. Further, combination of rofecoxib (5mg/kg) with caffeic acid (5mg/kg) and lower dose of gal (2.5mg/kg) with rofecoxib (5mg/kg) treatments significantly potentiated their protective effect which was significant as compared to their effect per se. The results of the present study suggest that galantamine

  6. Biotechnological production of caffeic acid derivatives from cell and organ cultures of Echinacea species.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Kim, Yun-Soo; Park, So-Young; Paek, Kee-Yoeup

    2014-09-01

    Caffeic acid derivatives (CADs) are a group of bioactive compounds which are produced in Echinacea species especially Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea angustifolia, and Echinacea pallida. Echinacea is a popular herbal medicine used in the treatment of common cold and it is also a prominent dietary supplement used throughout the world. Caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid (5-O-caffeoylquinic acid), caftaric acid (2-O-caffeoyltartaric acid), cichoric acid (2, 3-O-dicaffeoyltartaric acid), cynarin, and echinacoside are some of the important CADs which have varied pharmacological activities. The concentrations of these bioactive compounds are species specific and also they vary considerably with the cultivated Echinacea species due to geographical location, stage of development, time of harvest, and growth conditions. Due to these reasons, plant cell and organ cultures have become attractive alternative for the production of biomass and caffeic acid derivatives. Adventitious and hairy roots have been induced in E. pupurea and E. angustifolia, and suspension cultures have been established from flask to bioreactor scale for the production of biomass and CADs. Tremendous progress has been made in this area; various bioprocess methods and strategies have been developed for constant high-quality productivity of biomass and secondary products. This review is aimed to discuss biotechnological methods and approaches employed for the sustainable production of CADs.

  7. Structural, thermal and quantum chemical studies of p-coumaric and caffeic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naresh; Pruthi, Vikas; Goel, Nidhi

    2015-04-01

    Two hydroxycinnamic acids viz., p-coumaric, and caffeic acids have been extracted and purified from Parthenium hysterophorus, subsequently characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, NMR, single crystal X-ray crystallography. The optimized structures of these acids were calculated in terms of density functional theory by Gaussian 09. The validation of experimental and theoretically obtained data for structural parameters such as bond lengths and bond angles has have been carried out to analyze the statistical significance by curve fitting analysis and the values of correlation coefficient found to be 0.985, 0.992, and 0.984, 0.975 in p-coumaric, and caffeic acids, respectively. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies show the eventual charge transfer interaction within the molecule. Thermal studies were also carried out by thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermogravimetric analysis (DTA), and derivative thermogravimetry (DTG).

  8. Hepatoprotective activity of polyphenolic compounds from Cynara scolymus against CCl4 toxicity in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Adzet, T; Camarasa, J; Laguna, J C

    1987-01-01

    The hepatoprotective activity against CCl4 toxicity in isolated rat hepatocytes of some polyphenolic compounds, such as cynarin, isochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid, luteolin-7-glucoside, and two organic acids, caffeic and quinic, from Cynara scolymus, is tested. Only cynarine and, to a lesser extent, caffeic acid showed cytoprotective action. The possible relationship between the molecular structure and the protective effect found is discussed.

  9. Co-production of caffeic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid from p-coumaric acid by Streptomyces caeruleus MTCC 6638.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Ashish; Ghosh, Shashwati; Sen, Sukanta Kumar; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2006-08-01

    In a culture medium of Streptomyces caeruleus MTCC 6638 grown with p-coumaric acid (5 mM) as the sole source of carbon, co-production of caffeic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid was observed. Both caffeic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid are important phenolic compounds with pharmaceutical importance. These biotransformed products were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Obtained data suggest that p-coumaric acid was possibly utilized by two different routes, resulting in the formation of a hydroxycinnamate and a hydroxybenzoate compound. However, higher concentration of p-coumaric acid (10 mM) favoured caffeic acid formation. Addition of 5 mM p-coumaric acid into S. caeruleus cultures pre-grown on minimal medium with 1.0 g/l glucose resulted in the production of 65 mg/l caffeic acid. Furthermore, S. caeruleus cells were able to produce the maximum amount of caffeic acid when pre-grown on nutrient broth for 16 h. Under this condition, the addition of 5 mM p-coumaric acid was sufficient for the S. caeruleus culture to produce 150 mg/l caffeic acid, with a molar yield of 16.6% after 96 h of incubation.

  10. Cold water fish gelatin modification by a natural phenolic cross-linker (ferulic acid and caffeic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Araghi, Maryam; Moslehi, Zeinab; Mohammadi Nafchi, Abdorreza; Mostahsan, Amir; Salamat, Nima; Daraei Garmakhany, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays use of edible films and coatings is increasing due to their biodegradability and environment friendly properties. Fish gelatin obtained from fish skin wastage can be used as an appropriate protein compound for replacing pork gelatin to produce edible film. In this study films were prepared by combination of fish gelatin and different concentration (0%, 1%, 3%, and 5%) of two phenolic compounds (caffeic acid and ferulic acid). The film was prepared at pH > 10 and temperature of 60˚c under continuous injection of O2 and addition of the plasticizer sorbitol/glycerol. Results showed that solubility, oxygen permeability, and water vapor permeability were decreased for caffeic acid and the highest effect was observed at concentration of 5%. Solubility had a linear relationship with concentration of phenolic compound in film containing ferulic acid, however, no significant change was observed in vapor and O2 permeability. A comparison between two phenolic compounds showed that caffeic acid had the highest effect in decreasing solubility, water vapor permeability, and oxygen permeability. Caffeic acid is more effective phenolic compound compared with Ferulic acid that can increase safety of biodegradable packaging by improving their barrier and physicochemical properties. PMID:26405523

  11. Characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles containing caffeic acid and determination of its effects on MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Dikmen, Gokhan; Guney, Gamze; Genc, Lutfi

    2015-01-01

    Many anticancer drugs that are currently used in cancer treatment are natural products or their analogues by structural modification. Caffeic acid (3, 4-dihydroxycinnamic acid; CA) is classified as hydroxycinnamic acid and has a variety of potential pharmacological effects, including antioxidant, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities. As a drug carrier, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) introduced to improve stability, provide controlled drug release, avoid organic solvents and are obtained in small sizes. In this study, we developed solid lipid nanoparticles incorporating with caffeic acid using hot homogenization method. Caffeic acid loaded solid lipid nanoparticles were characterized regarding particle size, zeta potential, drug entrapment efficiency, drug release, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and FT-IR. The effects of caffeic acid loaded solid lipid nanoparticles on MCF-7 cells were determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-dimethyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) test and Annexin V-PI analysis. As a result, solid lipid nanoparticles could potentially be used for the delivery of caffeic acid and solid lipid nanoparticles formulation enhanced the effects of caffeic acid on MCF-7 cells. Some relevant patents are also referred in this article.

  12. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of caffeic acid amides as synergists to sensitize fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans to fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li; Zang, Chengxu; Tian, Shujuan; Liu, Wei; Tan, Shanlun; Cai, Zhan; Ni, Tingjunhong; An, Maomao; Li, Ran; Gao, Yue; Zhang, Dazhi; Jiang, Yuanying

    2015-01-01

    A series of caffeic acid amides were designed, synthesized, and their synergistic activity with fluconazole against fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans was evaluated in vitro. The title caffeic acid amides 3-30 except 26 exhibited potent activity, and the subsequent SAR study was conducted. Compound 3, 5, 21, and 34c, at a concentration of 1.0 μg/ml, decreased the MIC₈₀ of fluconazole from 128.0 μg/ml to 1.0-0.5 μg/ml against the fluconazole-resistant C. albicans. This result suggests that the caffeic acid amides, as synergists, can sensitize drug-resistant fungi to fluconazole. The SAR study indicated that the dihydroxyl groups and the amido groups linking to phenyl or heterocyclic rings are the important pharmacophores of the caffeic acid amides.

  13. Development and validation of an LCMS method to determine the pharmacokinetic profiles of caffeic acid phenethyl amide and caffeic acid phenethyl ester in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, John; Bowman, Phillip D; Kerwin, Sean M; Stavchansky, Salomon

    2014-02-01

    A validated LCMS method was developed for the quantitative determination of caffeic acid phenethyl amide (CAPA) and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) from rat plasma. Separation was achieved using a reverse-phase C12 HPLC column (150 × 2.00 mm, 4 µm) with gradient elution running water (A) and acetonitrile (B). Mass spectrometry was performed with electrospray ionization in negative mode. This method was used to determine the pharmacokinetic profiles of CAPA and CAPE in male Sprague-Dawley rats following intravenous bolus administration of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of CAPA and 20 mg/kg of CAPE. The pharmacokinetic analysis suggests the lack of dose proportionality in the dose range of 5-20 mg/kg of CAPA. Total clearance values for CAPA ranged from 45 to 156 mL/min and decreased with increasing dose of CAPA. The volume of distribution for CAPA ranged from 17,750 to 52,420 mL, decreasing with increasing dose. The elimination half-life for CAPA ranged from 243.1 to 295.8 min and no statistically significant differences were observed between dose groups in the range of 5-20 mg/kg (p > 0.05). The elimination half-life for CAPE was found to be 92.26 min.

  14. Establishment of adventitious root cultures of Echinacea purpurea for the production of caffeic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Paek, Kee-Yoeup; Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Hahn, Eun-Joo

    2009-01-01

    Echinacace purpurea (purple cone flower) is an important medicinal plant, and widely used for phytochemical purposes. The roots are traditionally used in herbal medicines and dietary supplements as an immunostimulant in treating inflammatory and viral diseases. Extensive research work has been carried out on both the induction of adventitious roots from E. purpurea as well as established small-scale (shake flask) to large-scale (bioreactor) cultures for the production of adventitious root biomass and caffeic acid derivatives. This chapter describes the methodologies of induction of adventitious roots from explants of E. purpurea, propagation of adventitious roots in suspension cultures, estimation of total phenolics, flavonoids, and antioxidant activities. The detailed methodology for high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of caffeic acid derivatives present in the adventitious roots is also discussed.

  15. Antioxidative effect of lipophilized caffeic acid in fish oil enriched mayonnaise and milk.

    PubMed

    Alemán, Mercedes; Bou, Ricard; Guardiola, Francesc; Durand, Erwann; Villeneuve, Pierre; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Sørensen, Ann-Dorit Moltke

    2015-01-15

    The antioxidative effect of lipophilized caffeic acid was assessed in two different fish oil enriched food products: mayonnaise and milk. In both emulsion systems, caffeic acid esterified with fatty alcohols of different chain lengths (C1-C20) were better antioxidants than the original phenolic compound. The optimal chain length with respect to protection against oxidation was, however, different for the two food systems. Fish oil enriched mayonnaise with caffeates of medium alkyl chain length (butyl, octyl and dodecyl) added resulted in a better oxidative stability than caffeates with shorter (methyl) or longer (octadecyl) alkyl chains. Whereas in fish oil enriched milk emulsions the most effective caffeates were those with shorter alkyl chains (methyl and butyl) rather than the ones with medium and long chains (octyl, dodecyl, hexadecyl and eicosyl). These results demonstrate that there might be an optimum alkyl chain length for each phenolipid in each type of emulsion systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Preferential cytotoxicity on tumor cells by caffeic acid phenethyl ester isolated from propolis.

    PubMed

    Grunberger, D; Banerjee, R; Eisinger, K; Oltz, E M; Efros, L; Caldwell, M; Estevez, V; Nakanishi, K

    1988-03-15

    The honeybee hive product, propolis, is a folk medicine employed for treating various ailments. Many important pharmaceutical properties have been ascribed to propolis, including anti-inflammatory, antiviral, immunostimulatory and carcinostatic activities. Propolis extracts have provided an active component identified as caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), which was readily prepared in one step. Differential cytotoxicity has been observed in normal rat/human versus transformed rat/human melanoma and breast carcinoma cell lines in the presence of CAPE.

  17. The chemotaxonomic significance of two bioactive caffeic acid esters, nepetoidins A and B, in the Lamiaceae.

    PubMed

    Grayer, Renée J; Eckert, Maria R; Veitch, Nigel C; Kite, Geoffrey C; Marin, Petar D; Kokubun, Tetsuo; Simmonds, Monique S J; Paton, Alan J

    2003-09-01

    A survey of leaf surface constituents in the family Lamiaceae using HPLC with diode array detection revealed the presence of two characteristic phenolic compounds in many species. The distribution of these phenolics in the Lamiaceae was found to be of taxonomic significance, as they were present in the great majority of species investigated for the subfamily Nepetoideae, including representatives of the well-known genera of culinary herbs, mint, rosemary, sage, thyme and basil. In contrast, they were absent from species of the other subfamilies of Lamiaceae studied and from the related families Verbenaceae, Scrophulariaceae, Acanthaceae and Buddlejaceae. The compounds were isolated from Plectranthus crassus and identified by NMR spectroscopy as the known caffeic acid esters (Z,E)-[2-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)ethenyl] 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-propenoate and (Z,E)-[2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethenyl] 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-propenoate, for which the trivial names nepetoidins A and B are proposed. The presence of this pair of caffeic acid esters adds another character to the chemical, palynological and embryological features distinguishing the Nepetoideae from the other subfamilies of Lamiaceae and related families, and supports the view that the Nepetoideae are a specialised and monophyletic group within the family. Nepetoidin B was shown to have a greater antioxidant activity than gallic, rosmarinic and caffeic acids, and showed activity as an insect phagostimulant. Both compounds were antifungal.

  18. Optimized photocatalytic degradation of caffeic acid by sol-gel TiO₂.

    PubMed

    García-Montelongo, Xiomara L; Martínez-de la Cruz, Azael; Contreras, David; Mansilla, Héctor D

    2015-01-01

    TiO₂anatase powder was prepared by means of the sol-gel method with titanium(IV) butoxide as precursor. The formation of a tetragonal crystal structure of TiO₂anatase at 500 °C was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction. The characterization of the samples synthesized was complemented by scanning electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the TiO₂anatase powder was evaluated in the degradation of caffeic acid in aqueous solution under ultraviolet radiation. A central composite circumscribed design was used to assess the weight of the experimental variables, pH and amount of catalyst in the percentage of caffeic acid degraded and the optimal conditions. The optimized conditions were found to be pH = 5.2 and a load of TiO₂of 1.1 g L⁻¹. Under these conditions more than 90% of caffeic acid degradation was achieved after 30 min of lamp irradiation. At this time the mineralization reached was almost 60%.

  19. The Quality Changes of Postharvest Mulberry Fruit Treated by Chitosan-g-Caffeic Acid During Cold Storage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Caifeng; Han, Beibei; Zheng, Yu; Liu, Lili; Li, Changlong; Sheng, Sheng; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Wu, Fuan

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to characterize the effects of chitosan-g-caffeic acid (CTS-g-CA) on improving the quality and extending the shelf life of postharvest mulberry fruit during storage at 4 °C for 18 d. CTS-g-CA was enzymatically synthesized using laccase from Pleurotus ostreatus as a catalyst. The synergistic effects of CTS-g-CA treatment on mulberry fruit were evaluated using a co-toxicity factor (cf). The results showed that the rotting rate of CTS-g-CA-treated fruit was 37.67% (compared with that of the control at 97.67%) on day 18. The weight loss and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of the CTS-g-CA-treated mulberry fruit were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those of the control, CA, CTS, and CA+CTS treatments. Moreover, the DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities of the CTS-g-CA treatment were both higher than those of the control. Furthermore, the CTS-g-CA treatment also maintained higher levels of main active substances, such as anthocyanins, ascorbic acid, polyphenols and flavones, in mulberry fruit than the other treatments. Therefore, CTS-g-CA could be used to improve the quality and extend the shelf life of postharvest mulberry fruit during cold storage. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Production of curcuminoids from tyrosine by a metabolically engineered Escherichia coli using caffeic acid as an intermediate.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joana L; Araújo, Rafael G; Prather, Kristala L J; Kluskens, Leon D; Rodrigues, Ligia R

    2015-04-01

    Curcuminoids are phenylpropanoids with high pharmaceutical potential. Herein, we report an engineered artificial pathway in Escherichia coli to produce natural curcuminoids through caffeic acid. Arabidopsis thaliana 4-coumaroyl-CoA ligase and Curcuma longa diketide-CoA synthase (DCS) and curcumin synthase (CURS1) were used to produce curcuminoids and 70 mg/L of curcumin was obtained from ferulic acid. Bisdemethoxycurcumin and demethoxycurcumin were also produced, but in lower concentrations, by feeding p-coumaric acid or a mixture of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid, respectively. Additionally, curcuminoids were produced from tyrosine through the caffeic acid pathway. To produce caffeic acid, tyrosine ammonia lyase from Rhodotorula glutinis and 4-coumarate 3-hydroxylase from Saccharothrix espanaensis were used. Caffeoyl-CoA 3-O-methyltransferase from Medicago sativa was used to convert caffeoyl-CoA to feruloyl-CoA. Using caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid or tyrosine as a substrate, 3.9, 0.3, and 0.2 mg/L of curcumin were produced, respectively. This is the first time DCS and CURS1 were used in vivo to produce curcuminoids and that curcumin was produced by feeding tyrosine. We have shown that curcumin can be produced using a pathway involvoing caffeic acid. This alternative pathway represents a step forward in the heterologous production of curcumin using E. coli.

  1. Caffeic and chlorogenic acids inhibit key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes (in vitro): a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Agunloye, Odunayo M; Adefegha, Stephen A; Akinyemi, Ayodele J; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O

    2015-03-01

    Chlorogenic acid is a major phenolic compound that forms a substantial part of plant foods and is an ester of caffeic acid and quinic acid. However, the effect of the structures of both chlorogenic and caffeic acids on their antioxidant and antidiabetic potentials have not been fully understood. Thus, this study sought to investigate and compare the interaction of caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid with α-amylase and α-glucosidase (key enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes) activities in vitro. The inhibitory effect of the phenolic acids on α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities was evaluated. Thereafter, their antioxidant activities as typified by their 1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing antioxidant properties were determined. The results revealed that both phenolic acids inhibited α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities in a dose-dependent manner (2-8 μg/mL). However, caffeic acid had a significantly (p<0.05) higher inhibitory effect on α-amylase [IC50 (concentration of sample causing 50% enzyme inhibition)=3.68 μg/mL] and α-glucosidase (IC50=4.98 μg/mL) activities than chlorogenic acid (α-amylase IC50=9.10 μg/mL and α-glucosidase IC50=9.24 μg/mL). Furthermore, both phenolic acids exhibited high antioxidant properties, with caffeic acid showing higher effects. The esterification of caffeic acid with quinic acid, producing chlorogenic acid, reduces their ability to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities. Thus, the inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities by the phenolic acids could be part of the possible mechanism by which the phenolic acids exert their antidiabetic effects.

  2. Green synthesis of gold-chitosan nanocomposites for caffeic acid sensing.

    PubMed

    Di Carlo, Gabriella; Curulli, Antonella; Toro, Roberta G; Bianchini, Chiara; De Caro, Tilde; Padeletti, Giuseppina; Zane, Daniela; Ingo, Gabriel M

    2012-03-27

    In this work, colloidal gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) stabilized into a chitosan matrix were prepared using a green route. The synthesis was carried out by reducing Au(III) to Au(0) in an aqueous solution of chitosan and different organic acids (i.e., acetic, malonic, or oxalic acid). We have demonstrated that by varying the nature of the acid it is possible to tune the reduction rate of the gold precursor (HAuCl(4)) and to modify the morphology of the resulting metal nanoparticles. The use of chitosan, a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer with a large number of amino and hydroxyl functional groups, enables the simultaneous synthesis and surface modification of AuNPs in one pot. Because of the excellent film-forming capability of this polymer, AuNPs-chitosan solutions were used to obtain hybrid nanocomposite films that combine highly conductive AuNPs with a large number of organic functional groups. Herein, Au-chitosan nanocomposites are successfully proposed as sensitive and selective electrochemical sensors for the determination of caffeic acid, an antioxidant that has recently attracted much attention because of its benefits to human health. A linear response was obtained over a wide range of concentration from 5.00 × 10(-8) M to 2.00 × 10(-3) M, and the limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be 2.50 × 10(-8) M. Moreover, further analyses have demonstrated that a high selectivity toward caffeic acid can be achieved without interference from catechin or ascorbic acid (flavonoid and nonphenolic antioxidants, respectively). This novel synthesis approach and the high performances of Au-chitosan hybrid materials in the determination of caffeic acid open up new routes in the design of highly efficient sensors, which are of great interest for the analysis of complex matrices such as wine, soft drinks, and fruit beverages.

  3. Caffeic acid binds to the minor groove of calf thymus DNA: A multi-spectroscopic, thermodynamics and molecular modelling study.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Tarique; Ishqi, Hassan Mubarak; Rehman, Sayeed Ur; Husain, Mohammed Amir; Rahman, Yusra; Tabish, Mohammad

    2017-05-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is a plant polyphenol which acts as an antioxidant and has various pharmacological effects. DNA is one of the major cellular targets of therapeutic molecules. Thus, studying the interaction of small molecules with DNA is of great importance. In the current article, we have studied the mode of binding of CA with calf thymus DNA (Ct-DNA) using a series of biophysical techniques. Formation of complex between CA and Ct-DNA is ascertained by analyzing the UV-vis absorbance and fluorescence emission spectra of CA upon successive addition of Ct-DNA. Binding constants of CA with Ct-DNA obtained using multiple experiments was in the order of 103 M-1 which is consistent with known groove binders. Analysis of thermodynamic parameters suggest that hydrogen bonding and van der Waal's forces played major role in the binding process. Competitive displacement studies confirmed that CA binds to the minor groove of Ct-DNA. These observations were further validated by KI quenching experiment, DNA melting studies, CD and viscosity measurements. In silico molecular docking further provided insight into the mode of binding of CA with Ct-DNA. Through in vitro experiments and in silico molecular docking studies, it was concluded that CA binds to the minor groove of Ct-DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antioxidant activity of propolis: role of caffeic acid phenethyl ester and galangin.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Longo, R; Vanella, A

    2002-11-01

    Propolis, a natural product produced by the honeybee, has been used for thousands of years in folk medicine for several purposes. The extract contains amino acids, phenolic acids, phenolic acid esters, flavonoids, cinnamic acid, terpenes and caffeic acid. It possesses several biological activities such as antiinflammatory, immunostimulatory, antiviral and antibacterial. The exact mode of physiological or biochemical mechanisms responsible for the medical effects, however, is yet to be determined. In this work, we have investigated the antioxidant activity of a propolis extract deprived of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE). In addition, the activity of CAPE and galangin was also examined. Propolis extract (with and without CAPE) and its active components showed a dose-dependent free radical scavenging effect, a significant inhibition of xanthine oxidase activity, and an antilipoperoxidative capacity. Propolis extract with CAPE was more active than propolis extract without CAPE. CAPE, used alone, exhibited a strong antioxidant activity, higher than galangin. The experimental evidence, therefore, suggests that CAPE plays an important role in the antioxidant activity of propolis.

  5. Antistaphylococcal and biofilm inhibitory activities of gallic, caffeic, and chlorogenic acids.

    PubMed

    Luís, Ângelo; Silva, Filomena; Sousa, Sónia; Duarte, Ana Paula; Domingues, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen which is able to form biofilms, exhibiting a more pronounced resistance to antibiotics and disinfectants. The hurdles posed in eradicating biofilms have driven the search for new compounds able to fight these structures. Phenolic compounds constitute one of the most numerous and ubiquitous group of plant secondary metabolites with many biological activities. The aim of the present work was to study the potential antimicrobial and antibiofilm properties of gallic, caffeic, and chlorogenic acids against S. aureus as well to elucidate its mechanism of action. It was concluded that the phenolic acids studied in this work have antistaphylococcal properties. For instance, gallic acid is able to influence the adhesion properties of S. aureus. The phenolic acids tested were also able to inhibit the production of α-hemolysin by this microorganism, with the exception of chlorogenic acid. Regarding its mechanism of action, caffeic acid interferes with the stability of the cell membrane and with the metabolic activity of the cells of S. aureus.

  6. [Study on determination of caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid in rat plasma and their pharmacokinetics with LC-MS/MS].

    PubMed

    Dai, Guo-Liang; Ma, Shi-Tang; Liu, Shi-Jia; Cheng, Xiao-Gui; Zang, Yu-Xin; Ju, Wen-Zheng; Tan, Heng-Shan

    2013-11-01

    To establish a LC-MS/MS method to determine caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid in rat plasma and study their pharmacokinetics in rats. Six Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously injected with 4 mL x kg(-1) of Dengzhanxixin injection, respectively. Their drug plasma concentration was determined by LC-MS/MS, with tinidazole as an internal standard. The pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by DAS 1.0. The linear concentration ranges of caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid were 2-128 microg x L(-1) (r = 0.998 1) and 3-384 microg x L(-1) (r = 0.998 7), respectively. The methodological test showed conformance to the requirements. The intraday and inter-day variable coefficients were both less than 10.0%, indicating that both of legitimate precise and accuracy were in conformity with the requirements of biological sample analysis. For caffeic acid, the pharmacokinetic parameter t1/2beta AUC0-t, and CL were (130.91 +/- 38.77) min, (4.89 +/- 0.96) mg x min x L(-1) and (0.12 +/- 0.02) L x min(-1) x kg(-1), respectively. For chlorogenic acid, the pharmacokinetic parameter t1/2beta , AUC0-t, and CL were (49.38 +/- 8.85) min, (9.54 +/- 0.95) mg x min x L(-1) and (0.09 +/- 0.003) L x min(-1) x kg(-1), respectively. The LC-MS/MS analysis method established in this study was proved to be so accurate and sensitive that it can be applied to the pharmacokinetic study of caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid.

  7. Analysis of Organic Acids, Deacetyl Asperulosidic Acid and Polyphenolic Compounds as a Potential Tool for Characterization of Noni (Morinda citrifolia) Products.

    PubMed

    Bittová, Miroslava; Hladůkova, Dita; Roblová, Vendula; Krácmar, Stanislav; Kubán, Petr; Kubán, Vlastimil

    2015-11-01

    Organic acids, deacetyl asperulosidic acid (DAA) and polyphenolic compounds in various noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) products (4 juices, 4 dry fruit powders and 2 capsules with dry fruit powder) were analyzed. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled with a variable wavelength detector (VWD) and electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ESI-TOF MS) was applied for simultaneous analysis of organic acids (malic, lactic, citric and succinic acid) and DAA. An RP-HPLC method with diode-array detector (DAD) was developed for the analysis of polyphenolic compound content (rutin, catechin, quercitrin, kaempferol, gallic acid, caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid). The developed methods can contribute to better characterization of available noni products that is required from the consumers. In our study, we discovered significant dissimilarities in the content of DAA, citric acid and several phenolic compounds in some samples.

  8. Effect of caffeic acid esters on carcinogen-induced mutagenicity and human colon adenocarcinoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Rao, C V; Desai, D; Kaul, B; Amin, S; Reddy, B S

    1992-11-16

    Propolis, a honey bee hive product, is thought to exhibit a broad spectrum of activities including antibiotic, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and tumor growth inhibition; some of the observed biological activities may be due to caffeic acid (cinnamic acid) esters that are present in propolis. In the present study we synthesized three caffeic acid esters, namely methyl caffeate (MC), phenylethyl caffeate (PEC) and phenylethyl dimethylcaffeate (PEDMC) and tested them against the 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl, (DMAB, a colon and mammary carcinogen)-induced mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100. Also, the effect of these agents on the growth of human colon adenocarcinoma, HT-29 cells and activities of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) was studied. Mutagenicity was induced in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100 plus S9 activation using 5 and 10 micrograms DMAB and antimutagenic activities of 0-150 microM MC, 0-60 microM PEC and 0-80 microM PEDMC were determined. The results indicate that MC, PEC and PEDMC were not mutagenic in the Salmonella tester system. DMAB-induced mutagenicity was significantly inhibited with 150 microM MC, 40-60 microM PEC and 40-80 microM PEDMC in both tester systems. Treatment of HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells with > 150 microM MC, 30 microM PEC and 20 microM PEDMC significantly inhibited the cell growth and syntheses of RNA, DNA and protein. ODC and PTK activities were also inhibited in HT-29 cells treated with different concentrations of MC, PEC and PEDMC. These results demonstrate that caffeic acid esters which are present in Propolis possess chemopreventive properties when tested in short-term assay systems.

  9. The effects of gallic/ferulic/caffeic acids on colour intensification and anthocyanin stability.

    PubMed

    Qian, Bing-Jun; Liu, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Shu-Juan; Cai, Jian-Xiong; Jing, Pu

    2017-08-01

    The mechanism by which copigments stabilize colour, by protecting anthocyanin chromophores from nucleophilic attack, seems well accepted. This study was to determine effects of gallic/ferulic/caffeic acids on colour intensification and anthocyanin stability. Molecular dynamics simulations were applied to explore molecular interactions. Phenolic acids intensified the colour by 19%∼27%. Colour fading during heating followed first-order reactions with half-lives of 3.66, 9.64, 3.50, and 3.39h, whereas anthocyanin degradation, determined by the pH differential method (or HPLC-PDA), followed second-order reactions with half-lives of 3.29 (3.40), 3.43 (3.39), 2.29 (0.39), and 2.72 (0.32)h alone or with gallic/ferulic/caffeic acids, respectively, suggesting that anthocyanin degradation was faster than the colour fading. The strongest protection of gallic acids might be attributed to the shortest distance (4.37Å) of its aromatic ring to the anthocyanin (AC) panel. Hyperchromic effects induced by phenolic acids were pronounced and they obscured the accelerated anthocyanin degradation due to self-association interruption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuroprotective effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester in 3-nitropropionic acid-induced striatal neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Jia; Kim, Hee Jung; Kim, Seong Yun

    2016-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), derived from honeybee hives, is a bioactive compound with strong antioxidant activity. This study was designed to test the neuroprotective effect of CAPE in 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP)-induced striatal neurotoxicity, a chemical model of Huntington's disease (HD). Initially, to test CAPE's antioxidant activity, a 2,2'-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) antioxidant assay was employed, and CAPE showed a strong direct radical-scavenging eff ect. In addition, CAPE provided protection from 3NP-induced neuronal cell death in cultured striatal neurons. Based on these observations, the in vivo therapeutic potential of CAPE in 3NP-induced HD was tested. For this purpose, male C57BL/6 mice were repeatedly given 3NP to induce HD-like pathogenesis, and 30 mg/kg of CAPE or vehicle (5% dimethyl sulfoxide and 95% peanut oil) was administered daily. CAPE did not cause changes in body weight, but it reduced mortality by 29%. In addition, compared to the vehicle-treated group, robustly reduced striatal damage was observed in the CAPE-treated animals, and the 3NP-induced behavioral defi cits on the rotarod test were signifi cantly rescued after the CAPE treatment. Furthermore, immunohistochemical data showed that immunoreactivity to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and CD45, markers for astrocyte and microglia activation, respectively, were strikingly reduced. Combined, these data unequivocally indicate that CAPE has a strong antioxidant eff ect and can be used as a potential therapeutic agent against HD. PMID:27162482

  11. [Vasorelaxant activity of caffeic acid derivatives from Cichorium intybus and Equisetum arvense].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Nobuko; Iizuka, Tohru; Nakayama, Shigeki; Funayama, Hiroko; Noguchi, Mariko; Nagai, Masahiro

    2003-07-01

    The vasorelaxant activities of chicoric acid (Compound 1) from Cichorium intybus and dicaffeoyl-meso-tartaric acid (Compound 2) from Equisetum arvense L. in isolated rat aorta strips were studied. Compound 1 is a diester composed of (S,S)-tartaric acid and caffeic acid, and 2 is composed of its meso type. Both 1 and 2 showed slow relaxation activity against norepinephrine (NE)-induced contraction of rat aorta with/without endothelium. These compounds did not affect contraction induced by a high concentration of potassium (60 mM K+), while they inhibited NE-induced vasocontraction in the presence of nicardipine. These results show that the inhibition by 1 and 2 of NE-induced vasocontraction is due to a decrease in calcium influx from the extracellular space caused by NE. In addition, dicaffeoyl tartaric acids showed vasorelaxant activity, regardless of their stereochemistry.

  12. Synthesis and Biological Activity of Arylspiroborate Salts Derived from Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Hébert, Martin J. G.; Flewelling, Andrew J.; Clark, Trevor N.; Jean-François, Jacques; Surette, Marc E.; Gray, Christopher A.; Vogels, Christopher M.; Touaibia, Mohamed; Westcott, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Two novel boron compounds containing caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) derivatives have been prepared and characterized fully. These new compounds and CAPE have been investigated for potential antioxidant and antimicrobial properties and their ability to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and whether chelation to boron improves their biological activity. Sodium salt 4 was generally more active than ammonium salt 5 in the biological assays and surpassed the radical scavenging ability of CAPE. Compounds 4 and 5 were more active than CAPE and Zileuton in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. These results clearly show the effectiveness of the synthesized salts as transporter of CAPE. PMID:25834744

  13. Synthesis and biological activity of arylspiroborate salts derived from caffeic Acid phenethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Martin J G; Flewelling, Andrew J; Clark, Trevor N; Levesque, Natalie A; Jean-François, Jacques; Surette, Marc E; Gray, Christopher A; Vogels, Christopher M; Touaibia, Mohamed; Westcott, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Two novel boron compounds containing caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) derivatives have been prepared and characterized fully. These new compounds and CAPE have been investigated for potential antioxidant and antimicrobial properties and their ability to inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and whether chelation to boron improves their biological activity. Sodium salt 4 was generally more active than ammonium salt 5 in the biological assays and surpassed the radical scavenging ability of CAPE. Compounds 4 and 5 were more active than CAPE and Zileuton in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. These results clearly show the effectiveness of the synthesized salts as transporter of CAPE.

  14. Comparative studies on the interaction of caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid and ferulic acid with bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang; Huang, Kelong; Zhong, Ming; Guo, Jun; Wang, Wei-zheng; Zhu, Ronghua

    2010-10-01

    The substitution of the hydrogen on aromatic and esterification of carboxyl group of the phenol compounds plays an important role in their bio-activities. In this paper, caffeic acid (CaA), chlorogenic acid (ChA) and ferulic acid (FA) were selected to investigate the binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) using UV absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that the methoxyl group substituting for the 3-hydroxyl group of CaA decreased the affinity for BSA and the esterification of carboxyl group of CaA with quinic acid increased the affinities. The affinities of ChA and FA with BSA were more sensitive to the temperature than that of CaA with BSA. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence indicated that the Stern-Volmer plots largely deviated from linearity at high concentrations and were caused by complete quenching of the tyrosine fluorescence of BSA.

  15. Polydopamine-coated magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer for the selective solid-phase extraction of cinnamic acid, ferulic acid and caffeic acid from radix scrophulariae sample.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuli; Yan, Liang; Zhang, Zhaohui; Wang, Jing; Luo, Ningjing

    2016-04-01

    We describe novel cinnamic acid polydopamine-coated magnetic imprinted polymers for the simultaneous selective extraction of cinnamic acid, ferulic acid and caffeic acid from radix scrophulariae sample. The novel magnetic imprinted polymers were synthesized by surface imprinting polymerization using magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as the support material, cinnamic acid as the template and dopamine as the functional monomer. The magnetic imprinted polymers were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results revealed that the magnetic imprinted polymers had outstanding magnetic properties, high adsorption capacity, selectivity and fast kinetic binding toward cinnamic acid, ferulic acid and caffeic acid. Coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography, the extraction conditions of the magnetic imprinted polymers as a magnetic solid-phase extraction sorbent were investigated in detail. The proposed imprinted magnetic solid phase extraction procedure has been used for the purification and enrichment of cinnamic acid, ferulic acid and caffeic acid successfully from radix scrophulariae extraction sample with recoveries of 92.4-115.0% for cinnamic acid, 89.4-103.0% for ferulic acid and 86.6-96.0% for caffeic acid. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Anti-HIV activities of natural antioxidant caffeic acid derivatives: toward an antiviral supplementation diet.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Fabrice; Cotelle, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Since 1996, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was designed to rapidly control HIV replication. It has had a significant impact on patient health and progression of AIDS in developed countries, but its success has not been complete. HAART strategy still suffers from issues of patient compliance, cost, deleterious side effects and emerging drug resistance. Therefore, expansion of novel anti-HIV drugs and targets will be critical in the coming years. In this context, discovering anti-HIV agents from natural sources and particularly from plants, may highlight the principle of a nutritional antioxidant antiretroviral diet. In this paper, we review the putative anti-HIV activity of simple caffeic acid derivatives, together with their antioxidant properties. Toxicity, metabolism and bioavailability, when known, will also be detailed. Well-known caffeic acid derivatives, such as chicoric, rosmarinic and lithospermic acids, may be designed as future leads multi-target anti-HIV compounds and the plants and vegetables containing them as potent nutritional therapeutic supplementation source. They are not expected to replace the actual antiretroviral therapy, but more likely, to complete and perhaps lighten it by adapted diet.

  17. Synthesis and antioxidant properties of caffeic acid corn bran arabinoxylan esters.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Zhu, Y; Liang, R; Yang, C

    2017-08-01

    As a potential of bioactive additives, corn bran arabinoxylan (CAX) was prominent in its probiotic benefits and immuno-enhancing activities. To improve the antioxidant ability of CAX, naturally occurring caffeic acid (CA) was covalently attached to CAX by esterification to generate caffeic acid corn bran arabinoxylan esters (CA-CAX) with various degrees of substitution (DS). The structure of CA-CAX was analysed by NMR, and the DS was determined by HPLC. The antioxidant activity of CA-CAX was investigated on scavenging the 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and autoxidazing methyl linoleate, and an aqueous linolenic acid dispersion was also used as an in vitro test system to examine the inhibition effect of CA-CAX on the lipid peroxidation level after UV exposure. The ability of CA-CAX to prevent H2 O2 -induced oxidative damage of cell was studied by reducing MDA levels and increasing SOD and GSH-Px activities in human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cell. The results certificated that CA was linked to CAX successfully with various DS. Compared with CAX, the antioxidant capacity of CA-CAX was improved significantly and enhanced with the increasing concentration and DS. © 2017 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  18. Effect of natural flavonoids, stilbenes and caffeic acid oligomers on protein glycation.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kenroh; Chiba, Syuko; Yoshizaki, Fumihiko

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the inhibitory activity of natural flavonoids, stilbenes and caffeic acid oligomers on protein glycation. Antioxidant activity was evaluated using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity. The production of 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG) and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) by glycation reactions were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and fluorescence, respectively. Certain flavonoids, stilbenes and caffeic acid oligomers prevented AGE production and the IC50 values of the compounds were compared. These examined compounds are assumed to suppress AGE generation by inhibiting the increase in 3-DG production through a specific unknown mechanism in the early phase of the Maillard reaction, by inhibiting the generation of active oxygen in the later phase and by suppressing the progression of the reaction. Regular, daily consumption of these compounds in the form of a food or extract is expected to aid in the prevention or inhibition of non-enzymatic amino acid glycation in the living body, which is possibly associated with aging, diabetic complications, arteriosclerotic diseases and Alzheimer's disease, and they may also be effective agents in cosmetics promoting anti-aging.

  19. Effects of exercise and caffeic acid phenethyl ester after chronic exercise rat model

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Ayse; Buyukbas, Sadik; Alp, Harun; Gergerlioglu, H. Serdar; Oz, Mehmet; Basarali, M. Kemal; Kiyici, Aysel

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand whether exercise and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) has an effect on obesity and weight control, we investigated the effects of CAPE, and exercise on lipid parameters (triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL-C, LDL-C), and adipokine substances such as leptin and resistin in rats. 40 male rat were randomly assigned into 4 groups. It was determined that CAPE does not have any significant effect on these parameters but that lipid parameters and leptin values in exercise groups decreased considerably, while no significant change occurred in resistin levels. In order to understand whether diet has an effect on exercise, body weights of all animal groups in pre and post-exercise were compared. A significant weight gain was observed (p = 0.005) in all groups. This study concluded that exercise has a considerable effect on leptin and lipid parameters; however, exercise alone was not sufficient for weight control and could be effective in weight control only when accompanied by a restricted diet. Key points Caffeic acid phenethyl ester is not effective on weight control, lipid parameters, and adipokine substances such as leptin and resistin. Exercise can be effective in weight control only when accompanied by a restricted diet. PMID:24149554

  20. Homogeneous and heterogeneous degradation of caffeic acid using photocatalysis driven by UVA and solar light.

    PubMed

    Yáñez, Eliana; Santander, Paola; Contreras, David; Yáñez, Jorge; Cornejo, Lorena; Mansilla, Héctor D

    2016-01-01

    Waste water from the wine industry is characterized by a high concentration of dissolved organic matter and the presence of natural phenolic compounds with low biodegradability. High concentrations of phenolic compounds may cause environmental pollution and risks to human health. In this article caffeic acid (CA) was used as a model compound of wine effluent because it is refractory to the conventional wastewater treatments. The oxidation of caffeic acid in water solution (0.01 g L(-1)) by heterogeneous photocatalysis and photo-Fenton reaction was studied using UVA. The optimal conditions for each treatment were performed by multivariate experimental design. The optimal conditions for heterogeneous photocatalysis were pH 5.3 and 0.9 g L(-1) TiO2. In the case of photo-Fenton treatment, optimized variable were 82.4 μmol L(-1) of Fe(2+) and 558.6 μmol L(-1) of H2O2. The degradation profiles of CA were monitored by UV-Vis, HPLC, TOC and COD. To reach 90% of CA removal, 40 and 2 min of reaction, respectively, were required by heterogeneous and photo-Fenton processes, respectively. For comparison purposes, the reactions were also performed under solar light. The use of solar light does not change the efficiency of the photo-Fenton reaction, yet the performance of the heterogeneous process was significantly improved, reaching 90% of degradation in 15 min.

  1. Phylogenetic, Molecular, and Biochemical Characterization of Caffeic Acid o-Methyltransferase Gene Family in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xianting; Wu, Jiajie; Luo, Yangfan; Bragg, Jennifer; Anderson, Olin; Vogel, John; Gu, Yong Q.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeic acid o-methyltransferase (COMT) is one of the important enzymes controlling lignin monomer production in plant cell wall synthesis. Analysis of the genome sequence of the new grass model Brachypodium distachyon identified four COMT gene homologs, designated as BdCOMT1, BdCOMT2, BdCOMT3, and BdCOMT4. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that they belong to the COMT gene family, whereas syntenic analysis through comparisons with rice and sorghum revealed that BdCOMT4 on Chromosome 3 is the orthologous copy of the COMT genes well characterized in other grass species. The other three COMT genes are unique to Brachypodium since orthologous copies are not found in the collinear regions of rice and sorghum genomes. Expression studies indicated that all four Brachypodium COMT genes are transcribed but with distinct patterns of tissue specificity. Full-length cDNAs were cloned in frame into the pQE-T7 expression vector for the purification of recombinant Brachypodium COMT proteins. Biochemical characterization of enzyme activity and substrate specificity showed that BdCOMT4 has significant effect on a broad range of substrates with the highest preference for caffeic acid. The other three COMTs had low or no effect on these substrates, suggesting that a diversified evolution occurred on these duplicate genes that not only impacted their pattern of expression, but also altered their biochemical properties. PMID:23431288

  2. Regulatory effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on neuroinflammation in microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Wu, Caren Yu-Ju; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Lai, Sheng-Wei; Liu, Yu-Shu; Wu, Ling-Hsuan; Lu, Jheng-Kun; Lu, Dah-Yuu

    2015-03-11

    Microglial activation has been widely demonstrated to mediate inflammatory processes that are crucial in several neurodegenerative disorders. Pharmaceuticals that can deliver direct inhibitory effects on microglia are therefore considered as a potential strategy to counter balance neurodegenerative progression. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a natural phenol in honeybee propolis, is known to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties. Accordingly, the current study intended to probe the effects of CAPE on microglia activation by using in vitro and in vivo models. Western blot and Griess reaction assay revealed CAPE significantly inhibited the expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and the production of nitric oxide (NO). Administration of CAPE resulted in increased expressions of hemeoxygenase (HO)-1and erythropoietin (EPO) in microglia. The phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-α was further found to regulate the anti-inflammatory effects of caffeic acid. In vivo results from immunohistochemistry along with rotarod test also revealed the anti-neuroinflammatory effects of CAPE in microglia activation. The current study has evidenced several possible molecular determinants, AMPKα, EPO, and HO-1, in mediating anti-neuroinflammatory responses in microglial cells.

  3. Molecular Characterization and Enhancement of Anticancer Activity of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester by γ Cyclodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Renu; Nigam, Nupur; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur; Goyal, Sukriti; Grover, Abhinav; Sundar, Durai; Ishida, Yoshiyuki; Terao, Keiji; Kaul, Sunil C

    2016-01-01

    Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) is a key component in New Zealand propolis, known for a variety of health promoting and therapeutic potentials. We investigated the molecular mechanism of anticancer and anti-metastasis activities of CAPE. cDNA array performed on the control and CAPE-treated breast cancer cells revealed activation of DNA damage signaling involving upregulation of GADD45α and p53 tumor suppressor proteins. Molecular docking analysis revealed that CAPE is capable of disrupting mortalin-p53 complexes. We provide experimental evidence and demonstrate that CAPE induced disruption of mortalin-p53 complexes led to nuclear translocation and activation of p53 resulting in growth arrest in cancer cells. Furthermore, CAPE-treated cells exhibited downregulation of mortalin and several other key regulators of cell migration accountable for its anti-metastasis activity. Of note, we found that whereas CAPE was unstable in the culture medium (as it gets degraded into caffeic acid by secreted esterases), its complex with gamma cyclodextrin (γCD) showed high efficacy in anti-tumor and anti-metastasis assays in vitro and in vivo (when administered through either intraperitoneal or oral route). The data proposes that CAPE-γCD complex is a potent anti-cancer and anti-metastasis reagent. PMID:27698914

  4. Regulatory Effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Neuroinflammation in Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Wu, Caren Yu-Ju; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Lai, Sheng-Wei; Liu, Yu-Shu; Wu, Ling-Hsuan; Lu, Jheng-Kun; Lu, Dah-Yuu

    2015-01-01

    Microglial activation has been widely demonstrated to mediate inflammatory processes that are crucial in several neurodegenerative disorders. Pharmaceuticals that can deliver direct inhibitory effects on microglia are therefore considered as a potential strategy to counter balance neurodegenerative progression. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a natural phenol in honeybee propolis, is known to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties. Accordingly, the current study intended to probe the effects of CAPE on microglia activation by using in vitro and in vivo models. Western blot and Griess reaction assay revealed CAPE significantly inhibited the expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and the production of nitric oxide (NO). Administration of CAPE resulted in increased expressions of hemeoxygenase (HO)-1and erythropoietin (EPO) in microglia. The phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-α was further found to regulate the anti-inflammatory effects of caffeic acid. In vivo results from immunohistochemistry along with rotarod test also revealed the anti-neuroinflammatory effects of CAPE in microglia activation. The current study has evidenced several possible molecular determinants, AMPKα, EPO, and HO-1, in mediating anti-neuroinflammatory responses in microglial cells. PMID:25768341

  5. Caffeic acid and glycerol are constituents of the suberin layers in green cotton fibres.

    PubMed

    Schmutz, A; Jenny, T; Amrhein, N; Ryser, U

    1993-03-01

    The fibres of the green-lint mutant (Lg) of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) are suberized and contain a large proportion of wax. The unidentified components of the wax were separated into a colourless fluorescent fraction and a yellow pigmented fraction. Using ultraviolet spectroscopy and nuclear-magneticresonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy, esterified trans-caffeic acid was identified as the only phenolic component in the colourless fraction. This fraction was further purified and was shown to contain caffeic acid esterified to fatty acids (mainly ω-hydroxy fatty acids), and glycerol in molar ratios of 4∶5∶5. When 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid (AIP), an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (EC 4. 3. 1. 5.) was added to ovules cultured in vitro, at the beginning of secondary wall formation, the fibres remained white and the colourless caffeic-acid derivative and the yellow compounds could no longer be detected by ultraviolet spectroscopy. Fibres grown in the presence of AIP were also examined in the electron microscope. Secondary cell walls were present in the treated fibres, but the electron-opaque suberin layers were replaced by apparently empty spaces. This result indicates that cinnamic-acid derivatives are covalently linked to suberin and have a structural role within the polymer or are involved in anchoring the polymer to the cellulosic secondary wall. Purified cell walls of green cotton fibres contained about 1% (of the dry weight) of bound glycerol, 0.9% of the glycerol being extractable with the wax fraction and 0.1% remaining in the cell-wall residue. The corresponding values for white fibres were 0.03% (total), 0.02% (wax), and 0.01% (cell-wall residue). Fibres synthesizing their secondary walls in the presence of AIP contained about normal amounts of bound glycerol in the wax fraction, but glycerol accumulation in the cell-wall residue was inhibited by about 95%. These observations indicate that glycerol is an important constituent of cotton

  6. Photoproduction of glyoxylic acid in model wine: Impact of sulfur dioxide, caffeic acid, pH and temperature.

    PubMed

    Grant-Preece, Paris; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Barril, Celia; Clark, Andrew C

    2017-01-15

    Glyoxylic acid is a tartaric acid degradation product formed in model wine solutions containing iron and its production is greatly increased by exposure to UV-visible light. In this study, the combined effect of sulfur dioxide, caffeic acid, pH and temperature on the light-induced (⩾300nm) production of glyoxylic acid in model wine containing tartaric acid and iron was investigated using a Box-Behnken experimental design and response surface methodology (RSM). Glyoxylic acid produced in the irradiated model wine was present in free and hydrogen sulfite adduct forms and the measured total, free and percentage free glyoxylic acid values were modeled using RSM. Sulfur dioxide significantly decreased the total amount of glyoxylic acid produced, but could not prevent its production, while caffeic acid showed no significant impact. The interaction between pH and temperature was significant, with low pH values and low temperatures giving rise to higher levels of total glyoxylic acid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermal transformation of bioactive caffeic acid on fumed silica seen by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry and quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Tetiana V; Lipkovska, Natalia O; Barvinchenko, Valentyna M; Palyanytsya, Borys B; Kazakova, Olga A; Dudik, Olesia O; Menyhárd, Alfréd; László, Krisztina

    2016-05-15

    Thermochemical studies of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and their surface complexes are important for the pharmaceutical industry, medicine and for the development of technologies of heterogeneous biomass pyrolysis. In this study, structural and thermal transformations of caffeic acid complexes on silica surfaces were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry (TPD MS) and quantum chemical methods. Two types of caffeic acid surface complexes are found to form through phenolic or carboxyl groups. The kinetic parameters of the chemical reactions of caffeic acid on silica surface are calculated. The mechanisms of thermal transformations of the caffeic chemisorbed surface complexes are proposed. Thermal decomposition of caffeic acid complex chemisorbed through grafted ester group proceeds via three parallel reactions, producing ketene, vinyl and acetylene derivatives of 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Immobilization of phenolic acids on the silica surface improves greatly their thermal stability.

  8. Structure-activity relationship of caffeic acid phenethyl ester analogs as new 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Jérémie A; Leblanc, Luc M; Hébert, Martin J G; Levesque, Natalie A; Paré, Aurélie F; Jean-François, Jacques; Cormier, Marc; Surette, Marc E; Touaibia, Mohamed

    2016-09-26

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are a class of lipid mediators implicated in numerous inflammatory disorders. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) possesses potent anti-LTs activity through the inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of LTs. In this study, we describe the design and synthesis of CAPE analogs as radical scavengers and 5-LO inhibitors. Caffeic esters bearing propargyl and allyl linkers between the caffeoyl and aryl moieties (4a-i and 5a-i, respectively) were synthesized by Sonogashira and Heck cross-coupling reactions to probe the effects of flexibility and aryl substitution on 5-LO inhibition. Caffeoyl alcohol and ethers (6, 7a-b) as well as caffeoyl aldehyde and ketones (8a-e) were synthesized to elucidate the importance of the ester linkage for inhibitory activity. All tested compounds proved to be good radical scavengers (IC50 of 10-30 μm). After preliminary anti-LTs activity screening in HEK293 cell models, 5-LO inhibition potential of selected compounds was determined in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL). Most screened compounds outperformed CAPE 3 in concentration-dependent assays on PMNL, with ester dimers 4i and 5i along with caffeoyl ethers 7a-b being roughly eight-, seven-, and 16-fold more potent than Zileuton, with IC50 values of 0.36, 0.43, and 0.18 μm, respectively.

  9. A spectrophotometric study of the copigmentation of malvin with caffeic and ferulic acids.

    PubMed

    Marković, J M; Petranović, N A; Baranac, J M

    2000-11-01

    The process of copigmentation of the anthocyanin molecule malvidin 3, 5-diglucoside with two organic monocarboxylic phenolic acids, caffeic and ferulic acids, was studied via their absorption electronic spectra. The dependence of the copigmentation process on the pH of the medium, molecular concentration, and temperature was established. The process of copigmentation was observed at two pH values: 2.50 and 3.65. The stoichiometric ratio was 1:1 at both pH values. The copigmentation was characterized by approximately equal values of the equilibrium constant, K, within each of the pH values. The temperature was found to be a significant factor that determines the thermodynamic conditions of the copigmentation process, because the process is spontaneous (DeltaG degrees < 0), and results in entropy loss (DeltaS degrees < 0) at both pH values.

  10. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of the caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) ortholog from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We cloned the full-length of the gene putatively encoding caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) using degenerate primers and the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) method. Kenaf is an herbaceous and rapidly growing dicotyledonous plant with great potential ...

  11. Evolution of novel O-methyltransferases from the Vanilla planifolia caffeic acid O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaijun Michael; Rotter, David; Hartman, Thomas G; Pak, Fulya E; Havkin-Frenkel, Daphna; Belanger, Faith C

    2006-06-01

    The biosynthesis of many plant secondary compounds involves the methylation of one or more hydroxyl groups, catalyzed by O-methyltransferases (OMTs). Here, we report the characterization of two OMTs, Van OMT-2 and Van OMT-3, from the orchid Vanilla planifolia Andrews. These enzymes catalyze the methylation of a single outer hydroxyl group in substrates possessing a 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene moiety, such as methyl gallate and myricetin. This is a substrate requirement not previously reported for any OMTs. Based on sequence analysis these enzymes are most similar to caffeic acid O-methyltransferases (COMTs), but they have negligible activity with typical COMT substrates. Seven of 12 conserved substrate-binding residues in COMTs are altered in Van OMT-2 and Van OMT-3. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences suggests that Van OMT-2 and Van OMT-3 evolved from the V. planifolia COMT. These V. planifolia OMTs are new instances of COMT-like enzymes with novel substrate preferences.

  12. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester: its protective role against certain major eye diseases.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Sumeyya; Ugurcu, Veli; Balci, Mehmet; Gurel, Ayse; Erden, Gonul; Cakmak, Ozlem; Akyol, Omer

    2014-11-01

    As an effective compound found mainly in the honeybee product propolis, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) has been commonly utilized as a medicine and remedial agent, in a number of countries. Specifically, it might inhibit nuclear factor kappa B at micromolar concentrations and demonstrate antioxidant, antineoplastic, antiproliferative, cytostatic, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory features. This review article summarizes the recent progress regarding the favorable effects of CAPE on a number of eye disease models, including cataract and posterior capsule opacification, corneal diseases, retina and optic nerve-related diseases, ischemia/reperfusion injury of retina, inflammation and infection-related diseases. CAPE has been found to exhibit promising efficacy, with minimal adverse effects, in animal and cell culture studies of several eye diseases.

  13. Antiviral properties of caffeic acid phenethyl ester and its potential application.

    PubMed

    Erdemli, Hacı Kemal; Akyol, Sumeyya; Armutcu, Ferah; Akyol, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is found in a variety of plants and well-known the active ingredient of the honeybee propolis. CAPE showed anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, antimitogenic, antiviral, and immunomodulatory properties in several studies. The beneficial effects of CAPE on different health issues attracted scientists to make more studies on CAPE. Specifically, the anti-viral effects of CAPE and its molecular mechanisms may reveal the important properties of virus-induced diseases. CAPE and its targets may have important roles to design new therapeutics and understand the molecular mechanisms of virus-related diseases. In this mini-review, we summarize the antiviral effects of CAPE under the light of medical and chemical literature.

  14. Future opportunities in preventing ototoxicity: Caffeic acid phenethyl ester may be a candidate (Review).

    PubMed

    Akyol, Sumeyya; Isik, Bunyamin; Altuntas, Aynur; Erden, Gonul; Cakmak, Ozlem; Kurşunlu, S Fatih; Adam, Bahattin; Akyol, Omer

    2015-09-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an important active component of propolis, which is derived from honeybee hives. It has received increasing attention in a variety of medical and pharmaceutical research, due to its anti‑oxidant, antiproliferative, anti‑inflammatory, antiviral and antifungal activity, in addition to its antineoplastic properties. Besides the use of CAPE as an antioxidant and anti‑inflammatory agent in a number of in vivo studies of ear disease, its beneficial effects have been reported in the treatment of cancer, arthritis, allergies, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, liver disease and neurological disease. CAPE influences a number of biochemical pathways, as well as several targets involved in ear diseases, in particular, in ototoxicity. The protective effects of CAPE in ototoxicity, which may be induced by a number factors, including lipopolysaccharides, hydrogen peroxide and streptomycin, are evaluated and discussed in the present review.

  15. Antiproliferative activity and SARs of caffeic acid esters with mono-substituted phenylethanols moiety.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jin; Yang, Fengzhi; Zhang, Man; Lam, Celine; Qiao, Yixue; Xiao, Jia; Zhang, Dongdong; Ge, Yuxuan; Fu, Lei; Xie, Dongsheng

    2017-01-15

    A series of CAPE derivatives with mono-substituted phenylethanols moiety were synthesized and evaluated by MTT assay on growth of 4 human cancer cell lines (Hela, DU-145, MCF-7 and ECA-109). The substituent effects on the antiproliferative activity were systematically investigated for the first time. It was found that electron-donating and hydrophobic substituents at 2'-position of phenylethanol moiety could significantly enhance CAPE's antiproliferative activity. 2'-Propoxyl derivative, as a novel caffeic acid ester, exhibited exquisite potency (IC50=0.4±0.02 & 0.6±0.03μM against Hela and DU-145 respectively). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Way toward "dietary pesticides": molecular investigation of insecticidal action of caffeic acid against Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Joshi, R S; Wagh, T P; Sharma, N; Mulani, F A; Sonavane, U; Thulasiram, H V; Joshi, R; Gupta, V S; Giri, A P

    2014-11-12

    Bioprospecting of natural molecules is essential to overcome serious environmental issues and pesticide resistance in insects. Here we are reporting insights into insecticidal activity of a plant natural phenol. In silico and in vitro screening of multiple molecules supported by in vivo validations suggested that caffeic acid (CA) is a potent inhibitor of Helicoverpa armigera gut proteases. Protease activity and gene expression were altered in CA-fed larvae. The structure-activity relationship of CA highlighted that all the functional groups are crucial for inhibition of protease activity. Biophysical studies and molecular dynamic simulations revealed that sequential binding of multiple CA molecules induces conformational changes in the protease(s) and thus lead to a significant decline in their activity. CA treatment significantly inhibits the insect's detoxification enzymes, thus intensifying the insecticidal effect. Our findings suggest that CA can be implicated as a potent insecticidal molecule and explored for the development of effective dietary pesticides.

  17. Stabilization effects of naringenin and caffeic acid on γ-irradiatedEPDM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharescu, T.; Jipa, S.; Mantsch, A.; Henderson, D.

    2013-03-01

    The stabilization of ethylene-propylene diene rubber (EPDM) with naringenin and caffeic acid is studied. The selected concentrations were 0.25, 0.50 and 1 phr. The degradation was performed by γ-irradiation. The protective effect of these antioxidants was investigated by isothermal chemiluminescence at 170 °C and FTIR spectroscopy. The synergetic action of these compounds and metallic selenium was also revealed. The exceptional contribution provided by these phenolic stabilizers is characterized by three kinetic parameters: initial CL intensity, oxidation induction time and maximum period of degradation. The radiation stability of stabilized EPDM is efficiently depicted by induction periods which are the minimum 6times longer for unirradiated samples and 2-50 times longer for 50 kGy-irradiated specimens than pristineEPDM.

  18. Effects of Caffeic Acid and Quercetin on In Vitro Permeability, Metabolism and In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of Melatonin in Rats: Potential for Herb-Drug Interaction.

    PubMed

    Jana, Snehasis; Rastogi, Himanshu

    2017-01-09

    Melatonin is a popular dietary supplement and also considered as pharmaceutical product for sleep disorders. Caffeic acid and quercetin are widely distributed in leafy vegetables, fruits, tea extract, and both are used as natural antioxidant. There is an immense concern for health researchers to study the herb/food-drug interactions of melatonin. It is mainly metabolized by CYP1A2 in human so that herbs/foods containing cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibitors can affect pharmacokinetics of melatonin. By considering pharmacokinetic aspects, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of caffeic acid and quercetin on Caco-2 cells permeability, metabolism, CYP1A inhibition in vitro assay systems and a single dose pharmacokinetics of melatonin in vivo rats. The effects of caffeic acid and quercetin on melatonin permeability were tested in Caco-2 cells. Metabolic stability and CYP1A activity were investigated in rat liver microsomes (RLMs) using probe substrates (melatonin/phenacetin in vitro). Melatonin and phenacetin were incubated in RLMs with or without caffeic acid and quercetin, and the IC50 values were determined. The pharmacokinetics of melatonin conducted in rats after a single dose (15 mg/kg) pre-treatment with caffeic acid, quercetin and caffeic acid plus quercetin followed by oral dose of melatonin at 5 mg/kg. Analysis of all samples was with LC-MS/MS. Caffeic acid and quercetin did not alter Caco-2 permeability of melatonin in apical to basolateral direction and vice versa. Melatonin was metabolized in rat liver microsomes, which was inhibited by both caffeic acid and quercetin through CYP1A. The concomitant oral administration of melatonin along with 15 mg/kg of caffeic acid or quercetin or caffeic acid plus quercetin significantly (p < 0.05) increased the AUC0-t of melatonin by 30.0, 66.7 and 114.0%, respectively. The apparent oral rat plasma clearance (CL/F) of melatonin also decreased significantly (p < 0.05) by 28.78, 47.87 and 50% in

  19. Inhibitory effect of caffeic acid on human organic anion transporters hOAT1 and hOAT3: a novel candidate for food-drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Uwai, Yuichi; Ozeki, Yukihiro; Isaka, Tomonori; Honjo, Hiroaki; Iwamoto, Kikuo

    2011-01-01

    Several kinds of food have been shown to influence the absorption and metabolism of drugs, although there is little information about their effect on the renal excretion of drugs. In this study, we performed uptake experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes to assess the inhibitory effects of chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and quinic acid, which are contained in coffee, fruits and vegetables, on human organic anion transporters hOAT1 and hOAT3; these transporters mediate renal tubular uptake of anionic drugs from blood. Injection of hOAT1 and hOAT3 cRNA into oocytes stimulated uptake of typical substrates of hOAT1 and hOAT3 (p-aminohippurate and estrone sulfate, respectively); among the three compounds tested, caffeic acid most strongly inhibited these transporters. The apparent 50% inhibitory concentrations of caffeic acid were estimated to be 16.6 µM for hOAT1 and 5.4 µM for hOAT3. Eadie-Hofstee plot analysis showed that caffeic acid inhibited both transporters in a competitive manner. In addition to the transport of p-aminohippurate and estrone sulfate, that of antifolates and antivirals was inhibited by caffeic acid. These findings show that caffeic acid has inhibitory potential against hOAT1 and hOAT3, suggesting that renal excretion of their substrates could be affected in patients consuming a diet including caffeic acid.

