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Sample records for poor coping self-efficacy

  1. Trauma Coping Self-Efficacy: A Context Specific Self-Efficacy Measure for Traumatic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Benight, Charles C.; Shoji, Kotaro; James, Lori E.; Waldrep, Edward E.; Delahanty, Douglas L.; Cieslak, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a Trauma Coping Self-Efficacy (CSE-T) scale that assesses general trauma-related coping self-efficacy perceptions were assessed. Measurement equivalence was assessed using several different samples: hospitalized trauma patients (n1 = 74, n2 = 69, n3 = 60), three samples of disaster survivors (n1 = 273, n2 = 227, n3 = 138), and trauma exposed college students (N = 242). This is the first multi-sample evaluation of the psychometric properties for a general trauma-related CSE measure. Results showed that a brief and parsimonious 9-item version of the CSE performed well across the samples with a robust factor structure; factor structure and factor loadings were similar across study samples. The 9-item scale CSE-T demonstrated measurement equivalence across samples indicating that the underlying concept of general post-traumatic CSE is organized in a similar manner in the different trauma-exposed groups. These results offer strong support for cross-event construct validity of the CSE-T scale. Associations of the CSE-T with important expected covariates showed significant evidence for convergent validity. Finally, discriminant validity was also supported. Replication of the factor structure, internal reliability, and other evidence for construct validity is a critical next step for future research. PMID:26524542

  2. Psychometric properties of a hurricane coping self-efficacy measure.

    PubMed

    Benight, C C; Ironson, G; Durham, R L

    1999-04-01

    This brief report describes the psychometric properties of an instrument designed to measure Hurricane Coping Self-Efficacy (HCSE). Survivors of Hurricane Andrew (n = 165) and Hurricane Opal (n = 63) completed the HCSE and assessments of optimism, social support, distress, and resource loss. Principal components factor analyses revealed a unidimensional structure for the HCSE. Internal consistency of the HCSE was strong. In both samples, HCSE was positively associated with optimism and social support, but negatively associated with general psychological distress, trauma related distress, and resource loss. Finally, hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that the HCSE explained a significant amount of experimental variance for intrusive thoughts and avoidance after controlling for social support, lost resources, and optimism.

  3. Stressors, Self-Efficacy, Coping Resources, and Burnout among Secondary School Teachers in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betoret, Fernando Domenech

    2006-01-01

    The relationships among teacher occupational stressors, self-efficacy, coping resources, and burnout were investigated in a sample of 247 Spanish secondary school teachers. Concretely, two specific aims were formulated in order to examine the effect of teaching stressors on teacher burnout and the role of self-efficacy and school coping resources…

  4. Coping with Bullying and Victimisation among Preadolescents: The Moderating Effects of Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kokkinos, Constantinos M.; Panagopoulou, Paraskevi; Tsolakidou, Ioanna; Tzeliou, Evdoxia

    2015-01-01

    Bullying and victimisation may result from ineffective coping with interpersonal stressors. However, little is known about the preadolescents who are most susceptible to dysfunctional coping styles. Self-efficacy beliefs may be one source of individual differences in coping among those involved in bullying and victimisation. The purpose of the…

  5. Effects of coping skills training on generalized self-efficacy and locus of control.

    PubMed

    Smith, R E

    1989-02-01

    A number of studies have shown that mastery experiences strengthen self-efficacy expectancies that are specific to the mastery situation. In this study I assessed the effects of cognitive-behavioral coping skills training on generalized expectancies concerning self-efficacy and locus of control in test-anxious college students. Compared with a waiting-list control group, the trained subjects exhibited significant decreases on trait and state measures of test anxiety and a higher level of academic performance on classroom tests, as well as changes in specific self-efficacy expectancies relating to test-anxiety management and academic performance. Consistent with generalization predictions derived from self-efficacy theory, the coping skills group also exhibited decreases in general trait anxiety and increased scores on a trait measure of generalized self-efficacy. Locus of control was unaffected by the program, and changes in general self-efficacy were unrelated to changes in locus of control, suggesting the possibility that different parameters of experience are related to changes in the two types of generalized expectancies. PMID:2926626

  6. Validation of the Korean Version of the Depression Coping Self-Efficacy Scale (DCSES-K).

    PubMed

    Lim, Young Mi; Perraud, Suzanne

    2016-08-01

    Coping self-efficacy is regarded as an important indicator of the quality of life and well-being for community-dwelling patients with depression. The Depression Coping Self-Efficacy Scale (DCSES) was designed to measure self-efficacy beliefs related to the ability to perform tasks specific to coping with the symptoms of depression. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of a Korean version of the Depression Coping Self-Efficacy Scale (DCSES-K) for community-dwelling patients with depression. A cross-sectional survey design was used. Content and semantic equivalence of the instrument using translation and back-translation of the DCSES was established. A convenience sample of 149 community-dwelling patients with depression was recruited from psychiatric outpatient clinics. The reliability alpha for the DCSES-K was .93, and the internal consistency was found to be acceptable. For convergent validity, DCSES-K score was positively correlated with the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES-K) score. For construct validity, significant differences in DCSES-K scores were found between a lower BDI group (mean=73.7, SD=16.54) and a higher BDI group (mean=53.74, SD=16.99) (t=7.19, p<.001). For the DCSES-K, 5 factors were extracted, accounting for 62.7% of the variance. Results of this study suggest that DCSES-K can be used as a reliable and valid measure for examining self-efficacy coping with depression for Korean community-dwelling patients with depression. PMID:27455919

  7. Coping Self-Efficacy Moderates the Association Between Severity of Partner Violence and PTSD Symptoms Among Incarcerated Women.

    PubMed

    DeCou, Christopher R; Lynch, Shannon M; Cole, Trevor T; Kaplan, Stephanie P

    2015-10-01

    Previous research indicates self-efficacy may function as a protective factor for survivors of partner violence (PV), including coping self-efficacy specific to domestic violence. We hypothesized that domestic violence coping self-efficacy would moderate the association between recent PV and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in a sample of incarcerated women, such that the association between PV and PTSD would be strongest at low levels of domestic violence coping self-efficacy. Participants (N = 102) were incarcerated women who reported PV in the year prior to incarceration. They were aged 19-55 years (M = 33.57, SD = 9.32), identified predominantly as European American (84.3%), American Indian (15.7%), and Hispanic (14.7%), with 80.4% completing high school or more in terms of education. Participants responded to self-report measures of PV, trauma history, domestic violence coping self-efficacy, and current PTSD symptoms. In a series of sequential regression analyses, PV (β = .65, sr(2) = .06, p = .017) was significantly associated with current PTSD symptoms above and beyond past trauma history (β = .37, sr(2) = .14, p < .001), and this association was moderated by domestic violence coping self-efficacy (Domestic Violence Coping Self-Efficacy × Partner Violence; β = -.54, sr(2) = .03, p = .044). The relationship between PV and PTSD symptoms was greatest at low and average levels of domestic violence coping self-efficacy and nonsignificant at high levels of domestic violence coping self-efficacy. These findings highlight the importance of assessing domestic violence coping self-efficacy in incarcerated women with recent PV, given that domestic violence coping self-efficacy appeared to be protective against symptoms of PTSD. PMID:26366884

  8. Psychometric properties of the Hurricane Coping Self-Efficacy measure following Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Hyre, Amanda D; Benight, Charles C; Tynes, L Lee; Rice, Janet; DeSalvo, Karen B; Muntner, Paul

    2008-07-01

    The Hurricane Coping Self-Efficacy (HCSE) measure is a validated tool for assessing self-efficacy appraisals after hurricanes. Data were collected 6 months after Hurricane Katrina from 1542 employed residents of New Orleans, and 181 participants randomly selected to complete a repeat survey to confirm the psychometric properties of the HCSE measure. Overall, coping self-efficacy was greater among men, the most educated and those with the highest income. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated a relatively good fit of the HCSE items into a single construct, with Bentler's comparative fit and McDonald's centrality index scores of 0.92 and 0.87, respectively. The repeatability of scores was high (Pearson's correlation = 0.70). Additionally, HCSE scores were highly correlated with validated scales of perceived stress and posttraumatic stress symptoms, and significantly lower scores were observed among participants who sought counseling after the storm. The HCSE measure exhibited excellent internal consistency, external validity and repeatability after Hurricane Katrina.

  9. Teaching Self-Efficacy, Stress and Coping in a Major Curriculum Reform: Applying Theory to Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, John; Ayres, Paul L.; Beechey, Bernice

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The main research aim was to investigate relationships among teachers' occupational stress, coping, teacher self-efficacy and relevant teachers' perceptions of curriculum changes in a major educational reform. Design/methodology/approach: A theoretical framework that included the attribution of responsibility for stress model, aspects of…

  10. The Development of a Peer Aggression Coping Self-Efficacy Scale for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Puneet; Bussey, Kay

    2009-01-01

    This study presents findings regarding the reliability and validity of a newly developed measure designed to assess children's self-efficacy for coping with peer aggression. The sample consisted of 2,161 participants (1,071 females and 1,090 males, who ranged in age from 10 to 15 years; 63% White, 17% Middle-Eastern, 10% Asian, and 10% from other…

  11. Depressive Symptoms and Gambling Behavior: Mediating Role of Coping Motivation and Gambling Refusal Self-Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Stephanie K; Martens, Matthew P; Arterberry, Brooke J

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the variables that contribute to the comorbidity of depression and gambling behaviors is important in developing effective intervention strategies for those who experience gambling-related problems. The purpose of this study was to implement core concepts from Jacob's general theory of addiction and the social cognitive theory in a multiple mediation model. Specifically, we tested two models to examine whether coping motivation and refusal self-efficacy mediated the relationship between depressive symptoms, gambling related problems, and days gambled. Data was collected from 333 undergraduate students at a large public Midwest university, participating in a larger clinical trial. Analyses indicated a direct effect between depressive symptoms and gambling related problems. Depressive symptoms were found to have a significant indirect effect through coping motivation and gambling refusal self-efficacy on gambling related problems and days gambled. These results provide further support regarding the mechanisms through which depressive symptoms may increase risk for problematic gambling behavior.

  12. A validity and reliability study of the coping self-efficacy scale

    PubMed Central

    Chesney, Margaret A.; Neilands, Torsten B.; Chambers, Donald B.; Taylor, Jonelle M.; Folkman, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Investigate the psychometric characteristics of the coping self-efficacy (CSE) scale, a 26-item measure of one’s confidence in performing coping behaviors when faced with life challenges. Design Data came from two randomized clinical trials (N1 = 149, N2 = 199) evaluating a theory-based Coping Effectiveness Training (CET) intervention in reducing psychological distress and increasing positive mood in persons coping with chronic illness. Methods The 348 participants were HIV-seropositive men with depressed mood who have sex with men. Participants were randomly assigned to intervention and comparison conditions and assessed pre- and post-intervention. Outcome variables included the CSE scale, ways of coping, and measures of social support and psychological distress and well-being. Results Exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) revealed a 13-item reduced form of the CSE scale with three factors: Use problem-focused coping (6 items, α = .91), stop unpleasant emotions and thoughts (4 items, α = .91), and get support from friends and family (3 items, α = .80). Internal consistency and test–retest reliability are strong for all three factors. Concurrent validity analyses showed these factors assess self-efficacy for different types of coping. Predictive validity analyses showed that residualized change scores in using problem- and emotion-focused coping skills were predictive of reduced psychological distress and increased psychological well-being over time. Conclusions The CSE scale provides a measure of a person’s perceived ability to cope effectively with life challenges, as well as a way to assess changes in CSE over time in intervention research. PMID:16870053

  13. Smoking cessation in cardiac patients: the influence of action plans, coping plans and self-efficacy on quitting smoking.

    PubMed

    de Hoog, Natascha; Bolman, Catherine; Berndt, Nadine; Kers, Esther; Mudde, Aart; de Vries, Hein; Lechner, Lilian

    2016-06-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective action for cardiac patients who smoke to improve their prognosis, yet more than one-half of cardiac patients continue to smoke after hospital admission. This study examined the influence of action plans, coping plans and self-efficacy on intention to quit and smoking cessation in cardiac patients. Cardiac patients completed a baseline questionnaire (N = 245) assessing demographic characteristics, smoking behavior, intention, self-efficacy, relapse self-efficacy and action and coping plans. Six months later (N = 184) continued abstinence from smoking was assessed. Self-efficacy predicted intention to quit smoking and was an indirect predictor of continued abstinence, through intention. Intention to quit smoking and making action plans both directly influenced continued abstinence. Future interventions to facilitate smoking cessation in cardiac patients should put strong emphasis on enhancing self-efficacy and on making specific action plans to increase the likelihood of smoking cessation.

  14. Perceived Self-Efficacy and Coping Styles Related to Stressful Critical Life Events

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Simonetta; Marano, Assunta; Geraci, Maria Angela; Legge, Emanuele

    2013-01-01

    Objective The study examined the personal resources, Self-efficacy and Coping Strategies, in a sample of pre-adolescents who experienced an emotionally and socially critical event, such as the earthquake of the 6th of April 2009, related to age and gender. Methods 198 pre-adolescents, 84 girls and 114 boys (Age Mean 12 years), attending Secondary School in L'Aquila meso-seismic area. The emotional, behavioural and social capacities have been assessed with specific questionnaires administered collectively ten months after the earthquake. Results Multidimensional analyses produced differentiated profiles according to gender and age: self-efficacy-perception and coping strategy profiles, based on quartiles calculations, revealed the difficulties of the subjects in estimating their ability to cope with the world of relations and emotions after the critical event. Conclusions The intervention could be specific to the cognitive, emotional and relational state of children and adolescents and differentiated before (prevention), during (intervention) and after the event (intervention and prevention). PMID:23874429

  15. The role of pain anxiety, coping, and pain self-efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis patient functioning.

    PubMed

    Strahl, C; Kleinknecht, R A; Dinnel, D L

    2000-09-01

    Anxiety about pain is increasingly recognized as one factor contributing to increased pain perception and pain behavior [McCracken, L. M., Faber S. D., & Janeck A. S. (1998) Pain-related anxiety predicts nonspecific physical complaints in persons with chronic pain. Behavior Research and Therapy, 36, 621-630; McCracken L., & Gross R. (1995). The pain anxiety symptoms scale (PASS) and the assessment of emotional responses to pain. Innovations in clinical practice: a source book, 14, 309-321]. To assess this emotional reaction to pain in chronic pain patients, McCracken, Zayfert and Gross [McCracken, L., Zayfert, C., & Gross, R. (1992). The Pain Anxiety Symptom Scale: development and validation of a scale to measure fear of pain. Pain, 50, 67-73] developed the Pain Anxiety Symptom Scale (PASS) composed of four subscales: Cognitive Anxiety, Fearful Appraisal, Escape Avoidance and Physiological Anxiety. The present study extended previous work by examining the relationship among pain anxiety dimensions, use of active and passive coping strategies and arthritis self-efficacy as predictors of functional status in 154 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Functional status was assessed using the Five-Factor Model of the Arthritis Impact Scale, 2nd ed., (AIMS2): Physical Functioning, Affective Experience, Symptoms, Social Interaction and Role Function. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis on each of the AIMS2 criterion variables showed that pain anxiety, pain and symptom self-efficacy, health status and coping strategies were able to explain between 9 and 38% of the variance in the five AIMS2 variables. The present results support the hypothesized role of pain anxiety along with previously established contributions of self-efficacy and coping strategies, in affecting physical, social, emotional and role functioning in chronic RA patients.

  16. Occupational coping self-efficacy explains distress and well-being in nurses beyond psychosocial job characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Pisanti, Renato; van der Doef, Margot; Maes, Stan; Lombardo, Caterina; Lazzari, David; Violani, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The main purpose of the present study was to extend the Job Demand Control Support (JDCS) model analyzing the direct and interactive role of occupational coping self-efficacy (OCSE) beliefs. Background: OCSE refers to an individual’s beliefs about their ability to cope with occupational stressors. The interplay between occupational stressors, job resources, and self-efficacy beliefs is poorly investigated. The present research attempts to address this gap. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: Questionnaire data from 1479 nurses (65% response) were analyzed. Hierarchical regression analyses were used to test the direct and moderating role of OCSE in conjunction with job demands (i.e., time pressure), and two job resources: job control (i.e., decision latitude and skill discretion) and social support (i.e., supervisor support and coworker support) in predicting psychological distress and well-being. Results: Our findings indicated that high demands, low job control, and low social support additively predicted the distress/well-being outcomes (job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, psychological distress, and somatic complaints). Beyond the main effects, no significant interactive effects of demands, control, and support were found. OCSE accounted for an additional 1–4% of the variance in the outcomes, after controlling for the JDCS variables. In addition, the results indicate that OCSE buffers the association between low job control and the distress dimensions emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and psychological distress. Low control was detrimental only for nurses with low OCSE. Conclusion: Our results suggest expanding the JDCS model incorporating individual characteristics such as OCSE beliefs, for predicting psychological distress and well-being. Limitations of the study and practical implications are discussed. PMID:26300827

  17. Stress and Academic Performance in Dental Students: The Role of Coping Strategies and Examination-Related Self-Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Crego, Antonio; Carrillo-Diaz, María; Armfield, Jason M; Romero, Martín

    2016-02-01

    Academic stress negatively affects students' performance. However, little is known of the processes that may be involved in this association. This study aimed to analyze how other variables such as coping strategies and exam-related self-efficacy could be related to academic stress and performance for dental students. An online survey, including measures of coping strategies, perceived stress, exam-related self-efficacy, and academic performance, was completed by undergraduate dental students in Madrid, Spain. Of the 275 students invited to take the survey, 201 participated (response rate 73.6%). Rational coping strategies (problem-solving, positive reappraisal, seeking social support) were negatively associated with perceived stress (β=-0.25, p<0.01), whereas emotional coping strategies (venting negative emotions, negative auto-focus) were linked to increased academic stress (β=0.34, p<0.01). Moreover, rational and emotional coping strategies were, respectively, positively (β=0.16, p<0.05) and negatively (β=-0.22, p<0.01) associated with students' exam-related self-efficacy, and this relation was found to be partially mediated by the students' perceived stress (β=-0.30, p<0.01). Experiencing higher levels of stress during the examination period was found to be associated with poorer average grades (β=-0.21, p<0.01), but students' exam-related self-efficacy partially mediated this relation (β=0.23, p<0.01). Those students who perceived themselves as more efficient in completing examinations reported better grades. Using adequate coping strategies (i.e., rational coping) may help to reduce stress for dental students and, through their effect on exam-related self-efficacy appraisals, contribute to improved academic performance.

  18. Stress and Academic Performance in Dental Students: The Role of Coping Strategies and Examination-Related Self-Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Crego, Antonio; Carrillo-Diaz, María; Armfield, Jason M; Romero, Martín

    2016-02-01

    Academic stress negatively affects students' performance. However, little is known of the processes that may be involved in this association. This study aimed to analyze how other variables such as coping strategies and exam-related self-efficacy could be related to academic stress and performance for dental students. An online survey, including measures of coping strategies, perceived stress, exam-related self-efficacy, and academic performance, was completed by undergraduate dental students in Madrid, Spain. Of the 275 students invited to take the survey, 201 participated (response rate 73.6%). Rational coping strategies (problem-solving, positive reappraisal, seeking social support) were negatively associated with perceived stress (β=-0.25, p<0.01), whereas emotional coping strategies (venting negative emotions, negative auto-focus) were linked to increased academic stress (β=0.34, p<0.01). Moreover, rational and emotional coping strategies were, respectively, positively (β=0.16, p<0.05) and negatively (β=-0.22, p<0.01) associated with students' exam-related self-efficacy, and this relation was found to be partially mediated by the students' perceived stress (β=-0.30, p<0.01). Experiencing higher levels of stress during the examination period was found to be associated with poorer average grades (β=-0.21, p<0.01), but students' exam-related self-efficacy partially mediated this relation (β=0.23, p<0.01). Those students who perceived themselves as more efficient in completing examinations reported better grades. Using adequate coping strategies (i.e., rational coping) may help to reduce stress for dental students and, through their effect on exam-related self-efficacy appraisals, contribute to improved academic performance. PMID:26834134

  19. The firefighter coping self-efficacy scale: measure development and validation.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jessica E; Benight, Charles C; Harrison, Erica; Cieslak, Roman

    2012-01-01

    The authors evaluated the psychometric properties of the Firefighter Coping Self-Efficacy (FFCSE) Scale, a new measure developed to assess firefighters' perceived competence in managing stressful and traumatic experiences encountered on the job. Two samples of firefighters completed the FFCSE Scale at two different time points. Exploratory factor analysis yielded a unidimensional structure, which was further supported with confirmatory factor analysis using a second sample. Internal consistency of the measure was excellent. Analysis of cross-sectional data indicated FFCSE was positively associated with measures of psychological well-being and social support, and negatively associated with work-related stress and psychological distress. FFCSE also uniquely contributed to the variance in psychological distress, over and above variables previously shown to be associated with distress among this population. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:21476153

  20. Coping Self-Efficacy in a Community-Based Sample of Women and Men from the United Kingdom: The Impact of Sex and Health Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colodro, H.; Godoy-Izquierdo, D.; Godoy, J.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents pioneer findings regarding coping self-efficacy obtained with the Coping Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) in a community-based sample composed of both women and men (to date, only data obtained in the 1980s from men with HIV and depression exist). The aims of this study were to investigate the psychometric properties of the CSES and…

  1. Positive Coping, Self-Efficacy, and Self-Esteem as Mediators between Seizure Severity and Life Satisfaction in Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sung, Connie; Muller, Veronica R.; Ditchman, Nicole; Phillips, Brian; Chan, Fong

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of positive psychological traits (positive coping, self-efficacy, and self-esteem) on the relationship between seizure severity and life satisfaction among individuals with epilepsy. Hierarchical regression analysis and correlation techniques were used to test a hypothesized tri-mediation model of life satisfaction…

  2. Emotional Intelligence, Self-Efficacy, and Coping among Chinese Prospective and In-Service Teachers in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (intrapersonal and interpersonal) and general teacher self-efficacy were assessed to represent personal resources facilitating active and passive coping in a sample of 273 Chinese prospective and in-service teachers in Hong Kong. Intrapersonal emotional intelligence and interpersonal emotional intelligence were found to…

  3. Smoking Cessation in Cardiac Patients: The Influence of Action Plans, Coping Plans and Self-Efficacy on Quitting Smoking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Hoog, Natascha; Bolman, Catherine; Berndt, Nadine; Kers, Esther; Mudde, Aart; de Vries, Hein; Lechner, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective action for cardiac patients who smoke to improve their prognosis, yet more than one-half of cardiac patients continue to smoke after hospital admission. This study examined the influence of action plans, coping plans and self-efficacy on intention to quit and smoking cessation in cardiac patients. Cardiac…

  4. Stigma-related stressors, coping self-efficacy, and physical health in lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals.

    PubMed

    Denton, F Nicholas; Rostosky, Sharon Scales; Danner, Fred

    2014-07-01

    Understanding and intervening to address health disparities is part of the expanding role of psychologists (Johnson, 2013). We drew on Hatzenbuehler's (2009) psychological mediation framework and Lick, Durso, and Johnson's (2013) conceptual pathways to lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) physical health disparities to test a serial mediation model in which 2 types of cognitive appraisals (proximal minority stressors and coping self-efficacy) partially account for the association between perceived discrimination and prejudice (distal minority stressor) and self-reported physical health symptoms in a nationally recruited sample of 564 LGB individuals (270 women, 294 men) who participated in a web-based survey. Results indicated that perceived experiences of discrimination and prejudice were associated with expectations of rejection and internalized homonegativity. These 2 proximal stressors were associated with lower coping self-efficacy, and the combined cognitive appraisal pathways were associated with higher levels of self-reported physical symptom severity. The pathway through emotion-focused coping self-efficacy was particularly salient in accounting for the overall mediation. Interventions to address distal and proximal minority stressors and improve emotion-focused coping self-efficacy may be particularly helpful in reducing the negative effects of stigma on physical health. PMID:25019542

  5. Coping Self-Efficacy and Academic Stress among Hispanic First-Year College Students: The Moderating Role of Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Joshua C.; Watson, April A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the role that emotional intelligence plays in moderating the relationship between academic stress and coping self-efficacy among a sample of 125 Hispanic 1st-year college students enrolled at a medium-size, southern Hispanic-serving institution. Results of a 2-stage hierarchical multiple regression analysis…

  6. Analysis of Academic Self-Efficacy, Self-Esteem and Coping with Stress Skills Predictive Power on Academic Procrastination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandemir, Mehmet; Ilhan, Tahsin; Ozpolat, Ahmed Ragip; Palanci, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this research is to analyze the predictive power level of academic self-efficacy, self-esteem and coping with stress on academic procrastination behavior. Relational screening model is used in the research whose research group is made of 374 students in Kirikkale University, Education Faculty in Turkey. Students in the research group…

  7. Coping with burns: the role of coping self-efficacy in the recovery from traumatic stress following burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Mark W G; Hofland, Helma W; De Jong, Alette E; Van Loey, Nancy E

    2015-08-01

    We conducted a three-wave prospective study among patients with burns (N = 178) to examine the prospective influence of coping self-efficacy (CSE) perceptions on trajectories of posttraumatic stress symptoms in the first 12 months after burn injuries. Using linear growth curve modeling, we corrected for demographics, the number of surgeries during initial admittance, trait coping styles, and changing levels of health-related quality of life. CSE during initial admission was by far the strongest predictor of both initial PTSD symptoms and degree of symptom change with higher CSE levels associated with lower initial symptoms and a steeper decline of symptoms over time. Of the other variables only avoidant coping was associated with higher initial symptom levels, and only emotional expression associated with greater rate of recovery. Current findings suggest that CSE plays a pivotal role in recovery from posttraumatic stress after a burn injury, even when the role of burn-related impairments is taken into consideration. Implications of findings are discussed. PMID:25851608

  8. Longitudinal interplay between posttraumatic stress symptoms and coping self-efficacy: A four-wave prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Mark W G; van der Velden, Peter G

    2015-06-01

    Trauma-related coping self-efficacy (CSE), the perceived capability to manage one's personal functioning and the myriad environmental demands of the aftermath of potentially traumatic events (PTE), has been shown to affect psychological outcomes after these events. Aim of the present four-wave study was to examine the cross-lagged relationships between CSE and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following PTEs in order to examine direction of influence. Levels of CSE and PTSD symptoms were measured with 4-month intervals. In addition, prospectively assessed personality traits and general self-efficacy perceptions as well as peritraumatic distress were entered in the analyses. The study sample consists of adult respondents of a representative internet panel who experienced PTE in the six months before T1, and did not experience any new PTE or life event between T1 and T3 (N = 400). Respondents were administered the coping self-efficacy scale (CSE-7), impact of event scale (IES) and arousal items of IES-R at each wave (T1 through T3), as well as questions on peritraumatic stress and prospectively measured personality traits (T0). Results of structural equation modeling showed that the effect of CSE on subsequent PTSD symptom levels was dominant. CSE significantly predicted subsequent symptoms, over and above earlier symptom levels, with higher CSE associated with lower PTSD. Symptoms in turn, did not predict subsequent levels of CSE. Higher peritraumatic distress was associated with both higher initial PTSD symptoms and lower initial CSE levels. Higher levels of the personality traits of emotional stability and agreeableness were associated with higher initial CSE levels. This supports a model in which CSE perceptions play an important role in recovery from trauma.

  9. Coping and Self-Efficacy in Marijuana Treatment: Results from the Marijuana Treatment Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Mark D.; Kadden, Ronald M.; Stephens, Robert S.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined whether a coping-skills-based treatment for marijuana dependence operated by encouraging the use of coping skills or via other mechanisms. Participants were 450 men and women treated in the multisite Marijuana Treatment Project who were randomly assigned to motivational enhancement therapy plus cognitive-behavioral (MET-CB)…

  10. Self-Efficacy for Coping with Barriers Helps Students Stay Physically Active during Transition to Their First Year at a University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined undergraduate students' physical activity during transition from high school to first-year university. Students' (N = 127) self-efficacy for coping with barriers to physical activity was investigated both as a predictor of physical activity and mediator of the relationship between pretransition and first-year physical…

  11. Meaning in Life, Emotion-Oriented Coping, Generalized Self-Efficacy, and Family Cohesion as Predictors of Family Satisfaction among Mothers of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.; Sweeney, James

    2008-01-01

    The authors tested whether self-efficacy, coping styles, family cohesion, and meaning in life predicted family satisfaction among 64 mothers of children with disabilities. They also examined whether meaning in life mediated the relationship between cohesion and family satisfaction or served as a resource whose effects on family satisfaction were…

  12. Emotional Approach Coping and Self-efficacy Moderate the Effects of Written Emotional Disclosure and Relaxation Training for People With Migraine Headaches

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Christina A.; Lumley, Mark A.; D’Souza, Pamela J.; Dooley, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We tested whether emotional skills and headache management self-efficacy (HMSE) moderated effects of written emotional disclosure (WED) compared to control writing and a different intervention, relaxation training (RT). Design/Methods Undergraduates with migraine headaches reported emotional approach coping (EAC) and HMSE; were randomized to WED, RT, or control; and assessed on health measures at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Results Greater EAC predicted improvement following WED compared to RT and control, whereas low HMSE predicted improvement following both WED and RT, compared to control. Conclusions Emotional skill may specifically—and low health management self-efficacy may generally—predict positive responses to WED. PMID:18230235

  13. Structured interviews examining the burden, coping, self-efficacy, and quality of life among family caregivers of persons with dementia in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tay, Kay Chai Peter; Seow, Chuen Chai Dennis; Xiao, Chunxiang; Lee, Hui Min Julian; Chiu, Helen F K; Chan, Sally Wai-Chi

    2016-03-01

    Dementia is a global health issue and the effects on caregivers are substantial. The study aimed to examine the associations of burden, coping, self-efficacy with quality of life among family caregivers of persons with dementia in Singapore. Structured interviews were conducted in a convenience sample of 84 family caregivers caring and seeking clinical care for the persons with dementia in an outpatient clinic of a public hospital in Singapore. The outcome measures included the Family Burden Interview Schedule, Family Crisis Oriented Personal Evaluation Scale, General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, and World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale - Brief Version. In general, significant correlations were observed between the quality of life scores with coping strategy and family burden scores, but not between the coping strategy and family burden scores. Compared to demographic factors such as caregiver age and household income, psychosocial factors including family burden, coping strategies, and self-efficacy demonstrated greater association with quality of life in the participants. However, the dynamics of these associations will change with an increasing population of persons with dementia, decreasing nuclear family size, and predicted changes in family living arrangements for the persons with dementia in future. As such, it necessitates continuous study examining the needs and concerns of family caregivers and the relevance of ongoing interventions specific to caregivers of persons with dementia.

  14. The associations between coping self-efficacy and posttraumatic stress symptoms 10 years postdisaster: differences between men and women.

    PubMed

    Bosmans, Mark W G; Benight, Charles C; van der Knaap, Leontien M; Winkel, Frans Willem; van der Velden, Peter G

    2013-04-01

    The mediating role of coping self-efficacy (CSE) perceptions between disaster-related posttraumatic stress symptoms (PSS) in the intermediate term (4 years postevent) and PSS in the long term (10 years postevent) were examined. Participants were 514 adult Dutch native residents affected by the Enschede fireworks disaster. The disaster (May, 2000) was caused by a massive explosion in a fireworks storage facility that destroyed a residential area. Multiple regression analysis and path analysis were used to examine the mediating role of CSE and whether the mediating role was the same for men and women. Age, education, disaster exposure, home destruction, optimism, and stressful life events were also taken into account. Regression analysis showed that the former variables were not associated with PSS at 10 years postevent, in contrast to PSS at 4 years, and were therefore omitted from the path analyses. CSE assessed at 10 years postdisaster partially mediated the relationship between PSS at 4 and PSS at 10 years postdisaster. Post hoc multigroup analysis showed that this effect was significantly stronger for men, whereas the association between PSS at 4 and 10 years postevent was stronger for women. PSS at 10 years postevent were better predicted among men (explained variance 59.5% vs 50.8%). PMID:23526650

  15. Animal-assisted therapy with farm animals for persons with psychiatric disorders: effects on self-efficacy, coping ability and quality of life, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The benefits of Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) for humans with mental disorders have been well-documented using cats and dogs, but there is a complete lack of controlled studies using farm animals as therapeutic agents for psychiatric patients. The study was developed in the context of Green care, a concept that involves the use of farm animals, plants, gardens, or the landscape in recreational or work-related interventions for different target groups of clients in cooperation with health authorities. The present study aimed at examining effects of a 12-week intervention with farm animals on self-efficacy, coping ability and quality of life among adult psychiatric patients with a variety of psychiatric diagnoses. Methods The study was a randomized controlled trial and follow-up. Ninety patients (59 women and 31 men) with schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety, and personality disorders completed questionnaires to assess self-efficacy (Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale; GSE), coping ability (Coping Strategies Scale), and quality of life (Quality of Life Scale; QOLS-N) before, at the end of intervention, and at six months follow-up. Two-thirds of the patients (N = 60) were given interventions; the remaining served as controls. Results There was significant increase in self-efficacy in the treatment group but not in the control group from before intervention (SB) to six months follow-up (SSMA), (SSMA-SB; F1,55 = 4.20, p= 0.05) and from end of intervention (SA) to follow-up (SSMA-SA; F1,55 = 5.6, p= 0.02). There was significant increase in coping ability within the treatment group between before intervention and follow-up (SSMA-SB = 2.7, t = 2.31, p = 0.03), whereas no changes in quality of life was found. There were no significant changes in any of the variables during the intervention. Conclusion AAT with farm animals may have positive influences on self-efficacy and coping ability among psychiatric patients with long lasting psychiatric symptoms. PMID

  16. Influence of 5-HTT variation, childhood trauma and self-efficacy on anxiety traits: a gene-environment-coping interaction study.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Miriam A; Ziegler, Christiane; Holitschke, Karoline; Schartner, Christoph; Schmidt, Brigitte; Weber, Heike; Reif, Andreas; Romanos, Marcel; Pauli, Paul; Zwanzger, Peter; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    Environmental vulnerability factors such as adverse childhood experiences in interaction with genetic risk variants, e.g., the serotonin transporter gene linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), are assumed to play a role in the development of anxiety and affective disorders. However, positive influences such as general self-efficacy (GSE) may exert a compensatory effect on genetic disposition, environmental adversity, and anxiety traits. We, thus, assessed childhood trauma (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, CTQ) and GSE in 678 adults genotyped for 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 and their interaction on agoraphobic cognitions (Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire, ACQ), social anxiety (Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale, LSAS), and trait anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, STAI-T). The relationship between anxiety traits and childhood trauma was moderated by self-efficacy in 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 LALA genotype carriers: LALA probands maltreated as children showed high anxiety scores when self-efficacy was low, but low anxiety scores in the presence of high self-efficacy despite childhood maltreatment. Our results extend previous findings regarding anxiety-related traits showing an interactive relationship between 5-HTT genotype and adverse childhood experiences by suggesting coping-related measures to function as an additional dimension buffering the effects of a gene-environment risk constellation. Given that anxiety disorders manifest already early in childhood, this insight could contribute to the improvement of psychotherapeutic interventions by including measures strengthening self-efficacy and inform early targeted preventive interventions in at-risk populations, particularly within the crucial time window of childhood and adolescence. PMID:27145764

  17. Sociodemographic and Clinical Predictors of Self-Management among People with Poorly Controlled Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: The Role of Illness Perceptions and Self-Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Abubakari, Abdul-Razak; Cousins, Rosanna; Thomas, Cecil; Sharma, Dushyant; Naderali, Ebrahim K

    2016-01-01

    Self-management is critical if people with diabetes are to minimise their risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications, yet adherence to self-management recommendations is suboptimal. Understanding the predictors of optimal diabetes self-management in specific populations is needed to inform effective interventions. This study investigated the role of demographic and clinical characteristics, illness perceptions, and self-efficacy in explaining adherence to self-management recommendations among people with poorly controlled diabetes in North West of England. Illness perceptions and self-efficacy data were collected using validated questionnaires and clinical data were obtained from hospital records. Correlations were used to investigate bivariate relationships between independent variables and self-management, and multiple regression techniques were used to determine demographic and psychosocial predictors of self-management. Various demographic and clinical characteristics were associated with adherence to self-management recommendations. In particular, employment status explained 11% of the variation in adherence to foot care whilst diabetes treatment category explained 9% of exercise and 21% of the variations in SMBG recommendations. Also, 22% and 8% of the variations in overall self-management were explained by illness perceptions and self-efficacy beliefs, respectively. Illness perceptions and self-efficacy beliefs of people with poorly controlled diabetes are important predictors of their self-management behaviours and could potentially guide effective interventions.

  18. Sociodemographic and Clinical Predictors of Self-Management among People with Poorly Controlled Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes: The Role of Illness Perceptions and Self-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Abubakari, Abdul-Razak; Cousins, Rosanna; Thomas, Cecil; Sharma, Dushyant; Naderali, Ebrahim K.

