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Sample records for polyvinyl siloxane impression

  1. The dimensional accuracy of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials using two different impression techniques: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Nirmala; Nandeeshwar, D. B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the Study: To evaluate and compare the linear dimensional changes of the three representative polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials and to compare the accuracy of single mix with double mix impression technique. Methodology: A study mold was prepared according to revised American Dental Association specification number 19 for nonaqueous elastic dental impression materials. Three PVS impression materials selected were Elite-HD, Imprint™ II Garant, Aquasil Ultra Heavy. Two impression techniques used were single mix and double mix impression technique. A total of 60 specimens were made and after 24 h the specimens were measured using profile projector. Statistical Analysis: The data were analyzed using one-way analyses of variance analysis and significant differences were separated using Student's Newman–Keul's test. Results: When all the three study group impression materials were compared for double mix technique, the statistically significant difference was found only between Imprint™ II Garantand Elite-HD (P < 0.05). Similarly, using single mix technique, statistically significant difference were found between Elite-HD and Imprint™ II Garant (P < 0.05) and also between Aquasil Ultra Heavy and Elite-HD (P < 0.05). When the linear dimensional accuracy of all three impression material in double mix impression technique and single mix impression technique were compared with the control group, Imprint™ II Garant showed the values more nearing to the values of master die, followed by Aquasil Ultra Heavy and Elite-HD respectively. Conclusion: Among the impression materials Imprint™ II Garant showed least dimensional change. Among the impression techniques, double mix impression technique showed the better results. PMID:26929515

  2. Effect of reactive adhesives on the tensile bond strength of polyvinyl siloxane impression materials to methyl methacrylate tray material.

    PubMed

    Ona, Masahiro; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Sato, Masayuki; Igarashi, Yoshimasa; Wakabayashi, Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    The effect of new adhesives on the bond strength of elastomeric impression materials to acrylic trays was evaluated. Two polyvinyl siloxane impression materials (Fusion and Imprinsis) with reactive adhesives and one (Examix) with a conventional adhesive were tested. Flat, double-sided plates of auto-polymerizing methyl methacrylate (10 x 10 x 2.5 mm) were prepared with one of the adhesives. Five specimens were prepared by injecting each impression material into a 2-mm gap between the two plates. Tensile tests were conducted until separation failure occurred. The mean bond strengths of Fusion (1.0 MPa) and Imprinsis (0.8 MPa) were significantly greater than that of Examix (0.2 MPa). On the contrary, one of five Fusion showed adhesive failure mode while all the Imprinsis exhibited mixed failure. The conflicting results were presumably attributed to the mean tear strength of Fusion (0.8 N/mm) being higher than that of Imprinsis (0.5 N/mm).

  3. Effect of five brands of latex gloves on the setting time of polyvinyl siloxane putty impression materials.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, C M; Sangur, Rajashekar

    2012-01-01

    Addition silicone impression materials have been used as impression material for more than 20 years. Although they are among the most expensive impression materials, they became popular during the past decade as they have excellent physical properties. Prevention of infection is an important aspect in dental treatment since dental professionals are routinely exposed to the wide variety of microorganisms present in saliva. Gloves are the most common protective measure used during dental treatment. The gloves are mostly made of latex. In this study, we examine how the setting time of three types polyvinyl putty materials were affected by the use of five different brands of latex gloves and one brand of vinyl gloves. Each material was first mixed without wearing gloves according to the manufacturer's instructions. After the stipulated mixing time, the setting time was measured using the Vicat needle. The setting time is measured from the time of mixing till the time that the needle does not produce any indentation on the surface of the material. The putty material was then mixed with gloved hands (using the five different brands of latex gloves in turn) and the setting time was measured. Then the material was mixed with washed gloved hands, and the setting time was measured again. Finally, the material was mixed with vinyl gloved hands and the setting time was measured. The following conclusions were drawn from the study: Reprosil and Express showed significant variation in the setting time with the latex gloved hands.There was no significant variation in the setting time when material was mixed with unwashed vs washed gloved hands.Vinyl gloves did not significantly affect the setting time of any of the putty impression materials.

  4. Evaluation of surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability and gypsum compatibility of monophase polyvinyl-siloxane and polyether elastomeric impression materials under dry and moist conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Atluri, Kaleswararao; Putcha, Madhu Sudhan; Kondreddi, Sirisha; Kumar, N. Suman; Tadi, Durga Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study was designed to compare polyvinyl-siloxane (PVS) monophase and polyether (PE) monophase materials under dry and moist conditions for properties such as surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability, and gypsum compatibility. Materials and Methods: Surface detail reproduction was evaluated using two criteria. Dimensional stability was evaluated according to American Dental Association (ADA) specification no. 19. Gypsum compatibility was assessed by two criteria. All the samples were evaluated, and the data obtained were analyzed by a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Pearson's Chi-square tests. Results: When surface detail reproduction was evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19, both the groups under the two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. When evaluated macroscopically both the groups showed statistically significant difference. Results for dimensional stability showed that the deviation from standard was significant among the two groups, where Aquasil group showed significantly more deviation compared to Impregum group (P < 0.001). Two conditions also showed significant difference, with moist conditions showing significantly more deviation compared to dry condition (P < 0.001). The results of gypsum compatibility when evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19 and by giving grades to the casts for both the groups and under two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. Conclusion: Regarding dimensional stability, both impregum and aquasil performed better in dry condition than in moist; impregum performed better than aquasil in both the conditions. When tested for surface detail reproduction according to ADA specification, under dry and moist conditions both of them performed almost equally. When tested according to macroscopic evaluation, impregum and aquasil performed significantly better in dry condition compared to moist condition. In dry

  5. Management of excessive movable tissue: a modified impression technique.

    PubMed

    Shum, Michael H C; Pow, Edmond H N

    2014-08-01

    Excessive movable tissue is a challenge in complete denture prosthetics. A modified impression technique is presented with polyvinyl siloxane impression material and a custom tray with relief areas and perforations in the area of the excessive movable tissue.

  6. Thiol-Ene functionalized siloxanes for use as elastomeric dental impression materials

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Megan A.; Jankousky, Katherine C.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Thiol- and allyl-functionalized siloxane oligomers are synthesized and evaluated for use as a radical-mediated, rapid set elastomeric dental impression material. Thiol-ene siloxane formulations are crosslinked using a redox-initiated polymerization scheme, and the mechanical properties of the thiol-ene network are manipulated through the incorporation of varying degrees of plasticizer and kaolin filler. Formulations with medium and light body consistencies are further evaluated for their ability to accurately replicate features on both the gross and microscopic levels. We hypothesize that thiol-ene functionalized siloxane systems will exhibit faster setting times and greater detail reproduction than commercially available polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) materials of comparable consistencies. Methods Thiol-ene functionalized siloxane mixtures formulated with varying levels of redox initiators, plasticizer, and kaolin filler are made and evaluated for their polymerization speed (FTIR), consistency (ISO4823.9.2), and surface energy (goniometer). Feature replication is evaluated quantitatively by SEM. The Tg, storage modulus, and creep behavior are determined by DMA. Results Increasing redox initiation rate increases the polymerization rate but at high levels also limits working time. Combining 0.86 wt% oxidizing agent with up to 5 wt% plasticizer gave a working time of 3 min and a setting time of 2 min. The selected medium and light body thiol-ene formulations also achieved greater qualitative detail reproduction than the commercial material and reproduced micrometer patterns with 98% accuracy. Significance Improving detail reproduction and setting speed is a primary focus of dental impression material design and synthesis. Radical-mediated polymerizations, particularly thiol-ene reactions, are recognized for their speed, reduced shrinkage, and ‘click’ nature. PMID:24553250

  7. A Technique to Transfer the Emergence Profile Contours of a Provisional Implant Crown to the Definitive Impression.

    PubMed

    Shah, Karnik; Yilmaz, Burak

    2016-01-01

    This clinical report describes a method to create a proper emergence profile and accurately transfer it to the definitive impression, using an indirectly fabricated modified impression post. A provisional screwretained crown was indexed with a polyvinyl siloxane material. An autopolymerizing acrylic resin was used to modify an impression post on the polyvinyl siloxane index, which was then screwed onto the implant for the definitive impression after proper soft tissue healing. The indirectly fabricated modified impression post helped to transfer the contours to the definitive impression with minimal soft tissue irritation.

  8. Impression techniques for implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Chee, W; Jivraj, S

    2006-10-07

    The object of making an impression in implant dentistry is to accurately relate an analogue of the implant or implant abutment to the other structures in the dental arch. This is affected by use of an impression coping which is attached to the implant or implant abutment. This impression coping is incorporated in an impression - much as a metal framework is 'picked up' in a remount impression for fixed prosthodontics. With implant copings the coping is usually attached to the implant or abutment with screws. The impression material used is usually an elastomeric impression material; the two types most widely used and shown to be the most appropriate are polyether and polyvinyl siloxane impression materials.

  9. An alternative impression technique for complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Burak; Özçelik, Tuncer Burak

    2014-02-01

    This article describes a technique for creating adequate space for an even thickness of polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression material at the periphery during complete denture impression making. A PVS border molding material is injected around the borders of a custom tray, a 17-μm-thick stretch wrap film is folded into 4 layers, and a tray-shaped piece slightly larger than the size of the custom tray is placed on the tray covering the borders. After the border molding procedure is completed, the film is removed and the definitive impression completed with a medium-viscosity PVS impression material.

  10. Effects of implant angulation, material selection, and impression technique on impression accuracy: a preliminary laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Sveikata, Kestutis; Savickas, Raimondas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary laboratory study was to evaluate the effects of 5- and 25-degree implant angulations in simulated clinical casts on an impression's accuracy when using different impression materials and tray selections. A convenience sample of each implant angulation group was selected for both open and closed trays in combination with one polyether and two polyvinyl siloxane impression materials. The influence of material and technique appeared to be significant for both 5- and 25-degree angulations (P < .05), and increased angulation tended to decrease impression accuracy. The open-tray technique was more accurate with highly nonaxially oriented implants for the small sample size investigated.

  11. Pressure produced on the residual maxillary alveolar ridge by different impression materials and tray design: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Subash M; Mohan, Chenthil Arun; Vijitha, D; Balasubramanian, R; Satish, A; Kumar, Mahendira

    2013-12-01

    Increased ridge resorption may occur due to inappropriate pressure applied during final impression making phase of complete denture fabrication. This study was done to evaluate the pressure applied on the residual ridge while making impressions with two tray designs (with and without spacer) using, zinc oxide eugenol and light body polyvinyl siloxane impression material. Five edentulous subjects were randomly selected. For each of the five subjects four maxillary final impressions were made and were labelled as, Group A-Impression made with tray without spacer using zinc oxide eugenol impression, Group B-Impression made with tray with spacer using zinc oxide eugenol impression material, Group C-Impression made with tray without spacer using light body polyvinyl siloxane impression material, Group D-Impression made with tray with spacer using light body polyvinyl siloxane impression material. During the impression procedure a closed hydraulic system was used to remotely measure the pressures produced in three areas. The pressure produced were calibrated according to the micro strain record. Statistical comparisons of readings were done using t test and ANOVA. The acquired data revealed that ZOE produced an average pressures value of 26.534 and 72.05 microstrain, while light body PVS produced 11.430 and 37.584 microstrain value with and without spacer respectively. Significantly high values were recorded on the vault of the palate when using trays without spacer. The use of light body polyvinyl siloxane and zinc oxide eugenol impression material showed insignificant difference. Within the limitations of this study, tray design has a significantly effected on the pressures produced, while the impression materials does not have any significant difference.

  12. Evaluation of dimensional stability of autoclavable elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Surendra, G P; Anjum, Ayesha; Satish Babu, C L; Shetty, Shilpa

    2011-03-01

    Impressions are important sources of cross contamination between patients and dental laboratories. As a part of infection control impressions contaminated with variety of micro-organisms via blood and oral secretions should be cleaned and disinfected or sterilized before being handled in dental laboratory. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of autoclaving on dimensional stability of elastomeric impression material (polyvinyl siloxane-Affinis). In this in vitro study standardized stainless steel die as per ADA specification number 19 was fabricated. Polyvinyl siloxane (Affinis) light body and putty viscosity elastomeric impression materials were used. A total of 40 impressions of the stainless steel die were made and numeric coding system was used to identify the samples. Measurements were made using a measuring microscope. Distance between the cross lines CD and C'D' reproduced in the impression were measured before autoclaving, immediately after autoclaving and 24 hours after autoclaving and dimensional change was calculated. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. The mean difference in dimensional change between the three groups was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). However the results revealed that there was higher mean dimensional change immediately after autoclaving when compared to the other 2 time intervals. It is desirable to delay the casting of an autoclavable elastomeric impression material by about 24 hours. Though disinfection of impression is routinely followed autoclaving of impression is an effective method of sterilization.

  13. An innovative impression technique for fabrication of a custom made ocular prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tripuraneni, Sunil Chandra; Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Ravikiran, P; Nirupama, N

    2015-01-01

    Various impression and fitting techniques have been described in the past for restoring ocular defects. The present article describes a new direct impression technique for recording and rehabilitating ocular defects, by custom-made ocular prosthesis. All the techniques described in the history, mainly concentrated in recording the tissue surface of the defect, which made it difficult to contour the palpebral surface resulting in the poor esthetics of the prosthesis. The present impression technique uses heavy bodied polyvinyl siloxane impression material, which facilitates accurate recording of the tissue surface and the palpebral surface of the defect, resulting in the fabrication of functionally and esthetically acceptable prosthesis. PMID:26265651

  14. Effect of relative humidity on the hydrophilicity of unset elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Frank; Axmann, Detlef; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of relative humidity (RH) on the initial hydrophilicity of unset elastomeric dental impression materials. Initial water contact angles were studied on thin unset films of 1 polyether and 4 polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials at 20%, 50%, and 80% RH by high-resolution drop shape analysis. One of 4 PVS materials reached the polyether's initial hydrophilicity. This PVS showed increased hydrophilicity with increasing RH. The initial hydrophilicity of impression materials can be influenced by the RH level. Accounting for RH will enhance the clinical relevance of hydrophilicity studies.

  15. Hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Frank; Geis-Gerstorfer, Jurgen

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the initial hydrophilicity of unset and set elastomeric impression materials. Initial water contact angles were studied on thin unset and set films of one polyether and six polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression materials using high-resolution drop shape analysis at drop ages of 1 and 3 seconds. All unset PVS materials were very hydrophobic initially but showed different kinetics of hydrophilization. In contrast, the unset polyether was more hydrophilic initially but lacked distinct hydrophilization. All impression materials showed statistically significant contact angle differences between unset and set surfaces (P < .05). Dependent on the drop age, two PVS materials reached or exceeded the hydrophilicity of the polyether (P < .05). It can be concluded that studies on the wetting behavior of elastomeric impression materials should consider both the experimental drop age and set and unset material surfaces.

  16. Effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts

    PubMed Central

    Ebadian, Behnaz; Rismanchian, Mansor; Dastgheib, Badrosadat; Bajoghli, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different factors such as impression techniques and materials can affect the passive fit between the superstructure and implant. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different impression materials and techniques on the dimensional accuracy of implant definitive casts. Materials and Methods: Four internal hex implants (Biohorizons Ø4 mm) were placed on a metal maxillary model perpendicular to the horizontal plane in maxillary lateral incisors, right canine and left first premolar areas. Three impression techniques including open tray, closed tray using ball top screw abutments and closed tray using short impression copings and two impression materials (polyether and polyvinyl siloxane) were evaluated (n = 60). The changes in distances between implant analogues in mediolateral (x) and anteroposterior (y) directions and analogue angles in x/z and y/z directions in the horizontal plane on the definitive casts were measured by coordinate measuring machine. The data were analyzed by multivariate two-way analysis of variance and one sample t-test (α = 0.05). Results: No statistical significant differences were observed between different impression techniques and materials. However, deviation and distortion of definitive casts had a significant difference with the master model when short impression copings and polyvinyl siloxane impression material were used (P < 0.05). In open tray technique, there was a significant difference in the rotation of analogs compared with the master model with both impression materials (P < 0.05). Conclusion: There was no difference between open and closed tray impression techniques; however, less distortion and deviation were observed in the open tray technique. In the closed tray impression technique, ball top screw was more accurate than short impression copings. PMID:25878678

  17. An Investigation into the Accuracy of Two Currently Available Dental Impression Materials in the Construction of Cobalt-Chromium Frameworks for Removable Partial Dentures.

    PubMed

    Dubal, Rajesh Kumar; Friel, Tim; Taylor, Philip D

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the suitability of irreversible hydrocolloid as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction. Scans of casts derived from (1) alginate and (2) addition-cured polyvinylsiloxane impressions were superposed on to a control. The differences within and between groups were compared at fixed landmarks. The investigation revealed a high degree of scan coincidence within and between groups. However, certain features, such as undercuts, resulted in a lower degree of scan coincidence. Irreversible hydrocolloid appears to be a viable alternative to addition-cured polyvinyl-siloxane as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction.

  18. Three-dimensional assessment of dental casts' occlusal surfaces using two impression materials.

    PubMed

    Tarawneh, F M; Panos, P G; Athanasiou, A E

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess by means of a three-dimensional computed tomography scanning system the occlusal surface characteristics of dental casts made using two different impression materials. Alginate and polyvinyl siloxane impressions were taken of 20 dental students resulting in 40 dental casts. The casts were paired for each student separately so that each pair consisted of an alginate poured cast and a polyvinyl siloxane poured out cast. The casts were scanned using FlashCT scanner and for each cast, a three-dimensional digital image was obtained. The digitized casts were processed using the three-dimensional imaging software Geomagic Studio 9. A total of 464 paired teeth were digitally separated and superimposed. For each tooth, two measurements were obtained corresponding to the two different impression materials used. The two sets of volumes for all digitally separated teeth were compared and analysed using the Wilcoxon signed test. Larger volume measurements were obtained for teeth separated from alginate poured out casts than from their corresponding ones from polyvinyl siloxane casts (P = 0.005). When the teeth were divided into the groups of incisors, canines and premolars/molars, only the last one exhibited significant difference (P = 0.00). The mean difference between the volumes measured for all 464 teeth separated was 0.041 mm(3) (+/-0.33). The occlusal surfaces of teeth appear differently in dental casts depending on the impression materials used. Impressions of dental casts should be utilized with caution in relation to their research application and in reference with dental wear studies.

  19. Preservation of the negative image of tooth enamel with dental impression material enhances morphometric measurements of gingival overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marian L; Andringa, Anastasia; Turner, Lloyd T; Dalton, Timothy P; Derkenne, Sandrine; Nebert, Daniel W

    2003-04-01

    Gingival overgrowth is a common health problem caused by genetic and environmental risk factors. Animal models for quantitative histological studies are needed to uncover genetic predisposition and dose-response data that might put individuals at increased risk for gingival disease. Gingival height, thickness, inflammation, and the degree of encroachment of gingiva over the tooth, are clinical measures of overgrowth; most of these parameters can be measured histologically, but in order to quantify gingival coverage of the tooth, the image of the crown must be present. Tooth and bone typically require decalcification for histology; thus, the tooth crown, a critical landmark, is lost. We describe a method for imaging the crown histologically, using impression materials applied to dissected mouse mandibles. Four dental alginates, three polyvinyl siloxanes, and one polyether and gelatin were used. The impression-material/mandibular tissue blocks were processed routinely. Polyvinyl siloxanes were incompatible with embedding resin; alginates, polyether and gelatin could be fixed, decalcified, embedded, and sectioned. Alginates and gelatin could be stained. Success in imaging the tooth crown varied with the preparation, but the alginates, polyether, and gelatin permitted a useful degree of measurement of exposed crown and enamel thickness, along with other morphometric parameters such as thickness of the dentin, lateral mandibular ramus, rete pegs, height of the gingiva, and volume density of vessels and inflammatory cells in the lamina propria. In conclusion, this new application for impression materials allows gingival coverage of tooth crown, as well as numerous other parameters to be measured for comparison with clinical data.

  20. Accuracy of different impression materials in parallel and nonparallel implants

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Torabi, Kianoosh; Ansarifard, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background: A precise impression is mandatory to obtain passive fit in implant-supported prostheses. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of three impression materials in both parallel and nonparallel implant positions. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two partial dentate maxillary acrylic models with four implant analogues in canines and lateral incisors areas were used. One model was simulating the parallel condition and the other nonparallel one, in which implants were tilted 30° bucally and 20° in either mesial or distal directions. Thirty stone casts were made from each model using polyether (Impregum), additional silicone (Monopren) and vinyl siloxanether (Identium), with open tray technique. The distortion values in three-dimensions (X, Y and Z-axis) were measured by coordinate measuring machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for data analysis (α = 0.05). Results: Under parallel condition, all the materials showed comparable, accurate casts (P = 0.74). In the presence of angulated implants, while Monopren showed more accurate results compared to Impregum (P = 0.01), Identium yielded almost similar results to those produced by Impregum (P = 0.27) and Monopren (P = 0.26). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, in parallel conditions, the type of impression material cannot affect the accuracy of the implant impressions; however, in nonparallel conditions, polyvinyl siloxane is shown to be a better choice, followed by vinyl siloxanether and polyether respectively. PMID:26288620

  1. Effect of splinting in accuracy of two implant impression techniques.

    PubMed

    de Avila, Erica Dorigatti; de Matos Moraes, Fernanda; Castanharo, Sabrina Maria; Del'Acqua, Marcelo Antonialli; de Assis Mollo, Francisco

    2014-12-01

    Because there is no consensus in the literature about the need for a splint between copings, the aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the accuracy of 2 impression techniques for implant-supported prostheses. A master cast was fabricated with four parallel implant abutment analogs and a passive framework. Two groups with 5 casts each were formed: Group 1 (squared impression copings with no splint: S) and Group 2 (splinted squared impression copings, using metal drill burs and Pattern resin: SS). The impression material used was polyvinyl siloxane with open trays for standard preparation of the casts. For each cast, the framework was positioned, and a titanium screw was tightened with 10 N·cm torque in analog A, after which measurements of the abutment-framework interface gaps were performed at analogs C and D. This process was repeated for analog D. These measurements were analyzed using software. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a confidence interval of 95% was used to analyze the data. Significant differences were detected between S and SS in relation to the master cast (P ≤ 0.05). The median values of the abutment-framework interface gaps were as follows: master cast: 39.64 μm; squared impression copings with no splint: 205.86 μm; splinted squared impression copings: 99.19 μm. Under the limitations of this study, the technique presented for Group 2 produces better results compared with the technique used for Group 1.

  2. Polyimides containing pendent siloxane groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Novel polyimides containing pendent siloxane groups (PISOX) were prepared by the reaction of functionalized siloxane compounds with hydroxy containing polyimides (PIOH). The pendent siloxane groups on the polyimide backbone offer distinct advantages such as lowering the dielectric constant and moisture resistance and enhanced atomic oxygen resistance. The siloxane containing polyimides are potentially useful as protective silicon oxide coatings and are useful for a variety of applications where atomic oxygen resistance is needed.

  3. Three-dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques for dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Nakhaei, Mohammadreza; Madani, Azam S; Moraditalab, Azizollah; Haghi, Hamidreza Rajati

    2015-01-01

    Background: Accurate impression making is an essential prerequisite for achieving a passive fit between the implant and the superstructure. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the three-dimensional accuracy of open-tray and three closed-tray impression techniques. Materials and Methods: Three acrylic resin mandibular master models with four parallel implants were used: Biohorizons (BIO), Straumann tissue-level (STL), and Straumann bone-level (SBL). Forty-two putty/wash polyvinyl siloxane impressions of the models were made using open-tray and closed-tray techniques. Closed-tray impressions were made using snap-on (STL model), transfer coping (TC) (BIO model) and TC plus plastic cap (TC-Cap) (SBL model). The impressions were poured with type IV stone, and the positional accuracy of the implant analog heads in each dimension (x, y and z axes), and the linear displacement (ΔR) were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey tests (α = 0.05). Results: The ΔR values of the snap-on technique were significantly lower than those of TC and TC-Cap techniques (P < 0.001). No significant differences were found between closed and open impression techniques for STL in Δx, Δy, Δz and ΔR values (P = 0.444, P = 0.181, P = 0.835 and P = 0.911, respectively). Conclusion: Considering the limitations of this study, the snap-on implant-level impression technique resulted in more three-dimensional accuracy than TC and TC-Cap, but it was similar to the open-tray technique. PMID:26604956

  4. Siloxane-grafted membranes

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, D.T.; Obligin, A.S.

    1989-10-31

    Composite cellulosic semipermeable membranes are disclosed which are the covalently bonded reaction product of an asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membrane and a polysiloxane containing reactive functional group. The two reactants chemically bond by ether, ester, amide or acrylate linkages to form a siloxane-grafted cellulosic membrane having superior selectivity and flux stability. Selectivity may be enhanced by wetting the surface with a swelling agent such as water.

  5. Siloxane-grafted membranes

    DOEpatents

    Friesen, Dwayne T.; Obligin, Alan S.

    1989-01-01

    Composite cellulosic semipermeable membranes are disclosed which are the covalently bonded reaction product of an asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membrane and a polysiloxane containing reactive functional groups. The two reactants chemically bond by ether, ester, amide or acrylate linkages to form a siloxane-grafted cellulosic membrane having superior selectivity and flux stability. Selectivity may be enhanced by wetting the surface with a swelling agent such as water.

  6. Accuracy of Implant Position Transfer and Surface Detail Reproduction with Different Impression Materials and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alikhasi, Marzieh; Siadat, Hakimeh; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of implant position transfer and surface detail reproduction using two impression techniques and materials. Materials and Methods: A metal model with two implants and three grooves of 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75 mm in depth on the flat superior surface of a die was fabricated. Ten regular-body polyether (PE) and 10 regular-body polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impressions with square and conical transfer copings using open tray and closed tray techniques were made for each group. Impressions were poured with type IV stone, and linear and angular displacements of the replica heads were evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Also, accurate reproduction of the grooves was evaluated by a video measuring machine (VMM). These measurements were compared with the measurements calculated on the reference model that served as control, and the data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and t-test at P= 0.05. Results: There was less linear displacement for PVS and less angular displacement for PE in closed-tray technique, and less linear displacement for PE in open tray technique (P<0.001). Also, the open tray technique showed less angular displacement with the use of PVS impression material. Detail reproduction accuracy was the same in all the groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: The open tray technique was more accurate using PE, and also both closed tray and open tray techniques had acceptable results with the use of PVS. The choice of impression material and technique made no significant difference in surface detail reproduction. PMID:27252761

  7. Comparison of dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced from scanned impressions and scanned stone casts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subeihi, Haitham

    Introduction: Digital models of dental arches play a more and more important role in dentistry. A digital dental model can be generated by directly scanning intraoral structures, by scanning a conventional impression of oral structures or by scanning a stone cast poured from the conventional impression. An accurate digital scan model is a fundamental part for the fabrication of dental restorations. Aims: 1. To compare the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced by scanning of impressions versus scanning of stone casts. 2. To compare the dimensional accuracy of digital dental models produced by scanning of impressions made of three different materials (polyvinyl siloxane, polyether or vinyl polyether silicone). Methods and Materials: This laboratory study included taking addition silicone, polyether and vinyl polyether silicone impressions from an epoxy reference model that was created from an original typodont. Teeth number 28 and 30 on the typodont with a missing tooth number 29 were prepared for a metal-ceramic three-unit fixed dental prosthesis with tooth #29 being a pontic. After tooth preparation, an epoxy resin reference model was fabricated by duplicating the typodont quadrant that included the tooth preparations. From this reference model 12 polyvinyl siloxane impressions, 12 polyether impressions and 12 vinyl polyether silicone impressions were made. All 36 impressions were scanned before pouring them with dental stone. The 36 dental stone casts were, in turn, scanned to produce digital models. A reference digital model was made by scanning the reference model. Six groups of digital models were produced. Three groups were made by scanning of the impressions obtained with the three different materials, the other three groups involved the scanning of the dental casts that resulted from pouring the impressions made with the three different materials. Groups of digital models were compared using Root Mean

  8. Siloxane materials for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Kai; DeGroot, Jon V., Jr.; Norris, Ann W.; Lo, Peter Y.

    2006-01-01

    Siloxanes, which can be viewed as hybrids of glass and organic materials, have been used to fabricate polymer waveguides and devices that exploit the large thermo-optical effect of this material. Siloxanes have many unique properties including good thermal stability, chemical resistance, tunable refractive index, tunable mechanical properties and excellent photo-stability. The refractive index of siloxane polymer is composition dependent and generally ranges from 1.4 to 1.54. Introduction of porosity or composition modification can further expand refractive index range to 1.15~1.63. The loss and absorption characteristics for a variety of silicone-based polymers are examined and an example of a UV curable polymer coating illustrates the flexibility of the silicone polymer family to be tailored to meet specific application needs.

  9. First Impressions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coen, Frank

    1969-01-01

    The unreliability of first impressions and subjective judgments is the subject of both Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice" and Lionel Trilling's "Of This Time, Of That Place"; consequently, the works are worthwhile parallel studies for high school students. Austen, by means of irony and subtle characterization, dramatizes the…

  10. Dinosaur Impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Philippe

    1998-09-01

    Perhaps you are a paleontologist or have always wondered what it is like to be one. Or you are fascinated by fossils and like to read about the origins and natural history of dinosaurs. Or maybe you are an avid traveler and reader of travelogues. If you are any of these things, then this book is for you. Originally published in 1994 in French, Dinosaur Impressions is the engaging account of thirty years of travel and paleontological exploration by Philippe Taquet, one of the world's most noted paleontologists. Dr. Taquet takes the reader on a surprisingly far-flung tour ranging from the Provence countryside to the Niger desert, from the Brazilian bush to the Mongolian Steppes, and from the Laos jungle to the Moroccan mountains in search of dinosaur bones and what they have to tell us about a vanished world. With wry humor and lively anecdotes, Dr. Taquet retraces the history of paleontological research, along the way discussing the latest theories of dinosaur existence and extinction. Elegantly translated by Kevin Padian, Dinosaur Impressions provides a unique, thoughtful perspective not often encountered in American- and English-language works. This insightful, first-hand account of an exceptional career is also a travelogue par excellence that will enthrall enthusiasts and general readers alike. Philippe Taquet is the Director of the National Museum of Natural History in Paris and is a member of the French Academy of Sciences. Kevin Padian is a professor in the Department of Integrative Biology and Curator of the Museum of Paleontology at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also the editor of The Beginning of the Age of Dinosaurs (Cambridge, 1986) and The Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs (1997).

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, Topographical Modification, and Surface Properties of Copoly(Imide Siloxane)s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Atkins, Brad M.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Connell, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Novel copoly(imide siloxane)s were synthesized from commercially available aminopropyl terminated siloxane oligomers, aromatic dianhydrides, and diamines. This synthetic approach produced copolymers with well-defined siloxane blocks linked with imide units in a random fashion. The copoly(amide acid)s were characterized by solution viscosity and subsequently used to cast thin films followed by thermal imidization in an inert atmosphere. Thin films were characterized using contact angle goniometry, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, confocal and optical microscopy, and tensile testing. Adhesion of micronsized particles was determined quantitatively using a sonication device. The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) moieties lowered the copolymer surface energy due to migration of siloxane moieties to the film s surface, resulting in a notable reduction in particle adhesion. A further reduction in particle adhesion was achieved by introducing topographical features on a scale of several to tens of microns by a laser ablation technique.

  12. 40 CFR 721.10119 - Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10119 Siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified silica nanoparticles (PMN P-05-673) is subject to reporting under this...

  13. Direct Human Contact with Siloxanes (Silicones) – Safety or Risk Part 1. Characteristics of Siloxanes (Silicones)

    PubMed Central

    Mojsiewicz-Pieńkowska, Krystyna; Jamrógiewicz, Marzena; Szymkowska, Katarzyna; Krenczkowska, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Siloxanes are commonly known as silicones. They belong to the organosilicon compounds and are exclusively obtained by synthesis. Their chemical structure determines a range of physicochemical properties which were recognized as unique. Due to the susceptibility to chemical modifications, ability to create short, long or complex polymer particles, siloxanes found an application in many areas of human life. Siloxanes differ in particle size, molecular weight, shape and chemical groups. As a result, this determines the different physico-chemical properties, that directly affect the safety or the risk of their use. The areas that can be a source of danger to human health will be commented in this paper. PMID:27303296

  14. Self-assembling particle-siloxane coatings for superhydrophobic concrete.

    PubMed

    Flores-Vivian, Ismael; Hejazi, Vahid; Kozhukhova, Marina I; Nosonovsky, Michael; Sobolev, Konstantin

    2013-12-26

    We report here, for the first time in the literature, a method to synthesize hydrophobic and superhydrophobic concrete. Concrete is normally a hydrophilic material, which significantly reduces the durability of concrete structures and pavements. To synthesize water-repellent concrete, hydrophobic emulsions were fabricated and applied on portland cement mortar tiles. The emulsion was enriched with the polymethyl-hydrogen siloxane oil hydrophobic agent as well as metakaolin (MK) or silica fume (SF) to induce the microroughness and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers to create hierarchical surfaces. Various emulsion types were investigated by using different mixing procedures, and single- and double-layer hydrophobic coatings were applied. The emulsions and coatings were characterized with optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and their wetting properties, including the water contact angle (CA) and roll-off angle, were measured. A theoretical model for coated and non-coated concrete, which can be generalized for other types of materials, was developed to predict the effect of surface roughness and composition on the CA. An optimized distance between the aggregates was found where the CA has the highest value. The maximal CA measured was 156° for the specimen with PVA fibers treated with MK based emulsion. Since water penetration is the main factor leading to concrete deterioration, hydrophobic water-repellent concretes have much longer durability then regular concretes and can have a broad range of applications in civil and materials engineering.

  15. Copoly(Imide Siloxane) Abhesive Materials with Varied Siloxane Oligomer Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christopher J.; Atkins, Brad M.; Belcher, Marcus A.; Connell, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Incorporation of PDMS moieties into a polyimide matrix lowered the surface energy resulting in enhanced adhesive interactions. Polyimide siloxane materials were generated using amine-terminated PDMS oligomers of different lengths to study changes in surface migration behavior, phase segregation, mechanical, thermal, and optical properties. These materials were characterized using contact angle goniometry, tensile testing, and differential scanning calorimetry. The surface migration behavior of the PDMS component depended upon the siloxane molecular weight as indicated by distinct relationships between PDMS chain length and advancing water contact angles. Similar correlations were observed for percent elongation values obtained from tensile testing, while the addition of PDMS reduced the modulus. High fidelity topographical modification via laser ablation patterning further reduced the polyimide siloxane surface energy. Initial particulate adhesion testing experiments demonstrated that polyimide siloxane materials exhibited greater abhesive interactions relative to their respective homopolyimides.

  16. Copoly(imide siloxane) Abhesive Materials with Varied Siloxane Oligomer Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, Christoper J.; Atkins, Brad M.; Lin, Yi; Belcher, Marcus A.; Connell, John W.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, low surface energy copoly(imide siloxane)s were synthesized with various siloxane segment lengths. Characterization of these materials revealed that domain formation of the low surface energy component within the matrix was more prevalent for longer siloxane segments as indicated by increased opacity, decreased mechanical properties, and variation of the Tg. Incorporation of siloxanes lowered the polymer s surface energy as indicated by water contact angle values. Topographical modification of these materials by laser ablation patterning further reduced the surface energy, even generating superhydrophobic surfaces. Combined, the contact angle data and particle adhesion testing indicated that copoly(imide siloxane) materials may provide greater mitigation to particulate adhesion than polyimide materials alone. These enhanced surface properties for abhesive applications did result in a reduction of the tensile moduli of the copolymers. It is possible that lower siloxane loading levels would result in retention of the mechanical properties of the polyimide while still affording abhesive surface properties. This hypothesis is currently being investigated. Laser ablation patterning offers further reduction in particle retention as the available surface area for particle adhesion is reduced. Pattern variation and size dependencies are currently being evaluated. For the purposes of lunar dust adhesion mitigation, it is likely that this approach, termed passive due to the lack of input from an external energy source, would not be sufficient to mitigate surface contamination or clean contaminated surfaces for some lunar applications. It is feasible to combine these materials with active mitigation strategies - methods that utilize input from external energy sources - would broaden the applicability of such materials for abhesive purposes. Collaborative efforts along these lines have been initiated with researchers at NASA Kennedy Space Center where experiments

  17. Siloxane treatment by adsorption into porous materials.

    PubMed

    Ricaurte Ortega, D; Subrenat, A

    2009-09-01

    Siloxanes are widely used in different applications: health care, dry cleaning, household products, paints and coatings, paper, personal care, for example. This explains their prevalence in the environment. Because of their volatile nature, most of the time they are dispersed in the atmosphere, but they can also be present in the slurry from landfills. During anaerobic digestion, when the temperature goes up to 60 degrees C, siloxanes are volatilized, forming part of the biogas. Operational problems using biogas to produce energy, heat and hydrogen have been identified. At high temperatures the siloxanes are transformed into silicate dioxide (commonly called sand transmission). These white deposits may adhere to metal or catalytic substrate surfaces, seriously reducing equipment efficiency, and this can be a reason for changing equipment warranties. Consequently, elimination of siloxanes has become very important. Unfortunately, relatively little information can be found on this subject. Nevertheless some authors have described different analytical methods for siloxane quantification, and recent studies have looked at the presence of siloxanes in landfills and the restriction on the energy recovery equipment using the biogas produced. The growing consumption of siloxanes and silicones in industrial processes consequently increase their prevalence in the environment, hampering the use of biogas as a source of 'green energy'. Therefore, the principal focus of this study is the treatment of siloxanes. Their elimination was carried out using an adsorption process with four different porous materials: activated carbon cloths (ACC), granular activated carbon (GAC), zeolite and silica gel. Two representative siloxane compounds were used in this study, hexamethyldisiloxane (L2) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4). Adsorption kinetics and isotherms in batch reactors were performed. It was observed that the mass transfer into the porous material was more rapid for the

  18. Basilar impression in children.

    PubMed

    Teodori, J B; Painter, M J

    1984-12-01

    Ataxia is a common neurologic sign in childhood. Basilar impression due to bony abnormalities of the craniovertebral junction is an uncommon but readily treatable cause of ataxia in children. Two children who had neck stiffness, ataxia, nystagmus, and corticospinal tract signs are described. Basilar impression was recognized only after specific radiologic studies were performed. Both children were treated surgically with good results.

  19. ETI: Our first impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Albert A.; Johnson, Joel T.

    2000-06-01

    Despite scant or ambiguous information, people are capable of developing comprehensive and detailed impressions. Consequently, if the detection of an electromagnetically-active civilization is announced, many people will rapidly form impressions of what the extraterrestrials and their civilization are "like". First impressions are crucial, not only because of their immediate psychological, social, and political consequences on Earth, but because they can influence the future of interstellar communication. Initial impressions will rest less on hard data than on the nature and tone of the "evidence" that is gleaned from the transmission; the interpretation and dissemination of this evidence; and the hard wiring, psychological programming, cultural conditioning, and social influence processes that shape human perception. We consider how dispositional inferences, implicit theories of personality, negatively toned or adverse information, physical appearance, prior expectations, the confirmation bias, and thinking and unthinking approaches to attitude formation are likely to affect human impressions of ETI.

  20. Recording surface detail on moist surfaces with elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    McCabe, J F; Carrick, T E

    2006-03-01

    The objective was to assess the ability to accurately record detail on moist surfaces for three elastomeric impression materials derived from different polymers. One polyvinylsiloxane, one polyether and one hybrid material containing a copolymer of siloxane and polyether polymers were used. Impressions were recorded of moist gypsum casts having both a shallow (approximately 20 microm) and deep (approximately 180 microm) groove reproduced on their surface. The grooves in the casts and in the impressions were profiled using a non-contacting laser profilometer Comparisons were made between the groove depths in the casts and impressions (paired t-test). The results indicated that all of the tested materials accurately recorded dimensions in the x-y plane. However, there was evidence that the polyether and hybrid materials were more accurate than the polyvinylsiloxane in recording the true depths of the deep grooves (z plane) under moist conditions. It was concluded that the more hydrophilic nature of the polyether and hybrid materials enabled them to record more accurate impressions of moist surfaces, particularly in areas of difficult access as modelled by the deep grooves.

  1. Impression block with orientator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilin, V. I.; Ulyanova, O. S.

    2015-02-01

    Tool review, namely the impression block, applied to check the shape and size of the top of fish as well as to determine the appropriate tool for fishing operation was realized. For multiple application and obtaining of the impress depth of 3 cm and more, the standard volumetric impression blocks with fix rods are used. However, the registered impress of fish is not oriented in space and the rods during fishing are in the extended position. This leads to rods deformation and sinking due to accidental impacts of impression block over the borehole irregularity and finally results in faulty detection of the top end of fishing object in hole. The impression blocks with copy rods and fixed magnetic needle allow estimating the object configuration and fix the position of magnetic needle determining the position of the top end of object in hole. However, the magnetic needle fixation is realized in staged and the rods are in extended position during fishing operations as well as it is in standard design. The most efficient tool is the impression block with copy rods which directs the examined object in the borehole during readings of magnetic needles data from azimuth plate and averaging of readings. This significantly increases the accuracy of fishing toll direction. The rods during fishing are located in the body and extended only when they reach the top of fishing object.

  2. [Impression technics in implantology].

    PubMed

    Vanheusden, A

    2001-01-01

    The implant-borne prostheses have become an integral part of the oral rehabilitation procedures. The aim of this article is to describe the most current impression techniques for oral implant prosthetics used at the University of Liège, Belgium. Impression protocols adapted to various prosthetic procedures are described step-by-step through several clinical cases. Emphasis is put on the means necessary for achieving a precise adaptation and a passive fit of the final prosthetic suprastructure.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10120 - Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nanoparticles (generic). 721.10120 Section 721.10120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10120 Siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (generic). (a) Chemical... as siloxane modified alumina nanoparticles (PMN P-05-687) is subject to reporting under this...

  4. How the adoption of impression management goals alters impression formation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Bryan; Poposki, Elizabeth M

    2010-11-01

    Five experiments (N = 390) tested the hypothesis that adopting an impression management goal leads the impression manager to view an interaction partner as having less of the trait he or she is attempting to express. This hypothesis was confirmed for the impression management goals of appearing introverted, extraverted, smart, confident, and happy. Experiment 2 shows that adoption of the impression goal could alter judgments even when participants could not act on the goal. Experiment 3 provides evidence that adopting an impression management goal prompted a comparison mind-set and that this comparison mind-set activation mediated target judgments. Experiment 4 rules out a potential alternative explanation and provides more direct evidence that comparison of the impression manager's self-concept mediates the impression of the target. Experiment 5 eliminates a potential confound and extends the effect to another impression goal. These experiments highlight the dynamic interplay between impression management and impression formation.

  5. [Elastomeric impression materials].

    PubMed

    Levartovsky, S; Folkman, M; Alter, E; Pilo, R

    2011-04-01

    Elastomeric impression materials are in common use. The impression taken should be highly precise, thus, requiring specific care when manipulatingthese materials. There are 4 groups of elastomers; polysulfide, condensation silicone, addition silicone and polyether; each differ in their setting mechanism and their physical and chemical properties. This review elaborates the major properties of elastomers and its implications on their use. The impression material is inserted into the patient's mouth in a viscous state and transforms into viscoelastic state, upon withdrawal, influencing the residual deformation. The requirements are minimal residual deformation or maximal elastic recovery. As the mouth is a wet environment a major consideration is hydrophilicity. The wettability which is estimated by measuring either the contact angle of a droplet of water and the substrate post setting or the contact angle of a droplet of impression material and the wet tooth pre setting, determines the interaction of the material with both mouth fluids and gypsum. As the primary end target is to obtain a model depicting accurately the oral details, an attention to the impressions' compatibility with gypsum should also be given. Many studies were conducted to get a thorough understanding of the hydrophilic properties of each material, and the mechanism utilized, such as surfactants in hydrophilic PVS. Polyether is the only material that is truly hydrophilic; it exhibits the lowest contact angle, during and after setting. Recent studies show that during setting the Polyether hydrophilicity is increased compared to the condition after setting. Dimensional stability, a crucial property of the impression, is affected by the physical and chemical attributes of the material, such as its tear strength. Polysulfide has the highest tear strength. Tear Strength is affected by two major parameters, viscosity, a built-in property, and how fast the impression is pulled out of the mouth, the

  6. Fouling-release and chemical activity effects of a siloxane-based material on tunicates.

    PubMed

    Filip, Natalia; Pustam, Amanda; Ells, Veronica; Grosicki, Kathleen M T; Yang, Jin; Oguejiofor, Ikenna; Bishop, Cory D; DeMont, M Edwin; Smith-Palmer, Truis; Wyeth, Russell C

    2016-05-01

    The antifouling performance of a siloxane-based elastomeric impression material (EIM) was compared to that of two silicone fouling-release coatings, Intersleek 757 and RTV-11. In field immersion trials, the EIM caused the greatest reduction in fouling by the solitary tunicate Ciona intestinalis and caused the longest delay in the progression of fouling by two species of colonial tunicate. However, in pseudobarnacle adhesion tests, the EIM had higher attachment strengths. Further laboratory analyses showed that the EIM leached alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs) that were toxic to C. intestinalis larvae. The EIM thus showed the longest duration of chemical activity measured to date for a siloxane-based coating (4 months), supporting investigations of fouling-release coatings that release targeted biocides. However, due to potential widespread effects of APEs, the current EIM formulation should not be considered as an environmentally-safe antifoulant. Thus, the data also emphasize consideration of both immediate and long-term effects of potentially toxic constituents released from fouling-release coatings.

  7. Virtual First Impressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2005-01-01

    Frequently, a nurse's first and only contact with a graduate school, legislator, public health official, professional organization, or school nursing colleague is made through e-mail. The format, the content, and the appearance of the e-mail create a virtual first impression. Nurses can manage their image and the image of the profession by…

  8. Airbag Impressions in Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows where the rover's airbags left impressions in the martian soil. The drag marks were made after the rover successfully landed at Meridiani Planum and its airbags were retracted. The rover can be seen in the foreground.

  9. Amino-siloxane composition and methods of using the same

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Michael Joseph; Farnum, Rachel Lizabeth; Perry, Robert James

    2016-08-30

    An amino-siloxane composition is presented. The amino-siloxane composition includes structure (I): ##STR00001## wherein R.sup.1 is independently at each occurrence a C.sub.1-C.sub.5 aliphatic radical; R.sup.2 is a C.sub.3-C.sub.4 aliphatic radical; R.sup.3 is a C.sub.1-C.sub.5 aliphatic radical or R.sup.4, wherein R.sup.4 comprises structure (II): ##STR00002## and X is an electron donating group. Methods of reducing an amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream using the amino-siloxane composition are also presented.

  10. Experimental studies of siloxane polymers and their elastomeric networks

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Chung Mien

    1992-12-31

    Siloxane polymers have been investigated systematically for the purpose of a greater understanding of the structure-property relationships in terms of their synthesis, polymer blends and rubber elasticity of their crosslinked networks. This study includes a variety of topological structures: linear, cyclic and crosslinked networks of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and poly(dimethylco-methylphenylsiloxane) copolymers. Siloxane polymers with a narrow molecular weight distribution were prepared by a series of well-characterized organometallic polymerizations. The reaction conditions and mechanisms for preparing polyorganosiloxane chains and networks using organotin catalyst and promoters were discussed. Experimental evidence shows that formamide was one of the best additives to improve the reactivity of the tin dicarboxylate catalyst, which seems to suggest that the nucleophilic function of the additive was on the Sn atom. Since the PDMS and PMPS are immiscible under most conditions, the miscibility and phase behavior of siloxane blends were studied by a static light scattering t technique. THe influence of molar mass, the topological effect of cyclic and linear structures, the end-group effect, and the configurational isomerism effect on miscibility were examined. Silicon networks of PDMS, PMPS and their copolymers were prepared at room temperature using the crosslinked siloxane homopolymer and copolymer networks at equilibrium swelling in organic solvents and in liquid siloxane oligomers were investigated as function of crosslinking density and composition variation. The resulting interaction parameters for PDMS and PMPS from the swollen siloxane networks in siloxane oligomers individually were compared with those from measurements of the corresponding blend systems. Moreover, the stress-strain behavior of the siloxane polymer networks undergoing uniaxial deformation were evaluated by a stress-strain experiment.

  11. Tool for Taking Clay Impressions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Clay impression of small parts taken with tool consisting of hollow tube closed at one end. Slots at other end admit part short distance into tube. Impression used to make silicone rubber mold for examination.

  12. Complete arch implant impression technique.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junping; Rubenstein, Jeffrey E

    2012-06-01

    When making a definitive impression for an arch containing multiple implants, there are many reported techniques for splinting impression copings. This article introduces a splint technique that uses the shim method, which has been demonstrated to reduce laboratory and patient chair time, the number of impression copings and laboratory analogs needed, and the ultimate cost.

  13. Substance Use as Impression Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Mark J.; Getz, J. Greg

    1996-01-01

    Examines the function of substance use as an impression management tactic. Introductory psychology students (n=377) responded to a survey instrument measuring self-monitoring, perceived success in impression management, interaction anxiety, and self-esteem. Results suggest that alcohol use may serve an impression management function. (JPS)

  14. Dental impression materials.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that many impression materials are available to the veterinary dentist. They each have different inherent properties, handling characteristics, and indications for use. A thorough understanding of these concepts is essential if the veterinarian and laboratory technician are to produce meaningful and accurate reproductions of oral structures. New products are constantly being introduced to the dental market, with fantastic claims for ease of use and reproduction of detail. The reader is urged to seek independent research findings when assessing such claims, and make decisions founded in the highest possible levels of evidence.

  15. Multimode siloxane polymer components for optical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamiedakis, Nikolaos; Beals, Joseph, IV; Penty, Richard V.; White, Ian H.; DeGroot, Jon v., Jr.; Clapp, Terry V.; De Shazer, David

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of multimode waveguides and waveguide components formed from siloxane polymer materials which are suitable for use in optical interconnection applications. The components can be cost-effectively integrated onto conventional PCBs and offer increased functionality in optical transmission. The multimode waveguides exhibit low loss (0.04 dB/cm at 850 nm) and low crosstalk (< -30 dB) performance, large alignment tolerances and negligible mode mixing for short waveguide lengths. Error-free data transmission at 10 Gb/s over 1.4 m long waveguides has been successfully demonstrated. Waveguide crossings exhibit very low excess losses, below 0.01 dB/crossing, and excellent crosstalk performance. Low loss is obtained for waveguide bends with radii of curvature larger than 8 mm and 6 mm for 90° and S-shaped bends respectively. High-uniformity splitting is achieved with multimode Y-splitters even in the presence of input misalignments. Y-combiners are shown to benefit from the multimode nature of the waveguides allowing low loss combining (4 dB for an 8×1 device). A large range of power splitting ratios between 30% and 75% is achieved with multimode coupler devices. Examples of system applications benefiting from the use of these components are briefly presented including a terabit capacity optical backplane, a radio-over-fibre multicasting system and a SCM passive optical network.

  16. Hybrid scaffold bearing polymer-siloxane Schiff base linkage for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nair, Bindu P; Gangadharan, Dhanya; Mohan, Neethu; Sumathi, Babitha; Nair, Prabha D

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolds that can provide the requisite biological cues for the fast regeneration of bone are highly relevant to the advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In the present article, we report the fabrication of a chitosan-gelatin-siloxane scaffold bearing interpolymer-siloxane Schiff base linkage, through a single-step dialdehyde cross-linking and freeze-drying method using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane as the siloxane precursor. Swelling of the scaffolds in phosphate buffered saline indicates enhancement with increase in siloxane concentration, whereas compressive moduli of the wet scaffolds reveal inverse dependence, owing to the presence of siloxane, rich in silanol groups. It is suggested that through the strategy of dialdehyde cross-linking, a limiting siloxane loading of 20 wt.% into a chitosan -gelatin matrix should be considered ideal for bone tissue engineering, because the scaffold made with 30 wt.% siloxane loading degrades by 48 wt.%, in 21 days. The hybrid scaffolds bearing Schiff base linkage between the polymer and siloxane, unlike the stable linkages in earlier reports, are expected to give a faster release of siloxanes and enhancement in osteogenesis. This is verified by the in vitro evaluation of the hybrid scaffolds using rabbit adipose mesenchymal stem cells, which revealed osteogenic cell-clusters on a polymer-siloxane scaffold, enhanced alkaline phosphatase activity and the expression of bone-specific genes, whereas the control scaffold without siloxane supported more of cell-proliferation than differentiation. A siloxane concentration dependent enhancement in osteogenic differentiation is also observed.

  17. 40 CFR 721.9502 - Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl, fluorooctyl, hydroxy-terminated salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9502 Siloxanes and silicones... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as siloxanes and...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9502 - Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl, fluorooctyl, hydroxy-terminated salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9502 Siloxanes and silicones... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as siloxanes and...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9502 - Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl, fluorooctyl, hydroxy-terminated salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9502 Siloxanes and silicones... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as siloxanes and...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9502 - Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl, fluorooctyl, hydroxy-terminated salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9502 Siloxanes and silicones... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as siloxanes and...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9502 - Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl, fluorooctyl, hydroxy-terminated salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, aminoalkyl... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9502 Siloxanes and silicones... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as siloxanes and...

  2. Hydrophilic vinyl polysiloxane impression materials.

    PubMed

    Sadan, Avishai

    2005-06-01

    VPS impression materials that contain a surfactant cannot be considered as hydrophilic, rather they are probably less hydrophobic. More VPS products that contain surfactants are expected to be introduced to the market. It is yet to be proven that surfactant-containing VPS materials have a better wettability than polyether-based impression materials. The current data still indicates that polyethers are more hydrophilic. The less hydrophobic behavior of the surfactant-containing VPS may provide a significant advantage in clinical practice. Due to this advantage, the author suggests that clinicians using VPS as their preferred elastomeric impression material should consider switching to surfactant-containing VPS impression materials.