  20. Binding of caffeine with caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid using fluorescence quenching, UV/vis and FTIR spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Belay, Abebe; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-03-01

    The interactions of caffeine (CF) with chlorogenic acid (CGA) and caffeic acid (CFA) were investigated by fluorescence quenching, UV/vis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques. The results of the study indicated that the fluorescence quenching between caffeine and hydroxycinnamic acids could be rationalized in terms of static quenching or the formation of non-fluorescent CF-CFA and CF-CGA complexes. From fluorescence quenching spectral analysis, the quenching constant (KSV), quenching rate constant (kq), number of binding sites (n), thermodynamic properties and conformational changes of the interaction were determined. The quenching constants (KSV) between CF and CGA, CFA are 1.84 × 10(4) and 1.04 × 10(4) L/mol at 298 K and their binding site n is ~ 1. Thermodynamic parameters determined using the Van't Hoff equation indicated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waal's forces have a major role in the reaction of caffeine with caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. The 3D fluorescence, UV/vis and FTIR spectra also showed that the binding of CF with CFA and CGA induces conformational changes in CFA and CGA. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester suppresses monocyte adhesion to the endothelium by inhibiting NF-κB/NOX2-derived ROS signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Risa; Makino, Junya; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Hara, Hirokazu; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), one of the major polyphenols, exhibits anti-oxidative, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer properties. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, the progression of which is closely related to the accumulated adhesion of inflammatory monocytes/macrophages to the endothelium. We herein determined whether CAPE and its derivatives suppressed THP-1 cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Of the four polyphenols tested, CAPE significantly suppressed the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-elicited expression of cluster for differentiation (CD) 11b, 14, and 36, and this was accompanied by the inhibition of THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVEC. CAPE also suppressed the activation of TPA-elicited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and accumulation of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS), but did not affect extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Taken together, these results demonstrated that CAPE suppressed THP-1 cell adhesion to HUVEC through, at least in part, the NF-κB, NOX2, and ROS-derived signaling axis. PMID:27257341

  2. Fungal biotransformation of chlorogenic and caffeic acids by Fusarium graminearum: New insights in the contribution of phenolic acids to resistance to deoxynivalenol accumulation in cereals.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Léa; Bonnin-Verdal, Marie-Noelle; Marchegay, Gisèle; Pinson-Gadais, Laetitia; Ducos, Christine; Richard-Forget, Florence; Atanasova-Penichon, Vessela

    2016-03-16

    Fusarium Head Blight and Gibberella Ear Rot, mainly caused by the fungi Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium culmorum, are two of the most devastating diseases of small-grain cereals and maize. In addition to yield loss, these diseases frequently result in contamination of kernels with toxic type B trichothecenes. The potential involvement of chlorogenic acid in cereal resistance to Fusarium Head Blight and Gibberella Ear Rot and to trichothecene accumulation was the focus of this study. The effects of chlorogenic acid and one of its hydrolyzed products, caffeic acid, on fungal growth and type B trichothecenes biosynthesis were studied using concentrations close to physiological amounts quantified in kernels and a set of F. graminearum and F. culmorum strains. Both chlorogenic and caffeic acids negatively impact fungal growth and mycotoxin production, with caffeic acid being significantly more toxic. Inhibitory efficiencies of both phenolic acids were strain-dependent. To further investigate the antifungal and anti "mycotoxin" effect of chlorogenic and caffeic acids, the metabolic fate of these two phenolic acids was characterized in supplemented F. graminearum broths. For the first time, our results demonstrated the ability of F. graminearum to degrade chlorogenic acid into caffeic, hydroxychlorogenic and protocatechuic acids and caffeic acid into protocatechuic and hydroxycaffeic acids. Some of these metabolic products can contribute to the inhibitory efficiency of chlorogenic acid that, therefore, can be compared as a "pro-drug". As a whole, our data corroborate the contribution of chlorogenic acid to the chemical defense that cereals employ to counteract F. graminearum and its production of mycotoxins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. In situ antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of naturally occurring caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and rutin, using food systems.

    PubMed

    Stojković, Dejan; Petrović, Jovana; Soković, Marina; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Kukić-Marković, Jelena; Petrović, Silvana

    2013-10-01

    Three pure compounds that naturally occur in plants were of particular interest to our study regarding the possibility of using them as food preservatives: p-coumaric acid (found in peanuts, tomatoes, carrots, garlic, wine, vinegar, etc.), caffeic acid (found in argan oil, oats, wheat, rice and olive oil) and rutin (found in asparagus, citrus fruits, berries, apple, apricot, asparagus, beef and beer). In the following study we investigated in situ antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of three pure compounds, namely caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and rutin, naturally occurring in plants. Two food systems were used in order to obtain information on how these compounds react in actual food systems rather than microbiological media. The results indicated good antioxidant activity in in situ food systems. For tested phenolic compounds it was further shown that they successively inhibited the development of the isolated food contaminant Staphylococcus aureus in chicken soup. Panelist found that organoleptic characteristics of chicken soup and pork meat improved after treatment with phenolics. Our findings alone, along with the potential use of phenolic compounds that are widespread in nature, may imply their potential use as preservatives in the food industry. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Effect of added caffeic acid and tyrosol on the fatty acid and volatile profiles of camellia oil following heating.

    PubMed

    Haiyan, Zhong; Bedgood, Danny R; Bishop, Andrea G; Prenzler, Paul D; Robards, Kevin

    2006-12-13

    Camellia oil is widely used in some parts of the world partly because of its high oxidative stability. The effect of heating a refined camellia oil for 1 h at 120 degrees C or 2 h at 170 degrees C with exogenous antioxidant, namely, caffeic acid and tyrosol, was studied. Parameters used to assess the effect of heating were peroxide and K values, volatile formation, and fatty acid profile. Of these, volatile formation was the most sensitive index of change as seen in the number of volatiles and the total area count of volatiles in gas chromatograms. Hexanal was generally the dominant volatile in treated and untreated samples with a concentration of 2.13 and 5.34 mg kg(-1) in untreated oils heated at 120 and 170 degrees C, respectively. The hexanal content was significantly reduced in heated oils to which tyrosol and/or caffeic acid had been added. Using volatile formation as an index of oxidation, tyrosol was the more effective antioxidant of these compounds. This is contradictory to generally accepted antioxidant structure-activity relationships. Changes in fatty acid profiles after heating for up to 24 h at 180 degrees C were not significant.

  5. Antioxidant, Antidiabetic, and Antihypertensive Properties of Echinacea purpurea Flower Extract and Caffeic Acid Derivatives Using In Vitro Models.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Shiow-Ying; Sung, Jih-Min; Huang, Po-Wei; Lin, Sheng-Dun

    2017-02-01

    The extraction yield, total phenols, caffeic acid derivatives (CAD), and antioxidant properties of 50% ethanolic Echinacea purpurea flower extract were determined. The in vitro inhibitory effects of 50% ethanolic extract and CAD on α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) linked with type 2 diabetes were also investigated. The extraction yield, total phenols, and total CAD of the extract were 27.04%, 195.69 mg CAE/g and 78.42 mg/g, respectively. Cichoric acid (56.03 mg/g) was the predominant CAD compound in the extract. The extract exhibited good antioxidant properties. The extract and CAD inhibited α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and ACE activities in a concentration-dependent manner. Among the tested samples, chlorogenic acid, and caffeic acid (IC50 of 1.71-1.81 mg/mL) had the highest α-amylase inhibitory activity, cichoric acid (IC50 of 0.28 mg/mL) showed higher α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Both chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid (IC50 of 0.11-0.14 mg/mL) demonstrated higher ACE-inhibitory activity. The in vitro results suggest that E. purpurea extract and CAD have good potential for managing hyperglycemia and hypertension. Overall, the data suggest it is a choice for developing antihyperglycemia and antihypertension compounds from field-grown E. purpurea.

  6. Reuse of Organomineral Substrate Waste from Hydroponic Systems as Fertilizer in Open-Field Production Increases Yields, Flavonoid Glycosides, and Caffeic Acid Derivatives of Red Oak Leaf Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) Much More than Synthetic Fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Dannehl, Dennis; Becker, Christine; Suhl, Johanna; Josuttis, Melanie; Schmidt, Uwe

    2016-09-28

    Effects of organic waste from a hydroponic system added with minerals (organomineral fertilizer) and synthetic fertilizer on major polyphenols of red oak leaf lettuce using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(3) were investigated. Interestingly, contents of the main flavonoid glycosides and caffeic acid derivatives of lettuce treated with organomineral fertilizer were equal to those synthesized without soil additives. This was found although soil nutrient concentrations, including that of nitrogen, were much lower without additives. However, lettuce treated with synthetic fertilizer showed a significant decrease in contents of caffeic acid derivatives and flavonoid glycosides up to 78.3 and 54.2%, respectively. It is assumed that a negative effect of a high yield on polyphenols as described in the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis can be counteracted by (i) a higher concentration of Mg or (ii) optimal physical properties of the soil structure. Finally, the organomineral substrate waste reused as fertilizer and soil improver resulted in the highest yield (+78.7%), a total fertilizer saving of 322 kg ha(-1) and waste reduction in greenhouses.

  7. Inhibition of stromelysin-1 by caffeic acid derivatives from a propolis sample from Algeria.

    PubMed

    Segueni, Narimane; Magid, Abdulmagid Alabdul; Decarme, Martine; Rhouati, Salah; Lahouel, Mesbah; Antonicelli, Frank; Lavaud, Catherine; Hornebeck, William

    2011-07-01

    Stromelysin-1 (matrix metalloproteinase-3: MMP-3) occupies a central position in collagenolytic and elastolytic cascades, leading to cutaneous intrinsic and extrinsic aging. We screened extracts of a propolis sample from Algeria with the aim to isolate compounds able to selectively inhibit this enzyme. A butanolic extract (B (3)) of the investigated propolis sample was found to potently inhibit MMP-3 activity (IC (50) = 0.15 ± 0.03 µg/mL), with no or only weak activity on other MMPs. This fraction also inhibited plasmin amidolytic activity (IC (50) = 0.05 µg/mL) and impeded plasmin-mediated proMMP-3 activation. B (3) was fractionated by HPLC, and one compound, characterized by NMR and mass spectroscopy and not previously identified in propolis, i.e., (+)-chicoric acid, displayed potent IN VITRO MMP-3 inhibitory activity (IC (50) = 6.3 × 10 (-7) M). In addition, both caffeic acid and (+)-chicoric acid methyl ester present in fraction B (3) significantly inhibited UVA-mediated MMP-3 upregulation by fibroblasts.

  8. Validation of HPLC-UV Assay of Caffeic Acid in Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Spagnol, Caroline Magnani; Isaac, Vera Lucia Borges; Corrêa, Marcos Antonio; Salgado, Hérida Regina Nunes

    2016-03-01

    An accurate, sensitive, precise and rapid reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method was successfully developed and validated for the determination of caffeic acid (CA) in emulsions. The best separation was achieved on a 250 × 4.6 mm, 5.0 µm particle size RP18 XDB Waters column using ethanol and purified water (40:60 v/v) adjusted to pH 2.5 with acetic acid as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.7 mL/min. Ultraviolet detection was performed at 325 nm at ambient column temperature (25°C). The method was linear over the concentration range of 10-60 µg/mL (r(2) = 0.9999) with limits of detection and quantification of 1.44 and 4.38 µg/mL, respectively. CA was subjected to oxidation, acid, base and neutral degradation, as well as photolysis and heat as stress conditions. There were no interfering peaks at or near the retention time of CA. The method was applied to the determination of CA in standard and pharmaceutical products with excellent recoveries. The method is applicable in the quality control of CA.

  9. Quantitative analysis of plasma caffeic and ferulic acid equivalents by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guy, Philippe A; Renouf, Mathieu; Barron, Denis; Cavin, Christophe; Dionisi, Fabiola; Kochhar, Sunil; Rezzi, Serge; Williamson, Gary; Steiling, Heike

    2009-12-01

    A validated method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the hydroxycinnamates caffeic acid (CA), dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA), ferulic acid (FA), dihydroferulic acid (DHFA), and isoferulic acid (IFA) in human plasma as metabolites derived from coffee consumption. The method includes a protein precipitation step prior to enzymatic hydrolysis of the conjugated metabolites (sulfate, glucuronide, and/or ester) back to their aglycone forms. After liquid-liquid extraction, the reconstituted extract was analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to negative electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry. Calibration curves were constructed from spiked human plasma samples in the range of 0-4800 nM for each of the targeted analytes. Two internal standards, 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionic acid (500 nM) and 1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid (200 nM), were spiked at the beginning of the sample preparation and before analysis, respectively. Good performance data were obtained with limits of detection and quantification of the five hydroxycinnamates ranging between 1-15 nM and 3-50 nM, respectively. Within and between-days precisions were respectively calculated between 8-18% and 8-30% (at 50 nM added initially), between 6-9% and 6-12% (at 200 nM), and between 5-9% and 5-9% (at 500 nM). Precision calculated from different analysts ranged from 18% to 44% (at 50 nM), from 8% to 16% (at 200 nM), and from 4% to 8% (at 500 nM). Using this method, we determined plasma levels in humans and measured the efficiency of deconjugation using our enzymatic cocktail.

  10. Biochemical mechanism of Caffeic Acid Phenylethyl Ester (CAPE) selective toxicity towards melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kudugunti, Shashi K.; Vad, Nikhil M.; Whiteside, Amanda J.; Naik, Bhakti U.; Yusuf, Mohd. A.; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S.; Moridani, Majid Y.

    2010-01-01

    In the current work, we investigated the in-vitro biochemical mechanism of caffeic acid phenylethyl ester (CAPE) toxicity and eight hydroxycinnamic/caffeic acid derivatives in-vitro, using tyrosinase enzyme as a molecular target in human SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells. Enzymatic reaction models using tyrosinase/O2 and HRP/H2O2 were used to delineate the role of one- and two-electron oxidation. Ascorbic acid (AA), NADH and GSH depletion were used as markers of quinone formation and oxidative stress in CAPE induced toxicity in melanoma cells. Ethylenediamine, an o-quinone trap, prevented the formation of o-quinone and oxidations of AA and NADH mediated by tyrosinase bioactivation of CAPE. The IC50 of CAPE towards SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells was 15μM. Dicoumarol, a diaphorase inhibitor, and 1-bromoheptane, a GSH depleting agent, increased CAPE’s toxicity towards SK-MEL-28 cells indicating quinone formation played an important role in CAPE induced cell toxicity. Cyclosporin-A and trifluoperazine, inhibitors of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (PTP), prevented CAPE toxicity towards melanoma cells. We further investigated the role of tyrosinase in CAPE toxicity in the presence of a shRNA plasmid, targeting tyrosinase mRNA. Results from tyrosinase shRNA experiments showed that CAPE led to negligible anti-proliferative effect, apoptotic cell death and ROS formation in shRNA plasmid treated cells. Furthermore, it was also found that CAPE selectively caused escalation in the ROS formation and intracellular GSH (ICG) depletion in melanocytic human SK-MEL-28 cells which express functional tyrosinase. In contrast, CAPE did not lead to ROS formation and ICG depletion in amelanotic C32 melanoma cells, which do not express functional tyrosinase. These findings suggest that tyrosinase plays a major role in CAPE’s selective toxicity towards melanocytic melanoma cell lines. Our findings suggest that the mechanisms of CAPE toxicity in SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells

  11. Antineurodegenerative effect of phenolic extracts and caffeic acid derivatives in romaine lettuce on neuron-like PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Sung-Eun; Yoon, Hyungeun; Nam, Tae-Gyu; Heo, Ho Jin; Lee, Chang Yong; Kim, Dae-Ok

    2010-08-01

    In recent decades, romaine lettuce has been one of the fastest growing vegetables with respect to its consumption and production. An understanding is needed of the effect of major phenolic phytochemicals from romaine lettuce on biological protection for neuron-like PC-12 cells. Phenolics in fresh romaine lettuce were extracted, and then its total phenolics and total antioxidant capacity were measured spectrophotometrically. Neuroprotective effects of phenolic extract of romaine lettuce and its pure caffeic acid derivatives (caffeic, chicoric, chlorogenic, and isochlorogenic acids) in PC-12 cells were evaluated using two different in vitro methods: lactate dehydrogenase release and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide reduction assays. Total phenolics and total antioxidant capacity of 100 g of fresh romaine lettuce averaged 22.7 mg of gallic acid equivalents and 31.0 mg of vitamin C equivalents, respectively. The phenolic extract of romaine lettuce protected PC-12 cells against oxidative stress caused by H(2)O(2) in a dose-dependent manner. Isochlorogenic acid, one of the phenolics in romaine lettuce, showed stronger neuroprotection than the other three caffeic acid derivatives also found in the lettuce. Although romaine lettuce had lower levels of phenolics and antioxidant capacity compared to other common vegetables, its contribution to total antioxidant capacity and antineurodegenerative effect in human diets would be higher because of higher amounts of its daily per capita consumption compared to other common vegetables.

  12. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Its Amide Analogue Are Potent Inhibitors of Leukotriene Biosynthesis in Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Luc H.; Maillet, Jacques; LeBlanc, Luc M.; Jean-François, Jacques; Touaibia, Mohamed; Flamand, Nicolas; Surette, Marc E.

    2012-01-01

    Background 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) catalyses the transformation of arachidonic acid (AA) into leukotrienes (LTs), which are important lipid mediators of inflammation. LTs have been directly implicated in inflammatory diseases like asthma, atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis; therefore inhibition of LT biosynthesis is a strategy for the treatment of these chronic diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings Analogues of caffeic acid, including the naturally-occurring caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), were synthesized and evaluated for their capacity to inhibit 5-LO and LTs biosynthesis in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) and whole blood. Anti-free radical and anti-oxidant activities of the compounds were also measured. Caffeic acid did not inhibit 5-LO activity or LT biosynthesis at concentrations up to 10 µM. CAPE inhibited 5-LO activity (IC50 0.13 µM, 95% CI 0.08–0.23 µM) more effectively than the clinically-approved 5-LO inhibitor zileuton (IC50 3.5 µM, 95% CI 2.3–5.4 µM). CAPE was also more effective than zileuton for the inhibition of LT biosynthesis in PMNL but the compounds were equipotent in whole blood. The activity of the amide analogue of CAPE was similar to that of zileuton. Inhibition of LT biosynthesis by CAPE was the result of the inhibition of 5-LO and of AA release. Caffeic acid, CAPE and its amide analog were free radical scavengers and antioxidants with IC50 values in the low µM range; however, the phenethyl moiety of CAPE was required for effective inhibition of 5-LO and LT biosynthesis. Conclusions CAPE is a potent LT biosynthesis inhibitor that blocks 5-LO activity and AA release. The CAPE structure can be used as a framework for the rational design of stable and potent inhibitors of LT biosynthesis. PMID:22347509

  13. Cytoprotection of Human Endothelial Cells From Menadione Cytotoxicity by Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: The Role of Heme Oxygenase-1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-08

    until the bands devel- oped. Quantitative analysis was performed with NIH Images (NIH, USA) on blots scanned into the computer. Following staining for...Le, T., 2001. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester, an inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB, attenuates bacterial peptidoglycan polysaccharide-induced colitis...279, 10677–10684. Zhao, B., Bowden, R.A., Stavchansky, S.A., Bowman, P.D., 2001. Human endothelial cell response to gram -negative lipopolysaccharide

  14. Survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 ATCC 43895 in a Model Apple Juice Medium with Different Concentrations of Proline and Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Robert D.; Biesterveld, Steef; Bijker, Peter G. H.

    2001-01-01

    The effects of proline and caffeic acid on the survival of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 strain ATCC 43895 in a model apple juice medium were studied. It is hypothesized that the inhibitory effect of caffeic acid may explain why almost all outbreaks of STEC O157:H7 infections linked to apple juice or cider have occurred in October or November. PMID:11375209

  15. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester: Inhibition of metastatic cell behaviours via voltage-gated sodium channel in human breast cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Scott P; Hemsley, Faye; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2016-02-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester, derived from natural propolis, has been reported to have anti-cancer properties. Voltage-gated sodium channels are upregulated in many cancers where they promote metastatic cell behaviours, including invasiveness. We found that micromolar concentrations of caffeic acid phenethyl ester blocked voltage-gated sodium channel activity in several invasive cell lines from different cancers, including breast (MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468), colon (SW620) and non-small cell lung cancer (H460). In the MDA-MB-231 cell line, which was adopted as a 'model', long-term (48 h) treatment with 18 μM caffeic acid phenethyl ester reduced the peak current density by 91% and shifted steady-state inactivation to more hyperpolarized potentials and slowed recovery from inactivation. The effects of long-term treatment were also dose-dependent, 1 μM caffeic acid phenethyl ester reducing current density by only 65%. The effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on metastatic cell behaviours were tested on the MDA-MB-231 cell line at a working concentration (1 μM) that did not affect proliferative activity. Lateral motility and Matrigel invasion were reduced by up to 14% and 51%, respectively. Co-treatment of caffeic acid phenethyl ester with tetrodotoxin suggested that the voltage-gated sodium channel inhibition played a significant intermediary role in these effects. We conclude, first, that caffeic acid phenethyl ester does possess anti-metastatic properties. Second, the voltage-gated sodium channels, commonly expressed in strongly metastatic cancers, are a novel target for caffeic acid phenethyl ester. Third, more generally, ion channel inhibition can be a significant mode of action of nutraceutical compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Downregulation of Caffeic Acid 3-O-Methyltransferase and Caffeoyl CoA 3-O-Methyltransferase in Transgenic Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dianjing; Chen, Fang; Inoue, Kentaro; Blount, Jack W.; Dixon, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic alfalfa plants were generated harboring caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase (CCOMT) cDNA sequences under control of the bean phenylalanine ammonia-lyase PAL2 promoter. Strong downregulation of COMT resulted in decreased lignin content, a reduction in total guaiacyl (G) lignin units, a near total loss of syringyl (S) units in monomeric and dimeric lignin degradation products, and appearance of low levels of 5-hydroxy guaiacyl units and a novel dimer. No soluble monolignol precursors accumulated. In contrast, strong downregulation of CCOMT led to reduced lignin levels, a reduction in G units without reduction in S units, and increases in β-5 linked dimers of G units. Accumulation of soluble caffeic acid β-d-glucoside occurred only in CCOMT downregulated plants. The results suggest that CCOMT does not significantly contribute to the 3-O-methylation step in S lignin biosynthesis in alfalfa and that there is redundancy with respect to the 3-O-methylation reaction of G lignin biosynthesis. COMT is unlikely to catalyze the in vivo methylation of caffeic acid during lignin biosynthesis. PMID:11158530

  17. Biocatalytic properties of a peroxidase-active cell-free extract from onion solid wastes: caffeic acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    El Agha, Ayman; Abbeddou, Souheila; Makris, Dimitris P; Kefalas, Panagiotis

    2009-04-01

    The exploitation of food residual sources consists of a major factor in reducing the polluting load of food industry wastes and developing novel added-value products. Plant food residues including trimmings and peels might contain a range of enzymes capable of transforming bio-organic molecules with potential phytotoxicity, including hydrolases, peroxidases and polyphenoloxidases. Although the use of bacterial and fungal enzymes has gained interest in studies pertaining to bioremediation applications, plant enzymes have been given less attention or even disregarded. In this view, this study aimed at the investigating the use of a crude peroxidase preparation from onion solid by-products for oxidising caffeic acid, a widespread o-diphenol, whose various derivatives may occur in food industry wastes, such as olive mill waste waters. Increased enzyme activity was observed at a pH value of 5, but considerable activity was also retained for pH up to 7. Favourable temperatures for increased activity varied between 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C, 30 degrees C being the optimal. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of a homogenate/H(2)O(2)-treated caffeic acid solution revealed the existence of a tetramer as major oxidation product. Based on the data generated, a putative pathway for the formation of the peroxidase-mediated caffeic acid tetramer was proposed.

  18. Molecularly imprinted polymers combination with deep eutectic solvents for solid-phase extraction of caffeic acid from hawthorn.

    PubMed

    Li, Guizhen; Tang, Weiyang; Cao, Weimin; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with caffeic acid as template and non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) materials were prepared in the same procedure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and adsorption capacity test were used to evaluate characteristic of the new materials. MIPs, NIPs and C18 were used for rapid purification of caffeic acid from hawthorn with solid-phase extraction ( SPE) , and extract yields of caffeic acid with the proposed materials were 3.46 µg/g, 1.01 µg/g and 1.17 µg/g, respectively. To optimize the MIPs-SPE procedures, different kinds of elution solutions were studied. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were prepared by choline chloride (ChCl)-glycerol (1/2, n/n) and choline chloride-urea (1/ 2, n/n). Methanol was mixed with the two kinds of DESs (glycerol-based DESs, urea-based DESs) in different ratios (0.5:1, 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, 4:1, 5:1, v/v), and they were used to investigated as elution solutions in the above MIPs-SPE procedures. The results showed that MIPs were potential SPE materials, and methanol/ glycerol-based DESs (3 :1, v/v) had the best elution capability with the recovery of 82.32%.

  19. Caffeic acid derivatives, analogs and applications: a patent review (2009-2013).

    PubMed

    Silva, Tiago; Oliveira, Catarina; Borges, Fernanda

    2014-11-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is broadly distributed in several species of the plant kingdom and is widely consumed in human diet. CA and derivatives have been extensively studied in the past years, which unveiled a broad spectrum of biological activities and potential therapeutic applications. As a result, there has been an upsurge in the development of new chemical entities based on the CA scaffold. The scope of this review is to revisit the therapeutic potential of CA and derivatives. It provides an overview of patented processes and applications thereof between 2009 and 2013. The phenylpropanoid framework is currently considered a valid structure for drug discovery programs. Actually, CA has been widely used as a template for the development of new chemical entities with potential therapeutic interest in human diseases associated with oxidative stress. Additionally, the applicability of CA derivatives expands to the realms of cosmetic industry due to its stabilizing properties. The synthesis of esters, amides and hybrids with currently marketed drugs is a trending strategy for the development of derivatives with therapeutic application. It is our opinion that the innovative artwork currently being developed involving this chemical scaffold will yield new and effective therapeutic agents in a foreseeable future.

  20. Protective Effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Fluoxetine-Induced Hepatotoxicity: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Ahmet; Elbey, Bilal; Yazgan, Ümit Can; Dönder, Ahmet; Arslan, Necmi; Arslan, Serkan; Alabalık, Ulaş; Aslanhan, Hamza

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on fluoxetine-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods. Group I served as control. Group II received CAPE intraperitoneally. Group III received fluoxetine per orally. Group IV received fluoxetine and CAPE. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), and liver enzymes including paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase levels were measured. Liver tissues were processed histopathologically for evaluation of liver injury and to validate the serum enzyme levels. Results. An increase in TOS and OSI and a decrease in TAC and PON-1 levels in serum and liver tissues of Group III were observed compared to Groups I and II. After treatment with CAPE, the level of TOS and OSI decreased while TAC and PON-1 increased in serum and liver in Group IV. Histopathological examination of the liver revealed hepatic injury after fluoxetine treatment and reduction of injury with CAPE treatment. Conclusion. Our results suggested that CAPE treatment provided protection against fluoxetine toxicity. Following CAPE treatment with fluoxetine-induced hepatotoxicity, TOS and OSI levels decreased, whereas PON-1 and TAC increased in the serum and liver.

  1. Therapeutic effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Buyukberber, Mehmet; Savaş, M Cemil; Bagci, Cahit; Koruk, Mehmet; Gulsen, Murat T; Tutar, Ediz; Bilgic, Tugba; Ceylan, Nurdan Ö

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic role of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in a rat model of cerulean-induced acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Seventy male Wistar albino rats were divided into seven groups. Acute edematous pancreatitis was induced by subcutaneous cerulein injection (20 μg/kg) four times at 1-h intervals. CAPE (30 mg/kg) was given by subcutaneous injection at the beginning (CAPE 1 group) and 12 h after the last cerulein injection (CAPE 2 group). Serum amylase, lipase, white blood cell count, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were measured, and pancreatic histopathology was assessed. RESULTS: In the AP group, amylase and lipase levels were found to be elevated and the histopathological evaluation showed massive edema and inflammation of the pancreas, with less fatty necrosis when compared with sham and control groups. Amylase and lipase levels and edema formation decreased significantly in the CAPE therapy groups (P < 0001); especially in the CAPE 2 group, edema was improved nearly completely (P = 0001). Inflammation and fatty necrosis were partially recovered by CAPE treatment. The pathological results and amylase level in the placebo groups were similar to those in the AP group. White blood cell count and TNF-α concentration was nearly the same in the CAPE and placebo groups. CONCLUSION: CAPE may be useful agent in treatment of AP but more experimental and clinical studies are needed to support our observation of beneficial effects of CAPE before clinical usage of this agent. PMID:19891017

  2. Protective Effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Fluoxetine-Induced Hepatotoxicity: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Ahmet; Elbey, Bilal; Yazgan, Ümit Can; Dönder, Ahmet; Arslan, Necmi; Arslan, Serkan; Alabalık, Ulaş; Aslanhan, Hamza

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on fluoxetine-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Materials and Methods. Group I served as control. Group II received CAPE intraperitoneally. Group III received fluoxetine per orally. Group IV received fluoxetine and CAPE. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), and liver enzymes including paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), aspartate transaminase, and alanine transaminase levels were measured. Liver tissues were processed histopathologically for evaluation of liver injury and to validate the serum enzyme levels. Results. An increase in TOS and OSI and a decrease in TAC and PON-1 levels in serum and liver tissues of Group III were observed compared to Groups I and II. After treatment with CAPE, the level of TOS and OSI decreased while TAC and PON-1 increased in serum and liver in Group IV. Histopathological examination of the liver revealed hepatic injury after fluoxetine treatment and reduction of injury with CAPE treatment. Conclusion. Our results suggested that CAPE treatment provided protection against fluoxetine toxicity. Following CAPE treatment with fluoxetine-induced hepatotoxicity, TOS and OSI levels decreased, whereas PON-1 and TAC increased in the serum and liver. PMID:27144157

  3. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester protects against the dopaminergic neuronal loss induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Barros Silva, R; Santos, N A G; Martins, N M; Ferreira, D A S; Barbosa, F; Oliveira Souza, V C; Kinoshita, A; Baffa, O; Del-Bel, E; Santos, A C

    2013-03-13

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a botanical compound abundant in honeybees' propolis. It has anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antioxidant, immunomodulatory and antitumor properties. Its beneficial effects against neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, have also been suggested and some mechanisms have been proposed. Mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress are critical events in neurodegeneration. Release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol and the downstream activation of caspase-3 have been suggested as targets of the protective mechanism of CAPE. Most of the studies addressing the protective effect of CAPE have been performed in cell culture. This is the first study to demonstrate the protective effect of CAPE against the dopaminergic neuronal loss induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in rats. It also demonstrates, for the first time, the inhibitory effect of CAPE on mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), a mediator of neuronal death that triggers cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and metal chelation was demonstrated in the brain-affected areas of the rats treated with 6-OHDA and CAPE. Additionally, we demonstrated that CAPE does not affect brain mitochondrial function. Based on these findings and on its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, CAPE is a promising compound to treat Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Un-Ho; Song, Kwon-Ho; Motomura, Muneo; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Gu, Yeun-Hwa; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Moon, Tae-Chul; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2008-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenyl ester (CAPE), a biologically active ingredient of propolis, has several interesting biological properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, immunostimulatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-invasive, anti-metastatic and carcinostatic activities. Recently, several groups have reported that CAPE is cytotoxic to tumor cells but not to normal cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of CAPE-induced apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells. Treatment of U937 cells with CAPE decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. DNA fragmentation assay revealed the typical ladder profile of oligonucleosomal fragments in CAPE-treated U937 cells. In addition, as evidenced by the nuclear DAPI staining experiment, we observed that the nuclear condensation, a typical phenotype of apoptosis, was found in U937 cells treated with 5 microg/ml of CAPE. Therefore, it was suggested that CAPE is a potent agent inducing apoptosis in U937 cells. Apoptotic action of the CAPE was accompanied by release of cytochrome C, reduction of Bcl-2 expression, increase of Bax expression, activation/cleavage of caspase-3 and activation/cleavage of PARP in U937 cells, but not by Fas protein, an initial mediator in the death signaling, or by phospho-eIF2 alpha and CHOP, crucial mediators in ER-mediated apoptosis. From the results, it was concluded that CAPE induces the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis but not death receptors- or ER-mediated apoptosis in U937 cells.

  5. The flavanoide caffeic acid phenethyl ester blocks 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Noelker, Carmen; Bacher, Michael; Gocke, Petra; Wei, Xing; Klockgether, Thomas; Du, Yansheng; Dodel, Richard

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is specific to dopaminergic neurons in intrastriatal rodent models. It induces neuronal death either via uncoupling mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation resulting in energy deprivation or alternatively, is associated with its ability to produce hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an antioxidant flavanoid, has antiviral, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory properties. Recent studies have shown that CAPE has also a neuroprotective effects in ischemia and low potassium-induced neuronal apoptotic models. In cerebellar granule neurons CAPE significantly blocks 6-OHDA mediated cell death (70 microM) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, CAPE was able to modulate the Ca(2+)-induced release of cyctochrome c in isolated liver mitochondria. Caspase-3 activation following 6-OHDA treatment was markedly inhibited in the presence of CAPE. Although the molecular mechanisms associated with CAPE's neuroprotective effects remain to be elucidated in more detail, our results clearly demonstrate a considerable neuroprotective effect of CAPE. Since a mitochondrial insult is a major cause for the degeneration of nigral neurons in PD, we hypothesize that propolis derivatives, in particular CAPE, may have a neuroprotective effect on those cells and may be a promising drug candidate to be taken into in vivo models of PD.

  6. Protective effect of N-acetylcysteine, caffeic acid and vitamin E on doxorubicin hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gokcimen, A; Cim, A; Tola, H T; Bayram, D; Kocak, A; Ozgüner, F; Ayata, A

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the possible protective effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), caffeic acid (CAPE) and vitamin E (Vit-E) on doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity. Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats, weighing between 250 and 350 g were supplied and randomly divided into five groups. Animals in study groups were pretreated with a single dose of doxorubicin (Dox), which was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.). Control group (Group I) was treated with intraperitoneal saline injection. Group II did not received any antioxidant agent after the injection. Group III and Group IV were given CAPE and intraperitoneal vitamin E injection for eight days, respectively. Group V received NAC for eight days. The study was finished after 10 days. Tissue samples were collected from all animals and histopathological examination was performed. There was statistically significant difference between the experiment groups and controls by means of mononuclear cell infiltration and diameters of hepatic sinusoid, terminal hepatic venule (central vein) and portal area (portal canal). Changes related with hepatocellular damage were more prominent, whereas there was no significant difference between Dox and NAC given groups histopathologically. It was observed that structural changes were regressed after CAPE administration. However, this recovery was more prominent in vitamin E given group. These findings suggest that Dox induced liver damage could be efficiently reversed by vitamin E administration. It has been found that CAPE, but not NAC has protective effects on Dox-induced hepatocellular damage.

  7. IRAK1/4-Targeted Anti-Inflammatory Action of Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Woo Seok; Jeong, Deok; Park, Jae Gwang; Seo, Hyohyun; Moh, Sang Hyun; Hong, Sungyoul

    2013-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is a phenolic compound that is frequently present in fruits, grains, and dietary supplements. Although CA has been reported to display various biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-viral, and anti-oxidative effects, the action mechanism of CA is not yet fully elucidated. In this study, the anti-inflammatory action mechanism of CA was examined in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated macrophages (RAW264.7 cells) and HCl/EtOH-induced gastritis. CA was found to diminish nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Additionally, mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) were downregulated by CA. CA also strongly suppressed the nuclear translocation of AP-1 family proteins and the related upstream signaling cascade composed of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1), IRAK4, TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4/7 (MKK4/7), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In a direct kinase assay, CA was revealed to directly inhibit IRAK1 and IRAK4. CA also ameliorated HCl/EtOH-induced gastric symptoms via the suppression of JNK, IRAK1, and IRAK4. Therefore, our data strongly suggest that CA acts as an anti-inflammatory drug by directly suppressing IRAK1 and IRAK4. PMID:24379523

  8. Lignification in Transgenic Poplars with Extremely Reduced Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Jouanin, Lise; Goujon, Thomas; de Nadaï, Véronique; Martin, Marie-Thérèse; Mila, Isabelle; Vallet, Christelle; Pollet, Brigitte; Yoshinaga, Arata; Chabbert, Brigitte; Petit-Conil, Michel; Lapierre, Catherine

    2000-01-01

    Transgenic poplars (Populus tremula × Populus alba) were obtained by introduction of a sense homologous transgene encoding caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) under the control either of the cauliflower mosaic virus double 35S promoter or of the eucalyptus cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase promoter. Although these constructs conferred a moderate overexpression of COMT in some lines, a transgenic line with the double 35S promoter was found where COMT activity in woody tissues was close to zero due to a gene-silencing phenomenon. For the first time in COMT down-regulated trees, this alteration substantially reduced lignin level in 6-month-old trees (17% decrease). Lignin structure was found to be strongly altered, with a two times higher content in condensed bonds, an almost complete lack of syringyl units, and the incorporation of 5-hydroxyguaiacyl units to the most remarkable extent reported so far. Consistent with the higher cellulose content and with the higher condensation degree of the lignin, the impact of the transformation on the kraft-pulping performances of the poplar trees positively affected the pulp yield (10% relative increase), but made lignins less amenable to industrial degradations. PMID:10938354

  9. Protective effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester against acute radiation-induced hepatic injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Chu, JianJun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Jin, Liugen; Chen, Junliang; Du, Bin; Pang, Qingfeng

    2015-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenyl ester (CAPE) is a potent anti-inflammatory agent and it can eliminate the free radicals. The current study was intended to evaluate the protective effect of CAPE against the acute radiation-induced liver damage in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally administered with CAPE (30 mg/kg) for 3 consecutive days before exposing them to a single dose of 30 Gy of β-ray irradiation to upper abdomen. We found that pretreatment with CAPE significantly decreased the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione. Histological evaluation further confirmed the protection of CAPE against radiation-induced hepatotoxicity. TUNEL assay showed that CAPE pretreatment inhibited hepatocyte apoptosis. Moreover, CAPE inhibited the nuclear transport of NF-κB p65 subunit, decreased the level of tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Taken together, these results suggest that pretreatment with CAPE offers protection against radiation-induced hepatic injury.

  10. Caffeic acid and hydroxytyrosol have anti-obesogenic properties in zebrafish and rainbow trout models

    PubMed Central

    Lutfi, Esmail; Babin, Patrick J.; Gutiérrez, Joaquim; Capilla, Encarnación

    2017-01-01

    Some natural products, known sources of bioactive compounds with a wide range of properties, may have therapeutic values in human health and diseases, as well as agronomic applications. The effect of three compounds of plant origin with well-known dietary antioxidant properties, astaxanthin (ATX), caffeic acid (CA) and hydroxytyrosol (HT), on zebrafish (Danio rerio) larval adiposity and rainbow trout (Onchorynchus mykiss) adipocytes was assessed. The zebrafish obesogenic test (ZOT) demonstrated the anti-obesogenic activity of CA and HT. These compounds were able to counteract the obesogenic effect produced by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonist, rosiglitazone (RGZ). CA and HT suppressed RGZ-increased PPARγ protein expression and lipid accumulation in primary-cultured rainbow trout adipocytes. HT also significantly reduced plasma triacylglycerol concentrations, as well as mRNA levels of the fasn adipogenic gene in the adipose tissue of HT-injected rainbow trout. In conclusion, in vitro and in vivo approaches demonstrated the anti-obesogenic potential of CA and HT on teleost fish models that may be relevant for studying their molecular mode of action. Further studies are required to evaluate the effect of these bioactive components as food supplements for modulating adiposity in farmed fish. PMID:28570659

  11. Effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on bone formation in the expanded inter-premaxillary suture

    PubMed Central

    Kazancioglu, Hakki Oguz; Aksakalli, Sertac; Ezirganli, Seref; Birlik, Muhammet; Esrefoglu, Mukaddes; Acar, Ahmet Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    Background Narrow maxilla is a common problem in orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics. To solve this problem, a procedure called rapid maxillary expansion (RME) has been used. However, relapse tendency is a major problem of RME. Although relapse tendency is not clearly understood, various treatment procedures and new applications have been investigated. The present study aimed to investigate the possible effectiveness of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on new bone formation in rat midpalatal suture after RME. Materials and methods Twenty male Sprague Dawley rats were used in this study. The animals were randomly divided into two groups as control and CAPE group. In the CAPE group, CAPE was administered systemically via intraperitoneal injection. RME procedure was performed on all animals. For this purpose, the springs were placed on the maxillary incisors of rats and activated for 5 days. After then, the springs were removed and replaced with short lengths of rectangular retaining wire for consolidation period of 15 days. At the end of the study, histomorphometric analysis was carried out to assess new bone formation. Results New bone formation was significantly greater in the CAPE group than the control group (P<0.05). CAPE enhances new bone formation in midpalatal suture after RME. Conclusion These results show that CAPE may decrease the time needed for retention. PMID:26730181

  12. Protective Effects of Intralipid and Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Nephrotoxicity Caused by Dichlorvos in Rats.

    PubMed

    Celik, Muhammet Murat; Alp, Ayse; Dokuyucu, Recep; Zemheri, Ebru; Ozkanli, Seyma; Ertekin, Filiz; Yaldiz, Mehmet; Akdag, Abdurrahman; Ipci, Ozlem; Toprak, Serhat

    2015-01-01

    The protective effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) and intralipid (IL) on nephrotoxicity caused by acute Dichlorvos (D) toxicity were investigated in this study. Forty-eight Wistar Albino rats were divided into 7 groups as follows: Control, D, CAPE, intralipid, D + CAPE, D + IL, and D + CAPE + IL. When compared to D group, the oxidative stress index (OSI) values were significantly lower in Control, CAPE, and D + IL + CAPE groups. When compared to D + IL + CAPE group, the TOS and OSI values were significantly higher in D group (P < 0.05). When mitotic cell counts were assessed in the renal tissues, it was found that mitotic cell count was significantly higher in the D group while it was lower in the D + CAPE, D + IL, and D + IL + CAPE groups when compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Also, immune reactivity showed increased apoptosis in D group and low profile of apoptosis in the D + CAPE group when compared to the Control group. The apoptosis level was significantly lower in D + IL + CAPE compared to D group (P < 0.05) in the kidneys. As a result, we concluded that Dichlorvos can be used either alone or in combination with CAPE and IL as supportive therapy or as facilitator for the therapeutic effect of the routine treatment in the patients presenting with pesticide poisoning.

  13. Protective Effects of Intralipid and Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Nephrotoxicity Caused by Dichlorvos in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Muhammet Murat; Alp, Ayse; Dokuyucu, Recep; Zemheri, Ebru; Ozkanli, Seyma; Ertekin, Filiz; Yaldiz, Mehmet; Akdag, Abdurrahman; Ipci, Ozlem; Toprak, Serhat

    2015-01-01

    The protective effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) and intralipid (IL) on nephrotoxicity caused by acute Dichlorvos (D) toxicity were investigated in this study. Forty-eight Wistar Albino rats were divided into 7 groups as follows: Control, D, CAPE, intralipid, D + CAPE, D + IL, and D + CAPE + IL. When compared to D group, the oxidative stress index (OSI) values were significantly lower in Control, CAPE, and D + IL + CAPE groups. When compared to D + IL + CAPE group, the TOS and OSI values were significantly higher in D group (P < 0.05). When mitotic cell counts were assessed in the renal tissues, it was found that mitotic cell count was significantly higher in the D group while it was lower in the D + CAPE, D + IL, and D + IL + CAPE groups when compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Also, immune reactivity showed increased apoptosis in D group and low profile of apoptosis in the D + CAPE group when compared to the Control group. The apoptosis level was significantly lower in D + IL + CAPE compared to D group (P < 0.05) in the kidneys. As a result, we concluded that Dichlorvos can be used either alone or in combination with CAPE and IL as supportive therapy or as facilitator for the therapeutic effect of the routine treatment in the patients presenting with pesticide poisoning. PMID:26504614

  14. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Is a Potential Therapeutic Agent for Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ying-Yu; Jim, Wai-Tim; Su, Liang-Cheng; Chung, Chi-Jung; Lin, Ching-Yu; Huo, Chieh; Tseng, Jen-Chih; Huang, Shih-Han; Lai, Chih-Jen; Chen, Bo-Chih; Wang, Bi-Juan; Chan, Tzu-Min; Lin, Hui-Ping; Chang, Wun-Shaing Wayne; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancers, which affect 650,000 people and cause 350,000 deaths per year, is the sixth leading cancer by cancer incidence and eighth by cancer-related death worldwide. Oral cancer is the most common type of head and neck cancer. More than 90% of oral cancers are oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The overall five-year survival rate of OSCC patients is approximately 63%, which is due to the low response rate to current therapeutic drugs. In this review we discuss the possibility of using caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as an alternative treatment for oral cancer. CAPE is a strong antioxidant extracted from honeybee hive propolis. Recent studies indicate that CAPE treatment can effectively suppress the proliferation, survival, and metastasis of oral cancer cells. CAPE treatment inhibits Akt signaling, cell cycle regulatory proteins, NF-κB function, as well as activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Therefore, CAPE treatment induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in oral cancer cells. According to the evidence that aberrations in the EGFR/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling, NF-κB function, COX-2 activity, and MMPs activity are frequently found in oral cancers, and that the phosphorylation of Akt, EGFR, and COX-2 correlates to oral cancer patient survival and clinical progression, we believe that CAPE treatment will be useful for treatment of advanced oral cancer patients. PMID:25984601

  15. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Regulates PPAR's Levels in Stem Cells-Derived Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Vanella, Luca; Tibullo, Daniele; Godos, Justyna; Pluchinotta, Francesca Romana; Di Giacomo, Claudia; Sorrenti, Valeria; Acquaviva, Rosaria; Russo, Alessandra; Li Volti, Giovanni; Barbagallo, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic obesity inhibits activation of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), considered the key mediator of the fully differentiated and insulin sensitive adipocyte phenotype. We examined the effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (Cape), isolated from propolis, a honeybee hive product, on Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs) differentiation to the adipocyte lineage. Finally we tested the effects of Cape on insulin-resistant adipocytes. Quantification of Oil Red O-stained cells showed that lipid droplets decreased following Cape treatment as well as radical oxygen species formation. Additionally, exposure of ASC to high glucose levels decreased adiponectin and increased proinflammatory cytokines mRNA levels, which were reversed by Cape-mediated increase of insulin sensitivity. Cape treatment resulted in decreased triglycerides synthesis and increased beta-oxidation. Exposure of ASCs to Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced a reduction of PPARγ, an increase of IL-6 levels associated with a well-known stimulation of lipolysis; Cape partially attenuated the LPS-mediated effects. These observations reveal the main role of PPARγ in the adipocyte function and during ASC differentiation. As there is now substantial interest in functional food and nutraceutical products, the observed therapeutic value of Cape in insulin-resistance related diseases should be taken into consideration. PMID:26904104

  16. IRAK1/4-targeted anti-inflammatory action of caffeic acid.

    PubMed

    Yang, Woo Seok; Jeong, Deok; Yi, Young-Su; Park, Jae Gwang; Seo, Hyohyun; Moh, Sang Hyun; Hong, Sungyoul; Cho, Jae Youl

    2013-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA) is a phenolic compound that is frequently present in fruits, grains, and dietary supplements. Although CA has been reported to display various biological activities such as anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-viral, and anti-oxidative effects, the action mechanism of CA is not yet fully elucidated. In this study, the anti-inflammatory action mechanism of CA was examined in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treated macrophages (RAW264.7 cells) and HCl/EtOH-induced gastritis. CA was found to diminish nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Additionally, mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) were downregulated by CA. CA also strongly suppressed the nuclear translocation of AP-1 family proteins and the related upstream signaling cascade composed of interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1), IRAK4, TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4/7 (MKK4/7), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). In a direct kinase assay, CA was revealed to directly inhibit IRAK1 and IRAK4. CA also ameliorated HCl/EtOH-induced gastric symptoms via the suppression of JNK, IRAK1, and IRAK4. Therefore, our data strongly suggest that CA acts as an anti-inflammatory drug by directly suppressing IRAK1 and IRAK4.

  17. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester lessens disease symptoms in an experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Hyeog; Roh, Kug-Hwan; Oh, Hana; Park, Sol-Ji; Ha, Sung-Min; Kang, Mi Seon; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jung, So Young; Song, Hyunkeun; Yang, Jae Wook; Park, SaeGwang

    2015-05-01

    Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) is an autoimmune disease that models human uveitis. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a phenolic compound isolated from propolis, possesses anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. CAPE demonstrates therapeutic potential in several animal disease models through its ability to inhibit NF-κB activity. To evaluate these therapeutic effects in EAU, we administered CAPE in a model of EAU that develops after immunization with interphotoreceptor retinal-binding protein (IRBP) in B10.RIII and C57BL/6 mice. Importantly, we found that CAPE lessened the severity of EAU symptoms in both mouse strains. Notably, treated mice exhibited a decrease in the ocular infiltration of immune cell populations into the retina; reduced TNF-α, IL-6, and IFN-γ serum levels: and inhibited TNF-α mRNA expression in retinal tissues. Although CAPE failed to inhibit IRBP-specific T cell proliferation, it was sufficient to suppress cytokine, chemokine, and IRBP-specific antibody production. In addition, retinal tissues isolated from CAPE-treated EAU mice revealed a decrease in NF-κB p65 and phospho-IκBα. The data identify CAPE as a potential therapeutic agent for autoimmune uveitis that acts by inhibiting cellular infiltration into the retina, reducing the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokine, and IRBP-specific antibody and blocking NF-κB pathway activation.

  18. Probing the interaction of caffeic acid with ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Belay, Abebe; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-05-01

    The binding of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and caffeic acid (CFA) was investigated using fluorescence quenching, UV/vis absorption spectrscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) at different temperatures. The study results indicated fluorescence quenching between ZnO NPs and CFA rationalized in terms of a static quenching mechanism or the formation of non-fluorescent CFA-ZnO. From fluorescence quenching spectral analysis, the binding constant (K(a)), number of binding sites (n) and thermodynamic properties were determined. Values of the quenching (K(SV)) and binding (K(a)) constants decrease with increasing temperature and the number of binding sites n = 2. The thermodynamic parameters determined using Van't Hoff equation indicated that binding occurs spontaneously involving the hydrogen bond, and van der Waal's forces played a major role in the reaction of ZnO NPs with CFA. The FTIR, TEM and DLS measurements also indicated differences in the structure, morphology and size of CFA, ZnO NPs and their corresponding CFA-ZnO.

  19. Research on the adsorption property of supported ionic liquids for ferulic acid, caffeic acid and salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Du, Ni; Cao, Shuwen; Yu, Yanying

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, the preparation of new supported ionic liquids (SILs) composed of the N-methylimidazolium cation and the quinoline cation is described. They have been confirmed and evaluated by infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. Six kinds of different SILs included SiO(2)·Im(+)·Cl(-), SiO(2)·Im(+)·BF(4)(-), SiO(2)·Im(+)·PF(6)(-), SiO(2)·Qu(+)·Cl(-), SiO(2)·Qu(+)·BF(4)(-) and SiO(2)·Qu(+)·PF(6)(-). The adsorption characteristics of ferulic acid (FA), caffeic acid (CA) and salicylic acid (SA) on SILs were investigated by static adsorption experiments. It was found that SiO(2)·Qu(+)·Cl(-) had excellent adsorption and desorption capacity to three tested phenolic compounds. The dynamic adsorption characteristics of FA, CA and SA on SiO(2)·Qu(+)·Cl(-) were also studied. The saturated adsorption capacity of FA, CA and SA using SiO(2)·Qu(+)·Cl(-) as adsorbent was 64.6 mg/g, 53.2 mg/g and 72.2 mg/g respectively. Using 70% ethanol as eluent, the saturated desorption efficiencies of FA, CA and SA were 97.2%, 90.3% and 96.5% respectively. Thus, SiO(2)·Qu(+)·Cl(-) had strong adsorption and separation capacity for FA, CA and SA.

  20. In vivo and in vitro antıneoplastic actions of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE): therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Sumeyya; Ozturk, Gulfer; Ginis, Zeynep; Armutcu, Ferah; Yigitoglu, M Ramazan; Akyol, Omer

    2013-01-01

    Cancer prevention and treatment strategies have attracted increasing interest. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of propolis extract, specifically inhibits NF-κB at μM concentrations and shows ability to stop 5-lipoxygenase-catalyzed oxygenation of linoleic acid and arachidonic acid. Previous studies have demonstrated that CAPE exhibits antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antiproliferative, cytostatic, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and, most improtantly, antineoplastic properties. The primary goal of the present review is to summarize and critically evaluate the current knowledge regarding the anticancer effect of CAPE in different cancer types.

  1. Protective effects of ferulic acid and related polyphenols against glyoxal- or methylglyoxal-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Maruf, Abdullah Al; Lip, HoYin; Wong, Horace; O'Brien, Peter J

    2015-06-05

    Glyoxal (GO) and methylglyoxal (MGO) cause protein and nucleic acid carbonylation and oxidative stress by forming reactive oxygen and carbonyl species which have been associated with toxic effects that may contribute to cardiovascular disease, complications associated with diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. GO and MGO can be formed through oxidation of commonly used reducing sugars e.g., fructose under chronic hyperglycemic conditions. GO and MGO form advanced glycation end products which lead to an increased potential for developing inflammatory diseases. In the current study, we have investigated the protective effects of ferulic acid and related polyphenols e.g., caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, methyl ferulate, ethyl ferulate, and ferulaldehyde on GO- or MGO-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress (ROS formation, protein carbonylation and mitochondrial membrane potential maintenance) in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. To investigate and compare the protective effects of ferulic acid and related polyphenols against GO- or MGO-induced toxicity, five hepatocyte models were used: (a) control hepatocytes, (b) GSH-depleted hepatocytes, (c) catalase-inhibited hepatocytes, (d) aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2)-inhibited hepatocytes, and (e) hepatocyte inflammation system (a non-toxic H2O2-generating system). All of the polyphenols tested significantly decreased GO- or MGO-induced cytotoxicity, ROS formation and improved mitochondrial membrane potential in these models. The rank order of their effectiveness was caffeic acid∼ferulaldehyde>ferulic acid>ethyl ferulate>methyl ferulate>p-coumaric acid. Ferulic acid was found to decrease protein carbonylation in GSH-depleted hepatocytes. This study suggests that ferulic acid and related polyphenols can be used therapeutically to inhibit or decrease GO- or MGO-induced hepatotoxicity.

  2. Detoxification Processes from Vanadate at the Root Apoplasm Activated by Caffeic and Polygalacturonic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Garau, Giovanni; Palma, Amedeo; Lauro, Gian Paolo; Mele, Elena; Senette, Caterina; Manunza, Bruno; Deiana, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    In the root apoplasm, V(V) and V(IV) toxicity can be alleviated through redox and complexation reactions involving phenolic substances and the polyuronic components. In such context we report the role of polygalacturonic acid (PGA) on the reducing activity of caffeic acid (CAF) towards V(V). The redox reaction was particularly effective at pH 2.8 leading to the formation of oxidation products with redox activity towards V(V). An o-quinone was identified as the first product of the reaction which is further involved in the formation of CAF dimers. At pH ≥ 3.6 the redox activity decreased and a yield in V(IV) equal to 38, 31, 21 and 14% was found at pH 3.6, 4.0. 5.0 and 6.0 respectively compared with that obtained at pH 2.8. The redox reaction was faster in the presence of PGA and a higher yield of V(IV) was found in the 4.0–6.0 pH range with respect to the CAF-V(V) binary system. The higher efficiency of the redox reaction in the presence of PGA was related with the ability of PGA to bind V(IV). The biological significance of the redox reaction between CAF and V(V), as well as the role of PGA in such reaction, was established “in vivo” using triticale plants. Results showed that PGA reduced significantly the phytotoxic effects of the V(V)-CAF system. PMID:26484667

  3. Propolis and its constituent caffeic acid suppress LPS-stimulated pro-inflammatory response by blocking NF-κB and MAPK activation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Búfalo, Michelle Cristiane; Ferreira, Isabel; Costa, Gustavo; Francisco, Vera; Liberal, Joana; Cruz, Maria Teresa; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Batista, Maria Teresa; Sforcin, José Maurício

    2013-08-26

    Propolis is a bee product with numerous biological and pharmacological properties, such as immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities. It has been used in folk medicine as a healthy drink and in food to improve health and prevent inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about its mechanism of action. Thus, the goal of this study was to verify the antioxidant activity and to explore the anti-inflammatory properties of propolis by addressing its intracellular mechanism of action. Caffeic acid was investigated as a possible compound responsible for propolis action. The antioxidant properties of propolis and caffeic acid were evaluated by using the 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging method. To analyze the anti-inflammatory activity, Raw 264.7 macrophages were treated with different concentrations of propolis or caffeic acid, and nitric oxide (NO) production, a strong pro-inflammatory mediator, was evaluated by the Griess reaction. The concentrations of propolis and caffeic acid that inhibited NO production were evaluated on intracellular signaling pathways triggered during inflammation, namely p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK1/2), the transcription nuclear factor (NF)-κB and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), through Western blot using specific antibodies. A possible effect of propolis on the cytotoxicity of hepatocytes was also evaluated, since this product can be used in human diets. Caffeic acid showed a higher antioxidant activity than propolis extract. Propolis and caffeic acid inhibited NO production in macrophages, at concentrations without cytotoxicity. Furthermore, both propolis and caffeic acid suppressed LPS-induced signaling pathways, namely p38 MAPK, JNK1/2 and NF-κB. ERK1/2 was not affected by propolis extract and caffeic acid. In addition, propolis and caffeic acid did not induce hepatotoxicity at concentrations with strong anti-inflammatory potential

  4. Nitrogen Limited Red and Green Leaf Lettuce Accumulate Flavonoid Glycosides, Caffeic Acid Derivatives, and Sucrose while Losing Chlorophylls, Β-Carotene and Xanthophylls

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Christine; Urlić, Branimir; Jukić Špika, Maja; Kläring, Hans-Peter; Krumbein, Angelika; Baldermann, Susanne; Goreta Ban, Smiljana; Perica, Slavko; Schwarz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of nitrogen application in crop production is desirable for ecological and health-related reasons. Interestingly, nitrogen deficiency can lead to enhanced concentrations of polyphenols in plants. The reason for this is still under discussion. The plants’ response to low nitrogen concentration can interact with other factors, for example radiation intensity. We cultivated red and green leaf lettuce hydroponically in a Mediterranean greenhouse, supplying three different levels of nitrogen (12 mM, 3 mM, 0.75 mM), either in full or reduced (-50%) radiation intensity. In both red and green lettuce, we found clear effects of the nitrogen treatments on growth characteristics, phenolic and photosynthetic compounds, nitrogen, nitrate and carbon concentration of the plants. Interestingly, the concentrations of all main flavonoid glycosides, caffeic acid derivatives, and sucrose increased with decreasing nitrogen concentration, whereas those of chlorophylls, β-carotene, neoxanthin, lactucaxanthin, all trans- and cis-violaxanthin decreased. The constitutive concentrations of polyphenols were lower in the green cultivar, but their relative increase was more pronounced than in the red cultivar. The constitutive concentrations of chlorophylls, β-carotene, neoxanthin, all trans- and cis-violaxanthin were similar in red and green lettuce and with decreasing nitrogen concentration they declined to a similar extent in both cultivars. We only detected little influence of the radiation treatments, e.g. on anthocyanin concentration, and hardly any interaction between radiation and nitrogen concentration. Our results imply a greater physiological plasticity of green compared to the red lettuce regarding its phenolic compounds. They support the photoprotection theory regarding anthocyanins as well as the theory that the deamination activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase drives phenylpropanoid synthesis. PMID:26569488

  5. Nitrogen Limited Red and Green Leaf Lettuce Accumulate Flavonoid Glycosides, Caffeic Acid Derivatives, and Sucrose while Losing Chlorophylls, Β-Carotene and Xanthophylls.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christine; Urlić, Branimir; Jukić Špika, Maja; Kläring, Hans-Peter; Krumbein, Angelika; Baldermann, Susanne; Goreta Ban, Smiljana; Perica, Slavko; Schwarz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of nitrogen application in crop production is desirable for ecological and health-related reasons. Interestingly, nitrogen deficiency can lead to enhanced concentrations of polyphenols in plants. The reason for this is still under discussion. The plants' response to low nitrogen concentration can interact with other factors, for example radiation intensity. We cultivated red and green leaf lettuce hydroponically in a Mediterranean greenhouse, supplying three different levels of nitrogen (12 mM, 3 mM, 0.75 mM), either in full or reduced (-50%) radiation intensity. In both red and green lettuce, we found clear effects of the nitrogen treatments on growth characteristics, phenolic and photosynthetic compounds, nitrogen, nitrate and carbon concentration of the plants. Interestingly, the concentrations of all main flavonoid glycosides, caffeic acid derivatives, and sucrose increased with decreasing nitrogen concentration, whereas those of chlorophylls, β-carotene, neoxanthin, lactucaxanthin, all trans- and cis-violaxanthin decreased. The constitutive concentrations of polyphenols were lower in the green cultivar, but their relative increase was more pronounced than in the red cultivar. The constitutive concentrations of chlorophylls, β-carotene, neoxanthin, all trans- and cis-violaxanthin were similar in red and green lettuce and with decreasing nitrogen concentration they declined to a similar extent in both cultivars. We only detected little influence of the radiation treatments, e.g. on anthocyanin concentration, and hardly any interaction between radiation and nitrogen concentration. Our results imply a greater physiological plasticity of green compared to the red lettuce regarding its phenolic compounds. They support the photoprotection theory regarding anthocyanins as well as the theory that the deamination activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase drives phenylpropanoid synthesis.

  6. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: A Review of Its Antioxidant Activity, Protective Effects against Ischemia-reperfusion Injury and Drug Adverse Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Mai F; Omar, Hany A; Azab, Samar S; Khalifa, Amani E; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2016-10-02

    Propolis, a honey bee product, has been used in folk medicine for centuries for the treatment of abscesses, canker sores and for wound healing. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is one of the most extensively investigated active components of propolis which possess many biological activities, including antibacterial, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer effects. CAPE is a polyphenolic compound characterized by potent antioxidant and cytoprotective activities and protective effects against ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced injury in multiple tissues such as brain, retina, heart, skeletal muscles, testis, ovaries, intestine, colon, and liver. Furthermore, several studies indicated the protective effects of CAPE against chemotherapy-induced adverse drug reactions (ADRs) including several antibiotics (streptomycin, vancomycin, isoniazid, ethambutol) and chemotherapeutic agents (mitomycin, doxorubicin, cisplatin, methotrexate). Due to the broad spectrum of pharmacological activities of CAPE, this review makes a special focus on the recently published data about CAPE antioxidant activity as well as its protective effects against I/R-induced injury and many adverse drug reactions.

