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Sample records for poplar populus leaves

  1. Response to drought and salt stress in leaves of poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa): expression profiling by oligonucleotide microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seo-Kyung; Park, Eung-Jun; Choi, Young-Im; Bae, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Joon-Hyeok; Park, So-Young; Kang, Kyu-Suk; Lee, Hyoshin

    2014-11-01

    Drought and salt stresses are major environmental constraints on forest productivity. To identify genes responsible for stress tolerance, we conducted a genome-wide analysis in poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) leaves exposed to drought and salt (NaCl) stresses. We investigated gene expression at the mRNA level using oligonucleotide microarrays containing 44,718 genes from Populus trichocarpa. A total of 1604 and 1042 genes were up-regulated (≥2-fold; P value < 0.05) by drought and salt stresses, respectively, and 765 genes were up-regulated by both stresses. In addition, 2742 and 1685 genes were down-regulated by drought and salt stresses, respectively, and 1564 genes were down-regulated by both stresses. The large number of genes regulated by both stresses suggests that crosstalk occurs between the drought and salt stress responses. Most up-regulated genes were involved in functions such as subcellular localization, signal transduction, metabolism, and transcription. Among the up-regulated genes, we identified 47 signaling proteins, 65 transcription factors, and 43 abiotic stress-related genes. Several genes were modulated by only one of the two stresses. About 25% of the genes significantly regulated by these stresses are of unknown function, suggesting that poplar may provide an opportunity to discover novel stress-related genes.

  2. Changes in sulphur metabolism of grey poplar (Populus x canescens) leaves during salt stress: a metabolic link to photorespiration.

    PubMed

    Herschbach, Cornelia; Teuber, Markus; Eiblmeier, Monika; Ehlting, Barbara; Ache, Peter; Polle, Andrea; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2010-09-01

    The poplar hybrid Populus x canescens (syn. Populus tremula x Populus alba) was subjected to salt stress by applying 75 mM NaCl for 2 weeks in hydroponic cultures. Decreasing maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm) indicated damage of photosystem II (PS II), which was more pronounced under nitrate compared with ammonium nutrition. In vivo staining with diaminobenzidine showed no accumulation of H(2)O(2) in the leaf lamina; moreover, staining intensity even decreased. But at the leaf margins, development of necrotic tissue was associated with a strong accumulation of H(2)O(2). Glutathione (GSH) contents increased in response to NaCl stress in leaves but not in roots, the primary site of salt exposure. The increasing leaf GSH concentrations correlated with stress-induced decreases in transpiration and net CO(2) assimilation rates at light saturation. Enhanced rates of photorespiration could also be involved in preventing reactive oxygen species formation in chloroplasts and, thus, in protecting PS II from damage. Accumulation of Gly and Ser in leaves indeed indicates increasing rates of photorespiration. Since Ser and Gly are both immediate precursors of GSH that can limit GSH synthesis, it is concluded that the salt-induced accumulation of leaf GSH results from enhanced photorespiration and is thus probably restricted to the cytosol.

  3. Transcriptome profiles of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa × deltoides) reveal rapid changes in undamaged, systemic sink leaves after simulated feeding by forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria).

    PubMed

    Philippe, Ryan N; Ralph, Steven G; Mansfield, Shawn D; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2010-11-01

    Poplar has been established as a model tree system for genomic research of the response to biotic stresses. This study describes a series of induced transcriptome changes and the associated physiological characterization of local and systemic responses in hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa × deltoides) after simulated herbivory. • Responses were measured in local source (LSo), systemic source (SSo), and systemic sink (SSi) leaves following application of forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria) oral secretions to mechanically wounded leaves. • Transcriptome analyses identified spatially and temporally dynamic, distinct patterns of local and systemic gene expression in LSo, SSo and SSi leaves. Galactinol synthase was strongly and rapidly upregulated in SSi leaves. Genome analyses and full-length cDNA cloning established an inventory of poplar galactinol synthases. Induced changes of galactinol and raffinose oligosaccharides were detected by anion-exchange high-pressure liquid chromatography. • The LSo leaves showed a rapid and strong transcriptome response compared with a weaker and slower response in adjacent SSo leaves. Surprisingly, the transcriptome response in distant, juvenile SSi leaves was faster and stronger than that observed in SSo leaves. Systemic transcriptome changes of SSi leaves have signatures of rapid change of metabolism and signaling, followed by later induction of defense genes.

  4. The relationship between isoprene emission rate and dark respiration rate in white poplar (Populus alba L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Loreto, Francesco; Centritto, Mauro; Barta, Csengele; Calfapietra, Carlo; Fares, Silvano; Monson, Russell K

    2007-05-01

    In past studies, it was hypothesized that reductions in chloroplast isoprene emissions at high atmospheric CO(2) concentrations were caused by competition between cytosolic and mitochondrial processes for the same substrate, possibly phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). We conducted field and laboratory experiments using leaves of white poplar (Populus alba L.) to identify whether an inverse relationship occurs between the dark respiration rate (a mitochondrial process) and the isoprene emission rate. Field experiments that were carried out in a free-air CO(2)-enriched (FACE) facility showed no clear effect of elevated CO(2) on either isoprene emission rate or respiration rate by leaves. In young, not yet fully expanded leaves, low isoprene emission and high dark respiration rates were measured in both ambient and elevated CO(2). In these leaves, isoprene emission was inversely correlated with dark respiration. It is possible to interpret from these results that, in young leaves, high rates of growth respiration compete with isoprene biosynthesis for the same substrate. However, it is also possible that the negative correlation reflects the contrasting reductions in growth respiration and increases in expression of the enzyme isoprene synthase at this final stage of leaf maturation. In contrast to our observations on young leaves, respiration rate and isoprene emission rate were positively correlated in older, fully expanded leaves (8 and 11 from apex). A positive correlation was also found between respiration rate and isoprene emission rate when these parameters were modulated using different ozone exposure, growth light intensity, growth temperature and exposure to different leaf temperatures in laboratory experiments. These data show that competition for substrate between isoprene biosynthesis and leaf respiration does not determine the rate of isoprene emission in most circumstances that affect both processes. A negative correlation was observed across all experiments

  5. Mercury uptake into poplar leaves.

    PubMed

    Assad, Mohamad; Parelle, Julien; Cazaux, David; Gimbert, Frédéric; Chalot, Michel; Tatin-Froux, Fabienne

    2016-03-01

    Tailings dumps require mercury stabilization to prevent air pollution by evaporated mercury, which can be achieved through plant covers. Plants are considered a net sink for atmospheric Hg via incorporation into leaf tissues. However, most studies related to Hg uptake by plants have considered plants exposed to only atmospheric Hg, whereas in the case of tailings dumps, plants are potentially exposed to both soil and atmospheric Hg. The goal of this work is to evaluate the relative contributions of root and atmospheric pathways by growing poplar (Populus trichocarpa X Populus maximowiczii/var Skado) cuttings on either control or polluted substrates and under either natural or controlled exposure conditions. We showed that foliar Hg concentrations significantly increased with age, reaching 120 ng g(-1) dry mass when poplars were exposed to Hg-contaminated substrate under natural exposure. Remarkably, we did not observe significantly different Hg concentrations in poplar leaves grown on either the control or polluted substrates when cultivated together in growth chambers. Our set of data prompted us to conclude that Hg entry into poplar leaves is exclusively through an atmospheric pathway. Our results are discussed in line with existing literature.

  6. Gaseous NO2 effects on stomatal behavior, photosynthesis and respiration of hybrid poplar leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, we used poplar as a model plant and investigated the effects of gaseous nitrogen dioxide (NO2, 4 microliter per liter) on stomatal conductance, photosynthesis, dark- and photorespiration of Populus alba x Populus berolinensis hybrid leaves using the photosynthesis system and scanning...

  7. Biochemical and physiological studies on the effects of senescence leaves of Populus deltoides on Triticum vulgare.

    PubMed

    Khaket, Tejinder Pal; Kumar, Viney; Singh, Jasbir; Dhanda, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Triticum vulgare (Wheat) based products are the major dietary source of food in developing countries. In India, it grows in association with boundary plantations of Populus deltoids (poplar). During winter, poplar enters in dormancy which cause a heavy leaf fall at the time of wheat seed germination. Large number of poplar senescence leaves may adversely affect the wheat. Therefore, the present study was performed to examine the effect of senescence poplar leaves on wheat germ and some other biochemical parameters. Seed's germination rate was determined by measuring root and shoot lengths, percent germination, germination index, and inhibition percentage. Biochemical parameters, namely, pigment, carbohydrate, protein, and phenol content, were estimated. Activities of catalase and polyphenol oxidase which are stress marker enzymes were also measured. Results revealed that germination and other biochemical parameters of wheat were severely affected by senescence poplar leaves even at very low concentration. So, intercropping of poplar along with wheat may be chosen carefully as wheat is the major dietary staple.

  8. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera).

    PubMed

    Olson, Matthew S; Robertson, Amanda L; Takebayashi, Naoki; Silim, Salim; Schroeder, William R; Tiffin, Peter

    2010-04-01

    *Current perceptions that poplars have high levels of nucleotide variation, large effective population sizes, and rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium are based primarily on studies from one poplar species, Populus tremula. *We analysed 590 gene fragments (average length 565 bp) from each of 15 individuals from different populations from throughout the range of Populus balsamifera. *Nucleotide diversity (theta(total) = 0.0028, pi = 0.0027) was low compared with other trees and model agricultural systems. Patterns of nucleotide diversity and site frequency spectra were consistent with purifying selection on replacement and intron sites. When averaged across all loci we found no evidence for decay of linkage disequilibrium across 750 bp, consistent with the low estimates of the scaled recombination parameter, rho = 0.0092. *Compared with P. tremula, a well studied congener with a similar distribution, P. balsamifera has low diversity and low effective recombination, both of which indicate a lower effective population size in P. balsamifera. Patterns of diversity and linkage indicate that there is considerable variation in population genomic patterns among poplar species and unlike P. tremula, association mapping techniques in balsam poplar should consider sampling single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at well-spaced intervals.

  9. Barcoding poplars (Populus L.) from western China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianju; Jiang, Dechun; Shang, Huiying; Dong, Miao; Wang, Gaini; He, Xinyu; Zhao, Changming; Mao, Kangshan

    2013-01-01

    Populus is an ecologically and economically important genus of trees, but distinguishing between wild species is relatively difficult due to extensive interspecific hybridization and introgression, and the high level of intraspecific morphological variation. The DNA barcoding approach is a potential solution to this problem. Here, we tested the discrimination power of five chloroplast barcodes and one nuclear barcode (ITS) among 95 trees that represent 21 Populus species from western China. Among all single barcode candidates, the discrimination power is highest for the nuclear ITS, progressively lower for chloroplast barcodes matK (M), trnG-psbK (G) and psbK-psbI (P), and trnH-psbA (H) and rbcL (R); the discrimination efficiency of the nuclear ITS (I) is also higher than any two-, three-, or even the five-locus combination of chloroplast barcodes. Among the five combinations of a single chloroplast barcode plus the nuclear ITS, H+I and P+I differentiated the highest and lowest portion of species, respectively. The highest discrimination rate for the barcodes or barcode combinations examined here is 55.0% (H+I), and usually discrimination failures occurred among species from sympatric or parapatric areas. In this case study, we showed that when discriminating Populus species from western China, the nuclear ITS region represents a more promising barcode than any maternally inherited chloroplast region or combination of chloroplast regions. Meanwhile, combining the ITS region with chloroplast regions may improve the barcoding success rate and assist in detecting recent interspecific hybridizations. Failure to discriminate among several groups of Populus species from sympatric or parapatric areas may have been the result of incomplete lineage sorting, frequent interspecific hybridizations and introgressions. We agree with a previous proposal for constructing a tiered barcoding system in plants, especially for taxonomic groups that have complex evolutionary histories

  10. Carbon balance in leaves of young poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Mayrhofer, S; Heizmann, U; Magel, E; Eiblmeier, M; Müller, A; Rennenberg, H; Hampp, R; Schnitzler, J-P; Kreuzwieser, J

    2004-11-01

    In the present study, important components of carbon metabolism of mature leaves of young poplar trees (Populus x canescens) were determined. Carbohydrate concentrations in leaves and xylem sap were quantified at five different times during the day and compared with photosynthetic gas exchange measurements (net assimilation, transpiration and rates of isoprene emission). Continuously measured xylem sap flow rates, with a time resolution of 15 min, were used to calculate diurnal balances of carbon metabolism of whole mature poplar leaves on different days. Loss of photosynthetically fixed carbon by isoprene emission and dark respiration amounted to 1% and 20%. The most abundant soluble carbohydrates in leaves and xylem sap were glucose, fructose and sucrose, with amounts of approx. 2 to 12 mmol m(-2) leaf area in leaves and about 0.2 to 15 mM in xylem sap. Clear diurnal patterns of carbohydrate concentration in xylem sap and leaves, however, were not observed. Calculations of the carbon transport rates in the xylem to the leaves were based on carbohydrate concentrations in xylem sap and xylem sap flow rates. This carbon delivery amounted to about 3 micromol C m(-2) s(-1) during the day and approx. 1 micromol C m(-2) s(-1) at night. The data demonstrated that between 9 and 28 % of total carbon delivered to poplar leaves during 24 h resulted from xylem transport and, hence, provide a strong indication for a significant rate of carbon cycling within young trees.

  11. Interaction of nitrogen nutrition and salinity in Grey poplar (Populus tremula x alba).

    PubMed

    Ehlting, B; Dluzniewska, P; Dietrich, H; Selle, A; Teuber, M; Hänsch, R; Nehls, U; Polle, A; Schnitzler, J-P; Rennenberg, H; Gessler, A

    2007-07-01

    Salinity represents an increasing environmental problem in managed ecosystems. Populus spp. is widely used for wood production by short-rotation forestry in fertilized plantations and can be grown on saline soil. Because N fertilization plays an important role in salt tolerance, we analysed Grey poplar (Populus tremula x alba, syn. Populus canescens) grown with either 1 mM nitrate or ammonium subjected to moderate 75 mM NaCl. The impact of N nutrition on amelioration of salt tolerance was analysed on different levels of N metabolism such as N uptake, assimilation and N (total N, proteins and amino compounds) accumulation. Na concentration increased in all tissues over time of salt exposure. The N nutrition-dependent effects of salt exposure were more intensive in roots than in leaves. Application of salt reduced root increment as well as stem height increase and, at the same time, increased the concentration of total amino compounds more intensively in roots of ammonium-fed plants. In leaves, salt treatment increased concentrations of total N more intensively in nitrate-fed plants and concentrations of amino compounds independently of N nutrition. The major changes in N metabolism of Grey poplar exposed to moderate salt concentrations were detected in the significant increase of amino acid concentrations. The present results indicate that N metabolism of Grey poplar exposed to salt performed better when the plants were fed with nitrate instead of ammonium as sole N source. Therefore, nitrate fertilization of poplar plantations grown on saline soil should be preferred.

  12. [Morphological analysis of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the PnEXPA3 gene of black poplar (Populus nigra)].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Safiullina, M G; Kniazev, A V; Chemeris, A V

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the PnEXPA3 gene of black poplar (Populus nigra), which encodes alpha-expansin, were obtained. The transgenic plants were characterized by increased size of epidermic and mesophyll cells of leaves. However, the size of leaves remained normal. Overexpression of the PnEXPA3 gene provided stimulatory effect only on the stem length. Other morphological traits of the transgenic plants remained unchanged.

  13. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of desert poplar (Populus euphratica).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun-jie; Gao, Li-zhi

    2016-01-01

    The complete chloroplast sequence of the desert poplar (Populus euphratica), a plant well-adapted to salt stress, was determined in this study. The genome consists of 156,766 bp containing a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 16,591 bp separated by a large single-copy region and a small single-copy region of 84,888 bp and 27,646 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome contains 130 known genes, including 89 protein-coding genes, 8 ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 tRNA genes; 18 of these are located in the inverted repeat region.

  14. White poplar (Populus alba) as a biomonitor of trace elements in contaminated riparian forests.

    PubMed

    Madejón, Paula; Marañón, Teodoro; Murillo, José M; Robinson, Brett

    2004-11-01

    Trees can be used to monitor the level of pollution of trace elements in the soil and atmosphere. In this paper, we surveyed the content of eight trace elements (As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in leaves and stems of white poplar (Populus alba) trees. We selected 25 trees in the riparian forest of the Guadiamar River (S. Spain), one year after this area was contaminated by a mine spill, and 10 trees in non-affected sites. The spill-affected soils had significantly higher levels of available cadmium (mean of 1.25 mg kg(-1)), zinc (117 mg kg(-1)), lead (63.3 mg kg(-1)), copper (58.0 mg kg(-1)) and arsenic (1.70 mg kg(-1)), than non-affected sites. The concentration of trace element in poplar leaves was positively and significantly correlated with the soil availability for cadmium and zinc, and to a lesser extent for arsenic (log-log relationship). Thus, poplar leaves could be used as biomonitors for soil pollution of Cd and Zn, and moderately for As.

  15. Efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of commercial hybrid poplar Populus nigra L. x P. maximowiczii A. Henry.

    PubMed

    Yevtushenko, Dmytro P; Misra, Santosh

    2010-03-01

    Many economically important species of Populus, especially those in sections Aigeiros and Tacamahaca, remain recalcitrant to genetic transformation. In this study, a simple and reliable protocol was developed for the efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of a difficult-to-transform, but commercially viable, hybrid poplar Populus nigra L. x P. maximowiczii A. Henry (NM6). A plant transformation vector designed to express the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) gene was used to detect transformation events at early stages of plant regeneration and to optimize parameters affecting poplar transformation. The use of zeatin riboside in shoot-induction medium, regeneration of shoots via indirect organogenesis, and early selection pressure were the major modifications that drastically improved the efficiency of poplar transformation and minimized the number of untransformed regenerants. Transgenic shoots were routinely obtained 4-10 weeks after co-culture with A. tumefaciens, with a greater than 90% rate of plant recovery. Stable transgene integration, ranging from a single insertion to ten copies per genome, was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. The mean transformation frequency was 36.3% and about two-thirds of the lines had 1-2 transgene copies. Among the explants, petioles and leaves had a higher transformation frequency than did stem segments. Growth characteristics and the morphology of transgenic poplar plants were identical to untransformed controls. These findings will accelerate the development of P. nigra x P. maximowiczii plants with novel traits, and may also be useful to improve transformation procedures for other Populus species.

  16. Water stress induces changes in polyphenol profile and antioxidant capacity in poplar plants (Populus spp.).

    PubMed

    Popović, B M; Štajner, D; Ždero-Pavlović, R; Tumbas-Šaponjac, V; Čanadanović-Brunet, J; Orlović, S

    2016-08-01

    This paper is aimed to characterize young poplar plants under the influence of water stress provoked by polyethileneglycol 6000 (PEG 6000). Three polar genotypes (M1, B229, and PE19/66) were grown in hydroponics and subjected to 100 and 200 mOsm PEG 6000 during six days. Polyphenol characterization, two enzymatic markers and antioxidant capacity in leaves and roots were investigated in stressed plants. Total phenol content, ferric reducing antioxidant capacity (FRAP) and DPPH antiradical power (DPPH ARP) were determined for estimating total antioxidant capacity. Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) were determined as enzymatic markers. Polyphenol characterization of poplar samples was performed by HPLC-PDA analysis. All results were subjected to correlation analysis and principal component analysis (PCA). Inspite of the decrease of total phenol content in investigated genotypes, as well as total antioxidant capacity, some of polyphenols were affected by stress like flavonoids chrysin, myricetine, kaempferol and isoferulic acid in roots of B229 genotype (Populus deltoides). Genotype B229 also showed the increase of antioxidant capacity and PAL activity in root and leaves under stress what could be the indicator of the adaptability of poplar plants to water stress. Significant positive correlations were obtained between PAL, antioxidant capacity as well as phenolic acids among themselves. Chemometric evaluation showed close interdependence between flavonoids, FRAP, DPPH antiradical power and both investigated enzymes of polyphenol metabolism, PAL and PPO.

  17. Boron accumulation and toxicity in hybrid poplar (Populus nigra × euramericana).

    PubMed

    Rees, Rainer; Robinson, Brett H; Menon, Manoj; Lehmann, Eberhard; Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S; Schulin, Rainer

    2011-12-15

    Poplars accumulate high B concentrations and are thus used for the phytomanagement of B contaminated soils. Here, we performed pot experiments in which Populus nigra × euramericana were grown on a substrate with B concentrations ranging from 13 to 280 mg kg(-1) as H(3)BO(3). Salix viminalis, Brassica juncea, and Lupinus albus were grown under some growing conditions for comparison. Poplar growth was unaffected at soil B treatment levels up to 93 mg kg(-1). Growth was progressively reduced at levels of 168 and 280 mg kg(-1). None of the other species survived at these substrate B levels. At leaf B concentrations <900 mg kg(-1) only <10% of the poplar leaf area showed signs of toxicity. Neutron radiography revealed that chlorotic leaf tissues had B concentrations of 1000-2000 mg kg(-1), while necrotic tissues had >2000 mg kg(-1). Average B concentrations of up to 3500 mg kg(-1) were found in leaves, while spots within leaves had concentrations >7000 mg kg(-1), showing that B accumulation in leaf tissue continued even after the onset of necrosis. The B accumulation ability of P. nigra × euramericana is associated with B hypertolerance in the living tissue and storage of B in dead leaf tissue.

  18. Early root development of poplars ( Populus spp.) in relation to moist and saturated soil conditions

    Treesearch

    Rebecka Mc Carthy; Magnus Löf; Emile S. Gardiner

    2017-01-01

    Poplars (Populus spp.) are among the fastest growing trees raised in temperate regions of the world. Testing of newly developed cultivars informs assessment of potential planting stock for local environments. Initial rooting by nine poplar clones was tested in moist and saturated soil conditions during an 18-day greenhouse experiment. Clones responded differently to...

  19. Morphological and molecular characterization of two Aphelenchoides from poplar leaves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    During a long-term, large network study of the ecology of plant endophytes in native habitats, various nematodes were found. Two poplar species, Populus angustifolia (narrowleaf cottonwood) and P. trichocarpa (black poplar) represent important ecological and genomic models now used in ongoing plant...

  20. Defining hybrid poplar (Populus deltoides x Populus trichocarpa) tolerance to ozone: identifying key parameters.

    PubMed

    Ryan, A; Cojocariu, C; Possell, M; Davies, W J; Hewitt, C N

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether two genotypes of hybrid poplar (Populus deltoides x Populus trichocarpa), previously classified as ozone tolerant and ozone sensitive, had differing physiological and biochemical responses when fumigated with 120 nL L(-1) ozone for 6 h per day for eight consecutive days. Isoprene emission rate, ozone uptake and a number of physiological and biochemical parameters were investigated before, during and after fumigation with ozone. Previous studies have shown that isoprene protects plants against oxidative stress. Therefore, it was hypothesized that these two genotypes would differ in either their basal isoprene emission rates or in the response of isoprene to fumigation by ozone. Our results showed that the basal emission rates of isoprene, physiological responses and ozone uptake rates were all similar. However, significant differences were found in visible damage, carotenoids, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), thiobarbituric acid reactions (TBARS) and post-fumigation isoprene emission rates. It is shown that, although the classification of ozone tolerance or sensitivity had been previously clearly and carefully defined using one particular set of parameters, assessment of other key variables does not necessarily lead to the same conclusions. Thus, it may be necessary to reconsider the way in which plants are classified as ozone tolerant or sensitive.

  1. Nucleotide diversity among natural populations of a North American poplar (Populus balsamifera, Salicaceae).

    PubMed

    Breen, Amy L; Glenn, Elise; Yeager, Adam; Olson, Matthew S

    2009-01-01

    Poplars (Populus spp.) comprise an important component of circumpolar boreal forest ecosystems and are the model species for tree genomics. In this study, we surveyed genetic variation and population differentiation in three nuclear genes among populations of balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) in North America. We examined nucleotide sequence variation in alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3pdh), two well-studied nuclear loci in plants, and abscisic acid insensitivity 1B (ABI1B), a locus coincident with timing of seasonal dormancy in quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies of hybrid poplars. We compared estimates of baseline population genetic parameters for these loci with those obtained in studies of other poplar species, particularly European aspen (Populus tremula). Average pairwise nucleotide diversity (pi(tot) = 0.00216-0.00353) was equivalent to that in Populus trichocarpa, but markedly less than that in P. tremula. Elevated levels of population structure were observed in ABI1B between the northern and southern regions (F(CT) = 0.184, P < 0.001) and among populations (F(ST) = 0.256, P < 0.001). These results suggest that geographic or taxonomic factors are important for understanding patterns of variation throughout the genus Populus. Our findings have the potential to aid in the design of sampling regimes for conservation and breeding stock and contribute to historical inferences regarding the factors that shaped the genetic diversity of boreal plant species.

  2. Physiological and transcriptional regulation in poplar roots and leaves during acclimation to high temperature and drought.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jingbo; Li, Shaojun; Cao, Xu; Li, Hong; Shi, Wenguang; Polle, Andrea; Liu, Tong-Xian; Peng, Changhui; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the physiological and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that underlie the responses of poplars to high temperature (HT) and/or drought in woody plants, we exposed Populus alba × Populus tremula var. glandulosa saplings to ambient temperature (AT) or HT under 80 or 40% field capacities (FC), or no watering. HT increased the foliar total carbon (C) concentrations, and foliar δ(13) C and δ(18) O. HT triggered heat stress signaling via increasing levels of abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in poplar roots and leaves. After perception of HT, poplars initiated osmotic adjustment by increasing foliar sucrose and root galactose levels. In agreement with the HT-induced heat stress and the changes in the levels of ABA and carbohydrates, we detected increased transcript levels of HSP18 and HSP21, as well as NCED3 in the roots and leaves, and the sugar transporter gene STP14 in the roots. Compared with AT, drought induced greater enhancement of foliar δ(13) C and δ(18) O in poplars at HT. Similarly, drought caused greater stimulation of the ABA and foliar glucose levels in poplars at HT than at AT. Correspondingly, desiccation led to greater increases in the mRNA levels of HSP18, HSP21, NCED3, STP14 and INT1 in poplar roots at HT than at AT. These results suggest that HT has detrimental effects on physiological processes and it induces the transcriptional regulation of key genes involved in heat stress responses, ABA biosynthesis and sugar transport and HT can cause greater changes in drought-induced physiological and transcriptional responses in poplar roots and leaves.

  3. Functional Characterization and Subcellular Localization of Poplar (Populus trichocarpa × Populus deltoides) Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase1

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae Kyun; Mah, Nancy; Ellis, Brian E.; Douglas, Carl J.

    2001-01-01

    Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H), a member of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase superfamily, plays a central role in phenylpropanoid metabolism and lignin biosynthesis and possibly anchors a phenylpropanoid enzyme complex to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). A full-length cDNA encoding C4H was isolated from a hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa × P. deltoides) young leaf cDNA library. RNA-blot analysis detected C4H transcripts in all organs tested, but the gene was most highly expressed in developing xylem. C4H expression was also strongly induced by elicitor-treatment in poplar cell cultures. To verify the catalytic activity of the putative C4H cDNA, two constructs, C4H and C4H fused to the FLAG epitope (C4H::FLAG), were expressed in yeast. Immunoblot analysis showed that C4H was present in the microsomal fraction and microsomal preparations from strains expressing both enzymes efficiently converted cinnamic acid to p-coumaric acid with high specific activities. To investigate the subcellular localization of C4H in vivo, a chimeric C4H-green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was engineered and stably expressed in Arabidopsis. Confocal laser microscopy analysis clearly showed that in Arabidopsis the C4H::GFP chimeric enzyme was localized to the ER. When expressed in yeast, the C4H::GFP fusion enzyme was also active but displayed significantly lower specific activity than either C4H or C4H::FLAG in in vitro and in vivo enzyme assays. These data definitively show that C4H is localized to the ER in planta. PMID:11351095

  4. Genetic structure and regulation of isoprene synthase in Poplar (Populus spp.).

    PubMed

    Vickers, Claudia E; Possell, Malcolm; Nicholas Hewitt, C; Mullineaux, Philip M

    2010-07-01

    Isoprene is a volatile 5-carbon hydrocarbon derived from the chloroplastic methylerythritol 2-C-methyl-D: -erythritol 4-phosphate isoprenoid pathway. In plants, isoprene emission is controlled by the enzyme isoprene synthase; however, there is still relatively little known about the genetics and regulation of this enzyme. Isoprene synthase gene structure was analysed in three poplar species. It was found that genes encoding stromal isoprene synthase exist as a small gene family, the members of which encode virtually identical proteins and are differentially regulated. Accumulation of isoprene synthase protein is developmentally regulated, but does not differ between sun and shade leaves and does not increase when heat stress is applied. Our data suggest that, in mature leaves, isoprene emission rates are primarily determined by substrate (dimethylallyl diphosphate, DMADP) availability. In immature leaves, where isoprene synthase levels are variable, emission levels are also influenced by the amount of isoprene synthase protein. No thylakoid isoforms could be identified in Populus alba or in Salix babylonica. Together, these data show that control of isoprene emission at the genetic level is far more complicated than previously assumed.

  5. Sapflow of hybrid poplar (Populus nigra L. x P. maximowiczii A. Henry 'NM6') during phytoremediation of landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Adam H. Wiese; Edmund O. Bauer; Don E. Riemenschneider

    2006-01-01

    Poplars are ideal for phytoremediation because of their high water usage, fast growth, and deep root systems. We measured in 2002 and 2003 the sapflow of hybrid poplars (Populus nigra L. x P. maximowiczii A. Henry 'NM6') planted in 1999 for phytoremediation of a landfill in Rhinelander, WI, USA (45.6?N, 89.4?W).

  6. A Novel Moderate Constitutive Promoter Derived from Poplar (Populus tomentosa Carrière)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhong; Wang, Jia; Ye, Mei-Xia; Li, Hao; Ji, Le-Xiang; Li, Ying; Cui, Dong-Qing; Liu, Jun-Mei; An, Xin-Min

    2013-01-01

    A novel sequence that functions as a promoter element for moderate constitutive expression of transgenes, designated as the PtMCP promoter, was isolated from the woody perennial Populus tomentosa. The PtMCP promoter was fused to the GUS reporter gene to characterize its expression pattern in different species. In stable Arabidopsis transformants, transcripts of the GUS reporter gene could be detected by RT-PCR in the root, stem, leaf, flower and silique. Further histochemical and fluorometric GUS activity assays demonstrated that the promoter could direct transgene expression in all tissues and organs, including roots, stems, rosette leaves, cauline leaves and flowers of seedlings and maturing plants. Its constitutive expression pattern was similar to that of the CaMV35S promoter, but the level of GUS activity was significantly lower than in CaMV35S promoter::GUS plants. We also characterized the promoter through transient expression in transgenic tobacco and observed similar expression patterns. Histochemical GUS staining and quantitative analysis detected GUS activity in all tissues and organs of tobacco, including roots, stems, leaves, flower buds and flowers, but GUS activity in PtMCP promoter::GUS plants was significantly lower than in CaMV35S promoter::GUS plants. Our results suggested that the PtMCP promoter from poplar is a constitutive promoter with moderate activity and that its function is presumably conserved in different species. Therefore, the PtMCP promoter may provide a practical choice to direct moderate level constitutive expression of transgenes and could be a valuable new tool in plant genetic engineering. PMID:23507754

  7. Recent Y chromosome divergence despite ancient origin of dioecy in poplars (Populus).

    PubMed

    Geraldes, A; Hefer, C A; Capron, A; Kolosova, N; Martinez-Nuñez, F; Soolanayakanahally, R Y; Stanton, B; Guy, R D; Mansfield, S D; Douglas, C J; Cronk, Q C B

    2015-07-01

    All species of the genus Populus (poplar, aspen) are dioecious, suggesting an ancient origin of this trait. Despite some empirical counter examples, theory suggests that nonrecombining sex-linked regions should quickly spread, eventually becoming heteromorphic chromosomes. In contrast, we show using whole-genome scans that the sex-associated region in Populus trichocarpa is small and much younger than the age of the genus. This indicates that sex determination is highly labile in poplar, consistent with recent evidence of 'turnover' of sex-determination regions in animals. We performed whole-genome resequencing of 52 P. trichocarpa (black cottonwood) and 34 Populus balsamifera (balsam poplar) individuals of known sex. Genomewide association studies in these unstructured populations identified 650 SNPs significantly associated with sex. We estimate the size of the sex-linked region to be ~100 kbp. All SNPs significantly associated with sex were in strong linkage disequilibrium despite the fact that they were mapped to six different chromosomes (plus 3 unmapped scaffolds) in version 2.2 of the reference genome. We show that this is likely due to genome misassembly. The segregation pattern of sex-associated SNPs revealed this to be an XY sex-determining system. Estimated divergence times of X and Y haplotype sequences (6-7 Ma) are much more recent than the divergence of P. trichocarpa (poplar) and Populus tremuloides (aspen). Consistent with this, in P. tremuloides, we found no XY haplotype divergence within the P. trichocarpa sex-determining region. These two species therefore have a different genomic architecture of sex, suggestive of at least one turnover event in the recent past.