    2016-01-01

    Self-management is critical if people with diabetes are to minimise their risk of macrovascular and microvascular complications, yet adherence to self-management recommendations is suboptimal. Understanding the predictors of optimal diabetes self-management in specific populations is needed to inform effective interventions. This study investigated the role of demographic and clinical characteristics, illness perceptions, and self-efficacy in explaining adherence to self-management recommendations among people with poorly controlled diabetes in North West of England. Illness perceptions and self-efficacy data were collected using validated questionnaires and clinical data were obtained from hospital records. Correlations were used to investigate bivariate relationships between independent variables and self-management, and multiple regression techniques were used to determine demographic and psychosocial predictors of self-management. Various demographic and clinical characteristics were associated with adherence to self-management recommendations. In particular, employment status explained 11% of the variation in adherence to foot care whilst diabetes treatment category explained 9% of exercise and 21% of the variations in SMBG recommendations. Also, 22% and 8% of the variations in overall self-management were explained by illness perceptions and self-efficacy beliefs, respectively. Illness perceptions and self-efficacy beliefs of people with poorly controlled diabetes are important predictors of their self-management behaviours and could potentially guide effective interventions. PMID:26697501

  19. Predicting Changes in Physical Activity among Adolescents: The Role of Self-Efficacy, Intention, Action Planning and Coping Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Araujo-Soares, Vera; McIntyre, Teresa; Sniehotta, Falko F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to test the direct predictors of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), action planning and coping planning as predictors of changes in physical activity (PA) in 157 adolescents (mean age: 12). TPB measures, the Action Planning and Coping Planning Scales (APCPS) and the International Physical Activity Questionnaires were measured…

  20. Coping Strategies among Urban Poor: Evidence from Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Amendah, Djesika D.; Buigut, Steven; Mohamed, Shukri

    2014-01-01

    Aims In Kenya, it is estimated that 60 to 80% of urban residents live in slum or slum-like conditions. This study investigates expenditures patterns of slum dwellers in Nairobi, their coping strategies and the determinants of those coping strategies. Method We use a dataset from the Indicator Development for Surveillance of Urban Emergencies (IDSUE) research study conducted in four Nairobi slums from April 2012 to September 2012. The dataset includes information related to household livelihoods, earned incomes of household members, expenditures, shocks, and coping strategies. Results Food spending is the single most important component, accounting for 52% of total households' income and 42% of total expenditures. Households report a variety of coping strategies over the last four weeks preceding the interview. The most frequently used strategy is related to reduction in food consumption, followed by the use of credit, with 69% and 52% of households reporting using these strategies respectively. A substantial proportion of households also report removing children from school to manage spending shortfalls. Formal employment, owning a business, rent-free housing, belonging to the two top tiers of income brackets, and being a member of social safety net reduced the likelihood of using any coping strategy. Exposure to shocks and larger number of children under 15 years increased the probability of using a coping strategy. Policy Implications Policies that contain food price inflation, improve decent-paying job opportunities for the urban poor are likely to reduce the use of negative coping strategies by providing urban slum dwellers with steady and reliable sources of income. In addition, enhancing access to free primary schooling in the slums would help limit the need to use detrimental strategies like “removing” children from school. PMID:24427272

  1. Coping with poor water supplies: empirical evidence from Kathmandu, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Katuwal, Hari; Bohara, Alok K

    2011-03-01

    The authors examined the demand for clean drinking water using treatment behaviors in Kathmandu, Nepal. Water supply is inadequate, unreliable and low quality. Households engage in several strategies to cope with the unreliable and poor quality of water supplies. Some of the major coping strategies are hauling, storing, and point-of-use treatment. Boiling, filtering, and use of Uro-guard are some of the major treatment methods. Using Water Survey of Kathmandu, the authors estimated the effect of wealth, education, information, gender, caste/ethnicity and opinion about water quality on drinking water treatment behaviors. The results show that people tend to increase boiling and then filtering instead of only one method if they are wealthier. In addition, people boil and then filter instead of boiling only and filtering only if they think that water delivered to the tap is dirty. Exposure to information has the strongest effect in general for the selection of all available treatment modes.

  2. Self-Efficacy and green entrepreneurship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, K. L.; Suhaida, S.; Leong, Y. P.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate empirically the extent to which self-efficacy contributes to the development of green entrepreneurial intention. The measurement constructs of self-efficacy were classified into market opportunities, innovative environment, initiating relationships, defining purpose, coping with challenges, and developing human resources. The study comprises 252 usable convenient samples through structured questionnaires. The coefficient of determination R2 shows that the variance of intention to entrepreneurship is explained by the variance of the independent variables. It was also found that the model is fit for prediction.

  3. Self-Efficacy as Related to Career Aspirations Based on the Educational Quality Assessment Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dentler, Donna J.

    A study examined the relationship between the self-efficacy and career aspirations of 37,942 11th-grade students across the state of Pennsylvania. Using Albert Bandura's theory of self-efficacy, which states that the level and strength of self-efficacy of an individual will determine (1) whether or not the individual will initiate coping behavior,…

  4. The Interrelationships among Coping Resources, Gender Role Stress, Self-Efficacy, and Anxiety in University Women Enrolled in Graduate Counseling Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kordansky, Jessica B.

    2010-01-01

    College-age women are affected by anxiety disorders at a significant rate. The data suggest that enhancing a sense of control over the negative effects of life events has a greater positive effect on women than men (Matheny, Ashby, & Cupp, 2005). While there is a literature base for stress coping among undergraduate students (McCarthy, Fouladi,…

  5. Effects of posttraumatic stress disorder and child sexual abuse on self-efficacy development.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Amy S; Prout, Maurice F

    2002-04-01

    The symptoms of child sexual abuse and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) affect a child's self-efficacy. A child's self-efficacy beliefs impact the course and treatment of PTSD, because perceived self-efficacy plays a mediating role in children's ability to cope with trauma. Self-efficacy research indicates that emotional competence can be learned and may provide treatment for PTSD that provides symptom reduction as well as a means of substituting problem-solving coping skills for emotion-focused coping skills.

  6. Self-Efficacy and Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivier, Terry A.; Shapiro, Faye

    1993-01-01

    Presents a conceptual analysis of self-efficacy and reviews the literature on self-efficacy in the microcomputer environment. Topics addressed include self-efficacy versus other theories; efficacy versus outcome expectations; and sources of efficacy information, including performance accomplishments, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and…

  7. Perceived social support, self-efficacy, and adjustment to abortion.

    PubMed

    Major, B; Cozzarelli, C; Sciacchitano, A M; Cooper, M L; Testa, M; Mueller, P M

    1990-09-01

    Prior to their having a 1st trimester abortion, women's perceptions of social support from their partner, family, and friends and self-efficacy for coping were assessed. Depression, mood, physical complaints, and anticipation of negative consequences were measured after the 30-min recovery period. As predicted, perceived social support enhanced adjustment indirectly through its effects on self-efficacy. Women who perceived high support from their family, friends, and partners had higher self-efficacy for coping. Higher self-efficacy, in turn, predicted better adjustment on the psychological measures but not on the physical complaint measure. No direct path between social support and adjustment was observed. In addition, women who told close others of their abortion but perceived them as less than completely supportive had poorer postabortion psychological adjustment than either women who did not tell or women who told and perceived complete support.

  8. Willpower versus "skillpower": Examining how self-efficacy works in treatment for marijuana dependence.

    PubMed

    Litt, Mark D; Kadden, Ronald M

    2015-09-01

    Self-efficacy has repeatedly been demonstrated to be a robust predictor of outcomes in the treatment of marijuana use disorders. It is not clear, however, how increases in confidence in ability to refrain from use get translated into actual improvements in drug-related outcomes. Marlatt, among others, viewed the acquisition and use of coping skills as the key to behavior change, and self-efficacy as a cognitive state that enabled coping. But that model of behavior change has not been supported, and few studies have shown that the effects of self-efficacy are mediated by coping or by other processes. The current study combined 3 marijuana treatment trials comprising 901 patients to examine the relationships between self-efficacy, coping, and potential mediators, to determine if the effects of self-efficacy on outcomes could be explained. Results of multilevel models indicated that self-efficacy was a strong predictor of adaptive outcomes in all trials, even when no active treatment was provided. Tests of mediation showed that effects of self-efficacy on marijuana use and on marijuana-related problems were partially mediated by use of coping skills and by reductions in emotional distress, but that direct effects of self-efficacy remained largely unexplained. The results are seen as supportive of efforts to improve coping skills and reduce distress in marijuana treatment, but also suggest that additional research is required to discover what is actually occurring when substance use changes, and how self-efficacy enables those changes.

  9. Coping strategies used by poorly adherent patients for self-managing bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Blixen, Carol; Levin, Jennifer B; Cassidy, Kristin A; Perzynski, Adam T; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Background Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic mental illness associated with reduced quality of life, high rates of suicide, and high financial costs. Evidence indicates that psychosocial stress might play an important role in the onset and course of BD. Objective The objective of this study was to address the gap between coping theory and the clinical use of coping strategies used to self-manage BD. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with a sample of 21 poorly adherent patients with BD. All interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using content analysis with an emphasis on dominant themes. Results Transcript-based analysis generated two major domains of coping strategies used to self-manage BD: 1) problem focused (altering eating habits, managing mood-stabilizing medications, keeping psychiatric appointments, seeking knowledge, self-monitoring, and socializing) and 2) emotion focused (distracting activities, denial, isolation, modifying/avoiding, helping others, and seeking social support). Participants used both types of coping strategies to deal with stressful situations brought about by the internal and external demands associated with self-management of BD. Conclusion This qualitative study provided a first step in evaluating coping strategies as a possible mediator in the self-management of BD and has implications for health care providers. Being able to characterize an individual’s coping behaviors can help patients modify or replace more maladaptive coping with better coping strategies in the self-management of this chronic mental illness. PMID:27524888

  10. Diversity Training: Analysis of the Impact of Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Gwendolyn M.; Luthans, Fred

    2007-01-01

    Although the importance of diversity in organizations is widely recognized, diversity training is under attack. Drawing from self-efficacy theory and research, we developed a questionnaire to measure one's efficacy of successfully coping with widely recognized diversity initiatives. Then we conducted a study examining the effect of…

  11. Side effects, adherence self-efficacy, and adherence to antiretroviral treatment: a mediation analysis in a Chinese sample.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liying; Li, Xiaoming; Lin, Zhenping; Jacques-Tiura, Angela J; Xu, Jinping; Zhou, Yuejiao; Qiao, Shan; Shen, Zhiyong; Stanton, Bonita

    2016-07-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifelong treatment. To date, ART adherence is suboptimal for most patients in resource-poor settings. Previous research indicates that medication side effects are perceived to be a significant barrier of high ART adherence. Data regarding the role of adherence self-efficacy in mediating the relationship between side effects from ART and adherence to ART are limited; thus, this study examines this potential mediational role of self-efficacy. A cross-sectional survey of 2987 people living with HIV aged ≥18 years was conducted in 2012-2013 in Guangxi Autonomous Region (Guangxi) which has one of the fastest-growing HIV rates in China. Of the total sample, 2146 (72.1%) participants had initiated ART. Participants reported the number of days of completing the daily dose of ART in the past month; adherence was defined as completing the daily dose at least 28 days in the last month (≥90%). Side effects were significantly negatively related to adherence to ART. Mediation analyses indicated that adherence self-efficacy significantly mediated the side effects-adherence relationship. Future interventions to increase adherence self-efficacy and effective coping with side effects among HIV patients are needed in order to improve their ART adherence.

  12. Assessing Perceived Empathic and Social Self-Efficacy Across Countries

    PubMed Central

    Di Giunta, Laura; Eisenberg, Nancy; Kupfer, Anne; Steca, Patrizia; Tramontano, Carlo; Caprara, Gian Vittorio

    2010-01-01

    The Perceived Empathic Self-Efficacy Scale (PESE) and the Perceived Social Self-Efficacy Scale (PSSE) were developed to assess, respectively, individuals’ self-efficacy beliefs regarding both empathic responding to others’ needs or feelings and managing interpersonal relationships. In this study of young adults, a unidimensional factorial structure of both scales was found in Italy, the United States, and Bolivia. Complete invariance at the metric level and partial invariance at the scalar level were found across gender and countries for both scales. The construct and incremental validity of both PESE and PSSE were further examined in a different sample of Italian young adults. Patterns of association of the PESE or PSSE with self-esteem, psychological well-being, and the use of adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies were found, often over and beyond their associations with empathy or extraversion, respectively. PMID:21228911

  13. A combined planning and self-efficacy intervention to promote physical activity: a multiple mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Koring, Milena; Richert, Jana; Parschau, Linda; Ernsting, Anna; Lippke, Sonia; Schwarzer, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Many individuals are motivated to improve their physical activity levels, but often fail to act upon their intention. Interventions fostering volitional strategies, such as action planning, coping planning, and self-efficacy beliefs, can help to translate intentions into behavior. This study examines the effectiveness and the mechanisms of a combined planning and self-efficacy intervention to promote physical activity among motivated individuals. Participants (N = 883) were randomly assigned to the intervention or to a waiting-list control condition. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that the intervention resulted in significantly more physical activity, higher levels of action planning, coping planning, and volitional self-efficacy beliefs (p < 0.01). In addition, multiple mediation analysis showed that action planning, coping planning, and volitional self-efficacy mediate between the intervention and physical activity. The study shows that the intervention successfully fostered physical activity and unfolds the underlying self-regulatory mechanisms of the intervention's effectiveness.

  14. Self Efficacy: Operationalizing Challenge Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Michael L.

    1986-01-01

    Examines self-efficacy theory and how it can be utilized in describing participant change in adventure/challenge programs. Explores connection between personal experience and how people view ability to function in world around them. Discusses Bandura's theory and interaction of sources of information: performance accomplishment, vicarious…

  15. The costs of coping with poor water supply in rural Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Joseph; Kimuyu, Peter; Whittington, Dale

    2016-02-01

    As the disease burden of poor access to water and sanitation declines around the world, the nonhealth benefits-mainly the time burden of water collection - will likely grow in importance in sector funding decisions and investment analyses. We measure the coping costs incurred by households in one area of rural Kenya. Sixty percent of the 387 households interviewed were collecting water outside the home, and household members were spending an average of 2-3 h doing so per day. We value these time costs using an individual-level value of travel time estimate based on a stated preference experiment. We compare these results to estimates obtained assuming that the value of time saved is a fraction of unskilled wage rates. Coping cost estimates also include capital costs for storage and rainwater collection, money paid either to water vendors or at sources that charge volumetrically, costs of treating diarrhea cases, and expenditures on drinking water treatment (primarily boiling in our site). Median total coping costs per month are approximately US$20 per month, higher than average household water bills in many utilities in the United States, or 12% of reported monthly cash income. We estimate that coping costs are greater than 10% of income for over half of households in our sample. They are higher among larger and wealthier households, and households whose primary source is not at home. Even households with unprotected private wells or connections to an intermittent piped network spend money on water storage containers and on treating water they recognize as unsafe.

  16. Measuring Students' Self-Efficacy for Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Amy L. Housley

    2011-01-01

    Design students are asked to regularly communicate their ideas to a diverse audience. Students' abilities may be affected by their perceived self-efficacy, the perception of abilities to perform a task. Because self-efficacy is conceived of as context-specific, it is vital to consider self-efficacy as it specifically relates to design studios and…

  17. Promoting Self-Efficacy in Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reivich, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Researchers have linked self-efficacy to a wide array of outcomes including psychological adjustment, resilience, physical health, achievement, and self-regulation, among others. In this article, the author describes self-efficacy and the factors that contribute to it, highlights the positive outcomes that self-efficacy leads to, and provides…

  18. Pre-Service Teachers' Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Mathematics Teaching Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuya, Habila Elisha; Kwalat, Simon Kevin; Attah, Bala Galle

    2016-01-01

    Pre-service mathematics teachers' mathematics self-efficacy and mathematics teaching self-efficacy were investigated in this study. The purpose was to determine the confidence levels of their self-efficacy in mathematics and mathematics teaching. Also, the study was aimed at finding whether their mathematics self-efficacy and teaching…

  19. Anxiety, Self-Efficacy, and College Exam Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrows, Jennifer; Dunn, Samantha; Lloyd, Carrie A.

    2013-01-01

    A student's level of self-efficacy and test anxiety directly impacts their academic success (Abdi, Bageri, Shoghi, Goodarzi, & Hosseinzadeh, 2012; Hassanzadeh, Ebrahimi, & Mahdinejad, 2012). When a student doubts themself and their own ability to test well, the students' sole focus becomes worrying about poor grades and cannot focus on…

  20. Changes in Biology Self-Efficacy during a First-Year University Course

    PubMed Central

    Ainscough, Louise; Foulis, Eden; Colthorpe, Kay; Zimbardi, Kirsten; Robertson-Dean, Melanie; Chunduri, Prasad; Lluka, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    Academic self-efficacy encompasses judgments regarding one’s ability to perform academic tasks and is correlated with achievement and persistence. This study describes changes in biology self-efficacy during a first-year course. Students (n = 614) were given the Biology Self-Efficacy Scale at the beginning and end of the semester. The instrument consisted of 21 questions ranking confidence in performing biology-related tasks on a scale from 1 (not at all confident) to 5 (totally confident). The results demonstrated that students increased in self-efficacy during the semester. High school biology and chemistry contributed to self-efficacy at the beginning of the semester; however, this relationship was lost by the end of the semester, when experience within the course became a significant contributing factor. A proportion of high- and low- achieving (24 and 40%, respectively) students had inaccurate self-efficacy judgments of their ability to perform well in the course. In addition, female students were significantly less confident than males overall, and high-achieving female students were more likely than males to underestimate their academic ability. These results suggest that the Biology Self-Efficacy Scale may be a valuable resource for tracking changes in self-efficacy in first-year students and for identifying students with poorly calibrated self-efficacy perceptions. PMID:27193290

  1. Willpower versus “Skillpower:” Examining How Self-Efficacy Works in Treatment for Marijuana Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Litt, Mark D.; Kadden, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy has repeatedly been demonstrated to be a robust predictor of outcomes in the treatment of marijuana use disorders. It is not clear, however, how increases in confidence in ability to refrain from use get translated into actual improvements in drug-related outcomes. Marlatt, among others, viewed the acquisition and use of coping skills as the key to behavior change, and self-efficacy as a cognitive state that enabled coping. But that model of behavior change has not been supported, and few studies have shown that the effects of self-efficacy are mediated by coping or by other processes. The current study combined three marijuana treatment trials comprising 901 patients to examine the relationships between self-efficacy, coping, and potential mediators, to determine if the effects of self-efficacy on outcomes could be explained. Results of multilevel models indicated that self-efficacy was a strong predictor of adaptive outcomes in all trials, even when no active treatment was provided. Tests of mediation showed that effects of self-efficacy on marijuana use and on marijuana-related problems were partially mediated by use of coping skills and by reductions in emotional distress, but that direct effects of self-efficacy remained largely unexplained. The results are seen as supportive of efforts to improve coping skills and reduce distress in marijuana treatment, but also suggest that additional research is required to discover what is actually occurring when substance use changes, and how self-efficacy enables those changes. PMID:25938628

  2. Thermal niche estimators and the capability of poor dispersal species to cope with climate change.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fernández, David; Rizzo, Valeria; Cieslak, Alexandra; Faille, Arnaud; Fresneda, Javier; Ribera, Ignacio

    2016-03-17

    For management strategies in the context of global warming, accurate predictions of species response are mandatory. However, to date most predictions are based on niche (bioclimatic) models that usually overlook biotic interactions, behavioral adjustments or adaptive evolution, and assume that species can disperse freely without constraints. The deep subterranean environment minimises these uncertainties, as it is simple, homogeneous and with constant environmental conditions. It is thus an ideal model system to study the effect of global change in species with poor dispersal capabilities. We assess the potential fate of a lineage of troglobitic beetles under global change predictions using different approaches to estimate their thermal niche: bioclimatic models, rates of thermal niche change estimated from a molecular phylogeny, and data from physiological studies. Using bioclimatic models, at most 60% of the species were predicted to have suitable conditions in 2080. Considering the rates of thermal niche change did not improve this prediction. However, physiological data suggest that subterranean species have a broad thermal tolerance, allowing them to stand temperatures never experienced through their evolutionary history. These results stress the need of experimental approaches to assess the capability of poor dispersal species to cope with temperatures outside those they currently experience.

  3. Thermal niche estimators and the capability of poor dispersal species to cope with climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Fernández, David; Rizzo, Valeria; Cieslak, Alexandra; Faille, Arnaud; Fresneda, Javier; Ribera, Ignacio

    2016-03-01

    For management strategies in the context of global warming, accurate predictions of species response are mandatory. However, to date most predictions are based on niche (bioclimatic) models that usually overlook biotic interactions, behavioral adjustments or adaptive evolution, and assume that species can disperse freely without constraints. The deep subterranean environment minimises these uncertainties, as it is simple, homogeneous and with constant environmental conditions. It is thus an ideal model system to study the effect of global change in species with poor dispersal capabilities. We assess the potential fate of a lineage of troglobitic beetles under global change predictions using different approaches to estimate their thermal niche: bioclimatic models, rates of thermal niche change estimated from a molecular phylogeny, and data from physiological studies. Using bioclimatic models, at most 60% of the species were predicted to have suitable conditions in 2080. Considering the rates of thermal niche change did not improve this prediction. However, physiological data suggest that subterranean species have a broad thermal tolerance, allowing them to stand temperatures never experienced through their evolutionary history. These results stress the need of experimental approaches to assess the capability of poor dispersal species to cope with temperatures outside those they currently experience.

  4. Thermal niche estimators and the capability of poor dispersal species to cope with climate change

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Fernández, David; Rizzo, Valeria; Cieslak, Alexandra; Faille, Arnaud; Fresneda, Javier; Ribera, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    For management strategies in the context of global warming, accurate predictions of species response are mandatory. However, to date most predictions are based on niche (bioclimatic) models that usually overlook biotic interactions, behavioral adjustments or adaptive evolution, and assume that species can disperse freely without constraints. The deep subterranean environment minimises these uncertainties, as it is simple, homogeneous and with constant environmental conditions. It is thus an ideal model system to study the effect of global change in species with poor dispersal capabilities. We assess the potential fate of a lineage of troglobitic beetles under global change predictions using different approaches to estimate their thermal niche: bioclimatic models, rates of thermal niche change estimated from a molecular phylogeny, and data from physiological studies. Using bioclimatic models, at most 60% of the species were predicted to have suitable conditions in 2080. Considering the rates of thermal niche change did not improve this prediction. However, physiological data suggest that subterranean species have a broad thermal tolerance, allowing them to stand temperatures never experienced through their evolutionary history. These results stress the need of experimental approaches to assess the capability of poor dispersal species to cope with temperatures outside those they currently experience. PMID:26983802

  5. Social cognitive theory of posttraumatic recovery: the role of perceived self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Benight, Charles C; Bandura, Albert

    2004-10-01

    The present article integrates findings from diverse studies on the generalized role of perceived coping self-efficacy in recovery from different types of traumatic experiences. They include natural disasters, technological catastrophes, terrorist attacks, military combat, and sexual and criminal assaults. The various studies apply multiple controls for diverse sets of potential contributors to posttraumatic recovery. In these different multivariate analyses, perceived coping self-efficacy emerges as a focal mediator of posttraumatic recovery. Verification of its independent contribution to posttraumatic recovery across a wide range of traumas lends support to the centrality of the enabling and protective function of belief in one's capability to exercise some measure of control over traumatic adversity.

  6. The Relative Importance of Specific Self-Efficacy Sources in Pretraining Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howardson, Garett N.; Behrend, Tara S.

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy is clearly important for learning. Research identifying the most important sources of self-efficacy beliefs, however, has been somewhat limited to date in that different disciplines focus largely on different sources of self-efficacy. Whereas education researchers focus on Bandura's original sources of "enactive mastery,"…

  7. Principal Self-Efficacy and Work Engagement: Assessing a Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federici, Roger A.; Skaalvik, Einar M.

    2011-01-01

    One purpose of the present study was to develop and test the factor structure of a multidimensional and hierarchical Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale (NPSES). Another purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between principal self-efficacy and work engagement. Principal self-efficacy was measured by the 22-item NPSES. Work…

  8. Italian youth subculture: collection, self-esteem, and self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Pravettoni, Gabriella; Miglioretti, Massimo

    2004-10-01

    63 young people (M age=23.9 yr., SD=2.4, 50 men, 13 women) belonging to four subculture groups (New American Punk, Cyberpunk, Trash Style, and Rasta-Hippy) were studied to examine the relationship between self-esteem, self-efficacy, and the development of a body modification collection. A survey was created to evaluate quality of life, risk behaviour, and body modification. Self-esteem and self-efficacy were assessed using the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale and General Perceived Self-efficacy Scale. Belonging to a group which permits neglect of standard norms of communal life makes it possible to avoid facing up to low self-esteem. Adherence to a group appears, from the results of this study, to be correlated with self-efficacy; inability to cope with life situations suggests a state of malaise in these young people.

  9. The Responsive Classroom approach and fifth grade students' math and science anxiety and self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Marissa Swaim; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Merritt, Eileen G; Patton, Christine L

    2013-12-01

    Self-efficacy forecasts student persistence and achievement in challenging subjects. Thus, it is important to understand factors that contribute to students' self-efficacy, a key factor in their success in math and science. The current cross-sectional study examined the contribution of students' gender and math and science anxiety as well as schools' use of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) practices to students' math and science self-efficacy. Fifth graders (n = 1,561) completed questionnaires regarding their feelings about math and science. Approximately half of the students attended schools implementing the Responsive Classroom® (RC) approach, an SEL intervention, as part of a randomized controlled trial. Results suggested no difference in math and science self-efficacy between boys and girls. Students who self-reported higher math and science anxiety also reported less self-efficacy toward these subjects. However, the negative association between students' anxiety and self-efficacy was attenuated in schools using more RC practices compared with those using fewer RC practices. RC practices were associated with higher science self-efficacy. Results highlight anxiety as contributing to poor self-efficacy in math and science and suggest that RC practices create classroom conditions in which students' anxiety is less strongly associated with negative beliefs about their ability to be successful in math and science.

  10. Development of Physics Self-Efficacy Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çalişkan, Serap; Selçuk, Gamze S.; Erol, Mustafa

    2007-04-01

    In this article, we describe development of a Physics Self-Efficacy Scale (PSES) that is a self-administered measure to assess physics self-efficacy beliefs regarding one's ability to successfully perform physics tasks in physics classroom. The scale is initially composed of 56 items prepared following a brief scrutiny of relating literature on self-efficacy. It was initially administered 30 physics teacher candidates and was also examined by 6 experts of physics education, then ambiguous or incomprehensible 6 items were dismissed. This PSES was tested on 558 undergraduate students all completed fundamental physics courses. Cronbach's Alpha reliability coefficient of the PSES was calculated as 0.94. The final version of the PSES contained 30 items with 5 dimensions namely, 1. Self-efficacy towards solving physics problems, 2. Self-efficacy towards physics laboratory, 3. Self-efficacy towards learning physics, 4. Self-efficacy towards application of physics knowledge and 5. Self-efficacy towards memorizing physics knowledge.

  11. Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavelle, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: While "teaching self-efficacy" has been supported as an important construct related to teacher competence (eg. Goddard, Hoy & Hoy, 2000), little is known about how in-service teachers think about themselves as writers, or writing self-efficacy, particularly as it relates to writing performance. The present study is a preliminary…

  12. Self-Efficacy and Cognitive Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schunk, Dale H.

    This paper reviews self-efficacy research with special emphasis on students in school. Bandura's emphasis on domain-specific assessment is useful for understanding student learning and fits well with current research on instructional processes. A self-efficacy model of student learning is presented, comprising entry characteristics, self-efficacy…

  13. Use of traditional medicines to cope with climate-sensitive diseases in a resource poor setting in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aims to explore the use of traditional medicines to cope with climate sensitive diseases in areas vulnerable to climate change. We assessed the extent to which traditional or alternative medicines were used for the treatment of the climate sensitive diseases by villagers as part of their health-coping strategies. Methods The study deployed a mixed-method research design to know the health-coping strategies of the people in a resource-poor setting. A cross sectional study was conducted from September 2010 to March 2011 among 450 households selected randomly in the districts of Rajshahi and Khulna, Bangladesh. The elder males or females of each household were interviewed. For qualitative methods, twelve focus group discussions (six with females and six with males) and fifteen key informant interviews were conducted by the research team, using interview guidelines on the use of traditional medicine. Results Univariate analysis showed that the use of traditional medicines has increased among community members of all socio-economic and demographic backgrounds. Due to the increased incidence of disease and sickness respondents had to increase the use of their cultural means to cope with adverse health situations. Conclusions A systematic collection of knowledge on the use of traditional medicines to cope with climate-sensitive diseases can help the adaptation of communities vulnerable to climate change. In addition it can be instrumental in creating a directory of traditional medicine components used for specific diseases and highlight the effectiveness and relevance of traditional medicines as health-coping strategies. This may be useful for policymakers, researchers, and development partners to adapt existing health care policy in resource-limited contexts. It may also encourage WHO, national and international institutions, such as pharmaceutical companies, to carry out research investigating the effectiveness of these traditional medicines and

  14. At-Risk Boys' Social Self-Efficacy and Physical Activity Self-Efficacy in a Summer Sports Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Xiaoxia; Xiang, Ping; McBride, Ron E.; Liu, Jiling; Thornton, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined at-risk boys' social self-efficacy and physical activity self-efficacy within Bandura's self-efficacy framework. A total of 97 boys, aged between 10 and 13 years, attending a summer sports camp completed questionnaires assessing their social self-efficacy, physical activity self- efficacy, prosocial behaviors, and effort.…

  15. An Analysis on the Effect of Computer Self-Efficacy over Scientific Research Self-Efficacy and Information Literacy Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuncer, Murat

    2013-01-01

    Present research investigates reciprocal relations amidst computer self-efficacy, scientific research and information literacy self-efficacy. Research findings have demonstrated that according to standardized regression coefficients, computer self-efficacy has a positive effect on information literacy self-efficacy. Likewise it has been detected…

  16. A Measurement Invariance Analysis of the General Self-Efficacy Scale on Two Different Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teo, Timothy; Kam, Chester

    2014-01-01

    The 10-item General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES) was developed to assess an individual's beliefs to cope with a variety of situations in life. Despite the GSES being used in numerous research from researchers in different countries and presented in different languages, little is known about the use of its validity in an Asian culture. The aim…

  17. Developing Self-Efficacy through Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feltz, Deborah L.; Weiss, Maureen R.

    1982-01-01

    A coach's role is to develop and sustain the athlete's self-efficacy by ensuring performance success, communicating effectively, using role-modeling techniques, reducing anxiety-producing factors, and using positive reinforcement. (JN)

  18. Leadership, self-efficacy, and student achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, Kristin

    This study examined the relationships between teacher leadership, science teacher self-efficacy, and fifth-grade science student achievement in diverse schools in a San Antonio, Texas, metropolitan school district. Teachers completed a modified version of the Leadership Behavior Description Question (LBDQ) Form XII by Stogdill (1969), the Science Efficacy and Belief Expectations for Science Teaching (SEBEST) by Ritter, Boone, and Rubba (2001, January). Students' scores on the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) measured fifth-grade science achievement. At the teacher level of analysis multiple regressions showed the following relationships between teachers' science self-efficacy and teacher classroom leadership behaviors and the various teacher and school demographic variables. Predictors of teacher self efficacy beliefs included teacher's level of education, gender, and leadership initiating structure. The only significant predictor of teacher self-efficacy outcome expectancy was gender. Higher teacher self-efficacy beliefs predicted higher leadership initiating structure. At the school level of analysis, higher school levels of percentage of students from low socio-economic backgrounds and higher percentage of limited English proficient students predicted lower school student mean science achievement. These findings suggest a need for continued research to clarify relationships between teacher classroom leadership, science teacher self-efficacy, and student achievement especially at the teacher level of analysis. Findings also indicate the importance of developing instructional methods to address student demographics and their needs so that all students, despite their backgrounds, will achieve in science.

  19. Adolescent Work Experience and Self-efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Cunnien, Keith A.; MartinRogers, Nicole; Mortimer, Jeylan T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of this paper To assess the relationship between high school work experiences and self-efficacy. Design/methodology/approach OLS regressions are applied to longitudinal data from the Youth Development Study to examine work experiences and self-efficacy. Findings The analyses indicate that employment fosters self-efficacy in multiple realms, Occasional and sporadic workers exhibit less self-efficacy than steady workers. Supervisory support may be especially important in enhancing adolescents’ confidence as they anticipate their future family lives, community participation, personal health, and economic achievements. Research limitations/Implications This research includes only a small set of the work dimensions that may be important for adolescents. Ethnography and in-depth interviews are recommended to further explore the subjective and emotional dimensions of youth work experiences. Practical implications In developing policies and guidance, educators, parents, and employers should be aware that steady employment and supervisory support enhance the development of adolescent self-efficacy. Original value of paper This paper finds evidence that adolescent work experiences spill over to influence youth’s developing confidence in the realms of family life, community and personal health. It also suggests that sporadic and occasional work patterns can impair the development of self-efficacy in adolescence. PMID:19750144

  20. High self-perceived stress and poor coping in intellectually able adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Hirvikoski, Tatja; Blomqvist, My

    2015-08-01

    Despite average intellectual capacity, autistic traits may complicate performance in many everyday situations, thus leading to stress. This study focuses on stress in everyday life in intellectually able adults with autism spectrum disorders. In total, 53 adults (25 with autism spectrum disorder and 28 typical adults from the general population) completed the Perceived Stress Scale. Autistic traits were assessed using the Autism Spectrum Quotient. Adults with autism spectrum disorder reported significantly higher subjective stress and poorer ability to cope with stress in everyday life, as compared to typical adults. Autistic traits were associated with both subjective stress/distress and coping in this cross-sectional series. The long-term consequences of chronic stress in everyday life, as well as treatment intervention focusing on stress and coping, should be addressed in future research as well as in the clinical management of intellectually able adults with autism spectrum disorder.

  1. Impact of Age, and Cognitive and Coping Resources on Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trouillet, Raphael; Doan-Van-Hay, Loane-Martine; Launay, Michel; Martin, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    To explore the predictive value of cognitive and coping resources for problem- and emotion-focused coping with age, we collected data from community-dwelling adults between 20 and 90 years old. We hypothesized that age, perceived stress, self-efficacy, working-memory capacity, and mental flexibility were predictors of coping. We collected data…

  2. Self-efficacy, transition, and patient outcomes in the sickle cell disease population.

    PubMed

    Molter, Brittany L; Abrahamson, Kathleen

    2015-06-01

    Severe pain is a common symptom of sickle cell disease (SCD). Transitions between adult and pediatric care are a point of particular vulnerability for patients, increasing the risk for poor pain management. The purpose of this literature review was to investigate the relationships among self-efficacy, transition, and SCD health outcomes. A systematic literature search was performed within CINAHL, Academic Search Premier, MEDLINE, and PubMed on published papers between 2003 and 2013. After applying exclusion criteria, 20 articles were used in the final review. Few studies were identified that directly tested the relationship between self-efficacy and SCD outcomes. Although there are few studies on this topic, most demonstrated positive correlations between self-efficacy during transition and positive patient outcomes in the SCD population. Additional studies are needed to support causation. Studies were commonly limited by small sample sizes and attrition. Furthermore, there is a large gap in the literature regarding how self-efficacy can be increased in these patients. Interventions that promote self-efficacy have the potential to improve SCD pain outcomes, but more research is needed to develop interventions to increase these adolescents' self-efficacy. If providers can identify individuals in this population with low self-efficacy, they may be able to intervene early to improve patient outcomes. Most identified studies point to the positive correlation between self-efficacy and positive health outcomes in adolescents with SCD. Self-efficacy has the potential to guide self-care interventions and further research with the SCD population.

  3. Gender Differences in Career Self-Efficacy in Singapore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chew, Irene Keng-Howe; Halim, Hendrick; Matsui, Tamao

    2002-01-01

    Measures of career self-efficacy and work activity self-efficacy were completed by 405 male and 346 female Singaporean university students. Men had significantly higher self-efficacy in realistic and enterprising occupations, women in artistic, investigative, and social occupations. Gender differences in career self-efficacy were predicted by…

  4. Self-efficacy moderates the relationship between stress appraisal and quality of life among rescue workers.

    PubMed

    Prati, Gabriele; Pietrantoni, Luca; Cicognani, Elvira

    2010-07-01

    Rescue workers are frequently exposed to highly stressful situations during their everyday work activity. Stress and coping theory emphasizes the interaction between primary and secondary appraisal in determining coping responses to stressful events and quality of life. According to Social Cognitive Theory, stress reactions depend on self-appraisal of coping capabilities. The present study investigated whether self-efficacy moderates the relationship between stress appraisal and professional quality of life. A self-administered questionnaire was submitted to a sample of 451 Italian rescue workers (firefighters, paramedics, and medical technicians), including the Professional Quality of Life Scale, which measures three dimensions of emergency workers' quality of working life: compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction. Multiple regression analyses indicated that the relationship between stress appraisal and professional quality of life was significant only among rescue workers with low levels of self-efficacy but not among those with higher levels of self-efficacy. These results confirmed the expectations based on Social Cognitive Theory that self-efficacy buffers the impact of perceived stressful encounters on professional quality of life. Results suggest the usefulness of interventions aimed at increasing rescue workers' psychosocial skills.

  5. Longitudinal field investigation of the moderating and mediating effects of self-efficacy on the relationship between training and newcomer adjustment.

    PubMed

    Saks, A M

    1995-04-01

    A longitudinal field study examined the moderating and mediating effects of self-efficacy on the relationship between training and the adjustment of newcomers during their 1st year of employment. The results provided some support for the hypothesis that initial self-efficacy moderates the relationship between training and adjustment. Training was more strongly related to posttraining self-efficacy, ability to cope, job performance, and intention to quit the profession for newcomers with low levels of initial self-efficacy mediates the relationship between training and adjustment; however, evidence of complete mediation was found only for ability to cope. Posttraining self-efficacy partially mediated the relationships between training and job satisfaction, organizational and professional commitment, and intention to quit the organization and the profession. Research and practical implications of these findings for the training and the socialization of newcomers are discussed.

  6. Does Emotional Self-Efficacy Predict Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Empathy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goroshit, Mariana; Hen, Meirav

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that teachers' self-efficacy and empathy are two of the most important variables consistently related to outcomes of positive teaching and student learning. Emotional self-efficacy refers to peoples' judgment regarding their own capacity to process emotional information accurately and effectively. It is considered a powerful…

  7. Connecting Counselor Self-Efficacy and Supervisor Self-Efficacy: The Continued Search for Counseling Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Robbie J.

    1998-01-01

    Critiques the articles on counselor and supervisory self-efficacy in this issue of JCP (Larson's Social Cognitive Model of Counselor Training is the theme) and finds no major points of disagreement. Points to questions which are not addressed regarding the most effective means of facilitating counselor self-efficacy and competence. Addresses the…

  8. End-of-treatment abstinence self-efficacy, behavioral processes of change, and posttreatment drinking outcomes in Project MATCH.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Taylor Berens; DiClemente, Carlo C; Pitts, Steven C

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated whether alcohol abstinence self-efficacy at the end of alcohol treatment was moderated by utilization of behavioral processes of change (coping activities used during a behavior change attempt). It was hypothesized that self-efficacy would be differentially important in predicting posttreatment drinking outcomes depending on the level of behavioral processes, such that the relation between self-efficacy and outcomes would be stronger for individuals who reported low process use. Analyses were also estimated with end-of-treatment abstinence included as a covariate. Data were analyzed from alcohol-dependent individuals in both treatment arms of Project MATCH (Matching Alcoholism Treatments to Client Heterogeneity; N = 1,328), a large alcohol treatment study. Self-efficacy was moderated by behavioral process use in predicting drinking frequency 6 and 12 months posttreatment and drinking quantity 6 months posttreatment such that self-efficacy was more strongly related to posttreatment drinking when low levels of processes were reported than high levels, but interactions were attenuated when end-of-treatment abstinence was controlled for. Significant quadratic relations between end-of-treatment self-efficacy and 6- and 12-month posttreatment drinking quantity and frequency were found (p < .001, ƒ² = 0.02-0.03), such that self-efficacy most robustly predicted outcomes when high. These effects remained significant when end-of-treatment abstinence was included as a covariate. Findings highlight the complex nature of self-efficacy's relation with drinking outcomes. Although the interaction between self-efficacy and behavioral processes was attenuated when end-of-treatment abstinence was controlled for, the quadratic effect of self-efficacy on outcomes remained significant. The pattern of these effects did not support the idea of "overconfidence" as a negative indicator.