  7. Oxidative stress, polarization of macrophages and tumour angiogenesis: Efficacy of caffeic acid.

    PubMed

    Oršolić, Nada; Kunštić, Martina; Kukolj, Marina; Gračan, Romana; Nemrava, Johann

    2016-08-25

    Macrophage polarization is a process when macrophage expresses different functional programs in response to microenvironmental signals and two extreme forms exist; M1 and M2 macrophages. M1 macrophages are highly microbicidal and anticancer with enhanced ability to kill and phagocytose pathogens, upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive molecular species, and present antigens; M2 macrophages and the related tumour associated macrophages (TAMs) regulate tissue remodelling and promote tissue repair and angiogenesis and can amplification of metabolic pathways that can suppress adaptive immune responses. It is demonstrated that ROS production, critical for the activation and functions of M1 macrophages, is necessary for the differentiation of M2 macrophages and TAMs, and that antioxidant therapy blocks TAMs differentiation and tumorigenesis in mouse models of cancer. In order to study how caffeic acid (CA), a natural antioxidant, affects macrophage function, polarization, angiogenesis and tumour growth we injected mice with Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells and treated them for 10 days with CA in a dose of 40 and/or 80 mg kg(-1.) Macrophage polarization was further characterized by quantifying secreted pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide and arginase 1 activity. CA may increase the cytotoxic actions of M1 macrophages and inhibit tumour growth; inhibitory activity on TAMs may be mediated through its antioxidative activity. Taken together, we conclude that the antitumour activity of CA was the result of the synergistic activities of different mechanisms by which CA acts on proliferation, angiogenesis, immunomodulation and survival. The continuous administration of CA efficiently blocked the occurrence of TAMs and markedly suppressed tumorigenesis in mouse cancer models. Targeting TAMs by antioxidants can be a potentially effective method for cancer treatment.

  8. Protective Effect of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) on Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosisin Rat

    PubMed Central

    Zaeemzadeh, Narjes; Hemmati, Aliasghar; Arzi, Ardeshir; Jalali, Mohammadtaha; Rashidi, Iran

    2011-01-01

    Treatment with amiodarone, a commonly prescribed antidysrhythmic agent, is associated with pulmonary fibrosis (PF) which is a commonly progressive and untreatable disease. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a phenolic antioxidant and an active anti-inflammatory , anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant component of propolis (bee glue; a resinous hive product collected by honey bees). In the current study, the effects of CAPE on amiodarone-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rat were investigated. Male rats were divided in to 4 groups. The first group only received amiodarone (6.25 mg/Kg) on first and third day. The second group received only vehicle (distilled water) with the same volume and in the same time as the first group. The third and fourth groups received amiodarone and were treated with CAPE , 5 and 10 µmol /day respectively, from 2 days before the first dose of amiodarone and until 21 days after the second dose of amiodarone. At the end of treatment course, lung tissue was removed for histopathology and biochemical evaluations. Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, myeloperoxidase MPO) and super oxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in lung tissue. Histopathological evaluation was performed using light microscopy. MDA level and the activity of myeloperoxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes significantly decreased in the group which was treated with CAPE (5 µmol/Kg). However, 10 µmol/Kg CAPE had not such an effect. Both doses of CAPE could histopathologically reduce the fibrogenic effects of amiodarone . CAPE was shown to be effective in reducing amiodarone-induced pulmonary fibrosis with the dose of 5 µmol/Kg. PMID:24250361

  9. Immunomodulatory effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester in Balb/c mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jong Kwon; Kim, Hyung Soo; Chung, Seung Tae; Eom, Juno H; Kim, Kyung A; Chung, Se Jin; Paik, Soon Young; Oh, Hye Young

    2004-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an the active component of propolis, is known to have anticarcinogenic, antiviral and various biological activities; however, the effect of CAPE on the immunomodulatory activity in vivo remains unknown. We have investigated the effect of CAPE on the immune system in female Balb/c mice. CAPE (0, 5, 10, 20 mg/kg) was given to mice orally for 14 days. Immunomodulatory activity was evaluated by assessment of body and organ weight, lymphocyte blastogenesis, plaque-forming cell (PFC) assay, lymphocyte subpopulation by flow cytometry and cytokine production. Even though the change of body weight was not observed in CAPE-administered group, thymus weight and/or cellularity of thymus and spleen are decreased at the all dose groups of CAPE (5, 10, 20 mg/kg). On the other hand, CAPE had no effect on B lymphocyte proliferation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but increased T lymphocyte blastogenesis induced by concanavalin A (Con A) at the dose of 20 mg/kg. In the case of lymphocyte subpopulation, the population of T and B cells was not changed but CD4(+) T cell subsets are significantly increased in exposure to CAPE. The antibody responses to T lymphocyte dependent antigen, sheep red blood cell and keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) were increased more than 10 mg/kg in CAPE-treated group. Likewise, the cytokine, IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma were significantly increased at the dose of 20 mg/kg CAPE group. These results suggest that CAPE could have immunomodulatory effects in vivo.

  10. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester modulates aflatoxin B1-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Akçam, Mustafa; Artan, Reha; Yilmaz, Aygen; Ozdem, Sebahat; Gelen, Tekinalp; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2013-12-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most potent of the mycotoxins and is widely observed in nutrition abnormalities. There are some studies suggesting oxidative stress-induced toxic changes on liver related to AFB1 toxicity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether antioxidant caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) relieves oxidative stress in AFB1-induced liver injury in rat. Twenty-four male rats were equally divided into three groups. The first group was used as a control. The second group received three doses of AFB1. The three doses of CAPE were given to constitute the third group with doses of AFB1. After 10 days of experiment, liver and serum samples were taken from all animals. Serum gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), glutathione s-transferase (GST), nitric oxide (NO) and sulfhydryl values were higher in the AFB1 group than in control, whereas serum GGT, ALP, GST and NO values were decreased by in the AFB1 + CAPE group than in AFB1 group. Liver GST, total oxidant capacity, sulfhydryl, apoptosis index and ischemia-modified albumin values were higher in the AFB1 group than in control, whereas the GST activity and apoptosis index were lower in the AFB1 + CAPE group than in the AFB1 group. There were histopathological degeneration and apoptosis in hepatocytes of AFB1 group. The findings were totally recovered by CAPE administration. In conclusion, we observed that AFB1 caused oxidative and nitrosative hepatoxicity to hepatocytes in the rat. However, CAPE induced protective effects on the AFB1-induced hepatoxicity by modulating free radical production, biochemical values and histopathological alterations.

  11. The protective effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester against toluene-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Meydan, Sedat; Nacar, Ahmet; Oztürk, Hasan Oktay; Tas, Ufuk; Köse, Evren; Zararsiz, Ismail; Yılmaz, Nigar; Kus, Ilter

    2016-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study is to examine the negative effects of toluene on kidney tissues and functions and to investigate the protective effects of CAPE against toluene-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. A total of 21 male Wistar rats were divided into three groups of equal number in each. The rats in group I were the controls. Toluene was intraperitoneally injected into the rats in group II with a dose of 500 mg/kg. Rats in group III received CAPE daily while exposed to toluene. After 14 days of experimental period, all rats were killed by decapitation. Enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were studied in the rat kidneys. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine levels were measured for renal function. The CAT and SOD enzyme activities and serum creatinine levels were significantly increased in rats treated with toluene when compared with the controls. But GSH-Px activity, MDA, and BUN levels showed statistically nonsignificant changes. However, increased CAT and SOD enzyme activities and decreased serum creatinine levels were detected in the rats that received CAPE while exposed to toluene. The GSH-Px activity and MDA and BUN levels in the same group did not show statistically significant changes. The results of our study demonstrated that toluene damages kidney tissue and is a nephrotoxic substance. CAPE was able to prevent the renal damage as antioxidant, antitoxic, and nephroprotective agent. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. Identification of differential proteins in colorectal cancer cells treated with caffeic acid phenethyl ester.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Jun; Li, Wan-Ling; Liu, Bao-Hua; Dong, Hui; Mou, Zhi-Rong; Wu, Yu-Zhang

    2014-09-07

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of the anti-cancer activity of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE). Protein profiles of human colorectal cancer SW480 cells treated with or without CAPE were analysed using a two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis gel-based proteomics approach. After electrophoresis, the gels were stained with Coomassie brilliant blue R-250. Digital images were taken with a GS-800 Calibrated Densitometer, and image analysis was performed using PDQuest 2-D Analysis software. The altered proteins following CAPE treatment were further identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry following a database search. The identified proteins were validated by Western blot and immunofluorescence assay. CAPE induced human colorectal cancer cell apoptosis. Four up-regulated proteins and seven down-regulated proteins in colorectal cancer cells treated with CAPE were found. The identified down-regulated proteins in CAPE-treated colorectal cancer cells were Triosephosphate Isomerase (Tim), Proteasome subunit alpha 4 (PSMA4) protein, Guanine nucleotide binding protein beta, Phosphoserine aminotransferase 1 (PSAT1), PSMA1, Myosin XVIIIB and Tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase. Notably, CAPE treatment led to the down-regulation of PSAT1 and PSMA1, two proteins that have been implicated in tumorigenesis. The identified up-regulated proteins were Annexin A4, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, Glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase 1 (GNPDA1), and Glutathione peroxidase (GPX-1). Based on high match scores and potential role in cell growth control, PSMA1, PSAT1, GNPDA1 and GPX-1 were further validated by Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay. PSMA1 and PSAT1 were down-regulated, while GNPDA1 and GPX-1 were up-regulated in CAPE-treated colorectal cancer cells. These differentiated proteins in colorectal cancer cells following CAPE treatment, may be potential molecular targets of CAPE and involved in the anti-cancer effect

  13. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester synergistically enhances docetaxel and paclitaxel cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Mai F; Esmat, Ahmed; Al-Abd, Ahmed M; Azab, Samar S; Khalifa, Amani E; Mosli, Hisham A; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2013-08-01

    Evidence is growing for the beneficial role of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM) in prostate diseases. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a promising component of propolis that possesses SERM activity. This study aimed at investigating the modulatory impact of CAPE on docetaxel (DOC) and paclitaxel (PTX) cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells and exploring the possible underlying mechanisms for this chemomodulation. CAPE significantly increased DOC and PTX potency in PC-3, DU-145 and LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Combination index calculations showed synergistic interaction of CAPE/DOC and CAPE/PTX cotreatments in all the tested cell lines. Subsequent mechanistic studies in PC-3 cells indicated that cyclin D1 and c-myc were significantly reduced in the combined treatment groups with concurrent increase in p27kip. DNA-ploidy analysis indicated a significant increase in the percentage of cells in pre-G1 in CAPE/DOC and CAPE/PTX cotreatments. Decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio together with increased caspase-3 activity and protein abundance were observed in the same groups. Estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) and its downstream tumor suppressor forkhead box O1 levels were significantly elevated in CAPE and combination groups compared to DOC or PTX-alone. ER-α and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor protein abundance were reduced in the same groups. CAPE significantly reduced AKT, ERK and ER-α (Ser-167) phosphorylation in PC-3 cells. CAPE-induced inhibition of AKT phosphorylation was more prominent (1.7-folds higher) in cells expressing ER-α such as PC-3 compared to LNCaP. In conclusion, CAPE enhances the antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of DOC and PTX in prostate cancer cells. This can be, at least partly, attributed to CAPE augmentation of DOC and PTX proapoptotic effects in addition to CAPE-induced alterations in ER-α and ER-β abundance.

  14. Protective Effect of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) on Amiodarone-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosisin Rat.

    PubMed

    Zaeemzadeh, Narjes; Hemmati, Aliasghar; Arzi, Ardeshir; Jalali, Mohammadtaha; Rashidi, Iran

    2011-01-01

    Treatment with amiodarone, a commonly prescribed antidysrhythmic agent, is associated with pulmonary fibrosis (PF) which is a commonly progressive and untreatable disease. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a phenolic antioxidant and an active anti-inflammatory , anticancer, antimicrobial and antioxidant component of propolis (bee glue; a resinous hive product collected by honey bees). In the current study, the effects of CAPE on amiodarone-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rat were investigated. Male rats were divided in to 4 groups. The first group only received amiodarone (6.25 mg/Kg) on first and third day. The second group received only vehicle (distilled water) with the same volume and in the same time as the first group. The third and fourth groups received amiodarone and were treated with CAPE , 5 and 10 µmol /day respectively, from 2 days before the first dose of amiodarone and until 21 days after the second dose of amiodarone. At the end of treatment course, lung tissue was removed for histopathology and biochemical evaluations. Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, myeloperoxidase MPO) and super oxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in lung tissue. Histopathological evaluation was performed using light microscopy. MDA level and the activity of myeloperoxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymes significantly decreased in the group which was treated with CAPE (5 µmol/Kg). However, 10 µmol/Kg CAPE had not such an effect. Both doses of CAPE could histopathologically reduce the fibrogenic effects of amiodarone . CAPE was shown to be effective in reducing amiodarone-induced pulmonary fibrosis with the dose of 5 µmol/Kg.

  15. Functional characterization of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lignin is a significant barrier in the conversion of plant biomass to bioethanol. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyze key steps in the pathway of lignin monomer biosynthesis. Brown midrib mutants in Zea mays and Sorghum bicolor with impaired CAD or COMT activity have attracted considerable agronomic interest for their altered lignin composition and improved digestibility. Here, we identified and functionally characterized candidate genes encoding CAD and COMT enzymes in the grass model species Brachypodium distachyon with the aim of improving crops for efficient biofuel production. Results We developed transgenic plants overexpressing artificial microRNA designed to silence BdCAD1 or BdCOMT4. Both transgenes caused altered flowering time and increased stem count and weight. Downregulation of BdCAD1 caused a leaf brown midrib phenotype, the first time this phenotype has been observed in a C3 plant. While acetyl bromide soluble lignin measurements were equivalent in BdCAD1 downregulated and control plants, histochemical staining and thioacidolysis indicated a decrease in lignin syringyl units and reduced syringyl/guaiacyl ratio in the transgenic plants. BdCOMT4 downregulated plants exhibited a reduction in total lignin content and decreased Maule staining of syringyl units in stem. Ethanol yield by microbial fermentation was enhanced in amiR-cad1-8 plants. Conclusion These results have elucidated two key genes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway in B. distachyon that, when perturbed, may result in greater stem biomass yield and bioconversion efficiency. PMID:23902793

  16. The effects of caffeic, coumaric and ferulic acids on proliferation, superoxide production, adhesion and migration of human tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nasr Bouzaiene, Nouha; Kilani Jaziri, Soumaya; Kovacic, Hervé; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila; Ghedira, Kamel; Luis, José

    2015-11-05

    Reactive oxygen species are well-known mediators of various biological responses. In this study, we examined the effect of three phenolic acids, caffeic, coumaric and ferulic acids, on superoxide anion production, adhesion and migration of human lung (A549) and colon adenocarcinoma (HT29-D4) cancer cell lines. Proliferation of both tumor cells was inhibited by phenolic acids. Caffeic, coumaric and ferulic acids also significantly inhibited superoxide production in A549 and HT29-D4 cells. Superoxide anion production decreased by 92% and 77% at the highest tested concentration (200 µM) of caffeic acid in A549 and HT29-D4 cell lines respectively. Furthermore, A549 and HT29-D4 cell adhesion was reduced by 77.9% and 79.8% respectively at the higher tested concentration of ferulic acid (200 µM). Migration assay performed towards A549 cell line, revealed that tested compounds reduced significantly cell migration. At the highest concentration tested (200 µM), the covered surface was 7.7%, 9.5% and 35% for caffeic, coumaric or ferulic acids, respectively. These results demonstrate that caffeic, coumaric and ferulic acids may participate as active ingredients in anticancer agents against lung and colon cancer development, at adhesion and migration steps of tumor progression.

  17. Genomic study of the absorption mechanism of p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid of extract of Ananas comosus L. leaves.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yun-jie; Zhu, Chun-yan

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac disease has emerged as the leading cause of death worldwide, and food rich in phenolic acids has drawn much attention as sources of active substances of hypolipidemic drug. Ananas comosus L. (pineapple) is one of the most popular tropical and subtropical fruits. Isolated from pineapple leaves, EAL(Extract of Ananas Comosus L. Leaves) is rich in phenolic acids, such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and other phenolics, highly relevant to the putative cardiovascular-protective effects, which suggests its potential to be a new plant medicine for treatment of cardiac disease, but little is known about absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of EAL in animals or human beings. In this study, we employed cDNA microarray, Caco-2 cell lines, and rat intestinal model to explore the absorption behavior of p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid in EAL. The permeation of 2 substances was concentration and time dependent. Results also indicated that monocarboxylic acid transporter was involved in the transepithelial transport of p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Absorption of phenolic acids in humans after coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Nardini, M; Cirillo, E; Natella, F; Scaccini, C

    2002-09-25

    Despite extensive literature describing the biological effects of polyphenols, little is known about their absorption from diet, one major unresolved point consisting of the absorption of the bound forms of polyphenols. In this view, in the present work we studied the absorption in humans of phenolic acids from coffee, a common beverage particularly rich in bound phenolic acids, such as caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and p-coumaric acid. Coffee brew was analyzed for free and total (free + bound) phenolic acids. Chlorogenic acid (5'-caffeoylquinic acid), a bound form of caffeic acid, was present in coffee at high levels, while free phenolic acids were undetectable. After alkaline hydrolysis, which released bound phenolic acids, ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, and high levels of caffeic acid were detected. Plasma samples were collected before and 1 and 2 h after coffee administration and analyzed for free and total phenolic acid content. Two different procedures were applied to release bound phenolic acids in plasma: beta-glucuronidase treatment and alkaline hydrolysis. Coffee administration resulted in increased total plasma caffeic acid concentration, with an absorption peak at 1 h. Caffeic acid was the only phenolic acid found in plasma samples after coffee administration, while chlorogenic acid was undetectable. Most of caffeic acid was present in plasma in bound form, mainly in the glucuronate/sulfate forms. Due to the absence of free caffeic acid in coffee, plasma caffeic acid is likely to be derived from hydrolysis of chlorogenic acid in the gastrointestinal tract.

  19. Synergistic antioxidative effects of alkamides, caffeic acid derivatives, and polysaccharide fractions from Echinacea purpurea on in vitro oxidation of human low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Dalby-Brown, Lea; Barsett, Hilde; Landbo, Anne-Katrine R; Meyer, Anne S; Mølgaard, Per

    2005-11-30

    Preparations of Echinacea are widely used as alternative remedies to prevent the common cold and infections in the upper respiratory tract. After extraction, fractionation, and isolation, the antioxidant activity of three extracts, one alkamide fraction, four polysaccharide-containing fractions, and three caffeic acid derivatives from Echinacea purpurea root was evaluated by measuring their inhibition of in vitro Cu(II)-catalyzed oxidation of human low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The antioxidant activities of the isolated caffeic acid derivatives were compared to those of echinacoside, caffeic acid, and rosmarinic acid for reference. The order of antioxidant activity of the tested substances was cichoric acid > echinacoside > or = derivative II > or = caffeic acid > or = rosmarinic acid > derivative I. Among the extracts the 80% aqueous ethanolic extract exhibited a 10 times longer lag phase prolongation (LPP) than the 50% ethanolic extract, which in turn exhibited a longer LPP than the water extract. Following ion-exchange chromatography of the water extract, the majority of its antioxidant activity was found in the latest eluted fraction (H2O-acidic 3). The antioxidant activity of the tested Echinacea extracts, fractions, and isolated compounds was dose dependent. Synergistic antioxidant effects of Echinacea constituents were found when cichoric acid (major caffeic acid derivative in E. purpurea) or echinacoside (major caffeic acid derivative in Echinacea pallida and Echinacea angustifolia) were combined with a natural mixture of alkamides and/or a water extract containing the high molecular weight compounds. This contributes to the hypothesis that the physiologically beneficial effects of Echinacea are exerted by the multitude of constituents present in the preparations.

  20. [Densitometric method for parallel measurement of rosmarinic and caffeic acids in plant samples].

    PubMed

    Janicsák, G; Máthé, I

    1998-09-01

    In the last few years, the role of free radicals in the promotion of cell aging and tumour growth has focused attention on phenolic compounds. Rosmarinic acid (RA) and caffeic acid (CA), as major components of tannins, commonly occur together in many species of the Lamiaceae. A TLC-densitometric method was introduced for the parallel determination of RA and CA. Experiments were performed to establish the optimal measurement parameters related to the excitation wavelength, colour stability, linearity of the calibration curves, sensitivity and reproducibility. In the wavelength range 290-330 nm, it was found that the emission peak areas exhibit a maximum at 325 nm. Therefore, the densitometric evaluations of these tannins were made at 325 nm. The two compounds behaved very similarly as regards colour stability. The changes during the 3 hours of observation were not strong, as reflected by coefficients of variation of 8.20% for RA and 5.40% for CA. The calibration plots demonstrating the relation between the spotted amount and the measured peak area were found to include 2 intersecting linear sections, in the intervals 0-0.40 microgram and 0.40-1.20 micrograms for RA and 0-0.08 microgram and 0.08-0.30 microgram for CA. The correlation coefficients ranging between 0.991 and 0.998. The lower limits of detection were 1 ng for RA and 0.1 ng for CA. The reproducibility proved to be very good: the 10 times repeated densitometric estimation of the same spot yielded a coefficient of variation of 0.34% for RA and 0.36 for CA. The application of TLC permits utilization of the fluorescence of both phenols, often without the need for prior purification. This fluorescence measurement makes the detection extremely sensitive. The densitometric quantification allows the routine analysis of many samples in a short time with reasonable accuracy. The practical application of the elaborated method will be demonstrated on the leaves of 5 Salvia species. The results are shown in table I.

  1. The metabolic bioactivation of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) mediated by tyrosinase selectively inhibits glutathione S-transferase

    PubMed Central

    Kudugunti, Shashi K.; Thorsheim, Helen; Yousef, Mohammad S.; Guan, Lan; Moridani, Majid Y.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) play major roles in drug resistance in melanoma. In this study, we investigated caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as a selective GST inhibitor in the presence of tyrosinase, which is abundant in melanoma cells. Tyrosinase bioactivates CAPE to an o-quinone, which reacts with glutathione to form CAPE-SG conjugate. Our findings indicate that 90% CAPE was metabolized by tyrosinase after a 60-min incubation. LC–MS/MS analyses identified a CAPE-SG conjugate as a major metabolite. In the presence of tyrosinase, CAPE (10–25 µM) showed 70–84% GST inhibition; whereas in the absence of tyrosinase, CAPE did not inhibit GST. CAPE-SG conjugate and CAPE-quinone (25 µM) demonstrated ≥85% GST inhibition via reversible and irreversible mechanisms, respectively. Comparing with CDNB and GSH, the non-substrate CAPE acted as a weak, reversible GST inhibitor at concentrations >50 µM. Furthermore, MK-571, a selective MRP inhibitor, and probenecid, a non-selective MRP inhibitor, decrease the IC50 of CAPE (15 µM) by 13% and 21%, apoptotic cell death by 3% and 13%, and mitochondrial membrane potential in human SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells by 10% and 56%, respectively. Moreover, computational docking analyses suggest that CAPE binds to the GST catalytic active site. Caffeic acid, a hydrolyzed product of CAPE, showed a similar GST inhibition in the presence of tyrosinase. Although, as controls, 4-hydroxyanisole and l-tyrosine were metabolized by tyrosinase to form quinones and glutathione conjugates, they exhibited no GST inhibition in the absence and presence of tyrosinase. In conclusion, both CAPE and caffeic acid selectively inhibited GST in the presence of tyrosinase. Our results suggest that intracellularly formed quinones and glutathione conjugates of caffeic acid and CAPE may play major roles in the selective inhibition of GST in SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells. Moreover, the inhibition of MRP

  2. Caffeic acid: potential applications in nanotechnology as a green reducing agent for sustainable synthesis of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yu Seon; Cha, Song-Hyun; Yoon, Hye-Ran; Kang, Young-Hwa; Park, Youmie

    2015-04-01

    The sustainable synthesis of gold nanoparticles from gold ions was conducted with caffeic acid as a green reducing agent. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed by spectroscopic and microscopic methods. Spherical nanoparticles with an average diameter of 29.99 ± 7.43 nm were observed in high- resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. The newly prepared gold nanoparticles exhibited catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride. This system enables the preparation of green catalysts using plant natural products as reducing agents, which fulfills the growing need for sustainability initiatives.

  3. Preparation and characterization of caffeic acid-grafted electrospun poly(L-lactic acid) fiber mats for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Chuysinuan, Piyachat; Pavasant, Prasit; Supaphol, Pitt

    2012-06-27

    Caffeic acid (CA) was chemically immobilized onto the surfaces of the individual electrospun poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) fibers to enhance the hydrophilicity and impart the antioxidant activity to the obtained fibrous membranes. This was done in two sequential steps. First, amino groups were covalently introduced onto the surfaces through the reaction with 1,6-hexamethylenediamine (HMD). In the second step, the amino moieties reacted with CA, which had been preactivated sequentially with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). The success of the reactions was confirmed by the ninhydrin assay and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis (XPS). Indirect cytotoxicity evaluation with murine dermal fibroblasts (L929) and human dermal fibroblasts (HDFa) revealed that the neat and the modified PLLA fibrous matrices released no substances in the levels that were harmful to the cells. Direct culturing of HDFa on these fibrous substrates indicated that they supported the proliferation of the cells on days 2 and 3 very well and that the CA-immobilized substrates exhibited the highest cell viability. Lastly, the antioxidant activity of the CA-immobilized substrates, as revealed by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryldrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay, was as high as 88% on average.

  4. Is caffeic acid phenethyl ester more protective than doxycycline in experimental periodontitis?

    PubMed

    Yiğit, Umut; Kırzıoğlu, Fatma Yeşim; Uğuz, Abdülhadi Cihangir; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Özmen, Özlem

    2017-09-01

    Host modulation therapies (anti-inflammatory drugs, bone-stimulating agents, anti-proteinase etc.) target the inhibition or stabilization of tissue breakdown. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and/or low dose doxycycline (LDD) administrations on alveolar bone loss (ABL), serum cytokines and gingival apoptosis, as well as the levels of oxidants and anti-oxidants in rats with ligature-induced periodontitis. The animals were randomly divided into five groups: Group C (periodontally healthy), Group PC (Periodontitis+CAPE), Group PD (Periodontitis+LDD), Group PCD (Periodontitis+CAPE+LDD), Group P (Periodontitis). Experimental periodontitis was induced for 14days. Levels of ABL, and the serum cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1 β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-10 were assessed as were the levels of the oxidants and anti-oxidants, malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and levels of gingival apoptosis. The lowest ABL levels was evident in the PC group, among the experimental groups. There was also less inflammatory infiltration in the PC group than the PD group. IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 were lower in the PC group and higher in the P group in comparison to the levels in the other experiment groups. TNF-α levels in the PD group were higher than levels in the PC and PCD groups. The PC and PCD groups did not differ from the C group in regard to MDA levels. The highest GSH-Px level was found in the PC group. Gingival apoptosis in the PC group was not only lower than the PD and PCD groups, but also lower than in the C group. The present study suggests that CAPE has more anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-apoptotic effects than LDD, with no additive benefits of a CAPE+LDD combination being evident in rats with periodontitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Derivatives of caffeic acid, a natural antioxidant, as the basis for the discovery of novel nonpeptidic neurotrophic agents.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Razieh; Rajaian, Hamid; Silva, Tiago; Magalhães E Silva, Diogo; Saso, Luciano; Edraki, Najmeh; Miri, Ramin; Borges, Fernanda; Firuzi, Omidreza

    2017-06-15

    Neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, threaten the lives of millions of people and the number of affected patients is constantly growing with the increase of the aging population. Small molecule neurotrophic agents represent promising therapeutics for the pharmacological management of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, a series of caffeic acid amide analogues with variable alkyl chain lengths, including ACAF3 (C3), ACAF4 (C4), ACAF6 (C6), ACAF8 (C8) and ACAF12 (C12) were synthesized and their neurotrophic activity was examined by different methods in PC12 neuronal cells. We found that all caffeic acid amide derivatives significantly increased survival in PC12 neuronal cells in serum-deprived conditions at 25μM, as measured by the MTT assay. ACAF4, ACAF6 and ACAF8 at 5µM also significantly enhanced the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF) in inducing neurite outgrowth, a sign of neuronal differentiation. The neurotrophic effects of amide derivatives did not seem to be mediated by direct activation of tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) receptor, since K252a, a potent TrkA antagonist, did not block the neuronal survival enhancement effect. Similarly, the active compounds did not activate TrkA as measured by immunoblotting with anti-phosphoTrkA antibody. We also examined the effect of amide derivatives on signaling pathways involved in survival and differentiation by immunoblotting. ACAF4 and ACAF12 induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in PC12 cells at 5 and 25µM, while ACAF12 was also able to significantly increase AKT phosphorylation at 5 and 25µM. Molecular docking studies indicated that compared to the parental compound caffeic acid, ACAF12 exhibited higher binding energy with phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) as a putative molecular target. Based on Lipinski's rule of five, all of the compounds obeyed three molecular descriptors (HBD, HBA and MM) in drug-likeness test. Taken together, these findings show for the

  6. Bactericidal Activity and Mechanism of Photoirradiated Polyphenols against Gram-Positive and -Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Ishiyama, Kirika; Sheng, Hong; Ikai, Hiroyo; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2015-09-09

    The bactericidal effect of various types of photoirradiated polyphenols against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria was evaluated in relation to the mode of action. Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus mutans) and Gram-negative bacteria (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) suspended in a 1 mg/mL polyphenol aqueous solution (caffeic acid, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, epigallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate, and proanthocyanidin) were exposed to LED light (wavelength, 400 nm; irradiance, 260 mW/cm(2)) for 5 or 10 min. Caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid exerted the highest bactericidal activity followed by gallic acid and proanthocyanidin against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. It was also demonstrated that the disinfection treatment induced oxidative damage of bacterial DNA, which suggests that polyphenols are incorporated into bacterial cells. The present study suggests that blue light irradiation of polyphenols could be a novel disinfection treatment.

  7. Effect of caffeine, caffeic acid and their various combinations on enzymes of cholinergic, monoaminergic and purinergic systems critical to neurodegeneration in rat brain-In vitro.

    PubMed

    Akomolafe, S F; Akinyemi, A J; Ogunsuyi, O B; Oyeleye, S I; Oboh, G; Adeoyo, O O; Allismith, Y R

    2017-04-29

    Caffeine and caffeic acid are two bioactive compounds that are present in plant foods and are major constituent of coffee, cocoa, tea, cola drinks and chocolate. Although not structurally related, caffeine and caffeic acid has been reported to elicit neuroprotective properties. However, their different proportional distribution in food sources and possible effect of such interactions are not often taken into consideration. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effect of caffeine, caffeic acid and their various combinations on activities of some enzymes [acetylcholinesterase (AChE), monoamine oxidase (MAO) ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPase), ecto-5(1)-nucleotidase (E-NTDase) and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase relevant to neurodegeneration in vitro in rat brain. The stock concentration of caffeine and caffiec acid and their various proportional combinations were prepared and their interactions with the activities of these enzymes were assessed (in vitro) in different brain structures. The Fe(2+) and Cu(2+) chelating abilities of the samples were also investigated. The results revealed that caffeine, caffeic acid and their various combinations exhibited inhibitory effect on activities of AChE, MAO, E-NTPase and E-NTDase, but stimulatory effect on Na(+)/K(+) ATPase activity. The combinations also exhibited Fe(2+) and Cu(2+) chelating abilities. Considering the various combinations, a higher caffeine to caffeic acid ratio produced significantly highest enzyme modulatory effects; these were significantly lower to the effect of caffeine alone but significantly higher than the effect of caffeic acid alone. These findings may provide new insight into the effect of proportional combination of these bioactive compounds as obtained in many foods especially with respect to their neuroprotective effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Plausible anti-inflammatory mechanism of resveratrol and caffeic acid against chronic stress-induced insulin resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Suprithi; Mourya, Ashish; Ahuja, Swati; Sah, Sangeeta Pilkhwal; Kumar, Anil

    2016-12-01

    Stress is associated with many diseases and dysfunctions, such as depression, cardiovascular alterations, immunological function disorder, inflammation, obesity, and insulin resistance. Stress-induced inflammation is associated with the genesis of insulin resistance. Stress activates hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis, Renin Angiotensin System pathway, and sympatho-adrenal system, all of which are involved in the production of cytokines, causing the negative downregulation of insulin signaling either by phosphorylating serine residues of IRS or by inhibiting the activity of Akt leading to insulin resistance. In this study, male LACA mice (20-30 g) were subjected to 2 h of chronic restraint stress daily for 30 days at variable time. Resveratrol, caffeic acid, glibenclamide, and their combinations were administered 45 min prior to restraint stress daily for 30 days and their anti-inflammatory effect was examined on CRS-induced behavioral, biochemical, and metabolic alterations. Induction of stress in mice was evident by increased corticosterone and decreased bodyweight. Chronic restraint stress for 30 days developed insulin resistance characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, increased glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index, hyperlipidemia, increased inflammatory cytokines, and TNF-α. Treatment with resveratrol, caffeic acid, and their combinations has attenuated stress-induced insulin resistance by reducing inflammation.

  9. Melatonin and caffeic acid phenethyl ester in the regulation of mitochondrial function and apoptosis: The basis for future medical approaches.

    PubMed

    Erdemli, Haci Kemal; Akyol, Sumeyya; Armutcu, Ferah; Gulec, Mehmet Akif; Canbal, Metin; Akyol, Omer

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this review article is to summarize and compare the effects of melatonin and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on the relationship between mitochondrial functioning and apoptosis. References in this article were selected with an approach based on a comprehensive literature review by using MEDLINE/PubMed and Google Scholar databases which were scanned in the last six months without any restrictions. For each database, the review terms used are 'melatonin', 'caffeic acid phenethyl ester, both together and associated with other key words such as apoptosis and mitochondria. Evidential mitochondrial molecular backgrounds for diseases make these two molecule competitors, since both of them use the same pathways to cope with fundamentals of the diseases such as nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B (NF-κB inhibition, induction of mitochondrial apoptosis in cancer cells, free radical scavenging effects, and antioxidant activities. The data reviewed in this paper provide a useful background for the understanding of some molecular details of melatonin and CAPE on several medical situation and diseases. Mutual usage of these two tremendous molecules might have a capacity to open new therapeutic approaches in near future.

  10. Enzymatic Browning in Sugar Beet Leaves (Beta vulgaris L.): Influence of Caffeic Acid Derivatives, Oxidative Coupling, and Coupled Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vissers, Anne; Kiskini, Alexandra; Hilgers, Roelant; Marinea, Marina; Wierenga, Peter Alexander; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean-Paul

    2017-06-21

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves of 8 month (8m) plants showed more enzymatic browning than those of 3 month (3m). Total phenolic content increased from 4.6 to 9.4 mg/g FW in 3m and 8m, respectively, quantitated by reverse-phase-ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet-mass spectrometry (RP-UHPLC-UV-MS). The PPO activity was 6.7 times higher in extracts from 8m than from 3m leaves. Substrate content increased from 0.53 to 2.45 mg/g FW in 3m and 8m, respectively, of which caffeic acid glycosyl esters were most important, increasing 10-fold with age. Caffeic acid glycosides and vitexin derivatives were no substrates. In 3m and 8m, nonsubstrate-to-substrate ratios were 8:1 and 3:1, respectively. A model system showed browning at 3:1 ratio due to formation of products with extensive conjugated systems through oxidative coupling and coupled oxidation. The 8:1 ratio did not turn brown as oxidative coupling occurred without much coupled oxidation. We postulate that differences in nonsubstrate-to-substrate ratio and therewith extent of coupled oxidation explain browning.

  11. Enzymatic Browning in Sugar Beet Leaves (Beta vulgaris L.): Influence of Caffeic Acid Derivatives, Oxidative Coupling, and Coupled Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) leaves of 8 month (8m) plants showed more enzymatic browning than those of 3 month (3m). Total phenolic content increased from 4.6 to 9.4 mg/g FW in 3m and 8m, respectively, quantitated by reverse-phase-ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography–ultraviolet-mass spectrometry (RP-UHPLC–UV-MS). The PPO activity was 6.7 times higher in extracts from 8m than from 3m leaves. Substrate content increased from 0.53 to 2.45 mg/g FW in 3m and 8m, respectively, of which caffeic acid glycosyl esters were most important, increasing 10-fold with age. Caffeic acid glycosides and vitexin derivatives were no substrates. In 3m and 8m, nonsubstrate-to-substrate ratios were 8:1 and 3:1, respectively. A model system showed browning at 3:1 ratio due to formation of products with extensive conjugated systems through oxidative coupling and coupled oxidation. The 8:1 ratio did not turn brown as oxidative coupling occurred without much coupled oxidation. We postulate that differences in nonsubstrate-to-substrate ratio and therewith extent of coupled oxidation explain browning. PMID:28570816

  12. The effects of Nigella sativa oil, thymoquinone, propolis, and caffeic acid phenethyl ester on radiation-induced cataract.

    PubMed

    Demir, Elif; Taysi, Seyithan; Al, Behcet; Demir, Tuncer; Okumus, Seydi; Saygili, Oguzhan; Saricicek, Edibe; Dirier, Ahmet; Akan, Muslum; Tarakcioglu, Mehmet; Bagci, Cahit

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant and radioprotective effects of propolis, caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), Nigella sativa oil (NSO), and thymoquinone (TQ) against ionizing radiation-induced cataracts in lens after total cranium irradiation of rats with single dose of 5-Gy cobalt-60 gamma rays. A total of 74 Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 8 groups to test the radioprotective effectiveness of Nigella sativa oil, thymoquine, propolis, or caffeic acid phenethyl ester administered by either orogastric tube or intraperitoneal injection. Appropriate control groups were also studied. Chylack's cataract classification was used in the study. At the end of the tenth day, cataracts developed in 80 % of the rats in the radiotherapy group. After irradiation, cataract rate dropped to 20 % in NSO, 30 % in propolis, 40 % in CAPE, and 50 % in TQ groups and was limited to grade 1 and grade 2. Cataract formation was observed the least in NSO group and the most in TQ group. In the irradiated (IR) group, superoxide dismutase activity was lower, while glutathione peroxidase and xanthine oxidase activities and malondialdehyde level were higher compared with the other groups. Total superoxide scavenger activity and nonenzymatic superoxide scavenger activity were not statistically significant in IR group compared with the other groups. The findings obtained in the study might suggest that propolis, CAPE, NSO, and TQ could prevent cataractogenesis in ionizing radiation-induced cataracts in the lenses of rats, wherein propolis and NSO were found to be more potent.

  13. Structure-Activity Relationships in the Cytoprotective Effect of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) and Fluorinated Derivatives: Effects on Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction and Antioxidant Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-09

    fluorinated derivatives: Effects on heme oxygenase-1 induction and antioxidant activities Xinyu Wang a,b, Salomon Stavchansky a, Sean M. Kerwin c, Phillip D...February 2010 Available online 9 March 2010 Keywords: Caffeic acid phenethyl ester Fluorinated derivative Cytoprotection Oxidative stress Human...acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as a cytoprotective agent, six catechol ring fluorinated CAPE derivatives were evaluated for their cytoprotective

  14. Cativic acid-caffeic acid hybrid exerts cytotoxic effects and induces apoptotic death in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Alza, Natalia P; Murray, Ana P; Salvador, Gabriela A

    2017-09-05

    The development of hybrids from natural products is a promising strategy for drug discovery. In cancer therapy, there is a need to discover novel agents that can induce apoptosis in cancer cells. To contribute to this field of interest, we investigated the effect of a synthetic hybrid from cativic acid and caffeic acid (5) on viability, proliferation, and apoptosis in human neuroblastoma cells (IMR-32). Three hybrids were prepared via Mitsunobu esterification from 17-hydroxycativic acid (1) and natural phenols. Cell viability was analyzed by MTT assay. SYTOX green and LDH leakage were used to determine the cytotoxic effect. Caspase-3 activity, cell cycle phases, and proliferation were analyzed in order to characterize the biological effects of hybrid 5. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) status was evaluated for elucidating the potential mechanisms involved in hybrid 5 effect. Hybrid 5 reduced the viability of IMR-32 cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner (IC50 = 18.0 ± 1.3 μM) as a result of its antiproliferative effect through changes in the cell cycle distribution and induction of apoptosis associated with activation of caspase-3. Exposure to 5 triggered ERK1/2 activation and nuclear translocation. Hybrid 5 also promoted an increase in nuclear localization of the transcription factor c-Jun. Inhibition of ERK1/2 and JNK potentiated 5-induced inhibition of IMR-32 viability. Hybrid 5 displays cell growth inhibition by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, through ERK1/2 and JNK participation.

  15. The potential usage of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) against chemotherapy-induced and radiotherapy-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Sumeyya; Ginis, Zeynep; Armutcu, Ferah; Ozturk, Gulfer; Yigitoglu, M Ramazan; Akyol, Omer

    2012-07-01

    Protection of the patients against the side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens has attracted increasing interest of clinicians and practitioners. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), which is extracted from the propolis of honeybee hives as an active component, specifically inhibits nuclear factor κB at micromolar concentrations and show ability to stop 5-lipoxygenase-catalysed oxygenation of linoleic acid and arachidonic acid. CAPE has antiinflammatory, antiproliferative, antioxidant, cytostatic, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal and antineoplastic properties. The purpose of this review is to summarize in vivo and in vitro usage of CAPE to prevent the chemotherapy-induced and radiotherapy-induced damages and side effects in experimental animals and to develop a new approach for the potential usage of CAPE in clinical trial as a protective agent during chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens.

  16. Inhibitory activity of the white wine compounds, tyrosol and caffeic acid, on lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, L; Migliori, M; Filippi, C; Origlia, N; Panichi, V; Falchi, M; Bertelli, A A E; Bertelli, A

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess whether tyrosol and caffeic acid are able to inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release. TNF is one of the most important cytokines involved in inflammatory reactions. The results show that both tyrosol and caffeic acid are able to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-alpha release from human monocytes, even at low doses. Their mechanisms of action are discussed and we conclude that high doses of the two compounds are not required to achieve effective inhibition of inflammatory reactions due to TNF-alpha release.

  17. Design, synthesis and evaluation of semi-synthetic triazole-containing caffeic acid analogues as 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, Daniela; Lucio, Oscar Méndez; Musio, Biagia; Bender, Andreas; Listing, Monika; Dennhardt, Sophie; Koeberle, Andreas; Garscha, Ulrike; Rizzo, Roberta; Manfredini, Stefano; Werz, Oliver; Ley, Steven V

    2015-08-28

    In this work the synthesis, structure-activity relationship (SAR) and biological evaluation of a novel series of triazole-containing 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors are described. The use of structure-guided drug design techniques provided compounds that demonstrated excellent 5-LO inhibition with IC50 of 0.2 and 3.2 μm in cell-based and cell-free assays, respectively. Optimization of binding and functional potencies resulted in the identification of compound 13d, which showed an enhanced activity compared to the parent bioactive compound caffeic acid 5 and the clinically approved zileuton 3. Compounds 15 and 16 were identified as lead compounds in inhibiting 5-LO products formation in neutrophils. Their interference with other targets on the arachidonic acid pathway was also assessed. Cytotoxicity tests were performed to exclude a relationship between cytotoxicity and the increased activity observed after structure optimization.

  18. Equilibrium adsorption of caffeic, chlorogenic and rosmarinic acids on cationic cross-linked starch with quaternary ammonium groups.

    PubMed

    Simanaviciute, Deimante; Klimaviciute, Rima; Rutkaite, Ramune

    2017-02-01

    In the present study, the equilibrium adsorption of caffeic acid (CA) and its derivatives, namely, chlorogenic (CGA) and rosmarinic (RA) acids on cationic cross-linked starch (CCS) with degree of substitution of quaternary ammonium groups of 0.42 have been investigated in relation to the structure and acidity of phenolic acids. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption models have been used to describe the equilibrium adsorption of CA, CGA and RA from their initial solutions and solutions having the equimolar amount of NaOH at different temperatures. In the case of adsorption from the initial solutions of acids the values of adsorption parameters were closely related to the dissociation constants of investigated acids. According to the increasing effectiveness of adsorption, phenolic acids could be arranged in the following order: CAacids solutions changed their sorption properties which became mostly related to the acids structure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Increases Radiosensitivity of Estrogen Receptor-Positive and -Negative Breast Cancer Cells by Prolonging Radiation-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Khoram, Nastaran Masoudi; Bigdeli, Bahareh; Nikoofar, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Breast cancer is an important cause of death among women. The development of radioresistance in breast cancer leads to recurrence after radiotherapy. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a polyphenolic compound of honeybee propolis, is known to have anticancer properties. In this study, we examined whether CAPE enhanced the radiation sensitivity of MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor-negative) and T47D (estrogen receptor-positive) cell lines. Methods The cytotoxic effect of CAPE on MDA-MB-231 and T47D breast cancer cells was evaluated by performing an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. To assess clonogenic ability, MDA-MB-231 and T47D cells were treated with CAPE (1 µM) for 72 hours before irradiation, and then, a colony assay was performed. A comet assay was used to determine the number of DNA strand breaks at four different times. Results CAPE decreased the viability of both cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In the clonogenic assay, pretreatment of cells with CAPE before irradiation significantly reduced the surviving fraction of MDA-MB-231 cells at doses of 6 and 8 Gy. A reduction in the surviving fraction of T47D cells was observed relative to MDA-MB-231 at lower doses of radiation. Additionally, CAPE maintained radiation-induced DNA damage in T47D cells for a longer period than in MDA-MB-231 cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that CAPE impairs DNA damage repair immediately after irradiation. The induction of radiosensitivity by CAPE in radioresistant breast cancer cells may be caused by prolonged DNA damage. PMID:27066092

  20. Determination of the structure and catalytic mechanism of Sorghum bicolor caffeic acid O-methyltransferase and the structural impact of three brown midrib12 mutations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) acting as the methyl donor, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase from Sorghum bicolor (SbCOMT) methylates the 5-hydroxyl group of its preferred substrate, 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde, to form sinapaldehyde. In order to determine the mechanism of SbCOMT and understand the red...

  1. Effect of caffeic acid on haemoglobin-mediated lipid and protein oxidation in washed cod mince during ice and frozen storage.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Karin J; Undeland, Ingrid K

    2010-11-01

    Little is known about the relation between haemoglobin (Hb)-mediated lipid and protein oxidation in muscle foods and how these two reactions can be inhibited by naturally occurring antioxidants. This study was aimed at evaluating (1) lipid oxidation and protein oxidation induced by 20 µmol L(-1) Hb during chilled and frozen storage of washed cod mince and (2) the efficiency of 10-1000 ppm (0.063-6.3 mmol L(-1)) caffeic acid in preventing these reactions. Addition of 20 µmol L(-1) Hb increased peroxide value (PV), rancid odour, protein carbonylation, protein insolubilisation, redness loss and α-tocopherol loss in ice-stored washed cod mince. Since both lipid and protein oxidation developed at the same time, it was not possible to conclude which reaction initiated the other. All studied reactions were efficiently inhibited by ≥ 50 ppm caffeic acid, which could be a result of α-tocopherol regeneration, general radical scavenging, reduced formation of oxidised Hb forms and/or conformational changes in Hb structure. During frozen storage the only clear effect of Hb was increased PV, and here caffeic acid was less efficient as an antioxidant. Hb-induced lipid and protein oxidation occurred quickly in ice-stored washed cod mince, and the two reactions could not be separated in time. During frozen storage, Hb caused only limited lipid oxidation. Caffeic acid (≥50 ppm) was an efficient antioxidant during ice storage. 2010 Society of Chemical Industry

  2. DJ-1 plays an important role in caffeic acid-mediated protection of the gastrointestinal mucosa against ketoprofen-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Ho, Cheng-Ying; Jhang, Jhih-Jia; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2014-10-01

    Ketoprofen is widely used to alleviate pain and inflammation in clinical medicine; however, this drug may cause oxidative stress and lead to gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers. We previously reported that nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays a crucial role in protecting cells against reactive oxygen species, and it facilitates the prevention of ketoprofen-induced GI mucosal ulcers. Recent reports suggested that Nrf2 becomes unstable in the absence of DJ-1/PARK7, attenuating the activity of Nrf2-regulated downstream antioxidant enzymes. Thus, increasing Nrf2 translocation by DJ-1 may represent a novel means for GI protection. In vitro, caffeic acid increases the nuclear/cytosolic Nrf2 ratio and the mRNA expression of the downstream antioxidant enzymes, ϒ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and heme oxygenase-1, by activating the JNK/p38 pathway in Int-407 cells. Moreover, knockdown of DJ-1 also reversed caffeic acid-induced nuclear Nrf2 protein expression in a JNK/p38-dependent manner. Our results also indicated that treatment of Sprague-Dawley rats with caffeic acid prior to the administration of ketoprofen inhibited oxidative damage and reversed the inhibitory effects of ketoprofen on the antioxidant system and DJ-1 protein expression in the GI mucosa. Our observations suggest that DJ-1 plays an important role in caffeic acid-mediated protection against ketoprofen-induced oxidative damage in the GI mucosa.

  3. Amine-modified SBA-15 and MCF mesoporous molecular sieves as promising sorbents for natural antioxidant. Modeling of caffeic acid adsorption.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Michał; Geszke-Moritz, Małgorzata

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a detailed study of caffeic acid adsorption on mesoporous SBA-15 and MCF silicas functionalized with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and 3-[2-(aminoethylamino)propyl]trimethoxysilane (AEAPTMS). Synthesized mesoporous adsorbents were characterized using different analytical techniques such as N2 sorption, XRD, TEM, SEM and FT-IR. The adsorption studies of caffeic acid were conducted in various organic solvents. Moreover, the effect of water content in 2-propanol-water mixture on adsorption efficiency was investigated. The experimental data were best fitted to the Langmuir equation, followed by the Temkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Freundlich models. The maximum adsorption capacity values calculated from the Langmuir model demonstrated that SBA-15 and MCF silicas modified with AEAPTMS revealed better adsorption properties toward caffeic acid (192.3 and 161.3mg/g, respectively) as compared to the materials modified with APTES (125.0 and 113.6 mg/g, respectively). The obtained results indicate that both SBA-15 and MCF silicas functionalized with AEAPTMS and APTES are promising materials for the entrapment of caffeic acid.

  4. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester as a remedial agent for reproductive functions and oxidative stress-based pathologies of gonads.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Sumeyya; Akbas, Ali; Butun, Ilknur; Toktas, Muhsin; Ozyurt, Huseyin; Sahin, Semsettin; Akyol, Omer

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the studies on the roles of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in several disease models and cell cultures are tremendously growing. It is such a great molecule that was used by ancient times to ameliorate some diseases and nowadays, it is used by modern medicine to test the effectiveness. In this mini-review article, the protection capability of CAPE, as a liposoluble antioxidant and a potent nuclear factor kappa B inhibitor, on oxidative and non-oxidative ovary, and testis damages has been summarized. In view of our laboratory findings/experience and those reported in the hitherto literature, we suggest that CAPE possesses protective effects for pathologies of the reproductive organs induced by untoward effects of harmful molecules such as free oxygen radicals, pesticides, methotrexate, and MK-801 (dizocilpine).

  5. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester as a protective agent against nephrotoxicity and/or oxidative kidney damage: a detailed systematic review.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Sumeyya; Ugurcu, Veli; Altuntas, Aynur; Hasgul, Rukiye; Cakmak, Ozlem; Akyol, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of propolis, has been attracting the attention of different medical and pharmaceutical disciplines in recent years because of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, cytotoxic, antiviral, antifungal, and antineoplastic properties. One of the most studied organs for the effects of CAPE is the kidney, particularly in the capacity of this ester to decrease the nephrotoxicity induced by several drugs and the oxidative injury after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). In this review, we summarized and critically evaluated the current knowledge regarding the protective effect of CAPE in nephrotoxicity induced by several special medicines such as cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclosporine, gentamycin, methotrexate, and other causes leading to oxidative renal injury, namely, I/R models and senility.

  6. Synthesis, antifungal activity of caffeic acid derivative esters, and their synergism with fluconazole and nystatin against Candida spp.

    PubMed

    Sardi, Janaína de Cássia Orlandi; Gullo, Fernanda Patrícia; Freires, Irlan Almeida; Pitangui, Nayla de Souza; Segalla, Maicon Petrônio; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Regasini, Luís Octávio; Mendes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2016-12-01

    We tested the antifungal potential of caffeic acid and 8 of its derivative esters against Candidaalbicans ATCC 90028 and 9 clinical isolatesand carried out a synergism assay with fluconazole and nystatin. Propyl caffeate (C3) showed the best antifungal activity against the tested strains. When in combination, C3 markedly reduced the MIC of fluconazole and nystatin with synergistic effect up to 64-fold. Finally, C3 showed a high IC50 value and selective indexagainst oral keratinocytes, demonstrating low toxicity against this cell type and selectivity for yeast cells. Further research should confirm its antifungal potential for development of combined therapy to treat C. albicans infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester, an antioxidant from propolis, protects peripheral blood mononuclear cells of competitive cyclists against hyperthermal stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Huang, Ai-Chun; Chang, Hen-Hong; Liao, Hui-Fen; Jiang, Chii-Ming; Lai, Li-Yun; Chan, Jen-Te; Chen, Yu-Yawn; Chiang, Jasson

    2009-08-01

    Hyperthermal stress and resulting free radical generation is known to impair endurance capacity and immune cell redistribution during prolonged exercise. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a phenolic compound purified from propolis, has many biological and pharmacological activities including antioxidation. To examine whether CAPE has protective effect against hyperthermal stress in athletes, we isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) from competitive cyclists and assessed their response to hyperthermia with or without CAPE pretreatment. We found that pretreatment of cyclists' MNC with CAPE (0, 1, 2, 4 microg/mL) reversed or reduced hyperthermia-induced survival inhibition, necrosis, superoxide production, glutathione depletion, and intracellular superoxide burst in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that CAPE may enhance the hyperthermal tolerance in immune mononuclear cells of competitive cyclists.

  8. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester as a remedial agent for reproductive functions and oxidative stress-based pathologies of gonads

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Sumeyya; Akbas, Ali; Butun, Ilknur; Toktas, Muhsin; Ozyurt, Huseyin; Sahin, Semsettin; Akyol, Omer

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the studies on the roles of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in several disease models and cell cultures are tremendously growing. It is such a great molecule that was used by ancient times to ameliorate some diseases and nowadays, it is used by modern medicine to test the effectiveness. In this mini-review article, the protection capability of CAPE, as a liposoluble antioxidant and a potent nuclear factor kappa B inhibitor, on oxidative and non-oxidative ovary, and testis damages has been summarized. In view of our laboratory findings/experience and those reported in the hitherto literature, we suggest that CAPE possesses protective effects for pathologies of the reproductive organs induced by untoward effects of harmful molecules such as free oxygen radicals, pesticides, methotrexate, and MK-801 (dizocilpine). PMID:26401405

  9. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester as a Protective Agent against Nephrotoxicity and/or Oxidative Kidney Damage: A Detailed Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Sumeyya; Ugurcu, Veli; Altuntas, Aynur; Hasgul, Rukiye; Cakmak, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of propolis, has been attracting the attention of different medical and pharmaceutical disciplines in recent years because of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, cytotoxic, antiviral, antifungal, and antineoplastic properties. One of the most studied organs for the effects of CAPE is the kidney, particularly in the capacity of this ester to decrease the nephrotoxicity induced by several drugs and the oxidative injury after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). In this review, we summarized and critically evaluated the current knowledge regarding the protective effect of CAPE in nephrotoxicity induced by several special medicines such as cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclosporine, gentamycin, methotrexate, and other causes leading to oxidative renal injury, namely, I/R models and senility. PMID:25003138

  10. Caffeic acid reduces the viability and migration rate of oral carcinoma cells (SCC-25) exposed to low concentrations of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Kubina, Robert; Kabała-Dzik, Agata; Wojtyczka, Robert D; Morawiec, Tadeusz; Bułdak, Rafał J

    2014-10-17

    Alcohol increases the risk of carcinoma originated from oral epithelium, but the biological effects of ultra-low doses of ethanol on existing carcinoma cells in combination with natural substances are still unclear. A role for ethanol (EtOH), taken in small amounts as an ingredient of some beverages or mouthwashes to change the growth behavior of established squamous cell carcinoma, has still not been examined sufficiently. We designed an in vitro study to determine the effect of caffeic acid (CFA) on viability and migration ability of malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes, exposed to ultra-low concentrations (maximum 100 mmol/L) EtOH. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-dimethyltetrazolium bromide) and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) assays were used to assess the cytotoxic effect of EtOH/CFA and the viability of squamous carcinoma SCC-25 cells (ATCC CRL-1628, mobile part of the tongue). Tested EtOH concentrations were: 2.5, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 mmol/L, along with an equal CFA concentration of 50 μmol/L. Carcinoma cells' migration was investigated by monolayer "wound" healing assay. We demonstrated that very low concentrations of EtOH ranging between 2.5 and 10 mmol/L may induce the viability of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells, while the results following addition of CFA reveal an antagonistic effect, attenuating pro-proliferative EtOH activity. The migration rate of oral squamous carcinoma cells can be significantly inhibited by the biological activity of caffeic acid.

  11. Caffeic Acid Reduces the Viability and Migration Rate of Oral Carcinoma Cells (SCC-25) Exposed to Low Concentrations of Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Kubina, Robert; Kabała-Dzik, Agata; Wojtyczka, Robert D.; Morawiec, Tadeusz; Bułdak, Rafał J.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol increases the risk of carcinoma originated from oral epithelium, but the biological effects of ultra-low doses of ethanol on existing carcinoma cells in combination with natural substances are still unclear. A role for ethanol (EtOH), taken in small amounts as an ingredient of some beverages or mouthwashes to change the growth behavior of established squamous cell carcinoma, has still not been examined sufficiently. We designed an in vitro study to determine the effect of caffeic acid (CFA) on viability and migration ability of malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes, exposed to ultra-low concentrations (maximum 100 mmol/L) EtOH. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-dimethyltetrazolium bromide) and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) assays were used to assess the cytotoxic effect of EtOH/CFA and the viability of squamous carcinoma SCC-25 cells (ATCC CRL-1628, mobile part of the tongue). Tested EtOH concentrations were: 2.5, 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 mmol/L, along with an equal CFA concentration of 50 μmol/L. Carcinoma cells’ migration was investigated by monolayer “wound” healing assay. We demonstrated that very low concentrations of EtOH ranging between 2.5 and 10 mmol/L may induce the viability of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells, while the results following addition of CFA reveal an antagonistic effect, attenuating pro-proliferative EtOH activity. The migration rate of oral squamous carcinoma cells can be significantly inhibited by the biological activity of caffeic acid. PMID:25329614

  12. Down-regulation of the Caffeic acid O-methyltransferase Gene in Switchgrass Reveals a Novel Monolignol Analog

    SciTech Connect

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Standaert, Robert F; Engle, Nancy L; Martin, Madhavi Z; Sangha, Amandeep K; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C; Samuel, Reichel; Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, A J; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Fu, Chunxiang; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Davison, Brian H; Dixon, Richard A; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Down-regulation of the caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene in the lignin biosynthetic pathway of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) resulted in cell walls of transgenic plants releasing more constituent sugars after pretreatment by dilute acid and treatment with glycosyl hydrolases from an added enzyme preparation and from Clostridium thermocellum. Fermentation of both wild-type and transgenic switchgrass after milder hot water pretreatment with no water washing showed that only the transgenic switchgrass inhibited C. thermocellum. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics were undertaken on cell wall aqueous extracts to determine the nature of the microbial inhibitors, confirming the increased concentration of a number of phenolic acids and aldehydes that are known inhibitors of fermentation. Metabolomic analyses of the transgenic biomass additionally revealed the presence of a novel monolignol-like metabolite, identified as trans-3, 4-dimethoxy-5-hydroxycinnamyl alcohol (iso-sinapyl alcohol) in both non-pretreated, as well as hot water pretreated samples. Although there was no indication that iso-sinapyl alcohol was integrated into the cell wall, diversion of substrates from sinapyl alcohol to free iso-sinapyl alcohol, its glucoside, and associated upstream lignin pathway changes, including increased phenolic aldehydes and acids, are associated with more facile cell wall deconstruction, and to the observed inhibitory effect on microbial growth.

  13. Synthesis and biological activity of 3-(2, 8, 9-trioxa-aza-1-germatricyclo [3. 3. 3. 0] undecane-1-yl)-caffeic acid.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lianbao; Luo, Yan; Peng, Xuedong; Zhou, Yuping; Ou, Xiaomin

    2009-07-01

    The new germanium compound of caffeic acid, (1), has been obtained to compare anti-tumor activities with 3-(2, 8, 9-trioxa-aza-1-germatricyclo[3. 3. 3. 0]undecane-1-yl)-hydroxycinnamic acids which have been researched previously. Compound was prepared which mainly used caffeic acid, germanium dioxide, sodium hypophosphite, triethanolamine as materials by reducing reaction, Micheal addition reaction and transesterification. The structure is comfirmed by (1)H-NMR and MS. Biological investigation has demonstrated that the compound is stronger anti-tumor activity than 3-(2, 8, 9-trioxa-aza-1-germatricyclo[3. 3. 3. 0]undecane-1-yl)-hydroxylcinnamic acids with lower toxicity.

  14. Electrochemical oxidation of wine polyphenols in the presence of sulfur dioxide.

    PubMed

    Makhotkina, Olga; Kilmartin, Paul A

    2013-06-12

    Electrochemical oxidation of three representative wine polyphenols (catechin, caffeic acid, and quercetin) in the presence of sulfur dioxide in a model wine solution (pH = 3.3) was investigated. The oxidation was undertaken using chronoamperometry at a rotating glassy carbon rod electrode, and the reaction products were characterized by HPLC-MS. The mechanism of electrochemical oxidation of polyphenols in the presence of sulfur dioxide was proposed to be an ECEC mechanism. The polyphenols first underwent a one-electron oxidation to a semiquinone radical, which can be reduced back to the original polyphenol by sulfur dioxide, or further oxidized to the quinone form. In the cases of caffeic acid and catechin, the quinone combined with sulfur dioxide and produced new derivatives. The quercetin quinone underwent further chemical transformations, producing several new compounds. The proposed mechanisms were confirmed by digital simulation of cyclic voltammograms.