  3. Occurrence of cyclic and linear siloxanes in indoor dust from China, and implications for human exposures.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Yuan, Tao; Yun, Se Hun; Wang, Wenhua; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2010-08-15

    Siloxanes are used in a wide variety of personal-care and other consumer products. Although there is clearly a potential for contamination of indoor dust with siloxanes, reports of occurrence of siloxanes in indoor dust were not available, prior to the present study. Here, we have determined the concentrations and profiles of four cyclic siloxanes, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D(4)), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D(5)), dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D(6)), and tetradecamethylcycloheptasiloxane (D(7)), as well as 11 linear siloxanes, from L(4)-L(14), in 100 dust samples collected in China. Cyclic and linear siloxanes were found in all dust samples, with the linear siloxanes L(9)-L(14) being the predominant compounds. Concentrations of total siloxanes in dust ranged from 21.5 to 21,000 (mean: 1540 +/- 2850) ng g(-1). The highest concentration of the individual linear siloxanes, L(9)-L(14), ranged between 2680 and 6170 ng g(-1). Concentrations of total linear siloxanes (TLS) were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than concentrations of total cyclic siloxanes (TCS), in all indoor dust samples. Siloxane concentrations in dust were associated with the number of electrical/electronic appliances, number of occupants, and smokers living in the house. Based on the measured siloxane concentrations and on estimated daily ingestion rates of dust by toddlers and adults, we calculated the daily intake of siloxanes. For adults, daily exposure to total siloxanes, based on an average dust intake rate and median exposure concentration, was calculated to be 15.9 ng day(-1); the corresponding value for toddlers was 32.8 ng d(-1).

  4. Synthesis and characterization of siloxane sulfobetaine antimicrobial agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shiguo; Chen, Shaojun; Jiang, Song; Mo, Yangmiao; Tang, Jiaoning; Ge, Zaochuan

    In this paper, we report a novel antibacterial agent siloxane sulfobetaine (SSB) with reactive siloxane groups, which can be bonded onto the glass surface, rendering excellent antibacterial activity and good durability. Their antibacterial rate against Escherichia Coli and Staphylococcus aureus reach 99.96% and 99.98%, respectively, within the 24 h contact time. Their antibacterial rates of SSB coated glass surface are still beyond 95.0% after 20 washes. Moreover, SSB does not induce a skin reaction and is nontoxic to animals. Therefore, the SSB has great applications in biomaterial applications requiring durable bacteriostasis.

  5. Making a Great First Impression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evenson, Renee

    2007-01-01

    Managers and business owners often base hiring decisions on first impressions. That is why it is so important to teach students to make a great first impression--before they go on that first job interview. Managers do not have unrealistic expectations, they just want to hire people who they believe can develop into valuable employees. A nice…

  6. Acetylene (ethynyl) terminated polyimide siloxane and process for preparation thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stclair, T. L.; ASI primers applied over ste (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Siloxane containing addition polyimides having improved physical property characteristics of flexibility, drape, tack, and toughness and the process for preparing and utilizing the same are disclosed. The novelty of this invention appears to reside in the composition and process of preparing addition type polyimides useful as structural adhesives as well as composite matrix materials and the process of preparing the same.

  7. From hydrophobic to superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic siloxanes by thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Karapanagiotis, Ioannis; Manoudis, Panagiotis N; Zurba, Andreea; Lampakis, Dimitrios

    2014-11-11

    The cross-influence effects of treatment temperature and time on the wettability of a siloxane elastomer is investigated in detail, through static and tilt contact angle measurements. The material is heated at 400, 500, 600, 650, 700, and 800 °C for various periods, ranging from 1 to 300 s. The siloxane surface is subjected to multiple wettability transitions with treatment time: from intrinsic hydrophobicity to superhydrophobicity (and water repellency) and then through intermediate stages (hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity) to superhydrophilicity. For the time scale used herein (1-300 s), this scenario is recorded for treatment at 650, 700, and 800 °C. For treatment at lower temperatures (400, 500, and 600 °C) only the first transition, from intrinsic hydrophobicity to superhydrophobicity, is recorded. Scanning electron microscopy, micro-Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR), and micro-Raman spectroscopies are employed to correlate the aforementioned wettability transitions with structural and chemical changes of the siloxane surface, developed during thermal treatment. It is shown that the first transition from intrinsic hydrophobicity to superhydrophobicity is accompanied by a severe surface-structure evolution that increases surface roughness. Once superhydrophobicity is achieved, the surface structure reaches a saturation point and it is not subjected to any other change with further thermal treatment. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the intensity of the O-H/C-H peaks increases/decreases with treatment time, and Raman measurements show that the C-Si-C vibrations gradually disappear with treatment time. The evaporation of a droplet resting on a superhydrophobic, water-repellent siloxane surface, which was produced after appropriate thermal treatment, is monitored. It is shown that droplet evaporation initially follows the constant contact area mode. At later evaporation stages, a transition to the constant contact angle mode is recorded. Finally, it is

  8. Ultra-high molecular weight silphenylene-siloxane polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.; Hundley, N. H.; Ludwick, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    Silphenylene-siloxane copolymers with molecular weights above one million were prepared using a two stage polymerization technique. The technique was successfully scaled up to produce 50 grams of this high polymer in a single run. The reactive monomer approach was also investigated using the following aminosilanes: bis(dimethylamino)dimethylsilane, N,N-bis(pyrrolidinyl)dimethylsilane and N,N-bis(gamma-butyrolactam)dimethylsilane). Thermal analyses were performed in both air and nitrogen. The experimental polymers decomposed at 540 to 562 C, as opposed to 408 to 426 C for commercial silicones. Differential scanning calorimetry showed a glass transition (Tg) at -50 to -55 C for the silphenylene-siloxane copolymer while the commercial silicones had Tg's at -96 to -112 C.

  9. Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight Silphenylene/Siloxane Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundley, N. H.; Patterson, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    Elastomers enhance thermal and mechancial properties. Capable of performing in extreme thermal/oxidative environments and having molecular weights above 10 to the sixth power prepared and analyzed in laboratory experiments. Made of methylvinylsilphenylene-siloxane terpolymers, new materials amenable to conventional silicone-processing technology. Similarly formulated commercial methyl-vinyl silicones, vulcanized elastomers exhibit enhance thermal/oxidative stability and equivalent or superior mechanical properties.

  10. Siloxanes removal from biogas by high surface area adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Gislon, P; Galli, S; Monteleone, G

    2013-12-01

    Biogas utilized for energy production needs to be free from organic silicon compounds, as their burning has damaging effects on turbines and engines; organic silicon compounds in the form of siloxanes can be found in biogas produced from urban wastes, due to their massive industrial use in synthetic product, such as cosmetics, detergents and paints. Siloxanes removal from biogas can be carried out by various methods (Mona, 2009; Ajhar et al., 2010 May; Schweigkofler and Niessner, 2001); aim of the present work is to find a single practical and economic way to drastically and simultaneously reduce both the hydrogen sulphide and the siloxanes concentration to less than 1 ppm. Some commercial activated carbons previously selected (Monteleone et al., 2011) as being effective in hydrogen sulfide up taking have been tested in an adsorption measurement apparatus, by flowing the most volatile siloxane (hexamethyldisiloxane or L2) in a nitrogen stream, typically 100-200 ppm L2 over N2, through an activated carbon powder bed; the adsorption process was analyzed by varying some experimental parameters (concentration, grain size, bed height). The best activated carbon shows an adsorption capacity of 0.1g L2 per gram of carbon. The next thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms the capacity data obtained experimentally by the breakthrough curve tests. The capacity results depend on L2 concentration. A regenerative carbon process is then carried out by heating the carbon bed up to 200 °C and flushing out the adsorbed L2 samples in a nitrogen stream in a three step heating procedure up to 200 °C. The adsorption capacity is observed to degrade after cycling the samples through several adsorption-desorption cycles.

  11. An alternative impression technique for mobile teeth.

    PubMed

    Lampraki, Evangelia; Chochlidakis, Konstantinos M; Rossopoulos, Evangelos; Ercoli, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    The impression technique described combines elastomeric impression materials and irreversible hydrocolloid to make an accurate preliminary impression of extremely mobile and misaligned teeth. Upon setting, the materials are removed from the mouth in 3 different directions and reassembled extraorally. This technique provides an alternative, easy, accurate, and safe way to make a preliminary impression of mobile, periodontally involved teeth.

  12. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impression tube. 872.6570 Section 872.6570 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6570 Impression tube. (a) Identification. An impression tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single...

  13. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Impression tube. 872.6570 Section 872.6570 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6570 Impression tube. (a) Identification. An impression tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single...

  14. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Impression tube. 872.6570 Section 872.6570 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6570 Impression tube. (a) Identification. An impression tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single...

  15. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Impression tube. 872.6570 Section 872.6570 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6570 Impression tube. (a) Identification. An impression tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single...

  16. 21 CFR 872.6570 - Impression tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impression tube. 872.6570 Section 872.6570 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6570 Impression tube. (a) Identification. An impression tube is a device consisting of a hollow copper tube intended to take an impression of a single...

  17. Hydrogen peroxide mechanosynthesis in siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Tavazzi, Silvia; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Cozza, Federica; Pastori, Valentina; Lecchi, Marzia; Farris, Stefano; Borghesi, Alessandro

    2014-11-26

    Drug-loaded contact lenses are emerging as the preferred treatment method for several ocular diseases, and efforts are being directed to promote extended and controlled delivery. One strategy is based on delivery induced by environmental triggers. One of these triggers can be hydrogen peroxide, since many platforms based on drug-loaded nanoparticles were demonstrated to be hydrogen-peroxide responsive. This is particularly interesting when hydrogen peroxide is the result of a specific pathophysiological condition. Otherwise, an alternative route to induce drug delivery is here proposed, namely the mechano-synthesis. The present work represents the proof-of-concept of the mechanosynthesis of hydrogen peroxide in siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses as a consequence of the cleavage of siloxane bonds at the interface between the polymer and water in aqueous phase. Their spongy morphology makes contact lenses promising systems for mechanical-to-chemical energy conversion, since the amount of hydrogen peroxide is expected to scale with the interfacial area between the polymer and water. The eyelid pressure during wear is sufficient to induce the hydrogen peroxide synthesis with concentrations which are biocompatible and suitable to trigger the drug release through hydrogen-peroxide-responsive platforms. For possible delivery on demand, the integration of piezoelectric polymers in the siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses could be designed, whose mechanical deformation could be induced by an applied wireless-controlled voltage.

  18. Gamma radiation effects on siloxane-based additive manufactured structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzer, Andrew M.; Cady, Carl M.; Geller, Drew; Ortiz-Acosta, Denisse; Zocco, Adam T.; Stull, Jamie; Labouriau, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Siloxane-basedadditive manufactured structures prepared by the direct ink write (DIW) technology were exposed to ionizing irradiation in order to gauge radiolysis effects on structure-property relationships. These well-defined 3-D structures were subjected to moderate doses of gamma irradiation in an inert atmosphere and characterized by a suite of experimental methods. Changes in thermal, chemical, microstructure, and mechanical properties were evaluated by DSC, TGA, FT-IR, mass spectroscopy, EPR, solvent swelling, SEM, and uniaxial compressive load techniques. Our results demonstrated that 3-D structures made from aromatic-free siloxane resins exhibited hardening after being exposed to gamma radiation. This effect was accompanied by gas evolution, decreasing in crystallization levels, decreasing in solvent swelling and damage to the microstructure. Furthermore, long-lived radiation-induced radicals were not detected by EPR methods. Our results are consistent with cross-link formation being the dominant degradation mechanism over chain scission reactions. On the other hand, 3-D structures made from high phenyl content siloxane resins showed little radiation damage as evidenced by low off gassing.

  19. Novel Low-Temperature Poss-Containing Siloxane Elastomers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, Marcus A.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Kiri, Neha N.; Lillehei, Peter T.

    2008-01-01

    One route to increased aircraft performance is through the use of flexible, shape-changeable aerodynamics effectors. However, state of the art materials are not flexible or durable enough over the required broad temperature range. Mixed siloxanes were crosslinked by polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) producing novel materials that remained flexible and elastic from -55 to 94 C. POSS molecules were chemically modified to generate homogeneous distributions within the siloxane matrix. High resolution scanning electron microscope (HRSEM) images indicated homogenous POSS distribution up to 0.8 wt %. Above the solubility limit, POSS aggregates could be seen both macroscopically and via SEM (approx.60-120 nm). Tensile tests were performed to determine Young s modulus, tensile strength, and elongation at break over the range of temperatures associated with transonic aircraft use (-55 to 94 C; -65 to 200 F). The siloxane materials developed here maintained flexibility at -55 C, where previous candidate materials failed. At room temperature, films could be elongated up to 250 % before rupturing. At -55 and 94 C, however, films could be elongated up to 400 % and 125 %, respectively.

  20. 75 FR 61175 - Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... COMMISSION Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... of polyvinyl alcohol, provided for in subheading 3905.30.00 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the... of polyvinyl alcohol from Taiwan are being sold in the United States at less than fair value...

  1. 76 FR 13660 - Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... COMMISSION Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... United States is materially injured by reason of imports from Taiwan of polyvinyl alcohol, provided for... of a preliminary determination by Commerce that imports of polyvinyl alcohol from Taiwan were...

  2. Accuracy of implant impression techniques.

    PubMed

    Assif, D; Marshak, B; Schmidt, A

    1996-01-01

    Three impression techniques were assessed for accuracy in a laboratory cast that simulated clinical practice. The first technique used autopolymerizing acrylic resin to splint the transfer copings. The second involved splinting of the transfer copings directly to an acrylic resin custom tray. In the third, only impression material was used to orient the transfer copings. The accuracy of stone casts with implant analogs was measured against a master framework. The fit of the framework on the casts was tested using strain gauges. The technique using acrylic resin to splint transfer copings in the impression material was significantly more accurate than the two other techniques. Stresses observed in the framework are described and discussed with suggestions to improve clinical and laboratory techniques.

  3. Impressed by impression management: Newcomer reactions to ingratiated supervisors.

    PubMed

    Foulk, Trevor A; Long, David M

    2016-10-01

    Organizational newcomers are unfamiliar with many aspects of their workplace and look for information to help them reduce uncertainty and better understand their new environment. One aspect critical to newcomers is the disposition of their supervisor-the person who arguably can impact the newcomer's career the most. To form an impression of their new supervisor, newcomers look to social cues from coworkers who have interpersonal contact with the supervisor. In the present research, we investigate the ways newcomers use observed ingratiation-a common impression management strategy whereby coworkers try to appear likable (Schlenker, 1980)-to form impressions of a supervisor's warmth. Research on social influence cannot easily account for how third parties will interpret ingratiation, as the behaviors linked to ingratiation suggest something positive about the target, yet the unsavory aspects of the behavior imply it may not have the same effects as other positive behaviors. Our findings suggest that newcomers are unique in that they are motivated to learn about their new supervisor, and are prone to ignore those unsavory aspects and infer something positive about a supervisor targeted with ingratiation. Our findings also suggest that this effect can be weakened based on the supervisor's response. In other words, newcomers rely less on evidence from a coworker's ingratiation in the presence of direct behaviors from the supervisor. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. Characterization of Cholesteric Cyclic Siloxane Liquid Crystalline Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    34AD-A256 128 CHARACIEUAThIONOFPCl LEST CCYCJC SILOXANE LIQUID CRYSTALLINE MATERIALS TI I Herbert E. Kii C r-• CTr Dept. of Chemical Engineering v... crystalline Materials . 18: 2422 S a.•mo) ... : 01 TJ suning. RR 1*1., Er SamlskI, •L CVa1e. W AMd 7. PWMoaG ORGAIRZAIIO "W3(SC) Sil AQM~SISfS) L. KNOW"ma...ordering of the NLO chromcphore can give rise to large response amplitudes, one system currently being investigated are liquid crystalline materials which

  5. Forming impressions from incongruent traits.

    PubMed

    Casselden, P A; Hampson, S E

    1990-08-01

    The factors that affect the ease with which impressions are formed from incongruent trait pairs are investigated. In Experiments 1 and 2, trait pairs that were both descriptively and evaluatively congruent, as well as ones that were only evaluatively congruent, were found to be more imaginable and to be perceived as more frequently co-occurring than incongruent trait pairs. In Experiment 3, response latency provided a converging measure of ease of imaginability. Experiment 4 examined written descriptions of targets described by these trait pairs, and found more attempts to integrate the congruent than the incongruent pairs. These findings are discussed in terms of the relation between laypersons' impressions of personality and formal personality assessment.

  6. Intraoral Digital Impression Technique: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ting-Shu, Su; Jian, Sun

    2015-06-01

    With the techniques of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) being applied in the field of prosthodontics, a concept of intraoral digital impressions was put forward in the early 1980s. It has drawn comprehensive attention from dentists and has been used for dental prosthesis fabrication in a number of cases. This new digital impression technique is expected to bring about absolute digitization to the mode of prosthodontics. A few published articles have indicated that dental prostheses fabricated from intraoral digital impressions have exhibited remarkable advantages over those from conventional impressions in several respects. The present review discusses intraoral digital impression techniques in terms of the following aspects: (1) categories and principles of intraoral digital impression devices currently available; (2) operating characteristics of the devices; and (3) comparison of the manipulation, accuracy, and repeatability between intraoral digital impression and conventional impression.

  7. Traumatic basilar impression: case report.

    PubMed

    Kuroiwa, T; Tanabe, H; Hasegawa, T; Ohta, T

    1995-07-01

    A very rare case of traumatic basilar impression is reported. The patient, a 57-year-old man, was hit on the head vertically in the parietal region. X ray of the cervical spine and computed tomography (CT) scans showed intracranial indentation of the atlas and the odontoid process with a depressed fracture around the foramen magnum. There are no previous reports about this type of fracture.

  8. [Familial occurrence of basilar impression].

    PubMed

    Da Silva, J A; Da Silva, E B; de Souza, M B

    1978-09-01

    The authors studied nine members of the same family; two among them received surgical treatment for basilar impression and Arnold-Chiari malformation. In the other members of the family, several signs and symptoms of central nervous disease were observed. All patients had the apex of the odontoid apophysis above McGregor's line, 4 mm in the case 9, and 10 mm or more in the others.

  9. Shock compression of polyvinyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-04-01

    This study presents shock compression simulation of atactic polyvinyl chloride (PVC) using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics. The manuscript also identifies the limits of applicability of classical molecular dynamics based shock compression simulation for PVC. The mechanism of bond dissociation under shock loading and its progression is demonstrated in this manuscript using the density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations. The rate of dissociation of different bonds at different shock velocities is also presented in this manuscript.

  10. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification. Impression material is a device composed of materials such as alginate or polysulfide intended to be...

  12. Computational benchmark for calculation of silane and siloxane thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Cypryk, Marek; Gostyński, Bartłomiej

    2016-01-01

    Geometries of model chlorosilanes, R3SiCl, silanols, R3SiOH, and disiloxanes, (R3Si)2O, R = H, Me, as well as the thermochemistry of the reactions involving these species were modeled using 11 common density functionals in combination with five basis sets to examine the accuracy and applicability of various theoretical methods in organosilicon chemistry. As the model reactions, the proton affinities of silanols and siloxanes, hydrolysis of chlorosilanes and condensation of silanols to siloxanes were considered. As the reference values, experimental bonding parameters and reaction enthalpies were used wherever available. Where there are no experimental data, W1 and CBS-QB3 values were used instead. For the gas phase conditions, excellent agreement between theoretical CBS-QB3 and W1 and experimental thermochemical values was observed. All DFT methods also give acceptable values and the precision of various functionals used was comparable. No significant advantage of newer more advanced functionals over 'classical' B3LYP and PBEPBE ones was noted. The accuracy of the results was improved significantly when triple-zeta basis sets were used for energy calculations, instead of double-zeta ones. The accuracy of calculations for the reactions in water solution within the SCRF model was inferior compared to the gas phase. However, by careful estimation of corrections to the ΔHsolv and ΔGsolv of H(+) and HCl, reasonable values of thermodynamic quantities for the discussed reactions can be obtained.

  13. Predictable definitive impressions for multiple indirect restorations using a modified putty and wash impression procedure.

    PubMed

    Leong, Elvin W J; Cheng, Ansgar C; Khin, Neo Tee; Lee, Helena; Leong, Daylene J M

    2007-12-01

    Accurate impression-making is essential for the construction of accurately fitting indirect restorations. The putty and wash impression technique using an elastomeric impression material is a popular method. A modified technique is presented that ensures predictable registration of multiple tooth preparations in the dental arch in a single impression.

  14. Degradation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell by siloxane in biogas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Ji-Sung; Kim, Da-Yeong; Hwang, Sun-Mi; Seo, Min Ho; Seo, Dong-Jun; Yang, Seung Yong; Han, Chan Hui; Jung, Yong-Min; Guim, Hwanuk; Nahm, Kee Suk; Yoon, Young-Gi; Kim, Tae-Young

    2016-06-01

    We studied the degradation and durability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) at membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) level by injection of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) as a representative siloxane, which has been found in many industrial and personal products. Specifically, i) GC/MS analysis demonstrated that the ring-opening polymerization of D4 could result in the formation of various linear and cyclic siloxanes in both electrodes of MEA; ii) post-test analysis revealed that the transformed siloxanes were transported from the anode to the cathode via free-volumes in the polymer membrane; iii) RDE measurement and DFT calculation revealed that D4 was not directly responsible for the electrocatalytic activity of Pt; iv) electrochemical analysis demonstrated that the residual methyl groups of siloxane and various siloxanes did not hinder the proton transport in the polymer membrane; and v) siloxanes accumulated in the primary and secondary pores with the exception of an external surface of carbon, causing an increase in the oxygen reactant's resistance and resulting in a decrease of the cell performance. In addition, we confirmed that injection of D4 did not affect the carbon corrosion adversely because the siloxane had little influence on water sorption in the catalyst layer.

  15. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  16. Transoral surgery for basilar impression.

    PubMed

    Pásztor, E; Vajda, J; Piffkó, P; Horváth, M

    1980-12-01

    A patient with basilar impression presented with a progressive myelopathy due to odontoid invagination. It was thought that a posterior decompression would be hazardous; therefore, the inferior clivus, odontoid process, and anterior arch of the atlas were removed transorally. We have found that, even with symptoms of long duration, marked improvement can be expected when the operation is targeted to the actual abnormality. In such cases, analysis of craniocervical tomograms will show the direction of medullary compression and thus indicate the correct surgical approach.

  17. The Clinical Global Impressions Scale

    PubMed Central

    Targum, Steven D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This paper reviews the potential value in daily clinical practice of an easily applied research tool, the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) Scale, for the nonresearcher clinician to quantify and track patient progress and treatment response over time. Method: The instrument is described and sample patient scenarios are provided with scoring rationales and a practical charting system. Conclusion: The CGI severity and improvement scales offer a readily understood, practical measurement tool that can easily be administered by a clinician in a busy clinical practice setting. PMID:20526405

  18. Fogging in Polyvinyl Toluene Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Richard J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Hurlbut, Charles; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ramey, Ashley; Smola, Richard

    2015-02-01

    It has been observed that large polyvinyl toluene (PVT)-based gamma ray detectors can suffer internal “fogging” when exposed to outdoor environmental conditions over long periods of time. When observed, this change results in reduced light collection by photomultiplier tubes connected to the PVT. Investigation of the physical cause of these changes has been explored, and a root cause identified. Water penetration into the PVT from hot, high-humidity conditions results in reversible internal water condensation at room temperature, and permanent micro-fracturing of the PVT at very low environmental temperatures. Mitigation procedures and methods are being investigated.

  19. Structure-property relationships in silica-siloxane nanocomposite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ulibarri, T.A.; Derzon, D.K.; Wang, L.C.

    1997-03-01

    The simultaneous formation of a filler phase and a polymer matrix via in situ sol-gel techniques provides silica-siloxane nanocomposite materials of high strength. This study concentrates on the effects of temperature and relative humidity on a trimodal polymer system in an attempt to accelerate the reaction as well as evaluate subtle process- structure-property relations. It was found that successful process acceleration is only viable for high humidity systems when using the tin(IV) catalyst dibutyltin dilaurate. Processes involving low humidity were found to be very temperature and time dependent. Bimodal systems were investigated and demonstrated that the presence of a short-chain component led to enhanced material strength. This part of the study also revealed a link between the particle size and population density and the optimization of material properties.

  20. Preparation and characterization of a siloxane containing bismaleimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maudgal, S.; St. Clair, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    A novel siloxane containing bismaleimide has been prepared by reacting maleic anhydride, benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride and bis(gamma-aminopropyl)tetramethyldisiloxane. Characterization of this monomer was done by comparing its nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum (NMR) to those of model compounds. Solubility of the prepolymer was tested in amide, chlorinated and ether solvents. Films were cast from solution as well as by melt processing and a cure cycle was determined. Infrared spectrum (IR) of the resulting film was obtained. Thermal polymerization was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Thermal properties of the cured resin were followed by means of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), torsional braid analysis (TBA) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Thermomechanical analysis (TMA) was used to study the effect of postcure on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the resin. Adhesive strength of the resin was obtained at ambient temperature.

  1. Environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textiles finished with siloxane sulfopropylbetaine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiguo; Chen, Shaojun; Jiang, Song; Xiong, Meiling; Luo, Junxuan; Tang, Jiaoning; Ge, Zaochuan

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports a novel environmentally friendly antibacterial cotton textile finished with reactive siloxane sulfopropylbetaine(SSPB). The results show that SSPB can be covalently bound onto the cotton textile surface, imparting perdurable antibacterial activity. The textiles finished with SSPB have been investigated systematically from the mechanical properties, thermal stability, hydrophilic properties and antibacterial properties. It is found that the hydrophilicity and breaking strength are improved greatly after the cotton textiles are finished with SSPB. Additionally, the cotton textiles finished with SSPB exhibit good antibacterial activities against gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus, ATCC 6538), gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli (E.coli, 8099) and fungi Candida albicans (C.albicans, ATCC 10231). Moreover, SSPB is nonleachable from the textiles, and it does not induce skin stimulation and is nontoxic to animals. Thus, SSPB is ideal candidate for environmentally friendly antibacterial textile applications.

  2. Polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels for iontohporesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Prasanta; Alam, Asif Ali; Arora, Neha; Tibarewala, Dewaki Nandan; Basak, Piyali

    2013-06-01

    Transdermal therapeutic systems propound controlled release of active ingredients through the skin into the systemic circulation in a predictive manner. Drugs administered through these systems escape first-pass metabolism and maintain a steady state scenario similar to a continuous intravenous infusion for up to several days. The iontophoresis deal with the systemic delivery of the bioactive agents (drug) by applying an electric current. It is basically an injection without the needle. The iontophoretic system requires a gel-based matrix to accommodate the bioactive agent. Hydrogels have been used by many investigators in controlled-release drug delivery systems because of their good tissue compatibility and easy manipulation of swelling level and, thereby, solute permeability. In this work we have prepared polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel. We have cross linked polyvinyl alcohol chemically with Glutaraldehyde with different wt%. FTIR study reveals the chemical changes during cross linking. Swelling in water, is done to have an idea about drug loading and drug release from the membrane. After drug loading to the hydrogels, we have studied the drug release property of the hydrogels using salicylic acid as a model drug.

  3. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics. Part 1: edentulous impressions.

    PubMed

    Massad, Joseph J; Cagna, David R

    2007-08-01

    Recent advances in impression materials and stock edentulous impression trays have resulted in simplified approaches to impression making in removable prosthodontics. Once considered an absolute necessity, it is now possible to avoid the need for custom impression trays. In an effort to achieve reliable master casts in a single appointment, new and innovative procedures are now available. This article, the first in a 3-part series, will review historical information, basic concepts, materials considerations, and philosophic approaches to impression making in complete-denture therapy. A modem technique using readily available impression materials will be described and illustrated so readers can consider the benefits of incorporation into their daily management of edentulous patients.

  4. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics. Part 1: Edentulous impressions.

    PubMed

    Massad, Joseph J; Cagna, David R

    2009-02-01

    Recent advances in impression materials and stock edentulous impression trays have resulted in simplified approaches to impression making in removable prosthodontics. Once considered an absolute necessity, it is now possible to avoid the need for custom impression trays. In an effort to achieve reliable master casts in a single appointment, new and innovative procedures are now available. This article, the first in a 3-part series, will review historical information, basic concepts, materials considerations, and philosophic approaches to impression making in complete-denture therapy. A modern technique using readily available impression materials will be described and illustrated so readers can consider the benefits of incorporation into their daily management of edentulous patients.

  5. [The global impression technic in fixed dentures].

    PubMed

    Lamy, M; Mainjot, A

    2001-01-01

    The global impression technique allows to obtain in a single stage the impression of the abutment as well as their neighboring teeth. This technique often requires the placement of one or two retraction cords in the sulcus. The impression technique herein described is the double mix method. This method is based on the use of two elastomers with different viscosities, but from the same group thus allowing a simultaneous polymerization.

  6. Analysis of siloxanes in hydrocarbon mixtures using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Seeley, Stacy K; Nartker, Steven R; Seeley, John V

    2014-09-19

    A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) method for separating siloxanes from hydrocarbons has been developed using a systematic process. First, the retention indices of a set of siloxanes and a set of hydrocarbons were determined on 6 different stationary phases. The retention indices were then used to model GC×GC separation on 15 different stationary phase pairs. The SPB-Octyl×DB-1 pair was predicted to provide the best separation of the siloxanes from the hydrocarbons. The efficacy of this stationary phase pair was experimentally tested by performing a GC×GC analysis of gasoline spiked with siloxanes and by analyzing biogas obtained from a local wastewater treatment facility. The model predictions agreed well with the experimental results. The SPB-Octyl×DB-1 stationary phase pair constrained the hydrocarbons to a narrow range of secondary retention times and fully isolated the siloxanes from the hydrocarbon band. The resulting GC×GC method allows siloxanes to be resolved from complex mixtures of hydrocarbons without requiring the use of a selective detector.

  7. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics. Part 2: Immediate denture and reline impressions.

    PubMed

    Cagna, David R; Massad, Joseph J

    2007-09-01

    Accurate impressions are important elements in both the fabrication and maintenance phases of complete denture therapy. For patients possessing nonrestorable, periodontally hopeless residual dentitions, immediate denture therapy is often the treatment of choice. An impression procedure capable of accurately registering functional vestibular anatomy facilitates successful therapy. For complete dentures currently in function, periodic assessment and correction of fit extends long-term prosthesis performance. To maintain optimal tissue-base relationships, use of specialized impressions, and subsequent laboratory reline procedures is often indicated. For both of these impression procedures (ie, immediate denture impressions and denture reline impressions), vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression material offers distinct advantages. Part 2 of this article series reports on the use of VPS for immediate denture and reline impression procedures.

  8. Vinyl polysiloxane impression material in removable prosthodontics. Part 2: immediate denture and reline impressions.

    PubMed

    Cagna, David R; Massad, Joseph J

    2009-01-01

    Accurate impressions are important elements in both the fabrication and maintenance phases of complete denture therapy. For patients possessing nonrestorable, periodontally hopeless residual dentitions, immediate denture therapy is often the treatment of choice. An impression procedure capable of accurately registering functional vestibular anatomy facilitates successful therapy. For complete dentures currently in function, periodic assessment and correction of fit extends long-term prosthesis performance. To maintain optimal tissue-base relationships, use of specialized impressions, and subsequent laboratory reline procedures is often indicated. For both of these impression procedures (i.e., immediate denture impressions and denture reline impressions), vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression material offers distinct advantages. Part 2 of this article series reports on the use of VPS for immediate denture and reline impression procedures.

  9. 21 CFR 177.1670 - Polyvinyl alcohol film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyvinyl alcohol film. 177.1670 Section 177.1670... Contact Surfaces § 177.1670 Polyvinyl alcohol film. Polyvinyl alcohol film may be safely used in contact..., in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The polyvinyl alcohol film is...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... on a preformed impression tray and used to reproduce the structure of a patient's teeth and gums....

  11. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Impression material. 872.3660 Section 872.3660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... on a preformed impression tray and used to reproduce the structure of a patient's teeth and gums....

  12. A Teacher's Impressions of the Soviet Union.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Anne

    1987-01-01

    Reports the impressions of an 11th-grade world cultures teacher who visited European Russia and Uzbekistan in August, 1985. Ten major impressions are detailed, among them are (1) the poverty, (2) the sloppiness, (3) the pervasive presence of Lenin, and (4) the cultural importance of the Babushka, the Russian word for grandmother. (JDH)

  13. A Classroom Exercise in Impression Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrenberg, Joy L.

    1987-01-01

    A classroom exercise for teaching students how to examine aspects of their own impression-formation processes is described. The data generated can be used to stimulate discussion about the origins of implicit personality theories, person prototypes, and the accuracy of first impressions. (Author/DH)

  14. Determination of siloxanes in silicone products and potential migration to milk, formula and liquid simulants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wong, Jon W; Begley, Timothy H; Hayward, Douglas G; Limm, William

    2012-08-01

    A pressurised solvent extraction procedure coupled with a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-selective ion monitoring (GC-MS-SIM) method was developed to determine three cyclic siloxanes, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) and three linear siloxanes, octamethyltrisiloxane (L3), decamethyltetrasiloxane (L4), dodecamethylpentasiloxane (L5), in silicone products. Additionally, two different extraction methods were developed to measure these siloxanes migrating into milk, infant formula and liquid simulants (50 and 95% ethanol in water). The limits of quantification (LOQs) of the six siloxanes ranged from 6 ng/g (L3) to 15 ng/g (D6). Silicone nipples and silicone bakewares were extracted using pressurised solvent extraction (PSE) and analysed using the GC-MS-SIM method. No linear siloxanes were detected in the silicone nipple samples analysed. The three cyclic siloxanes (D4, D5 and D6) were detected in all silicone nipple samples with concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 269 µg/g. In the bakeware samples, except for L3, the other five siloxanes were detected with concentrations ranging from 0.2 µg/g (L4) to 7030 µg/g (D6). To investigate the potential migration of the six siloxanes from silicone nipples to milk and infant formula, a liquid extraction and dispersive clean-up procedure was developed for the two matrices. The procedure used a mix of hexane and ethyl acetate (1 : 1, v/v) as extraction solvent and C₁₈ powder as the dispersive clean-up sorbent. For the liquid simulants, extraction of the siloxanes was achieved using hexane without any salting out or clean-up procedures. The recoveries of the six siloxanes from the milk, infant formula and simulants fortified at 50, 100, 200, 500 and 1000 µg/l ranged from 70 to 120% with a relative standard derivation (RSD) of less than 15% (n = 4). Migration tests were performed by exposing milk, infant formula and the liquid

  15. Intraoral Digital Impressioning for Dental Implant Restorations Versus Traditional Implant Impression Techniques.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Brian L

    2015-01-01

    Over the course of the past two to three decades, intraoral digital impression systems have gained acceptance due to high accuracy and ease of use as they have been incorporated into the fabrication of dental implant restorations. The use of intraoral digital impressions enables the clinician to produce accurate restorations without the unpleasant aspects of traditional impression materials and techniques. This article discusses the various types of digital impression systems and their accuracy compared to traditional impression techniques. The cost, time, and patient satisfaction components of both techniques will also be reviewed.

  16. Dimensional accuracy of 2-stage putty-wash impressions: influence of impression trays and viscosity.

    PubMed

    Balkenhol, Markus; Ferger, Paul; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of the impression tray and viscosity of the wash material on the dimensional accuracy of impressions taken using a 2-stage putty-wash technique. Identically shaped metal stock trays (MeTs) and disposable plastic stock trays (DiTs) were used for taking impressions (n = 10) of a mandibular cast (4 abutments) with 2 different impression materials. Dies were poured and the relative diameter deviation was calculated after measurement. Zero viscosity of the materials was determined. Dimensional accuracy was significantly affected when DiTs were used. Lower-viscosity wash materials led to more precise impressions.

  17. A novel chemically selective siloxane polymer for chemical vapor sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jia; Jiang, Yadong; Du, Xiaosong; Bi, Juan

    2010-10-01

    A new hydrogen-bond acidic carbosiloxane polymer for quartz crystal microbalance sensors (QCMs) application was synthesized via O-alkylation, Claisen rearrange, hydrosilylation reaction and functionalized the polysiloxane with trifluoroacetone groups (TFA). The trifluoroisopropanol functionalized polysiloxane was characterized by FT-IR and 1HNMR. And this novel siloxane polymer was coated onto AT-cut 8 MHz QCM sensors to investigate its gas sensitive responses to the organophosphorus nerve agent stimulant dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) vapor as well as other interfering organic vapors. The research work indicated that frequency shifts of the trifluoroisopropanol functionalized polysiloxane based QCM sensor to the DMMP vapor were completely linear, and with a regression coefficient of 0.9973 in the concentration range of 10-60 ppm. In addition, the sensitivity of the fabricated QCM sensors to DMMP was up to 10.64 Hz/ ppm, and much higher than the other interfering vapors, limits of detection (LODs) of the QCM sensors was 0.28 ppm, thus high selectivity to DMMP was demonstrated in this work.

  18. Junge relationships in measurement data for cyclic siloxanes in air.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Matthew; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Genualdi, Susie; Harner, Tom; Scheringer, Martin

    2013-10-01

    In 1974, Junge postulated a relationship between variability of concentrations of gases in air at remote locations and their atmospheric residence time, and this Junge relationship has subsequently been observed empirically for a range of trace gases. Here, we analyze two previously-published datasets of concentrations of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) in air and find Junge relationships in both. The first dataset is a time series of concentrations of decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) measured between January and June, 2009 at a rural site in southern Sweden that shows a Junge relationship in the temporal variability of the measurements. The second dataset consists of measurements of hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) and D5 made simultaneously at 12 sites in the Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) network that shows a Junge relationship in the spatial variability of the three cVMS congeners. We use the Junge relationship for the GAPS dataset to estimate atmospheric lifetimes of dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6), 8:2-fluorotelomer alcohol and trichlorinated biphenyls that are within a factor of 3 of estimates based on degradation rate constants for reaction with hydroxyl radical determined in laboratory studies.

  19. Survey of organosilicone compounds, including cyclic and linear siloxanes, in personal-care and household products.

    PubMed

    Horii, Yuichi; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2008-11-01

    The determination of organosiloxanes in consumer products is important for the evaluation and characterization of sources of human and environmental exposures. In this study, we determined concentrations of cyclic siloxanes [octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D(4)), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D(5)), dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D(6))], tetradecamethylcycloheptasiloxane (D(7))] and linear siloxanes (L(4) to L(14)) in a variety of consumer products (n = 76), including hair-care products, skin lotions, body washes, cosmetics, nursing nipples (i.e., pacifiers), cookware, and household sanitation products such as cleansers and furniture polishes, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring. Prior to the analysis of samples, a method was developed to reduce the contamination arising from organosiloxanes present in certain gas chromatograph (GC) parts, such as the inlet septum; use of a Restek BTO septum at an inlet temperature of 200 degrees C gave the lowest background level (D(4): 0.8 pg; D(5): 0.3 pg; D(6): 0.2 pg). Concentrations of cyclic siloxanes in consumer products analyzed ranged from <0.35 to 9380 microg/g, from <0.39 to 81,800 microg/g, from <0.33 to 43,100 microg/g, and from <0.42 to 846 microg/g for D(4), D(5), D(6), and D(7), respectively. Concentrations of linear siloxanes varied from <0.059 to 73,000 microg/g. More than 50% of the samples analyzed contained D(4), D(5), or D(6). Cyclic siloxanes were predominant in most of the sample categories; D(5) was predominant in hair-care products, skin lotions, and cosmetics; D(6) or D(7) was predominant in rubber products, including nipples, cookware, and sealants. Potential daily exposure to total organosiloxanes (sum of cyclic and linear siloxanes) from the use of personal-care products by adult women in the United States has been estimated to be 307 mg. Significant positive correlations (p < 0.01) existed in our study between D(4) and D(7), D(4) and linear siloxanes, D(5) and D(6

  20. Formation mechanism of photo-induced nested wrinkles on siloxane-photomonomer hybrid film

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kazumasa; Tokudome, Yasuaki Takahashi, Masahide

    2014-10-21

    Nested wrinkle structures, hierarchical surface wrinkles of different periodicities of sub-μm and tens-μm, have been fabricated on a siloxane-photomonomer hybrid film via a photo-induced surface polymerization of acrylamide. The formation mechanism of the nested wrinkle structures is examined based on a time-dependent structure observation and chemical composition analyses. In-situ observation of the evolving surface structure showed that sub-μm scale wrinkles first formed, subsequently the tens-μm scale ones did. In-situ FT-IR analysis indicated that the nested wrinkles formation took place along with the development of siloxane network of under layer. A cross sectional observation of the film revealed that the film was composed of three layers. FT-IR spectra of the film revealed that the surface and interior layers were polyacrylamide rich layer and siloxane-polymer rich layer, respectively. The intermediate layer formed as a diffusion layer by migration of acrylamide from interior to the surface. These three layers have different chemical compositions and therefore different mechanical characteristics, which allows the wrinkle formation. Shrinkage of siloxane-polymer interior layers, as a result of polycondensation of siloxane network, induced mechanical instabilities at interlayers, to form the nested wrinkle structures.

  1. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... custom impression tray for use in cases in which a preformed impression tray is not suitable, such as the... and gums is made. The resin impression tray material is applied to this preliminary study model...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9517 - Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-[4-[[[3-(dimethyl amino) propyl] amino]carbonyl]-2-oxo-1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9517 Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9517 - Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-[4-[[[3-(dimethyl amino) propyl] amino]carbonyl]-2-oxo-1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9517 Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9517 - Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-[4-[[[3-(dimethyl amino) propyl] amino]carbonyl]-2-oxo-1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9517 Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9517 - Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-[4-[[[3-(dimethyl amino) propyl] amino]carbonyl]-2-oxo-1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9517 Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9517 - Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-[4-[[[3-(dimethyl amino) propyl] amino]carbonyl]-2-oxo-1...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9517 Siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as siloxanes and silicones, de-Me, 3-...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10483 - Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica. 721.10483 Section 721.10483... Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica. (a... Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10483 - Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica. 721.10483 Section 721.10483... Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica. (a... Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, Me vinyl, hydroxy-terminated, reaction products with -modified silica (PMN...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3660 - Impression material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3660 Impression material. (a) Identification... device is intended to provide models for study and for production of restorative prosthetic devices,...

  10. A simplified impression technique for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Robert E

    2002-03-01

    Dental implants have been considered an acceptable form of dental treatment since the early 1980s. A number of studies have been published describing impression techniques for dental implants. Many of the techniques described are so complex that they may seem daunting to the average restorative dentist. Most general practitioners do not wish to attempt to restore dental implants. This article describes a very simple, yet extremely accurate, technique for making impressions of dental implant fixtures.

  11. Preliminary impression techniques for microstomia patients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, K Aswini; Bhat, Vinaya; Nair, K Chandrasekheran; Suresh, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    The Prosthetic rehabilitation of microstomia patients presents difficulties at all the stages. The difficulty starts with the preliminary impression making. This is due to the tongue rigidity and the decreased oral opening. A maximum oral opening which is smaller than the size of the tray can make prosthetic treatment challenging. Due to the restricted mouth opening, insertion and removal of the impression trays is extremely cumbersome and various modifications of the trays have been used in the past. Among these are the flexible trays and the sectional trays used with different modes of reassembling the segments extra orally after the impression is made. This article reviews the literature published from 1971 to 2015 concerning preliminary impression techniques used in making impressions for patients with microstomia based on various tray designs. An electronic search was performed across three databases (PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scolar) for relevant citations. The keywords/combinations used for the search were microstomia, limited/constricted/restricted mouth opening/oral access, trismus, sectional trays, impressions and prosthetic/prosthodontic rehabilitation. The search was limited to papers written in English which resulted in a total of 45 related articles of which 17 articles were included for discussion of this review.

  12. Fouling-release performance of silicone oil-modified siloxane-polyurethane coatings.

    PubMed

    Galhenage, Teluka P; Hoffman, Dylan; Silbert, Samantha D; Stafslien, Shane J; Daniels, Justin; Miljkovic, Tatjana; Finlay, John A; Franco, Sofia C; Clare, Anthony S; Nedved, Brian T; Hadfield, Michael G; Wendt, Dean E; Waltz, Grant; Brewer, Lenora; Teo, Serena Lay-Ming; Lim, Chin-Sing; Webster, Dean C

    2016-10-03

    The effect of incorporation of silicone oils into a siloxane-polyurethane fouling-release coatings system was explored. Incorporation of phenylmethyl silicone oil has been shown to improve the fouling-release performance of silicone-based fouling-release coatings through increased interfacial slippage. The extent of improvement is highly dependent upon the type and composition of silicone oil used. The siloxane-polyurethane (SiPU) coating system is a tough fouling-release solution, which combines the mechanical durability of polyurethane while maintaining comparable fouling-release performance with regard to commercial standards. To further improve the fouling-release performance of the siloxane-PU coating system, the use of phenylmethyl silicones oils was studied. Coatings formulations were prepared incorporating phenyl-methyl silicone oils having a range of compositions and viscosities. Contact angle and surface energy measurements were conducted to evaluate the surface wettability of the coatings. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling experiments demonstrated self-stratification of silicone oil along with siloxane to the coating-air interface. Several coating formulations displayed improved or comparable fouling-release performance to commercial standards during laboratory biological assay tests for microalgae (Navicula incerta), macroalgae (Ulva linza), adult barnacles (Balanus amphitrite syn. Amphibalanus amphitrite) and mussels (Geukensia demissa). Selected silicone oil-modified siloxane-PU coatings also demonstrated comparable fouling-release performance in field immersion trials. In general, modifying the siloxane-PU fouling-release coatings with a small amount (1-5% wt basis) of phenylmethyl silicone oil resulted in improved performance in several laboratory biological assays and in long-term field immersion assessments.

  13. Siloxane-based photonic structures and their application in optic and optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudiš, Dušan; Šušlik, Łuboš; Jandura, Daniel; Goraus, Matej; Figurová, Mária; Martinček, Ivan; Gašo, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Polymer based photonics brings simple and cheap solutions often with interesting results. We present capabilities of some siloxanes focusing on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) with unique mechanical and optical properties. In combination of laser lithography technologies with siloxane embossing we fabricate different grating structures with one- and two-dimensional symmetry. Concept of PDMS based thin membranes with patterned surface as an effective diffraction element for modification of radiation pattern diagram of light emitting diodes is here shown. Also the PDMS was used as an alternative material for fabrication of complicated waveguide with implemented Bragg grating. For lab-on-chip applications, we patterned PDMS microstructures for microfluidic and micro-optic devices.

  14. 75 FR 15726 - Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan; Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... COMMISSION Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan; Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... Taiwan of polyvinyl alcohol provided for in subheading 3905.30.00 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of... threatened with material injury by reason of allegedly LTFV imports of polyvinyl alcohol from...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1670 - Polyvinyl alcohol film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyvinyl alcohol film. 177.1670 Section 177.1670... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1670 Polyvinyl alcohol film. Polyvinyl alcohol film may be safely used in contact with food of the types identified in § 176.170(c) of...

  16. 21 CFR 177.1670 - Polyvinyl alcohol film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyvinyl alcohol film. 177.1670 Section 177.1670... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1670 Polyvinyl alcohol film. Polyvinyl alcohol film may be safely used in contact with food of the types identified in § 176.170(c) of...

  17. 21 CFR 177.1670 - Polyvinyl alcohol film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyvinyl alcohol film. 177.1670 Section 177.1670... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1670 Polyvinyl alcohol film. Polyvinyl alcohol film may be safely used in contact with food of the types identified in § 176.170(c) of...

  18. 21 CFR 177.1670 - Polyvinyl alcohol film.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyvinyl alcohol film. 177.1670 Section 177.1670... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1670 Polyvinyl alcohol film. Polyvinyl alcohol film may be safely used in contact with food of the types identified in § 176.170(c) of...

  19. 76 FR 13982 - Antidumping Duty Order: Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... International Trade Administration Antidumping Duty Order: Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan AGENCY: Import... Department is issuing an antidumping duty order on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) from Taiwan. DATES: Effective Date... value in the antidumping duty investigation of PVA from Taiwan. See Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan:...

  20. Assessing the clarity of friction ridge impressions.

    PubMed

    Hicklin, R Austin; Buscaglia, JoAnn; Roberts, Maria Antonia

    2013-03-10

    The ability of friction ridge examiners to correctly discern and make use of the ridges and associated features in finger or palm impressions is limited by clarity. The clarity of an impression relates to the examiner's confidence that the presence, absence, and attributes of features can be correctly discerned. Despite the importance of clarity in the examination process, there have not previously been standard methods for assessing clarity in friction ridge impressions. We introduce a process for annotation, analysis, and interchange of friction ridge clarity information that can be applied to latent or exemplar impressions. This paper: (1) describes a method for evaluating the clarity of friction ridge impressions by using color-coded annotations that can be used by examiners or automated systems; (2) discusses algorithms for overall clarity metrics based on manual or automated clarity annotation; and (3) defines a method of quantifying the correspondence of clarity when comparing a pair of friction ridge images, based on clarity annotation and resulting metrics. Different uses of this approach include examiner interchange of data, quality assurance, metrics, and as an aid in automated fingerprint matching.

  1. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  2. A predictable and accurate technique with elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Barghi, N; Ontiveros, J C

    1999-08-01

    A method for obtaining more predictable and accurate final impressions with polyvinylsiloxane impression materials in conjunction with stock trays is proposed and tested. Heavy impression material is used in advance for construction of a modified custom tray, while extra-light material is used for obtaining a more accurate final impression.

  3. Giving the wrong impression: food and beverage brand impressions delivered to youth through popular movies

    PubMed Central

    Skatrud-Mickelson, Monica; Adachi-Mejia, Anna M.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Sutherland, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Marketing on television showcases less-healthful options, with emerging research suggesting movies promote similar products. Given the obesity epidemic, understanding advertising to youth should be a public health imperative. The objective of this study was to estimate youth impressions to food and beverages delivered through movies. Methods Impressions were calculated by dividing US receipts annually into average movie ticket prices, then multiplying this by the number of brand appearances. Examination by ratings, product types and ages were conducted by Spearman rank correlation coefficient tests. Results Youth in the USA saw over 3 billion food, beverage or food–retail establishment (FRE) impressions on average, annually from 1996 to 2005. Those aged 12–18 viewed over half of all impressions, with PG-13-rated movies containing 61.5% of impressions. There were no significant trends in brand appearances by food, beverage or FRE impressions over the decade, although there was a decreasing trend in R-rated impressions for both foods (P< 0.01) and beverages (P< 0.01), but not FREs (P= 0.08). Conclusions Movies promote billions of food and beverage impressions annually to youth. Given the public health crisis of obesity, future research should further investigate these trends, as well as the potential association of these unhealthy exposures in youth. PMID:22076600

  4. Dimensional Accuracy of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic VPS Impression Materials Using Different Impression Techniques - An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Pilla, Ajai; Pathipaka, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The dimensional stability of the impression material could have an influence on the accuracy of the final restoration. Vinyl Polysiloxane Impression materials (VPS) are most frequently used as the impression material in fixed prosthodontics. As VPS is hydrophobic when it is poured with gypsum products, manufacturers added intrinsic surfactants and marketed as hydrophilic VPS. These hydrophilic VPS have shown increased wettability with gypsum slurries. VPS are available in different viscosities ranging from very low to very high for usage under different impression techniques. Aim To compare the dimensional accuracy of hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS using monophase, one step and two step putty wash impression techniques. Materials and Methods To test the dimensional accuracy of the impression materials a stainless steel die was fabricated as prescribed by ADA specification no. 19 for elastomeric impression materials. A total of 60 impressions were made. The materials were divided into two groups, Group1 hydrophilic VPS (Aquasil) and Group 2 hydrophobic VPS (Variotime). These were further divided into three subgroups A, B, C for monophase, one-step and two-step putty wash technique with 10 samples in each subgroup. The dimensional accuracy of the impressions was evaluated after 24 hours using vertical profile projector with lens magnification range of 20X-125X illumination. The study was analyzed through one-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey HSD test and unpaired t-test for mean comparison between groups. Results Results showed that the three different impression techniques (monophase, 1-step, 2-step putty wash techniques) did cause significant change in dimensional accuracy between hydrophilic VPS and hydrophobic VPS impression materials. One-way ANOVA disclosed, mean dimensional change and SD for hydrophilic VPS varied between 0.56% and 0.16%, which were low, suggesting hydrophilic VPS was satisfactory with all three impression techniques. However, mean

  5. Accuracy of three implant impression techniques with different impression materials and stones.

    PubMed

    Chang, Won-Gun; Vahidi, Farhad; Bae, Kwang-Hak; Lim, Bum-Soon

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of casts made using three different impression techniques to obtain an accurate definitive cast for fabrication of multiple-implant prostheses. Twelve experimental groups were formed combining the following conditions: three impression techniques, two impression materials, and two cast materials. The main effects of the three factors were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance using the full factorial general linear model between factors. The results showed that there were no significant differences in mean values for the transferred dimensions between the control and experimental groups. None of the measurements in the horizontal plane of the definitive casts demonstrated significant differences among the impression techniques with different impression and cast materials (P > .01).