  9. Psychometric properties of the Swedish childbirth self-efficacy inventory (Swe-CBSEI)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous research has reported that women who are admitted to delivery wards in early labour process before an active stage of labour has started run an increased risk of instrumental deliveries. Therefore, it is essential to focus on factors such as self-efficacy that can enhance a woman’s own ability to cope with the first stage of labour. However, there was no Swedish instrument measuring childbirth self-efficacy available. Thus, the aim of the study was to translate the Childbirth Self-efficacy Inventory and to psychometrically test the Swedish version on first- time mothers within the Swedish culture. Methods The method included a forward-backward translation with face and content validity. The psychometric properties were evaluated using a Principal Component Analysis and by using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and inter-item correlations. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests were used to describe and compare the scales. All data were collected from January 2011 to June 2012, from 406 pregnant women during the gestational week 35-42. Results The Swedish version of the Childbirth Self-Efficacy Inventory indicated good reliability and the Principal Component Analysis showed a three-component structure. The Wilcoxon Signed-Ranks Test indicated that the women could differentiate between the concepts outcome expectancy and self-efficacy expectatancy and between the two labour stages, active stage and the second stage of labour. Conclusions The Swedish version of Childbirth Self-efficacy Inventory is a reliable and valid instrument. The inventory can act as a tool to identify those women who need extra support and to evaluate the efforts of improving women’s self-efficacy during pregnancy. PMID:24383788

  10. Middle school science teachers' teaching self-efficacy and students' science self-efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisa, Danielle

    Project 2061, initiated by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), developed recommendations for what is essential in education to produce scientifically literate citizens. Furthermore, they suggest that teachers teach effectively. There is an abundance of literature that focuses on the effects of a teacher's science teaching self-efficacy and a student's science self-efficacy. However, there is no literature on the relationship between the two self-efficacies. This study investigated if there is a differential change in students' science self-efficacy over an academic term after instruction from a teacher with high science teaching self-efficacy. Quantitative analysis of STEBI scores for teachers showed that mean STEBI scores did not change over one academic term. A t test indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in mean SMTSL scores for students' science self-efficacy over the course of one academic term for a) the entire sample, b) each science class, and c) each grade level. In addition, ANOVA indicated that there was no statistically significant difference in mean gain factor of students rated as low, medium, and high on science self-efficacy as measured by the SMTSL, when students received instruction from a teacher with a high science teaching self-efficacy value as measured by the STEBI. Finally, there was no statistically significant association between the pre- and post-instructional rankings of SMTSL by grade level when students received instruction from a teacher with a high science teaching self-efficacy value as measured by the STEBI. This is the first study of its kind. Studies indicated that teaching strategies typically practiced by teachers with high science teaching were beneficial to physics self-efficacy (Fencl & Scheel, 2005). Although it was unsuccessful at determining whether or not a teacher with high science teaching self-efficacy has a differential affect on students' science self-efficacy

  11. Self-Efficacy for Creative Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schack, Gina

    The Efficacy Scale for Creative Productivity (ESCreP) was developed to measure students' convictions that they could be creative producers. Self-efficacy, an individual's estimation of ability to perform a behavior, is based upon performance accomplishments, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and emotional or physiological arousal. Three…

  12. Leadership, Self-Efficacy, and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between teacher leadership, science teacher self-efficacy, and fifth-grade science student achievement in diverse schools in a San Antonio, Texas, metropolitan school district. Teachers completed a modified version of the "Leadership Behavior Description Question" (LBDQ) Form XII by Stogdill (1969),…

  13. [Self-efficacy among health learners/self-efficacy among health educators].

    PubMed

    Chikamoto, Y

    1998-01-01

    The Social Cognitive Theory has helped health educators develop effective health education programs that target self-efficacy among participants in changing their health behavior. Bandura has identified four resources on which individuals determine their levels of self-efficacy: (1) performance accomplishment, (2) vicarious reinforcement, (3) verbal persuasion, and (4) emotional arousal. Examples of health education strategies that utilize each of the four resources to increase participants' self-efficacy are described. Health education professionals in Japan have attempted to use programs based on the Social Cognitive Theory for Japanese populations. It is criticized that health educators that use such programs are not well trained in effective use, and that those programs have not been utilized at their maximum potentials. Using the frame-work of the Social Cognitive Theory, the importance of incorporating ways to increase self-efficacy of health educators in providing health education services into education and training of health educators is discussed.

  14. Incorporating coping into an expectancy framework for explaining drinking behaviour.

    PubMed

    Hasking, Penelope A; Oei, Tian P S

    2008-01-01

    Expectancy Theory has offered much in the way of understanding alcohol use and abuse, and has contributed greatly to prevention and treatment initiatives. However although many cognitive-behavioural treatment approaches are based on expectancy constructs, such as outcome expectancies and self-efficacy, high relapse rates imply that expectancy theory may be too narrow in scope, and that additional variables need to be examined if a comprehensive understanding of drinking behaviour, and better treatment outcomes, are to be achieved. We suggest that the coping strategies an individual employs present one such set of variables that have largely been neglected from an expectancy framework. Although coping skills training is routinely used in prevention and treatment of alcohol problems, coping research has suffered from a poor theoretical framework. In this paper we review the existing research relating expectancies, self-efficacy and coping to drinking behaviour and propose a model which explains both social and dependent drinking, by incorporating coping into an expectancy theory framework. We also outline research and clinical implications of the proposed model. PMID:19630702

  15. Self-Efficacy and Learning in Sorority and Fraternity Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Jon G., Jr.; Oberle, Crystal D.; Lilley, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Past research consistently reveals that "self-efficacy," referring to one's perceived ability to obtain a desired outcome, in academic courses is linked to academic achievement and motivation in those courses. In particular, high self-efficacy in courses is associated with high academic performance, and low self-efficacy in courses is associated…

  16. Examining Dimensions of Self-Efficacy for Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruning, Roger; Dempsey, Michael; Kauffman, Douglas F.; McKim, Courtney; Zumbrunn, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    A multifactor perspective on writing self-efficacy was examined in 2 studies. Three factors were proposed--self-efficacy for writing ideation, writing conventions, and writing self-regulation--and a scale constructed to reflect these factors. In Study 1, middle school students (N = 697) completed the Self-Efficacy for Writing Scale (SEWS), along…

  17. Examining Preservice Teachers' Culturally Responsive Teaching Self-Efficacy Doubts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siwatu, Kamau Oginga; Chesnut, Steven Randall; Alejandro, Angela Ybarra; Young, Haeni Alecia

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to add to the research on teachers' self-efficacy beliefs by examining preservice teachers' culturally responsive teaching self-efficacy doubts. We examined the tasks that preservice teachers felt least efficacious to successfully execute and explored the reasoning behind these self-efficacy doubts. Consequently, we were…

  18. Identifying Events that Impact Self-Efficacy in Physics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawtelle, Vashti; Brewe, Eric; Goertzen, Renee Michelle; Kramer, Laird H.

    2012-01-01

    We present a method of analyzing the development of self-efficacy in real time using a framework of self-efficacy opportunities (SEOs). Considerable research has shown a connection between self-efficacy, or the confidence in one's own ability to perform a task, and success in science fields. Traditional methods of investigating the development of…

  19. Using Video Feedback to Measure Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobo, Linda; Andrews, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    When a student has a high sense of self-efficacy, foreseeing success and providing positive guides and supports for performing the skill will usually occur. A low self-efficacy tends to predict failure and anticipation of what could go wrong. Videotape feedback provided to students has reported favorable outcomes. Self-efficacy could alter…

  20. Measuring Distinct Types of Musical Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Laura; Williamon, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    This research examines the specific nature of self-efficacy beliefs within music. Separate questionnaires assessing self-efficacy for musical learning and self-efficacy for musical performing were developed and tested, and the reliability of the new questionnaires was demonstrated using internal reliability tests and exploratory factor analysis. A…

  1. Examination of Faculty Self-Efficacy Related to Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvitz, Brian S.; Beach, Andrea L.; Anderson, Mary L.; Xia, Jiangang

    2015-01-01

    Through this study we sought to gain understanding of the challenges professors face as they make the transition to teaching online. We measured professors' online teaching self-efficacy using survey research methods. Results showed that online teaching self-efficacy was high among the professors surveyed with no self-efficacy scores lower than…

  2. Self-Efficacy of Senior Baccalaureate Nursing Students and Preceptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Dolly; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Nursing students (n=23) rated their self-efficacy in nursing behaviors and clinical preceptors (n=24) rated their self-efficacy in helping students with the behaviors. Students' self-efficacy increased after the preceptorship; preceptors' scores remained high both before and after. The value of the preceptorship was supported. (SK)

  3. Can a Self-Efficacy-Based Intervention Decrease Burnout, Increase Engagement, and Enhance Performance? A Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breso, Edgar; Schaufeli, Wilmar; Salanova, Marisa

    2011-01-01

    Using the Social Cognitive Theory as a theoretical framework, this study evaluated a 4-month, individual cognitive-behavioral intervention program to decrease burnout and increase self-efficacy, engagement, and performance among university students. The main objective of the intervention was to decrease the anxiety the students coped with before…

  4. Pre-Service Teachers' Science Teaching Self-Efficacy Beliefs: The Influence of a Collaborative Peer Microteaching Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinici, Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of my study was to explore the nature of changes in pre-service science teachers' (PSTs') self-efficacy beliefs toward science teaching through a mixed-methods approach. Thirty-six participants enrolled in a science methods course that included a collaborative peer microteaching ("Cope-M"). Participants' science teaching…

  5. Constrained, Convenient, and Symbolic Consumption: Neighborhood Food Environments and Economic Coping Strategies among the Urban Poor.

    PubMed

    Tach, Laura; Amorim, Mariana

    2015-10-01

    Residents of poor and minority neighborhoods have less access to healthy, affordable food than their counterparts in more advantaged neighborhoods, and these disparities translate into population-level health disparities by race and socioeconomic status. Current research debates the extent of these disparities and how they translate into unequal health outcomes, but it has paid less attention to the micro-level decision-making processes and strategies residents employ to access food in the context of constrained personal and neighborhood resources. We examined this gap in the literature using data from in-depth qualitative interviews with 66 poor residents of three urban neighborhoods with varying nutritional environments. We found that economic and geographic constraints strongly influenced where and how residents shopped, but within those constraints, residents developed a number of adaptive strategies to maximize the quality and variety of their groceries. We also found that higher-quality stores and purchases were important to residents not only for their material benefits-such as health and cost-but also for their symbolic value. The presence of many stores, close stores, and high-quality stores offered opportunities for symbolic consumption and boosted neighborhood reputations but also created settings for social exclusion. These results illuminate how inequalities in nutritional environments shape residents' lived experiences and highlight residents' agency and resourcefulness in responding to such constraints.

  6. Constrained, Convenient, and Symbolic Consumption: Neighborhood Food Environments and Economic Coping Strategies among the Urban Poor.

    PubMed

    Tach, Laura; Amorim, Mariana

    2015-10-01

    Residents of poor and minority neighborhoods have less access to healthy, affordable food than their counterparts in more advantaged neighborhoods, and these disparities translate into population-level health disparities by race and socioeconomic status. Current research debates the extent of these disparities and how they translate into unequal health outcomes, but it has paid less attention to the micro-level decision-making processes and strategies residents employ to access food in the context of constrained personal and neighborhood resources. We examined this gap in the literature using data from in-depth qualitative interviews with 66 poor residents of three urban neighborhoods with varying nutritional environments. We found that economic and geographic constraints strongly influenced where and how residents shopped, but within those constraints, residents developed a number of adaptive strategies to maximize the quality and variety of their groceries. We also found that higher-quality stores and purchases were important to residents not only for their material benefits-such as health and cost-but also for their symbolic value. The presence of many stores, close stores, and high-quality stores offered opportunities for symbolic consumption and boosted neighborhood reputations but also created settings for social exclusion. These results illuminate how inequalities in nutritional environments shape residents' lived experiences and highlight residents' agency and resourcefulness in responding to such constraints. PMID:26382655

  7. Social and emotional self-efficacy at work.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Carina; Stempel, Christiane; Isaksson, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    Research has shown that self-efficacy is often one of the most important personal resources in the work context. However, because this research has focused on cognitive and task-oriented self-efficacy, little is known about social and emotional dimensions of self-efficacy at work. The main aim of the present study was to investigate social and emotional self-efficacy dimensions at work and to compare them to a cognitive and task-oriented dimension. Scales to measure social and emotional self-efficacy at work were developed and validated and found to be well differentiated from the cognitive task-oriented occupational self-efficacy scale. Confirmatory factor analyses of data from 226 Swedish and 591 German employees resulted in four separate but correlated self-efficacy dimensions: (1) occupational; (2) social; (3) self-oriented emotional; and (4) other-oriented emotional. Social self-efficacy explained additional variance in team climate and emotional self-efficacy in emotional irritation and emotional exhaustion, over and above effects of occupational self-efficacy. Men reported higher occupational self-efficacy, whereas social and emotional self-efficacy revealed no clear gender differences. The scales have strong psychometric properties in both Swedish and German language versions. The positive association between social self-efficacy and team climate, and the negative relationships between self-oriented emotional self-efficacy and emotional irritation and emotional exhaustion may provide promising tools for practical applications in work settings such as team-building, staff development, recruitment or other training programs aiming for work place health promotion. The next step will be to study how social and emotional self-efficacy relate to leadership, well-being and health over time.

  8. Social and emotional self-efficacy at work.

    PubMed

    Loeb, Carina; Stempel, Christiane; Isaksson, Kerstin

    2016-04-01

    Research has shown that self-efficacy is often one of the most important personal resources in the work context. However, because this research has focused on cognitive and task-oriented self-efficacy, little is known about social and emotional dimensions of self-efficacy at work. The main aim of the present study was to investigate social and emotional self-efficacy dimensions at work and to compare them to a cognitive and task-oriented dimension. Scales to measure social and emotional self-efficacy at work were developed and validated and found to be well differentiated from the cognitive task-oriented occupational self-efficacy scale. Confirmatory factor analyses of data from 226 Swedish and 591 German employees resulted in four separate but correlated self-efficacy dimensions: (1) occupational; (2) social; (3) self-oriented emotional; and (4) other-oriented emotional. Social self-efficacy explained additional variance in team climate and emotional self-efficacy in emotional irritation and emotional exhaustion, over and above effects of occupational self-efficacy. Men reported higher occupational self-efficacy, whereas social and emotional self-efficacy revealed no clear gender differences. The scales have strong psychometric properties in both Swedish and German language versions. The positive association between social self-efficacy and team climate, and the negative relationships between self-oriented emotional self-efficacy and emotional irritation and emotional exhaustion may provide promising tools for practical applications in work settings such as team-building, staff development, recruitment or other training programs aiming for work place health promotion. The next step will be to study how social and emotional self-efficacy relate to leadership, well-being and health over time. PMID:26882457

  9. Pre-Service English Language Teachers' Perceptions of Computer Self-Efficacy and General Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topkaya, Ece Zehir

    2010-01-01

    The primary aim of this study is to investigate pre-service English language teachers' perceptions of computer self-efficacy in relation to different variables. Secondarily, the study also explores the relationship between pre-service English language teachers' perceptions of computer self-efficacy and their perceptions of general self-efficacy.…

  10. Collective arrangements and social networks: Coping strategies for the poor households in the Great Ruaha Catchment in Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadigi, Reuben M. J.; Mdoe, N. S. Y.; Ashimogo, G. C.

    Access to water and land resources underpins the socio-economic fabric of many societies in the Southern Africa region, which is characterized broadly as underdeveloped with widespread food insecurity, exacerbated by persistent droughts, erratic rainfalls and increasing human populations. The availability of land and water resources is increasingly diminishing and becoming a stumbling block to the development of the agrarian societies in the region. The poor households have in turn adopted new livelihood coping mechanisms but little research has been done to assess the effectiveness of these ‘instruments’. Consequently, the concepts of sustainable water resources management and agricultural development have remained elusive and poorly understood by policy makers as well as by water resources planners and managers. Recognizing this, a study was conducted between 2002 and 2005 under the RIPARWIN (Raising Irrigation Productivity and Releasing Water for Intersectoral Needs) project to assess the spatial dynamics of livelihood capital, vulnerability and coping strategies for the poor agrarian households in the Upper Great Ruaha River Catchment (GRRC) in Tanzania. The results of analysis showed an array of livelihood platforms and institutional contexts that act to shape the existing livelihood typologies in the GRRC. In addition, the results showed a gradual increase in household vulnerability from upstream to downstream, particularly in terms of access to physical and natural assets. Vulnerability was found to be directly associated with the number of dependants. The female-headed households were relatively more likely to be vulnerable than the male-headed households (cf. probabilities of 27% and 21%, respectively). The value of collective arrangements and drawing on social networks crosscut all social strata and ranked as the most common livelihood strategy. This suggests that the scope for reducing vulnerability among the poor households in the GRRC critically

  11. The Optimistic Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews three studies that provide evidence that students with learning disabilities (LD) display optimistic academic self-beliefs, even in the face of relatively poor academic performance. In the first study, a quantitative approach was used to explore the spelling and writing self-efficacy of 133 adolescents with and without LD.…

  12. The association of personal resilience with stress, coping, and diabetes outcomes in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: variable- and person-focused approaches.

    PubMed

    Yi-Frazier, Joyce P; Yaptangco, Mona; Semana, Sharla; Buscaino, Emil; Thompson, Valeria; Cochrane, Katie; Tabile, Marissa; Alving, Erin; Rosenberg, Abby R

    2015-09-01

    This study explored the association between personal resilience and distress, coping, and diabetes outcomes in 50 adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Resilience was defined by a factor score derived from validated instruments measuring self-efficacy, optimism, and self-esteem. Variable- and person-focused methodologies were used to explore these associations. Low resilience was associated with higher distress, poor quality of life, and poor glycemic control. Participants with low resilience used more maladaptive coping strategies and were at greatest risk of poor outcomes. Findings suggest that resilience is a promising candidate for interventions designed to reduce distress and improve outcomes for adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

  13. Modeling Sources of Teaching Self-Efficacy for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Graduate Teaching Assistants.

    PubMed

    DeChenne, Sue Ellen; Koziol, Natalie; Needham, Mark; Enochs, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) have a large impact on undergraduate instruction but are often poorly prepared to teach. Teaching self-efficacy, an instructor's belief in his or her ability to teach specific student populations a specific subject, is an important predictor of teaching skill and student achievement. A model of sources of teaching self-efficacy is developed from the GTA literature. This model indicates that teaching experience, departmental teaching climate (including peer and supervisor relationships), and GTA professional development (PD) can act as sources of teaching self-efficacy. The model is pilot tested with 128 GTAs from nine different STEM departments at a midsized research university. Structural equation modeling reveals that K-12 teaching experience, hours and perceived quality of GTA PD, and perception of the departmental facilitating environment are significant factors that explain 32% of the variance in the teaching self-efficacy of STEM GTAs. This model highlights the important contributions of the departmental environment and GTA PD in the development of teaching self-efficacy for STEM GTAs.

  14. Modeling Sources of Teaching Self-Efficacy for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Graduate Teaching Assistants

    PubMed Central

    DeChenne, Sue Ellen; Koziol, Natalie; Needham, Mark; Enochs, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) have a large impact on undergraduate instruction but are often poorly prepared to teach. Teaching self-efficacy, an instructor’s belief in his or her ability to teach specific student populations a specific subject, is an important predictor of teaching skill and student achievement. A model of sources of teaching self-efficacy is developed from the GTA literature. This model indicates that teaching experience, departmental teaching climate (including peer and supervisor relationships), and GTA professional development (PD) can act as sources of teaching self-efficacy. The model is pilot tested with 128 GTAs from nine different STEM departments at a midsized research university. Structural equation modeling reveals that K–12 teaching experience, hours and perceived quality of GTA PD, and perception of the departmental facilitating environment are significant factors that explain 32% of the variance in the teaching self-efficacy of STEM GTAs. This model highlights the important contributions of the departmental environment and GTA PD in the development of teaching self-efficacy for STEM GTAs. PMID:26250562

  15. The impact of parents' sleep quality and hypoglycemia worry on diabetes self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Linda Jones; Monaghan, Maureen; Cogen, Fran; Streisand, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Parents of young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) may experience poor sleep quality, possibly impacting their confidence in T1D management. This study investigated sleep characteristics among parents of children with T1D and relationships among parents' sleep quality, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. As part of baseline assessment for a randomized clinical trial (RCT) to promote parental management of T1D, 134 parents of children ≤ age 6 reported on demographics, parent sleep characteristics, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. Parents reported they slept less time than recommended by the National Sleep Foundation and endorsed greater global sleep problems than standardized norms of healthy adults; one third of parents reported their overall sleep quality was "fairly bad" or "very bad." Hypoglycemia worry and parents' sleep quality were both significantly related to diabetes self-efficacy, but parents' sleep quality did not mediate the relationship of hypoglycemia worry and diabetes self-efficacy. Many parents experience disrupted sleep that impacts their perceived ability to perform T1D management. Interventions designed to improve parental T1D self-efficacy should consider sleep and concerns about children's hypoglycemia. PMID:24738994

  16. Engineering Professional Development: Elementary Teachers' Self-efficacy and Sources of Self-efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Donna Louise

    Currently, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) is a popular buzz word in P-12 education as it represents a means to advance American competitiveness in the global economy. Proponents of the engineering component of STEM advocate additional benefits in teaching engineering, such as its capacity to engage students in collaboration, and to apply critical thinking, systems thinking, negotiation, and communication skills to solve real-life contextual problems. Establishing a strong foundation of engineering knowledge at a young age will provide students with internal motivation as it taps into their curiosity toward how things work, and it also prepares them for secondary science courses. Successful STEM education is often constrained by elementary teachers' low perception of self-efficacy to teach science and engineering. Elementary teachers with low self-efficacy in science are more likely to spend less instructional time teaching science, which suggests that teachers with little to no training in engineering might avoid teaching this topic. Therefore, the purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to examine the effects of engineering professional development on elementary (K-6) teachers' content and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) and perceptions of self-efficacy to teach engineering, and (b) to identify and explain sources influencing self-efficacy. Professional development was conducted in a metropolitan area in the Pacific Northwest. Results revealed that after the engineering professional development, teachers experienced statistically significant gains in content, PCK, and self-efficacy to teach engineering. Increases in self-efficacy were mainly attributed to mastery experiences and cultivation of a growth mindset by embracing the engineering design process.

  17. Food Self-Provisioning in Czechia: Beyond Coping Strategy of the Poor--A Response to Alber and Kohler's "Informal Food Production in the Enlarged European Union" (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jehlicka, Petr; Kostelecky, Tomas; Smith, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Food systems are of increasing interest in both research and policy communities. Surveys of post-socialist countries of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) show high rates of food self-provisioning. These practices have been explained in terms of being "coping strategies of the poor". Alber and Kohler's "Informal Food Production in the Enlarged…

  18. A gender study investigating physics self-efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawtelle, Vashti

    The underrepresentation of women in physics has been well documented and a source of concern for both policy makers and educators. My dissertation focuses on understanding the role self-efficacy plays in retaining students, particularly women, in introductory physics. I use an explanatory mixed methods approach to first investigate quantitatively the influence of self-efficacy in predicting success and then to qualitatively explore the development of self-efficacy. In the initial quantitative studies, I explore the utility of self-efficacy in predicting the success of introductory physics students, both women and men. Results indicate that self-efficacy is a significant predictor of success for all students. I then disaggregate the data to examine how self-efficacy develops differently for women and men in the introductory physics course. Results show women rely on different sources of self-efficacy than do men, and that a particular instructional environment, Modeling Instruction, has a positive impact on these sources of self-efficacy. In the qualitative phase of the project, this dissertation focuses on the development of self-efficacy. Using the qualitative tool of microanalysis, I introduce a methodology for understanding how self-efficacy develops moment-by-moment using the lens of self-efficacy opportunities. I then use the characterizations of self-efficacy opportunities to focus on a particular course environment and to identify and describe a mechanism by which Modeling Instruction impacts student self-efficacy. Results indicate that the emphasizing the development and deployment of models affords opportunities to impact self-efficacy. The findings of this dissertation indicate that introducing key elements into the classroom, such as cooperative group work, model development and deployment, and interaction with the instructor, create a mechanism by which instructors can impact the self-efficacy of their students. Results from this study indicate that

  19. The effects of problem-based learning on the self-efficacy and attitudes of beginning biology majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajab, Adel Mohammad

    The problem of low persistence of science majors has resulted in calls for changes in undergraduate instruction toward environments that foster positive self-efficacy among beginning science majors. Low science self-efficacy and poor attitudes toward science may contribute to high attrition rates of science majors. Classroom environments that foster positive self-efficacy development include pedagogies that promote authentic learning contexts and involve collaborative learning teams. Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional model that attempts to create both conditions and may provide every source of information needed for the development of self-efficacy (i.e., mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and physiological states) as postulated by Albert Bandura. The degree to which these sources of self-efficacy are delivered to individuals within a PBL group may depend on how the group members interact and how students perceive the PBL process itself. This study examined the development of biology self-efficacy and attitudes among biology majors in a PBL setting and in a traditional lecture-based setting. Specifically, this project investigated changes in students' biology self-efficacy beliefs, mediating aspects of PBL in self-efficacy development, the relationship between PBL processes and group collective efficacy, the predictive nature of entering self-efficacy levels on attitudes toward PBL and mid-term grades, and changes in student attitudes toward biology. The study design was quasi-experimental and included quantitative pre- and post-surveys, qualitative interviews, and classroom observations. Findings revealed that students enrolled in a PBL class exhibited greater gains in biology self-efficacy and were likely to report more favorable attitudes toward biology compared to students enrolled in a traditional class. The aspects of PBL that most accounted for these findings were students' ownership of the learning process, their

  20. Covariates of Self-Efficacy: Caregiver Characteristics Related to Mental Health Services Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, S.; Bickman, L.; Heflinger, C. A.

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly, professionals are recognizing the need to involve parents and other caregivers in the mental health treatment of children. However, parents and caregivers may not feel efficacious when participating in mental health care. Self-efficacy is a mechanism of human agency that describes people's beliefs about their capabilities to exercise…

  1. Adapting Computer Programming Self-Efficacy Scale and Engineering Students' Self-Efficacy Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkmaz, Özgen; Altun, Halis

    2014-01-01

    Students might have different type and different level of perceptions: Positive or negative perceptions on programming; a perception on benefit of programming, perceptions related to difficulties of programming process etc. The perception of student on their own competence is defined as self-efficacy. Based on the discussions reported in…

  2. Threats to Pediatric Nurses’ Perception of Caring Self-efficacy: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Azam; Bahrami, Masoud; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Yousefy, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nurses are considered the largest and most important human resource for healthcare organizations. Self-efficacy as the main predictor of nurses’ behavior plays an important role in nurses’ professional behavior. However, the various dimensions and threats of caring self- efficacy concept have not been taken into consideration. Objectives: The present paper attempts to identify threats to self-efficacy as an important aspect of the concept of pediatric nurses’ caring self-efficacy. Materials and Methods: This study is part of a larger study on the caring self-efficacy concept that was conducted through content analysis and from a qualitative approach in 2014 in Iran. Twenty-seven nurses and pediatric clinical instructors participated in this research according to the purposive sampling method employed in the study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews. The collected data were analyzed using the conventional content analysis method. Results: “Threats to self-efficacy” was one of the main themes extracted from the interview analysis results in the present study. The theme consists of two main categories “individual barriers,” including not having a caring attitude and not being interested in children, and “organizational barriers,” including an inefficient educational system, not developing professional capabilities, non-valuation of the organization in a caring context, a poor rewards system, and inappropriate managerial policies. Conclusions: Nursing management and custodians of nursing trainings can break through the barriers to self-efficacy by knowing these factors and making changes in the educational programs and providing supporting policies. This can be an important step toward improving nurses’ inefficacy and ultimately improving the provision of quality healthcare services. PMID:27247779

  3. Creating opportunities to influence self-efficacy through modeling instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawtelle, Vashti; Brewe, Eric; Goertzen, Renee Michelle; Kramer, Laird H.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper we present an initial analysis connecting key elements of Modeling Instruction (MI) to self-efficacy experience opportunities. Previously, we demonstrated that MI has positive effects on self-efficacy when compared with traditional Lecture instruction [1]. We also found a particularly strong positive effect on the social persuasion source of self-efficacy for women in the MI class. Our current study seeks to understand through what mechanisms MI influences self-efficacy. We demonstrate this connection through an in-depth analysis of video chosen to exemplify Modeling techniques used in a problem-solving episode by three female participants enrolled in a MI introductory physics class. We provide a rich and descriptive analysis of the self-efficacy experiences opportunities within this context and discuss how these opportunities provide a potential explanation of how MI influences self-efficacy.

  4. Positive Impacts of Modeling Instruction on Self-Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawtelle, Vashti; Brewe, Eric; Kramer, Laird H.

    2010-10-01

    Analysis of the impact of Modeling Instruction (MI) on the sources of self-efficacy for students in Introductory Physics 1 will be presented. We measured self-efficacy through a quantitative diagnostic (SOSESC) developed by Fencl and Scheel [1] to investigate the impact of instruction on the sources of self-efficacy in all introductory physics classes. We collected both pre- semester data and post-semester data, and evaluated the effect of the classroom by analyzing the shift (Post-Pre). At Florida International University, a Hispanic-serving institution, we find that traditional lecture classrooms negatively impact the self-efficacy of all students, while the MI courses had no impact for all students. Further, when disaggregating the data by gender and sources of self-efficacy, we find that Modeling Instruction positively impacted the Verbal Persuasion source of self-efficacy for women. This positive impact helps to explain high rates of retention for women in the MI classes.

  5. Perceived Parenting Self-Efficacy (PMP S-E) of mothers who are breastfeeding hospitalised preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Christopher R; Adamson-Macedo, Elvidina N

    2004-12-01

    Breastfeeding is a complex task for many mothers but may be particularly difficult when coping with the birth of a preterm. In the following article the task of breastfeeding a preterm neonate is identified as one facet of the parenting process and the many problems encountered when breastfeeding are highlighted. Research is presented which investigates whether breastfeeding a preterm neonate mediates mothers' Perceived Parenting Self-Efficacy (PMP S-E) whilst in hospital. The findings from this study suggest that not only do mothers who are breastfeeding their preterm neonate have a lower self-efficacy than non-breastfeeding mothers, but they also require further support in all aspects of parenting. The authors discuss these results in terms of self-efficacy theory and suggest that they may have implications for Neonatal Health Psychologists practice particularly with regard to the facilitation of breastfeeding within the neonatal unit.

  6. Practicing biology: Undergraduate laboratory research, persistence in science, and the impact of self-efficacy beliefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkes, Elizabeth

    As undergraduate laboratory research internships become more popular and universities devote considerable resources towards promoting them, it is important to clarify what students specifically gain through involvement in these experiences and it is important to understand their impact on the science pipeline. By examining recent findings describing the primary benefits of undergraduate research participation, along with self-efficacy theory, this study aims to provide more explanatory power to the anecdotal and descriptive accounts regarding the relationship between undergraduate research experiences and interest in continuing in science. Furthermore, this study characterizes practices that foster students' confidence in doing scientific work with detailed description and analysis of the interactions of researchers in a laboratory. Phase 1 of the study, a survey of undergraduate biology majors (n=71) at a major research university, investigates the relationships among participation in biology laboratory research internships, biology laboratory self-efficacy strength, and interest in persisting in science. Phase 2 of the study, a two-year investigation of a university biology research laboratory, investigates how scientific communities of practice develop self-efficacy beliefs. The findings suggest that participation in lab internships results in increased interest in continuing in life science/biology graduate school and careers. They also suggest that a significant proportion of that interest is related to the students' biology laboratory self-efficacy. The findings of this study point to two primary ways that undergraduate research participation might work to raise self-efficacy strength. First, university research laboratory communities can provide students with a variety of resources that scaffold them into biology laboratory mastery experiences. Second, university research laboratory communities can provide students with coping and mastery Discourse models

  7. Physical Activity Enjoyment and Self-Efficacy As Predictors of Cancer Patients' Physical Activity Level

    PubMed Central

    Ungar, Nadine; Wiskemann, Joachim; Sieverding, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Background: Physical activity (PA) can support cancer patients during medical treatment by reducing side-effects and increasing quality of life. However, PA levels mostly decline after diagnosis. Which factors can explain if patients are able to remain or even increase their PA level? Self-efficacy is an important cognitive factor that has been linked to cancer patients' PA across many studies. In contrast, affective factors such as PA enjoyment have rarely been examined. We compare the influence of self-efficacy and PA enjoyment on cancer patients' PA levels after completion of an exercise or stress-management intervention. Methods: Outpatient cancer patients [N = 72; 54% female; M = 56 years, SD = 12.34; most with breast or colon cancer (34%, 15%)] were enrolled in the MOTIVACTION study, a 4-week intervention (1 h counseling followed by weekly phone calls), with pre-test (T1), post-test (T2), and a 10-week follow-up (T3). Participants were randomized to either an exercise intervention (emphasizing self-regulatory strategies for behavior change) or to a stress management intervention (coping and relaxation techniques). Sixty-seven patients remained in the study and completed the SQUASH assessment of PA, a measure of maintenance self-efficacy (7 items, Cronbach's α = 0.88) and PA enjoyment (2 items, Cronbach's α = 0.89). Regression analyses were calculated with PA level (at T2 and T3) as dependent variable and relative weight analyses were conducted. The study was registered at clinicalTrials.gov (unique identifier:NCT01576107; URL: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01576107?term=motivaction&rank=1). Results: Baseline self-efficacy and change in PA enjoyment significantly predicted cancer patients' PA level at T2 adjusting for baseline PA and type of intervention. Relative weight (RW) analysis revealed that PA enjoyment (baseline and change together) explained 34.3% of the dependent variable, self-efficacy (baseline and change) explained 38.4%. At follow

  8. Improvement in Stress, General Self-Efficacy, and Health Related Quality of Life following Patient Education for Patients with Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Haugland, Trude; Veenstra, Marijke; Vatn, Morten H; Wahl, Astrid K

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate changes in general self-efficacy, health related quality of life (HRQoL), and stress among patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET) following a multidisciplinary educational intervention. Forty-one patients were enrolled in this exploratory pilot study. A total of 37 patients completed the full 26-week intervention based on the principles of self-efficacy. General self-efficacy was measured by the General Self-Efficacy Scale, HRQoL was measured with the SF-36, and stress was measured with the Impact of Event Scale. Mixed effect models were used to evaluate changes in general self-efficacy, mental and physical components of HRQoL, and stress adjusting for demographic and clinical variables. Results showed significant improvements in patients' general self-efficacy (β = 0.71; P < 0.05), physical component scores of HRQoL (β = 3.09; P < 0.01), and stress (β = -2.10, P = 0.008). Findings suggest that patients with NET have the capacity to improve their ability to cope with their disease, problem-solve, improve their physical status, and reduce their stress following an educational intervention based on the principles of self-efficacy. These preliminary data provide a basis for future randomized controlled trials to test interventions to improve HRQoL for patients with NET. PMID:23738063

  9. Parental Protectiveness Mediates the Association between Parent-Perceived Child Self-Efficacy and Health Outcomes in Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder.

    PubMed

    DuPen, Melissa M; van Tilburg, Miranda A L; Langer, Shelby L; Murphy, Tasha B; Romano, Joan M; Levy, Rona L

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that parental protectiveness is associated with increased pain and disability in Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder (FAPD) but the role that perceived child self-efficacy may play remains unclear. One reason why parents may react protectively towards their child's pain is that they perceive their child to be unable to cope or function normally while in pain (perceived low self-efficacy). This study sought to examine (a) the association between parent-perceived child pain self-efficacy and child health outcomes (symptom severity and disability); and (b) the role of parental protectiveness as a mediator of this association. Participants were 316 parents of children aged 7-12 years with FAPD. Parents completed measures of perceived child self-efficacy when in pain, their own protective responses to their child's pain, child gastrointestinal (GI) symptom severity, and child functional disability. Parent-perceived child self-efficacy was inversely associated with parent-reported child GI symptom severity and disability, and parental protectiveness mediated these associations. These results suggest that parents who perceive their child to have low self-efficacy to cope with pain respond more protectively when they believe he/she is in pain, and this, in turn, is associated with higher levels of GI symptoms and disability in their child. This finding suggests that directly addressing parent beliefs about their child's ability to manage pain should be included as a component of FAPD, and potentially other child treatment interventions. PMID:27657151

  10. Health coping strategies of the people vulnerable to climate change in a resource-poor rural setting in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Among the many challenges faced by the people of Bangladesh, the effects of climate change are discernibly threatening, impacting on human settlement, agricultural production, economic development, and human health. Bangladesh is a low-income country with limited resources; its vulnerability to climate change has influenced individuals to seek out health coping strategies. The objectives of the study were to explore the different strategies/measures people employ to cope with climate sensitive diseases and sickness. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 450 households from Rajshahi and Khulna districts of Bangladesh selected through multi-stage sampling techniques, using a semi-structured questionnaire supplemented by 12 focus group discussions and 15 key informant interviews. Results Respondents applied 22 types of primary health coping strategies to prevent climate related diseases and sickness. To cope with health problems, 80.8% used personal treatment experiences and 99.3% sought any treatments available at village level. The percentage of respondents that visited unqualified health providers to cope with climate induced health problems was quite high, namely 92.7% visited village doctors, 75.9% drug stores, and 67.3% self-medicated. Ninety per cent of the respondents took treatment from unqualified providers as their first choice. Public health facilities were the first choice of treatment for only 11.0% of respondents. On average, every household spent Bangladesh Currency Taka 9,323 per year for the treatment of climate sensitive diseases and sickness. Only 46% of health expenditure was managed from their savings. The rest, 54% expenditure, was supported by using 24 different sources, such as social capital and the selling of family assets. The rate of out-of-pocket payment was almost 100%. Conclusion People are concerned about climate induced diseases and sickness and sought preventive as well as curative measures to cope with

  11. Career Self-Efficacy: Exemplary Recent Research and Emerging Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betz, Nancy E.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses what the author views as exemplary work illustrating important directions in research on the applications of Bandura's self-efficacy theory to career theory, assessment, and counseling. The author begins with research on measuring career self-efficacy, following which research testing the postulated behavioral consequences…

  12. The Relationship between Lesson Study and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibbald, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses a gap in the literature by developing a theory that bridges lesson study and self-efficacy. Since self-efficacy has been linked to student achievement, the theory is important as an explanatory mechanism linking lesson study to student achievement. The theory was developed using grounded theory based on primary source data…

  13. The Accuracy of Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Outdoor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumann, Scott

    2013-01-01

    In the present era of outcome assessment and accountability, self-efficacy is a popular outcome measure in outdoor and adventure education. Self-efficacy beliefs are context specific perceptions an individual possesses about a likelihood of success in future tasks and are related to well-being confidence, and persistence. However, recent research…

  14. Increasing Student Mathematics Self-Efficacy through Teacher Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegle, Del; McCoach, D. Betsy

    2007-01-01

    Teachers can modify their instructional strategies with minimal training and effort, and this can result in increases in their students' self-efficacy. Self-efficacy judgments are based on four sources of information: an individual's own past performance, vicarious experiences of observing the performances of others, verbal persuasion that one…

  15. Self-Efficacy and Statistics Performance among Sport Studies Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Andrew M.; Hall, Ross; Lane, John

    2004-01-01

    The present study explored predictive paths between performance accomplishments, self-efficacy, and performance among Sport Studies students taking a Level 1 statistics module. Fifty-eight Level 1 Sport Studies undergraduate degree students completed a 44-item self-efficacy measure and an assessment of perceived academic success at the start of…

  16. Assessing Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy in Three Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Giunta, Laura Di; Eisenberg, Nancy; Gerbino, Maria; Pastorelli, Concetta; Tramontano, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The Regulatory Emotional Self-Efficacy (RESE) scale was developed to assess perceived self-efficacy in managing negative (NEG) and in expressing positive (POS) affect (G. V. Caprara & M. Gerbino, 2001). In this study of young adults, the factorial structure of the RESE scale was found to be similar in Italy, the United States, and Bolivia: In…

  17. Attributional Style and Self-Efficacy in Singaporean Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Lay See; Tan, Kayce

    2012-01-01

    This investigation examined the relationship between adolescent students' attributional style and their perceived academic self-efficacy using the Children's Attributional Style Questionnaire (CASQ) (Seligman et al., 1984) and Multidimensional Scales of Perceived Self Efficacy (Bandura, 1989). Attributional style, defined as the way in which…

  18. A Self-Efficacy Scale for Chemical Dependency in Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Mary, Sharon; Russo, Thomas J.