  15. Evaluation of chemical constituents and antioxidant activity of coconut water (Cocus nucifera L.) and caffeic acid in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Santos, João L A; Bispo, Vanderson S; Filho, Adriano B C; Pinto, Isabella F D; Dantas, Lucas S; Vasconcelos, Daiane F; Abreu, Fabíula F; Melo, Danilo A; Matos, Isaac A; Freitas, Florêncio P; Gomes, Osmar F; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Matos, Humberto R

    2013-01-01

    Coconut water contains several uncharacterized substances and is widely used in the human consumption. In this paper we detected and quantified ascorbic acid and caffeic acid and total phenolics in several varieties of coconut using HPLS/MS/MS (25.8 ± 0.6 µg/mL and 1.078 ± 0.013 µg/mL and 99.7 µg/mL, respectively, in the green dwarf coconut water, or 10 mg and 539 µg and 39.8 mg for units of coconut consumed, 500 ± 50 mL). The antioxidant potential of four coconut varieties (green dwarf, yellow dwarf, red dwarf and yellow Malaysian) was compared with two industrialized coconut waters and the lyophilized water of the green dwarf variety. All varieties were effective in scavenging the DPPH radical (IC₅₀=73 µL) and oxide nitric (0.1 mL with an IP of 29.9%) as well as in inhibiting the in vitro production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (1 mL with an IP of 34.4%), highlighting the antioxidant properties of the green dwarf which it is the most common used. In cell culture, the green dwarf water was efficient in protecting against oxidative damages induced by hydrogen peroxide.

  16. Formation of nitric oxide, ethyl nitrite and an oxathiolone derivative of caffeic acid in a mixture of saliva and white wine.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Umeo; Tanaka, Mariko; Hirota, Sachiko

    2010-03-01

    Reactions of salivary nitrite with components of wine were studied using an acidic mixture of saliva and wine. The formation of nitric oxide (NO) in the stomach after drinking wine was observed. The formation of NO was also observed in the mixture (pH 3.6) of saliva and wine, which was prepared by washing the oral cavity with wine. A part of the NO formation in the stomach and the oral cavity was due to the reduction of salivary nitrite by caffeic and ferulic acids present in wine. Ethyl nitrite produced by the reaction of salivary nitrite and ethyl alcohol in wine also contributed to the formation of NO. In addition to the above reactions, caffeic acid in wine could be transformed to the oxathiolone derivative, which might have pharmacological functions. The results obtained in this study may help in understanding the effects of drinking wine on human health.

  17. Antiproliferative Effects of Honey and of Its Polyphenols: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Mandal, Mahitosh

    2009-01-01

    Honey has been used since long time both in medical and domestic needs, but only recently the antioxidant property of it came to limelight. The fact that antioxidants have several preventative effects against different diseases, such as cancer, coronary diseases, inflammatory disorders, neurological degeneration, and aging, led to search for food rich in antioxidants. Chemoprevention uses various dietary agents rich in phytochemicals which serve as antioxidants. With increasing demand for antioxidant supply in the food, honey had gained vitality since it is rich in phenolic compounds and other antioxidants like ascorbic acid, amino acids, and proteins. Some simple and polyphenols found in honey, namely, caffeic acid (CA), caffeic acid phenyl esters (CAPE), Chrysin (CR), Galangin (GA), Quercetin (QU), Kaempferol (KP), Acacetin (AC), Pinocembrin (PC), Pinobanksin (PB), and Apigenin (AP), have evolved as promising pharmacological agents in treatment of cancer. In this review, we reviewed the antiproliferative and molecular mechanisms of honey and above-mentioned polyphenols in various cancer cell lines. PMID:19636435

  18. Simultaneous determination of protocatechuic acid, syringin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, liriodendrin and isofraxidin in Acanthopanax senticosus Harms by HPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Jia, Ying; Xu, Liang; Wang, Xiaohui; Shen, Zhenduo; Liu, Yulei; Bi, Kaishun

    2006-03-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the first time to quantify simultaneously the six major active ingredients in Acanthopanax senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim.) Harms, namely protocatechuic acid, syringin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, liriodendrin and isofraxidin. The analysis was performed by a reverse phase gradient elution with an aqueous mobile phase (containing 0.05% phosphoric acid) modified by acetonitrile and diode-array multiple-wavelength UV detector (DAD). Six regression equations showed good linear relationships between the peak area of each marker and concentration. The recoveries of the markers listed above were 92.3%, 93.9%, 90.3%, 93.1%, 94.3% and 90.7%, respectively. The relative standard deviation of intra-day and inter-day were less than 2.7% and 3.1%, respectively. This method was validated for specificity, accuracy, precision and limits of quantification. Medicinal materials of ten commercial brands were analyzed and found to contain different amounts of the six bioactive markers. The method developed can be used for the quality control of Acanthopanax senticosus (Rupr. et Maxim.) Harms.

  19. Targeting ASC in NLRP3 inflammasome by caffeic acid phenethyl ester: a novel strategy to treat acute gout

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Eun; Yang, Gabsik; Kim, Nam Doo; Jeong, Seongkeun; Jung, Yunjin; Choi, Jae Young; Park, Hyun Ho; Lee, Joo Young

    2016-01-01

    Gouty arthritis is caused by the deposition of uric acid crystals, which induce the activation of NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3(NLRP3) inflammasome. The NLRP3 inflammasome, composed of NLRP3, the adaptor protein ASC, and caspase-1, is closely linked to the pathogenesis of various metabolic diseases including gouty arthritis. We investigated whether an orally administrable inhibitor of NLRP3 inflammasome was effective for alleviating the pathological symptoms of gouty arthritis and what was the underlying mechanism. In primary mouse macrophages, caffeic acid phenethyl ester(CAPE) blocked caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production induced by MSU crystals, showing that CAPE suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In mouse gouty arthritis models, oral administration of CAPE suppressed MSU crystals-induced caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production in the air pouch exudates and the foot tissues, correlating with attenuation of inflammatory symptoms. CAPE directly associated with ASC as shown by SPR analysis and co-precipitation, resulting in blockade of NLRP3-ASC interaction induced by MSU crystals. Our findings provide a novel regulatory mechanism by which small molecules harness the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome by presenting ASC as a new target. Furthermore, the results suggest the preventive or therapeutic strategy for NLRP3-related inflammatory diseases such as gouty arthritis using orally available small molecules. PMID:27934918

  20. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester downregulates phospholipase D1 via direct binding and inhibition of NFκB transactivation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Mi Hee; Kang, Dong Woo; Jung, Yunjin; Choi, Kang-Yell; Min, Do Sik

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •We found CAFÉ, a natural product that suppresses expression and activity of PLD1. •CAPE decreased PLD1 expression by inhibiting NFκB transactivation. •CAPE rapidly inhibited PLD activity via its binding to a Cys837 of PLD1. •PLD1 downregulation by CAPE inhibited invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. -- Abstract: Upregulation of phospholipase D (PLD) is functionally linked with oncogenic signals and tumorigenesis. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active compound of propolis extract that exhibits anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and antineoplastic properties. In this study, we demonstrated that CAPE suppressed the expression of PLD1 at the transcriptional level via inhibition of binding of NFκB to PLD1 promoter. Moreover, CAPE, but not its analogs, bound to a Cys837 residue of PLD1 and inhibited enzymatic activity of PLD. CAPE also decreased activation of matrix metalloproteinases-2 induced by phosphatidic acid, a product of PLD activity. Ultimately, CAPE-induced downregulation of PLD1 suppressed invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that CAPE might contribute to anti-neoplastic effect by targeting PLD1.

  1. Targeting ASC in NLRP3 inflammasome by caffeic acid phenethyl ester: a novel strategy to treat acute gout.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Eun; Yang, Gabsik; Kim, Nam Doo; Jeong, Seongkeun; Jung, Yunjin; Choi, Jae Young; Park, Hyun Ho; Lee, Joo Young

    2016-12-09

    Gouty arthritis is caused by the deposition of uric acid crystals, which induce the activation of NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3(NLRP3) inflammasome. The NLRP3 inflammasome, composed of NLRP3, the adaptor protein ASC, and caspase-1, is closely linked to the pathogenesis of various metabolic diseases including gouty arthritis. We investigated whether an orally administrable inhibitor of NLRP3 inflammasome was effective for alleviating the pathological symptoms of gouty arthritis and what was the underlying mechanism. In primary mouse macrophages, caffeic acid phenethyl ester(CAPE) blocked caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production induced by MSU crystals, showing that CAPE suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In mouse gouty arthritis models, oral administration of CAPE suppressed MSU crystals-induced caspase-1 activation and IL-1β production in the air pouch exudates and the foot tissues, correlating with attenuation of inflammatory symptoms. CAPE directly associated with ASC as shown by SPR analysis and co-precipitation, resulting in blockade of NLRP3-ASC interaction induced by MSU crystals. Our findings provide a novel regulatory mechanism by which small molecules harness the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome by presenting ASC as a new target. Furthermore, the results suggest the preventive or therapeutic strategy for NLRP3-related inflammatory diseases such as gouty arthritis using orally available small molecules.

  2. Down-Regulation of Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase in Maize Revisited Using a Transgenic Approach1

    PubMed Central

    Piquemal, Joel; Chamayou, Simon; Nadaud, Isabelle; Beckert, Michel; Barrière, Yves; Mila, Isabelle; Lapierre, Catherine; Rigau, Joan; Puigdomenech, Pere; Jauneau, Alain; Digonnet, Catherine; Boudet, Alain-Michel; Goffner, Deborah; Pichon, Magalie

    2002-01-01

    Transgenic maize (Zea mays) plants were generated with a construct harboring a maize caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) cDNA in the antisense (AS) orientation under the control of the maize Adh1 (alcohol dehydrogenase) promoter. Adh1-driven β-glucuronidase expression was localized in vascular tissues and lignifying sclerenchyma, indicating its suitability in transgenic experiments aimed at modifying lignin content and composition. One line of AS plants, COMT-AS, displayed a significant reduction in COMT activity (15%–30% residual activity) and barely detectable amounts of COMT protein as determined by western-blot analysis. In this line, transgenes were shown to be stably integrated in the genome and transmitted to the progeny. Biochemical analysis of COMT-AS showed: (a) a strong decrease in Klason lignin content at the flowering stage, (b) a decrease in syringyl units, (c) a lower p-coumaric acid content, and (d) the occurrence of unusual 5-OH guaiacyl units. These results are reminiscent of some characteristics already observed for the maize bm3 (brown-midrib3) mutant, as well as for COMT down-regulated dicots. However, as compared with bm3, COMT down-regulation in the COMT-AS line is less severe in that it is restricted to sclerenchyma cells. To our knowledge, this is the first time that an AS strategy has been applied to modify lignin biosynthesis in a grass species. PMID:12481050

  3. Polyphenol and l-ascorbic acid content in tomato as influenced by high lycopene genotypes and organic farming at different environments.

    PubMed

    Martí, Raúl; Leiva-Brondo, Miguel; Lahoz, Inmaculada; Campillo, Carlos; Cebolla-Cornejo, Jaime; Roselló, Salvador

    2018-01-15

    The accumulation of polyphenols and l-ascorbic acid was evaluated under conventional (integrated pest management, IPM) and organic farming, as means to increase the accumulation of chemoprotective compounds. The effect of genotype was considerably higher than the growing system, in fact it is determining. 'Kalvert', a high-lycopene cultivar, outstood for the accumulation of most polyphenols, though low-carotenoid cultivars with high accumulation were also detected. Organic farming significantly increased the levels of caffeic acid by 20%, but reduced those of ferulic acid and naringenin by 13% and 15% respectively. A strong interaction with the environment was detected: in Navarra the differences were limited, while in Extremadura lower contents of ferulic acid and higher contents of chlorogenic acid and rutin were found in organic farming for certain cultivars. The effect of organic farming on l-ascorbic acid was dependent on cultivar and environment and it only led to an increase in Extremadura by 58%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Determination of polyphenols in tobacco by solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Fang, R B; Li, Z; Jiang, C Q; Yang, G Y

    2001-11-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the determination of polyphenols in tobacco was studied. Polyphenols can be extracted from tobacco sample by refluxing with 80% (volume fraction) methanol, then subjected to degrease by solid phase extraction with Sep-Pak-C18 column. Chlorogenic acid, rutin, scopoletin, caffeic acid, scopolin and other polyphenols can be separated on a Nova-Pak-C18 column (3.9 mm i.d. x 150 mm) gradiently eluted with methanol and 0.05 mol.L-1 potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer solution as mobile phase at a flow-rate of 0.5 mL.min-1. Polyphenols were determined at the maximum wavelength of each polyphenol, for chlorogenic acid 326.1 nm, rutin 354.8 nm, scopoletin 344.0 nm, caffeic acid 323.7 nm and scopolin 365.2 nm by photodiode array detector. The main polyphenols in tobacco can be identified with UV spectroscopy. The recoveries of tobacco polyphenols were 94%-105%, and the relative standard deviations were 1.28%-1.49%. This method can be applied to the determination of polyphenols in tobacco with satisfactory results.

  5. Caffeic Acid Derivatives in Market Available Lamiaceae and Echinacea purpurea Products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fresh basil leaves contain chicoric acid, the principal phenolic compound of Echinacea purpurea and purportedly the active ingredient in its dietary supplements. Our group discovered and first reported chicoric acid in basil. This following study examined the distribution of chicoric acid within the...

  6. Evaluation of anti-allergic properties of caffeic acid phenethyl ester in a murine model of systemic anaphylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sae-Gwang; Lee, Da-Young; Seo, Su-Kil; Lee, Soo-Woong; Kim, Se-Kwon; Jung, Won-Kyo; Kang, Mi-Seon; Choi, Yung Hyun; Yea, Sung Su; Choi, Inhak Choi, Il-Whan

    2008-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active component of honeybee propolis extracts. It has several positive effects, including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidation, anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-fungal, and immunomodulatory effects. In particular, the suppressive effect of NF-{kappa}B may disrupt a component of allergic induction. The principal objective of this experimental study was to evaluate the effects of CAPE on the active systemic anaphylaxis induced by ovalbumin (OVA) challenge in mice. Mice were intraperitoneally sensitized and intravenously challenged with OVA. Histopathological analysis, nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B activation, and the plasma levels of histamine and total IgE after allergen challenge were evaluated. After challenges, all of the sham-treated mice developed anaphylactic symptoms, increased plasma levels of histamine and OVA-specific IgE, marked vascular leakage, NF-{kappa}B activation, platelet-activating factor (PAF) production, and histological changes including pulmonary edema and hemorrhage in the renal medullae within 20 min. By way of contrast, a reduction in the plasma levels of histamine and OVA-specific IgE and an inhibition of NF-{kappa}B activation and PAF release were observed in the CAPE-treated mice. In addition, a significant prevention of hemoconcentration and OVA-induced pathological changes were noted. These results indicate that CAPE demonstrates an anti-allergic effect, which may be the result of its protective effects against IgE-mediated allergy.

  7. A voltammetric determination of caffeic acid in red wines based on the nitrogen doped carbon modified glassy carbon electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karikalan, Natarajan; Karthik, Raj; Chen, Shen-Ming; Chen, Hsi-An

    2017-04-01

    We reported an electrochemical determination of caffeic acid (CA) based on the nitrogen doped carbon (NDC). The described sensor material was prepared by the flame synthesis method, which gave an excellent platform for the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials with the hetero atom dopant. The synthesized material was confirmed by various physical characterizations and it was further characterized by different electrochemical experiments. The NDC modified glassy carbon electrode (NDC/GCE) shows the superior electrocatalytic performance towards the determination of CA with the wide linear concentration range from 0.01 to 350 μM. It achieves the lowest detection limit of 0.0024 μM and the limit of quantification of 0.004 μM. The NDC/GCE-CA sensor reveals the good selectivity, stability, sensitivity and reproducibility which endorsed that the NDC is promising electrode for the determination of CA. In addition, NDC modified electrode is applied to the determination of CA in red wines and acquired good results.

  8. Synergistic Antibacterial Effects of Chitosan-Caffeic Acid Conjugate against Antibiotic-Resistant Acne-Related Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Yu, Daeung; Eom, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Song-Hee; Oh, Junghwan; Jung, Won-Kyo; Kim, Young-Mog

    2017-06-08

    The object of this study was to discover an alternative therapeutic agent with fewer side effects against acne vulgaris, one of the most common skin diseases. Acne vulgaris is often associated with acne-related bacteria such as Propionibacteriumacnes, Staphylococcusepidermidis, Staphylococcusaureus, and Pseudomonasaeruginosa. Some of these bacteria exhibit a resistance against commercial antibiotics that have been used in the treatment of acne vulgaris (tetracycline, erythromycin, and lincomycin). In the current study, we tested in vitro antibacterial effect of chitosan-phytochemical conjugates on acne-related bacteria. Three chitosan-phytochemical conjugates used in this study exhibited stronger antibacterial activity than that of chitosan (unmodified control). Chitosan-caffeic acid conjugate (CCA) showed the highest antibacterial effect on acne-related bacteria along with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC; 8 to 256 μg/mL). Additionally, the MIC values of antibiotics against antibiotic-resistant P. acnes and P.aeruginosa strains were dramatically reduced in combination with CCA, suggesting that CCA would restore the antibacterial activity of the antibiotics. The analysis of fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) indices clearly revealed a synergistic antibacterial effect of CCA with antibiotics. Thus, the median sum of FIC (∑FIC) values against the antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains ranged from 0.375 to 0.533 in the combination mode of CCA and antibiotics. The results of the present study suggested a potential possibility of chitosan-phytochemical conjugates in the control of infections related to acne vulgaris.

  9. Synergistic Antibacterial Effects of Chitosan-Caffeic Acid Conjugate against Antibiotic-Resistant Acne-Related Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Yu, Daeung; Eom, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Song-Hee; Oh, Junghwan; Jung, Won-Kyo; Kim, Young-Mog

    2017-01-01

    The object of this study was to discover an alternative therapeutic agent with fewer side effects against acne vulgaris, one of the most common skin diseases. Acne vulgaris is often associated with acne-related bacteria such as Propionibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Some of these bacteria exhibit a resistance against commercial antibiotics that have been used in the treatment of acne vulgaris (tetracycline, erythromycin, and lincomycin). In the current study, we tested in vitro antibacterial effect of chitosan-phytochemical conjugates on acne-related bacteria. Three chitosan-phytochemical conjugates used in this study exhibited stronger antibacterial activity than that of chitosan (unmodified control). Chitosan-caffeic acid conjugate (CCA) showed the highest antibacterial effect on acne-related bacteria along with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC; 8 to 256 μg/mL). Additionally, the MIC values of antibiotics against antibiotic-resistant P. acnes and P. aeruginosa strains were dramatically reduced in combination with CCA, suggesting that CCA would restore the antibacterial activity of the antibiotics. The analysis of fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) indices clearly revealed a synergistic antibacterial effect of CCA with antibiotics. Thus, the median sum of FIC (∑FIC) values against the antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains ranged from 0.375 to 0.533 in the combination mode of CCA and antibiotics. The results of the present study suggested a potential possibility of chitosan-phytochemical conjugates in the control of infections related to acne vulgaris. PMID:28594356

  10. The effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on the functions of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Li; Liang, Yu-Chih; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lee, Jyh-Hong; Yu, Hsin-Hui; Wu, Wen-Mein; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2009-01-01

    Background Propolis, an ancient herbal medicine, has been reported the beneficial effect both in asthma patients and murine model of asthma, but the mechanism was not clearly understood. In this study, the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), the most extensively studied components in propolis, on the functions of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) was investigated. Results CAPE significantly inhibited IL-12 p40, IL-12 p70, IL-10 protein expression in mature healthy human MoDCs stimulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and IL-12 p40, IL-10, IP-10 stimulated by crude mite extract. CAPE significantly inhibited IL-10 and IP-10 but not IL-12 expression in allergic patients' MoDCs stimulated by crude mite extract. In contrast, the upregulation of costimulatory molecules in mature MoDCs was not suppressed by CAPE. Further, the antigen presenting ability of DCs was not inhibited by CAPE. CAPE inhibited IκBα phosphorylation and NF-κB activation but not mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family phosphorylation in human MoDCs. Conclusion These results indicated that CAPE inhibited cytokine and chemokine production by MoDCs which might be related to the NF-κB signaling pathway. This study provided a new insight into the mechanism of CAPE in immune response and the rationale for propolis in the treatment of asthma and other allergic disorders. PMID:19604415

  11. Nanomolar electrochemical detection of caffeic acid in fortified wine samples based on gold/palladium nanoparticles decorated graphene flakes.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, Kokulnathan; Raja, Nehru; Chen, Shen-Ming; Liao, Wei-Cheng

    2017-09-01

    Amalgamation of noble metal nanomaterials on graphene flakes potentially paves one way to improve their physicochemical properties. This paper deals with the simultaneous electrochemical deposition of gold and palladium nanoparticles on graphene flakes (Au/PdNPs-GRF) for the sensitive determination of caffeic acid (CA). The physiochemical properties of the prepared Au/PdNPs-GRF was characterized by using numerous analytical techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The enhanced electrochemical determination of CA at Au/PdNPs deposition on GRF were studied by using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. In results, Au/PdNPs-GRF electrode exhibited an excellent electrocatalytic activity towards CA with wide linear range and low limit of detection of 0.03-938.97µM and 6nM, respectively. Eventually, the Au/PdNPs-GRF was found as a selective and stable active material for the sensing of CA. In addition, the proposed sensor showed the adequate results in real sample analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Quaternized chitosan/κ-carrageenan/caffeic acid-coated poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) fibrous materials: Preparation, antibacterial and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Milena; Manolova, Nevena; Rashkov, Iliya; Markova, Nadya

    2016-11-20

    Novel fibrous materials with antioxidant and antibacterial properties from poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), quaternized chitosan (QCh), κ-carrageenan (Car) and caffeic acid (CA) were obtained. These materials were prepared by applying electrospinning or electrospinning in conjunction with dip-coating and polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) formation. It was found that the CA release depended on the fiber composition. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) revealed that CA incorporated in the fibers was in the amorphous state, whereas CA included in the coating was in the crystalline state. In contrast to the neat PHB mats, the CA-containing mats and the PEC QCh/Car-coated mats were found to kill the Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus and the Gram-negative bacteria E. coli and were effective in suppressing the adhesion of pathogenic bacteria S. aureus. Enhancement of the antioxidant activity of the fibrous materials containing both CA and QCh/Car coating was observed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Vascular Damage Caused by Consumption of High Fructose Corn Syrup in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gun, Aburrahman; Bilgic, Sedat; Kocaman, Nevin; Ozan, Gonca

    2016-01-01

    Fructose corn syrup is cheap sweetener and prolongs the shelf life of products, but fructose intake causes hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension. All of them are referred to as metabolic syndrome and they are risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Hence, the harmful effects of increased fructose intake on health and their prevention should take greater consideration. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) has beneficial effects on metabolic syndrome and vascular function which is important in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, there are no known studies about the effect of CAPE on fructose-induced vascular dysfunction. In this study, we examined the effect of CAPE on vascular dysfunction due to high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). HFCS (6 weeks, 30% fed with drinking water) caused vascular dysfunction, but treatment with CAPE (50 micromol/kg i.p. for the last two weeks) effectively restored this problem. Additionally, hypertension in HFCS-fed rats was also decreased in CAPE supplemented rats. CAPE supplements lowered HFCS consumption-induced raise in blood glucose, homocysteine, and cholesterol levels. The aorta tissue endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) production was decreased in rats given HFCS and in contrast CAPE supplementation efficiently increased its production. The presented results showed that HFCS-induced cardiovascular abnormalities could be prevented by CAPE treatment. PMID:27042260

  14. The Effect of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) Fortification on the Liver Element Distribution that Occurs After Exercise.

    PubMed

    Akil, Mustafa; Coban, Funda Karabag; Yalcinkaya, Ozcan

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of the caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) fortification applied to the rats, which were made to exercise, on the liver elements. The study was conducted on 32 Sprague-Dawley male rats. The experimental animals were divided into 4 groups in equal numbers. Group 1 is the group which was applied 10 μmol/kg/day CAPE as intraperitoneal (IP) for 4 weeks, and they were not made to exercise at the end of the application. Group 2 is the group which was applied 10 μmol/kg/day CAPE as IP for 4 weeks, and they were made to exercise at the end of the 4th week. Group 3 is the general control group. Group 4 is the swimming control group. A 10 mmol/kg CAPE application dissolved in ethyl alcohol of 10 % was applied to the CAPE group. Sodium (Na), zinc (Zn), calcium (Ca), iron (Fe), chrome (Cr), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd) levels were identified in the liver samples at the end of the application. The results of the study suggest that exercise and CAPE fortification in rats cause changes in the Na, Zn, Ca, Fe and Cr parameters in liver tissues, and it does not affect Cd, Cu, Mg and K element distribution. It is thought that CAPE fortification would be helpful for preserving those parameters whose levels are known to be changing with exercise.

  15. Effect of propolis and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on NFκB activation by HTLV-1 Tax.

    PubMed

    Shvarzbeyn, Jenny; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2011-06-01

    HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of aggressive malignancy of the CD4(+) T-cells, adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), and other severe clinical disorders. The viral Tax protein is a key factor in HTLV-1 pathogenicity. A major part of Tax oncogenic potential is accounted for by its capacity of inducing the transcriptional activity of the NFκB factors, which regulate the expression of numerous cellular genes. Propolis (PE), a natural product produced by honeybees, has been used for a long time in folk medicine. One of PE active components, caffeic acid phenylethyl ester (CAPE), was well characterized and found to be a potent inhibitor of NFκB activation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to pursue the possibility of blocking Tax oncogenic effects by treatment with these natural products. Human T-cell lines were used in this study since these cells are the main targets of HTLV-1 infections. We tried to determine which step of Tax-induced NFκB activation is blocked by these products. Our results showed that both tested products substantially inhibited the activation of NFκB-dependent promoter by Tax. However, only PE could efficiently inhibit also the Tax-induced activation of SRF- and CREB-dependent promoters. Our results showed also that PE and CAPE strongly prevented both Tax binding to IκBα and its induced degradation by Tax. However, both products did not interfere in the nuclear transport of Tax or NFκB proteins.

  16. Protective effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester against experimental allergic encephalomyelitis-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ilhan, Atilla; Akyol, Omer; Gurel, Ahmet; Armutcu, Ferah; Iraz, Mustafa; Oztas, Emin

    2004-08-01

    Because oxidative damage has been known to be involved in inflammatory and autoimmune-mediated tissue destruction, modulation of oxygen free radical production represents a new approach to the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Central nervous system tissue is particularly vulnerable to oxidative damage, suggesting that oxidation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of honeybee propolis, has been determined to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and anticancer activities. We have previously reported that CAPE inhibits ischemia-reperfusion injury and oxidative stress in rabbit spinal cord tissue. The present study, therefore, examined effects of CAPE on oxidative tissue damage in EAE in rats. Treatment with CAPE significantly inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by EAE, and ameliorated clinical symptoms in rats. These results suggest that CAPE may exert its anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting ROS production at the transcriptional level through the suppression of nuclear factor kappaB activation, and by directly inhibiting the catalytic activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

  17. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester triggers apoptosis through induction of loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in CCRF-CEM cells.

    PubMed

    Avcı, Cığır Biray; Gündüz, Cumhur; Baran, Yusuf; Sahin, Fahri; Yılmaz, Sunde; Dogan, Zeynep Ozlem; Saydam, Güray

    2011-01-01

    CAPE (caffeic acid phenethyl ester) is one of the most valuable and investigated component of propolis which is composed by honeybees. In the current study, we aimed at examining apoptotic effects of CAPE on CCRF-CEM leukemic cells and at determining the roles of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in cell death. Trypan blue and XTT methods were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity. Apoptosis was examined by ELISA-based oligonucleotide and acridine orange/ethidium bromide dye techniques. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was evaluated using JC-1 dye by flow cytometric analysis and under fluorescent microscope. We detected the time- and dose-dependent increases in cytotoxic effect of CAPE on CCRF-CEM cells. ELISA and acridine orange/ethidium bromide results showed that apoptotic cell population increased significantly in CCRF-CEM cells exposed to increasing concentrations of CAPE. On the other hand, there was significant loss of MMP determined in response to CAPE in CCRF-CEM cells. This in vitro data by being supported with clinical data may open the way of the potential use of CAPE for the treatment of leukemia.

  18. Fibrinolytic Activity and Dose-Dependent Effect of Incubating Human Blood Clots in Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester: In Vitro Assays

    PubMed Central

    Elnager, Abuzar; Hassan, Rosline; Idris, Zamzuri; Mustafa, Zulkifli; Wan-Arfah, Nadiah; Sulaiman, S. A.; Gan, Siew Hua; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah

    2015-01-01

    Background. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) has been reported to possess time-dependent fibrinolytic activity by in vitro assay. This study is aimed at investigating fibrinolytic dose-dependent activity of CAPE using in vitro assays. Methods. Standardized human whole blood (WB) clots were incubated in either blank controls or different concentrations of CAPE (3.75, 7.50, 15.00, 22.50, and 30.00 mM). After 3 hours, D-dimer (DD) levels and WB clot weights were measured for each concentration. Thromboelastography (TEG) parameters were recorded following CAPE incubation, and fibrin morphology was examined under a confocal microscope. Results. Overall, mean DD (μg/mL) levels were significantly different across samples incubated with different CAPE concentrations, and the median pre- and postincubation WB clot weights (grams) were significantly decreased for each CAPE concentration. Fibrin removal was observed microscopically and indicated dose-dependent effects. Based on the TEG test, the Ly30 fibrinolytic parameter was significantly different between samples incubated with two different CAPE concentrations (15.0 and 22.50 mM). The 50% effective dose (ED50) of CAPE (based on DD) was 1.99 mg/mL. Conclusions. This study suggests that CAPE possesses fibrinolytic activity following in vitro incubation and that it has dose-dependent activities. Therefore, further investigation into CAPE as a potential alternative thrombolytic agent should be conducted. PMID:25664321

  19. Protective Effects of Intralipid and Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) on Hepatotoxicity and Pancreatic Injury Caused by Dichlorvos in Rats.

    PubMed

    Alp, Harun; Pinar, Neslihan; Dokuyucu, Recep; Sahan, Mustafa; Oruc, Cem; Kaplan, Ibrahim; Senol, Serkan; Ceyran, Ayse Bahar

    2016-12-01

    The present study was aimed to the investigate the protective effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and intralipid (IL) on hepatotoxicity and pancreatic injury caused by acute dichlorvos (D) intoxication in rats. Forty-eight Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups each containing seven rats except control groups. The groups included control, D, CAPE, IL, D + CAPE, D + IL, and D + CAPE + IL. Total antioxidant status and total oxidative stress levels were measured by automated colorimetric assay. Tissues were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Tissues were analyzed with hematoxylin and eosin by using standard protocols. Also, Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 were evaluated by immunohistochemical method in liver tissue. Total oxidant status in control, CAPE, and IL groups were significantly lower, and total antioxidant status in the D + CAPE, D + IL, and D + IL + CAPE groups were significantly higher compared to the D group. CAPE and IL treatment decreased the apoptotic and mitotic cell count in liver tissue. Parenchymal necrosis caused by dichlorvos is observed in pancreas tissues of rats. Mild congestion and edema formation occurred in pancreas tissues following D + CAPE and D + IL therapies. These results indicate that CAPE and IL have the potential to decrease oxidative stress and hepatic and pancreatic injuries caused by acute dichlorvos intoxication. These drugs can be considered as a new method for supportive and protective therapy against pesticide intoxication.

  20. Apoptosis induced by caffeic acid phenethyl ester in human oral cancer cell lines: Involvement of Puma and Bax activation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hyun-Ju; Shin, Ji-Ae; Yang, In-Hyoung; Won, Dong-Hoon; Ahn, Chi Hyun; Kwon, Hye-Jeong; Lee, Jeong-Sang; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Yoon, Hye-Jung; Lee, Jae Il; Hong, Seong-Doo; Cho, Sung-Dae

    2017-09-25

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a natural honeybee product exhibits a spectrum of biological activities including antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antitumor actions. The purpose of this research was to investigate the anticancer potential of CAPE and its molecular mechanism in human oral cancer cell lines (YD15, HSC-4 and HN22 cells). To determine the apoptotic activity of CAPE and identify its molecular targets, trypan blue exclusion assay, soft agar assay, Western blot analysis, DAPI staining, and live/dead assay were performed. CAPE significantly suppressed transformation of neoplastic cells induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA) without inhibiting growth. CAPE treatment inhibited cell growth, increased the cleavages of caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and augmented the number of fragmented nuclei in human oral cancer cell lines. CAPE activated Bax protein causing it to undergo a conformational change, translocate to the mitochondrial outer membrane, and oligomere. CAPE also significantly increased Puma expression and interestingly Puma and Bax were co-localized. Overall, these results suggest that CAPE is a potent apoptosis-inducing agent in human oral cancer cell lines. Its action is accompanied by up-regulation of Bax and Puma proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced antioxidant effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester and Trolox in combination against radiation induced-oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hua; Liu, Rui; Chen, Hong-Li; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Xiao-Di; Li, Wen-Li; Hai, Chun-Xu

    2014-01-25

    Combinations of antioxidants are believed to be more effective than single antioxidant because when antioxidants are combined they support each other synergistically to create a magnified effect. Discovering the enhancer effects or synergies between bioactive components is valuable for resisting oxidative stress and improving health benefits. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible cooperation of natural antioxidant caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) with synthetic antioxidant Trolox in the model systems of chemical generation of free radicals, lipid peroxidation of microsomes and radiation-induced oxidative injury in L929 cells. Based on the intermolecular interaction between CAPE and Trolox, the present study shows a synergistic effect of CAPE and Trolox in combination on elimination of three different free radicals and inhibition of lipid peroxidation initiated by three different systems. CAPE and Trolox added simultaneously to the L929 cells exerted an enhanced preventive effect on the oxidative injury induced by radiation through decreasing ROS generation, protecting plasma membrane and increasing the ratios of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione and the expression of key antioxidant enzymes mediated by nuclear factor erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Our results showed for the first time that administration of CAPE and Trolox in combination may exert synergistic antioxidant effects, and further indicate that CAPE and Trolox combination functions mainly through scavenging ROS directly, inhibiting lipid peroxidation and promoting redox cycle of GSH mediated by Nrf2-regulated glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase expression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A voltammetric determination of caffeic acid in red wines based on the nitrogen doped carbon modified glassy carbon electrode

    PubMed Central

    Karikalan, Natarajan; Karthik, Raj; Chen, Shen-Ming; Chen, Hsi-An

    2017-01-01

    We reported an electrochemical determination of caffeic acid (CA) based on the nitrogen doped carbon (NDC). The described sensor material was prepared by the flame synthesis method, which gave an excellent platform for the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials with the hetero atom dopant. The synthesized material was confirmed by various physical characterizations and it was further characterized by different electrochemical experiments. The NDC modified glassy carbon electrode (NDC/GCE) shows the superior electrocatalytic performance towards the determination of CA with the wide linear concentration range from 0.01 to 350 μM. It achieves the lowest detection limit of 0.0024 μM and the limit of quantification of 0.004 μM. The NDC/GCE-CA sensor reveals the good selectivity, stability, sensitivity and reproducibility which endorsed that the NDC is promising electrode for the determination of CA. In addition, NDC modified electrode is applied to the determination of CA in red wines and acquired good results. PMID:28378813

  3. Natural product-inspired esters and amides of ferulic and caffeic acid as dual inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Vijay P; Corona, Angela; Distinto, Simona; Maccioni, Elias; Meleddu, Rita; Fois, Benedetta; Floris, Costantino; Malpure, Nilesh V; Alcaro, Stefano; Tramontano, Enzo; Cottiglia, Filippo

    2017-04-21

    Using an HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase (RT)-associated RNase H inhibition assay as lead, bioguided fractionation of the dichloromethane extract of the Ocimum sanctum leaves led to the isolation of five triterpenes (1-5) along with three 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy phenyl derivatives (6-8). The structure of this isolates were determined by 1D and 2D NMR experiments as well as ESI-MS. Tetradecyl ferulate (8) showed an interesting RNase H IC50 value of 12.4 μM and due to the synthetic accessibility of this secondary metabolite, a structure-activity relationship study was carried out. A series of esters and amides of ferulic and caffeic acids were synthesized and, among all, the most active was N-oleylcaffeamide displaying a strong inhibitory activity towards both RT-associated functions, ribonuclease H and DNA polymerase. Molecular modeling studies together with Yonetani-Theorell analysis, demonstrated that N-oleylcaffeamide is able to bind both two allosteric site located one close to the NNRTI binding pocket and the other close to RNase H catalytic site.

  4. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester exhibiting distinctive binding interaction with human serum albumin implies the pharmacokinetic basis of propolis bioactive components.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Wu, Fan; Tan, Jing; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Cuiping; Zheng, Huoqing; Hu, Fuliang

    2016-04-15

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), as one of the major bioactive components present in propolis, exhibits versatile bioactivities, especially for its potent cytotoxic effects on several cancer cell models. To understand the pharmacokinetic characteristics of CAPE, the binding interaction between CAPE and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated in vitro using multiple spectroscopic methods and molecular docking. The results reveal that CAPE exhibits a distinctive binding interaction with HSA comparing with other propolis components. The association constant K(A) (L mol(-1)) of the binding reaches 10(6) order of magnitude, which is significantly stronger than the other components of propolis. Based on the theory of fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the binding distance was calculated as 5.7 nm, which is longer than that of the other components of propolis. The thermodynamic results indicate that the binding is mainly driven by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. The docking and drugs (warfarin and ibuprofen) competitive results show that CAPE is located in the subdomain IIA (Sudlow's site I, FA7) of HSA, and Gln196 and Lys199 contribute to the hydrogen bonds. Circular dichroism spectra suggest an alteration of the secondary structure of HSA due to its partial unfolding in the presence of CAPE.

  5. Melatonin production in Escherichia coli by dual expression of serotonin N-acetyltransferase and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Yeong; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2016-08-01

    Melatonin is a well-known bioactive molecule produced in animals and plants and a well-studied natural compound. Two enzymatic steps are required for the biosynthesis of melatonin from serotonin. First, serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) catalyzes serotonin to N-acetylserotonin (NAS) followed by the action of N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (ASMT), resulting in the synthesis of O-methylated NAS, also known as melatonin. Attempts to document melatonin production in Escherichia coli have been unsuccessful to date due to either low enzyme activity or inactive ASMT expression. Here, we employed caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) instead of ASMT, as COMT is a multifunctional enzyme that has ASMT activity as well. Among several combinations of dual expression cassettes, recombinant E. coli that expressed sheep SNAT with rice COMT produced a high quantity of melatonin, which was measured in a culture medium (1.46 mg/L in response to 1 mM serotonin). This level was several orders of magnitude higher than that produced in transgenic rice and tomato overexpressing sheep SNAT and ASMT, respectively. This heterologous expression system can be widely employed to screen various putative SNAT or ASMT genes from animals and plants as well as to overproduce melatonin in various useful microorganisms.

  6. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester is a potent inhibitor of HIF prolyl hydroxylase: structural analysis and pharmacological implication.

    PubMed

    Choi, Daekyu; Han, Jeongoh; Lee, Youna; Choi, Jungyun; Han, Songyi; Hong, Sungchae; Jeon, Hyunchu; Kim, Young Mi; Jung, Yunjin

    2010-09-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active component of propolis from honeybee. We investigated a potential molecular mechanism underlying a CAPE-mediated protective effect against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and analyzed the structure contributing to the CAPE effect. CAPE induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) alpha protein, concomitantly transactivating the HIF-1 target genes vascular endothelial growth factor and heme oxygenase-1, which play a protective role in I/R injury. CAPE delayed the degradation of HIF-1alpha protein in cells, which occurred by inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylase (HPH), the key enzyme for von Hippel-Lindau-dependent HIF-1alpha degradation. CAPE inhibition of HPH and induction of HIF-1alpha protein were neutralized by an elevated dose of iron. The catechol moiety, a chelating group, is essential for HPH inhibition, while hydrogenation of the double bond (-C=C-) in the Michael reaction acceptor markedly reduced potency. Removal of the phenethyl moiety of CAPE (substitution with the methyl moiety) severely deteriorated its inhibitory activity for HPH. Our data suggest that a beneficial effect of CAPE on I/R injury may be ascribed to the activation of HIF-1 pathway via inhibition of HPH and reveal that the chelating moiety of CAPE acted as a pharmacophore while the double bond and phenethyl moiety assisted in inhibiting HPH.

  7. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of two diastereomeric lignan amides serving as dimeric caffeic acid-l-DOPA hybrids.

    PubMed

    Magoulas, George E; Rigopoulos, Andreas; Piperigkou, Zoi; Gialeli, Chrysostomi; Karamanos, Nikos K; Takis, Panteleimon G; Troganis, Anastassios N; Chrissanthopoulos, Athanassios; Maroulis, George; Papaioannou, Dionissios

    2016-06-01

    Two new diastereomeric lignan amides (4 and 5) serving as dimeric caffeic acid-l-DOPA hybrids were synthesized. The synthesis involved the FeCl3-mediated phenol oxidative coupling of methyl caffeate to afford trans-diester 1a as a mixture of enantiomers, protection of the catechol units, regioselective saponification, coupling with a suitably protected l-DOPA derivative, separation of the two diastereomers thus obtained by flash column chromatography and finally global chemoselective deprotection of the catechol units. The effect of hybrids 4 and 5 and related compounds on the proliferation of two breast cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential and estrogen receptor status (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7) and of one epithelial lung cancer cell line, namely A-549, was evaluated for concentrations ranging from 1 to 256μM and periods of treatment of 24, 48 and 72h. Both hybrids showed interesting and almost equipotent antiproliferative activities (IC50 64-70μM) for the MDA-MB-231 cell line after 24-48h of treatment, but they were more selective and much more potent (IC50 4-16μM) for the MCF-7 cells after 48h of treatment. The highest activity for both hybrids and both breast cancer lines was observed after 72h of treatment (IC50 1-2μM), probably as the result of slow hydrolysis of their methyl ester functions.

  8. Effect of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Vascular Damage Caused by Consumption of High Fructose Corn Syrup in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gun, Aburrahman; Ozer, Mehmet Kaya; Bilgic, Sedat; Kocaman, Nevin; Ozan, Gonca

    2016-01-01

    Fructose corn syrup is cheap sweetener and prolongs the shelf life of products, but fructose intake causes hyperinsulinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension. All of them are referred to as metabolic syndrome and they are risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Hence, the harmful effects of increased fructose intake on health and their prevention should take greater consideration. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) has beneficial effects on metabolic syndrome and vascular function which is important in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, there are no known studies about the effect of CAPE on fructose-induced vascular dysfunction. In this study, we examined the effect of CAPE on vascular dysfunction due to high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). HFCS (6 weeks, 30% fed with drinking water) caused vascular dysfunction, but treatment with CAPE (50 micromol/kg i.p. for the last two weeks) effectively restored this problem. Additionally, hypertension in HFCS-fed rats was also decreased in CAPE supplemented rats. CAPE supplements lowered HFCS consumption-induced raise in blood glucose, homocysteine, and cholesterol levels. The aorta tissue endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) production was decreased in rats given HFCS and in contrast CAPE supplementation efficiently increased its production. The presented results showed that HFCS-induced cardiovascular abnormalities could be prevented by CAPE treatment.

  9. Sequencing around 5-Hydroxyconiferyl Alcohol-Derived Units in Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase-Deficient Poplar Lignins1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fachuang; Marita, Jane M.; Lapierre, Catherine; Jouanin, Lise; Morreel, Kris; Boerjan, Wout; Ralph, John

    2010-01-01

    Caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) is a bifunctional enzyme that methylates the 5- and 3-hydroxyl positions on the aromatic ring of monolignol precursors, with a preference for 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde, on the way to producing sinapyl alcohol. Lignins in COMT-deficient plants contain benzodioxane substructures due to the incorporation of 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol (5-OH-CA), as a monomer, into the lignin polymer. The derivatization followed by reductive cleavage method can be used to detect and determine benzodioxane structures because of their total survival under this degradation method. Moreover, partial sequencing information for 5-OH-CA incorporation into lignin can be derived from detection or isolation and structural analysis of the resulting benzodioxane products. Results from a modified derivatization followed by reductive cleavage analysis of COMT-deficient lignins provide evidence that 5-OH-CA cross couples (at its β-position) with syringyl and guaiacyl units (at their O-4-positions) in the growing lignin polymer and then either coniferyl or sinapyl alcohol, or another 5-hydroxyconiferyl monomer, adds to the resulting 5-hydroxyguaiacyl terminus, producing the benzodioxane. This new terminus may also become etherified by coupling with further monolignols, incorporating the 5-OH-CA integrally into the lignin structure. PMID:20427467

  10. Preparative separation of polyphenols from water-soluble fraction of Chinese propolis using macroporous absorptive resin coupled with preparative high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Aifeng; Xuan, Hongzhuan; Sun, Ailing; Liu, Renmin; Cui, Jichun

    2016-02-15

    In this study, a preparative separation method was developed for isolation of eleven polyphenols from water-soluble fraction of Chinese propolis using macroporous absorptive resin (MAR) coupled with preparative high performance liquid chromatography (PHPLC). Water-soluble fraction of Chinese propolis was first "prefractioned" using MAR, which yielded four subfractions. The four subfractions were then isolated by PHPLC with an isocratic elution of methanol-water. Finally, eleven polyphenols were purified from Chinese propolis including caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, 3,4-dimethoxy cinnamic acid, pinobanksin, caffeic acid benzyl ester, caffeic acid phenethyl ester, apigenin, pinocembrin, chrysin and galangin. The purities of the compounds were determined by HPLC and the chemical structures were confirmed by UV and NMR analysis. The method developed was simple, effective, rapid, scalable and economical, and it was a promising basis for large-scale preparation of multiple components from natural products.

  11. Down-regulation of the caffeic acid O-methyltransferase gene in switchgrass reveals a novel monolignol analog

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Down-regulation of the caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase EC 2.1.1.68 (COMT) gene in the lignin biosynthetic pathway of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) resulted in cell walls of transgenic plants releasing more constituent sugars after pretreatment by dilute acid and treatment with glycosyl hydrolases from an added enzyme preparation and from Clostridium thermocellum. Fermentation of both wild-type and transgenic switchgrass after milder hot water pretreatment with no water washing showed that only the transgenic switchgrass inhibited C. thermocellum. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GCMS)-based metabolomics were undertaken on cell wall aqueous extracts to determine the nature of the microbial inhibitors. Results GCMS confirmed the increased concentration of a number of phenolic acids and aldehydes that are known inhibitors of microbial fermentation. Metabolomic analyses of the transgenic biomass additionally revealed the presence of a novel monolignol-like metabolite, identified as trans-3, 4-dimethoxy-5-hydroxycinnamyl alcohol (iso-sinapyl alcohol) in both non-pretreated, as well as hot water pretreated samples. iso-Sinapyl alcohol and its glucoside were subsequently generated by organic synthesis and the identity of natural and synthetic materials were confirmed by mass spectrometric and NMR analyses. The additional novel presence of iso-sinapic acid, iso-sinapyl aldehyde, and iso-syringin suggest the increased activity of a para-methyltransferase, concomitant with the reduced COMT activity, a strict meta-methyltransferase. Quantum chemical calculations were used to predict the most likely homodimeric lignans generated from dehydration reactions, but these products were not evident in plant samples. Conclusions Down-regulation of COMT activity in switchgrass resulted in the accumulation of previously undetected metabolites resembling sinapyl alcohol and its related metabolites, but that are derived from para-methylation of 5-hydroxyconiferyl

  12. Developmental Expression and Substrate Specificities of Alfalfa Caffeic Acid 3-O-Methyltransferase and Caffeoyl Coenzyme A 3-O-Methyltransferase in Relation to Lignification1

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kentaro; Sewalt, Vincent J.H.; Murray Ballance, G.; Ni, Weiting; Stürzer, Cornelia; Dixon, Richard A.

    1998-01-01

    The biosynthesis of monolignols can potentially occur via two parallel pathways involving free acids or their coenzyme A (CoA) esters. Caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase (CCOMT) catalyze functionally identical reactions in these two pathways, resulting in the formation of mono- or dimethoxylated lignin precursors. The activities of the two enzymes increase from the first to the sixth internode in stems of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), preceding the deposition of lignin. Alfalfa CCOMT is highly similar at the amino acid sequence level to the CCOMT from parsley, although it contains a six-amino acid insertion near the N terminus. Transcripts encoding both COMT and CCOMT are primarily localized to vascular tissue in alfalfa stems. Alfalfa CCOMT expressed in Escherichia coli catalyzes O-methylation of caffeoyl and 5-hydroxyferuloyl CoA, with preference for caffeoyl CoA. It has low activity against the free acids. COMT expressed in E. coli is active against both caffeic and 5-hydroxyferulic acids, with preference for the latter compound. Surprisingly, very little extractable O-methyltransferase activity versus 5-hydroxyferuloyl CoA is present in alfalfa stem internodes, in which relative O-methyltransferase activity against 5-hy-droxyferulic acid increases with increasing maturity, correlating with increased lignin methoxyl content. PMID:9662519

  13. Reducing effects of polyphenols on metmyoglobin and the in vitro regeneration of bright meat color by polyphenols in the presence of cysteine.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yukari; Inai, Miyuki; Honda, Sari; Masuda, Akiko; Masuda, Toshiya

    2014-10-01

    The effect of polyphenols and related phenolic compounds on the reduction of metmyoglobin (MetMb) to oxymyoglobin (MbO2), in the presence of cysteine, was investigated. Caffeic acid, dihydrocaffeic acid, and hydroxtyrosol (600 μmol/L) did not show any reducing activity individually. However, their highly potent activity in the reduction of MetMb to MbO2 was observed in the presence of equimolar amounts of cysteine. On the basis of the analytical results for the redox reaction products generated during the MetMb-reducing reaction of caffeic acid, we proposed a mechanism for the polyphenol-mediated reduction of MetMb. As per the proposed mechanism, the antioxidant polyphenols having a catechol substructure can effectively reduce MetMb to MbO2 with chemical assistance from nucleophilic reactive thiol compounds such as cysteine. Moreover, cysteine-coupled polyphenols such as cysteinylcaffeic acids (which are coupling products of caffeic acid and cysteine) can be used as preserving agents for retaining the fresh meat color, because of their powerful reducing effect on MetMb. The reduction of MetMb to MbO2 changes the color of meat from brown to the more desirable bright red.

  14. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) derived from propolis, a honeybee product, inhibits growth of breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Omene, Coral O; Wu, Jing; Frenkel, Krystyna

    2012-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are chemoresistant and implicated in tumor recurrence, metastasis and high patient mortality; thus substances impairing CSC activity, could be invaluable as novel cancer therapeutics. We previously showed that CAPE (caffeic acid phenethyl ester), a component of propolis, a honeybee product, inhibits growth of MDA-MB-231 (MDA-231) cells, mdr gene expression, NF-κB, EGFR, and VEGF. We hypothesized that CAPE also acts by interfering with CSC-mediated effects. We isolated breast CSC (bCSC) from MDA-231 cells, a model of human triple-negative breast cancer, and mouse xenografts. bCSC grow as mammospheres (MMS) and when dissociated into single cells, form MMS again, a sign of self-renewal. bCSC exhibited the characteristic CD44(+)/CD24(-/low) phenotype and generated progenitors in the presence of serum, a CSC trait responsible for regenerating tumor mass. CAPE caused dose-dependent bCSC self-renewal inhibition and progenitor formation. Clonal growth on soft agar was inhibited dose-dependently, but apoptosis was not induced as determined by Annexin-V/PI assay. Instead, bCSC were noted to significantly progress from a quiescent cell cycle state in G0/G1 (82%), S phase (12%) to a cycling state with an increase in S phase (41%) and subsequent decrease in G0/G1 (54%). Treatment of bCSC with CAPE (4.5-days) decreased CD44 levels by 95%, while another cell population containing 10-100-fold lower CD44 content concurrently increased. Results suggest that CAPE causes pronounced changes in bCSC characteristics manifested by inhibition of self renewal, progenitor formation, clonal growth in soft agar, and concurrent significant decrease in CD44 content, all signs of decreased malignancy potential.

  15. Caffeic acid attenuated acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibiting ERK1/2-mediated early growth response-1 transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chun; Shi, Liang; Sheng, Yuchen; Zheng, Zhiyong; Wei, Hai; Wang, Zhengtao; Ji, Lili

    2016-12-25

    Caffeic acid (CA) is a natural compound abundant in fruits, coffee and plants. This study aims to investigate the involved mechanism of the therapeutic detoxification of CA against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. CA (10, 30 mg/kg) was orally given to mice at 1 h after mice were pre-administrated with APAP (300 mg/kg). The therapeutic detoxification of CA against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity was observed by detecting serum aminotransferases, liver malondialdehyde (MDA) amount and liver histological evaluation in vivo. CA reduced APAP-induced increase in the mRNA expression of early growth response 1 (Egr1) in hepatocytes, and inhibited APAP-induced Egr1 transcriptional activation in vitro and in vivo. CA reduced the increased expression of growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein (Gadd45)α induced by APAP in hepatocytes. Moreover, Egr1 siRNA reduced Gadd45α expression and reversed APAP-induced cytotoxicity in hepatocytes. Further results showed that CA blocked APAP-induced activation of extracellular-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) signaling cascade in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the application of ERK1/2 inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) abrogated the nuclear translocation of Egr1 induced by APAP in hepatocytes. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the therapeutic detoxification of CA against APAP-induced liver injury, and the inhibition of CA on ERK1/2-mediated Egr1 transcriptional activation was involved in this process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester preferentially sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to ionizing radiation without affecting bone marrow radioresponse

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-J.; Liao, H.-F.; Tsai, T.-H.; Wang, S.-Y.; Shiao, M.-S. . E-mail: msshiao@vghtpe.gov.tw

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a component of propolis, was reported capable of depleting glutathione (GSH). We subsequently examined the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE and its toxicity. Methods and Materials: The effects of CAPE on GSH level, GSH metabolism enzyme activities, NF-{kappa}B activity, and radiosensitivity in mouse CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were determined. BALB/c mouse with CT26 cells implantation was used as a syngeneic in vivo model for evaluation of treatment and toxicity end points. Results: CAPE entered CT26 cells rapidly and depleted intracellular GSH in CT26 cells, but not in bone marrow cells. Pretreatment with nontoxic doses of CAPE significantly enhanced cell killing by ionizing radiation (IR) with sensitizer enhancement ratios up to 2.2. Pretreatment of CT26 cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed the GSH depletion activity and partially blocked the radiosensitizing effect of CAPE. CAPE treatment in CT26 cells increased glutathione peroxidase, decreased glutathione reductase, and did not affect glutathione S-transferase or {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase activity. Radiation activated NF-{kappa}B was reversed by CAPE pretreatment. In vivo study revealed that pretreatment with CAPE before IR resulted in greater inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of survival in comparison with IR alone. Pretreatment with CAPE neither affected body weights nor produced hepatic, renal, or hematopoietic toxicity. Conclusions: CAPE sensitizes CT26 colorectal adenocarcinoma to IR, which may be via depleting GSH and inhibiting NF-{kappa}B activity, without toxicity to bone marrow, liver, and kidney.

  17. In vitro permeation through porcine buccal mucosa of caffeic acid phenetyl ester (CAPE) from a topical mucoadhesive gel containing propolis.

    PubMed

    Ceschel, G C; Maffei, P; Sforzini, A; Lombardi Borgia, S; Yasin, A; Ronchi, C

    2002-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that propolis has on the oral cavity appreciable antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral actions, as well as anti-inflammatory, anaesthetic and cytostatic properties. In light of these studies, an assessment of the diffusion and permeation of caffeic acid phenetyl ester (CAPE) through porcine buccal mucosa was considered useful as a possible application in the stomatological field. To do so, a mucoadhesive topical gel was prepared to apply to the buccal mucosa. The gel was formulated in such a way as to improve the solubility of the propolis, conducting to an increase of the flux. The mucosal permeation of CAPE from the formulation was evaluated using Franz cells, with porcine buccal mucosa as septum between the formulation (donor compartment) and the receptor phase chamber. The diffusion through the membrane was determined by evaluating the amount of CAPE present in the receiving solution, the flux and the permeation coefficient (at the steady state) in the different formulations at set intervals. Qualitative and quantitative determinations were done by HPLC analysis. From the results, CAPE allowed a high permeability coefficient in comparison to the coefficient of other molecules, as expected from its physical-chemical structure. Moreover, the developed gel improved the CAPE flux approximately 35 times more with respect to an ethanol solution formulated at the same gel concentration. The developed gel was also tested in order to evaluate the mucoadhesive behaviour and comfort in vivo on 10 volunteers in a period of 8 h. The in vivo evaluation of mucoadhesive gel revealed adequate comfort and non-irritancy during the period of study and it was well accepted by the volunteers.

  18. Caffeic Acid Cyclohexylamide Rescues Lethal Inflammation in Septic Mice through Inhibition of IκB Kinase in Innate Immune Process

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun Hyeon; Park, Sun Hong; Jung, Jae-Kyung; Cho, Won-Jea; Ahn, Byeongwoo; Yun, Cheong-Yong; Choi, Yong Pyo; Yeo, Jong Hun; Lee, Heesoon; Hong, Jin Tae; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2017-01-01

    Targeting myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) or Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) with small molecule inhibitor rescues the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in sepsis due to infection with Gram-negative bacteria but not other microbes. Herein, we provided IκB kinase β (IKKβ) in innate immune process as a molecular target of caffeic acid cyclohexylamide (CGA-JK3) in the treatment of polymicrobial TLR agonists-induced lethal inflammation. CGA-JK3 ameliorated E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, MD-2/TLR4 agonist)-induced endotoxic shock, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-challenged septic shock or LPS plus D-galactosamine (GalN)-induced acute liver failure (ALF) in C57BL/6J mice. As a molecular basis, CGA-JK3 inhibited IKKβ-catalyzed kinase activity in a competitive mechanism with respect to ATP, displaced fluorescent ATP probe from the complex with IKKβ, and docked at the ATP-binding active site on the crystal structure of human IKKβ. Furthermore, CGA-JK3 inhibited IKKβ-catalyzed IκB phosphorylation, which is an axis leading to IκB degradation in the activating pathway of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), in macrophages stimulated with TLR (1/2, 2/6, 4, 5, 7, 9) agonists from Gram-positive/negative bacteria and viruses. CGA-JK3 consequently interrupted IKKβ-inducible NF-κB activation and NF-κB-regulated expression of TNF-α, IL-1α or HMGB-1 gene, thereby improving TLRs-associated redundant inflammatory responses in endotoxemia, polymicrobial sepsis and ALF. PMID:28145460

  19. Evaluation of effects of melatonin and caffeic acid phenethyl ester on acute potassium dichromate toxicity and genotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Mujgan; Alansal, Nurnisa Oya; Tuncdemir, Matem; Tanriverdi, Gamze; Bayoglu, Burcu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the possible protective effects of melatonin and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on potassium dichromate (K2 Cr2O7)-induced nephrotoxicity and genotoxicity. Methods: A total of 40 Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups: control, K2Cr2O7(K2Cr2O715 mg/kg, one dose, i.p.), K2Cr2O7 + melatonin, K2Cr2O7 + CAPE, and K2Cr2O7 + melatonin + CAPE. Urine and blood samples were collected from rats before scarification. One kidney was collected for histopathological studies, and the other was stored at −80°C for further determination of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) levels with spectrophotometric method. Comet assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity. Results: We observed a significant amelioration in genotoxicity by melatonin and simultaneous melatonin + CAPE treatment compared to K2Cr2O7 group (p1, p2< 0.05). SOD, CAT, GSH, GST, and MDA levels did not change when compared with controls. When K2Cr2O7 applied group was treated with melatonin and CAPE, neither melatonin nor CAPE made any changes in kidney GSH, GST, SOD, and MDA levels (P > 0.05). We noted that treatment with CAPE and melatonin + CAPE together caused a significant decrease in renal tissue damage, an upregulation in the kidney CAT levels (P < 0.05) and a slight healing at GR levels when compared with the K2Cr2O7 group. Conclusion: Our results revealed, CAPE and melatonin may have protective effects on K2Cr2O7 induced nephrotoxicity and cellular damage in rats. PMID:27756952

  20. Modification of Caffeic Acid with Pyrrolidine Enhances Antioxidant Ability by Activating AKT/HO-1 Pathway in Heart

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Hui-Chun; Lee, Shih-Yi; Yang, Kai-Chien; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Su, Ming-Jai

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of free radicals during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury leads to an interest in using antioxidant therapy. Activating an endogenous antioxidant signaling pathway is more important due to the fact that the free radical scavenging behavior in vitro does not always correlate with a cytoprotection effect in vivo. Caffeic acid (CA), an antioxidant, is a major phenolic constituent in nature. Pyrrolidinyl caffeamide (PLCA), a derivative of CA, was compared with CA for their antioxidant and cytoprotective effects. Our results indicate that CA and PLCA exert the same ability to scavenge DPPH in vitro. In response to myocardial I/R stress, PLCA was shown to attenuate lipid peroxydation and troponin release more than CA. These responses were accompanied with a prominent elevation in AKT and HO-1 expression and a preservation of mnSOD expression and catalase activity. PLCA also improved cell viability and alleviated the intracellular ROS level more than CA in cardiomyocytes exposed to H2O2. When inhibiting the AKT or HO-1 pathways, PLCA lost its ability to recover mnSOD expression and catalase activity to counteract with oxidative stress, suggesting AKT/HO-1 pathway activation by PLCA plays an important role. In addition, inhibition of AKT signaling further abolished HO-1 activity, while inhibition of HO-1 signaling attenuated AKT expression, indicating cross-talk between the AKT and HO-1 pathways. These protective effects may contribute to the cardiac function improvement by PLCA. These findings provide new insight into therapeutic approaches using a modified natural compound against oxidative stress from myocardial injuries. PMID:26845693

  1. Direct interaction between caffeic acid phenethyl ester and human neutrophil elastase inhibits the growth and migration of PANC-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jianhui; Xiaokaiti, Yilixiati; Fan, Shengjun; Pan, Yan; Li, Xin; Li, Xuejun

    2017-05-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal malignant tumors of the digestive system, but the mechanisms of its development and progression are unclear. Inflammation is thought to be fundamental to pancreatic cancer development and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active component of honey bee resin or propolis with anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. We investigated the inhibitory effects of CAPE on cell growth and migration induced by human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and report that HNE induced cancer cell migration at low doses and growth at higher doses. In contrast, lower CAPE doses inhibited migration and higher doses of CAPE inhibited the growth induced by HNE. HNE activity was significantly inhibited by CAPE (7.5-120 µM). Using quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting, we observed that CAPE (18-60 µM) did not affect transcription and translation of α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT), an endogenous HNE inhibitor. However, in an in silico drug target docking model, we found that CAPE directly bound to the binding pocket of HNE (25.66 kcal/mol) according to CDOCKER, and the residue of the catalytic site stabilized the interaction between CAPE and HNE as evidenced by molecular dynamic simulation. Response unit (RU) values of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) significantly increased with incremental CAPE doses (7.5-120 µM), indicating that CAPE could directly bind to HNE in a concentration-dependent manner. Thus, CAPE is an effective inhibitor of HNE via direct interaction whereby it inhibits the migration and growth of PANC-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner.