  6. Congenital basilar impression: correlated neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bassi, P; Corona, C; Contri, P; Paiocchi, A; Loiero, M; Mangoni, A

    1992-01-01

    A series of 8 cases operated on for symptomatic basilar impression associated with occipitalization of the atlas is reported (with or without atlantoaxial dislocation). Symptoms of onset (such as the frequent association between nuchal pain and vertigo) are emphasized and analyzed in relation to the pathogenetic mechanism that underlies the multiform symptomatology of the basilar impression. The diagnostic workup for basilar impression foresees X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. The most important diagnostic problem is that of considering the possible existence of such a pathology in the presence of very common symptoms such as nuchal pain and vertigo. The surgical treatment has certainly been useful both to improve and to stabilize the symptomatology mainly when there is atlantoaxial dislocation. In fact in these cases the symptomatology is more severe and progressive for the alteration of the transverse ligament of the atlas secondary to abnormal mechanical stimuli.

  7. Objective analysis of impressed chisel toolmarks

    DOE PAGES

    Spotts, Ryan; Chumbley, L. Scott

    2015-08-06

    Historical and recent challenges to the practice of comparative forensic examination have created a driving force for the formation of objective methods for toolmark identification. In this study, fifty sequentially manufactured chisels were used to create impression toolmarks in lead (500 toolmarks total). An algorithm previously used to statistically separate known matching and nonmatching striated screwdriver marks and quasi-striated plier marks was used to evaluate the chisel marks. Impression toolmarks, a more complex form of toolmark, pose a more difficult test for the algorithm that was originally designed for striated toolmarks. Lastly, results show in this instance that the algorithmmore » can separate matching and nonmatching impression marks, providing further validation of the assumption that toolmarks are identifiably unique.« less

  8. Objective analysis of impressed chisel toolmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Spotts, Ryan; Chumbley, L. Scott

    2015-08-06

    Historical and recent challenges to the practice of comparative forensic examination have created a driving force for the formation of objective methods for toolmark identification. In this study, fifty sequentially manufactured chisels were used to create impression toolmarks in lead (500 toolmarks total). An algorithm previously used to statistically separate known matching and nonmatching striated screwdriver marks and quasi-striated plier marks was used to evaluate the chisel marks. Impression toolmarks, a more complex form of toolmark, pose a more difficult test for the algorithm that was originally designed for striated toolmarks. Lastly, results show in this instance that the algorithm can separate matching and nonmatching impression marks, providing further validation of the assumption that toolmarks are identifiably unique.

  9. Direct Conversion of Hydride- to Siloxane-Terminated Silicon Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Ryan T.; Zang, Xiaoning; Fernando, Roshan; Dzara, Michael J.; Ngo, Chilan; Sharps, Meredith; Pinals, Rebecca; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Lusk, Mark T.; Sellinger, Alan

    2016-11-17

    Peripheral surface functionalization of hydride-terminated silicon quantum dots (SiQD) is necessary in order to minimize their oxidation/aggregation and allow for solution processability. Historically thermal hydrosilylation addition of alkenes and alkynes across the Si-H surface to form Si-C bonds has been the primary method to achieve this. Here we demonstrate a mild alternative approach to functionalize hydride-terminated SiQDs using bulky silanols in the presence of free-radical initiators to form stable siloxane (~Si-O-SiR3) surfaces with hydrogen gas as a byproduct. This offers an alternative to existing methods of forming siloxane surfaces that require corrosive Si-Cl based chemistry with HCl byproducts. A 52 nm blue shift in the photoluminescent spectra of siloxane versus alkyl-functionalized SiQDs is observed that we explain using computational theory. Model compound synthesis of silane and silsesquioxane analogues is used to optimize surface chemistry and elucidate reaction mechanisms. Thorough characterization on the extent of siloxane surface coverage is provided using FTIR and XPS. TEM is used to demonstrate SiQD size and integrity after surface chemistry and product isolation.

  10. Impression Testing of Self-Healing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Huber, Amy

    2005-01-01

    As part of the BIOSANT program (biologically-inspired smart nanotechnology), scientists at NASA-Langley have identified a "self-healing" plastic that spontaneously closes the hole left by the passage of a bullet. To understand and generalize the phenomenon in question, the mechanical properties responsible for this ability are being explored. Low-rate impression testing was chosen to characterize post-yield material properties, and it turned out that materials that heal following ballistic puncture also show up to 80% healing of the low-rate impression. Preliminary results on the effects of temperature and rate of puncture are presented.

  11. Comparison of elastomeric impression materials' thixotropic behavior.

    PubMed

    Tolidis, K; Tortopidist, D; Gerasimou, P; Theocharidou, A; Boutsiouki, C

    2013-06-01

    The improved flow characteristics of new elastomeric impression materials are significant factors in the selection ofsuitableproductsfor clinical applications. The aim of this study was to assess the thixotropic behavior and compare the flow characteristics of seven different elastomeric impression materials using a shark fin test. One polyvinylsiloxane showed the highest shark fin height values, while the newly formed vinylsiloxanether material exhibited no significant differences when compared with two polyvinylsiloxanes. One of the five polyvinylosiloxanes presented significantly lower shark fin values than all other materials. It was concluded that flow characteristics for most of the tested materials are acceptable.

  12. Revisiting impressions using dual-arch trays.

    PubMed

    Small, Bruce W

    2012-01-01

    Making routine perfect impressions is the goal of any restorative dentist. Using dual-arch trays is an easy, repeatable way to accomplish that goal, as long as each step is done before the next and each step is performed perfectly. This column reviewed several articles that support the metal dual-arch concept and provided some clinical tips that might help restorative dentists. The dual-arch technique does have its limits and is meant for one or two teeth in a quadrant when there are other teeth to occlude with. Also, if the case involves anterior guidance, a full-arch impression maybe advisable.

  13. MR imaging of familial basilar impression.

    PubMed

    Bewermeyer, H; Dreesbach, H A; Hünermann, B; Heiss, W D

    1984-10-01

    Basilar impression was found in three members of one family. The mother showed an asymptomatic deformity, her eldest son complained of headache, drop-attacks, nystagmus, unilateral ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia; the middle son presented with headache, nystagmus, and hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated convexobasia of various degrees with elevation of the upper spine and malformation of the occipital bone. The medulla oblongata and the pons were flattened and dislocated backward in two cases. Chiari malformation was present in one case and mild hydrocephalus in another. A comparison of MR with CT imaging demonstrates some advantages of the former method in the assessment of the neural structures directly involved in basilar impression.

  14. Basilar impression in a child with hypochondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Wong, V C; Fung, C F

    1991-01-01

    A 4-year-old boy with hypochondroplasia presented with delay in gross motor development. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated basilar impression with compression at the craniovertebral junction and mild degree of hydrocephalus. Posterior fossa decompression resulted in improvement in neurologic function and relief of hydrocephalus.

  15. Patterns of Vocalization and Impression Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Donald P.; Bouma, Gary D.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses the interactive behavior that accompanies verbal exchange. It specifically describes a set of experiments designed to isolate an important subset of interactive behavior, the vocal (as opposed to the verbal) and to relate this information to a wide range of social impressions resulting from verbal exchange. (Available from…

  16. Lasting Impressions: Hannah Arendt's Educational Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Rita A.

    2016-01-01

    Hannah Arendt's work is gaining increasing recognition in educational administration. But less has been written about her as an educator, colleague, and provocateur. Here, I explore the lasting impressions that Arendt had on former students, colleagues, and friends. This exploration is conducted through the lens of Arendtian narrative inquiry. For…

  17. EVALUATION OF IMPRESSED ELECTROMOTIVE FORCE CATHODIC PROTECTION

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Electromotive couples consisting of 0.064 in. x 24 in. x 24 in. bare 7075-T6 aluminum cathodes and 0.064 in. x 2 in. x 3 in. RC-70 titanium or...such a manner that it opposed the galvanic current. In a series of tests wherein the impressed voltage and current was varied from specimen to specimen

  18. The elimination of siloxanes from the biogas of a wastewater treatment plant by means of an adsorption process.

    PubMed

    Trapote, Arturo; García, Mariano; Prats, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    Siloxanes present in the biogas produced during anaerobic digestion in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) can damage the mechanism of cogeneration heat engines and obstruct the process of energy valorization. The objective of this research is to detect the presence of siloxanes in the biogas and evaluate a procedure for their elimination. A breakthrough curve of a synthetic decamethylcyclopentasiloxane on an experimental bed of activated carbon was modeled and the theoretical mathematical model of the adsorption process was adjusted. As a result, the constants of the model were obtained: the mass transfer constant, Henry's equilibrium constant, and the Eddy diffusion. The procedure developed allows the adsorption equilibrium of siloxanes on activated carbon to be predicted, and makes it possible to lay the basis for the design of an appropriate activated carbon module for the elimination of siloxanes in a WWTP.

  19. You want to give a good impression? Be honest! Moral traits dominate group impression formation.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Marco; Sacchi, Simona; Rusconi, Patrice; Cherubini, Paolo; Yzerbyt, Vincent Y

    2012-03-01

    Research has shown that warmth and competence are core dimensions on which perceivers judge others and that warmth has a primary role at various phases of impression formation. Three studies explored whether the two components of warmth (i.e., sociability and morality) have distinct roles in predicting the global impression of social groups. In Study 1 (N= 105) and Study 2 (N= 112), participants read an immigration scenario depicting an unfamiliar social group in terms of high (vs. low) morality, sociability, and competence. In both studies, participants were asked to report their global impression of the group. Results showed that global evaluations were better predicted by morality than by sociability or competence-trait ascriptions. Study 3 (N= 86) further showed that the effect of moral traits on group global evaluations was mediated by the perception of threat. The importance of these findings for the impression-formation process is discussed.

  20. A survey of cyclic and linear siloxanes in indoor dust and their implications for human exposures in twelve countries.

    PubMed

    Tran, Tri Manh; Abualnaja, Khalid O; Asimakopoulos, Alexandros G; Covaci, Adrian; Gevao, Bondi; Johnson-Restrepo, Boris; Kumosani, Taha A; Malarvannan, Govindan; Minh, Tu Binh; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Nakata, Haruhiko; Sinha, Ravindra K; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2015-05-01

    Siloxanes are used widely in a variety of consumer products, including cosmetics, personal care products, medical and electrical devices, cookware, and building materials. Nevertheless, little is known on the occurrence of siloxanes in indoor dust. In this survey, five cyclic (D3-D7) and 11 linear (L4-L14) siloxanes were determined in 310 indoor dust samples collected from 12 countries. Dust samples collected from Greece contained the highest concentrations of total cyclic siloxanes (TCSi), ranging from 118 to 25,100ng/g (median: 1380), and total linear siloxanes (TLSi), ranging from 129 to 4990ng/g (median: 772). The median total siloxane (TSi) concentrations in dust samples from 12 countries were in the following decreasing order: Greece (2970ng/g), Kuwait (2400), South Korea (1810), Japan (1500), the USA (1220), China (1070), Romania (538), Colombia (230), Vietnam (206), Saudi Arabia (132), India (116), and Pakistan (68.3). TLSi concentrations as high as 42,800ng/g (Kuwait) and TCSi concentrations as high as 25,000ng/g (Greece) were found in indoor dust samples. Among the 16 siloxanes determined, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) was found at the highest concentration in dust samples from all countries, except for Japan and South Korea, with a predominance of L11; Kuwait, with L10; and Pakistan and Romania, with L12. The composition profiles of 16 siloxanes in dust samples varied by country. TCSi accounted for a major proportion of TSi concentrations in dust collected from Colombia (90%), India (80%) and Saudi Arabia (70%), whereas TLSi predominated in samples collected from Japan (89%), Kuwait (85%), and South Korea (78%). Based on the measured median TSi concentrations in indoor dust, we estimated human exposure doses through indoor dust ingestion for various age groups. The exposure doses ranged from 0.27 to 11.9ng/kg-bw/d for toddlers and 0.06 to 2.48ng/kg-bw/d for adults.

  1. Hydrophilization of Polyvinyl Chloride Surface by Ozonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurose, Keisuke; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nakai, Satoshi; Tsai, Tsung-Yueh; Nishijima, Wataru; Okada, Mitsumasa

    The surface modification mechanism of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) by ozonation was investigated to study the selective hydrophilization of PVC surface among other plastics. Infrared analysis confirmed the increase of hydrophilic groups. XPS analysis revealed that the increase was due to the structural change in chlorine group in PVC to hydroxylic acid, ketone, and carboxylic groups by ozonation. This chemical reaction by ozone could occur only for polymers with chlorides in its structure and resulted in the selective hydrophilization of PVC among various polymers.

  2. ANIMAL ANALOGIES IN FIRST IMPRESSIONS OF FACES.

    PubMed

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A; Wadlinger, Heather A; Luevano, Victor X; White, Benjamin M; Xing, Cai; Zhang, Yi

    2011-08-01

    Analogies between humans and animals based on facial resemblance have a long history. We report evidence for reverse anthropomorphism and the extension of facial stereotypes to lions, foxes, and dogs. In the stereotype extension, more positive traits were attributed to animals judged more attractive than con-specifics; more childlike traits were attributed to those judged more babyfaced. In the reverse anthropomorphism, human faces with more resemblance to lions, ascertained by connectionist modeling of facial metrics, were judged more dominant, cold, and shrewd, controlling attractiveness, babyfaceness, and sex. Faces with more resemblance to Labradors were judged warmer and less shrewd. Resemblance to foxes did not predict impressions. Results for lions and dogs were consistent with trait impressions of these animals and support the species overgeneralization hypothesis that evolutionarily adaptive reactions to particular animals are overgeneralized, with people perceived to have traits associated with animals their faces resemble. Other possible explanations are discussed.

  3. The Importance of Subtextual Impression Management and Business Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaney, Lillian H.; Lyden, Julie A.

    1998-01-01

    College students (n=265) reported their impressions of business faculty's personal appearance, body language, behavior, and office appearance. Findings indicate that impression management is useful for professors who want to convey credibility, authority, and interest in students. (JOW)

  4. Mitigating the effect of siloxanes on internal combustion engines using landfill gasses

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2014-01-21

    A waste gas combustion method that includes providing a combustible fuel source, in which the combustible fuel source is composed of at least methane and siloxane gas. A sodium source or magnesium source is mixed with the combustible fuel source. Combustion of the siloxane gas of the combustible fuel source produces a silicon containing product. The sodium source or magnesium source reacts with the silicon containing product to provide a sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or a magnesium containing silicate. By producing the sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or the magnesium containing silicate, or magnesium source for precipitating particulate silica instead of hard coating, the method may reduce or eliminate the formation of silica deposits within the combustion chamber and the exhaust components of the internal combustion engine.

  5. Mitigating the effect of siloxanes on internal combustion engines using landfill gasses

    DOEpatents

    Besmann, Theodore M

    2015-01-06

    A waste gas combustion method that includes providing a combustible fuel source, in which the combustible fuel source is composed of at least methane and siloxane gas. A sodium source or magnesium source is mixed with the combustible fuel source. Combustion of the siloxane gas of the combustible fuel source produces a silicon containing product. The sodium source or magnesium source reacts with the silicon containing product to provide a sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or a magnesium containing silicate. By producing the sodium containing glass or sodium containing silicate, or the magnesium containing silicate, or magnesium source for precipitating particulate silica instead of hard coating, the method may reduce or eliminate the formation of silica deposits within the combustion chamber and the exhaust components of the internal combustion engine.

  6. Non-toxic liquid scintillators with high light output based on phenyl-substituted siloxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Palma, M.; Carturan, S. M.; Degerlier, M.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Quaranta, A.

    2015-04-01

    The work describes the development of a new class of liquid scintillators based on polysiloxane liquid compounds. These materials are characterized by low toxicity, chemical inertness, very low volatility and low flammability, allowing their use without concerns even at high temperatures in vacuum. In this view different polysiloxane based liquids have been tested, with variable content and distribution of phenyl lateral substituents and added with suitable dyes, namely 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and Lumogen Violet (LV). Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy have been used in order to study the emission feature of the various compounds and to investigate the spectral matching between siloxane solvents and dissolved primary dyes. Scintillation efficiency towards 60Co and 137Cs gamma rays, relative to commercial liquid scintillator (EJ-309), has been measured and the results have been related to the energy transfer and energy migration mechanism from monomer and excimer forming sites in liquid siloxanes.

  7. Insights into siloxane removal from biogas in biotrickling filters via process mapping-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Soreanu, Gabriela

    2016-03-01

    Data process mapping using response surface methodology (RSM)-based computational techniques is performed in this study for the diagnosis of a laboratory-scale biotrickling filter applied for siloxane (i.e. octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5)) removal from biogas. A mathematical model describing the process performance (i.e. Si removal efficiency, %) was obtained as a function of key operating parameters (e.g biogas flowrate, D4 and D5 concentration). The contour plots and the response surfaces generated for the obtained objective function indicate a minimization trend in siloxane removal performance, however a maximum performance of approximately 60% Si removal efficiency was recorded. Analysis of the process mapping results provides indicators of improvement to biological system performance.

  8. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Yuji; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61).

  9. Neurofibromatosis, stroke and basilar impression. Case report.

    PubMed

    Piovesan, E J; Scola, R H; Werneck, L C; Zétola, V H; Nóvak, E M; Iwamoto, F M; Piovesan, L M

    1999-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) can virtually affect any organ, presenting most frequently with "cafe au lait" spots and neurofibromas. Vasculopathy is a known complication of NF1, but cerebrovascular disease is rare. We report the case of a 51-year-old man admitted to the hospital with a history of stroke four months before admission. On physical examination, he presented various "cafe au lait" spots and cutaneous neurofibromas. Neurologic examination demonstrated right-sided facial paralysis, right-sided hemiplegia, and aphasia. Computed tomography scan of head showed hypodense areas in the basal ganglia and centrum semiovale. Radiographs of cranium and cervical spine showed basilar impression. Angiography revealed complete occlusion of both vertebral and left internal carotid arteries, and partial stenosis of the right internal carotid artery. A large network of collateral vessels was present (moyamoya syndrome). It is an uncommon case of occlusive cerebrovascular disease associated with NF1, since most cases described in the literature are in young people, and tend to spare the posterior cerebral circulation. Basilar impression associated with this case may be considered a pure coincidence, but rare cases of basilar impression and NF1 have been described.

  10. Odor Impression Prediction from Mass Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell arises from the perception of odors from chemicals. However, the relationship between the impression of odor and the numerous physicochemical parameters has yet to be understood owing to its complexity. As such, there is no established general method for predicting the impression of odor of a chemical only from its physicochemical properties. In this study, we designed a novel predictive model based on an artificial neural network with a deep structure for predicting odor impression utilizing the mass spectra of chemicals, and we conducted a series of computational analyses to evaluate its performance. Feature vectors extracted from the original high-dimensional space using two autoencoders equipped with both input and output layers in the model are used to build a mapping function from the feature space of mass spectra to the feature space of sensory data. The results of predictions obtained by the proposed new method have notable accuracy (R≅0.76) in comparison with a conventional method (R≅0.61). PMID:27326765

  11. First results of ESA's IMPRESS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heppener, Marc; Minster, Olivier; Jarvis, David John

    2008-07-01

    IMPRESS is an acronym for Intermetallic Materials Processing in Relation to Earth and Space Solidification. This 5-year project was selected by the European Commission in 2004 and is being coordinated by the European Space Agency. The main scientific objective of IMPRESS is to gain a better understanding of the links between materials processing routes, structure and final properties of novel intermetallic alloys. From a technical standpoint, the project aims to develop and test two distinct prototypes based on intermetallic materials; namely (i) gas turbine blades and (ii) Raney-type catalytic powders. Numerous material processing routes are being investigated within the project with a strong emphasis on solidification. For turbine blade manufacturing the main processes under study are casting and heat treatment. For catalytic powder production the focus is placed on gas atomisation and vapour condensation processes. IMPRESS combines a wide range of fundamental studies of solidification both on ground and in space, as well as industrial process development. This paper will describe some of the different facets related to solidification and the benchmark space experiments.

  12. In Vitro Comparative Evaluation of Different Types of Impression Trays and Impression Materials on the Accuracy of Open Tray Implant Impressions: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sonam; Balakrishnan, Dhanasekar

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. For a precise fit of multiple implant framework, having an accurate definitive cast is imperative. The present study evaluated dimensional accuracy of master casts obtained using different impression trays and materials with open tray impression technique. Materials and Methods. A machined aluminum reference model with four parallel implant analogues was fabricated. Forty implant level impressions were made. Eight groups (n = 5) were tested using impression materials (polyether and vinylsiloxanether) and four types of impression trays, two being custom (self-cure acrylic and light cure acrylic) and two being stock (plastic and metal). The interimplant distances were measured on master casts using a coordinate measuring machine. The collected data was compared with a standard reference model and was statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. Statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) was found between the two impression materials. However, the difference seen was small (36 μm) irrespective of the tray type used. No significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed between varied stock and custom trays. Conclusions. The polyether impression material proved to be more accurate than vinylsiloxanether impression material. The rigid nonperforated stock trays, both plastic and metal, could be an alternative for custom trays for multi-implant impressions when used with medium viscosity impression materials. PMID:28348595

  13. Synthesis and properties of dicationic ionic liquids containing a siloxane structural moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhov, L. M.; Krasovskiy, V. G.; Chernikova, E. A.; Kapustin, G. I.; Kustov, L. M.; Koroteev, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Five new ionic liquids formed by doubly charged cations containing a siloxane moiety and bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide anion are synthesized and characterized. Their thermal stability is studied by means of TGA; melting points (glass transition temperatures) and densities are measured. The temperature dependences of kinematic viscosity of the obtained ionic liquids are presented along with their approximations by the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher equation.

  14. The effect of amphiphilic siloxane oligomers on fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lynam, Emily C; Xie, Yan; Loli, Bree; Dargaville, Tim R; Leavesley, David I; George, Graeme A; Upton, Zee

    2010-11-01

    The formation of hypertrophic scars (HSF) is a frequent medical outcome of wound repair and often requires further therapy with treatments such as silicone gel sheets (SGS) or apoptosis-inducing agents, including bleomycin. Although widely used, knowledge regarding SGS and their mode of action is limited. Preliminary research has shown that small amounts of amphiphilic silicone present in SGS have the ability to move into skin during treatment. We demonstrate herein that a commercially available analogue of these amphiphilic siloxane species, the rake copolymer GP226, decreases collagen synthesis on exposure to cultures of fibroblasts derived from HSF. By size exclusion chromatography, GP226 was found to be a mixture of siloxane species, containing five fractions of different molecular weight. By studies of collagen production, cell viability and proliferation, it was revealed that a low molecular weight fraction (fraction IV) was the most active, reducing the number of viable cells present after treatment and thereby reducing collagen production as a result. On exposure of fraction IV to human keratinocytes, viability and proliferation were also significantly affected. HSF undergoing apoptosis after application of fraction IV were also detected via real-time microscopy and by using the TUNEL assay. Taken together, these data suggests that these amphiphilic siloxanes could be potential non-invasive substitutes to apoptotic-inducing chemical agents that are currently used as scar treatments.

  15. 6LiF oleic acid capped nanoparticles entrapment in siloxanes for thermal neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carturan, S.; Maggioni, G.; Marchi, T.; Gramegna, F.; Cinausero, M.; Quaranta, A.; Palma, M. Dalla

    2016-07-01

    The good light output of siloxane based scintillators as displayed under γ-rays and α particles has been exploited here to obtain clear and reliable response toward thermal neutrons. Sensitization towards thermal neutrons has been pursued by adding 6LiF, in form of nanoparticles. Aiming at the enhancement of compatibility between the inorganic nanoparticles and the low polarity, siloxane based surrounding medium, oleic acid-capped 6LiF nanoparticles have been synthesized by thermal decomposition of Li trifluoroacetate. Thin pellets siloxane scintillator maintained their optical transmittance up to weight load of 2% of 6Li. Thin samples with increasing 6Li concentration and thicker ones with fixed 6Li amount have been prepared and tested with several sources (α, γ-rays, moderated neutrons). Light output as high as 80% of EJ212 under α irradiation was measured with thin samples, and negligible changes have been observed as a result of 6LiF addition. In case of thick samples, severe light loss has been observed, as induced by opacity. Nevertheless, thermal neutrons detection has been assessed and the data have been compared with GS20, based on Li glass, taken as a reference material.

  16. Differences in volatile methyl siloxane (VMS) profiles in biogas from landfills and anaerobic digesters and energetics of VMS transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Tansel, Berrin Surita, Sharon C.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • In the digester gas, D4 and D5 comprised the 62% and 27% if siloxanes, respectively. • In landfill gas, the bulk of siloxanes were TMSOH (58%) followed by D4 (17%). • Methane utilization may be a possible mechanism for TMSOH formation in the landfills. • The geometric configurations of D4 and D5 molecules make them very stable. - Abstract: The objectives of this study were to compare the types and levels of volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) present in biogas generated in the anaerobic digesters and landfills, evaluate the energetics of siloxane transformations under anaerobic conditions, compare the conditions in anaerobic digesters and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills which result in differences in siloxane compositions. Biogas samples were collected at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant and South Dade Landfill in Miami, Florida. In the digester gas, D4 and D5 comprised the bulk of total siloxanes (62% and 27%, respectively) whereas in the landfill gas, the bulk of siloxanes were trimethylsilanol (TMSOH) (58%) followed by D4 (17%). Presence of high levels of TMSOH in the landfill gas indicates that methane utilization may be a possible reaction mechanism for TMSOH formation. The free energy change for transformation of D5 and D4 to TMSOH either by hydrogen or methane utilization are thermodynamically favorable. Either hydrogen or methane should be present at relatively high concentrations for TMSOH formation which explains the high levels present in the landfill gas. The high bond energy and bond distance of the Si–O bond, in view of the atomic sizes of Si and O atoms, indicate that Si atoms can provide a barrier, making it difficult to break the Si–O bonds especially for molecules with specific geometric configurations such as D4 and D5 where oxygen atoms are positioned inside the frame formed by the large Si atoms which are surrounded by the methyl groups.

  17. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in urine on fabric.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Bandey, Helen; Bleay, Steve; NicDaéid, Niamh

    2012-01-10

    A range of chemical techniques were utilised for the enhancement of footwear impressions deposited on a variety of fabric types of different colours with urine as a contaminant. A semi-automated stamping device was used to deliver test impressions at a set force to minimise the variability between impressions; multiple impressions were produced and enhanced by each reagent to determine the repeatability of the enhancement. Urine samples from different donors were analysed using a spectrofluorophotometer revealing differences between individuals. Results indicated that the enhancement of footwear impressions in urine was possible using amino acid staining techniques whereas protein stains failed to achieve successful enhancement.

  18. Evaluation of the precision of three implant transfer impression techniques using two elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Tamer Mohamed Nasr; Elgendy, Mohamed Nabeel Mohamed; Kashef, Nahed Ahmed; Halim, Maha Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    A master cast representing a completely edentulous mandible was fabricated in polyurethane resin and had four implants secured to the anterior interforaminal area. Impressions were made using six technique-material combinations. Ten definitive casts were fabricated for each technique. Linear distances between implants were measured using a traveling microscope. There was no statistically significant difference between the direct unsplinted and splinted techniques (P > .05), while the indirect technique was statistically significantly different from the other two techniques (P < .05). There was no statistically significant difference between the two impression materials.

  19. Dimensional changes of alginate dental impression materials.

    PubMed

    Nallamuthu, N; Braden, M; Patel, M P

    2006-12-01

    The weight loss and corresponding dimensional changes of two dental alginate impression materials have been studied. The weight loss kinetics indicate this to be a diffusion controlled process, but with a boundary condition at the surface of the concentration decreasing exponentially with time. This is in marked contrast to most desorption processes, where the surface concentration becomes instantaneously zero. The appropriate theory has been developed for an exponential boundary condition, and its predictions compared with experimental data; the agreement was satisfactory. The diffusion coefficients for two thicknesses of the same material were not identical as predicted by theory; the possible reasons for this are discussed.

  20. Polyvinyl alcohol as photoluminescent conductive polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Limón, B.; Wetzel, G. B. J.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Ponce-Lee, E. L.; Hernández-Garay, M. P.; Páez-Trujillo, G.; Toxqui-López, S.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2007-02-01

    We synthesized a photoluminescent conductor polymer composed of polyvinyl alcohol, which was doped with nickel chloride to decrease its resistivity (300 Ωcm) and benzalkonium chloride to obtain photoluminescence properties, when it is radiated with a green laser beam (532 nm). We compared its absorbance curve and its energy emitted curve to observe the amount energy that is taken advantage of this process. Besides we research the photoluminescence behavior when an electric currant is applied in our conductor polymer, obtaining a modulation capacity.

  1. Complex compound polyvinyl alcohol-titanic acid/titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosanov, I. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    A complex compound polyvinyl alcohol-titanic acid has been produced and investigated by means of IR and Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and synchronous thermal analysis. It is claimed that it represents an interpolymeric complex of polyvinyl alcohol and hydrated titanium oxide.

  2. Fluorinated/siloxane copolymer blends for fouling release: chemical characterisation and biological evaluation with algae and barnacles.

    PubMed

    Marabotti, Ilaria; Morelli, Andrea; Orsini, Lorenzo M; Martinelli, Elisa; Galli, Giancarlo; Chiellini, Emo; Lien, Einar M; Pettitt, Michala E; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Conlan, Sheelagh L; Mutton, Robert J; Clare, Anthony S; Kocijan, Aleksandra; Donik, Crtomir; Jenko, Monika

    2009-01-01

    Fouling-release coatings were prepared from blends of a fluorinated/siloxane copolymer with a poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) matrix in order to couple the low modulus character of PDMS with the low surface tension typical for fluorinated polymers. The content of the surface-active copolymer was varied in the blend over a broad range (0.15-10 wt % with respect to PDMS). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling analyses were performed on the coatings to establish the distribution of specific chemical constituents throughout the coatings, and proved enrichment in fluorine of the outermost layers of the coating surface. Addition of the fluorinated/siloxane copolymer to the PDMS matrix resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in settlement of barnacle, Balanus amphitrite, cyprids. The release of young plants of Ulva, a soft fouling species, and young barnacles showed that adhesion strength on the fluorinated/siloxane copolymer was significantly lower than the siloxane control. However, differences in adhesion strength were not directly correlated with the concentration of copolymer in the blends.

  3. Development of on-line FTIR spectroscopy for siloxane detection in biogas to enhance carbon contactor management.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, C A; Vale, P; Brown, A S; Simms, N J; McAdam, E J

    2015-08-15

    Activated carbon filters are used to limit engine damage by siloxanes when biogas is utilised to provide electricity. However, carbon filter siloxane removal performance is poorly understood as until recently, it had not been possible to measure siloxanes on-line. In this study, on-line Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was developed to measure siloxane concentration in real biogas both upstream (86.1-157.5mg m(-3)) and downstream (2.2-4.3mg m(-3)) of activated carbon filters. The FTIR provided reasonable precision upstream of the carbon vessel with a root mean square error of 10% using partial least squares analysis. However, positive interference from volatile organic carbons was observed in downstream gas measurements limiting precision at the outlet to an RMSE of 1.5mg m(-3) (47.8%). Importantly, a limit of detection of 3.2mg m(-3) was identified which is below the recommended siloxane limit and evidences the applicability of on-line FTIR for this application.

  4. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine. 721.6170 Section 721.6170 Protection... Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine... identified as siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with...

  5. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine. 721.6170 Section 721.6170 Protection... Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine... identified as siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with...

  6. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine. 721.6170 Section 721.6170 Protection... Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine... identified as siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with...

  7. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine. 721.6170 Section 721.6170 Protection... Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine... identified as siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with...

  8. 40 CFR 721.6170 - Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine. 721.6170 Section 721.6170 Protection... Siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-(2-propenyloxy)piperdine... identified as siloxanes and silicones, Me hydrogen, reaction products with...

  9. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BLENDS OF PAMAM DENDRIMERS WITH POLY(VINYL CHLORIDE) AND POLY(VINYL ACETATE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hybrid blends of poly(amidoamine) PAMAM dendrimers with two linear high polymers, poly(vinyl chloride), PVC, and poly(vinyl acetate), PVAc, are reported. The interaction between the blend components was studied using dynamic mechanical analysis, xenon nuclear magnetic resonacne ...

  10. Dimensional stability ofautoclave sterilised addition cured impressions and trays.

    PubMed

    Deb, S; Etemad-Shahidi, S; Millar, B J

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dimensional accuracy of impressions following sterilisation by autoclaving. Dental impressions (75) were of a dentoform containing 6 reference points. The impressions were split into 5 groups of 15, each group used a different impression technique. Groups were divided into 3 subgroups with 5 impressions as control, 5 for disinfection by Perform-ID and 5 being autoclaved. Measurements were made using a travelling light microscope. A minimal significant dimensional difference (0.01impression method. No significant dimensional differences were observed for all other groups (P>0.05). The trays and materials tested were suitable for the autoclave sterilisation.

  11. Volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) concentrations in outdoor air of several Catalan urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, E.; Perales, J. F.; Roca, F. J.; Guardino, X.; Gadea, E.

    2017-04-01

    Volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) were evaluated in ten Catalan urban areas with different industrial impacts, such as petrochemical industry, electrical and mechanical equipment, metallurgical and chemical industries, municipal solid waste treatment plant and cement and food industries, during 2013-2015. 24 h samples were taken with LCMA-UPC pump samplers specially designed in our laboratory, with a flow range of 70 ml min-1. A sorbent-based sampling method, successfully developed to collect a wide-range of VOC, was used. The analysis was performed by automatic thermal desorption coupled with capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry detector. The presented methodology allows the evaluation of VMS together with a wide range of other VOC, increasing the number of compounds that can be determined in outdoor air quality assessment of urban areas. This aspect is especially relevant as a restriction of several VMS (D4 and D5) in consumer products has been made by the European Chemicals Agency and US EPA is evaluating to include D4 in the Toxic Substances Control Act, regarding the concern of the possible effects of these compounds in human health and the environment. ΣVMS concentrations (L2-L5, D3-D6 and trimethylsilanol) varied between 0.3 ± 0.2 μg m-3 and 18 ± 12 μg m-3, determined in a hotspot area. Observed VMS concentrations were generally of the same order of magnitude than the previously determined in Barcelona, Chicago and Zurich urban areas, but higher than the published from suburban sites and Arctic locations. Cyclic siloxanes concentrations were up to two-three orders of magnitude higher than those of linear siloxanes, accounting for average contributions to the total concentrations of 97 ± 6% for all samples except for the hotspot area, where cyclic VMS accounted for 99.9 ± 0.1%. D5 was the most abundant siloxane in 5 sampling points; however, differing from the generally observed in previous studies, D3 was the most abundant compound in the

  12. Semipermeable thin-film membranes comprising siloxane, alkoxysilyl and aryloxysilyl oligomers and copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Babcock, W.C.; Friesen, D.T.

    1988-11-01

    Novel semipermeable membranes and thin film composite (TFC) gas separation membranes useful in the separation of oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, water vapor, methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, lower hydrocarbons, and other gases are disclosed. The novel semipermeable membranes comprise the polycondensation reaction product of two complementary polyfunctional compounds, each having at least two functional groups that are mutually reactive in a condensation polymerization reaction, and at least one of which is selected from siloxanes, alkoxsilyls and aryloxysilyls. The TFC membrane comprises a microporous polymeric support, the surface of which has the novel semipermeable film formed thereon, preferably by interfacial polymerization.

  13. Formulation/cure technology for ultrahigh molecular weight silphenylene-siloxane polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hundley, N. H.; Patterson, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    Molecular weights above one million were achieved for methylvinylsilphenylene-siloxane terpolymers using a two-stage polymerization technique which was successfully scaled up to 200 grams. The resulting polymer was vulcanized by two different formulations and compared to an identically formulated commercial methylvinyl silicone on the basis of ultimate strength, Young's modulus, percent elongation at failure, and tear strength. Relative thermal/oxidative stabilities of the elastomers were assessed by gradient and isothermal thermogravimetric analyses performed in both air and nitrogen. The experimental elastomer exhibited enhanced thermal/oxidative stability and possed equivalent or superior mechanical properties. The effect of variations in prepolymer molecular weight on mechanical properties was also investigated.

  14. Semipermeable thin-film membranes comprising siloxane, alkoxysilyl and aryloxysilyl oligomers and copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Babcock, Walter C.; Friesen, Dwayne T.

    1988-01-01

    Novel semiperimeable membranes and thin film composite (TFC) gas separation membranes useful in the separation of oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen, water vapor, methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, lower hydrocarbons, and other gases are disclosed. The novel semipermeable membranes comprise the polycondensation reaction product of two complementary polyfunctional compounds, each having at least two functional groups that are mutually reactive in a condensation polymerization reaction, and at least one of which is selected from siloxanes, alkoxsilyls and aryloxysilyls. The TFC membrane comprises a microporous polymeric support, the surface of which has the novel semipermeable film formed thereon, preferably by interfacial polymerization.

  15. Impression Management in Survey Responding: Easier for Collectivists or Individualists?

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, Hila; Shavitt, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments indicate that when individualists and collectivists engage in impression management on self-reports, they do so through different psychological mechanism s. Collectivists do so through a relatively automatic process. Thus, they can impression manage even when cognitively busy. Individualists impression manage through a more effortful process. Therefore, they can do so only when the situation permits effortful processing. These findings highlight distinct conditions under which social norms may influence consumer self-reports across cultures. PMID:23175618

  16. [Impression traces from firearms on cadaver skin].

    PubMed

    Püschel, K; Koops, E; Kulle, K J

    1996-01-01

    Guns may occasionally leave traces on human skin, for example by compression/impression of the tissue (esp. in the area of livores), by contact-transfer of dirt, oil, and rust, or by forming the pattern of blood-smears. The case of a 31-year-old drug-addict is presented in detail: The man committed suicide by shooting himself (entrance hole under the chin). When the dead body was found there was no weapon at the scene. By careful securing of evidence and analyzing the pattern of metallisations (identified as rust from the old pistol) it was reconstructed that the suicident held the pistol (identified as Russian Tokarew TT33-7.62 mm) in his hand for many hours postmortem until it was removed by an unknown thief.

  17. Fast ensemble representations for abstract visual impressions

    PubMed Central

    Leib, Allison Yamanashi; Kosovicheva, Anna; Whitney, David

    2016-01-01

    Much of the richness of perception is conveyed by implicit, rather than image or feature-level, information. The perception of animacy or lifelikeness of objects, for example, cannot be predicted from image level properties alone. Instead, perceiving lifelikeness seems to be an inferential process and one might expect it to be cognitively demanding and serial rather than fast and automatic. If perceptual mechanisms exist to represent lifelikeness, then observers should be able to perceive this information quickly and reliably, and should be able to perceive the lifelikeness of crowds of objects. Here, we report that observers are highly sensitive to the lifelikeness of random objects and even groups of objects. Observers' percepts of crowd lifelikeness are well predicted by independent observers' lifelikeness judgements of the individual objects comprising that crowd. We demonstrate that visual impressions of abstract dimensions can be achieved with summary statistical representations, which underlie our rich perceptual experience. PMID:27848949

  18. Vertebral artery dissection related to basilar impression: case report.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, L D; Tuite, G F; Colon, G P; Papadopoulos, S M

    1995-04-01

    A 50-year-old man with myelopathy secondary to basilar impression developed bilateral vertebral artery dissection after undergoing treatment with 8 pounds of cervical traction. The vertebral artery dissection resulted in vertebrobasilar insufficiency and posterior circulation stroke. In this report, the current management philosophies in the treatment of basilar impression are discussed, and the pertinent neurovascular anatomy is illustrated. This report suggests that vertebral artery injury may result from attempted reduction of severe basilar impression. Regardless of the cause of cranial settling, the risk of vertebral artery injury with cervical traction should be considered in patients with severe basilar impression.

  19. The fungicidal effect of ultraviolet light on impression materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, H.; Nahara, Y.; Tamamoto, M.; Hamada, T. )

    1991-04-01

    The effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on fungi and impression materials were tested. UV light (250 microW/cm2) killed most Candida organisms (10(3) cells/ml) within 5 minutes. UV light (8000 microW/cm2) killed most C. albicans (10(7) cells/ml) within 2 minutes of exposure. The effect of UV light on dimensional change and surface roughness of impression materials (irreversible hydrocolloid, agar, and silicone rubber) was tested. The results showed that neither dimensional change nor surface roughness of the impression materials were affected. The results of this study indicate that UV light disinfects impression materials that are contaminated with Candida organisms.

  20. Dimensional accuracy of 3 silicone dental impression materials.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A K

    2006-09-01

    This study was carried out to measure the dimensional changes in silicone impression material, which can affect the fitness of the prosthesis. Using both single and double mix techniques, 20 impression samples for each of 3 different proprietary silicones, Xantopren-H, President and Fulldent, were made. Selected measurements were made on the stone casts made from each impression. In all 3 cases, the single mix gave more accurate casts than the double mix technique. The Xantopren-H impressions had the most accurate dimensions.

  1. Poly(vinyl chloride) processes and products.

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, R N

    1981-01-01

    Poly(vinyl chloride) resins are produced by four basic processes: suspension, emulsion, bulk and solution polymerization. PVC suspensions resins are usually relatively dust-free and granular with varying degrees of particle porosity. PVC emulsion resins are small particle powders containing very little free monomer. Bulk PVC resins are similar to suspension PVC resins, though the particles tend to be more porous. Solution PVC resins are smaller in particle size than suspension PVC with high porosity particles containing essentially no free monomer. The variety of PVC resin products does not lend itself to broad generalizations concerning health hazards. In studying occupational hazards the particular PVC process and the product must be considered and identified in the study. PMID:7333230

  2. [Survey of plasticizers in polyvinyl chloride toys].

    PubMed

    Abe, Yutaka; Yamaguchi, Miku; Mutsuga, Motoh; Hirahara, Yoshichika; Kawamura, Yoko

    2012-01-01

    Plasticizers in 101 samples of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) toys on the Japanese market were surveyed. No phthalates were detected in designated toys, though bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, diisononyl phthalate, diisobutyl phthalate, dibutyl phthalate, diisodecyl phthalate and benzyl butyl phthalate were detected in more than half of other toys. 2,2,4-Tributyl-1,3-pentanediol diisobutylate, o-acetyl tributyl citrate, adipates and diacetyl lauroyl glycerol, which are alternative plasticizers to phthalates, were detected. The results of structural analysis confirmed the presence of di(2-ethylhexyl)terephthalate, tributyl citrate, diisononyl 1,2-cyclohexanedicarboxylate and neopentyl glycol esters; these have not previonsly been reported in Japan. There appears to be a shift in plasticizers used for designated toys from phthalates to new plasticizers, and the number of different plasticizers is increasing.

  3. Dynamical Properties of Plasticizer in Polyvinyl Acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, S.; Alvarez, F.; Arbe, A.; Tyagi, M.; Frick, B.; Colmenero, J.

    2011-07-01

    Dynamical properties of polymers in a blend are known to exhibit unusual features. For example, dynamic heterogeneities can be observed in a blend with asymmetries in the composition or the glass transition temperature of the blend components. The relaxation functions corresponding to the individual components in such a blend are also known to be broadened. If the asymmetry is large, even confinement like features can be observed. A similar situation could arise in an asymmetric system consisting of a polymer and a low molecular weight system (a plasticizer). Here we report the structural and dynamical properties of a system with 75% PVAc/25%trimer (Polyvinyl acetate and its trimer), a system with high Tg asymmetry (Tg(PVAc) = 314 K, Tg (Trimer) = 209 K, Tg(Average) = 259 K).

  4. Thermal Decomposition and Stabilisation of Poly(vinyl Chloride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskii, B. B.; Troitskaya, L. S.

    1985-08-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the thermal dehydrochlorination of poly(vinyl chloride) and low-molecular-weight chlorohydrocarbons which model various fragments of the polymer molecule, are discussed. Studies designed to determine the qualitative and quantitative compositions of the unstable fragments in poly(vinyl chloride) macromolecules by 13C NMR are examined. Attention is concentrated on the consideration of the mechanism of the action of the most effective thermostabilisers for the polymer - organotin compounds. The principal features of synergism in the stabilisation of poly(vinyl chloride) and the mechanism of the action of synergistic mixtures are analysed. The bibliography includes 107 references.

  5. Solvent effects on silica domain growth in silica/siloxane composite materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ulibarri, T.A.; Bates, S.E.; Black, E.P.; Schaefer, D.W.; Beaucage, W.G.; Lee, M.K.; Moore, P.A.; Burns, G.T.

    1995-07-01

    The effect of solvent addition on the phase separation, mechanical Properties and thermal stability of silica/siloxane composite materials prepared by in situ reinforcement was examined. The addition of a solvent enhances the miscibility of the reinforcement precursor, a partial hydrolyzate of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS-PH), with the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer. As a result, the phase separation at the micron level, termed the large-scale structure, diminished in size. This decrease in particle size resulting from the addition of moderate amounts of solvent was accompanied by an improvement in the mechanical properties. However, solvent addition in the excess of 50 weight percent led to a decrease in mechanical properties even though the large-scale structure continued to diminish in size. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) was used to examine the Angstrom level or small-scale structure. This small-scale structure was only affected by the presence of solvent, not the amount. The silica/siloxane composite materials showed the same thermal transition temperatures as the original PDMS material.

  6. Triblock siloxane copolymer surfactant: template for spherical mesoporous silica with a hexagonal pore ordering.

    PubMed

    Stébé, M J; Emo, M; Forny-Le Follotec, A; Metlas-Komunjer, L; Pezron, I; Blin, J L

    2013-02-05

    Ordered mesoporous silica materials with a spherical morphology have been prepared for the first time through the cooperative templating mechanism (CTM) by using a silicone triblock copolymer as template. The behavior of the pure siloxane copolymer amphiphile in water was first investigated. A direct micellar phase (L(1)) and a hexagonal (H(1)) liquid crystal were found. The determination of the structural parameters by SAXS measurements leads us to conclude that in the hexagonal liquid crystal phase a part of the ethylene oxide group is not hydrated as observed for the micelles. Mesoporous materials were then synthesized from the cooperative templating mechanism. The recovered materials were characterized by SAXS measurements, nitrogen adsorption-desorption analysis, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The results clearly evidence that one can control the morphology and the nanostructuring of the resulting material by modifying the synthesis parameters. Actually, highly ordered mesoporous materials with a spherical morphology have been obtained with a siloxane copolymer/tetramethoxysilane molar ratio of 0.10 after hydrothermal treatment at 100 °C. Our study also supports the fact that the interactions between micelles and the hydrolyzed precursor are one of the key parameters governing the formation of ordered mesostructures through the cooperative templating mechanism. Indeed, we have demonstrated that when the interactions between micelles are important, only wormhole-like structures are recovered.

  7. Facile Patterning of Ag Nanowires Network by Micro-Contact Printing of Siloxane.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung-Soo; Khang, Dahl-Young

    2016-09-07

    A simple, low-cost, scalable patterning method has been demonstrated for chemically welded Ag nanowires (AgNWs) network. The chemically welded network of AgNWs on substrates has been patterned by modified microcontact printing (μCP). As an ink for the μCP, uncured high-viscosity siloxane polymer has been applied. Using elastomeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp that has been replicated from micromachined Si master mold by metal-assisted chemical etching, the printed siloxane ink materials have been cured by simple UV/ozone exposure for 3 min, which acts as an etch barrier in ensuing wet-removal of exposed AgNWs network. The proposed patterning technique has no limitation in the choice of substrates and pattern shape, in addition to high resolution. The patterned AgNWs network electrodes have shown excellent optical, electrical, and mechanical performances, such as high flexibility (up to ∼10%) and stretchability (up to 40%). Finally, the patterned AgNWs network electrodes have been applied as a transparent heater, which can be used for rapid raindrop removal or deicing of car windows and outside mirrors. This can be a valuable help for driving safety under harsh weather conditions.

  8. Solid oxide fuel cell anode degradation by the effect of siloxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, Hossein; Lanzini, Andrea; Diethelm, Stefan; Papurello, Davide; Van herle, Jan; Lualdi, Matteo; Gutzon Larsen, Jørgen; Santarelli, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    Lifetime and durability issues connected with Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology are strongly related to the amount of contaminants that reach the stack. In this study the focus is on organic silicon compounds (siloxanes) and their highly detrimental effects on the performance of SOFC Ni-YSZ anodes. The involved mechanism of degradation is clarified and quantified through several test runs and subsequent post-mortem analysis on tested samples. In particular, experiments on both Ni anode-supported single cells and 11-cell- stacks are performed, co-feeding D4-siloxane (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane, C8H24O4Si4) as model compound for the organic silicon species which are generally found in sewage biogas. High degradation rates are observed already at ppb(v) level of contaminant in the fuel stream. Post-test analysis revealed that Si (as silica) is mostly deposited at the inlet of the fuel channel on both the interconnect and the anode side of the cell suggesting a relatively fast condensation-type process. Deposition of the Si was found on the interconnect and on the anode contact layer, throughout the anode support and the three phase boundary in the anode, correlating with the observed increase of polarization losses from the EIS analysis of tested cells.

  9. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold...

  11. 21 CFR 872.6880 - Preformed impression tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6880 Preformed impression tray. (a..., such as alginate, to make an impression of a patient's teeth or alveolar process (bony tooth sockets) to reproduce the structure of a patient's teeth and gums. (b) Classification. Class I...

  12. 21 CFR 872.6880 - Preformed impression tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6880 Preformed impression tray. (a..., such as alginate, to make an impression of a patient's teeth or alveolar process (bony tooth sockets) to reproduce the structure of a patient's teeth and gums. (b) Classification. Class I...

  13. Impression Management: The Web Presence of College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Joanne Cardin

    2013-01-01

    Leadership profile pages on organizational websites have become staged opportunities for impression management. This research uses content analysis to examine the strategies of assertive impression management used to construct the leadership Web presence of the 70 presidents of national public universities, as identified in the "US News and…

  14. Read Two Impress: An Intervention for Disfluent Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Chase; Rasinski, Timothy; Mohr, Kathleen A. J.

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a research-based method to increase students' reading fluency. The method is called Read Two Impress, which is derived from the Neurological Impress Method and the method of repeated readings. The authors provide step-by-step procedures to effectively implement the reading fluency intervention. Previous research indicates that…

  15. Impressions of College Intructors: Stability and Change in Student Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Kari L.

    2013-01-01

    Although the topic of stability and change in classroom impressions research is not new, there remain unanswered questions about what impressions are stable, when they are likely to change, and for whom they are likely to change over the course of a semester. My research will begin to answer those questions. My research took place in four college…

  16. Polyvinyl alcohol cross-linked with two aldehydes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Rieker, L. L.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A film forming polyvinyl alcohol resin is admixed, in aqueous solution, with a dialdehyde crosslinking agent which is capable of crosslinking the polyvinyl alcohol resin and a water soluble acid aldehyde containing a reactive aldehyde group capable of reacting with hydroxyl groups in the polyvinyl alcohol resin and an ionizable acid hydrogen atom. The dialdehyde is present in an amount sufficient to react with from 1 to 20% by weight of the theoretical amount required to react with all of the hydroxyl groups of the polyvinyl alcohol. The amount of acid aldehyde is from 1 to 50% by weight, same basis, and is sufficient to reduce the pH of the aqueous admixture to 5 or less. The admixture is then formed into a desired physical shape, such as by casting a sheet or film, and the shaped material is then heated to simultaneously dry and crosslink the article.

  17. A Paradigm shift in the concept for making dental impressions

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Mahadevan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Digital dental impression is a revolutionary technological advancement that so surpasses the accuracy and efficiency of former techniques for obtaining replicas of prepared teeth for the purpose of fabricating restorations that its adoption by dentists is rapidly eclipsing the use of elastomeric impression materials. The ultimate goals of dentists dedicated to quality restorative dentistry are to make their treatment of patients as accurate, stressless, and efficient as possible. By elimination of the everyday problems described above, there is no question that the significant advantages of digital impressions will make intraoral digital scanning standard procedure in most dental offices within the next several years. Furthermore, digital impressions have proven to reduce remakes and returns, as well as increase overall efficiency. The patient also benefits by being provided a far more positive experience. Finally, through the use of digital impression making, it has been determined that laboratory products become more consistent and require less chair time at insertion. PMID:26015714

  18. An alternative impression technique for individuals with special care needs.

    PubMed

    Topouzelis, Nikolaos; Kotsiomiti, Eleni; Arhakis, Aristidis

    2010-01-01

    Impression making may be complicated in individuals with limited ability to cooperate with caregivers. An alternative technique for obtaining full-arch casts from sectional preliminary impressions is described. The technique is a modification of the procedure advocated for impression making in subjects with limited mouth opening. A pair of partial stock trays is selected to fit the right and left side of the arch. Two sectional irreversible hydrocolloid impressions are made separately. The first cast is placed into the second impression prior to pouring, to obtain a cast of the complete arch. The procedure was used during the treatment of an uncooperative young patient with Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome and provided a simple and reliable means to obtain the diagnostic cast of the mandibular teeth. It is recommended not only for uncooperative patients, but also for patients with special needs; such as those with anatomical restrictions, functional impairment, and movement disorders.

  19. Polyvinylidene fluoride/siloxane nanofibrous membranes for long-term continuous CO2 -capture with large absorption-flux enhancement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Feng; Wang, Chi-Sen; Ko, Chia-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Hua; Chang, Kai-Shiun; Tung, Kuo-Lun; Lee, Kueir-Rarn

    2014-02-01

    In a CO2 membrane contactor system, CO2 passes through a hydrophobic porous membrane in the gas phase to contact the amine absorbent in the liquid phase. Consequently, additional CO2 gas is absorbed by amine absorbents. This study examines highly porous polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)/siloxane nanofibrous layers that are modified with hydrophobic fluoroalkylsilane (FAS) functional groups and successfully coated onto a macroporous Al2 O3 membrane. The performance of these materials in a membrane contactor system for CO2 absorption is also investigated. Compared with pristine PVDF nanofibrous membranes, the PVDF/siloxane nanofibrous membranes exhibit greater solvent resistance and mechanical strength, making them more suitable for use in CO2 capture by the membrane contactor. The PVDF/siloxane nanofibrous layer in highly porous FAS-modified membranes can prevent the wetting of the membrane by the amine absorbent; this extends the periods of continuous CO2 absorption and results in a high CO2 absorption flux with a minimum of 500 % enhancement over that of the uncoated membranes. This study suggests the potential use of an FAS-modified PVDF/siloxane nanofibrous membrane in a membrane contactor system for CO2 absorption. The resulting hydrophobic membrane contactor also demonstrates the potential for large-scale CO2 absorption during post-combustion processes in power plants.