    This study was conducted to develop a scale that assesses perceptions of self-efficacy in potentially stressful situations for chemically dependent adolescents. Adolescent subjects (N=100) currently receiving treatment for chemical dependency were given a 20-situation questionnaire, the Adolescent Self-Efficacy Scale (ASES). Students were…

  19. Academic Self-Efficacy and Prospective ELT Teachers' Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sariçoban, Arif; Behjoo, Bahram Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to scrutinize the possible relationship between academic self-efficacy beliefs and foreign language achievement among prospective ELT teachers. To do so, the data for the study were collected through a questionnaire, "College Academic Self-Efficacy Scale" adapted from Owen & Froman (1988), consisting of 33 items…

  20. Gender Differences in Self-Efficacy among Latino College Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, J. Derek

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the changes in self-efficacy among Latinos during the freshman year in a highly selective institution. Results indicate that gender differences exist during this period. Males rate themselves high in self-efficacy at the beginning of the year, while females rate themselves low. An interaction effect occurs at the end of the…

  1. Does Digital Game Interactivity Always Promote Self-Efficacy?

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Hao

    2015-11-01

    Interactive digital games can promote self-efficacy by engaging players in enactive and observational learning. However, interactivity does not always lead to greater self-efficacy. Important constructs in social cognitive theory, such as performance outcome and perceived similarity, are often not accounted for in studies that have tested the effect of digital game interactivity on self-efficacy. This study assessed the effects of interactive digital games compared with passive digital games based on video comparison, a common experimental design used to test the effect of digital game interactivity on self-efficacy. In addition, this study also evaluated player performance and measured perceived similarity to the observed player. Findings suggested that in general, digital game interactivity predicted higher self-efficacy compared with noninteractive passive games. However, in the noninteractive conditions, the effects of performance on self-efficacy were moderated by perceived similarity between the observer and the observed player. When the observed player was perceived to be similar to the observer, the effects of performance on self-efficacy were comparable to the interactive game, but when the observed player was perceived as dissimilar to the observer, observing the dissimilar player failed to increase observer self-efficacy. Implications for interactivity manipulations and game developers are discussed.

  2. Self-Efficacy in Second/Foreign Language Learning Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raoofi, Saeid; Tan, Bee Hoon; Chan, Swee Heng

    2012-01-01

    This study reviews the empirical literature of self-efficacy, a central component of social cognitive theory, in the area of second language learning by focusing on two research questions: first, to what extent, has self-efficacy, as a predicting variable, been explored in the field of second language learning? Second, what factors affect…

  3. Investigation of Teachers' Mathematics Teaching Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nurlu, Özge

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate primary school teachers' characteristics by comparing their mathematics teaching self-efficacy beliefs. In this research, qualitative research method is used. In order to determine the participant teachers, firstly, "Self-Efficacy Beliefs toward Mathematics Teaching Scale" (Dede, 2008) was…

  4. Perceptions of Self-Efficacy among STEM Students with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenson, Ronda J.; Petri, Alexis N.; Day, Arden D.; Truman, Kevin Z.; Duffy, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies examine the relationship between self-efficacy and positive outcomes for postsecondary students. Collectively they echo that self-efficacy is an essential component to positive outcomes. Relatively few studies focused on students with disabilities majoring in STEM fields. Twenty postsecondary students with disabilities…

  5. Self-Efficacy and Interest: Experimental Studies of Optimal Incompetence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvia, Paul J.

    2003-01-01

    To test the optimal incompetence hypothesis (high self-efficacy lowers task interest), 30 subjects rated interest, perceived difficulty, and confidence of success in different tasks. In study 2, 33 subjects completed a dart-game task in easy, moderate, and difficult conditions. In both, interest was a quadratic function of self-efficacy,…

  6. Development of Self-Efficacy towards Using Alternative Assessment Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buldur, Serkan; Tatar, Nilgun

    2011-01-01

    Determining the candidate teachers' opinions regarding self-efficacy towards alternative assessment will be beneficial in that this will improve their competencies while using these approaches in their applications within the classroom. In this article, the development and validation of the "Self-efficacy towards Using Alternative Assessment…

  7. Study Skills Course Impact on Academic Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wernersbach, Brenna M.; Crowley, Susan L.; Bates, Scott C.; Rosenthal, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Although study skills courses improve student retention, the impact of study skills courses on students' academic self-efficacy has not been investigated. The present study examined pre- and posttest levels of academic self-efficacy in college students enrolled in a study skills course (n = 126) compared to students enrolled in a general education…

  8. Do Personality Traits Contribute to Vocational Self-Efficacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Lisa M.; Borgen, Fred H.

    2006-01-01

    Although personality is viewed as a precursor to self-efficacy and interest development (e.g., Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994), little research concerns linkages between personality and self-efficacy. This article bridges the relation by presenting the pattern of findings across four university samples. Three general and 11 specific personality…

  9. Questioning the Utility of Self-Efficacy Measurements for Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushi, Purva J.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the influence of academic self-efficacy and social support on the academic success of Indian-American and Caucasian-American undergraduate students. 200 Indian-American and Caucasian-American students completed a demographic form and five surveys. The data showed that academic self-efficacy had a significant effect on college…

  10. Emotional Intelligence and Self-Efficacy among Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouton, Alexandre; Hansenne, Michel; Delcour, Romy; Cloes, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Research has documented a positive association between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and well-being, performance and self-efficacy. The purpose of the current study was to examine potential associations between EI and self-efficacy among physical education teachers. The Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue) and the Teacher Sense of…

  11. Music Teachers' Computer Anxiety and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiliç, Deniz Beste Çevik

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the computer anxiety and self-efficacy of music teachers in terms of different variables. The research is implemented on 124 music teachers. A personal information form and scales of Computer Anxiety and Self Efficacy are implemented on 124 music teachers. Data are analyzed with one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and…

  12. Self-Efficacy and Burnout in Professional School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunduz, Bulent

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between burnout and self-efficacy among school counselors. Also, the level of their burnout and self-efficacy was examined in terms of the social support, task perception and the number of students. A sample of 194 school counselors filled out the Maslach Burnout Inventory, The School Counselors…

  13. Mathematics Self-Efficacy: Stereotype Threat versus Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweinle, Amy; Mims, Grace A.

    2009-01-01

    Children's academic self-efficacy is one of the strongest predictors of achievement (Wigfield and Eccles, "Contemporary Educational Psychology" 25(1): 68-81, 2000). The present research examined mathematics self-efficacy and the relationship of racial context from the perspective of two competing bodies of research. Stereotype threat theory would…

  14. Exploring the Development of Novice Teachers' Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mongillo, Maria Boeke

    2011-01-01

    Teacher self-efficacy has been linked to multiple positive student outcomes and teacher practices (Ashton & Webb, 1986; Grant, 2006; Klassen, et al., 2009; Perrachione, Rosser, & Petersen, 2008). However, few studies, have explored teacher self-efficacy qualitatively (Manuel, 2003; Tschannen-Moran & Hoy, 2007; Tschannen-Moran, Hoy, & Hoy, 1998).…

  15. Academic Gender Bias and Women's Behavioral Agency Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ancis, Julie R.; Phillips, Susan D.

    1996-01-01

    Examined 67 upper-level college women enrolled in traditional, nontraditional, and gender-neutral majors to study the relationship between academic gender bias and female students' agentic self-efficacy expectations. Results indicate that perceived academic gender bias predicted agentic self-efficacy expectations, beyond the contributions of sex…

  16. Self-Efficacy, Stress, and Academic Success in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajacova, Anna; Lynch, Scott M.; Espenshade, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the joint effects of academic self-efficacy and stress on the academic performance of 107 nontraditional, largely immigrant and minority, college freshmen at a large urban commuter institution. We developed a survey instrument to measure the level of academic self-efficacy and perceived stress associated with 27…

  17. Mental Health Promotion in Schools by Strengthening Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerusalem, Matthias; Hessling, Johannes Klein

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review two school intervention projects aiming to promote students' self-efficacy in Germany. Self-efficacy, defined as people's "beliefs in their capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action required to produce given attainments", is a core prevention criterion of mental health. It is…

  18. Factor Structure of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornick, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study utilized exercise self-efficacy ratings from undergraduate students to assess the factor structure of the Self-Efficacy to Regulate Exercise Scale (Bandura, 1997, 2006). An exploratory factor analysis (n = 759) indicated a two-factor model solution and three separate confirmatory factor analyses (n = 1,798) supported this…

  19. Student Self-Efficacy and Gender-Personality Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallan, Lars; Opstad, Leiv

    2016-01-01

    The present study examines the self-efficacy levels and self-efficacy strength for male and female students in a course in Principle of Economics. The groups of male and female students may be mutually heterogeneous when it comes to personality types in a business school (Fallan & Opstad, 2014). This study does not treat the gender groups as…

  20. Regulation of Cognitive Processes through Perceived Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandura, Albert

    1989-01-01

    Addresses issues concerning the extension of self-efficacy theory to memory functioning. Issues include perceived memory capabilities, memory self-appraisal, personal control over memory functioning, preservation of a favorable sense of memory self-efficacy, and strategies for generalizing the impact of training in memory skills. (RJC)

  1. Treatment Implications Derived from Self-Efficacy Research with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, William G.

    Self-efficacy, a person's perceived capacity to execute a behavior required to produce a desired oucome, can affect motivation and behavior. It appears that individuals gain self-efficacy information from performance accomplishments, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal. Effective clinical interventions must promote…

  2. Gender Differences in Self-Efficacy and Attitudes toward Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Tor

    1995-01-01

    Investigates gender differences in computer use among 147 college students. Students completed a questionnaire designed to measure self-efficacy, computer anxiety, computer liking, and computer confidence. Results indicate gender differences in perceived self-efficacy in word processing and spreadsheet software. No gender differences were found in…

  3. Neighborhood Processes, Self-Efficacy, and Adolescent Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupere, Veronique; Leventhal, Tama; Vitaro, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Self-efficacy beliefs are central to mental health. Because adolescents' neighborhoods shape opportunities for experiences of control, predictability, and safety, we propose that neighborhood conditions are associated with adolescents' self-efficacy and, in turn, their internalizing problems (i.e., depression/anxiety symptoms). We tested these…

  4. Physical Activity and Perceived Self-Efficacy in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langan, Mary E.; Marotta, Sylvia A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of self-efficacy in older adults, with physical activity, age, and sex as the predictor variables. Regression analyses revealed physical activity to be the only statistically significant predictor of self-efficacy. These findings may be of interest to counselors who work with older people.…

  5. Pre-Service Teacher Self-Efficacy in Digital Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Narelle; Garvis, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Self-efficacy is an important motivational construct for primary school teachers (teachers of children aged 5-12 years) within Australia. Teacher self-efficacy beliefs will determine the level of teacher confidence and competence to engage with a task. In this study, we explore engagement with digital technology and the associated learning and…

  6. Validation of the Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn-Nilas, Christopher; Milhausen, Robin R.; Breuer, Rebecca; Bailey, Julia; Pavlou, Menelaos; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Wingood, Gina M.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed a newly developed Sexual Communication Self-Efficacy Scale designed to measure the sexual communication self-efficacy of adolescent men and women. Three-hundred and seventy-four U.K. adolescents completed this new scale, along with several other validity measures. Factor analysis revealed that the Sexual Communication…

  7. Creative Self-Efficacy Development and Creative Performance over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Pamela; Farmer, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Building from an established framework of self-efficacy development, this study provides a longitudinal examination of the development of creative self-efficacy in an ongoing work context. Results show that increases in employee creative role identity and perceived creative expectation from supervisors over a 6-month time period were associated…

  8. The Role of Self-Efficacy in Performing Emotion Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heuven, Ellen; Bakker, Arnold B.; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; Huisman, Noortje

    2006-01-01

    This study used a sample of 154 cabin attendants to examine the role of self-efficacy in the performance of emotion work. On the basis of the literature, we hypothesized that self-efficacy would have a moderating influence on the relationship between emotional job demands (i.e., feeling rules and emotionally charged interactions with passengers)…

  9. The Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Depression in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Marion F.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined the self-efficacy status of 366 depressed and nondepressed adolescents. Found that self-efficacy was negatively correlated with depression. Three-way interaction of Sex X Age X Level of Depression suggested separate analyses for males and females. Regression analysis revealed age-related changes in the dependence of depression scores on…

  10. College English Writing Affect: Self-Efficacy and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodrow, Lindy

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a research project into the self-efficacy and anxiety of college English students at four universities in China. A total of 738 participants completed a questionnaire measuring self-efficacy and anxiety in writing in English. This was immediately followed by a writing task. The questionnaire used a seven point Likert type…

  11. Career Decision Self-Efficacy among Turkish Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isik, Erkan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the career decision-making self-efficacy in a sample of 356 Turkish undergraduate students. Method: With this purpose, 356 (138 females; 218 males) Turkish undergraduate students aged 17-24 completed a Turkish-translated version of Career Decision Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form (CDSE-SF) to…

  12. Instructional design considerations promoting engineering design self-efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Andrew M.

    Engineering design activities are frequently included in technology and engineering classrooms. These activities provide an open-ended context for practicing critical thinking, problem solving, creativity, and innovation---collectively part of the 21st Century Skills which are increasingly needed for success in the workplace. Self-efficacy is a perceptual belief that impacts learning and behavior. It has been shown to directly impact each of these 21st Century Skills but its relation to engineering design is only recently being studied. The purpose of this study was to examine how instructional considerations made when implementing engineering design activities might affect student self-efficacy outcomes in a middle school engineering classroom. Student responses to two self-efficacy inventories related to design, the Engineering Design Self-Efficacy Instrument and Creative Thinking Self-Efficacy Inventory, were collected before and after participation in an engineering design curriculum. Students were also answered questions on specific factors of their experience during the curriculum which teachers may exhibit control over: teamwork and feedback. Results were analyzed using Pearson's correlation coefficients, paired and independent t-tests, and structural equation modeling to better understand patterns for self-efficacy beliefs in students. Results suggested that design self-efficacy and creative thinking self-efficacy are significantly correlated, r(1541) = .783, p < .001, and increased following participation in a design curriculum, M diff = 1.32, t(133) = 7.60, p < .001 and Mdiff = 0.79, t(124) = 4.19, p < .001 respectively. Structural models also showed that students perceive team inclusion and feedback as significant contributors to their self-efficacy beliefs, while team diversity was not related to self-efficacy. Separate models for each predictor demonstrated good fit. Recommendations are made based on the corresponding nature of engineering design self-efficacy

  13. Writing Essays: Does Self-Efficacy Matter? The Relationship between Self-Efficacy in Reading and in Writing and Undergraduate Students' Performance in Essay Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prat-Sala, Merce; Redford, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Self-efficacy beliefs have been identified as associated with students' academic performance. The present research assessed the relationship between two new self-efficacy scales (self-efficacy in reading [SER] and self-efficacy in writing [SEW]) and students' writing performance on a piece of assessed written coursework. Using data from first and…

  14. The Relationships between Academic Self-Efficacy, Computer Self-Efficacy, Prior Experience, and Satisfaction with Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jan, Shazia K.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between academic self-efficacy (ASE), computer self-efficacy (CSE), prior experience, and satisfaction with online learning and explored how ASE, CSE, and satisfaction vary with age and gender. One hundred and three graduate students enrolled in purely online courses in January 2014 at a university in the…

  15. Nurses' self-efficacy and academic degree advancement.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Susan; DeGuzman, Pamela; Kulbok, Pamela; Jackson, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The last decade has brought about a synergy of influences for registered nurses to advance their academic preparation. Literature indicates that there is correlation between self-efficacy and goal establishment and success. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the relationship between self-efficacy and advancing academic aspirations of registered nurses. Findings indicated that there was a trend toward a difference in the self-efficacy of nurses who began their career with a diploma or associate degree and went on for academic advancement and those who did not.

  16. Negative self-efficacy and goal effects revisited.

    PubMed

    Bandura, Albert; Locke, Edwin A

    2003-02-01

    The authors address the verification of the functional properties of self-efficacy beliefs and document how self-efficacy beliefs operate in concert with goal systems within a sociocognitive theory of self-regulation in contrast to the focus of control theory on discrepancy reduction. Social cognitive theory posits proactive discrepancy production by adoption of goal challenges working in concert with reactive discrepancy reduction in realizing them. Converging evidence from diverse methodological and analytic strategies verifies that perceived self-efficacy and personal goals enhance motivation and performance attainments. The large body of evidence, as evaluated by 9 meta-analyses for the effect sizes of self-efficacy beliefs and by the vast body of research on goal setting, contradicts findings (J. B. Vancouver, C. M. Thompson, & A. A. Williams, 2001; J. B. Vancouver, C. M. Thompson, E. C. Tischner, & D. J. Putka 2002) that belief in one's capabilities and personal goals is self-debilitating.

  17. Self-efficacy and resilience in baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Heidi; Reyes, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The attrition of admitted students from nursing programs has been attributed to the perceived stress of nursing school. Students who possess the characteristics of self-efficacy and resilience may be persistent and therefore academically successful as demonstrated by test scores over the course of their education. In this article, the authors report on a study that explored self efficacy and resilience in relation to test scores among 136 baccalaureate nursing students in multiple courses during one, 16 week semester. No statistically significant differences were found in perceived self-efficacy or resilience total scores between early semester and late semester measurements. Significant differences were found on the Resilience Scale subscales of Perseverence and Existential Aloneness. Test scores were weakly correlated with resilience and self-efficacy scores. PMID:22499714

  18. Predicting Positive Self-Efficacy in Group Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kay N.

    1997-01-01

    A study of 288 hospital employees engaged in problem-solving groups found that previous group problem-solving experience, educational level, work expertise, and problem-solving confidence were the best predictors of self-efficacy. (SK)

  19. The dynamic change of self-efficacy in information searching on the Internet: influence of valence of experience and prior self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Wen-Bin; Wan, Chin-Sheng

    2007-11-01

    The authors investigated the dynamic change of specific self-efficacy in information searching on the Internet. In Study 1, the valence of experience was manipulated by task difficulty to obtain the developmental curve of self-efficacy change in consecutive information-searching trials. The results indicated that positive task experiences in information searching elicited a linear increase in self-efficacy. In contrast, negative task experiences elicited a more rapid decrease in self-efficacy. Self-efficacy of participants decreased to a lower level after the first negative experience and displayed a quadratic trend toward a floor effect. In Study 2, the authors examined the moderating effect of initial self-efficacy on the valence of experience. The enhancement effect of positive task experience on self-efficacy was more pronounced for individuals with lower levels of self-efficacy, whereas the deteriorating effect of negative experience was more prominent for individuals with higher levels of self-efficacy.

  20. Parental self-efficacy and morbidity in pediatric asthma.

    PubMed

    Grus, C L; Lopez-Hernandez, C; Delamater, A; Appelgate, B; Brito, A; Wurm, G; Wanner, A

    2001-02-01

    This study investigated the relationship between parental self-efficacy and asthma-related morbidity. Participants included 139 parents of children (ages 5-8) who were diagnosed with asthma and were primarily from lower-income and minority backgrounds. Parents completed a 22-item measure of self-efficacy; factor analysis was conducted on this measure, yielding two factors: learned helplessness and self-efficacy. Correlational analyses indicated that higher scores on the learned helplessness factor were significantly related to increased asthma-related morbidity for the majority of morbidity variables. The self-efficacy factor was significantly related to days of school missed. Regression analyses conducted with the factor scores and the morbidity variables provide further support that the learned helplessness factor accounts for a significant amount of the variance in asthma morbidity for many of the variables studied, while the self-efficacy factor was related to only a few. Although improving health outcomes of children with asthma is a multifaceted process, the results of this study suggest that targeting parental self-efficacy, particularly with parents who are experiencing high levels of perceived learned helplessness, may be a helpful component of an intervention program with this population. PMID:11256560

  1. Depression and AIDS Preventive Self-efficacy Among Taiwanese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hui; Salman, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Effectively reducing adolescents' risky sexual behaviors has been an urgent need since the HIV/AIDS infections among young people has been acknowledged as a priority. Self-efficacy has been considered playing an essential role in behavioral changes, and depressed individuals may demonstrate lower self-efficacy. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to gain insights into self-reported depression among 16-18 years-old Taiwanese adolescents as well as to explore psychosocial predictors of AIDS preventive self-efficacy. A convenience sample of 734 adolescents from southern Taiwan was recruited, and several reliable and valid questionnaires were used to collect data. Descriptive statistics, odds ratio, independent t-test, and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were utilized to analyze data. Results showed that the differences in self-reported depression and in the AIDS preventive self-efficacy varied by gender, substance use, and having sexual experience. Furthermore, depression was a significant predictor of AIDS preventive self-efficacy while controlling the covariates. This study suggests that gender and mental health status such as depression may play significant roles in AIDS preventive self-efficacy. Nurses and health care providers should take the influence of mental health into consideration when designing AIDS preventive interventions for male and female Taiwanese adolescents. The provided information may also enhance psychiatric nurses' capability to provide care and to enhance the prevention of HIV infection for adolescents. PMID:26804507

  2. Relationship between decision-making self-efficacy, task self-efficacy, and the performance of a sport skill.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Teri J; Chase, Melissa A

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between decision-making self-efficacy and task self-efficacy and subsequent decision-making and task performance. Sixty undergraduate students (30 males, 30 females) participated in this study, which involved infield defensive plays in softball. The physical task required participants to throw a ball at a target. The decision-making task required participants to watch video scenes depicting different infield defensive situations and decide where to throw the ball in each situation. Both tasks used manipulated failure. Self-efficacy was assessed before performance. Strength of decision-making and task self-efficacy predicted physical performance, but not decision-making performance.

  3. Development and Psychometric Testing of a Breast Cancer Survivor Self-Efficacy Scale

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Victoria L.; Ziner, Kim W.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Stump, Timothy E.; Cella, David; Smith, Lisa G.; Bell, Cynthia J.; Von Ah, Diane; Sledge, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To describe the development of a self-efficacy instrument that measures perceived ability to manage symptoms and quality-of-life problems resulting from the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Design Items were developed and content validity assessed. A 14-item scale was psychometrically evaluated using internal consistency reliability and several types of construct validity. Sample 1,127 female breast cancer survivors (BCSs). Methods Written consents were mailed to the research office. Data were collected via mail and telephone. Main Research Variables Demographics, symptom bother, communication with healthcare provider, attention function, fear of recurrence, depression, marital satisfaction, fatigue, sexual functioning, trait and state anxiety, and overall well-being. Findings Data demonstrated that the breast cancer self-efficacy scale (BCSES) was reliable, with an alpha coefficient of 0.89, inter-item correlations ranging from 0.3–0.6, and item-total correlation coefficients ranging from 0.5–0.73. Three of 14 items were deleted because of redundancy as identified through high (> 0.7) inter-item correlations. Factor analysis revealed that the scale was unidimensional. Predictive validity was supported through testing associations between self-efficacy and theoretically supported quality-of-life variables, including physical, psychological, and social dimensions, as well as overall well-being. Conclusions The BCSES demonstrated high internal consistency reliability, unidimensionality, and excellent content and construct validity. This scale should be integrated into interventions that target self-efficacy for managing symptoms in BCSs. Implications for Nursing Nurses working with BCSs may use this tool to assess areas in which survivors might need to build confidence to adequately cope with their specific survivorship concerns. Knowledge Translation The use of the BCSES can inform nurse researchers about the impact of an intervention

  4. Effects of Internet-Based Self-Efficacy Intervention on Secondary Traumatic Stress and Secondary Posttraumatic Growth among Health and Human Services Professionals Exposed to Indirect Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, Roman; Benight, Charles C.; Rogala, Anna; Smoktunowicz, Ewelina; Kowalska, Martyna; Zukowska, Katarzyna; Yeager, Carolyn; Luszczynska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although the evidence for the associations among self-efficacy, secondary traumatic stress (STS) and secondary posttraumatic growth (SPTG) is mounting, there is a lack of the experimental evidence for the influence of self-efficacy on positive and negative mental health outcomes among professionals indirectly exposed to trauma. Purpose: This study investigated the effects of an internet-based self-efficacy intervention (the experimental condition), compared to an education (the active control condition) on STS and SPTG among workers exposed to traumatic events indirectly, through their clients. We hypothesized that the group assignment (experimental vs. control) would affect STS and SPTG indirectly, with a mediating role of self-efficacy beliefs. Methods: Participants were 168 health and human services professionals (78% women), exposed indirectly to a traumatic event at work. They were randomly assigned to either a 4-session internet-based self-efficacy intervention (n = 87) or an education control group (n = 81) which received information about coping resources and consequences of stressors at work or at home. STS, SPTG, and self-efficacy were measured at the baseline (Time 1), 1-month follow-up (Time 2) and 2-month follow-up (Time 3). Results: Analysis of covariance showed that the group assignment had a significant effect on STS (Time 2) and self-efficacy (Time 2), with lower STS and higher self-efficacy reported by the self-efficacy intervention participants. Compared to the experimental group, the active control (education) group participants reported higher SPTG at Time 2. Mediation analyses indicated that the group assignment had indirect effects on STS and SPTG at Time 3. Workers who experienced increases in self-efficacy (Time 2) through the intervention were more likely to report lower STS and higher SPTG at Time 3. Conclusion: Elucidating the mediating processes that explain why an intervention for secondary trauma works is essential in

  5. Tinkering and Technical Self-Efficacy of Engineering Students at the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dale R.; Wood, Lorelei; Corkins, James; Krause, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy in engineering is important because individuals with low self-efficacy have lower levels of achievement and persistence in engineering majors. To examine self-efficacy among community college engineering students, an instrument to specifically measure two important aspects of engineering, tinkering and technical self-efficacy, was…

  6. Educational Persistence: Self-Efficacy and Topics in a College Orientation Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Susan A.; Yucedag-Ozcan, Arfe

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether a college orientation course for online programs leads to increased self-efficacy and, if so, which course topics are related to changes in students' self-efficacy. The culminating research question explores whether self-efficacy is related to enrollment persistence. Students' self-efficacy scores improved significantly…

  7. Who Cares about Others?: Empathic Self-Efficacy as an Antecedent to Prosocial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eklund, Jakob; Loeb, Carina; Hansen, Eric M.; Andersson-Wallin, Ann-Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Two studies tested associations among self-efficacy and prosocial behavior. In Study 1 we measured academic self-efficacy, emotional self-efficacy and self-reported prosocial behavior. The study showed that academic but not emotional self-efficacy was positively correlated with prosocial behavior. Study 1 included only self-oriented emotions, and…

  8. Building Self-Efficacy for Exercise among Rural High School Students: It Takes Ongoing Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hortz, Brian; Petosa, R. Lingyak; Grim, Melissa L.; Stevens, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-efficacy has been associated with adolescent exercise. Previous studies have revealed that self-efficacy is relatively resistant to change. Effective strategies to build self-efficacy among adolescents are needed. Purpose: To describe the changes in self-efficacy and leisure time exercise produced by the "Planning to be…

  9. Writing Self-Efficacy in Young Children: Issues for the Early Grades Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jin-Ah; Lorsbach, Anthony W.

    2005-01-01

    The intent of this study was to examine young children's perceptions of writing self-efficacy (Grades K-1). Most research studies find a significant relationship between self-efficacy and achievement in older students (Grades 4-16). Research has also shown that children are affected by personal perceived self-efficacy. Therefore, self-efficacy can…

  10. Practicum Experiences as Sources of Pre-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Maria; Costa, João; Onofre, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    This study examines physical education pre-service teachers' (PTs) self-efficacy and practicum experiences as self-efficacy sources through a mixed-method approach. For the quantitative phase, a self-efficacy questionnaire was applied to 141 PTs. Results showed a stronger self-efficacy in the relationship with students and discipline promotion.…

  11. Sources of science self-efficacy beliefs of middle school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britner, Shari L.; Pajares, Frank

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree to which A. Bandura's ([1997]) hypothesized sources of self-efficacy predict the science self-efficacy beliefs of middle school students (N = 319), to replicate previous findings that science self-efficacy predicts science achievement, and to explore how science self-efficacy and its antecedents differ by gender. Significant correlations were found between mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, social persuasions, physiological arousal, and self-efficacy. Only mastery experiences significantly predicted science self-efficacy. Girls reported stronger science self-efficacy than did boys. Findings support and extend the theoretical tenets of Bandura's social cognitive theory.

  12. Intervention to Improve Engineering Self-Efficacy and Sense of Belonging of First-Year Engineering Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kari L.

    /her physiological state, and social persuasions, such as student-professor interaction. Increasing the awareness of a student's engineering self-efficacy could potentially improve sense of belonging and persistence for underrepresented minority students in engineering. The hypothesis of this study is that an intervention during the first semester of an incoming freshman's tenure can help improve their engineering self-efficacy, sense of belonging, and overall retention in the engineering program. This study explored the following research questions: 1. What are the differences in engineering self-efficacy, and sense of belonging for first-year underrepresented minority engineering students compared to majority students? 2. What factors or variables should be considered and/or addressed in designing an intervention to increase engineering self-efficacy and sense of belonging amongst first-year underrepresented minority engineering students? 3. Can a small intervention during the beginning of the first semester improve a student's sense of belonging, engineering self-efficacy, and student-professor interaction? Using the race, social fit, and achievement study by Walton and Cohen as a model, the author developed an intervention consisting of short compelling videos of upperclass engineering students from diverse backgrounds. In these videos, students discussed their pursuit of the engineering degree, what obstacles they faced in terms of sense of belonging and coping efficacy, and how they overcame those obstacles. Treatment groups of students watched the videos during the first few weeks of the semester, and pre and post tests were administered to measure mean gains in the student's engineering self-efficacy, sense of belonging, and other variables. The results showed that underrepresented minority students had a lower sense of belonging than whites. The intervention used in the study contributed to mean gain increases in participants' engineering self-efficacy, which could

  13. Outcomes of Occupational Self-Efficacy in Older Workers

    PubMed Central

    Paggi, Michelle E.; Jopp, Daniela S.

    2016-01-01

    Because of the increasing number of older workers, it is important to develop models of work-related constructs for this population. The present article developed a model surrounding occupational self-efficacy, testing its relation to other factors (e.g., intrinsic job motivation), predictors (e.g., self-perceptions of aging), and outcomes (e.g., job satisfaction). Employed adults of ages 50 and older (n= 313) were recruited via organizations and social media sites. Study participants (M= 59.7, SD= 6.1, range = 50–78) volunteered to fill out an Internet survey. Occupational self-efficacy predicted job satisfaction, and intrinsic job motivation fully mediated this relationship. More negative self-perceptions of aging predicted poorer occupational self-efficacy. Occupational self-efficacy also predicted life satisfaction. Expected retirement age and job performance were unrelated to occupational self-efficacy. These findings may inform workplace interventions that seek to maintain or increase older worker job and life satisfaction. PMID:26394821

  14. SELF-EFFICACY, EMOTIONAL STATES, AND PERFORMANCE IN CAROM BILLIARDS.

    PubMed

    Di Corrado, Donatella; Vitali, Francesca; Robazza, Claudio; Bortoli, Laura

    2015-08-01

    Based on an integrative approach to the study of the emotional-cognitive-motor linkage in sport competition, the purpose was to examine the mediating role of emotion-related (psychobiosocial) states in the relationship between self-efficacy (technical and cognitive) and performance in carom billiards. Forty-five male players of master or intermediate categories, between 30 and 74 years of age (M=51.2, SD=10.8), participated in the study. Measures included scores of technical and cognitive self-efficacy, functional (i.e., facilitative to performance) and dysfunctional (i.e., debilitative to performance) psychobiosocial states, and performance outcome. The assessment took place prior to one game of a national or an international competition. Results showed technical self-efficacy, cognitive self-efficacy, functional states, and performance to be significantly and positively related among them. Functional psychobiosocial states mediated the effect of both technical and cognitive self-efficacy on performance. Overall, the findings supported an integrative approach to the study of the linkage among cognition, emotion, and action in sport.

  15. Exercise Video Games and Exercise Self-Efficacy in Children.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Hildemar; Bredehoft, Margaret Dinhluu; Gonzalez, Frecia M; Montgomery, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to investigate the use of exergaming in promoting exercise behavior among children and to examine the impact of the intervention on participants' exercise self-efficacy, in addition to assessing physiological changes. A sample of 55 children enrolled in the Family Fit program, where participants were categorized into 2 groups: healthy weight and overweight. Measures were taken at baseline, after the 7-week program, at the 12-week follow-up, and at the 24-month follow-up. Positive changes in exercise self-efficacy were significant for the overweight group, while the healthy weight group maintained their exercise self-efficacy. At the 24-month follow-up, 97% children reported being interested in participating in a future fitness program, and 96% children who did not play sports before the intervention started practicing sports. Exercise self-efficacy is a predictor of physical activity, and incorporating exergaming in a structured program may lead to increased self-efficacy in participants. PMID:27336015

  16. A program to support self-efficacy among athletes.

    PubMed

    Zagórska, A; Guszkowska, M

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a proprietary program for increasing self-efficacy among track and field athletes through vicarious experience and successful control over excitation and to determine the changes in the cognitive dimensions related to self-efficacy: dispositional optimism, hope of success and locus of control. An experimental two-group design with a pre-test and a post-test in the experimental and control groups was used. Forty-two athletes (29 women and 13 men) aged 17 to 24 years randomly assigned to the intervention and control groups took part in the study. The General Scale of Self-Efficacy, Hope for Success Questionnaire, Life Orientation Test Revised, and Internal-External Locus of Control Scale were used. The study's results indicate that the program was effective. Participants in the intervention group demonstrated a substantial increase in self-efficacy (P = 0.001). This was not observed in the control group (P = 0.732). After the completion of the program, athletes in the intervention group had significantly higher levels of self-efficacy (P = 0.001) and optimism (P = 0.017). They also had more internal locus of control compared to the control group (P = 0.001). Contrary to expectations, athletes in the intervention group demonstrated a substantially lower level of propensity in pathways (P = 0.001) as well as in agency (P = 0.001) (both components of the hope for success).

  17. Exercise Video Games and Exercise Self-Efficacy in Children

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos, Hildemar; Bredehoft, Margaret Dinhluu; Gonzalez, Frecia M.; Montgomery, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to investigate the use of exergaming in promoting exercise behavior among children and to examine the impact of the intervention on participants’ exercise self-efficacy, in addition to assessing physiological changes. A sample of 55 children enrolled in the Family Fit program, where participants were categorized into 2 groups: healthy weight and overweight. Measures were taken at baseline, after the 7-week program, at the 12-week follow-up, and at the 24-month follow-up. Positive changes in exercise self-efficacy were significant for the overweight group, while the healthy weight group maintained their exercise self-efficacy. At the 24-month follow-up, 97% children reported being interested in participating in a future fitness program, and 96% children who did not play sports before the intervention started practicing sports. Exercise self-efficacy is a predictor of physical activity, and incorporating exergaming in a structured program may lead to increased self-efficacy in participants. PMID:27336015

  18. Outcomes of Occupational Self-Efficacy in Older Workers.

    PubMed

    Paggi, Michelle E; Jopp, Daniela S

    2015-04-01

    Because of the increasing number of older workers, it is important to develop models of work-related constructs for this population. The present article developed a model surrounding occupational self-efficacy, testing its relation to other factors (e.g., intrinsic job motivation), predictors (e.g., self-perceptions of aging), and outcomes (e.g., job satisfaction). Employed adults of ages 50 and older (n = 313) were recruited via organizations and social media sites. Study participants (M = 59.7, SD = 6.1, range = 50-78) volunteered to fill out an Internet survey. Occupational self-efficacy predicted job satisfaction, and intrinsic job motivation fully mediated this relationship. More negative self-perceptions of aging predicted poorer occupational self-efficacy. Occupational self-efficacy also predicted life satisfaction. Expected retirement age and job performance were unrelated to occupational self-efficacy. These findings may inform workplace interventions that seek to maintain or increase older worker job and life satisfaction. PMID:26394821

  19. Coping styles of Chicago adults: effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Ilfeld, F W

    1980-11-01

    With a sample of 2,299 Chicago adults, a quantitive exploration is made of the effectiveness of different coping styles in dealing with stressor situations and feelings of distress associated with marriage, parenting, finances, and job; psychiatric symptomatology; and feelings of low self-efficacy. The specific measure of effectiveness is the extent to which one or more coping styles predicts a given dependent variable in a multiple regression analysis. As a group. coping strategies are more predictive of the stressor situation and feelings of personal distress than of psychiatric symptomatology or feelings of low self-efficacy. Also, coping styles relate differentially among the four life areas; they are more predictive of levels of stressors in marriage and parenting than in finances or job. Some coping styles are strongly predictive of low amounts of stressors; this is particularly true of the use of strategies that invoke direct action.