  2. Effects of intralipid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester on neurotoxicity, oxidative stress, and acetylcholinesterase activity in acute chlorpyriphos intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Umit; Osun, Arif; Basarslan, Kagan; Senol, Serkan; Kaplan, Ibrahim; Alp, Harun

    2014-01-01

    Chlorpyriphos is one of the most widely used organophosphate (OP) insecticide in agriculture with potential toxicity. Current post-exposure treatments consist of anti-cholinergic drugs and oxime compounds. We studied the effects of intralipid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on chlorpyriphos toxicity to compose an alternative or supportive treatment for OP poisoning. Methods: Forty-nine rats were randomly divided into seven groups. Chlorpyriphos was administered for toxicity. Intralipid (IL) and CAPE administered immediately after chlorpyriphos. Serum acetylcholinesterase (AChE) level, total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant response (TAR), and histologic examination of cerebellum and brain tissue with Hematoxylin-Eosin and immunohistochemical dyes were examined. Results: Serum enzym levels showed that chlorpyriphos and CAPE inhibited AChE while IL alone had no effect, chlorpyriphos and CAPE intensifies the inhibition effect. Significant difference at AChE levels between the chlorpyriphos+IL and chlorpyriphos+CAPE verified that IL has a protective effect on AChE inhibition. TAR levels were significantly increased in all groups except chlorpyriphos group, TOS levels revealed that CAPE and IL decrease the amount of oxidative stress. Histologic examination revealed that neuronal degeneration was slightly decreased at chlorpyriphos+IL group, but CAPE had a significant effect on protection of neuronal degeneration. Conclusion: The results of this study gave us three key points. 1) AChE activity is important for diagnosis of OP intoxication but it has no value for determining the neuro-degeneration. 2) CAPE inhibits AChE activity and may increase the muscarinic-nicotinic hyperactivation. Therefore it should not be used for treatment of OP intoxication. 3) IL decreases the severity of neurodegeneration and symptoms of OP intoxication and it can be used as a supportive agent. PMID:24955152

  3. Caffeic Acid Cyclohexylamide Rescues Lethal Inflammation in Septic Mice through Inhibition of IκB Kinase in Innate Immune Process.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun Hyeon; Park, Sun Hong; Jung, Jae-Kyung; Cho, Won-Jea; Ahn, Byeongwoo; Yun, Cheong-Yong; Choi, Yong Pyo; Yeo, Jong Hun; Lee, Heesoon; Hong, Jin Tae; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2017-02-01

    Targeting myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) or Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) with small molecule inhibitor rescues the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in sepsis due to infection with Gram-negative bacteria but not other microbes. Herein, we provided IκB kinase β (IKKβ) in innate immune process as a molecular target of caffeic acid cyclohexylamide (CGA-JK3) in the treatment of polymicrobial TLR agonists-induced lethal inflammation. CGA-JK3 ameliorated E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, MD-2/TLR4 agonist)-induced endotoxic shock, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-challenged septic shock or LPS plus D-galactosamine (GalN)-induced acute liver failure (ALF) in C57BL/6J mice. As a molecular basis, CGA-JK3 inhibited IKKβ-catalyzed kinase activity in a competitive mechanism with respect to ATP, displaced fluorescent ATP probe from the complex with IKKβ, and docked at the ATP-binding active site on the crystal structure of human IKKβ. Furthermore, CGA-JK3 inhibited IKKβ-catalyzed IκB phosphorylation, which is an axis leading to IκB degradation in the activating pathway of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), in macrophages stimulated with TLR (1/2, 2/6, 4, 5, 7, 9) agonists from Gram-positive/negative bacteria and viruses. CGA-JK3 consequently interrupted IKKβ-inducible NF-κB activation and NF-κB-regulated expression of TNF-α, IL-1α or HMGB-1 gene, thereby improving TLRs-associated redundant inflammatory responses in endotoxemia, polymicrobial sepsis and ALF.

  4. Protective effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) against neomycin-induced hair cell damage in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Park, Moo Kyun; Im, Gi Jung; Chang, Jiwon; Chae, Sung Won; Yoo, Jun; Han, Won-gue; Hwang, Gyu Ho; Jung, Jong Yoon; Choi, Jungim; Jung, Hak Hyun; Chung, Ah-Young; Park, Hae-Chul; Choi, June

    2014-08-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is known to reduce the generation of oxygen-derived free radicals, which is a major mechanism of aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of CAPE on neomycin-induced ototoxicity in zebrafish (Brn3c: EGFP). Five-day post-fertilization zebrafish larvae (n=10) were exposed to 125 μM neomycin and one of the following CAPE concentrations for 1h: 50, 100, 250, 500, or 1000 μM. Ultrastructural changes were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay and 2-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-N-ethylpyridiniumiodide (DASPEI) assay were performed for evaluation of apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. CAPE decreased neomycin-induced hair cell loss in the neuromasts (500 μM CAPE: 12.7 ± 1.1 cells, 125 μM neomycin only: 6.3 ± 1.1 cells; n = 10, P < 0.05). In the ultrastructural analysis, structures of mitochondria and hair cells were preserved when exposed to 125 μM neomycin and 500 μM CAPE. CAPE decreased apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. In the present study, CAPE attenuated neomycin-induced hair cell damage in zebrafish. The results of the current study suggest that neomycin induces apoptosis, and the apoptotic cell death can be prevented by treatment with CAPE in zebrafish. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on membrane potential and intracellular calcium in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kamil Burgazli, M; Aydogdu, N; Rafiq, A; Mericliler, M; Chasan, R; Erdogan, A

    2013-03-01

    BACKGROUNG AND OBJECTIVES: Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active component of the resin propolis obtained from beehives. Propolis has a long history of medicinal use and a number of studies have already reported on some of its pharmaceutical properties. This study aimed to explore the effects of CAPE on the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, cell proliferation, membrane potential and NO levels in human endothelial cells. Isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were incubated with CAPE (1-100 µM) at 37°C for 48 hours. Cell proliferation was estimated by counting cell numbers with use of a Neubauer chamber. The effect of CAPE (1-100 µM) on the membrane potential was measured with the fluorescence dye DIBAC4(3) whereas its effect on the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration was measured by use of the fluorescence probe Fluo-3 AM (Invitrogen, Leiden, Netherlands). NO production was assayed using the flourophore DAF~AM (Invitrogen, Leiden, Netherlands). Changes in fluorescence intensity was determined with the GENios plate reader (Genios, Tecan, Austria). A dose-dependent hyperpolarization of the endothelial cell membrane was observed with CAPE stimulation. The initial increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration showed a subsequent decrease over time. CAPE stimulation also resulted in an increase in NO production; however, at higher doses a decrease in NO levels was observed. HUVEC proliferation was inhibited by CAPE. Here we report on the effect of CAPE stimulation on the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, cell proliferation, membrane potential and NO production in HUVEC in a dose-dependent manner. These findings provide important insights into some potential key roles that both calcium and the membrane potential play in the CAPE activation of endothelial cells in a concentration-dependent manner.

  6. Photoreactive polylactide nanoparticles by the terminal conjugation of biobased caffeic acid.

    PubMed

    Tran, Thi Hang; Matsusaki, Michiya; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2009-09-15

    Photoreactive 3,4-diacetoxycinnamic acid- (DACA-) terminally conjugated poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) (DACA-PLLA) nanoparticles with different diameters were prepared by mixing acetonitrile as a good solvent and water as a poor solvent. The average diameters and morphologies of the nanoparticles prepared under various conditions were evaluated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation. The particle size was controllable from about 100 to 300 nm by altering the composition ratio of the mixed solvent, the concentration of the polymers, or the L-lactic acid (LLA) unit number. The particle size increased upon decreasing the LLA unit number or increasing the polymer concentration and water content in the mixed solution. Interestingly, the DACA-PLLA nanoparticles showed different size change properties following UV irradiation at lambda>280 nm before or after particle formation. When UV irradiation was performed after particle formation, only a few percent (ca. 3%) size decrement was observed, although a significant size decrement (ca. 30%) was detected after UV irradiation before particle formation. The DACA-PLLA nanoparticles showed weight decrement during accelerated hydrolysis experiments (pH=10.0, 37 degrees C) for 5 days, whereas the particle diameters were unchanged completely. DACA-PLLA nanoparticles have great potential as a photoreactive PLLA nanoparticles in the various applications.

  7. Comparative study on the inhibitory effect of caffeic and chlorogenic acids on key enzymes linked to Alzheimer's disease and some pro-oxidant induced oxidative stress in rats' brain-in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Agunloye, Odunayo M; Akinyemi, Ayodele J; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O; Adefegha, Stephen A

    2013-02-01

    This study sought to investigate and compare the interaction of caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and some pro-oxidants (FeSO(4), sodium nitroprusside and quinolinic acid) induced oxidative stress in rat brain in vitro. The result revealed that caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid inhibited AChE and BChE activities in dose-dependent manner; however, caffeic acid had a higher inhibitory effect on AChE and BChE activities than chlorogenic acid. Combination of the phenolic acids inhibited AChE and BChE activities antagonistically. Furthermore, pro-oxidants such as, FeSO(4), sodium nitroprusside and quinolinic acid caused increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) contents of the brain which was significantly decreased dose-dependently by the phenolic acids. Inhibition of AChE and BChE activities slows down acetylcholine and butyrylcholine breakdown in the brain. Therefore, one possible mechanism through which the phenolic acids exert their neuroprotective properties is by inhibiting AChE and BChE activities as well as preventing oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration. However, esterification of caffeic acid with quinic acid producing chlorogenic acid affects these neuroprotective properties.

  8. Effect of different polyphenol sources on the efficiency of ellagic acid release by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Leonardo; de la Cruz, Reynaldo; Buenrostro, José Juan; Ascacio-Valdés, Juan Alberto; Aguilera-Carbó, Antonio Francisco; Prado, Arely; Rodríguez-Herrera, Raúl; Aguilar, Cristóbal Noé

    2016-01-01

    Fungal hydrolysis of ellagitannins produces hexahydroxydiphenic acid, which is considered an intermediate molecule in ellagic acid release. Ellagic acid has important and desirable beneficial health properties. The aim of this work was to identify the effect of different sources of ellagitannins on the efficiency of ellagic acid release by Aspergillus niger. Three strains of A. niger (GH1, PSH and HT4) were assessed for ellagic acid release from different polyphenol sources: cranberry, creosote bush, and pomegranate used as substrate. Polyurethane foam was used as support for solid-state culture in column reactors. Ellagitannase activity was measured for each of the treatments. Ellagic acid was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography. When pomegranate polyphenols were used, a maximum value of ellagic acid (350.21 mg/g) was reached with A. niger HT4 in solid-state culture. The highest amount of ellagitannase (5176.81 U/l) was obtained at 8h of culture when cranberry polyphenols and strain A. niger PSH were used. Results demonstrated the effect of different polyphenol sources and A. niger strains on ellagic acid release. It was observed that the best source for releasing ellagic acid was pomegranate polyphenols and A. niger HT4 strain, which has the ability to degrade these compounds for obtaining a potent bioactive molecule such as ellagic acid. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Interactions between prebiotics, probiotics, polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols: diet or supplementation for metabolic syndrome prevention?

    PubMed

    Peluso, Ilaria; Romanelli, Luca; Palmery, Maura

    2014-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome can be prevented by the Mediterranean diet, characterized by fiber, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols. However, the composition of the Mediterranean diet, which can be viewed as a natural multiple supplement, is poorly controlled, and its beneficial effects poorly predictable. The metabolic syndrome is associated with intestinal dysbiosis and the gut microbioma seems to be the main target and player in the interactions occurring between probiotics, prebiotics, omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenols. From the reviewed evidence, it is reasonable to manage growth and metabolism of gut microflora with specific prebiotics and polyphenols. Even though the healthy properties of functional foods and nutraceuticals still need to be fully elucidated, available data suggest that well-designed supplements, containing the better ratio of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants, specific probiotic strains, and selected polyphenols and prebiotics, could be useful in metabolic syndrome prevention and treatment.

  10. Interactions between polyphenols in thinned young apples and porcine pancreatic α-amylase: Inhibition, detailed kinetics and fluorescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lijun; Chen, Weiqi; Meng, Yonghong; Yang, Xingbin; Yuan, Li; Guo, Yurong

    2016-10-01

    Young apple polyphenols (YAP) and nine types of phenolic compounds were investigated regarding the inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic α-amylase (PPA) in vitro. Tannic acid, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid in YAP showed relatively high inhibition with the IC50 values of 0.30, 1.96 and 3.69mg/mL, respectively. A detailed kinetics of inhibition study revealed that YAP and tannic acid were competitive inhibitors of PPA, whereas chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid were mixed inhibitors, exhibiting both competitive and uncompetitive characteristics. The fluorescence of PPA could be significantly quenched by YAP and the three polyphenols, and their quenching constants were determined. The results showed that for the polyphenols investigated, the order of the apparent static quenching constants (KFQ) was in agreement with that of the reciprocal competitive inhibition constants (1/Kic) (tannic acid>chlorogenic acid>caffeic acid>epicatechin); both of the parameters were contrary to the order of the IC50 values. Thus, combining detailed kinetics and fluorescence quenching studies can be applied to characterise the interactions between polyphenols in young apples and α-amylase.

  11. Caffeine and Caffeic Acid Inhibit Growth and Modify Estrogen Receptor and Insulin-like Growth Factor I Receptor Levels in Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosendahl, Ann H; Perks, Claire M; Zeng, Li; Markkula, Andrea; Simonsson, Maria; Rose, Carsten; Ingvar, Christian; Holly, Jeff M P; Jernström, Helena

    2015-04-15

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that dietary factors, such as coffee, may influence breast cancer and modulate hormone receptor status. The purpose of this translational study was to investigate how coffee may affect breast cancer growth in relation to estrogen receptor-α (ER) status. The influence of coffee consumption on patient and tumor characteristics and disease-free survival was assessed in a population-based cohort of 1,090 patients with invasive primary breast cancer in Sweden. Cellular and molecular effects by the coffee constituents caffeine and caffeic acid were evaluated in ER(+) (MCF-7) and ER(-) (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells. Moderate (2-4 cups/day) to high (≥5 cups/day) coffee intake was associated with smaller invasive primary tumors (Ptrend = 0.013) and lower proportion of ER(+) tumors (Ptrend = 0.018), compared with patients with low consumption (≤1 cup/day). Moderate to high consumption was associated with lower risk for breast cancer events in tamoxifen-treated patients with ER(+) tumors (adjusted HR, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.26-0.97). Caffeine and caffeic acid suppressed the growth of ER(+) (P ≤ 0.01) and ER(-) (P ≤ 0.03) cells. Caffeine significantly reduced ER and cyclin D1 abundance in ER(+) cells. Caffeine also reduced the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGFIR) and pAkt levels in both ER(+) and ER(-) cells. Together, these effects resulted in impaired cell-cycle progression and enhanced cell death. The clinical and experimental findings demonstrate various anticancer properties of caffeine and caffeic acid against both ER(+) and ER(-) breast cancer that may sensitize tumor cells to tamoxifen and reduce breast cancer growth. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Caffeic Acid Derivatives Inhibit the Growth of Colon Cancer: Involvement of the PI3-K/Akt and AMPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Pai, Man-Hui; Chiu, Hsi-Lin; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; Tang, Feng-Yao

    2014-01-01

    Background The aberrant regulation of phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3-K)/Akt, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR) signaling pathways in cancer has prompted significant interest in the suppression of these pathways to treat cancer. Caffeic acid (CA) has been reported to possess important anti-inflammatory actions. However, the molecular mechanisms by which CA derivatives including caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and caffeic acid phenylpropyl ester (CAPPE), exert inhibitory effects on the proliferation of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells have yet to be elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings CAPE and CAPPE were evaluated for their ability to modulate these signaling pathways and suppress the proliferation of CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Anti-cancer effects of these CA derivatives were measured by using proliferation assays, cell cycle analysis, western blotting assay, reporter gene assay and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining assays both in vitro and in vivo. This study demonstrates that CAPE and CAPPE exhibit a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation and survival of CRC cells through the induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and augmentation of apoptotic pathways. Consumption of CAPE and CAPPE significantly inhibited the growth of colorectal tumors in a mouse xenograft model. The mechanisms of action included a modulation of PI3-K/Akt, AMPK and m-TOR signaling cascades both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the results demonstrate novel anti-cancer mechanisms of CA derivatives against the growth of human CRC cells. Conclusions CA derivatives are potent anti-cancer agents that augment AMPK activation and promote apoptosis in human CRC cells. The structure of CA derivatives can be used for the rational design of novel inhibitors that target human CRC cells. PMID:24960186

  13. Synthesis and effects of new caffeic acid derivatives on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Xu, Liu-Xin; Xu, Xu-Sheng; Li, Bo-Wei; Wang, Rui; Fu, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 20 new derivatives of caffeic acid esters were synthesized and their inhibitory activities against the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW264.7 macrophages were determined. Compounds 3l, 3r, 3s and 3t were found to decrease nitrite levels in a dose-dependent manner in LPS-induced cells and showed potent inhibitory activities against the NO production in RAW264.7 macrophages with IC50 values of 7.4, 5.9, 3.3 and 2.2 μM, respectively. They could be selected as compromising compounds for the later pharmacological study. PMID:24955176

  14. Extraction, spectrophotometric and atomic absorption spectrophotometric determination of molybdenum with caffeic acid and application in high purity grade steel and environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, N.; Desai, M.N. ); Menon, S.K.; Agrawal, Y.K. )

    1989-06-01

    A new selective and sensitive method for extraction of yellow Mo(VI)-caffeic acid complex with a liquid ion exchanger, Aliquat 336 from 4.0 pH, and spectrophotometric determination of molybdenum in trace amounts is described. The molar absorptivity of the complex is 1.1 {times} 10{sup 5} 1 mol{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1} at 340 nm and the color system obeys Beers law in the range 0.04-0.99 ppm of Mo(VI). The molybdenum is also determined with AAS and the method is applied for its determination in steel and environmental samples.

  15. The impact of hop bitter acid and polyphenol profiles on the perceived bitterness of beer.

    PubMed

    Oladokun, Olayide; Tarrega, Amparo; James, Sue; Smart, Katherine; Hort, Joanne; Cook, David

    2016-08-15

    Thirty-four commercial lager beers were analysed for their hop bitter acid, phenolic acid and polyphenol contents. Based on analytical data, it was evident that the beers had been produced using a range of different raw materials and hopping practices. Principal Components Analysis was used to select a sub-set of 10 beers that contained diverse concentrations of the analysed bitter compounds. These beers were appraised sensorially to determine the impacts of varying hop acid and polyphenolic profiles on perceived bitterness character. Beers high in polyphenol and hop acid contents were perceived as having 'harsh' and 'progressive' bitterness, whilst beers that had evidently been conventionally hopped were 'sharp' and 'instant' in their bitterness. Beers containing light-stable hop products (tetrahydro-iso-α-acids) were perceived as 'diminishing', 'rounded' and 'acidic' in bitterness. The hopping strategy adopted by brewers impacts on the nature, temporal profile and intensity of bitterness perception in beer.

  16. The hepatoprotection of caffeic acid and rosmarinic acid, major compounds of Perilla frutescens, against t-BHP-induced oxidative liver damage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Yong; Hong, Chung-Oui; Lee, Gung Pyo; Kim, Cheong-Tae; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2013-05-01

    Perilla frutescens leaves are often used in East Asian gourmet food. In this study, we investigated the hepatoprotective effects of caffeic acid (CA), rosmarinic acid (RA), and their combination. P. frutescens contains 1.32μg CA/mg dry material (DM) and 26.84μg RA/mg DM analyzed by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS. CA remarkably reduced the oxidative damage than rosmarinic acid in an in vitro study. Oral intubation with CA or RA alone for five days was conducted prior to treatment with a single dose of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (0.5mmol/kg b.w., i.p.), which led to a significant reduction of indicators of hepatic toxicity, such as aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, oxidized glutathione, lipid peroxidation and enzyme activities related to antioxidant such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Interestingly, compared to treatment with CA or RA alone, a combination of both compounds more increased the endogenous antioxidant enzymes and glutathione (GSH) and decreased lipid peroxidation in livers. These results suggest that CA from perilla leaves plays a role in the increased hepatic GSH concentration, and shows an additive hepatic protection with RA against oxidative hepatic damage.

  17. Acid detergent lignin, lodging resistance index, and expression of the caffeic acid O-methyltransferase gene in brown midrib-12 sudangrass.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Liu, Guibo; Li, Jun; You, Yongliang; Zhao, Haiming; Liang, Huan; Mao, Peisheng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the relationship between acid detergent lignin (ADL) and lodging resistance index (LRI) is essential for breeding new varieties of brown midrib (bmr) sudangrass (Sorghum sudanense (Piper) Stapf.). In this study, bmr-12 near isogenic lines and their wild-types obtained by back cross breeding were used to compare relevant forage yield and quality traits, and to analyze expression of the caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene using quantitative real time-PCR. The research showed that the mean ADL content of bmr-12 mutants (20.94 g kg(-1)) was significantly (P < 0.05) lower than measured in N-12 lines (43.45 g kg(-1)), whereas the LRI of bmr-12 mutants (0.29) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than in N-12 lines (0.22). There was no significant correlation between the two indexes in bmr-12 materials (r = -0.44, P > 0.05). Sequence comparison of the COMT gene revealed two point mutations present in bmr-12 but not in the wild-type, the second mutation changed amino acid 129 of the protein from Gln (CAG) to a stop codon (UAG). The relative expression level of COMT gene was significantly reduced, which likely led to the decreased ADL content observed in the bmr-12 mutant.

  18. Caffeic acid prevents acetaminophen-induced liver injury by activating the Keap1-Nrf2 antioxidative defense system.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chun; Zheng, Zhiyong; Shi, Liang; Sheng, Yuchen; Wei, Hai; Wang, Zhengtao; Ji, Lili

    2016-02-01

    Acute liver failure induced by acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the main cause of drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Caffeic acid (CA) is a phenolic compound from many natural products. This study aims to investigate the protective mechanism of CA in APAP-induced liver injury. The results of serum alanine/aspartate aminotransferases (ALT/AST), liver myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, liver glutathione (GSH) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels demonstrated the protection of CA against APAP-induced liver injury. Liver histological observation provided further evidences of CA-induced protection. CA was found to reverse the APAP-induced decreased cell viability in human normal liver L-02 cells and HepG2 cells. CA also reduced the increased cellular ROS level induced by APAP in hepatocytes. The results of luciferase assay and Western-blot analysis showed that CA increased the transcriptional activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the presence of APAP. Nrf2 siRNA reduced the protection of CA against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. CA also reversed the APAP-induced decreased mRNA and protein expression of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1). In addition, HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and NQO1 inhibitor diminutol (Dim) reduced the protection of CA against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. CA also decreased the expression of kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1(Keap1). Molecular docking indicated the potential interacting of CA with Nrf2 binding site in the Keap1 protein. CA had little effect on the enzymatic activity of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 and CYP2E1 in vitro. In conclusion, we demonstrated that CA prevented APAP-induced hepatotoxicity by decreasing Keap1 expression, inhibiting binding of Keap1 to Nrf2, and thus activating Nrf2 and leading to increased expression of antioxidative signals including HO-1 and NQO1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The protective effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester in isoniazid and ethambutol-induced ocular toxicity of rats.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Alparslan; Kürşat Cingü, Abdullah; Kaya, Savaş; Türkcü, Gül; Arı, Şeyhmus; Evliyaoğlu, Osman; Çınar, Yasin; Türkcü, Fatih Mehmet; Yüksel, Harun; Murat, Mehmet; Çaça, İhsan; Gökalp, Osman

    2013-09-01

    This study intended to examine the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on isoniazid (INH) and/or ethambutol (ETM)-induced retina and optic nerve toxicity in a rat model. This study included eight groups, each containing 10 rats. The groups were Control, INH, ETM, CAPE, INH+CAPE, ETM+CAPE, INH+ETM and INH+ETM+CAPE. Rats were given orally 50 mg/kg/d of INH and 50 mg/kg/d of ETM in tap water for 30 d. 10 μmol/kg of CAPE were intraperitoneally injected for 30 d. The first dose of CAPE was given 24 h before the INH and ETM treatment and continued until sacrifice. Control group was given only tap water for 30 d. Rats were anaesthetized and sacrificed on the 30th day of experiment. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities, malondialdehyde (MDA), total anti-oxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS) were measured on the dissected and excised retina and optic nerve samples. Fellow eyes were used for histopathologic evaluation and the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. In addition, CAPE, INH and ETM interaction with SOD isoforms were calculated in silico. The SOD activity and TAS levels were found significantly higher in CAPE-treated groups compared to INH and/or ETM-treated groups (p < 0.0001). But the MDA, and TOS levels were significantly lower in CAPE-treated groups (p < 0.0001). The mean RGC count is significantly decreased in INH, ETM and INH+ETM groups compared with INH+CAPE, ETM+CAPE and INH+ETM+CAPE groups, respectively (p values 0.001, 0.042, and 0.001 respectively). Besides, in silico calculations showed that binding affinity of CAPE to SOD isotypes was higher than that of INH and ETM. This study demonstrates that CAPE treatment may decrease the oxidative stress in the retina and optic nerve of INH- and ETM-treated rats and may prevent RGC loss. As an underlying mechanism, CAPE and SOD interaction seems crucial for alleviation of ocular oxidative stress and RGCs toxicity.

  20. Caffeic acid, naringenin and quercetin enhance glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and glucose sensitivity in INS-1E cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, S; Oksbjerg, N; Young, J F; Jeppesen, P B

    2014-07-01

    Caffeic acid, naringenin and quercetin are naturally occurring phenolic compounds (PCs) present in many plants as secondary metabolites. The aim of this study was to investigate their effect on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in INS-1E cells and to explore their effect on expression of genes involved in β-cell survival and function under normoglycaemic and glucotoxic conditions. For acute studies, INS-1E cells were grown in 11 mM glucose (72 h) and then incubated with the PCs (1 h) with 3.3/16.7 mM glucose; whereas, for chronic studies, the cells were grown in 11 mM glucose (72 h) with/without the PCs, and then incubated with 3.3/16.7 mM glucose (1 h); thereafter, GSIS was measured. For GSIS and gene expression studies (GES) under glucotoxic conditions, two sets of cells were grown in 11/25 mM glucose with/without the PCs (72 h): one was used for GES, using real time RT-PCR, and the other was exposed to 3.3/16.7 mM glucose, followed by measurement of GSIS. The study demonstrated that the PCs can enhance GSIS under hyperglycaemic and glucotoxic conditions in INS-1E cells. Moreover, these compounds can differentially, yet distinctly change the expression profile of genes [Glut2 (glucose transporter 2), Gck (glucokinase), Ins1 (insulin 1), Ins2, Beta2 (neurogenic differentiation protein 1), Pdx1 (pancreatic and duodenal homeobox protein 1), Akt1 (RAC-α serine/threonine-protein kinase encoding gene), Akt2 (RAC-β serine/threonine-protein kinase encoding gene), Irs1 (insulin receptor substrate 1), Acc1 (acetyl CoA carboxylase 1), Bcl2 (β-cell lymphoma 2 protein), Bax (Bcl-2 associated X protein), Casp3 (Caspase 3), Hsp70 (heat shock protein 70), and Hsp90] involved in β-cell stress, survival and function. The results indicate that the PCs tested enhance GSIS and glucose sensitivity in INS-1E cells. They also modulate gene expression profiles to improve β-cell survival and function during glucotoxicity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Separation of chlorogenic acid and concentration of trace caffeic acid from natural products by pH-zone-refining countercurrent chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuanyuan; Dong, Genlai; Gu, Yanxiang; Ito, Yoichiro; Wei, Yun

    2013-07-01

    Chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid were selected as test samples for separation by the pH-zone-refining countercurrent chromatography (CCC). The separation of these test samples was performed with a two-phase solvent system composed of methyl-tert-butyl-ether/acetonitrile/water at a volume ratio of 4:1:5 v/v/v where trifluoroacetic acid (TFA; 8 mM) was added to the organic stationary phase as a retainer and NH4 OH (10 mM) to the aqueous mobile phase as an eluter. Chlorogenic acid was successfully separated from Flaveria bidentis (L.) Kuntze (F. bidentis) and Lonicerae Flos by pH-zone-refining CCC, a slightly polar two-phase solvent system composed of methyl-tert-butyl-ether/acetonitrile/n-butanol/water at a volume ratio of 4:1:1:5 v/v/v/v was selected where TFA (3 mM) was added to the organic stationary phase as a retainer and NH4 OH (3 mM) to the aqueous mobile phase as an eluter. A 16.2 mg amount of chlorogenic acid with the purity of 92% from 1.4 g of F. bidentis, and 134 mg of chlorogenic acid at the purity of 99% from 1.3 g of crude extract of Lonicerae Flos have been obtained. These results suggest that pH-zone-refining CCC is suitable for the isolation of the chlorogenic acid from the crude extracts of F. bidentis and Lonicerae Flos. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Modulation of neurotrophic signaling pathways by polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Razieh; Saso, Luciano; Firuzi, Omidreza

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols are an important class of phytochemicals, and several lines of evidence have demonstrated their beneficial effects in the context of a number of pathologies including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. In this report, we review the studies on the effects of polyphenols on neuronal survival, growth, proliferation and differentiation, and the signaling pathways involved in these neurotrophic actions. Several polyphenols including flavonoids such as baicalein, daidzein, luteolin, and nobiletin as well as nonflavonoid polyphenols such as auraptene, carnosic acid, curcuminoids, and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives including caffeic acid phentyl ester enhance neuronal survival and promote neurite outgrowth in vitro, a hallmark of neuronal differentiation. Assessment of underlying mechanisms, especially in PC12 neuronal-like cells, reveals that direct agonistic effect on tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk) receptors, the main receptors of neurotrophic factors including nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) explains the action of few polyphenols such as 7,8-dihydroxyflavone. However, several other polyphenolic compounds activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. Increased expression of neurotrophic factors in vitro and in vivo is the mechanism of neurotrophic action of flavonoids such as scutellarin, daidzein, genistein, and fisetin, while compounds like apigenin and ferulic acid increase cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. Finally, the antioxidant activity of polyphenols reflected in the activation of Nrf2 pathway and the consequent upregulation of detoxification enzymes such as heme oxygenase-1 as well as the contribution of these effects to the neurotrophic activity have also been discussed. In conclusion, a better understanding of the neurotrophic effects of polyphenols and

  3. Modulation of neurotrophic signaling pathways by polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Razieh; Saso, Luciano; Firuzi, Omidreza

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols are an important class of phytochemicals, and several lines of evidence have demonstrated their beneficial effects in the context of a number of pathologies including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. In this report, we review the studies on the effects of polyphenols on neuronal survival, growth, proliferation and differentiation, and the signaling pathways involved in these neurotrophic actions. Several polyphenols including flavonoids such as baicalein, daidzein, luteolin, and nobiletin as well as nonflavonoid polyphenols such as auraptene, carnosic acid, curcuminoids, and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives including caffeic acid phentyl ester enhance neuronal survival and promote neurite outgrowth in vitro, a hallmark of neuronal differentiation. Assessment of underlying mechanisms, especially in PC12 neuronal-like cells, reveals that direct agonistic effect on tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk) receptors, the main receptors of neurotrophic factors including nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) explains the action of few polyphenols such as 7,8-dihydroxyflavone. However, several other polyphenolic compounds activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways. Increased expression of neurotrophic factors in vitro and in vivo is the mechanism of neurotrophic action of flavonoids such as scutellarin, daidzein, genistein, and fisetin, while compounds like apigenin and ferulic acid increase cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. Finally, the antioxidant activity of polyphenols reflected in the activation of Nrf2 pathway and the consequent upregulation of detoxification enzymes such as heme oxygenase-1 as well as the contribution of these effects to the neurotrophic activity have also been discussed. In conclusion, a better understanding of the neurotrophic effects of polyphenols and the

  4. Fruit maturity and juice extraction influences ellagic acid derivatives and other antioxidant polyphenolics in muscadine grapes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon-Hee; Talcott, Stephen T

    2004-01-28

    Polyphenolic compounds including ellagic acid, ellagic acid derivatives, and anthocyanins were characterized and quantified by novel chromatographic conditions in eight muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia) cultivars and evaluated for antioxidant capacity as influenced by two ripening stages and their location within the fruit (skin, pulp, and juice). All polyphenolics generally increased as fruit ripened and the highest concentrations were located in the skins. Free ellagic acid, ellagic acid glycosides, and total ellagic acid ranged from 8 to 162, 7 to 115, and 587 to 1900 mg/kg, respectively, in the skin of ripe grapes. Hot-pressed juices contained considerably lower polyphenolic concentrations than were present in whole grapes. Five anthocyanidins were present in each cultivar in variable concentrations (delphinidin > petunidin > malvidin + peonidin > cyanidin). Antioxidant capacity was appreciably influenced by cultivar, maturity, and location in the fruit with good correlations to soluble phenolics found in both methanolic and ethyl acetate extracts (r = 0.83 and 0.92, respectively).

  5. Enhancement of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on all-trans retinoic acid-induced differentiation in human leukemia HL-60 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, H.-C.; Kuo, W.-H.; Lee, Y.-J.; Wang, C.-J.; Tseng, T.-H. . E-mail: tht@csmu.edu.tw

    2006-10-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) induces complete remission in a high proportion of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL); however, the response is sometimes very slow. Furthermore, relapse and resistance to treatment often occur despite continued treatment with ATRA. Thereafter, combination treatment strategies have been suggested to circumvent these problems. The present study demonstrates that caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a major component of honeybee propolis, enhanced ATRA-induced granulocytic differentiation in HL-60, a human promyelocytic cell line. The differentiation was assessed by Wright-Giemsa stain, nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, and membrane differentiation marker CD11b. In addition, CAPE enhanced ATRA-induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase by decreasing the association of cdk2-cyclin E complex. Finally, it was demonstrated that CAPE promoted the ATRA-mediated nuclear transcription activation of RAR{alpha} assessed by EMSA assay and enhanced the expression of target genes including RAR{alpha}, C/EBP{epsilon}, and p21 protein resulting in the differentiation development of leukemia. It is suggested that CAPE possesses the potential to enhance the efficiency of ATRA in the differentiation therapy of APL.

  6. Effects of solvent polarity on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid compounds: determination of the dipole moments.

    PubMed

    Belay, Abebe; Libnedengel, Ermias; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-02-01

    The effects of solvent polarity on absorption and fluorescence spectra of biologically active compounds (chlorogenic acid (CGA) and caffeic acids (CA)) have been investigated. In both spectra pronounced solvatochromic effects were observed with shift of emission peaks larger than the corresponding UV-vis electronic absorption spectra. From solvatochromic theory the ground and excited-state dipole moments were determined experimentally and theoretically. The differences between the excited and ground state dipole moment determined by Bakhshiev, Kawski-Chamma-Viallet and Reichardt equations are quite similar. The ground and excited-state dipole moments were determined by theoretical quantum chemical calculation using density function theory (DFT) method (Gaussian 09) and were also similar to the experimental results. The HOMO-LUMO energy band gaps for CGA and CFA were calculated and found to be 4.1119 and 1.8732 eV respectively. The results also indicated the CGA molecule is more stable than that of CFA. It was also observed that in both compounds the excited state possesses a higher dipole moment than that of the ground state. This confirms that the excited state of the hydroxycinnamic compounds is more polarized than that of the ground state and therefore is more sensitive to the solvent.

  7. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-07-08

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee.

  8. The role of cyclodextrins in ORAC-fluorescence assays. antioxidant capacity of tyrosol and caffeic acid with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    García-Padial, Marcos; Martínez-Ohárriz, María Cristina; Navarro-Blasco, Iñigo; Zornoza, Arantza

    2013-12-18

    Tyrosol and caffeic acid are biophenols that contribute to the beneficial properties of virgin olive oil. The influence of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβ-CD) on their respective antioxidant capacities was analyzed. The ORAC antioxidant activity of tyrosol (expressed as μM Trolox equivalents/μM Tyrosol) was 0.83 ± 0.03 and it increased up to 1.20 ± 0.11 in the presence of 0.8 mM HPβ-CD. However, the ORAC antioxidant activity of caffeic acid experienced no change. The different effect of HPβ-CD on each compound was discussed. In addition, the effect of increasing concentrations of different cyclodextrins in the development of ORAC-fluorescence (ORAC-FL) assays was studied. The ORAC signal was higher for HPβ-CD, followed by Mβ-CD, β-CD, γ-CD and finally α-CD. These results could be explained by the formation of inclusion complexes with fluorescein.

  9. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee. PMID:27399778

  10. Functional Analyses of Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase and Cinnamoyl-CoA-Reductase Genes from Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne)[W

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yi; Rochfort, Simone; Liu, Zhiqian; Ran, Yidong; Griffith, Megan; Badenhorst, Pieter; Louie, Gordon V.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Smith, Kevin F.; Noel, Joseph P.; Mouradov, Aidyn; Spangenberg, German

    2010-01-01

    Cinnamoyl CoA-reductase (CCR) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) catalyze key steps in the biosynthesis of monolignols, which serve as building blocks in the formation of plant lignin. We identified candidate genes encoding these two enzymes in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) and show that the spatio-temporal expression patterns of these genes in planta correlate well with the developmental profile of lignin deposition. Downregulation of CCR1 and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase 1 (OMT1) using an RNA interference–mediated silencing strategy caused dramatic changes in lignin level and composition in transgenic perennial ryegrass plants grown under both glasshouse and field conditions. In CCR1-deficient perennial ryegrass plants, metabolic profiling indicates the redirection of intermediates both within and beyond the core phenylpropanoid pathway. The combined results strongly support a key role for the OMT1 gene product in the biosynthesis of both syringyl- and guaiacyl-lignin subunits in perennial ryegrass. Both field-grown OMT1-deficient and CCR1-deficient perennial ryegrass plants showed enhanced digestibility without obvious detrimental effects on either plant fitness or biomass production. This highlights the potential of metabolic engineering not only to enhance the forage quality of grasses but also to produce optimal feedstock plants for biofuel production. PMID:20952635

  11. Polyphenols and fatty acids responsible for anti-cyanobacterial allelopathic effects of submerged macrophyte Myriophyllum spicatum.

    PubMed

    Nakai, S; Zou, G; Okuda, T; Nishijima, W; Hosomi, M; Okada, M

    2012-01-01

    Myriophyllum spicatum is known to inhibit the growth of cyanobacteria such as Microcystis aeruginosa by releasing anti-cyanobacterial allelochemicals. The allelochemicals possibly responsible for the inhibition include five polyphenols and three fatty acids, but the extent to which these are indeed responsible for the anti-cyanobacterial effects is unclear. The goal of this research was to determine the contribution of these compounds to the allelopathic effect of M. spicatum on M. aeruginosa. We first collected information on the release rates of these compounds and then added the compounds to a cyanobacterial medium on the basis of their release rates so as to simulate their excretion by M. spicatum. Addition of the polyphenols and fatty acids inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa, and the interaction of the polyphenols and fatty acids was additive. The EC50 of a polyphenol and fatty acid mixture was compared with that of M. spicatum itself as previously determined in a mixed culture system in which M. spicatum and M. aeruginosa were incubated. The former was about 1.9 times higher than that of the latter, the implication being that the inhibitory effect of the polyphenols and fatty acids contributed about 53% of the allelopathic effect of M. spicatum. This paper is the first to describe allelochemicals that account for a half of the anti-cyanobacterial allelopathic effect of a macrophyte.

  12. Inhibition of human catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT)-mediated O-methylation of catechol estrogens by major polyphenolic components present in coffee.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bao Ting; Wang, Pan; Nagai, Mime; Wen, Yujing; Bai, Hyoung-Woo

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of three catechol-containing coffee polyphenols, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), on the O-methylation of 2- and 4-hydroxyestradiol (2-OH-E(2) and 4-OH-E(2), respectively) catalyzed by the cytosolic catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) isolated from human liver and placenta. When human liver COMT was used as the enzyme, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid each inhibited the O-methylation of 2-OH-E(2) in a concentration-dependent manner, with IC(50) values of 1.3-1.4 and 6.3-12.5 microM, respectively, and they also inhibited the O-methylation of 4-OH-E(2), with IC(50) values of 0.7-0.8 and 1.3-3.1 microM, respectively. Similar inhibition pattern was seen with human placental COMT preparation. CAPE had a comparable effect as caffeic acid for inhibiting the O-methylation of 2-OH-E(2), but it exerted a weaker inhibition of the O-methylation of 4-OH-E(2). Enzyme kinetic analyses showed that chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid inhibited the human liver and placental COMT-mediated O-methylation of catechol estrogens with a mixed mechanism of inhibition (competitive plus noncompetitive). Computational molecular modeling analysis showed that chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid can bind to human soluble COMT at the active site in a similar manner as the catechol estrogen substrates. Moreover, the binding energy values of these two coffee polyphenols are lower than that of catechol estrogens, which means that coffee polyphenols have higher binding affinity for the enzyme than the natural substrates. This computational finding agreed perfectly with our biochemical data.

  13. Effects of processing on the polyphenol and phenolic acid content and antioxidant capacity of semi-dried cherry tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum M.).

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Valeria; Clifford, Mike N; Brown, Jonathan E; Siracusa, Laura; Muratore, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    This study was performed to test the effects of pre-treating cherry tomatoes with a solution containing citric acid-NaCl-CaCl2 (10:10:24 g L(-1)), followed by one of three different drying regimes (40, 60, 80 °C) on the antioxidant capacity of their aqueous extracts and the extent of phenolic compound degradation. Chlorogenic acids, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rutin and naringenin were all detected in the aqueous extracts. In fresh cherry tomatoes the predominant phenolic compound was rutin, followed by naringenin, which corresponded to 79% and 8% of the total phenolic compounds present, respectively. Pre-treatment was protective towards naringenin and had a modest protective effect on rutin and ferulic acid (0.1 > P > 0.05). Total phenolic content was similar in all samples, but there was a trend for the level of free polyphenols to be lower in treated tomatoes. The destruction of naringenin was confirmed by liquid chromatographic-mass spectrometric data. A significant effect of temperature on the antioxidant capacity was observed. After this treatment the industry might introduce some advances in the processing of tomatoes, preserving the main nutritive characteristics and saving the products as semi-dried. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Reduction of polyphenol and phytic acid content of pearl millet grains by malting and blanching.

    PubMed

    Archana; Sehgal, S; Kawatra, A

    1999-01-01

    This work was undertaken to evaluate the changes in polyphenol and phytic acid content in malted and blanched pearl millet grains. For malting, grains were steeped for 16 hours, germinated for 48 or 72 hours and then kilned at 50 degrees C for 24 hours. Blanching was done for 30 seconds in boiling water at 98 degrees C. Results indicated that blanching resulted in significant reduction in polyphenol (28%) and phytic acids (38%). Destruction of polyphenols (38 to 48%) and phytic acid (46 to 50%) was significantly higher in grains subjected to malting than blanching: The overall results suggested that malting with 72 hours of germination was most effective in reducing the antinutrient levels of pearl millet grains.

  15. Study on the determination of polyphenols in tobacco by HPLC coupled with ESI-MS after solid-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Wang, Lan; Yang, Guangyu; Shi, Honglin; Jiang, Ciqing; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yunhuai

    2003-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method coupled with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry for the determination of polyphenols in tobacco is studied. The polyphenols are extracted from a tobacco sample by being refluxed in a boiling water bath with 80% methanol and purified by solid-phase extraction with a C18 cartridge. The chlorogenic acid, rutin, scopoletin, caffeic acid, scopolin, and other polyphenols are satisfactorily separated on a Nova-Pak C18 chromatographic column (3.9 x 150 mm) with methanol and 0.05 mol/L potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer solution gradient elution as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. Each of the polyphenols is monitored by photodiode array detector at its maximum wavelength: chlorogenic acid, 326.1 nm; rutin, 354.8 nm; scopoletin, 344.0 nm; caffeic acid, 323.7 nm; and scopolin, 365.2 nm. The limits of detection are: 100 ng/mL for chlorogenic acid, 125 ng/mL for rutin, 60 ng/mL for scopoletin, 50 ng/mL for caffeic acid, and 100 ng/mL for scopolin. The key polyphenols in tobacco are identified by comparing the retention time, the UV-spectrum, and the mass spectra with those of the standards. The recovery of tobacco polyphenols is 94-105%, and the relative standard deviations are 1.28-1.49%. This method is successfully applied to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze the polyphenols in tobacco with good results.

  16. Efficacy of various naturally occurring caffeic acid derivatives in preventing post-harvest protein losses in forages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In red clover, oxidation of endogenous o-diphenols by polyphenol oxidase (PPO) inhibits post-harvest proteolyis. This system is transferable to alfalfa by providing PPO (via a transgene) and o-diphenol PPO substrates (via exogenous application). To exploit the PPO system for protein protection, it w...

  17. Chocolate intake increases urinary excretion of polyphenol-derived phenolic acids in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Rios, Laurent Y; Gonthier, Marie-Paule; Rémésy, Christian; Mila, Isabelle; Lapierre, Catherine; Lazarus, Sheryl A; Williamson, Gary; Scalbert, Augustin

    2003-04-01

    Proanthocyanidins, the most abundant polyphenols in chocolate, are not depolymerized in the stomach and reach the small intestine intact, where they are hardly absorbed because of their high molecular weight. In vitro and in vivo studies using pure compounds as substrates suggest that proanthocyanidins and the related catechin monomers may be degraded into more bioavailable low-molecular-weight phenolic acids by the microflora in the colon. The aim of the study was to estimate the amounts of phenolic acids formed by the microflora and excreted in the urine of human subjects after consumption of polyphenol-rich chocolate. After consumption of a polyphenol-free diet for 2 d and a subsequent overnight fast, 11 healthy subjects (7 men and 4 women) consumed 80 g chocolate containing 439 mg proanthocyanidins and 147 mg catechin monomers. All urine was collected during the 24 h before chocolate consumption and at 3, 6, 9, 24, and 48 h after chocolate consumption. Aromatic acids were identified in urine by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and were quantified by HPLC-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. Chocolate intake increased the urinary excretion of the 6 following phenolic acids: m-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid, ferulic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, m-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, vanillic acid, and m-hydroxybenzoic acid. The antioxidant and biological effects of chocolate may be explained not solely by the established absorption of catechin monomers but also by the absorption of microbial phenolic acid metabolites.

  18. Pinus pinaster Knot: A Source of Polyphenols against Plasmopara viticola.

    PubMed

    Gabaston, Julien; Richard, Tristan; Cluzet, Stéphanie; Palos Pinto, Antonio; Dufour, Marie-Cécile; Corio-Costet, Marie-France; Mérillon, Jean-Michel

    2017-09-29

    Pine knot extract from Pinus pinaster byproducts was characterized by UHPLC-DAD-MS and NMR. Fourteen polyphenols divided into four classes were identified as follows: lignans (nortrachelogenin, pinoresinol, matairesinol, isolariciresinol, secoisolariciresinol), flavonoids (pinocembrin, pinobanksin, dihydrokaempferol, taxifolin), stilbenes (pinosylvin, pinosylvin monomethyl ether, pterostilbene), and phenolic acids (caffeic acid, ferulic acid). The antifungal potential of pine knot extract, as well as the main compounds, was tested in vitro against Plasmopara viticola. The ethanolic extract showed a strong antimildew activity. In addition, pinosylvins and pinocembrin demonstrated significant inhibition of zoospore mobility and mildew development. These findings strongly suggest that pine knot is a potential biomass that could be used as a natural antifungal product.

  19. Plasma concentrations of coffee polyphenols and plasma biomarkers of diabetes risk in healthy Japanese women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A H; Tan, L 'B; Hiramatsu, N; Ishisaka, A; Alfonso, H; Tanaka, A; Uemura, N; Fujiwara, Y; Takechi, R

    2016-01-01

    Coffee consumption has been reported to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in experimental and epidemiological studies. This anti-diabetic effect of coffee may be attributed to its high content in polyphenols especially caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. However, the association between plasma coffee polyphenols and diabetic risks has never been investigated in the literature. In this study, fasting plasma samples were collected from 57 generally healthy females aged 38–73 (mean 52, s.d. 8) years recruited in Himeji, Japan. The concentrations of plasma coffee polyphenols were determined by liquid chromatography coupled with mass tandem spectrometer. Diabetes biomarkers in the plasma/serum samples were analysed by a commercial diagnostic laboratory. Statistical associations were assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. The results showed that plasma chlorogenic acid exhibited negative associations with fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin and C-reactive protein, whereas plasma total coffee polyphenol and plasma caffeic acid were weakly associated with these biomarkers. Our preliminary data support previous findings that coffee polyphenols have anti-diabetic effects but further replications with large samples of both genders are recommended. PMID:27270110

  20. Plasma concentrations of coffee polyphenols and plasma biomarkers of diabetes risk in healthy Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Lee, A H; Tan, L 'b; Hiramatsu, N; Ishisaka, A; Alfonso, H; Tanaka, A; Uemura, N; Fujiwara, Y; Takechi, R

    2016-06-06

    Coffee consumption has been reported to reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in experimental and epidemiological studies. This anti-diabetic effect of coffee may be attributed to its high content in polyphenols especially caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. However, the association between plasma coffee polyphenols and diabetic risks has never been investigated in the literature. In this study, fasting plasma samples were collected from 57 generally healthy females aged 38-73 (mean 52, s.d. 8) years recruited in Himeji, Japan. The concentrations of plasma coffee polyphenols were determined by liquid chromatography coupled with mass tandem spectrometer. Diabetes biomarkers in the plasma/serum samples were analysed by a commercial diagnostic laboratory. Statistical associations were assessed using Spearman's correlation coefficients. The results showed that plasma chlorogenic acid exhibited negative associations with fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin and C-reactive protein, whereas plasma total coffee polyphenol and plasma caffeic acid were weakly associated with these biomarkers. Our preliminary data support previous findings that coffee polyphenols have anti-diabetic effects but further replications with large samples of both genders are recommended.

  1. Polyphenolic acids from mint (the aerial of Mentha haplocalyx Briq.) with DPPH radical scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    She, G-M; Xu, C; Liu, B; Shi, R-B

    2010-05-01

    Vegetables of mint (the aerial part of Mentha haplocalyx) contain a significant amount of polyphenols with many health benefits. The crude aqueous acetone extract exhibited high antioxidant activity (IC(50)= 45.67 mug/mL) in 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. The activity-guided separation of chlorophyll removal fraction on column chromatography afforded 8 polyphenolic acids, including a new compound, cis-salvianolic acid J (1), and 7 known compounds, salvianolic acid J (2), lithospermic acid (3), rosmarinic acid (4), lithospermic acid B (5), magnesium lithospermate B (6), sodium lithospermate B (7), and danshensu (8), respectively. Their structural elucidations of all the compounds were based on extensive spectroscopic methods, including HRESIMS and 2D NMR experiments (HSQC, HMBC, and ROESY) and by comparison with reference values. Compounds 2, 3, and 5 to 8 were isolated from Mentha genus for the 1st time. The DPPH radical scavenging activities of all the isolated compounds were evaluated.

  2. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Causes p21Cip1 Induction, Akt Signaling Reduction, and Growth Inhibition in PC-3 Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Ping; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2012-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) treatment suppressed proliferation, colony formation, and cell cycle progression in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells. CAPE decreased protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, SKP2, c-Myc, Akt1, Akt2, Akt3, total Akt, mTOR, Bcl-2, Rb, as well as phosphorylation of Rb, ERK1/2, Akt, mTOR, GSK3α, GSK3β, PDK1; but increased protein expression of KLF6 and p21Cip1. Microarray analysis indicated that pathways involved in cellular movement, cell death, proliferation, and cell cycle were affected by CAPE. Co-treatment of CAPE with chemotherapeutic drugs vinblastine, paclitaxol, and estramustine indicated synergistic suppression effect. CAPE administration may serve as a potential adjuvant therapy for prostate cancer. PMID:22347457

  3. Synthesis of caffeic acid amides bearing 2,3,4,5-tetra-hydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxocine moieties and their biological evaluation as antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ji-Wen; Qiu, Han-Yue; Wang, Peng-Fei; Makawana, Jigar A; Yang, Yong-An; Zhang, Fei; Yin, Yong; Lin, Jie; Wang, Zhong-Chang; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2014-06-03

    A series of caffeic acid amides D1-D17 bearing 2,3,4,5-tetrahydrobenzo-[b][1,4]dioxocine units has been synthesized and their biological activities evaluated for potential antiproliferative and EGFR inhibitory activity. Of all the compounds studied, compound D9 showed the most potent inhibitory activity (IC50=0.79 μM for HepG2 and IC50=0.36 μM for EGFR). The structures of compounds were confirmed by 1H-NMR, ESI-MS and elemental analysis. Among all, the structure of compound D9 ((E)-N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-3-(2,3,4,5-tetrahydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxocin-8-yl)acrylamide) was also determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compound D9 was found to be a potential antitumor agent according to biological activity, molecular docking, apoptosis assay and inhibition of HepG2.

  4. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester, a promising component of propolis with a plethora of biological activities: a review on its anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, hepatoprotective, and cardioprotective effects.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Mai F; Azab, Samar S; Khalifa, Amani E; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2013-08-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an important active component of honey bee propolis that possesses a plethora of biological activities. Propolis is used safely in traditional medicine as a dietary supplement for its therapeutic benefits. This review highlights the recently published data about CAPE bioavailability, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective; hepatoprotective and cardioprotective activities. CAPE showed promising efficacy both in vitro and in vivo studies in animal models with minimum adverse effects. Its effectiveness was demonstrated in multiple target organs. Despite this fact, it has not been yet investigated as a protective agent or a potential therapy in humans. Investigation of CAPE efficacy in clinical trials is strongly encouraged to elucidate its therapeutic benefit for different human diseases after performing full preclinical toxicological studies and gaining more insights into its pharmacokinetics.

  5. Humic substances can modulate the allelopathic potential of caffeic, ferulic, and salicylic acids for seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    PubMed

    Loffredo, Elisabetta; Monaci, Linda; Senesi, Nicola

    2005-11-30

    The capacity of a leonardite humic acid (LHA), a soil humic acid (SHA), and a soil fulvic acid (SFA) in modulating the allelopathic potential of caffeic acid (CA), ferulic acid (FA), and salicylic acid (SA) on seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) was investigated. Lettuce showed a sensitivity greater than that of tomato to CA, FA, and SA phytotoxicity, which was significantly reduced or even suppressed in the presence of SHA or SFA, especially at the highest dose, but not LHA. In general, SFA was slightly more active than SHA, and the efficiency of the action depended on their concentration, the plant species and the organ examined, and the allelochemical. The daily measured residual concentration of CA and FA decreased drastically and that of SA slightly in the presence of germinating seeds of lettuce, which were thus able to absorb and/or enhance the degradation of CA and FA. The adsorption capacity of SHA for the three allelochemicals was small and decreased in the order FA > CA > SA, thus suggesting that adsorption could be a relevant mechanism, but not the only one, involved in the "antiallelopathic" action.

  6. Determination of polyphenol components in herbal medicines by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with Tween 20.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Kui; He, You-Zhao; Qian, Li-Li

    2007-11-15

    A simple and convenient method of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MEKC) using polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20) to form single micelle and methanol as a buffer additive was introduced for the simultaneous determination of five polyphenols, including scopoletin, rutin, esculetin, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid. A running buffer solution of pH 9.3, 20 mmol/L sodium tetraborate containing 64 mmol/L Tween 20 and 9% (v/v) methanol was adopted in the separation. Because rutin and esculetin were difficult to be separated by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and SDS-based MEKC, Tween 20-based MEKC was adopted and the polyphenols were separated satisfactorily. The proposed method was used to determine the polyphenol components in the herbal medicine of Cortex fraxini. The separation mechanism of Tween 20-based MEKC for the polyphenols was discussed preliminarily.

  7. Excess boron reduces polyphenol oxidase activities in embryo and endosperm of maize seed during germination.

    PubMed

    Olçer, Hillya; Kocaçaliskan, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    The effects of increasing concentrations of boron (0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 20 mM) as boric acid on the rate of germination and polyphenol oxidase activities in embryo and endosperm tissues of maize seeds (Zea mays L. cv. Arifiye) were studied. The germination percentage of maize seeds was not affected by boron concentrations up to 10 mM, and decreased by 20 mM. Distilled water and lower boron concentrations (0.1 and 1 mM) increased polyphenol oxidase activities at the beginning of germination up to 12 h whereas its excess levels (10 and 20 mM) decreased polyphenol oxidase activities in embryos and endosperm during germination. Polyphenol oxidase activities with o-diphenolic substrates (caffeic acid, catechol and dopa) were found to be higher than with a monophenolic substrat (tyrosine) in both embryos and endosperms. Further, caffeic acid oxidizing polyphenol oxidase was found to show more activity in embryos of the seeds germinating in distilled water when compared to other substrates.

  8. Bioavailability of various polyphenols from a diet containing moderate amounts of berries.

    PubMed

    Koli, Raika; Erlund, Iris; Jula, Antti; Marniemi, Jukka; Mattila, Pirjo; Alfthan, Georg

    2010-04-14

    Berries are a rich source of various polyphenols. The objective of this study was to investigate the bioavailability of polyphenols from berries. Middle-aged subjects (n = 72) consumed moderate amounts of berry or control products for 8 weeks in a randomized, placebo-controlled dietary intervention trial. Average intake of berries was 160 g/day (bilberries, lingonberries, black currants, and chokeberries). Plasma and urine polyphenols were analyzed by GC-MS and HPLC and berry polyphenols by HPLC. The total intake of polyphenols was 837 mg/day. Plasma quercetin, p-coumaric acid, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, caffeic acid, protocatechuic acid, vanillic acid, homovanillic acid, and 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid increased significantly from the baseline in the berry group compared to the control group (p < 0.05). The urinary excretion of quercetin, p-coumaric acid, and 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid increased significantly in the berry group compared to the control group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, a number of polyphenols are bioavailable from a diet containing moderate amounts of blue and red berries.

  9. Measurement of caffeic and ferulic acid equivalents in plasma after coffee consumption: small intestine and colon are key sites for coffee metabolism.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Mathieu; Guy, Philippe A; Marmet, Cynthia; Fraering, Anne-Lise; Longet, Karin; Moulin, Julie; Enslen, Marc; Barron, Denis; Dionisi, Fabiola; Cavin, Christophe; Williamson, Gary; Steiling, Heike

    2010-06-01

    Previous studies on coffee examined absorption of phenolic acids (PA) in the small intestine, but not the contribution of the colon to absorption. Nine healthy volunteers ingested instant soluble coffee ( approximately 335 mg total chlorogenic acids (CGAs)) in water. Blood samples were taken over 12 h, and at 24 h to assess return to baseline. Many previous studies, which used glucuronidase and sulfatase, measured only PA and did not rigorously assess CGAs. To improve this, plasma samples were analyzed after full hydrolysis by chlorogenate esterase, glucuronidase and sulfatase to release aglycone equivalents of PA followed by liquid-liquid extraction and ESI-LC-ESI-MS/MS detection. Ferulic, caffeic and isoferulic acid equivalents appeared rapidly in plasma, peaking at 1-2 h. Dihydrocaffeic and dihydroferulic acids appeared in plasma 6-8 h after ingestion (T(max=)8-12 h). Substantial variability in maximum plasma concentration and T(max) was also observed between individuals. This study confirms that the small intestine is a significant site for absorption of PA, but shows for the first time that the colon/microflora play the major role in absorption and metabolism of CGAs and PA from coffee.

  10. Caffeic Acid Expands Anti-Tumor Effect of Metformin in Human Metastatic Cervical Carcinoma HTB-34 Cells: Implications of AMPK Activation and Impairment of Fatty Acids De Novo Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tyszka-Czochara, Malgorzata; Konieczny, Pawel; Majka, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of cancer treatments is often limited and associated with substantial toxicity. Appropriate combination of drug targeting specific mechanisms may regulate metabolism of tumor cells to reduce cancer cell growth and to improve survival. Therefore, we investigated the effects of anti-diabetic drug Metformin (Met) and a natural compound caffeic acid (trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid, CA) alone and in combination to treat an aggressive metastatic human cervical HTB-34 (ATCC CRL­1550) cancer cell line. CA at concentration of 100 µM, unlike Met at 10 mM, activated 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). What is more, CA contributed to the fueling of mitochondrial tricarboxylic acids (TCA) cycle with pyruvate by increasing Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex (PDH) activity, while Met promoted glucose catabolism to lactate. Met downregulated expression of enzymes of fatty acid de novo synthesis, such as ATP Citrate Lyase (ACLY), Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS), Fatty Acyl-CoA Elongase 6 (ELOVL6), and Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1 (SCD1) in cancer cells. In conclusion, CA mediated reprogramming of glucose processing through TCA cycle via oxidative decarboxylation. The increased oxidative stress, as a result of CA treatment, sensitized cancer cells and, acting on cell biosynthesis and bioenergetics, made HTB-34 cells more susceptible to Met and successfully inhibited neoplastic cells. The combination of Metformin and caffeic acid to suppress cervical carcinoma cells by two independent mechanisms may provide a promising approach to cancer treatment. PMID:28230778

  11. The impact of polyphenols on Bifidobacterium growth.

    PubMed

    Gwiazdowska, Daniela; Juś, Krzysztof; Jasnowska-Małecka, Joanna; Kluczyńska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenols are a common group of plant based bioactive compounds, that can affect human health because of their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties as well as free-radical scavenging activity. An increasing interest is observed in the interaction between polyphenols and microbiota occurring in food and the human gut. The aim of the work presented here, was to evaluate the effect of some polyphenolic compounds on the growth of two strains of Bifidobacterium: B. adolescentis and B. bifidum. The influence of some flavonoids: naringinin, hesperidin, rutin, quercetin as well as phenolic acids: gallic, caffeic, p-coumaric, ferulic, chlorogenic, vanillic and sinapic was determined by a 96-well microtiter plate assay. In the experiments the effect of three different concentrations of polyphenols: 2, 20 and 100 µg/ml on the growth of Bifidobacterium strains was investigated. All tested compounds influenced the growth of the examined bacteria. Both stimulatory and inhibitory effects were observed in comparison to the positive control. The strongest impact on the growth of bifidobacteria was observed during the first hours of incubation. The constant inhibitory effect was observed for hesperidin and quercetin addition and was dose-dependent. B. bifidum showed a stronger dependence on phenolic acids content in the medium than B. adolescentis during the first hours of incubation.

  12. Polyphenolic constituents of Actaea racemosa.

    PubMed

    Nuntanakorn, Paiboon; Jiang, Bei; Einbond, Linda S; Yang, Hui; Kronenberg, Fredi; Weinstein, I Bernard; Kennelly, Edward J

    2006-03-01

    A new lignan, actaealactone (1), and a new phenylpropanoid ester derivative, cimicifugic acid G (2), together with 15 known polyphenols, protocatechuic acid, protocatechualdehyde, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, methyl caffeate, ferulic acid, ferulate-1-methyl ester, isoferulic acid, 1-isoferuloyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside, fukinolic acid, and cimicifugic acids A, B, and D-F, were isolated from an extract of the rhizomes and roots of black cohosh (Actaea racemosa). The structures of the new compounds were determined on the basis of NMR spectroscopic analysis. Compounds 1 and 2 displayed antioxidant activity in the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free-radical assay with IC(50) values of 26 and 37 microM, respectively. Other antioxidants identified from A. racemosa include cimicifugic acid A (3), cimicifugic acid B (4), and fukinolic acid (5). Compounds 1 and 2 also exhibited a small stimulating effect on the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation 1.24-fold (14 microM) and 1.14-fold (10 microM), respectively, compared to untreated cells.