  20. Evaluation of a Full-Scale Water-Based Scrubber for Removing Siloxanes from Digester Gas: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Surita, Sharon C; Tansel, Berrin

    2015-05-01

    Siloxanes are becoming more prominent in digester gas at water resource recovery facilities because of their wide use in personal care products. This study evaluates a full-scale water-based scrubber operating in a water resource recovery facility (Miami, FL). The digester gas is used for energy generation due to its high methane content. During energy generation, siloxanes are converted to silicates and Silicon Dioxide (SiO2), which leave deposits on engine components. Trimethylsilanol (TMSOH), Octamethyltrisiloxane (L3), Hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3), Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), Decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and Dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) were detected in the digester gas. D4 and D5 were present at the highest concentrations, 5000 and 1800 μg/ m3, respectively. Sampling results have indicated that scrubbers employed for hydrogen sulfide (H2S) removal at the facility do not provide effective removal of siloxanes due to their high Henry's Constant. Post scrubber treatment is needed to remove siloxanes from the digester gas prior to combustion.

  1. Conjunctival impression cytology: bright hope of children.

    PubMed

    1991-01-01

    A practical method of screening for pre-clinical xerophthalmia due to vitamin A deficiency, called conjunctival impression cytology (CIC), is described as it is being used in a training stage in the Philippines. The noninvasive technic consists of touching the conjunctiva with a filter paper disc, and fixing and staining the disc on a slide for histology. Normally goblet cells with mucin spots are seen among sheets of epithelial cells. In abnormal conjunctiva from vitamin A deficient individuals, the epithelial cells are enlarged, and goblet cells are lacking. These specimens may be obtained from areas of the conjunctiva that appear clinically normal. The equipment needed is millipore paper, a hand-held suction pump with 5 feet of tubing, tissue or gauze, screw-top vials, labels, fixative, Papanicolaou stain, and a microscope. Vitamin A supplements can be given to affected children, or to the whole population at risk. With CIC training materials donated by International Center for Epidemiologic and Preventive Ophthalmology (ICEPO) at the Wilmer Institute, and the School of Hygiene and Public Health of the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, the 1st training class was certified by the Nutrition Center of the Philippines. Twice yearly training of physicians and technologists has been recommended.

  2. In Situ Cross-Linking of Polyvinyl Alcohol Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Shu, L. C.; May, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Films or impregnated matrices readily made from aqueous polyvinyl alcohol solution. Controlled thickness films made by casting precise quantities of aqueous polymer solution on smooth surface, allowing water to evaporate and then removing film. Composite separators formed in similar fashion by impregnating cloth matrix with polyvinyl alcohol solution and drying composite. Insoluble thin hydrophilic membranes made from aqueous systems, and use of undesirable organic solvents not required.

  3. Dimensional changes of dental impression materials by thermal changes.

    PubMed

    Kim, K M; Lee, J S; Kim, K N; Shin, S W

    2001-05-01

    Dental impression materials for prosthodontic treatment must be easy to use, precisely replicate of oral tissue, be dimensionally stable, and be compatible with gypsum materials. The dimensional accuracy of all materials is affected by thermal changes; impression materials shrink during cooling from mouth temperature (37 degrees C) to room temperature (23 degrees C). Five kinds of light body addition-reaction silicone impression materials [Contrast (CT), Voco Co., Germany; Examix (EM), GC Co., Japan; Extrude (EX), Kerr Co., USA; Imprint II (IM), 3M Co., USA; Perfect (PF), Handae Chemical, Korea] were tested by making cylindrical specimens (6 mm diameter and 12 mm height). The thermal expansion of the impression materials was measured with a thermomechanical analyzer (TMA 2940, TA Instruments, USA) between 23-37 degrees C. Data were analyzed via the Mann-Whitney Usage Test. To simulate actual dental impressions, tooth and tray shapes were modeled to measure the linear shrinkage of impression materials at anterior and posterior locations. The thermal expansion of impression materials tested decreased as follows: CT >or= PF >or= EM >or= EX >or= IM (p < 0.05). The anterior region changed more than the posterior region for the same impression materials. The dimensional changes averaged more than 40 microm in the anterior region, but less than 40 microm in the posterior region for all materials. Thermal expansion coefficients of some impression materials were significantly different from each other (p < 0.05), and the anterior region had more dimensional change than the posterior region for the same impression materials.

  4. Differences in volatile methyl siloxane (VMS) profiles in biogas from landfills and anaerobic digesters and energetics of VMS transformations.

    PubMed

    Tansel, Berrin; Surita, Sharon C

    2014-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the types and levels of volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) present in biogas generated in the anaerobic digesters and landfills, evaluate the energetics of siloxane transformations under anaerobic conditions, compare the conditions in anaerobic digesters and municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills which result in differences in siloxane compositions. Biogas samples were collected at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant and South Dade Landfill in Miami, Florida. In the digester gas, D4 and D5 comprised the bulk of total siloxanes (62% and 27%, respectively) whereas in the landfill gas, the bulk of siloxanes were trimethylsilanol (TMSOH) (58%) followed by D4 (17%). Presence of high levels of TMSOH in the landfill gas indicates that methane utilization may be a possible reaction mechanism for TMSOH formation. The free energy change for transformation of D5 and D4 to TMSOH either by hydrogen or methane utilization are thermodynamically favorable. Either hydrogen or methane should be present at relatively high concentrations for TMSOH formation which explains the high levels present in the landfill gas. The high bond energy and bond distance of the Si-O bond, in view of the atomic sizes of Si and O atoms, indicate that Si atoms can provide a barrier, making it difficult to break the Si-O bonds especially for molecules with specific geometric configurations such as D4 and D5 where oxygen atoms are positioned inside the frame formed by the large Si atoms which are surrounded by the methyl groups.

  5. Complete denture impression techniques practiced by private dental practitioners: a survey.

    PubMed

    Kakatkar, Vinay R

    2013-09-01

    Impression making is an important step in fabricating complete dentures. A survey to know the materials used and techniques practiced while recording complete denture impressions was conducted. It is disheartening to know that 33 % practitioners still use base plate custom trays to record final impressions. 8 % still use alginate for making final impressions. An acceptable technique for recording CD impressions is suggested.

  6. Trophic transfer of methyl siloxanes in the marine food web from coastal area of Northern China.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hongliang; Zhang, Zifeng; Wang, Chaoqun; Hong, Wen-Jun; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Yi-Fan

    2015-03-03

    Methyl siloxanes, which belong to organic silicon compounds and have linear and cyclic structures, are of particular concern because of their potential characteristic of persistent, bioaccumulated, toxic, and ecological harm. This study investigated the trophic transfer of four cyclic methyl siloxanes (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6), and tetradecamethylcycloheptasiloxane (D7)) in a marine food web from coastal area of Northern China. Trophic magnification of D4, D5, D6, and D7 were assessed as the slope of lipid equivalent concentrations regressed against trophic levels of marine food web configurations. A significant positive correlation (R = 0.44, p < 0.0001) was found between lipid normalized D5 concentrations and trophic levels in organisms, showing the trophic magnification potential of this chemical in the marine food web. The trophic magnification factor (TMF) of D5 was estimated to be 1.77 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.41-2.24, 99.8% probability of the observing TMF > 1). Such a significant link, however, was not found for D4 (R = 0.14 and p = 0.16), D6 (R = 0.01 and p = 0.92), and D7 (R = -0.15 and p = 0.12); and the estimated values of TMFs (95% CI, probability of the observing TMF > 1) were 1.16 (0.94-1.44, 94.7%), 1.01 (0.84-1.22, 66.9%) and 0.85 (0.69-1.04, 48.6%) for D4, D6, and D7, respectively. The TMF value for the legacy contaminant BDE-99 was also estimated as a benchmark, and a significant positive correlation (R = 0.65, p < 0.0001) was found between lipid normalized concentrations and trophic levels in organisms. The TMF value of BDE-99 was 3.27 (95% CI: 2.49-4.30, 99.7% probability of the observing TMF > 1), showing the strong magnification in marine food webs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the trophic magnification of methyl siloxanes in China, which provided important information for trophic transformation of these compounds in marine

  7. Accuracy of implant impression splinted techniques: effect of splinting material.

    PubMed

    Assif, D; Nissan, J; Varsano, I; Singer, A

    1999-01-01

    Three implant impression techniques, using 3 different splinting materials, were assessed for accuracy in a laboratory model that simulated clinical practice. For group A, an autopolymerizing acrylic resin was used to splint transfer copings. In group B, a dual-cure acrylic resin was used, and for group C, plaster, which was also the impression material, was used. A metal implant master cast with an implant master framework was made to accurately fit to the cast. This cast was the standard for all impressions. For each group, 15 impressions were made. Polyether impression material was used for groups A and B. The accuracy of the stone casts with the implant analogues was measured against the master framework, using strain gauges. A multiple analysis of variance with repeated measures was performed to test for significant differences among the 3 groups. Additional analyses of variance were carried out to locate the source of difference. The statistical analyses revealed that a significant difference existed between groups A and B and between groups B and C but not between groups A and C. Impression techniques using autopolymerizing acrylic resin or impression plaster as a splinting material were significantly more accurate than dual-cure acrylic resin. Plaster is the material of choice in completely edentulous patients, since it is much easier to manipulate, less time consuming, and less expensive.

  8. Social relevance enhances memory for impressions in older adults.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Brittany S; Gutchess, Angela H

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that older adults have difficulty retrieving contextual material over items alone. Recent research suggests this deficit can be reduced by adding emotional context, allowing for the possibility that memory for social impressions may show less age-related decline than memory for other types of contextual information. Two studies investigated how orienting to social or self-relevant aspects of information contributed to the learning and retrieval of impressions in young and older adults. Participants encoded impressions of others in conditions varying in the use of self-reference (Experiment 1) and interpersonal meaningfulness (Experiment 2), and completed memory tasks requiring the retrieval of specific traits. For both experiments, age groups remembered similar numbers of impressions. In Experiment 1 using more self-relevant encoding contexts increased memory for impressions over orienting to stimuli in a non-social way, regardless of age. In Experiment 2 older adults had enhanced memory for impressions presented in an interpersonally meaningful relative to a personally irrelevant way, whereas young adults were unaffected by this manipulation. The results provide evidence that increasing social relevance ameliorates age differences in memory for impressions, and enhances older adults' ability to successfully retrieve contextual information.

  9. Accuracy of stone casts obtained by different impression materials.

    PubMed

    Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Macedo, Ana Paula; Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello de; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria

    2008-01-01

    Several impression materials are available in the Brazilian marketplace to be used in oral rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of different impression materials used for fixed partial dentures following the manufacturers' instructions. A master model representing a partially edentulous mandibular right hemi-arch segment whose teeth were prepared to receive full crowns was used. Custom trays were prepared with auto-polymerizing acrylic resin and impressions were performed with a dental surveyor, standardizing the path of insertion and removal of the tray. Alginate and elastomeric materials were used and stone casts were obtained after the impressions. For the silicones, impression techniques were also compared. To determine the impression materials' accuracy, digital photographs of the master model and of the stone casts were taken and the discrepancies between them were measured. The data were subjected to analysis of variance and Duncan's complementary test. Polyether and addition silicone following the single-phase technique were statistically different from alginate, condensation silicone and addition silicone following the double-mix technique (p < or = .05), presenting smaller discrepancies. However, condensation silicone was similar (p > or = .05) to alginate and addition silicone following the double-mix technique, but different from polysulfide. The results led to the conclusion that different impression materials and techniques influenced the stone casts' accuracy in a way that polyether, polysulfide and addition silicone following the single-phase technique were more accurate than the other materials.

  10. Contamination level of alginate impressions arriving at a dental laboratory.

    PubMed

    Sofou, A; Larsen, T; Fiehn, N-E; Owall, B

    2002-09-01

    The contamination level of alginate impressions delivered to a large dental laboratory in Sweden was determined. One hundred and seven consecutive alginate impressions were included during 7 days. Samples were taken and transferred into sterile physiological saline and analysed microbiologically for colony-forming units (cfu) as well as nonhemolytic, alpha-hemolytic, and beta-hemolytic colonies. After sampling, the clinics were contacted and asked to fill in simple questionnaires about their routines of disinfecting impressions. The questionnaire study revealed that about half of the clinics had some kind of disinfection routine, while the others rinsed in running water only. Seventy-two percent of the impressions yielded growth of bacteria, with a median number of 1.3x10(2) cfu. Thirteen per cent of the samples yielded >10(3) cfu, with a maximum number of 3.4x10(4) cfu. The majority of isolates were non- and alpha-hemolytic bacteria. Growth was recorded in 61.3% of disinfected impressions, and the numbers of bacteria in disinfected and nondisinfected impressions were similar. These findings raise the question of whether impressions need to be disinfected or if proper handling and hygienic procedures are sufficient to block the possible route of infection.

  11. Piezoresistive Properties of Polyvinyl Chloride Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toprakci, Hatice Aylin Karahan

    Textile based sensors provide an interface between the user and the electronic system by converting any type of physiological or environmental signal into electrical signals. Common applications include health monitoring, rehabilitation, multimedia, and surveillance. In this research we demonstrate fabrication of piezoresistive sensors on textile fabrics through application of a screen-printed conductive nanocomposite layer of plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), and carbon nanofiber (CNF). In order to understand the behavior of conductive plastisol, morphological, mechanical and electrical properties of composite films were investigated for different molecular weights of PVC. Homogeneous filler dispersion and good filler/polymer interphase were observed without any dominant filler orientation. Mechanical and electrical properties were found to be affected by CNF, plasticizer content and matrix molecular weight. CNFs were found to provide substantial bridging in the matrix and enhance strength. These nanostructured composite sensors were found to be sensitive under different levels of strain which can be monitored by change in electrical resistance. Finally, we demonstrate the fabrication of piezoresistive sensors on textile fabrics through application of a screen-printed conductive nanocomposite layer of conductive plastisol. Conductive plastisol was found to show good adhesion to fabric with homogeneous CNF distribution. As in composite films, samples were found to show negative piezoresistance at different levels of strain. Strain level and filler concentration were found to affect the piezoresistive behavior and sensitivity of the printed sensors.

  12. Ultrasonic depolymerization of aqueous polyvinyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Grönroos, A; Pirkonen, P; Heikkinen, J; Ihalainen, J; Mursunen, H; Sekki, H

    2001-07-01

    Ultrasonication has proved to be a highly advantageous method for depolymerizing macromolecules because it reduces their molecular weight simply by splitting the most susceptible chemical bond without causing any changes in the chemical nature of the polymer. Most of the effects involved in controlling molecular weight can be attributed to the large shear gradients and shock waves generated around collapsing cavitation bubbles. In general, for any polymer degradation process to become acceptable to industry, it is necessary to be able to specify the sonication conditions which lead to a particular relative molar mass distribution. This necessitates the identification of the appropriate irradiation power, temperature, concentration and irradiation time. According to the results of this study the reactors constructed worked well in depolymerization and it was possible to degrade aqueous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer with ultrasound. The most extensive degradation took place at the lowest frequency used in this study, i.e. 23 kHz, when the input power was above the cavitation threshold and at the lowest test concentration of PVA, i.e. 1% (w/w). Thus this study confirms the general assumption that the shear forces generated by the rapid motion of the solvent following cavitational collapse are responsible for the breakage of the chemical bonds within the polymer. The effect of polymer concentration can be interpreted in terms of the increase in viscosity with concentration, causing the molecules to become less mobile in solution and the velocity gradients around the collapsing bubbles to therefore become smaller.

  13. Preparation and properties of polyvinyl alcohol microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.H.; Grens, J.Z.; Poco, J.F.; Ives, B.H.

    1986-06-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) microspheres, having a size range of approx.150- to 250-..mu..m diameter with 1- to 5-..mu..m wall thickness, have been fabricated using a solution droplet technique. The spheres were developed for possible use on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. PVA, a polymer chosen based on earlier survey work carried out at KMS Fusion, Inc., has good strength, low hydrogen permeability, is optically transparent, and water soluble. The latter property makes it safe and easy to use in our droplet generator system. A unique dual-orifice droplet generator was used to prepare the spheres. The droplet generator operating conditions and the column processing parameters were chosen using results from our 1-D model calculations as a guide. The polymer microsphere model is an extension of the model we developed to support the glass sphere production. After preparation, the spheres were physically characterized for surface quality, sphericity, wall thickness (and uniformity), and size. We also determined the buckling pressure for both uncoated and CH-coated spheres. Radiation stability to beta decay (from tritium) was evaluated by exposing the spheres to a 7-keV electron beam. The results from these and other physical property measurements are presented in this report.

  14. Hydrothermal carbonization of poly(vinyl chloride).

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, J; Weiner, B; Woszidlo, S; Koehler, R; Kopinke, F-D

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) was subjected to hydrothermal carbonization in subcritical water at 180-260 °C. Dehydrochlorination increased with increasing reaction temperature. The release of chlorine was almost quantitative above ∼235 °C. The fraction of organic carbon (OC) recovered in the hydrochar decreased with increasing operating temperature from 93% at 180 °C to 75% at 250 °C. A wide array of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could be detected in the aqueous phase, but their combined concentration amounted to only ∼140 μg g(-1) PVC-substrate at 240 °C. A pathway for the formation of cyclic hydrocarbons and O-functionalized organics was proposed. Chlorinated hydrocarbons including chlorophenols could only be identified at trace levels (low ppb). Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) could not be detected. The sorption potential of the hydrochar turned out to be very low, in particular for polar organic pollutants. Our results provide strong evidence that hydrothermal carbonization of household organic wastes which can be tied to co-discarded PVC-plastic residues is environmentally sound regarding the formation of toxic organic products. Following these findings, hydrothermal treatment of PVC-waste beyond operating temperatures of ∼235 °C to allow complete release of organic chlorine should be further pursued.

  15. A Randomised Controlled Trial of complete denture impression materials

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, T.P.; Craddock, H.L.; Gray, J.C.; Pavitt, S.H.; Hulme, C.; Godfrey, M.; Fernandez, C.; Navarro-Coy, N.; Dillon, S.; Wright, J.; Brown, S.; Dukanovic, G.; Brunton, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Methods Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Results Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7–67.3%, p < 0.0001). Conclusion There is significant evidence that dentures made from silicone impressions were preferred by patients. Clinical significance Given the strength of the clinical findings within this paper, dentists should consider choosing silicone rather than alginate as their material of choice for secondary impressions for complete dentures. Trial Registration: ISRCTN 01528038.

 This article forms part of a project for which the author (TPH) won the Senior Clinical Unilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. PMID:24995473

  16. Predictable elastomeric impressions in advanced fixed prosthodontics: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Lee, E A

    1999-05-01

    Despite advances in dental material technology, the predictable procurement of accurate impressions for the fabrication of complex fixed prosthodontic restorations remains an elusive objective. The technical challenges and potential negative sequelae are exponentially magnified in advanced applications that involve multiple abutments and preparatory phases. A protocol for consistently achieving accurate impressions with the use of polyether impression materials and automatic instrumentation is presented and illustrated with multiple clinical examples. The technique is capable of yielding reliable results in extensive cases and requires minimal support from auxiliary personnel.

  17. Predictable elastomeric impressions in advanced fixed prosthodontics: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ernesto A

    2007-10-01

    Despite advances in dental material technology, the predictable procurement of accurate impressions for the fabrication of complex fixed prosthodontic restorations remains an elusive objective. The technical challenges and potential negative sequelae are exponentially magnified in advanced applications that involve multiple abutments and preparatory phases. A protocol for consistently achieving accurate impressions with the use of various impression materials and automatic instrumentation is presented and illustrated with multiple clinical examples. The technique is capable of yielding reliable results in extensive cases and requires minimal support from auxiliary personnel.

  18. Functional Impressions in Complete Denture and Overdenture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kršek, Hrvoje

    2015-01-01

    Tooth loss can cause loss of occlusal, masticatory, esthetic, physiognomic, phonetic and psychosocial function of patients. The most frequently used treatment method of completely edentulous patients and patients with a small number of remaining teeth are complete dentures or overdentures. One of the most important clinical and laboratory procedures in their fabrication is functional impression taking. The aim of this paper was to present procedures of taking functional impressions in fabrication of complete dentures and overdentures, using standardized techniques and materials. An accurate functional impression together with other correctly performed clinical and laboratory procedures ensure good retention and stability of dentures, which is a precondition for restoring patients’ lost functions. PMID:27688385

  19. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Holanda, Maurus Marques; Pereira Neto, Normando Guedes; de Moura Peixoto, Gustavo; Pinheiro Santos, Rayan Haquim

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the second reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with basilar impression in Brazil. PMID:25972713

  20. Basilar impression. A differential diagnosis of Menier'es disease.

    PubMed

    Elies, W; Plester, D

    1980-04-01

    We examined the craniocervical region in 180 patients with nonspecific dizziness and unilateral sensorineural hearing loss in most of them. In 32 cases, we found malformations of the craniocervical region. The symptoms of the basilar impression are probably caused by compression of the vessels of the lower cerebellar region and the brainstem as well as by disturbances of the CSF circulation. The diagnosis of basilar impression is based on lateral x-ray films of the skull base, tomography of this region, and in some cases on computerized axial tomography. We emphasize the importance of basilar impression in the differential diagnosis of Meniere's disease.

  1. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Holanda, Maurus Marques; Pereira Neto, Normando Guedes; de Moura Peixoto, Gustavo; Pinheiro Santos, Rayan Haquim

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the second reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with basilar impression in Brazil.

  2. Fatal anaphylactic shock due to a dental impression material.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, Sebastiano; Spagnolo, Elvira Ventura; Cardia, Giulio; Minciullo, Paola L

    2009-01-01

    Materials used for dental impressions are usually safe. This study describes a case of fatal anaphylaxis that appeared immediately after the oral mucosa came into contact with an alginate paste used for dental impressions. The cadaveric examination and the postmortem toxicology report confirmed that the cause of death was anaphylactic shock. The patient was affected by both cardiovascular and lung diseases that worsened the condition and forbade the use of epinephrine. To the authors' knowledge, dental impression materials, and alginate in particular, have not been reported previously as being a cause of anaphylaxis.

  3. Wettability of elastomeric impression materials and voids in gypsum casts.

    PubMed

    Cullen, D R; Mikesell, J W; Sandrik, J L

    1991-08-01

    Numerous factors are involved in making an accurate void-free dental artificial stone cast or die. The relationship of the wettability of an elastomeric impression material and its interaction with the gypsum slurry is an important factor. This study examined the relative "pourability" of several impression materials by counting the number of resultant voids in artificial stone casts containing 48 point angles. Those elastomers that exhibited the lowest contact angle with water produced artificial stone casts with the fewest voids. Surfactants applied to the impression material significantly reduced the number of voids in artificial stone casts, as did modified elastomers designated by the manufacturer as hydrophilic.

  4. Strategies for managing impressions of racial identity in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Laura Morgan; Cha, Sandra E; Kim, Sung Soo

    2014-10-01

    This article deepens understanding of the workplace experiences of racial minorities by investigating racial identity-based impression management (RIM) by Asian American journalists. Racial centrality, directly or indirectly, predicted the use of 4 RIM strategies (avoidance, enhancement, affiliation, and racial humor). Professional centrality also predicted strategy use, which was related to life satisfaction and perceived career success. By shedding light on proactive strategies that individuals use to influence colleagues' impressions of their racial identity, we contribute to research on diversity in organizations, impression management, and racial identity.

  5. Interfacial enhancement of polypropylene composites modified with sorbitol derivatives and siloxane-silsesquioxane resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzyńska-Mizera, Monika; Dutkiewicz, Michał; Sterzyński, Tomasz; Di Lorenzo, Maria Laura

    2015-12-01

    Composites based on polypropylene (iPP) modified with a sorbitol derivative (NX8000) and siloxane-silsesquioxane resin (SiOPh) containing maleated polypropylene (MAPP) as compatibilizer were prepared by melt extrusion. Calorimetric investigations were carried out using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), whereas the morphological and mechanical properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and static tensile tests. DSC measurements revealed no influence of SiOPh and a slight effect of MAPP addition on the crystallization kinetics of polypropylene. Additionally, the introduction of MAPP into the iPP+NX8000+SiOPh composites increased plastic properties of the samples. All the above was attributed to the compatibilizing effect of MAPP which improved interfacial adhesion between iPP, NX8000 and SiOPh. This phenomenon was also confirmed by the SEM images illustrating more homogenous distribution of the filler in the compatibilized samples.

  6. Regeneration of siloxane-exhausted activated carbon by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Codony, Alba; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael; Martín, Maria J

    2015-03-21

    In the context of the biogas upgrading, siloxane exhausted activated carbons need to be regenerated in order to avoid them becoming a residue. In this work, two commercial activate carbons which were proved to be efficient in the removal of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) from biogas, have been regenerated through advanced oxidation processes using both O3 and H2O2. After the treatment with O3, the activated carbon recovered up to 40% of the original adsorption capacity while by the oxidation with H2O2 the regeneration efficiency achieved was up to 45%. In order to enhance the H2O2 oxidation, activated carbon was amended with iron. In this case, the regeneration efficiency increased up to 92%.

  7. Accessing siloxane functionalized polynorbornenes via vinyl-addition polymerization for CO2 separation membranes

    DOE PAGES

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Saito, Tomonori; ...

    2016-07-06

    Here, the vinyl addition polymerization of norbornylbased monomers bearing polar functional groups is often problematic, leading to low molecular weight polymers in poor yield. Herein, we provide proof-of-principle evidence that addition-type homopolymers of siloxane substituted norbornyl-based monomers may be readily synthesized using the catalyst trans-[Ni(C6F5)2(SbPh3)2]. Polymerizations using this catalyst reached moderate to high conversion in just 5 min of polymerization and produced siloxanesubstituted polymers with molecular weights exceeding 100 kg/mol. These polymers showed excellent thermal stability (Td ≥ 362 °C) and were cast into membranes that displayed high CO2 permeability and enhanced CO2/N2 selectivity as compared to related materials.

  8. Liquid-phase-deposited siloxane-based capping layers for silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Veith-Wolf, Boris; Wang, Jianhui; Hannu-Kuure, Milja; Chen, Ning; Hadzic, Admir; Williams, Paul; Leivo, Jarkko; Karkkainen, Ari; Schmidt, Jan

    2015-02-02

    We apply non-vacuum processing to deposit dielectric capping layers on top of ultrathin atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide (AlO{sub x}) films, used for the rear surface passivation of high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells. We examine various siloxane-based liquid-phase-deposited (LPD) materials. Our optimized AlO{sub x}/LPD stacks show an excellent thermal and chemical stability against aluminum metal paste, as demonstrated by measured surface recombination velocities below 10 cm/s on 1.3 Ωcm p-type silicon wafers after firing in a belt-line furnace with screen-printed aluminum paste on top. Implementation of the optimized LPD layers into an industrial-type screen-printing solar cell process results in energy conversion efficiencies of up to 19.8% on p-type Czochralski silicon.

  9. Liquid-phase-deposited siloxane-based capping layers for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veith-Wolf, Boris; Wang, Jianhui; Hannu-Kuure, Milja; Chen, Ning; Hadzic, Admir; Williams, Paul; Leivo, Jarkko; Karkkainen, Ari; Schmidt, Jan

    2015-02-01

    We apply non-vacuum processing to deposit dielectric capping layers on top of ultrathin atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide (AlOx) films, used for the rear surface passivation of high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells. We examine various siloxane-based liquid-phase-deposited (LPD) materials. Our optimized AlOx/LPD stacks show an excellent thermal and chemical stability against aluminum metal paste, as demonstrated by measured surface recombination velocities below 10 cm/s on 1.3 Ωcm p-type silicon wafers after firing in a belt-line furnace with screen-printed aluminum paste on top. Implementation of the optimized LPD layers into an industrial-type screen-printing solar cell process results in energy conversion efficiencies of up to 19.8% on p-type Czochralski silicon.

  10. Facile fabrication of siloxane @ poly (methylacrylic acid) core-shell microparticles with different functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zheng-Bai; Tai, Li; Zhang, Da-Ming; Jiang, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Siloxane @ poly (methylacrylic acid) core-shell microparticles with functional groups were prepared by a facile hydrolysis-condensation method in this work. Three different silane coupling agents 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS), 3-triethoxysilylpropylamine (APTES), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) were added along with tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) into the polymethylacrylic acid (PMAA) microparticle ethanol dispersion to form the Si@PMAA core-shell microparticles with different functional groups. The core-shell structure and the surface special functional groups of the resulting microparticles were measured by transmission electron microscopy and FTIR. The sizes of these core-shell microparticles were about 350-400 nm. The corresponding preparation conditions and mechanism were discussed in detail. This hydrolysis-condensation method also could be used to functionalize other microparticles which contain active groups on the surface. Meanwhile, the Si@PMAA core-shell microparticles with carbon-carbon double bonds and amino groups have further been applied to prepare hydrophobic coatings.

  11. Thermal neutron detection by entrapping 6LiF nanocrystals in siloxane scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carturan, S. M.; Marchi, T.; Maggioni, G.; Gramegna, F.; Degerlier, M.; Cinausero, M.; Dalla Palma, M.; Quaranta, A.

    2015-06-01

    Exploiting the long experience in design and production of scintillating mixtures based on siloxane matrices with combinations of primary dye and waveshifter, a first set of 6LiF loaded scintillator disks has been produced. The synthesis is herein described and reported, as well as preliminary results on their light response towards thermal neutrons. The preservation of transparency and mechanical integrity of the scintillator material is challenging when introducing the inorganic salt LiF which is a "foreign body" to the organic polysiloxane host matrix Different strategies such as synthesis of nanoparticles and surface functionalization have been pursued to succeed in the entrapment of the neutron converter whilst maintaining moderate light output, optical transparency and flexibility of the base scintillator.

  12. Interfacial enhancement of polypropylene composites modified with sorbitol derivatives and siloxane-silsesquioxane resin

    SciTech Connect

    Dobrzyńska-Mizera, Monika Sterzyński, Tomasz; Dutkiewicz, Michał; Di Lorenzo, Maria Laura

    2015-12-17

    Composites based on polypropylene (iPP) modified with a sorbitol derivative (NX8000) and siloxane-silsesquioxane resin (SiOPh) containing maleated polypropylene (MAPP) as compatibilizer were prepared by melt extrusion. Calorimetric investigations were carried out using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), whereas the morphological and mechanical properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and static tensile tests. DSC measurements revealed no influence of SiOPh and a slight effect of MAPP addition on the crystallization kinetics of polypropylene. Additionally, the introduction of MAPP into the iPP+NX8000+SiOPh composites increased plastic properties of the samples. All the above was attributed to the compatibilizing effect of MAPP which improved interfacial adhesion between iPP, NX8000 and SiOPh. This phenomenon was also confirmed by the SEM images illustrating more homogenous distribution of the filler in the compatibilized samples.

  13. Surface properties and wear performances of siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Bettuelli, Michela; Trabattoni, Silvia; Fagnola, Matteo; Tavazzi, Silvia; Introzzi, Laura; Farris, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    The low surface roughness of disposable contact lenses made of a new siloxane-hydrogel loaded with hyaluronic acid is reported, as studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Before the wear, the surface is characterized by out-of-plane and sharp structures, with maximum height of about 10 nm. After a wear of 8 h, evidence of two typical morphologies is provided and discussed. One morphology (sharp type) has a similar aspect as the unworn lenses with a slight increase in both the height and the number of the sharp peaks. The other morphology (smooth type) is characterized by troughs and bumpy structures. Wettability and clinical performances are also discussed, the latter deduced by the ocular-surface-disease index (OSDI). The main finding arising from this work is the indication of correlation between the change of the OSDI before and after wear and the lens surface characteristics obtained by AFM.

  14. Mineralization of radiation-crosslinked polyvinyl alcohol/polyvinyl pyrrolidone hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hill, David J T; Whittaker, Andrew K

    2007-11-01

    A study of the calcification of the polyvinyl alcohol/polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVA/PVP) hydrogels during their exposure to a calcium chloride solution or a simulated body fluid has been carried out. On the basis of the experiments, using a two-compartment permeation cell, the diffusion of calcium ions and their subsequent deposition in the hydrogels were elucidated. Steady-batch experiments were also performed to further elaborate the deposition pattern and the types of calcium deposits. It was demonstrated that Fick's second law of diffusion can describe the diffusion of calcium ions through PVA/PVP hydrogels at 310 K. The diffusion coefficient was determined to be (4.4+/-0.1)x10(-10) m2/s and the partition coefficient for the hydrogels was 0.06. Formation of calcium deposits was noticed taking place both on the surface and inside the hydrogels. The deposits formed on the surface have flake morphology, while the deposits inside the hydrogels are more like globular aggregates. Both types of deposits have been characterized as being comprised calcium and hydroxyl ion deficient apatites with chloride ions the most likely substituting species at the hydroxyl sites.

  15. An Investigation of Siloxane Cross-linked Hydroxyapatite-Gelatin/Copolymer Composites for Potential Orthopedic Applications†

    PubMed Central

    Dyke, Jason Christopher; Knight, Kelly Jane; Zhou, Huaxing; Chiu, Chi-Kai; Ko, Ching-Chang; You, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Causes of bone deficiency are numerous, but biomimetic alloplastic grafts provide an alternative to repair tissue naturally. Previously, a hydroxyapatite-gelatin modified siloxane (HAp-Gemosil) composite was prepared by cross-linking (N, N′-bis[(3-trimethoxysilyl)propyl]ethylene diamine (enTMOS) around the HAp-Gel nanocomposite particles, to mimic the natural composition and properties of bone. However, the tensile strength remained too low for many orthopedic applications. It was hypothesized that incorporating a polymer chain into the composite could help improve long range interaction. Furthermore, designing this polymer to interact with the enTMOS siloxane cross-linked matrix would provide improved adhesion between the polymer and the ceramic composite, and improve mechanical properties. To this end, copolymers of L-Lactide (LLA), and a novel alkyne derivatized trimethylene carbonate, propargyl carbonate (PC), were synthesized. Incorporation of PC during copolymerization affects properties of copolymers such as molecular weight, Tg, and % PC incorporation. More importantly, PC monomers bear a synthetic handle, allowing copolymers to undergo post-polymerization functionalization with graft monomers to specifically tailor the properties of the final composite. For our investigation, P(LLA-co-PC) copolymers were functionalized by an azido-silane (AS) via copper catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) through terminal alkyne on PC monomers. The new functionalized polymer, P(LLA-co-PC)(AS) was blended with HAp-Gemosil, with the azido-silane linking the copolymer to the silsesquioxane matrix within the final composite. These HAp-Gemosil/P(LLA-co-PC)(AS) composites were subjected to mechanical and biological testing, and the results were compared with those from the HAp-Gemosil composites. This study revealed that incorporating a cross-linkable polymer served to increase the flexural strength of the composite by 50%, while maintaining the biocompatibility of

  16. Accuracy of impressions obtained with dual-arch trays.

    PubMed

    Wöstmann, Bernd; Rehmann, Peter; Balkenhol, Markus

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the accuracy resulting from dual-arch impressions when compared to conventional impressions in complex preparations (ie, inlay and partial crown). One hundred eighty impressions were made using two different dual-arch trays; conventional trays served as the control. The accuracy of the dies obtained (Fuji-Rock EP, GC Europe) was assessed indirectly from the change of 59 transversal dimensions. Statistical analysis (t test, analysis of variance) revealed that less rigid dual-arch trays performed better than rigid ones. Though the inlay preparation was more difficult to reproduce with dual-arch trays, it can be concluded that the accuracy obtainable with nonrigid dual-arch trays is comparable to impressions taken from full-arch trays.

  17. Technique for adapting a spacer for a custom impression tray.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harsimran; Nanda, Aditi; Verma, Mahesh; Koli, Dheeraj

    2016-12-01

    A method of adapting a spacer for the custom trays used to make a definite impression for complete dentures is presented. The technique can be used under a variety of conditions and offers several advantages.

  18. Electronic evaluation for video commercials by impression index.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wanzeng; Zhao, Xinxin; Hu, Sanqing; Vecchiato, Giovanni; Babiloni, Fabio

    2013-12-01

    How to evaluate the effect of commercials is significantly important in neuromarketing. In this paper, we proposed an electronic way to evaluate the influence of video commercials on consumers by impression index. The impression index combines both the memorization and attention index during consumers observing video commercials by tracking the EEG activity. It extracts features from scalp EEG to evaluate the effectiveness of video commercials in terms of time-frequency-space domain. And, the general global field power was used as an impression index for evaluation of video commercial scenes as time series. Results of experiment demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to track variations of the cerebral activity related to cognitive task such as observing video commercials, and help to judge whether the scene in video commercials is impressive or not by EEG signals.

  19. 6. INTERIOR OF UNFINISHED BASEMENT SHOWING CONCRETE FORM IMPRESSIONS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR OF UNFINISHED BASEMENT SHOWING CONCRETE FORM IMPRESSIONS ON THE WALLS, AND EXPOSED FLOOR SUPPORT BEAMS. VIEW TO WEST. - Rush Creek Hydroelectric System, Worker Cottage, Rush Creek, June Lake, Mono County, CA

  20. Basilar impression in osteogenesis imperfecta tarda. Case report.

    PubMed

    Kurimoto, M; Ohara, S; Takaku, A

    1991-01-01

    A case is presented of basilar impression secondary to osteogenesis imperfecta tarda, associated with hemifacial spasm and brain-stem compression syndrome. The symptoms improved with posterior fossa decompression and posterior fusion.

  1. Impression management and food intake. Current directions in research.

    PubMed

    Vartanian, Lenny R

    2015-03-01

    This paper reviews recent research on consumption stereotypes (judgments of others based on what they eat) and impression management (modifying one's eating behavior in order to create a particular impression). A major recent focus in the literature has been on masculinity and meat eating, with research showing that meat is strongly associated with masculinity, and that individuals who follow a meat-based diet are perceived as more masculine than are individuals who follow a vegetarian diet. Although direct evidence for impression management through food intake remains sparse, a number of methodological approaches (including priming techniques and ecological valid assessments) are described that could be used in future research to identify the motives underlying people's eating behavior. Consumption stereotypes and impression management may be important influences on people's eating behavior, but the complexities of how, when, and for whom these factors influence food intake are still not well understood.

  2. A recurrent connectionist model of person impression formation.

    PubMed

    Van Overwalle, Frank; Labiouse, Christophe

    2004-01-01

    Major findings in impression formation are reviewed and modeled from a connectionist perspective. The findings are in the areas of primacy and recency in impression formation, asymmetric diagnosticity of ability- and morality-related traits, increased recall for trait-inconsistent information, assimilation and contrast in priming, and discounting of trait inferences by situational information. The majority of these phenomena are illustrated with well-known experiments and simulated with an autoassociative network architecture with linear activation update and using the delta learning algorithm for adjusting the connection weights. All of the simulations successfully reproduced the empirical findings. Moreover, the proposed model is shown to be consistent with earlier algebraic models of impression formation (Anderson, 1981; Busemeyer, 1991; Hogarth and Einhorn, 1992). The discussion centers on how our model compares to other connectionist approaches to impression formation and how it may contribute to a more parsimonious and unified theory of person perception.

  3. Basilar impression in an achondroplastic dwarf: causative role in tetraparesis.

    PubMed

    Luyendijk, W; Matricali, B; Thomeer, R T

    1978-01-01

    The neurological and radiological findings in a case of chondrodystrophic dwarfism are described. The progressive tetraparesis proved to be based on a high-level medullary compression resulting from basilar impression and upper cervical stenosis. Surgical decompression led to the disappearance of the tetraparetic phenomena. Various aspects of chondrodystrophic dwarfism and basilar impression are discussed in relation to the neurological symptomatology, and the question of whether, in general, more attention should be given to the cranio-cervical region, is raised.

  4. Presence of Siloxanes in the Biogas of a Wastewater Treatment Plant Separation in Condensates and Influence of the Dose of Iron Chloride on its Elimination

    SciTech Connect

    Mariano, García; Daniel, Prats; Arturo, Trapote

    2015-12-21

    The siloxanes present in the biogas produced during anaerobic digestion damage the mechanism of cogeneration equipment and, consequently, negatively affect the energy valorization process. For this reason, the detection and elimination of these silicon-derived chemical compounds are a priority in the management of cogeneration facilities. In this regard, the objectives of this paper are, firstly, to characterize the siloxanes in the biogas and, secondly, to qualitatively evaluate the influence of the dose of iron chloride on its elimination. The research was performed at the Rincón de León Wastewater Treatment Plant (Alicante, Spain). The outflow biogas of the digesters and of the pressurized gasometers was sampled and analyzed. The results obtained made it possible to demonstrate, firstly, the absence of linear siloxanes and that, of the cyclic siloxanes, the predominant type was decamethylcyclopentasiloxane, and, secondly, that the addition of iron chloride in the digesters significantly reduces the siloxane content in the biogas. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the process of compression of the biogas, with the elimination of condensates, also produces significant reductions in the concentration of siloxanes in the biogas.

  5. Comparison of two impression techniques for auricular prosthesis: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Kasim; Mani, U M; Seenivasan, M K; Vaidhyanathan, A K; Veeravalli, P T

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to compare the accuracy of a new impression technique, the triple-layer impression technique (TLIT), with the conventional impression technique (CIT) to fabricate an auricular prosthesis. Fifteen male subjects (aged 22-45 yr) were selected. Ten markings were made on the subject's ear (super aurale [sa], sub aurale [sba], pre aurale [pra], post aurale [poa], A, A1, B, B1, C, and C1) and five measurements (sa-sba, pra-poa, A-A1, B-B1, and C-C1) were made. Custom-made trays were used to record impression in CIT and TLIT. Impressions were made using alginate, and models were cast with type IV gypsum product. Markings were transferred on the cast. Measurements were rechecked on the models. Distribution analysis of difference in measurements between the two impression techniques and the subject's actual values was evaluated. Sign test was used to analyze the statistical significance. Statistically significant differences were found in measurements A-A1, B-B1, and C-C1 between the two techniques when compared with the subject's actual dimensions (p < 0.01). TLIT was found to produce accurate models when compared with CIT. The TLIT used in the study was cost effective, less technique sensitive, and tailor made to reduce chairside orientation time during wax try-in appointments for rehabilitating patients, especially those with unilateral auricular defects.

  6. Auditory and visual spatial impression: Recent studies of three auditoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Andy; Cabrera, Densil

    2004-10-01

    Auditory spatial impression is widely studied for its contribution to auditorium acoustical quality. By contrast, visual spatial impression in auditoria has received relatively little attention in formal studies. This paper reports results from a series of experiments investigating the auditory and visual spatial impression of concert auditoria. For auditory stimuli, a fragment of an anechoic recording of orchestral music was convolved with calibrated binaural impulse responses, which had been made with the dummy head microphone at a wide range of positions in three auditoria and the sound source on the stage. For visual stimuli, greyscale photographs were used, taken at the same positions in the three auditoria, with a visual target on the stage. Subjective experiments were conducted with auditory stimuli alone, visual stimuli alone, and visual and auditory stimuli combined. In these experiments, subjects rated apparent source width, listener envelopment, intimacy and source distance (auditory stimuli), and spaciousness, envelopment, stage dominance, intimacy and target distance (visual stimuli). Results show target distance to be of primary importance in auditory and visual spatial impression-thereby providing a basis for covariance between some attributes of auditory and visual spatial impression. Nevertheless, some attributes of spatial impression diverge between the senses.

  7. Impressions of Danger Influence Impressions of People: An Evolutionary Perspective on Individual and Collective Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Mark; Faulkner, Jason; Park, Justin H.; Neuberg, Steven L.; Kenrick, Douglas T.

    2011-01-01

    An evolutionary approach to social cognition yields novel hypotheses about the perception of people belonging to specific kinds of social categories. These implications are illustrated by empirical results linking the perceived threat of physical injury to stereotypical impressions of outgroups. We review a set of studies revealing several ways in which threat-connoting cues influence perceptions of ethnic outgroups and the individuals who belong to those outgroups. We also present new results that suggest additional implications of evolved danger-avoidance mechanisms on interpersonal communication and the persistence of cultural-level stereotypes about ethnic outgroups. The conceptual utility of an evolutionary approach is further illustrated by a parallel line of research linking the threat of disease to additional kinds of social perceptions and behaviors. Evolved danger-avoidance mechanisms appear to contribute in diverse ways to individual-level cognitive processes, as well as to culturally-shared collective beliefs. PMID:21874126

  8. Radiation-chemical preparation of poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duflot, Anastasia V.; Kitaeva, Natalia K.; Duflot, Vladimir R.

    2015-02-01

    This work reports the usage of method of radiation-chemical synthesis to prepare cross-linked hydrogels from poly(vinyl alcohol) modified with glycidyl methacrylate. Synthesis kinetics of modified poly(vinyl alcohol) and properties of hydrogels were studied. The gel fraction, swelling, mechanical properties, and water content of the hydrogels were measured. It was found that gel fraction increases with increasing radiation dose, concentration of modified poly(vinyl alcohol), and reaches 60%. It was established by differential scanning calorimetry that a fraction of the "bound" water in hydrogels is 50-70% and independent of gel fraction content. In addition to "bound" and "free" states, water in hydrogels is also present in the intermediate state.

  9. Application of microwave irradiation for the removal of polychlorinated biphenyls from siloxane transformer and hydrocarbon engine oils.

    PubMed

    Antonetti, Claudia; Licursi, Domenico; Raspolli Galletti, Anna Maria; Martinelli, Marco; Tellini, Filippo; Valentini, Giorgio; Gambineri, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    The removal of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) both from siloxane transformer oil and hydrocarbon engine oil was investigated through the application of microwave (MW) irradiation and a reaction system based on polyethyleneglycol (PEG) and potassium hydroxide. The influence of the main reaction parameters (MW irradiation time, molecular weight of PEG, amount of added reactants and temperature) on the dechlorination behavior was studied. Promising performances were reached, allowing about 50% of dechlorination under the best experimental conditions, together time and energy saving compared to conventional heating systems. Moreover, an interesting dechlorination degree (up to 32%) was achieved for siloxane transformer oil when MW irradiation was employed as the unique driving force. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time in which MW irradiation is tested as the single driving force for the dechlorination of these two types of PCB-contaminated oils.

  10. Thermally Stable Siloxane Hybrid Matrix with Low Dielectric Loss for Copper-Clad Laminates for High-Frequency Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Ho; Lim, Young-Woo; Kim, Yun Hyeok; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2016-04-06

    We report vinyl-phenyl siloxane hybrid material (VPH) that can be used as a matrix for copper-clad laminates (CCLs) for high-frequency applications. The CCLs, with a VPH matrix fabricated via radical polymerization of resin blend consisting of sol-gel-derived linear vinyl oligosiloxane and bulky siloxane monomer, phenyltris(trimethylsiloxy)silane, achieve low dielectric constant (Dk) and dissipation factor (Df). The CCLs with the VPH matrix exhibit excellent dielectric performance (Dk = 2.75, Df = 0.0015 at 1 GHz) with stability in wide frequency range (1 MHz to 10 GHz) and at high temperature (up to 275 °C). Also, the VPH shows good flame resistance without any additives. These results suggest the potential of the VPH for use in high-speed IC boards.

  11. From visible to white-light emission by siloxane-capped ZnO quantum dots upon interaction with thiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schejn, Aleksandra; Balan, Lavinia; Piatkowski, Dawid; Mackowski, Sebastian; Lulek, Janina; Schneider, Raphaël

    2012-06-01

    The interaction of thiols (glutathione, cysteine, and cysteamine) with yellow-emitting siloxane-capped ZnO QDs was studied. A gradual enlargement of the PL emission band resulting in white-light emission was observed upon reaction with thiols, while the diameter (ca. 4 nm) and the crystallinity of the dots were not affected. The appearance of broad white-emission was accompanied by a decrease of the photoluminescence quantum yield from 16% to 5-6%. Generation of surface defect states through interaction of the thiols with Zn surface atoms of the dots provoking shrunk of the siloxane capping may be responsible of that broadband emission throughout most of the light spectrum.

  12. Effect of Storage Time and Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Impressions Made with Zinc Oxide Impression Paste

    PubMed Central

    Habibzadeh, Sareh; Safaeian, Shima; Behruzibakhsh, Marjan; Kaviyani, Parisa; Kharazifard, Mohamadjavad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of storage time and temperature on dimensional stability of impressions made with Cavex Outline zinc oxide impression paste. Materials and Methods: A round stainless steel mold with five grooves (three horizontal and two vertical) was used in this in-vitro experimental study. Cavex Outline impression paste was prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions and applied to the mold. The mold was placed on a block and stored at 35°C and 100% humidity for setting. The impressions were poured with stone immediately and also after 30, 120, 240 and 420 minutes and 24 hours. The distance between the vertical lines on the casts was measured and compared with that in the immediately poured cast. Results: Storage in a refrigerator and at room temperature for zero to seven hours had no significant effect on dimensional stability of the impressions; however, 24 hours of storage in a refrigerator or at room temperature decreased the dimensional stability of Cavex Outline (P=0.001). Also, a significant association was found between dimensional changes following 24 hours of storage in a refrigerator (4°C) and at room temperature (23°C; P<0.01). Conclusions: The optimal pouring time of Cavex Outline impressions with stone is between zero to seven hours, and 24 hours of storage significantly decreases the dimensional stability. PMID:28392816

  13. Analytical methodology for sampling and analysing eight siloxanes and trimethylsilanol in biogas from different wastewater treatment plants in Europe.

    PubMed

    Raich-Montiu, J; Ribas-Font, C; de Arespacochaga, N; Roig-Torres, E; Broto-Puig, F; Crest, M; Bouchy, L; Cortina, J L

    2014-02-17

    Siloxanes and trimethylsilanol belong to a family of organic silicone compounds that are currently used extensively in industry. Those that are prone to volatilisation become minor compounds in biogas adversely affecting energetic applications. However, non-standard analytical methodologies are available to analyse biogas-based gaseous matrixes. To this end, different sampling techniques (adsorbent tubes, impingers and tedlar bags) were compared using two different configurations: sampling directly from the biogas source or from a 200 L tedlar bag filled with biogas and homogenised. No significant differences were apparent between the two sampling configurations. The adsorbent tubes performed better than the tedlar bags and impingers, particularly for quantifying low concentrations. A method for the speciation of silicon compounds in biogas was developed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry working in dual scan/single ion monitoring mode. The optimised conditions could separate and quantify eight siloxane compounds (L2, L3, L4, L5, D3, D4, D5 and D6) and trimethylsilanol within fourteen minutes. Biogas from five waste water treatment plants located in Spain, France and England was sampled and analysed using the developed methodology. The siloxane concentrations in the biogas samples were influenced by the anaerobic digestion temperature, as well as the nature and composition of the sewage inlet. Siloxanes D4 and D5 were the most abundant, ranging in concentration from 1.5 to 10.1 and 10.8 to 124.0 mg Nm(-3), respectively, and exceeding the tolerance limit of most energy conversion systems.

  14. A Comparative Study on Graphene Oxide and Carbon Nanotube Reinforcement of PMMA-Siloxane-Silica Anticorrosive Coatings.

    PubMed

    Harb, Samarah V; Pulcinelli, Sandra H; Santilli, Celso V; Knowles, Kevin M; Hammer, Peter

    2016-06-29

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene oxide (GO) have been used to reinforce PMMA-siloxane-silica nanocomposites considered to be promising candidates for environmentally compliant anticorrosive coatings. The organic-inorganic hybrids were prepared by benzoyl peroxide (BPO)-induced polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) covalently bonded through 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MPTS) to silica domains formed by hydrolytic condensation of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). Single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide nanosheets were dispersed by surfactant addition and in a water/ethanol solution, respectively. These were added to PMMA-siloxane-silica hybrids at a carbon (CNT or GO) to silicon (TEOS and MPTS) molar ratio of 0.05% in two different matrices, both prepared at BPO/MMA molar ratios of 0.01 and 0.05. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed very smooth, homogeneous, and defect-free surfaces of approximately 3-7 μm thick coatings deposited onto A1020 carbon steel by dip coating. Mechanical testing and thermogravimetric analysis confirmed that both additives CNT and GO improved the scratch resistance, adhesion, wear resistance, and thermal stability of PMMA-siloxane-silica coatings. Results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 3.5% NaCl solution, discussed in terms of equivalent circuits, showed that the reinforced hybrid coatings act as a very efficient anticorrosive barrier with an impedance modulus up to 1 GΩ cm(2), approximately 5 orders of magnitude higher than that of bare carbon steel. In the case of GO addition, the high corrosion resistance was maintained for more than 6 months in saline medium. These results suggest that both carbon nanostructures can be used as structural reinforcement agents, improving the thermal and mechanical resistance of high performance anticorrosive PMMA-siloxane-silica coatings and thus extending their application range to abrasive environments.