  20. Transcultural self-efficacy perceptions of baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Halter, Margaret; Grund, Faye; Fridline, Mark; See, Sharon; Young, Lisa; Reece, Carol

    2015-05-01

    Addressing the health care needs of a 21st-century nation that is experiencing increased diversity and disparity will require new models of educating future providers. The cultural competence and confidence model was the guiding framework in a study evaluating the influence of cultural educational offerings on the transcultural self-efficacy (TSE) perceptions in baccalaureate nursing students. The Transcultural Self-Efficacy Tool was used to measure perceived TSE in a pretest (N = 260), posttest (N = 236) study over an academic year. Significant changes were demonstrated in overall self-efficacy and on the cognitive, practical, and affective subscales. A classification and regression tree analysis identified social orientation as the demographic variable most predictive of the TSE level. This study supports previous research where positive changes were found in students' TSE based on the inclusion of cultural interventions in the nursing curriculum.

  1. Understanding Women's Success in Physics through Self-Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawtelle, Vashti

    2015-03-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics has been well documented and is a source of concern for both policy makers and educators. Considerable research has shown a connection between students' confidence in their ability to perform well (also known as self-efficacy) and persistence in science fields. In this presentation I will build from research that suggests men and women draw from different types experiences when evaluating their self-efficacy. I will demonstrate through a logistic regression analysis that self-efficacy is a positive predictor of success for women and men in introductory physics, and that the sources these students draw upon differ by gender. Through qualitative data, I will also present a variety of ways that students may develop their confidence in their ability to succeed in physics.

  2. Multidimensional self-efficacy and affect in wheelchair basketball players.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeffrey J

    2008-10-01

    In the current study, variables grounded in social cognitive theory with athletes with disabilities were examined. Performance, training, resiliency, and thought control self-efficacy, and positive (PA) and negative (NA) affect were examined with wheelchair basketball athletes (N = 79). Consistent with social cognitive theory, weak to strong significant relationships among the four types of self-efficacy (rs = .22-.78) and among self-efficacy and affect (rs = -.40-.29) were found. Basketball players who were efficacious in their ability to overcome training barriers were also confident in their basketball skills and efficacious in their ability to overcome ruminating distressing thoughts while simultaneously cultivating positive thoughts. Athletes with strong resiliency and thought control efficacy also reported more PA and less NA. Multiple regression analyses indicated that the four efficacies predicted 10 and 22% of the variance in PA and NA, respectively.

  3. Parental Protectiveness Mediates the Association between Parent-Perceived Child Self-Efficacy and Health Outcomes in Pediatric Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder

    PubMed Central

    DuPen, Melissa M.; van Tilburg, Miranda A. L.; Langer, Shelby L.; Murphy, Tasha B.; Romano, Joan M.; Levy, Rona L.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that parental protectiveness is associated with increased pain and disability in Functional Abdominal Pain Disorder (FAPD) but the role that perceived child self-efficacy may play remains unclear. One reason why parents may react protectively towards their child’s pain is that they perceive their child to be unable to cope or function normally while in pain (perceived low self-efficacy). This study sought to examine (a) the association between parent-perceived child pain self-efficacy and child health outcomes (symptom severity and disability); and (b) the role of parental protectiveness as a mediator of this association. Participants were 316 parents of children aged 7–12 years with FAPD. Parents completed measures of perceived child self-efficacy when in pain, their own protective responses to their child’s pain, child gastrointestinal (GI) symptom severity, and child functional disability. Parent-perceived child self-efficacy was inversely associated with parent-reported child GI symptom severity and disability, and parental protectiveness mediated these associations. These results suggest that parents who perceive their child to have low self-efficacy to cope with pain respond more protectively when they believe he/she is in pain, and this, in turn, is associated with higher levels of GI symptoms and disability in their child. This finding suggests that directly addressing parent beliefs about their child’s ability to manage pain should be included as a component of FAPD, and potentially other child treatment interventions. PMID:27657151

  4. Educational preferences, psychological well-being and self-efficacy among people with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Barlow, J H; Cullen, L A; Rowe, I F

    2002-01-01

    As a basis for developing interventions to meet the psycho-educational needs of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) outpatients attending a regional hospital have been investigated. Specifically, patients' preferences for interventions addressing education (e.g. the disease and its treatment), self-management (e.g. pain-management, exercise) and the consequences (e.g. emotions, impact on work, family relationships) of RA were examined. In addition, psychological well-being and self-efficacy were examined. Results showed that patients preferred education about the disease and its treatment to be delivered on a one-to-one basis by health professionals. Similarly, emotional issues were believed to be best dealt with one-to-one although this could be with a similar other (i.e. a patient). Group interventions were the preferred format for self-management, exercise and relationship issues, whereas videos were thought to be useful for demonstrating use of aids and how other families cope. None of the participants would welcome computer-based interventions. Psychological well-being (e.g. depression, anxiety) remained stable over a 12-month period. Both physical and psychological health status were correlated with arthritis self-efficacy. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to development of interventions to better meet the psycho-educational needs of outpatients with RA.

  5. Intervention to Improve Engineering Self-Efficacy and Sense of Belonging of First-Year Engineering Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kari L.

    /her physiological state, and social persuasions, such as student-professor interaction. Increasing the awareness of a student's engineering self-efficacy could potentially improve sense of belonging and persistence for underrepresented minority students in engineering. The hypothesis of this study is that an intervention during the first semester of an incoming freshman's tenure can help improve their engineering self-efficacy, sense of belonging, and overall retention in the engineering program. This study explored the following research questions: 1. What are the differences in engineering self-efficacy, and sense of belonging for first-year underrepresented minority engineering students compared to majority students? 2. What factors or variables should be considered and/or addressed in designing an intervention to increase engineering self-efficacy and sense of belonging amongst first-year underrepresented minority engineering students? 3. Can a small intervention during the beginning of the first semester improve a student's sense of belonging, engineering self-efficacy, and student-professor interaction? Using the race, social fit, and achievement study by Walton and Cohen as a model, the author developed an intervention consisting of short compelling videos of upperclass engineering students from diverse backgrounds. In these videos, students discussed their pursuit of the engineering degree, what obstacles they faced in terms of sense of belonging and coping efficacy, and how they overcame those obstacles. Treatment groups of students watched the videos during the first few weeks of the semester, and pre and post tests were administered to measure mean gains in the student's engineering self-efficacy, sense of belonging, and other variables. The results showed that underrepresented minority students had a lower sense of belonging than whites. The intervention used in the study contributed to mean gain increases in participants' engineering self-efficacy, which could

  6. Anxiety related to discharge from inpatient neurorehabilitation: Exploring the role of self-efficacy and internal health control beliefs.

    PubMed

    Genis, Michelle; Camic, Paul M; Harvey, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the prevalence of anxiety related to discharge, among a group of 42 participants who were likely to have sustained an at least moderate to severe ABI and who were due to be discharged home following a period of inpatient neurorehabilitation. Differential relationships between psychological factors (self-efficacy and internal health control beliefs) were examined, alongside the relative influence of demographic and clinical characteristics on discharge anxiety. Data were obtained via self-report measures and retrospective reviews of participant's inpatient medical records. While relatively few participants (n = 6; 14%) reported markedly elevated trait-anxiety, almost half the sample (n = 19; 45%) reported clinically significant levels of transient state-anxiety. Notably, state-anxiety was strongly associated with discharge anxiety. Multivariate analyses revealed that age, self-efficacy and internal health control beliefs made independent contributions to self-reported discharge anxiety, with perceived self-efficacy alone explaining 69% of the variance and mediating the effects of age and internal health control beliefs. None of the other demographic or clinical characteristics examined was significantly associated with discharge anxiety. While causality cannot be inferred, findings suggest that anxiety related to discharge from rehabilitation might be best predicted by poor perceptions of self-efficacy. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

  7. The Relationship between Active Coping and Trait Resilience across U.S. and Taiwanese College Student Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Ming-Hui; Nishikawa, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    This study compared predictors of active coping (people's tendency to actively cope with stress) among college students in the United States and Taiwan. In both samples, trait resilience predicted active coping and mediated the effect of self-efficacy on active coping. The findings indicate that trait resilience influences college students' active…

  8. Enhancing Students' Self-Efficacy in Making Positive Career Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddan, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Field Project A is an elective course in the Bachelor of Exercise Science program at Griffith University and includes elements of both career development learning and work-integrated learning. This paper aims to determine the effects of the learning activities and assessment items developed for the course on students' self-efficacy in making…

  9. College Student Disposition and Academic Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Timothy W., II; Skidmore, Ronald L.; Aagaard, Lola

    2012-01-01

    Dispositional optimism is an adopted orientation in which one believes that goals will generally be attained and that tasks can generally be successfully completed, whereas pessimists orient toward less belief in successful task or goal completion. A related concept, individuals with high self-efficacy believe they will be successful at particular…

  10. Self-Efficacy and Marijuana Cessation: A Construct Validity Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Robert S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines possible relationships between self-efficacy for avoiding marijuana use and theoretically related measures in a sample of 161 men and 51 women who sought marijuana cessation treatments. Predictive validity was stronger for frequency of posttreatment use than for abstinence status. Discusses the need for better assessment of the efficacy…

  11. Reading and Writing Self-Efficacy of Incarcerated Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lise Oen; Varberg, Jeanette; Manger, Terje; Eikeland, Ole-Johan; Asbjornsen, Arve

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the first to examine the Reading and Writing Self-Efficacy Scale among incarcerated adults. The aim was to examine whether performance of reading and spelling tests (Reading Speed, Nonsense Words and Spelling) explained individual differences in the participants' efficacy beliefs in reading and writing. Six hundred subjects rated…

  12. Enhancing Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy through Vocational Entrepreneurship Education Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maritz, Alex; Brown, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the results of a longitudinal evaluation of a vocational entrepreneurship education programme (EEP) using entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) measures. An empirical, mixed methods longitudinal and effectuation scale was used to measure ESE scores. Results indicate that participation in the programme had a…

  13. Self-Efficacy and Latina Leaders in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montas-Hunter, Sonja S.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, minorities represented only 16% of all senior administrators at institutions of higher learning and very few Hispanic women have made it to the "executive suites" of academia (Bridges et al., 2008). The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the self-efficacy of Hispanic women in leadership positions at higher education…

  14. Early Career Teachers' Self-Efficacy for Balanced Reading Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, Petra

    2012-01-01

    According to Bandura (1986; 1997), perceptions of efficacy are based on four sources: enactive attainment; vicarious experience; physiological and emotional states; and verbal persuasion. The factors affecting Early Career Teachers' self-efficacy for reading instruction are closely related to these four sources. It is not difficult to imagine an…

  15. Social and Cultural Meanings of Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Nancy J.; Bird, Joyce A.; Clark, Melissa A.; Rakowski, William; Guerra, Claudia; Barker, Judith C.; Pasick, Rena J.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the influences of social context on women's health behavior through illustration of the powerful influences of social capital (the benefits and challenges that accrue from participation in social networks and groups) on experiences and perceptions of self-efficacy. The authors conducted inductive interviews with Latino and…

  16. Effect of Self-Efficacy on Dropout from Obesity Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Christine; Stuart, Richard B.

    1984-01-01

    Subjects (N=414) averaging 51 pounds overweight were followed by telephone questionnaire for the first 12 weeks of their Weight Watchers participation. Dropouts (N=101) reported lower self-efficacy at the beginning of their memberships and were less likely to feel successful in weight control although their weight loss did not differ…

  17. Teachers' Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Self-Efficacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazu, Ibrahim Yasar; Erten, Pinar

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine teachers' views on technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK), their self-efficacy, and whether these views changed according to sex, age, period of service, faculty graduated from, branch, access to the internet, the use of technology level, and access to in-service training which is oriented to the…

  18. Teachers' Self-Efficacy vs. Parental Involvement: Prediction and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Yael; Kostelitz, Yifat

    2015-01-01

    This research examines the influence of teachers' views regarding parental involvement on their perception of self-efficacy. Data were collected from a sample of 319 Israeli elementary schools teachers. A path analysis procedure was employed to test the mediating effect of personal background and organizational variables and perceived parental…

  19. A Gender Study Investigating Physics Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawtelle, Vashti

    2011-01-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics has been well documented and a source of concern for both policy makers and educators. My dissertation focuses on understanding the role self-efficacy plays in retaining students, particularly women, in introductory physics. I use an explanatory mixed methods approach to first investigate quantitatively…

  20. The Relationship between Principals' and Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolas, Julie Marie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between principals' and teachers' self-efficacy beliefs. The study focused on the efficacy beliefs in instructional leadership, instructional strategies, school management, classroom management, and the effect of specific demographics on efficacy beliefs. The study, conducted during…

  1. Can Process Portfolios Affect Students' Writing Self-Efficacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicolaidou, Iolie

    2012-01-01

    Can process portfolios that support students in goal setting, reflection, self-evaluation and feedback have a positive impact on students' writing self-efficacy? This article presents the findings of a yearlong study conducted in three 4th grade elementary classes in Cyprus where paper-based and web-based portfolios were implemented to help…

  2. Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers' Sense of Teaching Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stripling, Christopher; Ricketts, John C.; Roberts, T. Grady; Harlin, Julie F.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a longitudinal examination of the teaching self-efficacy of preservice agricultural education teachers. Data were collected for two years at The University of Georgia and Texas A&M University during the Fall 2004 and Spring 2005 and the Fall 2005 and Spring 2006 semesters (N = 102). Data were collected at…

  3. Factors Affecting Students' Self-Efficacy in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dinther, Mart; Dochy, Filip; Segers, Mien

    2011-01-01

    Researchers working in educational settings are increasingly paying attention to the role students' thoughts and beliefs play in the learning process. Self-efficacy, a key element of social cognitive theory, appears to be an important variable because it affects students' motivation and learning. This article investigates empirical literature…

  4. Academic Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Undergraduate Mathematics Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turgut, Melih

    2013-01-01

    The present paper investigated academic self-efficacy beliefs of undergraduate mathematics education students with respect to gender, academic performance and grade level. The participants were a total of 244 undergraduate students (195 females and 49 males) enrolled to department of mathematics education (57 freshmen, 106 sophomores and 81…

  5. Social activities, self-efficacy, game attitudes, and game addiction.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eui Jun; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2011-04-01

    This study examines whether social activities with parents, online and offline social self-efficacy, and attitudes toward gaming are associated with the degree of game addiction among adolescents. Using data from a survey of 600 middle- and high-school students in South Korea, we tested the relationships of personal characteristics (grade point average and time spent on gaming each day), social self-efficacy (both on- and offline), general social activities (with parents, friends, and teachers), gaming activities with parents, and attitudes toward gaming (those of self, parents, friends, and teachers) with the degree of game addiction. In addition, we conducted ANOVA tests to determine the differences among three groups: non-addicts (NA), possible (mild or moderate) addicts (PA), and Internet addicts (IA). The results show that social self-efficacy in the real world (offline) was negatively related with the degree of game addiction, whereas social self-efficacy in the virtual world (online) indicated a positive association. Social activities with parents are negatively associated with game addiction, although no relationship is found between gaming activities with parents and game addiction. Parental attitude toward gaming has a negative relationship with the addiction. Results and implications are discussed.

  6. The Relationship between Computer Anxiety and Computer Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simsek, Ali

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between computer anxiety and computer self-efficacy of students and teachers in elementary and secondary schools. The sample included a total of 845 subjects from two private school systems in Turkey. The Oetting's Computer Anxiety Scale was used to measure computer anxiety whereas the Murphy's Computer…

  7. Self-Efficacy and IPS: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Linda P.

    2015-01-01

    The fact that some learners learn language more successfully than others who are at the same level of aptitude and capabilities is inevitable. To understand why, the researcher has focused her attention on individual differences among learners. The ones that have been taken into account in this study are namely called self-efficacy and identity…

  8. The Acculturation and Self-Efficacy of International College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clauson-Sells, Heather N.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationships between acculturation, academic self-efficacy and academic achievement of international college students in the United States during the 2013-2014 academic year. The subjects were 83 international students from 17 different countries- 36 students were enrolled full-time in community college level English…

  9. Self-Efficacy Development in School Leaders: An Alternate Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketelle, Diane

    2005-01-01

    Although self-efficacy is an area of self-cognition that has been well explored in psychology, teacher education and business management, it has not been investigated or related to school leadership. In this article the author presents an example of how her administrative credential students developed greater efficacy perceptions through a…

  10. The German Teacher Trainers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batdi, Veli

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the aim is to identify the interpersonal self-efficacy beliefs of German teacher trainers' in Turkey. It is a descriptive survey and the population of the study consists of German teacher trainers who have worked in the seven regions of Turkey during the 2012-2013 academic year. The sample comprises 52 German teacher trainers chosen…

  11. Correlates of Special Educators' Self-Efficacy Beliefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safran, Stephen P.

    1985-01-01

    Forty-six special education teachers completed a questionnaire on factors significantly correlated with general efficacy and self-efficacy beliefs. Results indicate no significant correlation of general efficacy with any of the variables analyzed. However, six items: years employed, school level, class size, class structure, teacher role and…

  12. The Paradox of Self-Efficacy: Research with Diverse Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Lori D.

    2006-01-01

    Since its earliest applications to vocational psychology, self-efficacy has been recognized for its utility with diverse populations, attributable to its attention to environmental influences. Somewhat paradoxically, then, it has also been criticized as being limited in its applicability with people from other cultures, because of its focus on…

  13. Self-Efficacy: Toward a Unifying Theory of Behavioral Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bandura, Albert

    1977-01-01

    This research presents an integrative theoretical framework to explain and to predict psychological changes achieved by different modes of treatment. This theory states that psychological procedures, whatever their form, alter the level and strength of "self-efficacy". (Editor/RK)

  14. Primary School Children's Self-Efficacy for Music Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Laura; Williamon, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy for Musical Learning questionnaire was adapted and tested with 404 primary school children, producing a robust Cronbach alpha (0.87) and confirming a single underlying factor through exploratory factor analysis. Test-retest scores showed the measure's stability over a 9-month period. Data were collected on children's prior music…

  15. A Factor Analysis of the Research Self-Efficacy Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bieschke, Kathleen J.; And Others

    Counseling professionals' and counseling psychology students' interest in performing research seems to be waning. Identifying the impediments to graduate students' interest and participation in research is important if systematic efforts to engage them in research are to succeed. The Research Self-Efficacy Scale (RSES) was designed to measure…

  16. Prediction of Research Self-Efficacy and Future Research Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Rosean M.; And Others

    Although graduate programs hope that their students will be committed to research in their careers, most students express ambivalence towards research. Identifying the variables that predict involvement in research thus seems crucial. In this study 136 doctoral students from a wide range of disciplines completed the Research Self-Efficacy Scale…

  17. Students' Research Self-Efficacy during Online Doctoral Research Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltes, Beate; Hoffman-Kipp, Peter; Lynn, Laura; Weltzer-Ward, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    This study will explore student skill development and research self-efficacy as related to online doctoral students' first core research course experience. Findings from this study will be used to inform instructors in effective ways to support doctoral students during their early research experiences. This support will ensure that online graduate…

  18. Background Characteristics as Predictors of Greek Teachers' Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gkolia, Aikaterini; Dimitrios, Belias A.; Koustelios, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between elementary and secondary teachers' background characteristics and constructs of self-efficacy, using the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale--TSES, during a difficult economic period for Greece and other European countries. Design/methodology/approach Equation modeling…

  19. Multidimensional Self-Efficacy and Affect in Wheelchair Basketball Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    In the current study, variables grounded in social cognitive theory with athletes with disabilities were examined. Performance, training, resiliency, and thought control self-efficacy, and positive (PA) and negative (NA) affect were examined with wheelchair basketball athletes (N = 79). Consistent with social cognitive theory, weak to strong…

  20. Experiential High School Career Education, Self-Efficacy, and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaylor, Lisa; Nicol, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Students' perceived self-efficacy and motivation in the context of experiential high school career education was examined through an exploratory mixed methods case study of an elective experiential career education class offered in Saskatchewan public schools. Data were generated by having students (N = 14) complete two measures at the start and…

  1. Strengthening the Teaching Self-Efficacy of Early Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Brian Colin

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study exploring teaching self-efficacy (defined as a belief in capability to execute teaching-related tasks) in a higher education context. It is based on the views of 12 early career academics (ECAs) employed at Charles Sturt University who were interviewed to learn more about how their teaching self-efficacy…

  2. The Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Help Evasion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Persson, Roger; Cleal, Bryan; Jakobsen, Mette Øllgaard; Villadsen, Ebbe; Andersen, Lars L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between self-efficacy and not wanting help to change health behaviors. Method: All employees in the Danish police department were invited to respond to an electronic questionnaire. All respondents expressing a desire to change health behaviors in relation to smoking ("n" = 845), alcohol…

  3. Academic Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yesilyurt, Etem

    2013-01-01

    This study aims determining academic self-efficacy perception of teacher candidates. It is survey model. Population of the study consists of teacher candidates in 2010-2011 academic years at Ahmet Kelesoglu Education Faculty of Education Formation of Selcuk University. A simple random sample was selected as sampling method and the study was…

  4. Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Social Studies Candidate Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simsek, Nihat

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the self efficacy beliefs of pre-service social studies teachers. For this purpose, the scales developed in various areas were examined, the opinions of experts were taken and a final scale was created to be used for this study. The validity and reliability of the scale were checked. The validity coefficient…

  5. Teacher Burnout and Self-Efficacy in Eliciting Social Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brouwers, Andre; Evers, Will J. G.; Tomic, Welko

    This study examined the relationship between perceived lack of social support, perceived self-efficacy in eliciting support at the workplace, and the three successive burnout symptoms (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment) in a sample of 277 Dutch secondary school teachers. The study hypothesized that teachers'…

  6. Students' Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy: Does the Teaching Method Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abaho, Ernest; Olomi, Donath R.; Urassa, Goodluck Charles

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the various entrepreneurship teaching methods in Uganda and how these methods relate to entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE). Design/methodology/approach: A sample of 522 final year students from selected universities and study programs was surveyed using self-reported questionnaires. Findings: There…

  7. Interests, Self-Efficacy, and Choice Goals: An Experimental Manipulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonitz, Verena S.; Larson, Lisa M.; Armstrong, Patrick Ian

    2010-01-01

    An experimental design was used to test the hypothesis that vocational interests can be a precursor to the development of self-efficacy. Participants (n = 180) rated job descriptions for careers in the domains of information technology, sales, and teaching that contained information on activities and work values. Participants rated those job…

  8. Response switching and self-efficacy in Peer Instruction classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kelly; Schell, Julie; Ho, Andrew; Lukoff, Brian; Mazur, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Peer Instruction, a well-known student-centered teaching method, engages students during class through structured, frequent questioning and is often facilitated by classroom response systems. The central feature of any Peer Instruction class is a conceptual question designed to help resolve student misconceptions about subject matter. We provide students two opportunities to answer each question—once after a round of individual reflection and then again after a discussion round with a peer. The second round provides students the choice to "switch" their original response to a different answer. The percentage of right answers typically increases after peer discussion: most students who answer incorrectly in the individual round switch to the correct answer after the peer discussion. However, for any given question there are also students who switch their initially right answer to a wrong answer and students who switch their initially wrong answer to a different wrong answer. In this study, we analyze response switching over one semester of an introductory electricity and magnetism course taught using Peer Instruction at Harvard University. Two key features emerge from our analysis: First, response switching correlates with academic self-efficacy. Students with low self-efficacy switch their responses more than students with high self-efficacy. Second, switching also correlates with the difficulty of the question; students switch to incorrect responses more often when the question is difficult. These findings indicate that instructors may need to provide greater support for difficult questions, such as supplying cues during lectures, increasing times for discussions, or ensuring effective pairing (such as having a student with one right answer in the pair). Additionally, the connection between response switching and self-efficacy motivates interventions to increase student self-efficacy at the beginning of the semester by helping students develop early mastery or

  9. How Are Previous Physical Activity and Self-Efficacy Related to Future Physical Activity and Self-Efficacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Prabu; Pennell, Michael L.; Foraker, Randi E.; Katz, Mira L.; Buckworth, Janet; Paskett, Electra D.

    2014-01-01

    Self-efficacy (SE) has been found to be a robust predictor of success in achieving physical activity (PA) goals. While much of the current research has focused on SE as a trait, SE as a state has received less attention. Using day-to-day measurements obtained over 84 days, we examined the relationship between state SE and PA. Postmenopausal women…

  10. Sex Partnership and Self-Efficacy Influence Depression in Chinese Transgender Women: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoshi; Wang, Lie; Hao, Chun; Gu, Yuan; Song, Wei; Wang, Jian; Chang, Margaret M.; Zhao, Qun

    2015-01-01

    , self-efficacy had positive effects on attenuating depression due to gender transition. Therefore, interventions should focus on improving the sense of self-efficacy among these women to enable them to cope with depression and to determine risky sex partnership characteristics, especially for regular and casual partners. PMID:26367265

  11. Sources of Self-efficacy in a Science Methods Course for Primary Teacher Education Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. H.

    2006-12-01

    Self-efficacy has been shown to be an issue of concern for primary teacher education students - many of them have low self-efficacy and this can negatively affect their future teaching of science. Previous research has identified four factors that may contribute towards self-efficacy: enactive mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion and physiological/affective states. It could also be argued that there are additional sources of self-efficacy that apply to primary teacher education students, namely cognitive content mastery, cognitive pedagogical mastery and simulated modelling. The main purpose of the present paper was to investigate the relative importance of the various sources of self-efficacy in a primary science methods course. Data on changes in self-efficacy and sources of self-efficacy were collected throughout the course using formal and informal surveys. It was found that the main source of self-efficacy was cognitive pedagogical mastery.

  12. Personal, social, and cultural correlates of self-efficacy beliefs among South Korean college smokers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyunyi; So, Jiyeon; Lee, Jinro

    2009-06-01

    Much research has documented the significant influence of self-efficacy on smoking cessation, but considerably less is known as to what health communicators can do to promote or address barriers to self-efficacy. This study investigated personal, social, and cultural correlates of smoking self-efficacy. A survey of college smokers was done in South Korea, where the current smoking rate among males is over 56%. At the personal level, the perceived success-fullness of the last quit trial positively predicted self-efficacy. At the social level, interpersonal communication with friends was positively associated with self-efficacy. The cultural orientation of independent self-construal was positively associated with self-efficacy. These results indicate that factors affecting smokers' self-efficacy are operative in multiple domains and levels. Future communication programs should promote positive perceptions about prior quit trials, and segment the audience in terms of their self-construal to effectively enhance self-efficacy.

  13. FAMILY DEVELOPMENT CREDENTIAL TRAINING IMPACT ON SELF-EFFICACY BELIEFS OF HUMAN SERVICE WORKERS.

    PubMed

    Smith, Deborah B; Day, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    The Family Development Credential (FDC) Training offers an innovative interagency training for human service workers within a community. We use a mixed-methods approach to evaluate the impact of FDC on work-related self-efficacy beliefs. Quantitative data found FDC participants increased their levels of positive self-efficacy beliefs and had no change in negative self-efficacy beliefs; a comparison group saw no change in positive self-efficacy beliefs but increased their levels of negative self-efficacy beliefs. Qualitative data indicated training increased work-related self-efficacy beliefs. Overall, findings suggest that FDC training improved self-efficacy in human service workers and that no training allowed negative self-efficacy beliefs to grow. PMID:26897990

  14. Impact of Simulation and Clinical Experience on Self-efficacy in Nursing Students: Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Kimhi, Einat; Reishtein, Judith L; Cohen, Miri; Friger, Michael; Hurvitz, Nancy; Avraham, Rinat

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effect of simulation and clinical experience timing on self-confidence/self-efficacy for the nursing process. Using a randomized, double-crossover design, self-efficacy was measured 3 times. Although self-efficacy was significantly higher at time 1 for students who had clinical experience, there was no difference between the groups at the end of the course (time 2). Thus, simulation increased self-confidence/self-efficacy equivalently if placed either before or after clinical experience.

  15. Are Self-Efficacy Instruments Comparable to Knowledge and Skills Tests in Training Evaluation Settings?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Mary L.

    2008-01-01

    Researchers have linked self-efficacy to performance, but they have not investigated the relationship between self-efficacy and knowledge and skills tests within a training evaluation setting, which is the main purpose of this study. Additionally, researchers have acknowledged self-efficacy scores may be distorted as a result of assessors…

  16. The Effect of "Career Cruising" on the Self-Efficacy of Students Deciding on Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Karen; Smothers, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the impact of a self-assessment instrument on the self-efficacy of those deciding on majors in a university setting. Using a pre- and post-test methodology, we employed "Career Cruising" to measure career decision-making self-efficacy. Participants completed the "Career Decision Self-Efficacy-Short Form" (CDSE-SF)…

  17. Leadership and Leader Developmental Self-Efficacy: Their Role in Enhancing Leader Development Efforts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Susan Elaine; Johnson, Stefanie K

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the role of two types of self-efficacy-leader self-efficacy and leader developmental efficacy-for enhancing leadership development. Practical implications for designing and developing leadership programs that take into account these two types of self-efficacy are discussed.

  18. Changes in Biology Self-Efficacy during a First-Year University Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainscough, Louise; Foulis, Eden; Colthorpe, Kay; Zimbardi, Kirsten; Robertson-Dean, Melanie; Chunduri, Prasad; Lluka, Lesley

    2016-01-01

    Academic self-efficacy encompasses judgments regarding one's ability to perform academic tasks and is correlated with achievement and persistence. This study describes changes in biology self-efficacy during a first-year course. Students (n = 614) were given the Biology Self-Efficacy Scale at the beginning and end of the semester. The instrument…

  19. Self-Efficacy and Stress of Staff Managing Challenging Behaviours of People with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cudre-Mauroux, Annick

    2011-01-01

    Self-efficacy has been reported to play a significant role in stress levels of parents facing challenging behaviours of their children with learning disabilities. The role of self-efficacy has also been found to affect the stress levels of professional caregivers in such situations. To understand the implications of staff self-efficacy in…

  20. Relations between Informational Sources, Self-Efficacy and Academic Achievement: A Developmental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Huy Phuong

    2012-01-01

    As a cognitive-motivational construct, self-efficacy has been researched extensively and has involved two important lines of inquiries, namely the impact of sources of information on self-efficacy and the predictive effect of self-efficacy on learning outcomes. We proposed and tested the relations between the four major sources of information…

  1. Changes in Self-Efficacy and Task Value in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Cheng-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether course content self-efficacy, online technologies self-efficacy, and task value change over the course of a semester. Sixty-nine participating students from four classes provided data through two instruments: (1) the self-efficacy instrument and (2) the task value instrument. Students' self-efficacy…

  2. Improving the Accuracy of Outdoor Educators' Teaching Self-Efficacy Beliefs through Metacognitive Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumann, Scott; Sibthorp, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Accuracy in emerging outdoor educators' teaching self-efficacy beliefs is critical to student safety and learning. Overinflated self-efficacy beliefs can result in delayed skilled development or inappropriate acceptance of risk. In an outdoor education context, neglecting the accuracy of teaching self-efficacy beliefs early in an educator's…

  3. Effect of glycemic load on eating behavior self-efficacy during weight loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High eating behavior self-efficacy may contribute to successful weight loss. Diet interventions that maximize eating behavior self-efficacy may therefore improve weight loss outcomes. However, data on the effect of diet composition on eating behavior self-efficacy are sparse. To determine the eff...

  4. Patterns of Self-Efficacy among College Students in Developmental Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantrell, Susan Chambers; Correll, Pamela; Clouse, Jane; Creech, Kimberly; Bridges, Sharon; Owens, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the self-efficacy beliefs and sources of self-efficacy among first-year college students placed in developmental reading courses. Students enrolled in developmental reading were compared to students who were not placed in developmental reading courses in terms of self-efficacy in various contexts and sources of…

  5. Developing a Measurement Tool for Assessing Physiotherapy Students' Self-Efficacy: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anne; Sheppard, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine if self-efficacy can be correlated with prior academic achievement and whether self-efficacy can be an outcome measure of education. A self-efficacy instrument was developed and administered to physiotherapy students following completion of their pre-clinical theory experience. The questionnaire results…

  6. Freshman Engineering Students At-Risk of Non-Matriculation: Self-Efficacy for Academic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Bowen, Bradley D.; Williams, Thomas O.

    2016-01-01

    Students identified as at-risk of non-academic continuation have a propensity toward lower academic self-efficacy than their peers (Lent, 2005). Within engineering, self-efficacy and confidence are major markers of university continuation and success (Lourens, 2014 Raelin, et al., 2014). This study explored academic learning self-efficacy specific…

  7. Calibration of Self-Efficacy for Conducting a Chi-Squared Test of Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Whitney Alicia; Goins, Deborah D.

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy and knowledge, both concerning the chi-squared test of independence, were examined in education graduate students. Participants rated statements concerning self-efficacy and completed a related knowledge assessment. After completing a demographic survey, participants completed the self-efficacy and knowledge scales a second time.…

  8. Brief Psychometric Analysis of the Self-Efficacy Parent Report Scale (SEPRS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erford, Bradley T.; Gavin, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The Self-Efficacy Parent-Report Scale was designed to assess parent perceptions of self-efficacy of their children aged 7 to 17 years. Internal aspects of validity indicated a marginal fit of the data to the unidimensional model. External facets of validity indicated the Self-Efficacy Parent-Report Scale had excellent convergent and discriminant…

  9. Exploring Gender and Self-Efficacy Ratings of Athletic Training Students over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, W. David; Volberding, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the development of a self-efficacy instrument and to explore the changes by gender in student self-efficacy ratings over 1 year. Design and Setting: An exploratory study utilizing an instrument that measures self-efficacy in undergraduate students in a university setting. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty students (13…

  10. Self-Efficacy Pathways between Relational Aggression and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buser, Trevor J.; Peterson, Christina Hamme; Kearney, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The authors recruited college students (N = 648) and investigated relationships among academic and social self-efficacy, relational aggression from parents and peers, and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Results indicated that both types of self-efficacy were related inversely to NSSI. Academic self-efficacy mediated the relationship between…

  11. Family Background and Academic Achievement: Does Self-Efficacy Mediate Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiser, Dana A.; Riggio, Heidi R.

    2010-01-01

    Research indicates both family background and self-efficacy influence academic outcomes; however, family background also impacts self-efficacy development. The purpose of the current study was to establish whether self-efficacy mediates the relationship between family background and academic achievement. Results indicated family background…

  12. The Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Achievement in At-Risk High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Jarrett Graham

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this quantitative survey study was the examination of the relationship between self-efficacy and academic achievement in 164 at-risk high school students. The study used Bandura's self-efficacy as the theoretical framework. The research questions involved understanding the levels of self-efficacy in at-risk high school students and…

  13. Self-Efficacy of College Intermediate French Students: Relation to Achievement and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Nicole; Pajares, Frank; Herron, Carol

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to examine the influence of self-efficacy and other motivational self-beliefs on the achievement of college intermediate French students (N= 303). Self-efficacy for self-regulation was a stronger predictor of intermediate French language achievement than were self-efficacy to obtain grades in French, French…

  14. Investigating a Relationship between Learner Control and Self-Efficacy in an Online Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taipjutorus, Widchaporn; Hansen, Sally; Brown, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In both traditional face-to-face and online learning contexts, self-efficacy has been shown to be a key contributor to learner success. Once established, self-efficacy can be generalised to other learning situations, with the strongest effect occurring with learning activities that are closest to those in which self-efficacy has been improved.…

  15. How Teachers' Self-Efficacy Is Related to Instructional Quality: A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzberger, Doris; Philipp, Anja; Kunter, Mareike

    2013-01-01

    This study extends previous research on teachers' self-efficacy by exploring reciprocal effects of teachers' self-efficacy and instructional quality in a longitudinal panel study. The study design combined a self-report measure of teacher self-efficacy with teacher and student ratings of instructional quality (assessing cognitive activation,…

  16. Gaining a Degree: The Effect on Teacher Self-Efficacy and Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Bandura's concept of self-efficacy has been the focus of numerous research studies related to teacher self-efficacy. Most studies have investigated Bandura's first three sources of self-efficacy beliefs: mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, and social persuasion--with much less emphasis placed on Bandura's fourth source, the role of…

  17. Collective Problem-Solving: The Role of Self-Efficacy, Skill, and Prior Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geifman, Dorit; Raban, Daphne R.

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy is essential to learning but what happens when learning is done as a result of a collective process? What is the role of individual self-efficacy in collective problem solving? This research examines the manifestation of self-efficacy in prediction markets that are configured as collective problem-solving platforms and whether…

  18. Principal Self-Efficacy: Relations with Burnout, Job Satisfaction and Motivation to Quit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federici, Roger A.; Skaalvik, Einar M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relations between principals' self-efficacy, burnout, job satisfaction and principals' motivation to quit. Principal self-efficacy was measured by a recently developed multidimensional scale called the Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale. Burnout was measured by a modified version of the Maslach Burnout…

  19. Self-Efficacy Expectancy and Depression: An Investigation of Causal Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Melinda A.; Maddux, James E.

    Research suggests that depression is associated with low self-efficacy expectancies and that enhancement of self-efficacy expectancies may be effective in the relief of depressive symptoms. To examine the causal relationships between self-efficacy expectancies for interpersonal skills and depressed mood, two independent experiments were conducted.…

  20. Self-Efficacy and Illicit Opioid Use in a 180-Day Methadone Detoxification Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, Patrick M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Studied self-efficacy and treatment outcomes in a sample of opioid addicts. Results show self-efficacy influenced subsequent drug use in parallel with previous behavior. Suggests that psychological constructs like self-efficacy may hold promise for understanding and decreasing illicit opioid use during long-term methadone detoxification treatment.…

  1. Changes in Science Teaching Self-Efficacy among Primary Teacher Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, David; Dixon, Jeanette; Archer, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Many preservice primary teachers have low self-efficacy for science teaching. Although science methods courses have often been shown to enhance self-efficacy, science content courses have been relatively ineffective in this respect. This study investigated whether a tailored science content course would enhance self-efficacy. The participants were…

  2. Students as Evaluators in Practicum: Examining Peer/Self Assessment and Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzpatrick, Corine

    This study explores peer assessment and self-efficacy in a counseling practicum. Data was gathered on the perceptions of practicum students, in their second year of a master's program, with regard to the counseling competencies of their peers and themselves. Counselor self-efficacy was measured using the Counselor Self-Efficacy Rating Scale.…

  3. Persistence at an Urban Community College: The Implications of Self-Efficacy and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Hsiang-Ann; Edlin, Margot; Ferdenzi, Anita Cuttita

    2014-01-01

    This study examined how self-efficacy and motivation affected student persistence at an urban community college. Self-efficacy was studied at two dimensions: self-regulated learning efficacy and self-efficacy for academic achievement. Motivation was also investigated at two levels: intrinsic motivation and extrinsic motivation. Results show that…

  4. Principals' Self-Efficacy: Relations with Job Autonomy, Job Satisfaction, and Contextual Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federici, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore relations between principals' self-efficacy, perceived job autonomy, job satisfaction, and perceived contextual constraints to autonomy. Principal self-efficacy was measured by a multidimensional scale called the Norwegian Principal Self-Efficacy Scale. Job autonomy, job satisfaction, and contextual…

  5. Job Search Self-Efficacy of East Asian International Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yi-Jiun; Flores, Lisa Y.