  13. Identification of ellagic acid conjugates and other polyphenolics in muscadine grapes by HPLC-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon-Hee; Johnson, Jodie V; Talcott, Stephen T

    2005-07-27

    Ellagic acid, ellagic acid glycosides, and ellagitannins found in various fruits and nuts, including muscadine grape, are reported to have potential health-promoting benefits and antioxidant properties. This study isolated and identified several ellagic acid derivatives present in muscadine grapes and determined their relative antioxidant properties (AOX). Compounds were extracted from grape skins and pulp using methanol, and the solvent was evaporated. Isolates were dissolved in citric acid buffer (pH 3.5) and absorbed onto C18 cartridges. Nonretained polyphenolics were collected separately and again partitioned from Sephadex LH-20, whereas retained polyphenolics were first eluted with ethyl acetate followed by methanol. Ellagic acid derivatives were identified on the basis of UV and mass spectra, and the presence of ellagitannins was confirmed by a significant increase in free ellagic acid with HPLC followed by acid hydrolysis. Muscadine grapes contained phenolic acids, flavonols, anthocyanins, ellagic acid, and numerous ellagic acid derivatives. AOX varied in the order ethyl acetate > methanol > C18 nonretained fractions; each correlated to both total phenolics (r = 0.90) and total ellagic acid (r = 0.99) contents. Results of this study revealed previously unidentified ellagic acid derivatives in muscadine grapes.

  14. Mechanisms involved in the cytotoxic action of Brazilian propolis and caffeic acid against HEp-2 cells and modulation of P-glycoprotein activity.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Lívia M; Frión-Herrera, Yahima; Bartolomeu, Ariane R; Gorgulho, Carolina Mendonça; Sforcin, José M

    2017-08-04

    The effects of propolis and phenolic compounds (caffeic acid - Caf; dihydrocinnamic acid - Cin; p-coumaric acid - Cou) in the same quantity found in our propolis sample were investigated on human laryngeal epidermoid carcinoma (HEp-2) cells. Cell viability, apoptosis/necrosis and cell cycle arrest, P53 and CASPASE-3 gene expression, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ability of propolis to induce doxorubicin (DOX) efflux using a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor (verapamil) were assayed. Propolis exerted a cytotoxic effect on HEp-2 cells, whereas isolated compounds had no effect on cell viability. Higher concentrations were tested and Caf induced late apoptosis or necrosis in HEp-2 cells, while propolis induced apoptosis, both probably due to ROS generation. P53 expression was downregulated by propolis but not by Caf. CASPASE-3 expression was correlated with induction of both early and late apoptosis, with both propolis and Caf alone upregulating its expression. Propolis induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and Caf at S phase. Propolis but not Caf may act as a P-gp inhibitor by modulating P-gp activity and inhibiting DOX efflux. Propolis exerted cytotoxic effects on HEp-2 cells, and the mechanisms are discussed, showing its potential as an antitumour drug. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. Interaction between Tea Polyphenols and Bile Acid Inhibits Micellar Cholesterol Solubility.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kazuki; Hirose, Sayumi; Nagaoka, Satoshi; Yanase, Emiko

    2016-01-13

    The molecular mechanism by which tea polyphenols decrease the micellar solubility of cholesterol is not completely clear. To clarify this mechanism, this study investigated the interaction between tea polyphenols (catechins and oolongtheanins) and cholesterol micelles. A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) study was performed on a micellar solution containing taurocholic acid and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis was carried out on the precipitate and the supernatant that formed when EGCg was added to a cholesterol-micelle solution. The data indicated a regiospecific interaction of EGCg with taurocholic acid. Therefore, the ability of EGCg to lower the solubility of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and cholesterol in micellar solutions can be attributed to their elimination from the micelles due to interaction between taurocholic acids and EGCg.

  16. Catechol Groups Enable Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging-Mediated Suppression of PKD-NFkappaB-IL-8 Signaling Pathway by Chlorogenic and Caffeic Acids in Human Intestinal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hee Soon; Satsu, Hideo; Bae, Min-Jung; Totsuka, Mamoru; Shimizu, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CHA) and caffeic acid (CA) are phenolic compounds found in coffee, which inhibit oxidative stress-induced interleukin (IL)-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells, thereby suppressing serious cellular injury and inflammatory intestinal diseases. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of CHA and CA, both of which inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced IL-8 transcriptional activity. They also significantly suppressed nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) transcriptional activity, nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit, and phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK). Additionally, upstream of IKK, protein kinase D (PKD) was also suppressed. Finally, we found that they scavenged H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the functional moiety responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of CHA and CA was the catechol group. Therefore, we conclude that the presence of catechol groups in CHA and CA allows scavenging of intracellular ROS, thereby inhibiting H2O2-induced IL-8 production via suppression of PKD-NF-κB signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:28230729

  17. Structure-Function Analyses of a Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase from Perennial Ryegrass Reveal the Molecular Basis for Substrate Preference[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Gordon V.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Tu, Yi; Mouradov, Aidyn; Spangenberg, German; Noel, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Lignin forms from the polymerization of phenylpropanoid-derived building blocks (the monolignols), whose modification through hydroxylation and O-methylation modulates the chemical and physical properties of the lignin polymer. The enzyme caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) is central to lignin biosynthesis. It is often targeted in attempts to engineer the lignin composition of transgenic plants for improved forage digestibility, pulping efficiency, or utility in biofuel production. Despite intensive investigation, the structural determinants of the regiospecificity and substrate selectivity of COMT remain poorly defined. Reported here are x-ray crystallographic structures of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) COMT (Lp OMT1) in open conformational state, apo- and holoenzyme forms and, most significantly, in a closed conformational state complexed with the products S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine and sinapaldehyde. The product-bound complex reveals the post-methyl-transfer organization of COMT’s catalytic groups with reactant molecules and the fully formed phenolic-ligand binding site. The core scaffold of the phenolic ligand forges a hydrogen-bonding network involving the 4-hydroxy group that anchors the aromatic ring and thereby permits only metahydroxyl groups to be positioned for transmethylation. While distal from the site of transmethylation, the propanoid tail substituent governs the kinetic preference of ryegrass COMT for aldehydes over alcohols and acids due to a single hydrogen bond donor for the C9 oxygenated moiety dictating the preference for an aldehyde. PMID:21177481

  18. Catechol Groups Enable Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging-Mediated Suppression of PKD-NFkappaB-IL-8 Signaling Pathway by Chlorogenic and Caffeic Acids in Human Intestinal Cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Soon; Satsu, Hideo; Bae, Min-Jung; Totsuka, Mamoru; Shimizu, Makoto

    2017-02-20

    Chlorogenic acid (CHA) and caffeic acid (CA) are phenolic compounds found in coffee, which inhibit oxidative stress-induced interleukin (IL)-8 production in intestinal epithelial cells, thereby suppressing serious cellular injury and inflammatory intestinal diseases. Therefore, we investigated the anti-inflammatory mechanism of CHA and CA, both of which inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂)-induced IL-8 transcriptional activity. They also significantly suppressed nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) transcriptional activity, nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit, and phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK). Additionally, upstream of IKK, protein kinase D (PKD) was also suppressed. Finally, we found that they scavenged H₂O₂-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the functional moiety responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of CHA and CA was the catechol group. Therefore, we conclude that the presence of catechol groups in CHA and CA allows scavenging of intracellular ROS, thereby inhibiting H₂O₂-induced IL-8 production via suppression of PKD-NF-κB signaling in human intestinal epithelial cells.

  19. Preventative Effects of Caffeic Acid Phenyl Ester on Cadmium Intoxication Induced Hematological and Blood Coagulation Disturbances and Hepatorenal Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ashour, Tariq Helal

    2014-01-01

    The preventative effect of caffeic acid phenyl ester (CAPE) against hematological, blood coagulation, and hepatorenal disturbances in cadmium (Cd) intoxication was investigated in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into control group, Cd-group, and Cd + CAPE group. Cd intoxication was induced by intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of CdCl2 (1 mg/kg/day) for 21 days, and CAPE was daily given (10 micromol/kg; i.p.) for also 21 days. The results showed that Cd intoxication impaired hepatorenal function and significantly prolonged prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time and decreased fibrinogen level, red blood cells and platelets counts, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. Interestingly, all these hematological, blood coagulation, and hepatorenal deteriorations of Cd toxicity were significantly prevented by CAPE. Additionally, CAPE significantly reversed the significant decreases in levels of total reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase and increases in levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances that were observed in the sera and liver and kidney homogenates of Cd group. It is concluded that CAPE is a promising compound that can counteract the hematological and blood coagulation disturbances, oxidative stress, and hepatorenal damages in Cd intoxication. However, further studies are crucially needed to improve this treatment in patients. PMID:25006475

  20. Absorption properties and effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester and its p-nitro-derivative on P-glycoprotein in Caco-2 cells and rats.

    PubMed

    Gou, Jing; Yao, Xiaofang; Tang, Hao; Zou, Kaili; Liu, Yujia; Zuo, Hua; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Li, Zhubo

    2016-12-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), isolated from honeybee propolis, has pharmacological applications. A synthesized CAPE derivative, p-nitro-caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE-NO2), showed similar activities with CAPE. The pharmacological activities of CAPE and CAPE-NO2 are related to their absorption properties. To understand the pharmacokinetic profiles of CAPE and CAPE-NO2 in rats and investigate the absorption mechanisms and effects on P-glycoprotein in Caco-2 cells. The pharmacokinetic profiles of CAPE and CAPE-NO2 were obtained after oral administration (10 mg/kg) to rats. Transport studies of CAPE and CAPE-NO2 (5, 10, 20 μM) were performed in Caco-2 cell model. P-gp activities were assayed by rhodamine 123 cellular retention. Expression of P-gp was determined after the cells were administrated with CAPE and CAPE-NO2 (5, 20 μM) for 48 and 72 h. The AUC(0-t) of CAPE-NO2 (3239.9 ± 352 ng × h/mL) was two-time greater than CAPE (1659.6 ± 152 ng × h/mL) in rats. The Papp values of CAPE and CAPE-NO2 were (4.86 ± 0.90) × 10(-6 )cm/s and (12.34 ± 1.6) × 10(-6 )cm/s, respectively. The accumulation of rhodamine 123 was increased by 1.3- to 1.9-fold and 1.4- to 2.3-fold in CAPE and CAPE-NO2 groups after 1 h administration, respectively. However, CAPE and CAPE-NO2 increased the P-gp levels by 2.1- and 1.7-fold, respectively. The absorption of CAPE-NO2 can be enhanced in rats and Caco-2 cells compared with CAPE. The two compounds are potential inhibitors of P-gp. The increased P-gp levels generated by CAPE and CAPE-NO2 played a role as a defense mechanism by limiting intracellular xenobiotic levels.

  1. Neuroprotective effects of naturally occurring polyphenols on quinolinic acid-induced excitotoxicity in human neurons.

    PubMed

    Braidy, Nady; Grant, Ross; Adams, Seray; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2010-01-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) excitotoxicity is mediated by elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels, and nitric oxide-mediated oxidative stress, resulting in DNA damage, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation, NAD(+) depletion and cell death. We evaluated the effect of a series of polyphenolic compounds [i.e. epigallocatechin gallate (EPCG), catechin hydrate, curcumin, apigenin, naringenin and gallotannin] with antioxidant properties on QUIN-induced excitotoxicity on primary cultures of human neurons. We showed that the polyphenols, EPCG, catechin hydrate and curcumin can attenuate QUIN-induced excitotoxicity to a greater extent than apigenin, naringenin and gallotannin. Both EPCG and curcumin were able to attenuate QUIN-induced Ca(2+) influx and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity to a greater extent compared with apigenin, naringenin and gallotannin. Although Ca(2+) influx was not attenuated by catechin hydrate, nNOS activity was reduced, probably through direct inhibition of the enzyme. All polyphenols reduced the oxidative effects of increased nitric oxide production, thereby reducing the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and, hence, preventing NAD(+) depletion and cell death. In addition to the well-known antioxidant properties of these natural phytochemicals, the inhibitory effect of some of these compounds on specific excitotoxic processes, such as Ca(2+) influx, provides additional evidence for the beneficial health effects of polyphenols in excitable tissue, particularly within the central nervous system.

  2. Proximate composition, phytic acid, polyphenols and digestibility (in vitro) of four brown cowpea varieties.

    PubMed

    Preet, K; Punia, D

    2000-05-01

    Four cultivars of brown cowpea (Vigna unguiculata. L. Walp) were analysed for their proximate composition, phytic acid, polyphenols and protein and starch digestibility (in vitro). Crude protein values ranged from 20.07 to 24.60%. Ether extract and crude fiber contents varied from 1.77 to 1.96% and 4.27 to 4.95%, respectively. All the four cowpea varieties differed significantly for their starch content which ranged from 46.84 to 53.63%. Antinutrients, phytic acid and polyphenols, showed significant variations among the varieties. In vitro digestibility of protein and starch of grains had a narrow variation. The variety CS-46 containing minimum amount of antinutritional factors had the highest protein digestibility.

  3. Effect of chlorocholine chlorid on phenolic acids accumulation and polyphenols formation of buckwheat plants.

    PubMed

    Sytar, Oksana; Borankulova, Asel; Hemmerich, Irene; Rauh, Cornelia; Smetanska, Iryna

    2014-05-27

    Effect of chlorocholine chloride (CCC) on phenolic acids composition and polyphenols accumulation in various anatomical parts (stems, leaves and inflorescences) of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) in the early stages of vegetation period were surveyed. Treatment of buckwheat seeds with 2% of CCC has been increased content of total phenolics in the stems, leaves and inflorescences. On analyzing the different parts of buckwheat plants, 9 different phenolic acids - vanilic acid, ferulic acid, trans-ferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, salycilic acid, cinamic acid, p-coumaric acid, p-anisic acid, methoxycinamic acid and catechins were identified. The levels of identified phenolic acids varied not only significantly among the plant organs but also between early stages of vegetation period. Same changes as in contents of chlorogenic acid, ferulic acid, trans-ferulic acid were found for content of salycilic acid. The content of these phenolic acids has been significant increased under effect of 2% CCC treatment at the phase I (formation of buds) in the stems and at the phase II (beginning of flowering) in the leaves and then inflorescences respectively. The content of catechins as potential buckwheat antioxidants has been increased at the early stages of vegetation period after treatment with 2% CCC. The obtained results suggest that influence of CCC on the phenolics composition can be a result of various mechanisms of CCC uptake, transforming and/or its translocation in the buckwheat seedlings.

  4. Stability and biological activity of wild blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) polyphenols during simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion.

    PubMed

    Correa-Betanzo, J; Allen-Vercoe, E; McDonald, J; Schroeter, K; Corredig, M; Paliyath, G

    2014-12-15

    Wild blueberries are rich in polyphenols and have several potential health benefits. Understanding the factors that affect the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of polyphenols is important for evaluating their biological significance and efficacy as functional food ingredients. Since the bioavailability of polyphenols such as anthocyanins is generally low, it has been proposed that metabolites resulting during colonic fermentation may be the components that exert health benefits. In this study, an in vitro gastrointestinal model comprising sequential chemostat fermentation steps that simulate digestive conditions in the stomach, small intestine and colon was used to investigate the breakdown of blueberry polyphenols. The catabolic products were isolated and biological effects tested using a normal human colonic epithelial cell line (CRL 1790) and a human colorectal cancer cell line (HT 29). The results showed a high stability of total polyphenols and anthocyanins during simulated gastric digestion step with approximately 93% and 99% of recovery, respectively. Intestinal digestion decreased polyphenol- and anthocyanin- contents by 49% and 15%, respectively, by comparison to the non-digested samples. During chemostat fermentation that simulates colonic digestion, the complex polyphenol mixture was degraded to a limited number of phenolic compounds such as syringic, cinnamic, caffeic, and protocatechuic acids. Only acetylated anthocyanins were detected in low amounts after chemostat fermentation. The catabolites showed lowered antioxidant activity and cell growth inhibition potential. Results suggest that colonic fermentation may alter the biological activity of blueberry polyphenols.

  5. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 expression through induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Han, Eun Hee; Im, Ji Hye; Lee, Eun Ji; Jin, Sun Woo; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2015-09-25

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a natural component of propolis, is reported to have anticarcinogenic properties, although its precise chemopreventive mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of CAPE on 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC)-induced CYP1A1 expression and activities. CAPE reduced the formation of the benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct. Moreover, CAPE inhibited 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 activity, mRNA expression, protein level, and promoter activity. CAPE treatment also decreased 3-MC-inducible xenobiotic-response element (XRE)-linked luciferase, aryl hydrocarbons receptor (AhR) transactivation and nuclear localization. CAPE induced hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein level and HIF-1α responsible element (HRE) transcriptional activity. CAPE-mediated HIF-1α reduced 3-MC-inducible CYP1A1 protein expression. Taken together, CAPE decreases 3-MC-mediated CYP1A1 expression, and this inhibitory response is associated with inhibition of AhR and HIF-1α induction.

  6. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits nuclear factor-κB and protein kinase B signalling pathways and induces caspase-3 expression in primary human CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L-C; Chu, K-H; Liang, Y-C; Lin, Y-L; Chiang, B-L

    2010-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component in propolis, is known to have anti-tumour, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. In this study, the effects of CAPE on the functions of primary human CD4+ T cells were evaluated in vitro. CAPE significantly suppressed interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-5 production and proliferation of CD4+ T cells stimulated by soluble anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies in both healthy subjects and asthmatic patients. CAPE inhibited nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation and protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation in T cells. CAPE also induced active caspase-3 expression in CD4+ T cells; CCR4+CD4+ T cells were more sensitive to CAPE induction than CXCR3+CD4+ T cells. Together, these results indicate that CAPE inhibits cytokine production and proliferation of T cells, which might be related to the NF-κB and Akt signalling pathways, and that CCR4+CD4+ T cells are more sensitive to CAPE inhibition. This study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of CAPE for immune regulation and a rationale for the use of propolis for the treatment of allergic disorders. PMID:20059479

  7. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE), Derived from a Honeybee Product Propolis, Exhibits a Diversity of Anti-tumor Effects in Preclinical Models of Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Omene, Coral; Karkoszka, Jerzy; Bosland, Maarten; Eckard, Jonathan; Klein, Catherine B.; Frenkel, Krystyna

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) patients use alternative and natural remedies more than patients with other malignancies. Specifically, 63%–83% use at least one type of alternative medicine and 25%–63% use herbals and vitamins. Propolis is a naturopathic honeybee product, and CAPE (caffeic acid phenethyl ester), is a major medicinal component of propolis. CAPE, in a concentration dependent fashion, inhibits MCF-7 (hormone receptor positive, HR+) and MDA-231 (a model of triple-negative BC (TNBC) tumor growth, both in vitro and in vivo without much effect on normal mammary cells and strongly influences gene and protein expression. It induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and reduces expression of growth and transcription factors, including NF-κB. Notably, CAPE down-regulates mdr-1 gene, considered responsible for the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Further, CAPE dose-dependently suppresses VEGF formation by MDA-231 cells and formation of capillary-like tubes by endothelial cells, implicating inhibitory effects on angiogenesis. In conclusion, our results strongly suggest that CAPE inhibits MDA-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer growth via its apoptotic effects, and modulation of NF-κB, the cell cycle, and angiogenesis. PMID:21570765

  8. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester up-regulates antioxidant levels in hepatic stellate cell line T6 via an Nrf2-mediated mitogen activated protein kinases pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ning; Shi, Juan-Juan; Wu, Feng-Ping; Li, Mei; Zhang, Xin; Li, Ya-Ping; Zhai, Song; Jia, Xiao-Li; Dang, Shuang-Suo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the antioxidant effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in hepatic stellate cell-T6 (HSC-T6) cells cultured in vitro and the potential mechanisms. METHODS HSC-T6 cells were cultured in vitro and treated with various concentrations of CAPE for 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Cell proliferation was investigated using the MTT assay, and cell ultrastructural alterations were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Flow cytometry was employed to investigate the effects of CAPE on apoptosis and the levels of reactive oxygen species in HSC-T6 cells cultured in vitro. An enzyme immunoassay instrument was used to evaluate antioxidant enzyme expression. The effect on α-smooth muscle actin was shown using immunofluorescence. Gene and protein levels of Nrf2, related factors, and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), in HSC-T6 cells were detected using RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. RESULTS CAPE inhibited the proliferation and activation of HSC-T6 cells cultured in vitro. CAPE increased the antioxidant levels and the translocation of Nrf2 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in HSC-T6 cells. Moreover, the phosphorylation of MAPKs in cells decreased in response to CAPE. Interestingly, CAPE-induced oxidative stress in the cells was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with MAPKs inhibitors. CONCLUSION CAPE inhibits cell proliferation and up-regulates the antioxidant levels in HSC-T6 cells partly through the Nrf2-MAPKs signaling pathway. PMID:28275300

  9. Involvement of tumor suppressor protein p53 and p38 MAPK in caffeic acid phenethyl ester-induced apoptosis of C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yean-Jang; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Chu, Chia-Yih; Wang, Chau-Jong; Lin, Wan-Chyi; Tseng, Tsui-Hwa

    2003-12-15

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of propolis, has many biological and pharmacological activities including antioxidant, anti-inflammation, antiviral action, and anticancer effect. Our previous studies showed that CAPE exhibited significant cytotoxicity in oral cancer cells. Herein we further investigated the cytotoxicity potential of CAPE and the mechanism of its action in C6 glioma cells. The data exhibited that C6 glioma cells underwent internucleosomal DNA fragmentation 24 hr after the treatment of CAPE (50 microM). The proportion of C6 glioma cells with hypodiploid nuclei was increased to 24% at 36 hr after the exposure. Further results showed that CAPE induced the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into cytosol, and the activation of CPP32. CAPE application also enhanced the expression of p53, Bax, and Bak. Finally, the potential signaling components underlying CAPE induction of apoptosis were elucidated. We found that CAPE activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERKs) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) in C6 glioma cells. More importantly, p38 kinase formed a complex with p53 after the treatment of CAPE for 0.5 hr. The expression of p53, phospho-serine 15 of p53, and Bax, and inactivate form of CPP32 was suppressed by a pretreatment of a specific p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580. The resultant data suggest that p38 MAPK mediated the CAPE-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in C6 glioma cells.

  10. Nrf2-Mediated HO-1 Induction Coupled with the ERK Signaling Pathway Contributes to Indirect Antioxidant Capacity of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Jang, Hae-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the contributing effect of the nuclear transcription factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated signaling pathway on the indirect antioxidant capacity of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) against oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. The result of an antioxidant response element (ARE)-luciferase assay showed that CAPE stimulated ARE promoter activity resulting in increased transcriptional and translational activities of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In addition, CAPE treatment enhanced Nrf2 accumulation in the nucleus and the post-translational phosphorylation level of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) among several protein kinases tested. Treatment with ERK inhibitor U126 completely suppressed CAPE-induced ERK phosphorylation and HO-1 expression, but it only partly inhibited CAPE-induced Nrf2 accumulation and ARE promoter. Using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) method, the cellular antioxidant capacity of CAPE against 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)- or H2O2-induced oxidative stress also was shown to be partially suppressed by the ERK inhibitor. From the overall results it is proposed that the indirect antioxidant activity of CAPE against oxidative stress in HepG2 cells is partially attributed to induction of HO-1, which is regulated by Kelch-like erythroid-cell-derived protein with CNC homology (ECH)-associated protein 1 (Keap1)-independent Nrf2 activation relying on post-translational phosphorylation of ERK. PMID:25007817

  11. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) revisited: Covalent modulation of XPO1/CRM1 activities and implication for its mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sijin; Zhang, Keren; Qin, Hongqiang; Niu, Mingshan; Zhao, Weijie; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa; Yang, Yongliang

    2016-11-08

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is the bioactive constituent of propolis from honeybee hives and is well known for its anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory properties. Herein, we revisited the cellular mechanism underlying the diverse biological effects of CAPE. We demonstrated that XPO1/CRM1, a major nuclear export receptor, is a cellular target of CAPE. Through nuclear export functional assay, we observed a clear shift of XPO1 cargo proteins from a cytoplasmic localization to nucleus when treated with CAPE. In particular, we showed that CAPE could specifically target the non-catalytic and conserved Cys(528) of XPO1 through the means of mass spectrometric analysis. In addition, we demonstrated that the mutation of Cys(528) residue in XPO1 could rescue the nuclear export defects caused by CAPE. Furthermore, we performed position-restraint molecular dynamics simulation to show that the Michael acceptor moiety of CAPE is the warhead to enable covalent binding with Cys(528) residue of XPO1. The covalent modulation of nuclear export by CAPE may explain its diverse biological effects. Our findings may have general implications for further investigation of CAPE and its structural analogs.

  12. Ganglioside GM3 is required for caffeic acid phenethyl ester-induced megakaryocytic differentiation of human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Un-Ho; Chung, Tae-Wook; Song, Kwon-Ho; Kwak, Choong-Hwan; Choi, Hee-Jung; Ha, Ki-Tae; Chang, Young-Chae; Lee, Young-Choon; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2014-08-01

    The human chronic myelogenous cell line K562 has been used extensively as a model for the study of leukemia differentiation. We show here that treatment of K562 cells with caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) induced a majority of cells to differentiate towards the megakaryocytic lineage. Microscopy analysis showed that K562 cells treated with CAPE exhibited characteristic features of physiological megakaryocytic differentiation, including the presence of vacuoles and demarcation membranes. Differentiation of K562 cells treated with CAPE was also accompanied by a net increase in megakaryocytic markers. The transcriptional activity of lactosylceramide α-2,3-sialyltransferase (GM3 synthase) and synthesis of ganglioside GM3 were increased by CAPE treatment. The promoter analysis of GM3 synthase demonstrated that CAPE induced the expression of GM3 synthase mRNA via activation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), transcription factor in nucleus. Interestingly, the inhibition of ganglioside GM3 synthesis by D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propranol (D-PDMP) and GM3 synthase-siRNA blocked the CAPE-induced expression of the megakaryocytic markers and differentiation of K562 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CAPE induces ganglioside GM3-mediated megakaryocytic differentiation of human chronic myelogenous cells.

  13. Caffeic Acid phenethyl ester and ethanol extract of propolis induce the complementary cytotoxic effect on triple-negative breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rzepecka-Stojko, Anna; Kabała-Dzik, Agata; Moździerz, Aleksandra; Kubina, Robert; Wojtyczka, Robert D; Stojko, Rafał; Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Jastrzębska-Stojko, Żaneta; Jurzak, Magdalena; Buszman, Ewa; Stojko, Jerzy

    2015-05-20

    Chemotherapy of breast cancer could be improved by bioactive natural substances, which may potentially sensitize the carcinoma cells' susceptibility to drugs. Numerous phytochemicals, including propolis, have been reported to interfere with the viability of carcinoma cells. We evaluated the in vitro cytotoxic activity of ethanol extract of propolis (EEP) and its derivative caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) towards two triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T, by implementation of the MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. The morphological changes of breast carcinoma cells were observed following exposure to EEP and CAPE. The IC50 of EEP was 48.35 µg∙mL-1 for MDA-MB-23 cells and 33.68 µg∙mL-1 for Hs578T cells, whereas the CAPE IC50 was 14.08 µM and 8.01 µM for the MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T cell line, respectively. Here, we report that propolis and CAPE inhibited the growth of the MDA-MB-231 and Hs578T lines in a dose-dependent and exposure time-dependent manner. EEP showed less cytotoxic activity against both types of TNBC cells. EEP and, particularly, CAPE may markedly affect the viability of breast cancer cells, suggesting the potential role of bioactive compounds in chemoprevention/chemotherapy by potentiating the action of standard anti-cancer drugs.

  14. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 expression through induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Han, Eun Hee; Im, Ji Hye; Lee, Eun Ji; Jin, Sun Woo; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2015-09-25

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a natural component of propolis, is reported to have anticarcinogenic properties, although its precise chemopreventive mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of CAPE on 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC)-induced CYP1A1 expression and activities. CAPE reduced the formation of the benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct. Moreover, CAPE inhibited 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 activity, mRNA expression, protein level, and promoter activity. CAPE treatment also decreased 3-MC-inducible xenobiotic-response element (XRE)-linked luciferase, aryl hydrocarbons receptor (AhR) transactivation and nuclear localization. CAPE induced hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein level and HIF-1α responsible element (HRE) transcriptional activity. CAPE-mediated HIF-1α reduced 3-MC-inducible CYP1A1 protein expression. Taken together, CAPE decreases 3-MC-mediated CYP1A1 expression, and this inhibitory response is associated with inhibition of AhR and HIF-1α induction. - Highlights: • CAPE reduced the formation of the benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct. • CAPE inhibited 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 expression. • CAPE induced HIF-1α induction. • CAPE-mediated HIF-1α reduced 3-MC-inducible CYP1A1 expression.

  15. Mutation in Brachypodium caffeic acid O-methyltransferase 6 alters stem and grain lignins and improves straw saccharification without deteriorating grain quality

    PubMed Central

    Ho-Yue-Kuang, Séverine; Alvarado, Camille; Antelme, Sébastien; Bouchet, Brigitte; Cézard, Laurent; Le Bris, Philippe; Legée, Frédéric; Maia-Grondard, Alessandra; Yoshinaga, Arata; Saulnier, Luc; Guillon, Fabienne; Sibout, Richard; Lapierre, Catherine; Chateigner-Boutin, Anne-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Cereal crop by-products are a promising source of renewable raw material for the production of biofuel from lignocellulose. However, their enzymatic conversion to fermentable sugars is detrimentally affected by lignins. Here the characterization of the Brachypodium Bd5139 mutant provided with a single nucleotide mutation in the caffeic acid O-methyltransferase BdCOMT6 gene is reported. This BdCOMT6-deficient mutant displayed a moderately altered lignification in mature stems. The lignin-related BdCOMT6 gene was also found to be expressed in grains, and the alterations of Bd5139 grain lignins were found to mirror nicely those evidenced in stem lignins. The Bd5139 grains displayed similar size and composition to the control. Complementation experiments carried out by introducing the mutated gene into the AtCOMT1-deficient Arabidopsis mutant demonstrated that the mutated BdCOMT6 protein was still functional. Such a moderate down-regulation of lignin-related COMT enzyme reduced the straw recalcitrance to saccharification, without compromising the vegetative or reproductive development of the plant. PMID:26433202

  16. Caffeic Acid Phenylethyl Ester and MG-132 Have Apoptotic and Antiproliferative Effects on Leukemic Cells But Not on Normal Mononuclear Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Cavaliere, Victoria; Papademetrio, Daniela L; Lorenzetti, Mario; Valva, Pamela; Preciado, María Victoria; Gargallo, Patricia; Larripa, Irene; Monreal, Mariela B; Pardo, María Laura; Hajos, Silvia E; Blanco, Guillermo AC; Álvarez, Élida MC

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy aims to limit proliferation and induce apoptotic cell death in tumor cells. Owing to blockade of signaling pathways involved in cell survival and proliferation, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) inhibitors can induce apoptosis in a number of hematological malignancies. The efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs, such as vincristine (VCR) and doxorubicine (DOX), may be enhanced with combined therapy based on NF-κB modulation. In this study, we evaluated the effect of caffeic acid phenylethyl ester (CAPE) and MG-132, two nonspecific NF-κB inhibitors, and conventional chemotherapeutics drugs DOX and VCR on cell proliferation and apoptosis induction on a lymphoblastoid B-cell line, PL104, established and characterized in our laboratory. CAPE and MG-132 treatment showed a strong antiproliferative effect accompanied by clear cell cycle deregulation and apoptosis induction. Doxorubicine and VCR showed antiproliferative effects similar to those of CAPE and MG-132, although the latter drugs showed an apoptotic rate two-fold higher than DOX and VCR. None of the four compounds showed cytotoxic effect on peripheral mononuclear cells from healthy volunteers. CAPE- and MG-132-treated bone marrow cells from patients with myeloid and lymphoid leukemias showed 69% (P < .001) and 25% decrease (P < .01) in cell proliferation and 42% and 34% (P < .01) apoptosis induction, respectively. Overall, our results indicate that CAPE and MG-132 had a strong and selective apoptotic effect on tumor cells that may be useful in future treatment of hematological neoplasias. PMID:19252751

  17. Cloning of Arabidopsis serotonin N-acetyltransferase and its role with caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in the biosynthesis of melatonin in vitro despite their different subcellular localizations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyoung Yool; Byeon, Yeong; Lee, Kyungjin; Lee, Hye-Jung; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2014-11-01

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT) is the penultimate enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis. We cloned SNAT from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSNAT) and functionally characterized this enzyme for the first time from dicotyledonous plants. Similar to rice SNAT, AtSNAT was found to localize to chloroplasts with peak enzyme activity at 45 °C (Km , 309 μm; Vmax , 1400 pmol/min/mg protein). AtSNAT also catalyzed 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MT) into melatonin with high catalytic activity (Km , 51 μm; Vmax , 5300 pmol/min/mg protein). In contrast, Arabidopsis caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (AtCOMT) localized to the cytoplasm. Interestingly, AtCOMT can methylate serotonin into 5-MT with low catalytic activity (Km , 3.396 mm; Vmax , 528 pmol/min/mg protein). These data suggest that serotonin can be converted into either N-acetylserotonin by SNAT or into 5-MT by COMT, after which it is metabolized into melatonin by COMT or SNAT, respectively. To support this hypothesis, serotonin was incubated in the presence of both AtSNAT and AtCOMT enzymes. In addition to melatonin production, the production of major intermediates depended on incubation temperatures; N-acetylserotonin was predominantly produced at high temperatures (45 °C), while low temperatures (37 °C) favored the production of 5-MT. Our results provide biochemical evidence for the presence of a serotonin O-methylation pathway in plant melatonin biosynthesis.

  18. Protective Effect of Caffeic Acid on Paclitaxel Induced Anti-Proliferation and Apoptosis of Lung Cancer Cells Involves NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Liang; Chen, Ruei-Feng; Chen, Jeff Yi-Fu; Chu, Ying-Chieh; Wang, Hui-Min; Chou, Han-Lin; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Fong, Yao; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Wu, Chang-Yi; Chiu, Chien-Chih

    2012-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA), a natural phenolic compound, is abundant in medicinal plants. CA possesses multiple biological effects such as anti-bacterial and anti-cancer growth. CA was also reported to induce fore stomach and kidney tumors in a mouse model. Here we used two human lung cancer cell lines, A549 and H1299, to clarify the role of CA in cancer cell proliferation. The growth assay showed that CA moderately promoted the proliferation of the lung cancer cells. Furthermore, pre-treatment of CA rescues the proliferation inhibition induced by a sub-IC50 dose of paclitaxel (PTX), an anticancer drug. Western blot showed that CA up-regulated the pro-survival proteins survivin and Bcl-2, the down-stream targets of NF-κB. This is consistent with the observation that CA induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. Our study suggested that the pro-survival effect of CA on PTX-treated lung cancer cells is mediated through a NF-κB signaling pathway. This may provide mechanistic insights into the chemoresistance of cancer calls. PMID:22754361

  19. Inhibitory effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on cancer cell metastasis mediated by the down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase expression in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hye Jin; Park, Hyen Joo; Chung, Hwa-Jin; Min, Hye-Young; Park, Eun-Jung; Hong, Ji-Young; Lee, Sang Kook

    2006-05-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) derived from honeybee propolis has been used as a folk medicine. Recent study also revealed that CAPE has several biological activities including antioxidation, anti-inflammation and inhibition of tumor growth. The present study investigated the effect of CAPE on tumor invasion and metastasis by determining the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Matrix metalloproteinases, which are zinc-dependent proteolytic enzymes, play a pivotal role in tumor metastasis by cleavage of extracellular matrix (ECM) as well as nonmatrix substrates. On this line, we examined the influence of CAPE on the gene expression of MMPs (MMP-2, MMP-9, MT1-MMP), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and in vitro invasiveness of human fibrosarcoma cells. Dose-dependent decreases in MMP and TIMP-2 mRNA levels were observed in CAPE-treated HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells as detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Gelatin zymography analysis also exhibited a significant down-regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression in HT1080 cells treated with CAPE compared to controls. In addition, CAPE inhibited the activated MMP-2 activity as well as invasion, motility, cell migration and colony formation of tumor cells. These data therefore provide direct evidence for the role of CAPE as a potent antimetastatic agent, which can markedly inhibit the metastatic and invasive capacity of malignant cells.

  20. Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Suppresses Proliferation and Survival of TW2.6 Human Oral Cancer Cells via Inhibition of Akt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ying-Yu; Lin, Hui-Ping; Huo, Chieh; Su, Liang-Cheng; Yang, Jonathan; Hsiao, Ping-Hsuan; Chiang, Hung-Che; Chung, Chi-Jung; Wang, Horng-Dar; Chang, Jang-Yang; Chen, Ya-Wen; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2013-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a bioactive component extracted from honeybee hive propolis. Our observations indicated that CAPE treatment suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation of TW2.6 human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells dose-dependently. CAPE treatment decreased G1 phase cell population, increased G2/M phase cell population, and induced apoptosis in TW2.6 cells. Treatment with CAPE decreased protein abundance of Akt, Akt1, Akt2, Akt3, phospho-Akt Ser473, phospho-Akt Thr 308, GSK3β, FOXO1, FOXO3a, phospho-FOXO1 Thr24, phospho-FoxO3a Thr32, NF-κB, phospho-NF-κB Ser536, Rb, phospho-Rb Ser807/811, Skp2, and cyclin D1, but increased cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip. Overexpression of Akt1 or Akt2 in TW2.6 cells rescued growth inhibition caused by CAPE treatment. Co-treating TW2.6 cells with CAPE and 5-fluorouracil, a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug for oral cancers, exhibited additive cell proliferation inhibition. Our study suggested that administration of CAPE is a potential adjuvant therapy for patients with OSCC oral cancer. PMID:23615471

  1. Assesment the role of oxidative stress and efficacy of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on neurotoxicity induced by isoniazid and ethambutol in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Uzar, E; Varol, S; Acar, A; Firat, U; Basarslan, S K; Evliyaoglu, O; Yucel, Y; Alp, H; Gökalp, O

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study were to investigate a role of oxidative stress and the therapeutic efficacy of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in the pathogenesis of neurotoxicity induced by isoniazid and etambutol in a rat model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into eight experimental groups: control, INH, ETM, INH+ETM, INH+CAPE, ETM+CAPE, INH+ETM+CAPE, and CAPE treatment group, with ten animals in each group. INH and ETM doses were given orally within tap water for 30 days. CAPE was administered into relevant groups intraperitoneally for 30 days. Brain tissue and sciatic nerve were removed for biochemical and histopathological investigation. In the INH, ETM, and INH+ETM groups, malondialdehyde (MDA) and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were significantly higher than those of the control group (p < 0.05). Also, in these groups, brain total antioxidant capacity (TAC) levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and PON-1 activities were decreased compared with the control group (p < 0.05). By a CAPE supplement within INH and ETM groups, there was a significant decrease in MDA and TOS (p < 0.05). In addition to a significant increase in TAC levels, and SOD and PON-1 activities both in brain and sciatic nerve tissues (p < 0.05). CAPE may protect against INH- and ETM-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain and sciatic nerve.

  2. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits T-cell activation by targeting both nuclear factor of activated T-cells and NF-kappaB transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Nieves; Sancho, Rocío; Macho, Antonio; Calzado, Marco A; Fiebich, Bernd L; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2004-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), which is derived from the propolis of honeybee hives, has been shown to reveal anti-inflammatory properties. Since T-cells play a key role in the onset of several inflammatory diseases, we have evaluated the immunosuppressive activity of CAPE in human T-cells, discovering that this phenolic compound is a potent inhibitor of early and late events in T-cell receptor-mediated T-cell activation. Moreover, we found that CAPE specifically inhibited both interleukin (IL)-2 gene transcription and IL-2 synthesis in stimulated T-cells. To further characterize the inhibitory mechanisms of CAPE at the transcriptional level, we examined the DNA binding and transcriptional activities of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, nuclear factor of activated cells (NFAT), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors in Jurkat cells. We found that CAPE inhibited NF-kappaB-dependent transcriptional activity without affecting the degradation of the cytoplasmic NF-kappaB inhibitory protein, IkappaBalpha. However, both NF-kappaB binding to DNA and transcriptional activity of a Gal4-p65 hybrid protein were clearly prevented in CAPE-treated Jurkat cells. Moreover, CAPE inhibited both the DNA-binding and transcriptional activity of NFAT, a result that correlated with its ability to inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin-induced NFAT1 dephosphorylation. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities of this natural compound.

  3. Cooperative Reinforcement of Ionic Liquid and Reactive Solvent on Enzymatic Synthesis of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester as an In Vitro Inhibitor of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Sheng, Sheng; Liu, Xi; Wang, Chao; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Jun; Wu, Fu-An

    2017-01-02

    It is widely believed that lipases in ionic liquids (ILs) possess higher enzyme activity, stability and selectivity; however, reaction equilibrium is always limited by product inhibition, and the product is difficult to separate from non-volatile ILs using distillation. To solve this problem, using trialkylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as a complexing agent, a novel biphase of reactive solvent and IL was firstly reported for caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) production from methyl caffeate (MC) and 2-phenylethanol (PE) catalyzed by lipase via transesterification. The effects of the reaction parameters and their action mechanism were investigated, and the inhibition of CAPE against bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum was firstly measured. The MC conversion of 98.83% ± 0.76% and CAPE yield of 96.29% ± 0.07% were obtained by response surface methodology in the 25 g/L TOPO-cyclohexane/[Bmim][Tf₂N] (1:1, v/v); the complex stoichiometry calculation and FTIR spectrum confirmed that the reversible hydrogen-bond complexation between TOPO and caffeates significantly enhances the cooperative effect of two phases on the lipase-catalyzed reaction. The temperature was reduced by 14 °C; the MC concentration increased by 3.33-fold; the ratio of catalyst to donor decreased by 4.5-fold; and Km decreased 1.08-fold. The EC50 of CAPE against R. solanacearum was 0.17-0.75 mg/mL, suggesting that CAPE is a potential in vitro inhibitor of plant pathogenic bacteria.

  4. Role of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on mitomycin C induced clastogenesis: analysis of chromosome aberrations, micronucleus, mitotic index and adenosine deaminase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Ghassan Mohammad

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to determine whether the caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in combination with mitomycine-C (MMC) can ameliorate MMC-induced clastogenesis in the bone marrow cells of mice. The scoring of chromosomal aberrations, mitotic activity and micronuclei were undertaken in the current study as markers of clastogenicity. The action of CAPE in adenosine deaminase enzyme (ADA) activities of serum, thymus and spleen were also investigated. The animals were orally administered CAPE alone at the doses 5 or 10 mg kg b.wt.(-1) for 5 days then sacrificed 24 hours after the CAPE administration. MMC was administered to mice either alone at a single dose (2 mg kg b.wt.(-1)) by intraperitoneal injection, before or after CAPE treatment. Pre or post - treatment with two doses of CAPE significantly decreased the number of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and adapted the mitotic activity reduction in the bone marrow cells of mice induced by MMC when compared with only MMC given group. In addition, combination treatment with MMC caused a significant decrease in the activities of ADA in serum, thymus and spleen. The results of this study showed that ADA activity probably related to high levels of reactive oxygen species. This study concluded that the protective effect of CAPE against MMC clastogenesis resides at least in part, in its antioxidant effects.

  5. Rapid and efficient isolation of high quality nucleic acids from plant tissues rich in polyphenols and polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Japelaghi, Reza Heidari; Haddad, Raheem; Garoosi, Ghasem-Ali

    2011-10-01

    Isolation of high quality nucleic acids from plant tissues rich in polysaccharides and polyphenols is often difficult. The presence of these substances can affect the quality and/or quantity of the nucleic acids isolated. Here, we describe a rapid and efficient nucleic acids extraction protocol that in contrast to other methods tested, effectively purify high quality nucleic acids from plant tissues rich in polysaccharides and polyphenolic compounds such as different grape tissues and fruit tissue of fruit trees. The nucleic acids isolated with this protocol were successfully used for many functional genomic based experiments including polymerase chain reaction, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cloning, and semiquantitative RT-PCR.

  6. Absorption, Metabolism and Excretion of Cranberry (Poly)phenols in Humans: A Dose Response Study and Assessment of Inter-Individual Variability

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Rodrigo P.; Mills, Charlotte E.; Istas, Geoffrey; Heiss, Christian; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana

    2017-01-01

    The beneficial health effects of cranberries have been attributed to their (poly)phenol content. Recent studies have investigated the absorption, metabolism and excretion of cranberry (poly)phenols; however, little is known about whether they follow a dose response in vivo at different levels of intake. An acute double-blind randomized controlled trial in 10 healthy men with cranberry juices containing 409, 787, 1238, 1534 and 1910 mg total (poly)phenols was performed. Blood and urine were analyzed by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS. Sixty metabolites were identified in plasma and urine including cinnamic acids, dihydrocinnamic, flavonols, benzoic acids, phenylacetic acids, benzaldehydes, valerolactones, hippuric acids, catechols, and pyrogallols. Total plasma, but not excreted urinary (poly)phenol metabolites, exhibited a linear dose response (r2 = 0.74, p < 0.05), driven by caffeic acid 4-O-ß-d-glucuronide, quercetin-3-O-ß-d-glucuronide, ferulic acid 4-O-ß-d-glucuronide, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid 3-O-ß-d-glucuronide, sinapic acid, ferulic acid 4-O-sulfate, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, syringic acid, vanillic acid-4-O-sulfate, (4R)-5-(3′-hydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone-4′-O-sulfate, 4-methylgallic acid-3-O-sulfate, and isoferulic acid 3-O-sulfate (all r2 ≥ 0.89, p < 0.05). Inter-individual variability of the plasma metabolite concentration was broad and dependent on the metabolite. Herein, we show that specific plasma (poly)phenol metabolites are linearly related to the amount of (poly)phenols consumed in cranberry juice. The large inter-individual variation in metabolite profile may be due to variations in the gut microbiome. PMID:28287476

  7. Determination of the Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Sorghum bicolor Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase and the Structural Impact of Three brown midrib12 Mutations1[W

    PubMed Central

    Green, Abigail R.; Lewis, Kevin M.; Barr, John T.; Jones, Jeffrey P.; Lu, Fachuang; Ralph, John; Vermerris, Wilfred; Sattler, Scott E.; Kang, ChulHee

    2014-01-01

    Using S-adenosyl-methionine as the methyl donor, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor; SbCOMT) methylates the 5-hydroxyl group of its preferred substrate, 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde. In order to determine the mechanism of SbCOMT and understand the observed reduction in the lignin syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio of three brown midrib12 mutants that carry COMT gene missense mutations, we determined the apo-form and S-adenosyl-methionine binary complex SbCOMT crystal structures and established the ternary complex structure with 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde by molecular modeling. These structures revealed many features shared with monocot ryegrass (Lolium perenne) and dicot alfalfa (Medicago sativa) COMTs. SbCOMT steady-state kinetic and calorimetric data suggest a random bi-bi mechanism. Based on our structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic results, we propose that the observed reactivity hierarchy among 4,5-dihydroxy-3-methoxycinnamyl (and 3,4-dihydroxycinnamyl) aldehyde, alcohol, and acid substrates arises from the ability of the aldehyde to stabilize the anionic intermediate that results from deprotonation of the 5-hydroxyl group by histidine-267. Additionally, despite the presence of other phenylpropanoid substrates in vivo, sinapaldehyde is the preferential product, as demonstrated by its low Km for 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde. Unlike its acid and alcohol substrates, the aldehydes exhibit product inhibition, and we propose that this is due to nonproductive binding of the S-cis-form of the aldehydes inhibiting productive binding of the S-trans-form. The S-cis-aldehydes most likely act only as inhibitors, because the high rotational energy barrier around the 2-propenyl bond prevents S-trans-conversion, unlike alcohol substrates, whose low 2-propenyl bond rotational energy barrier enables rapid S-cis/S-trans-interconversion. PMID:24948836

  8. Chlorogenic acid, a polyphenol from Prunus domestica (Mirabelle), with coupled anxiolytic and antioxidant effects.

    PubMed

    Bouayed, Jaouad; Rammal, Hassan; Dicko, Amadou; Younos, Chafique; Soulimani, Rachid

    2007-11-15

    Oxidative stress is linked to neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, cardiovascular diseases and to some behaviors, such as anxiety and depression. In particular, recent research observed a close relationship between oxidative stress and anxiety. We investigated the anxiolytic effect of chlorogenic acid, a dietary antioxidant present in fruits, in mouse models of anxiety including the light/dark test, the elevated plus maze and the free exploratory test. Moreover, the antioxidative effect of chlorogenic acid on peripheral blood granulocytes was investigated. Chlorogenic acid (20 mg/kg) induced a decrease in anxiety-related behaviors suggesting an anxiolytic-like effect of this polyphenol. The anti-anxiety effect was blocked by flumazenil suggesting that anxiety is reduced by activation of the benzodiazepine receptor. In vitro, chlorogenic acid protected granulocytes from oxidative stress. Chlorogenic acid is one of the most abundant polyphenols in fruits. We demonstrated in vivo and in vitro for the first time, that chlorogenic acid has anxiolytic effects coupled with antioxidant activity. Thus, fruits such as plums (Mirabelle), apples and cherries may provide health-promoting advantages to consumers.

  9. Caffeic acid attenuates the inflammatory stress induced by glycated LDL in human endothelial cells by mechanisms involving inhibition of AGE-receptor, oxidative, and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Toma, Laura; Sanda, Gabriela M; Niculescu, Loredan S; Deleanu, Mariana; Stancu, Camelia S; Sima, Anca V

    2017-07-28

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a worldwide epidemic and its atherosclerotic complications determine the high morbidity and mortality of diabetic patients. Caffeic acid (CAF), a phenolic acid present in normal diets, is known for its antioxidant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate CAF's anti-inflammatory properties and its mechanism of action, using cultured human endothelial cells (HEC) incubated with glycated low-density lipoproteins (gLDL). Levels of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE), inflammatory stress markers (C reactive protein, CRP; vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, VCAM-1; monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, MCP-1), and oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) markers were evaluated in gLDL-exposed HEC, in the presence/absence of CAF. RAGE silencing or blocking, specific inhibitors for oxidative stress (apocynin, N-acetyl-cysteine), and ERS (salubrinal) were used. The results showed that: (i) gLDL induced CRP synthesis and secretion through mechanisms involving NADPH oxidase-dependent oxidative stress and ERS in HEC; (ii) gLDL-RAGE interaction, oxidative stress, and ERS stimulated the secretion of VCAM-1 and MCP-1 in HEC; and (iii) CAF reduced the secretion of CRP, VCAM-1, and MCP-1 in gLDL-exposed HEC by inhibiting RAGE expression, oxidative stress, and ERS. In conclusion, CAF might be a promising alternative to ameliorate a wide spectrum of disorders due to its complex mechanisms of action resulting in anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties. © 2017 BioFactors, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester protects 661W cells from H2O2-mediated cell death and enhances electroretinography response in dim-reared albino rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Tran, Julie-Thu A; Anderson, Robert E; Mandal, Md Nawajes A

    2012-01-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of honeybee propolis, has a wide range of beneficial properties. The purpose of this study was to test the protective role of CAPE in 661W cells (in vitro) against H(2)O(2)-mediated cell death and in albino rats (in vivo) against various light conditions. The 661W cells were pretreated with CAPE and then stressed with H(2)O(2). Cell death was measured with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, and mRNA and proteins were analyzed. Sprague Dawley rats were raised on either a control or CAPE (0.02%) diet and exposed to various light conditions for short or long periods. Retinal histology, mRNA, protein, lipid composition, and retinal function by electroretinography (ERG) were measured at the end of feeding. Pretreatment of 661W cells with CAPE reduced H(2)O(2)-mediated cell death in a dose-dependent manner and induced expression of heme oxygenase-1 (Ho1). Albino rats fed with CAPE had greater expression of Ho1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (Icam1), less expression of FOS-like antigen (Fosl) and lipoxygenase 12 (Lox12) genes in the retina, less translocation of nuclear factor kappaB protein to the nucleus, and a lower molar ratio of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Further, the ERGs of the retinas of CAPE-fed rats were significantly higher than those of the control-fed rats when raised in dim light. CAPE can activate the antioxidative gene expression pathway in retinal cells in vitro and in vivo. Feeding CAPE to albino rats can enhance ERG responses and change the lipid profile in the rats' retinas.

  11. Protective Effect of Caffeic Acid Derivatives on tert-Butyl Hydroperoxide-Induced Oxidative Hepato-Toxicity and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tzung-Hsun; Yu, Chun-Hsien; Chang, Yu-Ping; Lin, Yu-Ting; Huang, Ching-Jang; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Tsai, Po-Jung

    2017-04-28

    Oxidative stress results in structural and functional abnormalities in the liver and is thought to be a crucial factor in liver diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytoprotective and antioxidant effects of caffeic acid (CA) derivatives on tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. Nine CA derivatives were synthesized, including N-phenylethyl caffeamide (PECA), N-(3-florophen)methyl caffeamide (FMCA), N-(4-methoxy-phen)methyl caffeamide (MPMCA), N-heptyl caffeamide (HCA), N-octyl caffeamide (OCA), octyl caffeate (CAOE), phenpropyl caffeate (CAPPE), phenethyl caffeate (CAPE), and phenmethyl caffeate (CAPME). The results showed that CA and its derivatives significantly inhibited t-BHP-induced cell death of HepG2 cells. The rank order of potency of the CA derivatives for cytoprotection was CAOE > HCA > OCA > FMCA > CAPPE > CAPME > CAPE > PECA > MPMCA > CA. Their cytoprotective activity was associated with lipophilicity. The antioxidant effect of these compounds was supported by the reduction in the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substrates, a biomarker of lipid peroxidation, in HepG2 cells. Pre-treatment of CA derivatives significantly prevented the depletion of glutathione, the most important water-soluble antioxidant in hepatocytes. Pre-treatment of CA derivatives before t-BHP exposure maintained mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate and ATP content in the injured HepG2 cells. CA derivatives except OCA and HCA significantly suppressed t-BHP-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein level. In addition, all of these CA derivatives markedly increased the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) accumulation in the nucleus, indicating that their cytoprotection may be mediated by the activation of Nrf2. Our results suggest that CA derivatives might be a hepatoprotective agent against oxidative stress.

  12. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester protects 661W cells from H2O2-mediated cell death and enhances electroretinography response in dim-reared albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Tran, Julie-Thu A.; Anderson, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of honeybee propolis, has a wide range of beneficial properties. The purpose of this study was to test the protective role of CAPE in 661W cells (in vitro) against H2O2-mediated cell death and in albino rats (in vivo) against various light conditions. Methods The 661W cells were pretreated with CAPE and then stressed with H2O2. Cell death was measured with lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, and mRNA and proteins were analyzed. Sprague Dawley rats were raised on either a control or CAPE (0.02%) diet and exposed to various light conditions for short or long periods. Retinal histology, mRNA, protein, lipid composition, and retinal function by electroretinography (ERG) were measured at the end of feeding. Results Pretreatment of 661W cells with CAPE reduced H2O2-mediated cell death in a dose-dependent manner and induced expression of heme oxygenase-1 (Ho1). Albino rats fed with CAPE had greater expression of Ho1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (Icam1), less expression of FOS-like antigen (Fosl) and lipoxygenase 12 (Lox12) genes in the retina, less translocation of nuclear factor kappaB protein to the nucleus, and a lower molar ratio of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Further, the ERGs of the retinas of CAPE-fed rats were significantly higher than those of the control-fed rats when raised in dim light. Conclusions CAPE can activate the antioxidative gene expression pathway in retinal cells in vitro and in vivo. Feeding CAPE to albino rats can enhance ERG responses and change the lipid profile in the rats’ retinas. PMID:22690111

  13. Iron binding efficiency of polyphenols: Comparison of effect of ascorbic acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid on catechol and galloyl groups.

    PubMed

    Tamilmani, Poonkodi; Pandey, Mohan Chandra

    2016-04-15

    Dietary polyphenols are markedly studied for their antioxidant activity. They also have a negative impact on nutrition whereby they interfere with iron absorption. Common dietary polyphenols include: catechins, flavonols, flavanols, flavones, anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins and phenolic acids. Ascorbic acid (AA) and Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) are commonly used to counter act this reaction and increase iron bioavailability. This study was aimed at determining the effect of AA and EDTA on the catechol or galloyl iron binding ability of pure phenolics, coffee and tea. Phenolic concentrations of 40, 80, 610, 240, 320, 400, 520 and 900 μg/ml were tested against six levels of AA and EDTA. These effects were studied in detail using Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) with the hypothesis that there would be one or more mean differences between the ratio of enhancer and the different concentrations of samples tested. AA was found to be more efficient than EDTA in a way that lesser quantity is required for completely overcoming negative iron binding effects of polyphenols and similar samples.

  14. Polyphenol-chitosan conjugates: Synthesis, characterization, and applications.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qiaobin; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-10-20

    Chitosan, the only positively charged polysaccharide in the world, is very attractive for food, medicinal and pharmaceutical applications because of its promising properties, including non-toxicity, superb biodegradability, high biocompatibility, abundant availability and low cost. In order to overcome the poor water solubility and widen the applications of chitosan, various polyphenol-chitosan conjugates have been synthesized in recent years. The present review focuses on the chitosan-based conjugates formed using different polyphenols, including gallic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, salicylic acid, catechin, and EGGE, etc. Three major synthesis techniques, namely, activated ester-mediated modification, enzyme-mediated strategy, and free radical induced grafting approach are introduced in detail. In addition, the new physicochemical and biological properties of polyphenol-chitosan conjugates are introduced, including water solubility, thermo stability, in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity, antimicrobial and anticancer activity. Furthermore, the novel applications of each conjugate are discussed in detail. Lastly, the challenges and prospective areas of study related to polyphenol-chitosan are summarized.

  15. Phytochemical study of polyphenols in Perilla Frutescens as an antioxidant

    PubMed Central

    Asif, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Perilla frutescens is an annual herb of the mint family native to East Asia. Polyphenols present in perilla have various structural varieties with large diversity of biological activities. It is direct influence the quality of perilla plant and their potential functions. Some of these products have been studied and proven to be effective source of phenolic antioxidants. The aqueous extract contains phenolic compounds such as phenolic acids, cinnamic acid derivatives, flavonoids, and lignans. Gallic acid, hydroxytyrosol (3,4-DHPEA), cinnamic acid derivatives (coumaroyl tartaric acid, caffeic acid and rosmarinic acid), flavonoids, scutellarein 7-O-diglucuronide, luteolin 7-O-diglucuronide, apigenin 7-O-diglucuronide, luteolin 7-O-glucuronide, and scutellarein 7-O-glucuronide), and anthocyanins (mainly cis-shisonin, shisonin, malonylshisonin and cyanidin 3-O-(E)-caffeoylglucoside-5-O-malonylglucoside) are present. PMID:25050247

  16. Neuroprotection comparison of chlorogenic acid and its metabolites against mechanistically distinct cell death-inducing agents in cultured cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Taram, Faten; Winter, Aimee N; Linseman, Daniel A

    2016-10-01

    While the number of patients diagnosed with neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease is increasing, there are currently no effective treatments that significantly limit the neuronal cell death underlying these diseases. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a polyphenolic compound found in high concentration in coffee, is known to possess antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of CGA and its major metabolites in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons. We show that CGA and caffeic acid displayed a dramatic protective effect against the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside. In marked contrast, ferulic acid and quinic acid had no protective effect against this nitrosative stress. While CGA and quinic acid had no protective effect against glutamate-induced cell death, caffeic acid and ferulic acid significantly protected neurons from excitotoxicity. Finally, caffeic acid was the only compound to display significant protective activity against hydrogen peroxide, proteasome inhibition, caspase-dependent intrinsic apoptosis, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. These results indicate that caffeic acid displays a much broader profile of neuroprotection against a diverse range of stressors than its parent polyphenol, CGA, or the other major metabolites, ferulic acid and quinic acid. We conclude that caffeic acid is a promising candidate for testing in pre-clinical models of neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Establishment of Hairy Root Cultures of Rhaponticum carthamoides (Willd.) Iljin for the Production of Biomass and Caffeic Acid Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Skała, Ewa; Kicel, Agnieszka; Olszewska, Monika A.; Kiss, Anna K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain transformed roots of Rhaponticum carthamoides and evaluate their phytochemical profile. Hairy roots were induced from leaf explants by the transformation of Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains A4 and ATCC 15834. The best response (43%) was achieved by infection with A4 strain. The effects of different liquid media (WPM, B5, SH) with full and half-strength concentrations of macro- and micronutrients on biomass accumulation of the best grown hairy root line (RC3) at two different lighting conditions (light or dark) were investigated. The highest biomass (93 g L−1 of the fresh weight after 35 days) was obtained in WPM medium under periodic light. UPLC-PDA-ESI-MS3 and HPLC-PDA analyses of 80% aqueous methanol extracts from the obtained hairy roots revealed the presence of eleven caffeoylquinic acids and their derivatives and five flavonoid glycosides. The production of caffeoylquinic acids and their derivatives was elevated in hairy roots grown in the light. Only light-grown hairy roots demonstrated the capability for the biosynthesis of such flavonoid glycosides as quercetagetin, quercetin, luteolin, and patuletin hexosides. Chlorogenic acid, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid and a tentatively identified tricaffeoylquinic acid derivative were detected as the major compounds present in the transformed roots. PMID:25811023

  18. Establishment of hairy root cultures of Rhaponticum carthamoides (Willd.) Iljin for the production of biomass and caffeic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Skała, Ewa; Kicel, Agnieszka; Olszewska, Monika A; Kiss, Anna K; Wysokińska, Halina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain transformed roots of Rhaponticum carthamoides and evaluate their phytochemical profile. Hairy roots were induced from leaf explants by the transformation of Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains A4 and ATCC 15834. The best response (43%) was achieved by infection with A4 strain. The effects of different liquid media (WPM, B5, SH) with full and half-strength concentrations of macro- and micronutrients on biomass accumulation of the best grown hairy root line (RC3) at two different lighting conditions (light or dark) were investigated. The highest biomass (93 g L(-1) of the fresh weight after 35 days) was obtained in WPM medium under periodic light. UPLC-PDA-ESI-MS(3) and HPLC-PDA analyses of 80% aqueous methanol extracts from the obtained hairy roots revealed the presence of eleven caffeoylquinic acids and their derivatives and five flavonoid glycosides. The production of caffeoylquinic acids and their derivatives was elevated in hairy roots grown in the light. Only light-grown hairy roots demonstrated the capability for the biosynthesis of such flavonoid glycosides as quercetagetin, quercetin, luteolin, and patuletin hexosides. Chlorogenic acid, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid and a tentatively identified tricaffeoylquinic acid derivative were detected as the major compounds present in the transformed roots.