  15. Oxidation of siloxanes during biogas combustion and nanotoxicity of Si-based particles released to the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Tansel, Berrin; Surita, Sharon C

    2014-01-01

    Siloxanes have been detected in the biogas produced at municipal solid waste landfills and wastewater treatment plants. When oxidized, siloxanes are converted to silicon oxides. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the transformation of siloxanes and potential nanotoxicity of Si-based particles released to the atmosphere from the gas engines which utilize biogas. Data available from nanotoxicity studies were used to assess the potential health risks associated with the inhalation exposure to Si-based nanoparticles. Silicon dioxide formed from siloxanes can range from 5 nm to about 100 nm in diameter depending on the combustion temperature and particle clustering characteristics. In general, silicon dioxide particles formed during from combustion process are typically 40-70 nm in diameter and can be described as fibrous dusts and as carcinogenic, mutagenic, astmagenic or reproductive toxic (CMAR) nanoparticles. Nanoparticles deposit in the upper respiratory system, conducting airways, and the alveoli. Size ranges between 5 and 50 nm show effective deposition in the alveoli where toxic effects are higher. In this study the quantities for the SiO₂ formed and release during combustion of biogas were estimated based on biogas utilization characteristics (gas compositions, temperature). The exposure to Si-based particles and potential effects in humans were analyzed in relation to their particle size, release rates and availability in the atmosphere. The analyses showed that about 54.5 and 73 kg/yr of SiO₂ can be released during combustion of biogas containing D4 and D5 at 14.1 mg/m(3) (1 ppm) and 15.1 mg/m(3) (1ppm), respectively, per MW energy yield.

  16. Solid phase microextraction, sand flies, oviposition pheromones, plaster of Paris and siloxanes-What is in common?

    PubMed

    Goulart, Thais Marchi; Tosta, Christiann Davis; Machado, Vicente Estevam; da Rocha Silva, Flávia Benini; de Castro, Camila Feitosa; Ortiz, Dennys Ghenry Samillan; Oliveira, Wanderson Henrique Cruz; Pinto, Mara Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Sand flies are natural hosts of various microorganisms. Due to their epidemiological importance, sand fly colonies are kept in laboratories to be studied in terms of their biology and vector/host/parasite interactions. In order to investigate the presence of oviposition pheromones in Nyssomyia neivai, experiments using Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) were performed. However, siloxanes which is an external class of contamination, present in breeding containers made by plaster used to maintain sand flies in colonies, may be hindered the experiments.

  17. Polyvinyl alcohol battery separator containing inert filler. [alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol battery separator is disclosed. A particulate filler, inert to alkaline electrolyte of an alkaline battery, is incorporated in the separator in an amount of 1-20% by weight, based on the weight of the polyvinyl alcohol, and is dispersed throughout the product. Incorporation of the filler enhances performance and increases cycle life of alkaline batteries when compared with batteries containing a similar separator not containing filler. Suitable fillers include titanates, silicates, zirconates, aluminates, wood floor, lignin, and titania. Particle size is not greater than about 50 microns.

  18. Single Visit Feeding Appliance for 1-day-old Neonate with Cleft Palate Using Safe Dental Putty-Gauze Hybrid Impression Technique for Maxillary Impression

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Manu

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common craniofacial anomalies of humans. Intraoral impression making is the first clinical step in the fabrication of feeding appliance for infants with oro-nasal communication. It is difficult to control the flow of the impression material in the cleft area and undercuts in a child patient. This clinical report presents a simple and safe impression technique for maxillary impression making in neonates and infants with cleft palate. A gauze piece was used to confine the impression material during functional movements of sucking while impression making in an awake child to avoid the risk of aspiration or swallowing. PMID:27512543

  19. 75 FR 38079 - Postponement of Preliminary Determination of Antidumping Duty Investigation: Polyvinyl Alcohol...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ...: Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration, Department...) initiated the antidumping duty investigation on polyvinyl alcohol from Taiwan. See Initiation of Anti-Dumping Duty Investigation: Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan, 69 FR 59204 (October 4, 2004). On October...

  20. 78 FR 39256 - Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2012-2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ...] Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan: Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2012-2013 AGENCY... on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) from Taiwan for the period March 1, 2012, through February 28, 2013. DATES... administrative review.\\3\\ \\3\\ See letter from CCPC to the Department, ``Polyvinyl Alcohol from Taiwan:...

  1. [Pulmonary manifestations of polyvinyl chloride exposure].

    PubMed

    Süyür, Hüseyin; Bayram, Nazan; Aydın, Neriman; Uyar, Meral; Gündoğdu, Nevhiz; Elbek, Osman

    2011-01-01

    There is currently no national data on the effects of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) exposure on pulmonary function. In this study we recruited workers and administrative staff from two PVC plants between July 2008 and July 2009. A questionnaire, pulmonary function tests, carbon monoxide diffusion capacity, and peak flows were recorded. Particulate matter analyses were performed by the Adana Central Laboratory of the Directorate of Occupational Health and Safety. Data were analyzed with SPSS 13.0 software. Nine of the 147 subjects were female. The incidence of a cough was more common in the administrative group. Of the study population, 59.1% were smokers. Tobacco addiction significantly increased cough and dyspnea [OR= 1.10 (1.00-1.20, 95% CI) p= 0.007 and OR= 1.08 (1.02-1.14, 95% CI), p= 0.008, respectively]. Dust exposure was correlated with the incidence of a cough [OR= 0.20 (0.04-0.80, 95% CI) p= 0.008]. The period of work correlated with sputum production [OR= 1.00 (1.00-1.02, 95% CI) p= 0.044]. The FVC% was significantly higher in the administrative group, and FEV1/FVC and DLCO were higher in the exposed group. Tobacco addiction increased the risk of airflow limitation, as evaluated by FEV1/FVC < 70% and FEF25-75 < 50% [OR= 1.15 (1.06-1.25, 95% CI) p= 0.001 and OR= 1.09 (1.02-1.17, 95% CI) p= 0.010, respectively]. Tobacco addiction and increasing duration of work had a negative influence on DLCO in the exposed group (r= -0.270, p= 0.025 and r= -0.210, p= 0.037). In the exposed group PEF variability was significantly greater on workdays, compared with rest days. This study shows that tobacco consumption has a greater affect on the airways than PVC dust exposure. A median of 36 months exposure to PVC dust had no significant impact on pulmonary function parameters, except for DLCO and PEF variability.

  2. Determination of siloxanes and VOC in landfill gas and sewage gas by canister sampling and GC-MS/AES analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Schweigkofler, M.; Niessner, R.

    1999-10-15

    Biogases such as landfill gas and sewage gas undergo a combustion process which is generating electric energy. Since several trace compounds such as siloxanes (also halogenated and sulfur compounds) are known to cause severe problems to these gas combustion engines, they are of particular interest. In this work, a new technique for sampling, identification, and quantification of siloxanes and volatile organic carbon (VOC) in landfill gas and sewage gas is presented. After sample collection using evacuated stainless steel canisters biogas was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/atomic emission spectroscopy (GC-MS/AES). Using gas canisters, the sampling process was simplified (no vacuum pump needed), and multiple analysis was possible. The simultaneous application of MSD and AED allowed a rapid screening of silicon compounds in the complex biogases. Individual substances were identified independently both by MSD analysis and by determination of their elemental constitution. Quantification of trace compounds was achieved using a 30 component external standard containing siloxanes, organochlorine and organosulfur compounds, alkanes, terpenes, and aromatic compounds. Precision, linearity, and detection limits have been studied. In real samples, concentrations of silicon containing compounds (trimethylsilanol, hexamethyldisiloxane, octamethyltrisiloxane, decamethyltetrasiloxane, hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane, octamethylcyclotetrasilioxane, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane, and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane) in the mg/m{sub 3} range have been observed.

  3. Prefabricated stock trays for impression of auricular region.

    PubMed

    Vibha, Shetty; Anandkrishna, G N; Anupam, Purwar; Namratha, N

    2010-06-01

    The conventional methods of impression making for maxillofacial defects are cumbersome and time consuming for both patient and operator. This study focuses upon standardizing and simplifying the impression making methodology for auricular prosthesis with the help of prefabricated stock trays for auricular region. The stock trays were designed on positive replicas of anatomical structures, broadly divided into long and narrow, short and broad and long and broad ear. For each stock tray, impressions of auricle, of patients of different morphology were made with plastic funnels of different shape and size ensuring at least 6 mm of space between the anatomical part and inner surface of funnel and master cast was obtained. Subsequent adaptation of wax was done and fabrications of stock stainless steel trays were done. A standardized stock tray for making of auricular impressions was developed. From this innovative technical procedure it is possible to get an accurate impression of auricular defects now by the use of prefabricated stock trays rather than the cumbersome conventional method.

  4. Accuracy of Multiple Pour Cast from Various Elastomer Impression Methods.

    PubMed

    Haralur, Satheesh B; Saad Toman, Majed; Ali Al-Shahrani, Abdullah; Ali Al-Qarni, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    The accurate duplicate cast obtained from a single impression reduces the profession clinical time, patient inconvenience, and extra material cost. The stainless steel working cast model assembly consisting of two abutments and one pontic area was fabricated. Two sets of six each custom aluminum trays were fabricated, with five mm spacer and two mm spacer. The impression methods evaluated during the study were additional silicone putty reline (two steps), heavy-light body (one step), monophase (one step), and polyether (one step). Type IV gypsum casts were poured at the interval of one hour, 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours. The resultant cast was measured with traveling microscope for the comparative dimensional accuracy. The data obtained were subjected to Analysis of Variance test at significance level <0.05. The die obtained from two-step putty reline impression techniques had the percentage of variation for the height -0.36 to -0.97%, while diameter was increased by 0.40-0.90%. The values for one-step heavy-light body impression dies, additional silicone monophase impressions, and polyether were -0.73 to -1.21%, -1.34%, and -1.46% for the height and 0.50-0.80%, 1.20%, and -1.30% for the width, respectively.

  5. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Daniel L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information. PMID:23850465

  6. Accuracy of Multiple Pour Cast from Various Elastomer Impression Methods

    PubMed Central

    Saad Toman, Majed; Ali Al-Shahrani, Abdullah; Ali Al-Qarni, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    The accurate duplicate cast obtained from a single impression reduces the profession clinical time, patient inconvenience, and extra material cost. The stainless steel working cast model assembly consisting of two abutments and one pontic area was fabricated. Two sets of six each custom aluminum trays were fabricated, with five mm spacer and two mm spacer. The impression methods evaluated during the study were additional silicone putty reline (two steps), heavy-light body (one step), monophase (one step), and polyether (one step). Type IV gypsum casts were poured at the interval of one hour, 12 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours. The resultant cast was measured with traveling microscope for the comparative dimensional accuracy. The data obtained were subjected to Analysis of Variance test at significance level <0.05. The die obtained from two-step putty reline impression techniques had the percentage of variation for the height −0.36 to −0.97%, while diameter was increased by 0.40–0.90%. The values for one-step heavy-light body impression dies, additional silicone monophase impressions, and polyether were −0.73 to −1.21%, −1.34%, and −1.46% for the height and 0.50–0.80%, 1.20%, and −1.30% for the width, respectively. PMID:28096815

  7. Amphiphilic siloxane phosphonate macromolecule monolayers at the air/water interface: effects of structure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Cabasso, Israel; Stesikova, Elvira

    2008-11-20

    A comprehensive study is reported of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films (spread at the air/water interface using the Langmuir balance technique) composed of surface active, nonionic, and OH-free amphiphilic siloxane phosphonate ester macromolecules. Analysis is made on three molecular structures in the form of linear polymer poly(diethylphosphono-benzyl-alphabeta-ethyl methylsiloxane) (PPEMS), cyclic oligomer methylphosphonobenzyl-alphabeta-ethyl cyclosiloxane (MPECS), and copolymer poly(PEMS-co-DMS). The surface pressure-surface area (pi -A) isotherms of homopolymer at 3-40 degrees C show a clear temperature-induced phase transition (plateaus at pit approximately 17-19 mN/m) below 10 degrees C. The magnitude of the transition substantially increases upon lowering the temperature (partial differential DeltaAt/ partial differential T approximately -0.1 nm2 unit(-1) deg(-1) and partial differential pi t / partial differential T approximately -0.25 mN m(-1) deg(-1)). The positive entropy and enthalpy gain infers that strong coupling with the subphase and excess hydration attributed to hydrogen bonding between the P=O bond and the subphase prevails at low temperatures. The cyclic oligomer MPECS forms a condensed monolayer at the air/water interface that does not display a similar transition in the experimental temperature range. The temperature sensitivity of MPECS film is observed only in the collapsed region. The nature of the interaction with the subphase is similar for MPECS and PPEMS, indicating that the size and thermal mobility are the controlling factors in these processes. The elasticity plot reveals two distinct states (above and below transition). This observation is supported by BAM images that show irregular spiral structures below 10 degrees C. The transition occurring in the copolymer at 20 degrees C is due to relaxation of the PDMS component. The two maxima shown in the elasticity plot indicate additive fractions of PPEMS and PDMS. The surface areas of these

  8. Corrosion resistance and durability of siloxane ceramic/polymer films for aluminum alloys in marine environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusada, Kentaro

    The objective of this study is to evaluate corrosion resistance and durability of siloxane ceramic/polymer films for aluminum alloys in marine environments. Al5052-H3 and Al6061-T6 were selected as substrates, and HCLCoat11 and HCLCoat13 developed in the Hawaii Corrosion Laboratory were selected for the siloxane ceramic/polymer coatings. The HCLCoat11 is a quasi-ceramic coating that has little to no hydrocarbons in its structure. The HCLCoat13 is formulated to incorporate more hydrocarbons to improve adhesion to substrate surfaces with less active functionalities. In this study, two major corrosion evaluation methods were used, which were the polarization test and the immersion test. The polarization tests provided theoretical corrosion rates (mg/dm 2/day) of bare, HCLCoat11-coated, and HCLCoat13-coated aluminum alloys in aerated 3.15wt% sodium chloride solution. From these results, the HCLCoat13-coated Al5052-H3 was found to have the lowest corrosion rate which was 0.073mdd. The next lowest corrosion rate was 0.166mdd of the HCLCoat11-coated Al5052-H3. Corrosion initiation was found to occur at preexisting breaches (pores) in the films by optical microscopy and SEM analysis. The HCLCoat11 film had many preexisting breaches of 1-2microm in diameter, while the HCLCoat13 film had much fewer preexisting breaches of less than 1microm in diameter. However, the immersion tests showed that the seawater immersion made HCLCoat13 film break away while the HCLCoat11 film did not apparently degrade, indicating that the HCLCoat11 film is more durable against seawater than the HCLCoat13. Raman spectroscopy revealed that there was some degradation of HCLCoat11 and HCLCoat13. For the HCLCoat11 film, the structure relaxation of Si-O-Si linkages was observed. On the other hand, seawater generated C-H-S bonds in the HCLCoat13 film resulting in the degradation of the film. In addition, it was found that the HCLCoat11 coating had anti-fouling properties due to its high water contact

  9. Custom sectional impression trays with interlocking type handle for microstomia patients.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Aquaviva S; Mascarenhas, Kennedy; Aras, Meena A

    2009-01-01

    Making impressions in microstomia patients is often cumbersome. A modification of standard impression procedure is often necessary while treating such patients. This article describes the fabrication of a custom sectional impression tray with interlocking type of a handle for definitive impression procedures in a microstomia patient.

  10. Using polyvinyl chloride dyed with bromocresol purple in radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Kattan, Munzer; al Kassiri, Haroun; Daher, Yarob

    2011-02-01

    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) dyed with bromocresol purple was investigated as a high-dose radiation dosimeter. The absorbance at 417 nm depends linearly on the dose below 50 kGy. The response depends neither on dose rate nor on the irradiation temperature. The effects of post-irradiation storage in the dark and in indirect sunlight are also discussed.

  11. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... polymerization of vinyl fluoride. (b) The poly(vinyl fluoride) basic resins have an intrinsic viscosity of not... Dilute Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies may be... Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference; see paragraph (b)...

  12. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... polymerization of vinyl fluoride. (b) The poly(vinyl fluoride) basic resins have an intrinsic viscosity of not... Dilute Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies may be... Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference; see paragraph (b)...

  13. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... polymerization of vinyl fluoride. (b) The poly(vinyl fluoride) basic resins have an intrinsic viscosity of not... Dilute Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies may be... Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference; see paragraph (b)...

  14. 21 CFR 175.270 - Poly(vinyl fluoride) resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... polymerization of vinyl fluoride. (b) The poly(vinyl fluoride) basic resins have an intrinsic viscosity of not... Dilute Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference. Copies may be... Solution Viscosity of Vinyl Chloride Polymers,” which is incorporated by reference; see paragraph (b)...

  15. A Sensitive Measurement for Estimating Impressions of Image-Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Mie; Matouge, Shingo; Mori, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Noboru; Kasuga, Masao

    We have investigated Kansei Content that appeals maker's intention to viewer's kansei. An SD method is a very good way to evaluate subjective impression of image-contents. However, because the SD method is performed after subjects view the image-contents, it is difficult to examine impression of detailed scenes of the image-contents in real time. To measure viewer's impression of the image-contents in real time, we have developed a Taikan sensor. With the Taikan sensor, we investigate relations among the image-contents, the grip strength and the body temperature. We also explore the interface of the Taikan sensor to use it easily. In our experiment, a horror movie is used that largely affects emotion of the subjects. Our results show that there is a possibility that the grip strength increases when the subjects view a strained scene and that it is easy to use the Taikan sensor without its circle base that is originally installed.

  16. Forming impressions: effects of facial expression and gender stereotypes.

    PubMed

    Hack, Tay

    2014-04-01

    The present study of 138 participants explored how facial expressions and gender stereotypes influence impressions. It was predicted that images of smiling women would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting warmth, and that images of non-smiling men would be evaluated more favorably on traits reflecting competence. As predicted, smiling female faces were rated as more warm; however, contrary to prediction, perceived competence of male faces was not affected by facial expression. Participants' female stereotype endorsement was a significant predictor for evaluations of female faces; those who ascribed more strongly to traditional female stereotypes reported the most positive impressions of female faces displaying a smiling expression. However, a similar effect was not found for images of men; endorsement of traditional male stereotypes did not predict participants' impressions of male faces.

  17. Identifying UMLS concepts from ECG Impressions using KnowledgeMap.

    PubMed

    Denny, Joshua C; Spickard, Anderson; Miller, Randolph A; Schildcrout, Jonathan; Darbar, Dawood; Rosenbloom, S Trent; Peterson, Josh F

    2005-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) impressions represent a wealth of medical information for potential decision support and drug-effect discovery. Much of this information is inaccessible to automated methods in the free-text portion of the ECG report. We studied the application of the KnowledgeMap concept identifier (KMCI) to map Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) concepts from ECG impressions. ECGs were processed by KMCI and the results scored for accuracy by multiple raters. Reviewers also recorded unidentified concepts through the scoring interface. Overall, KMCI correctly identified 1059 out of 1171 concepts for a recall of 0.90. Precision, indicating the proportion of ECG concepts correctly identified, was 0.94. KMCI was particularly effective at identifying ECG rhythms (330/333), perfusion changes (65/66), and noncardiac medical concepts (11/11). In conclusion, KMCI is an effective method for mapping ECG impressions to UMLS concepts.

  18. Does immediate dentin sealing influence the polymerization of impression materials?

    PubMed Central

    Ghiggi, Paula Cristine; Steiger, Arno Kieling; Marcondes, Maurem Leitão; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; Burnett, Luiz Henrique; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of the following study is to evaluate the interaction between the resin materials used in immediate dentin sealing (IDS) techniques and impression materials with two different techniques to eliminate the oxygen-inhibition layer. Materials and Methods: The occlusal dentin surface of 35 human molars was exposed. The teeth were used in two Groups: Group 1 – Impression with Express XT; Group 2 – Impression with Impregum. Groups 1 and 2 were divided into 14 subgroups: Groups 1a and 2a – Control groups; 1b and 2b – IDS with Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); 1c and 2c – IDS with CSE + additional polymerization with glycerin jelly; 1d and 2d – IDS with CSE + alcohol; 1e and 2e – IDS with CSE and Protect Liner F (PLF); 1f and 2f – IDS with CSE and PLF + additional polymerization with glycerin jelly; and 1g and 2g – IDS with CSE and PLF + alcohol. Five teeth were used in each experimental group, and the tooth surface was photographed using a digital camera. Results: Small quantity of unpolymerized impression material remained attached to the CSE or to the PLF in Groups 1b and 1e. Groups 1c and 1d prevented the interaction. Small quantity of polymerized impression material remained attached to the CSE or to the PLF for Groups 2b and 2e. The same interaction was observed for Groups 2c and 2d. For Groups 2c and 2f, no interactions were observed. Conclusion: Resin materials interacted with impression materials. The application of glycerin jelly and alcohol prevented the interaction of CSE with Express XT and PLF with Impregum; however, these treatments were not completely effective in preventing the interaction of CSE with Impregum and PLF with Express XT. PMID:25202218

  19. Inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm formation by antimycotics released from modified polydimethyl siloxane.

    PubMed

    De Prijck, Kristof; De Smet, Nele; Honraet, Kris; Christiaen, Steven; Coenye, Tom; Schacht, Etienne; Nelis, Hans J

    2010-03-01

    Unlike various disinfectants, antifungals have not been commonly incorporated so far in medical devices, such as catheters or prostheses, to prevent biofilm formation by Candida spp. In the present study, five antimycotics were added to polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) disks via admixture (nystatin) or impregnation (trimethylsilyl-nystatin (TMS-nystatin), miconazole, tea tree oil (TTO), zinc pyrithione). Nystatin-medicated PDMS disks exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on biofilm formation in a microtiter plate (MTP) but not in a Modified Robbins Device (MRD). This observation, together with HPLC data and agar diffusion tests, indicates that a small fraction of free nystatin is released, which kills Candida albicans cells in the limited volume of a MTP well. In contrast, biofilm inhibition amounted to more than one log unit in the MRD on disks impregnated with miconazole, TTO, and zinc pyrithione. It is hypothesized that the reduction in biofilm formation by these compounds in a flow system occurs through a contact-dependent effect.

  20. Calibration and application of a passive air sampler (XAD-PAS) for volatile methyl siloxanes.

    PubMed

    Krogseth, Ingjerd S; Zhang, Xianming; Lei, Ying D; Wania, Frank; Breivik, Knut

    2013-05-07

    Because the atmosphere is key to understanding the environmental behavior of volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS), a variety of reliable air sampling methods are needed. The purpose of this study was to calibrate and evaluate an existing, polystyrene-divinylbenzene copolymeric resin-based passive air sampler (XAD-PAS) for VMS. Sixteen XAD-PAS were deployed for 7-98 days at a suburban site in Toronto, Canada, while the VMS concentration in air was monitored by an active sampling method. This calibration and a subsequent field test further allowed for investigation of the temporal and spatial variability of VMS in the region. Uptake in the XAD-PAS of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and three linear VMS was linear throughout the whole deployment period. Sampling rates were between 0.4 and 0.5 m(3)/day. The XAD-PAS measured ∑VMS concentrations ranged from nondetects in rural areas (n = 3), to 169 ± 49 ng/m(3) in the urban region (n = 21), to levels above 600 ng/m(3) at sewage treatment plants (n = 2). Levels and composition of VMS within the urban area were remarkably uniform in space. Levels, but not composition, were highly variable in time and weakly correlated with temperature, wind speed, and wind direction.

  1. Modified inverse micelle synthesis for mesoporous alumina with a high D4 siloxane adsorption capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Wei; Jiang, Ting; Jafari, Tahereh; Poyraz, Altug S.; Wu, Wei; Kriz, David A.; Du, Shoucheng; Biswas, Sourav; Thompson Pettes, Michael; Suib, Steven L.

    2016-10-18

    In this work, mesoporous aluminas (MAs) with uniform and monomodal pores were fabricated via a modified inverse micelle synthesis method, using a non-polar solvent (to minimize the effect of water content) and short reaction time (for a fast evaporation process). The effects of reaction times (4–8 h), surfactant chain lengths (non-ionic surfactants), and calcination temperatures and hold times (450–600 °C; 1–4 h) on the textural properties of MA were studied. Additionally, the targeted pore sizes of MA were obtained in the range of 3.1–5.4 nm by adjusting the surfactant and reaction time. The surface area and pore volume were controlled by the calcination temperature and hold time while maintaining the thermal stability of the materials. The tuned MA of the large mesopore volume achieved 168 mg/g octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4 siloxane) adsorption capacity, a 32% improvement compared to commercially activated alumina. Finally, after three adsorption recycles, the synthesized MA still maintained approximate 85% of its original adsorption capacity, demonstrating a sustainable adsorption performance and high potential for related industrial applications.

  2. Modified inverse micelle synthesis for mesoporous alumina with a high D4 siloxane adsorption capacity

    DOE PAGES

    Zhong, Wei; Jiang, Ting; Jafari, Tahereh; ...

    2016-10-18

    In this work, mesoporous aluminas (MAs) with uniform and monomodal pores were fabricated via a modified inverse micelle synthesis method, using a non-polar solvent (to minimize the effect of water content) and short reaction time (for a fast evaporation process). The effects of reaction times (4–8 h), surfactant chain lengths (non-ionic surfactants), and calcination temperatures and hold times (450–600 °C; 1–4 h) on the textural properties of MA were studied. Additionally, the targeted pore sizes of MA were obtained in the range of 3.1–5.4 nm by adjusting the surfactant and reaction time. The surface area and pore volume were controlledmore » by the calcination temperature and hold time while maintaining the thermal stability of the materials. The tuned MA of the large mesopore volume achieved 168 mg/g octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4 siloxane) adsorption capacity, a 32% improvement compared to commercially activated alumina. Finally, after three adsorption recycles, the synthesized MA still maintained approximate 85% of its original adsorption capacity, demonstrating a sustainable adsorption performance and high potential for related industrial applications.« less

  3. Influence of different organic solvents on degree of swelling of poly (dimethyl siloxane)-based sealer

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Thilla Sekar; Deivanayagam, Kandaswamy; Ganesh, Arathi; Kumar, Dinesh

    2011-01-01

    The study evaluated the compatibility of chloroform, ether, and xylene with poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) based sealer. Freshly mixed sealer was placed in 90 glass molds with 5 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness. All samples were stored in 75% relative humidity at 37°C for 2 weeks. All the samples were divided into three groups: group A – chloroform; group B – ether, and group C – xylene and immersed in fresh solvent at room temperature. The specimens were weighed before and after immersion for each group at the end of 2, 5, and 10 min. The swelling ratio was calculated for all the groups. Intergroup comparison revealed no difference in the mean swelling ratio for 2, 5, and 10 min (P > 0.001; Tukey HSD Post Hoc). Intragroup comparison revealed significant difference in swelling ratio between 2 and 5 min for group B and group C (P < 0.001; Paired t test). Ether has the highest compatibility with PDMS-based sealer after 2 min followed by xylene after 5 min. PMID:21814357

  4. Siloxane nanoprobes for labeling and dual modality imaging of neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Addington, Caroline P.; Cusick, Alex; Shankar, Rohini Vidya; Agarwal, Shubhangi; Stabenfeldt, Sarah E.; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic for a myriad of medical conditions, including cancer, traumatic brain injury, and cardiovascular disease among others. A thorough understanding of the efficacy and cellular dynamics of these therapies necessitates the ability to non-invasively track cells in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a platform to track cells as a non-invasive modality with superior resolution and soft tissue contrast. We recently reported a new nanoprobe platform for cell labeling and imaging using fluorophore doped siloxane core nanoemulsions as dual modality (1H MRI/Fluorescence), dual-functional (oximetry/detection) nanoprobes. Here, we successfully demonstrate the labeling, dual-modality imaging, and oximetry of neural progenitor/stem cells (NPSCs) in vitro using this platform. Labeling at a concentration of 10 μl/104 cells with a 40%v/v polydimethylsiloxane core nanoemulsion, doped with rhodamine, had minimal effect on viability, no effect on migration, proliferation and differentiation of NPSCs and allowed for unambiguous visualization of labeled NPSCs by 1H MR and fluorescence and local pO2 reporting by labeled NPSCs. This new approach for cell labeling with a positive contrast 1H MR probe has the potential to improve mechanistic knowledge of current therapies, and guide the design of future cell therapies due to its clinical translatability. PMID:26597417

  5. Synthesis of a novel multi N-halamines siloxane precursor and its antimicrobial activity on cotton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lin; Xu, Yan; Cai, Lu; Zang, Xiong; Li, Zhanxiong

    2014-09-01

    A novel N-halamine siloxane antibacterial precursor N-(3-triethoxysilylpropyl)-N‧- (N″‧-heptylcarbamido-N″-ethyl)-butanediamide (TSHCEB) was synthesized and characterized in this study. The compound was then tethered to the surface of cotton fabrics through covalent ether linkages, followed by exposure to dilute sodium hypochlorite solutions to confer the cotton fabrics antibacterial property. The chemical structure of the monomer was confirmed by FTIR, 1H NMR and MS, and the surface of the treated cotton fabrics was characterized by FTIR, TGA, SEM, and XPS analysis. The antimicrobial cotton materials were then challenged with Gram-negative Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895) and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538). Results showed that it provided excellent antimicrobial properties against E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus via direct contacting for 2-15 min. The controlled release of diverse chlorines was proved by inhibition zone. The chlorine bonded to the coating was stable under standard washing test and routine storage, stability toward UVA irradiation was also investigated, and the lost chlorine could be regenerated by rechlorination. The new N-halamine antibacterial precursor can provide superior antibacterial property within a short contact time.

  6. Novel gelatin siloxane nanoparticles decorated by Tat peptide as vectors for gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zu-yong; Zhao, Yang; Ren, Lei; Jin, Li-hua; Sun, Li-ping; Yin, Pei; Zhang, Ya-fei; Zhang, Qi-Qing

    2008-11-01

    In principle, the technique of gene delivery involves taking complete or parts of genes that can code specific messages and delivering them to selected cells in the body. Such a transfer of plasmid DNA into mammalian cells has posed major challenges for gene therapy. A series of gelatin-siloxane nanoparticles (GS NPs) with controlled size and surface charge were synthesized through a two-step sol-gel process. In order to increase the efficiency of cellular uptake, HIV-derived Tat peptide was further grafted to GS NPs. In vitro co-location and endocytosis inhibition experiments suggested that the as-synthesized TG NPs may enter HeLa cells via a combined pathway of lipid-raft- and receptor-dependent endocytosis, and only cause little cell damage. Moreover, this study shows the encapsulation of a plasmid DNA in TG NPs to be obtained as a non-viral gene vector. This kind of encapsulation provides complete protection to the plasmid DNA from the external DNase and serum environment, and generates the hope that the resulting formulation can be developed into a potential vector for effective gene delivery. In order to check this potential, the reporter gene pSVβ-gal was encapsulated, and in vitro transfection efficiency of this system was found to be nearly 130% compared to the commercially available transfection reagent Lipofectamine™.

  7. Nonfunctionalized Polydimethyl Siloxane Superhydrophobic Surfaces Based on Hydrophobic-Hydrophilic Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Polizos, Georgios; Tuncer, Enis; Qiu, Xiaofeng; Aytug, Tolga; Kidder, Michelle; Messman, Jamie M; Sauers, Isidor

    2011-01-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces based on polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) were fabricated using a 50:50 PDM-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) blend. PDMS was mixed with PEG, and incomplete phase separation yielded a hierarchic structure. The phase-separated mixture was annealed at a temperature close to the crystallization temperature of the PEG. The PEG crystals were formed isothermally at the PDMS/PEG interface, leading to an engineered surface with PDMS spherulites. The resulting roughness of the surface was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The PDMS spherulites, a few micrometers in diameter observed from SEM images, were found to have an undulated (rippled) surface with nanometer-sized features. The combination of micrometer- and nanometer-sized surface features created a fractal surface and increased the water contact angle (WCA) of PDMS more than 60, resulting in a superhydrophobic PDMS surface with WCA of >160 degrees. The active surface layer for the superhydrophobicity was approximately 100 mu m thick, illustrating that the material had bulk superhydrophobicity compared to conventional fluorocarbon or fluorinated coated rough surfaces. Theoretical analysis of the fractal surface indicates that the constructed surface has a fractal dimension of 2.5, which corresponds to the Apollonian sphere packing.

  8. AFM in peak force mode applied to worn siloxane-hydrogel contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Abadías, Clara; Serés, Carme; Torrent-Burgués, Juan

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this work is to apply Atomic Force Microscopy in Peak Force mode to obtain topographic characteristics (mean roughness, root-mean-square roughness, skewness and kurtosis) and mechanical characteristics (adhesion, elastic modulus) of Siloxane-Hydrogel Soft Contact Lenses (CLs) of two different materials, Lotrafilcon B of Air Optix (AO) and Asmofilcon A of PremiO (P), after use (worn CLs). Thus, the results obtained with both materials will be compared, as well as the changes produced by the wear at a nanoscopic level. The results show significant changes in the topographic and mechanical characteristics of the CLs, at a nanoscopic level, due to wear. The AO CL show values of the topographic parameters lower than those of the P CL after wear, which correlates with a better comfort qualification given to the former by the wearers. A significant correlation has also been obtained between the adhesion values found after the use of the CLs with tear quality tests, both break-up-time and Schirmer.

  9. Microscopic observation of unworn siloxane-hydrogel soft contact lenses by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    González-Méijome, José M; López-Alemany, Antonio; Almeida, José B; Parafita, Manuel A; Refojo, Miguel F

    2006-02-01

    In the present study, samples of lotrafilcon A, balafilcon A, and galyfilcon A contact lenses were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in tapping mode at areas ranging from 0.25 to 400 microm2. Mean roughness (Ra), root-mean-square roughness (Rms) and maximum roughness (Rmax) in nanometers were obtained for the three lens materials at different magnifications. The three contact lenses showed significantly different surface topography. However, roughness values were dependent of the surface area to be analyzed. For a 1 microm2 area, statistics revealed a significantly more irregular surface of balafilcon A (Ra = 6.44 nm; Rms = 8.30 nm; Rmax = 96.82 nm) compared with lotrafilcon A (Ra = 2.40 nm; Rms = 3.19 nm; Rmax = 40.89 nm) and galyfilcon A (Ra = 1.40 nm; Rms = 1.79 nm; Rmax = 15.33 nm). Ra and Rms were the most consistent parameters, with Rmax presenting more variability for larger surface areas. The higher roughness of balafilcon A is attributed to the plasma oxidation treatment used to improve wettability. Conversely, galyfilcon A displays a smoother surface. Present observations could have implications in clinical aspects of siloxane-hydrogel contact lens wear such as lens spoliation, resistance to bacterial adhesion, or mechanical interaction with the ocular surface.

  10. Occurrence and seasonality of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes in Arctic air.

    PubMed

    Krogseth, Ingjerd S; Kierkegaard, Amelie; McLachlan, Michael S; Breivik, Knut; Hansen, Kaj M; Schlabach, Martin

    2013-01-02

    Cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) are present in technical applications and personal care products. They are predicted to undergo long-range atmospheric transport, but measurements of cVMS in remote areas remain scarce. An active air sampling method for decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) was further evaluated to include hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6). Air samples were collected at the Zeppelin observatory in the remote Arctic (79° N, 12° E) with an average sampling time of 81 ± 23 h in late summer (August-October) and 25 ± 10 h in early winter (November-December) 2011. The average concentrations of D5 and D6 in late summer were 0.73 ± 0.31 and 0.23 ± 0.17 ng/m(3), respectively, and 2.94 ± 0.46 and 0.45 ± 0.18 ng/m(3) in early winter, respectively. Detection of D5 and D6 in the Arctic atmosphere confirms their long-range atmospheric transport. The D5 measurements agreed well with predictions from a Eulerian atmospheric chemistry-transport model, and seasonal variability was explained by the seasonality in the OH radical concentrations. These results extend our understanding of the atmospheric fate of D5 to high latitudes, but question the levels of D3 and D4 that have previously been measured at Zeppelin with passive air samplers.

  11. Food web accumulation of cyclic siloxanes in Lake Mjøsa, Norway.

    PubMed

    Borgå, Katrine; Fjeld, Eirik; Kierkegaard, Amelie; McLachlan, Michael S

    2012-06-05

    The biomagnification of the cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexatetrasiloxane (D6) was analyzed in the Lake Mjøsa food web in Norway from zooplankton and Mysis to planktivorous and piscivorous fish. The trophic magnification factor (TMF) for D5 was determined and compared with TMFs of several legacy contaminants: polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners 153 and 180, polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners 47 and 99, and p,p'-DDE. D5 showed TMF significantly greater than 1, implying food web biomagnification (TMF = 2.28, CI: 1.22-4.29). This contrasts with two studies that reported TMF < 1, which may reflect variability in TMF between food webs. The Lake Mjøsa D5 TMF was sensitive to the species included at the higher trophic level; whole food web TMF differed from TMF excluding smelt (Osmerus eperlanus) or brown trout (Salmo trutta) (TMF(-SMELT) = 1.62, CI: 0.96-2.72; TMF(-TROUT) = 3.58, CI: 1.82-7.03). For legacy contaminants (e.g., PCB-153 and PCB-180), the TMFs were less sensitive to the food web composition, and a better model fit was obtained compared to D5. The differences in biomagnification behavior between D5 and the legacy contaminants suggest that the biomagnification of D5 is being governed by species-specific properties such as biotransformation rate or tissue distribution that differ from those of legacy contaminants.

  12. Optical and mechanical behaviors of glassy silicone networks derived from linear siloxane precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Heejun; Seo, Wooram; Kim, Hyungsun; Lee, Yoonjoo; Kim, Younghee

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-based inorganic polymers are promising materials as matrix materials for glass fiber composites because of their good process ability, transparency, and thermal property. In this study, for utilization as a matrix precursor for a glass-fiber-reinforced composite, glassy silicone networks were prepared via hydrosilylation of linear/pendant Si-H polysiloxanes and the C=C bonds of viny-lterminated linear/cyclic polysiloxanes. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of the cross-linked states, and a thermal analysis was performed. To assess the mechanical properties of the glassy silicone networks, we performed nanoindentation and 4-point bending tests. Cross-linked networks derived from siloxane polymers are thermally and optically more stable at high temperatures. Different cross-linking agents led to final networks with different properties due to differences in the molecular weights and structures. After stepped postcuring, the Young's modulus and the hardness of the glassy silicone networks increased; however, the brittleness also increased. The characteristics of the cross-linking agent played an important role in the functional glassy silicone networks.

  13. Quantum Dot/Siloxane Composite Film Exceptionally Stable against Oxidation under Heat and Moisture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwea Yoon; Yoon, Da-Eun; Jang, Junho; Lee, Daewon; Choi, Gwang-Mun; Chang, Joon Ha; Lee, Jeong Yong; Lee, Doh C; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2016-12-21

    We report on the fabrication of a siloxane-encapsulated quantum dot (QD) film (QD-silox film), which exhibits stable emission intensity for over 1 month even at elevated temperature and humidity. QD-silox films are solidified via free radical addition reaction between oligosiloxane resin and ligand molecules on QDs. We prepare the QD-oligosiloxane resin by sol-gel condensation reaction of silane precursors with QDs blended in the precursor solution, forgoing ligand-exchange of QDs. The resulting QD-oligosiloxane resin remains optically clear after 40 days of storage, in contrast to other QD-containing resins which turn turbid and ultimately form sediments. QDs also disperse uniformly in the QD-silox film, whose photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) remains nearly unaltered under harsh conditions; for example, 85 °C/5% relative humidity (RH), 85 °C/85% RH, strongly acidic, and strongly basic environments for 40 days. The QD-silox film appears to remain equally emissive even after being immersed into boiling water (100 °C). Interestingly, the PL QY of the QD-silox film noticeably increases when the film is exposed to a moist environment, which opens a new, facile avenue to curing dimmed QD-containing films. Given its excellent stability, we envision that the QD-silox film is best suited in display applications, particularly as a PL-type down-conversion layer.

  14. Poly(dimethyl siloxane) surface modification with biosurfactants isolated from probiotic strains.

    PubMed

    Pinto, S; Alves, P; Santos, A C; Matos, C M; Oliveiros, B; Gonçalves, S; Gudiña, E; Rodrigues, L R; Teixeira, J A; Gil, M H

    2011-09-15

    Depending on the final application envisaged for a given biomaterial, many surfaces must be modified before use. The material performance in a biological environment is mainly mediated by its surface properties that can be improved using suitable modification methods. The aim of this work was to coat poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) surfaces with biosurfactants (BSs) and to evaluate how these compounds affect the PDMS surface properties. BSs isolated from four probiotic strains (Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus paracasei, Streptococcus thermophilus A, and Streptococcus thermophilus B) were used. Bare PDMS and PDMS coated with BSs were characterized by contact angle measurements, infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The influence of the surface modifications on the materials blood compatibility was studied through thrombosis and hemolysis assays. The cytotoxicity of these materials was tested against rat peritoneal macrophages. AFM results demonstrated the successful coating of the surfaces. Also, by contact angle measurements, an increase of the coated surfaces hydrophilicity was seen. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated a decrease of the silicon content at the surface, and ATR-FTIR results showed the presence of BS characteristic groups as a consequence of the modification. All the studied materials revealed no toxicity and were found to be nonhemolytic. The proposed approach for the modification of PDMS surfaces was found to be effective and opens new possibilities for the application of these surfaces in the biomedical field.

  15. Structural characterization of sol-gel derived siloxane-oxide materials

    SciTech Connect

    Babonneau, F.; Dire, S.

    1993-12-31

    Sol-gel processing of hybrid siloxane-oxide materials is currently widely investigated due to a large amount of potential applications for these systems. They are usually based on silicon alkoxides and derivatives. Various new materials have been prepared combining a modified silicon alkoxide, diethoxydimethylsilane (DEDMS) and a transition metal alkoxide, M(OR){sub n} with M=Ti and Zr. Transparent monolithic pieces or thick films can be obtained over a wide range of compositions. The hydrolysis process of various preparations was followed by {sup 29}Si liquid NMR, and indicates the formation of Si-O-M bonds. The structure of the final gels was essentially characterized by solid state NMR ({sup 1}H, {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si) and X-ray absorption spectroscopies (Ti K-edge), and leads to propose structural models for these gels. This study points out that titanium and zirconium alkoxides does not only act as cross linking agents, such as silicon alkoxides, but behave as catalysts for the formation of polydimethylsiloxane chains within the materials.

  16. Recovery of methane from anaerobic process effluent using poly-di-methyl-siloxane membrane contactors.

    PubMed

    Cookney, J; Cartmell, E; Jefferson, B; McAdam, E J

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential for recovering dissolved methane from low temperature anaerobic processes treating domestic wastewater. In the absence of methane recovery, ca. 45% of the produced methane is released as a fugitive emission which results in a net carbon footprint of -0.47 kg CO(2e) m(-3). A poly-di-methyl-siloxane (PDMS) membrane contactor was applied to support sweep gas desorption of dissolved methane using nitrogen. The dense membrane structure controlled gaseous mass transfer thus recovery was maximised at low liquid velocities. At the lowest liquid velocity, V(L), of 0.0025 m s(-1), 72% of the dissolved methane was recovered. A vacuum was also trialled as an alternative to sweep-gas operation. At vacuum pressures below 30 mbar, reasonable methane recovery was observed at an intermediate V(L) of 0.0056 m s(-1). Results from this study demonstrate that dissolved methane recovery could increase net electrical production from low temperature anaerobic processes by ca. +0.043 kWh(e) m(-3) and reduce the net carbon footprint to +0.01 kg CO(2e) m(-3). However, further experimental work to optimise the gas-side hydrodynamics is required as well as validation of the long-term impacts of biofouling on process performance.

  17. Looks and linguistics: Impression formation in online exchange marketplaces.

    PubMed

    Ciuchta, Michael P; O'Toole, Jay

    2016-01-01

    This study advances theories of impression formation by focusing on two factors that generate emotional responses: physical attractiveness and positive word use. Although considerable research on impression formation exists, most studies consider factors in isolation and neglect possible interactions. Our theory introduces competing mechanisms regarding possible interaction effects, and we empirically test them in an online marketplace. Results from the analysis of 729 loan requests from a leading online peer-to-peer lending market suggest that physical attractiveness and positive word use work together to influence the likelihood of acquiring resources and establish an important boundary condition to the general "beauty is good" effect.

  18. Social Behavioral Assessment and Intervention: Observations and Impressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    The author was favorably impressed with the breadth, scope, and quality of the articles in this issue that dealt with the various aspects and correlates of social behavioral functioning as well as assessment and intervention considerations. Each of these articles dealt with a unique aspect of social behavioral functioning in children and youth and…

  19. Mechanical Properties of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Comparison.

    PubMed

    Re, Dino; De Angelis, Francesco; Augusti, Gabriele; Augusti, Davide; Caputi, Sergio; D'Amario, Maurizio; D'Arcangelo, Camillo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Although new elastomeric impression materials have been introduced into the market, there are still insufficient data about their mechanical features. The tensile properties of 17 hydrophilic impression materials with different consistencies were compared. Materials and Methods. 12 vinylpolysiloxane, 2 polyether, and 3 hybrid vinylpolyether silicone-based impression materials were tested. For each material, 10 dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated (n = 10), according to the ISO 37:2005 specifications, and loaded in tension until failure. Mean values for tensile strength, yield strength, strain at break, and strain at yield point were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Results. Vinylpolysiloxanes consistently showed higher tensile strength values than polyethers. Heavy-body materials showed higher tensile strength than the light bodies from the same manufacturer. Among the light bodies, the highest yield strength was achieved by the hybrid vinylpolyether silicone (2.70 MPa). Polyethers showed the lowest tensile (1.44 MPa) and yield (0.94 MPa) strengths, regardless of the viscosity. Conclusion. The choice of an impression material should be based on the specific physical behavior of the elastomer. The light-body vinylpolyether silicone showed high tensile strength, yield strength, and adequate strain at yield/brake; those features might help to reduce tearing phenomena in the thin interproximal and crevicular areas.

  20. Transmaxillary anterior decompressions in patients with severe basilar impression.

    PubMed

    Bhangoo, R S; Crockard, H A

    1999-02-01

    Severe basilar impression leads to an upward translocation of the upper cervical spine and clivus into the foramen magnum and is a diagnosis best made with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans. Basilar impression may be a primary condition or secondary to bone softening disorders. Symptoms relating to direct neuraxial compression, obstruction to cerebral spinal fluid outflow, and vascular compromise all have been described. Management depends on the exact nature of the abnormality seen, but it is now firmly accepted that those with anterior neuraxial compression should have an anterior decompression. The severe basilar impression and craniofacial abnormalities seen in osteogenesis imperfecta together with the progressive nature of the condition have led to the development of a specific surgical response, the open door maxillotomy combined with a contoured loop fixation of the cervical spine. Little is known of the long term outcome of severe basilar impression, and long term studies undertaken by centers familiar with the condition and its management are required if definitive care is to be delivered to these patients.

  1. Megadolichobasilar anomaly, basilar impression and occipito-vertebral anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Dehaene, I; Pattyn, G; Calliauw, L

    1975-01-01

    The authors describe a case of a megadolichobasilar anomaly associated with basilar impression, bilateral megadolichocarotid arteries and an occipito-vertebral anastomosis. The concurrence of these anomalies lends support to the hypothesis that congenital factors play a part in the origin of the megadolichobasilar anomaly.

  2. Basilar impression and the so-called 'associated anomalies'.

    PubMed

    Bares, L

    1975-01-01

    Analysing the casuistry of 210 patients with basilar impression, the author has enumerated the type and frequency of the associated anomalies and looked for correlations between them and the various clinical syndromes. An attempt is made to divide the anomalies into pathogenetic groups on the basis of these findings.

  3. Modeling first impressions from highly variable facial images.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Richard J W; Sutherland, Clare A M; Young, Andrew W; Hartley, Tom

    2014-08-12

    First impressions of social traits, such as trustworthiness or dominance, are reliably perceived in faces, and despite their questionable validity they can have considerable real-world consequences. We sought to uncover the information driving such judgments, using an attribute-based approach. Attributes (physical facial features) were objectively measured from feature positions and colors in a database of highly variable "ambient" face photographs, and then used as input for a neural network to model factor dimensions (approachability, youthful-attractiveness, and dominance) thought to underlie social attributions. A linear model based on this approach was able to account for 58% of the variance in raters' impressions of previously unseen faces, and factor-attribute correlations could be used to rank attributes by their importance to each factor. Reversing this process, neural networks were then used to predict facial attributes and corresponding image properties from specific combinations of factor scores. In this way, the factors driving social trait impressions could be visualized as a series of computer-generated cartoon face-like images, depicting how attributes change along each dimension. This study shows that despite enormous variation in ambient images of faces, a substantial proportion of the variance in first impressions can be accounted for through linear changes in objectively defined features.

  4. Curriculum Challenge from the Religious Right: The "Impressions" Reading Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Louise; Tellez, Kip

    1992-01-01

    Studies curriculum challenges by religious conservatives to the "Impressions" reading series in California. Many parents thought the series promoted satanism, witchcraft, and disrespect toward parents. Data from 22 school districts, 4 of which dropped the series, illustrate the complex nature of such challenges and highlight school…

  5. The impact of motivation on race-based impression formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianyi; Cardenas-Iniguez, Carlos; Correll, Joshua; Cloutier, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Affective biases toward racial out-group members, characterized by White perceivers' negative evaluations of Black individuals, prevail in U.S. culture. Such affective associations have been found to guide race-based impression formation. Accordingly, individuals may strive to resolve inconsistencies when perceiving targets violating their expectations. The current study focuses on the impact of evaluative incongruence on the activity of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) - a brain region previously shown to support impression formation. When asking participants to form impressions of positively and negatively evaluated Black and White individuals, we found preferential dmPFC activity in response to individuals paired with information that violates race-based affective associations. Importantly, individual differences in internal motivation to respond without prejudice (IMS) were found to shape the extent to which dmPFC activity indexes the interactive effects of race and affective associations during impression formation. Specifically, preferential dmPFC activity in response to evaluatively incongruent targets (i.e., Black-positive & White-negative) was present among participants with lower, but not those with higher, levels of IMS. Implications and future directions are discussed in the context of dmPFC involvement in social cognition.

  6. 21 CFR 872.6880 - Preformed impression tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed impression tray. 872.6880 Section 872.6880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...) to reproduce the structure of a patient's teeth and gums. (b) Classification. Class I...

  7. Mechanical Properties of Elastomeric Impression Materials: An In Vitro Comparison

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Francesco; Caputi, Sergio; D'Amario, Maurizio; D'Arcangelo, Camillo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Although new elastomeric impression materials have been introduced into the market, there are still insufficient data about their mechanical features. The tensile properties of 17 hydrophilic impression materials with different consistencies were compared. Materials and Methods. 12 vinylpolysiloxane, 2 polyether, and 3 hybrid vinylpolyether silicone-based impression materials were tested. For each material, 10 dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated (n = 10), according to the ISO 37:2005 specifications, and loaded in tension until failure. Mean values for tensile strength, yield strength, strain at break, and strain at yield point were calculated. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). Results. Vinylpolysiloxanes consistently showed higher tensile strength values than polyethers. Heavy-body materials showed higher tensile strength than the light bodies from the same manufacturer. Among the light bodies, the highest yield strength was achieved by the hybrid vinylpolyether silicone (2.70 MPa). Polyethers showed the lowest tensile (1.44 MPa) and yield (0.94 MPa) strengths, regardless of the viscosity. Conclusion. The choice of an impression material should be based on the specific physical behavior of the elastomer. The light-body vinylpolyether silicone showed high tensile strength, yield strength, and adequate strain at yield/brake; those features might help to reduce tearing phenomena in the thin interproximal and crevicular areas. PMID:26693227

  8. Do we spontaneously form stable trustworthiness impressions from facial appearance?

    PubMed

    Klapper, André; Dotsch, Ron; van Rooij, Iris; Wigboldus, Daniël H J

    2016-11-01

    It is widely assumed among psychologists that people spontaneously form trustworthiness impressions of newly encountered people from their facial appearance. However, most existing studies directly or indirectly induced an impression formation goal, which means that the existing empirical support for spontaneous facial trustworthiness impressions remains insufficient. In particular, it remains an open question whether trustworthiness from facial appearance is encoded in memory. Using the 'who said what' paradigm, we indirectly measured to what extent people encoded the trustworthiness of observed faces. The results of 4 studies demonstrated a reliable tendency toward trustworthiness encoding. This was shown under conditions of varying context-relevance, and salience of trustworthiness. Moreover, evidence for this tendency was obtained using both (experimentally controlled) artificial and (naturalistic varying) real faces. Taken together, these results suggest that there is a spontaneous tendency to form relatively stable trustworthiness impressions from facial appearance, which is relatively independent of the context. As such, our results further underline how widespread influences of facial trustworthiness may be in our everyday life. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Making an Impression: YA Authors and Their Influential Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenbach, Brooke; Kaywell, Joan F.

    2013-01-01

    This article recounts significant moments from online interviews these authors conducted with Young Adult (YA) authors concerning the teachers who left a lasting impression on them and assisted them in finding their voice and unique writing abilities. S. E. Hinton, Walter Dean Myers, Erin Gruwell, Chris Crutcher, and other popular YA authors…

  10. DETAIL OF THE IMPRESSION IN THE CONCRETE SLAB OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE IMPRESSION IN THE CONCRETE SLAB OF THE SOUTH END OF THE ABOVE-GROUND PORTION. NOTE STEP DOWN TO THE STEEL PLATE IN BACKGROUND. VIEW FACING NORTH - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... fabrication of crowns, bridges, or full dentures. A preliminary plaster or stone model of the patient's...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section 872.3670 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... fabrication of crowns, bridges, or full dentures. A preliminary plaster or stone model of the patient's...

  13. 21 CFR 872.6880 - Preformed impression tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....6880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED..., such as alginate, to make an impression of a patient's teeth or alveolar process (bony tooth sockets) to reproduce the structure of a patient's teeth and gums. (b) Classification. Class I...