  8. Successful grafting in poplar species (Populus spp.) breeding

    Treesearch

    A. Assibi Mahama; Brian Sparks; Ronald S., Zalesny; Richard B. Hall

    2006-01-01

    Poor rooting of Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh hardwood cuttings often has contributed to delays in breeding progress as a result of failures of scion wood before and/or after pollination. Seventeen clones were used, and the study was conducted in the greenhouse to test an "intervenous feeding" (IV) method, along with three different...

  9. Assessment of mercury content in poplar leaves of Novokuznetsk agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyapina, E. E.; Yusupov, D. V.; Tursunalieva, E. M.; Osipova, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the content of mercury in poplar leaves in the Novokuznetsk industrial agglomeration and along the automobile route Novokuznetsk-Mezhdurechensk is assessed. The geoecological indicators are also calculated.

  10. Impact of ectomycorrhizal colonization and rust infection on the secondary metabolism of poplar (Populus trichocarpa x deltoides).

    PubMed

    Pfabel, Cornelia; Eckhardt, Kai-Uwe; Baum, Christel; Struck, Christine; Frey, Pascal; Weih, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Fungal colonization can significantly affect the secondary metabolism of the host plants. We tested the impact of a common below-ground symbiosis, i.e., ectomycorrhiza formation, on poplar leaf chemical components that are involved in the defence against a common disease, i.e., rust fungi, in N-deficient soil. A rust-susceptible poplar clone (Populus trichocarpa × deltoides 'Beaupré') was (a) non-associated with ectomycorrhizal fungus (EM) Hebeloma mesophaeum (Pers.) Quélet MÜN and non-infected with rust fungus Melampsora larici-populina Kleb. (isolate 98AG31), (b) associated with EM, (c) inoculated with rust fungus and (d) associated with EM and inoculated with rust fungus. Poplar leaves were analysed by photometric and mass spectrometric techniques (liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry (Py-FIMS)). Both rust infection and mycorrhiza formation led to increased proportions of condensed tannins in relation to total phenolics (13% in the control, 18-19% in the fungal treatments). In contrast, salicylic acid concentration (6.8 µg g(-1) in the control) was higher only in the rust treatments (17.9 and 25.4 µg g(-1) with rust infection). The Py-FIMS analysis revealed that the rust-infected treatments were significantly separated from the non-rust-infected treatments on the basis of six flavonoids and one lipid. The relative abundance of these components, which have known functions in plant defence, was decreased after rust infection of non-mycorrhizal plants, but not in mycorrhizal plants. The results indicate that the ectomycorrhizal formation compensated the rust infection by a decrease in the flavonoid syntheses. The study provides new evidence for an interactive response of mycorrhizal colonization and infection with rust fungi in the metabolism of poplar.

  11. In silico identification and characterization of N-Terminal acetyltransferase genes of poplar (Populus trichocarpa).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hang-Yong; Li, Chun-Ming; Wang, Li-Feng; Bai, Hui; Li, Yan-Ping; Yu, Wen-Xi; Xia, De-An; Liu, Chang-Cai

    2014-01-27

    N-terminal acetyltransferase (Nats) complex is responsible for protein N-terminal acetylation (Nα-acetylation), which is one of the most common covalent modifications of eukaryotic proteins. Although genome-wide investigation and characterization of Nat catalytic subunits (CS) and auxiliary subunits (AS) have been conducted in yeast and humans they remain unexplored in plants. Here we report on the identification of eleven genes encoding eleven putative Nat CS polypeptides, and five genes encoding five putative Nat AS polypeptides in Populus. We document that the expansion of Nat CS genes occurs as duplicated blocks distributed across 10 of the 19 poplar chromosomes, likely only as a result of segmental duplication events. Based on phylogenetic analysis, poplar Nat CS were assigned to six subgroups, which corresponded well to the Nat CS types (CS of Nat A-F), being consistent with previous reports in humans and yeast. In silico analysis of microarray data showed that in the process of normal development of the poplar, their Nat CS and AS genes are commonly expressed at one relatively low level but share distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. This exhaustive survey of Nat genes in poplar provides important information to assist future studies on their functional role in poplar.

  12. Expression and molecular evolution of two DREB1 genes in black poplar (Populus nigra).

    PubMed

    Chu, Yanguang; Huang, Qinjun; Zhang, Bingyu; Ding, Changjun; Su, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    Environmental stresses such as low temperature, drought, and high salinity significantly affect plant growth and yield. As selective forces, these adverse factors play essential roles in shaping phenotypic variation in plant populations. Black poplar (Populus nigra) is an economically and ecologically important forest tree species with widely distributed populations and is thus suitable for experiments detecting evolutionary footprints left by stress. Here, we performed expression and evolutionary analysis of two duplicated DREB A1-subgroup (DREB1) genes, PnDREB68 and PnDREB69, encoding transcription factors that are involved in stress responses. The two genes showed partially overlapping but distinct expression patterns in response to stresses. These genes were strongly and rapidly induced by cold stress in leaves, stems, and roots. In leaf tissue, dehydration stress induced the expression of PnDREB68 but not PnDREB69. PnDREB69 displayed more rapid responses and longer expression durations than PnDREB68 under salt and ABA stress, respectively. Based on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, we found significant population genetic differentiation, with a greater FST value (0.09189) for PnDREB69 than for PnDREB68 (0.07743). Nucleotide diversity analysis revealed a two-fold higher πT for PnDREB68 than for PnDREB69 (0.00563 vs. 0.00243), reflecting strong purifying selection acting on the former. The results suggest that positive selection acted on PnDREB69, as evidenced by neutral testing using Tajima's D statistic. The distinct selective forces to which each of the genes was subjected may be associated with expression divergence. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) was low for the sequenced region, with a higher level for PnDREB68 than for PnDREB69. Additionally, analysis of the relationship among carbon isotope ratios, SNP classes and gene expression, together with motif and domain analysis, suggested that 14 polymorphisms within the two genes may be candidates

  13. Isolation and expression analysis of low temperature-induced genes in white poplar (Populus alba).

    PubMed

    Maestrini, Pierluigi; Cavallini, Andrea; Rizzo, Milena; Giordani, Tommaso; Bernardi, Rodolfo; Durante, Mauro; Natali, Lucia

    2009-09-15

    Poplar is an important crop and a model system to understand molecular processes of growth, development and responses to environmental stimuli in trees. In this study, we analyzed gene expression in white poplar (Populus alba) plants subjected to chilling. Two forward suppression-subtractive-hybridization libraries were constructed from P. alba plants exposed to low non-freezing temperature for 6 or 48h. Hundred and sixty-two cDNAs, 54 from the 6-h library and 108 from the 48-h library, were obtained. Isolated genes belonged to six categories of genes, specifically those that: (i) encode stress and defense proteins; (ii) are involved in signal transduction; (iii) are related to regulation of gene expression; (iv) encode proteins involved in cell cycle and DNA processing; (v) encode proteins involved in metabolism and energetic processes; and (vi) are involved in protein fate. Different expression patterns at 3, 6, 12, 24, 48h at 4 degrees C and after a recovery of 24h at 20 degrees C were observed for isolated genes, as expected according to the class in which the gene putatively belongs. Forty-four of 162 genes contained DRE/LTRE cis-elements in the 5' proximal promoter of their orthologs in Populus trichocarpa, suggesting that they putatively belong to the CBF regulon. The results contribute new data to the list of possible candidate genes involved in cold response in poplar.

  14. Effect of sprayer settings on spray drift during pesticide application in poplar plantations (Populus spp.).

    PubMed

    Grella, Marco; Marucco, Paolo; Manzone, Marco; Gallart, Montserrat; Balsari, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed spray drift generated by sprayer settings commonly used for pesticide application in poplar plantations (Populus spp.). Tests were conducted per the ISO 22866 methodology using a mounted air-assisted sprayer (Tifone VRP600) equipped with a swivel-cannon air conveyor (model Cannone 50S). Trials evaluated sprayer settings, combinations of nozzle types, airflow rates, and air direction in both adult and young poplar plantations. Overall, spray drift amounts registered downwind of poplar plantations were less than those obtained to derive reference drift curves during the EU Plant Protection Product registration process that used late-growth-stage fruit crops. In the adult poplar plantation, Venturi nozzles (TVI 8004 red) yielded the highest drift reductions compared to reference sprayer setting, especially at distances farthest from the sprayed area (86% between 40 and 47m). Highest total drift reductions were achieved when conventional nozzles (1.81mm ceramic disc-core) were combined with their spray direction modified for an inclined cannon spray unit. Alternatively, the young poplar plantation showed no drift reduction for distances farthest from the sprayed area, regardless of sprayer settings, which likely resulted from lower foliage density and widely-spaced rows. Yet, both Venturi nozzles combined with high fan flow rates and conventional nozzles combined with reduced fan flow rate showed total spray drift reductions of over 70% within the downwind sampling area. These experimental results represent the first set of data on spray drift amounts in poplar plantations, which is key for defining the reference curves and best practices to reduce spray drift in tall tree plantations.

  15. Chemical responses to modified lignin composition in tension wood of hybrid poplar (Populus tremula x Populus alba).

    PubMed

    Al-Haddad, Jameel M; Kang, Kyu-Young; Mansfield, Shawn D; Telewski, Frank W

    2013-04-01

    The effect of altering the expression level of the F5H gene was investigated in three wood tissues (normal, opposite and tension wood) in 1-year-old hybrid poplar clone 717 (Populus tremula × Populus alba L.), containing the F5H gene under the control of the C4H promoter. Elevated expression of the F5H gene in poplar has been previously reported to increase the percent syringyl content of lignin. The wild-type and three transgenic lines were inclined 45° for 3 months to induce tension wood formation. Tension and opposite wood from inclined trees, along with normal wood from control trees, were analyzed separately for carbohydrates, lignin, cellulose crystallinity and microfibril angle (MFA). In the wild-type poplar, the lignin in tension wood contained a significantly higher percentage of syringyl than normal wood or opposite wood. However, there was no significant difference in the percent syringyl content of the three wood types within each of the transgenic lines. Increasing the F5H gene expression caused an increase in the percent syringyl content and a slight decrease in the total lignin in normal wood. In tension wood, the addition of a gelatinous layer in the fiber walls resulted in a consistently lower percentage of total lignin in the tissue. Acid-soluble lignin was observed to increase by up to 2.3-fold in the transgenic lines. Compared with normal wood and opposite wood, cell wall crystallinity in tension wood was higher and the MFA was smaller, as expected, with no evidence of an effect from modifying the syringyl monomer ratio. Tension wood in all the lines contained consistently higher total sugar and glucose percentages when compared with normal wood within the respective lines. However, both sugar and glucose percentages were lower in the tension wood of transgenic lines when compared with the tension wood of wild-type trees. Evaluating the response of trees with altered syringyl content to gravity will improve our understanding of the changes

  16. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Two Aphelenchoides Endophytic in Poplar Leaves.

    PubMed

    Carta, Lynn K; Li, Shiguang; Skantar, Andrea M; Newcombe, George

    2016-03-01

    During a long-term, large network study of the ecology of plant endophytes in native habitats, various nematodes have been found. Two poplar species, Populus angustifolia (narrowleaf cottonwood) and Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood), are important ecological and genomic models now used in ongoing plant-pathogen-endophyte interaction studies. In this study, two different aphelenchid nematodes within surface-sterilized healthy leaves of these two Populus spp. in northwestern North America were discovered. Nematodes were identified and characterized microscopically and molecularly with 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and 18S rRNA molecular markers. From P. angustifolia, Aphelenchoides saprophilus was inferred to be closest to another population of A. saprophilus among sequenced taxa in the 18S tree. From P. trichocarpa, Laimaphelenchus heidelbergi had a 28S sequence only 1 bp different from that of a Portuguese population, and 1 bp different from the original Australian type population. The 28S and 18S rRNA trees of Aphelenchoides and Laimaphelenchus species indicated L. heidelbergi failed to cluster with three other Laimaphelenchus species, including the type species of the genus. Therefore, we support a conservative definition of the genus Laimaphelenchus, and consider these populations to belong to Aphelenchoides, amended as Aphelenchoides heidelbergi n. comb. This is the first report of these nematode species from within aboveground leaves. The presence of these fungal-feeding nematodes can affect the balance of endophytic fungi, which are important determinants of plant health.

  17. Morphological and Molecular Characterization of Two Aphelenchoides Endophytic in Poplar Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Carta, Lynn K.; Li, Shiguang; Skantar, Andrea M.; Newcombe, George

    2016-01-01

    During a long-term, large network study of the ecology of plant endophytes in native habitats, various nematodes have been found. Two poplar species, Populus angustifolia (narrowleaf cottonwood) and Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood), are important ecological and genomic models now used in ongoing plant–pathogen–endophyte interaction studies. In this study, two different aphelenchid nematodes within surface-sterilized healthy leaves of these two Populus spp. in northwestern North America were discovered. Nematodes were identified and characterized microscopically and molecularly with 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and 18S rRNA molecular markers. From P. angustifolia, Aphelenchoides saprophilus was inferred to be closest to another population of A. saprophilus among sequenced taxa in the 18S tree. From P. trichocarpa, Laimaphelenchus heidelbergi had a 28S sequence only 1 bp different from that of a Portuguese population, and 1 bp different from the original Australian type population. The 28S and 18S rRNA trees of Aphelenchoides and Laimaphelenchus species indicated L. heidelbergi failed to cluster with three other Laimaphelenchus species, including the type species of the genus. Therefore, we support a conservative definition of the genus Laimaphelenchus, and consider these populations to belong to Aphelenchoides, amended as Aphelenchoides heidelbergi n. comb. This is the first report of these nematode species from within aboveground leaves. The presence of these fungal-feeding nematodes can affect the balance of endophytic fungi, which are important determinants of plant health. PMID:27168650

  18. Effects of isoprene production on the photosynthetic performance of Poplars (Populus sp.) under thermal and moisture stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, E. A.; McFarland, E.; Minor, R. L.; Heard, M. M.; Barron-Gafford, G.

    2015-12-01

    Poplars are an important agro-forestry product used for both biofuel and paper production. Importantly, all poplars are not created equal - some have the potential to produce isoprene, a compound thought to aid plants under temperatures and water stress conditions. Isoprene production, then, would be an important feature in a plant's response to projected climatic changes of warmer temperatures and longer inter-storm periods of drought. Our project observed how drought conditions modulated photosynthetic rates in two lineages of Populus trees, those that produce isoprene and those that have had isoprene gene knocked out. We measured leaf-level photosynthesis and thermal sensitivity from the two lineages under high and low soil water conditions in a common garden experiment. We found that both lines had similar photosynthetic rates over the range of temperatures and water exposure levels measured. However, we wondered if some of the variation we found in our data was due to the time of day of the measurements. Subsequent measurements of photosynthetic rates in the morning and afternoon on the same leaves illustrated that poplars reached higher rates of photosynthesis in the morning, but ultimately decreased faster than observed in the afternoon measurements (indicative of an eased thermal sensitivity in the afternoon). Also, we used measures of soil moisture and leaf water potential to determine that the "drought" treatment we had induced didn't actually yield any differences in the moisture status among the trees. Ultimately, our experiment showed that isoprene did not aid in photosynthesis under heat stressed conditions and that the common garden setting was not able to currently induce a water stress condition in the plants. We have begun exploring the use of low-altitude remote sensing by an unmanned aerial vehicles outfitted with thermal and multi-spectral cameras to quantify patterns of transpirational water loss, NDVI, leaf browning due to moisture stress

  19. Feeding on poplar leaves by caterpillars potentiates foliar peroxidase action in their guts and increases plant resistance.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, Raymond; Dukatz, Chris; Holt, Chris; Reese, Austin; Martiskainen, Olli; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Yip, Lynn; Tran, Lan; Constabel, C Peter

    2010-12-01

    Peroxidases (PODs) are believed to act as induced and constitutive defenses in plants against leaf-feeding insects. However, little work has examined the mode of action of PODs against insects. Putative mechanisms include the production of potentially antinutritive and/or toxic semiquinone free radicals and quinones (from the oxidation of phenolics), as well as increased leaf toughness. In this study, transgenic hybrid poplar saplings (Populus tremula × Populus alba) overexpressing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were produced to examine the impact of elevated HRP levels on the performance and gut biochemistry of Lymantria dispar caterpillars. HRP-overexpressing poplars were more resistant to L. dispar than wild-type (WT) poplars when the level of a phenolic substrate of HRP (chlorogenic acid) was increased, but only when leaves had prior feeding damage. Damaged (induced) leaves produced increased amounts of hydrogen peroxide, which was used by HRP to increase the production of semiquinone radicals in the midguts of larvae. The decreased growth rates of larvae that fed on induced HRP-overexpressing poplars resulted from post-ingestive mechanisms, consistent with the action of HRP in their midguts. The toughness of HRP-overexpressing leaves was not significantly greater than that of WT leaves, whether or not they were induced. When leaves were coated with ellagitannins, induced HRP leaves also produced elevated levels of semiquinone radicals in the midgut. Decreased larval performance on induced HRP leaves in this case was due to post-ingestive mechanisms as well as decreased consumption. The results of this study provide the first demonstration that a POD is able to oxidize phenolics within an insect herbivore's gut, and further clarifies the chemical conditions that must be present for PODs to function as antiherbivore defenses.

  20. Genome Sequences of Populus tremula Chloroplast and Mitochondrion: Implications for Holistic Poplar Breeding.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Birgit; Faivre Rampant, Patricia; Mader, Malte; Le Paslier, Marie-Christine; Bounon, Rémi; Berard, Aurélie; Vettori, Cristina; Schroeder, Hilke; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Fladung, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Complete Populus genome sequences are available for the nucleus (P. trichocarpa; section Tacamahaca) and for chloroplasts (seven species), but not for mitochondria. Here, we provide the complete genome sequences of the chloroplast and the mitochondrion for the clones P. tremula W52 and P. tremula x P. alba 717-1B4 (section Populus). The organization of the chloroplast genomes of both Populus clones is described. A phylogenetic tree constructed from all available complete chloroplast DNA sequences of Populus was not congruent with the assignment of the related species to different Populus sections. In total, 3,024 variable nucleotide positions were identified among all compared Populus chloroplast DNA sequences. The 5-prime part of the LSC from trnH to atpA showed the highest frequency of variations. The variable positions included 163 positions with SNPs allowing for differentiating the two clones with P. tremula chloroplast genomes (W52, 717-1B4) from the other seven Populus individuals. These potential P. tremula-specific SNPs were displayed as a whole-plastome barcode on the P. tremula W52 chloroplast DNA sequence. Three of these SNPs and one InDel in the trnH-psbA linker were successfully validated by Sanger sequencing in an extended set of Populus individuals. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of P. tremula is the first in the family of Salicaceae. The mitochondrial genomes of the two clones are 783,442 bp (W52) and 783,513 bp (717-1B4) in size, structurally very similar and organized as single circles. DNA sequence regions with high similarity to the W52 chloroplast sequence account for about 2% of the W52 mitochondrial genome. The mean SNP frequency was found to be nearly six fold higher in the chloroplast than in the mitochondrial genome when comparing 717-1B4 with W52. The availability of the genomic information of all three DNA-containing cell organelles will allow a holistic approach in poplar molecular breeding in the future.

  1. Genome Sequences of Populus tremula Chloroplast and Mitochondrion: Implications for Holistic Poplar Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Malte; Le Paslier, Marie-Christine; Bounon, Rémi; Berard, Aurélie; Vettori, Cristina; Schroeder, Hilke; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Fladung, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Complete Populus genome sequences are available for the nucleus (P. trichocarpa; section Tacamahaca) and for chloroplasts (seven species), but not for mitochondria. Here, we provide the complete genome sequences of the chloroplast and the mitochondrion for the clones P. tremula W52 and P. tremula x P. alba 717-1B4 (section Populus). The organization of the chloroplast genomes of both Populus clones is described. A phylogenetic tree constructed from all available complete chloroplast DNA sequences of Populus was not congruent with the assignment of the related species to different Populus sections. In total, 3,024 variable nucleotide positions were identified among all compared Populus chloroplast DNA sequences. The 5-prime part of the LSC from trnH to atpA showed the highest frequency of variations. The variable positions included 163 positions with SNPs allowing for differentiating the two clones with P. tremula chloroplast genomes (W52, 717-1B4) from the other seven Populus individuals. These potential P. tremula-specific SNPs were displayed as a whole-plastome barcode on the P. tremula W52 chloroplast DNA sequence. Three of these SNPs and one InDel in the trnH-psbA linker were successfully validated by Sanger sequencing in an extended set of Populus individuals. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of P. tremula is the first in the family of Salicaceae. The mitochondrial genomes of the two clones are 783,442 bp (W52) and 783,513 bp (717-1B4) in size, structurally very similar and organized as single circles. DNA sequence regions with high similarity to the W52 chloroplast sequence account for about 2% of the W52 mitochondrial genome. The mean SNP frequency was found to be nearly six fold higher in the chloroplast than in the mitochondrial genome when comparing 717-1B4 with W52. The availability of the genomic information of all three DNA-containing cell organelles will allow a holistic approach in poplar molecular breeding in the future. PMID:26800039

  2. Effect of short-term cadmium stress on Populus nigra L. detached leaves.

    PubMed

    Lomaglio, Tonia; Rocco, Mariapina; Trupiano, Dalila; De Zio, Elena; Grosso, Alessandro; Marra, Mauro; Delfine, Sebastiano; Chiatante, Donato; Morabito, Domenico; Scippa, Gabriella Stefania

    2015-06-15

    Pollution by toxic metals, accumulating into soils as result of human activities, is a worldwide major concern in industrial countries. Plants exhibit different degrees of tolerance to heavy metals, as a consequence of their ability to exclude or accumulate them in particular tissues, organs or sub-cellular compartments. Molecular information about cellular processes affected by heavy metals is still largely incomplete. As a fast-growing, highly tolerant perennial plant species, poplar has become a model for environmental stress response investigations. To study the short-term effects of cadmium accumulation in leaves, we analyzed photosystem II (PSII) quantum yield, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation, hormone levels variation, as well as proteome profile alteration of 50μM CdSO4 vacuum-infiltrated poplar (Populus nigra L.) detached leaves. Cadmium management brought about an early and sustained production of hydrogen peroxide, an increase of abscisic acid, ethylene and gibberellins content, as well as a decrease in cytokinins and auxin levels, whereas photosynthetic electron transport was unaffected. Proteomic analysis revealed that twenty-one proteins were differentially induced in cadmium-treated leaves. Identification of fifteen polypeptides allowed to ascertain that most of them were involved in stress response while the remaining ones were involved in photosynthetic carbon metabolism and energy production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Repeated unidirectional introgression towards Populus balsamifera in contact zones of exotic and native poplars.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stacey Lee; Lamothe, Manuel; Meirmans, Patrick G; Périnet, Pierre; Isabel, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    As the evolutionary significance of hybridization is largely dictated by its extent beyond the first generation, we broadly surveyed patterns of introgression across a sympatric zone of two native poplars (Populus balsamifera, Populus deltoides) in Quebec, Canada within which European exotic Populus nigra and its hybrids have been extensively planted since the 1800s. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that appeared fixed within each species were characterized by DNA-sequencing pools of pure individuals. Thirty-five of these diagnostic SNPs were employed in a high-throughput assay that genotyped 635 trees of different age classes, sampled from 15 sites with various degrees of anthropogenic disturbance. The degree of admixture within sampled trees was then assessed through Bayesian clustering of genotypes. Hybrids were present in seven of the populations, with 2.4% of all sampled trees showing spontaneous admixture. Sites with hybrids were significantly more disturbed than pure stands, while hybrids comprised both immature juveniles and trees of reproductive age. All three possible F1s were detected. Advanced-generation hybrids were consistently biased towards P. balsamifera regardless of whether hybridization had occurred with P. deltoides or P. nigra. Gene exchange between P. deltoides and P. nigra was not detected beyond the F1 generation; however, detection of a trihybrid demonstrates that even this apparent reproductive isolation does not necessarily result in an evolutionary dead end. Collectively, results demonstrate the natural fertility of hybrid poplars and suggest that introduced genes could potentially affect the genetic integrity of native trees, similar to that arising from introgression between natives.

  4. Circadian Rhythms of Isoprene Biosynthesis in Grey Poplar Leaves1

    PubMed Central

    Loivamäki, Maaria; Louis, Sandrine; Cinege, Gyöngyi; Zimmer, Ina; Fischbach, Robert J.; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2007-01-01

    Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) emission varies diurnally in different species. In poplar (Populus spp.), it has recently been shown that the gene encoding the synthesizing enzyme for isoprene, isoprene synthase (ISPS), displays diurnal variation in expression. Working on shoot cultures of Grey poplar (Populus × canescens) placed under a different light regime in phytochambers, we showed that these variations in PcISPS gene expression, measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, are not only due to day-night changes, but also are linked to an internal circadian clock. Measurement of additional selected isoprenoid genes revealed that phytoene synthase (carotenoid pathway) displays similar fluctuations, whereas 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase, possibly the first committed enzyme of the 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate pathway, only shows light regulation. On the protein level, it appeared that PcISPS activity and protein content became reduced under constant darkness, whereas under constant light, activity and protein content of this enzyme were kept high. In contrast, isoprene emission rates under continuous irradiation displayed circadian changes as is the case for gene expression of PcISPS. Furthermore, binding assays with Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) late elongated hypocotyl, a transcription factor of Arabidopsis involved in circadian regulation, clearly revealed the presence of circadian-determining regulatory elements in the promoter region of PcISPS. PMID:17122071

  5. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Plastidic Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Poplar Leaves Emitting and Nonemitting Isoprene1[W

    PubMed Central

    Ghirardo, Andrea; Wright, Louwrance Peter; Bi, Zhen; Rosenkranz, Maaria; Pulido, Pablo; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Niinemets, Ülo; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The plastidic 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway is one of the most important pathways in plants and produces a large variety of essential isoprenoids. Its regulation, however, is still not well understood. Using the stable isotope 13C-labeling technique, we analyzed the carbon fluxes through the MEP pathway and into the major plastidic isoprenoid products in isoprene-emitting and transgenic isoprene-nonemitting (NE) gray poplar (Populus × canescens). We assessed the dependence on temperature, light intensity, and atmospheric [CO2]. Isoprene biosynthesis was by far (99%) the main carbon sink of MEP pathway intermediates in mature gray poplar leaves, and its production required severalfold higher carbon fluxes compared with NE leaves with almost zero isoprene emission. To compensate for the much lower demand for carbon, NE leaves drastically reduced the overall carbon flux within the MEP pathway. Feedback inhibition of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase activity by accumulated plastidic dimethylallyl diphosphate almost completely explained this reduction in carbon flux. Our data demonstrate that short-term biochemical feedback regulation of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase activity by plastidic dimethylallyl diphosphate is an important regulatory mechanism of the MEP pathway. Despite being relieved from the large carbon demand of isoprene biosynthesis, NE plants redirected only approximately 0.5% of this saved carbon toward essential nonvolatile isoprenoids, i.e. β-carotene and lutein, most probably to compensate for the absence of isoprene and its antioxidant properties. PMID:24590857

  6. Sexual dimorphism floral microRNA profiling and target gene expression in andromonoecious poplar (Populus tomentosa).

    PubMed

    Song, Yuepeng; Ma, Kaifeng; Ci, Dong; Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2013-01-01

    Although the molecular basis of poplar sex-specific flower development remains largely unknown, increasing evidence indicates an essential role for microRNAs (miRNAs). The specific miRNA types and precise miRNA expression patterns in dioecious plant flower development remain unclear. Here, we used andromonoecious poplar, an exceptional model system, to eliminate the confounding effects of genetic background of dioecious plants. This system, combined with high-throughput sequencing and computational analysis, allowed us to characterize sex-specific miRNAomes from female and male flowers. Comparative miRNAome analysis combined with quantitative real-time PCR revealed the expression patterns of 27 miRNAs in poplar flower and showed that the targets of these miRNAs are involved in flower organogenesis, Ca(2+) transport, phytohormone synthesis and metabolism, and DNA methylation. This paper describes a complex regulatory network consisting of these miRNAs expressed in sex-specific flower development in a dioecious plant. The conserved and novel miRNA locations were annotated in the Populus trichocarpa genome. Among these, miRNA Pto-F70 and 4 targets are located in the sex-determination regions of chromosome XIX. Furthermore, two novel miRNAs, Pto-F47 and Pto-F68, were shown for the first time to be regulatory factors in phytohormone interactions. To our knowledge, this report is the first systematic investigation of sex-specific flower-related miRNAs and their targets in poplar, and it deepens our understanding of the important regulatory functions of miRNAs in female and male flower development in this dioecious plant.

  7. Sexual Dimorphism Floral MicroRNA Profiling and Target Gene Expression in Andromonoecious Poplar (Populus tomentosa)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuepeng; Ma, Kaifeng; Ci, Dong; Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2013-01-01

    Although the molecular basis of poplar sex-specific flower development remains largely unknown, increasing evidence indicates an essential role for microRNAs (miRNAs). The specific miRNA types and precise miRNA expression patterns in dioecious plant flower development remain unclear. Here, we used andromonoecious poplar, an exceptional model system, to eliminate the confounding effects of genetic background of dioecious plants. This system, combined with high-throughput sequencing and computational analysis, allowed us to characterize sex-specific miRNAomes from female and male flowers. Comparative miRNAome analysis combined with quantitative real-time PCR revealed the expression patterns of 27 miRNAs in poplar flower and showed that the targets of these miRNAs are involved in flower organogenesis, Ca2+ transport, phytohormone synthesis and metabolism, and DNA methylation. This paper describes a complex regulatory network consisting of these miRNAs expressed in sex-specific flower development in a dioecious plant. The conserved and novel miRNA locations were annotated in the Populus trichocarpa genome. Among these, miRNA Pto-F70 and 4 targets are located in the sex-determination regions of chromosome XIX. Furthermore, two novel miRNAs, Pto-F47 and Pto-F68, were shown for the first time to be regulatory factors in phytohormone interactions. To our knowledge, this report is the first systematic investigation of sex-specific flower-related miRNAs and their targets in poplar, and it deepens our understanding of the important regulatory functions of miRNAs in female and male flower development in this dioecious plant. PMID:23667507

  8. Characterization of Dof Transcription Factors and Their Responses to Osmotic Stress in Poplar (Populus trichocarpa).

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Zhao, Shicheng; Gao, Yuchi; Yang, Jingli

    2017-01-01

    The DNA-binding One Zinc Finger (Dof) genes are ubiquitous in many plant species and are especial transcription regulators that participate in plant growth, development and various procedures, including biotic and abiotic stress reactions. In this study, we identified 41 PtrDof members from Populus trichocarpa genomes and classified them into four groups. The conserved motifs and gene structures of some PtrDof genes belonging to the same subgroup were almost the same. The 41 PtrDof genes were dispersed on 18 of the 19 Populus chromosomes. Many key stress- or phytohormone-related cis-elements were discovered in the PtrDof gene promoter regions. Consequently, we undertook expression profiling of the PtrDof genes in leaves and roots in response to osmotic stress and abscisic acid. A total of seven genes (PtrDof14, 16, 25, 27, 28, 37 and 39) in the Populus Dof gene family were consistently upregulated at point in all time in the leaves and roots under osmotic and abscisic acid (ABA) stress. We observed that 12 PtrDof genes could be targeted by 15 miRNAs. Moreover, we mapped the cleavage site in PtrDof30 using the 5'RLM-RACE. The results showed that PtrDofs may have a role in resistance to abiotic stress in Populus trichocarpa.