  19. Supplementation of cow milk naturally enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols to growing rats.

    PubMed

    Santos, Nadine W; Yoshimura, Emerson H; Mareze-Costa, Cecília E; Machado, Erica; Agustinho, Bruna C; Pereira, Lucelia M; Brito, Márcia N; Brito, Nilton A; Zeoula, Lucia M

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether intake of cow milk, naturally enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, omega-3) and polyphenols (from propolis extract and vitamin E), from manipulation of cow's diet, would result in positive metabolic effects in rats from weaning until adulthood. Male Wistar rats were fed a standard chow diet or a hypercaloric diet (metabolically disturbed rats, obese) which was supplemented with either whole common milk, milk enriched with PUFA (PUFA-M) or milk enriched with PUFA and polyphenols (PUFA/P-M), at 5mL/kg body weight,having water as control. Whole milk supplementation increased initial weight gain and reduced gain in the adulthood of rats. Intake of common milk reduced cholesterol levels in non-obese rats and reduced insulin resistance in obese rats. PUFA-milk showed a decreasing effect on plasma triacylglycerol and VLDL concentrations, increasing plasma HDL concentration and reducing adipocyte size of non-obese rats, but no effect was observed in obese rats. PUFA/P-milk in obese rats resulted in greater deposition of muscle mass and mesenteric fat, with a tendency to lower LDL levels, and resulted a visceral fat accumulation in non-obese rats. Thus, whole common milk and PUFA-rich milk have shown to be beneficial in a normal metabolic condition, whereas common milk and milk enriched with PUFA and polyphenols improve metabolic effects of obesity.

  20. Supplementation of cow milk naturally enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols to growing rats

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Emerson H.; Mareze-Costa, Cecília E.; Machado, Erica; Agustinho, Bruna C.; Pereira, Lucelia M.; Brito, Márcia N.; Brito, Nilton A.; Zeoula, Lucia M.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether intake of cow milk, naturally enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA, omega-3) and polyphenols (from propolis extract and vitamin E), from manipulation of cow’s diet, would result in positive metabolic effects in rats from weaning until adulthood. Male Wistar rats were fed a standard chow diet or a hypercaloric diet (metabolically disturbed rats, obese) which was supplemented with either whole common milk, milk enriched with PUFA (PUFA-M) or milk enriched with PUFA and polyphenols (PUFA/P-M), at 5mL/kg body weight,having water as control. Whole milk supplementation increased initial weight gain and reduced gain in the adulthood of rats. Intake of common milk reduced cholesterol levels in non-obese rats and reduced insulin resistance in obese rats. PUFA-milk showed a decreasing effect on plasma triacylglycerol and VLDL concentrations, increasing plasma HDL concentration and reducing adipocyte size of non-obese rats, but no effect was observed in obese rats. PUFA/P-milk in obese rats resulted in greater deposition of muscle mass and mesenteric fat, with a tendency to lower LDL levels, and resulted a visceral fat accumulation in non-obese rats. Thus, whole common milk and PUFA-rich milk have shown to be beneficial in a normal metabolic condition, whereas common milk and milk enriched with PUFA and polyphenols improve metabolic effects of obesity. PMID:28267800

  1. Comparison of dietary polyphenols for protection against molecular mechanisms underlying nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in a cell model of steatosis.

    PubMed

    Rafiei, Hossein; Omidian, Kosar; Bandy, Brian

    2017-09-01

    Dietary polyphenols have shown promise in protecting the liver against nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. The relative effectiveness and mechanisms of different polyphenols however is mostly unknown. In a model of steatosis using HepG2 hepatocytes, we evaluated the protective effects of different classes of polyphenols and the contributing mechanisms. The treatment of the cells with oleic acid increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), decreased expression of uncoupling protein 2, and decreased mitochondrial content and markers of biogenesis. The treatment with 1-10 μM polyphenols (resveratrol, quercetin, catechin, cyanidin, kuromanin, and berberine), as well as phenolic degradation products (caffeic acid, protocatechuic acid, and 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzaldehyde), all protected by more than 50% against the oleic acid induced increase in ROS. In other mechanisms involved, the polyphenols except anthocyanins strongly prevented or reversed the effect on mitochondrial content/biogenesis, increased expression of manganese superoxide dismutase, and prevented the large increase in TNF-α expression. Most polyphenols also prevented the decrease in uncoupling protein 2. The anthocyanins were unique in decreasing ROS generation without inducing mitochondrial biogenesis or manganese superoxide dismutase expression. While different polyphenols similarly decreased cellular ROS in this model of steatosis, they differed in their ability to suppress TNF-α expression and induce mitochondrial biogenesis and content. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Optimization of polyphenol extraction from red grape pomace using aqueous glycerol/tartaric acid mixtures and response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Makris, Dimitris P; Passalidi, Vassiliki; Kallithraka, Stamatina; Mourtzinos, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Grape pomace is a food industry waste containing a high burden of antioxidant polyphenols and several methodologies have been developed for their efficient extraction. However, a sustainable and environmentally friendly process should involve recovery means composed of benign, non-toxic solvents, such as tartaric acid and glycerol, which are natural food constituents. In this line, this study examined the extraction of polyphenols using aqueous tartaric acid/glycerol solutions. The aim was to assess the role of acid and glycerol concentration in the extraction yield, employing a Box-Behnken experimental design and response surface methodology. The results showed that solutions containing only glycerol (20%, w/v) are more suitable for retrieving polyphenols, flavonoids, and pigments from grape pomace, while tartaric acid exerted a negative effect in this regard, when tested at concentrations up to 2% (w/v).

  3. Evaluation of the Effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester on Prostaglandin E2 and Two Key Cytokines Involved in Bleomycin-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Larki-Harchegani, Amir; Hemmati, Ali Asghar; Arzi, Ardeshir; Ghafurian-Boroojerdnia, Mehri; Shabib, Somayeh; Zadkarami, Mohammad Reza; Esmaeilzadeh, Saleh

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is the most common outcome of a collection of diverse lung disorders known as interstitial lung diseases. It is proposed that alterations in the levels of fibrogenic mediators and the profibrotic/antifibrotic imbalance play a substantial role in the progression of PF in animal models and possibly in humans. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), an active component of propolis, has numerous biological effects. In the present study, the main objective was to investigate the effects of CAPE on some key mediators including TGF-β1, TNF-α and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) involved in profibrotic/antifibrotic balance and pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Materials and Methods: In this study, forty male Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into 5 groups (n=8). (1) “Bleomycin (BLM)-treated (Model) group”: BLM (5 mg/kg, single intratracheal dose), (2) “Saline-treated group”: the rats were given only saline, (3) “Treatment-1 group”: BLM + CAPE (5 μmol/kg/day, 28 days, IP), (4) “Treatment-2 group”: BLM + CAPE (10 μmol/kg/day, 28 days, IP) and (5) “Vehicle + CAPE group”: CAPE (10 μmol/kg/day, 28 days, IP). Results: BLM could significantly increase the levels of TNF-α and TGF-β1 and decrease the PGE2 concentration compared to the saline control group. CAPE could considerably improve these values almost close to normal levels. Conclusion: Briefly, CAPE can be suggested as a novel, attractive and effective agent for prevention and treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23997916

  4. Propolis and its Active Component, Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE), Modulate Breast Cancer Therapeutic Targets via an Epigenetically Mediated Mechanism of Action.

    PubMed

    Omene, Coral; Kalac, Matko; Wu, Jing; Marchi, Enrica; Frenkel, Krystyna; O'Connor, Owen A

    2013-10-21

    Alternative remedies for cancer treatment is a multi-billion dollar industry. In particular, breast cancer (BC) patients use alternative and natural remedies more frequently than patients with other malignancies. Propolis is an example of a honeybee-produced naturopathic formulation, contents of which differ by geographic location. It is readily available, affordable, and in use safely since ancient times globally. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a major active component in propolis and is thought to be responsible for its varied properties, including antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer. CAPE is effective in many models of human cancer, including BC as we have previously shown. CAPE affects genes associated with tumor cell growth and survival, angiogenesis and chemoresistance. We demonstrate that these are related in part to CAPE's role as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, a class of drugs designated as epigenetic agents that modulate the activities of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. CAPE and propolis, cause an accumulation of acetylated histone proteins in MCF-7 (ER+) and MDA-MB-231 (ER-/PR-/Her2-) cells with associated decreases in ER and PR in MCF-7 cells, and upregulation of ER and decrease in EGFR in MDA-231 cells. In addition, these products reduced activated phosphorylated Her2 protein in SKBR3 (Her2 +) cells. Interestingly, propolis, when normalized for CAPE content, appears to be more potent than CAPE alone similarly to the greater effects of complete foods than isolated components. These data provide a potential mechanistic basis for one of the oldest naturopathic agents used in medicine and cancer treatment.

  5. Suppression of Toll-like receptor 4 activation by caffeic acid phenethyl ester is mediated by interference of LPS binding to MD2

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Young; Koo, Jung Eun; Seo, Yun Jee; Tyagi, Nisha; Jeong, Eunshil; Choi, Jaeyoung; Lim, Kyung-Min; Park, Zee-Yong; Lee, Joo Young

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a crucial role in recognizing invading pathogens and endogenous danger signal to induce immune and inflammatory responses. Since dysregulation of TLRs enhances the risk of immune disorders and chronic inflammatory diseases, modulation of TLR activity by phytochemicals could be useful therapeutically. We investigated the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on TLR-mediated inflammation and the underlying regulatory mechanism. Experimental Approach Inhibitory effects of CAPE on TLR4 activation were assessed with in vivo murine skin inflammation model and in vitro production of inflammatory mediators in macrophages. In vitro binding assay, cell-based immunoprecipitation study and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis were performed to determine lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding to MD2 and to identify the direct binding site of CAPE in MD2. Key Results Topical application of CAPE attenuated dermal inflammation and oedema induced by intradermal injection of LPS (a TLR4 agonist). CAPE suppressed production of inflammatory mediators and activation of NFκB and interferon-regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in macrophages stimulated with LPS. CAPE interrupted LPS binding to MD2 through formation of adduct specifically with Cys133 located in hydrophobic pocket of MD2. The inhibitory effect on LPS-induced IRF3 activation by CAPE was not observed when 293T cells were reconstituted with MD2 (C133S) mutant. Conclusions and Implications Our results show a novel mechanism for anti-inflammatory activity of CAPE to prevent TLR4 activation by interfering with interaction between ligand (LPS) and receptor complex (TLR4/MD2). These further provide beneficial information for the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:23231684

  6. Cloning and Phylogenetic Analysis of Brassica napus L. Caffeic Acid O-Methyltransferase 1 Gene Family and Its Expression Pattern under Drought Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kun; Yuan, Jianglian; Huang, Jieheng; Du, Hai; Li, Jiana

    2016-01-01

    For many plants, regulating lignin content and composition to improve lodging resistance is a crucial issue. Caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) is a lignin monomer-specific enzyme that controls S subunit synthesis in plant vascular cell walls. Here, we identified 12 BnCOMT1 gene homologues, namely BnCOMT1-1 to BnCOMT1-12. Ten of 12 genes were composed of four highly conserved exons and three weakly conserved introns. The length of intron I, in particular, showed enormous diversification. Intron I of homologous BnCOMT1 genes showed high identity with counterpart genes in Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea, and intron I from positional close genes in the same chromosome were relatively highly conserved. A phylogenetic analysis suggested that COMT genes experience considerable diversification and conservation in Brassicaceae species, and some COMT1 genes are unique in the Brassica genus. Our expression studies indicated that BnCOMT1 genes were differentially expressed in different tissues, with BnCOMT1-4, BnCOMT1-5, BnCOMT1-8, and BnCOMT1-10 exhibiting stem specificity. These four BnCOMT1 genes were expressed at all developmental periods (the bud, early flowering, late flowering and mature stages) and their expression level peaked in the early flowering stage in the stem. Drought stress augmented and accelerated lignin accumulation in high-lignin plants but delayed it in low-lignin plants. The expression levels of BnCOMT1s were generally reduced in water deficit condition. The desynchrony of the accumulation processes of total lignin and BnCOMT1s transcripts in most growth stages indicated that BnCOMT1s could be responsible for the synthesis of a specific subunit of lignin or that they participate in other pathways such as the melatonin biosynthesis pathway. PMID:27832102

  7. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester is protective in experimental ulcerative colitis via reduction in levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and enhancement of epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed N; Lane, Majella E; McCarron, Paul A; Tambuwala, Murtaza M

    2017-05-20

    Inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κβ) pathway has been proposed as a therapeutic target due to its key role in the expression of pro-inflammatory genes, including pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory agent, found in propolis, and has been reported as a specific inhibitor of NF-κβ. However, the impact of CAPE on levels of myeloperoxidases (MPO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines during inflammation is not clear. The aims of this study were to investigate the protective efficacy of CAPE in the mouse model of colitis and determine its effect on MPO activity, pro-inflammatory cytokines levels, and intestinal permeability. Dextran sulphate sodium was administered in drinking water to induce colitis in C57/BL6 mice before treatment with intraperitoneal administration of CAPE (30 mg kg(-1) day(-1)). Disease activity index (DAI) score, colon length and tissue histology levels of MPO, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and intestinal permeability were observed. CAPE-treated mice had lower DAI and tissue inflammation scores, with improved epithelial barrier protection and significant reduction in the level of MPO and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results show that CAPE is effective in suppressing inflammation-triggered MPO activity and pro-inflammatory cytokines production while enhancing epithelial barrier function in experimental colitis. Thus, we conclude that CAPE could be a potential therapeutic agent for further clinical investigations for treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases in humans.

  8. Propolis and its Active Component, Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE), Modulate Breast Cancer Therapeutic Targets via an Epigenetically Mediated Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Omene, Coral; Kalac, Matko; Wu, Jing; Marchi, Enrica; Frenkel, Krystyna; O’Connor, Owen A

    2014-01-01

    Alternative remedies for cancer treatment is a multi-billion dollar industry. In particular, breast cancer (BC) patients use alternative and natural remedies more frequently than patients with other malignancies. Propolis is an example of a honeybee-produced naturopathic formulation, contents of which differ by geographic location. It is readily available, affordable, and in use safely since ancient times globally. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a major active component in propolis and is thought to be responsible for its varied properties, including antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer. CAPE is effective in many models of human cancer, including BC as we have previously shown. CAPE affects genes associated with tumor cell growth and survival, angiogenesis and chemoresistance. We demonstrate that these are related in part to CAPE's role as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, a class of drugs designated as epigenetic agents that modulate the activities of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. CAPE and propolis, cause an accumulation of acetylated histone proteins in MCF-7 (ER+) and MDA-MB-231 (ER−/PR−/Her2-) cells with associated decreases in ER and PR in MCF-7 cells, and upregulation of ER and decrease in EGFR in MDA-231 cells. In addition, these products reduced activated phosphorylated Her2 protein in SKBR3 (Her2 +) cells. Interestingly, propolis, when normalized for CAPE content, appears to be more potent than CAPE alone similarly to the greater effects of complete foods than isolated components. These data provide a potential mechanistic basis for one of the oldest naturopathic agents used in medicine and cancer treatment. PMID:24466386

  9. TALEN mediated targeted mutagenesis of the caffeic acid O-methyltransferase in highly polyploid sugarcane improves cell wall composition for production of bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Jung, Je Hyeong; Altpeter, Fredy

    2016-09-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) is a prime crop for commercial biofuel production. Advanced conversion technology utilizes both, sucrose accumulating in sugarcane stems as well as cell wall bound sugars for commercial ethanol production. Reduction of lignin content significantly improves the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol. Conventional mutagenesis is not expected to confer reduction in lignin content in sugarcane due to its high polyploidy (x = 10-13) and functional redundancy among homo(eo)logs. Here we deploy transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) to induce mutations in a highly conserved region of the caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) of sugarcane. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was validated by pyrosequencing as reliable and inexpensive high throughput method for identification and quantitative characterization of TALEN mediated mutations. Targeted COMT mutations were identified by CE in up to 74 % of the lines. In different events 8-99 % of the wild type COMT were converted to mutant COMT as revealed by pyrosequencing. Mutation frequencies among mutant lines were positively correlated to lignin reduction. Events with a mutation frequency of 99 % displayed a 29-32 % reduction of the lignin content compared to non-transgenic controls along with significantly reduced S subunit content and elevated hemicellulose content. CE analysis displayed similar peak patterns between primary COMT mutants and their vegetative progenies suggesting that TALEN mediated mutations were faithfully transmitted to vegetative progenies. This is the first report on genome editing in sugarcane. The findings demonstrate that targeted mutagenesis can improve cell wall characteristics for production of lignocellulosic ethanol in crops with highly complex genomes.

  10. Effects of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and 4-Vinylcatechol on the Stabilities of Oil-in-Water Emulsions of Stripped Soybean Oil.

    PubMed

    Jia, Cai-Hua; Shin, Jung-Ah; Lee, Ki-Teak

    2015-12-02

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and 4-vinylcatechol (4-VC) were prepared for studying their antioxidative activities in emulsion. Oil-in-water emulsions of stripped soybean oil containing 200 ppm of CAPE, 4-VC, or α-tocopherol were stored at 40 °C in the dark for 50 days, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) was used to identify and quantify the oxidation products. Emulsion droplet sizes, peroxide values, and levels of primary oxidation products (i.e., hydroperoxides) and secondary oxidation products (i.e., aldehydes) were determined. The results showed that CAPE (200 ppm) and 4-VC (200 ppm) had significantly greater antioxidant activities on the oxidation of stripped soybean oil-in-water emulsions than α-tocopherol (200 ppm). The peroxide values of CAPE (8.4 mequiv/L emulsion) and 4-VC (15.0 mequiv/L emulsion) were significantly lower than that of α-tocopherol (33.4 mequiv/L emulsion) (p < 0.05) on 36 days. In addition, the combinations of CAPE + α-tocopherol (100 + 100 ppm) or 4-VC + α-tocopherol (100 + 100 ppm) had better antioxidant activities than α-tocopherol (200 ppm). For CAPE + α-tocopherol, 4-VC + α-tocopherol, and α-tocopherol, the amounts of conjugated diene forms were 16.67, 13.72, and 16.32 mmol/L emulsion, and the concentrations of aldehydes were 2.15, 1.13, and 4.26 mmol/L emulsion, respectively, after 50 days of storage.

  11. Chloroplast overexpression of rice caffeic acid O-methyltransferase increases melatonin production in chloroplasts via the 5-methoxytryptamine pathway in transgenic rice plants.

    PubMed

    Choi, Geun-Hee; Lee, Hyoung Yool; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2017-08-01

    Recent analyses of the enzymatic features of various melatonin biosynthetic genes from bacteria, animals, and plants have led to the hypothesis that melatonin could be synthesized via the 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MT) pathway. 5-MT is known to be synthesized in vitro from serotonin by the enzymatic action of O-methyltransferases, including N-acetylserotonin methyltransferase (ASMT) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT), leading to melatonin synthesis by the subsequent enzymatic reaction with serotonin N-acetyltransferase (SNAT). Here, we show that 5-MT was produced and served as a precursor for melatonin synthesis in plants. When rice seedlings were challenged with senescence treatment, 5-MT levels and melatonin production were increased in transgenic rice seedlings overexpressing the rice COMT in chloroplasts, while no such increases were observed in wild-type or transgenic seedlings overexpressing the rice COMT in the cytosol, suggesting a 5-MT transport limitation from the cytosol to chloroplasts. In contrast, cadmium treatment led to results different from those in senescence. The enhanced melatonin production was not observed in the chloroplast COMT lines relative over the cytosol COMT lines although 5-MT levels were equally induced in all genotypes upon cadmium treatment. The transgenic seedlings with enhanced melatonin in their chloroplasts exhibited improved seedling growth vs the wild type under continuous light conditions. This is the first report describing enhanced melatonin production in chloroplasts via the 5-MT pathway with the ectopic overexpression of COMT in chloroplasts in plants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Development and Validation of a Reversed-Phase HPLC Method for the Quantitative Determination of Ten Polyphenols Extracted from Apple Peel.

    PubMed

    Ran, Junjian; Sun, Huadi; Zhu, Mingming; Chen, Juan; Zhao, Ruixiang

    2016-01-01

    A method based on a reversed-phase HPLC method was established, optimized, and validated for the separation and quantitation of 10 polyphenols extracted from the peel of apple species. A bidentate reversed-phase C18 column was used as stationary phase, and an acidified water buffer and methanol were used as mobile phase. The polyphenols were well separated and detected using UV at 280 and 320 nm. Validation parameters, such as linearity, LOD, LOQ, accuracy, and precision, were acceptable for all 10 polyphenols. The proposed method has enough linearity with correlation coefficient >0.99 within the investigated range for all tested polyphenols. The LOD was 0.24 μg/mL for ellagic acid and <0.2 μg/mL for all other polyphenols. The LOQ was 9.39 × 10(-2) μg/mL for chlorogenic acid, and ellagic acid, 2.82 × 10(-2) μg/mL for caffeic acid and >0.1 μg/mL for all other polyphenols. Recovery was within the acceptable range from 98.38 to 100.39% for all polyphenols standards. Satisfactory precision was achieved for both intra- and interday assay, with RSD <2%. The method was successfully applied for simultaneous analysis of polyphenols from apple peel.

  13. Antioxidant-guided isolation and mass spectrometric identification of the major polyphenols in barley (Hordeum vulgare) grain.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Nirupama; Rai, Dilip K; Brunton, Nigel P; Gallagher, Eimear; Hossain, Mohammad B

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the relative contribution of individual/classes of polyphenols in barley, to its antioxidant properties, was evaluated. Flash chromatography was used to fractionate the total polyphenol extract of Irish barley cultivar 'Irina', and fractions with highest antioxidant properties were identified using total phenolic content and three in vitro antioxidant assays: DPPH, FRAP, and ORAC. Flavanols (catechin, procyanidin B, prodelphinidin B, procyanidin C) and a novel substituted flavanol (catechin dihexoside, C27H33O16(-), m/z 613.17), were identified as constituents of the fraction with highest antioxidant capacity. Upon identification of phenolics in the other active fractions, the order of most potent contributors to observed antioxidant capacity of barley extract were, flavanols>flavonols (quercetin)>hydroxycinnamic acids (ferulic, caffeic, coumaric acids). The most abundant polyphenol in the overall extract was ferulic acid (277.7μg/gdw barley), followed by procyanidin B (73.7μg/gdw barley).

  14. Food Polyphenol Apigenin Inhibits the Cytochrome P450 Monoxygenase Branch of the Arachidonic Acid Cascade.

    PubMed

    Steuck, Maryvonne; Hellhake, Stefan; Schebb, Nils Helge

    2016-11-30

    The product of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (P450) ω-hydroxylation of arachidonic acid (AA), 20- hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), is a potent vasoconstrictor. Utilizing microsomes as well as individual CYP4 isoforms we demonstrate here that flavonoids can block 20-HETE formation. Apigenin inhibits CYP4F2 with an IC50 value of 4.6 μM and 20-HETE formation in human liver and kidney microsomes at 2.4-9.8 μM. Interestingly, the structurally similar naringenin shows no relevant effect on the formation of 20-HETE. Based on these in vitro data, it is impossible to evaluate if a relevant blockade of 20-HETE formation can result in humans from intake of polyphenols with the diet. However, the potency of apigenin is comparable to those of P450 inhibitors such as ketoconazole. Moreover, an IC50 value in the micromolar range is also described for the inhibition of CYP-mediated drug metabolism leading to food-drug interactions. The modulation of the arachidonic acid cascade by food polyphenols therefore warrants further investigation.

  15. Application of Cornelian Cherry Iridoid-Polyphenolic Fraction and Loganic Acid to Reduce Intraocular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Szumny, Dorota; Sozański, Tomasz; Kucharska, Alicja Z.; Dziewiszek, Wojciech; Piórecki, Narcyz; Magdalan, Jan; Chlebda-Sieragowska, Ewa; Kupczynski, Robert; Szeląg, Adam; Szumny, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common diseases of old age in modern societies is glaucoma. It is strongly connected with increased intraocular pressure (IOP) and could permanently damage vision in the affected eye. As there are only a limited number of chemical compounds that can decrease IOP as well as blood flow in eye vessels, the up-to-date investigation of new molecules is important. The chemical composition of the dried Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.) polar, iridoid-polyphenol-rich fraction was investigated. Loganic acid (50%) and pelargonidin-3-galactoside (7%) were found as the main components. Among the other constituents, iridoid compound cornuside and the anthocyans cyanidin 3-O-galactoside, cyanidin 3-O-robinobioside, and pelargonidin 3-O-robinobioside were quantified in the fraction. In an animal model (New Zealand rabbits), the influence of loganic acid and the polyphenolic fraction isolated from Cornelian cherry fruit was investigated. We found a strong IOP-hypotensive effect for a 0.7% solution of loganic acid, which could be compared with the widely ophthalmologically used timolol. About a 25% decrease in IOP was observed within the first 3 hours of use. PMID:26124854

  16. Application of Cornelian Cherry Iridoid-Polyphenolic Fraction and Loganic Acid to Reduce Intraocular Pressure.

    PubMed

    Szumny, Dorota; Sozański, Tomasz; Kucharska, Alicja Z; Dziewiszek, Wojciech; Piórecki, Narcyz; Magdalan, Jan; Chlebda-Sieragowska, Ewa; Kupczynski, Robert; Szeląg, Adam; Szumny, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common diseases of old age in modern societies is glaucoma. It is strongly connected with increased intraocular pressure (IOP) and could permanently damage vision in the affected eye. As there are only a limited number of chemical compounds that can decrease IOP as well as blood flow in eye vessels, the up-to-date investigation of new molecules is important. The chemical composition of the dried Cornelian cherry (Cornus mas L.) polar, iridoid-polyphenol-rich fraction was investigated. Loganic acid (50%) and pelargonidin-3-galactoside (7%) were found as the main components. Among the other constituents, iridoid compound cornuside and the anthocyans cyanidin 3-O-galactoside, cyanidin 3-O-robinobioside, and pelargonidin 3-O-robinobioside were quantified in the fraction. In an animal model (New Zealand rabbits), the influence of loganic acid and the polyphenolic fraction isolated from Cornelian cherry fruit was investigated. We found a strong IOP-hypotensive effect for a 0.7% solution of loganic acid, which could be compared with the widely ophthalmologically used timolol. About a 25% decrease in IOP was observed within the first 3 hours of use.

  17. Effect of grape polyphenols on lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria growth: resistance and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tabasco, Raquel; Sánchez-Patán, Fernando; Monagas, María; Bartolomé, Begoña; Victoria Moreno-Arribas, M; Peláez, Carmen; Requena, Teresa

    2011-10-01

    Food polyphenols are able to selectively modify the growth of susceptible micro-organisms. This study describes the effect of a flavan-3-ol enriched grape seed extract (GSE) on the growth of several lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and bifidobacteria and the ability of the resistant strains to metabolize these compounds. Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus vaginalis strains showed a remarkable sensitivity to the phenolic extracts assayed, including a GSE fraction consisting mainly in (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin (GSE-M). On the other hand, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus bulgaricus strains reached maximal growth with the GSE fractions, including a rich-oligomeric (GSE-O) fraction. Within bifidobacteria, Bifidobacterium lactis BB12 showed the highest sensitivity to the phenolic extracts assayed, whereas Bifidobacterium breve 26M2 and Bifidobacterium bifidum HDD541 reached maximum growth in presence of GSE-O and GSE-M fractions. Metabolism of flavan-3-ols by LAB and bifidobacteria resistant strains was investigated in vitro. The results revealed that only L. plantarum IFPL935 was able to metabolize the polyphenols studied by means of galloyl-esterase, decarboxylase and benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase activities that led to the formation of gallic acid, pyrogallol and catechol, respectively. An unknown metabolite that does not exhibit a phenolic-acid-type structure was also detected, which suggests a new enzyme activity in L. plantarum IFPL935 able to degrade flavan-3-ol monomers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV absorption, 1H and 13C NMR) and theoretical (in B3LYP/6-311++G** level) studies on alkali metal salts of caffeic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Świsłocka, Renata

    The effect of some metals on the electronic system of benzoic and nicotinic acids has recently been investigated by IR, Raman and UV spectroscopy [1-3]. Benzoic and nicotinic acids are regarded model systems representing a wide group of aromatic ligands which are incorporated into enzymes. In this work the FT-IR (in solid state and in solution), FT-Raman, UV absorption and 1H and 13C NMR spectra of caffeic acid (3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid) and its salts with lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium were registered, assigned and analyzed. The effect of alkali metals on the electronic system of ligands was discussed. Studies of differences in the number and position of bands from the IR, Raman, UV absorption spectra and chemical shifts from NMR spectra allowed to conclude on the distribution of electronic charge in the molecules, the delocalization energy of π electrons and the reactivity of ligands in metal complexes. Optimized geometrical structures of studied compounds were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G** basis set. Bond lengths, angles and dipole moments for the optimized structures of caffeic acid and lithium, sodium, potassium caffeinates were also calculated. The theoretical wavenumbers and intensities of IR spectra were obtained. The calculated parameters were compared to the experimental characteristics of investigated compounds. Microbial activity of studied compounds was tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Proteus vulgaris.

  19. Analysis of polyphenols in white wine by CZE with amperometric detection using carbon nanotube-modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Mónica; Arribas, Alberto Sánchez; Bermejo, Esperanza; Zapardiel, Antonio; Chicharro, Manuel

    2011-04-01

    A method for the simultaneous detection of five polyphenols (caffeic, chlorogenic, ferulic and gallic acids and (+)-catechin) by CZE with electrochemical detection was developed. Separation of these polyphenols was performed in a 100 mM borate buffer (pH 9.2) within 15 min. Under optimized separation conditions, the performance of glassy carbon (GC) electrodes modified with multiwalled carbon nanotube layer obtained from different dispersions was examined. GC electrode modified with a dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) in polyethylenimine has proven to be the most suitable CNT-based electrode for its application as amperometric detector for the CZE separation of the studied compounds. The excellent electrochemical properties of this electrode allowed the detection of the selected polyphenols at +200 mV and improved the efficiency and the resolution of their CZE separation. Limits of detection below 3.1 μM were obtained with linear ranges covering the 10⁻⁵ to 10⁻⁴  M range. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the detection (ferulic, caffeic and gallic acids and (+)-catechin) and the quantification (gallic acid and (+)-catechin) of polyphenols in two different white wines without any preconcentration step. A remarkable signal stability was observed on the electrode performance despite the presence of potential fouling substances in wine. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Urinary excretions of 34 dietary polyphenols and their associations with lifestyle factors in the EPIC cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zamora-Ros, Raul; Achaintre, David; Rothwell, Joseph A.; Rinaldi, Sabina; Assi, Nada; Ferrari, Pietro; Leitzmann, Michael; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fagherazzi, Guy; Auffret, Aurélie; Kühn, Tilman; Katzke, Verena; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Naska, Androniki; Vasilopoulou, Effie; Palli, Domenico; Grioni, Sara; Mattiello, Amalia; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Slimani, Nadia; Romieu, Isabelle; Scalbert, Augustin

    2016-01-01

    Urinary excretion of 34 dietary polyphenols and their variations according to diet and other lifestyle factors were measured by tandem mass spectrometry in 475 adult participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cross-sectional study. A single 24-hour urine sample was analysed for each subject from 4 European countries. The highest median levels were observed for phenolic acids such as 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (157 μmol/24 h), followed by 3-hydroxyphenylacetic, ferulic, vanillic and homovanillic acids (20–50 μmol/24 h). The lowest concentrations were observed for equol, apigenin and resveratrol (<0.1 μmol/24 h). Urinary polyphenols significantly varied by centre, followed by alcohol intake, sex, educational level, and energy intake. This variability is largely explained by geographical variations in the diet, as suggested by the high correlations (r > 0.5) observed between urinary polyphenols and the intake of their main food sources (e.g., resveratrol and gallic acid ethyl ester with red wine intake; caffeic, protocatechuic and ferulic acids with coffee consumption; and hesperetin and naringenin with citrus fruit intake). The large variations in urinary polyphenols observed are largely determined by food preferences. These polyphenol biomarkers should allow more accurate evaluation of the relationships between polyphenol exposure and the risk of chronic diseases in large epidemiological studies. PMID:27273479

  1. Aminoparathion: a highly reactive metabolite of parathion. 1. Reactions with polyphenols and polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Rung, Bruno; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2005-11-16

    Spiking of tomato and apple fruits with parathion at different levels of about 1-4 mg/kg irradiation and under simulated sunlight conditions resulted in nearly complete photodegradation within 13 h, but extractable parathion degradation products could not be found in any case. However, after irradiation of an unrealistically spiked apple (134 mg/kg) different photoproducts including aminoparathion (AP) were detectable by HPLC, proving that the hitherto postulated photochemistry of parathion indeed takes place in the fruit cuticle environment. Besides the photoreduction pathway it was shown for the first time that AP is also easily formed by reduction of the primary photoproduct nitrosoparathion with thiols (cysteine, glutathione), while ascorbic acid only leaves hydroxylaminoparathion. In the presence of polyphenols, AP was effectively bound to quinone intermediates formed by both silver oxide and polyphenol oxidases. For pyrocatechol, a disubstituted o-quinone derivative could be isolated as a dark red addition product and structurally be elucidated. However, in the presence of caffeic acid, catechol, naringin, and quercetin, respectively, insoluble dark colored polymers precipitated within 48 h, while in the supernatants AP was not detectable any more. Polymer-bound and nonextractable AP was proven by transesterification with sodium ethoxide releasing O,O,O-triethyl thiophosphate which was determined by GC. Additionally, AP itself was a substrate for polyphenol oxidases, resulting in a quinone imine intermediate which in turn reacted with excessive AP yielding deep red colored di- and trimerization products.

  2. Evaluation of antioxidant activity, polyphenolic compounds, amino acids and mineral elements of representative genotypes of Lonicera edulis.

    PubMed

    Sochor, Jiri; Jurikova, Tunde; Pohanka, Miroslav; Skutkova, Helena; Baron, Mojmir; Tomaskova, Lenka; Balla, Stefan; Klejdus, Borivoj; Pokluda, Robert; Mlcek, Jiri; Trojakova, Zuzana; Saloun, Jan

    2014-05-21

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioactive substances in 19 berry cultivars of edible honeysuckle (Lonicera edulis). A statistical evaluation was used to determine the relationship between the content of selected bioactive substances and individual cultivars. Regarding mineral elements, the content of sodium was measured using potentiometry and spectrophotometry. The content of selected polyphenolic compounds with high antioxidant activity was determined by a HPLC-UV/ED method. The total amount of polyphenols was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. The antioxidant activity was determined using five methods (DPPH, FRAP, ABTS, FR and DMPD) that differ in their principles. The content of 13 amino acids was determined by ion-exchange chromatography. The experimental results obtained for the different cultivars were evaluated and compared by statistical and bioinformatic methods. A unique feature of this study lies in the exhaustive analysis of the chosen parameters (amino acids, mineral elements, polyphenolic compounds and antioxidant activity) during one growing season.

  3. HCT2, a Novel Hydroxycinnamoyl-Malate Transferase, is Responsible for Phaselic Acid (2-O-Caffeoyl-L-Malate) Biosynthesis in Red Clover

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In red clover, post-harvest oxidation of o-diphenol caffeic acid derivatives to o-quinones by an endogenous polyphenol oxidase (PPO) prevents breakdown of forage protein during storage (1). Agronomically important forages like alfalfa lack both PPO and o-diphenols. Consequently, breakdown of their p...

  4. Comparative analysis of the protective effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on pulmonary contusion lung oxidative stress and serum copper and zinc levels in experimental rat model.

    PubMed

    Sırmalı, Mehmet; Solak, Okan; Tezel, Cagatay; Sırmalı, Rana; Ginis, Zeynep; Atik, Dilek; Agackıran, Yetkin; Koylu, Halis; Delibas, Namık

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in the lungs by biochemical and histopathological analyses in an experimental isolated lung contusion model. Eighty-one male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. The animals were divided randomly into four groups: group 1 (n = 9) was defined as without contusion and without CAPE injection. Group 2 (n = 9) was defined as CAPE 10 μmol/kg injection without lung contusion. Group 3 (n = 36) was defined as contusion without CAPE-administrated group which consisted of four subgroups that were created according to analysis between days 0, 1, 2, and 3. Group 4 (n = 27) was defined as CAPE 10 μmol/kg administrated after contusion group divided into three subgroups according to analysis on days 1, 2, and 3. CAPE 10 μmol/kg was injected intraperitoneally 30 min after trauma and on days 1 and 2. Blood samples were obtained to measure catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and for blood gas analysis. Trace elements such as zinc and copper were measured in serum. The lung tissue was also removed for histopathological examination. Isolated lung contusion increased serum and tissue SOD and CAT activities and MDA levels (p < 0.05). Both serum and tissue SOD, MDA, and CAT levels on day 3 were lower in group 4 compared to group 3 (p < 0.05). Further, the levels of SOD, MDA, and CAT in group 4 were similar compared to group 1 (p > 0.05). CAPE also had a significant beneficial effect on blood gases (p < 0.05). Both serum zinc and copper levels were (p < 0.05) influenced by the administration of CAPE. Histopathological examination revealed lower scores in group 4 compared to group 3 (p < 0.05) and no significant differences compared to group 1 (p > 0.05). CAPE appears to be effective in protecting against severe oxidative stress and tissue damage caused by pulmonary contusion in an

  5. Extraction of Honey Polyphenols: Method Development and Evidence of Cis Isomerization

    PubMed Central

    Istasse, Thibaut; Jacquet, Nicolas; Berchem, Thomas; Haubruge, Eric; Nguyen, Bach Kim; Richel, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Honey polyphenols have been studied with the objective of relating honeys to their floral sources. Initially synthesized by plant, these polyphenols can be found in the plant’s nectar, which are collected by bees, which convert the nectar into honey. Consequently, polyphenols constitute minor components of honey. The development of a solid-phase extraction method for honey polyphenols is presented in this study. The technique employs Amberlite XAD-2 adsorbent and was tested on monofloral honeys from six different plants: acacia, chestnut, eucalyptus, thyme, sunflower, and wild carrot. Analyses were performed using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV detection and mass spectrometry. Several phenolic acids and flavonoids were identified: caffeic and p-coumaric acids, quercetin, kaempferol, naringenin, chrysin, and pinocembrin. Generally, the quantity of a given polyphenol in the honey was around 0.2 mg/100 g of honey, except for chestnut honey, which contained around 3.0 mg of p-coumaric acid/100 g of honey. Analyses highlighted significant formation of cis isomers for phenolic acids during the extraction despite protection from light. PMID:27547032

  6. Extraction of Honey Polyphenols: Method Development and Evidence of Cis Isomerization.

    PubMed

    Istasse, Thibaut; Jacquet, Nicolas; Berchem, Thomas; Haubruge, Eric; Nguyen, Bach Kim; Richel, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Honey polyphenols have been studied with the objective of relating honeys to their floral sources. Initially synthesized by plant, these polyphenols can be found in the plant's nectar, which are collected by bees, which convert the nectar into honey. Consequently, polyphenols constitute minor components of honey. The development of a solid-phase extraction method for honey polyphenols is presented in this study. The technique employs Amberlite XAD-2 adsorbent and was tested on monofloral honeys from six different plants: acacia, chestnut, eucalyptus, thyme, sunflower, and wild carrot. Analyses were performed using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with UV detection and mass spectrometry. Several phenolic acids and flavonoids were identified: caffeic and p-coumaric acids, quercetin, kaempferol, naringenin, chrysin, and pinocembrin. Generally, the quantity of a given polyphenol in the honey was around 0.2 mg/100 g of honey, except for chestnut honey, which contained around 3.0 mg of p-coumaric acid/100 g of honey. Analyses highlighted significant formation of cis isomers for phenolic acids during the extraction despite protection from light.

  7. Interactions of different polyphenols with bovine serum albumin using fluorescence quenching and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Skrt, Mihaela; Benedik, Evgen; Podlipnik, Crtomir; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar

    2012-12-15

    Polyphenols are responsible for the major organoleptic characteristics of plant-derived foods and beverages. Here, we investigated the binding of several polyphenols to bovine serum albumin (BSA) at pH 7.5 and 25°C: catechins [(-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, (-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate], flavones (kaempferol, kaempferol-3-glucoside, quercetin, naringenin) and hydroxycinnamic acids (rosmarinic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid). Fluorescence emission spectrometry and molecular docking were applied to compare experimentally determined binding parameters with molecular modelling. Among these polyphenols, (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate showed the highest Stern-Volmer modified quenching constant, followed by (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate. Similarly, (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate had the highest effect on the Circular Dichroic spectrum of BSA, while the changes induced by other polyphenols were negligible. Molecular docking predicted high binding energies for (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate for the binding site on BSA near Trp213. Our data reveal that the polyphenol structures significantly affect the binding process: the binding affinity generally decreases with glycosylation and reduced numbers of hydroxyl groups on the second aromatic ring. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Polyphenols from artichoke heads (Cynara cardunculus (L.) subsp. scolymus Hayek): in vitro bio-accessibility, intestinal uptake and bioavailability.

    PubMed

    D'Antuono, Isabella; Garbetta, Antonella; Linsalata, Vito; Minervini, Fiorenza; Cardinali, Angela

    2015-04-01

    Artichoke is a rich source of health promoting compounds such as polyphenols, important for their pharmaceutical and nutritional properties. In this study, the potential for bioavailability of the artichoke polyphenols was estimated by using both in vitro digestion and Caco-2 human intestinal cell models. In vitro digestive recoveries (bio-accessibility) were found to be 55.8% for total artichoke phenolics and in particular, 70.0% for chlorogenic acid, 41.3% for 3,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and 50.3% for 1,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, highlighting potential sensitivity of these compounds to gastric and small intestinal digestive conditions. Uptake of artichoke polyphenols was rapid with peak accumulation occurring after 30 min with an efficiency of 0.16%, according to the poor uptake of dietary polyphenols. Some compounds, such as coumaric acid, caffeic acid and caffeic acid derivatives, were also detected in the basolateral side assuming extra and intracellular esterase activities on chlorogenic acid. Only apigenin-7-O-glucoside was transported through the Caco-2 monolayer demonstrating its bioavailability to the extent of 1.15% at 60 min. In addition, permeability coefficient (Papp = 2.29 × 10(-5) cm s(-1)), involving apical to basolateral transport of apigenin 7-O-glucoside, was calculated to facilitate estimation of transport through the Caco-2 monolayer. Finally, the mono and dicaffeoylquinic acids present in artichoke heads exert an antioxidant activity on the human low density lipoprotein system correlated to their chemical structure. In conclusion, the utilized in vitro models, although not fully responding to the morphological and physiological features of human in vivo conditions, could be a useful tool for investigating mechanistic effects of polyphenols released from the food matrix.

  9. Chitosan crosslinked microparticles with encapsulated polyphenols: Water sorption and release properties.

    PubMed

    Trifković, Kata; Milašinović, Nikola; Djordjević, Verica; Zdunić, Gordana; Kalagasidis Krušić, Melina; Knežević-Jugović, Zorica; Šavikin, Katarina; Nedović, Viktor; Bugarski, Branko

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan-glutaraldehyde microparticles were produced by emulsion crosslinking method to be used as drug delivery system for polyphenols from Thymus serpyllum L. aqueous extract. The effect of preparation conditions, chitosan concentration (1.5-3% w/v), and glutaraldehyde/chitosan (GA/Ch) mass ratio (0.15-1.20) on water and polyphenols transport properties was investigated. Swelling ratio of dry particles (68-230 µm) in water ranged from 280% to 530%, depending on the formulation. The decrease in swelling was observed with increased GA/Ch mass ratio (i.e. crosslinking degree) at the same chitosan concentration, or with increased chitosan concentration at the same GA/Ch mass ratio. The increase in GA/Ch mass ratio was also manifested by increased particle compactness i.e. decreased size and reduced surface roughness. The sorption capacity for polyphenols seems to be a complex interplay of swelling behaviour and interactions chitosan-glutaraldehyde-polyphenols identified by Fourier transmission infrared analysis. An increase in crystallinity of chitosan was observed upon crosslinking with glutaraldehyde and encapsulation of polyphenols, as observed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The results obtained from release kinetics of selected polyphenolic compounds (caffeic acid, rosmarinic acid, total flavonoids, and total phenol content) showed that polyphenols were released at a lower amount (2-4 times) in water, but more rapidly (45-120 min) in comparison with the release in gastric followed by intestinal simulated fluid (SGF-SIF) (120-240 min). The experimental results of the time-dependent swelling in water and polyphenols release in both, water and SGF-SIF, were analyzed with several mathematical models. The results depicted Fickian diffusion as the water transport mechanism. In the case of polyphenols, only empirical Weibull model could be suggested for describing release kinetics. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Three-year comparative study of polyphenol contents and antioxidant capacities in fruits of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cultivars grown under organic and conventional conditions.

    PubMed

    Anton, Dea; Matt, Darja; Pedastsaar, Priit; Bender, Ingrid; Kazimierczak, Renata; Roasto, Mati; Kaart, Tanel; Luik, Anne; Püssa, Tõnu

    2014-06-04

    In the present study, four tomato cultivars were grown under organic and conventional conditions in separate unheated greenhouses in three consecutive years. The objective was to assess the influence of the cultivation system on the content of individual polyphenols, total phenolics, and antioxidant capacity of tomatoes. The fruits were analyzed for total phenolic content by the Folin-Ciocalteau method and antioxidant capacity by the DPPH free radical scavenging assay. Individual phenolic compounds were analyzed using HPLC-DAD-MS/MS. Among 30 identified and quantified polyphenols, significantly higher contents of apigenin acetylhexoside, caffeic acid hexoside I, and phloretin dihexoside were found in all organic samples. The content of polyphenols was more dependent on year and cultivar than on cultivation conditions. Generally, the cultivation system had minor impact on polyphenols content, and only a few compounds were influenced by the mode of cultivation in all tested cultivars during all three years.

  11. Impact of cooking, proving, and baking on the (poly)phenol content of wild blueberry.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana; Cifuentes-Gomez, Tania; George, Trevor W; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2014-05-07

    Accumulating evidence suggests that diets rich in (poly)phenols may have positive effects on human health. Currently there is limited information regarding the effects of processing on the (poly)phenolic content of berries, in particular in processes related to the baking industry. This study investigated the impact of cooking, proving, and baking on the anthocyanin, procyanidin, flavonol, and phenolic acid contents of wild blueberry using HPLC with UV and fluorescence detection. Anthocyanin levels decreased during cooking, proving, and baking, whereas no significant changes were observed for total procyanidins. However, lower molecular weight procyanidins increased and high molecular weight oligomers decreased during the process. Quercetin and ferulic and caffeic acid levels remained constant, whereas increases were found for chlorogenic acid. Due to their possible health benefits, a better understanding of the impact of processing is important to maximize the retention of these phytochemicals in berry-containing products.

  12. Bioconversion of grape and chokeberry wine polyphenols during simulated gastrointestinal in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Gumienna, Małgorzata; Lasik, Małgorzata; Czarnecki, Zbigniew

    2011-05-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to assess the qualitative and quantitative changes of wine polyphenols during in vitro digestion process conducted in a gastrointestinal tract model. Wines selected for these experiments were red grape, white grape and chokeberry wines. Following the stages of in vitro digestion-stomach, small and large intestine-qualitative and quantitative changes particularly in phenolic acids were monitored. Decomposition of resveratrol and chlorogenic acid, secretion of caffeic acid and formation of other derivatives characterized with high antioxidant activity were determined. As a second focus of this work the evaluation of interactions between human fecal microflora (Enterobacteriaceae, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus and Bifidobacterium) and polyphenolic compounds and their derivatives secreted during the digestion were performed.

  13. [Determination of chlorogenic acid, rutin, scopoletin and total polyphenol in tobacco by Fourier transform near infrared spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Leng, Hong-Qiong; Guo, Ya-Dong; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Deng, Liang; Shen, Zhi-Qiang

    2013-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of predicting chlorogenic acid, rutin, scopoletin and total polyphenol in tobacco by Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy. The partial least squares(PLS) regression method, second derivative and Norris derivative filter were applied in the NIR spectroscopy prediction of chlorogenic acid, rutin, scopoletin and total polyphenol in the range of 7 500 to 4 000 cm(-1). For chlorogenic acid, rutin, scopoletin and total polyphenol, the determination coefficients were 0.976 6, 0.941 9, 0.957 1 and 0.966 6, respectively. The SEP/SEC values for them were < 1.2, and the SD/SEP values for them were > 2. The root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of the four calibration models were 1.938 9, 1.046 2, 0.047 9 and 2.745 2, respectively. NIR spectroscopy was compared with the conventional methods. The results show that the two methods showed no significant difference at the significant level of 0.05. NIR spectroscopy technology can accurately analyze chlorogenic acid, rutin, scopoletin and total polyphenol in tobacco.

  14. Stimulatory role of grape pomace polyphenols on Lactobacillus acidophilus growth.

    PubMed

    Hervert-Hernández, Deisy; Pintado, Concepción; Rotger, Rafael; Goñi, Isabel

    2009-11-30

    Grape pomace is a natural product rich in dietary fiber and polyphenols. A major part of dietary polyphenols is not absorbed in the small intestine and can interact with colonic microbiota. The influence of grape polyphenols on Lactobacillus acidophilus CECT 903 growth was investigated through agar diffusion assays and cultures in liquid media. Grape phenolic extracts and some standards of phenolic compounds (caffeic acid, gallic acid, tannic acid, catechin, epicatechin, and quercetin) were assayed. All phenolic compounds tested did not exert an inhibitory effect on L. acidophilus growth at a maximum concentration of 5000 microg/disk in agar diffusion assays. In addition, a stimulatory trend in bacterial growth was observed in both grape phenolic extracts and tannic acid. The major finding was that grape pomace phenolic extract (1mg/mL) induced a significant biomass increase of L. acidophilus grown in liquid culture media. Further research into the interaction between phenolic compounds and other intestinal bacteria, as well as healthy consequences, is required.

  15. Calculation of the molar absorptivity of polyphenols by using liquid chromatography with diode array detection: the case of carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Pelillo, M; Cuvelier, M E; Biguzzi, B; Gallina Toschi, T; Berset, C; Lercker, G

    2004-01-16

    Antioxidant activity of vegetable extracts is related to the nature and the amount of active components, mainly polyphenols; therefore, a correct quantification of these molecules should be required to define their concentration in such kind of vegetable extracts. A fast and accurate method to calculate molar absorption coefficients (epsilon), by using HPLC, has been tested on standard polyphenols and caffeine, and should be widely adapted for standardless quantitative analysis. Molar absorptivity (epsilon) of carnosic acid (CA) was determined from 200 to 300 nm, by the proposed method and those values were compared to tert-butyl-hydroxytoluene (BHT) ones for further comparative quantification.

  16. Polyphenols, antioxidant potential and color of fortified wines during accelerated ageing: the Madeira Wine case study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vanda; Albuquerque, Francisco; Cacho, Juan; Marques, José C

    2013-03-05

    Polyphenols, antioxidant potential and color of three types of fortified Madeira wines were evaluated during the accelerated ageing, named as estufagem. The traditional estufagem process was set to 45 °C for 3 months. Overheating conditions, 1 month at 70 °C, were also examined. Total polyphenols (TP), total monomeric anthocyanins (TMA) and total flavonoids (TF) were assessed by spectrophotometric methods, while individual polyphenols and furans were simultaneously determined by HPLC-DAD. Antioxidant potential (AP) was estimated by ABTS, DPPH and FRAP assays, while color was evaluated by Glories and CIELab. Traditional estufagem decreased the TP and AP up to 20% and 26%, respectively, with final values similar to other wines. TMA of the Madeira wines from red grapes decreased during estufagem. Six hydroxybenzoic acids, three hydroxycinnamic acids, one stilbene, three flavonols and three flavan-3-ols were found in these wines. The prominent phenolics were hydroxycinnamates and hydroxybenzoates, even after estufagem. Most polyphenols decreased, with the exception of caffeic, ferulic, p-coumaric, gallic and syringic acids. Finally, both chromatic systems revealed that all wines tended to similar chromatic characteristics after estufagem. The study suggests that estufagem can be applied without high impact on polyphenols and antioxidant potential of these fortified wines.

  17. Multivariate statistical analysis of the polyphenolic constituents in kiwifruit juices to trace fruit varieties and geographical origins.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Yuan, Yahong; Dou, Pei; Yue, Tianli

    2017-10-01

    Fifty-one kiwifruit juice samples of seven kiwifruit varieties from five regions in China were analyzed to determine their polyphenols contents and to trace fruit varieties and geographical origins by multivariate statistical analysis. Twenty-one polyphenols belonging to four compound classes were determined by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultra-high-resolution TOF mass spectrometry. (-)-Epicatechin, (+)-catechin, procyanidin B1 and caffeic acid derivatives were the predominant phenolic compounds in the juices. Principal component analysis (PCA) allowed a clear separation of the juices according to kiwifruit varieties. Stepwise linear discriminant analysis (SLDA) yielded satisfactory categorization of samples, provided 100% success rate according to kiwifruit varieties and 92.2% success rate according to geographical origins. The result showed that polyphenolic profiles of kiwifruit juices contain enough information to trace fruit varieties and geographical origins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Diphenol activation of the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of field bean (Dolichos lablab) polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Lalitha R; Paul, Beena

    2002-03-13

    This paper reports a study on the hydroxylation of ferulic acid and tyrosine by field bean (Dolichos lablab) polyphenol oxidase, a reaction that does not take place without the addition of catechol. A lag period similar to the characteristic lag of tyrosinase activity was observed, the length of which decreased with increasing catechol concentration and increased with increasing ferulic acid concentration. The activation constant K(a) of catechol for ferulic acid hydroxylation reaction was 5 mM. The kinetic parameters of field bean polyphenol oxidase toward ferulic acid and tyrosine were evaluated in the presence of catechol. 4-Methyl catechol, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine, pyrogallol, and 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzoic acid, substrates with high binding affinity to field bean polyphenol oxidase, could stimulate this hydroxylation reaction. In contrast, diphenols such as protocatechuic acid, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, and caffeic acid, which were not substrates for the oxidation reaction, were unable to bring about this activation. It is most likely that only o-diphenols that are substrates for the diphenolase serve as cosubstrates by donating electrons at the active site for the monophenolase activity. The reaction mechanism for this activation is consistent with that proposed for tyrosinase (Sanchez-Ferrer, A.; Rodriguez-Lopez, J. N.; Garcia-Canovas, F.; Garcia-Carmona, F. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1995, 1247, 1-11). The presence of o-diphenols, viz. catechol, L-dihydroxyphenylalanine, and 4-methyl catechol, is also necessary for the oxidation of the diphenols, caffeic acid, and catechin to their quinones by the field bean polyphenol oxidase. This oxidation reaction occurs immediately with no lag period and does not occur without the addition of diphenol. The kinetic parameters for caffeic acid (K(m) = 0.08 mM, V(max) = 32440 u/mg) in the presence of catechol and the activation constant K(a) of catechol (4.6 mM) for this reaction were enumerated. The absence of a lag

  19. Spinach Thylakoid Polyphenol Oxidase : ISOLATION, ACTIVATION, AND PROPERTIES OF THE NATIVE CHLOROPLAST ENZYME.

    PubMed

    Golbeck, J H; Cammarata, K V

    1981-05-01

    Polyphenol oxidase activity (E.C. 1.14.18.1) has been found in two enzyme species isolated from thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts. The proteins were released from the membrane by sonication and purified >900-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and ion-exchange chromatography. The enzymes appear to be the tetramer and monomer of a subunit with a molecular weight of 42,500 as determined by lithium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The higher molecular weight enzyme is the predominant form in freshly isolated preparations but on aging or further purification, the amount of lower molecular weight enzyme increases at the expense of the higher.Sonication releases polyphenol oxidase from the membrane largely in the latent state. C(18) fatty acids, especially linolenic acid, are potent activators of the enzymic activity. In the absence of added fatty acids, the isolated enzyme spontaneously, but slowly, activates with time.Purified polyphenol oxidase utilizes o-diphenols as substrates and shows no detectable levels of monophenol or p-diphenol oxidase activities. The K(m) values for 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and O(2) are 6.5 and 0.065 millimolar, respectively. Suitable substrates include chlorogenic acid, catechol, caffeic acid, pyrogallol, and dopamine; however, the enzyme is substrate-inhibited by the last four at concentrations near their K(m) A large seasonal variation in polyphenol oxidase activity may result from a decrease in enzyme content rather than inhibition of the enzyme present.

  20. Validation of Spectrophotometric Methods for the Determination of Total Polyphenol and Total Flavonoid Content.

    PubMed

    Matić, Petra; Sabljić, Marija; Jakobek, Lidija

    2017-07-20

    The aim of this study was to validate spectrophotometric methods for the measurement of total polyphenol (TP;via the Folin-Ciocalteu method) and total flavonoid (TF) content [via the aluminum chloride (AlCl₃) method]. Validation parameters of these methods were determined, including linearity, sensitivity, precision (intra-assay and intermediate), accuracy, LOD, and LOQ. For the validation process, groups of polyphenol standards were used, including phenolic acids (gallic, p-coumaric, caffeic, and chlorogenic acids), flavan-3-ols [(+)-catechin and procyanidins B1 and B2], flavonols (quercetin and quercetin-3-rutinoside), and dihydrochalcones (phloretin and phloretin-2-glucoside). Obtained validation parameters were within acceptable ranges with high determination coefficients, reasonably low LODs and LOQs, and high slopes in the calibration curves for both methods, except for phloretin and phloretin-2-glucoside, for which there were low slopes in the calibration curves for the AlCl₃ method. To evaluate differences in polyphenol content, the validated spectrophotometric methods were used to determine TP and TF content in wines (Plavac, Gra¡evina, and Vranac) and juices (blueberry, strawberry, and blackcurrant juice) according to the polyphenol calibration curves. Polyphenol contents were different for both methods in all wines and juices.

  1. Induction of nodD Gene in a Betarhizobium Isolate, Cupriavidus sp. of Mimosa pudica, by Root Nodule Phenolic Acids.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Chakraborty, Dipjyoti; Dutta, Suhrid R; Ghosh, Ananta K; Pati, Bikas R; Korpole, Suresh; Paul, Debarati

    2016-06-01

    A range of phenolic acids, viz., p-coumaric acid, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, protocatechuic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and cinnamic acid have been isolated and identified by LC-MS analysis in the roots and root nodules of Mimosa pudica. The effects of identified phenolic acids on the regulation of nodulation (nod) genes have been evaluated in a betarhizobium isolate of M. pudica root nodule. Protocatechuic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid were most effective in inducing nod gene, whereas caffeic acid had no significant effect. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase, peroxidase, and polyphenol oxidase activities were estimated, indicating regulation and metabolism of phenolic acids in root nodules. These results showed that nodD gene expression of betarhizobium is regulated by simple phenolic acids such as protocatechuic acid and p-hydroxybenzoic acid present in host root nodule and sustains nodule organogenesis.

  2. p-Coumaric acid, a common dietary polyphenol, protects cadmium chloride-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Navaneethan, Dhanalakshmi; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2014-03-01

    The present study was conducted to elucidate the protective role of p-coumaric acid, a common dietary polyphenol against cadmium induced nephrotoxicity in rats. For the purpose of comparison, a standard reference drug silymarin (50 mg/kg b. wt) was used. In this experiment, the animals were divided into four groups, with each consisting of six animals. The animals in Group I animals received saline and served as a control group and those in Group II received cadmium chloride (3 mg/kg b. wt) subcutaneously once daily for 3 weeks, but Group III and IV animals received cadmium chloride followed by p-coumaric acid (100 mg/kg b. wt, oral) and silymarin (50 mg/kg b. wt, oral), respectively, daily for 3 weeks. At the end of the treatment, the animals were sacrificed, and the blood and kidney samples were collected. The results obtained in this study revealed the fact that the levels of lipid peroxidation, lysosomal enzymes, glycoprotein, cadmium and metallothionein were increased in the cadmium chloride alone treated rats and antioxidant status was found to be decreased, when compared to the control group. The levels of kidney functional markers (urea, uric acid and creatinine) were also found to be abnormal in serum and urine of cadmium chloride alone treated rats. On the other hand, the administration of p-coumaric acid along with cadmium chloride significantly protected the biochemical alterations as observed in the cadmium chloride alone treated rats as evidenced by histopathology. Thus, the oral administration of p-coumaric acid significantly protected the cadmium-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

  3. Chlorogenic acid, a polyphenol in coffee, protects neurons against glutamate neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Yoshinori; Yamazawa, Toshiko

    2015-10-15

    The present study has been designed to explore the molecular mechanism of chlorogenic acid (CGA) in the protective effect against glutamate-induced neuronal cell death. Cortical neurons in primary culture were exposed to 300 μM l-glutamic acid or vehicle, with or without 10 μM CGA or 10 μM MK-801. After 16 h, primary cultures were stained with propidium iodide (PI)/Hoechst or calcein. Double-staining with PI and Hoechst was performed to confirm whether cell death induced by glutamate was apoptotic. In addition, intracellular concentrations of Ca(2+) were observed using Ca(2+) indicator fura-2. We investigated the protective effects of CGA on glutamate-induced neuronal cell death using primary cultures of mouse cerebral cortex because the release of glutamate during brain ischemia triggers death of neurons. Glutamate-induced neuronal cell death was inhibited by treatment with CGA. In addition, CGA prevented the increase in intracellular concentrations of Ca(2+) caused by the addition of glutamate to cultured neurons. On the other hand, there was little effect of CGA on cell death induced by nitric oxide, which is downstream of the ischemic neuronal cell death. Our results suggested that the polyphenol CGA in coffee protects neurons from glutamate neurotoxicity by regulating Ca(2+) entry into neurons. CGA in coffee may have clinical benefits for neurodegenerative diseases such as ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Voltammetric determination of polyphenolic content as rosmarinic acid equivalent in tea samples using pencil graphite electrodes.

    PubMed

    David, Iulia Gabriela; Buleandră, Mihaela; Popa, Dana Elena; Bîzgan, Ana-Maria Cristina; Moldovan, Zenovia; Badea, Irinel-Adriana; Iorgulescu, Emilia Elena; Tekiner, Tuğçe Ayça; Basaga, Huveyda

    2016-06-01

    The quasi-reversible, diffusion controlled behavior of rosmarinic acid (RA) on a disposable pencil graphite electrode (PGE) was established by cyclic voltammetry. Using the anodic oxidation peak presented by RA on the PGE a differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) method was developed for the quantitative determination of RA. The linear range was 10(-8) - 10(-5) M RA and the detection and quantification limits were 7.93 × 10(-9) M and 2.64 × 10(-8) M RA, respectively. The applicability of the developed method was tested by recovery studies and by the assessment of the total polyphenolic contents (TPCDPV) of green, white and black Turkish teas, which were found to be 40.74, 30.04 and 23.97 mg rosmarinic acid equivalent/g dry tea, respectively. These results were in good agreement with those obtained by the Folin-Ciocalteu method. The developed method is a sensitive and cheap tool for the rapid and precise evaluation of TPCDPV of tea samples.