  14. 21 CFR 872.6880 - Preformed impression tray.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....6880 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED..., such as alginate, to make an impression of a patient's teeth or alveolar process (bony tooth sockets) to reproduce the structure of a patient's teeth and gums. (b) Classification. Class I...

  15. Study of the potential cytotoxicity of dental impression materials.

    PubMed

    Roberta, Tiozzo; Federico, Magagna; Federica, Boraldi; Antonietta, Croce Maria; Sergio, Bortolini; Ugo, Consolo

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cytotoxicity of tow types of impression dental materials: polyethers (Impregum Penta, Permadyne Penta Heavy and Light) and vinyl polysiloxanes (Elite Mono Tray, Medium, Low viscosity and Elite H-D Putty). Their cytotoxic effects were studied by indirect and direct tests. The indirect tests were performed by incubating impression materials in serum free cell culture medium to prepare the soluble extracts. Balb/c 3T3 cells were incubated with extract dilutions (25, 50, 75 and 100%) for 24 h. The extracts of polyether materials caused a decrease of cellular viability, evaluated by light microscopy, by cell counting and by MTT test. The extracts of vinyl polysiloxanes materials induced a slight effect on cellular number and viability. The direct tests were performed by placing the impression materials in the centre of Petri dishes while Balb/c 3T3 were settling. The cellular proliferation was drastically reduced by polyethers and it was unaffected by the presence of vinyl polysiloxanes. These results show that: (a) the polyether materials are more toxic than vinyl polysiloxanes in our experimental conditions, (b) the impression materials are cytotoxic to the same degree in all assay methods.

  16. Empirical study of alginate impression materials by customized proportioning system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Alginate mixers available in the market do not have the automatic proportioning unit. In this study, an automatic proportioning unit for the alginate mixer and controller software were designed and produced for a new automatic proportioning unit. With this device, it was ensured that proportioning operation could arrange weight-based alginate impression materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS The variation of coefficient in the tested groups was compared with the manual proportioning. Compression tension and tear tests were conducted to determine the mechanical properties of alginate impression materials. The experimental data were statistically analyzed using one way ANOVA and Tukey test at the 0.05 level of significance. RESULTS No statistically significant differences in modulus of elastisity (P>0.3), tensional/compresional strength (P>0.3), resilience (P>0.2), strain in failure (P>0.4), and tear energy (P>0.7) of alginate impression materials were seen. However, a decrease in the standard deviation of tested groups was observed when the customized machine was used. To verify the efficiency of the system, powder and powder/water mixing were weighed and significant decrease was observed. CONCLUSION It was possible to obtain more mechanically stable alginate impression materials by using the custom-made proportioning unit. PMID:27826387

  17. Forming On-Line Impressions: A Class Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop-Clark, Cathy; Dietz-Uhler, Beth

    2003-01-01

    In an exercise designed to assess the accuracy of the impressions we form of people in online settings, students in a Psychology of the Internet course were asked to interact with two people in two different Internet settings. First, students were asked to interact with "Tom" (a college student) in an asynchronous discussion board setting over the…

  18. Shared impression formation in the cognitively interdependent dyad.

    PubMed

    Ruscher, Janet B; Santuzzi, Alecia M; Hammer, Elizabeth Yost

    2003-09-01

    We examined the role of cognitive interdependence in determining how close friends form shared impressions of another person. Cognitive interdependence should provide a processing advantage, such that close friends are more efficient in forming shared impressions and are more successful at doing so. Under normal circumstances, the conversations of close friends should be marked by little necessity to make explicit requests for information, mutual recognition of who currently is controlling the flow of conversation, and willingness to express differences in opinion. Given these advantages, close friends also should be able to form complex shared impressions that go beyond mere one-sided stereotypic judgments and that instead resolve apparent discrepancies in the target's personality. However, if the cognitive interdependence system is disrupted by mutual distraction, these advantages should attenuate or even reverse. Dyads of varying degrees of closeness were mutually distracted or not while discussing their impressions of another female college student. Results supported predictions and are discussed with reference to how cognitive interdependence may help close dyads function within their mutual social networks.

  19. First Impressions: Gait Cues Drive Reliable Trait Judgements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoresen, John C.; Vuong, Quoc C.; Atkinson, Anthony P.

    2012-01-01

    Personality trait attribution can underpin important social decisions and yet requires little effort; even a brief exposure to a photograph can generate lasting impressions. Body movement is a channel readily available to observers and allows judgements to be made when facial and body appearances are less visible; e.g., from great distances.…

  20. Cross-Cultural Impression Management: A Cultural Knowledge Audit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spong, Abigail; Kamau, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many people moving into a new culture for work or study do so without prior cross-cultural training, yet successful cultural adaptation has important ramifications. The purpose of this paper is to focus on cross-cultural impression management as an element of cultural adaptation. Does cultural adaptation begin by paying strong attention…

  1. The Neurological-Impress Method of Teaching Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partridge, Susan

    In the neurological impress method the teacher sits slightly behind the child, a book is held jointly, and the teacher and child read aloud simultaneously with the teacher directing his/her voice into the child's ear as the child slides a finger along each line following the words as they are spoken. No attempt is made to teach sounds or word…

  2. Ultraviolet light stable and transparent sol-gel methyl siloxane hybrid material for UV light-emitting diode (UV LED) encapsulant.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jun-Young; Kim, YongHo; Kim, HweaYoon; Kim, YuBae; Jin, Jungho; Bae, Byeong-Soo

    2015-01-21

    An ultraviolet (UV) transparent and stable methyl-siloxane hybrid material was prepared by a facile sol-gel method. The transparency and stability of a UV-LED encapsulant is an important issue because it affects UV light extraction efficiency and long-term reliability. We introduced a novel concept for UV-LED encapsulation using a thermally curable oligosiloxane resin. The encapsulant was fabricated by a hydrosilylation of hydrogen-methyl oligosiloxane resin and vinyl-methyl siloxane resin, and showed a comparable transmittance to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) in the UVB (∼300 nm) region. Most remarkably, the methyl-siloxane hybrid materials exhibited long-term UV stability under light soaking in UVB (∼300 nm) for 1000 h.

  3. Effect of Siloxane Ring Strain and Cation Charge Density on the Formation of Coordinately Unsaturated Metal Sites on Silica: Insights from DFT Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ujjal; Zhang, Guanghui; Hu, Bo; Hock, Adam S.; Redfern, Paul C.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silica (SiO2) is commonly used as a support in heterogeneous catalysis. However, due to the structural disorder and temperature induced change of surface morphology, the structures of silica supported metal catalysts are difficult to determine. Most studies are primarily focused on understanding the interactions of different types of surface hydroxyl groups with metal ions. In comparison, the effect of siloxane ring size on the structure of silica supported metal catalysts and how it affects catalytic activity is poorly understood. Here, we have used density functional theory calculations to understand the effect of siloxane ring strain on structure and activity of different monomeric Lewis acid metal sites on silica. In particular, we have found that large siloxane rings favor strong dative bonding interaction between metal ion and surface hydroxyls, leading to the formation of high-coordinate metal sites. In comparison, metal-silanol interaction is weak in small siloxane rings, resulting in low-coordinate metal sites. The physical origin of this size dependence is associated with siloxane ring strain, and, a correlation between metal-silanol interaction energy and ring strain energy has been observed. In addition to ring strain, the strength of the metal-silanol interaction also depends on the positive charge density of the cations. In fact, a correlation also exists between metal-silanol interaction energy and charge density of several first-row transition and post-transition metals. The theoretical results are compared with the EXAFS data of monomeric Zn(II) and Ga(III) ions grafted on silica. The molecular level insights of how metal ion coordination on silica depends on siloxane ring strain and cation charge density will be useful in the synthesis of new catalysts.

  4. Paper based colorimetric biosensing platform utilizing cross-linked siloxane as probe.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Miao; Yang, Minghui; Zhou, Feimeng

    2014-05-15

    Paper based colorimetric biosensing platform utilizing cross-linked siloxane 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTMS) as probe was developed for the detection of a broad range of targets including H2O2, glucose and protein biomarker. APTMS was extensively used for the modification of filter papers to develop paper based analytical devices. We discovered when APTMS was cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GA), the resulting complex (APTMS-GA) displays brick-red color, and a visual color change was observed when the complex reacted with H2O2. By integrating the APTMS-GA complex with filter paper, the modified paper enables quantitative detection of H2O2 through the monitoring of the color intensity change of the paper via software Image J. Then, with the immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOx) onto the modified paper, glucose can be detected through the detection of enzymatically generated H2O2. For protein biomarker prostate specific antigen (PSA) assay, we immobilized capture, not captured anti-PSA antibody (Ab1) onto the paper surface and using GOx modified gold nanorod (GNR) as detection anti-PSA antibody (Ab2) label. The detection of PSA was also achieved via the liberated H2O2 when the GOx label reacted with glucose. The results demonstrated the possibility of this paper based sensor for the detection of different analytes with wide linear range. The low cost and simplicity of this paper based sensor could be developed for "point-of-care" analysis and find wide application in different areas.

  5. Evaluation of adsorbents for volatile methyl siloxanes sampling based on the determination of their breakthrough volume.

    PubMed

    Lamaa, L; Ferronato, C; Fine, L; Jaber, F; Chovelon, J M

    2013-10-15

    Volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) have been detected in many different atmospheres such as biogas, sewage sludge, landfill gas, gasoline and ambient air. In these different atmospheres, their presence can involve several contamination problems and negative effects in industrial processes, their identification and quantification become a real challenge. Up to now there is no standardized procedure for VMS quantification, the sampling step remaining the major obstacle. Sampling gas through sorbent tube followed by analysis on TD-GC-MS is one of the reliable possibilities. It gathers sampling and preconcentration in one step and allows discrimination between all VMS, despite the difficulty to choose the appropriate adsorbent in order to avoid loss of analytes during sampling. In this context, this work deals with the comparison of different types of adsorbents based on the determination of the VMS breakthrough volume (BV). Although Tenax TA is the most widely used adsorbent, experiments show low BV values for the lightest VMS. At 25°C, the BV of TMS and L2 are, respectively, 0.2 and 0.44 L g(-1) which can contribute to an underestimation in concentration during their quantification. Carbosieve SIII usually used for C2-C5, did not adsorb light VMS as it was expected, and breakthrough volume obtained for VMS are more than ten times less than the values obtained for Tenax. On other hand, Chromosorb 106 and Carboxen 1000 in association with Carbotrap C and Carbotrap proved to be appropriated for VMS sampling, due to the high breakthrough volumes obtained for the lightest compounds comparing to the other adsorbents. The BVs of TMS for Carboxen 1000 and Chromosorb 106 are 1.2 × 10(4) and 39 L g(-1), respectively, and 49 × 10(4) and 1142 L g(-1) for L2, respectively.

  6. Development of Magnesium and Siloxane-Containing Vaterite and Its Composite Materials for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shinya; Obata, Akiko; Maeda, Hirotaka; Ota, Yoshio; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel biomaterials with Mg2+, Ca2+, and silicate ions releasability for bone regeneration is now in progress. Several inorganic ions have been reported to stimulate bone-forming cells. We featured Ca2+, silicate, and especially, Mg2+ ions as growth factors for osteoblasts. Various biomaterials, such as ceramic powders and organic–inorganic composites, that release the ions, have been developed and investigated for their cytocompatibilities in our previous work. Through the investigation, providing the three ions was found to be effective to activate osteogenic cells. Magnesium and siloxane-­containing vaterite was prepared by a carbonation process as an inorganic particle that can has the ability to simultaneously release Ca2+, silicate, and Mg2+ ions to biodegradable polymers. Poly (l-lactic acid) (PLLA)- and bioactive PLLA-based composites containing vaterite coatings were discussed regarding their degradability and cytocompatibility using a metallic Mg substrate as Mg2+ ion source. PLLA/SiV composite film, which has a releasability of silicate ions besides Ca2+ ion, was coated on a pure Mg substrate to be compared with the PLLA/V coating. The degradability and releasability of inorganic ions were morphologically and quantitatively monitored in a cell culture medium. The bonding strength between the coatings and Mg substrates was one of the key factors to control Mg2+ ion release from the substrates. The cell culture tests were conducted using mouse osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1 cells); cellular morphology, proliferation, and differentiation on the materials were evaluated. The PLLA/V and PLLA/SiV coatings on Mg substrates were found to enhance the proliferation, especially the PLLA/SiV coating possessed a higher ability to induce the osteogenic differentiation of the cells. PMID:26697421

  7. Comparison of Dimensional Accuracies Using Two Elastomeric Impression Materials in Casting Three-dimensional Tool Marks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two types of impression materials which were frequently used for casting three-dimensional tool marks in China, namely (i) dental impression material and (ii) special elastomeric impression material for tool mark casting. The two different elastomeric impression materials were compared under equal conditions. The parameters measured were dimensional accuracies, the number of air bubbles, the ease of use, and the sharpness and quality of the individual characteristics present on casts. The results showed that dental impression material had the advantage of special elastomeric impression material in casting tool marks in crime scenes; hence, it combined ease of use, dimensional accuracy, sharpness and high quality.

  8. Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol and method of making same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L. C.; Sheibley, D. W.; Philipp, W. H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A film-forming polyvinyl alcohol polymer is mixed with a polyaldehyde-polysaccharide cross-linking agent having at least two monosaccharide units and a plurality of aldehyde groups per molecule, perferably an average of at least one aldehyde group per monosaccharide units. The cross-linking agent, such as a polydialdehyde starch, is used in an amount of about 2.5 to 20% of the theoretical amount required to cross-link all of the available hydroxyl groups of the polyvinyl alcohol polymer. Reaction between the polymer and cross-linking agent is effected in aqueous acidic solution to produce the cross-linked polymer. The polymer product has low electrical resistivity and other properties rendering it suitable for making separators for alkaline batteries.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of high-performance polymeric materials: Part I. Silphenylene-siloxanes. Part II. Biodegradable films from gelatins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruzhi

    Poly(tetramethyl-m-silphenylene-siloxane) (PTMMS) has been successfully synthesized from m-bis(dimethylhydroxysilyl)benzene in a step-growth polymerization using n-hexylamine 2-ethylhexoate as the catalyst. The glass transition temperature of PTMMS is -52 °C, but no melting temperature was detected by DSC. TGA measurements revealed excellent high-temperature properties under nitrogen or air. Random copolymers of tetramethyl-p-silphenylene-siloxane and tetramethyl-m-silphenylene-siloxane were synthesized through condensation copolymerization. Alternating copolymers were prepared through dehydrogenation polymerization. The physical properties can be adjusted from those of a crystalline polymer to those of an amorphous, elastomeric polymer by increasing the amount of the meta comonomer. Thermal studies revealed that these copolymers possess excellent thermal stability. PTMMS has been successfully cross-linked by UV irradiation under air or argon in the presence of benzophenone. Mechanical properties of PTMMS networks were studied by equilibrium stress-strain measurements, and the cross-link density was estimated by means of the Mooney-Rivlin equation. TGA studies revealed that PTMMS elastomers have excellent thermal and thermo-oxidative stabilities. Dehydrogenation polymerization of bis-silanes and disilanols to silphenylenesiloxane polymers through the formation of Si-O-Si bonds as mediated by a rhodium complex was successfully developed. Coordination polymerization using Wilkinson's catalyst provided high molecular weight polymers in high yield at room temperature in an open system. Octamethylcyclo-di(meta-silphenylenesiloxane) (cyclic meta-dimer) was synthesized as the dominant cyclic oligomer product from 1,3--bis(dimethylhydroxysilyl)benzene using 4-dimethylaminopyridine as the catalyst in a dilute THF solution. The X-ray structure of the cyclic meta-dimer was obtained and the Si-O-Si bond angle is 142.1°. The attempted ring-opening polymerization of cyclic

  10. Structural-mechanical and thermophysical properties of modified polyvinyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordyuk, N. A.; Bestyuk, Yu. N.; Nikitchuk, V. I.; Kolupaev, B. S.

    1991-06-01

    On the basis of a systematic investigation of the viscoelastic properties of polyvinyl chloride filled with waste from mineral fertilizer and phosphoric acid production in the form of highly dispersed phospho-gypsum, the specific heat is calculated and the energy of interaction of the structural elements of the system matrix is determined, together with the effective thermal conductivity coefficient, with allowance for energy dissipation by the elements of the structure.

  11. Fluoroalkyl Siloxanes as Liquid-Repellent Fabric Finishes. Part 3. The Durability of the Copolymers and Comparisons with Commercially Available Finishes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    Availability Codes Avail and/or - Dist Special DEFENCE RESEARCH ESTABLISHMENT OTTAWA TECHNICAL NOTE 83- 4 PCN SPeptr I= 3 148 Otwa ABSTRACT -ln this report the...fluorinated alkyl silane §2 was utilized in P4, the phosphate resistance dropped from 9 to 4 . When a linear siloxane was used, P5, the phosphate ...and P6, on the other hand, maintained reasonable oil-repellency values of 4 /5-5/6. For the siloxanes, no values of phosphate resistance higher than 1

  12. Stability of polyvinyl alcohol-coated biochar nanoparticles in brine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Christopher; Daigle, Hugh

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the dispersion stability of 150 nm polyvinyl alcohol coated biochar nanoparticles in brine water. Biochar is a renewable, carbon based material that is of significant interest for enhanced oil recovery operations primarily due to its wide ranging surface properties, low cost of synthesis, and low environmental toxicity. Nanoparticles used as stabilizing agents for foams (and emulsions) or in nanofluids have emerged as potential alternatives to surfactants for subsurface applications due to their improved stability at reservoir conditions. If, however, the particles are not properly designed, they are susceptible to aggregation because of the high salinity brines typical of oil and gas reservoirs. Attachment of polymers to the nanoparticle surface, through covalent bonds, provides steric stabilization, and is a necessary step. Our results show that as the graft density of polyvinyl alcohol increases, so too does the stability of nanoparticles in brine solutions. A maximum of 34 wt% of 50,000 Da polyvinyl alcohol was grafted to the particle surface, and the size of the particles was reduced from 3500 nm (no coating) to 350 nm in brine. After 24 h, the particles had a size of 500 nm, and after 48 h completely aggregated. 100,000 Da PVA coated at 24 wt% on the biochar particles were stable in brine for over 1 month with no change in mean particle size of 330 nm.

  13. DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF POLYVINYL ALCOHOL, POLY(METHYL METHACRYLATE), POLYVINYL BUTYRAL RESIN AND POLYIMIDE AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R

    2008-01-01

    Performance of materials and their compatibility determine the size of the electrical insulation in power equipment. For this reason dielectric properties of electrical insulation materials are needed for low temperature power applications. In this work we report the dielectric properties of four polymers: polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polyvinyl butyral resin (PVB), and polyimide (PI--Kapton\\textregistered). The dielectric measurements are performed with an electrical impedance analyzer in the frequency domain. The impedances are recorded in a cryocooler in the temperature range from 45K to 350K. The dielectric breakdown characteristics of the polymers are measured in a liquid nitrogen bath at atmospheric pressure. It is observed that PI and \\pmma\\ dissolved in toluene have the lowest dielectric losses for temperatures lower than $100\\ \\kelvin$. \\Blx\\ and PI have the smallest spread in their breakdown strength data.

  14. Formation of Linear Polyenes in Thermal Dehydration of Polyvinyl Alcohol, Catalyzed by Phosphotungstic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretinnikov, O. N.; Sushko, N. I.

    2015-01-01

    In order to obtain linear polyenes in polyvinyl alcohol films via acid-catalyzed thermal dehydration of the polyvinyl alcohol, we used phosphotungstic acid as the catalyst: a safe and heat-stable solid chemical compound. We established that phosphotungstic acid, introduced as solid nanoparticles into polyvinyl alcohol films, is a more effective dehydration catalyst than hydrochloric acid, since in contrast to HCl it does not evaporate from the film during heat treatment.

  15. Ultrasonic monitoring of the setting of silicone elastomeric impression materials.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Chie; Murayama, Ryosuke; Furuichi, Tetsuya; Imai, Arisa; Suda, Shunichi; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2017-01-31

    This study used an ultrasonic measurement device to monitor the setting behavior of silicone elastomeric impression materials, and the influence of temperature on setting behavior was determined. The ultrasonic device consisted of a pulser-receiver, transducers, and an oscilloscope. The two-way transit time through the mixing material was divided by two to account for the down-and-back travel path; then it was multiplied by the sonic velocity. Analysis of variance and the Tukey honest significant difference test were used. In the early stages of the setting process, most of the ultrasonic energy was absorbed by the elastomers and the second echoes were relatively weak. As the elastomers hardened, the sonic velocities increased until they plateaued. The changes in sonic velocities varied among the elastomers tested, and were affected by temperature conditions. The ultrasonic method used in this study has considerable potential for determining the setting processes of elastomeric impression materials.

  16. Cervicovertebral anomalies and basilar impression in Goldenhar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gosain, A K; McCarthy, J G; Pinto, R S

    1994-03-01

    Although previously unreported, neurologic compromise may occur secondary to anomalies of the cervical spine in the oculoauriculovertebral spectrum. Medical records and cephalograms were reviewed from 18 patients with classic Goldenhar syndrome and from 18 normal adults. One patient, a 22-year-old man, had experienced a 5-year history of progressive neurologic compromise from basilar impression; the remaining 17 patients were asymptomatic. Radiographic evidence of cervicovertebral fusion was documented in 11 of 18 patients (61 percent). Fusion occurred at every cervical level other than the atlantoaxial joint. Radiographic indices that characterize the cranial base were not significantly different between asymptomatic Goldenhar patients and normal adults. Posterior inclination of the odontoid with respect to the foramen magnum appears to be the best indicator that a patient is at risk for basilar impression. Careful radiographic evaluation may indicate which patients require more careful surveillance with periodic neurologic examination and CT and/or MRI scans.

  17. Basilar impression and platybasia in osteogenesis imperfecta tarda.

    PubMed

    Frank, E; Berger, T; Tew, J M

    1982-02-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, a rare, genetically transmitted disorder of bone, is known to be associated with the development of basilar impression and platybasia. These deformities of the base of the skull may cause neurosurgical abnormalities secondary to compression of the brainstem and hydrocephalus. The case is presented of a young boy with a family history of osteogenesis imperfecta tarda who suffered respiratory arrest during hospitalization. Cranial nerves and pyramidal tract signs were demonstrated. Roentgenograms showed severe basilar impression and hydrocephalus. Decompression of the brainstem and shunting were performed with improvement in the patient's neurological status. This case represents a rare by significant central nervous system complication of osteogenesis imperfecta. Early recognition and implementation of aggressive treatment are important if irreversible neurological deficits are to be avoided.

  18. Exercise promotes positive impression formation towards both men and women.

    PubMed

    Kanarek, Robin B; Mathes, Wendy Foulds; D'Anci, Kristen E

    2012-06-01

    Exercise is endorsed for its physiological and psychological benefits, and has been proposed to have positive effects on impression formation. To test this proposal, 62 female and 44 male college students read one of three brief descriptions of either a fictitious male or female "target" student. The descriptions varied only in exercise level: no exercise; moderate exercise and intensive exercise. Participants then rated the fictitious student on 38 personality traits. Ratings of characteristics that are associated with exercise (e.g. athletic; energetic) increased, while ratings associated with the lack of exercise (e.g. lazy; weak) decreased as a function of the reported level of exercise. Exercise level also positively influenced ratings of characteristics not related to exercise. These data show that even minimal information about exercise is an important component of first impressions in both men and women.

  19. Age and forgetfulness: managing perceivers' impressions of targets' capability.

    PubMed

    Erber, J T; Caiola, M A; Pupo, F A

    1994-12-01

    Two experiments investigated the effect of positive endorsement on perceivers' impressions of young and old female targets. In Experiment 1, 160 young adult perceivers listened to a tape of a young or old forgetful target being interviewed for a volunteer job. They read a nonelaborative or elaborative reference letter for the target either before or after listening to the tape. Perceivers who read the elaborative letter after listening to the tape rated themselves as more likely to assign tasks to both young and old targets and had a higher general capability opinion of old targets. In Experiment 2, 84 older adult perceivers read an elaborative letter and listened to one of the same taped interviews. Reading the letter after the tape resulted in higher task ratings than reading it before the tape, but letter order had no effect on general capability ratings. Results are discussed in terms of impression management.

  20. Dimensional stability of silicone-based impression materials.

    PubMed

    Fano, V; Gennari, P U; Ortalli, I

    1992-03-01

    This study attempts to demonstrate that the polymerization reaction is not the only factor that affects the shrinkage of silicone-based impression materials because evaporation of the constituents also contributes to the shrinkage. These factors can be evaluated by the study of time-dependent dimensional changes. This is shown both by chemical kinetics and by experimental testing of condensation and addition polymerizing impression materials with different viscosities. Comparison of the different materials shows that the two contributions, polymerization shrinkage, and evaporation shrinkage, can be assessed separately by analysis of the time-dependent shrinkage diagrams. The instability due to the polymerization reaction is complete after a few hours, but the contribution of the constituent evaporation, if present, can have a significant long-term role.

  1. An evaluation of three implant level impression techniques for single tooth implant.

    PubMed

    Daoudi, M Firas; Setchell, Derrick J; Searson, Lloyd J

    2004-03-01

    This laboratory study investigated the hypotheses that there is no difference between three implant level impression techniques using vinyl polysiloxane impression material. The tested techniques were 1)- the repositioning technique. 2)-The pickup technique. 3)- The pickup technique with the impression copings splinted to the impression trays with autopolymerising acrylic resin. The Reflex Microscope was used for 3D measurement of distances and angles. Analysis of variance and Tukey's multiple comparisons test were applied to analyse the data. The results showed significant differences in implant analogue position with the repositioning and the pickup (unsplinted) impression techniques from the master model. Alarming rotational errors were recorded with the repositioning and the pickup (unsplinted) techniques. However, connecting the impression coping to the impression tray improves the accuracy of the pickup impression technique.

  2. The Role of Profanity and Sex Variables in Interpersonal Impression Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Marshall M.; Saine, Thomas J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses a study designed to identify areas of research which may increase under standing of the relationship between speaker profanity and impression formation. Provides an experimental test of the predicted interrelationships between profanity, sex variables, and impression formation. (MH)

  3. An evaluation of impression techniques for osseointegrated implants.

    PubMed

    Spector, M R; Donovan, T E; Nicholls, J I

    1990-04-01

    A passive fit between osseointegrated implants and the prosthesis they will support has been advocated. An experimental model was developed to test the accuracy of three impression techniques and the components used to make the transfer records. Statistically, no significant difference was found between the three methods tested. From this initial study, it appears that further work is needed to isolate techniques that will predictably provide accurate registration of the position of endosseous implants.

  4. Evaluation of transfer impressions for osseointegrated implants at various angulations.

    PubMed

    Assuncao, Wirley Gonçalves; Filho, Humberto Gennari; Zaniquelli, Osvaldo

    2004-12-01

    The accuracy of impressions that transfer the relationship of the implant to the metal framework of the prosthesis continues to be a problem. This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of the transfer process under variable conditions with regard to implant analog angulations, impression materials, and techniques. Replicas (n = 60) of a metal matrix (control) containing four implants at 90 degrees , 80 degrees , 75 degrees , and 65 degrees in relation to the horizontal surface were obtained by using three impression techniques: T1-indirect technique with conical copings in closed trays; T2-direct technique with square copings in open trays; and T3-square copings splinted with autopolymerizing acrylic resin; and four elastomers: "P"-polysulfide; "I"-polyether; "A"-addition silicone; and "Z"-condensation silicone. The values of the implant analog angulations were assessed by a profilometer to the nearest 0.017 degrees , then submitted to analysis of variance for comparisons at significance of 5% (P < .05). For implant analog at 90 degrees , the material "A" associated with T2 and material "Z" with T3 behaved differently (P < .05) from all groups. At 80 degrees , all materials behaved differently (P < .01) with T1. At 75 degrees , when T1 was associated, materials "P" and "A" showed similar behavior, as well as materials "I" and "Z"; however, "P" and "A" were different from "I" and "Z" (P < .01). When T3 was associated, all experimental groups behaved differently among them (P < .01). At 65 degrees , the materials "P" and "Z" behaved differently (P < .01) from the control group with T1, T2, and T3; the materials "I" and "A" behaved differently from the control group (P < .01) when T1 and T2, respectively, were associated. The more perpendicular the implant analog angulation is in relation to the horizontal surface, the more accurate the impression. The best materials were material "I" and "A" and the most satisfactory technique was technique 3.

  5. [The clinical picture and course in basilar impression].

    PubMed

    Scharf, J; Hohagen, F; Rittmann, M; Reuther, R

    1989-09-01

    We have reviewed 29 cases of patients who suffered from basilar impression and had undergone hospital treatment since 1969. 12 of these patients were reexamined. The predominant symptoms were lesions of the long tracts while the ,,classical signs" such as headache and nystagmus occurred less frequently than expected. Only a quarter of our patients showed a marked deterioration during follow-up. The outcome for four patients who underwent operation is reported.

  6. Tensile bond strength between custom tray and elastomeric impression material.

    PubMed

    Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Oka, Morihiko; Minagi, Shogo; Irie, Masao; Suzuki, Kazuomi

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how to achieve sufficient and stable adhesive strength between impression material and tray. Impression materials were molded between autopolymerizing resin columns, and tensile strength was measured as a function of these factors: tray storage time (1, 2, 4, 7, and 10 days), adhesive drying time (0, 1, 5, 10, and 15 minutes), and tray surface roughness (air abrasion, bur-produced roughness, and no treatment). Tensile bond strength was not affected by tray storage time throughout the entire evaluation period of 10 days. As for tray adhesive drying time, Reprosil and Exaimplant yielded extremely low values for drying times of 10 minutes or less (P<0.05), while Imprint II and Impregum were not influenced by drying time. Vinyl polysiloxane achieved the highest adhesive strength with bur-produced roughness, which was significantly higher than with air abrasion or no treatment (P<0.05), whereas polyether achieved the lowest value with bur-produced roughness (P<0.05). It was concluded that surface treatment of custom tray should be adapted to the type of impression material used to achieve optimum bond strength.

  7. Effect of Time on Gypsum-Impression Material Compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, John Boram

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of dental gypsum with three recently introduced irreversible hydrocolloid (alginate) alternatives. The test materials were Alginot® (Kerr™), Position Penta Quick® (3M ESPE™) and Silgimix ® (Sultan Dental™). The irreversible hydrocolloid impression material, Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial® (Dentsply Caulk™) served as the control. Materials and Methods: Testing of materials was conducted in accordance with ANSI/ADA Specification No. 18 for Alginate Impression Materials. Statistical Analysis: The 3-Way ANOVA test was used to analyze measurements between different time points at a significance level of (p < 0.05). Outcome: It was found that there was greater compatibility between gypsum and the alternative materials over time than the traditional irreversible hydrocolloid material that was tested. A statistically significant amount of surface change/incompatibility was found over time with the combination of the dental gypsum products and the control impression material (Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial®).

  8. Self-presentational persona: simultaneous management of multiple impressions.

    PubMed

    Leary, Mark R; Allen, Ashley Batts

    2011-11-01

    Most research on self-presentation has examined how people convey images of themselves on only 1 or 2 dimensions at a time. In everyday interactions, however, people often manage their impressions on several image-relevant dimensions simultaneously. By examining people's self-presentations to several targets across multiple dimensions, these 2 studies offer new insights into the nature of self-presentation and provide a novel paradigm for studying impression management. Results showed that most people rely on a relatively small number of basic self-presentational personas in which they convey particular profiles of impressions as a set and that these personas reflect both normative influences to project images that are appropriate to a particular target and distinctive influences by which people put an idiosyncratic spin on these normative images. Furthermore, although people's self-presentational profiles correlate moderately with their self-views, they tailor their public images to specific targets. The degree to which participants' self-presentations were normative and distinctive, as well as the extent to which they reflected their own self-views, were moderated by individual differences in agreeableness, self-esteem, authenticity, and Machiavellianism.

  9. Estimation of stature from hand impression: a nonconventional approach.

    PubMed

    Ahemad, Nasir; Purkait, Ruma

    2011-05-01

    Stature is used for constructing a biological profile that assists with the identification of an individual. So far, little attention has been paid to the fact that stature can be estimated from hand impressions left at scene of crime. The present study based on practical observations adopted a new methodology of measuring hand length from the depressed area between hypothenar and thenar region on the proximal surface of the palm. Stature and bilateral hand impressions were obtained from 503 men of central India. Seventeen dimensions of hand were measured on the impression. Linear regression equations derived showed hand length followed by palm length are best estimates of stature. Testing the practical utility of the suggested method on latent prints of 137 subjects, a statistically insignificant result was obtained when known and estimated stature derived from latent prints was compared. The suggested approach points to a strong possibility of its usage in crime scene investigation, albeit the fact that validation studies in real-life scenarios are performed.

  10. Durable and Hydrophobic Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Coatings via Fluoride Rearrangement of Phenyl T12 Silsesquioxane and Siloxanes.

    PubMed

    Krug, David J; Laine, Richard M

    2017-03-08

    There have been many successful efforts to enhance the water shedding properties of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic coatings, but durability is often a secondary concern. Here, we describe durable and hydrophobic coatings prepared via fluoride catalyzed rearrangement reaction of dodecaphenylsilsesquioxane [PhSiO1.5]12 (DDPS) with octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4). Hydrophobic properties and wear resistance are maximized by incorporating both low surface energy moieties and cross-linkable moieties into the siloxane network. Water contact angles as high as 150 ± 4° were achieved even after 150 wear cycles with SiC sandpaper (2000 grit, 2 kPa). These hybrid organic-inorganic copolymers also have high thermal stabilities after curing at 250 °C (Td5% ≥ 340 °C in air) due to the siloxane network with a maximum Td5% of >460 °C measured for the system with the highest silsesquioxane content. The coating systems presented here offer a unique combination of hydrophobicity and mechanical/thermal stability and could greatly expand the utility of water repellent coatings.

  11. Computer-Mediated Impression Formation: A Test of the Sticky Cues Model Using Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Heide, Brandon Lee

    2009-01-01

    This research offers a model of online impression formation that explains how different impression-bearing cues may carry more or less informational value. This research considers the possibility that impression-bearing cues have greater informational value when those cues are distinctive and are task-relevant. This research refers to such cues as…

  12. 21 CFR 872.3661 - Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM. 872.3661... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3661 Optical Impression Systems for CAD... (CAD/CAM) is a device used to record the topographical characteristics of teeth, dental impressions,...

  13. Synthesis and characterization of poly(silyl ether)s and modified poly(siloxane)s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabry, Joseph Mark

    Activated dihydridocarbonyltris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium ( Ru) catalyzes the dehydrogenative silylation condensation copolymerization of ortho-quinones with alpha,o-dihydrido-oligodimethylsiloxanes to give high molecular weight copoly(arylene-1,2-dioxy/oligodimethylsiloxanylene)s in good chemical yield. The hydrosilylation polymerization of aliphatic o-dimethylsilyloxy ketones is also catalyzed by activated Ru to yield unsymmetrical poly(silyl ether)s. Likewise, Ru catalyzes the copolymerization of alpha,o-diketones with alpha,o-dihydrido-oligodimethylsiloxanes to yield symmetrical poly(silyl ether)s. A mechanism of the copolymerizations is proposed, in which beta-hydride elimination is favored over reductive elimination in the reaction of the ortho-quinones. Chiral centers affect the NMR spectra of the poly(silyl ether)s produced by hydrosilylation. The photoluminescence properties of the polymers were studied along with those of model compounds. The decrease in Tgs with increase in siloxane chain length as well as fluorescence spectra is discussed. RuH2(CO)(PPh3)3 (Ru), activated with a stoichiometric amount of styrene, catalyzes the anti-Markovnikov addition of an ortho C-H bond of benzophenone across the C-C double bonds of alpha,o-bis(trimethylsilyloxy)copoly(dimethylsiloxane/vinylmethylsiloxane), alpha,o-bis(vinyldimethsilyloxy)poly(dimethylsiloxane)s, and 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane to yield alpha,o-bis(trimethylsilyloxy)copoly[dimethylsiloxane/2-(2 '-benzophenonyl)ethylmethylsiloxane]s, alpha,o-bis[2-(2 '-benzophenonyl)ethyldimethylsilyloxy]poly(dimethylsiloxane)s, and 1,3-bis[2-(2'-benzophenonyl)ethyl]tetramethyldisiloxane, respectively. While the Mw/Mn and Tgs of the modified polysiloxanes are similar to those of the precursor polymers, an increase in molecular weight is observed upon heating. 1,3-bis[2-(2 '-Benzophenonyl)ethyl]tetramethyldisiloxane, a model compound, was utilized to test a mechanism for the increase in molecular weight. A

  14. Study of the interocclusal distortion in impressions taken with different types of closed-mouth trays and two types of impression materials.

    PubMed

    Mañes-Ferrer, José-Félix; Selva-Otaolaurruchi, Eduardo-José; Parra-Arenós, Carmina; Selfa-Bas, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different types of impression trays for the closed-mouth impression technique, using two different types of impression material. For this study, five different types of impression trays were used with two different types of impression materials, one of addition silicone and the other of polyether. We designed a model used for taking the impressions and for measuring interocclusal distortion. The results obtained show that the impression trays COE (GC (R) GC America INC. Alsip) and Premier (Premier (R), Premier Dental Products Co. Canada) show a lesser degree of interocclusal distortion when taking closed-mouth impressions. In terms of impression materials, the polyether was the one that produced the best results. From a clinical point of view, our study shows that the use of these types of trays is absolutely recommendable when used according to the clinical indications for which they have been designed; that said, we must not fail to consider that selecting the proper type of tray is also important.

  15. 40 CFR 721.9516 - Siloxanes and silicones, 3-[(2-aminoethyl) amino]propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol Bu glycidal ether. 721.9516 Section... Substances § 721.9516 Siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene..., reaction products with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol Bu glycidyl ether (PMN P-97-740; CAS No....

  16. 40 CFR 721.9516 - Siloxanes and silicones, 3-[(2-aminoethyl) amino]propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol Bu glycidal ether. 721.9516 Section... Substances § 721.9516 Siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene..., reaction products with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol Bu glycidyl ether (PMN P-97-740; CAS No....

  17. 40 CFR 721.9516 - Siloxanes and silicones, 3-[(2-aminoethyl) amino]propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol Bu glycidal ether. 721.9516 Section... Substances § 721.9516 Siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene..., reaction products with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol Bu glycidyl ether (PMN P-97-740; CAS No....

  18. 40 CFR 721.9516 - Siloxanes and silicones, 3-[(2-aminoethyl) amino]propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol Bu glycidal ether. 721.9516 Section... Substances § 721.9516 Siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene..., reaction products with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol Bu glycidyl ether (PMN P-97-740; CAS No....

  19. 40 CFR 721.9516 - Siloxanes and silicones, 3-[(2-aminoethyl) amino]propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol Bu glycidal ether. 721.9516 Section... Substances § 721.9516 Siloxanes and silicones, 3- propyl Me, di-Me, reaction products with polyethylene..., reaction products with polyethylene-polypropylene glycol Bu glycidyl ether (PMN P-97-740; CAS No....

  20. Innovative Two-Part Impression Technique for an Extensive Maxillary Defect.

    PubMed

    Soofi, Zahid Iqbal; Yazdanie, Nazia; Kazmi, Syed Murtaza Raza

    2015-10-01

    Patients reporting with large maxillary defects pose great difficulty in prosthodontic practice. After thorough history and clinical examination, prosthetic rehabilitation of these patients usually starts with an impression. In such cases conventional single step impression technique solely may not give the desired results. If the defect is of large size then impression making becomes difficult and complicated procedure. Therefore, conventional impression technique can be modified according to the needs and requirements. This report describes a modified and innovative technique of making impression in two parts, which can be withdrawn from mouth in two segments and easily reoriented outside the mouth.

  1. Continuous microcellular foaming of polyvinyl chloride and compatibilization of polyvinyl chloride and polylactide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Bhavesh

    This dissertation focuses on overcoming existing limitations of WPCs which prevent them from realizing their full market potential. These limitations include: (i) lack of a continuous extrusion process for microcellular foaming of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and its composites using supercritical fluids to reduce the high density of the WPCs, (ii) need for an efficient coupling agent for WPCs to overcome the poor compatibility between wood and plastic, and (iii) unproven use of wood as a filler for the biopolymer polylactide (PLA) to make "green" composites. These limitations were addressed through experimentation to develop a continuous extrusion process for microcellular foaming, and through surface modification of wood flour using natural coupling agents. The effects of wood flour, acrylic modifier and plasticizer content on the rheological properties of PVC based WPCs were studied using an extrusion capillary rheometer and a two-level factorial design. Wood flour content and acrylic modifier content were the major factors affecting the die swell ratio. Addition of plasticizer decreased the true viscosity of unfilled and filled PVC, irrespective of the acrylic modifier content. However, the addition of acrylic modifier significantly increased the viscosity of unfilled PVC but decreased the composite viscosity. Results of the rheological study were used to set baseline conditions for the continuous extrusion foaming of PVC WPCs using supercritical CO 2. Effects of material composition and processing conditions on the morphology of foamed samples were investigated. Foamed samples were produced using various material compositions and processing conditions, but steady-state conditions could not be obtained for PVC. Thus the relationships could not be determined. Incompatibility between wood flour and PVC was the focus of another study. The natural polymers chitin and chitosan were used as novel coupling agents to improve interfacial adhesion between the polymer matrix

  2. Electrical and Thermal Properties of Polyvinyl Acetal Based Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Tuncer, Enis; Polyzos, Georgios; Pace, Marshall O

    2009-10-01

    A water chemistry procedure is used to synthesize titanium dioxide nanoparticles which can later be blended with a polymer to form a nanodielectric. The synthesized nanoparticles are dispersed in two grades of polyvinyl acetal (commercially available under the trade names BX-L and KS-10, manufactured by SEKISUI Chemicals). Nanocomposite materials were prepared with 15 and 33 wt% titanium dioxide. The variation of the glass transition temperature with increasing filler weight fraction is presented. The dielectric breakdown strengths of the nanodielectric samples are reported. The presented results can be employed to optimize the dielectric properties of the studied nanocomposites for potential use in cryogenic high voltage applications.

  3. Polyvinyl alcohol doped with nickel chloride hexahydrate as conductor polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Limon, B.; Olivares-Perez, Arturo; Silva-Andrade, F.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.; Ibarra-Torres, Juan Carlos

    2004-06-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol is a viscous solution, with blue clear appearance, not has odor, when is deposited, as a film dry the appearance is clear transparent and has high flexibility. This polymer no has double link and don not has p orbital that permit the conductivity. However, can be doped with salts as ammonium dichromate and nickel chloride hexahydrate NiCl26H2O constructing a good conductor polymer with a resistivity around 300 ohms cm. Conserving the high flexibility opened new possibilities and applications.

  4. Impression Procedures for Metal Frame Removable Partial Dentures as Applied by General Dental Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Fokkinga, Wietske A; van Uchelen, Judith; Witter, Dick J; Mulder, Jan; Creugers, Nico H J

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study analyzed impression procedures for conventional metal frame removable partial dentures (RPDs). Heads of RPD departments of three dental laboratories were asked to record features of all incoming impressions for RPDs during a 2-month period. Records included: (1) impression procedure, tray type (stock/custom), impression material (elastomer/alginate), use of border-molding material (yes/no); and (2) RPD type requested (distal-extension/tooth-bounded/combination). Of the 132 total RPD impressions, 111 (84%) involved custom trays, of which 73 (55%) were combined with an elastomer. Impression border-molding material was used in 4% of the cases. Associations between impression procedure and RPD type or dentists' year/university of graduation were not found.

  5. A comparison of dimensional accuracy between three different addition cured silicone impression materials.

    PubMed

    Forrester-Baker, L; Seymour, K G; Samarawickrama, D; Zou, L; Cherukara, G; Patel, M

    2005-06-01

    Ten impressions of a metal implant abutment were made with each of three addition-cured silicone impression materials. Using the technique of co-ordinate metrology, the shoulder region of the abutment and corresponding regions of both impressions and dies made from these impressions were scanned and measured. Comparison of these measurements indicated that the mean dimension measured from the shoulder region for each group of impression materials was significantly different from those taken from the original metal implant abutment. However, when these impressions were cast in a gypsum based die material, none of the measured dimensions taken from the casts were significantly different from those taken from the original metal implant abutment. Thus, any change in measured dimensions occurring during impression making, was compensated for in some way by the casting process.

  6. An Approach for Impression Creep of Lead Free Microelectronic Solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasio, Onofrio A.

    2002-06-01

    Currently, the microelectronics industry is transitioning from lead-containing to lead-free solders in response to legislation in the EU and Japan. Before an alternative alloy can be designated as a replacement for current Pb-Sn extensive testing must be accomplished. One major characteristic of the alloy that must be considered is creep. Traditionally, creep testing requires numerous samples and a long tin, which thwarts the generation of comprehensive creep databases for difficult to prepare samples such as microelectronic solder joints. However, a relatively new technique, impression creep enables us to rapidly generate creep data. This test uses a cylindrical punch with a flat end to make an impression on the surface of a specimen under constant load. The steady state velocity of the indenter is found to have the same stress and temperature dependence as the conventional unidirectional creep test using bulk specimens. This thesis examines impression creep tests of eutectic Sn-Ag. A testing program and apparatus was developed constructed based on a servo hydraulic test frame. The apparatus is capable of a load resolution of 0.01N with a stability of plus/minus 0.1N, and a displacement resolution of 0.05 microns with a stability of plus/minus 0.1 microns. Samples of eutectic Sn-Ag solder were reflowed to develop the microstructure used in microelectronic packaging. Creep tests were conducted at various stresses and temperatures and showed that coarse microstructures creep more rapidly than the microstructures in the tested regime.

  7. 40 CFR 61.64 - Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... chloride plants. 61.64 Section 61.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.64 Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants. An owner or operator of a polyvinyl chloride plant shall comply with the requirements of this section and § 61.65....

  8. 40 CFR 61.64 - Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... chloride plants. 61.64 Section 61.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.64 Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants. An owner or operator of a polyvinyl chloride plant shall comply with the requirements of this section and § 61.65....

  9. 40 CFR 61.64 - Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... chloride plants. 61.64 Section 61.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.64 Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants. An owner or operator of a polyvinyl chloride plant shall comply with the requirements of this section and § 61.65....

  10. 40 CFR 61.64 - Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... chloride plants. 61.64 Section 61.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.64 Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants. An owner or operator of a polyvinyl chloride plant shall comply with the requirements of this section and § 61.65....

  11. 40 CFR 61.64 - Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... chloride plants. 61.64 Section 61.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Standard for Vinyl Chloride § 61.64 Emission standard for polyvinyl chloride plants. An owner or operator of a polyvinyl chloride plant shall comply with the requirements of this section and § 61.65....

  12. 77 FR 14342 - Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan: Correction to Notice of Opportunity To Request Administrative Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan: Correction to Notice of Opportunity To Request... antidumping duty order on polyvinyl alcohol from Taiwan. See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty Order,...

  13. Basilar Invagination, Basilar Impression, and Platybasia: Clinical and Imaging Aspects.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; McVige, Jennifer; Mechtler, Laszlo

    2016-08-01

    The congenital and acquired deformities of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ), such as basilar invagination, basilar impression, or platybasia, can present in the form of slowly progressive or acute neurologic deterioration. In many cases, an insidious headache is the only symptom and can be a diagnostic challenge for the neurologist. Proper imaging studies as well as recognizing often associated neurologic or systemic conditions are required for early diagnosis and effective therapy. In the current report, the primary focus will be on clinical aspects of these CVJ abnormalities; the pathologic and radiologic aspects, such as developmental and pathophysiologic background or radiographic analysis, will be discussed briefly, confined to clinically relevant data.

  14. [Clinical radiographic features of basilar impression (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Scotti, G; Redaelli, M R

    1978-09-01

    After a review of the literature and an analysis of the clinical and radiographic features of basilar impression (b.i.) the authors describe 27 personal cases. In 6 b.i. was present in its pure form and in 21 it was associated with other anomalies at the cranio-vertebral junction. Because of the frequent misdiagnosis with multiple sclerosis or other chronic neurologic diseases and because of the possible improvement of symptoms following decompressive occipital craniectomy and cervical laminectomy, the importance of a correct and complete radiographic study of the cranio-vertebral junction in these cases is stressed.

  15. The operative management of basilar impression in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Harkey, H L; Crockard, H A; Stevens, J M; Smith, R; Ransford, A O

    1990-11-01

    Four patients with osteogenesis imperfecta and neurologically significant basilar impression have been treated over the past 8 years. The experience has resulted in changes in our therapeutic strategy for this particularly difficult problem. These cases are discussed with respect to the disease process, neurological involvement, radiological findings, and modes of surgical therapy. The errors in management as well as the success resulting from our learning experience are described. Currently, we recommend the extensive removal of the anterior bony compression by a transoral approach. This should be followed by a posterior rigid fixation that transfers the weight of the head to the thoracic spine, in an effort to prevent further basilar invagination.

  16. Use of Clinical UV Chamber to Disinfect Dental Impressions: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sakshi; Kumar, Varun; Gupta, Neelu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dental impressions are potential source of infection in a prosthodontic practice. Risk of transmission of infection through saliva, blood etc is considered as hazard for both dentist as well as dental auxiliary staff. A number of methods are currently employed for disinfecting the impressions which are technique sensitive and time consuming. This study focuses on disinfecting impression using dental UV chamber which is commonly employed for storing sterilized instruments. Aim The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate the use of clinical UV chamber to disinfect various impression materials at different time intervals and its comparison with 2% glutaraldehyde using standard immersion technique. Materials and Methods Total sample size of 180 specimens was taken from three different impression materials. The impressions were made from 30 dentulous subjects. A total of ten impressions were made for each impression material i.e. alginate, addition silicone and polyether impression material. Six punch samples were taken from each impression. Out of 6 punch sample, one was kept as control, second was disinfected by immersing in freshly prepared 2% glutaraldehyde solution for 10 minutes and remaining four were exposed to UV rays for 3 minutes, 6 minutes, 10 minutes and 15 minutes using dental UV chamber. Amount of disinfection achieved was evaluated by counting the colonies over the culture plates with the help of digital colony. Results The results showed that the mean CFUs for alginate were found to be i.e. 11797.40 ± 5989.73 (mean ± SD). The mean CFUs for addition silicone impression material was found 7095.40 with a standard deviation of 4268.83 and the mean CFUs for polyether impression material was found to be 2168.92 ± 1676 (mean ± SD). Conclusion For alginate and addition silicone impression material, disinfection was achieved on exposure to UV rays for a period of 10 minutes. However, for polyether impression material 3 minutes of exposure to

  17. Accuracy of five implant impression technique: effect of splinting materials and methods

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Bum

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dimensional stability of splinting material on the accuracy of master casts. MATERIALS AND METHODS A stainless steel metal model with 6 implants embedded was used as a master model. Implant level impressions were made after square impression copings were splinted using 5 different techniques as follows. (1) Splinted with autopolymerizing resin and sectioned, reconnected to compensate polymerization shrinkage before the impression procedure. (2) Splinted with autopolymerizing resin just before impression procedure. (3) Primary impression made with impression plaster and secondary impression were made over with polyether impression material. (4) Splinted with impression plaster. (5) Splinted with VPS bite registration material. From master model, 5 impressions and 5 experimental casts, total 25 casts were made for each of 5 splinting methods. The distortion values of each splinting methods were measured using coordinate measuring machine, capable of recordings in the x-, y-, z-axes. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a confidence level of 95% was used to evaluate the data and Tukey's studentized range test was used to determine significant differences between the groups. RESULTS Group 1 showed best accuracy followed by Group 3 & 4. Group 2 and 5 showed relatively larger distortion value than other groups. No significant difference was found between group 3, 4, 5 in x-axis, group 2, 3, 4 in y-axis and group 1, 3, 4, 5 in z-axis (P<.0001). CONCLUSION Both Splinting impression copings with autopolymerizing resin following compensation of polymerization shrinkage and splinting method with impression plaster can enhance the accuracy of master cast and impression plaster can be used simple and effective splinting material for implant impression procedure. PMID:22259700

  18. Preparation and application of low molecular weight poly(vinyl chloride). III mechanical properties of blended poly(vinyl chloride)

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kikuo; Maehala, Takashi; Mitani, Katsuo; Mizutani, Yukio )

    1993-11-05

    The blending effect of poly(vinyl chloride) with relatively higher molecular weight (HMW-PVC) and relatively lower molecular weight (LMW-PVC) has been investigated by measuring various mechanical properties: melt properties, tensile strength, tensile modulus, and impact strength. The blended PVC has slightly improved melt properties in comparison with the HMW-PVC used. The tensile strength of the blended PVC is related to the weight-average polymerization degree (Pw) of LMW-PVC and the LMW-PVC content. At the LMW-PVC content of 20%, the tensile strength of blended PVC is a maximum: approximately 58 MPa.

  19. 78 FR 37794 - Polyvinyl Alcohol from Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2010-2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... International Trade Administration Polyvinyl Alcohol from Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty... results of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) from Taiwan... February 29, 2012. \\1\\ See Polyvinyl Alcohol From Taiwan: Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

  20. Halloysite nanotube supported Ag nanoparticles heteroarchitectures as catalysts for polymerization of alkylsilanes to superhydrophobic silanol/siloxane composite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiping; Li, Xueyuan; Duan, Xuelan; Li, Guangjie; Wang, Jiaqiang

    2014-12-15

    Halloysite nanotube supported Ag nanoparticles heteroarchitectures have been prepared through a very simple electroless plating method. Robust Ag nanocrystals can be reproducibly fabricated by soaking halloysite nanotubes in ethanolic solutions of AgNO3 and butylamine. By simply adjusting the molar ratio of AgNO3 and butylamine, Ag nanoparticles with tunable size and quantity on halloysite nanotube are achieved. It reveals that the Ag nanoparticles are well-dispersed on the surface of halloysite nanotubes. The halloysite nanotube supported Ag nanoparticles heteroarchitectures can serve as active catalysts for the polymerization of an alkylsilane C18H37SiH3 with water to form silanol/siloxane composite microspheres and exhibit interesting superhydrophobicity ascribed to the micro/nanobinary structure.