    2013-01-01

    Using a sample of 86 East Asian international graduate students, this study examined Bandura's perceived self-efficacy model (1986) in the domain of job search self-efficacy and tested the mediating effects of job search self-efficacy in the relationship between efficacy source variables and job search behaviors. Results show that both performance…

  6. Mind over Matter: Contributing Factors to Self-Efficacy in Montessori Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Punum

    2012-01-01

    Interpreting Albert Bandura's term "self-efficacy" as the individual's belief in his own abilities to succeed in spite of the given circumstances, this study seeks to identify the influences which lead to self-efficacy in Montessori teachers. In order to evaluate perceptions of self-efficacy, 35 pre-service teachers in the…

  7. Supervision and Increasing Self-Efficacy in the Therapist-Trainee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanklin, Jennifer E.

    This work includes a discussion of the concept of self-efficacy, originally introduced by Albert Bandura, as it pertains to the therapist-trainee. Therapist self-efficacy has only recently gained attention theoretically as well as empirically. Measures used to assess the self-efficacy of the therapist are highlighted as well as factors…

  8. Sources of Writing Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Elementary, Middle, and High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pajares, Frank; Johnson, Margaret J.; Usher, Ellen L.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of Albert Bandura's four hypothesized sources of self-efficacy on students' writing self-efficacy beliefs (N = 1256) and to explore how these sources differ as a function of gender and academic level (elementary, middle, high). Consistent with the tenets of self-efficacy theory, each of the…

  9. Validation of a U.S. Adult Social Self-Efficacy Inventory in Chinese Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Jinyan; Meng, Hui; Gao, Xiangping; Lopez, Felix J.; Liu, Cong

    2010-01-01

    The authors report a series of efforts to validate a U.S. adult social self-efficacy inventory, the Perceived Social Self-Efficacy scale (PSSE), in Chinese populations. They argue that the construct underlying the PSSE scale constitutes an important component of Chinese adult social self-efficacy, which was confirmed in focus group discussions.…

  10. An Investigation of Early Childhood Teacher Self-Efficacy Beliefs in the Teaching of Arts Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvis, Susanne; Pendergast, Donna

    2011-01-01

    The self-efficacy beliefs teachers hold about their ability to teach subjects shapes their competence in teaching. Teacher self-efficacy is defined as teacher beliefs in their ability to perform a teaching task. If teachers have strong teacher self-efficacy in the teaching of arts education, they are more likely to incorporate arts in the…

  11. Improving Fifth Grade Students' Mathematics Self-Efficacy Calibration and Performance through Self-Regulation Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramdass, Darshanand H.

    2009-01-01

    This primary goal of this study was to investigate the effects of strategy training and self-reflection, two subprocesses of Zimmerman's cyclical model of self-regulation, on fifth grade students' mathematics performance, self-efficacy, self-evaluation, and calibration measures of self-efficacy bias, self-efficacy accuracy, self-evaluation bias,…

  12. Exploring Baccalaureate Social Work Students' Self-Efficacy: Did It Change over Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Bonnie; Boykin, Lolita; Hebert, Corie; Kulkin, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    This study explored baccalaureate social work students' self-efficacy at a rural southern university. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy is used as a theoretical base for the study. Students (N = 43) in introductory social work courses and in the field practicum course completed the Foundation Practice Self Efficacy Scale. Following The Council on…

  13. Self-Efficacy for Science Teaching Scale Development: Construct Validation with Elementary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yangin, Selami; Sidekli, Sabri

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of teacher self-efficacy has a history of more than 30 years. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the development and validation of a new scale to measure the science teaching self-efficacy of elementary school teachers. Therefore, a scale has been created to measure elementary teachers' science teaching self-efficacy and…

  14. Role of Self-Efficacy in Rehabilitation Outcome among Chronic Low Back Pain Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altmaier, Elizabeth M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined role of self-efficacy beliefs in rehabilitation of 45 low back pain patients participating in 3-week rehabilitation program. Increments in self-efficacy beliefs during program were not associated with improved patient functioning at discharge. However, in support of theorized role of self-efficacy in behavior change, increments in…

  15. Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Counseling Attitudes among First-Year College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirpak, David M.; Schlosser, Lewis Z.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between a set of self-efficacy variables and a set of variables assessing attitudes toward counseling. Results revealed a significant relationship between self-efficacy and attitudes toward counseling among a sample of 253 first-year college students. Low perceptions of self-efficacy were…

  16. An Investigation of Factors Related to Self-Efficacy for Java Programming among Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askar, Petek; Davenport, David

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the factors related to self-efficacy for Java programming among first year engineering students. An instrument assessing Java programming self-efficacy was developed from the computer programming self-efficacy scale of Ramalingam & Wiedenbeck. The instrument was administered at the beginning of the course…

  17. The Impact of Task Preview Information as a Function of Recipient Self-Efficacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pond, Samuel B., III; Hay, Mary Sue

    1989-01-01

    Hypothesized perceived general self-efficacy of students (N=87) performing job simulation task to moderate relationship between task preview exposure and task performance and between task preview exposure and task self-efficacy. Used Favorable and Realistic task previews. Found significant General Self-Efficacy X Task Preview condition interaction…

  18. The Effects of Equipment Modification on Children's Self-Efficacy and Basketball Shooting Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Melissa A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Reports a study that examined the effects of modification of basketball size and basket height on shooting performance and self-efficacy of children ages 9-12 years. Subjects completed a self-efficacy questionnaire before and after shooting 10 baskets under 4 conditions. Self-efficacy was highest when children shot at a lower basket. (SM)

  19. The Impact of a Self-Efficacy Intervention on Short-Term Breast-Feeding Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Jeni; Schutte, Nicola S.; Brown, Rhonda F.; Dennis, Cindy-Lee; Price, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Maternal self-efficacy for breast-feeding may contribute to success in breast-feeding. This study aimed to increase breast-feeding self-efficacy and actual breast-feeding through an intervention based on Bandura's self-efficacy theory. A total of 90 pregnant women participated in the study. The women who were assigned to a breast-feeding…

  20. Self-Control and Coping Skills as Factors in Pain Perception, Perceived Health and Psychological Adjustment in the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Coralie; And Others

    Self-control and self-efficacy have played a central role in recent behavioral medicine work on the control of chronic physical pain. Little work investigating the concepts of self-control and self-efficacy has been done with the elderly in spite of the fact that coping strategies in the elderly have been associated with a variety of health and…

  1. Running the Race to Improve Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The idea of believing in oneself is a construct that goes by several names: (1) self-efficacy; (2) self-concept; and (3) self-esteem. How well a person thinks he or she will do in the completion of a task plays a significant role in how well that person will actually do. Positive self-beliefs have been linked to many benefits, including increased…

  2. Social and Cultural Meanings of Self-Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Nancy J.; Bird, Joyce A.; Clark, Melissa A.; Rakowski, William; Guerra, Claudia; Barker, Judith C.; Pasick, Rena J.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the influences of social context on women’s health behavior through illustration of the powerful influences of social capital (the benefits and challenges that accrue from participation in social networks and groups) on experiences and perceptions of self-efficacy. The authors conducted inductive interviews with Latino and Filipino academics and social service providers and with U.S.-born and immigrant Latinas and Filipinas to explore direct and indirect influences of social context on health behaviors such as mammography screening. Iterative thematic analysis identified themes (meanings of efficacy, spheres of efficacy, constraints on efficacy, sources of social capital, and differential access to and quality of social capital) that link the domain of social capital with the behavioral construct perceived self-efficacy. The authors conclude that social capital addresses aspects of social context absent in the current self-efficacy construct and that these aspects have important implications for scholars’ and practitioners’ understandings of health behavior and intervention development. PMID:19805794

  3. Self-efficacy of college freshmen engaged in STEM outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patchin, Stephen H.

    Not since the Cold War and the launch of Sputnik has there been such a focus on producing college graduates in fields related to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). As manually driven careers disappear, new diverse careers are created and they have one thing in common, STEM. As students move into these challenging curriculums they will need to have faith in their abilities to achieve their goals. This self-efficacy is vital component for their collegiate and career success. This mixed methods study examines the unique pre-college STEM outreach phenomenon called Mind Trekkers. Mind Trekkers uses the "WOW" of experiential learning in the areas of STEM to motivate K-12 students to engage in STEM related fields. The focus of the study is on the first-year college freshmen that join this program, becoming STEM serviceteers, and how being part of this STEM phenomenon impacts their self-efficacy. The findings can be summed up in a quote. I get to help people understanding in a different way than I would if I was just doing volunteering like I did in high school. It's cool. I just love it and it gives me the confidence that what I am doing is the right thing here at (the university). (Jean). The results of the study indicate that the Mind Trekkers program acted as a catalyst to increase the self-efficacy of the students that participated in it, through personal social and academic impact.

  4. Expecting success: Factors influencing ninth graders' science self-efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Elizabeth

    What factors influence ninth grade students' expectations for success in science? Using social cognitive theory and bioecological systems theory as theoretical frameworks, this dissertation employs data from the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09) to examine the relative impact of teacher practices and their perceived attitudes on students' science self-efficacy. Further, as they relate to this broader issue, the relative impact of student subjective task value and teacher characteristics is also investigated. It has been well documented that U.S. students are not achieving at satisfactory levels in science. Education policy has focused on improving science teacher quality as one way to address this problem. Teacher effectiveness has been primarily measured by student achievement on standardized tests. However, not enough attention has been given to the social cognitive factors that can lead to increased achievement and persistence in science as well as how teachers may influence these factors. This study interrogates the relationship between student and teacher variables and the social cognitive construct of self-efficacy, which has proven to have a significant impact on student achievement and persistence in science. Findings add to the current literature surrounding ways that educators may increase student performance in science by employing policies and practices that benefit the development of student science self-efficacy.

  5. Changes on Quality of Life, Self-Efficacy and Social Support for Activities and Physical Fitness in People with Intellectual Disabilities through Multimodal Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pérez-Cruzado, David; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability have poor levels of physical activity, quality of life, fitness condition and self-efficacy and social support when they want to undertake physical activity so it is very important to improve these parameters in this population. Method: A prospective study was conducted. Data were measured before and…

  6. Relationship between student nurses' self-efficacy and psychomotor skills competence.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Ükke; Serbest, Şehriban; Kan Öntürk, Zehra; Eti Aslan, Fatma; Olgun, Nermin

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the general self efficacy levels of students studying for undergraduate degree in nursing and to examine the relationship between skills development and self efficacy. The research was conducted in a descriptive way. The sample consisted of 100 students. Data were collected via the use of a student introduction form, Self-Efficacy Scale (SES) and an intramuscular (i.m.) injection procedure checklist; the forms were filled in by 100% of the nursing students. The mean general self-efficacy score of the students in the study was high. the self-efficacy levels of our students were high, and no correlation was observed between personal characteristics and self-efficacy; therefore, education in injection technique had the same influence on all students' self-efficacy.

  7. Achievement, attributions, self-efficacy, and goal setting by accounting undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pi-Yueh; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2010-02-01

    Correlations were examined between two measures of accounting self-efficacy achievement goal setting, attributions, and scores on the Accounting Practice Achievement Test, obtained 1 yr. apart for 124 freshmen in junior college. Analysis indicated favorable attribution contributed to a higher mean score on accounting self-efficacy. Students with higher perceived self-efficacy performed better on the proficiency tests. Those with higher self-efficacy also set higher goals for subsequent achievement tests. Moreover, students who set higher achievement goals performed better. Goal setting mediated the relation of initial self-efficacy with subsequent test performance. However, the amount of variance accounted for by self-efficacy was small. An effective method for enhancing performance on an accounting achievement test might be to increase beneficial attributions, self-efficacy in accounting, and to encourage setting reasonable achievement goals.

  8. The Effect of Educating Health Promotion Strategies on Self-Care Self-Efficacy in Patients Undergoing Kidney Transplantation: A Double Blind Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soltannezhad, Fateme; Farsi, Zahra; Jabari Moroei, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-care self-efficacy in patients with end stage renal disease, waiting for kidney transplantation, probably decreases due to facing new conditions and side effects of treatment. Objectives: The current study was conducted to investigate the effect of educating health promotion strategies on self-care self-efficacy in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. Patients and Methods: A double blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 52 patients undergoing kidney transplantation in Baqiyatallah Hospital in 2012. Patients were randomly assigned into intervention and control groups. The questionnaire of Strategies Used by People to Promote Health (SUPPH) was employed to measure self-care self-efficacy. At first, the two groups filled the questionnaire. Then, the intervention group was trained regarding health promotion strategies within 4 sessions before the transplantation. The control group was trained according to routine protocol of the transplantation unit. Then, the two groups were followed up for two months, and reassessed at the end of the first and second months after the transplantation. The data were analyzed by descriptive and analytic statistics including independent samples T test, Chi square and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: In the intervention group, the mean of total self-care self-efficacy was 106.96 ± 25.1 at first, and changed to 135.81 ± 9.65 and 111.19 ± 12.45 after the first and second post-test respectively (P = 0.001). In the control group, the mean of total self-care self-efficacy was 112.73 ± 14.33 at first, and changed to 118.58 ± 17.59 and 108.73 ± 15.93 after the first and second post-test respectively (P = 0.001). Significant differences were observed between the two groups in the first post-test regarding total score of self-care self-efficacy (P = 0.001) and dimensions of reduction of stress (P = 0.001), enjoying life (P = 0.01), and coping (P = 0.001). The mean scores of the intervention group were

  9. Early Empowerment Strategies Boost Self-Efficacy to Improve Cardiovascular Health Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Kashani, Mariam; Eliasson, Arn H; Walizer, Elaine M; Fuller, Clarie E; Engler, Renata J; Villines, Todd C; Vernalis, Marina N

    2016-01-01

    Background: Self-efficacy, defined as confidence in the ability to carry out behavior to achieve a desired goal, is considered to be a prerequisite for behavior change. Self-efficacy correlates with cardiovascular health although optimal timing to incorporate self-efficacy strategies is not well established. We sought to study the effect of an empowerment approach implemented in the introductory phase of a multicomponent lifestyle intervention on cardiovascular health outcomes. Design: Prospective intervention cohort study. Methods: Patients in the Integrative Cardiac Health Project Registry, a prospective lifestyle change program for the prevention of cardiovascular disease were analyzed for behavioral changes by survey, at baseline and one year, in the domains of nutrition, exercise, stress management and sleep. Self-efficacy questionnaires were administered at baseline and after the empowerment intervention, at 8 weeks. Results: Of 119 consecutive registry completers, 60 comprised a high self-efficacy group (scoring at or above the median of 36 points) and 59 the low self-efficacy group (scoring below median). Self-efficacy scores increased irrespective of baseline self-efficacy but the largest gains in self-efficacy occurred in patients who ranked in the lower half for self-efficacy at baseline. This lower self-efficacy group demonstrated behavioral gains that erased differences between the high and low self-efficacy groups. Conclusions: A boost to self-efficacy early in a lifestyle intervention program produces significant improvements in behavioral outcomes. Employing empowerment in an early phase may be a critical strategy to improve self-efficacy and lower risk in individuals vulnerable to cardiovascular disease. PMID:27157185

  10. Relationship of Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Urban Public School Students to Performance on a High-Stakes Mathematics Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afolabi, Kolajo A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of "self-efficacy" for "Enlisting Social Resources, Self-Regulatory Efficacy, self-efficacy" for "Self-Regulated Learning," and "self-efficacy" for "Academic Achievement" (Bandura's Children's "Self-Efficacy Scale," 2006) of urban public school students to performance on the high stakes…

  11. Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Their Sources in Undergraduate Computing Disciplines: An Examination of Gender and Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Guan-Yu

    2016-01-01

    This study has two central purposes: First, it examines not only the roles of gender and persistence in undergraduate computing majors' learning self-efficacy, computer self-efficacy, and programming self-efficacy but also Bandura's hypothesized sources of self-efficacy; second, it examines the influence of sources of efficacy on the three…

  12. Internet addiction: coping styles, expectancies, and treatment implications

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Matthias; Laier, Christian; Young, Kimberly S.

    2014-01-01

    Internet addiction (IA) has become a serious mental health condition in many countries. To better understand the clinical implications of IA, this study tested statistically a new theoretical model illustrating underlying cognitive mechanisms contributing to development and maintenance of the disorder. The model differentiates between a generalized Internet addiction (GIA) and specific forms. This study tested the model on GIA on a population of general Internet users. The findings from 1019 users show that the hypothesized structural equation model explained 63.5% of the variance of GIA symptoms, as measured by the short version of the Internet Addiction Test. Using psychological and personality testing, the results show that a person’s specific cognitions (poor coping and cognitive expectations) increased the risk for GIA. These two factors mediated the symptoms of GIA if other risk factors were present such as depression, social anxiety, low self-esteem, low self-efficacy, and high stress vulnerability to name a few areas that were measured in the study. The model shows that individuals with high coping skills and no expectancies that the Internet can be used to increase positive or reduce negative mood are less likely to engage in problematic Internet use, even when other personality or psychological vulnerabilities are present. The implications for treatment include a clear cognitive component to the development of GIA and the need to assess a patient’s coping style and cognitions and improve faulty thinking to reduce symptoms and engage in recovery. PMID:25426088

  13. Internet addiction: coping styles, expectancies, and treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Brand, Matthias; Laier, Christian; Young, Kimberly S

    2014-01-01

    Internet addiction (IA) has become a serious mental health condition in many countries. To better understand the clinical implications of IA, this study tested statistically a new theoretical model illustrating underlying cognitive mechanisms contributing to development and maintenance of the disorder. The model differentiates between a generalized Internet addiction (GIA) and specific forms. This study tested the model on GIA on a population of general Internet users. The findings from 1019 users show that the hypothesized structural equation model explained 63.5% of the variance of GIA symptoms, as measured by the short version of the Internet Addiction Test. Using psychological and personality testing, the results show that a person's specific cognitions (poor coping and cognitive expectations) increased the risk for GIA. These two factors mediated the symptoms of GIA if other risk factors were present such as depression, social anxiety, low self-esteem, low self-efficacy, and high stress vulnerability to name a few areas that were measured in the study. The model shows that individuals with high coping skills and no expectancies that the Internet can be used to increase positive or reduce negative mood are less likely to engage in problematic Internet use, even when other personality or psychological vulnerabilities are present. The implications for treatment include a clear cognitive component to the development of GIA and the need to assess a patient's coping style and cognitions and improve faulty thinking to reduce symptoms and engage in recovery.

  14. Middle School Students' Science Self-Efficacy and Its Sources: Examination of Gender Difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kıran, Dekant; Sungur, Semra

    2012-10-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate middle school students' science self-efficacy as well as its sources and outcomes as a function of gender. Bandura's hypothesized sources of self-efficacy (i.e., mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and emotional arousal) in addition to being inviting with self and inviting with others were examined as sources of self-efficacy, while cognitive and metacognitive strategy use was examined as an outcome of self-efficacy. A total of 1,932 students participated in the study and were administered self-report instruments. Results showed that the relationship between science self-efficacy and its proposed sources does not change as a function of gender. All proposed sources, except for vicarious experience, were found to be significantly related to students' scientific self-efficacy. Moreover, girls were found to experience significantly more emotional arousal and to send positive messages to others more than boys. On the other hand, no gender difference was found concerning science self-efficacy and strategy use. The findings also revealed a positive association between science self-efficacy and strategy use. Overall, findings supported Bandura's conception of self-efficacy and suggested invitations as additional sources of self-efficacy.

  15. How does self-efficacy affect performance of learner?

    PubMed

    Vakani, Farhan; Sheerani, Mughis; Afzal, Azam; Amin, Almas

    2012-01-01

    All types of attribution based on which learners make their judgement (i.e., self efficacy), about academic success or failure or about a specific task usually affect their performance and their capabilities to deal with different realities. It is perhaps the most distinctive capability of self-reflection. Many of the cognitive theorists have defined it as a meta-cognitive capability. This judgement influence learners choose what to do, how much effort to be invested in the activity, how long to carry the phase of disappointment, and whether to approach the task anxiously or with assurance.

  16. Reading instruction in science: Teachers' practices, beliefs, & self-efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Christina M.

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS, 2010) and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS, 2013) call on science teachers to play a stronger role in helping students learn from informational science texts. Curriculum implementation efforts aimed at addressing these new standards should build on what teachers are already doing to help students with reading in their classrooms and the pedagogical issues that they feel are important to science learning. However, few current studies have gathered these important insights from science teachers. Aiming to fill this gap in the literature, this study attempted to describe middle school science teachers' current practices, beliefs, and self-efficacy regarding reading and reading instruction in their classrooms. A conceptual model hypothesizing that self-efficacy mediates the relationship between teachers' beliefs about how important reading instruction is to science learning and how often they provide reading instruction in their science classes was also tested. Participants (N = 247) reported that students regularly engaged in reading-related tasks in science class. Somer's D correlation analyses highlighted positive associations between the frequency with which teachers reported that students engaged in various reading-related tasks and the frequency with which they reported providing reading instruction for those tasks, suggesting that students tended to receive explicit instruction or coaching for the reading-related tasks they engaged in most often. Middle school science teachers also expressed positive beliefs about the importance of reading-related tasks and explicit instruction or coaching for reading in science and tended to take on responsibility for helping students become better readers of science texts. Last, a path analysis confirmed that the association between teachers' beliefs and practices was mediated through teachers' self-efficacy (beta = .07, p < .001). This suggests that self-efficacy can influence

  17. Perceived barriers mediate the association between self-efficacy and fruit and vegetable consumption among students attending alternative high schools.

    PubMed

    Bruening, Meg; Kubik, Martha Y; Kenyon, Denyelle; Davey, Cynthia; Story, Mary

    2010-10-01

    Compared to students attending regular high schools, alternative high school students are more likely to be racial/ethnic minorities, have higher levels of poverty, and higher rates of risky and poor health behaviors, including weight-related behaviors like limited fruit and vegetable intake. However, little is known about fruit/vegetable intake among alternative high school students. This study examined whether perceived barriers to healthy eating mediated the association between self-efficacy to eat healthy foods and fruit/vegetable consumption among alternative high school students. The cross-sectional study population consisted of students (N=145) attending six alternative high schools in the St Paul-Minneapolis, MN, area who were participants in an obesity prevention pilot study and completed a baseline survey during fall 2006. Mixed model linear regression, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, was used to test a series of regression models performed according to mediation analysis procedures. Students' mean age was 17.3 years; 52% were male, 63% were low-income, and 61% were from racial/ethnic minorities. Students reported a mean fruit/vegetable intake of 3.6 servings per day, mean self-efficacy to eat healthy score of 22.2 (range 3 to 35), and mean barriers to eating healthy score of 6.9 (range 3 to 13). Perceived barriers to healthy eating fully mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and fruit/vegetable consumption (Sobel test statistic 2.7, P=0.007). Interventions targeting the dietary practices of alternative high school students should include components to decrease perceived barriers as a way to increase self-efficacy and ultimately fruit/vegetable intake.

  18. Disease-specific self-efficacy in the eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ballou, Sarah; Taft, Tiffany; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-08-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGIDs) are chronic inflammatory conditions with increasing global prevalence. Self-efficacy is important for patients' ability to manage chronic disease. We sought to evaluate disease-specific self-efficacy in the EGIDs via a modified version of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Self-Efficacy Scale (IBD-SES). Ninety-one Participants reported demographic, clinical, and psychosocial variables. The IBD-SES demonstrated excellent reliability and validity in this population. Self-efficacy was higher in men, patients with less severe disease, and those who had consulted a dietitian. The IBD-SES is a useful measure of disease-specific self-efficacy in the EGIDs. Further research is necessary to understand the role of self-efficacy in the management of these illnesses.

  19. Self-Efficacy Beliefs, Motivation, Race, and Gender in Middle School Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britner, Shari L.; Pajares, Frank

    The purpose of this study was to discover whether the science motivation beliefs of middle school students (N = 262) vary as a function of their gender or race/ethnicity and to determine whether science self-efficacy beliefs predict science achievement when motivation variables shown to predict achievement in other academic areas are controlled. Girls reported stronger science self-efficacy and self-efficacy for self-regulation, and they received higher grades in science. Boys had stronger performance-approach goals. White students had stronger self-efficacy and achievement, and African American students reported stronger task goals. Self-efficacy was the only motivation variable to predict the science achievement of girls, boys, and White students. Self-efficacy and self-concept predicted the science achievement of African American students. Results are interpreted from the perspective of Bandura's social cognitive theory.

  20. The effects of equipment modification on children's self-efficacy and basketball shooting performance.

    PubMed

    Chase, M A; Ewing, M E; Lirgg, C D; George, T R

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of modification of basketball size and basket height on shooting performance and self-efficacy of girls and boys 9 to 12 years of age. Subjects (N = 74) completed a self-efficacy questionnaire before and after shooting 10 baskets under four conditions. Shooting conditions were a combination of basketball size (women's or men's) and basket height (10 or 8 ft). Repeated measures analyses of variance indicated that children made more baskets and had higher shooting scores at the 8-ft basket than the 10-ft basket. This was especially evident for girls and 9- and 10-year-old children. Self-efficacy was higher prior to shooting, and boys had higher self-efficacy than girls. Self-efficacy was highest when children shot at the 8-ft basket. These results indicated that basket height modification can positively influence children's shooting performance and self-efficacy.

  1. Clinical Self-Efficacy in Senior Nursing Students: A Mixed- Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdal, Marzieh; Masoudi Alavi, Negin; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Clinical education has a basic role in nursing education, and effective clinical training establishes a sense of clinical self-efficacy in senior nursing students. Self-efficacy is a key component for acting independently in the nursing profession. Objectives: This study was designed to outline senior nursing students’ views about clinical self-efficacy and to determine its level in nursing students. Patients and Methods: A mixed-methods approach, including a quantitative cross-sectional study and qualitative content analysis,was used in this study. Participants were senior nursing students who were in their two last semesters. During the initial quantitative stage, all students in the 7th and 8th semesters of the nursing major were invited to participate. They were asked to complete the Nursing Clinical Self-Efficacy Scale (NCSES) and, during the subsequent qualitative stage, the 14 students in the 7th and 8th semesters were asked to participate in semi-structured interviews. Results: In the quantitative part, 58 students completed the self-efficacy questionnaire; the mean score was 219.28 ± 35.8, which showed moderate self-efficacy in students. Self-efficacy was different across skills. In the qualitative part, the 355 open codes that were extracted from the interviews were clustered to 12 categories and 3 themes. The main themes included the factors related to self-efficacy, outcomes of self-efficacy, and ways to improve self-efficacy. Conclusions: Students had moderate self-efficacy. Several factors such as environment, nursing colleagues, and clinical educators could influence the creation of clinical self-efficacy in nursing students. PMID:26576443

  2. Mastering developmental transitions in young and middle adulthood: the interplay of openness to experience and traditional gender ideology on women's self-efficacy and subjective well-being.

    PubMed

    Weiss, David; Freund, Alexandra M; Wiese, Bettina S

    2012-11-01

    The present research focuses on 2 factors that might help or hurt women to cope with the uncertainties associated with developmental transitions in modern societies (i.e., starting one's first job, graduating from high school, reentry to work after parental leave). We investigate (a) the role of openness to experience in coping with challenging transitions and (b) the (mal)adaptive consequences of adopting a traditional gender ideology. Starting with the assumption that transitional uncertainty has different consequences for women high or low in openness to experience, a first experiment (N = 61; 18-30 years) demonstrated that self-efficacy and well-being decrease after being confronted with transitional uncertainty among women low in openness. Two longitudinal studies investigated the (mal)adaptive consequences of adopting a traditional gender ideology for women high or low in openness in dealing with challenging transitions. Study 2 examined whether endorsing or rejecting traditional gender role beliefs might help female (but not male) students to maintain a sense of self-efficacy and subjective well-being during the transition of graduating from high school (N = 520, 17-22 years). Study 3 (N = 297; 20-53 years) tested the same model for women in middle adulthood during the transition from parental leave to reentry into work life. For both studies, latent growth analyses showed that endorsing traditional gender role beliefs contributed to self-efficacy and subjective well-being among women low in openness. By contrast, for women high in openness, rejecting traditional gender role beliefs had a positive effect on their relative level of self-efficacy and subjective well-being. Functions of ideologies in the context of challenging transitions are discussed.

  3. Perceived self-efficacy, social comparison, affective reactions and academic performance.

    PubMed

    Vrugt, A

    1994-11-01

    The present study is based on Bandura's theory of perceived self-efficacy and on Wills' theory of downward comparison. We expected that perceived self-efficacy and downward comparison, separately and in combination, would contribute to the positive feelings of university students regarding their skills and by way of these feelings to their study performance. The results largely support this expectation. Both perceived self-efficacy and downward comparison contributed to the positive feelings of the students. These feelings also influenced their course grades. In contrast with the expectation the interaction between self-efficacy and direction of comparison did not contribute to feelings of students regarding their own skills.

  4. Caregiving representations at work and the moderating role of job self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Reizer, Abira; Hetsroni, Amir

    2015-02-01

    This study measured the effect of job self-efficacy and caregiving dimensions (hyperactivation and deactivation) on Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB) in a sample of 160 customer service workers. While job self-efficacy and caregiving deactivation independently had moderate main effects on OCB-Individual and OCB-Organizational, the effect of caregiving hyperactivation was smaller and significantly contributed solely to OCB-Organizational. When caregiving dimensions were examined in interaction with job self-efficacy, the effect of deactivated caregiving on OCB-Organizational was stronger for workers who scored high on job self-efficacy. PMID:25621667

  5. The relationship among self-efficacy, perfectionism and academic burnout in medical school students

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji Hye; Chae, Su Jin; Chang, Ki Hong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among academic self-efficacy, socially-prescribed perfectionism, and academic burnout in medical school students and to determine whether academic self-efficacy had a mediating role in the relationship between perfectionism and academic burnout. Methods: A total of 244 first-year and second-year premed medical students and first- to fourth-year medical students were enrolled in this study. As study tools, socially-prescribed perfectionism, academic self-efficacy, and academic burnout scales were utilized. For data analysis, correlation analysis, multiple regression analysis, and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted. Results: Academic burnout had correlation with socially-prescribed perfectionism. It had negative correlation with academic self-efficacy. Socially-prescribed perfectionism and academic self-efficacy had 54% explanatory power for academic burnout. When socially-prescribed perfectionism and academic self-efficacy were simultaneously used as input, academic self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between socially-prescribed perfectionism and academic burnout. Conclusion: Socially-prescribed perfectionism had a negative effect on academic self-efficacy, ultimately triggering academic burnout. This suggests that it is important to have educational and counseling interventions to improve academic self-efficacy by relieving academic burnout of medical school students. PMID:26838568

  6. Life Lessons from Women with HIV: Mutuality, Self-Awareness, and Self-Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Brody, Leslie R; Jack, Dana C; Bruck-Segal, Dana L; Ruffing, Elizabeth G; Firpo-Perretti, Yudelki M; Dale, Sannisha K; Weber, Kathleen M; Cohen, Mardge H

    2016-06-01

    Women with HIV in the United States cope with multiple traumas that influence adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and well-being. Narrative themes from three life turning points and a projective story task were compared for two groups of women with HIV (HIV well-managed vs. HIV not well-managed, matched on demographics and narrative word count) to understand predictors of successful outcomes. The well-managed group (n = 10) was virally suppressed and reported ≥95% ART adherence; the not well-managed group (n = 10) had detectable viral load and reported <95% ART adherence. Women were predominantly African American with low socioeconomic status and averaged 46.51 years. A three-stage coding process (with coders blind to group status in stages 1 and 2) involved (1) line by line thematic analyses that generated 155 subthemes reflecting six content areas (interpersonal relationships; culture and community; sense of self; relationship to past, present, and future experiences; self-care; and motivators for change); (2) absence/presence of the 155 subthemes was compared for the two groups; the frequency of 37 subthemes was found to significantly differ; and (3) the 37 differentiating subthemes were conceptually integrated, revealing that the well-managed group's narratives more frequently reflected (a) mutuality (growth-fostering relationships involving reciprocal care and empathy); (b) self-awareness (recognition of personal strengths and weaknesses and multiple factors contributing to life choices and trajectories); and (c) self-efficacy (active coping, self-advocacy, and utilizing resources). Implications for treatment and interconnections among themes are discussed, emphasizing the factors that enable women to care for themselves and others. PMID:27214648

  7. Self-efficacy for managing pain, symptoms, and function in patients with lung cancer and their informal caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Laura S.; Keefe, Francis J.; Garst, Jennifer; McBride, Colleen M.; Baucom, Donald

    2008-01-01

    This study examined self-efficacy for managing pain, symptoms, and function in patients with lung cancer and their caregivers, and associations between self-efficacy and patient and caregiver adjustment. 152 patients with early stage lung cancer completed measures of self-efficacy, pain, fatigue, quality of life, depression, and anxiety. Their caregivers completed a measure assessing their self-efficacy for helping the patient manage symptoms and measures of psychological distress and caregiver strain. Analyses indicated that, overall, patients and caregivers were relatively low in self-efficacy for managing pain, symptoms, and function, and that there were significant associations between self-efficacy and adjustment. Patients low in self-efficacy reported significantly higher levels of pain, fatigue, lung cancer symptoms, depression, and anxiety, and significantly worse physical and functional well being, as did patients whose caregivers were low in self-efficacy. When patients and caregivers both had low self-efficacy, patients reported higher levels of anxiety and poorer quality of life than when both were high in self-efficacy. There were also significant associations between patient and caregiver self-efficacy and caregiver adjustment, with lower levels of self-efficacy associated with higher levels of caregiver strain and psychological distress. These preliminary findings raise the possibility that patient and caregiver self-efficacy for managing pain, symptoms, and function may be important factors affecting adjustment, and that interventions targeted at increasing self-efficacy may be useful in this population. PMID:17942229

  8. Science self-efficacy in tenth grade Hispanic female high school students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Maria Decanio

    Historical data have demonstrated an underrepresentation of females and minorities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professions. The purpose of the study considered the variables of gender and ethnicity collectively in relationship to tenth grade Hispanic females' perception of their self-efficacy in science. The correlation of science self-efficacy to science academic achievement was also studied. Possible interventions for use with female Hispanic minority populations might help increase participation in STEM field preparation during the high school career. A population of 272 students was chosen through convenience sampling methods, including 80 Hispanic females. Students were administered a 27-item questionnaire taken directly from the Smist (1993) Science Self-efficacy Questionnaire (SSEQ). Three science self-efficacy factors were successfully extracted and included Academic Engagement Self-efficacy (M=42.57), Laboratory Self-efficacy (M=25.44), and Biology Self-efficacy ( M=19.35). Each factor showed a significant positive correlation ( p<.01) to each of the other two factors. ANOVA procedures compared all female subgroups in their science self-efficacy perceptions. Asian/Pacific and Native American females had higher self-efficacy mean scores as compared to White, Black and Hispanic females on all three extracted science self-efficacy factors. Asian/Pacific females had the highest mean scores. No statistically significant correlations were found between science-self-efficacy and a measure of science achievement. Two high-ability and two low-ability Hispanic females were randomly chosen to participate in a brief structured interview. Three general themes emerged. Classroom Variables, Outside School Variables, and Personal Variables were subsequently divided into sub themes influenced by participants' views of science. It was concluded that Hispanic female science self-efficacy was among the subgroups which self-scored the lowest

  9. Nanotechnology and Secondary Science Teacher's Self-Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Elena K.

    The recommendations of the United States President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and the multi-agency National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) identified the need to prepare the workforce and specialists in the field of nanotechnology in order for the United States to continue to compete in the global marketplace. There is a lack of research reported in recent literature on the readiness of secondary science teachers to introduce higher level sciences---specifically nanotechnology---in their classes. The central research question of this study examined secondary science teachers' beliefs about teaching nanotechnology comfortably, effectively, and successfully. Bandura's self-efficacy theory provided the conceptual framework for this phenomenological study. A data analysis rubric was used to identify themes and patterns that emerged from detailed descriptions during in-depth interviews with 15 secondary science teachers. The analysis revealed the shared, lived experiences of teachers and their beliefs about their effectiveness and comfort in teaching higher-level sciences, specifically nanotechnology. The results of the study indicated that, with rare exceptions, secondary science teachers do not feel comfortable or effective, nor do they believe they have adequate training to teach nanotechnology concepts to their students. These teachers believed they were not prepared or trained in incorporating these higher level science concepts in the curriculum. Secondary science teachers' self-efficacy and personal beliefs of effectiveness in teaching nanotechnology can be an important component in achieving a positive social change by helping to familiarize high school students with nanotechnology and how it can benefit society and the future of science.

  10. Predictive Power of the Sources of Primary School Students' Self-Efficacy Beliefs on Their Self-Efficacy Beliefs for Learning and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to reveal the extent to which the sources of 6th- 8th grade students' self-efficacy beliefs predict their self-efficacy beliefs for learning and performance. The study is correlational and was conducted on a total of 1049 students during the fall term of the educational year 2010-2011. The data of the study were…

  11. Life Changes, Coping Resources, and Health among the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Ronald L.; West, Gale E.

    1985-01-01

    Examined the extent to which the presence of a confidant, social network involvement, marital status, self-efficacy, religiosity, self-esteem, occupational status, and income served as coping resources for older adults (N=299). Results suggested that variables other than income were not significantly related to life changes. (NRB)

  12. Career Barriers and Coping Efficacy among Native American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Mindi N.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between career barriers (low perceived social status [PSS], experiences with personal and systemic classism, and general ethnic discrimination) and college outcome expectations (COEs) among a sample of 121 Native American postsecondary students. Self-efficacy for coping with career barriers was tested as a…

  13. Effects of a Low-Element Challenge Course on Abstinence Self-Efficacy and Group Cohesion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clem, Jamie M.; Smith, Thomas E.; Richards, Kristin V.