  5. Aromatic Plants: Antioxidant Capacity and Polyphenol Characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Proestos, Charalampos; Varzakas, Theo

    2017-01-01

    The antioxidant properties and polyphenol content of some selected aromatic plants grown in Greece were studied. Plants were refluxed with 60% methanol after acid hydrolysis. The phenolic substances were quantified by High Performance Liquid Chromatography–Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD). The antioxidant capacity of the extracts was determined with the Rancimat test using sunflower oil as substrate. Free radical scavenging activity was measured using the stable free radical 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Results were compared with standard butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and ascorbic acid. Total phenol concentration of the extracts was estimated with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent using gallic acid as standard. All plant extracts examined showed antioxidant capacity and contained phenolic compounds. Caffeic acid was detected in all the examined plant extracts. Ferulic acid was also detected in all the methanolic extracts, except from P. lanata, in rather high concentration. The amount of total phenolics varied slightly in plant materials and ranged from 8.2 mg to 31.6 mg of gallic acid/g dry sample. The highest amount was found in O. dictamnus, and the lowest in N. melissifolia. PMID:28375185

  6. Determination of polyphenolic compounds by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in Thymus species.

    PubMed

    Boros, Borbála; Jakabová, Silvia; Dörnyei, Agnes; Horváth, Györgyi; Pluhár, Zsuzsanna; Kilár, Ferenc; Felinger, Attila

    2010-12-17

    Polyphenolic compounds represent a wide group of phytochemicals, including well-known subgroups of phenolic acids, flavonoids, natural dyes, lignans etc., which are produced by plants. These natural bioactive compounds possess a variety of beneficial effects including antioxidant and anticarcinogenic activities, protection against coronary diseases as well as antimicrobial properties. Thymus species have already been reported as sources of different phenolic acids and flavonoids. Moreover, the composition and content of flavonoids in Thymus species play important role as taxonomic markers providing distinction of species. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with diode array detector (DAD) and on-line mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) method was used for analysis. The method was evaluated for a number of validation characteristics (repeatability and intermediate precision, LOD, LOQ, calibration range, and recovery). The polyphenolic pattern of five native Hungarian Thymus species (T. glabrescens Willd., T. pannonicus All., T. praecox Opiz, T. pulegioides L., and T. serpyllum L.) was characterized. The dominant compound was rosmarinic acid, which ranged between 83.49 μg g(-1) and 1.436 mg g(-1). Other phenolic acids (ferulic acid, caffeic acid and its other derivatives, chlorogenic acid and p-coumaric acids) were present in every examined Thymus species, as well as flavanones: naringenin, eriodictyol and dihydroquercetin; flavones: apigenin and apigenin-7-glucoside, flavonols: quercetin and rutin. The polyphenolic pattern was found to be a useful additional chemotaxonomic tool for classification purposes and determination of the locality of origin.

  7. Improved LC-MS(n) characterization of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavonols in different commercial mate (Ilex paraguariensis) brands. Quantification of polyphenols, methylxanthines, and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Raquel; Baeza, Gema; Sarriá, Beatriz; Bravo, Laura

    2018-02-15

    Yerba mate is a beverage rich in bioactive compounds popular in South America. Polyphenols and methylxanthines were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed in four commercial brands of yerba mate, as well as the antioxidant capacity of the beverages. Using LC/MS(n) analysis, 58 polyphenols were observed of which 4-sinapoylquinic acid, di- and tri-methoxycinnamoylquinic acids, two isomers of trimethoxycinnamoylshikimic acid and four isomers of caffeoyl-2,7-anhydro-3-deoxy-2-octulopyranosonic acid were identified for the first time in mate. Additionally, 46 polyphenols and 2 methylxanthines were quantified by HPLC-DAD. Hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavonols comprised 90% and 10% of mate phenols, respectively, 3-caffeoylquinic (26.8-28.8%), 5-caffeoylquinic (21.1-22.4%), 4-caffeoylquinic (12.6-14.2%) and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acids (9.5-11.3%) along with rutin (7.1-7.8%) were the most abundant polyphenols, whereas caffeine was the main methylxanthine (90%). Ilex paraguariensis is an important source of polyphenols with moderate methylxanthines content; therefore its high antioxidant capacity was mainly associated to its polyphenolic composition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. From the X-rays to a reliable “low cost” computational structure of caffeic acid: DFT, MP2, HF and integrated molecular dynamics-X-ray diffraction approach to condensed phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Giuseppe M.; Portalone, Gustavo; Colapietro, Marcello; Rescifina, Antonio; Punzo, Francesco

    2011-05-01

    The ability of caffeic acid to act as antioxidant against hyperoxo-radicals as well as its recently found therapeutic properties in the treatment of hepatocarcinoma, still make this compound, more than 20 years later the refinement of its crystal structure, object of study. It belongs to the vast family of humic substances, which play a key role in the biodegradation processes and easily form complexes with ions widely diffused in the environment. This class of compounds is therefore interesting for potential environmental chemistry applications concerning the possible complexation of heavy metals. Our study focused on the characterization of caffeic acid as a starting necessary step, which will be followed in the future by the application of our findings on the study of the properties of caffeate anion interaction with heavy metal ions. To reach this goal, we applied a low cost approach - in terms of computational time and resources - aimed at the achievement of a high resolution, robust and trustable structure using the X-ray single crystal data, recollected with a higher resolution, as touchstone for a detailed check. A comparison between the calculations carried out with density functional theory (DFT), Hartree-Fock (HF) method and post SCF second order Møller-Plesset perturbation method (MP2), at the 6-31G ** level of the theory, molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) was performed. As a consequence we explained on one hand the possible reasons for the pitfalls of the DFT approach and on the other the benefits of using a good and robust force field developed for condensed phases, as AMBER, with MM and MD. The reliability of the latter, highlighted by the overall agreement extended up to the anisotropic displacement parameters calculated by means of MD and the ones gathered by X-ray measurements, makes it very promising for the above-mentioned goals.

  9. Polyphenol oxidase from yacon roots (Smallanthus sonchifolius).

    PubMed

    Neves, Valdir Augusto; da Silva, Maraiza Aparecida

    2007-03-21

    Polyphenol oxidase (E.C. 1.14.18.1) (PPO) extracted from yacon roots (Smallanthus sonchifolius) was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation and separation on Sephadex G-100. The enzyme had a molecular weight of 45 490+/-3500 Da and Km values of 0.23, 1.14, 1.34, and 5.0 mM for the substrates caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, 4-methylcatechol, and catechol, respectively. When assayed with resorcinol, DL-DOPA, pyrogallol, protocatechuic, p-coumaric, ferulic, and cinnamic acids, catechin, and quercetin, the PPO showed no activity. The optimum pH varied from 5.0 to 6.6, depending on substrate. PPO activity was inhibited by various phenolic and nonphenolic compounds. p-Coumaric and cinnamic acids showed competitive inhibition, with Ki values of 0.017 and 0.011 mM, respectively, using chlorogenic acid as substrate. Heat inactivation from 60 to 90 degrees C showed the enzyme to be relatively stable at 60-70 degrees C, with progressive inactivation when incubated at 80 and 90 degrees C. The Ea (apparent activation energy) for inactivation was 93.69 kJ mol-1. Sucrose, maltose, glucose, fructose, and trehalose at high concentrations appeared to protect yacon PPO against thermal inactivation at 75 and 80 degrees C.

  10. Quantitative kinetic analysis of hydrogen transfer reactions from dietary polyphenols to the DPPH radical.

    PubMed

    Goupy, Pascale; Dufour, Claire; Loonis, Michele; Dangles, Olivier

    2003-01-29

    Diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) is widely used for quickly assessing the ability of polyphenols to transfer labile H atoms to radicals, a likely mechanism of antioxidant protection. This popular test generally pays no attention to the kinetics of H atom transfer, which however could be even more important than the total H-atom-donating capacities (stoichiometry, EC50) typically evaluated. In the present work, a series of dietary polyphenols belonging to the most representative families (flavonols from onion, flavanol monomers and oligomers from barley, and caffeic acid and caffeoyl esters from artichoke and endive) are characterized not only by their total stoichiometries (n(tot)) but also by their rate constants of first H atom abstraction by DPPH (k(1)), deduced from the kinetic analysis of the decay of the DPPH visible band following addition of the antioxidant. The mildly reactive DPPH radical allows a good discrimation between polyphenols, as demonstrated by the relatively large ranges of k(1) (ca. 400-5000 M(-)(1) s(-)(1)) and n(tot) (ca. 1-5) values typically measured with antioxidants having a single polyphenolic nucleus. With antioxidants displaying more than one polyphenolic nucleus (procyanidin oligomers, dicaffeoyl esters), the kinetic analysis makes it possible to demonstrate significant differences in reactivity between the subunits (two distinct k(1) values whose ratio lies in the range 3-10) and nonadditive stoichiometries.

  11. Mediterranean diet and cardioprotection: the role of nitrite, polyunsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    Nadtochiy, Sergiy M.; Redman, Emily K.

    2010-01-01

    The continually increasing rate of myocardial infarction (MI) in the Western world at least partly can be explained by a poor diet lacking in green vegetables, fruits, and fish, and enriched in food that contains saturated fat. In contrast, a number of epidemiological studies provide strong evidence highlighting the cardioprotective benefits of the Mediterranean diet enriched in green vegetables, fruits, fish and grape wine. Regular consumption of these products leads to an accumulation of nitrate/nitrite/NO•, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), and polyphenolic compounds, such as resveratrol, in the human body. Studies have confirmed that these constituents are bioactive exogenous mediators, which induce strong protection against MI. The aim of this review is to provide a critical, in-depth analysis of the cardioprotective pathways mediated by nitrite/NO•, PUFA, and phenolic compounds of grape wines discovered in the recent years, including cross-talk between different mechanisms and compounds. Overall, these findings may facilitate the design and synthesis of novel therapeutic tools for the treatment of MI. PMID:21454053

  12. Green tea polyphenols protect against okadaic acid-induced acute learning and memory impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Wu, Xiukui; Wu, Qiong; Gong, Dezheng; Shi, Meijun; Guan, Lili; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Jing; Yuan, Bo; Han, Guozhu; Zou, Yuan

    2014-03-01

    Green tea polyphenols (GTPs) are now being considered possible protective agents in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies suggested that GTPs could inhibit amyloid fibril formation and protect neurons from toxicity induced by β-amyloid. However, whether GTPs can ameliorate learning and memory impairments and also reduce tau hyperphosphorylation induced by okadaic acid (OA) in rats remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine if GTPs have neuroprotection against OA-induced neurotoxicity. In this work, rats were pretreated with GTPs by intragastric administration for 4 wk. Then OA was microinjected into the right dorsal hippocampus. Morris water maze tests were used to test the ethologic changes in all groups, and tau protein hyperphosphorylation was detected both in vivo and in vitro. The ethologic test indicated that the staying time and swimming distance in the target quadrant were significantly decreased after OA treatment, whereas rats pretreated with GTPs stayed longer in the target quadrant. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and lactate dehydrogenase leakage showed that GTPs greatly ameliorated primary hippocampal neurons damage induced by OA. Furthermore, reduced hyperphosphorylated tau protein was detected with GTPs pretreatment. Taken together, our results suggest that GTPs have neuroprotection against OA-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Front-face fluorescence spectroscopy combined with second-order multivariate algorithms for the quantification of polyphenols in red wine samples.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Bañegil, Manuel; Hurtado-Sánchez, María Del Carmen; Galeano-Díaz, Teresa; Durán-Merás, Isabel

    2017-04-01

    The potential of front-face fluorescence spectroscopy combined with second-order chemometric methods was investigated for the quantification of the main polyphenols present in wine samples. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and unfolded-partial least squares coupled to residual bilinearization (U-PLS/RBL) were assessed for the quantification of catechin, epicatechin, quercetin, resveratrol, caffeic acid, gallic acid, p-coumaric acid, and vanillic acid in red wines. Excitation-emission matrices of different red wine samples, without pretreatment, were obtained in front-face mode, recording emission between 290 and 450 nm, exciting between 240 and 290 nm, for the analysis of epicatechin, catechin, caffeic acid, gallic acid, and vanillic acid; and excitation and emission between 300-360 and 330-400nm, respectively, for the analysis of resveratrol. U-PLS/RBL algorithm provided the best results and this methodology was validated by an optimized liquid chromatographic coupled to diode array and fluorimetric detectors procedure, obtaining a very good correlation for vanillic acid, caffeic acid, epicatechin and resveratrol. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of an optimized hyaluronic acid-based lipidic nanoemulsion co-encapsulating two polyphenols for nose to brain delivery.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Maha

    2016-05-01

    The development of mucoadhesive lipidic nanoemulsion based on hyaluronic acid, co-encapsulating two polyphenols (resveratrol and curcumin) for the transnasal treatment of neurodegenerative diseases was attempted in the current manuscript. Nanoemulsions were prepared by the spontaneous emulsification method, and were characterized for their particle size, zeta potential, mucoadhesive strength and morphology. The selected formula was tested for its antioxidant potential, in vitro and ex vivo release of the two polyphenols, safety on nasal mucosa and in vivo quantification of the two drugs in rat brains. Its stability was tested by monitoring the change in particle size, zeta potential, drugs' content and antioxidant potential upon storage for 3 months. The optimized hyaluronic acid based nanoemulsion formula displayed a particle size of 115.2 ± 0.15 and a zeta potential of -23.9 ± 1.7. The formula displayed a spherical morphology and significantly higher mucoadhesive strength compared to its non mucoadhesive counterpart. In addition, the nanoemulsion was able to preserve the antioxidant ability of the two polyphenols and protect them from degradation. Diffusion controlled release of the two drugs was achievable till 6 hours, with an ex vivo flux across sheep nasal mucosa of 2.86 and 2.09 µg/cm(2)hr for resveratrol and curcumin, respectively. Moreover, the mucoadhesive nanoemulsion was safe on nasal mucosa and managed to increase the amounts of the two polypehnols in the brain (about 7 and 9 folds increase in AUC0-7 h for resveratrol and curcumin, respectively). Hyaluronic acid based lipidic nanoemulsion proved itself as a successful carrier enhancing the solubility, stability and brain targetability of polyphenols.

  15. Heterogeneous photodegradation of methylene blue with iron and tea or coffee polyphenols in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Claudio Kendi; Shinohara, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we developed two new Fenton catalysts using iron (Fe) and spent tea leaves or coffee grounds as raw material. In this study, Fe-to-tea or Fe-to-coffee polyphenol complexes were successfully tested as heterogeneous photo-Fenton catalysts. The photodegradation efficiency of methylene blue solutions with Fe-to-polyphenol complexes was higher than that of homogeneous iron salts in the photo-Fenton process. Furthermore, the tested Fe-to-polyphenol complexes could be reused by simply adding H2O2 to the solutions. After three sequential additions of H2O2, the conventional catalysts FeCl2·4H2O and FeCl3 removed only 16.6% and 53.6% of the dye, while the catalysts made using spent coffee grounds and tea leaves removed 94.4% and 96.0% of the dye, respectively. These results showed that the complexes formed between Fe and chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, gallic acid and catechin, which are the main polyphenols in tea and coffee, can be used to improve the photo-Fenton process.

  16. Enhancing polyphenol extraction from unripe apples by carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hu-zhe; Hwang, In-Wook; Chung, Shin-Kyo

    2009-01-01

    The effects of process variables such as enzyme types, enzyme ratio, reaction temperature, pH, time, and ethanol concentration on the extraction of unripe apple polyphenol were investigated. The results indicated that Viscozyme L had the strongest effect on polyphenols extraction and was selected to study the polyphenol composition. The ratio of enzyme (Viscozyme L) to substrate (2 fungal beta-glucanase units (FBG)) at 0.02, reaction at pH 3.7, 50 °C for 12 h, and ethanol concentration of 70% were chosen as the most favorable extraction condition. Total phenolic content (TPC), reducing sugar content (RSC), and extraction yield increased by about 3, 1.5, and 2 times, respectively, compared with control. The contents of p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and caffeic acid increased to 8, 4, and 32 times, respectively. The enzyme-aided polyphenol extraction process from unripe apples might be applied to food industry for enhancing bioactive compound production. PMID:19946955

  17. Spinach thylakoid polyphenol oxidase isolation, activation, and properties of the native chloroplast enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Golbeck, J.H.; Cammarata, K.V.

    1981-05-01

    Polyphenol oxidase activity (E.C. 1.14,18.1) has been found in two enzyme species isolated from thylakoid membranes of spinach chloroplasts. The proteins were released from the membrane by sonication and purified >900-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration, and ion-exchange chromatography. The enzymes appear to be the tetramer and monomer of a subunit with a molecular weight of 42,500 as determined by lithium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Sonication releases polyphenol oxidase from the membrane largely in the latent state. In the absence of added fatty acids, the isolated enzyme spontaneously, but slowly, activates with time. Purified polyphenol oxidase utilizes o-diphenols as substrates and shows no detectable levels of monophenol or p-diphenol oxidase activities. Suitable substrates include chlorogenic acid, catechol, caffeic acid, pyrogallol, and dopamine; however, the enzyme is substrate-inhibited by the last four at concentrations near their K/sub m/. A large seasonal variation in polyphenol oxidase activity may result from a decrease in enzyme content rather than inhibition of the enzyme present.

  18. Metformin and caffeic acid regulate metabolic reprogramming in human cervical carcinoma SiHa/HTB-35 cells and augment anticancer activity of Cisplatin via cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Tyszka-Czochara, Malgorzata; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Majka, Marcin

    2017-08-01

    Metformin shows benefits in anticancer prevention in humans. In this study, normal human fibroblasts (FB) and metastatic cervical cancer cells (SiHa) were exposed to 10 mM Metformin (Met), 100 μM Caffeic Acid (trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid, CA) or combination of the compounds. Both drugs were selectively toxic towards cancer cells, but neither Met nor CA treatment suppressed growth of normal cells. Met and CA regulated metabolic reprogramming in SiHa tumor cells through different mechanisms: Met suppressed regulatory enzymes Glurtaminase (GLS) and Malic Enzyme 1 (ME1) and enhanced pyruvate oxidation via tricarboxylic acids (TCA) cycle, while CA acted as glycolytic inhibitor. Met/CA treatment impaired expression of Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein 1 (SREBP1c) which resulted in alleviation of de novo synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid. The toxic action of CisPt was supported by Met and CA not only in tumor cells, but also during co-culture of SiHa GFP+ cells with fibroblasts. Furthermore, Met and CA augmented Cisplatin (CisPt) action against quiescent tumor cells involving reprogramming of cell cycle. Our findings provide new insights into specific targeting of mitochondrial metabolism in neoplastic cells and into designing new cisplatin-based selective strategies for treating cervical cancer in humans with regard to the role of tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Purification of polyphenol oxidase from borage (Trachystemon orientalis L.) by using three-phase partitioning and investigation of kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Alici, Esma Hande; Arabaci, Gulnur

    2016-12-01

    In this study a Polyphenol oxidase from borage plant was purified with 3.59-fold enrichment in the specific activity and 68.75% recovery of the total activity by using three-phase partitioning purification technique for the first time. Its molecular weight was found around 80kDa with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The optimum pH and temperature values of the enzyme for the used four substrates ranged between the pH 5.0-7.5 and 5-30°C. The kcat/Km values showed that the enzyme has the greatest reactivity toward caffeic acid among the substrates used. Ascorbic acid, l-cysteine and sodium metabisulfite markedly inhibited borage polyphenol oxidase activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimization of microwave-assisted extraction of polyphenols from apple pomace using response surface methodology and HPLC analysis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue-Lian; Yue, Tian-Li; Yuan, Ya-Hong; Zhang, Hua-Wei

    2010-12-01

    A simple and efficient microwave-assisted extraction of polyphenols from industrial apple pomace was developed and optimized by the maximization of the yield using response surface methodology. A Box-Behnken design was used to monitor the effect of microwave power, extraction time, ethanol concentration and ratio of solvent to raw material (g/mL) on the polyphenols yield. The results showed that the optimal conditions were as follows: microwave power 650.4 W, extraction time 53.7 s, ethanol concentration 62.1% and ratio of solvent to raw material 22.9:1. Validation tests indicated that the actual yield of polyphenols was 62.68±0.35 mg gallic acid equivalents per 100 g dry apple pomace with RSD=0.86% (n=5) under the optimal conditions, which was in good agreement with the predicted yield and higher than those of reflux and ultrasonic-assisted extraction methods. HPLC analysis indicated that the major polyphenols of apple pomace consisted of chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, syrigin, procyanidin B2, (-)-epicatechin, cinnamic acid, coumaric acid, phlorizin and quercetin, of which procyanidin B2 had the highest content of 219.4 mg/kg.

  1. Polyphenolic compounds progress during olive mill wastewater sludge and poultry manure co-composting, and humic substances building (Southeastern Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Rigane, Hafedh; Chtourou, Mohamed; Ben Mahmoud, Imen; Medhioub, Khaled; Ammar, Emna

    2015-01-01

    In Mediterranean areas, olive mill wastes pose a major environmental problem owing to their important production and their high polyphenolic compounds and organic acids concentrations. In this work, the evolution of polyphenolic compounds was studied during co-composting of olive mill wastewater sludge and poultry manure, based on qualitative (G-50 sephadex) and quantitative (Folin-Ciocalteu), as well as high pressure liquid chromatography analyses. Results showed a significant polyphenolic content decrease of 99% and a noticeable transformation of low to high molecular weight fraction during the compost maturation period. During this step, polyphenols disappearance suggested their assimilation by thermophilic bacteria as a carbon and energy source, and contributed to humic substances synthesis. Polyphenolic compounds, identified initially by high pressure liquid chromatography, disappeared by composting and only traces of caffeic, coumaric and ferulic acids were detected in the compost. In the soil, the produced compost application improved the chemical and physico-chemical soil properties, mainly fertilising elements such as calcium, magnesium, nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus. Consequently, a higher potato production was harvested in comparison with manure amendment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Sodium sulphite inhibition of potato and cherry polyphenolics in nucleic acid extraction for virus detection by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Nie, X; Singh, M; Coffin, R; Duplessis, P

    2002-01-01

    Phenolic compounds from plant tissues inhibit reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Multiple-step protocols using several additives to inhibit polyphenolic compounds during nucleic acid extraction are common, but time consuming and laborious. The current research highlights that the inclusion of 0.65 to 0.70% of sodium sulphite in the extraction buffer minimizes the pigmentation of nucleic acid extracts and improves the RT-PCR detection of Potato virus Y (PVY) and Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers and Prune dwarf virus (PDV) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) in leaves and bark in the sweet cherry (Prunus avium) tree. Substituting sodium sulphite in the nucleic acid extraction buffer eliminated the use of proteinase K during extraction. Reagents phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-Tween 20 and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were also no longer required during RT or PCR phase. The resultant nucleic acid extracts were suitable for both duplex and multiplex RT-PCR. This simple and less expensive nucleic acid extraction protocol has proved very effective for potato cv. Russet Norkotah, which contains a high amount of polyphenolics. Comparing commercially available RNA extraction kits (Catrimox and RNeasy), the sodium sulphite based extraction protocol yielded two to three times higher amounts of RNA, while maintaining comparable virus detection by RT-PCR. The sodium sulphite based extraction protocol was equally effective in potato tubers, and in leaves and bark from the cherry tree.

  3. Polyphenols and phytic acid contribute to the low iron bioavailability from common beans in young women.

    PubMed

    Petry, Nicolai; Egli, Ines; Zeder, Christophe; Walczyk, Thomas; Hurrell, Richard

    2010-11-01

    Low iron absorption from common beans might contribute to iron deficiency in countries where beans are a staple food. High levels of phytic acid (PA) and polyphenols (PP) inhibit iron absorption; however, the effect of bean PP on iron absorption in humans has not been demonstrated and, with respect to variety selection, the relative importance of PP and PA is unclear. To evaluate the influence of bean PP relative to PA on iron absorption in humans, 6 stable iron isotope absorption studies were conducted in women (16 or 17 per study). Bean PP (20, 50, and 200 mg) were added in studies 1-3 as red bean hulls to a bread meal. Studies 4- 6 investigated the influence on iron absorption of PP removal and dephytinization of whole red bean porridge and PP removal from dephytinized porridge. Iron absorption was lowered by 14% with 50 mg PP (P < 0.05) and by 45% with 200 mg PP (P < 0.001). The mean iron absorption from whole bean porridge was 2.5%. PP and PA removal increased absorption 2.6-fold (P < 0.001) and removal of PP from dephytinized porridge doubled absorption (P < 0.001). Between-study comparisons indicated that dephytinization did not increase iron absorption in the presence of PP, but in their absence, absorption increased 3.4-fold (P < 0.001). These data suggest that in countries where beans are a staple food, PP and PA concentrations should be considered when selecting bean varieties for human consumption. Lowering only one inhibitor will have a modest influence on iron absorption.

  4. Anti-depressive effect of polyphenols and omega-3 fatty acid from pomegranate peel and flax seed in mice exposed to chronic mild stress.

    PubMed

    Naveen, Shivanna; Siddalingaswamy, Mahadevappa; Singsit, Dongzagin; Khanum, Farhath

    2013-11-01

    In this study polyphenols from pomegranate peel, and n-3 fatty acids with polyphenols from flax seed were evaluated for their anti depression properties in mice exposed to chronic mild stress (CMS). A total of 40 mice initially trained to consume 2% sucrose solution for 3 weeks were then divided into five groups of eight each. The first group was the normal control, the remaining four groups were exposed to CMS but were force fed with either: 10 mL water per kg bodyweight per day; imipramine (a standard antidepressant) 15 mg kg bodyweight; 30 mg per kg bodyweight polyphenol equivalent extract from pomegranate peel; or 30 mg polyphenols per kg bodyweight with omega-3 fatty acids present, for 50 days. At the end, blood and brain were analyzed for various biomarkers of depression. The flax seed and imipramine groups had significantly increased sucrose consumption, decreased cortisol (blood), decreased epinephrine and norepinephrine concentration, decreased monoamine oxidase A and B activity, and decreased superoxide dismutase activity. Lipid peroxidation was completely inhibited. In contrast, pomegranate peel extract also completely inhibited lipid peroxidation in the brain, and reduced enzyme activity and hormone concentration but to a lesser extent than flax seed. Polyphenols from flax seed with omega-3 fatty acids were able to reduce all the CMS effects tested compared to polyphenols from pomegranate peel. © 2013 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2013 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  5. Cytogenetic effects of grape extracts (Vitis vinifera) and polyphenols on mitomycin C-induced sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in human blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Stagos, Dimitrios; Spanou, Chrysa; Margariti, Maria; Stathopoulos, Constantinos; Mamuris, Zissis; Kazantzoglou, Georgios; Magiatis, Prokopios; Kouretas, Demetrios

    2007-06-27

    In the present study, the effects of extracts and polyphenol-rich fractions as well as monomer polyphenols identified in them, from both red and white grapes, on mitomycin C (MMC) induced sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes were investigated. The grape extracts and two of the three polyphenol-rich fractions promoted MMC-induced SCEs at concentrations from 75 to 300 microg/mL. However, none of the extracts or fractions alone induced SCEs. Thus, these results suggest caution especially with regard to the use of grape extracts as dietary supplements. On the other hand, the fact that these extracts were not genotoxic alone may indicate a selective activity against genetically damaged cells. This is the first study regarding the clastogenic effects of grape extracts in human cells. Moreover, from the tested polyphenols, caffeic acid, gallic acid, and rutin hydrate enhanced MMC-induced clastogenicity, whereas ferulic acid, protocatechuic acid, (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, and trans-resveratrol had no effect at concentrations between 5 and 100 microM. The differences in the chemical structures of the tested polyphenols may account for their differential effects on MMC clastogenicity.

  6. Exhaustive Qualitative LC-DAD-MS(n) Analysis of Arabica Green Coffee Beans: Cinnamoyl-glycosides and Cinnamoylshikimic Acids as New Polyphenols in Green Coffee.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Gema; Sarriá, Beatriz; Bravo, Laura; Mateos, Raquel

    2016-12-28

    Coffee is one of the most consumed beverages in the world, due to its unique aroma and stimulant properties. Although its health effects are controversial, moderate intake seems to be beneficial. The present work deals with the characterization and quantification of polyphenols and methylxanthines in four Arabica green coffee beans from different geographical origins. The antioxidant activity was also evaluated. Forty-three polyphenols (cinnamic acid, cinnamoyl-amide, 5 cinammoyl-glycosides, and 36 cinnamate esters) were identified using LC-MS(n). Among these, cinnamate esters of six different chemical groups (including two dimethoxycinnamoylquinic acid isomers, three caffeoyl-feruloylquinic acid isomers, caffeoyl-sinapoylquinic acid, p-coumaroyl-feruloylquinic acid, two caffeoylshikimic acid isomers, and trimethoxycinnamoylshikimic acid) in addition to five isomers of cinnamoyl-glycosides called caffeoyl-2,7-anhydro-3-deoxy-2-octulopyranosic acid (CDOA) are described for the first time in Arabica green coffee beans. Moreover, 38 polyphenols (6-7% w/w) and 2 methylxanthines (1.3% w/w) were quantified by HPLC-DAD. Caffeoylquinic was the most abundant group of compounds (up to 85.5%) followed by dicaffeoylquinic and feruloylquinic acids (up to 8 and 7%, respectively) and the newly identified cinnamoyl-glycosides (CDOA) (up to 2.5%). Caffeine was the main methylxanthine (99.8%), with minimal amounts of theobromine (0.2%). African coffees (from Kenya and Ethiopia) showed higher polyphenolic content than American beans (from Brazil and Colombia), whereas methylxanthine contents varied randomly. Both phenols and methylxanthines contributed to the antioxidant capacity associated with green coffee, with a higher contribution of polyphenols. We conclude that green coffee represents an important source of polyphenols and methylxanthines, with high antioxidant capacity.

  7. Inhibition by polyphenolic phytochemicals and sulfurous compounds of the formation of 8-chloroguanosine mediated by hypochlorous acid, human myeloperoxidase, and activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiki; Masuda, Mitsuharu; Suzuki, Toshinori; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO) of activated neutrophils can react with nucleic acid bases to form chlorinated nucleosides such as 8-chloroguanosine (Cl-Guo). Chlorination is enhanced by nicotine. We investigated the effects of various natural antioxidants including polyphenolic phytochemicals on the formation of Cl-Guo by HOCl in the presence and the absence of nicotine. Polyphenols, including catechins, curcumin, resveratrol, silibinin, and sulfurous compound α-lipoic acid, were found to inhibit both HOCl- and human MPO-induced Cl-Guo formation dose-dependently. Among the test compounds, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) showed the strongest inhibitory effect. Cl-Guo formation, mediated by activated human neutrophils in the presence of nicotine, was inhibited by EGCG, silibinin, and α-lipoic acid. These results suggest that polyphenols and sulfurous compounds have the potential to inhibit the induction of nucleobase damage mediated by chlorination, with possible application to reducing DNA damage associated with inflammation and cigarette-smoke inhalation.

  8. Chemical fingerprint and quantitative analysis for quality control of polyphenols extracted from pomegranate peel by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianke; He, Xiaoye; Li, Mengying; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Liu; Kong, Xianghong

    2015-06-01

    A simple and efficient HPLC fingerprint method was developed and validated for quality control of the polyphenols extracted from pomegranate peel (PPPs). Ten batches of pomegranate collected from different orchards in Shaanxi Lintong of China were used to establish the fingerprint. For the fingerprint analysis, 15 characteristic peaks were selected to evaluate the similarities of 10 batches of the PPPs. The similarities of the PPPs samples were all more than 0.968, indicating that the samples from different areas of Lintong were consistent. Additionally, simultaneous quantification of eight monophenols (including gallic acid, punicalagin, catechin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, epicatechin, rutin, and ellagic acid) in the PPPs was conducted to interpret the consistency of the quality test. The results demonstrated that the HPLC fingerprint as a characteristic distinguishing method combining similarity evaluation and quantitative analysis can be successfully used to assess the quality and to identify the authenticity of the PPPs.

  9. The effects of pollen, propolis, and caffeic acid phenethyl ester on tyrosine hydroxylase activity and total RNA levels in hypertensive rats caused by nitric oxide synthase inhibition: experimental, docking and molecular dynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Ekhteiari Salmas, Ramin; Durdagi, Serdar; Gulhan, Mehmet Fuat; Duruyurek, Merve; Abdullah, Huda I; Selamoglu, Zeliha

    2017-02-15

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of propolis, pollen, and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and total RNA levels of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) inhibition of nitric oxide synthase in the heart, adrenal medulla, and hypothalamus of hypertensive male Sprague dawley rats. The TH activity in the adrenal medulla, heart, and hypothalamus of the rats was significantly increased in the L-NAME group vs. control (p < 0.05). Treatment with L-NAME led to a significant increase in blood pressure (BP) in the L-NAME group compared to control (p < 0.05). These data suggest that propolis, pollen, and CAPE may mediate diminished TH activity in the heart, adrenal medulla, and hypothalamus in hypertensive rats. The decreased TH activity may be due to the modulation and synthesis of catecholamines and BP effects. In addition, the binding mechanism of CAPE within the catalytic domain of TH was investigated by means of molecular modeling approaches. These data suggest that the amino acid residues, Glu429 and Ser354 of TH may play a pivotal role in the stabilization of CAPE within the active site as evaluated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Gibbs binding free energy (ΔGbinding) of CAPE in complex with TH was also determined by post-processing MD analysis approaches (i.e. Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA) method).

  10. Visible Light-Induced Lipid Peroxidation of Unsaturated Fatty Acids in the Retina and the Inhibitory Effects of Blueberry Polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixiang; Zhang, Di; Hu, Jimei; Liu, Guangming; Chen, Jun; Sun, Lechang; Jiang, Zedong; Zhang, Xichun; Chen, Qingchou; Ji, Baoping

    2015-10-28

    The lipid peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) in the retina not only threatens visual cells but also affects the physiological health of the retina. In this work, the potential damages caused by daily visible light exposure on retinal UFAs were evaluated via a simulated in vitro model. At the same time, the benefits of dietary supplementation of blueberries to the eyes were also assessed. After prolonged light exposure, lipid peroxidation occurred for both docosahexaenoic and arachidonic acids (DHA and AA, respectively). The oxidized UFAs presented obvious cytotoxicity and significantly inhibited cell growth in retinal pigment epithelium cells. Among the different blueberry polyphenol fractions, the flavonoid-rich fraction, in which quercetin was discovered as the main component, was considerably better in preventing visible light-induced DHA lipid peroxidation than the anthocyanin- and phenolic acid-rich fractions. Then the retinal protective activity of blueberry polyphenols against light-induced retinal injury was confirmed in vivo. On the basis of the above results, inhibiting lipid peroxidation of UFAs in the retina is proposed to be another important function mechanism for antioxidants to nourish eyes.

  11. Rosmarinic Acid, a New Polyphenol from Baccaurea ramiflora Lour. Leaf: A Probable Compound for Its Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Usha, Talambedu; Middha, Sushil Kumar; Bhattacharya, Malay; Lokesh, Prakash; Goyal, Arvind Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Despite several pharmacological applications of Baccaurea ramiflora Lour., studies on the influence of its polyphenol content on pharmacological activity such as anti-inflammatory properties have been scarce. Here we evaluated in vitro antioxidant activity, poyphenolics by HPLC and the anti-inflammatory potential of the methanolic leaf extract of Baccaurea ramiflora (BME) and its protective effects in carrageenan-induced paw edema model of inflammation in rats. The BME extract contained 79.06 ± 0.03 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g total polyphenols, 28.80 ± 0.01 mg quercetin equivalent (QE)/g flavonoid and 29.42 ± 0.01 μg cathechin equivalent/g proanthocyanidin respectively and rosmarinic acid (8 mg/kg) as a main component was identified by HPLC. Results demonstrate that administration of BME at the dose of 200 mg/kg can reduce paw edema by over 63%, and it exhibits a dose-response effect. Depending on concentration, the extract exerted scavenging activity on DPPH radical (IC50 36.4 μg/mL), significantly inhibited IL-1β (4.4 pg/mg protein) and TNF-α (0.21 ng/μg protein). Therefore, we conclude BME causes a substantial reduction of inflammation in in vivo models. We propose that rosmarinic acid and similar phenolic compounds may be useful in the therapy of inflammation-related injuries. PMID:26785243

  12. Rosmarinic Acid, a New Polyphenol from Baccaurea ramiflora Lour. Leaf: A Probable Compound for Its Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Usha, Talambedu; Middha, Sushil Kumar; Bhattacharya, Malay; Lokesh, Prakash; Goyal, Arvind Kumar

    2014-12-03

    Despite several pharmacological applications of Baccaurea ramiflora Lour., studies on the influence of its polyphenol content on pharmacological activity such as anti-inflammatory properties have been scarce. Here we evaluated in vitro antioxidant activity, poyphenolics by HPLC and the anti-inflammatory potential of the methanolic leaf extract of Baccaurea ramiflora (BME) and its protective effects in carrageenan-induced paw edema model of inflammation in rats. The BME extract contained 79.06 ± 0.03 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g total polyphenols, 28.80 ± 0.01 mg quercetin equivalent (QE)/g flavonoid and 29.42 ± 0.01 μg cathechin equivalent/g proanthocyanidin respectively and rosmarinic acid (8 mg/kg) as a main component was identified by HPLC. Results demonstrate that administration of BME at the dose of 200 mg/kg can reduce paw edema by over 63%, and it exhibits a dose-response effect. Depending on concentration, the extract exerted scavenging activity on DPPH radical (IC50 36.4 μg/mL), significantly inhibited IL-1β (4.4 pg/mg protein) and TNF-α (0.21 ng/μg protein). Therefore, we conclude BME causes a substantial reduction of inflammation in in vivo models. We propose that rosmarinic acid and similar phenolic compounds may be useful in the therapy of inflammation-related injuries.

  13. Analysis of total polyphenols in wines by FIA with highly stable amperometric detection using carbon nanotube-modified electrodes.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Alberto Sánchez; Martínez-Fernández, Marta; Moreno, Mónica; Bermejo, Esperanza; Zapardiel, Antonio; Chicharro, Manuel

    2013-02-15

    The use of glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs) modified with multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) films for the continuous monitoring of polyphenols in flow systems has been examined. The performance of these modified electrodes was evaluated and compared to bare GCE by cyclic voltammetry experiments and by flow injection analysis (FIA) with amperometric detection monitoring the response of gallic, caffeic, ferulic and p-coumaric acids in 0.050 M acetate buffer pH 4.5 containing 100 mM NaCl. The GCE modified with CNT dispersions in polyethyleneimine (PEI) provided lower overpotentials, higher sensitivity and much higher signal stability under a dynamic regime than bare GCEs. These properties allowed the estimation of the total polyphenol content in red and white wines with a remarkable long-term stability in the measurements despite the presence of potential fouling substances in the wine matrix. In addition, the versatility of the electrochemical methodology allowed the selective estimation of the easily oxidisable polyphenol fraction as well as the total polyphenol content just by tuning the detection potential at +0.30 or 0.70 V, respectively. The significance of the electrochemical results was demonstrated through correlation studies with the results obtained with conventional spectrophotometric assays for polyphenols (Folin-Ciocalteu, absorbance at 280 nm index and colour intensity index). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Metagenomic analysis of rumen microbial population in dairy heifers fed a high grain diet supplemented with dicarboxylic acids or polyphenols.

    PubMed

    De Nardi, Roberta; Marchesini, Giorgio; Li, Shucong; Khafipour, Ehsan; Plaizier, Kees J C; Gianesella, Matteo; Ricci, Rebecca; Andrighetto, Igino; Segato, Severino

    2016-02-19

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of two feed supplements on rumen bacterial communities of heifers fed a high grain diet. Six Holstein-Friesian heifers received one of the following dietary treatments according to a Latin square design: no supplement (control, C), 60 g/day of fumarate-malate (organic acid, O) and 100 g/day of polyphenol-essential oil (P). Rumen fluid was analyzed to assess the microbial population using Illumina sequencing and quantitative real time PCR. The P treatment had the highest number of observed species (P < 0.10), Chao1 index (P < 0.05), abundance based coverage estimated (ACE) (P < 0.05), and Fisher's alpha diversity (P < 0.10). The O treatment had intermediate values between C and P treatments with the exception of the Chao1 index. The PCoA with unweighted Unifrac distance showed a separation among dietary treatments (P = 0.09), above all between the C and P (P = 0.05). The O and P treatments showed a significant increase of the family Christenenellaceae and a decline of Prevotella brevis compared to C. Additionally, the P treatment enhanced the abundance of many taxa belonging to Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Tenericutes phyla due to a potential antimicrobial activity of flavonoids that increased competition among bacteria. Organic acid and polyphenols significantly modified rumen bacterial populations during high-grain feeding in dairy heifers. In particular the polyphenol treatment increased the richness and diversity of rumen microbiota, which are usually high in conditions of physiological rumen pH and rumen function.

  15. Degradation of polyphenols (catechin and tannic acid) in the rat intestinal tract. Effect on colonic fermentation and faecal output.

    PubMed

    Bravo, L; Abia, R; Eastwood, M A; Saura-Calixto, F

    1994-06-01

    Low- and intermediate-molecular-weight polyphenols are usually extracted by using different solvents (e.g. water, methanol, aqueous acetone). The aim of the present work was to study the possible effects of some extractable polyphenols (EPP) on fat and protein digestibilities and on the colonic microflora. Degradability of these compounds through the intestinal tract was also studied. Catechin and tannic acid (TA) were chosen as representatives of the most common basic structures of EPP (flavonoids and gallic acid respectively). Three groups of eight male Wistar rats were given either a control diet free of EPP, or diets containing 20 g/kg dry matter of catechin and TA. Body-weight and food intake were monitored during a 3-week experimental period. Faeces and urine were collected daily during the third experimental week. EPP and fat were determined in faeces, and N in both urine and faeces. Only 3.1 and 4.6% of the ingested catechin and TA respectively were excreted in faeces, indicating that absorption and/or degradation of these EPP had occurred. HPLC analysis of the polyphenolic content of faeces showed qualitative differences between groups. A significant increase of total faecal weight as well as water, fat and N excretion was produced by TA. Catechin only caused an increase in fat excretion. In vitro fermentation assays were also performed to study the effect of EPP on the colonic microflora. Both catechin and TA affected the yield of end-products of fermentation, and were also degraded during the fermentation process.

  16. Inhibition of Human UGT1A1-Mediated Bilirubin Glucuronidation by Polyphenolic Acids Impact Safety of Popular Salvianolic Acid A/B-Containing Drugs and Herbal Products.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guo; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Wenyan; Tang, Zhifang; Xin, Xiaoming; Yang, Ping; Liu, Xiaoqin; Cai, Weimin; Hu, Ming

    2017-09-05

    Bilirubin-related adverse reactions (ADR, e.g., jaundice and hyperbilirubinemia) induced by herbs rich in certain polyphenolic acids are widely reported. However, the causes and the mechanisms underlying these ADR are not well understood. The purpose of this article is to determine the mechanism by which certain polyphenolic acids inhibit UGT1A1-mediated bilirubin glucuronidation, leading to jaundice or hyperbilirubinemia. We investigated in vitro inhibitory effects on bilirubin glucuronidation of salvianolic acid A (SAA), salvianolic acid B (SAB), danshensu (DSS), protocatechuic aldehyde (PA), and rosmarinic acid (RA), as well as two Salvia miltiorrhiza injections (DSI and CDI) rich in polyphenolic acids. The results showed that average formation rates of three bilirubin glucuronides displayed a significant difference (p < 0.05) and the formation of monoglucuronide was favored regardless if an inhibitor was present or not. SAA, SAB, DSI, and CDI, but not DSS, PA, and RA, significantly inhibited human UGT1A1-mediated bilirubin glucuronidation via a mixed-type inhibitory mechanism. Average IC50 values of SAA, SAB, DSI, and CDI-mediated inhibition of bilirubin glucuronidation were bilirubin concentration-dependent, and their values (against total bilirubin glucuronidation) were in the range 0.44 ± 0.02 to 0.86 ± 0.04 μg/mL (for SAA), 4.22 ± 0.30 to 12.50 ± 0.93 μg/mL (for SAB), 9.29 ± 0.76 to 18.82 ± 0.63 μg/mL (for DSI), and 9.18 ± 2.00 to 22.36 ± 1.39 μg/mL (for CDI), respectively. In conclusion, SAA and its analog SAB are the main ingredients responsible for inhibition of bilirubin glucuronidation by DSI and CDI, whose use is associated with many high bilirubin-related ADR.

  17. Acceleration of proliferative response of mouse fibroblasts by short-time pretreatment with polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Tsuruya, Makoto; Niwano, Yoshimi; Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Nakashima, Takuji; Egusa, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    Under the hypothesis that photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin could accelerate wound healing through reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, we examined the effect of proanthocyanidin on 3T3-L1 mouse fibroblasts with or without photo-irradiation. As a result, irrespective of presence or absence of photo-irradiation, only 1 min exposure of the cells to proanthocyanidin resulted in accelerated proliferation of the cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Similarly to proanthocyanidin, 1 min pretreatment with catechin, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid accelerated the proliferative response, but gallic acid, epicatechin gallate, epigallocatechin, and epigallocatechin gallate failed. If incorporated active ingredient such as proanthocyanidin for such a short time as 1 min accelerates the proliferation response, a bioassay was conducted by utilizing antioxidant potential of proanthocyanidin. That is, intracellular oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescin induced by H2O2 was significantly inhibited when the cells were pretreated with proanthocyanidin for 1 min, suggesting that incorporated proanthocyanidin into the cells exerted antioxidant effect. This was also supported by a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis in which incorporation of proanthocyanidin components such as catechin monomers and dimers into the cells within 1 min was confirmed. These results suggest that active polyphenolic compounds such as proanthocyanidin, catechin, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid incorporated into the cells in such a short time as 1 min could accelerate the proliferative response of the cells.

  18. A green ultrasonic-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction based on deep eutectic solvent for the HPLC-UV determination of ferulic, caffeic and cinnamic acid from olive, almond, sesame and cinnamon oil.

    PubMed

    Khezeli, Tahere; Daneshfar, Ali; Sahraei, Reza

    2016-04-01

    A simple, inexpensive and sensitive ultrasonic-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction method based on deep eutectic solvent (UALLME-DES) was used for the extraction of three phenolic acids (ferulic, caffeic and cinnamic) from vegetable oils. In a typical experiment, deep eutectic solvent as green extraction solvent was added to n-hexane (as a typical oil medium) containing target analytes. Subsequently, the extraction was accelerated by sonication. After the extraction, phase separation (DES rich phase/n-hexane phase) was performed by centrifugation. DES rich phase (lower phase) was withdrawn by a micro-syringe and submitted to isocratic reverse-phase HPLC with UV detection. Under optimum conditions obtained by response surface methodology (RSM) and desirability function (DF), the method has good linear calibration ranges (between 1.30 and 1000 µg L(-1)), coefficients of determination (r(2)>0.9949) and low limits of detection (between 0.39 and 0.63 µg L(-1)). This procedure was successfully applied to the determination of target analytes in olive, almond, sesame and cinnamon oil samples. The relative mean recoveries ranged from 94.7% to 104.6%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Verbascoside is not genotoxic in the ST and HB crosses of the Drosophila wing spot test, and its constituent, caffeic acid, decreases the spontaneous mutation rate in the ST cross.

    PubMed

    Santos-Cruz, Luis Felipe; Ávila-Acevedo, José Guillermo; Ortega-Capitaine, Diego; Ojeda-Duplancher, Jesús Clemente; Perdigón-Moya, Juana Laura; Hernández-Portilla, Luis Barbo; López-Dionicio, Héctor; Durán-Díaz, Angel; Dueñas-García, Irma Elena; Castañeda-Partida, Laura; García-Bores, Ana María; Heres-Pulido, María Eugenia

    2012-03-01

    Verbascoside (VB) is a phenylpropanoid isolated from Buddleja species, some of which originate in Mexico, and was first described in the sixteenth century in the codices of Mexican traditional medicine. VB is present in alcohol extracts and is widely used in the north of Mexico as a sunscreen. VB absorbs UV-A and UV-B radiation and has high antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacities. VB and its constituent caffeic acid (CA) were screened to determine their genotoxic activity using the Drosophila wing spot test. Third instar larvae (72±4 h) of the standard (ST) and high bioactivation (HB) crosses, with regulated and high levels of cytochrome P450s (Cyp450s), respectively, were exposed to VB or CA (0, 27, 57, 81, 135, and 173 mM). VB was not genotoxic at any of the concentrations tested in both crosses. The amount of VB residue as determined by HPLC in the adult flies that were fed with VB indicated a low metabolism of this compound, which explains the absence of genotoxicity. CA decreased the spontaneous frequencies of small and total spots and showed putative toxicity in the ST cross.

  20. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester-mediated Nrf2 activation and IkappaB kinase inhibition are involved in NFkappaB inhibitory effect: structural analysis for NFkappaB inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youna; Shin, Dong-Ha; Kim, Ji-Hye; Hong, Sungchae; Choi, Daekyu; Kim, Yung-Jin; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Jung, Yunjin

    2010-09-15

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active component of propolis from honeybee. We investigated potential molecular mechanisms underlying CAPE-mediated nuclear factor kappa beta (NFkappaB) inhibition and analyzed structure of CAPE for its biological effect. CAPE attenuated expression of NFkappaB dependent luciferase stimulated with TNF-alpha or LPS and suppressed LPS-mediated induction of iNOS, a target gene product of NFkappaB. In HCT116 cells, CAPE interfered with TNF-alpha dependent IkappaBalpha degradation and subsequent nuclear accumulation of p65, which occurred by direct inhibition of inhibitory protein kappaB kinase (IKK). CAPE increased the expression of Nrf2-dependent luciferase and heme oxygenase-1, a target gene of Nrf2, and elevated the nuclear level of Nrf2 protein, indicating that CAPE activated the Nrf2 pathway. In HCT116 cells with stable expression of Nrf2 shRNA, CAPE elicited a reduced inhibitory effect on TNF-alpha-activated NFsmall ka, CyrillicB compared to scramble RNA expressing control cells. On the other hand, the NFkappaB inhibitory effect of CAPE was diminished by removal or modification of the Michael reaction acceptor, catechol or phenethyl moiety in CAPE. These data suggest that CAPE inhibits TNF-alpha-dependent NFkappaB activation via direct inhibition of IKK as well as activation of Nrf2 pathway, in which the functional groups in CAPE may be involved.

  1. Stress Responses in Alfalfa (XXI. Activation of Caffeic Acid 3-O-Methyltransferase and Caffeoyl Coenzyme A 3-O-Methyltransferase Genes Does Not Contribute to Changes in Metabolite Accumulation in Elicitor-Treated Cell-Suspension Cultures).

    PubMed Central

    Ni, W.; Sewalt, VJH.; Korth, K. L.; Blount, J. W.; Ballance, G. M.; Dixon, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    Transcription of genes encoding L-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), the first enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway, and caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase (CCOMT), enzymes involved in the synthesis of lignin and wall-esterified phenolic compounds, was strongly activated in elicitor-treated cell-suspension cultures of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). However, consequent changes in the extractable activities of COMT and CCOMT were small to nonexistent compared with a 15- to 16-fold increase in PAL activity. Only low levels of COMT and CCOMT transcripts were reflected in the total and polysomal RNA fractions compared with PAL transcripts. Elicited cell cultures did not accumulate lignin or the products of COMT and CCOMT in the soluble and wall-esterified phenolic fractions. In one alfalfa cell line in which elicitation resulted in very high PAL activity and increased deposition of methoxyl groups in the insoluble wall fraction, there was still no change in COMT and CCOMT activities. Overall, these results indicate that the initial gene transcription events in elicited cells may be less selective than the subsequent metabolic changes, highlighting the importance of posttranscriptional events in the control of phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. PMID:12226420

  2. Metabolomic analysis of the polyphenols in germinating mung beans (Vigna radiata) seeds and sprouts.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dongyan; Dong, Yinmao; Guo, Na; Li, Li; Ren, Hankun

    2014-06-01

    The mung bean (Vigna radiata) is a key food crop in much of Asia and contains plentiful biological activities to prevent human disease. Mung bean sprouts have more plentiful metabolites and activities after germination. The metabolite profile of polyphenols in the germination process was described using the methods of ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry and partial least squares discriminant analysis. Sprouts from different periods were clearly discriminated from each other. Eight flavonoids - vitexin, isovitexin, rutin, kaempferol 3-O-rutinoside, isoquercitrin, genistein, daidzein and isorhamnetin - and two phenolic acids - shikimic acid and caffeic acid - were thought to be chemical markers of the sprouts. The method of high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection was established to quantitatively analyze the eight chemical markers of flavonoids, and provides good linearity, repeatability, intra- and inter-day precision, accuracy and recovery. The main metabolic and transformation pathways of the polyphenols in the germination process were discussed. The proposed method is sensitive, rapid and robust. Understanding the complete profile of polyphenol metabolites in the germination process may be useful for better utilizing mung beans sprouts as the raw materials of functional food, health products and cosmetics. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Food grade fungal stress on germinating peanut seeds induced phytoalexins and enhanced polyphenolic antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziyun; Song, Lixia; Huang, Dejian

    2011-06-08

    The effects of food grade fungus Rhizopus oligosporus stress on phytochemicals and phytoalexins of germinating peanut seeds were investigated by comparing the metabolic profiles of ungerminated (UG), germinated (G), and germinated seeds under fungal stress (GS). Three types of peanut seeds with different skin color (red, reddish brown, and black) were compared in the process. The polyphenolic contents were analyzed and correlated with antioxidant capacity for specific free radicals including peroxyl radical ROO(•) (ORAC), hydroxyl radical HO(•) (HORAC), superoxide radical O(2)(•-) (SORAC), and DPPH radical. The polyphenolic fingerprints analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS(n) showed that phenolic acids (coumaric, sinapinic, and ferulic acids derivatives) were the major group of phenolic compounds in ungerminated seeds. G or GS increased the level of phenolic acids, phytoalexins, and antioxidant capacity values in reddish and red peanuts but not in black peanuts. From the LC-MS(n) spectral data, 45 compounds were identified tentatively in the germinated peanuts, including 14 coumaric acids, 3 ferulic acids, 4 sinapinic acids, 2 hydroxybenzoic acids, 1 caffeic acid, 2 flavonoids, and 19 stilbenoids derivatives. Reddish brown germinated peanuts produced the highest amount of phytoalexins after GS with 55 compounds detected. Forty-five of these compounds were suggested as stilbenoid phytoalexins derivatives. The high content of phytoalexins may enhance the bioactivity of peanut seeds as functional food ingredients.

  4. Rye polyphenols and the metabolism of n-3 fatty acids in rats: a dose dependent fatty fish-like effect

    PubMed Central

    Ounnas, Fayçal; de Lorgeril, Michel; Salen, Patricia; Laporte, François; Calani, Luca; Mena, Pedro; Brighenti, Furio; Del Rio, Daniele; Demeilliers, Christine

    2017-01-01

    As long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) of the n-3 series are critically important for human health, fish consumption has considerably increased in recent decades, resulting in overfishing to respond to the worldwide demand, to an extent that is not sustainable for consumers’ health, fisheries economy, and marine ecology. In a recent study, it has been shown that whole rye (WR) consumption improves blood and liver n-3 LCFA levels and gut microbiota composition in rats compared to refined rye. The present work demonstrates that specific colonic polyphenol metabolites may dose dependently stimulate the synthesis of n-3 LCFA, possibly through their microbial and hepatic metabolites in rats. The intake of plant n-3 alpha-linolenic acid and WR results in a sort of fatty fish-like effect, demonstrating that the n-3 LCFA levels in blood and tissues could be increased without eating marine foods, and therefore without promoting unsustainable overfishing, and without damaging marine ecology. PMID:28071699

  5. Rye polyphenols and the metabolism of n-3 fatty acids in rats: a dose dependent fatty fish-like effect.

    PubMed

    Ounnas, Fayçal; de Lorgeril, Michel; Salen, Patricia; Laporte, François; Calani, Luca; Mena, Pedro; Brighenti, Furio; Del Rio, Daniele; Demeilliers, Christine

    2017-01-10

    As long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) of the n-3 series are critically important for human health, fish consumption has considerably increased in recent decades, resulting in overfishing to respond to the worldwide demand, to an extent that is not sustainable for consumers' health, fisheries economy, and marine ecology. In a recent study, it has been shown that whole rye (WR) consumption improves blood and liver n-3 LCFA levels and gut microbiota composition in rats compared to refined rye. The present work demonstrates that specific colonic polyphenol metabolites may dose dependently stimulate the synthesis of n-3 LCFA, possibly through their microbial and hepatic metabolites in rats. The intake of plant n-3 alpha-linolenic acid and WR results in a sort of fatty fish-like effect, demonstrating that the n-3 LCFA levels in blood and tissues could be increased without eating marine foods, and therefore without promoting unsustainable overfishing, and without damaging marine ecology.

  6. Infrared Spectroscopy as a Tool to Study the Antioxidant Activity of Polyphenolic Compounds in Isolated Rat Enterocytes

    PubMed Central

    Barraza-Garza, Guillermo; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; de la Rosa, Laura A.; Martinez-Martinez, Alejandro; Pérez-León, Jorge A.; Cotte, Marine; Alvarez-Parrilla, Emilio

    2016-01-01

    The protective effect of different polyphenols, catechin (Cat), quercetin (Qc) (flavonoids), gallic acid (GA), caffeic acid (CfA), chlorogenic acid (ChA) (phenolic acids), and capsaicin (Cap), against H2O2-induced oxidative stress was evaluated in rat enterocytes using Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) Spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Microspectroscopy (FTIRM), and results were compared to standard lipid peroxidation techniques: conjugated dienes (CD) and Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS). Analysis of ATR-FTIR and FTIRM spectral data allowed the simultaneous evaluation of the effects of H2O2 and polyphenols on lipid and protein oxidation. All polyphenols showed a protective effect against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in enterocytes, when administered before or after H2O2. Cat and capsaicin showed the highest protective effect, while phenolic acids had weaker effects and Qc presented a mild prooxidative effect (IR spectral profile of biomolecules between control and H2O2-treated cells) according to FTIR analyses. These results demonstrated the viability to use infrared spectroscopy to evaluate the oxidant and antioxidant effect of molecules in cell systems assays. PMID:27213031

  7. Optimization of microwave-assisted extraction of polyphenols from herbal teas and evaluation of their in vitro hypochlorous acid scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Durusoy, Nazan; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-19

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is an important reactive oxygen species (ROS) and non-radical and is taking part in physiological processes concerned with the defense of the organism, but there has been limited information regarding its scavenging by polyphenols. This study was designed to examine the HOCl scavenging activity of several polyphenols and microwave-assisted extracts of herbal teas. HOCl scavenging activity has usually been determined spectrophotometrically by a KI/taurine assay at 350 nm. Because some polyphenols (i.e., apigenin and chrysin) have a strong ultraviolet (UV) absorption in this range, their HOCl scavenging activity was alternatively determined without interference using resorcinol (1,3-dihydroxybenzene) as a fluorogenic probe. In the present assay, HOCl induces the chlorination of resorcinol into its non-fluorescent products. Polyphenols as HOCl scavengers inhibit the chlorination of the probe by this species. Thus, the 25% inhibitive concentration (IC25) value of polyphenols was determined using the relative increase in fluorescence intensity of the resorcinol probe. The HOCl scavenging activities of the test compounds decreased in the order: epigallocatechin gallate > quercetin > gallic acid > rutin > catechin > kaempferol. The present study revealed that epigallocatechin gallate (IC25 = 0.1 μM) was the most effective scavenging agent. In addition to polyphenols, four herbal teas were evaluated for their HOCl activity using the resorcinol method. The proposed spectrofluorometric method was practical, rapid, and less open to interferences by absorbing substances in the range of 200-420 nm. The results hint to the possibility of polyphenols having beneficial effects in diseases, such as atherosclerosis, in which HOCl plays a pathogenic role.

  8. Evaluation of biological value and appraisal of polyphenols and glucosinolates from organic baby-leaf salads as antioxidants and antimicrobials against important human pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Aires, Alfredo; Marques, Esperança; Carvalho, Rosa; Rosa, Eduardo A S; Saavedra, Maria J

    2013-04-19

    The present investigation has been carried out to investigate the biological role of four different types of baby-leaf salads and to study their potential as natural sources of antioxidants and antimicrobials against several isolates from important human pathogenic bacteria. Four single types of salads (green lettuce, red lettuce, rucola and watercress) and two mixtures [(1) red lettuce+green lettuce; (2) green lettuce + red lettuce + watercress + rucola] were assayed. The HPLC analysis revealed interesting levels of polyphenols and glucosinolates. The results showed a significant variation (p < 0.05) of polyphenols and glucosinolates with plant material. Nine different types of polyphenols grouped in three major classes were found: gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and dicaffeoyltartaric acid (phenolic acids); quercitin-3-O-rutinoside, quercitin-3-O-rhamnoside, luteolin-7-O-glucoside and isorhamnetin (flavonoids); and cyanidin-3-glucoside (anthocyanins). Only three different glucosinolates were found: glucoraphanin; gluconasturtiin and 4-methoxy-glucobrassicin. A positive correlation was detected between polyphenol contents and antioxidant activity. Red lettuce and mixture 1 were the baby-leaf salads with the highest antioxidant potential. As for the antimicrobial activity, the results showed a selective effect of chemicals against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus were the bacteria most affected by the phytochemicals. Based on the results achieved baby-leaf salads represent an important source of natural antioxidants and antimicrobial substances.

  9. NMR-based identification of the phenolic profile of fruits of Lycium barbarum (goji berries). Isolation and structural determination of a novel N-feruloyl tyramine dimer as the most abundant antioxidant polyphenol of goji berries.

    PubMed

    Forino, Martino; Tartaglione, Luciana; Dell'Aversano, Carmela; Ciminiello, Patrizia

    2016-03-01

    Biological properties of fruits of Lycium barbarum (goji berries) have been ascribed to their high content of nutrients and phenolics. Comprehensive studies aimed at unambiguously identifying the phenolic components in goji berries are still lacking. In this paper, we report on the isolation and NMR-based identification of the major phenolics in commercially available goji berries. Together with already known phenolics, including caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, rutin, scopoletin, N-trans-feruloyl tyramine, and N-cis-feruloyl tyramine, an unreported N-feruloyl tyramine dimer was characterized as the most abundant polyphenol isolated from the berries. Usually divalent molecules show enhanced biological activities than their corresponding monomers.

  10. Evaluation of physicochemical properties and intestinal permeability of six dietary polyphenols in human intestinal colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Himanshu; Jana, Snehasis

    2016-02-01

    Phenolic compounds are common ingredients in many dietary supplements and functional foods. However, data concerning physicochemical properties and permeability of polyphenols on the intestinal epithelial cells are scarce. The aims of this study were to determine the experimental partition coefficient (Log P), and parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA), to characterize the bi-directional transport of six phenolic compounds viz. caffeic acid, chrysin, gallic acid, quercetin, resveratrol and rutin in Caco-2 cells. The experimental Log P values of six polyphenols were correlated (R (2) = 0.92) well with the calculated Log P values. The apparent permeability (P app) range of all polyphenols in PAMPA for the apical (AP) to basolateral (BL) was 1.18 ± 0.05 × 10(-6) to 5.90 ± 0.16 × 10(-6) cm/s. The apparent Caco-2 permeability (P app) range for the AP-BL was 0.96 ± 0.03 × 10(-6) to 3.80 ± 0.45 × 10(-6) cm/s. The efflux ratio of P app (BL → AP) to P app (AP → BL) for all phenolics was <2, suggesting greater permeability in the absorptive direction. Six compounds exhibited strong correlations between Log P and PAMPA/Caco-2 cell monolayer permeation data. Dietary six polyphenols were poorly absorbed through PAMPA and Caco-2 cells, and their transepithelial transports were mainly by passive diffusion.

  11. Evidences for Chlorogenic Acid--A Major Endogenous Polyphenol Involved in Regulation of Ripening and Senescence of Apple Fruit.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yu; Cheng, Dai; Zeng, Xiangquan; Cao, Jiankang; Jiang, Weibo

    2016-01-01