  9. Characterization of Dof Transcription Factors and Their Responses to Osmotic Stress in Poplar (Populus trichocarpa)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Zhao, Shicheng; Gao, Yuchi; Yang, Jingli

    2017-01-01

    The DNA-binding One Zinc Finger (Dof) genes are ubiquitous in many plant species and are especial transcription regulators that participate in plant growth, development and various procedures, including biotic and abiotic stress reactions. In this study, we identified 41 PtrDof members from Populus trichocarpa genomes and classified them into four groups. The conserved motifs and gene structures of some PtrDof genes belonging to the same subgroup were almost the same. The 41 PtrDof genes were dispersed on 18 of the 19 Populus chromosomes. Many key stress- or phytohormone-related cis-elements were discovered in the PtrDof gene promoter regions. Consequently, we undertook expression profiling of the PtrDof genes in leaves and roots in response to osmotic stress and abscisic acid. A total of seven genes (PtrDof14, 16, 25, 27, 28, 37 and 39) in the Populus Dof gene family were consistently upregulated at point in all time in the leaves and roots under osmotic and abscisic acid (ABA) stress. We observed that 12 PtrDof genes could be targeted by 15 miRNAs. Moreover, we mapped the cleavage site in PtrDof30 using the 5’RLM-RACE. The results showed that PtrDofs may have a role in resistance to abiotic stress in Populus trichocarpa. PMID:28095469

  10. Response of the Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar to Transgenic Poplar, Populus simonii x P. nigra, Expressing Fusion Protein Gene of the Spider Insecticidal Peptide and Bt-toxin C-peptide

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chuan-Wang; Liu, Gui-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ying; Yan, Shan-Chun; Ma, Ling; Yang, Chuan-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The response of the Asian gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) to a fusion gene consisting of the spider, Atrax robustus Simon (Araneae: Hexanthelidae) ω?-ACTX-Ar1 sequence coding for an ω?-atracotoxin and a sequence coding for the Bt-toxin C-peptide, expressed in transgenic poplar Populus simonii x P. nigra L. (Malphigiales: Salicaceae) was investigated. Individual performance, feeding selection, midgut proteinase activity and nutrition utilization were monitored. The growth and development of L. dispar were significantly affected by continually feeding on the transgenic poplar, with the larval instars displaying significantly shorter developmental times than those fed on nontransgenic poplar, but pupation was delayed. Mortality was higher in populations fed transgenic poplar leaves, than for larvae fed nontransgenic poplar leaves. The cumulative mortality during all stages of larvae fed transgenic leaves was 92% compared to 16.7% of larvae on nontransgenic leaves. The highest mortality observed was 71.7% in the last larval instar stage. A two-choice test showed that fifth-instar larvae preferred to feed on nontransgenic leaves at a ratio of 1:1.4. Feeding on transgenic leaves had highly significant negative effects on relative growth of larvae, and the efficiency of conversion of ingested and digested food. Activity of major midgut proteinases was measured using substrates TAME and BTEE showed significant increases in tryptase and chymotrypsinlike activity (9.2- and 9.0-fold, respectively) in fifth-instar larvae fed on transgenic leaves over control. These results suggest transgenic poplar is resistant to L. dispar, and the mature L. dispar may be weakened by the transgenic plants due to Bt protoxins activated by elevated major midgut proteinase activity. The new transgenic poplar expressing fusion protein genes of Bt and a new spider insecticidal peptide are good candidates for managing gypsy moth. PMID:21268699

  11. Response of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar to transgenic poplar, Populus simonii x P. nigra, expressing fusion protein gene of the spider insecticidal peptide and Bt-toxin C-peptide.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chuan-Wang; Liu, Gui-Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ying; Yan, Shan-Chun; Ma, Ling; Yang, Chuan-Ping

    2010-01-01

    The response of the Asian gypsy moth Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) to a fusion gene consisting of the spider, Atrax robustus Simon (Araneae: Hexanthelidae) ω-ACTX-Ar1 sequence coding for an ω-atracotoxin and a sequence coding for the Bt-toxin C-peptide, expressed in transgenic poplar Populus simonii x P. nigra L. (Malphigiales: Salicaceae) was investigated. Individual performance, feeding selection, midgut proteinase activity and nutrition utilization were monitored. The growth and development of L. dispar were significantly affected by continually feeding on the transgenic poplar, with the larval instars displaying significantly shorter developmental times than those fed on nontransgenic poplar, but pupation was delayed. Mortality was higher in populations fed transgenic poplar leaves, than for larvae fed nontransgenic poplar leaves. The cumulative mortality during all stages of larvae fed transgenic leaves was 92% compared to 16.7% of larvae on nontransgenic leaves. The highest mortality observed was 71.7% in the last larval instar stage. A two-choice test showed that fifth-instar larvae preferred to feed on nontransgenic leaves at a ratio of 1:1.4. Feeding on transgenic leaves had highly significant negative effects on relative growth of larvae, and the efficiency of conversion of ingested and digested food. Activity of major midgut proteinases was measured using substrates TAME and BTEE showed significant increases in tryptase and chymotrypsinlike activity (9.2- and 9.0-fold, respectively) in fifth-instar larvae fed on transgenic leaves over control. These results suggest transgenic poplar is resistant to L. dispar, and the mature L. dispar may be weakened by the transgenic plants due to Bt protoxins activated by elevated major midgut proteinase activity. The new transgenic poplar expressing fusion protein genes of Bt and a new spider insecticidal peptide are good candidates for managing gypsy moth.

  12. Lead uptake increases drought tolerance of wild type and transgenic poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba) overexpressing gsh 1.

    PubMed

    Samuilov, Sladjana; Lang, Friedericke; Djukic, Matilda; Djunisijevic-Bojovic, Danijela; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2016-09-01

    Growth and development of plants largely depends on their adaptation ability in a changing climate. This is particularly true on heavy metal contaminated soils, but the interaction of heavy metal stress and climate on plant performance has not been intensively investigated. The aim of the present study was to elucidate if transgenic poplars (Populus tremula x P. alba) with enhanced glutathione content possess an enhanced tolerance to drought and lead (Pb) exposure (single and in combination) and if they are good candidates for phytoremediation of Pb contaminated soil. Lead exposure reduced growth and biomass accumulation only in above-ground tissue of wild type poplar, although most of lead accumulated in the roots. Drought caused a decline of the water content rather than reduced biomass production, while Pb counteracted this decline in the combined exposure. Apparently, metals such as Pb possess a protective function against drought, because they interact with abscisic acid dependent stomatal closure. Lead exposure decreased while drought increased glutathione content in leaves of both plant types. Lead accumulation was higher in the roots of transgenic plants, presumably as a result of chelation by glutathione. Water deprivation enhanced Pb accumulation in the roots, but Pb was subject to leakage out of the roots after re-watering. Transgenic plants showed better adaptation under mild drought plus Pb exposure partially due to improved glutathione synthesis. However, the transgenic plants cannot be considered as a good candidate for phytoremediation of Pb, due to its small translocation to the shoots and its leakage out of the roots upon re-watering.

  13. Differentiation of Populus species using chloroplast single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers--essential for comprehensible and reliable poplar breeding.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, H; Hoeltken, A M; Fladung, M

    2012-03-01

    Within the genus Populus several species belonging to different sections are cross-compatible. Hence, high numbers of interspecies hybrids occur naturally and, additionally, have been artificially produced in huge breeding programmes during the last 100 years. Therefore, determination of a single poplar species, used for the production of 'multi-species hybrids' is often difficult, and represents a great challenge for the use of molecular markers in species identification. Within this study, over 20 chloroplast regions, both intergenic spacers and coding regions, have been tested for their ability to differentiate different poplar species using 23 already published barcoding primer combinations and 17 newly designed primer combinations. About half of the published barcoding primers yielded amplification products, whereas the new primers designed on the basis of the total sequenced cpDNA genome of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray yielded much higher amplification success. Intergenic spacers were found to be more variable than coding regions within the genus Populus. The highest discrimination power of Populus species was found in the combination of two intergenic spacers (trnG-psbK, psbK-psbl) and the coding region rpoC. In barcoding projects, the coding regions matK and rbcL are often recommended, but within the genus Populus they only show moderate variability and are not efficient in species discrimination.

  14. Genome-scale transcriptome analysis of the desert poplar, Populus euphratica.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Qiang; Ma, Tao; Hu, Quanjun; Liu, Bingbing; Wu, Yuxia; Zhou, Haihong; Wang, Qian; Wang, Juan; Liu, Jianquan

    2011-04-01

    Populus euphratica is well-adapted to extreme desert environments and is an important model species for studying the effects of abiotic stresses on trees. Here we present the first deep transcriptomic analysis of this species. To maximize representation of conditional transcripts, mRNA was obtained from living tissues of desert-grown trees and two types of callus (salt-stressed and unstressed). De novo assembly generated 86,777 Unigenes using Solexa sequence data. These sequences covered 92% of previously reported P. euphratica expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and 90% of the TIGR poplar ESTs, and a total of 58,499 high-quality unique sequences were annotated by BLAST similarity searches against public databases. We found that 27% of the total Unigenes were differentially expressed (up- or down-regulated) in response to salt stress in P. euphratica callus. These differentially expressed genes are mainly involved in transport, transcription, cellular communication and metabolism. In addition, we found that numerous putative genes involved in ABA regulation and biosynthesis were also differentially regulated. This study represents the deepest transcriptomic and gene-annotation analysis of P. euphratica to date. The genetic knowledge acquired should be very useful for future studies of the molecular adaptation of this tree species to abiotic stress and facilitate genetic manipulation of other poplar species.

  15. Association genetics of chemical wood properties in black poplar (Populus nigra).

    PubMed

    Guerra, Fernando P; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Mark F; Stanton, Brian J; Neale, David B

    2013-01-01

    Black poplar (Populus nigra) is a potential feedstock for cellulosic ethanol production, although breeding for this specific end use is required. Our goal was to identify associations between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers within candidate genes encoding cellulose and lignin biosynthetic enzymes, with chemical wood property phenotypic traits, toward the aim of developing genomics-based breeding technologies for bioethanol production. Pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry was used to determine contents of five- and six-carbon sugars, lignin, and syringyl : guaiacyl ratio. The association population included 599 clones from 17 half-sib families, which were successfully genotyped using 433 SNPs from 39 candidate genes. Statistical analyses were performed to estimate genetic parameters, linkage disequilibrium (LD), and single marker and haplotype-based associations. A moderate to high heritability was observed for all traits. The LD, across all candidate genes, showed a rapid decay with physical distance. Analysis of single marker-phenotype associations identified six significant marker-trait pairs, whereas nearly 280 haplotypes were associated with phenotypic traits, in both an individual and multiple trait-specific manner. The rapid decay of LD within candidate genes in this population and the genetic associations identified suggest a close relationship between the associated SNPs and the causative polymorphisms underlying the genetic variation of lignocellulosic traits in black poplar.

  16. Local selection across a latitudinal gradient shapes nucleotide diversity in balsam poplar, Populus balsamifera L.

    PubMed

    Keller, Stephen R; Levsen, Nicholas; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Olson, Matthew S; Tiffin, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Molecular studies of adaptive evolution often focus on detecting selective sweeps driven by positive selection on a species-wide scale; however, much adaptation is local, particularly of ecologically important traits. Here, we look for evidence of range-wide and local adaptation at candidate genes for adaptive phenology in balsam poplar, Populus balsamifera, a widespread forest tree whose range extends across environmental gradients of photoperiod and growing season length. We examined nucleotide diversity of 27 poplar homologs of the flowering-time network-a group of genes that control plant developmental phenology through interactions with environmental cues such as photoperiod and temperature. Only one gene, ZTL2, showed evidence of reduced diversity and an excess of fixed replacement sites, consistent with a species-wide selective sweep. Two other genes, LFY and FRI, harbored high levels of nucleotide diversity and exhibited elevated differentiation between northern and southern accessions, suggesting local adaptation along a latitudinal gradient. Interestingly, FRI has also been identified as a target of local selection between northern and southern accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana, indicating that this gene may be commonly involved in ecological adaptation in distantly related species. Our findings suggest an important role for local selection shaping molecular diversity and reveal limitations of inferring molecular adaptation from analyses designed only to detect species-wide selective sweeps.

  17. Rapid phytochemical analysis of birch (Betula) and poplar (Populus) foliage by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Holeski, Liza M; Couture, John J; Gusse, Adam; Undersander, Daniel J; Lindroth, Richard L

    2013-02-01

    Poplar (Populus) and birch (Betula) species are widely distributed throughout the northern hemisphere, where they are foundation species in forest ecosystems and serve as important sources of pulpwood. The ecology of these species is strongly linked to their foliar chemistry, creating demand for a rapid, inexpensive method to analyze phytochemistry. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) as an inexpensive, high-throughput tool for determining primary (e.g., nitrogen, sugars, starch) and secondary (e.g., tannins, phenolic glycosides) foliar chemistry of Populus and Betula species, and identifies conditions necessary for obtaining reliable quantitative data. We developed calibrations with high predictive power (residual predictive deviations ≤ 7.4) by relating phytochemical concentrations determined with classical analytical methods (e.g., spectrophotometric assays, liquid chromatography) to NIR spectra, using modified partial least squares regression. We determine that NIRS, although less sensitive and precise than classical methods for some compounds, provides useful predictions in a much faster, less expensive manner than do classical methods.

  18. VOC emissions of Grey poplar leaves as affected by salt stress and different N sources.

    PubMed

    Teuber, M; Zimmer, I; Kreuzwieser, J; Ache, P; Polle, A; Rennenberg, H; Schnitzler, J-P

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen nutrition and salt stress experiments were performed in a greenhouse with hydroponic-cultured, salt-sensitive Grey poplar (Populus x canescens) plants to study the combined influence of different N sources (either 1 mm NO(3) (-) or NH(4)(+)) and salt (up to 75 mm NaCl) on leaf gas exchange, isoprene biosynthesis and VOC emissions. Net assimilation and transpiration proved to be highly sensitive to salt stress and were reduced by approximately 90% at leaf sodium concentrations higher than 1,800 microg Na g dry weight (dw)(-1). In contrast, emissions of isoprene and oxygenated VOC (i.e. acetaldehyde, formaldehyde and acetone) were unaffected. There was no significant effect of combinations of salt stress and N source, and neither NO(3)(-) or NH(4)(+) influenced the salt stress response in the Grey poplar leaves. Also, transcript levels of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (PcDXR) and isoprene synthase (PcISPS) did not respond to the different N sources and only responded slightly to salt application, although isoprene synthase (PcISPS) activity was negatively affected at least in one of two experiments, despite high isoprene emission rates. A significant salt effect was the strong reduction of leaf dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP) content, probably due to restricted availability of photosynthates for DMADP biosynthesis. Further consequences of reduced photosynthetic gas exchange and maintaining VOC emissions are a very high C loss, up to 50%, from VOC emissions related to net CO(2) uptake and a strong increase in leaf internal isoprene concentrations, with maximum mean values up to 6.6 microl x l(-1). Why poplar leaves maintain VOC biosynthesis and emission under salt stress conditions, despite impaired photosynthetic CO(2) fixation, is discussed.

  19. Host genotype shapes the foliar fungal microbiome of balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera).

    PubMed

    Bálint, Miklós; Tiffin, Peter; Hallström, Björn; O'Hara, Robert B; Olson, Matthew S; Fankhauser, Johnathon D; Piepenbring, Meike; Schmitt, Imke

    2013-01-01

    Foliar fungal communities of plants are diverse and ubiquitous. In grasses endophytes may increase host fitness; in trees, their ecological roles are poorly understood. We investigated whether the genotype of the host tree influences community structure of foliar fungi. We sampled leaves from genotyped balsam poplars from across the species' range, and applied 454 amplicon sequencing to characterize foliar fungal communities. At the time of the sampling the poplars had been growing in a common garden for two years. We found diverse fungal communities associated with the poplar leaves. Linear discriminant analysis and generalized linear models showed that host genotypes had a structuring effect on the composition of foliar fungal communities. The observed patterns may be explained by a filtering mechanism which allows the trees to selectively recruit fungal strains from the environment. Alternatively, host genotype-specific fungal communities may be present in the tree systemically, and persist in the host even after two clonal reproductions. Both scenarios are consistent with host tree adaptation to specific foliar fungal communities and suggest that there is a functional basis for the strong biotic interaction.

  20. Contribution of different carbon sources to isoprene biosynthesis in poplar leaves.

    PubMed

    Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Graus, Martin; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Heizmann, Ulrike; Rennenberg, Heinz; Wisthaler, Armin; Hansel, Armin

    2004-05-01

    This study was performed to test if alternative carbon sources besides recently photosynthetically fixed CO2 are used for isoprene formation in the leaves of young poplar (Populus x canescens) trees. In a 13CO2 atmosphere under steady state conditions, only about 75% of isoprene became 13C labeled within minutes. A considerable part of the unlabeled carbon may be derived from xylem transported carbohydrates, as may be shown by feeding leaves with [U-13C]Glc. As a consequence of this treatment approximately 8% to 10% of the carbon emitted as isoprene was 13C labeled. In order to identify further carbon sources, poplar leaves were depleted of leaf internal carbon pools and the carbon pools were refilled with 13C labeled carbon by exposure to 13CO2. Results from this treatment showed that about 30% of isoprene carbon became 13C labeled, clearly suggesting that, in addition to xylem transported carbon and CO2, leaf internal carbon pools, e.g. starch, are used for isoprene formation. This use was even increased when net assimilation was reduced, for example by abscisic acid application. The data provide clear evidence of a dynamic exchange of carbon between different cellular precursors for isoprene biosynthesis, and an increasing importance of these alternative carbon pools under conditions of limited photosynthesis. Feeding [1,2-13C]Glc and [3-13C]Glc to leaves via the xylem suggested that alternative carbon sources are probably derived from cytosolic pyruvate/phosphoenolpyruvate equivalents and incorporated into isoprene according to the predicted cleavage of the 3-C position of pyruvate during the initial step of the plastidic deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate pathway.

  1. Ozone-induced changes in photosynthesis and photorespiration of hybrid poplar in relation to the developmental stage of the leaves.

    PubMed

    Bagard, Matthieu; Le Thiec, Didier; Delacote, Emilien; Hasenfratz-Sauder, Marie-Paule; Banvoy, Jacques; Gérard, Joëlle; Dizengremel, Pierre; Jolivet, Yves

    2008-12-01

    Young poplar trees (Populus tremula Michx. x Populus alba L. clone INRA 717-1B4) were subjected to 120 ppb of ozone for 35 days in phytotronic chambers. Treated trees displayed precocious leaf senescence and visible symptoms of injury (dark brown/black upper surface stippling) exclusively observed on fully expanded leaves. In these leaves, ozone reduced parameters related to photochemistry (Chl content and maximum rate of photosynthetic electron transport) and photosynthetic CO(2) fixation [net CO(2) assimilation, Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase) activity and maximum velocity of Rubisco for carboxylation]. In fully expanded leaves, the rate of photorespiration as estimated from Chl fluorescence was markedly impaired by the ozone treatment together with the activity of photorespiratory enzymes (Rubisco and glycolate oxidase). Immunoblot analysis revealed a decrease in the content of serine hydroxymethyltransferase in treated mature leaves, while the content of the H subunit of the glycine decarboxylase complex was not modified. Leaves in the early period of expansion were exempt from visible symptoms of injury and remained unaffected as regards all measured parameters. Leaves reaching full expansion under ozone exposure showed potential responses of protection (stimulation of mitochondrial respiration and transitory stomatal closure). Our data underline the major role of leaf phenology in ozone sensitivity of photosynthetic processes and reveal a marked ozone-induced inhibition of photorespiration.

  2. Predicting yields of short-rotation hybrid poplar (Populus spp.) for the United States through model-data synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; LeBauer, David; Dietze, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Hybrid poplar (Populus spp.) is an important biomass crop being evaluated for cellulosic ethanol production. Predictions of poplar growth, rotation period, and soil carbon sequestration under various growing conditions, soils, and climates are critical for farmers and managers planning to establish short-rotation forestry (SRF) plantations. In this study, we used an ecoinformatics workflow, the Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer (PEcAn), to integrate literature data and field measurements into the Ecosystem Demography 2 (ED2) model to estimate yield potential of poplar plantations. Within PEcAn 164 records of seven different traits from the literature were assimilated using a Bayesian meta-analysis. Next, variance decomposition identified seven variables for further constraint that contributed > 80% to the uncertainty in modeled yields: growth respiration, dark respiration, quantum efficiency, mortality coefficient, water conductance, fine-root allocation, and root turnover rate. Assimilation of observed yields further constrained uncertainty in model parameters (especially dark respiration and root turnover rate) and biomass estimates. Additional measurements of growth respiration, mortality, water conductance, and quantum efficiency would provide the most efficient path toward further constraint of modeled yields. Modeled validation demonstrated that ED2 successfully captured the interannual and spatial variability of poplar yield observed at nine independent sites. Site-level analyses were conducted to estimate the effect of land use change to SRF poplar on soil C sequestration compared to alternate land uses. These suggest that poplar plantations became a C sink within 18 years of conversion from corn production or existing forest. Finally, poplar yields were estimated for the contiguous United States at a half degree resolution in order to determine potential productivity, estimate the optimal rotation period, and compare poplar to perennial grass yields. This

  3. Topochemical Studies on Modified Lignin Distribution in the Xylem of Poplar (Populus spp.) after Wounding

    PubMed Central

    FRANKENSTEIN, C.; SCHMITT, U.; KOCH, G.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Information on the influence of wounding on lignin synthesis and distribution in differentiating xylem tissue is still scarce. The present paper provides information on cell modifications with regard to wall ultrastructure and lignin distribution on cellular and subcellular levels in poplar after wounding. • Methods Xylem of Populus spp. close to a wound was collected and processed for light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and cellular UV microspectrophotometry. Cell wall modification with respect to lignin distribution was examined at different stages of wound tissue development. Scanning UV microspectrophotometry and point measurements were used to determine the lignin distribution. • Key Results Xylem fibres within a transition zone between differentiated xylem laid down prior to wounding and the tissues formed after wounding developed distinctively thickened secondary cell walls. Those modified walls and cell corners showed, on average, a higher lignin content and an inhomogeneous lignin distribution within the individual wall layers. • Conclusions The work presented shows that wounding of the xylem may induce a modified wall architecture and lignin distribution in tissues differentiating at the time of wounding. An increasing lignin content and distinctively thickened walls can contribute to improved resistance as part of the compartmentalization process. PMID:16354725

  4. Two highly validated SSR multiplexes (8-plex) for Euphrates' poplar, Populus euphratica (Salicaceae).

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang; Feng, Sisi; Wu, Rongling; Du, Fang K

    2013-01-01

    Multiplex PCR amplification of microsatellites has significantly increased the throughput and decreased the costs of genotyping. We have developed two highly polymorphic microsatellite multiplexes for Populus euphratica, the only tree species found in desert regions of Western China and adjacent Central Asian countries. The first of these multiplex kits comprises an eight-Plex of genomic SSRs (gSSRs) obtained from published databases. The second comprises an eight-plex of newly designed EST-SSRs (eSSRs) based on expressed sequence tags for P. euphratica. Both kits were tested on a sample of 170 individuals from four populations. The gSSRs exhibited slightly more polymorphism than the eSSRs. The new multiplex protocols yielded consistent results in the hands of multiple researchers, demonstrating their robustness. The 16 loci used in the kits exhibited a high transferability rate (82.0%) in eight other poplar species belonging to five different sections of the genus. Both kits should therefore be useful for further investigations of population genetics in P. euphratica and related species. Our results indicate that it is essential to follow recently established recommendations when developing microsatellite markers, including verifying the amplification efficiency, detecting null alleles and carefully measuring error rates.

  5. Genomic diversity, population structure, and migration following rapid range expansion in the Balsam poplar, Populus balsamifera.

    PubMed

    Keller, Stephen R; Olson, Matthew S; Silim, Salim; Schroeder, William; Tiffin, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Rapid range expansions can cause pervasive changes in the genetic diversity and structure of populations. The postglacial history of the Balsam Poplar, Populus balsamifera, involved the colonization of most of northern North America, an area largely covered by continental ice sheets during the last glacial maximum. To characterize how this expansion shaped genomic diversity within and among populations, we developed 412 SNP markers that we assayed for a range-wide sample of 474 individuals sampled from 34 populations. We complemented the SNP data set with DNA sequence data from 11 nuclear loci from 94 individuals, and used coalescent analyses to estimate historical population size, demographic growth, and patterns of migration. Bayesian clustering identified three geographically separated demes found in the Northern, Central, and Eastern portions of the species' range. These demes varied significantly in nucleotide diversity, the abundance of private polymorphisms, and population substructure. Most measures supported the Central deme as descended from the primary refuge of diversity. Both SNPs and sequence data suggested recent population growth, and coalescent analyses of historical migration suggested a massive expansion from the Centre to the North and East. Collectively, these data demonstrate the strong influence that range expansions exert on genomic diversity, both within local populations and across the range. Our results suggest that an in-depth knowledge of nucleotide diversity following expansion requires sampling within multiple populations, and highlight the utility of combining insights from different data types in population genomic studies.

  6. In vitro shoot regeneration from leaf mesophyll protoplasts of hybrid poplar (Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii).

    PubMed

    Park, Y G; Son, S H

    1992-02-01

    Protoplasts were isolated from leaf mesophyll of hybrid poplar (Populus nigra X P. maximowiczii) with a mean yield of 10.4 x 10(6) protoplasts per g fresh weight using 2.0% Cellulase 'Onozuka' R-10, 0.8% Macerozyme R-10, 1.2% Hemicellulase, 2.0% Driselase, and 0.05% Pectolyase Y-23 with CPW salts solution containing 0.6 M mannitol, 0.002 M DTT, 3 mM MES at pH 5.6. A liquid plating method produced the highest frequency of dividing protoplasts (48.6%) using an MS medium without NH4NO3. The highest percent of colony formation was 22.8%, produced with fabric supported semi-solid (0.5% w/v) agar plating method using the same culture medium. Growing cell colonies and/or micro-calli were transferred to a fresh semisolid agar medium containing 0.44 μM BAP and 9.0 μM 2,4-D. Multiple shoots were produced from protoplast-derived callus after culture on MS medium containing 6.8 μM zeatin. After root induction on half-strength MS medium that lacked growth regulators, shoots were transferred to pots containing artificial soil mix.

  7. Expression of multiple resistance genes enhances tolerance to environmental stressors in transgenic poplar (Populus × euramericana 'Guariento').

    PubMed

    Su, Xiaohua; Chu, Yanguang; Li, Huan; Hou, Yingjie; Zhang, Bingyu; Huang, Qinjun; Hu, Zanmin; Huang, Rongfeng; Tian, Yingchuan

    2011-01-01

    Commercial and non-commercial plants face a variety of environmental stressors that often cannot be controlled. In this study, transgenic hybrid poplar (Populus × euramericana 'Guariento') harboring five effector genes (vgb, SacB, JERF36, BtCry3A and OC-I) were subjected to drought, salinity, waterlogging and insect stressors in greenhouse or laboratory conditions. Field trials were also conducted to investigate long-term effects of transgenic trees on insects and salt tolerance in the transformants. In greenhouse studies, two transgenic lines D5-20 and D5-21 showed improved growth, as evidenced by greater height and basal diameter increments and total biomass relative to the control plants after drought or salt stress treatments. The improved tolerance to drought and salt was primarily attributed to greater instantaneous water use efficiency (WUEi) in the transgenic trees. The chlorophyll concentrations tended to be higher in the transgenic lines under drought or saline conditions. Transformed trees in drought conditions accumulated more fructan and proline and had increased Fv/Fm ratios (maximum quantum yield of photosystem II) under waterlogging stress. Insect-feeding assays in the laboratory revealed a higher total mortality rate and lower exuviation index of leaf beetle [Plagiodera versicolora (Laicharting)] larvae fed with D5-21 leaves, suggesting enhanced insect resistance in the transgenic poplar. In field trials, the dominance of targeted insects on 2-year-old D5-21 transgenic trees was substantially lower than that of the controls, indicating enhanced resistance to Coleoptera. The average height and DBH (diameter at breast height) of 2.5-year-old transgenic trees growing in naturally saline soil were 3.80% and 4.12% greater than those of the control trees, but these increases were not significant. These results suggested that multiple stress-resistance properties in important crop tree species could be simultaneously improved, although additional

  8. Expression of glutathione S-transferases in poplar trees (Populus trichocarpa) exposed to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT).

    PubMed

    Brentner, Laura B; Mukherji, Sachiyo T; Merchie, Kate M; Yoon, Jong Moon; Schnoor, Jerald L; Van Aken, Benoit

    2008-10-01

    Twelve Populus genes were identified from Arabidopsis thaliana sequences previously shown to be induced by exposure to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Using the resources of the Poplar Genome Project and National Center for Biotechnology Information databases, Populus conserved domains were identified and used to design gene specific primers. RNA extracted from root tissues of TNT-exposed hydroponic poplar plants was used to quantify the expression of genes by reverse-transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cyclophilin and 18S ribosomal DNA genes were used as internal standards. Exposure to TNT resulted in a significant increase of gene expression of two glutathione S-transferases (GST), peaking at levels of 25.0 +/- 13.1 and 10 +/- 0.7 fold the expression level of non-exposed plants after 24 h for each of the GST genes, respectively. This paper demonstrates the use of functional genomics information from the model plant species, Arabidopsis, to identify genes which may be important in detoxification of TNT in the model phytoremediation species, Populus trichocarpa.

  9. Impact of Iron Supply on the Kinetics of Recovery of Photosynthesis in Cd-stressed Poplar (Populus glauca)

    PubMed Central

    Solti, Ádám; Gáspár, László; Mészáros, Ilona; Szigeti, Zoltán; Lévai, László; Sárvári, Éva

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Cadmium (Cd) causes Fe-deficiency-like symptoms in plants, and strongly inhibits photosynthesis. To clarify the importance of Cd-induced Fe deficiency in Cd effects on photosynthesis, the recovery processes were studied by supplying excess Fe after the Cd symptoms had developed. Methods Fe-citrate at 10 µm or 50 µm was given with or without 10 µm Cd(NO3)2 to hydroponically cultured poplars (Populus glauca ‘Kopeczkii’) with characteristic Cd symptoms. Ion, chlorophyll and pigment contents, amount of photosynthetic pigment–protein complexes, chlorophyll fluorescence and carbon assimilation were measured together with the mapping of healing processes by fluorescence imaging. Key Results In regenerated leaves, the iron content increased significantly, while the Cd content did not decrease. As a result, the structural (increase in the amount of photosynthetic pigments and pigment–protein complexes, decrease in the F690/F740 ratio) and functional (elevation of CO2 fixation activity and ΔF/Fm′) recovery of the photosynthetic machinery was detected. Cd-induced, light-stress-related changes in non-photochemical quenching, activity of the xanthophyll cycle, and the F440?/F520 ratio were also normalized. Imaging the changes in chlorophyll fluorescence, the recovery started from the parts adjacent to the veins and gradually extended to the interveinal parts. Kinetically, the rate of recovery depended greatly on the extent of the Fe supply, and chlorophyll a/b ratio and ΔF/Fm′ proved to be the most-rapidly reacting parameters. Conclusions Iron deficiency is a key factor in Cd-induced inhibition of photosynthesis. PMID:18757882

  10. S-Nitroso-Proteome in Poplar Leaves in Response to Acute Ozone Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vanzo, Elisa; Ghirardo, Andrea; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Lindermayr, Christian; Heller, Werner; Hauck, Stefanie M.; Durner, Jörg; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Protein S-nitrosylation, the covalent binding of nitric oxide (NO) to protein cysteine residues, is one of the main mechanisms of NO signaling in plant and animal cells. Using a combination of the biotin switch assay and label-free LC-MS/MS analysis, we revealed the S-nitroso-proteome of the woody model plant Populus x canescens. Under normal conditions, constitutively S-nitrosylated proteins in poplar leaves and calli comprise all aspects of primary and secondary metabolism. Acute ozone fumigation was applied to elicit ROS-mediated changes of the S-nitroso-proteome. This treatment changed the total nitrite and nitrosothiol contents of poplar leaves and affected the homeostasis of 32 S-nitrosylated proteins. Multivariate data analysis revealed that ozone exposure negatively affected the S-nitrosylation status of leaf proteins: 23 proteins were de-nitrosylated and 9 proteins had increased S-nitrosylation content compared to the control. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase 2 (log2[ozone/control] = −3.6) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (−3.4), key enzymes catalyzing important steps in the phenylpropanoid and subsequent lignin biosynthetic pathways, respectively, were de-nitrosylated upon ozone stress. Measuring the in vivo and in vitro phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity indicated that the increase of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase activity in response to acute ozone is partly regulated by de-nitrosylation, which might favor a higher metabolic flux through the phenylpropanoid pathway within minutes after ozone exposure. PMID:25192423

  11. Salt stress affects xylem differentiation of grey poplar (Populus x canescens).

    PubMed

    Escalante-Pérez, María; Lautner, Silke; Nehls, Uwe; Selle, Anita; Teuber, Markus; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Teichmann, Thomas; Fayyaz, Payam; Hartung, Wolfram; Polle, Andrea; Fromm, Jörg; Hedrich, Rainer; Ache, Peter

    2009-01-01

    In this study the impact of salt stress on the physiology and wood structure of the salt-sensitive Populus x canescens was investigated. Two weeks of salt stress altered wood anatomy significantly. The xylem differentiation zone was reduced and the resulting vessels exhibited reduced lumina. To understand this phenomenon, ion composition, levels of corresponding transcripts and of the stress hormone ABA were analysed. With increasing sodium and chloride concentrations, a general reduction of potassium was found in roots and shoots, but not in leaves. Consequently, the corresponding K+ channel transcripts in roots favoured K+ release. The overall osmolarity in leaves was up to fourfold higher than in roots or shoots. Therefore, adjustment of the K+/Na+ balance seemed not to be required in leaves. Sodium increased gradually from roots to shoots and then to leaves indicating that sodium storage took place first in roots, then in shoots, and finally in leaves to protect photosynthesis from salt effects as long as possible. Since leaf abscisic acid levels markedly increased, stomatal closure seemed to limit CO2 uptake. As a consequence, diminished nutrient supply to the cambium in combination with lowered shoot K+ content led to decreased vessel lumina, and a reduction of the radial cambium was observed. Thus, xylem differentiation was curtailed and the development of full size vessels was impaired.