    2012-01-01

    Substance abuse researchers identify self-efficacy and group cohesion as important components in alcohol and other drug-dependency treatment. Objectives: The purpose of this single-group, pretest-posttest study is to explore the therapeutic value of a challenge course intervention on the self-efficacy and group cohesion of nine chemically…

  14. The Correlation between Teacher Self-Efficacy among Seminaries and Institutes Seminary Teachers and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangum, James Irvin, III

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the correlation between teacher self-efficacy and student outcomes. Teacher self-efficacy was measured in 99 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Seminaries and Institutes seminary teachers using Tschannen-Moran and Hoy's Teachers Sense of Efficacy Scale (2001). Student outcomes included academic grades, conduct…

  15. Exploring Embedded Guidance and Self-Efficacy in Educational Multi-User Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Brian C.; Ketelhut, Diane Jass

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of an exploratory study into the relationship between student self-efficacy and guidance use in a Multi-User Virtual Environment (MUVE) science curriculum project. We describe findings from a sample of middle school science students on the combined impact on learning of student self-efficacy in scientific…

  16. English Bar as a Venue to Boost Students' Speaking Self-Efficacy at the Tertiary Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Mingxu

    2013-01-01

    Research in EFL and ESL has confirmed that self-efficacy affects language learners' choices of learning tasks, persistence, motivation and achievement. As a cognitive construct, self-efficacy can be strengthened by both outcomes of behaviors and input from the environment. This paper studies the effects of an English Bar, a self-access center for…

  17. Self-Efficacy, Motivation, and Academic Adjustment among African American Women Attending Institutions of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Deneia M.; Love, Keisha M.; Roan-Belle, Clarissa; Tyler, Keneth M.; Brown, Carrie Lynn; Garriott, Patton O.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among self-efficacy beliefs, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, and academic adjustment among 111 African American women in college. Results revealed that self-efficacy beliefs predicted Motivation to Know, Externally Regulated motivation, Identified motivation, and academic adjustment. Furthermore,…

  18. Initial Teacher Education: Does Self-Efficacy Influence Candidate Teacher Academic Achievement and Future Career Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawer, Saad F.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative investigation examined the influence of low and high self-efficacy on candidate teacher academic performance in a foreign language teaching methodology course through testing the speculation that high self-efficacy levels would improve pedagogical-content knowledge (PCK). Positivism guided the research design at the levels of…

  19. The Effect of Communication Skills and Interpersonal Problem Solving Skills on Social Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erozkan, Atilgan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine communication skills, interpersonal problem solving skills, and social self-efficacy perception of adolescents and the predictive role of communication skills and interpersonal problem solving skills on social self-efficacy. This study is a quantitative and relational study aimed at examining the…

  20. Investigating Academic Self-Efficacy of University Students in Terms of Socio-Demographic Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satici, Seydi Ahmet; Can, Gurhan

    2016-01-01

    In this study whether academic self-efficacy of university students differ in terms of various socio-demographic features has been investigated. The study was conducted on 1679 students who were attending Anadolu University. In the study, the Academic Self-Efficacy Scale and Personal Information Form were used as data collection tools. In the…

  1. Rural High School Teachers' Self-Efficacy in Student Engagement, Instructional Strategies, and Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoulders, Tori L.; Krei, Melinda Scott

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the differences in rural high school teachers' (n = 256) self-efficacy in student engagement, instructional practices, and classroom management using selected teacher characteristics. Analysis of variance showed significant mean differences between different levels of education in self-efficacy for…

  2. Self-Efficacy for Reading and Writing: Influence of Modeling, Goal Setting, and Self-Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schunk, Dale H.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses theory, research, and applications relevant to one type of personal belief: perceived self-efficacy. Presents research evidence showing how social models, goal setting, and self-evaluation affect self-efficacy, motivation, and learning. Concludes with implications of the theory and research for educational practice. (SG)

  3. Principles and Practices for Building Academic Self-Efficacy in Middle Grades Language Arts Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McTigue, Erin; Liew, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Academic self-efficacy contributes to students' motivation and persistence for learning. However, motivation for reading and learning, and students' self-efficacy in school often declines in adolescence. This manuscript presents research-based strategies for facilitating students' motivations within the context of language arts classes.

  4. Measuring University Students' Perceived Self-Efficacy in Science Communication in Middle and High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chi, Shaohui; Liu, Xiufeng; Gardella, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Service learning typically involves university students in teaching and learning activities for middle and high school students, however, measurement of university students' self-efficacy in science communication is still lacking. In this study, an instrument to measure university students' perceived self-efficacy in communicating science to…

  5. The Impact of Achievement Goals on Cardiorespiratory Fitness: Does Self-Efficacy Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Zan; Xiang, Ping; Lochbaum, Marc; Guan, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The relationships among students' self-efficacy, 2 × 2 achievement goals (mastery-approach [MAp], mastery-avoidance [MAv], performance-approach [PAp], and performance-avoidance goals), and achievement performance remain largely unanswered. We tested a model of the mediating role of self-efficacy on the relationship between 2 × 2…

  6. A Comparative Examination of Pre-Service Teacher Self-Efficacy Related to Literacy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helfrich, Sara R.; Clark, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated differences in self-efficacy to teach literacy between two groups of pre-service teachers. The authors hypothesized that pre-service teachers enrolled in one program focusing on fewer grade levels (K-3) and requiring more literacy-focused courses would have higher self-efficacy than pre-service teachers enrolled in another…

  7. Beginning Generalist Teacher Self-Efficacy for Music Compared with Maths and English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvis, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, 201 beginning generalist teachers throughout Queensland, Australia, responded to a questionnaire intended to create a snapshot of current self-efficacy beliefs towards teaching music. Beginning teachers were asked to rank their perceived level of teacher self-efficacy for music, English and maths. Results were analysed through a series of…

  8. The Sources of Self-Efficacy: Educational Research and Implications for Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Karin S.

    2016-01-01

    Music teachers can empower students with control over their own music ability development by helping them foster positive self-efficacy beliefs. This article reviews general education and music research concerning Bandura's theoretical four sources of self-efficacy (enactive mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal/social persuasion, and…

  9. Teacher Self-Efficacy in Working with Children with Autism in the General Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Mary Irene

    2014-01-01

    Autism is being diagnosed at an unprecedented rate, with an influx of children with autism being educated in the general education classroom. A positive self-efficacy amongst teachers is imperative as education moves toward the inclusive education model. Bandura theorized a bidirectional approach in the improvement of self-efficacy. The purpose of…

  10. Social Self-Efficacy, Academic Locus of Control, and Internet Addiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iskender, Murat; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship of internet addiction, social self-efficacy, and academic locus of control. Participants were 311 university students who completed a questionnaire package that included the Online Cognition Scale, the Academic Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Social Self-efficacy Scale. The…

  11. Women's Self-Efficacy Perceptions in Mathematics and Science: Investigating USC-MESA Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Rebecca C.; Jun, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Higher education institutions have struggled with the underrepresentation of female students in the STEM majors. The authors investigate the USC-MESA program and the role of women's self-efficacy perceptions in mathematics and science. It is crucial to understand the theory of self-efficacy in examining historically underrepresented populations in…

  12. Correlations between Perceived Teacher Empowerment and Perceived Sense of Teacher Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemric, Marty; Eury, Allen D.; Shellman, David

    2010-01-01

    Empirical research has linked teacher efficacy with student achievement. In this study, the authors determined the perceived levels of empowerment and self-efficacy from 70 elementary teachers in two schools. Descriptive and predictive statistics were used to explore the degree to which perceived empowerment and self-efficacy were related in an…

  13. Self-Efficacy, Curriculum Content, Practicum Experience, and the Interest of Social Work Students in Gerontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the linkages among perceptions of self-efficacy, curriculum, and field experience on students' attitudes and interest in working with older adults. Graduate level social work students were surveyed regarding perceived self-efficacy to intervene with older adult clients, the amount of aging content in the master of social…

  14. Self-Efficacy in Internet-Based Learning Environments: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Chin-Chung; Chuang, Shih-Chyueh; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Tsai, Meng-Jung

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews 46 papers from 1999 to 2009 regarding self-efficacy in Internet-based learning environments, and discusses three major categories of research: (1) learners' Internet self-efficacy, assessing learners' confidence in their skills or knowledge of operating general Internet functions or applications in Internet-based learning; (2)…

  15. Path Analysis Examining Self-Efficacy and Decision-Making Performance on a Simulated Baseball Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepler, Teri J.; Feltz, Deborah L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between decision-making self-efficacy and decision-making performance in sport. Undergraduate students (N = 78) performed 10 trials of a decision-making task in baseball. Self-efficacy was measured before performing each trial. Decision-making performance was assessed by decision speed and…

  16. Evaluating High School Students' Anxiety and Self-Efficacy towards Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çimen, Osman; Yilmaz, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety and self-efficacy are among the factors that impact students' performance in biology. The current study aims to investigate high school students' perception of biology anxiety and self-efficacy, in relation to gender, grade level, interest in biology, negative experience associated with biology classes, and teachers' approaches in the…

  17. Financial Hardship, Unmet Medical Need, and Health Self-Efficacy among African American Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker-Seeley, Reginald D.; Mitchell, Jamie A.; Shires, Deirdre A.; Modlin, Charles S., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Health self-efficacy (the confidence to take care of one's health) is a key component in ensuring that individuals are active partners in their health and health care. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between financial hardship and health self-efficacy among African American men and to determine if unmet…

  18. Empirical Study on Learners' Self-Efficacy in ESL/EFL Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Lihong

    2016-01-01

    With the popularity of learner-oriented approach in language teaching, research on learners is gaining more and more importance. This paper attempts to review the empirical researches on self-efficacy in the ESL/EFL settings during the past 10 years with the purpose of depicting the extent to which the self-efficacy research in ESL/EFL has…

  19. Bystander Behavior in Bullying Situations: Basic Moral Sensitivity, Moral Disengagement and Defender Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornberg, Robert; Jungert, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how basic moral sensitivity in bullying, moral disengagement in bullying and defender self-efficacy were related to different bystander behaviors in bullying. Therefore, we examined pathways that linked students' basic moral sensitivity, moral disengagement, and defender self-efficacy to different…

  20. Effects of Self-Regulated Vocabulary Learning Process on Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mizumoto, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Researchers, especially in the field of educational psychology, have argued that self-efficacy plays an important role in self-regulated learning. As such, teaching of self-regulated learning often focuses on enhancing self-efficacy. However, few studies have examined how the process of self-regulated learning might lead to the enhancement of…

  1. The "Responsive Classroom" Approach and Fifth Grade Students' Math and Science Anxiety and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Marissa Swaim; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.; Merritt, Eileen G.; Patton, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Self-efficacy forecasts student persistence and achievement in challenging subjects. Thus, it is important to understand factors that contribute to students' self-efficacy, a key factor in their success in math and science. The current cross-sectional study examined the contribution of students' gender and math and science anxiety as well as…

  2. Research Design and the Predictive Power of Measures of Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Beverley

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this enquiry was to examine how research design impacts on the predictive power of measures of self-efficacy. Three cautions for designing research into self-efficacy drawn from the seminal work of Albert Bandura (1986) and a further caution proposed by the current author together form the analytical framework for this enquiry. For…

  3. Self-Efficacy, Reflection, and Achievement: A Short-Term Longitudinal Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Huy P.

    2014-01-01

    This short-term longitudinal study involved the inclusion of personal self-efficacy and the 4 categories of reflective thinking practice within 1 conceptual framework. Using structural equation modeling, the author explored the temporally displaced effects of prior performance (Time 1) on self-efficacy (Time 2, Time 3) and the four categories of…

  4. Predictive Utility and Causal Influence of the Writing Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Elementary Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pajares, Frank; Valiante, Gio

    According to self-efficacy theorists, people's judgments of what they can accomplish are influential arbiters in human agency and, as such, powerful determinants of their behavior. In large part, this is because these self-efficacy beliefs are said to act as mediators between other acknowledged influences on behavior, such as skill, ability,…

  5. Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Career Development. ERIC Digest No. 205.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Bettina Lankard

    Self-efficacy is mediated by individuals' beliefs or expectations about their capacity to accomplish certain tasks successfully or demonstrate certain behaviors. When individuals have low self-efficacy expectations regarding their behavior, they limit the extent to which they participate in an endeavor and are more apt to give up at the first sign…

  6. The Development of English and Mathematics Self-Efficacy: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Huy P.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical research has provided evidence supporting the validation and prediction of 4 major sources of self-efficacy: enactive performance accomplishments, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and emotional states. Other research studies have also attested to the importance and potency of self-efficacy in academic learning and achievement.…

  7. Self-Efficacy and Career Choice among Students with Physical Disabilities in Postsecondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ElHessen, Souraya Sue

    This paper discusses the findings of a study that explored the role of self-efficacy and career decision-making in students with physical disabilities engaged in the career planning process. The relationships of career decision-making self-efficacy to adjustment of disability, severity of disability, and career exploration behaviors were examined…

  8. Self-Efficacy and Creative Productivity: Three Studies of above Average Ability Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schack, Gina D.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Three studies involving a total of 918 students of above average ability in grades 3 through 8 confirm the importance of self-efficacy in students' decisions to initiate creative productivity and reinforce the value of performance accomplishments for increasing self-efficacy and creative productivity. (SLD)

  9. Informational Sources, Self-Efficacy and Achievement: A Temporally Displaced Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phan, Huy Phuong

    2012-01-01

    Personal self-efficacy is an important theoretical orientation that helps to explain students' learning and academic achievements. One area of research inquiry has involved the four major sources of information and their predictive effects on self-efficacy. As an extension for examination, the purpose of our investigation was to explore the…

  10. Examining the Practicum Experience to Increase Counseling Students' Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikonomopoulos, James; Vela, Javier Cavazos; Smith, Wayne D.; Dell'Aquila, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Counseling graduate students may begin practicum with low self-efficacy regarding their counseling abilities and skills. In the current study, we implemented a small-series (N = 11) single-case research design to assess the effectiveness of the practicum experience to increase counseling students' self-efficacy. Analysis of participants' scores on…

  11. Reliability of a Scale of Work-Related Self-Efficacy for People with Psychiatric Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    Work-related self-efficacy at a core task level fits with the social cognitive career theory explaining the career development of people with severe mental illness. The aim of this study was to further investigate the psychometric properties of the "Work-related Self- Efficacy Scale" for use with people with psychiatric disabilities. Sixty…

  12. Helicopter Parenting: The Effect of an Overbearing Caregiving Style on Peer Attachment and Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ingen, Daniel J.; Freiheit, Stacy R.; Steinfeldt, Jesse A.; Moore, Linda L.; Wimer, David J.; Knutt, Adelle D.; Scapinello, Samantha; Roberts, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Helicopter parenting, an observed phenomenon on college campuses, may adversely affect college students. The authors examined how helicopter parenting is related to self-efficacy and peer relationships among 190 undergraduate students ages 16 to 28 years. Helicopter parenting was associated with low self-efficacy, alienation from peers, and a lack…

  13. A Survey Study of Chinese In-Service Teachers' Self-Efficacy about Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Mian; Zan, Fei; Liu, Jiaqiu; Liu, Chunling; Sharma, Umesh

    2012-01-01

    A survey study was conducted to a total of 323 in-service teachers (110 special education teachers and 213 general education teachers) in Shanghai regarding their self-efficacy and concerns about inclusive education. Multivariate analysis results reveal that special teachers have significantly higher self-efficacy about inclusive education than…

  14. Using Self-Efficacy Theory to Facilitate Inclusion in General Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Martin; Taliaferro, Andrea; Harris, Natasha; Krause, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Self-efficacy, a situational form of self confidence, is critical in the success of all professionals, including physical education teachers. Most physical educators have confidence in their ability to teach fitness, motor skills, and sport and health concepts. However, their self-efficacy often declines when they face the need to include a…

  15. The Role of Work Experience and Self-Efficacy in STEM Student Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raelin, Joseph A.; Bailey, Margaret B.; Hamann, Jerry; Pendleton, Leslie K.; Reisberg, Rachelle; Whitman, David L.

    2015-01-01

    The authors report the results of a three-year longitudinal study of retention among undergraduate engineering students enrolled at four major universities. The study demonstrates that self-efficacy can be a critical factor in student persistence and can be broken down into three components: work, career, and academic self-efficacy. The authors…

  16. Item response modeling: an evaluation of the children's fruit and vegetable self-efficacy questionnaire

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perceived self-efficacy (SE) for eating fruit and vegetables (FV) is a key variable mediating FV change in interventions. This study applies item response modeling (IRM) to a fruit, juice and vegetable self-efficacy questionnaire (FVSEQ) previously validated with classical test theory (CTT) procedur...

  17. Academic Self-Efficacy Mediates the Effects of School Psychological Climate on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Høigaard, Rune; Kovac, Velibor Bobo; Øverby, Nina Cecilie; Haugen, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of proximal and distal constructs on adolescent's academic achievement through self-efficacy. Participants included 482 ninth-and tenth-grade Norwegian students who completed a questionnaire designed to assess school-goal orientations, organizational citizenship behavior, academic self-efficacy, and academic…

  18. Student and Teacher Self-Efficacy and the Connection to Reading and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkett, Julie; Hatt, Blaine; Benevides, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Self-efficacy or the belief in one's ability (Bandura, 1977) on the part of both teachers and students is thought to be directly related to teacher and student success. Few studies have compared teacher efficacy, student efficacy, and student ability at once. This study examined the relationship between teacher self-efficacy, student…

  19. Validity-Supporting Evidence of the Self-Efficacy for Teaching Mathematics Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Jennifer R.; Wang, Chuang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide evidence of reliability and validity of the Self-Efficacy for Teaching Mathematics Instrument (SETMI). Self-efficacy, as defined by Bandura, was the theoretical framework for the development of the instrument. The complex belief systems of mathematics teachers, as touted by Ernest provided insights into the…

  20. The Contribution of School Counselors' Self-Efficacy to Their Programmatic Service Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Patrick R.; Lambie, Glenn W.

    2016-01-01

    Self-efficacy pertains to individuals' belief about their capability to accomplish a task; consequently, school counselors' positive self-efficacy is a theoretically based prerequisite for their facilitation of school-based interventions. In addition, school counselor-led interventions and comprehensive, developmental guidance programs benefit…

  1. Thinking Styles and University Self-Efficacy among Deaf, Hard-of-Hearing, and Hearing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Sanyin; Zhang, Li-Fang; Hu, Xiaozhong

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how students' thinking styles are related to their university self-efficacy, by administering the Thinking Styles Inventory-Revised II and the University Self-Efficacy Scale to 366 deaf or hard-of-hearing (DHH) and 467 hearing university students in mainland China. Results showed that, among all participants, those with Type I…

  2. Self-Efficacy and Entrepreneurial Intention: The Mediation Effect of Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pihie, Zaidatol Akmaliah Lope; Bagheri, Afsaneh

    2013-01-01

    Specifying the mechanism through which perceived self-efficacy affects one's behavior has been one of the main concerns of researchers and educators particularly in entrepreneurship domain due to the critical role that entrepreneurial self-efficacy plays in motivating and enabling individuals to establish a new venture. This study examines…

  3. Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Prospective Primary Mathematics Teachers about Mathematical Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yavuz, Gunes; Gunhan, Berna Canturk; Ersoy, Esen; Narli, Serkan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the self-efficacy beliefs about mathematical literacy among teachers of primary school mathematics and the relationship between the self-efficacy beliefs and attitudes towards mathematics. To that end, a descriptive research study was conducted with 550 prospective teachers studying primary school mathematics…

  4. Hardiness, Perceived Employability, and Career Decision Self-Efficacy among Taiwanese College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Jie-Tsuen

    2015-01-01

    Past empirical evidence has demonstrated that personality traits predict career decision self-efficacy. This study extends previous research by proposing and testing a model that examines the mediating roles of perceived internal and external employability on the relationship between personality hardiness and career decision self-efficacy. Using…

  5. Health literacy predicts change in physical activity self-efficacy among sedentary Latinas.

    PubMed

    Dominick, Gregory M; Dunsiger, Shira I; Pekmezi, Dorothy W; Marcus, Bess H

    2013-06-01

    Health literacy (HL) is associated with preventive health behaviors. Self-efficacy is a predictor of health behavior, including physical activity (PA); however, causal pathways between HL and self-efficacy for PA are unknown, especially among Latinas who are at risk for chronic disease. To explore this potential relationship, secondary analyses were conducted on data [Shortened Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (STOFHLA), PA self-efficacy, and socio-demographics] from a 6-month, randomized controlled trial of a print-based PA intervention (n = 89 Spanish-speaking Latinas). Linear regression models revealed associations between HL and baseline self-efficacy in addition to changes in self-efficacy at 6-months. After controlling for significant covariates, higher HL scores were associated with lower baseline PA self-efficacy. Regardless of treatment assignment, higher HL scores at baseline predicted greater changes in PA self-efficacy at 6-months. HL may contribute to Latinas' improved PA self-efficacy, though further research is warranted.

  6. A Qualitative Case Study Exploring Self-Efficacy and Its Influence on Fourth Grade Mathematics Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prindle, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    The perception of higher self-efficacy in young children has been determined to be a better predictor of intellectual and academic performance than simply the acquisition of skills alone. This empirical qualitative single-case study was conducted in order to explore the influence of self-efficacy instruction on perceptions toward and achievement…

  7. The Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Black Women Leaders in Fortune 500 Companies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, LaTonya R.

    2012-01-01

    Black women are underrepresented in leadership positions within organizations. The extent to which self-efficacy influences the advancement potential of Black females is unknown. The purpose of this study was to examine the self-efficacy beliefs of black women in leadership positions and to determine how Black women leaders' careers are…

  8. Improving Self-Efficacy and Motivation: What to Do, What to Say

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Howard; McCabe, Patrick P.

    2006-01-01

    It is not surprising that many struggling learners have low self-efficacy for academics. They believe that they lack the ability to succeed. Consequently, they tend to avoid academics and give up quickly when difficulties arise. This article suggests practical solutions based on self-efficacy theory to improve the motivation of struggling…

  9. Self-Efficacy: A Key to Improving the Motivation of Struggling Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Howard; McCabe, Patrick P.

    2004-01-01

    Many struggling learners resist academics, thinking that they lack the ability to succeed, even if they expend great effort. In other words, these struggling learners have low rather than high self-efficacy for academics. It is widely believed that without sufficiently high self-efficacy, or the belief that they can succeed on specific academic…

  10. Teacher Self-Efficacy for Teaching Students to Lead IEP Meetings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, LaRon

    2010-01-01

    The level of self-efficacy exhibited by an individual has been closely linked to how that individual will perform a given task. Previous studies on teacher self-efficacy focused on general activities and were less specific regarding special education teachers' perceived ability to perform a given task. Based on the theoretical framework of…

  11. The Perception of Educational Software Development Self-Efficacy among Undergraduate CEIT Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzun, Adem; Ozkilic, Ruchan; Senturk, Aysan

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze self-efficacy perceptions for education software development of teacher candidates studying at Department of Computer Education and Instructional Technologies, with respect to a range of variables. The Educational Software Development Self-Efficacy Perception Scale was used as data collection tool. Sixty…

  12. Determination of Self-Efficacy Beliefs of High School Students towards Math Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozgen, Kemal; Bindaka, Recep

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the high school students' self-efficacy beliefs about math literacy, and examine this beliefs in terms of some variables. The research was conducted on 712 high school students. A questionnaire and Math Literacy Self-Efficacy Scale were used for data collection. The data were analyzed in terms of t-test,…

  13. Exploring the Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Retention in Introductory Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawtelle, Vashti; Brewe, Eric; Kramer, Laird H.

    2012-01-01

    The quantitative results of Sources of Self-Efficacy in Science Courses-Physics (SOSESC-P) are presented as a logistic regression predicting the passing of students in introductory Physics with Calculus I, overall as well as disaggregated by gender. Self-efficacy as a theory to explain human behavior change [Bandura [1977] "Psychological Review,…

  14. Three Essential Components of College Teaching: Achievement Calibration, Self-Efficacy, and Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of calibration under the umbrella of metacognition. It examines the current theoretical and empirical issues related to self-efficacy beliefs and traces the pathways through which self-efficacy is related to calibration. This paper concludes by outlining three essential components of college teaching of…

  15. Perceptions of Freedom and Commitment as Sources of Self-Efficacy among Pedagogical Advisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kass, Efrat; Rajuan, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    The perceptions of the role of the pedagogical advisor are multiple and diverse. This amorphous situation places importance on the sense of self-efficacy among those filling this role. Examined in this study was what pedagogical advisors perceive as factors affecting their professional self-efficacy through in-depth interviews of 10 experienced…

  16. The Influences of Social Collaboration on Web 2.0 Self-Efficacy for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turky, Mohamed Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    The present study tries to research the relationship between Social Collaboration Activity and Web 2.0 Self-Efficacy for Higher Education student. It additionally looks to decide how Social Collaboration adds to the forecast of their sense Web 2.0 Self-Efficacy. The study reported in this paper was led to inspect the relationship Social…

  17. Computer Self-Efficacy, Computer Anxiety, Performance and Personal Outcomes of Turkish Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aktag, Isil

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the computer self-efficacy, performance outcome, personal outcome, and affect and anxiety level of physical education teachers. Influence of teaching experience, computer usage and participation of seminars or in-service programs on computer self-efficacy level were determined. The subjects of this study…

  18. Teacher' Interpersonal Self-Efficacy: Evaluation and Predictive Capacity of Teacher Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García-Ros, Rafael; Fuentes, María C.; Fernández, Basilio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study analyzed the predictive capacity and incremental validity of teachers' interpersonal self-efficacy on their levels of burnout. First, it presents the validation process of a Spanish adaptation of the Teacher Interpersonal Self-Efficacy Scale--TISES--(Browers & Tomic, 1999, 2001). Second, the predictive capacity of…

  19. Item Response Modeling: An Evaluation of the Children's Fruit and Vegetable Self-Efficacy Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Tom; Thompson, Debbe

    2006-01-01

    Perceived self-efficacy (SE) for eating fruit and vegetables (FV) is a key variable mediating FV change in interventions. This study applies item response modeling (IRM) to a fruit, juice and vegetable self-efficacy questionnaire (FVSEQ) previously validated with classical test theory (CTT) procedures. The 24-item (five-point Likert scale) FVSEQ…

  20. Financial Stress, Self-Efficacy, and Financial Help-Seeking Behavior of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, HanNa; Heckman, Stuart J.; Letkiewicz, Jodi C.; Montalto, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    Financial stress and self-efficacy are examined in relationship to college students' financial help-seeking behavior utilizing Grable and Joo's (1999) framework. A cognitive approach is taken by focusing on the moderating role of financial self-efficacy on the relationship between financial stress and financial help-seeking. Data from…

  1. Rating Scale Analysis and Psychometric Properties of the Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cipriani, Daniel J.; Hensen, Francine E.; McPeck, Danielle L.; Kubec, Gina L. D.; Thomas, Julie J.

    2012-01-01

    Parents and caregivers faced with the challenges of transferring children with disability are at risk of musculoskeletal injuries and/or emotional stress. The Caregiver Self-Efficacy Scale for Transfers (CSEST) is a 14-item questionnaire that measures self-efficacy for transferring under common conditions. The CSEST yields reliable data and valid…

  2. Ideal Teacher Behaviors: Student Motivation and Self-Efficacy Predict Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Komarraju, Meera

    2013-01-01

    Differences in students' academic self-efficacy and motivation were examined in predicting preferred teacher traits. Undergraduates (261) completed the Teaching Behavior Checklist, Academic Self-Concept scale, and Academic Motivation scale. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that academic self-efficacy and extrinsic motivation explained…

  3. High School Counselors' Perceived Self-Efficacy and Relationships with Actual and Preferred Job Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jellison, Vickie Dawn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the relationship between School Counselor self-efficacy, role definition and actual and preferred school counseling activities in a sample drawn from a population of school counselors. To measure these variables, the School Counselor Self-Efficacy Scale (SCSE) and the School Counselor Activity Rating…

  4. Preservice Teachers' Work Stress, Self-Efficacy, and Occupational Commitment in Four Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Robert; Wilson, Elaine; Siu, Angela F. Y.; Hannok, Wanwisa; Wong, Marina W.; Wongsri, Nongkran; Sonthisap, Panwadee; Pibulchol, Chaleosri; Buranachaitavee, Yanisa; Jansem, Anchalee

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examine the teaching-related stress, self-efficacy, and occupational commitment of preservice teachers from two culturally western and two culturally eastern countries. The sample included 1,187 participants from Canada (n?=?379), England (n?=?203), Hong Kong (n?=?211), and Thailand (n?=?394). Self-efficacy partially reduced…

  5. Self-Efficacy's Influence on Student Academic Achievement in the Medical Anatomy Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgoon, Jennifer Marie; Meece, Judith L.; Granger, Noelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Self-efficacy is defined as a person's beliefs in his or her own abilities to successfully complete a task and has been shown to influence student motivation and academic behaviors. More specifically, anatomical self-efficacy is defined as an individual's judgment of his or her ability to successfully complete tasks related to the anatomy…

  6. The Relationship between General Self-Efficacy Belief and Burnout Level among Turkish Academicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevindi, Tarik

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relation between burnout level and general self-efficacy beliefs of academicians working in School of Physical Education and Sport. 178 Academicians working at various universities in Turkey participated in this study. The General Self-Efficacy Scale developed by Schwarzer and Jerusalem (1995), adapted to…

  7. Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Prospective Social Studies Teachers in Relation to History Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Self-efficacy is one of the important concepts of the social cognitive theory, and can be defined as individual's perception of his or her own capabilities for organizing and successfully executing the courses of action required to attain designated types of performance. Teachers with high self-efficacy perception can contribute to creation of a…

  8. Study of Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Social Studies Teacher Candidates on Educational Internet Usage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akman, Özkan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at examining the self-efficacy perceptions of social studies teacher candidates with respect to educational internet use. This research was conducted on a sample of 174 social studies teacher candidates enrolled in Gaziantep University Nizip Faculty of Education. The "Educational Internet Self-Efficacy Scale," developed…

  9. Teacher Self-Efficacy and Successful Intelligence among Chinese Secondary School Teachers in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, David W.

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed perceptions of self-efficacy and successful intelligence among 220 Chinese prospective and in-service secondary school teachers in Hong Kong. Teacher self-efficacy in six domains--teaching highly able learners, classroom management, guidance and counselling, student engagement, teaching to accommodate diversity, and teaching…

  10. Measuring the Sources of Self-Efficacy among Secondary School Music Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelenak, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the four sources of self-efficacy in music performance and examine responses from the Music Performance Self-Efficacy Scale (MPSES). Participants (N = 290) were middle and high school music students from 10 schools in two regions of the United States. Questions included the following: (1) How much…

  11. Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Novice Teachers and Their Performance in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozder, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the data related to the novice teachers' self-efficacy beliefs and their performance in the classroom. The researcher collected both qualitative and quantitative data for this study. According to the findings, teacher self-efficacy beliefs of the novice teachers were found to be at a sufficient level. The novice teachers…

  12. Science Teacher Self-Efficacy and Student Achievement: A Quantitative Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Benika J.

    2015-01-01

    A teacher's sense of self-efficacy may have significant influence on the pedagogical decisions in the classroom. An elementary school teacher's sense of self-efficacy in teaching science may negatively influence student achievement in science. Negative beliefs concerning science or the ability to teach and promote student learning in science may…

  13. School Nurses' Perceptions of Self-Efficacy in Providing Diabetes Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Kelly L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure school nurses' perceived self-efficacy in providing diabetes care and education to children and to identify factors that correlate with higher self-efficacy levels in the performance of these tasks. The results of this study revealed that the surveyed school nurses perceived a moderate level of…

  14. Evaluating Corrective Feedback Self-Efficacy Changes among Counselor Educators and Site Supervisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motley, Veronica; Reese, Mary Kate; Campos, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of pretest-posttest scores on the Corrective Feedback Self-Efficacy Instrument (Page & Hulse-Killacky, [Page, B. J., 1999]) following a supervision workshop indicated a significant positive relationship between workshop training and supervisors' feedback self-efficacy in giving corrective feedback. Furthermore, the association…

  15. Predicting Mathematics Achievement by Motivation and Self-Efficacy across Gender and Achievement Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sartawi, AbdelAziz; Alsawaie, Othman N.; Dodeen, Hamzeh; Tibi, Sana; Alghazo, Iman M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which self-efficacy and motivation served as a predictor for mathematics achievement of fifth grade students in United Arab Emirates (UAE) across gender and achievement levels. Self-efficacy was measured by two scales, which differed in levels of specificity--Category Specific and Task Specific. Motivation was…

  16. The Effect of Self-Assessment on EFL Learners' Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baleghizadeh, Sasan; Masoun, Atieh

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the continuous influence of self-assessment on EFL (English as a foreign language) learners' self-efficacy. The participants, divided into an experimental and a control group, were 57 Iranian EFL learners in an English-language institute. The participants' self-efficacy was measured through a questionnaire that…

  17. Teacher Self-Efficacy and Teacher Burnout: A Study of Relations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaalvik, Einar M.; Skaalvik, Sidsel

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was partly to test the factor structure of a recently developed Norwegian scale for measuring teacher self-efficacy and partly to explore relations between teachers' perception of the school context, teacher self-efficacy, collective teacher efficacy, teacher burnout, teacher job satisfaction, and teachers' beliefs that…

  18. Assimilation Attitudes Predict Lower Immigration-Related Self-Efficacy among Israeli Immigrant Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Moshe; Ben-Uri, Ina; Horenczyk, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on self-efficacy among teachers working in culturally diverse educational contexts. We put forward the notion of immigration-related self-efficacy and provide initial support for its relationship with the acculturation attitudes held by immigrant teachers. One hundred thirty-three teachers who immigrated to Israel from the…

  19. Students' Self-Efficacy of Computer through the Use of Cognitive Thinking Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Jaber, Majed; Qutami, Nayfeh

    1998-01-01

    A study of 164 undergraduate students at Sultan Qaboos University investigated self-efficacy of computer skills and cognitive thinking style and found higher self-efficacy scores for students with abstract cognitive thinking style than those with concrete and iconic thinking styles, concluding this might be attributed to higher theoretical…

  20. Preservice Elementary Teachers' Science Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Science Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Deepika; Sadler, Troy D.

    2016-01-01

    Self-efficacy beliefs that relate to teachers' motivation and performance have been an important area of concern for preservice teacher education. Research suggests high-quality science coursework has the potential to shape preservice teachers' science self-efficacy beliefs. However, there are few studies examining the relationship between science…

  1. Cultural Differences in the Understanding of Modelling and Feedback as Sources of Self-Efficacy Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Hyun Seon; Usher, Ellen L.; Butz, Amanda; Bong, Mimi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The potential role of culture in the development and operation of self-efficacy has been acknowledged by researchers. Clearer understanding of this cultural impact will benefit from research that shows how the same efficacy information is evaluated across cultures. Aims: We tested whether two sources of self-efficacy information…

  2. Teacher Self-Efficacy and Classroom Management Styles in Jordanian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Tineh, Abdullah M.; Khasawneh, Samar A.; Khalaileh, Huda A.

    2011-01-01

    Two main purposes guided this study. The first was to identify the degree to which Jordanian teachers practise classroom management styles in their classrooms and their level of teacher self-efficacy. The second purpose was to explore the relationships between classroom management styles and teacher self-efficacy. This study is quantitative in…

  3. Investigation the Relationship among Language Learning Strategies, English Self-Efficacy, and Explicit Strategy Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Pei-Ling; Wang, Ai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the relationship among EFL college learners' language learning strategies, English self-efficacy, and explicit strategy instruction from the perspectives of Social Cognitive Theory. Three constructs, namely language learning strategies, English learning self-efficacy, and explicit strategy instruction, were…

  4. The Relationship between Iranian EFL Learners' Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Use of Vocabulary Learning Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidari, Farrokhlagha; Izadi, Mehri; Ahmadian, Mansooreh Vahed

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between Iranian EFL juniors' self-efficacy beliefs and their employed vocabulary learning strategies. The participants were 50 juniors studying English Translation at University of Sistan & Baluchestan. The self-efficacy and vocabulary learning strategies questionnaires were administered to identify the…

  5. Factors Caribbean Overseas Students Perceive Influence Their Academic Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards-Joseph, Arline; Baker, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated factors that influenced the academic self-efficacy of Caribbean overseas students attending universities in the United States, and the themes that emerged from their perceptions of variables impacting their academic self-efficacy. Seven major themes (educational background, faith in God, finances, age and maturity,…

  6. Tobacco Control Policy Advocacy Attitudes and Self-Efficacy among Ethnically Diverse High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Amelie G.; Velez, Luis F.; Chalela, Patricia; Grussendorf, Jeannie; McAlister, Alfred L.