  1. Preparation, characterization, and evaluation of a heparin-benzalkonium chloride-graphite oxide/polymethylvinyl siloxane nanocomposite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ninglin; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Yinchen; Yuan, Jiang; Shen, Jian

    2012-06-01

    A heparin (Hep)-benzalkonium chloride (C12)-graphite oxide (GO)/polymethylvinyl siloxane (PMVS) nancomposite was prepared via melting intercalation at different temperatures. Scanning electron microscopy images showed the Hep-C12-GO was well dispersed into PMVS processed at 100°C. Mechanical properties measurement demonstrated that the addition of Hep-C12-GO maintained its strength. XRD data indicated that Hep-C12-GO lost its layer structure completely. FTIR results suggested that Hep-C12-GO interacted with PMVS strongly. Antibacterial activity of resulting nanocomposite was evaluated using zone of inhibition and bacteria adhesion methods. The results demonstrated that Hep-C12-GO/PMVS had a good capability against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Antithrombogenic properties were assessed using platelet adhesion experiment and the results showed that Hep-C12-GO/PMVS was blood-compatible.

  2. Accessing siloxane functionalized polynorbornenes via vinyl-addition polymerization for CO2 separation membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Mahurin, Shannon Mark; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Saito, Tomonori; Long, Brian K.; Gmernicki, Kevin R.; Hong, Eunice; Maroon, Christopher R.

    2016-07-06

    Here, the vinyl addition polymerization of norbornylbased monomers bearing polar functional groups is often problematic, leading to low molecular weight polymers in poor yield. Herein, we provide proof-of-principle evidence that addition-type homopolymers of siloxane substituted norbornyl-based monomers may be readily synthesized using the catalyst trans-[Ni(C6F5)2(SbPh3)2]. Polymerizations using this catalyst reached moderate to high conversion in just 5 min of polymerization and produced siloxanesubstituted polymers with molecular weights exceeding 100 kg/mol. These polymers showed excellent thermal stability (Td ≥ 362 °C) and were cast into membranes that displayed high CO2 permeability and enhanced CO2/N2 selectivity as compared to related materials.

  3. Effects of positive impression management on the Psychopathic Personality Inventory.

    PubMed

    Edens, J F; Buffington, J K; Tomicic, T L; Riley, B D

    2001-06-01

    The Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; S. O. Lilienfeld & B. P. Andrews, 1996) is a self-report test that has shown considerable promise as a screening measure for psychopathy. A current limitation of the PPI is that no data exist regarding the impact of response sets such as positive impression management. Although the PPI contains a validity scale (Unlikely Virtues) designed to identify response biases such as "faking good," its utility has not yet been assessed. In this study a repeated measures analogue design was employed in which 186 respondents completed the PPI both under standard conditions and with specific instructions to create a favorable impression of themselves. In the "fake good" condition, participants were able to appear significantly less psychopathic, with those who obtained higher scores in the standard instruction condition showing the largest decreases in their PPI scores. Receiver Operating Characteristic analyses indicated that, although the Unlikely Virtues scale significantly differentiated between "fake good" and honest protocols (area under the curve = .73), a considerable number of misclassifications occurred. The clinical and forensic implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. Once an Impression Manager, Always an Impression Manager? Antecedents of Honest and Deceptive Impression Management Use and Variability across Multiple Job Interviews

    PubMed Central

    Roulin, Nicolas; Bourdage, Joshua S.

    2017-01-01

    Research has examined the antecedents of applicants' use of impression management (IM) tactics in employment interviews. All existing empirical studies have measured IM in one particular interview. Yet, applicants generally interview multiple times for different positions, and thus have multiple opportunities to engage in IM, before they can secure a job. Similarly, recent theoretical advances in personnel selection and IM research have suggested that applicant behaviors should be considered as dynamic and adaptive in nature. In line with this perspective, the present study is the first to examine the role of individual differences in both applicants' use of IM tactics and the variability in IM use across multiple interviews. It also highlights which honest and deceptive IM tactics remain stable vs. vary in consecutive interviews with different interviewers and organizations. Results suggest that applicants high in Extraversion or core self-evaluations tend to engage in more honest self-promotion but do not adapt their IM approach across interviews. In contrast, applicants who possess more undesirable personality traits (i.e., low on Honesty-Humility and Conscientiousness, but high on Machiavellianism, Narcissism, Psychopathy, or Competitive Worldviews) tend to use more deceptive IM (and especially image creation tactics) and are also more likely to adapt their IM strategy across interviews. Because deceptive IM users can obtain better evaluations from interviewers and the personality profile of those users is often associated with undesirable workplace outcomes, this study provides additional evidence for the claim that deceptive IM (or faking) is a potential threat for organizations. PMID:28174546

  5. Once an Impression Manager, Always an Impression Manager? Antecedents of Honest and Deceptive Impression Management Use and Variability across Multiple Job Interviews.

    PubMed

    Roulin, Nicolas; Bourdage, Joshua S

    2017-01-01

    Research has examined the antecedents of applicants' use of impression management (IM) tactics in employment interviews. All existing empirical studies have measured IM in one particular interview. Yet, applicants generally interview multiple times for different positions, and thus have multiple opportunities to engage in IM, before they can secure a job. Similarly, recent theoretical advances in personnel selection and IM research have suggested that applicant behaviors should be considered as dynamic and adaptive in nature. In line with this perspective, the present study is the first to examine the role of individual differences in both applicants' use of IM tactics and the variability in IM use across multiple interviews. It also highlights which honest and deceptive IM tactics remain stable vs. vary in consecutive interviews with different interviewers and organizations. Results suggest that applicants high in Extraversion or core self-evaluations tend to engage in more honest self-promotion but do not adapt their IM approach across interviews. In contrast, applicants who possess more undesirable personality traits (i.e., low on Honesty-Humility and Conscientiousness, but high on Machiavellianism, Narcissism, Psychopathy, or Competitive Worldviews) tend to use more deceptive IM (and especially image creation tactics) and are also more likely to adapt their IM strategy across interviews. Because deceptive IM users can obtain better evaluations from interviewers and the personality profile of those users is often associated with undesirable workplace outcomes, this study provides additional evidence for the claim that deceptive IM (or faking) is a potential threat for organizations.

  6. Fertilizing ROSES through the STEM: Interdisciplinary Modules as Pre-service Research Experiences for Secondary STEM Educators (IMPRESS-Ed)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavic, Michael; Wiita, P. J.; Benoit, M.; Magee, N.

    2013-01-01

    IMPRESS-Ed is a program designed to provide authentic summer research experiences in the space, earth, and atmospheric sciences for pre-service K-12 educators at Long Island University (LIU) and The College of New Jersey (TCNJ). In 2011 and 2012, the program involved five students and took place over eight weeks with recruitment occurring during the preceding academic year. The program was divided into two modules: A common core module and an individual mentored research experience. The common module consisted of three units focusing on data-driven pedagogical approaches in astrophysics, tectonophysics, and atmospheric science, respectively. The common module also featured training sessions in observational astronomy, and use of a 3D geowall and state of the art planetarium. Participants in the program are also offered the opportunity to utilize the available TCNJ facilities with their future students. The individual mentored research module matched student interests with potential projects. All five students demonstrated strong gains in earth and space science literacy compared to a baseline measurement. Each student also reported gaining confidence to incorporate data and research-driven instruction in the space and earth sciences into the K-12 STEM classroom setting. All five research projects were also quite successful: several of the students plan to continue research during the academic year and two students are presenting research findings as first authors here at AAS. Other research results are likely to be presented at this year's American Geophysical Union meeting.

  7. A laboratory study of dimensional changes for three elastomeric impression materials using custom and stock trays.

    PubMed

    Boulton, J L; Gage, J P; Vincent, P F; Basford, K E

    1996-12-01

    Clinical success of fixed prosthodontic procedures is dependent in part upon the dimensional accuracy of elastomeric impression materials and impression procedures. Three elastomeric impression materials were used in custom and stock trays to determine the accuracy of impressions taken from an experimental stainless steel model representing premolar and molar bridge abutment preparations. Horizontal and vertical individual abutment and interabutment dimensions were measured on die stone replicas, and the measurements compared with those obtained from stainless steel master models. The results of this study demonstrate polysulphide is the least accurate impression material for both vertical and horizontal individual abutment dimensions. However, for interabutment horizontal dimensions, no statistical differences were noted between impression material types when using a custom tray. Stock trays produced unreliable results for all the materials tested.

  8. Interpretation of Appearance: The Effect of Facial Features on First Impressions and Personality

    PubMed Central

    Wolffhechel, Karin; Fagertun, Jens; Jacobsen, Ulrik Plesner; Majewski, Wiktor; Hemmingsen, Astrid Sofie; Larsen, Catrine Lohmann; Lorentzen, Sofie Katrine; Jarmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Appearance is known to influence social interactions, which in turn could potentially influence personality development. In this study we focus on discovering the relationship between self-reported personality traits, first impressions and facial characteristics. The results reveal that several personality traits can be read above chance from a face, and that facial features influence first impressions. Despite the former, our prediction model fails to reliably infer personality traits from either facial features or first impressions. First impressions, however, could be inferred more reliably from facial features. We have generated artificial, extreme faces visualising the characteristics having an effect on first impressions for several traits. Conclusively, we find a relationship between first impressions, some personality traits and facial features and consolidate that people on average assess a given face in a highly similar manner. PMID:25233221

  9. Beyond the actor's traits: forming impressions of actors, targets, and relationships from social behaviors.

    PubMed

    Frey, K P; Smith, E R

    1993-09-01

    Perceivers who observe social behaviors may form impressions not only of actors' traits but also of people as targets and of interpersonal relationships. In Study 1, Ss read about 4 individuals' behaviors under instructions to form actor-, target-, and relationship-based impressions. Ss then read additional behavioral information that they later tried to recall. Ss accurately perceived actor, target, and relationship effects in the presented information, and they better recalled subsequent behaviors that were consistent with all 3 types of impressions. In Study 2, Ss thought of 4 people they knew and judged how much each liked the other 3. These ratings revealed actor, target, and relationship effects as well as individual and dyadic reciprocity. Perceivers can form relatively accurate impressions of people as actors and as targets and accurate impressions of relationships between people, and these impressions influence memory for further behaviors.

  10. Comparison of intraoral scanning and conventional impression techniques using 3-dimensional superimposition

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Ye-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study is to evaluate the appropriate impression technique by analyzing the superimposition of 3D digital model for evaluating accuracy of conventional impression technique and digital impression. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-four patients who had no periodontitis or temporomandibular joint disease were selected for analysis. As a reference model, digital impressions with a digital impression system were performed. As a test models, for conventional impression dual-arch and full-arch, impression techniques utilizing addition type polyvinylsiloxane for fabrication of cast were applied. 3D laser scanner is used for scanning the cast. Each 3 pairs for 25 STL datasets were imported into the inspection software. The three-dimensional differences were illustrated in a color-coded map. For three-dimensional quantitative analysis, 4 specified contact locations(buccal and lingual cusps of second premolar and molar) were established. For twodimensional quantitative analysis, the sectioning from buccal cusp to lingual cusp of second premolar and molar were acquired depending on the tooth axis. RESULTS In color-coded map, the biggest difference between intraoral scanning and dual-arch impression was seen (P<.05). In three-dimensional analysis, the biggest difference was seen between intraoral scanning and dual-arch impression and the smallest difference was seen between dual-arch and full-arch impression. CONCLUSION The two- and three-dimensional deviations between intraoral scanner and dual-arch impression was bigger than full-arch and dual-arch impression (P<.05). The second premolar showed significantly bigger three-dimensional deviations than the second molar in the three-dimensional deviations (P>.05). PMID:26816576

  11. Impression technique for a complete-arch prosthesis with multiple implants using additive manufacturing technologies.

    PubMed

    Revilla-León, Marta; Sánchez-Rubio, José Luis; Oteo-Calatayud, Jesús; Özcan, Mutlu

    2016-11-23

    This article describes an impression technique for a complete-arch prosthesis supported by multiple implants where additive manufacturing technologies were used to fabricate a splinting framework and a custom tray. The technique presented uses a shim method to control the homogenous splinting acrylic resin and impression material during the procedure, thereby reducing laboratory and chairside time and the number of impression copings and laboratory analogs needed.

  12. A Single Step Impression Technique of Flabby Ridges Using Monophase Polyvinylsiloxane Material: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Umesh Y.; Reddy, Vikram Simha; Hosi, Rushad Nariman

    2014-01-01

    Complete denture fabrication in clinically compromised situations such as flabby ridges is a challenging task for the clinician. Accurate impressioning of these tissues plays a major role in ensuring a well-fitting prosthesis. In this paper, the authors have proposed a newer technique of impression making of the flabby tissues using a combination of readily available newer and older materials to ensure an accurate and easy impression of these tissues. PMID:24872897

  13. Neuro-impressions: interpreting the nature of human creativity

    PubMed Central

    Siler, Todd Lael

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the creative process is essential for realizing human potential. Over the past four decades, the author has explored this subject through his brain-inspired drawings, paintings, symbolic sculptures, and experimental art installations that present myriad impressions of human creativity. These impressionistic artworks interpret rather than illustrate the complexities of the creative process. They draw insights from empirical studies that correlate how human beings create, learn, remember, innovate, and communicate. In addition to offering fresh aesthetic experiences, this metaphorical art raises fundamental questions concerning the deep connections between the brain and its creations. The author describes his artworks as embodiments of everyday observations about the neuropsychology of creativity, and its all-purpose applications for stimulating and accelerating innovation. PMID:23091455

  14. [A clinical case of demyelinating disease with basilar impression].

    PubMed

    Gasparini, A; Sterlicchio, M; Castiglioni, E; Raimondi, E

    1994-11-01

    The authors report a clinical case of a 48-year-old female patient admitted to the Neurological Division following acute symptoms characterised by generalised asthenia, motory disorders (incoordination, equilibrium or gait deficit) accompanied by diplopia. Instrumental (medullary and encephalic NMR) and laboratory tests revealed a malformation of the atlo-occpital hinge with basilar impression and areas of corticosubcortical demyelinisation signifying multiple sclerosis. The liquor test was also positive for the presence of oligoclonal bands of IgG with a Link index of 0.97 (lower v.n. at 0.7). The association between these two pathologies is rare, whereas the need for a differential diagnosis between them often arises. Therefore, two pathologies which are mutually exclusive in many cases were present in an associated form in this case.

  15. Impression management and achievement motivation: Investigating substantive links.

    PubMed

    Elliot, Andrew J; Aldhobaiban, Nawal; Murayama, Kou; Kobeisy, Ahmed; Gocłowska, Małgorzata A; Khyat, Aber

    2016-01-24

    In this research, we investigate impression management (IM) as a substantive personality variable by linking it to differentiated achievement motivation constructs, namely achievement motives (workmastery, competitiveness, fear of failure) and achievement goals (mastery-approach, mastery-avoidance, performance-approach, performance-avoidance). Study 1 revealed that IM was a positive predictor of workmastery and a negative predictor of competitiveness (with and without self-deceptive enhancement (SDE) controlled). Studies 2a and 2b revealed that IM was a positive predictor of mastery-approach goals and mastery-avoidance goals (without and, in Study 2b, with SDE controlled). These findings highlight the value of conceptualising and utilising IM as a personality variable in its own right and shed light on the nature of the achievement motive and achievement goal constructs.

  16. Study on impression smears of hepatic coccidiosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sivajothi, S; Reddy, B Sudhakara; Rayulu, V C

    2016-09-01

    Hepatic coccidiosis is a contagious and lethal disease condition in rabbits. The disease was recorded in six rabbits suffering with watery diarrhoea. Clinically, affected rabbits showed decreased growth rate, anorexia, debilitation, diarrhea and rough hair coat. Examination of the faecal samples revealed the presence of unsporulated oocysts of Eimeria spp. After sporulation Eimeria stiedae oocysts were identified. Postmortem examination revealed hepatomegaly with presence of discrete yellowish-white nodules on the surface of the liver. Impression smears from the liver revealed the presence of numerous developmental stages of E. stiedae corresponding with the stage of the liver lesion and also represent the histological changes of the liver. Rabbits were treated with a combination of sulphaquinoxaline and diaveridine for five days.

  17. A video Clinical Global Impression (CGI) in obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bourredjem, Abderrahmane; Pelissolo, Antoine; Rotge, Jean-Yves; Jaafari, Nematollah; Machefaux, Sebastien; Quentin, Solene; Bui, Eric; Bruno, Nicolas; Pochon, Jean-Baptiste; Polosan, Mircea; Baup, Nicolas; Papetti, François; Chéreau, Isabelle; Arbus, Christophe; Mallet, Luc; du Montcel, Sophie Tezenas

    2011-03-30

    The Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI) is frequently used in clinical research because of its face validity and ease of use but data on its reliability are scarce. Our goal was to estimate the reliability of the scale and compare reliability between face-to-face and video scoring. We analyzed 50 different video interviews recorded during 5 visits of a crossover trial to study the effect of subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Six specialized clinicians rated the CGI using these videos, providing 300 different ratings. The intraclass correlation was lower at inclusion (0.30 [0.13-0.50]) than at later visits (0.68 [0.61-0.80]). Reliability was not influenced by the patients' stimulation status. The mean of at least two independent evaluations of the video is needed to achieve an ICC greater than 0.8. The video CGI is a valid clinical outcome measure suitable for clinical trials (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00169377).

  18. Impressions of the Meson Spectrum: Hybrids & Exotics, present and future

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2016-03-25

    It has long been expected that the spectrum of hadrons in QCD would be far richer and extensive than experiment has so far revealed. While there have been experimental hints of this richness for some time, it is really only in the last few years that dramatic progress has been seen in the exploration both experimentally and in calculations on the lattice. Precision studies enabled by new technology both with detectors and high performance computations are converging on an understanding of the spectrum in strong coupling QCD. These methodologies are laying the foundation for a decade of potential discovery that electro and photoproduction experiments at Jefferson Lab, which when combined with key results on B and charmonium decays from both e+e? and pp colliders, should turn mere impressions of the light meson spectrum into a high definition picture.

  19. Effects of Exposure to Advertisements on Audience Impressions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Mie; Kasuga, Masao; Nagao, Yoshihide; Shono, Toru; Norose, Yuka; Oku, Ritsuya; Nogami, Akira; Miyazawa, Yoshitaka

    This study investigated effects of listening and/or watching commercial-messages (CMs) on audience impressions. We carried out experiments of TV advertisements presentation in conditions of audio only, video only, and audio-video. As results, we confirmed the following two effects: image-multiple effect, that is, the audience brings to mind various images that are not directly expressed in the content, and marking-up effect, that is, the audience concentrates on some images that are directly expressed in the content. The image-multiple effect, in particular, strongly appeared under the audio only condition. Next, we investigated changes in the following seven subjective responses; usage image, experience, familiarity, exclusiveness, feeling at home, affection, and willingness to buy, after exposure to advertisements under conditions of audio only and audio-video. As a result, noting that the image-multiple effect became stronger as the evaluation scores of the responses increased.

  20. Rheological properties of elastomeric impression materials before and during setting.

    PubMed

    McCabe, J F; Arikawa, H

    1998-11-01

    In this study, we examined the rheological properties of elastomeric impression materials, both before and during setting, to assess the clinical significance of certain key characteristics such as viscosity, pseudoplasticity, and the rate of development of elasticity. The hypothesis to be tested was that monitoring the change in tan delta is the most appropriate means of monitoring the setting characteristics of elastomers. The loss tangent (tan delta) and the dynamic viscosity (eta') for five impression materials (both unmixed pastes and mixed/setting materials) were measured by means of a controlled-stress rheometer in a cone/plate configuration. For unmixed pastes, tests were performed at various frequencies (0.1 to 10 Hz) and torques (from 1 to 50 x 10(-4) Nm), while testing on setting materials was performed at constant frequency (1 Hz) and torque (3 x 10(-3) Nm). Most base and catalyst pastes were pseudoplastic before being mixed. Immediately after being mixed, the polyether (tan delta = 9.85) and polysulfide (tan delta = 9.54) elastomers showed tan delta markedly higher than those of other mixed materials (tan delta = 4.96 to 3.01). The polyvinylsiloxane elastomers showed lower initial tan delta, which rapidly reduced even further with time. This suggests that these materials should be used as soon as possible after being mixed. The polyether elastomer had a comparatively long induction period during which the tan delta remained at a high value. These characteristics are thought to be key factors in controlling clinical efficacy and therefore support the hypothesis that monitoring tan delta is an appropriate method for evaluating the setting characteristics of elastomers. One limitation was that the controlled-stress rheometer was unable to monitor rheological properties through to completion of setting.

  1. Optical Fiber Relative-Humidity Sensor with Polyvinyl Alcohol Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastón, Ainhoa; Pérez, Fátima; Sevilla, Joaquín

    2004-07-01

    We describe a fiber-optic relative-humidity (RH) sensor comprising a moisture-sensitive overlay on a single-mode side-polished fiber. The hygroscopic polymeric material deposited was polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), which proved to have good adherence and stability. The film reached a fast equilibrium with atmospheric moisture (in less than 1 min), inducing changes in the output optical power of ~10 dB for the 70%-90% RH range. To yield a low-cost device, single-mode standard communication fibers were used; therefore all the components of the sensor can be commercial, mass-produced telecommunication devices. The experimental results obtained are consistent with the expected behavior of the system; the output power decreases because of losses in the polished region of the fiber as the refractive index of its external medium approaches the fiber core value. Because the external medium is PVA film, its refractive index changes in response to its water content.

  2. [Determination of organotin compounds in polyvinyl chloride toys].

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Masako; Aoyama, Taiki; Mitani, Kazunori

    2003-08-01

    Organotin compounds in polyvinyl chloride toys were determined by GC/MS after ethyl derivatization with sodium tetraethylborate. The samples were 12 balls, 12 soft toys, 10 food toys and 13 face masks for children. Monooctyltin, dioctyltin and trioctyltin compounds were found in all face masks at the levels of 74.8-917 micrograms/g. 474-3,960 micrograms/g and 1.0-213 micrograms/g, respectively. They also were detected in 6 balls, 4 soft toys and 1 food toy. Monomethyltin and dimethyltin compounds were found in 8 face masks at the levels of 40.9-227 micrograms/g and 222-1,450 micrograms/g, respectively. Monobutyltin and dibutyltin (DBT) compounds were found in 1 ball, 3 food toys and 5 face masks. In particular, 1 ball and 4 face masks contained toxic DBT at the levels of 527-999 micrograms/g.

  3. Evaluation of a Polyvinyl Toluene Neutron Counter Array

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Hayes

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to simulate the performance of a neutron detector array for empirical configuration optimization and preliminary algorithm evaluation. Utilizing a compact array of borated Polyvinyl Toluene light pipes and Photomultiplier Tubes, pulse shape analysis, standard spectral histogramming, and multiplicity counting can enable neutron measurements for multiple applications. Results demonstrate that analysis with Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) can be used to obtain a better understanding of field measurement results and aid in algorithm development for unfolding in conjunction with detector optimization. Use of a handheld neutron spectrometer has promise of widespread applicability. By correlating MCNP results with empirical measurements, substantial confidence can be placed on predicting detector response to sufficiently similar spectral sources under alternate experimental configurations. In addition, use of the detector has substantial promise for operational health physics applications.

  4. Immobilization of enzyme into poly(vinyl alcohol) membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, K.; Shiomi, T.; Uchida, K.; Miya, M.

    1986-11-01

    Glucoamylase, invertase, and cellulase were entrapped within poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membrane cross-linked by means of irradiation of ultraviolet light. The conditions for immobilization of glucoamylase were examined with respect to enzyme concentration in PVA, sensitizer (sodium benzoate) concentration in PVA, irradiation time, and membrane thickness. Various characteristics of immobilized glucoamylase were evaluated. Among them, the pH activity curve for the immobilized enzyme was superior to that for the native one, and thermal stability was improved by immobilization with bovine albumin. The apparent Km was larger for immobilized glucoamylase than for the native one, while Vmax was smaller for the immobilized enzyme. Also, the apparent Km appeared to be affected by the molecular size of the substrate. Further, immobilized invertase and cellulase showed good stabilities in repeating usage. 9 references.

  5. Surface Sulfonation of Polyvinyl Chloride by Plasma for Antithrombogenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Yashao

    2004-06-01

    To enhance the blood compatibility of Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) film, the film was modified by SO2/O2 gas plasma treatment. The effect of surface sulfonation of PVC treated by various SO2/O2 gas plasma depended on the volume ratio O2/(SO2 + O2). When the volume ratio was 0.5, the effect of sulfonation was the best. Sulfonic acid groups were specifically and efficiently introduced onto the PVC surface, which was proved by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transfer Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The surface microstructure of modified PVC film was studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The antithrombogenicity of the samples was determined by the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), thrombin time (TT) and plasma recalcification time (PRT) tests and platelet adhesion experiment. The results indicated that the antithrombogenicity of modified PVC was improved remarkably.

  6. [Test method for 6 phthalates in polyvinyl chloride].

    PubMed

    Abe, Yutaka; Mutsuga, Motoh; Hirahara, Yoshichika; Kawamura, Yoko

    2011-01-01

    A test method for 6 phthalates, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, dibutyl phthalate, benzyl butyl phthalate, diisononyl phthalate, diisodecyl phthalate and di-n-octyl phthalate, in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) was developed. GC/MS was used in the SIM mode for the separation and detection of phthalates. For preparation of the test solution, the extraction method with acetone-hexane mixture (3 : 7) and the dissolution method with tetrahydrofuran and ethanol were compared and it was confirmed that each method gave good recoveries. Dilution of the test solution was effective to reduce the influence of PVC. In a collaborative study with nine laboratories, the intra-laboratory variations showed good repeatability, but the measurements at some laboratories deviated widely. It appears that this method is unsuitable for the judgment of acceptability, but it may be suitable for the determination of phthalate content in PVC products.

  7. Friction loss in straight pipes of unplasticized polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, T; Ojima, J

    1996-01-01

    In order to design proper ductwork for a local exhaust system, airflow characteristics were investigated in straight pipes of unplasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC). A linear decrease in static pressure was observed downstream at points from the opening of the VU pipes (JIS K 6741) located at distances greater than 10 times the pipe diameter, for velocities ranging between 10.18-36.91 m/s. Roughness inside pipes with small diameters was found to be 0.0042-0.0056 mm and the friction factor was calculated on the basis of Colebrook's equation for an airflow transition zone. An extended friction chart was then constructed on the basis of the roughness value and the friction factor. This chart can be applied when designing a local exhaust system with the ducts of diameters ranging from 40 to 900 mm. The friction loss of the PVC pipe was found to be approximately 2/3 of that of a galvanized steel pipe.

  8. End-of-life of starch-polyvinyl alcohol biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Guo, M; Stuckey, D C; Murphy, R J

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a life cycle assessment (LCA) model comparing the waste management options for starch-polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) biopolymers including landfill, anaerobic digestion (AD), industrial composting and home composting. The ranking of biological treatment routes for starch-PVOH biopolymer wastes depended on their chemical compositions. AD represents the optimum choice for starch-PVOH biopolymer containing N and S elements in global warming potential (GWP(100)), acidification and eutrophication but not on the remaining impact categories, where home composting was shown to be a better option due to its low energy and resource inputs. For those starch-PVOH biopolymers with zero N and S contents home composting delivered the best environmental performance amongst biological treatment routes in most impact categories (except for GWP(100)). The landfill scenario performed generally well due largely to the 100-year time horizon and efficient energy recovery system modeled but this good performance is highly sensitive to assumptions adopted in landfill model.

  9. Polyvinyl chloride meat-wrapping film study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vandervort, R.

    1988-01-01

    As a result of worker complaints in the Baltimore, Maryland area, potential health hazards associated with the use of polyvinyl-chloride film for wrapping meat were reviewed. Fumes generated during the meat-wrapping process were causing concern among the workers as they experienced respiratory irritation and distress. It appeared that only some of the meat wrappers experienced difficulty, only some of the rolls of film-produced irritations in the affected workers, and affected workers had prior histories of respiratory difficulties. Fumes were generated during hot-wire film cutting. The amount of fume generated depended significantly on the care taken during the operation. If the dispensing machines were improperly adjusted, large amounts of fumes could be obtained during the cutting process. The author concludes that the amounts of these chemicals released during this operation does not constitute a health hazard to the employees. It may be necessary, however, to remove persons with prior respiratory irritation from this particular job location.

  10. [Use of polyvinyl alcohol for preparing frozen histological sections].

    PubMed

    Serga, V A; Bykov, L A; Kasatonov, V G

    1982-01-01

    The authors developed a new method for preparation of frozen histological sections. It consists in the use of glycerin-plastified polymer, polyvinyl alcohol, and distilled water for impregnation of tissue pieces and subsequent freezing of them in the same medium. This produces histological sections of high quality. The frozen sections are sufficiently thin (3--5 micrometers). The method excludes cell structure destruction by ice crystals and overfreezing of blocks; the sections do not crumble. Losses of free cell elements, extraction of substances and other artifacts are minimized. The frozen histological sections are firmly glued to the glass without using protein with glycerin. The method saves time and reagents for the preparation of the sections and allows their wide use in morphological and histochemical studies.

  11. Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol films as alkaline battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1983-01-01

    Cross-linking methods have been investigated to determine their effect on the performance of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films as alkaline battery separators. The following types of cross-linked PVA films are discussed: (1) PVA-dialdehyde blends post-treated with an acid or acid periodate solution (two-step method) and (2) PVA-dialdehyde blends cross-linked during film formation (drying) by using a reagent with both aldehyde and acid functionality (one-step method). Laboratory samples of each cross-linked type of film were prepared and evaluated in standard separator screening tests. Then pilot-plant batches of films were prepared and compared to measure differences due to the cross-linking method. The pilot-plant materials were then tested in nickel oxide-zinc cells to compare the two methods with respect to performance characteristics and cycle life. Cell test results are compared with those from tests with Celgard.

  12. Polyvinyl alcohol coating of polystyrene inertial confinement fusion targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annamalai, P.; Lee, M. C.; Crawley, R. L.; Downs, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    An inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target made of polystyrene is first levitated in an acoustic field. The surface of the target is then etched using an appropriate solution (e.g., cyclohexane) to enhance the wetting characteristics. A specially prepared polyvinyl alcohol solution is atomized using an acoustic atomizer and deposited on the surface of the target. The solution is air dried to form a thin coating (2 microns) on the target (outside diameter of about 350-850 microns). Thicker coatings are obtained by repeated applications of the coating solutions. Preliminary results indicate that uniform coatings may be achievable on the targets with a background surface smoothness in the order of 1000 A.

  13. Cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol films as alkaline battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1982-01-01

    Cross-linking methods were investigated to determine their effect on the performance of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films as alkaline battery separators. The following types of cross-linked PVA films are discussed: (1) PVA-dialdehyde blends post-treated with an acid or acid periodate solution (two-step method) and (2) PVA-dialdehyde blends cross-linked during film formation (drying) by using a reagent with both aldehyde and acid functionality (one-step method). Laboratory samples of each cross-linked type of film were prepared and evaluated in standard separator screening tests. The pilot-plant batches of films were prepared and compared to measure differences due to the cross-linking method. The pilot-plant materials were then tested in nickel oxide - zinc cells to compare the two methods with respect to performance characteristics and cycle life. Cell test results are compared with those from tests with Celgard.

  14. In situ self cross-linking of polyvinyl alcohol battery separators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Hsu, L. C.; Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A battery separator was produced from a polyvinyl alcohol sheet structure which was subjected to an in situ, self crosslinking process by selective oxidation of the 1,2 diol units present in the polyvinyl alcohol sheet structure. The 1,2 diol units were cleaved to form aldehyde end groups which subsequently crosslink through acetalization of the 1,3 diol units of the polyvinyl alcohol. Selective oxidation was achieved using a solution of a suitable oxidizing agent such as periodic acid or lead tetraacetate.

  15. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on fabric - part 2: peroxidase reagents.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Savage, Kathleen A; Bandey, Helen; Ciuksza, Tomasz; Nic Daéid, Niamh

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates the optimisation of peroxidase based enhancement techniques for footwear impressions made in blood on various fabric surfaces. Four different haem reagents: leuco crystal violet (LCV), leuco malachite green (LMG), fluorescein and luminol were used to enhance the blood contaminated impressions. The enhancement techniques in this study were used successfully to enhance the impressions in blood on light coloured surfaces, however, only fluorescent and/or chemiluminescent techniques allowed visualisation on dark coloured fabrics, denim and leather. Luminol was the only technique to enhance footwear impressions made in blood on all the fabrics investigated in this study.

  16. A novel technique of impression procedure in a hemimaxillectomy patient with microstomia.

    PubMed

    Deogade, Suryakant C

    2012-01-01

    A restricted mouth opening in hemimaxillectomy patient can create a significant problem with the insertion and the removal of the obturator prosthesis. Even it poses a problem in impression making due to small oral opening. A modification of the standard impression procedure is often necessary to accomplish an acceptable impression in the fabrication of a successful prosthesis. Sectional trays are a good option for such patients. This paper describes a novel technique of impression procedure and a method of fabricating a sectional tray with the anterior and the posterior locking mechanism for a hemimaxillectomy patient with limited oral opening.

  17. Does aging impair first impression accuracy? Differentiating emotion recognition from complex social inferences.

    PubMed

    Krendl, Anne C; Rule, Nicholas O; Ambady, Nalini

    2014-09-01

    Young adults can be surprisingly accurate at making inferences about people from their faces. Although these first impressions have important consequences for both the perceiver and the target, it remains an open question whether first impression accuracy is preserved with age. Specifically, could age differences in impressions toward others stem from age-related deficits in accurately detecting complex social cues? Research on aging and impression formation suggests that young and older adults show relative consensus in their first impressions, but it is unknown whether they differ in accuracy. It has been widely shown that aging disrupts emotion recognition accuracy, and that these impairments may predict deficits in other social judgments, such as detecting deceit. However, it is unclear whether general impression formation accuracy (e.g., emotion recognition accuracy, detecting complex social cues) relies on similar or distinct mechanisms. It is important to examine this question to evaluate how, if at all, aging might affect overall accuracy. Here, we examined whether aging impaired first impression accuracy in predicting real-world outcomes and categorizing social group membership. Specifically, we studied whether emotion recognition accuracy and age-related cognitive decline (which has been implicated in exacerbating deficits in emotion recognition) predict first impression accuracy. Our results revealed that emotion recognition accuracy did not predict first impression accuracy, nor did age-related cognitive decline impair it. These findings suggest that domains of social perception outside of emotion recognition may rely on mechanisms that are relatively unimpaired by aging.

  18. Accuracy of the One-Stage and Two-Stage Impression Techniques: A Comparative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jamshidy, Ladan; Mozaffari, Hamid Reza; Faraji, Payam; Sharifi, Roohollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. One of the main steps of impression is the selection and preparation of an appropriate tray. Hence, the present study aimed to analyze and compare the accuracy of one- and two-stage impression techniques. Materials and Methods. A resin laboratory-made model, as the first molar, was prepared by standard method for full crowns with processed preparation finish line of 1 mm depth and convergence angle of 3-4°. Impression was made 20 times with one-stage technique and 20 times with two-stage technique using an appropriate tray. To measure the marginal gap, the distance between the restoration margin and preparation finish line of plaster dies was vertically determined in mid mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual (MDBL) regions by a stereomicroscope using a standard method. Results. The results of independent test showed that the mean value of the marginal gap obtained by one-stage impression technique was higher than that of two-stage impression technique. Further, there was no significant difference between one- and two-stage impression techniques in mid buccal region, but a significant difference was reported between the two impression techniques in MDL regions and in general. Conclusion. The findings of the present study indicated higher accuracy for two-stage impression technique than for the one-stage impression technique.

  19. Controlling the variable of pressure in the production of test footwear impressions.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Riches, Philip; Bandey, Helen; Savage, Kathleen; NicDaéid, Niamh

    2012-09-01

    Footwear impression lifting and enhancement techniques may be affected by several variables introduced during the production of test footwear impressions, thus limiting the usefulness of enhancement technique comparisons and the results obtained. One such variable is the force applied when the impressed mark is being made. Producing consistent test impressions for research into footwear enhancement techniques would therefore be beneficial. This study was designed to control pressure in the production of test footwear impressions when mimicking a stamping action. Twenty-seven volunteers were asked to stamp on two different surfaces and the average stamping force was recorded. Information from the data obtained was used to design and build a mechanical device which could be calibrated to consistently deliver footwear impressions with the same force onto a receiving surface. Preliminary experiments using this device and different contaminants on the footwear sole have yielded consistent and repeatable impressions. Controlling the variable of pressure for the production of test impressions in this study demonstrated that the differences observed were visual (due to the amount of contaminant transferred and subsequent enhancement) and did not affect the replication of outer sole characteristics. This paper reports the development of the device and illustrates the quality of the impressions produced.

  20. Reliability of antagonistic arch impression in dental prostheses: clinical evaluation of different preimpression preparation procedures.

    PubMed

    Scotti, R; Lugli, M; D'Elia, A

    1995-08-01

    This study compared the influence of different methods of preimpression preparation on the quality of occlusal reproduction in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions. A total of 30 impressions of the lower dental arch of a patient were made with five different preimpression preparation procedures. Stone casts were made and analyzed. Critical comparison showed that the preimpression preparation influenced the quality of the occlusal surface of the cast. Fingerpainting the occlusal surface with fluid hydrocolloid before positioning the loaded impression tray, associated with use of a saliva ejector, reduced the incidence of macroscopic defects on the occlusal surface of the impressions.

  1. Establishing versus preserving impressions: Predicting success in the multiple audience problem.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Austin Lee; Cottrell, Catherine A

    2015-12-01

    People sometimes seek to convey discrepant impressions of themselves to different audiences simultaneously. Research suggests people are generally successful in this "multiple audience problem." Adding to previous research, the current research sought to examine factors that may limit this success by measuring social anxiety and placing participants into situations requiring them to either establish or preserve multiple impressions simultaneously. In general, participants were more successful when preserving previously conveyed impressions than when establishing impressions for the first time. In contrast, social anxiety did not affect multiple audience success. In all, this research offers valuable insight into potential challenges that people face in many social situations.

  2. Accuracy of the One-Stage and Two-Stage Impression Techniques: A Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidy, Ladan; Faraji, Payam; Sharifi, Roohollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. One of the main steps of impression is the selection and preparation of an appropriate tray. Hence, the present study aimed to analyze and compare the accuracy of one- and two-stage impression techniques. Materials and Methods. A resin laboratory-made model, as the first molar, was prepared by standard method for full crowns with processed preparation finish line of 1 mm depth and convergence angle of 3-4°. Impression was made 20 times with one-stage technique and 20 times with two-stage technique using an appropriate tray. To measure the marginal gap, the distance between the restoration margin and preparation finish line of plaster dies was vertically determined in mid mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual (MDBL) regions by a stereomicroscope using a standard method. Results. The results of independent test showed that the mean value of the marginal gap obtained by one-stage impression technique was higher than that of two-stage impression technique. Further, there was no significant difference between one- and two-stage impression techniques in mid buccal region, but a significant difference was reported between the two impression techniques in MDL regions and in general. Conclusion. The findings of the present study indicated higher accuracy for two-stage impression technique than for the one-stage impression technique. PMID:28003824

  3. The effect of a range of disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy of some impression materials.

    PubMed

    Jagger, D C; Al Jabra, O; Harrison, A; Vowles, R W; McNally, L

    2004-12-01

    In this study the dimensional accuracy of two model materials; dental stone and plaster of Paris, reproduced from three commonly used impression materials; alginate, polyether and addition-cured silicone, retained by their adhesives in acrylic resin trays and exposed to four disinfectant solutions was evaluated. Ninety casts were used to investigate the effect of the four disinfectants on the dimensional accuracy of alginate, polyether and addition-cured silicone impression material. For each impression material 30 impressions were taken, half were poured in dental stone and half in plaster of Paris. The disinfectants used were Dimenol, Perform-ID, MD-520, and Haz-tabs. Measurements were carried out using a High Precision Reflex Microscope. For the alginate impressions only those disinfected by 5-minute immersion in Haz-tabs solution and in full-strength MD 520 were not adversely affected by the disinfection treatment. All polyether impressions subjected to immersion disinfection exhibited a clinically acceptable expansion. Disinfected addition-cured silicone impressions produced very accurate stone casts. Those disinfected by spraying with fill-strength Dimenol produced casts that were very similar to those left as controls, but those treated by immersion disinfection exhibited negligible and clinically acceptable expansion. The results of the studied demonstrated that the various disinfection treatments had different effects on the impression materials. It is important that an appropriate disinfectant is used for each type of impression material.

  4. Effect of disinfecting solutions on accuracy of alginate and elastomeric impressions.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, A; Asmussen, E

    1989-10-01

    The effect of immersion in six disinfecting solutions on the accuracy of 10 impression materials was investigated. Impressions were taken of a truncated steel cone. After setting, the impressions were either stored at room temperature for 24 h, for control, or immediately immersed in a disinfecting agent for 60 min (in one case 10 min), and after 24 h poured with gypsum. A steel ring fitting the steel cone was placed on the resulting dies, and the discrepancy between the top surface of the ring and the die was measured. From these measurements the deviation between the base diameter of the die and of the impression was calculated to express the inaccuracy. All impressions except some in Blueprint exhibited a net shrinkage, giving rise to too large die stones and incomplete seating of the steel ring. Blueprint impressions, however, occasionally swelled and resulted in too small die stones and "overseating" of the steel ring. The disinfecting solutions had no significant impact on two impression materials. For the remaining eight materials the accuracy was decreased, increased, or unaffected by the immersion. Generally, the accuracy of the alginates investigated were more affected by the disinfecting solutions than were the elastomeric impression materials. The accuracy of the three alginates was drastically impaired by immersion in 70% ethanol, whereas the remaining five disinfecting solutions had a smaller, though sometimes statistically significant, effect on the accuracy. For the elastomeric materials only a few specific combinations of impression material and disinfecting solution reduced the accuracy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Growth characteristics of selected fungi on polyvinyl film

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, W.T.; Davidson, P.M.

    1986-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if plasticized polyvinyl chloride film would support the growth of any of nine species of fungi. The film was suspended in distilled water with no nutrients or with glucose or ammonium sulfate. Spores of each of the test species were inoculated into the suspension medium, and the mixture was incubated at 30/sup 0/C for up to 18 weeks. Most species were found to be capable of utilizing the film for carbon or nitrogen when the other nutrient was supplied. Only two species, Aspergillus fischeri and Paecilomyces sp., were found to be capable of utilizing components of the film without added nutrients. Components of the polyvinyl chloride film were then incorporated into mineral salts medium to determine if these components could serve as carbon sources in the presence of ammonium nitrate. The only component found to be utilized by all the fungi as a carbon source was epoxidized oil, a plasticizer-stabilizer. Calcium-zinc stearate was an available carbon source for all except the Penicillium and Verticillium strains. The only other component utilized was a stearamide, which was metabolized solely by the Aspergillus sp. Only the stearamide contained enough nitrogen to serve as a primary source in the film. The compound, however, did not support growth of fungi in the presence of glucose. It was theorized that either the nitrogen of the stearamide was more readily available to the fungi in the whole film due to the presence of trace nutrients or the nitrogen was supplied by exogenous sources.

  6. A technique to ensure the reproducibility of a cast post and core.

    PubMed

    Naas, Haitem M M; Dashti, Mohammad Hossein; Hashemian, Roxana; Hifeda, Nedda Y

    2014-12-01

    The post-and-core pattern duplication technique is a simple, cost-effective, and accurate method of ensuring the reproducibility of a cast post and core. An acrylic resin pattern is fabricated for an endodontically treated tooth. The post portion of the pattern is duplicated with a polyvinyl siloxane impression material in the lower compartment of a container. The core portion is then duplicated with a polyether impression material in the upper compartment. After the original pattern has been retrieved, the duplicate resin pattern is fabricated in the provided space. This technique will improve efficiency if damage or loss of the pattern or the actual cast post and core occurs.

  7. Synthesis and properties of a novel UV-cured fluorinated siloxane graft copolymer for improved surface, dielectric and tribological properties of epoxy acrylate coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenlong; Liu, Weiqu; Gao, Nan; Wang, Honglei; Su, Kui

    2013-11-01

    A novel functional fluorinated siloxane graft copolymer bearing with vinyl end-groups was synthesized from dihydroxypropyl-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), dicarboxyl terminated poly(2,2,3,4,4,4-hexafluorobutyl acrylate) oligomer (CTHFA), 2,4-toluene diissocyanate (TDI) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The chemical structure was characterized by FT-IR and GPC. The effect of concentration of the vinyl-capped fluorosilicone graft copolymer (Vi-PFSi) on the surface, thermal properties, dielectric and tribological properties of UV-cured films was investigated. Contact angles and surface energies showed that the high hydrophobic and oleophobic surfaces were obtained by incorporation of Vi-PFSi at very low amount (0.5 wt%). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) evidenced that the fluorinated and siloxane moiety selectively migrated to the outermost surface of UV-cured film, thus reduced its surface energy from 45.42 to 15.40 mN/m2 without affecting its bulk properties. The morphology of fracture surface of modified film exhibited rough fracture surface only at the outermost surface, revealing fluorinated and siloxane groups migrated toward air-side surface. The dielectric constants decreased from 5.32 (1 MHz) for bisphenol-A epoxy methacrylate (EMA) to 2.82 (1 MHz) for modified film when the Vi-PFSi copolymer concentration increased from 0 to 0.8 wt%. Tribological results from abrasion tester suggested that the Vi-PFSi could obviously reduce the abrasion weight loss of modified films.

  8. Corrosion resistance of siloxane-poly(methyl methacrylate) hybrid films modified with acetic acid on tin plate substrates: Influence of tetraethoxysilane addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunst, S. R.; Cardoso, H. R. P.; Oliveira, C. T.; Santana, J. A.; Sarmento, V. H. V.; Muller, I. L.; Malfatti, C. F.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the corrosion resistance of hybrid films. Tin plate was coated with a siloxane-poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) hybrid film prepared by sol-gel route with covalent bonds between the organic (PMMA) and inorganic (siloxane) phases obtained by hydrolysis and polycondensation of 3-(trimethoxysilylpropyl) methacrylate (TMSM) and polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) using benzoyl peroxide (BPO) as a thermic initiator. Hydrolysis reactions were catalyzed by acetic acid solution avoiding the use of chlorine or stronger acids in the film preparation. The effect of the addition of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) on the protective properties of the film was evaluated. The hydrophobicity of the film was determined by contact angle measurements, and the morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and profilometry. The local nanostructure was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The electrochemical behavior of the films was assessed by open circuit potential monitoring, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements in a 0.05 M NaCl solution. The mechanical behavior was evaluated by tribology. The results highlighted that the siloxane-PMMA hybrid films modified with acetic acid are promising anti-corrosive coatings that acts as an efficient diffusion barrier, protecting tin plates against corrosion. However, the coating properties were affected by the TEOS addition, which contributed for the thickness increase and irregular surface coverage.

  9. A study of the surface hardness and dimensional stability of several intermaxillary registration materials.

    PubMed

    Chai, J; Tan, E; Pang, I C

    1994-01-01

    This study compared the surface hardness, the effect of time on surface hardness, and the dimensional stability of various intermaxillary relationship registration materials. The Shore hardness values of one zinc oxide-eugenol material, one polyether, and seven poly(vinyl siloxane) materials were obtained at 30 minutes and 24 hours after the start of mixing. The dimensional stability of one polyether and seven poly(vinyl siloxane) materials was measured using a standard mold as described in American Dental Association (ADA) Specification No. 19. All materials exhibited relatively high surface hardness despite some statistical differences among them. Four materials possessed higher surface hardness at 24 hours than at 30 minutes. Although the polyether showed significantly lower dimensional stability than the other materials, all materials satisfied the minimum requirement for Type I elastomeric impression material.

  10. Accuracy of Intraoral Digital Impressions for Whole Upper Jaws, Including Full Dentitions and Palatal Soft Tissues.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ning; Xiong, Yaoyang; Jiao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Intraoral digital impressions have been stated to meet the clinical requirements for some teeth-supported restorations, though fewer evidences were proposed for larger scanning range. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of intraoral digital impressions for whole upper jaws, including the full dentitions and palatal soft tissues, as well as to determine the effect of different palatal vault height or arch width on accuracy of intraoral digital impressions. Thirty-two volunteers were divided into three groups according to the palatal vault height or arch width. Each volunteer received three scans with TRIOS intraoral scanner and one conventional impression of whole upper jaw. Three-dimensional (3D) images digitized from conventional gypsum casts by a laboratory scanner were chose as the reference models. All datasets were imported to a specific software program for 3D analysis by "best fit alignment" and "3D compare" process. Color-coded deviation maps showed qualitative visualization of the deviations. For the digital impressions for palatal soft tissues, trueness was (130.54±33.95)μm and precision was (55.26±11.21)μm. For the digital impressions for upper full dentitions, trueness was (80.01±17.78)μm and precision was (59.52±11.29)μm. Larger deviations were found between intraoral digital impressions and conventional impressions in the areas of palatal soft tissues than that in the areas of full dentitions (p<0.001). Precision of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues was slightly better than that for full dentitions (p = 0.049). There was no significant effect of palatal vault height on accuracy of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues (p>0.05), but arch width was found to have a significant effect on precision of intraoral digital impressions for full dentitions (p = 0.016). A linear correlation was found between arch width and precision of digital impressions for whole upper jaws (r = 0.326, p = 0

  11. Accuracy of Intraoral Digital Impressions for Whole Upper Jaws, Including Full Dentitions and Palatal Soft Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Ning; Xiong, Yaoyang; Jiao, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Intraoral digital impressions have been stated to meet the clinical requirements for some teeth-supported restorations, though fewer evidences were proposed for larger scanning range. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy (trueness and precision) of intraoral digital impressions for whole upper jaws, including the full dentitions and palatal soft tissues, as well as to determine the effect of different palatal vault height or arch width on accuracy of intraoral digital impressions. Thirty-two volunteers were divided into three groups according to the palatal vault height or arch width. Each volunteer received three scans with TRIOS intraoral scanner and one conventional impression of whole upper jaw. Three-dimensional (3D) images digitized from conventional gypsum casts by a laboratory scanner were chose as the reference models. All datasets were imported to a specific software program for 3D analysis by "best fit alignment" and "3D compare" process. Color-coded deviation maps showed qualitative visualization of the deviations. For the digital impressions for palatal soft tissues, trueness was (130.54±33.95)μm and precision was (55.26±11.21)μm. For the digital impressions for upper full dentitions, trueness was (80.01±17.78)μm and precision was (59.52±11.29)μm. Larger deviations were found between intraoral digital impressions and conventional impressions in the areas of palatal soft tissues than that in the areas of full dentitions (p<0.001). Precision of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues was slightly better than that for full dentitions (p = 0.049). There was no significant effect of palatal vault height on accuracy of digital impressions for palatal soft tissues (p>0.05), but arch width was found to have a significant effect on precision of intraoral digital impressions for full dentitions (p = 0.016). A linear correlation was found between arch width and precision of digital impressions for whole upper jaws (r = 0.326, p = 0

  12. Clinical Evaluation of Different Pre-impression Preparation Procedures of Dental Arch

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Nitin; Arora, Monika; Gupta, Naveen; Agarwal, Manisha; Verma, Rohit; Rathod, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bubbles and voids on the occlusal surface impede the actual intercuspation and pre-impression preparation aims to reduce the incidence of air bubbles and voids as well as influences the quality of occlusal reproduction and actual clinical intercuspation in the articulator. The study was undertaken to determine the influence of different pre-impression preparation procedures of antagonistic dental arch on the quality of the occlusal reproduction of the teeth in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions and to determine most reliable pre-impression preparation method to reduce the incidence of air bubbles. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 subjects were selected having full complement of mandibular teeth from second molar to second molar with well demarcated cusp height. 200 impressions were made with irreversible hydrocolloid material. The impressions were divided into five groups of 40 impressions each and each group had one specific type of pre-impression preparation. All the impressions were poured in die stone. A stereomicroscope with graduated eyepiece was used to count the number of bubbles on the occlusal surface of premolars and molars. The mean and standard deviations were calculated for each group. Mann–Whitney U-test was applied to find the significant difference between different groups. Results: Least bubbles were found in the group in which oral cavity was dried by saliva ejector and fluid hydrocolloid was finger painted onto the occlusal surfaces immediately before the placement of impression tray in the mouth. Conclusion: It was found that finger painting the tooth surfaces with fluid hydrocolloid immediately before the placement of loaded impression tray in the mouth was the most reliable method. The oral cavity can be cleared more easily of excess saliva by vacuum suction rather than by use of an astringent solution. PMID:26229376

  13. Dental wax impressions of plant tissues for viewing with scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

    PubMed

    Beermann, Anke; Hülskamp, Martin

    2010-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a valuable method for examining surface structures. Taking wax impressions of plant structures, such as leaves, is a nondestructive procedure that makes it possible to view changes in surface structures over time, such as during development. This protocol describes a method for making dental wax impressions of plant tissues.

  14. Instructional Strategies for Achieving a Positive Impression in Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) Distance Education Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuliang; Ginther, Dean W.