  12. QTLs for Woolly Poplar Aphid (Phloeomyzus passerinii L.) Resistance Detected in an Inter-Specific Populus deltoides x P. nigra Mapping Population

    PubMed Central

    Carletti, Giorgia; Carra, Andrea; Allegro, Gianni; Vietto, Lorenzo; Desiderio, Francesca; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Gianinetti, Alberto; Cattivelli, Luigi; Valè, Giampiero; Nervo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The genus Populus represents one of the most economically important groups of forest trees. It is composed by approximately 30 species used for wood and non-wood products, phytoremediation and biomass. Poplar is subjected to several biological and environmental threats although, compared to annual crops, we know far less about the genetic bases of biotic stress resistance. Woolly poplar aphid (Phloeomyzus passerinii) is considered a main pest of cultivated poplars in European and American countries. In this work we present two high density linkage maps in poplar obtained by a genotyping by sequencing (GBS) approach and the identification of QTLs involved in Ph. passerinii resistance. A total of 5,667 polymorphic markers (5,606 SNPs and 61 SSRs) identified on expressed sequences have been used to genotype 131 plants of an F1 population P ×canadensis obtained by an interspecific mate between Populus deltoides (resistant to woolly poplar aphid) and Populus nigra (susceptible to woolly poplar aphid). The two linkage maps, obtained following the two-way pseudo-testcross mapping strategy, have been used to investigate the genetic bases of woolly poplar aphid resistance. One major QTL and two QTLs with minor effects (mapped on LGV, LGXVI and LG XIX) explaining the 65.8% of the genetic variance observed in the progeny in response to Ph. passerinii attack were found. The high density coverage of functional markers allowed the identification of three genes belonging to disease resistance pathway as putative candidates for P. deltoides resistance to woolly poplar aphid. This work is the first report on genetic of woolly poplar aphid genetic resistance and the resistant loci associated markers identified represent a valuable tool in resistance poplar breeding programs. PMID:27022954

  13. QTLs for Woolly Poplar Aphid (Phloeomyzus passerinii L.) Resistance Detected in an Inter-Specific Populus deltoides x P. nigra Mapping Population.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Giorgia; Carra, Andrea; Allegro, Gianni; Vietto, Lorenzo; Desiderio, Francesca; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Gianinetti, Alberto; Cattivelli, Luigi; Valè, Giampiero; Nervo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The genus Populus represents one of the most economically important groups of forest trees. It is composed by approximately 30 species used for wood and non-wood products, phytoremediation and biomass. Poplar is subjected to several biological and environmental threats although, compared to annual crops, we know far less about the genetic bases of biotic stress resistance. Woolly poplar aphid (Phloeomyzus passerinii) is considered a main pest of cultivated poplars in European and American countries. In this work we present two high density linkage maps in poplar obtained by a genotyping by sequencing (GBS) approach and the identification of QTLs involved in Ph. passerinii resistance. A total of 5,667 polymorphic markers (5,606 SNPs and 61 SSRs) identified on expressed sequences have been used to genotype 131 plants of an F1 population P ×canadensis obtained by an interspecific mate between Populus deltoides (resistant to woolly poplar aphid) and Populus nigra (susceptible to woolly poplar aphid). The two linkage maps, obtained following the two-way pseudo-testcross mapping strategy, have been used to investigate the genetic bases of woolly poplar aphid resistance. One major QTL and two QTLs with minor effects (mapped on LGV, LGXVI and LG XIX) explaining the 65.8% of the genetic variance observed in the progeny in response to Ph. passerinii attack were found. The high density coverage of functional markers allowed the identification of three genes belonging to disease resistance pathway as putative candidates for P. deltoides resistance to woolly poplar aphid. This work is the first report on genetic of woolly poplar aphid genetic resistance and the resistant loci associated markers identified represent a valuable tool in resistance poplar breeding programs.

  14. Drought, salt and wounding stress induce the expression of the plasma membrane intrinsic protein 1 gene in poplar (Populus alba×P. tremula var. glandulosa).

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Hyoshin; Lee, Jae-Soon; Noh, Eun-Woon

    2011-09-01

    Water uptake across cell membranes is a principal requirement for plant growth at both the cellular and whole-plant levels; water movement through plant membranes is regulated by aquaporins (AQPs) or major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). We examined the expression characteristics of the poplar plasma membrane intrinsic protein 1 gene (PatPIP1), a type of MIP, which was isolated from a suspension cell cDNA library of Populus alba×P. tremula var. glandulosa. Examination of protoplasts expressing the p35S-PatPIP1::sGFP fusion protein revealed that the protein was localized in the plasma membrane. Northern blot analysis revealed that the gene was strongly expressed in poplar roots and leaves. Gene expression was inducible by abiotic factors including drought, salinity, cold temperatures and wounding, and also by plant hormones including gibberellic acid, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid. Since we found that the PatPIP1 gene was strongly expressed in response to mannitol, NaCl, jasmonic acid and wounding, we propose that PatPIP1 plays an essential role in the defense of plants against water stress.

  15. Local adaptation in the flowering-time gene network of balsam poplar, Populus balsamifera L.

    PubMed

    Keller, Stephen R; Levsen, Nicholas; Olson, Matthew S; Tiffin, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Identifying the signature and targets of local adaptation is an increasingly important goal in empirical population genetics. Using data from 443 balsam poplar Populus balsamifera trees sampled from 31 populations, we tested for evidence of geographically variable selection shaping diversity at 27 homologues of the Arabidopsis flowering-time network. These genes are implicated in the control of seasonal phenology, an important determinant of fitness. Using 335 candidate and 412 reference single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we tested for evidence of local adaptation by searching for elevated population differentiation using F(ST)-based outlier analyses implemented in BayeScan or a Hierarchical Model in Arelquin and by testing for significant associations between allele frequency and environmental variables using BAYENV. A total of 46 SNPs from 14 candidate genes had signatures of local adaptation-either significantly greater population differentiation or significant covariance with one or more environmental variable relative to reference SNP distributions. Only 11 SNPs from two genes exhibited both elevated population differentiation and covariance with one or more environmental variables. Several genes including the abscisic acid gene ABI1B and the circadian clock genes ELF3 and GI5 harbored a large number of SNPs with signatures of local adaptation-with SNPs in GI5 strongly covarying with both latitude and precipitation and SNPs in ABI1B strongly covarying with temperature. In contrast to several other systems, we find little evidence that photoreceptors, including phytochromes, play an important role in local adaptation. Our results additionally show that detecting local adaptation is sensitive to the analytical approaches used and that model-based significance thresholds should be viewed with caution.

  16. Flavitalea populi gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from soil of a Euphrates poplar (Populus euphratica) forest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Cai, Feng; Tang, Yali; Dai, Jun; Qi, Huan; Rahman, Erkin; Peng, Fang; Fang, Chengxiang

    2011-07-01

    A novel strain, designated HY-50R(T), isolated from soil of a Euphrates poplar (Populus euphratica) forest in Xinjiang, China, was characterized using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Cells of the isolate were gram-reaction-negative, strictly aerobic, rod-shaped, non-motile, oxidase-negative and catalase-positive. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolate was a member of the phylum Bacteroidetes, its closest relatives being Niastella populi THYL-44(T) (93.6 % similarity), Flavisolibacter ginsengisoli Gsoil 643(T) (93.5 %), Terrimonas ferruginea IAM 15098(T) (93.3 %) and Flavisolibacter ginsengiterrae Gsoil 492(T) (93.2 %). The major fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 1) G (11.7 %), iso-C(15 : 0) (19.6 %) and iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH (19.3 %). The predominant menaquinone of strain HY-50R(T) was MK-7 and the genomic DNA G+C content was 46.8 mol%. Flexirubin-type pigments were not produced. Based on phylogenetic evidence and the results of phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic analysis, strain HY-50R(T) represents a novel species of a novel genus, for which the name Flavitalea populi gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HY-50R(T) ( = CCTCC AB 208255(T)  = NRRL B-59222(T)).

  17. Epigenetic Diversity of Clonal White Poplar (Populus alba L.) Populations: Could Methylation Support the Success of Vegetative Reproduction Strategy?

    PubMed

    Guarino, Francesco; Cicatelli, Angela; Brundu, Giuseppe; Heinze, Berthold; Castiglione, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The widespread poplar populations of Sardinia are vegetatively propagated and live in different natural environments forming large monoclonal stands. The main goals of the present study were: i) to investigate/measure the epigenetic diversity of the poplar populations by determining their DNA methylation status; ii) to assess if and how methylation status influences population clustering; iii) to shed light on the changes that occur in the epigenome of ramets of the same poplar clone. To these purposes, 83 white poplar trees were sampled at different locations on the island of Sardinia. Methylation sensitive amplified polymorphism analysis was carried out on the genomic DNA extracted from leaves at the same juvenile stage. The study showed that the genetic biodiversity of poplars is quite limited but it is counterbalanced by epigenetic inter-population molecular variability. The comparison between MspI and HpaII DNA fragmentation profiles revealed that environmental conditions strongly influence hemi-methylation of the inner cytosine. The variable epigenetic status of Sardinian white poplars revealed a decreased number of population clusters. Landscape genetics analyses clearly demonstrated that ramets of the same clone were differentially methylated in relation to their geographic position. Therefore, our data support the notion that studies on plant biodiversity should no longer be restricted to genetic aspects, especially in the case of vegetatively propagated plant species.

  18. Biochemical response of hybrid black poplar tissue culture (Populus × canadensis) on water stress.

    PubMed

    Popović, B M; Štajner, D; Ždero-Pavlović, R; Tari, I; Csiszár, J; Gallé, Á; Poór, P; Galović, V; Trudić, B; Orlović, S

    2017-02-27

    In this study, poplar tissue culture (hybrid black poplar, M1 genotype) was subjected to water stress influenced by polyethyleneglycol 6000 (100 and 200 mOsm PEG 6000). The aim of the research was to investigate the biochemical response of poplar tissue culture on water deficit regime. Antioxidant status was analyzed including antioxidant enzymes, superoxide-dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), guiacol-peroxidase (GPx), glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione-reductase, reduced glutathione, total phenol content, Ferric reducing antioxidant power and DPPH radical antioxidant power. Polyphenol oxidase and phenylalanine-ammonium-lyase were determined as enzymatic markers of polyphenol metabolism. Among oxidative stress parameters lipid peroxidation, carbonyl-proteins, hydrogen-peroxide, reactive oxygen species, nitric-oxide and peroxynitrite were determined. Proline, proline-dehydrogenase and glycinebetaine were measured also as parameters of water stress. Cell viability is finally determined as a biological indicator of osmotic stress. It was found that water stress induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and lipid peroxidation in leaves of hybrid black poplar and reduced cell viability. Antioxidant enzymes including SOD, GPx, CAT and GSH-Px were induced but total phenol content and antioxidant capacity were reduced by PEG 6000 mediated osmotic stress. The highest biochemical response and adaptive reaction was the increase of proline and GB especially by 200 mOsm PEG. While long term molecular analysis will be necessary to fully address the poplar potentials for water stress adaptation, our results on hybrid black poplar suggest that glycine-betaine, proline and PDH enzyme might be the most important markers of poplar on water stress and that future efforts should be focused on these markers and strategies to enhance their concentration in poplar.

  19. [Effects of cadmium stress on the microbial biodiversity in purple soil and alluvial soil potted with a poplar (Populus deltoides x Populus nigra)].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ao; Wu, Fu-Zhong; Yang, Wan-Qin; Zhou, Li-Qiang; Wang, Xu-Xi; Han, Yu

    2011-07-01

    Effects of current Cd contamination levels on microbial biodiversity were studied under the typical Cd contaminated soils in the Yangtze Basin. Purple soil and alluvial soil potted with a poplar (Populus deltoides x Populus nigra) were selected, and the culturable soil microbial amounts by flat method, microbial biomass and bacterial community structure by PCR-DGGE were investigated. Cd supplies significantly increased the culturable amounts of bacteria and actinomyces in purple soil, but decreased the culturable amounts of fungi and the content of microbial biomass N. Fingerprint of DGGE also showed that bacterial community structure have obviously changed under different Cd supplies. In contrast, the lower Cd supplies slightly increased the culturable amounts of bacteria and fungi in alluvial soil, but higher Cd supply treatment decreased the culturable amounts of bacteria, actinomyces and fungi, and the content of microbial biomass N. However, only a slight change was observed under different Cd supplies by DGGE fingerprint. Additionally, there were few effects of Cd supplies on the content of microbial biomass C in both purple soil and alluvial soil. The results provided basic data to understand the effects of present Cd contamination levels on soil microbial characteristics.

  20. Rapid Activation of Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Elicitor-Treated Hybrid Poplar (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray × Populus deltoides Marsh) Suspension-Cultured Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Mário Moniz; Subramaniam, Rajgopal; Williams, Frank E.; Douglas, Carl J.

    1992-01-01

    Elicitor induction of phenylpropanoid metabolism was investigated in suspension-cultured cells of the fast-growing poplar hybrid (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray × Populus deltoides Marsh) H11-11. Treatment of cells with polygalacturonic acid lyase or two fungal elicitors resulted in rapid and transient increases in extractable l-phenylalanine ammonia lyase and 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activities. The substrate specificity of the inducible 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activity appeared to differ from substrate specificity of 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activity in untreated control cells. Large and transient increases in the accumulation of l-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase mRNAs preceded the increases in enzyme activities and were detectable by 30 minutes after the start of elicitor treatment. Chalcone synthase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, and coniferin β-glucosidase enzyme activities were unaffected by the elicitors, but a large and transient increase in β-glucosidase activity capable of hydrolyzing 4-nitrophenyl-β-glucoside was observed. Subsequent to increases in l-phenylalanine ammonialyase and 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activities, cell wall-bound thioglycolic acid-extractable compounds accumulated in elicitor-treated cultures, and these cells exhibited strong staining with phloroglucinol, suggesting the accumulation of wall-bound phenolic compounds. ImagesFigure 7Figure 9 PMID:16668702

  1. Determination of As in tree-rings of poplar (Populus alba L.) by U-shaped DC arc.

    PubMed

    Marković, D M; Novović, I; Vilotić, D; Ignjatović, Lj

    2009-04-01

    An argon-stabilized U-shaped DC arc with a system for aerosol introduction was used for determination of As in poplar (Populus alba L.) tree-rings. After optimization of the operating parameters and selection of the most appropriate signal integration time (30 s), the limit of detection for As was reduced to 15.0 ng/mL. This detection limit obtained with the optimal integration time was compared with those for other methods: inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), direct coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES), microwave induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES) and improved thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS). Arsenic is toxic trace element which can adversely affect plant, animal and human health. As an indicator of environment pollution we collected poplar tree-rings from two locations. The first area was close to the "Nikola Tesla" (TENT-A) power plant, Obrenovac, while the other was in the urban area of Novi Sad. In all cases elevated average concentrations of As were registered in poplar tree-rings from the Obrenovac location.

  2. Long-term biomonitoring of soil contamination using poplar trees: accumulation of trace elements in leaves and fruits.

    PubMed

    Madejón, P; Ciadamidaro, L; Marañón, T; Murillo, J M

    2013-01-01

    Phytostabilization aims to immobilize soil contaminants using higher plants. The accumulation of trace elements in Populus alba leaves was monitored for 12 years after a mine spill. Concentrations of As and Pb significantly decreased, while concentrations of Cd and Zn did not significantly over time. Soil concentrations extracted by CaCl2 were measured by ICP-OES and results of As and Pb were below the detection limit. Long-term biomonitoring of soil contamination using poplar leaves was proven to be better suited for the study of trace elements. Plants suitable for phytostabilization must also be able to survive and reproduce in contaminated soils. Concentrations of trace elements were also measured in P. alba fruiting catkins to determine the effect on its reproduction potential. Cadmium and Zn were found to accumulate in fruiting catkins, with the transfer coefficient for Cd significantly greater than Zn. It is possible for trace elements to translocate to seed, which presents a concern for seed germination, establishment and colonization. We conclude that white poplar is a suitable tree for long-term monitoring of soil contaminated with Cd and Zn, and for phytostabilization in riparian habitats, although some caution should be taken with the possible effects on the food web. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of International Journal of Phytoremediation to view the supplemental file.

  3. Overexpression of a Populus trichocarpa H+-pyrophosphatase gene PtVP1.1 confers salt tolerance on transgenic poplar.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Tang, R J; Li, B; Wang, H H; Jin, Y L; Jiang, C M; Bao, Y; Su, H Y; Zhao, N; Ma, X J; Yang, L; Chen, S L; Cheng, X H; Zhang, H X

    2015-06-01

    The Arabidopsis vacuolar H(+)-pyrophosphatase (AVP1) has been well studied and subsequently employed to improve salt and/or drought resistance in herbaceous plants. However, the exact function of H(+)-pyrophosphatase in woody plants still remains unknown. In this work, we cloned a homolog of type I H(+)-pyrophosphatase gene, designated as PtVP1.1, from Populus trichocarpa, and investigated its function in both Arabidopsis and poplar. The deduced translation product PtVP1.1 shares 89.74% identity with AVP1. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed a ubiquitous expression pattern of PtVP1.1 in various tissues, including roots, stems, leaves and shoot tips. Heterologous expression of PtVP1.1 rescued the retarded-root-growth phenotype of avp1, an Arabidopsis knock out mutant of AVP1, on low carbohydrate medium. Overexpression of PtVP1.1 in poplar (P. davidiana × P. bolleana) led to more vigorous growth of transgenic plants in the presence of 150 mM NaCl. Microsomal membrane vesicles derived from PtVP1.1 transgenic plants exhibited higher H(+)-pyrophosphatase hydrolytic activity than those from wild type (WT). Further studies indicated that the improved salt tolerance was associated with a decreased Na(+) and increased K(+) accumulation in the leaves of transgenic plants. Na(+) efflux and H(+) influx in the roots of transgenic plants were also significantly higher than those in the WT plants. All these results suggest that PtVP1.1 is a functional counterpart of AVP1 and can be genetically engineered for salt tolerance improvement in trees.

  4. Induction of cambial reactivation by localized heating in a deciduous hardwood hybrid poplar (Populus sieboldii x P. grandidentata).

    PubMed

    Begum, Shahanara; Nakaba, Satoshi; Oribe, Yuichiro; Kubo, Takafumi; Funada, Ryo

    2007-09-01

    The timing of cambial reactivation plays an important role in the control of both the quantity and the quality of wood. The effect of localized heating on cambial reactivation in the main stem of a deciduous hardwood hybrid poplar (Populus sieboldii x P. grandidentata) was investigated. Electric heating tape (20-22 degrees C) was wrapped at one side of the main stem of cloned hybrid poplar trees at breast height in winter. Small blocks were collected from both heated and non-heated control portions of the stem for sequential observations of cambial activity and for studies of the localization of storage starch around the cambium from dormancy to reactivation by light microscopy. Cell division in phloem began earlier than cambial reactivation in locally heated portions of stems. Moreover, the cambial reactivation induced by localized heating occurred earlier than natural cambial reactivation. In heated stems, well-developed secondary xylem was produced that had almost the same structure as the natural xylem. When cambial reactivation was induced by heating, the buds of trees had not yet burst, indicating that there was no close temporal relationship between bud burst and cambial reactivation. In heated stems, the amount of storage starch decreased near the cambium upon reactivation of the cambium. After cambial reactivation, storage starch disappeared completely. Storage starch appeared again, near the cambium, during xylem differentiation in heated stems. The results suggest that, in deciduous diffuse-porous hardwood poplar growing in a temperate zone, the temperature in the stem is a limiting factor for reactivation of phloem and cambium. An increase in temperature might induce the conversion of storage starch to sucrose for the activation of cambial cell division and secondary xylem. Localized heating in poplar stems provides a useful experimental system for studies of cambial biology.

  5. Adaptive mechanisms and genomic plasticity for drought tolerance identified in European black poplar (Populus nigra L.)

    PubMed Central

    Viger, Maud; Smith, Hazel K.; Cohen, David; Dewoody, Jennifer; Trewin, Harriet; Steenackers, Marijke; Bastien, Catherine; Taylor, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Summer droughts are likely to increase in frequency and intensity across Europe, yet long-lived trees may have a limited ability to tolerate drought. It is therefore critical that we improve our understanding of phenotypic plasticity to drought in natural populations for ecologically and economically important trees such as Populus nigra L. A common garden experiment was conducted using ∼500 wild P. nigra trees, collected from 11 river populations across Europe. Phenotypic variation was found across the collection, with southern genotypes from Spain and France characterized by small leaves and limited biomass production. To examine the relationship between phenotypic variation and drought tolerance, six genotypes with contrasting leaf morphologies were subjected to a water deficit experiment. ‘North eastern’ genotypes were collected at wet sites and responded to water deficit with reduced biomass growth, slow stomatal closure and reduced water use efficiency (WUE) assessed by Δ13C. In contrast, ‘southern’ genotypes originating from arid sites showed rapid stomatal closure, improved WUE and limited leaf loss. Transcriptome analyses of a genotype from Spain (Sp2, originating from an arid site) and another from northern Italy (Ita, originating from a wet site) revealed dramatic differences in gene expression response to water deficit. Transcripts controlling leaf development and stomatal patterning, including SPCH, ANT, ER, AS1, AS2, PHB, CLV1, ERL1–3 and TMM, were down-regulated in Ita but not in Sp2 in response to drought. PMID:27174702

  6. Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration from cell suspension and tissue cultures of mature himalayan poplar (Populus ciliata).

    PubMed

    Cheema, G S

    1989-02-01

    Somatic embryogenesis and plantlet formation were obtained from callus and cell suspension cultures of 40-year- old Himalayan Poplar (Populus ciliata Wall ex Royle). Callus and cell suspensions were obtained by transfer of inoculum of semiorganized leaf cultures, which were maintained on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with benzylaminopurine (BAP), to MS with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Reduction of 2,4-D concentration during subsequent subculture of cell suspensions resulted in the formation of embryoids. These embryoids developed further only after being transferred to agar-based MS medium supplemented with BAP and naphthalene acetic acid. Loss of embryogenic potential was observed in cell suspensions after 6 subcultures. However, callus cultures retained the embryogenic potential even after repeated subcultures for more than a year. Plantlets could be successfully hardened and grown in natural outdoor conditions.

  7. Cellulose and lignin biosynthesis is altered by ozone in wood of hybrid poplar (Populus tremula × alba).

    PubMed

    Richet, Nicolas; Afif, Dany; Huber, Françoise; Pollet, Brigitte; Banvoy, Jacques; El Zein, Rana; Lapierre, Catherine; Dizengremel, Pierre; Perré, Patrick; Cabané, Mireille

    2011-06-01

    Wood formation in trees is a dynamic process that is strongly affected by environmental factors. However, the impact of ozone on wood is poorly documented. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of ozone on wood formation by focusing on the two major wood components, cellulose and lignin, and analysing any anatomical modifications. Young hybrid poplars (Populus tremula × alba) were cultivated under different ozone concentrations (50, 100, 200, and 300 l l(-1)). As upright poplars usually develop tension wood in a non-set pattern, the trees were bent in order to induce tension wood formation on the upper side of the stem and normal or opposite wood on the lower side. Biosynthesis of cellulose and lignin (enzymes and RNA levels), together with cambial growth, decreased in response to ozone exposure. The cellulose to lignin ratio was reduced, suggesting that cellulose biosynthesis was more affected than that of lignin. Tension wood was generally more altered than opposite wood, especially at the anatomical level. Tension wood may be more susceptible to reduced carbon allocation to the stems under ozone exposure. These results suggested a coordinated regulation of cellulose and lignin deposition to sustain mechanical strength under ozone. The modifications of the cellulose to lignin ratio and wood anatomy could allow the tree to maintain radial growth while minimizing carbon cost.

  8. Multiplication and growth of hybrid poplar (Populus alba × P. tremula) shoots on a hormone-free medium.

    PubMed

    Ziauka, J; Kuusienė, Sigutė

    2014-09-01

    The present study explored an alternative approach for poplar micropropagation, based on the restriction of gas exchange between inside and outside environments of culture vessel, rather than on the application of exogenous hormones. Apical and nodal stem segments (explants) excised from in vitro-developed shoots of hybrid white poplar (Populus alba L. × P. tremula L.) were incubated in either sealed (with Parafilm) or unsealed capped glass culture tubes (150 × 20 mm) on a hormone-free Woody Plant Medium. Shoot proliferation on apical explants was observed in sealed culture tubes but not in the unsealed ones; the difference between these two samples in respect of shoot number increased in the course of time and became threefold after three months of culture, with 3.2 ± 0.4 (mean ± SE) shoots per explant in the sealed tubes versus 1.1 ± 0.1 in the unsealed ones (for comparison, the mean shoot numbers on nodal explants were 2.4 ± 0.3 and 3.4 ± 0.4 in the unsealed and sealed culture tubes, respectively). Moreover, the shoots taken from the sealed culture tubes could be distinguished by superior shoot length, if compared to the shoots from the unsealed tubes, during the subsequent culture stage under uniform conditions.

  9. Cellulose and lignin biosynthesis is altered by ozone in wood of hybrid poplar (Populus tremula×alba)

    PubMed Central

    Richet, Nicolas; Afif, Dany; Huber, Françoise; Pollet, Brigitte; Banvoy, Jacques; El Zein, Rana; Lapierre, Catherine; Dizengremel, Pierre; Perré, Patrick; Cabané, Mireille

    2011-01-01

    Wood formation in trees is a dynamic process that is strongly affected by environmental factors. However, the impact of ozone on wood is poorly documented. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of ozone on wood formation by focusing on the two major wood components, cellulose and lignin, and analysing any anatomical modifications. Young hybrid poplars (Populus tremula×alba) were cultivated under different ozone concentrations (50, 100, 200, and 300 nl l−1). As upright poplars usually develop tension wood in a non-set pattern, the trees were bent in order to induce tension wood formation on the upper side of the stem and normal or opposite wood on the lower side. Biosynthesis of cellulose and lignin (enzymes and RNA levels), together with cambial growth, decreased in response to ozone exposure. The cellulose to lignin ratio was reduced, suggesting that cellulose biosynthesis was more affected than that of lignin. Tension wood was generally more altered than opposite wood, especially at the anatomical level. Tension wood may be more susceptible to reduced carbon allocation to the stems under ozone exposure. These results suggested a coordinated regulation of cellulose and lignin deposition to sustain mechanical strength under ozone. The modifications of the cellulose to lignin ratio and wood anatomy could allow the tree to maintain radial growth while minimizing carbon cost. PMID:21357770

  10. Mathematical modeling of RDX and HMX metabolism in poplar (Populus deltoides x Populus nigra, DN34) tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Mezzari, Melissa P; Van Aken, Benoit; Yoon, Jong M; Just, Craig L; Schnoor, Jerald L

    2004-01-01

    Three mathematical models were developed based on a fate study as an approach to define transformation pathways of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) within plant cells. [U-14C]RDX and [U-14C]HMX were added in Murashige and Skoog (MS) liquid media containing Populus deltoides x P. nigra (DN34) tissue cultures. Radioactivity of samples was analyzed using HPLC, a bio-oxidizer and liquid scintillation counter. Based on information collected, transformation pathways of nitramine compounds were fitted with the raw data obtained and using a modified "green liver" model. Ordinary differential equations were developed and simulations were performed with MicroMath Scientist version 2.0 (MicroMath Inc., St. Louis, MO, USA). The three models, with different sequential transformation processes, were tested in order to support the raw data (model I) and the assumptions of the modified "green liver" model (models II and III). The results showed a high correlation between the collected data and the simulated concentrations for all models. Thus, the simplest model developed (model I) is the best model description of these particular results. The results obtained suggest that the principle of parsimony should be applied. The "green liver"-based models also demonstrated a reliable approach for the investigation of degradation pathways of nitramines within plant cells.

  11. Phenolic composition and antioxidant properties of poplar bud (Populus nigra) extract: individual antioxidant contribution of phenolics and transcriptional effect on skin aging.

    PubMed

    Dudonné, Stéphanie; Poupard, Pascal; Coutière, Philippe; Woillez, Marion; Richard, Tristan; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Vitrac, Xavier

    2011-05-11

    The Populus species possess great potential for therapeutical applications, especially for their known anti-inflammatory properties. The antioxidant properties of propolis, a hive product collected by honey bees mainly from poplar bud exudates, suggest that poplar buds also possess antioxidant properties. Here is reported the characterization of the antioxidant properties of an aqueous poplar bud (Populus nigra) extract. It presented a high total phenolic content, and moderate antioxidant properties as determined by ORAC assay. The main phenolic compounds identified were phenolic acids and flavonoid aglycons. These phenolic compounds were analyzed by ORAC assay for their individual antioxidant activity, in order to determine the major contributors to the total antioxidant activity of the extract. Thanks to their high antioxidant activity, caffeic and p-coumaric acids were identified as the major antioxidant components. Representing only 3.5% of its dry weight, these compounds represented together about 50% of the total antioxidant activity of the extract. The antioxidant properties of poplar bud extract and the phenolic compounds identified were also analyzed by cellular antioxidant activity assay (CAA), which was weakly correlated with ORAC assay. The transcriptional effect of poplar bud extract on skin aging was evaluated in vitro on a replicative senescence model of normal human dermal fibroblasts, using a customized DNA macroarray specifically designed to investigate skin aging markers. Among the detected genes, poplar bud extract significantly regulated genes involved in antioxidant defenses, inflammatory response and cell renewal. The collective antioxidant properties and transcriptional effect of this extract suggest potential antiaging properties which could be utilized in cosmetic and nutraceutical formulations.

  12. Photosynthesis and substrate supply for isoprene biosynthesis in poplar leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magel, E.; Mayrhofer, S.; Müller, A.; Zimmer, I.; Hampp, R.; Schnitzler, J.-P.

    Gray poplar leaves emit high amounts of isoprene. In this context, we investigated the degree to which photosynthesis delivers necessary precursors for chloroplast isoprene biosynthesis, and whether this energy-consuming pathway could be involved in protecting the photosynthetic electron transport system. Such protection could result from consumption of a surplus in ATP and NADPH, generated under constricted net assimilation caused by high leaf temperatures and high light intensities. During the course of the day triose phosphate (TP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP) concentrations showed pronounced diurnal variations closely related to net assimilation and isoprene emission rates, while other variables, e.g. energy (ATP/ADP) and redox (NADPH/NADP) ratio, as well as phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and pyruvate strongly scattered related to changing temperature and light intensities. Intra-day positive correlations were found mainly between leaf concentrations of TP and DMADP, and sucrose, ATP/ADP ratio and net assimilation rates. Under non-saturating light (200-400 μmol photons m -2 s -1), leaf DMADP pools were positively correlated mainly with PEP, starch, and fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (F26BP). Under saturating light, correlations improved and additionally involved sucrose, TP, and the ratio of NADPH/NADP. Study of temperature response curves showed that net assimilation and isoprene emission were negatively correlated to each other. This disconnection was mostly visible by the transient change of DMADP contents with maximum levels at 25 °C. At higher temperatures, declining pools of DMADP, TP and pyruvate indicated that DMADP consumption overcompensated DMADP production resulting in highest isoprene emission rates at declining pool sizes of precursors. In parallel to the reduction of net assimilation increases of NADPH/NADP and ATP/ADP ratios also portended that the MEP pathway dissipates a surplus of ATP and NADPH which cannot be used for carbon reduction under

  13. Genomics of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpax deltoides) interacting with forest tent caterpillars (Malacosoma disstria): normalized and full-length cDNA libraries, expressed sequence tags, and a cDNA microarray for the study of insect-induced defences in poplar.

    PubMed

    Ralph, Steven; Oddy, Claire; Cooper, Dawn; Yueh, Hesther; Jancsik, Sharon; Kolosova, Natalia; Philippe, Ryan N; Aeschliman, Dana; White, Rick; Huber, Dezene; Ritland, Carol E; Benoit, François; Rigby, Tracey; Nantel, André; Butterfield, Yaron S N; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Chun, Elizabeth; Liu, Jerry; Palmquist, Diana; Wynhoven, Brian; Stott, Jeffrey; Yang, George; Barber, Sarah; Holt, Robert A; Siddiqui, Asim; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A; Ellis, Brian E; Douglas, Carl J; Ritland, Kermit; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2006-04-01

    As part of a genomics strategy to characterize inducible defences against insect herbivory in poplar, we developed a comprehensive suite of functional genomics resources including cDNA libraries, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and a cDNA microarray platform. These resources are designed to complement the existing poplar genome sequence and poplar (Populus spp.) ESTs by focusing on herbivore- and elicitor-treated tissues and incorporating normalization methods to capture rare transcripts. From a set of 15 standard, normalized or full-length cDNA libraries, we generated 139,007 3'- or 5'-end sequenced ESTs, representing more than one-third of the c. 385,000 publicly available Populus ESTs. Clustering and assembly of 107,519 3'-end ESTs resulted in 14,451 contigs and 20,560 singletons, altogether representing 35,011 putative unique transcripts, or potentially more than three-quarters of the predicted c. 45,000 genes in the poplar genome. Using this EST resource, we developed a cDNA microarray containing 15,496 unique genes, which was utilized to monitor gene expression in poplar leaves in response to herbivory by forest tent caterpillars (Malacosoma disstria). After 24 h of feeding, 1191 genes were classified as up-regulated, compared to only 537 down-regulated. Functional classification of this induced gene set revealed genes with roles in plant defence (e.g. endochitinases, Kunitz protease inhibitors), octadecanoid and ethylene signalling (e.g. lipoxygenase, allene oxide synthase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase), transport (e.g. ABC proteins, calreticulin), secondary metabolism [e.g. polyphenol oxidase, isoflavone reductase, (-)-germacrene D synthase] and transcriptional regulation [e.g. leucine-rich repeat transmembrane kinase, several transcription factor classes (zinc finger C3H type, AP2/EREBP, WRKY, bHLH)]. This study provides the first genome-scale approach to characterize insect-induced defences in a woody perennial providing a solid platform for

  14. Spatial distribution of cadmium in leaves and its impact on photosynthesis: examples of different strategies in willow and poplar clones.