    2006-01-01

    This study applied self-efficacy theory to assess empowerment to advocate on behalf of tobacco control policies. The Youth Tobacco Survey with added policy advocacy self-efficacy, attitudes, and outcome expectations scales was given to 9,177 high school students in Texas. Asians showed the lowest prevalence of experimentation and current smoking,…

  7. Relation between Assertiveness, Academic Self-Efficacy, and Psychosocial Adjustment among International Graduate Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poyrazli, Senel; Arbona, Consuelo; Nora, Amaury; McPherson, Robert; Pisecco, Stewart

    2002-01-01

    Rathus Assertiveness Schedule, Academic Self-Efficacy Scale, The Inventory for Student Adjustment Strain, and UCLA Loneliness Scale were used to examine a total of 122 graduate international students. Findings indicate that English proficiency, assertiveness, and academic self-efficacy contributed uniquely to the variance in students' general…

  8. The Self-Efficacy Scale for Preschool Teachers Regarding Asthma Care: Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gau, Bih-Shya; Hung, Chao-Chia

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire that assesses preschool teachers' self-efficacy in providing asthma care. Methods: A total of 407 teachers from 54 preschools in Taiwan participated in the study by completing the asthma management self-efficacy scale. We assessed…

  9. Relationships between Teachers' Creativity Fostering Behaviors and Their Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkal, Nese

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to examine primary and secondary school teachers' creativity fostering behaviors and self-efficacy beliefs according to gender and subject matters taught by teachers and to investigate the relationships between teachers' creativity fostering behaviors and their self-efficacy beliefs. The study was conducted with the…

  10. Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Mental Time Travel Ability: Uncovering a Hidden Relationship in Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eren, Altay

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was threefold: first, it was to explore the profiles of student teachers' mental time travel ability; second, it was to examine the relationship between student teachers' mental time travel ability and self-efficacy beliefs; and third, it was to investigate the role of self-efficacy beliefs in relationship between the past…

  11. Impact of Adolescents' Filial Self-Efficacy on Quality of Family Functioning and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Pastorelli, Concetta; Regalia, Camillo; Scabini, Eugenia; Bandura, Albert

    2005-01-01

    In this prospective study, we tested a structural model in which adolescents' perceived self-efficacy to manage parental relationships affected their satisfaction with family life both directly, and indirectly, through its impact on family practices. Findings based on 380 Italian adolescents showed that perceived filial self-efficacy was linked…

  12. School Psychologists' Sense of Self-Efficacy for Consultation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiney, Meaghan C.; Harris, Abigail; Zusho, Akane; Cancelli, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The Consultation Self-Efficacy Scale (CSES) was developed and validated to assess school psychologists' perceptions of self-efficacy for engaging in school-based consultation. A pilot study with graduate students (N = 92) indicated high internal consistency (a = 0.99) and provided evidence of discriminant validity, as a group with more…

  13. Technical Analysis of Scores on the "Self-Efficacy Self-Report Scale"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erford, Bradley T.; Schein, Hallie; Duncan, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary analysis of reliability and validity of scores on the "Self-Efficacy Self-Report Scale", which was designed to assess general self-efficacy in students aged 10 to 17 years. Confirmatory factor analysis on cross-validated samples was conducted revealing a marginal fit of the data to the 19-item…

  14. Influence of School-Image on Academic Self-Efficacy Belief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gafoor, K. Abdul; Ashraf, P. Muhammed

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the academic self-efficacy and School-Image among higher secondary school students, on a sample of 652 XIth standard students drawn from Kerala, adopting proportionate stratified random sampling. The data was collected using Academic Self-Efficacy Scale and School-Image Scale. Significant difference exist in School-Image of…

  15. Basic Confidence Predictors of Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, Alisa M.; Betz, Nancy E.

    2004-01-01

    The extent to which Basic Confidence Scales predicted career decision-making self-efficacy was studied in a sample of 627 undergraduate students. Six confidence variables accounted for 49% of the variance in career decision-making self-efficacy. Leadership confidence was the most important, but confidence in science, mathematics, writing, using…

  16. Effects of an Intensive Disability-Focused Training Experience on University Faculty Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Christopher; Lombardi, Allison; Seely, John R.; Gerdes, Hilary

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluates the short-term effects of a disability-focused training on the disability-related self-efficacy of university faculty. Three consecutive cohorts of faculty (N = 102) participated in an intensive four-day training institute focused on understanding and supporting university students with disabilities. Self-efficacy for…

  17. Gender, Group Composition, Cooperation, and Self-Efficacy in Computer Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Tor

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study of Norwegian college students that investigated whether gender, group composition, or self-efficacy in computing has any impact on cooperation, giving or getting task-related help, and level of activity in student groups. Results confirms gender differences in self-efficacy in computing. (Author/LRW)

  18. The Differential Antecedents of Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Novice and Experienced Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tschannen-Moran, Megan; Hoy, Anita Woolfolk

    2007-01-01

    Among the sources of teachers' self-efficacy beliefs, mastery experiences are postulated to be the most potent. Thus it seems likely that other sources of self-efficacy would play a larger role early in learning when fewer mastery experiences are available. Among the 255 novice and careers teachers who participated in this study, contextual…

  19. Engineering Self-Efficacy Contributing to the Academic Performance of AMAIUB Engineering Students: A Qualitative Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aleta, Beda T.

    2016-01-01

    This research study aims to determine the factors of engineering skills self- efficacy sources contributing on the academic performance of AMAIUB engineering students. Thus, a better measure of engineering self-efficacy is needed to adequately assess engineering students' beliefs in their capabilities to perform tasks in their engineering…

  20. Relations among Preschool Teachers' Self-Efficacy, Classroom Quality, and Children's Language and Literacy Gains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Ying; Piasta, Shayne B.; Justice, Laura M.; Kaderavek, Joan N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relations among preschool teachers' self-efficacy (n = 67), classroom quality (instructional and emotional support), and children's (n = 328) gains in print awareness and vocabulary knowledge over an academic year in the US. Results indicated that teachers' self-efficacy and classroom quality served as significant and…

  1. Abstinence Self-Efficacy and Abstinence 1 Year After Substance Use Disorder Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilgen, Mark; McKellar, John; Tiet, Quyen

    2005-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between abstinence self-efficacy and treatment outcomes in substance use disorder patients, experts in the field need more information about the levels of abstinence self-efficacy most predictive of treatment outcomes. Participants (N = 2,967) from 15 residential substance use disorder treatment programs were…

  2. Developing Teaching Self-Efficacy in Research Institutions: A Study of Award-Winning Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, David B.; Usher, Ellen L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the sources of award-wining research professors' (six women; six men) teaching self-efficacy through the framework of Bandura's (1986) social cognitive theory. Semi-structured interviews revealed that mastery experiences and social persuasions were particularly influential sources of self-efficacy and that…

  3. Mastery of Negative Affect: A Hierarchical Model of Emotional Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Di Giunta, Laura; Pastorelli, Concetta; Eisenberg, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Building on previous studies that formulated measures for assessing self-efficacy beliefs regarding the management of anger/irritation and despondency/sadness, we developed 3 new scales to assess perceived self-efficacy in managing fear, shame/embarrassment, and guilt. In Study 1, the internal and construct validity of the 5 aforementioned…

  4. The Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Student Physician Assistant Clinical Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Opacic, Deborah A.

    2003-01-01

    Multivariate analysis of data from measures of self-efficacy, values, outcomes expectation, health care experience, and grade point average for 300 physician assistant students revealed that self-efficacy is a significant predictor of clinical performance. The importance of considering noncognitive variables in addition to academic ones was…

  5. Social Support, Infant Temperament, and Parenting Self-Efficacy: A Mediational Model of Postpartum Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutrona, Carolyn E.; Troutman, Beth R.

    1986-01-01

    Infant temperamental difficulty was strongly related to mothers' level of postpartum depression, both directly and through the mediation of parenting self-efficacy. Social support appeared to function protectively against depression, primarily through self-efficacy. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed. (Author/RH)

  6. Agricultural Education Perceived Teacher Self-Efficacy: A Descriptive Study of Beginning Agricultural Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kattlyn J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe beginning agriculture teachers' perceived agricultural education teacher self-efficacy. Additionally, the researcher sought to describe the relationship among teachers' demographic characteristics and their agricultural education teacher self-efficacy. An instrument specific to agricultural education was…

  7. Investigating the Impact of Snacks on Secondary School Students' Science Learning and Science Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Reco T.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of Snacks on secondary school students' science learning and science self-efficacy. This study also explored the relationship between teacher science self-efficacy and confidence. The study utilized thirteen (13) teachers participating in an inquiry science professional development that…

  8. Predicting End-of-Semester Interest and Self-Efficacy from Course and Professor Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riconscente, Michelle M.; Seli, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Prior research has shown that both self-efficacy and interest are related to important academic processes outcomes such as use of deep strategies, persistence, attention, and achievement. However, little research has examined whether course and professor characteristics are predictive of undergraduates' self-efficacy and interest. The present…

  9. Influences of Mentor Support on Beginning Special Education Teachers' Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paresa, Dawn Eiko

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to determine the influences of mentor support on the self-efficacy of beginning special education teachers (BSET). Research on induction has been limited in the focus of specific mentoring dynamics such as the development of self-efficacy that can benefit its participants. Two research questions guided…

  10. Human Patient Simulations: Evaluation of Self-Efficacy and Anxiety in Clinical Skills Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onovo, Grace N.

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between self-efficacy (self-confidence) and anxiety levels, and the use of Human Patient Simulations (HPS) as a teaching-learning strategy, has not been sufficiently studied in the area of clinical nursing education. Despite the evidence in the literature indicating that HPS increases self-efficacy/self-confidence and decreases…

  11. The Sources of Science Teaching Self-Efficacy among Elementary School Teachers: A Mediational Model Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Ya-Ling; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Wei, Shih-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the factors accounting for science teaching self-efficacy and to examine the relationships among Taiwanese teachers' science teaching self-efficacy, teaching and learning conceptions, technological--pedagogical content knowledge for the Internet (TPACK-I), and attitudes toward Internet-based instruction (Attitudes)…

  12. Adolescents' Self-Efficacy to Overcome Barriers to Physical Activity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, John J. M.; Chulak, Tala; Maitland, Scott; Allison, Kenneth R.; Lysy, Daria C.; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Sheeshka, Judy

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a revised measure of self-efficacy to overcome barriers to moderate and vigorous physical activity in a sample of 484 high school students in Toronto, Ontario. The students had a mean age of 15.3 years. Principal axis factoring with oblique rotation yielded five factors: self-efficacy to overcome internal, harassment, physical…

  13. The Effects of Student Verbal and Nonverbal Responsiveness on Teacher Self-Efficacy and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mottet, Timothy P.; Beebe, Steven A.; Raffeld, Paul C.; Medlock, Amanda L.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of student verbal and nonverbal responsiveness on teacher self-efficacy and job satisfaction. Over a quarter (26%) of the total variance in teacher self-efficacy and over half (53%) of the total variance in teacher job satisfaction were attributable to student verbal and nonverbal…

  14. The Relationship of Academic Self-Efficacy to Class Participation and Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galyon, Charles E.; Blondin, Carolyn A.; Yaw, Jared S.; Nalls, Meagan L.; Williams, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of academic self-efficacy to engagement in class discussion and performance on major course exams among students (N = 165) in an undergraduate human development course. Cluster analysis was used to identify three levels of academic self-efficacy: high (n = 34), medium (n = 91), and low (n = 40). Results…

  15. Using Asynchronous AV Communication Tools to Increase Academic Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girasoli, Anthony J.; Hannafin, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Technology-enhanced learning environments (TELEs) deliver instructional content and provide an array of scaffolding features designed to support independent student learning. TELEs also support teacher efforts to guide student inquiry within these sometimes complex environments. Self-efficacy, defined by Bandura [Bandura, A. (1994). Self-efficacy.…

  16. TPACK Competencies and Technology Integration Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keser, Hafize; Karaoglan Yilmaz, Fatma Gizem; Yilmaz, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) competency of pre-service teachers with their self-efficacy perception towards technology integration, based on various variables; and the correlation between their TPACK competencies and self-efficacy perceptions towards technology integration were examined. The study…

  17. Writing Self-Efficacy of International Students Learning Turkish as a Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahin, Munir; Genc, Bilal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate writing self-efficacy of international students majoring at Inonu University. Ninety-three participants were from seventeen countries and at the time of the study they had completed a one year Turkish language course before proceeding with their majors. In order to measure the writing self-efficacy of…

  18. Effects of School-Wide Positive Behavior Support on Teacher Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelm, Joanna L.; McIntosh, Kent

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between implementation of a school-wide approach to behavior, School-wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS), and teacher self-efficacy. Twenty-two teachers from schools implementing SWPBS and 40 teachers from schools not implementing SWPBS completed a questionnaire measuring aspects of self-efficacy.…

  19. Sources of Self-Efficacy: An Investigation of Elementary School Students in France

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joet, Gwenaelle; Usher, Ellen L.; Bressoux, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of Bandura's (1997) theorized sources of self-efficacy on the academic and self-regulatory efficacy beliefs of 3rd-grade elementary school students (N = 395) in France, to examine whether classroom context might explain a significant portion of the variation in self-efficacy, and to assess…

  20. Leadership Attributes Valence in Self-Concept and Occupational Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schyns, Birgit; Sczesny, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between leadership-relevant attributes and occupational self-efficacy in management students. It is assumed that leadership-relevant attributes are related to high self-efficacy beliefs. Design/methodology/approach: In the present study management students from three different…

  1. Effects of Parental Job Insecurity and Parenting Behaviors on Youth's Self-Efficacy and Work Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Vivien K. G.; Loo, Geok Leng

    2003-01-01

    Structural equation modeling results from data on 178 undergraduates and their parents in Singapore indicated that paternal job insecurity was associated positively and maternal job insecurity negatively with authoritarian parenting. Mothers' authoritarian parenting was related to young adults' self-efficacy. Self-efficacy was positively…

  2. A Qualitative Exploration of Higher Self-Efficacy String Students Preparing for a Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jennifer Cahill

    2013-01-01

    This study examined and qualitatively described the music practice behaviors, strategies, and thoughts of four high school string students who indicated a high string playing self-efficacy. Concepts of practice, motivation, achievement, and self-efficacy were linked together to analyze tendencies and summarize strategies. These students were…

  3. Take the First Heuristic, Self-Efficacy, and Decision-Making in Sport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepler, Teri J.; Feltz, Deborah L.

    2012-01-01

    Can taking the first (TTF) option in decision-making lead to the best decisions in sports contexts? And, is one's decision-making self-efficacy in that context linked to TTF decisions? The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the TTF heuristic and self-efficacy in decision-making on a simulated sports task. Undergraduate and graduate…

  4. Mathematics Self-Efficacy and Mistake-Handling Learning as Predictors of Mathematics Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksu, Zeki; Ozkaya, Merve; Gedik, Solmaz Damla; Konyalioglu, Alper Cihan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to analyze the relationship between secondary school seventh grade students' perception of mathematical self-efficacy, mistake-handling learning awareness, and mathematical anxiety; and to define the power of mistake-handling learning and self-efficacy in predicting mathematical anxiety. In this study, relational model was used and…

  5. Analysis of Mathematics Teachers' Self-Efficacy Levels Concerning the Teaching Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ünsal, Serkan; Korkmaz, Fahrettin; Perçin, Safiye

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify mathematics teachers' opinions on the teaching process self-efficacy levels; and to examine mathematics teachers' teaching process self-efficacy beliefs with regards to specific variables. The study was conducted in Turkey during the second term of the 2015-2016 academic year. The study sample consisted of…

  6. Motives of Cheating among Secondary Students: The Role of Self-Efficacy and Peer Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nora, Wong Lok Yan; Zhang, Kaili Chen

    2010-01-01

    A survey research study was conducted with a sample of 100 secondary students from a local secondary school about the motives of cheating. The primary focus of this study was the interplay among variables of self-efficacy, peer influence and cheating. The results showed that students with low self-efficacy were more likely to cheat than those who…

  7. The Relationships between University Students' Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety, Attitudes, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurbanoglu, N. Izzet; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationships between chemistry laboratory anxiety, chemistry attitudes, and self-efficacy. Participants were 395 university students. Participants completed the Chemistry Laboratory Anxiety Scale, the Chemistry Attitudes Scale, and the Self-efficacy Scale. Results showed that chemistry laboratory anxiety…

  8. The Effects of Exercise Advertising on Self-efficacy and Decisional Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Tanya R.; Howe, Bruce L.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effects of exercise advertising on self-efficacy and decisional balance for changing exercise behavior. Methods: One hundred seventy-four university students (females = 108; males = 66) watched a video that contained health, appearance, or control advertising and completed stage of change, exercise self-efficacy, and…

  9. Developing and Validating a New Instrument to Measure the Self-Efficacy of Elementary Mathematics Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Jennifer Richardson

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the development and validation of an instrument to measure the self-efficacy of elementary mathematics teachers. Self-efficacy, as defined by Bandura, was the theoretical framework for the development of the instrument. The complex belief systems of mathematics teachers, as touted by Ernest (1989) provided insight…

  10. The Effects of Extensive Reading and Reading Strategies on Reading Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Lance

    2012-01-01

    This study is a quasi-experimental, longitudinal investigation into the role that extensive reading and reading strategies play in the cultivation of reading self-efficacy. Conducted over the course of one academic year, how changes in reading self-efficacy translate into changes in reading comprehension was examined. In addition, the…

  11. Role Ambiguity and Self-Efficacy: The Moderating Effects of Goal Orientation and Procedural Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Andrew; Bagger, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated variables that moderated the relationship between role ambiguity and self-efficacy. Results of a field study found support for the moderating role of learning goal orientation, such that the relationship between role ambiguity and self-efficacy was weaker when learning goal orientation was high. In addition, we found…

  12. The Relationship among Iranian EFL Learners' Self-Efficacy, Autonomy and Listening Comprehension Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabrizi, Haleh Mojarrabi; Saeidi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interrelationships among EFL learners' self-efficacy, autonomy and listening comprehension ability. Ninety female learners of intermediate level participated in the study. They were between 16 and 24 years old. In order to obtain the required data on the three variables (i.e., self-efficacy, autonomy, and listening…

  13. Academic Support Services and Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy in Student Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary N.; Jasinski, Dale; Dunn, Steve; Fletcher, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between evaluations of academic support services and student athletes' career decision-making self-efficacy. One hundred and fifty-eight NCAA athletes (68% male) from 11 Division I teams completed measures of satisfaction with their academic support services, career decision-making self-efficacy, general…

  14. The Design of Inclusive Education Courses and the Self-Efficacy of Preservice Teacher Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancaster, Julie; Bain, Alan

    2007-01-01

    This study examines whether participation in a 13-week undergraduate inclusive education course covaried with an improvement in the self-efficacy of preservice elementary education teachers. We sought to determine whether self-efficacy was influenced differentially by the type of field-based placement experienced by students in the course. The…

  15. Changes in Self-Efficacy of Prospective Special and General Education Teachers: Implication for Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyser, Yona; Zeiger, Tali; Romi, Shlomo

    2011-01-01

    The impact of three variables on the self-efficacy of 992 general and special education preservice teachers was examined. These variables were years of preservice education, experience with children with special educational needs, and training in inclusion or exceptional education. All participants responded to a teacher self-efficacy scale that…

  16. Dimensions of Teacher Self-Efficacy for Inclusive Practices among Mainland Chinese Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinen, Olli-Pekka; Savolainen, Hannu; Xu, Jiacheng

    2013-01-01

    Five hundred fifty mainland Chinese university students were given a questionnaire that contained a Teacher Efficacy for Inclusive Practices (TEIP) scale. The purpose of the study was a) to test the factor structure of teacher self-efficacy for inclusive practices, b) to investigate the relationship between teacher self-efficacy for inclusive…

  17. Interaction between Task Values and Self-Efficacy on Maladaptive Achievement Strategy Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jeesoo; Bong, Mimi; Kim, Sung-il

    2014-01-01

    We tested the interaction between task value and self-efficacy on defensive pessimism, academic cheating, procrastination and self-handicapping among 574 Korean 11th graders in the context of English as a foreign language. We hypothesised that perceiving high value in tasks or domains for which self-efficacy was low would pose a threat to…

  18. Buffering or Strengthening: The Moderating Effect of Self-Efficacy on Stressor-Strain Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Dong

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the moderating effect of self-efficacy on stressor-strain relationship among 30 telephone interviewers in an academic survey research center. Participants filled out measures of the Skills Confidence Inventory and the Scale of Perceived Social Self-Efficacy. They reported their state anxiety and recorded the number of…

  19. Internet Self-Efficacy Preferences of Internet Based Environments and Achievement of Prospective Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozyalcin Oskay, Ozge

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study are to determine prospective chemistry teachers' internet self-efficacy and preferences of constructivist internet-assisted environments and to examine the relationship between their internet self-efficacy and their preferences for constructivist internet-assisted environments, the relationship between their achievement in…

  20. Exploring Prospective EFL Teachers' Perceived Self-Efficacy and Beliefs on English Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genç, Gülten; Kulusakli, Emine; Aydin, Savas

    2016-01-01

    Learners' perceived self-efficacy and beliefs on English language learning are important in education. Taking into consideration the important impact of individual variables on language learning, this study seeks to highlight the relationship between Turkish EFL learners' beliefs about language learning and their sense of self-efficacy. The…

  1. The Relationship among Self-Concept, Self-Efficacy, and Performance in Mathematics during Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietsch, James; Walker, Richard; Chapman, Elaine

    2003-01-01

    Examines the relationship among self-concept, self-efficacy, and performance in mathematics among 416 high school students. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the existence of two self-concept components--a competency component and an affective component. Self-efficacy items and the competency items of self-concept also loaded on a single…

  2. Factors Affecting Self-Esteem and Self-Efficacy in the Unemployed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddy, Luther M., III

    2013-01-01

    Unemployment is, and will likely continue to be, a problem in industrialized nations. Numerous studies have concluded unemployment negatively impacts self-esteem and self-efficacy. Additional studies have shown that unemployed individuals with lower self-esteem and self-efficacy tend to remain unemployed longer than individuals with higher…

  3. Empirical Properties of a Scale to Assess Writing Self-Efficacy in School Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pajares, Frank

    2007-01-01

    The psychometric properties of a scale assessing the writing self-efficacy of 1,258 students from Grades 4 to 11 were analyzed with exploratory factor analysis. Two factors emerged, 1 designating basic grammar skills and 1 designating more advanced composition skills. The Writing Self-Efficacy Scale (F. Pajares & G. Valiante, 1999) functioned…

  4. Exploring Gender Differences on General and Specific Computer Self-Efficacy in Mobile Learning Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bao, Yukun; Xiong, Tao; Hu, Zhongyi; Kibelloh, Mboni

    2013-01-01

    Reasons for contradictory findings regarding the gender moderate effect on computer self-efficacy in the adoption of e-learning/mobile learning are limited. Recognizing the multilevel nature of the computer self-efficacy (CSE), this study attempts to explore gender differences in the adoption of mobile learning, by extending the Technology…

  5. Sources of self-efficacy in an undergraduate introductory astronomy course for non-science majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Brooke L.

    The role of the astronomy laboratory on non-science major student self-efficacy is investigated through combining quantitative and qualitative methodologies. The Astronomy Diagnostic Test 2.0 is distributed to an introductory astronomy laboratory for non-science major class in the Spring of 2005. The ADT 2.0 is used to draw comparisons between interview subjects and the remaining class. Eight subjects were interviewed three times throughout the semester in order to determine the important contributing factors to the subjects' self-efficacy beliefs. Results of the quantitative data suggest that the interview participants' general science self-efficacy did not significantly increase over the course of the semester. Results of the quantitative data suggest the most important contributor to the subjects' self-efficacy in the laboratory is verbal persuasion. The results of this limited study suggest that the astronomy laboratory experience is a strong contributor to student self-efficacy beliefs.

  6. Preliminary Investigation of the Sources of Self-Efficacy Among Teachers of Students with Autism

    PubMed Central

    Ruble, Lisa A.; Usher, Ellen L.; McGrew, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Teacher self-efficacy refers to the beliefs teachers hold regarding their capability to bring about desired instructional outcomes and may be helpful for understanding and addressing critical issues such as teacher attrition and teacher use of research-supported practices. Educating students with autism likely presents teachers with some of the most significant instructional challenges. The self-efficacy of 35 special education teachers of students with autism between the ages of 3 to 9 years was evaluated. Teachers completed rating scales that represented self-efficacy and aspects of the following 3 of Bandura’s 4 sources of self-efficacy: (1) sense of mastery, (2) social persuasions, and (3) physiological/affective states. Significant associations were observed between physiological/affective states and self-efficacy, but no associations were observed for the other sources. PMID:21691453

  7. Reliability and Validity of the Self Efficacy Expectations and Outcome Expectations After ICD Implantation Scales

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Cynthia M.; Johnston, Sandra K.; Thompson, Elaine Adams

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and validity characteristics of two new scales that measure self-efficacy expectations (SE-ICD) and outcome expectations (OE-ICD) in survivors (n=168) of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), all of whom received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Cronbach's alpha reliability demonstrated good internal consistency (SE-ICD α = 0.93 and OE-ICD α = 0.81). Correlations with other self-efficacy instruments (general self-efficacy and social self-efficacy) were consistently high. The instruments were responsive to change across time with effect sizes of 0.46 for SE-ICD, and 0.26 for OE-ICD. These reliable, valid, and responsive instruments for measurement of self-efficacy expectations and outcome expectations after an ICD can be used in research and clinical settings. PMID:17693214

  8. Path analysis examining self-efficacy and decision-making performance on a simulated baseball task.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Teri J; Feltz, Deborah L

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between decision-making self-efficacy and decision-making performance in sport. Undergraduate students (N = 78) performzed 10 trials of a decision-making task in baseball. Self-efficacy was measured before performing each trial. Decision-making performance was assessed by decision speed and decision accuracy. Path analyses examined the relationships between self-efficacy, residualized past performance, and current performance. The results indicated that self-efficacy was a significant and consistent predictor of decision speed (eight of nine trials), but not decision accuracy (four of nine trials). It was also found that experience does not have a meaningful effect on the relationship between self-efficacy and decision-making performance in sport.

  9. Hope and Abstinence Self-Efficacy: Positive Predictors of Negative Affect in Substance Abuse Recovery.

    PubMed

    May, Emily M; Hunter, Bronwyn A; Ferrari, Joseph; Noel, Nicole; Jason, Leonard A

    2015-08-01

    Goal-oriented thinking, including hope and self-efficacy, might play a constructive and integral role in the substance abuse recovery process, although such an effect may differ by race. The current study investigated hope and self-efficacy, specifically abstinence self-efficacy, as predictors of negative affect (i.e. depression and anxiety) in a longitudinal sample of men and women in substance abuse recovery who lived in sober living homes. We found hope agency and self-efficacy were related but not identical constructs; hope agency and self-efficacy predicted depressive and anxiety symptoms for individuals in recovery, yet these relationships were moderated by race. Theoretical and clinical implications for promoting positive affect among individuals in substance abuse recovery are discussed.

  10. Hope and Abstinence Self-Efficacy: Positive Predictors of Negative Affect in Substance Abuse Recovery

    PubMed Central

    May, Emily M.; Hunter, Bronwyn A.; Ferrari, Joseph; Noel, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Goal-oriented thinking, including hope and self-efficacy, might play a constructive and integral role in the substance abuse recovery process, although such an effect may differ by race. The current study investigated hope and self-efficacy, specifically abstinence self-efficacy, as predictors of negative affect (i.e. depression and anxiety) in a longitudinal sample of men and women in substance abuse recovery who lived in sober living homes. We found hope agency and self-efficacy were related but not identical constructs; hope agency and self-efficacy predicted depressive and anxiety symptoms for individuals in recovery, yet these relationships were moderated by race. Theoretical and clinical implications for promoting positive affect among individuals in substance abuse recovery are discussed. PMID:25990539

  11. [Coping with chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Silke

    2014-03-26

    Patients suffering form chronic diseases have to deal with several problems, the illness itself only being one of them. Health care providers have to undergo a paradigm shift to be able to meet the new challenges which differ from those in acute care. From the patient's perspective, coping with a chronic disease is not a limited process, but encompasses different, often recurring phases (trajectory model). The treating physician's support may comprise the offering of information on general and specific stress factors (physical, emotional, social), empathy, respecting the individual's expertise and activating a patient's resources and self-efficacy. The amount of support given is limited by the treating physician's expert knowledge in this area. Physicians should respect their own limits and involve specialists, supervision or Balint groups.

  12. The Mediating Role of Coping Style in the Relationship between Psychological Capital and Burnout among Chinese Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yongqing; Yang, Yanjie; Yang, Xiuxian; Zhang, Tiehui; Qiu, Xiaohui; He, Xin; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Lin; Sui, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Burnout is recognized as an occupational hazard, and nursing has a high risk of burnout. This study aims to explore the relationship between psychological capital (PsyCap) and burnout among Chinese nurses and the mediating role of coping style in this relationship. Methods A total of 1,496 nurses (effective response rate: 80.11%) from two large general hospitals in Daqing City of China were selected as participants. Data were collected via the Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMBI), the psychological capital questionnaire (PCQ-24), the Chinese Trait Coping Style Questionnaire (TCSQ) and demographic and caregiver-patient relationship. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were performed to explore the mediating role of positive coping and negative coping, and we used the Bootstrap method to confirm the mediating effect. Results Self-efficacy, hope, resilience and optimism of nurses were all negatively related with emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment among Chinese nurses. Positive coping partially mediated the relationship between hope/optimism and emotional exhaustion and between self-efficacy/optimism and reduced personal accomplishment. Negative coping fully mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and emotional exhaustion, and in the regression model self-efficacy was positively correlated with emotional exhaustion. And negative coping also partially mediated the relationship between hope/optimism and emotional exhaustion and between optimism and depersonalization. Conclusion PsyCap had effects on burnout and coping style was a mediator in this relationship among Chinese nurses. Nurses who had a strong sense of self-efficacy adopted more negative coping style, which in turn would lead to higher levels of emotional exhaustion. These findings shed light on the influence of negative coping on burnout, and positive coping was a positive resource for fighting against nurses’ burnout. Hence, in order to

  13. The Combined Effects of Classroom Teaching and Learning Strategy Use on Students' Chemistry Self-Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Derek

    2015-02-01

    For students to be successful in school chemistry, a strong sense of self-efficacy is essential. Chemistry self-efficacy can be defined as students' beliefs about the extent to which they are capable of performing specific chemistry tasks. According to Bandura (Psychol. Rev. 84:191-215, 1977), students acquire information about their level of self-efficacy from four sources: performance accomplishments, vicarious experiences, verbal persuasion, and physiological states. No published studies have investigated how instructional strategies in chemistry lessons can provide students with positive experiences with these four sources of self-efficacy information and how the instructional strategies promote students' chemistry self-efficacy. In this study, questionnaire items were constructed to measure student perceptions about instructional strategies, termed efficacy-enhancing teaching, which can provide positive experiences with the four sources of self-efficacy information. Structural equation modeling was then applied to test a hypothesized mediation model, positing that efficacy-enhancing teaching positively affects students' chemistry self-efficacy through their use of deep learning strategies such as metacognitive control strategies. A total of 590 chemistry students at nine secondary schools in Hong Kong participated in the survey. The mediation model provided a good fit to the student data. Efficacy-enhancing teaching had a direct effect on students' chemistry self-efficacy. Efficacy-enhancing teaching also directly affected students' use of deep learning strategies, which in turn affected students' chemistry self-efficacy. The implications of these findings for developing secondary school students' chemistry self-efficacy are discussed.

  14. Development and initial validation of a survey to assess students' self-efficacy in medical school.

    PubMed

    Artino, Anthony R; Dong, Ting; DeZee, Kent J; Gilliland, William R; Waechter, Donna M; Cruess, David F; Durning, Steven J

    2012-09-01

    Self-efficacy is a personal belief in one's capability to successfully execute the behaviors necessary to attain designated types of performances. Sometimes described as task-specific self-confidence, self-efficacy is a key component in many contemporary theories of motivation and learning. The purpose of this study was to develop a survey for measuring students' medical skills self-efficacy and to collect reliability and validity evidence for the instrument. A secondary purpose was to explore differences in students' self-efficacy from year 1 of medical school to year 4. We created 19 survey items based on the 6 core competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, and we collected data from 304 medical students. Results from an exploratory factor analysis suggested three interpretable factors: patient care self-efficacy (eight items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.92), interpersonal skills self-efficacy (three items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.76), and evidence-based medicine self-efficacy (three items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.79). We then compared students' self-efficacy at different stages of training using a one-way multivariate analysis of variance. Consistent with our expectations, we found several statistically significant differences, suggesting students' self-efficacy increased considerably from year 1 of medical school to year 4, F(9, 725) = 30.58, p < 0.001, Wilks' lambda = 0.46. Using this survey, medical educators and researchers have a psychometrically sound tool for measuring students' medical skills self-efficacy during undergraduate medical education. Practical implications and future directions are discussed.

  15. Development and initial validation of a survey to assess students' self-efficacy in medical school.

    PubMed

    Artino, Anthony R; Dong, Ting; DeZee, Kent J; Gilliland, William R; Waechter, Donna M; Cruess, David F; Durning, Steven J

    2012-09-01

    Self-efficacy is a personal belief in one's capability to successfully execute the behaviors necessary to attain designated types of performances. Sometimes described as task-specific self-confidence, self-efficacy is a key component in many contemporary theories of motivation and learning. The purpose of this study was to develop a survey for measuring students' medical skills self-efficacy and to collect reliability and validity evidence for the instrument. A secondary purpose was to explore differences in students' self-efficacy from year 1 of medical school to year 4. We created 19 survey items based on the 6 core competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, and we collected data from 304 medical students. Results from an exploratory factor analysis suggested three interpretable factors: patient care self-efficacy (eight items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.92), interpersonal skills self-efficacy (three items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.76), and evidence-based medicine self-efficacy (three items, Cronbach's alpha = 0.79). We then compared students' self-efficacy at different stages of training using a one-way multivariate analysis of variance. Consistent with our expectations, we found several statistically significant differences, suggesting students' self-efficacy increased considerably from year 1 of medical school to year 4, F(9, 725) = 30.58, p < 0.001, Wilks' lambda = 0.46. Using this survey, medical educators and researchers have a psychometrically sound tool for measuring students' medical skills self-efficacy during undergraduate medical education. Practical implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:23029858

  16. Predicting Fear of Breast Cancer Recurrence and Self-Efficacy in Survivors by Age at Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ziner, Kim Wagler; Sledge, George W.; Bell, Cynthia J.; Johns, Shelley; Miller, Kathy D.; Champion, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To determine the effect that age at diagnosis has on fear of breast cancer recurrence and to identify the predictors of fear of recurrence using self-efficacy as a mediator. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Two university cancer centers and one cooperative group in the midwestern United States. Sample 1,128 long-term survivors. Methods Survivors were eligible if they were aged 18–45 years (younger group) or 55–70 years (older group) at cancer diagnosis, had received chemotherapy, and were three to eight years postdiagnosis. Fear of recurrence was compared between younger and older groups. Multiple regression analyses were used to test variables’ prediction of fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, as well as breast cancer survivor self-efficacy mediation effects. Main Research Variables Fear of recurrence, breast cancer survivor self-efficacy, and age at diagnosis. Findings Survivors diagnosed at a younger age had significantly higher fear of recurrence, as well as health, role, womanhood, death, and parenting worries. Perceived risk of recurrence, trait anxiety, and breast cancer reminders explained significant variance in fear of recurrence and breast cancer survivor self-efficacy. Breast cancer survivor self-efficacy partially mediated the effects of variables on fear of recurrence. Conclusions The findings suggest that breast cancer survivor self-efficacy may have a protective effect for survivors who are younger at diagnosis and have higher perceived risk of recurrence, higher trait anxiety, and more breast cancer reminders. Oncology nurses already use the skills required to support self-efficacy. Additional research is needed to define and test breast cancer survivor self-efficacy interventions. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses are in a key role to assess fear of recurrence and provide self-efficacy interventions to reduce it in breast cancer survivors. Strategies to efficiently address fear of

  17. Goal orientation and self-efficacy in relation to memory in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Erin C; West, Robin L

    2011-07-01

    The achievement goal framework (Dweck, 1986, American Psychologist, 41, 1040) has been well-established in children and college-students, but has rarely been examined empirically with older adults. The current study, including younger and older adults, examined the effects of memory self-efficacy, learning goals (focusing on skill mastery over time) and performance goals (focusing on performance outcome evaluations) on memory performance. Questionnaires measured memory self-efficacy and general orientation toward learning and performance goals; free and cued recall was assessed in a subsequent telephone interview. As expected, age was negatively related and education was positively related to memory self-efficacy, and memory self-efficacy was positively related to memory, in a structural equation model. Age was also negatively related to memory performance. Results supported the positive impact of learning goals and the negative impact of performance goals on memory self-efficacy. There was no significant direct effect of learning or performance goals on memory performance; their impact occurred via their effect on memory self-efficacy. The present study supports past research suggesting that learning goals are beneficial, and performance goals are maladaptive, for self-efficacy and learning, and validates the achievement goal framework in a sample including older adults. PMID:21728891

  18. Impact of Physical Activity Intervention Programs on Self-Efficacy in Youths: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cataldo, Rosa; John, Janice; Chandran, Latha; Pati, Susmita; Shroyer, A. Laurie W.

    2013-01-01

    Lack of physical activity has contributed to the nation's childhood obesity crisis, but the impact of physical activity on self-efficacy as a mediator of behavior change has not been examined. This systematic review (SR) describes the published evidence related to the impact of physical activity intervention programs on self-efficacy among youths. From January 2000 to June 2011, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) standards were used to identify publications from PubMed, PsychInfo, Web of Knowledge, and the Cochran Database of Systematic Reviews. The Cochrane Population, Intervention, Control, Outcome, Study Design (PICOS) approach guided this SR articles selection and evaluation process. Of the 102 publications screened, 10 original studies matched the SR inclusion criteria. The types of physical activity interventions and self-efficacy assessments for these 10 studies were diverse. Of the 10 included articles, 6 articles identified an improvement in post-self-efficacy assessments compared to baseline and 4 showed no effect. In conclusion, physical activity intervention programs may improve self-efficacy in youths. A standardized approach to classify and measure self-efficacy is required. Further research is needed to quantify the association of self-efficacy ratings after completing physical activity interventions with objective health improvements, such as weight loss. PMID:24555151

  19. Predictors of self-efficacy in women on long-term sick leave.

    PubMed

    Andersén, Åsa; Larsson, Kjerstin; Lytsy, Per; Kristiansson, Per; Anderzén, Ingrid

    2015-12-01

    Self-efficacy has been shown to be related to sick leave and to be a predictor of return to work after sickness absence. The aim of this study was to investigate whether factors related to sick leave predict self-efficacy in women on long-term sick leave because of pain and/or mental illness. This cross-sectional study uses baseline data from 337 Swedish women with pain and/or mental illness. All included women took part in vocational rehabilitation. Data were collected through a sick leave register and a baseline questionnaire. General self-efficacy, sociodemographics, self-rated health, anxiety, depression, view of the future, and social support were measured and analyzed by univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses. The full multivariate linear regression model, which included mental health factors together with all measured factors, showed that anxiety and depression were the only predictive factors of lower self-efficacy (adjusted R2=0.46, P<0.001) and explained 46% of the variance in self-efficacy. The mean scores of general self-efficacy were low, especially in women born abroad, those with low motivation, those with uncertainties about returning to work, and women reporting distrust. Anxiety and depression are important factors to consider when targeting self-efficacy in vocational rehabilitation.

  20. Increased perceived self-efficacy facilitates the extinction of fear in healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Zlomuzica, Armin; Preusser, Friederike; Schneider, Silvia; Margraf, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Self-efficacy has been proposed as an important element of a successful cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT). Positive changes in perceived self-efficacy have been linked to an improved adaptive emotional and behavioral responding in the context of anxiety-provoking situations. Furthermore, a positive influence of increased self-efficacy on cognitive functions has been confirmed. The present study examined the effect of verbal persuasion on perceived self-efficacy and fear extinction. Healthy participants were subjected to a standardized differential fear conditioning paradigm. After fear acquisition, half of the participants received a verbal persuasion aimed at increasing perceived self-efficacy. The extinction of fear was assessed immediately thereafter on both the implicit and explicit level. Our results suggest that an increased perceived self-efficacy was associated with enhanced extinction, evidenced on the psychophysiological level and accompanied by more pronounced decrements in conditioned negative valence. Changes in extinction were not due to a decrease in overall emotional reactivity to conditioned stimuli (CS). In addition, debriefing participants about the false positive feedback did not affect the processing of already extinguished conditioned responses during a subsequent continued extinction phase. Our results suggest that positive changes in perceived self-efficacy can be beneficial for emotional learning. Findings are discussed with respect to strategies aimed at increasing extinction learning in the course of exposure-based treatments. PMID:26528152