    With the rapid development of computer technology in recent years, distance education, and especially computer-mediated communication (CMC), has expanded very quickly. The application of computer technology in education presents many unanswered questions, including issues related to impression formation and impression management in…

  15. Speed Dating and the Presentation of Self: A Teaching Exercise in Impression Management and Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Jeff A.; Tsitsos, William

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an in-class exercise for teaching theories of the presentation of self that is organized around two key concepts, impression management and impression formation. By highlighting the interpretive, interactive aspects of the presentation of self, this exercise is also useful for teaching the major principles of symbolic…

  16. Modification of Fixture Mount to be Used as an Impression Coping in Closely Placed Implants.

    PubMed

    Mahoorkar, Sudhindra; Jain, Anoop; K, Cauvery; Kumar, Pawan; Havale, Raghavendra

    2014-04-01

    An implant-level impression is often desired for designing and fabricating an implant-supported fixed restoration. This clinical report describes the use of modified press-fit metal implant fixture mount as an impression coping for making an impression of closely placed implants. The fixture mount is easier to manipulate, time saving and more comfortable for both the clinician and patient because the implant fixture mount is connected to the implant by pressing on instead of screwing. As compared to plastic press fit impression coping, metal fixture mount will not distort when modification of fixture mount are required in convergently or closely placed implants. It has the advantage of both the open-tray and closed-tray implant impression techniques.

  17. Chemical enhancement of footwear impressions in blood on fabric - part 1: protein stains.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Savage, Kathleen A; Bandey, Helen; Nic Daéid, Niamh

    2011-09-01

    A range of protein stains were utilised for the enhancement of footwear impressions on a variety of fabric types of different colours with blood as a contaminant. A semi-automated stamping device was used to deliver test impressions at a set force to minimise the variability between impressions; multiple impressions were produced and enhanced by each reagent to determine the repeatability of the enhancement. Results indicated that while most protein stains used in this study successfully enhanced impressions in blood on light coloured fabrics, background staining caused interference on natural fabrics. Enhancement on dark coloured fabrics was only achieved using fluorescent protein stains, as non-fluorescent protein stains provided poor contrast. A further comparison was performed with commercially available protein staining solutions and solutions prepared within the laboratory from the appropriate chemicals. Both solutions performed equally well, though it is recommended to use freshly prepared solutions whenever possible.

  18. Capturing finger and palm impressions using a hand cream and thermochromatic paper.

    PubMed

    Bond, John W

    2013-09-01

    An inkless set of finger and palm impressions has been obtained on thermochromatic paper by incorporating the protic solvent butylene glycol into a base hand cream mixture, which is rubbed into the hands for 30 sec before donation. This requires no washing of the hands before or after donation, removing many of the difficulties associated with inked impressions. In a random trial of 50 male and 50 female participants (mean age 41 years), 96 found the hand cream pleasant and easy to use and all produced identifiable finger and palm impressions. Following donation, participants continued to rub the hand cream into their hands. Impressions were visible immediately after donation and have not exhibited fading 2 years after being taken. 10% of participants produced impressions that captured third-level detail, the variation between participants being thought to be associated with the amount of pressure applied during donation.

  19. Part-Digitizing System of Impression and Interocclusal Record for Complete Denture Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Takashi; Goto, Takaharu; Yagi, Kazutomo; Kashiwabara, Toshiya; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have reported the application of digital technology to removable dentures, particularly for the process of impression and interocclusal recording for complete denture fabrication. This article describes a part-digitizing system of impression and interocclusal records for complete denture fabrication. The denture foundation area in an edentulous mouth, including the border areas and residual ridge, is outlined by tracing the surfaces with a 3-D pen-type digitizer. Specialized trays for final impressions and interocclusal records were generated using computer-aided design and manufactured using the digital data. Final impression and interocclusal records were carried out using these specialized trays. The computer-aided method using preliminary digital impressions and specialized trays would be feasible for clinical use for complete denture fabrication.

  20. A method for impregnating nylon transfer membranes with leucocrystal violet for enhancing and lifting bloody impressions.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Amy L; Brun-Conti, Leanora

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this research project was to demonstrate a quick and easy method for impregnating nylon transfer membranes with leucocrystal violet (LCV) for the purpose of lifting and enhancing impressions made in blood. A stamp that would simulate fine detail found in fingerprints or footwear was used to create impressions on a variety of substrates. Four different LCV formulations were tested to determine the effectiveness of the prepared membranes in lifting and enhancing the impressions. Further investigation involved the feasibility of using the LCV membranes in the field by studying the shelf life and storage of the impregnated membranes and the longevity of the lifted impressions. One of the formations studied demonstrated superior lifting and enhancing capabilities, as well as a prolonged shelf life and a resilience of the lifted impressions, thus proving LCV to be an extremely valuable technique.

  1. A Comparison of Various Fixatives for Casting Footwear Impressions in Sand at Crime Scenes.

    PubMed

    Battiest, Travis; Clutter, Susan W; McGill, David

    2016-05-01

    Footwear examination can provide an important link between the crime scene and the suspect. Casts have been taken from snow, soil, and sand substrates to assist with the examination and to accurately depict the impression. However, there has been some discrepancy on what kind of fixative, if any, should be used with impressions present in sand. This study tested four different fixatives on three sandy substrates. Eight gross characteristics were added to a boot sole, and thirty sand impressions were created in each substrate. Except for one control set that remained untreated, the impressions were treated with a fixative agent before casting. The ninety shoe casts were examined by a qualified footwear examiner and scored based on his ability to see the eight characteristics. The results indicated that pump-action hairspray was the most successful on play and construction sand, while beach sand impressions without any fixative scored highest.

  2. A novel method for the photographic recovery of fingermark impressions from ammunition cases using digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Porter, Glenn; Ebeyan, Robert; Crumlish, Charles; Renshaw, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    The photographic preservation of fingermark impression evidence found on ammunition cases remains problematic due to the cylindrical shape of the deposition substrate preventing complete capture of the impression in a single image. A novel method was developed for the photographic recovery of fingermarks from curved surfaces using digital imaging. The process involves the digital construction of a complete impression image made from several different images captured from multiple camera perspectives. Fingermark impressions deposited onto 9-mm and 0.22-caliber brass cartridge cases and a plastic 12-gauge shotgun shell were tested using various image parameters, including digital stitching method, number of images per 360° rotation of shell, image cropping, and overlap. The results suggest that this method may be successfully used to recover fingermark impression evidence from the surfaces of ammunition cases or other similar cylindrical surfaces.

  3. Psychotic patients' impressions of a person from written descriptions.

    PubMed

    Luchins, A S; Luchins, E H

    1984-02-01

    The present study examined the impressions of personality formed from written descriptions of behavior by over 200 hospitalized male schizophrenics, tested individually when they seemed in contact with reality. One description was of extrovert (E) behavior by a youth named Jim; another was of his introvert (I) behavior in similar settings. Combined communications gave one description immediately after the other. After 150 patients read one of the communications, they were generally willing and able to respond to a 36-item questionnaire about Jim. This also occurred when 96 patients were asked to answer it before any communication, on the basis of their expectations about Jim; 56 subsequently received a communication, followed by readministration of the questionnaire. Patients' responses, before or after the communications, revealed few pathological signs and, like those of normal Ss, could usually be classified as E or I. Patients had less differential effects, and far fewer I responses than normal Ss. Patients and normals showed preconceptions of Jim as extrovertive. Results were discussed in light of the projective hypothesis and other theories.

  4. Personality and workplace impression management: correlates and implications.

    PubMed

    Bourdage, Joshua S; Wiltshire, Jocelyn; Lee, Kibeom

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of personality in understanding impression management (IM) behaviors. We hypothesized that the HEXACO model of personality could provide an intricate understanding of the dispositional bases of IM behaviors, as well as coworkers' ability to accurately perceive the IM of those they work with. Using 2 samples (N = 176 and N = 366), we found that the common core underlying 5 IM behaviors possesses a strong negative relationship with the personality trait of Honesty-Humility, such that individuals low in this trait were more likely to report using all IM behaviors. Furthermore, we found that the unique variance associated with specific IM behaviors can be understood using other traits included in the HEXACO personality model, including Emotionality, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness. In a subset of the data (N = 100), we examined self-coworker convergence in IM and personality. We found that while coworkers are adequate at judging traditional personality traits, the self-coworker convergence for all 5 IM behaviors, as well as the personality trait of Honesty-Humility, were not significant. This adds to a growing body of evidence that coworkers may not be good at accurately perceiving IM or Honesty-Humility in the workplace.

  5. Measuring turbulent gust impressions in a forested canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiscox, A.; Ertell, K.

    2014-12-01

    The temporal and spatial characteristics of tree-sway motions and their aerodynamic interactions with coherent turbulence wind fields in a forest (Howland Forest, ME) are examined. Year round measurements of turbulence where taken at heights, above, below, and in the live crown. Additionally measurements of tree bole motion were taken simultaneously for 150 trees surrounding the main meteorological tower. To identify the gust impressions and further understand the timing, spacing and intensity of momentum flux, a a multi-resolution decomposition (MRD) technique was used to find the dominant eddy size. Fourier analysis was applied to each tree for the corresponding time and changes in dominant tree frequency were mapped over time. Results indicate that the most coherency in stand-scale motion occurs when frequency changes are mapped at the same time resolution of the dominant eddy size. Through a mapping-displacement comparison, the sub-mesoscale motions of a canopy atmosphere and their effect on the tree's movement as well as fluxes of energy will be better understood.

  6. Dimensional stability of newer alginate impression materials over seven days.

    PubMed

    Wandrekar, Siddharth; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Clark, Robert K F; Radford, David R

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the dimensional stability of the so called '5 day stable' alginates. Ten specimens each of three alginate materials were prepared using a standardised impression technique and a typodont model. Travelling microscope measurements were recorded for six distances at 24 hour intervals. SEM and EDX analysis was undertaken. Changes in dimension over time and differences between materials were tested using analysis of variance. 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the percentage change for comparison with a target of 1.5% based on the ISO Standard. Statistically significant dimensional changes were observed in some measured distances for all materials, but only six out of fifty four distances measured at 1, 5 and 7 days in three materials showed 95% confidence intervals that included the 1.5% ISO standard. There were no statistically significant differences in the proportional change between the three materials. The three materials showed similar appearance under SEM and similar composition by EDX analysis. It is concluded that all materials demonstrated good dimensional stability over the recommended maximum of 5 days.

  7. Ethnic Minorities’ Impression Management in the Interview: Helping or Hindering?

    PubMed Central

    Derous, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Cross-cultural impression management (IM) has not been considered much, which is remarkable given the fast rate at which the labor market is becoming multicultural. This study investigated whether ethnic minorities and majorities differed in their preference for IM-tactics and how this affected ethnic minorities’ interview outcomes. A preliminary study (focus groups/survey) showed that ethnic minorities (i.e., Arab/Moroccans) preferred ‘entitlements’ whereas majorities (i.e., Flemish/Belgians) preferred ‘opinion conformity’ as IM-tactics. An experimental follow-up study among 163 ethnic majority raters showed no main effect of IM-tactics on interview ratings. Ethnic minorities’ use of IM-tactics only affected interview ratings if rater characteristics were considered. Specifically, interview ratings were higher when ethnic minorities used opinion conformity (i.e., majority-preferred IM-tactic) and lower when minorities used entitlements (i.e., minority-preferred IM-tactic) if recruiters were high in social dominance orientation, and when they felt more experienced/proficient with interviewing. IM-tactics are a human capital factor that might help applicants to increase their job chances on the labor market. It is concluded that ethnic minority applicants’ preferences for certain IM-tactics might lead to bias even in structured interview settings, but that this depends on ethnic majority recruiters’ interview experience and ingroup/outgroup attitudes. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:28203211

  8. Ethnic Minorities' Impression Management in the Interview: Helping or Hindering?

    PubMed

    Derous, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Cross-cultural impression management (IM) has not been considered much, which is remarkable given the fast rate at which the labor market is becoming multicultural. This study investigated whether ethnic minorities and majorities differed in their preference for IM-tactics and how this affected ethnic minorities' interview outcomes. A preliminary study (focus groups/survey) showed that ethnic minorities (i.e., Arab/Moroccans) preferred 'entitlements' whereas majorities (i.e., Flemish/Belgians) preferred 'opinion conformity' as IM-tactics. An experimental follow-up study among 163 ethnic majority raters showed no main effect of IM-tactics on interview ratings. Ethnic minorities' use of IM-tactics only affected interview ratings if rater characteristics were considered. Specifically, interview ratings were higher when ethnic minorities used opinion conformity (i.e., majority-preferred IM-tactic) and lower when minorities used entitlements (i.e., minority-preferred IM-tactic) if recruiters were high in social dominance orientation, and when they felt more experienced/proficient with interviewing. IM-tactics are a human capital factor that might help applicants to increase their job chances on the labor market. It is concluded that ethnic minority applicants' preferences for certain IM-tactics might lead to bias even in structured interview settings, but that this depends on ethnic majority recruiters' interview experience and ingroup/outgroup attitudes. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  9. [Minimal emotional dysfunction and first impression formation in personality disorders].

    PubMed

    Linden, M; Vilain, M

    2011-01-01

    "Minimal cerebral dysfunctions" are isolated impairments of basic mental functions, which are elements of complex functions like speech. The best described are cognitive dysfunctions such as reading and writing problems, dyscalculia, attention deficits, but also motor dysfunctions such as problems with articulation, hyperactivity or impulsivity. Personality disorders can be characterized by isolated emotional dysfunctions in relation to emotional adequacy, intensity and responsivity. For example, paranoid personality disorders can be characterized by continuous and inadequate distrust, as a disorder of emotional adequacy. Schizoid personality disorders can be characterized by low expressive emotionality, as a disorder of effect intensity, or dissocial personality disorders can be characterized by emotional non-responsivity. Minimal emotional dysfunctions cause interactional misunderstandings because of the psychology of "first impression formation". Studies have shown that in 100 ms persons build up complex and lasting emotional judgements about other persons. Therefore, minimal emotional dysfunctions result in interactional problems and adjustment disorders and in corresponding cognitive schemata.From the concept of minimal emotional dysfunctions specific psychotherapeutic interventions in respect to the patient-therapist relationship, the diagnostic process, the clarification of emotions and reality testing, and especially an understanding of personality disorders as impairment and "selection, optimization, and compensation" as a way of coping can be derived.

  10. Lateral orbitofrontal cortex links social impressions to political choices.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chenjie; Stolle, Dietlind; Gidengil, Elisabeth; Fellows, Lesley K

    2015-06-03

    Recent studies of political behavior suggest that voting decisions can be influenced substantially by "first-impression" social attributions based on physical appearance. Separate lines of research have implicated the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) in the judgment of social traits on the one hand and economic decision-making on the other, making this region a plausible candidate for linking social attributions to voting decisions. Here, we asked whether OFC lesions in humans disrupted the ability to judge traits of political candidates or affected how these judgments influenced voting decisions. Seven patients with lateral OFC damage, 18 patients with frontal damage sparing the lateral OFC, and 53 matched healthy participants took part in a simulated election paradigm, in which they voted for real-life (but unknown) candidates based only on photographs of their faces. Consistent with previous work, attributions of "competence" and "attractiveness" based on candidate appearance predicted voting behavior in the healthy control group. Frontal damage did not affect substantially the ability to make competence or attractiveness judgments, but patients with damage to the lateral OFC differed from other groups in how they applied this information when voting. Only attractiveness ratings had any predictive power for voting choices after lateral OFC damage, whereas other frontal patients and healthy controls relied on information about both competence and attractiveness in making their choice. An intact lateral OFC may not be necessary for judgment of social traits based on physical appearance, but it seems to be crucial in applying this information in political decision-making.

  11. Stimulation of Wound Healing by Electroactive, Antibacterial, and Antioxidant Polyurethane/Siloxane Dressing Membranes: In Vitro and in Vivo Evaluations.

    PubMed

    Gharibi, Reza; Yeganeh, Hamid; Rezapour-Lactoee, Alireza; Hassan, Zuhair M

    2015-11-04

    A series of novel polyurethane/siloxane-based wound dressing membranes was prepared through sol-gel reaction of methoxysilane end-functionalized urethane prepolymers composed of castor oil and ricinoleic methyl ester as well as methoxysilane functional aniline tetramer (AT) moieties. The samples were fully characterized and their physicochemical, mechanical, electrical, and biological properties were assayed. The biological activity of these dressings against fibroblast cells and couple of microbes was also studied. It was revealed that samples that displayed electroactivity by introduction of AT moieties showed a broad range of antimicrobial activity toward different microorganisms, promising antioxidant (radical scavenging) efficiency and significant activity for stimulation of fibroblast cell growth and proliferation. Meanwhile, these samples showed appropriate tensile strength and ability for maintaining a moist environment over a wound by controlled equilibrium water absorption and water vapor transmission rate. The selected electroactive dressing was subjected to an in vivo assay using a rat animal model and the wound healing process was monitored and compared with analogous dressing without AT moieties. The recorded results showed that the electroactive dressings induced an increase in the rate of wound contraction, promoted collagen deposition, and encouraged vascularization in the wounded area. On the basis of the results of in vitro and in vivo assays, the positive influence of designed dressings for accelerated healing of a wound model was confirmed.

  12. Preparation of electrospun fiber mats using siloxane-containing vaterite and biodegradable polymer hybrids for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Kie; Lin, Sen; Nakamura, Jin; Obata, Akiko; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2013-11-01

    An electrospun fiber mat using a new composite consisting of siloxane-containing vaterite (SiV) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (denoted by SiPLGVH) was prepared with the aim of applying it as a membrane for use in a guided bone regeneration (GBR) system. Another electrospun fiber mat using a previously described composite consisting of SiV and poly(L-lactic acid) (denoted by SiPVH) was also prepared as a comparative sample. SiPLG VH fiber mats showed superior results in terms of mechanical tensile properties and cellular behavior. Their elongation before failure was about eight times higher than that of SiPVH. The numbers of osteoblast-like cells that proliferated on the SiPLGVH fiber mats, regardless of the hydroxyapatite coating, were comparable to that of SiPVH. The cells spread more, two dimensionally, on the SiPLGVH fiber mats, since the pores between fibers were narrowed down because of swelling of the PLGA matrix during cell culture. This two-dimensional cellular proliferation quality on the SiPLGVH fiber mats is expected to be suitable for materials used in GBR, leading to control of infiltration of the soft tissue and great tissue integration with the surrounding tissue.

  13. Self-assembly of linear and cyclic siloxane-containing mesogens: investigation of layered structures in bulk and thin films.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Paul; Hindelang, Konrad; Golosova, Anastasia; Papadakis, Christine M; Rieger, Bernhard

    2011-12-23

    Silicon-containing materials which possess the ability to form mesophases are promising systems for applications in the fields of electro-optical devices, nonlinear optics, and information storage media. In this work, the formation of supramolecular assemblies of a series of low molecular weight siloxane-containing mesogens is presented. Besides a novel synthesis route via Ru(II) -catalyzed hydrosilylation of phenyl acetylene derivatives, mesophase characterization by modern analysis techniques is performed. As linker groups, leading to bi- and tetramesogens, linear disiloxane and cyclic tetrasiloxane are utilized. In the resulting class of materials, high thermal stability, induced by the formation of layered smectic-type structures, is predominant. The smectic-type phases were found to be monotropic. Layer distances in the assemblies, as well as the phase transition temperatures, can be controlled by the substitution motif on the mesogens (number and length of alkyl chains). In spin-cast thin films, the layered domains are visualized by atomic force microscopy; furthermore, domain dimensions and electron densities are determined by grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering.

  14. Siloxanes removal from biogas by a lab-scale biotrickling filter inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa S240.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunhui; Zhang, Weijiang; Xu, Jiao

    2014-06-30

    Removing volatile methyl siloxanes (VMSs) from biogas remains a longstanding challenge in the field of biological process due to their low bioavailability and biodegradation. To address this issue, a lab-scale aerobic biotrickling filter, packed with porous lava and inoculated with an effective strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, was developed and its performance for octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4, selected as a model VMS) removal from an aerobic synthetic gas was monitored. The biotrickling filter exhibited a relatively high removal efficiency over 74% at empty bed residence time of 13.2 min. Rhamnolipids, biosurfactants produced by P. aeruginosa, were identified in the liquid phase of the biotrickling filter by HPLC-MS and ATR-FTIR, and they were found to be the main factor of improving D4 removal. Moreover, dimethylsilanediol, methanol, silicic acid in the liquid phase and carbon dioxide in the gas phase, as the biodegradation products of D4, were determined by GC-MS, silicic acid analysis and non-dispersive infrared analysis. To our knowledge, it is the first time to report the existence of methanol in the D4 degradation products. Finally, a metabolic pathway for D4 degradation by P. aeruginosa was proposed based on our results.

  15. Characterization and Mechanism for the Protection of Photolytic Decomposition of N-Halamine Siloxane Coatings by Titanium Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Li, Jing; Li, Lin; McFarland, Stuart; Ren, Xuehong; Acevedo, Orlando; Huang, T S

    2016-02-10

    N-Halamine antibacterial materials have superior inactivation activities due to oxidative chlorine species. However, N-Cl bonds and bonds between N-halamine and substrates often decompose rapidly under UV irradiation, leading to unrecoverable loss of antimicrobial activity. In this study, titanium dioxide was covalently bonded onto N-halamine siloxane poly[5,5-dimethyl-3-(3'-triethoxysilylpropyl)hydantoin] (PSPH) via a sol-gel process. Experimental testing of the chlorinated cotton fabrics treated with TiO2/PSPH demonstrated that the residual oxidative chlorine in cotton-TiO2/PSPH-Cl was still effective for inactivating bacteria after 50 washing cycles and under UV light irradiation for 24 h. Quantum mechanical calculations found that TiO2 improves the UV stability of the PSPH-Cl system by increasing the activation barrier of the C-Si scission reaction responsible for the loss of the biocidal hydantoin moiety. SEM, XPS and FTIR spectra were used to characterize the coated cotton samples. Cotton-TiO2/PSPH-Cl samples exhibited good antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538) and Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 43895). The storage stability and washing stability of treated cotton fabrics were also investigated.

  16. Molecular-Level Insights into the Reactivity of Siloxane-Based Electrolytes at a Lithium-Metal Anode

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Lu, Jun; Luo, Xiangyi; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Ren, Yang; Wu, Huiming; Albishri, Hassan M.; El-Hady, D. A.; Al-Bogami, A. S.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2014-07-21

    A molecular-level understanding of the reactions that occur at the lithium-metal anode/electrolyte interphase is essential to improve the performance of Li–O2 batteries. Experimental and computational techniques are applied to explore the reactivity of tri(ethylene glycol)-substituted trimethylsilane (1NM3), a siloxane-based ether electrolyte, at the lithium-metal anode. In situ/ex situ X-ray diffraction and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy studies provide evidence of the formation of lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonates at the anode upon gradual degradation of the metallic lithium anode and the solvent molecules in the presence of oxygen. Density functional calculations performed to obtain a mechanistic understanding of the reductive decomposition of 1NM3 indicate that the decomposition does not require any apparent barrier to produce lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonates when the reduced 1NM3 solvent molecules interact with the oxygen crossing over from the cathode. This study indicates that degradation may be more significant in the case of the 1NM3 solvent, compared to linear ethers such as tetraglyme or dioxalone, because of its relatively high electron affinity. Also, both protection of the lithium metal and prevention of oxygen crossover to the anode are essential for minimizing electrolyte and anode decomposition.

  17. Consistency in trophic magnification factors of cyclic methyl siloxanes in pelagic freshwater food webs leading to brown trout.

    PubMed

    Borgå, Katrine; Fjeld, Eirik; Kierkegaard, Amelie; McLachlan, Michael S

    2013-12-17

    Cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) concentrations were analyzed in the pelagic food web of two Norwegian lakes (Mjøsa, Randsfjorden), and in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) collected in a reference lake (Femunden), in 2012. Lakes receiving discharge from wastewater treatment plants (Mjøsa and Randsfjorden) had cVMS concentrations in trout that were up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those in Femunden, where most samples were close to the limit of quantification (LOQ). Food web biomagnification of cVMS in Mjøsa and Randsfjorden was quantified by estimation of trophic magnification factors (TMFs). TMF for legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were analyzed for comparison. Both decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) biomagnified with TMFs of 2.9 (2.1-4.0) and 2.3 (1.8-3.0), respectively. Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) was below the LOQ in the majority of samples and had substantially lower biomagnification than for D5 and D6. The cVMS TMFs did not differ between the lakes, whereas the legacy POP TMFs were higher in Mjøsa than inRandsfjorden. Whitefish had lower cVMS bioaccumulation compared to legacy POPs, and affected the TMF significance for cVMS, but not for POPs. TMFs of D5 and legacy contaminants in Lake Mjøsa were consistent with those previously measured in Mjøsa.

  18. Fertilizing ROSES through the STEM: Interdisciplinary Modules as Pre-service Research Experiences for Secondary STEM Educators (IMPRESS-Ed)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, N. B.; Kavic, M.; Benoit, M. H.; Wiita, P.

    2011-12-01

    IMPRESS-Ed is a program designed to provide authentic summer research experiences in the space, earth, and atmospheric sciences for pre-service K-12 educators at The College of New Jersey (TCNJ). In 2011, the program involved five students and took place over eight weeks with recruitment occurring during the preceding academic year. The program was divided into two modules: A common core module and an individual mentored research experience. The common module consisted of three units focusing on data-driven pedagogical approaches in astrophysics, tectonophysics, and atmospheric science, respectively. The common module also featured training sessions in observational astronomy, and use of a 3D geowall and state of the art planetarium. Participants in the program are also offered the opportunity to utilize the available TCNJ facilities with their future students. Given that a large number of graduates from the TCNJ take positions in local New Jersey schools, the opportunity to make use of these facilities at a future time would be of great significance to them and their future students. The individual mentored research module matched student interests with potential projects. Research led by M.H. Benoit analyzed gravity data from the NASA-GRACE mission to find lithospheric density contrasts beneath the eastern US. A student working with N.B. Magee used data from NASA satellites CALIPSO, CloudSat, and AQUA-MODIS to study the dynamics of convective cloud tops. Research projects led by M. Kavic performed simulations to investigate the possibility of detecting superconducting cosmic strings using radio observations and also designed and constructed a radio interferometer based on the NASA's Radio-Jove program. P. Wiita supervised a research project studying star-forming regions of active galaxies through analysis of images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and GALEX. The research program was also incorporated into the framework of the TCNJ Mentored Undergraduate Summer

  19. An evaluation of dimensional accuracy of one-step and two-step impression technique using addition silicone impression material: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Pande, Neelam A; Parkhedkar, R D

    2013-09-01

    The study is aimed to evaluate the dimensional accuracy, the effect of undercut of two different configurations and the elastic recovery of addition silicone impression material assessed indirectly, by measuring the dimensions on stone models recorded from the impression of the master model, using one-step and two-step impression technique, for addition silicone impression materials. Measurements are taken to evaluate horizontal or linear and vertical dimensional changes, of the abutment V and abutment C from the stainless steel model. Heavy body/light body material is used for making one-step impression technique in a custom tray. Putty/light body is used for taking two-step technique in a stock metal tray. Improved die stone is used for pouring the impression. The different 11 locations on the dies produced by two different techniques are measured microscopically on image analyzer and compared with those of stainless steel model. Anova test was applied to test the differences of mean values of inter and intra abutment measurements, to calculate p value. Unpaired t test was applied to calculate t value. Results showed less deviation of stone models produced by one-step technique from stainless steel model, whereas the deviation of stone models produced by two-step is comparatively more. (p < 0.01). This difference of deviation is significantly less in one-step as compared to two-step technique. One-step is sufficiently dimensionally accurate than two-step technique in conjunction with addition silicone impression material. They have the best elastic recovery from the two undercut configurations.

  20. The quality of impressions for crowns and bridges: an assessment of the work received at three commercial dental laboratories. assessing qualities of impressions that may lead to occlusal discrepancies with indirect restorations.

    PubMed

    Storey, D; Coward, T J

    2014-03-01

    There are few published studies that directly assess the quality of impressions for crowns and bridges in the UK. This paper considers aspects of impression quality with particular attention to factors causing potential occlusal discrepancies in the final restoration. To this end three dental laboratories were visited over a 3-month period. All impressions for conventional crown and bridgework that arrived on the days of the visits were examined and assessed against criteria defined on a custom-designed assessment form. A total of 206 impression cases were considered in this study. Flexible impression trays were used for 65% of working impressions. Their use was more common for NHS work than for private work. 31.9% of all alginate impressions examined were not adequately fixed to the tray. Visible contamination of impressions was not uncommon.

  1. Thermal stability of polyvinyl alcohol/nanocrystalline cellulose composites.

    PubMed

    Voronova, Marina I; Surov, Oleg V; Guseinov, Sabir S; Barannikov, Vladimir P; Zakharov, Anatoly G

    2015-10-05

    Thermal stability of polyvinyl alcohol/cellulose nanocrystals (PVA/CNCs) composites prepared with solution casting technique was studied. The PVA/CNCs composites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis. Due to the presence of CNCs nanoparticles, thermal degradation of the composites occurs at much higher temperatures compared to that of the neat PVA. Thermal stability of the PVA/CNCs composites is maximally enhanced with CNCs content of 8-12 wt%. Some thermal degradation products of the PVA/CNCs composites were identified by mass spectrometric analysis. TG measurements with synchronous recording of mass spectra revealed that the thermal degradation of both CNCs and PVA in the composites with CNCs content of 8-12 wt% occurs simultaneously at a much higher temperature than that of CNCs or the neat PVA. However, with increasing CNCs content more than 12 wt% the thermal stability of the composites decreases. In this case, the degradation of CNCs comes first followed by the degradation of PVA.

  2. UV-responsive polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers prepared by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Zeeshan; Ali, Shamshad; Khatri, Imran; Mayakrishnan, Gopiraman; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Ick-Soo

    2015-07-01

    We report UV-responsive polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers for potential application for recording and erasing quick response (QR) codes. We incorporate 1‧-3‧-dihydro-8-methoxy-1‧,3‧,3‧-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro [2H-1-benzopyran-2,2‧-(2H)-indole] (indole) and,3-dihydro-1,3,3-trimethylspiro [2H-indole-2,3‧-[3H] phenanthr [9,10-b] (1,4) oxazine] (oxazine) into PVA polymer matrix via electrospinning technique. The resultant nanofibers were measured for recording-erasing, photo-coloration and thermal reversibility. The rate of photo-coloration of PVA-indole nanofibers was five times higher than the PVA-oxazine nanofibers, whereas the thermal reversibility found to be more than twice as fast as PVA-oxazine nanofibers. Results showed that the resultant nanofibers have very good capability of recording QR codes multiple times. The FTIR spectroscopy and SEM were employed to characterize the electrospun nanofibers. The UV-responsive PVA nanofibers have great potentials as a light-driven nanomaterials incorporated within sensors, sensitive displays and in optical devices such as erasable and rewritable optical storage.

  3. Pressure loss in elbow pipes of unplasticized polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, T; Ojima, J

    1996-01-01

    In the ductwork of local exhaust systems, 90 degrees elbow pipes (JIS K 6739) are commonly used to alter the direction of airflow; thus, are important components of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) ducts. Pressure loss in 90 degrees PVC elbow pipes was investigated by measuring static pressure, and the characteristics of airflow was determined. First, a linear decrease in static pressure was observed at points of the downstream side beyond a distance of 10 times the diameter (10d) from the flanged round opening of the smooth VU ducts (JIS K6741). The linear decrease was also observed at points of the downstream side located at distances of greater than 30d from the elbow pipe. Coefficients of loss in the PVC elbow pipes were found to be constant for the Reynolds numbers ranging from 3.38 x 10(4) to 5.96 x 10(5) for all diameters examined, and a chart of pressure loss was constructed with these coefficients. The coefficients of loss in PVC elbow pipes were not equivalent to those of metal stamped elbows for any R/d. However, the differences in the coefficients between the metal stamped elbow and the PVC elbow were smaller with larger R/d values.

  4. Dielectric breakdown during Cs+ sputtering of polyvinyl chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahoud, F.; Guillot, J.; Audinot, J. N.; Bertrand, P.; Delcorte, A.; Migeon, H. N.

    2014-02-01

    Thin films of insulating polymers are sometimes analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) or by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) without the use of an electron gun. In this work, both SIMS and XPS have been used to study the chemical and structural modifications due to the charge effect during Cs+ sputtering of a thin film of polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The kinetic energy distribution study shows that at a small primary fluence ˜1015 Cs+ ions/cm2, the dielectric breakdown voltage of the PVC film is reached, i.e. the minimum voltage that causes a portion of an insulator to become electrically conductive. XPS study indicates that the conducting phase created in the PVC film after energetic Cs+ bombardment consists of graphitized carbon and metallic cesium clusters. After the dielectric breakdown of the film, the positive charge, previously accumulated on the surface, is neutralized through the conductive regions, which are created in the insulating film. During Cs+ sputtering of a PVC film, the chemical structure of the analyzed surface is completely modified and some ionic bonds such as CsC and CsCl are also created.

  5. Electrospun chitosan/polyvinyl alcohol nanofibre mats for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Charernsriwilaiwat, Natthan; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Opanasopit, Praneet

    2014-04-01

    Chitosan (CS) aqueous salt blended with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibre mats was prepared by electrospinning. CS was dissolved with hydroxybenzotriazole (HOBt), thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in distilled water without the use of toxic or hazardous solvents. The CS aqueous salts were blended with PVA at different weight ratios, and the effect of the solution ratios was investigated. The morphologies and mechanical and swelling properties of the generated fibres were analysed. Indirect cytotoxicity studies indicated that the CS/PVA nanofibre mats were non-toxic to normal human fibroblast cells. The CS-HOBt/PVA and CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats demonstrated satisfactory antibacterial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, and an in vivo wound healing test showed that the CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats performed better than gauze in decreasing acute wound size during the first week after tissue damage. In conclusion, the biodegradable, biocompatible and antibacterial CS-EDTA/PVA nanofibre mats have potential for use as wound dressing materials.

  6. Self Nucleation and Crystallization of Poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David; Cebe, Peggy

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a hydrophilic, biodegradable, semi-crystalline polymer with uses ranging from textiles to medicine. Film samples of PVA were investigated to assess crystallization and melting behavior during self-nucleation experiments, and thermal degradation, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, respectively. TG results show that degradation occurred at temperatures close to the observed peak melting temperature of 223 C. Using conventional DSC, PVA was heated at a rate of 10 C/min to various self-nucleation temperatures, Ts, within its melting range, briefly annealed, cooled and reheated. Three distinct crystallization regimes were observed upon cooling, depending upon self nucleation temperature. At low values of Ts, below 227 C, PVA only partially melts; residual crystal anneals while new, less perfect crystals form during cooling. Between 228 C and 234 C, PVA was found to crystallize exclusively by self-nucleation. For Ts above 235 C the PVA melts completely. Fast scanning chip-based calorimetry was used to heat and cool at 2000 K/s, to prevent degradation. Results of self nucleation experiments using fast scanning and conventional DSC will be compared. NSF DMR-1206010.

  7. Respiratory illness caused by overheating of polyvinyl chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Froneberg, B; Johnson, P L; Landrigan, P J

    1982-01-01

    On 9 August 1979, 62 (30.8%) of 201 workers and one of 60 management personnel in a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) fabricating plant developed acute upper and lower respiratory irritation, headache, nausea, and fainting. All were taken to hospital; none died. Sixty of the patients were women. Interviews two weeks later with 57 affected and 14 unaffected workers disclosed that illness had followed exposure to fumes from an overheated (362 degrees C) PVC extruding machine. Fumes were emitted from 1100 until 1150; cases occurred from 1100 until late afternoon. All workers who became ill worked west of the overheated extruder, and the affected manager had visited that area. The earliest cases occurred closest to the machine, and incidence decreased (from 53.3% to 15.4%) with distance westward. This pattern was consistent with plant ventilation. Incidence rates in men and women did not differ (p greater than 0.1). At two and 14 weeks, pulmonary function testing of workers with persistent pulmonary symptoms showed abnormalities in 13 of 16 and in 9 of 11 respectively; the group with persistent symptoms contained an excess of non-smokers and of those with previous respiratory illnesses. One kilogram of PVC heated to 300 degrees C releases an estimated 12.9 g of hydrochloric acid (HCl) and 4.9 g of carbon monoxide (CO). We attributed the outbreak to exposure to toxic HCl and CO and rejected the hypothesis of mass psychogenic illness. PMID:7093150

  8. Poly(vinyl alcohol) gels as photoacoustic breast phantoms revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Piras, Daniele; Heijblom, Michelle; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Manohar, Srirang

    2011-07-01

    A popular phantom in photoacoustic imaging is poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel fabricated by freezing and thawing (F-T) aqueous solutions of PVA. The material possesses acoustic and optical properties similar to those of tissue. Earlier work characterized PVA gels in small test specimens where temperature distributions during F-T are relatively homogeneous. In this work, in breast-sized samples we observed substantial temperature differences between the shallow regions and the interior during the F-T procedure. We investigated whether spatial variations were also present in the acoustic and optical properties. The speed of sound, acoustic attenuation, and optical reduced scattering coefficients were measured on specimens sampled at various locations in a large phantom. In general, the properties matched values quoted for breast tissue. But while acoustic properties were relatively homogeneous, the reduced scattering was substantially different at the surface compared with the interior. We correlated these variations with gel microstructure inspected using scanning electron microscopy. Interestingly, the phantom's reduced scattering spatial distribution matches the optical properties of the standard two-layer breast model used in x ray dosimetry. We conclude that large PVA samples prepared using the standard recipe make excellent breast tissue phantoms.

  9. The First Impression of Data Sent by Two Martian Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    ``Spirit'' at the Gusev crater near the dichotomy boundary sent a panoramic view, an image of the near ground and a very close view of a small spot analyzed by X-ray. The first impression of chaotic disposition of big and small rocks and sandy fragments is wrong. All scales images display striations in 4 directions probably due to intersecting undulations, besides, rock fragments are rather evenly distributed. This is not of surprise because many MOLA images show very regular patterns described earlier for intersecting wave processes on planetary surfaces [1]. The middle scale image shows angular rock fragments of various sizes protruding soil. There is an impression that the protruding blocks represent uplifted parts of a wave-woven surface of volcanic infilling , subsided parts being covered with sandy soil mainly of eolian origin. Such an interpretation is supported by the THEMIS image (released 23 Sept., 2003 in Internet) of a 22 km-diameter crater on Sirenum Fossae where wave structurized (volcanic?) material is gradually covered by eolian sediments leaving protruding high standing blocks (antinodes). The soil X-ray analysis shows high Si an Fe, some Al, Ca, Mg, K, Na, Cl, S, minor Cu, Ni, Zn that should be expected for a mixed material at low/highland contact contaminated by an eolian stuff. ``Opportunity'' is the first highland landing and in this is its highest importance. It seems that long awaited light (in color and density) rock type without Fe [2, 3 & others] is in front of us. The leveled out white outcrops probably represent this kind of rocks (albitites, syenites). Eleveted K, Na, CL, S, Si and H20 (!) detected by gamma and neutron spectra can be explained by sodalite (hydrosodalite) and cancrinite group minerals present in nepheline syenites -- albitites and always accompanied by zeolites containing water. The high chemical dichotomy (and mantle fractionation) between lowlands and highlands is an important part of the wave planetology (Theorem 4 [3

  10. Cost of Impressed Current Cathodic Protection for Coastal Oregon Bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cryer, Curtis B.

    1998-07-01

    The State of Oregon is using arc-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems on reinforced concrete coastal bridges. The two lowest bids for four ICCP projects were averaged and converted to 1997 dollars. The total average cost for the ICCP projects was $51.63/ft2 ($555.51/m2) of protected concrete. The cathodic protection part of the ICCP projects average $14.08/ft2 ($151.47/m2), while zinc anode installation cost an average of $7.13/ft2 ($76.67/m2). Oregon's rugged and beautiful coastline is graced with a series of historical arched bridges designed by Conde B. McCullough. McCullough is the internationally recognized architect who designed many of the Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. 101) bridges in the 1920s and 1930s. Many are listed on the National Historic Register. After the expense ($45m) and public outcry associated with the replacement of the historic Alsea Bay Bridge in Waldport, Oregon, the Oregon Department of Transportation began using impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) to extend the service life of reinforced concrete bridges. Figure 1 visually illustrates the need for such remediation. It shows exposed rebar from underneath the Brush Creek Bridge, which is very representative of the conditions found underneath many coastal Oregon bridges. Four ICCP projects have been funded, put out for bid, and completed. The four projects, their bid closing dates, and their completion dates are the Cape Creek Bridge (1990- 1992), the Yaquina Bay Bridge south arches (1991-1995), the Depoe Bay Bridge (1993-1997), and the Yaquina Bay Bridge south approach (1995-1997). The Cape Creek, Yaquina Bay, and Depoe Bay Bridges are shown in Figs. 2-4. Other ICCP projects are underway on the Oregon coast. In the ICCP systems, arc-sprayed zinc coatings on the concrete surface are anodes that protect the steel rebar. Accelerated laboratory studies at the Albany Research Center have predicted zinc anode service lives of

  11. Impression Cytology in Different Types of Contact Lens Users.

    PubMed

    Iskeleli, Guzin; Arici, Ceyhun; Deger Bilgec, Mustafa; Demirkesen, Cuyan; Serap Arslan, Hilal

    2015-01-01

    This study compared tear function tests and cytologic changes on the conjunctival surface in asymptomatic patients wearing contact lens of different materials. Included in this study were 40 eyes wearing daily wear 4 week replacement hydrogel (H) lenses, 32 eyes wearing silicone hydrogel (SiH) lenses, 18 eyes wearing rigid gas-permeable (RGP) lenses, and 21 healthy eyes (no lenses) as the control group. Epithelial morphology of the conjunctival surface was evaluated, based on Nelson classification with conjunctival impression cytology (CIC), after the tear break-up time (TBUT) and Schirmer test were performed. The mean values of the Schirmer and TBUT tests were significantly higher in the control group than in the other lens groups (p < 0.001). Grade 0 was the most frequent CIC in the control group (66.7%) and least frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%); grade I was least frequent in the control and RGP groups (33.3%) and most frequent in the SiH lens group (40.6%). Moreover, grade 2 was most frequent in the SiH lens group (18.8%). There was no statistically significant difference in goblet cell densities between the groups (p = 0.462). In addition to the different Schirmer and TBUT test results between contact lens wearers and healthy non-wearers, some cytologic changes may occur on the ocular surface with direct mechanical effects of contact lenses. This simple and noninvasive technique may be used to evaluate the ocular surface with regard to intolerance to contact lenses.

  12. Dimensional Changes of Alginate Dental Impression Materials-An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thombare, Ram U

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentists are always looking ahead for more dimensionally stable material for accurate and successful fabrication of prosthesis in this competitive world. Arrival of newer materials and increased material market puts dentists in dilemma for selection of material. Aim The study evaluated the effect of variations in time of pour and temperature on dimensional stability of three brands of commercially available alginates. Materials and Methods Velplast, Marieflex & Zelgan alginate impression materials were evaluated by measuring dimensional accuracy of the master cast. A die was prepared and mounted on the apparatus for the ease of impression making. The prepared casts were categorized into five groups and made up of three brands of alginate impression material with variation in time of pour viz: immediate, 20&40 minutes interval and with varying temperature of 250C, 300C & 400C. Results Impressions showed least distortion at varying degrees of temperature for 20 minutes, but the values obtained by storing of alginate impressions for 20 minutes at 300C were found to be nearly accurate than the values obtained by storing of impression at 400C. However, storing showed shrinkage of impressions. Conclusion Marieflex showed better accuracy in comparison with other two materials. Maintenance of temperature and humidity play key role during storage & transport to prevent distortion. But the study suggests immediate pouring which will minimize the distortion. The manipulation instructions, temperature of mixing water, environment & water powder ratio also plays key role in minimizing the distortion. PMID:26436059

  13. Bragging on Facebook: The Interaction of Content Source and Focus in Online Impression Formation.

    PubMed

    Scott, Graham G; Ravenscroft, Kirsty

    2017-01-01

    Warranting Theory proposes that third-party testimonials are more influential in online impression formation than target-authored statements. Individuals posting content on social media accurately convey their offline personality while endeavoring to present themselves in a positive light. In doing so, they may misjudge the psychological distance of the majority of viewers, who could view this positive self-presentation as bragging and form resultant negative impressions. In this study, we asked 136 participants to view the Facebook timelines of four female targets. Timeline content varied by source (owner- vs. friend-authored) and focus (generally positive vs. personally positive). Participants were tasked with forming impressions of targets and rating them based on attractiveness, confidence, modesty, and popularity. We found that source and focus played distinct roles in impression formation. More positive impressions were formed when owner-authored content was general, and when friend-authored content was personal. This highlights the role played by content focus in impression formation, and the potentially damaging effect of perceived bragging. These results are discussed in relation to the application of the Warranting Theory of impression formation online, and discrepancies between these results and those from related articles are examined.

  14. Evaluation of properties of irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials mixed with disinfectant liquids

    PubMed Central

    Amalan, Arul; Ginjupalli, Kishore; Upadhya, Nagaraja

    2013-01-01

    Background: Addition of disinfectant to irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials can eliminate the disinfection step to avoid dimensional changes associated with it. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of various disinfectant mixing liquids on the properties of commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials. Materials and Methods: Four commercially available irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials (Zelgan, Vignette, Tropicalgin, and Algitex) were mixed with disinfectant liquid containing chlorhexidine (0.1 and 0.2%) and sodium hypochlorite (0.1 and 0.5%). After mixing with disinfectant liquids, materials were evaluated for pH changes during gelation, gelation time, flow, gel strength, permanent deformation and detail reproduction. Results: Significant changes in gelation time were observed in irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials upon mixing with disinfectant liquids. In general, chlorhexidine increased the gelation time, whereas sodium hypochlorite reduced it. However, no significant changes in the flow were observed both with chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite. Gel strength was found to decrease when mixed with chlorhexidine, whereas an increase in gel strength was observed upon mixing with sodium hypochlorite. Permanent deformation of the most irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials was below the specification limit even after mixing with disinfectant liquids. Sodium hypochlorite significantly reduced the surface detail reproduction, whereas no change in detail reproduction was observed with chlorhexidine. Conclusion: Chlorhexidine solution can be used to mix irreversible hydrocolloid impression materials in regular dental practice as it did not significantly alter the properties. This may ensure effective disinfection of impressions. PMID:23878566

  15. Three-dimensional accuracy of implant and abutment level impression techniques: effect on marginal discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Alikhasi, Marzieh; Siadat, Hakimeh; Monzavi, Abbas; Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh

    2011-12-01

    Impression techniques should precisely represent the 3-dimensional status of implants to allow for the fabrication of passively fitting prostheses and subsequently the elimination of strain on supporting implant components and surrounding bone. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of an abutment level impression method with that of an implant level (direct and indirect) impression method using polyether impression material to obtain precise definitive casts and prostheses. A reference acrylic resin dentoform with 2 internal connection implants (Implantium) was made. A total of 21 medium-consistency polyether impressions of the dentoform, including 7 direct implant level, 7 indirect implant level, and 7 abutment level (after 2 straight abutments were secured), were made. Impressions were poured with American Dental Association (ADA) type IV stone, and the positional accuracy of the implant replica heads and abutment analogs in each dimension of x-, y-, and z-axes, as well as angular displacement (Δθ), was evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine. Noble alloy 3-unit castings were fabricated and seated on the abutments in 3 groups; marginal discrepancies were measured at 4 points between prostheses and abutments. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Kruskal-Wallis tests. In comparisons of different impression techniques, only significant statistical Δθ differences were noted between the abutment level method and other techniques (P < .001). Results of this study reveal that although the implant level impression method could better transfer the angular position of the implants (Δθ), the impression method could not affect Δy, Δx, and Δz coordinates of the implants or marginal discrepancy of the 3-unit fixed partial dentures (FPD).

  16. Impression techniques and misfit-induced strains on implant-supported superstructures: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Cehreli, Murat C; Akça, Kivanç

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare misfit-induced strains on implant-supported superstructures fabricated by two impression techniques and two different elastomeric impression materials. A master cast hosting four Straumann implants was constructed. On this cast, a total of 21 implant-level impressions were made by the direct technique using a polyether impression material and synOcta screwed aluminum impression caps (PE-D), and by the indirect technique using polyether (PE-IN) or polyvinylsiloxane impression material (VPS-IN) with snap-on impression caps and synOcta plastic positioning cylinders. Two casts were randomly selected from each group of seven, and a total of four screw-retained superstructures, supported by either two or four implants (one of each type on both casts), were cast in a gold alloy for each group. Linear strain gauges were bonded on the superstructures, and misfit-induced strains were recorded during superstructure connection on each of the working casts and on the master cast using a data acquisition system and corresponding software at a sample rate of 10 kHz. Connection on the implants in the master cast increased strains considerably on most of the superstructures, in comparison with strain gradients measured when the superstructures were connected on the casts from which they were fabricated (P <.05). The differences in strain amplitude between connection on the cast from which the superstructure was fabricated and on the master cast were higher for superstructures fabricated by PE-D than for those fabricated by PE-IN and VPS-IN. The snap-on indirect impression technique for Straumann implants leads to acceptable superstructures, regardless of the impression material used.

  17. Evaluation of factors affecting the accuracy of impressions using quantitative surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, I K; DeLong, R; Pintado, M R; Malik, R

    1995-01-01

    Impression material goes from a plastic to an elastic state during setting. Movement of the impression and excessive seating pressure during this transition can cause distortion in the impressions. The purpose of this study is to determine if the impression distortion is related to movement during setting or to distortion of the putty phase in the two-step impressioning technique. A master model of a maxillary quadrant of teeth was impressed using four different procedures: 1) one-step technique without movement (1S-NM); 2) one-step technique with movement (1S-M); 3) two-step technique without movement (2S-NM); and 4) two-step technique with movement (2S-M). An artificial oral environment and surface analysis technique of the Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanics were used to produce the impressions and measure their accuracy. A digitized image of the first premolar of the master model was aligned with a digitized image of the first premolar of each epoxy model using AnSur. The root mean squared difference (RMS) between the aligned images is a measure of the distortion. The corresponding RMS values for the different methods were: 1S-NM = 23.7 +/- 9.21; 1S-M = 20.4 +/- 3.9; 2S-NM = 20.5 +/- 7.7; 2S-M = 21.3 +/- 4.4. Statistical analysis using a two-way analysis of variance showed no difference at the 0.05 level of significance. Pairwise comparison using the Tukey method showed that neither technique (one-step vs two-step) nor movement is a significant factor. These results showed that low seating pressure will not cause any greater distortions in the two-step impression technique than in the one-step technique, and minor movement during the setting of the impression material will no cause distortion.

  18. Examination of the Position Accuracy of Implant Abutments Reproduced by Intra-Oral Optical Impression

    PubMed Central

    Odaira, Chikayuki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    An impression technique called optical impression using intraoral scanner has attracted attention in digital dentistry. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the optical impression, comparing a virtual model reproduced by an intraoral scanner to a working cast made by conventional silicone impression technique. Two implants were placed on a master model. Working casts made of plaster were fabricated from the master model by silicone impression. The distance between the ball abutments and the angulation between the healing abutments of 5 mm and 7 mm height at master model were measured using Computer Numerical Control Coordinate Measuring Machine (CNCCMM) as control. Working casts were then measured using CNCCMM, and virtual models via stereo lithography data of master model were measured by a three-dimensional analyzing software. The distance between ball abutments of the master model was 9634.9 ± 1.2 μm. The mean values of trueness of the Lava COS and working casts were 64.5 μm and 22.5 μm, respectively, greater than that of control. The mean of precision values of the Lava COS and working casts were 15.6 μm and 13.5 μm, respectively. In the case of a 5-mm-height healing abutment, mean angulation error of the Lava COS was greater than that of the working cast, resulting in significant differences in trueness and precision. However, in the case of a 7-mm-height abutment, mean angulation errors of the Lava COS and the working cast were not significantly different in trueness and precision. Therefore, distance errors of the optical impression were slightly greater than those of conventional impression. Moreover, the trueness and precision of angulation error could be improved in the optical impression using longer healing abutments. In the near future, the development of information technology could enable improvement in the accuracy of the optical impression with intraoral scanners. PMID:27706225

  19. Comparison of different final impression techniques for management of resorbed mandibular ridge: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Bhupender; Jayna, Manisha; Yadav, Harish; Suri, Shrey; Phogat, Shefali; Madan, Reshu

    2014-01-01

    The history of complete denture impression procedures has been influenced largely by the development of impression materials from which new techniques and ideas arose. The purpose of this study was to compare the retention of complete dentures made by using different impression techniques like conventional, admixed, all green, and functional techniques. The results showed that there was significant difference in retention between the six techniques where functional technique showed the highest mean value of retention followed by elastomeric, all green, and admixed, while cocktail and green stick compound showed the lowest mean value. However, on clinical examination, the retention produced by the six techniques was satisfactory.

  20. Stroke following appendectomy under general anesthesia in a patient with basilar impression.

    PubMed

    Zotter, H; Zenz, W; Gallistl, S; Zohrer, B; Lindbichler, F

    2000-11-01

    We report a boy who developed a vertebral stroke immediately after an appendectomy. Basilar impression was diagnosed eight years after this event when skull roentgenograms revealed basilar impression with high standing tip of the odontoid. We speculate that muscle relaxation and cervical hyperextension during intubation in the presence of basilar impression resulted in vertebral artery dissection and stroke. We suggest that patients with vertebral stroke and no obvious risk factors should be evaluated for the presence of malformations of the craniovertebral junction to be able to take precautions against excessive neck movement during intubation.