    PubMed

    Pietrini, F; Zacchini, M; Iori, V; Pietrosanti, L; Ferretti, M; Massacci, A

    2010-03-01

    The interaction of cadmium (Cd) with photosynthesis was investigated in poplar (Populus x canadensis Mönch., clone A4A, Populus nigra L., clone Poli) and willow (Salix alba L., clone SS5) clones that had different leaf metal concentrations in preliminary experiments. Plants grown in the presence of 50 microm CdSO(4) for 3 weeks under hydroponic conditions were used to examine leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters and images, and for Cd detection using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF). Leaves were finally analysed for Cd and phytochelatin concentrations. Results showed that SS5 had the highest leaf Cd concentration and high gas exchange activity similar to that of Poli, which had the lowest Cd concentration. Leaf fluorescence images evidenced in large undamaged areas of SS5 corresponded to high values of F(v)/F(m), F(o), PhiPSII, qP and NPQ, while patches of dark colour (visible necrosis) close to the main vein corresponded to low values of these parameters. In A4A, these necrotic patches were more diffuse on the leaf blade and associated with a range of fluorescence parameter values. ED-XRF analysis indicated that Cd was only detectable in necroses of SS5 leaves, while in A4A it was relatively more diffuse. Phytochelatins (PCs) were not detected in SS5, while their concentration was high in both Poli and A4A. The absence of these molecules in SS5 is thought to favour confinement of high accumulations of Cd to necrotic areas and gives SS5 the ability to maintain high photosynthesis and transpiration in remaining parts of the leaf.

  15. Temperature responses of cambial reactivation and xylem differentiation in hybrid poplar (Populus sieboldii x P. grandidentata) under natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shahanara; Nakaba, Satoshi; Bayramzadeh, Vilma; Oribe, Yuichiro; Kubo, Takafumi; Funada, Ryo

    2008-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that localized heating of tree stems induces localized cambial reactivation. We analyzed by light microscopy the effects of early spring increases in ambient temperature in 2005 and 2007 on the timing of cambial reactivation and xylem differentiation in stems of two trees of a cloned deciduous hardwood hybrid poplar (Populus sieboldii Miquel. x P. grandidentata Michx.) growing under natural conditions. Meteorological data at the study site showed that temperatures in late winter and early spring differed markedly between 2005 and 2007, with trends toward higher temperatures starting around April 3 in 2005 and around March 20 in 2007. Cambial reactivation occurred about 17 days earlier in 2007 than in 2005. The cumulative daily maximum temperature in excess of 15 degrees C (maximum daily temperatures minus 15 degrees C) in late winter and early spring before cambial reactivation was defined as the cambial reactivation index (CRI(15)). Cambial reactivation, which began when the minimum temperature rose above 0 degrees C, occurred when the CRI(15) was 93 and 96 degrees C in 2005 and 2007, respectively. The differentiation of secondary xylem started earlier in 2007 than in 2005. On May 27, we found a wider current-year band of xylem and a higher frequency of small-diameter vessel elements in 2007 than in 2005. We propose that the timing of cambial reactivation is controlled by air temperature and that earlier cambial reactivation induces earlier differentiation of xylem in hybrid poplar under natural conditions. Our results indicate that the CRI might be a useful indicator of the timing of cambial reactivation.

  16. Tree and stand water fluxes of hybrid poplar clone (Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii) in short rotation coppice culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, M.; Trnka, M.; Kucera, J.; Zalud, Z.

    2010-09-01

    This study reports on evapotranspiration and tree water use in short rotation coppice culture of hybrid poplar (Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii) for biomass energy in the Czech Republic. The high density poplar plantation (10 000 trees per ha) was established in 2003 on arable land in Czech-Moravian Highland (49°32´ N, 16°15´ E, 530 m a.s.l.) and has been coppiced in rotation period of 7 years. Firstly, evapotranspiration of the stand has been estimated by applying the Bowen ratio-energy budget method, which is considered as reliable, robust, quite simple and inexpensive technique with comparable results to eddy covariance and lysimeters. The gaps in evapotranspiration diurnal patterns caused by limitation of the bowen ratio method were filled with simple linear regression model based on relation between potential and actual evapotranspiration with regard to soil water availability and leaf area index and thus the daily, monthly and seasonal totals could be calculated. The amount of evapotranspiration during the growing season 2009 (1 March - 31 October) was 593 mm with highest monthly total 116 mm in June. Mean daily water loss over the season reached 2.43 mm per day. During the hot summer day, the maximal value 5.73 mm per day, which presented 89 % of potential evapotranspiration calculated by Penman equation, was recorded with a peak rate 0.94 mm per hour. Secondly, the transpiration was measured by sap flow tissue heat balance techniques on four individual trees with greatest stem diameters (11 - 12 cm d.b.h.) and height of 12 - 12.5 m. Relatively high transpiration values by the poplars were found during the measured part of growing season (18 June - 31 October), with maximum and mean daily transpiration of 44.41 dm3 and 16.69 dm3 per day, respectively. The seasonal transpiration of the most vigorous from the investigated individuals amounted 2542 dm3. Because in this study we didńt evaluate the transpiration of thinner trees (technical features of sap

  17. Effects of repeated soil irrigation with liquid biological paper sludge on poplar Populus alba saplings: potential risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Corbel, Sylvain; Bourioug, Mohamed; Alaoui-Sossé, Laurence; Bourgeade, Pascale; Alaoui-Sossé, Badr; Aleya, Lotfi

    2016-11-01

    The authors explored the risks and benefits of repeated irrigation of Populus alba saplings with aqueous paper sludge (APS). Saplings were cultivated in pots of forest soil (3 L) in a greenhouse for 7 weeks and watered twice a week with differing concentrations of APS (0, 10, 20, 30, 50, 75, and 100 % v/v with deionized water). Plant growth and ecophysiological variables along with zinc and aluminum transfer were monitored. A stimulation of plant growth was observed with sludge treatments of 30 or 50 %, significantly correlated to APS input (r = 0.81). This may be explained by the easily available nitrogen as is shown with the positive correlation of CO2 assimilation and leaf nitrogen (r = 0.70). However, a significant reduction in plant growth was observed when treatments of 75 and 100 % of APS were administered, despite a high nutritional level (nitrogen and phosphorus). The study suggests that APS concentrations from 30 to 50 % may positively affect the growth of poplar saplings; however, the higher concentrations indicated a risk for plant growth and the environment.

  18. Molecular evolution and expression divergence of the Populus euphratica Hsf genes provide insight into the stress acclimation of desert poplar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Jia, Huixia; Li, Jianbo; Li, Yu; Lu, Mengzhu; Hu, Jianjun

    2016-07-18

    Heat shock transcription factor (Hsf) family is one of the most important regulators in the plant kingdom. Hsf has been demonstrated to be involved in various processes associated with plant growth, development as well as in response to hormone and abiotic stresses. In this study, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of Hsf family in desert poplar, Populus euphratica. Total of 32 genes encoding Hsf were identified and they were classified into three main classes (A, B, and C). Gene structure and conserved motif analyses indicated that the members in each class were relatively conserved. Total of 10 paralogous pairs were identified in PeuHsf family, in which nine pairs were generated by whole genome duplication events. Ka/Ks analysis showed that PeuHsfs underwent purifying selection pressure. In addition, various cis-acting elements involved in hormone and stress responses located in the promoter regions of PeuHsfs. Gene expression analysis indicated that several PeuHsfs were tissue-specific expression. Compared to Arabidopsis, more PeuHsf genes were significantly induced by heat, drought, and salt stresses (21, 19, and 22 PeuHsfs, respectively). Our findings are helpful in understanding the distinguished adaptability of P. euphratica to extreme environment and providing a basis for functional analysis of PeuHsfs in the future.

  19. Comparative Physiological and Proteomic Analysis Reveals the Leaf Response to Cadmium-Induced Stress in Poplar (Populus yunnanensis).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunqiang; Li, Xiong; Yang, Shihai; Zhou, Yanli; Dong, Chao; Ren, Jian; Sun, Xudong; Yang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Excess amounts of heavy metals are important environmental pollutants with significant ecological and nutritional effects. Cdmium (Cd) is of particular concern because of its widespread occurrence and high toxicity. We conducted physiological and proteomic analyses to improve our understanding of the responses of Populus yunnanensis to Cd stress. The plantlets experienced two apparent stages in their response to Cd stress. During the first stage, transiently induced defense-response molecules, photosynthesis- and energy-associated proteins, antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs) accumulated to enhance protein stability and establish a new cellular homeostasis. This activity explains why plant photosynthetic capability during this period barely changed. During the second stage, a decline of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO) and HSP levels led to imbalance of the plant photosynthetic system. Additionally, the expression of Mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MPK3), Mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 (MPK6) and a homeobox-leucine zipper protein was higher in the second stage. Higher expression of caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT) may regulate plant cell wall synthesis for greater Cd storage. These genes may be candidates for further research and use in genetic manipulation of poplar tolerance to Cd stress.

  20. Comparative Physiological and Proteomic Analysis Reveals the Leaf Response to Cadmium-Induced Stress in Poplar (Populus yunnanensis)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shihai; Zhou, Yanli; Dong, Chao; Ren, Jian; Sun, Xudong; Yang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Excess amounts of heavy metals are important environmental pollutants with significant ecological and nutritional effects. Cdmium (Cd) is of particular concern because of its widespread occurrence and high toxicity. We conducted physiological and proteomic analyses to improve our understanding of the responses of Populus yunnanensis to Cd stress. The plantlets experienced two apparent stages in their response to Cd stress. During the first stage, transiently induced defense-response molecules, photosynthesis- and energy-associated proteins, antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs) accumulated to enhance protein stability and establish a new cellular homeostasis. This activity explains why plant photosynthetic capability during this period barely changed. During the second stage, a decline of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO) and HSP levels led to imbalance of the plant photosynthetic system. Additionally, the expression of Mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MPK3), Mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 (MPK6) and a homeobox-leucine zipper protein was higher in the second stage. Higher expression of caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT) may regulate plant cell wall synthesis for greater Cd storage. These genes may be candidates for further research and use in genetic manipulation of poplar tolerance to Cd stress. PMID:26349064

  1. Molecular evolution and expression divergence of the Populus euphratica Hsf genes provide insight into the stress acclimation of desert poplar

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Jia, Huixia; Li, Jianbo; Li, Yu; Lu, Mengzhu; Hu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock transcription factor (Hsf) family is one of the most important regulators in the plant kingdom. Hsf has been demonstrated to be involved in various processes associated with plant growth, development as well as in response to hormone and abiotic stresses. In this study, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of Hsf family in desert poplar, Populus euphratica. Total of 32 genes encoding Hsf were identified and they were classified into three main classes (A, B, and C). Gene structure and conserved motif analyses indicated that the members in each class were relatively conserved. Total of 10 paralogous pairs were identified in PeuHsf family, in which nine pairs were generated by whole genome duplication events. Ka/Ks analysis showed that PeuHsfs underwent purifying selection pressure. In addition, various cis-acting elements involved in hormone and stress responses located in the promoter regions of PeuHsfs. Gene expression analysis indicated that several PeuHsfs were tissue-specific expression. Compared to Arabidopsis, more PeuHsf genes were significantly induced by heat, drought, and salt stresses (21, 19, and 22 PeuHsfs, respectively). Our findings are helpful in understanding the distinguished adaptability of P. euphratica to extreme environment and providing a basis for functional analysis of PeuHsfs in the future. PMID:27425424

  2. Fate of xylem-transported 11C- and 13C-labeled CO2 in leaves of poplar.

    PubMed

    Bloemen, Jasper; Bauweraerts, Ingvar; De Vos, Filip; Vanhove, Christian; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Boeckx, Pascal; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    In recent studies, assimilation of xylem-transported CO2 has gained considerable attention as a means of recycling respired CO2 in trees. However, we still lack a clear and detailed picture on the magnitude of xylem-transported CO2 assimilation, in particular within leaf tissues. To this end, detached poplar leaves (Populus × canadensis Moench 'Robusta') were allowed to take up a dissolved (13)CO2 label serving as a proxy of xylem-transported CO2 entering the leaf from the branch. The uptake rate of the (13)C was manipulated by altering the vapor pressure deficit (VPD) (0.84, 1.29 and 1.83 kPa). Highest tissue enrichments were observed under the highest VPD. Among tissues, highest enrichment was observed in the petiole and the veins, regardless of the VPD treatment. Analysis of non-labeled leaves showed that some (13)C diffused from the labeled leaves and was fixed in the mesophyll of the non-labeled leaves. However, (13)C leaf tissue enrichment analysis with elemental analysis coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry was limited in spatial resolution at the leaf tissue level. Therefore, (11)C-based CO2 labeling combined with positron autoradiography was used and showed a more detailed spatial distribution within a single tissue, in particular in secondary veins. Therefore, in addition to (13)C, (11) C-based autoradiography can be used to study the fate of xylem-transported CO2 at leaf level, allowing the acquisition of data at a yet unprecedented resolution.

  3. The effects of gamma irradiation on growth and expression of genes encoding DNA repair-related proteins in Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra var. italica).

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Mitsuru; Nanjo, Tokihiko; Yoshida, Kazumasa

    2012-07-01

    In this study, to elucidate the mechanisms of adaptation and tolerance to ionizing radiation in woody plants, we investigated the various biological effects of γ-rays on the Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra L. var. italica Du Roi). We detected abnormal leaf shape and color, fusion, distorted venation, shortened internode, fasciation and increased axillary shoots in γ-irradiated poplar plants. Acute γ-irradiation with a dose of 100Gy greatly reduced the height, stem diameter and biomass of poplar plantlets. After receiving doses of 200 and 300Gy, all the plantlets stopped growing, and then most of them withered after 4-10 weeks of γ-irradiation. Comet assays showed that nuclear DNA in suspension-cultured poplar cells had been damaged by γ-rays. To determine whether DNA repair-related proteins are involved in the response to γ-rays in Lombardy poplars, we cloned the PnRAD51, PnLIG4, PnKU70, PnXRCC4, PnPCNA and PnOGG1 cDNAs and investigated their mRNA expression. The PnRAD51, PnLIG4, PnKU70, PnXRCC4 and PnPCNA mRNAs were increased by γ-rays, but the PnOGG1 mRNA was decreased. Moreover, the expression of PnLIG4, PnKU70 and PnRAD51 was also up-regulated by Zeocin known as a DNA cleavage agent. These observations suggest that the morphogenesis, growth and protective gene expression in Lombardy poplars are severely affected by the DNA damage and unknown cellular events caused by γ-irradiation.

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of ethanol extracts of Chinese propolis and buds from poplar (Populus×canadensis).

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Jianglin; Ping, Shun; Ma, Quanxin; Chen, Xuan; Xuan, Hongzhuan; Shi, Jinhu; Zhang, Cuiping; Hu, Fuliang

    2014-08-08

    Propolis is used widely in a number of cultures as a folk medicine and is gaining wider recognition for its potential therapeutic use, due to its wide range of biological properties and pharmacological activities, especially its anti-inflammatory effects. Despite an increasing number of studies focused on the biological activities of propolis together with its botanical sources, studies on Chinese propolis are insufficient. This study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of ethanol extracts from Chinese propolis (EECP) and poplar buds (EEPB) from Populus×canadensis Moench (Salicaceae family). Phytochemical analysis of EECP and EEPB was performed via total phenolic and flavonoid content measurements followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. DPPH and ABTS free-radical scavenging methods were used to evaluate their anti-oxidant properties. The anti-inflammatory effects of EECP and EEPB were investigated in vitro by evaluating their modulating effects on the key inflammatory cytokines and mediators in LPS/IFN-γ co-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and by measuring nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in TNF-α or IL-1β stimulation HEK 293 cells using reporter gene assays. Their effects on acute inflammatory symptoms (LPS-induced endotoxemia and acute pulmonary damage) were also examined in mice. EECP and EEPB exhibited strong free-radical scavenging activity and significant in vitro anti-inflammatory effects by modulating key inflammatory mediators of mRNA transcription, inhibiting the production of specific inflammatory cytokines, and blocking the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. The administration of EECP and EEPB (25 and 100 mg/kg) provided significant protective effects by attenuating lung histopathological changes and suppressing the secretion of LPS-stimulated inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-12p70 production in endotoxemic mice. The results presented here reveal

  5. Altering carbon allocation in hybrid poplar ( Populus alba × grandidentata ) impacts cell wall growth and development

    DOE PAGES

    Unda, Faride; Kim, Hoon; Hefer, Charles; ...

    2017-03-04

    Galactinol synthase is a pivotal enzyme involved in the synthesis of the raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs) that function as transport carbohydrates in the phloem, as storage compounds in sink tissues and as soluble metabolites that combat both abiotic and biotic stress in several plant species. For hybrid poplar (Populus alba 9 grandidentata) overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana GolS3 (AtGolS3) gene showed clear effects on development; the extreme overexpressing lines were stunted and had cell wall traits characteristic of tension wood, whereas lines with only moderate up-regulation grew normally and had moderately altered secondary cell wall composition and ultrastructure. Stem cross-sectionsmore » of the developing xylem revealed a significant increase in the number of vessels, as well as the clear presence of a G-layer in the fibres. Furthermore, AtGolS3-OE lines possessed higher cellulose and lower lignin contents, an increase in cellulose crystallinity, and significantly altered hemicellulose-derived carbohydrates, notably manifested by their mannose and xylose contents. Additionally, the transgenic plants displayed elevated xylem starch content. Transcriptome interrogation of the transgenic plants showed a significant up-regulation of genes involved in the synthesis of myo-inositol, along with genes involved in sucrose degradation. Our results suggest that the over expression of GolS and its product galactinol may serve as a molecular signal that initiates metabolic changes, culminating in a change in cell wall development and potentially the formation of tension wood.« less

  6. Altering carbon allocation in hybrid poplar (Populus alba × grandidentata) impacts cell wall growth and development.

    PubMed

    Unda, Faride; Kim, Hoon; Hefer, Charles; Ralph, John; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2017-07-01

    Galactinol synthase is a pivotal enzyme involved in the synthesis of the raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs) that function as transport carbohydrates in the phloem, as storage compounds in sink tissues and as soluble metabolites that combat both abiotic and biotic stress in several plant species. Hybrid poplar (Populus alba × grandidentata) overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana GolS3 (AtGolS3) gene showed clear effects on development; the extreme overexpressing lines were stunted and had cell wall traits characteristic of tension wood, whereas lines with only moderate up-regulation grew normally and had moderately altered secondary cell wall composition and ultrastructure. Stem cross-sections of the developing xylem revealed a significant increase in the number of vessels, as well as the clear presence of a G-layer in the fibres. Furthermore, AtGolS3-OE lines possessed higher cellulose and lower lignin contents, an increase in cellulose crystallinity, and significantly altered hemicellulose-derived carbohydrates, notably manifested by their mannose and xylose contents. In addition, the transgenic plants displayed elevated xylem starch content. Transcriptome interrogation of the transgenic plants showed a significant up-regulation of genes involved in the synthesis of myo-inositol, along with genes involved in sucrose degradation. The results suggest that the overexpression of GolS and its product galactinol may serve as a molecular signal that initiates metabolic changes, culminating in a change in cell wall development and potentially the formation of tension wood. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Adaptive traits to fluvial systems of native tree European black Poplar (Populus nigra L.) population in Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulino, Luigi; Pasquino, Vittorio; Todaro, Luigi; Rita, Angelo; Villani, Paolo; Battista Chirico, Giovanni; Saracino, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    This work focuses on the morphological and biomechanical traits developed by the European black poplar (Populus nigra) to cope with the hydraulic force and prolonged submersion periods during floods. Two riverine environments of the Cilento sub-region (Southern Italy) have been selected for this experimental study. The two sites have the same climatic and hydrological regimes. The first site is located along the Ripiti stream, characterized by a braided channel with longitudinal and transverse bars and eroding banks. The second site is located along the Badolato stream, an entrenched meandering riffle/pool channel, with low gradients and high width/depth. P. nigra mixed with Salix alba and along the Badolato stream also Platanus orientalis, is the dominant wooden riparian vegetation in both sites. Cuttings from adult P. nigra trees originated by seeds were collected and planted in the 'Azienda Sperimentale Regionale Improsta' (Eboli-Salerno, Campania region). The experimental plantation was managed according to a multi-stem short rotation coppice with low external energy input and high disturbance regime generated by a 3 years rotation coppicing. The two sample stool sets exhibit statistically similar morphological traits, but different values of Young elasticity module of the shoots. A functional evaluation of the biomechanical differences was performed by measuring the bending of the individual stems under the hypothesis of complete submergence within a flow of different mean velocities, using a numerical model that predicts the bending of woody vegetation beams allowing for large deflections. The results suggest that plants with the same gene pool but coming from morphologically different riverine environments, may reflect different dominant biomechanical properties, which might be relevant for designing local sustainable management and restoration plans of rivers and riparian systems.

  8. Comparative physiological and proteomic analyses of poplar (Populus yunnanensis) plantlets exposed to high temperature and drought.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiong; Yang, Yunqiang; Sun, Xudong; Lin, Huaming; Chen, Jinhui; Ren, Jian; Hu, Xiangyang; Yang, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Plantlets of Populus yunnanensis Dode were examined in a greenhouse for 48 h to analyze their physiological and proteomic responses to sustained heat, drought, and combined heat and drought. Compared with the application of a single stress, simultaneous treatment with both stresses damaged the plantlets more heavily. The plantlets experienced two apparent response stages under sustained heat and drought. During the first stage, malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents were induced by heat, but many protective substances, including antioxidant enzymes, proline, abscisic acid (ABA), dehydrin, and small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), were also stimulated. The plants thus actively defended themselves against stress and exhibited few pathological morphological features, most likely because a new cellular homeostasis was established through the collaborative operation of physiological and proteomic responses. During the second stage, ROS homeostasis was overwhelmed by substantial ROS production and a sharp decline in antioxidant enzyme activities, while the synthesis of some protective elements, such as proline and ABA, was suppressed. As a result, photosynthetic levels in P. yunnanensis decreased sharply and buds began to die, despite continued accumulation of sHSPs and dehydrin. This study supplies important information about the effects of extreme abiotic environments on woody plants.

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of Chinese White poplar (Populus tomentosa) revealed by SSR markers.

    PubMed

    Du, Qingzhang; Wang, Bowen; Wei, Zunzheng; Zhang, Deqiang; Li, Bailian

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of allelic diversity and population structure is important in developing association studies and constructing core collections for tree breeding. We examined population genetic differentiation in the native Populus tomentosa by genotyping 460 unrelated individuals using 20 species-specific microsatellite markers. We identified 99 alleles with a mean of 4.95 observed alleles per locus, indicating a moderate level of polymorphism across all individuals. A model-based population structure analysis divided P. tomentosa into 11 subpopulations (K = 11). The pattern of individual assignments into the subsets (K = 3) provided reasonable evidence for treating climatic zones as genetic regions for population genetics. The highest level of genetic variation was found in the southern region (i.e., N = 93, N (P) = 11, H (E) = 0.445, F = -0.102), followed by the northeastern and northwestern regions. Thus, the southern region is probably the center of the current species distribution. No correlation was found between population genetic distance and geographic distance (r = 0.0855, P = 0.3140), indicating that geographical distance was not the principal factor influencing genetic differentiation in P. tomentosa. These data provide a starting point for conserving valuable natural resources and optimizing breeding programs.

  10. Comparative Physiological and Proteomic Analyses of Poplar (Populus yunnanensis) Plantlets Exposed to High Temperature and Drought

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xudong; Lin, Huaming; Chen, Jinhui; Ren, Jian; Hu, Xiangyang; Yang, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Plantlets of Populus yunnanensis Dode were examined in a greenhouse for 48 h to analyze their physiological and proteomic responses to sustained heat, drought, and combined heat and drought. Compared with the application of a single stress, simultaneous treatment with both stresses damaged the plantlets more heavily. The plantlets experienced two apparent response stages under sustained heat and drought. During the first stage, malondialdehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents were induced by heat, but many protective substances, including antioxidant enzymes, proline, abscisic acid (ABA), dehydrin, and small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), were also stimulated. The plants thus actively defended themselves against stress and exhibited few pathological morphological features, most likely because a new cellular homeostasis was established through the collaborative operation of physiological and proteomic responses. During the second stage, ROS homeostasis was overwhelmed by substantial ROS production and a sharp decline in antioxidant enzyme activities, while the synthesis of some protective elements, such as proline and ABA, was suppressed. As a result, photosynthetic levels in P. yunnanensis decreased sharply and buds began to die, despite continued accumulation of sHSPs and dehydrin. This study supplies important information about the effects of extreme abiotic environments on woody plants. PMID:25225913

  11. The physiological response of Populus tremula x alba leaves to the down-regulation of PIP1 aquaporin gene expression under no water stress

    PubMed Central

    Secchi, Francesca; Zwieniecki, Maciej A.

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the role of PIP1 aquaporins in leaf water and CO2 transport, several lines of PIP1-deficient transgenic Populus tremula x alba were generated using a reverse genetic approach. These transgenic lines displayed no visible developmental or morphological phenotypes when grown under conditions of no water stress. Major photosynthetic parameters were also not affected by PIP1 down regulation. However, low levels of PIP1 expression resulted in greater leaf hydraulic resistance (an increase of 27%), which effectively implicated PIP1 role in water transport. Additionally, the expression level of PIP1 genes in the various transgenic lines was correlated with reductions in mesophyll conductance to CO2 (gm), suggesting that in poplar, these aquaporins influenced membrane permeability to CO2. Overall, although analysis showed that PIP1 genes contributed to the mass transfer of water and CO2 in poplar leaves, their down-regulation did not dramatically impair the physiological needs of this fast growing tree when cultivated under conditions of no stress. PMID:24379822

  12. Determination of the site of CO₂ sensing in poplar: is the area-based N content and anatomy of new leaves determined by their immediate CO₂ environment or by the CO₂ environment of mature leaves?

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Shin-Ichi; Warren, Charles R; Turpin, David H; Livingston, Nigel J

    2011-05-01

    Exposure to an elevated CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) generally decreases leaf N content per unit area (N(area)) and stomatal density, and increases leaf thickness. Mature leaves can 'sense' elevated [CO(2)] and this regulates stomatal development of expanding leaves (systemic regulation). It is unclear if systemic regulation is involved in determination of leaf thickness and N(area)-traits that are significantly correlated with photosynthetic capacity. A cuvette system was used whereby [CO(2)] around mature leaves was controlled separately from that around expanding leaves. Expanding leaves of poplar (Populus trichocarpa×P. deltoides) seedlings were exposed to elevated [CO(2)] (720 μmol mol(-1)) while the remaining mature leaves inside the cuvette were under ambient [CO(2)] of 360 μmol mol(-1). Reverse treatments were performed. Exposure of newly developing leaves to elevated [CO(2)] increased their thickness, but when mature leaves were exposed to elevated [CO(2)] the increase in thickness of new leaves was less pronounced. The largest response to [CO(2)] was reflected in the palisade tissue thickness (as opposed to the spongy tissue) of new leaves. The N(area) of new leaves was unaffected by the local [CO(2)] where the new leaves developed, but decreased following the exposure of mature leaves to elevated [CO(2)]. The volume fraction of mesophyll cells compared with total leaf and the mesophyll cell density changed in a manner similar to the response of N(area). These results suggest that N(area) is controlled independently of the leaf thickness, and suggest that N(area) is under systemic regulation by [CO(2)] signals from mature leaves that control mesophyll cell division.

  13. Genotypic variations in the dynamics of metal concentrations in poplar leaves: a field study with a perspective on phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Pottier, Mathieu; García de la Torre, Vanesa S; Victor, Cindy; David, Laure C; Chalot, Michel; Thomine, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Poplar is commonly used for phytoremediation of metal polluted soils. However, the high concentrations of trace elements present in leaves may return to soil upon leaf abscission. To investigate the mechanisms controlling leaf metal content, metal concentrations and expression levels of genes involved in metal transport were monitored at different developmental stages on leaves from different poplar genotypes growing on a contaminated field. Large differences in leaf metal concentrations were observed among genotypes. Whereas Mg was remobilized during senescence, Zn and Cd accumulation continued until leaf abscission in all genotypes. A positive correlation between Natural Resistance Associated Macrophage Protein 1 (NRAMP1) expression levels and Zn bio-concentration factors was observed. Principal component analyses of metal concentrations and gene expression levels clearly discriminated poplar genotypes. This study highlights a general absence of trace element remobilization from poplar leaves despite genotype specificities in the control of leaf metal homeostasis.

  14. Impact of moderate Fe excess under Cd stress on the photosynthetic performance of poplar (Populus jacquemontiana var. glauca cv. Kopeczkii).

    PubMed

    Sárvári, Eva; Solti, Adám; Basa, Brigitta; Mészáros, Ilona; Lévai, László; Fodor, Ferenc

    2011-05-01

    Cadmium interference with Fe nutrition has a strong impact on the development and efficiency of the photosynthetic apparatus. To shed more light on the interaction between Fe and Cd, it was studied how iron given in moderate excess under Cd stress affects the development and functioning of chlorophyll-protein complexes. Poplar plants grown in hydroponics up to four-leaf stage were treated with 10 μM Cd(NO₃)₂ in the presence of 50 μM Fe([III])-citrate as iron supply (5xFe + Cad) for two weeks. Though leaf area growth was inhibited similarly to that of Cad (10 μM Cd(NO₃)₂ + 10 μM Fe([III])-citrate) plants, chlorophyll content, ¹⁴CO₂ fixation and quenching parameters calculated from PAM fluorescence induction measurements were control-like in 5xFe+Cad leaves. Increased chloroplast iron content (measured photometrically by the bathophenanthroline disulfonate method) without changes in the iron and cadmium content of leaves (determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) pointed out that a key factor in the observed protection of photosynthesis is the iron-excess-induced redistribution of iron in the leaf. However, the chlorophyll a/b ratio and the chlorophyll-protein pattern obtained by Deriphat PAGE remained similar to that of Cad leaves. The decreased amount of PSII core and PSI in mature and developing leaves, respectively, refers to developmental stage-dependent remodelling of thylakoids in the presence of Cd. The results underline not only the beneficial effect of iron excess under Cd stress, but also refer to the importance of a proper Fe/Cd ratio and light environment to avoid its possible harmful effects.

  15. Overexpression of PtrMYB119, a R2R3-MYB transcription factor from Populus trichocarpa, promotes anthocyanin production in hybrid poplar.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jin-Seong; Nguyen, Van Phap; Jeon, Hyung-Woo; Kim, Min-Ha; Eom, Seok Hyun; Lim, You Jin; Kim, Won-Chan; Park, Eung-Jun; Choi, Young-Im; Ko, Jae-Heung

    2016-09-01

    Anthocyanins are a group of colorful and bioactive natural pigments with important physiological and ecological functions in plants. We found an MYB transcription factor (PtrMYB119) from Populus trichocarpa that positively regulates anthocyanin production when expressed under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that PtrMYB119 is highly homologous to Arabidopsis PAP1 (PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT1), a well-known transcriptional activator of anthocyanin biosynthesis. Independently produced transgenic poplars overexpressing PtrMYB119 or PtrMYB120 (a paralogous gene to PtrMYB119) (i.e., 35S::PtrMYB119 and 35S::PtrMYB120, respectively) showed elevated accumulation of anthocyanins in the whole plants, including leaf, stem and even root tissues. Using a reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, we confirmed that the majority of the accumulated anthocyanin in our transgenic poplar is cyanidin-3-O-glucoside. Gene expression analyses revealed that most of the genes involved in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway were highly upregulated in 35S::PtrMYB119 poplars compared with the nontransformed control poplar. Among these genes, expression of PtrCHS1 (Chalcone Synthase1) and PtrANS2 (Anthocyanin Synthase2), which catalyze the initial and last steps of anthocyanin biosynthesis, respectively, was upregulated by up to 350-fold. Subsequent transient activation assays confirmed that PtrMYB119 activated the transcription of both PtrCHS1 and PtrANS2 Interestingly, expression of MYB182, a repressor of both anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin (PA) biosynthesis, was largely suppressed in 35S::PtrMYB119 poplars, while expression of MYB134, an activator of PA biosynthesis, was not changed significantly. More interestingly, high-level accumulation of anthocyanins in 35S::PtrMYB119 poplars did not have an adverse effect on plant growth. Taken together, our results demonstrate that PtrMYB119 and PtrMYB120

  16. Determination of Fe, Hg, Mn, and Pb in three-rings of poplar (Populus alba L.) by U-shaped DC arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, D. M.; Novović, I.; Vilotić, D.; Ignjatović, Lj.

    2007-09-01

    The U-shaped DC arc with aerosol supply was applied for the determination of Fe, Hg, Mn, and Pb in poplar (Populus alba L.) tree-rings. By optimization of the operating parameters and by selection of the most appropriate signal integration time (20 s for Fe, Mn, and Pb and 30 s for Hg), the obtained limits of detection for Fe, Hg, Mn, and Pb are 5.8, 2.6, 1.6, and 2.0 ng/ml, respectively. The detection limits achieved by this method for Fe, Hg, Mn, and Pb are comparable with the detection limits obtained for these elements by such methods as inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), direct coupled plasmatomic emission spectrometry (DCP-AES), and microwave-induced plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (MIP-AES). We used the tree-rings of poplar from two different locations. The first one is in the area close to the power plant “Nikola Tesla” TENT A, Obrenovac, while the other one is in the urban area of Novi Sad. In almost all cases, samples from the location at Obrenovac registered elevated average concentrations of Fe, Hg, Mn, and Pb in the tree-rings of poplar.

  17. Low temperature induces different cold sensitivity in two poplar clones (Populus x canadensis Monch 'I-214' and P. deltoides Marsh. 'Dvina').

    PubMed

    Cocozza, Claudia; Lasserre, Bruno; Giovannelli, Alessio; Castro, Gaetano; Fragnelli, Giuseppe; Tognetti, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Changes of stem diameter were continuously monitored during winter in two field-grown poplar clones, using automatic point dendrometers. The objective of this study was to find an analytical solution to seasonal synchronization of stem diameter oscillations and low air temperatures. The study identified to what extent and with what frequency low air temperature induced stem diameter variation in 'Dvina' (P. deltoides) and 'I-214' (Populus x canadensis) poplar clones, after exposure to summer drought. The patterns of reversible stem shrinkage were related to the cycles of low air temperature. Hourly and daily evidence showed that 'I-214' was more sensitive to low air temperatures than 'Dvina'. The analysis of raw data and graphic details implemented with the study of derivative tests allowed an increase in the general sensitivity of the investigation applied to describe the response of poplar clones to environmental conditions. Given these diameter fluctuation patterns, automatic point dendrometers were confirmed to be a reliable non-invasive method for testing the sensitivity of diameter variation to cold temperature. Variation in rate and duration of daily stem shrinkage in response to low air temperature in winter appeared to occur independently of the effects of water deficit suffered by plants the previous summer.

  18. [Effects of salt-alkali stress on osmoregulation substance and active oxygen metabolism of Qingshan poplar (Populus pseudo-cathayana x P. deltoides)].

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong-qing; Wang, Wen-jie; Zhu, Hong; Shi, Xi-chan; Liu, Xing-liang; Zu, Yuan-gang

    2009-09-01

    Aimed to examine the adaptability of Qingshan poplar (Populus pseudo-cathayana x P. deltoides) to salt-alkali stress, two-year-old cutting seedlings of the poplar were treated with 28 combinations of salt-alkali stress. With increasing salt concentration, the leaf electrolyte leakage and MDA and proline contents of test seedlings all showed an increasing trend, while the leaf soluble sugar content and SOD and POD activities increased first but decreased afterwards. The increase of substrate pH made the electrolyte leakage, MDA content, and POD activity increased and the proline and soluble sugar contents decreased after an initial increase, but had lesser effects on the SOD activity. When the salinity was <100 mmol x L(-1) and the pH was increasing, all test physiological indices had a slight change while SOD activity kept at a higher level; when the salinity was >200 mmol x L(-1) and the pH was higher than 8.99, the electrolyte leakagewas higher than 50%, POD activity and MDA content increased obviously, proline and soluble sugar contents declined, and SOD activity was lower. It was concluded that a salt-alkali condition with salinity >200 mmol x L(-1) and pH > 8.99 was not appropriate to the growth of Qingshan poplar.

  19. Epidermal Micromorphology and Mesophyll Structure of Populus euphratica Heteromorphic Leaves at Different Development Stages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yubing; Li, Xinrong; Chen, Guoxiong; Li, Mengmeng; Liu, Meiling; Liu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Leaf epidermal micromorphology and mesophyll structure during the development of Populus euphratica heteromorphic leaves, including linear, lanceolate, ovate, dentate ovate, dentate rhombic, dentate broad-ovate and dentate fan-shaped leaves, were studied by using electron and light microscopy. During development of heteromorphic leaves, epidermal appendages (wax crystals and trichomes) and special cells (mucilage cells and crystal idioblasts) increased in all leaf types while chloroplast ultrastructure and stomatal characters show maximum photosynthetic activity in dentate ovate and rhombic leaves. Also, functional analysis by subordinate function values shows that the maximum adaptability to adverse stress was exhibited in the broad type of mature leaves. The 12 heteromorphic leaf types are classified into three major groups by hierarchical cluster analysis: young, developing and mature leaves. Mature leaves can effectively obtain the highest stress resistance by combining the protection of xerophytic anatomy from drought stress, regulation of water uptake in micro-environment by mucilage and crystal idioblasts, and assistant defense of transpiration reduction through leaf epidermal appendages, which improves photosynthetic activity under arid desert conditions. Our data confirms that the main leaf function is differentiated during the developing process of heteromorphic leaves. PMID:26356300

  20. Underground riparian wood: Buried stem and coarse root structures of Black Poplar (Populus nigra L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, James V.; Rillig, Matthias C.; Gurnell, Angela M.

    2017-02-01

    Despite the potential importance of tree species in influencing the processes of wood recruitment, transport, retention, and decay that control river wood budgets, focus has been relatively limited on this theme within fluvial wood research. Furthermore, one of the least investigated topics is the belowground living wood component of riparian trees. This paper presents observations of the morphology and age of buried stem and coarse root structures of eight Populus nigra individuals located in the riparian woodland of two sites on the middle to lower Tagliamento River, Italy. This species was selected because of its wide distribution along European rivers and its frequent dominance of riparian woodland. Each tree was excavated by hand to expose a minimum of half of the root system with complete exposure of the main axis. Smaller roots were then removed and larger protruding roots cut back to permit access to the main axis. The excavated structures were photographed from multiple angles for photogrammetric modelling; the structure and character of the exposed sediments around the tree's main axis were recorded; and wood samples were taken from the main aboveground stem(s), sections of the main buried axis, and major roots for dendrochronological analysis. Results from these field observations and laboratory dating of the wood samples were combined to describe the belowground morphology of each tree and to draw inferences concerning the impact of fluvial disturbances. Common features of these excavated structures included: (i) rooting depths to below the bar surface where the original tree established, with many young roots also existing at depth; (ii) translocation of the main buried axis in a downstream direction; (iii) a main buried axis comprised mainly of stems that have become buried and then generated new shoots, including multistem patches, and adventitious roots; (iv) the presence of steps and bends in the main buried axis associated with the generation of

  1. Prioritization of copper for the use in photosynthetic electron transport in developing leaves of hybrid poplar

    PubMed Central

    Shahbaz, Muhammad; Ravet, Karl; Peers, Graham; Pilon, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Plastocyanin (PC) is an essential and abundant copper (Cu) protein required for photosynthesis in higher plants. Severe copper deprivation has the potential to cause a defect in photosynthetic electron transport due to a lack in PC. The Cu-microRNAs, which are up-regulated under Cu deficiency, down-regulate the expression of target Cu proteins other than PC, cytochrome-c oxidase and the ethylene receptors. It has been proposed that this mechanism saves Cu for PC maturation. We aimed to test how hybrid poplar, a species that has capacity to rapidly expand its photosynthetically active tissue, responds to variations in Cu availability over time. Measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence after Cu depletion revealed a drastic effect on photosynthesis in hybrid poplar. The decrease in photosynthetic capacity was correlated with a reduction in PC protein levels. Compared to older leaves, PC decreased more strongly in developing leaves, which also lost more photosynthetic electron transport capacity. The effect of Cu depletion on older and more developed leaves was minor and these leaves maintained much of their photosynthetic capacity. Interestingly, upon resupply of Cu to the medium a very rapid recovery of Cu levels was seen in the younger leaves with a concomitant rise in the expression and activity of PC. In contrast, the expression of those Cu proteins, which are targets of microRNAs was under the same circumstances delayed. At the same time, Cu resupply had only minor effects on the older leaves. The data suggest a model where rapid recovery of photosynthetic capacity in younger leaves is made possible by a preferred allocation of Cu to PC in younger leaves, which is supported by Cu-microRNA expression. PMID:26089828

  2. Inhibitor studies of leaf lamina hydraulic conductance in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Mihaela C; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2010-02-01

    The present study investigated leaf water transport properties in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) leaves. Leaf lamina hydraulic conductance (K(lam)) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) were drastically suppressed by NaF (a general metabolic inhibitor). In leaves treated with 0.2 mM HgCl(2) (an aquaporin blocker), K(lam) declined by 22% when the leaves were sampled in June but the decline was not significant when the leaves were sampled in August. The leaves sampled in June that transpired 30 mM beta-mercaptoethanol following mercury application showed similar K(lam) as those in control leaves transpiring distilled water. When leaves were pressure-infiltrated with 0.1 mM HgCl(2), K(lam) significantly declined by 25%. Atrazine (a photosystem II inhibitor) drastically reduced leaf net CO(2) uptake by the leaves from seedlings and mature trees but did not have any effect on K(lam) regardless of the irradiance at the leaf level during the K(lam) measurements. When PTS(3) (trisodium 3-hydroxy-5,8,10-pyrenetrisulphonate) apoplastic tracer was pressure-infiltrated inside the leaves, its concentration in the leaf exudates did not change from ambient light to high irradiance treatment and declined in the presence of HgCl(2) in the treatment solution. Trembling aspen K(lam) appears to be linked to leaf metabolism and is uncoupled from the short-term variations in photosynthesis. Aquaporin-mediated water transport does not appear to constitute the dominant pathway for the pressure-driven water flow in the leaves of trembling aspen trees.

  3. Assimilate movement dictates remote sites of wound-induced gene expression in poplar leaves.

    PubMed

    Davis, J M; Gordon, M P; Smit, B A

    1991-03-15

    When a single leaf on a young poplar tree is mechanically wounded, wound-induced (win) mRNAs are detected in the unwounded portion of that leaf and in specific leaves that are remote from the wounded leaf. Shortly after wounding (6-8 hr), the remote leaves in which win genes are expressed can be predicted by a knowledge of photoassimilate movement patterns in vivo. When assimilate movement from a wounded leaf is blocked or the direction of assimilate movement is altered by shading, win gene expression in remote leaves is similarly blocked or altered. These data illustrate how the long-distance transduction of wound-induced signals can be manipulated in plants by altering carbon allocation.

  4. Leaching of contaminated leaves following uptake and phytoremediation of RDX, HMX, and TNT by poplar.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Moon; Van Aken, Benoit; Schnoor, Jerald L

    2006-01-01

    The uptake and fate of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) by hybrid poplars in hydroponic systems were compared and exposed leaves were leached with water to simulate potential exposure pathways from groundwater in the field. TNT was removed from solution more quickly than nitramine explosives. Most of radioactivity remained in root tissues for 14C-TNT, but in leaves for 14C-RDX and 14C-HMX. Radiolabel recovery for TNT and HMX was over 94%, but that of RDX decreased over time, suggesting a loss of volatile products. A considerable fraction (45.5%) of radioactivity taken up by whole plants exposed to 14C-HMX was released into deionized water, mostly as parent compound after 5 d of leaching. About a quarter (24.0%) and 1.2% were leached for RDX and TNT, respectively, mostly as transformed products. Leached radioactivity from roots was insignificant in all cases (< 2%). This is the first report in which small amounts of transformation products of RDX leach from dried leaves following uptake by poplars. Such behavior for HMX was reported earlier and is reconfirmed here. All three compounds differ substantially in their fate and transport during the leaching process.

  5. [Effects of 6-BA and AsA on photosynthesis photoinhibition of attached poplar leaves under osmotic stress of root].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yulong; Ma, Yongshuang; Feng, Zhili

    2004-12-01

    In order to know more about the relationships between photosynthesis photoinhibition and reactive oxygen species metabolism, the effects of 6-benzyladenine (6-BA) and ascorbate (AsA) on net photosynthetic rate (Pn), apparent quantum yield (AQY), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities, O2-* generation rate, and H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were studied with attached leaves of poplar clone seedlings under osmotic stress of root. Under osmotic stress, the photosynthesis photoinhibition of attached poplar leaves, judged by the significant decrease of Pn and AQY, was aggravated, and the balance of reactive oxygen species metabolism was destroyed. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity increased, but ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity decreased. In the meantime, the O2-* generation rate and the contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) increased. When osmotic stressed poplar seedlings were pretreated with 6-BA and AsA, the activities of SOD and APX increased, O2-* generation rate and H2O2 and MDA contents decreased, and photosynthesis photoinhibition was alleviated. The contents of reactive oxygen species and MDA in poplar leaves were negatively correlated with net photosynthetic rate and apparent quantum yield. It's indicated that the photosynthesis photoinhibition of attached leaves of poplar clone seedlings had intrinsic relations with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species under osmotic stress of root, and the alleviation effects of 6-BA and AsA on photosynthesis photoinhibition were related to their promotion effects to the scavenging system of reactive oxygen species.

  6. Microarray and suppression subtractive hybridization analyses of gene expression in hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus tremula var. glandulosa) cell suspension cultures after exposure to NaCl.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Hyoshin; Lee, Jae-Soon; Noh, Eun-Woon; Choi, Young-Im; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Choi, Dong-Woog

    2012-09-01

    The gene expression profiles of hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus tremula var. glandulosa) cells in suspension culture after exposure to salinity (NaCl) induced stress were examined by constructing two suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries. cDNA from non-treated cells was used as a driver and cDNA samples from cell suspension cultures exposed to 150 mM NaCl for 2 or 10 h were used as testers. Randomly selected clones from each SSH library were sequenced and 727 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained and analyzed. Four novel ESTs were identified. Between the two libraries, 542 unique SSH clones were selected for placement on a cDNA microarray. In total, 18 differentially expressed genes were identified with 4 and 12 genes being significantly differentially expressed 2 and 10 h after the treatment, respectively. Genes related to metabolism and protein synthesis and several genes whose protein products are implicated in salt or other abiotic stress-related responses were expressed in the salt-stressed cells.

  7. Regulation of sulphate assimilation by glutathione in poplars (Populus tremula x P. alba) of wild type and overexpressing gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase in the cytosol.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Tanja; Hönicke, Petra; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger; Rennenberg, Heinz; Kopriva, Stanislav

    2004-04-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the major low molecular weight thiol in plants with different functions in stress defence and the transport and storage of sulphur. Its synthesis is dependent on the supply of its constituent amino acids cysteine, glutamate, and glycine. GSH is a feedback inhibitor of the sulphate assimilation pathway, the primary source of cysteine synthesis. Sulphate assimilation has been analysed in transgenic poplars (Populus tremula x P. alba) overexpressing gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, the key enzyme of GSH synthesis, and the results compared with the effects of exogenously added GSH. Although foliar GSH levels were 3-4-fold increased in the transgenic plants, the activities of enzymes of sulphate assimilation, namely ATP sulphurylase, adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate reductase (APR), sulphite reductase, serine acetyltransferase, and O-acetylserine (thiol)lyase were not affected in three transgenic lines compared with the wild type. Also the mRNA levels of these enzymes were not altered by the increased GSH levels. By contrast, an increase in GSH content due to exogenously supplied GSH resulted in a strong reduction in APR activity and mRNA accumulation. This feedback regulation was reverted by simultaneous addition of O-acetylserine (OAS). However, OAS measurements revealed that OAS cannot be the only signal responsible for the lack of feedback regulation of APR by GSH in the transgenic poplars.

  8. Patterns of DNA sequence variation at candidate gene loci in black poplar (Populus nigra L.) as revealed by single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yanguang; Su, Xiaohua; Huang, Qinjun; Zhang, Xianghua

    2009-11-01

    Black poplar (Populus nigra L.) is an economically and ecologically important tree species and an ideal organism for studies of genetic variation. In the present work, we use a candidate gene approach to infer the patterns of DNA variation in natural populations of this species. A total of 312 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are found among 8,056 bp sequenced from nine drought-adaptation and photosynthesis-related gene loci. The median SNP frequency is one site per 26 bp. The average nucleotide diversity is calculated to be theta(W) = 0.01074 and pi(T) = 0.00702, higher values than those observed in P. tremula, P. trichocarpa and most conifer species. Tests of neutrality for each gene reveal a general excess of low-frequency mutations, a greater number of haplotypes than expected and an excess of high-frequency derived variants in P. nigra, which is consistent with previous findings that genetic hitchhiking has occurred in this species. Linkage disequilibrium is low, decaying rapidly from 0.45 to 0.20 or less within a distance of 300 bp, although the declines of r(2) are variable among different loci. This is similar to the rate of decay reported in most other tree species. Our dataset is expected to enhance understanding of how evolutionary forces shape genetic variation, and it will contribute to molecular breeding in black poplar.

  9. Enhanced expression of glutamine synthetase (GS1a) confers altered fibre and wood chemistry in field grown hybrid poplar (Populus tremula X alba) (717-1B4).

    PubMed

    Coleman, Heather D; Cánovas, Francisco M; Man, Huimin; Kirby, Edward G; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2012-09-01

    Hybrid poplar (Populus tremula X P. alba) genetically engineered to express the pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase gene (GS1a) has been previously shown to display desirable field performance characteristics, including enhancements in growth and nitrogen use efficiency. Analysis of wood samples from a 3-year-old field trial of three independently transformed GS1a transgenic hybrid poplar lines revealed that, when compared with wild-type controls, ectopic expression of GS1a resulted in alterations in wood properties and wood chemistry. Included were significant enhancements in wood fibre length, wood density, microfibre angle, per cent syringyl lignin and elevated concentrations of wood sugars, specifically glucose, galactose, mannose and xylose. Total extractive content and acid-insoluble lignin were significantly reduced in wood of GS1a transgenics when compared with wild-type trees. Together, these cell wall characteristics resulted in improved wood pulping attributes, including improved lignin solubilization with no concurrent decrease in yield. Trees with increased GS1a expression have improved characteristics for pulp and paper production and hold potential as a feedstock for biofuels production.

  10. Salt-induced expression of genes related to Na(+)/K(+) and ROS homeostasis in leaves of salt-resistant and salt-sensitive poplar species.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingquan; Hou, Peichen; Shen, Xin; Wang, Meijuan; Deng, Shurong; Sun, Jian; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Ruigang; Zhou, Xiaoyang; Lu, Cunfu; Zhang, Deqiang; Zheng, Xiaojiang; Hu, Zanmin; Chen, Shaoliang

    2010-06-01

    Using the Affymetrix poplar genome array, we explored the leaf transcriptome of salt-tolerant Populus euphratica Oliv. and salt-sensitive P. popularis 35-44 (P. popularis) under control and saline conditions. Our objective was to clarify the genomic differences in regulating K(+)/Na(+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis between the two species. Compared to P. popularis, salt-tolerant P. euphratica responses to salinity involved induction of a relatively larger number of probesets after short-term (ST) exposure to 150 mM NaCl (24 h) and relatively fewer probesets after a long-term (LT) exposure to salinity (200 mM NaCl, 28 days). Compared to P. popularis, leaves of the control P. euphratica plants exhibited a higher transcript abundance of genes related to Na(+)/H(+) antiport (Na(+)/H(+) antiporters, H(+) pumps) and K(+) uptake and transport. Notably, the expression of these genes did not decrease (with a few exceptions) during salt treatment. Regarding ROS homeostasis, P. euphratica exhibited rapid up-regulation of a variety of antioxidant enzymes after exposure to ST salinity, indicating a rapid adaptive response to salt stress. However, the effect of NaCl on transcription in P. popularis leaves was more pronounced after exposure to prolonged salinity. LT-stressed P. popularis up-regulated some genes mediating K(+)/Na(+) homeostasis but decreased transcription of main scavengers of superoxide radicals and H(2)O(2) except for some isoforms of a few scavengers. Mineral and ROS analyses show that NaCl induced a marked increase of leaf Na(+) and H(2)O(2) in LT-stressed plants of the two species and the effects were even more pronounced in the salt-sensitive poplar. We place the transcription results in the context of our physiological measurements to infer some implications of NaCl-induced alterations in gene expression related to K(+)/Na(+) and ROS homeostasis.

  11. Genome-wide identification, classification, and expression analysis of CDPK and its closely related gene families in poplar (Populus trichocarpa).

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ran; Hu, Ruibo; Chai, Guohua; Xu, Meiling; Qi, Guang; Kong, Yingzhen; Zhou, Gongke

    2013-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are Ca(2+)-binding proteins known to play crucial roles in Ca(2+) signal transduction pathways which have been identified throughout plant kingdom and in certain types of protists. Genome-wide analysis of CDPKs have been carried out in Arabidopsis, rice and wheat, and quite a few of CDPKs were proved to play crucial roles in plant stress responsive signature pathways. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of Populus CDPK and its closely related gene families was performed, including phylogeny, chromosome locations, gene structures, and expression profiles. Thirty Populus CDPK genes and twenty closely related kinase genes were identified, which were phylogenetically clustered into eight distinct subfamilies and predominately distributed across fifteen linkage groups (LG). Genomic organization analyses indicated that purifying selection has played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of Populus CDPK gene family. Furthermore, microarray analysis showed that a number of Populus CDPK and its closely related genes differentially expressed across disparate tissues and under various stresses. The expression profiles of paralogous pairs were also investigated to reveal their evolution fates. In addition, quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed on nine selected CDPK genes to confirm their responses to drought stress treatment. These observations may lay the foundation for future functional analysis of Populus CDPK and its closely related gene families to unravel their biological roles.

  12. Water extraction kinetics of metals, arsenic and dissolved organic carbon from industrial contaminated poplar leaves.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Xiong, Tiantian; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse; Leveque, Tibo; Dumat, Camille

    2013-12-01

    In industrial areas, tree leaves contaminated by metals and metalloids could constitute a secondary source of pollutants. In the present study, water extraction kinetics of inorganic elements (IE: Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Fe and Mn), dissolved organic carbon, pH and biological activity were studied for industrial contaminated poplar leaves. Moreover, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the associated top soil was measured. High quantities of Mn, Zn and As and polysaccharides were released in the solution from the strongly contaminated leaves. The kinetic of release varied with time and metal type. The solution pH decreased while dissolved organic contents increased with time after 30 days. Therefore, these contaminated leaves could constitute a source of more available organic metals and metalloids than the initial inorganic process particles. However, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the top soil suggested that a great part of the released IE was adsorbed, reducing in consequence their transfers and bioavailability. It's concluded that mobility/bioavailability and speciation of metals and metalloids released from the decomposition of polluted tree leaves depends on soil characteristics, pollutant type and litter composition, with consequences for environmental risk assessment.

  13. Productivity, water-use efficiency and tolerance to moderate water deficit correlate in 33 poplar genotypes from a Populus deltoides x Populus trichocarpa F1 progeny.

    PubMed

    Monclus, R; Villar, M; Barbaroux, C; Bastien, C; Fichot, R; Delmotte, F M; Delay, D; Petit, J-M; Bréchet, C; Dreyer, E; Brignolas, F

    2009-11-01

    Genotypic variability for productivity, water-use efficiency and leaf traits in 33 genotypes selected from an F1 progeny of Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh x Populus trichocarpa L. was explored under optimal and moderate water-deficit conditions. Saplings of the 33 genotypes were grown in a two-plot open field at INRA Orléans (France) and coppiced every year. A moderate water deficit was induced during two successive years on one plot by withholding irrigation, while the second one remained irrigated (control). Stem biomass and leaf structure (e.g., specific leaf area and leaf area) were measured in 2004 and 2005 and functional leaf traits (e.g., carbon isotope discrimination, Delta) were measured only in 2004. Tolerance to water deficit was estimated at genotype level as the ability to limit losses in biomass production in water deficit versus control trees. Stem biomass, leaf structure and Delta displayed a significant genotypic variability whatever the irrigation regime. For all traits, genotype ranks remained stable across years for similar irrigation conditions. Carbon isotope discrimination scaled negatively with productivity and leaf nitrogen content in controls. The most productive genotypes were the least tolerant to moderate water deficit. No relationship was evidenced between Delta and the level of tolerance to water deficit. The relationships between traits evidenced in this collection of P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa F1 genotypes contrast with the ones that were previously detected in a collection of P. deltoides x Populus nigra L. cultivars tested in the same field trial.

  14. Polyphenol oxidase from hybrid poplar. Cloning and expression in response to wounding and herbivory.

    PubMed

    Constabel, C P; Yip, L; Patton, J J; Christopher, M E

    2000-09-01

    The inducible expression of polyphenol oxidase (PPO), a presumed antiherbivore enzyme, was examined in hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa x Populus deltoides). Following mechanical wounding simulating insect damage, PPO activity increased dramatically in wounded and unwounded leaves on wounded plants beginning at 24 and 48 h, respectively. A hybrid poplar PPO cDNA was isolated and its nucleotide sequence determined. On northern blots, PPO transcripts were detected within 8 h of wounding, and reached peak levels at 16 and 24 h in wounded and unwounded leaves, respectively. Methyl jasmonate spray and feeding by forest tent caterpillar also induced PPO expression. The induction of PPO was strongest in the youngest four leaves, which were generally avoided by caterpillars in free feeding experiments. This wound- and herbivore-induced expression of PPO in hybrid poplar supports the defensive role of this protein against insect pests.

  15. Polyphenol Oxidase from Hybrid Poplar. Cloning and Expression in Response to Wounding and Herbivory1

    PubMed Central

    Constabel, C. Peter; Yip, Lynn; Patton, Joseph J.; Christopher, Mary E.

    2000-01-01

    The inducible expression of polyphenol oxidase (PPO), a presumed antiherbivore enzyme, was examined in hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa × Populus deltoides). Following mechanical wounding simulating insect damage, PPO activity increased dramatically in wounded and unwounded leaves on wounded plants beginning at 24 and 48 h, respectively. A hybrid poplar PPO cDNA was isolated and its nucleotide sequence determined. On northern blots, PPO transcripts were detected within 8 h of wounding, and reached peak levels at 16 and 24 h in wounded and unwounded leaves, respectively. Methyl jasmonate spray and feeding by forest tent caterpillar also induced PPO expression. The induction of PPO was strongest in the youngest four leaves, which were generally avoided by caterpillars in free feeding experiments. This wound- and herbivore-induced expression of PPO in hybrid poplar supports the defensive role of this protein against insect pests. PMID:10982443

  16. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling of black poplar (Populus nigra L.) under boron toxicity revealed candidate genes responsible in boron uptake, transport and detoxification.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Kubilay; Uylaş, Senem

    2016-12-01

    Boron (B) is an essential nutrient for normal growth of plants. Despite its low abundance in soils, it could be highly toxic to plants in especially arid and semi-arid environments. Poplars are known to be tolerant species to B toxicity and accumulation. However, physiological and gene regulation responses of these trees to B toxicity have not been investigated yet. Here, B accumulation and tolerance level of black poplar clones were firstly tested in the current study. Rooted cutting of these clones were treated with elevated B toxicity to select the most B accumulator and tolerant genotype. Then we carried out a microarray based transcriptome experiment on the leaves and roots of this genotype to find out transcriptional networks, genes and molecular mechanisms behind B toxicity tolerance. The results of the study indicated that black poplar is quite suitable for phytoremediation of B pollution. It could resist 15 ppm soil B content and >1500 ppm B accumulation in leaves, which are highly toxic concentrations for almost all agricultural plants. Transcriptomics results of study revealed totally 1625 and 1419 altered probe sets under 15 ppm B toxicity in leaf and root tissues, respectively. The highest induction were recorded for the probes sets annotated to tyrosine aminotransferase, ATP binding cassette transporters, glutathione S transferases and metallochaperone proteins. Strong up regulation of these genes attributed to internal excretion of B into the cell vacuole and existence of B detoxification processes in black poplar. Many other candidate genes functional in signalling, gene regulation, antioxidation, B uptake and transport processes were also identified in this hyper B accumulator plant for the first time with the current study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Microsatellite DNA fingerprinting, differentiation, and genetic relationships of clones, cultivars, and varieties of six poplar species from three sections of the genus Populus.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Muhammad H; Rajora, Om P

    2002-12-01

    Accurate identification of Populus clones and cultivars is essential for effective selection, breeding, and genetic resource management programs. The unit of cultivation and breeding in poplars is a clone, and individual cultivars are normally represented by a single clone. Microsatellite DNA markers of 10 simple sequence repeat loci were used for genetic fingerprinting and differentiation of 96 clones/cultivars and varieties belonging to six Populus species (P. deltoides, P. nigra, P. balsamifera, P. trichocarpa, P. grandidentata, and P maximowiczii) from three sections of the genus. All 96 clones/cultivars could be uniquely fingerprinted based on their single- or multilocus microsatellite genotypes. The five P. grandidentata clones could be differentiated based on their single-locus genotypes, while six clones of P. trichocarpa and 11 clones of P. maximowiczii could be identified by their two-locus genotypes. Twenty clones of P. deltoides and 25 clones of P. nigra could be differentiated by their multilocus genotypes employing three loci, and 29 clones of P. balsamifera required the use of multilocus genotypes at five loci for their genetic fingerprinting and differentiation. The loci PTR3, PTR5, and PTR7 were found to be the most informative for genetic fingerprinting and differentiation of the clones. The mean number of alleles per locus ranged from 2.9 in P. trichocarpa or P. grandidentata to 6.0 in P. balsamifera and 11.2 in 96 clones of the six species. The mean number of observed genotypes per locus ranged from 2.4 in P. grandidentata to 7.4 in P. balsamifera and 19.6 in 96 clones of the six species. The mean number of unique genotypes per locus ranged from 1.3 in P. grandidentata to 3.9 in P. deltoides and 8.8 in 96 clones of the six species. The power of discrimination of the microsatellite DNA markers in the 96 clones ranged from 0.726 for PTR4 to 0.939 for PTR7, with a mean of 0.832 over the 10 simple sequence repeat loci. Clones/cultivars from the same

  18. Root hydraulic properties and growth of balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) mycorrhizal with Hebeloma crustuliniforme and Wilcoxina mikolae var. mikolae.

    PubMed

    Siemens, J Aurea; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2008-10-01

    The effects of an E-strain fungus (Wilcoxina mikolae var. mikolae) and an ectomycorrhizal fungus (Hebeloma crustuliniforme) on growth and water relations of balsam poplar were examined and compared in the present study. Balsam poplar roots inoculated with W. mikolae var. mikolae (Wm) exhibited structures consistent with ectendomycorrhizal (EEM) associations, including a mantle surrounding the outside of the root and an extensive Hartig net that was located between cortical cells and extended to the vascular cylinder. Roots colonized with H. crustuliniforme (Hc) developed a mantle layer, indicative of an ectomycorrhizal (ECM) association, around the outer part of the root, but no distinct Hartig net was present. Wm-colonized balsam poplar also showed increased shoot growth, stomatal conductance (g(s)), and root volumes compared with non-inoculated and Hc-inoculated plants. However, Hc-inoculated plants had higher root hydraulic conductivity (L(pr)) compared with non-inoculated plants and Wm-inoculated plants. These results suggest that L(pr) was not a growth-limiting factor in balsam poplar and that hyphal penetration of the root cortex in itself may have little influence on root hydraulic properties.

  19. Chlorophyll, Ribulose-1,5-diphosphate Carboxylase, and Hill Reaction Activity in Developing Leaves of Populus deltoides

    PubMed Central

    Dickmann, Donald I.

    1971-01-01

    The synthesis of chlorophyll and ribulose diphosphate carboxylase as well as the development of Hill reaction activity were followed in expanding Populus deltoides leaves and related to photosynthetic patterns. Total chlorophyll, which was not correlated with photosynthetic rate in expanding leaves, decreased slightly with age in very young leaves, due to a decrease in chlorophyll b, but then increased linearly. The ratio of chlorophyll a to b, which rose sharply in young leaves, was highly correlated with the onset of net photosynthesis. Hill reaction activity was very low in young leaves and did not increase significantly until leaves were about half expanded. Ribulose diphosphate carboxylase activity increased in a sigmoid fashion with leaf ontogenesis and closely paralleled development of the photosynthetic system. The study demonstrates the importance of chlorophyll a and Calvin cycle enzyme synthesis to photosynthetic development in expanding leaves. PMID:16657751

  20. Genetic variation for leaf morphology, leaf structure and leaf carbon isotope discrimination in European populations of black poplar (Populus nigra L.).

    PubMed

    Guet, Justine; Fabbrini, Francesco; Fichot, Régis; Sabatti, Maurizio; Bastien, Catherine; Brignolas, Franck

    2015-08-01

    To buffer against the high spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the riparian habitat, riparian tree species, such as black poplar (Populus nigra L.), may display a high level of genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity for functional traits. Using a multisite common garden experiment, we estimated the relative contribution of genetic and environmental effects on the phenotypic variation expressed for individual leaf area, leaf shape, leaf structure and leaf carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C) in natural populations of black poplar. Twenty-four to 62 genotypes were sampled in nine metapopulations covering a latitudinal range from 48 °N to 42 °N in France and in Italy and grown in two common gardens at Orléans (ORL) and at Savigliano (SAV). In the two common gardens, substantial genetic variation was expressed for leaf traits within all metapopulations, but its expression was modulated by the environment, as attested by the genotype × environment (G × E) interaction variance being comparable to or even greater than genetic effects. For LA, G × E interactions were explained by both changes in genotype ranking between common gardens and increased variation in SAV, while these interactions were mainly attributed to changes in genotype ranking for Δ(13)C. The nine P. nigra metapopulations were highly differentiated for LA, as attested by the high coefficient of genetic differentiation (QST = 0.50 at ORL and 0.51 at SAV), and the pattern of metapopulation differentiation was highly conserved between the two common gardens. In contrast, they were moderately differentiated for Δ(13)C (QST = 0.24 at ORL and 0.25 at SAV) and the metapopulation clustering changed significantly between common gardens. Our results evidenced that the nine P. nigra metapopulations present substantial genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity for leaf traits, which both represent potentially significant determinants of populations' capacities to respond, on a short-term basis and

  1. Photosynthetic Response of Poplars (Populus) to Climatic Stressors: Investigating Isoprene's Role in Increasing Tolerance to Temperature and Atmospheric Water Stress in Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, A. W.; Minor, R. L.; Heard, M. M.; Barron-Gafford, G.

    2014-12-01

    The southwestern United States is expected to become warmer and drier under future climate projections. The way in which plant and ecosystems respond to these changes is valuable for predicting carbon and water cycling, ecosystem resilience, phenology, and future agriculture, including biofuel production. We examined the interacting effects of dominant climate stressors--vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and temperature--on photosynthesis. Specifically, we tested whether or not plant production of the terpene isoprene imparts heat and water-stress tolerance. Within an experimental common garden of poplars (Populus) at University of Arizona's Biosphere 2 we measured four separate genetic lines - two that retained isoprene production capacity and two that had this gene "knocked out". VPD was altered at temperatures of 30, 35, and 40C to present both heat and aridity stresses. Maximum photosynthetic capacity (Amax), the VPD at which Amax occurred (VPDopt), and the VPD range between Amax and ninety percent of Amax (Ω90) were calculated to quantify how VPD differentially affected the lines. Amax was significantly lower in knockout lines than in control lines. Moreover, the difference in Amax between lines increased from 19.3% at 30C to 28.4% at 35C to 39.0% at 40C, indicating that trees without isoprene production are less equipped to handle hot and dry conditions. Ω90 and VPDopt response were not the same, though. Isoprene knockouts had significantly higher VPD optimums (1.9749 kPA vs. 1.6451 kPa) compared to isoprene-producing lines. Although maximum photosynthesis is diminished without isoprene production under water and heat stress, isoprene knockout lines were still fairly active at a high VPD and under a wide range of VPD conditions. Beyond advancing our basic understanding of plant ecophysiology, these results will inform the potential use of poplars as a source of biofuel production across a range of current and projected climate conditions.

  2. Overexpression of TaLEA gene from Tamarix androssowii improves salt and drought tolerance in transgenic poplar (Populus simonii × P. nigra).

    PubMed

    Gao, Weidong; Bai, Shuang; Li, Qingmei; Gao, Caiqiu; Liu, Guifeng; Li, Guangde; Tan, Feili

    2013-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) genes were confirmed to confer resistance to drought and water deficiency. An LEA gene from Tamarixandrossowii (named TaLEA) was transformed into Xiaohei poplar (Populussimonii × P. nigra) via Agrobacterium. Twenty-five independent transgenic lines were obtained that were resistant to kanamycin, and 11 transgenic lines were randomly selected for further analysis. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) gel blot indicated that the TaLEA gene had been integrated into the poplar genome. The height growth rate, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, relative electrolyte leakage and damages due to salt or drought to transgenic and non-transgenic plants were compared under salt and drought stress conditions. The results showed that the constitutive expression of the TaLEA gene in transgenic poplars could induce an increase in height growth rate and a decrease in number and severity of wilted leaves under the salt and drought stresses. The MDA content and relative electrolyte leakage in transgenic lines under salt and drought stresses were significantly lower compared to those in non-transgenic plants, indicating that the TaLEA gene may enhance salt and drought tolerance by protecting cell membranes from damage. Moreover, amongst the lines analyzed for stress tolerance, the transgenic line 11 (T11) showed the highest tolerance levels under both salinity and drought stress conditions. These results indicated that the TaLEA gene could be a salt and drought tolerance candidate gene and could confer a broad spectrum of tolerance under abiotic stresses in poplars.

  3. Seasonal variation in the structure of red reflectance of leaves from yellow poplar, red oak, and red maple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brakke, Thomas W.; Wergin, William P.; Erbe, Eric F.; Harnden, Joann M.

    1993-01-01

    The light scattered from leaves was measured as a function of view angle in the principal plane for yellow poplar, red oak, and red maple. The source was a parallel-polarized helium-neon laser. Yellow poplar leaves had the highest reflectance of the three species, which may have been due to its shorter palisade cells and more extensive spongy mesophyll. Prior to senescence, there was a significant decrease, but not total extinction, in the reflectance of the beam incident at 60 deg from nadir on the adaxial side of the leaves of all three species. Low-temperature SEM observations showed differences in the surface wax patterns among the three species but did not indicate a cause of the reflectance changes other than possibly the accumulation and aging of the wax.

  4. Development and application of microsatellites in candidate genes related to wood properties in the Chinese white poplar (Populus tomentosa Carr.).

    PubMed

    Du, Qingzhang; Gong, Chenrui; Pan, Wei; Zhang, Deqiang

    2013-02-01

    Gene-derived simple sequence repeats (genic SSRs), also known as functional markers, are often preferred over random genomic markers because they represent variation in gene coding and/or regulatory regions. We characterized 544 genic SSR loci derived from 138 candidate genes involved in wood formation, distributed throughout the genome of Populus tomentosa, a key ecological and cultivated wood production species. Of these SSRs, three-quarters were located in the promoter or intron regions, and dinucleotide (59.7%) and trinucleotide repeat motifs (26.5%) predominated. By screening 15 wild P. tomentosa ecotypes, we identified 188 polymorphic genic SSRs with 861 alleles, 2-7 alleles for each marker. Transferability analysis of 30 random genic SSRs, testing whether these SSRs work in 26 genotypes of five genus Populus sections (outgroup, Salix matsudana), showed that 72% of the SSRs could be amplified in Turanga and 100% could be amplified in Leuce. Based on genotyping of these 26 genotypes, a neighbour-joining analysis showed the expected six phylogenetic groupings. In silico analysis of SSR variation in 220 sequences that are homologous between P. tomentosa and Populus trichocarpa suggested that genic SSR variations between relatives were predominantly affected by repeat motif variations or flanking sequence mutations. Inheritance tests and single-marker associations demonstrated the power of genic SSRs in family-based linkage mapping and candidate gene-based association studies, as well as marker-assisted selection and comparative genomic studies of P. tomentosa and related species.

  5. Enhanced assimilation rate and water use efficiency with latitude through increased photosynthetic capacity and internal conductance in balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera L.).

    PubMed

    Soolanayakanahally, Raju Y; Guy, Robert D; Silim, Salim N; Drewes, Eric C; Schroeder, William R

    2009-12-01

    In outdoor common gardens, high latitude populations of deciduous tree species often display higher assimilation rates (A) than low latitude populations, but they accomplish less height. To test whether trends in A reflect adaptation to growing season length or, alternatively, are garden growth artefacts, we examined variation in height increment and ecophysiological traits in a range-wide collection of Populus balsamifera L. populations from 21 provenances, during unconstrained growth in a greenhouse. Rooted cuttings, maintained without resource limitation under 21 h photoperiod for 90 d, displayed increasing height growth, A, leaf mass per area and leaf N per area with latitude whereas stomatal conductance (g(s)) showed no pattern. Water-use efficiency as indicated by both gas exchange and delta(13)C increased with latitude, whereas photosynthetic nitrogen-use efficiency decreased. Differences in delta(13)C were less than expected based on A/g(s), suggesting coextensive variation in internal conductance (g(m)). Analysis of A-C(i) curves on a subset of populations showed that high latitude genotypes had greater g(m) than low-latitude genotypes. We conclude that higher peak rates of height growth in high latitude genotypes of balsam poplar are supported by higher A, achieved partly through higher g(m), to help compensate for a shorter growing season.

  6. Seasonal changes in starch and sugar content of poplar (Populus deltoides x nigra cv. Dorskamp) and the impact of stem girdling on carbohydrate allocation to roots.

    PubMed

    Regier, Nicole; Streb, Sebastian; Zeeman, Samuel C; Frey, Beat

    2010-08-01

    Trees need to store reserves to allow their survival during winter and for bud flush and leaf growth in the following spring. In many tree species, these reserve functions are mainly covered by starch, which is degraded to soluble carbohydrates during the dormant season for maintenance respiration and in spring during bud flush. We conducted girdling experiments on poplar (Populus deltoides x nigra cv. Dorskamp) in order to elucidate how interrupted transport of carbohydrates to the roots during autumn affects plant survival during winter and bud flush in spring. We measured the content of starch, sucrose, glucose, fructose, raffinose and stachyose in stems (above and below the girdle), coarse roots and fine roots over 1 year. We found that, in response to girdling, carbohydrates accumulated in stems above the girdle. As a result of interrupted reserve allocation, girdled plants depleted their root starch reserves nearly to zero, whereas in stems below the girdle, reserves were maintained close to control values, presumably in order to facilitate dormancy release and re-sprouting from buds below the girdle. Furthermore, we showed that stachyose accumulated during winter also in the roots, even in girdled plants, consistent with its importance as freezing protectant. The lower stachyose content of roots compared with shoots was likely due to protection of the roots from cold by the soil.

  7. Thresholds of heavy-metal toxicity in cuttings of European black poplar (Populus nigra L.) determined according to antioxidant status of fine roots and morphometrical disorders.

    PubMed

    Stobrawa, Krzysztof; Lorenc-Plucińska, Gabriela

    2008-02-01

    The effects of increasing concentrations of polluted soils collected from two different stands in the direct neighbourhood of a copper smelter were studied by analyzing the activity of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in the fine roots of cuttings of black poplar (Populus nigra L.). Morphological parameters of affected and unaffected plants were compared and concentrations of heavy metals in their fine roots were estimated. Copper and lead were the major pollutants, and their threshold concentrations were determined on the basis of positive or negative impact on shoots and root growth, morphological disorders of the roots (thickening, decreasing of fine roots volume), stimulation or inhibition of the most important antioxidant enzymes: catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol and ascorbate peroxidases (GPOX, APOX) and glutathione reductase (GR) as well as increasing MDA concentration. Finally, three thresholds of Cu and Pb concentrations resulting in increasing toxicity against plants were proposed, splitting the ranges of the non toxic presence of these metals into soil (Cu<100 ppm, Pb<30 ppm), full tolerance (Cu 100-220 ppm, Pb 30-70 ppm), limited tolerance (Cu 220-650 ppm, Pb 70-200 ppm) and breakdown of tolerance (Cu>650 ppm, Pb>200 ppm).

  8. Elevated CO2 and/or ozone modify lignification in the wood of poplars (Populus tremula x alba)

    PubMed Central

    Richet, Nicolas; Afif, Dany; Tozo, Koffi; Pollet, Brigitte; Maillard, Pascale; Huber, Françoise; Priault, Pierrick; Banvoy, Jacques; Gross, Patrick; Dizengremel, Pierre; Lapierre, Catherine; Perré, Patrick; Cabané, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Trees will have to cope with increasing levels of CO2 and ozone in the atmosphere. The purpose of this work was to assess whether the lignification process could be altered in the wood of poplars under elevated CO2 and/or ozone. Young poplars were exposed either to charcoal-filtered air (control), to elevated CO2 (800 μl l−1), to ozone (200 nl l−1) or to a combination of elevated CO2 and ozone in controlled chambers. Lignification was analysed at different levels: biosynthesis pathway activities (enzyme and transcript), lignin content, and capacity to incorporate new assimilates by using 13C labelling. Elevated CO2 and ozone had opposite effects on many parameters (growth, biomass, cambial activity, wood cell wall thickness) except on lignin content which was increased by elevated CO2 and/or ozone. However, this increased lignification was due to different response mechanisms. Under elevated CO2, carbon supply to the stem and effective lignin synthesis were enhanced, leading to increased lignin content, although there was a reduction in the level of some enzyme and transcript involved in the lignin pathway. Ozone treatment induced a reduction in carbon supply and effective lignin synthesis as well as transcripts from all steps of the lignin pathway and some corresponding enzyme activities. However, lignin content was increased under ozone probably due to variations in other major components of the cell wall. Both mechanisms seemed to coexist under combined treatment and resulted in a high increase in lignin content. PMID:22553285

  9. Effects of in vitro ozone treatment on proteolysis of purified rubisco from two hybrid poplar clones. [Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, L.G.; Pell, E.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Plants exposed to ozone (O{sub 3}) exhibited symptoms of premature senescence, including early decline in quantity of rubisco. O{sub 3}-induced oxidation may cause changes in protein conformation of rubisco, resulting in enhanced proteolysis. To test this hypothesis, rubisco was purified from two hybrid clones of Populus maximowizii x trichocarpa, clones 388 and 245, and treated in vitro with O{sub 3} or air. Rubisco was then challenged with bromelain, papain, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase A, or endoproteinase Glu-C and percent degradation measured by SDS-PAGE and densitometric scanning of the gels. Degree of rubisco sensitivity to oxidation may be related to available sulfhydryl (SH) groups on the protein. The number of SH groups in native and denatured rubisco was measured for purified rubisco of both clones by DTNB titration method. The relationship between sensitivity to proteolysis and number and availability of SH groups is discussed.

  10. Phytoextraction of risk elements by willow and poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Kacálková, Lada; Tlustoš, Pavel; Száková, Jiřina

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the phytoextraction efficiency of two clones of willow trees (Salix x smithiana Willd., Salix rubens) and two clones of poplar trees (Populus nigra x maximowiczii, Populus nigra Wolterson) were planted in contaminated soil (0.4-2.0 mg Cd.kg(-1), 78-313 mg Zn.kg(-1), 21.3-118 mg Cu.kg(-1)). Field experiment was carried out in Czech Republic. The study investigated their ability to accumulate heavy metals (Cd, Zn, and Cu) in harvestable plant parts. The poplars produced higher amount of biomass than willows. Both Salix clones accumulated higher amount of Cd, Zn and Cu in their biomass (maximum 6.8 mg Cd.kg(-1), 909 mg Zn.kg(-1), and 17.7 mg Cu.kg(-1)) compared to Populus clones (maximum 2.06 mg Cd.kg(-1), 463 mg Zn.kg(-1), and 11.8 mg Cu.kg(-1)). There were no significant differences between clones of individual species. BCs for Cd and Zn were greater than 1 (the highest in willow leaves). BCs values of Cu were very low. These results indicate that Salix is more suitable plant for phytoextraction of Cd and Zn than Populus. The Cu phytoextraction potential of Salix and Populus trees was not confirmed in this experiment due to low soil availability of this element.

  11. Different sensitivity of isoprene emission, respiration and photosynthesis to high growth temperature coupled with drought stress in black poplar (Populus nigra) saplings.

    PubMed

    Centritto, Mauro; Brilli, Federico; Fodale, Roberta; Loreto, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    The effects of the interaction between high growth temperatures and water stress on gas-exchange properties of Populus nigra saplings were investigated. Water stress was expressed as a function of soil water content (SWC) or fraction of transpirable soil water (FTSW). Isoprene emission and photosynthesis (A) did not acclimate in response to elevated temperature, whereas dark (R(n)) and light (R(d)) respiration underwent thermal acclimation. R(d) was ~30% lower than R(n) irrespective of growth temperature and water stress level. Water stress induced a sharp decline, but not a complete inhibition, of both R(n) and R(d). There was no significant effect of high growth temperature on the responses of A, stomatal conductance (g(s)), isoprene emission, R(n) or R(d) to FTSW. High growth temperature resulted in a significant increase in the SWC endpoint. Photosynthesis was limited mainly by CO(2) acquisition in water-stressed plants. Impaired carbon metabolism became apparent only at the FTSW endpoint. Photosynthesis was restored in about a week following rewatering, indicating transient biochemical limitations. The kinetics of isoprene emission in response to FTSW confirmed that water stress uncouples the emission of isoprene from A, isoprene emission being unaffected by decreasing g(s). The different kinetics of A, respiration and isoprene emission in response to the interaction between high temperature and water stress led to rising R(d)/A ratio and amount of carbon lost as isoprene. Since respiration and isoprene sensitivity are much lower than A sensitivity to water stress, temperature interactions with water stress may dominate poplar acclimatory capability and maintenance of carbon homeostasis under climate change scenarios. Furthermore, predicted temperature increases in arid environments may reduce the amount of soil water that can be extracted before plant gas exchange decreases, exacerbating the effects of water stress even if soil water availability is not

  12. Population genetics of Chrysomela tremulae: a first step towards management of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis poplars Populus tremula x .P. tremuloides.

    PubMed

    Génissel, A; Viard, F; Bourguet, D

    2000-01-01

    Many strategies have been proposed for delaying the development of insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). The current paradigm for Bt resistance management is the high dose-refuge strategy. For this strategy to be successful: (i) heterozygotes must be killed in treated areas, (ii) resistant alleles must be rare (frequency < 10-3), and (iii) there must be a high level of gene flow between populations to ensure random mating. We studied gene flow within and between populations with a view to managing the resistance of Chrysomela tremulae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to new transgenic, highly toxic poplars expressing a synthetic Bt gene. In this study, we assessed the extent of gene flow in C. tremulae within and between 16 sites in France and Belgium, using allozyme markers. We found a high level of genetic variability in C. tremulae, with a mean of 0.206 +/- 0.16. There were no obvious limitations to gene flow between populations of C. tremulae over large geographical distances (several hundreds of kilometres). Nevertheless, a very low level of genetic differentiation was observed between a site located in the south of France and the sampled sites from the Centre region.

  13. Over-expression of bacterial gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) in plastids affects photosynthesis, growth and sulphur metabolism in poplar (Populus tremula x Populus alba) dependent on the resulting gamma-glutamylcysteine and glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    Herschbach, Cornelia; Rizzini, Luca; Mult, Susanne; Hartmann, Tanja; Busch, Florian; Peuke, Andreas D; Kopriva, Stanislav; Ensminger, Ingo

    2010-07-01

    We compared three transgenic poplar lines over-expressing the bacterial gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (GSH1) targeted to plastids. Lines Lggs6 and Lggs12 have two copies, while line Lggs20 has three copies of the transgene. The three lines differ in their expression levels of the transgene and in the accumulation of gamma-glutamylcysteine (gamma-EC) and glutathione (GSH) in leaves, roots and phloem exudates. The lowest transgene expression level was observed in line Lggs6 which showed an increased growth, an enhanced rate of photosynthesis and a decreased excitation pressure (1-qP). The latter typically represents a lower reduction state of the plastoquinone pool, and thereby facilitates electron flow along the electron transport chain. Line Lggs12 showed the highest transgene expression level, highest gamma-EC accumulation in leaves and highest GSH enrichment in phloem exudates and roots. This line also exhibited a reduced growth, and after a prolonged growth of 4.5 months, symptoms of leaf injury. Decreased maximum quantum yield (F(v)/F(m)) indicated down-regulation of photosystem II reaction centre (PSII RC), which correlates with decreased PSII RC protein D1 (PsbA) and diminished light-harvesting complex (Lhcb1). Potential effects of changes in chloroplastic and cytosolic GSH contents on photosynthesis, growth and the whole-plant sulphur nutrition are discussed for each line.

  14. Symplastic phloem loading in poplar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cankui; Han, Lu; Slewinski, Thomas L; Sun, Jianlei; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Turgeon, Robert

    2014-09-01

    Sap is driven through phloem sieve tubes by an osmotically generated pressure gradient between source and sink tissues. In many plants, source pressure results from thermodynamically active loading in which energy is used to transfer sucrose (Suc) from mesophyll cells to the phloem of leaf minor veins against a concentration gradient. However, in some species, almost all trees, correlative evidence suggests that sugar migrates passively through plasmodesmata from mesophyll cells into the sieve elements. The possibility of alternate loading mechanisms has important ramifications for the regulation of phloem transport and source-sink interactions. Here, we provide experimental evidence that, in gray poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba), Suc enters the phloem through plasmodesmata. Transgenic plants were generated with yeast invertase in the cell walls to prevent Suc loading by this route. The constructs were driven either by the constitutive 35S promoter or the minor vein-specific galactinol synthase promoter. Transgenic plants grew at the same rate as the wild type without symptoms of loading inhibition, such as accumulation of carbohydrates or leaf chlorosis. Rates of photosynthesis were normal. In contrast, alfalfa (Medicago sativa) plants, which have limited numbers of plasmodesmata between mesophyll and phloem, displayed typical symptoms of loading inhibition when transformed with the same DNA constructs. The results are consistent with passive loading of Suc through plasmodesmata in poplar. We also noted defense-related symptoms in leaves of transgenic poplar when the plants were abruptly exposed to excessively high temperatures, adding to evidence that hexose is involved in triggering the hypersensitive response.

  15. Mycorrhizae of poplars

    Treesearch

    R. C. Schultz; J. G. Isebrands; P. P. Kormanik

    1983-01-01

    Poplar hybrids, being screened for short-rotation intensive culture, can form ecto-, endo-, or ectendo-mycorrhizae or may be autotrophic. Different sections of the genus Populus tend to be selective in the type of mycorrhizae formed. Knowledge of which types are formed influences the kinds of propagule production, site preparation, and herbicide...

  16. Sequencing the genome of Marssonina brunnea reveals fungus-poplar co-evolution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The fungus Marssonina brunnea is a causal pathogen of Marssonina leaf spot that devastates poplar plantations by defoliating susceptible trees before normal fall leaf drop. Results We sequence the genome of M. brunnea with a size of 52 Mb assembled into 89 scaffolds, representing the first sequenced Dermateaceae genome. By inoculating this fungus onto a poplar hybrid clone, we investigate how M. brunnea interacts and co-evolves with its host to colonize poplar leaves. While a handful of virulence genes in M. brunnea, mostly from the LysM family, are detected to up-regulate during infection, the poplar down-regulates its resistance genes, such as nucleotide binding site domains and leucine rich repeats, in response to infection. From 10,027 predicted proteins of M. brunnea in a comparison with those from poplar, we identify four poplar transferases that stimulate the host to resist M. brunnea. These transferas-encoding genes may have driven the co-evolution of M. brunnea and Populus during the process of infection and anti-infection. Conclusions Our results from the draft sequence of the M. brunnea genome provide evidence for genome-genome interactions that play an important role in poplar-pathogen co-evolution. This knowledge could help to design effective strategies for controlling Marssonina leaf spot in poplar. PMID:22876864

  17. Comparing vegetation indices for remote chlorophyll measurement of white poplar and Chinese elm leaves with different adaxial and abaxial surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shan; Lu, Xingtong; Zhao, Wenli; Liu, Yu; Wang, Zheyi; Omasa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Quick non-destructive assessment of leaf chlorophyll content (LCC) is important for studying phenotypes related to plant growth and stress resistance. This study was undertaken to investigate the quantitative relationship between LCC and different vegetation indices (VIs) on both adaxial and abaxial surfaces of white poplar (Populus alba), which has dense tubular hairs on its abaxial surface, and Chinese elm (Ulmus pumila var. pendula), which does not show obvious superficial differences except for lighter colour on the abaxial surface. Some published and newly developed VIs were tested to relate them to LCC. The results showed that most of the published VIs had strong relationships with LCC on the one-surface dataset, but did not show a clear relationship with LCC when both adaxial and abaxial surface reflectance data were included. Among the reflectance indices tested, the modified Datt index, (R 719−R 726)/(R 719−R 743), performed best and is proposed as a new index for remote estimation of chlorophyll content in plants with varying leaf surface structures. It explained 92% of LCC variation in this research, and the root mean square error of the LCC prediction was 5.23 μg/cm2. This new index is insensitive to the effects of adaxial and abaxial leaf surface structures and is strongly related to the variation in reflectance caused by chlorophyll content. PMID:26034132

  18. Comparing vegetation indices for remote chlorophyll measurement of white poplar and Chinese elm leaves with different adaxial and abaxial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shan; Lu, Xingtong; Zhao, Wenli; Liu, Yu; Wang, Zheyi; Omasa, Kenji

    2015-09-01

    Quick non-destructive assessment of leaf chlorophyll content (LCC) is important for studying phenotypes related to plant growth and stress resistance. This study was undertaken to investigate the quantitative relationship between LCC and different vegetation indices (VIs) on both adaxial and abaxial surfaces of white poplar (Populus alba), which has dense tubular hairs on its abaxial surface, and Chinese elm (Ulmus pumila var. pendula), which does not show obvious superficial differences except for lighter colour on the abaxial surface. Some published and newly developed VIs were tested to relate them to LCC. The results showed that most of the published VIs had strong relationships with LCC on the one-surface dataset, but did not show a clear relationship with LCC when both adaxial and abaxial surface reflectance data were included. Among the reflectance indices tested, the modified Datt index, (R719-R726)/(R719-R743), performed best and is proposed as a new index for remote estimation of chlorophyll content in plants with varying leaf surface structures. It explained 92% of LCC variation in this research, and the root mean square error of the LCC prediction was 5.23 μg/cm(2). This new index is insensitive to the effects of adaxial and abaxial leaf surface structures and is strongly related to the variation in reflectance caused by chlorophyll content.

  19. Energy Values of Nine Populus Clones

    Treesearch

    Terry F. Strong

    1980-01-01

    Compares calorific values for components of nine Populus clones. The components include stem wood, stem bark, and branches. Also compares calorific values for clones of balsam poplar and black cottonwood parentages.

  20. Nutrient composition of blades, petioles, and whole leaves from fertilized and unfertilized yellow-poplar

    Treesearch

    L. R. Auchmoody

    1974-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations in leaf blades and petioles obtained from three fertilized and three unfertilized yellow-poplar sample trees were determined annually during a 4-year period. Concentrations were substantially higher in blades than in petioles. Fertilization increased N and P concentrations in blades, but petioles showed only a slight...

  1. Drought induces alterations in the stomatal development program in Populus.

    PubMed

    Hamanishi, Erin T; Thomas, Barb R; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2012-08-01

    Much is known about the physiological control of stomatal aperture as a means by which plants adjust to water availability. By contrast, the role played by the modulation of stomatal development to limit water loss has received much less attention. The control of stomatal development in response to water deprivation in the genus Populus is explored here. Drought induced declines in stomatal conductance as well as an alteration in stomatal development in two genotypes of Populus balsamifera. Leaves that developed under water-deficit conditions had lower stomatal indices than leaves that developed under well-watered conditions. Transcript abundance of genes that could hypothetically underpin drought-responsive changes in stomatal development was examined, in two genotypes, across six time points, under two conditions, well-watered and with water deficit. Populus homologues of STOMAGEN, ERECTA (ER), STOMATA DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION 1 (SDD1), and FAMA had variable transcript abundance patterns congruent with their role in the modulation of stomatal development in response to drought. Conversely, there was no significant variation in transcript abundance between genotypes or treatments for the Populus homologues of YODA (YDA) and TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM). The findings highlight the role that could be played by stomatal development during leaf expansion as a longer term means by which to limit water loss from leaves. Moreover, the results point to the key roles played by the regulation of the homologues of STOMAGEN, ER, SDD1, and FAMA in the control of this response in poplar.

  2. Cuticle lipids on heteromorphic leaves of Populus euphratica Oliv. growing in riparian habitats differing in available soil moisture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojing; Xiao, Lei; Feng, Jinchao; Chen, Ningmei; Chen, Yue; Song, Buerbatu; Xue, Kun; Shi, Sha; Zhou, Yijun; Jenks, Matthew A

    2016-11-01

    Populus euphratica is an important native tree found in arid regions from North Africa and South Europe to China, and is known to tolerate many forms of environmental stress, including drought. We describe cuticle waxes, cutin and cuticle permeability for the heteromorphic leaves of P. euphratica growing in two riparian habitats that differ in available soil moisture. Scanning electron microscopy revealed variation in epicuticular wax crystallization associated with leaf type and site. P. euphratica leaves are dominated by cuticular wax alkanes, primary-alcohols and fatty acids. The major cutin monomers were 10,16-diOH C16:0 acids. Broad-ovate leaves (associated with adult phase growth) produced 1.3- and 1.6-fold more waxes, and 2.1- and 0.9-fold more cutin monomers, than lanceolate leaves (associated with juvenile phase growth) at the wetter site and drier site, respectively. The alkane-synthesis-associated ECERIFERUM1 (CER1), as well as ABC transporter- and elongase-associated genes, were expressed at much higher levels at the drier than wetter sites, indicating their potential function in elevating leaf cuticle lipids in the dry site conditions. Higher cuticle lipid amounts were closely associated with lower cuticle permeability (both chlorophyll efflux and water loss). Our results implicate cuticle lipids as among the xeromorphic traits associated with P. euphratica adult-phase broad-ovate leaves. Results here provide useful information for protecting natural populations of P. euphratica and their associated ecosystems, and shed new light on the functional interaction of cuticle and leaf heterophylly in adaptation to more arid, limited-moisture environments.

  3. Changes in photosynthesis, mesophyll conductance to CO2, and isoprenoid emissions in Populus nigra plants exposed to excess nickel.

    PubMed

    Velikova, Violeta; Tsonev, Tsonko; Loreto, Francesco; Centritto, Mauro

    2011-05-01

    Poplar (Populus nigra) plants were grown hydroponically with 30 and 200 μM Ni (Ni30 and Ni200). Photosynthesis limitations and isoprenoid emissions were investigated in two leaf types (mature and developing). Ni stress significantly decreased photosynthesis, and this effect depended on the leaf Ni content, which was lower in mature than in developing leaves. The main limitations to photosynthesis were attributed to mesophyll conductance and metabolism impairment. In Ni-stressed developing leaves, isoprene emission was significantly stimulated. We attribute such stimulation to the lower chloroplastic [CO2] than in control leaves. However chloroplastic [CO2] did not control isoprene emission in mature leaves. Ni stress induced the emission of cis-β-ocimene in mature leaves, and of linalool in both leaf types. Induced biosynthesis and emission of isoprenoids reveal the onset of antioxidant processes that may also contribute to reduce Ni stress, especially in mature poplar leaves. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Polyphenol oxidase overexpression in transgenic Populus enhances resistance to herbivory by forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiehua; Constabel, C Peter

    2004-11-01

    In order to functionally analyze the predicted defensive role of leaf polyphenol oxidase (PPO; EC 1.10.3.1) in Populus, transgenic hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. alba) plants overexpressing a hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides) PtdPPO1 gene were constructed. Regenerated transgenic plants showed high PPO enzyme activity, PtdPPO1 mRNA levels and PPO protein accumulation. In leaf disk bioassays, forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria) larvae feeding on PPO-overexpressing transgenics experienced significantly higher mortality and reduced average weight gain compared to larvae feeding on control leaves. However, this effect was observed only when older egg masses were used and the resulting larvae showed reduced growth and vigor. In choice tests, no effect of PPO overexpression was detected. Although PPO in poplar leaves is latent and requires activation with detergents or trypsin for full enzymatic activity, in caterpillar frass the enzyme was extracted in the fully activated form. This activation correlated with partial proteolytic cleavage, suggesting that PPO latency and activation during digestion could be an adaptive and defense-related feature of poplar PPO.

  5. Contribution of Various Carbon Sources Toward Isoprene Biosynthesis in Poplar Leaves Mediated by Altered Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Trowbridge, Amy M.; Asensio, Dolores; Eller, Allyson S. D.; Way, Danielle A.; Wilkinson, Michael J.; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Jackson, Robert B.; Monson, Russell K.

    2012-01-01

    Biogenically released isoprene plays important roles in both tropospheric photochemistry and plant metabolism. We performed a 13CO2-labeling study using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) to examine the kinetics of recently assimilated photosynthate into isoprene emitted from poplar (Populus × canescens) trees grown and measured at different atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This is the first study to explicitly consider the effects of altered atmospheric CO2 concentration on carbon partitioning to isoprene biosynthesis. We studied changes in the proportion of labeled carbon as a function of time in two mass fragments, M41+, which represents, in part, substrate derived from pyruvate, and M69+, which represents the whole unlabeled isoprene molecule. We observed a trend of slower 13C incorporation into isoprene carbon derived from pyruvate, consistent with the previously hypothesized origin of chloroplastic pyruvate from cytosolic phosphenolpyruvate (PEP). Trees grown under sub-ambient CO2 (190 ppmv) had rates of isoprene emission and rates of labeling of M41+ and M69+ that were nearly twice those observed in trees grown under elevated CO2 (590 ppmv). However, they also demonstrated the lowest proportion of completely labeled isoprene molecules. These results suggest that under reduced atmospheric CO2 availability, more carbon from stored/older carbon sources is involved in isoprene biosynthesis, and this carbon most likely enters the isoprene biosynthesis pathway through the pyruvate substrate. We offer direct evidence that extra-chloroplastic rather than chloroplastic carbon sources are mobilized to increase the availability of pyruvate required to up-regulate the isoprene biosynthesis pathway when trees are grown under sub-ambient CO2. PMID:22384238

  6. Low temperatures are required to induce the development of fertile flowers in transgenic male and female early flowering poplar (Populus tremula L.).

    PubMed

    Hoenicka, Hans; Lehnhardt, Denise; Briones, Valentina; Nilsson, Ove; Fladung, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Until now, artificial early flowering poplar systems have mostly led to the development of sterile flowers. In this study, several strategies aimed at inducting fertile flowers in pHSP::AtFT transgenic poplar were evaluated, in particular the influence of temperature and photoperiod. Our results provide evidence that temperature, and not photoperiod, is the key factor required for the development of fertile flowers in early flowering poplar. Fertile flowers were only obtained when a cold treatment phase of several weeks was used after the heat treatment phase. Heat treatments induced AtFT gene activity through activation of the heat-shock promoter (pHSP). Photoperiod did not show a similar influence on flower fertility as pollen grains were obtained under both long- and short-day conditions. Fertility was confirmed in flowers of both male and female plants. For the first time, crosses were successfully performed with transgenic female early flowering poplar. All mature flowers obtained after 8 weeks of inductive treatments were fertile. Gene expression studies also confirmed that cold temperatures influenced expression of poplar genes homologous to 'pollen development genes' from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Homology and expression patterns suggested a role for PtTDF1, PtBAM1, PtSERK1/2 and PtMS1 on anther and pollen development in poplar flowers. The system developed in this study allows a fast and very reliable induction of fertile poplar flowers in a very short period of time. The non-reproductive phase, usually 7-10 years, can now be shortened to 6-10 months, and fertile flowers can be obtained independently of the season. This system is a reliable tool for breeding purposes (high-speed breeding technology), genomics and biosafety research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Transcriptomes of Marssonina brunnea and Infected Poplar Leaves to Capture Vital Events in Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Xu, Minjie; Jiang, Jianping; Dou, Tonghai; Lin, Wei; Zhao, Guoping; Huang, Minren; Zhou, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding host-pathogen interaction mechanisms helps to elucidate the entire infection process and focus on important events, and it is a promising approach for improvement of disease control and selection of treatment strategy. Time-course host-pathogen transcriptome analyses and network inference have been applied to unravel the direct or indirect relationships of gene expression alterations. However, time series analyses can suffer from absent time points due to technical problems such as RNA degradation, which limits the application of algorithms that require strict sequential sampling. Here, we introduce an efficient method using independence test to infer an independent network that is exclusively concerned with the frequency of gene expression changes. Results Highly resistant NL895 poplar leaves and weakly resistant NL214 leaves were infected with highly active and weakly active Marssonina brunnea, respectively, and were harvested at different time points. The independent network inference illustrated the top 1,000 vital fungus-poplar relationships, which contained 768 fungal genes and 54 poplar genes. These genes could be classified into three categories: a fungal gene surrounded by many poplar genes; a poplar gene connected to many fungal genes; and other genes (possessing low degrees of connectivity). Notably, the fungal gene M6_08342 (a metalloprotease) was connected to 10 poplar genes, particularly including two disease-resistance genes. These core genes, which are surrounded by other genes, may be of particular importance in complicated infection processes and worthy of further investigation. Conclusions We provide a clear framework of the interaction network and identify a number of candidate key effectors in this process, which might assist in functional tests, resistant clone selection, and disease control in the future. PMID:26222429

  8. Characterization of PM2.5-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and its deposition in Populus tomentosa leaves in Beijing.

    PubMed

    An, Hailong; Zhang, Gang; Liu, Chao; Guo, Huihong; Yin, Weilun; Xia, Xinli

    2017-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous constituents of air particulate matter and can be taken up by plants from the atmosphere. However, the purification of particulate-bound PAHs in the atmosphere by greening tree species has not been reported. In this study, we assess the concentrations, distribution, and sources of PM2.5-bound PAHs at three representative sites of Beijing in April, July, and November (non-heating period) and analyze the correlation between PAHs in Populus tomentosa leaves and in atmospheric PM2.5. The total PAH concentrations in PM2.5 were in the range of 19.85 ± 13.59-42.01 ± 37.17 ng/m(3) with mean value of 31.35 ng/m(3) at the three sites, and the PM2.5-bound PAHs concentrations in the two suburban sites (YF and YQ) were significantly higher than that in urban site (XZM) in November (autumn). At the three sites, the high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs in PM2.5 were dominant, accounting for 54.09-64.90% of total PAHs and the concentration of HMW PAHs was, on average, 9.1 times higher than that of low molecular weight (LWM) PAHs. Principal component analysis combined with diagnostic ratio analysis indicated that vehicle emission, wood combustion, and industrial processes were the main sources for PM2.5-bound PAHs in the non-heating period of Beijing. However, the LMW PAHs were dominant in P. tomentosa leaves. The concentrations of HMW PAHs (BbF, BkF, BaP, IcdP, and BghiP) in P. tomentosa leaves reached 26.11 ± 2.39, 41.42 ± 7.77, and 55.70 ± 12.33 ng/g at YQ, XZM, and YF in autumn, respectively, and were, on average, 2.1 times higher than those in April (spring) at the three sites. The ∑5PAHs concentration in P. tomentosa leaves accumulatively increased from spring to autumn, which was not related to the temporal variation of PM2.5-bound PAHs. Nevertheless, the ∑5PAHs mean concentrations followed the order of YF > XZM > YQ. This trend was consistent with spatial distribution of atmosphere PM2.5, indicating

  9. Resprout and survival of willows (Salix purpurea and S. incana), Poplars (Populus nigra) and Tamaris (Tamarix gallica) cuttings in marly gullies with Southern aspect in a mountainous and Mediterranean climate (Southern Alps, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Freddy; Labonne, Sophie; Dangla, Laure; Lavandier, Géraud

    2014-05-01

    In the Southern French Alps under a mountainous and Mediterranean climate, a current strategy of bioengineering is developed for trapping sediment in marly gullies with surface area less than 1 ha. It is based on the use of structures in the form of brush layers and brush mats of cuttings on deadwood microdams. Purple and white Willows (Salix purpurea and S. incana) are recommended here as they proved their efficiency to resprout and survive in such environment. However, these species installed in Southern gullies did not survive in previous experiments, due to the too harsh conditions of solar radiation and drought. We thus decided to test other species, namely black Poplar (Populus nigra) and Tamaris (Tamarix gallica), which proved their resistance to drought conditions in other experiments. To this view, bioengineering structures have been built in 2010 in eroded marly gullies in the Roubines and Fontaugier catchments (Southern Alps, France). We tested two installation modalities: one in spring and a second in autumn. Seventy-eight bioengineering structures (50 in spring and 28 in autumn), among which 32 made with Poplar cuttings and 28 with Tamaris cuttings, as well as 11 structures with purple Willow and 7 with white Willow as controls, were built in 6 experimental gullies. After 3 observation years for each modality (2010 to 2012, and 2011 to 2013, respectively), results first revealed that Willow species succeeded in surviving in gullies in Southern aspect (76 % for the cuttings installed in spring and 52 % for those installed in autumn), which is in contradiction with previous results. Second, Poplar showed a good ability to survive (62 % for the cuttings installed in spring and 33 % for those installed in autumn). Tamaris obtained the worst score with 26 % and 38 % of survival for the cuttings installed in spring and autumn, respectively. Globally, excepted for Tamaris, survival rates were better for the cuttings installed in spring. The bioengineering

  10. Insect regurgitant and wounding elicit similar defense responses in poplar leaves: not something to spit at?

    PubMed

    Major, Ian T; Constabel, C Peter

    2007-01-01

    How plants perceive insect attacks is an area of active research. Numerous studies have shown that regurgitant from feeding insects elicits a defense response in plants, which is often assumed to be distinct from a wound response. We have characterized the inducible defense response in hybrid poplar and found it to be qualitatively similar between wounding and application of regurgitant from forest tent caterpillar. We suggest that this is likely attributable to our wounding treatment which is much more intense compared to most other studies. These overlapping responses appear to be activated via jasmonic acid signaling, and we speculate that they are both triggered by elicitors of plant origin. Wounding would release such elicitor molecules when leaf cells are disrupted, and regurgitant may contain them in a modified or processed form. This hypothesis could explain why some other necrosis-inducing stresses also induce herbivore defense genes.

  11. Seasonal variations in photosynthesis, intrinsic water-use efficiency and stable isotope composition of poplar leaves in a short-rotation plantation

    PubMed Central

    Broeckx, L.S.; Fichot, R.; Verlinden, M.S.; Ceulemans, R.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic carbon assimilation and transpirational water loss play an important role in the yield and the carbon sequestration potential of bioenergy-devoted cultures of fast-growing trees. For six poplar (Populus) genotypes in a short-rotation plantation, we observed significant seasonal and genotypic variation in photosynthetic parameters, intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) and leaf stable isotope composition (δ13C and δ18O). The poplars maintained high photosynthetic rates (between 17.8 and 26.9 μmol m−2 s−1 depending on genotypes) until late in the season, in line with their fast-growth habit. Seasonal fluctuations were mainly explained by variations in soil water availability and by stomatal limitation upon photosynthesis. Stomatal rather than biochemical limitation was confirmed by the constant intrinsic photosynthetic capacity (Vcmax) during the growing season, closely related to leaf nitrogen (N) content. Intrinsic water-use efficiency scaled negatively with carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13Cbl) and positively with the ratio between mesophyll diffusion conductance (gm) and stomatal conductance. The WUEi – Δ13Cbl relationship was partly influenced by gm. There was a trade-off between WUEi and photosynthetic N-use efficiency, but only when soil water availability was limiting. Our results suggest that seasonal fluctuations in relation to soil water availability should be accounted for in future modelling studies assessing the carbon sequestration potential and the water-use efficiency of woody energy crops. PMID:25074859

  12. The response of male and female black poplar (Populus nigra L. subspecies betulifolia (Pursh) W. Wettst.) cuttings to different water table depths and sediment types: implications for flow management and river corridor biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Francine M. R.; Barsoum, Nadia; Richards, Keith S.; Winfield, Mark; Hayes, Adrian

    2000-10-01

    Management of river flows has altered the pattern of flood arrival times and reduced their frequency and duration on many European floodplains. Floodplain tree species depend on floods both to provide new sites for their regeneration and to recharge water tables at various depths in the rooting zone. A reduction in floods is one factor that has led to loss of river corridor biodiversity, with early successional tree species from the Salicaceae being particularly adversely affected. Members of the Salicaceae are dioecious and it is possible that the males and females of these species have measurably different water table requirements, which might lead to spatial segregation of the sexes on a floodplain. This paper describes an investigation that was carried out into the response of male and female black poplar (Populus nigra L. subspecies betulifolia (Pursh) W. Wettst.) to different soil moisture conditions. An experiment was set up on an alluvial island in the River Great Ouse (UK) in which cuttings of male and female black poplar were grown in different sediment types with different water table levels. The experiment was carried out over two field seasons in 1997 and 1998. Results showed that females tended to prefer wetter and more nutrient-rich sites than males but that there was considerable overlap in their requirements. A complementary genetic study showed very little genetic variation in the experimental population, which may also partially explain the relatively low level of variation between the two sexes found in the study. It is suggested that some limited spatial segregation of the sexes does occur in response to soil moisture availability and that river flow management which aims to maintain or increase river corridor biodiversity may need to take this into account.

  13. Expression of the Arabidopsis mutant ABI1 gene alters abscisic acid sensitivity, stomatal development, and growth morphology in gray poplars.

    PubMed

    Arend, Matthias; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Ehlting, Barbara; Hänsch, Robert; Lange, Theo; Rennenberg, Heinz; Himmelbach, Axel; Grill, Erwin; Fromm, Jörg

    2009-12-01

    The consequences of altered abscisic acid (ABA) sensitivity in gray poplar (Populus x canescens [Ait.] Sm.) development were examined by ectopic expression of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant abi1 (for abscisic acid insensitive1) gene. The expression resulted in an ABA-insensitive phenotype revealed by a strong tendency of abi1 poplars to wilt, impaired responsiveness of their stomata to ABA, and an ABA-resistant bud outgrowth. These plants therefore required cultivation under very humid conditions to prevent drought stress symptoms. Morphological alterations became evident when comparing abi1 poplars with poplars expressing Arabidopsis nonmutant ABI1 or wild-type plants. abi1 poplars showed increased stomatal size, enhanced shoot growth, and retarded leaf and root development. The increased stomatal size and its reversion to the size of wild-type plants by exogenous ABA indicate a role for ABA in regulating stomatal development. Enhanced shoot growth and retarded leaf and root development support the hypothesis that ABA acts independently from drought stress as a negative regulator of growth in shoots and as a positive regulator of growth in leaves and roots. In shoots, we observed an interaction of ABA with ethylene: abi1 poplars exhibited elevated ethylene production, and the ethylene perception inhibitor Ag(+) antagonized the enhanced shoot growth. Thus, we provide evidence that ABA acts as negative regulator of shoot growth in nonstressed poplars by restricting ethylene production. Furthermore, we show that ABA has a role in regulating shoot branching by inhibiting lateral bud outgrowth.

  14. Lignin engineering in field-grown poplar trees affects the endosphere bacterial microbiome.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Bram; Op De Beeck, Michiel; Weyens, Nele; Van Acker, Rebecca; Van Montagu, Marc; Boerjan, Wout; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-02-23

    Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR), an enzyme central to the lignin biosynthetic pathway, represents a promising biotechnological target to reduce lignin levels and to improve the commercial viability of lignocellulosic biomass. However, silencing of the CCR gene results in considerable flux changes of the general and monolignol-specific lignin pathways, ultimately leading to the accumulation of various extractable phenolic compounds in the xylem. Here, we evaluated host genotype-dependent effects of field-grown, CCR-down-regulated poplar trees (Populus tremula × Populus alba) on the bacterial rhizosphere microbiome and the endosphere microbiome, namely the microbiota present in roots, stems, and leaves. Plant-associated bacteria were isolated from all plant compartments by selective isolation and enrichment techniques with specific phenolic carbon sources (such as ferulic acid) that are up-regulated in CCR-deficient poplar trees. The bacterial microbiomes present in the endosphere were highly responsive to the CCR-deficient poplar genotype with remarkably different metabolic capacities and associated community structures compared with the WT trees. In contrast, the rhizosphere microbiome of CCR-deficient and WT poplar trees featured highly overlapping bacterial community structures and metabolic capacities. We demonstrate the host genotype modulation of the plant microbiome by minute genetic variations in the plant genome. Hence, these interactions need to be taken into consideration to understand the full consequences of plant metabolic pathway engineering and its relation with the environment and the intended genetic improvement.

  15. Lignin engineering in field-grown poplar trees affects the endosphere bacterial microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Beckers, Bram; Op De Beeck, Michiel; Weyens, Nele; Van Acker, Rebecca; Van Montagu, Marc; Boerjan, Wout; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR), an enzyme central to the lignin biosynthetic pathway, represents a promising biotechnological target to reduce lignin levels and to improve the commercial viability of lignocellulosic biomass. However, silencing of the CCR gene results in considerable flux changes of the general and monolignol-specific lignin pathways, ultimately leading to the accumulation of various extractable phenolic compounds in the xylem. Here, we evaluated host genotype-dependent effects of field-grown, CCR-down-regulated poplar trees (Populus tremula × Populus alba) on the bacterial rhizosphere microbiome and the endosphere microbiome, namely the microbiota present in roots, stems, and leaves. Plant-associated bacteria were isolated from all plant compartments by selective isolation and enrichment techniques with specific phenolic carbon sources (such as ferulic acid) that are up-regulated in CCR-deficient poplar trees. The bacterial microbiomes present in the endosphere were highly responsive to the CCR-deficient poplar genotype with remarkably different metabolic capacities and associated community structures compared with the WT trees. In contrast, the rhizosphere microbiome of CCR-deficient and WT poplar trees featured highly overlapping bacterial community structures and metabolic capacities. We demonstrate the host genotype modulation of the plant microbiome by minute genetic variations in the plant genome. Hence, these interactions need to be taken into consideration to understand the full consequences of plant metabolic pathway engineering and its relation with the environment and the intended genetic improvement. PMID:26755604

  16. Transcriptome Analysis of Poplar during Leaf Spot Infection with Sphaerulina spp.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Adam J.; Pelletier, Gervais; Tanguay, Philippe; Séguin, Armand

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of poplar caused by the native fungal pathogen Sphaerulina musiva and related species are of growing concern, particularly with the increasing interest in intensive poplar plantations to meet growing energy demands. Sphaerulina musiva is able to cause infection on leaves, resulting in defoliation and canker formation on stems. To gain a greater understanding of the different responses of poplar species to infection caused by the naturally co-evolved Sphaerulina species, RNA-seq was conducted on leaves of Populus deltoides, P. balsamifera and P. tremuloides infected with S. musiva, S. populicola and a new undescribed species, Ston1, respectively. The experiment was designed to contain the pathogen in a laboratory environment, while replicating disease development in commercial plantations. Following inoculation, trees were monitored for disease symptoms, pathogen growth and host responses. Genes involved in phenylpropanoid, terpenoid and flavonoid biosynthesis were generally upregulated in P. balsamifera and P. tremuloides, while cell wall modification appears to play an important role in the defense of P. deltoides. Poplar defensive genes were expressed early in P. balsamifera and P. tremuloides, but their expression was delayed in P. deltoides, which correlated with the rate of disease symptoms development. Also, severe infection in P. balsamifera led to leaf abscission. This data gives an insight into the large differences in timing and expression of genes between poplar species being attacked by their associated Sphaerulina pathogen. PMID:26378446

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of Poplar during Leaf Spot Infection with Sphaerulina spp.

    PubMed

    Foster, Adam J; Pelletier, Gervais; Tanguay, Philippe; Séguin, Armand

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of poplar caused by the native fungal pathogen Sphaerulina musiva and related species are of growing concern, particularly with the increasing interest in intensive poplar plantations to meet growing energy demands. Sphaerulina musiva is able to cause infection on leaves, resulting in defoliation and canker formation on stems. To gain a greater understanding of the different responses of poplar species to infection caused by the naturally co-evolved Sphaerulina species, RNA-seq was conducted on leaves of Populus deltoides, P. balsamifera and P. tremuloides infected with S. musiva, S. populicola and a new undescribed species, Ston1, respectively. The experiment was designed to contain the pathogen in a laboratory environment, while replicating disease development in commercial plantations. Following inoculation, trees were monitored for disease symptoms, pathogen growth and host responses. Genes involved in phenylpropanoid, terpenoid and flavonoid biosynthesis were generally upregulated in P. balsamifera and P. tremuloides, while cell wall modification appears to play an important role in the defense of P. deltoides. Poplar defensive genes were expressed early in P. balsamifera and P. tremuloides, but their expression was delayed in P. deltoides, which correlated with the rate of disease symptoms development. Also, severe infection in P. balsamifera led to leaf abscission. This data gives an insight into the large differences in timing and expression of genes between poplar species being attacked by their associated Sphaerulina pathogen.

  18. Phytoextraction potential of wild type and 35S-gshI transgenic poplar trees (Populus x Canescens) for environmental pollutants herbicide paraquat, salt sodium, zinc sulfate and nitric oxide in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gyulai, G; Bittsánszky, A; Szabó, Z; Waters, L; Gullner, G; Kampfl, G; Heltai, G; Komíves, T

    2014-01-01

    Phytoextraction potentials of two transgenic (TR) poplar (Populus x canescens) clones TRggs11 and TRlgl6 were compared with that of wild-type (WT) following exposure to paraquat, zinc sulfate, common salt and nitric oxide (NO), using a leaf-disc system incubated for 21 days on EDTA-containing nutritive WPM media in vitro. Glutathione (GSH) contents of leaf discs of TRlgl6 and TRggs11 showed increments to 296% and 190%, respectively, compared with WT. NO exposure led to a twofold GSH content in TRlgl6, which was coupled with a significantly increased sulfate uptake when exposed to 10(-3) M ZnSO4. The highest mineral contents of Na, Zn, Mn, Cu, and Mo was observed in the TRggs11 clone. Salt-induced activity of catalase enzyme increased in both TR clones significantly compared with WT under NaCl (0.75% and 1.5%) exposure. The in silico sequence analyses of gsh1 genes revealed that P. x canadensis and Salix sachalinensis show the closest sequence similarity to that of P. x canescens, which predicted an active GSH production with high phytoextraction potentials of these species with indication for their use where P. x canescens can not be grown.

  19. Influence of over-expression of the Flowering Promoting Factor 1 gene (FPF1) from Arabidopsis on wood formation in hybrid poplar (Populus tremula L. × P. tremuloides Michx.).

    PubMed

    Hoenicka, Hans; Lautner, Silke; Klingberg, Andreas; Koch, Gerald; El-Sherif, Fadia; Lehnhardt, Denise; Zhang, Bo; Burgert, Ingo; Odermatt, Jürgen; Melzer, Siegbert; Fromm, Jörg; Fladung, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    Constitutive expression of the FPF1 gene in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. × P. tremuloides Michx.) showed a strong effect on wood formation but no effect on flowering time. Gene expression studies showed that activity of flowering time genes PtFT1, PtCO2, and PtFUL was not increased in FPF1 transgenic plants. However, the SOC1/TM3 class gene PTM5, which has been related to wood formation and flowering time, showed a strong activity in stems of all transgenic lines studied. Wood density was lower in transgenic plants, despite significantly reduced vessel frequency which was overcompensated by thinner fibre cell walls. Chemical screening of the wood by pyrolysis GC/MS showed that FPF1 transgenics have higher fractions of cellulose and glucomannan products as well as lower lignin content. The latter observation was confirmed by UV microspectrophotometry on a cellular level. Topochemical lignin distribution revealed a slower increase of lignin incorporation in the developing xylem of the transgenics when compared with the wild-type plants. In line with the reduced wood density, micromechanical wood properties such as stiffness and ultimate stress were also significantly reduced in all transgenic lines. Thus, we provide evidence that FPF1 class genes may play a regulatory role in both wood formation and flowering in poplar.

  20. Level of tissue differentiation influences the activation of a heat-inducible flower-specific system for genetic containment in poplar (Populus tremula L.).

    PubMed

    Hoenicka, Hans; Lehnhardt, Denise; Nunna, Suneetha; Reinhardt, Richard; Jeltsch, Albert; Briones, Valentina; Fladung, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Differentiation level but not transgene copy number influenced activation of a gene containment system in poplar. Heat treatments promoted CRE gene body methylation. The flower-specific transgene deletion was confirmed. Gene flow between genetic modified trees and their wild relatives is still motive of concern. Therefore, approaches for gene containment are required. In this study, we designed a novel strategy for achieving an inducible and flower-specific transgene removal from poplar trees but still expressing the transgene in the plant body. Hence, pollen carrying transgenes could be used for breeding purposes under controlled conditions in a first phase, and in the second phase genetic modified poplars developing transgene-free pollen grains could be released. This approach is based on the recombination systems CRE/loxP and FLP/frt. Both gene constructs contained a heat-inducible CRE/loxP-based spacer sequence for in vivo assembling of the flower-specific FLP/frt system. This allowed inducible activation of gene containment. The FLP/frt system was under the regulation of a flower-specific promoter, either CGPDHC or PTD. Our results confirmed complete CRE/loxP-based in vivo assembling of the flower-specific transgene excision system after heat treatment in all cells for up to 30 % of regenerants derived from undifferentiated tissue cultures. Degradation of HSP::CRE/loxP spacer after recombination but also persistence as extrachromosomal DNA circles were detected in sub-lines obtained after heat treatments. Furthermore, heat treatment promoted methylation of the CRE gene body. A lower methylation level was detected at CpG sites in transgenic sub-lines showing complete CRE/loxP recombination and persistence of CRE/loxP spacer, compared to sub-lines with incomplete recombination. However, our results suggest that low methylation might be necessary but not sufficient for recombination. The flower-specific FLP/frt-based transgene deletion was confirmed in 6.3 % of

  1. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting ectomycorrhizal symbiosis in an interspecific F1 poplar cross and differential expression of genes in ectomycorrhizas of the two parents: Populus deltoides and Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Labbe, Jessy L; Jorge, Veronique; Vion, Patrice; Marcais, Benoit; Bastien, Catherine; Tuskan, Gerald A; Martin, Francis; Le Tacon, F

    2011-01-01

    A Populus deltoides Populus trichocarpa F1 pedigree was analyzed for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting ectomycorrhizal development and for microarray characterization of gene networks involved in this symbiosis. A 300 genotype progeny set was evaluated for its ability to form ectomycorrhiza with the basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor. The percentage of mycorrhizal root tips was determined on the root systems of all 300 progeny and their two parents. QTL analysis identified four significant QTLs, one on the P. deltoides and three on the P. trichocarpa genetic maps. These QTLs were aligned to the P. trichocarpa genome and each contained several megabases and encompass numerous genes. NimbleGen whole-genome microarray, using cDNA from RNA extracts of ectomycorrhizal root tips from the parental genotypes P. trichocarpa and P. deltoides, was used to narrow the candidate gene list. Among the 1,543 differentially expressed genes (p value 0.05; 5.0-fold change in transcript level) having different transcript levels in mycorrhiza of the two parents, 41 transcripts were located in the QTL intervals: 20 in Myc_d1, 14 in Myc_t1, and seven in Myc_t2, while no significant differences among transcripts were found in Myc_t3. Among these 41 transcripts, 25 were overrepresented in P. deltoides relative to P. trichocarpa; 16 were overrepresented in P. trichocarpa. The transcript showing the highest overrepresentation in P. trichocarpa mycorrhiza libraries compared to P. deltoides mycorrhiza codes for an ethylene-sensitive EREBP-4 protein which may repress defense mechanisms in P. trichocarpa while the highest overrepresented transcripts in P. deltoides code for proteins/genes typically associated with pathogen resistance.

  2. Recent advances in research of some pest problems of hybrid populus in Michigan and Wisconsin

    Treesearch

    Lincoln M. Moore; Louis F. Wilson

    1983-01-01

    Hybrid Populus clones were examined for impact from and resistance to attack from several insects and diseases. Cottonwood leaf beetle, poplar-and-willow borer, and Septoria canker were most injurious. The spotted poplar aphid and poplar-gall saperda, even when abundant, caused only minor impact. The tarnished plant bug, a newly identified pest of...

  3. Application of Five Light-Response Models in the Photosynthesis of Populus × Euramericana cv. 'Zhonglin46' Leaves.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lidong; Zhang, Shuyong; Zhang, Guangcan; Liu, Xia; Xia, Xuanxuan; Zhang, Songsong; Xing, Wei; Fang, Xiaochen

    2015-05-01

    The light-response curve of photosynthesis is an important tool used to study plant ecophysiology and can provide a scientific basis for the response of plant photosynthetic characteristics to environmental factors. At present, there are five common light-response models of photosynthesis. To gain deeper insight into the applicability of different light-response models of photosynthesis and the photosynthetic physiological characteristics of Populus euramericana cv. 'Zhonglin46', two typical light-response curves of photosynthesis in P. euramericana cv. 'Zhonglin46' leaves, one under drought stress and the other under control conditions, were measured using a CIRAS-2 portable photosynthesis system. The light-response data were divided into two groups: one set of data was used to fit light-response curves, and the other set of data was used to test them. The accuracy of the fitting and the predictions of the different models were evaluated by mean square error and mean absolute error. The results showed that the light-response curves of P. euramericana cv. 'Zhonglin46' under drought stress matched the light-saturated inhibition type and that those under the control condition matched the approaching light-saturation type. The two new models (i.e., the modified rectangular hyperbola model and modified exponential model) fit the two light-response curves and their characteristic parameters well, and the fitting results of the two models were similar. Conversely, the three traditional models (i.e., the rectangular hyperbola model, nonrectangular hyperbola model, and exponential model) did not fit the two light-response curves well; in particular, they overestimated the maximum net photosynthetic rate, underestimated the light saturation point (LSP), and did not fit the net photosynthetic rate during the light-saturated stage. The LSP calculated by the "linear method" combined with the traditional models was significantly lower than the measured values; additionally, the

  4. Effects of a three-year exposure to ambient ozone on biomass allocation in poplar using ethylenediurea.

    PubMed

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Pecori, Francesco; Conese, Ilaria; Bardelli, Tommaso; Marchi, Enrico; Manning, William J; Badea, Ovidiu; Paoletti, Elena

    2013-09-01

    We examined the effect of ambient ozone on visible foliar injury, growth and biomass in field-grown poplar cuttings of an Oxford clone sensitive to ozone (Populus maximoviczii Henry × berolinensis Dippel) irrigated with ethylenediurea (EDU) or water for three years. EDU is used as an ozone protectant for plants. Protective effects of EDU on ozone visible injury were found. As a result, poplar trees grown under EDU treatment increased leaves, lateral branches and root density in the third year, although no significant enhancement of stem height and diameter was found. Ambient ozone (AOT40, 24.6 ppm h; diurnal hourly average, 40.3 ppb) may finally reduce carbon gain by reducing the number of branches, and thus sites for leaf formation, in ozone-sensitive poplar trees under not-limiting conditions.

  5. Hydroxylated Metabolites of 4-Monochlorobiphenyl and Its Metabolic Pathway in Whole Poplar Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Guangshu; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2010-01-01

    4-Monochlorobiphenyl (CB3), mainly an airborne pollutant, undergoes rapid biotransformation to produce hydroxylated metabolites (OH-CB3s). However, up to now, hydroxylation of CB3 has not been studied in living organisms. In order to explore the formation of hydroxylated metabolites of CB3 in whole plants, poplars (Populus deltoides × nigra, DN34) were exposed to CB3 for 10 days. Poplars are a model plant with complete genomic sequence, and they are widely used in phytoremediation. Results showed poplar plants can metabolize CB3 into OH-CB3s. Three monohydroxy metabolites, including 2′-hydroxy-4-chlorobiphenyl (2′OH-CB3), 3′-hydroxy-4-chlorobiphenyl (3′OH-CB3) and 4′-hydroxy-4-chlorobiphenyl (4′OH-CB3), were identified in hydroponic solution and in different parts of poplar plant. The metabolite 4′OH-CB3 was the major product. In addition, there were two other unknown monohydroxy metabolites of CB3 found in whole poplar plants. Based on their physical and chemical properties, they are likely to be 2-hydroxy-4-chlorobiphenyl (2OH-CB3) and 3-hydroxy-4-chlorobiphenyl (3OH-CB3). Compared to the roots and leaves, the middle portion of the plant (the middle wood and bark) had higher concentrations of 2′OH-CB3, 3′OH-CB3 and 4′OH-CB3, which suggests that these hydroxylated metabolites of CB3 are easily translocated in poplars from roots to shoots. The total masses of 2′OH-CB3, 3′OH-CB3 and 4′OH-CB3 in whole poplar plants were much higher than those in solution, strongly suggesting that it is mainly the poplar plant itself which metabolizes CB3 to OH-CB3s. Finally, the data suggest that the metabolic pathway be via epoxide intermediates. PMID:20402517

  6. Growth and biomass of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; David R. Coyle; Richard B. Hall

    2007-01-01

    Resource managers are challenged with waste disposal and leachate produced from its degradation. Poplar (Populus spp.) trees offer an opportunity for ecological leachate disposal as an irrigation source for managed tree systems. Our objective was to irrigate Populus trees with municipal solid waste landfill leachate or fertilized well water (control...

  7. Poplar for the phytomanagement of boron contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Robinson, B H; Green, S R; Chancerel, B; Mills, T M; Clothier, B E

    2007-11-01

    Boron (B) is a widespread environmental contaminant that is mobile relative to other trace elements. We investigated the potential of hybrid poplar (Populus sp.) for B phytomanagement using a lysimeter experiment and a field trial on B-contaminated wood-waste. In both studies, poplars enhanced evapotranspiration from the wood-waste, reduced B leaching, and accumulated B in the aerial portions of the tree. When grown in a substrate containing 30 mg/kg B, poplar leaves had an average B concentration of 845 mg/kg, while the stems contained 21 mg/kg B. Leaf B concentrations increased linearly with leaf age. A decomposition experiment revealed that abscised leaves released 14% of their B during the winter months. Fertiliser application enhanced tree growth without decreasing the leaf B concentrations. Harvesting alternate rows of trees on a contaminated site would reduce leaching from the site while removing B. Harvested plant material may provide bioenergy, stock fodder, or an amendment for B-deficient soils.

  8. Laboratory evaluation of transgenic Populus davidiana×Populus bolleana expressing Cry1Ac + SCK, Cry1Ah3, and Cry9Aa3 genes against gypsy moth and fall webworm.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liping; Chen, Yajuan; Wei, Xiaoli; Ni, Mi; Zhang, Jiewei; Wang, Hongzhi; Zhu, Zhen; Wei, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Transgenic poplar lines 'Shanxin' (Populus davidiana×Populus bolleana) were generated via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transgenic lines carried the expression cassettes of Cry1Ac + SCK, Cry1Ah3, and Cry9Aa3, respectively. The expression levels of the exogenous insect resistance genes in the transgenic lines were determined by Q-PCR and Western blot. Leaves of the transgenic lines were used for insect feeding bioassays on first instar larvae of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) and fall webworm (Hyphantria cunea). At 5 d of feeding, the mean mortalities of larvae feeding on Cry1Ac + SCK and Cry1Ah3 transgenic poplars leaves were 97% and 91%, while mortality on Cry9Aa3 transgenic lines was about 49%. All gypsy moth and fall webworm larvae were killed in 7-9 days after feeding on leaves from Cry1Ac + SCK or Cry1Ah3 transgenic poplars, while all the fall webworm larvae were killed in 11 days and about 80% of gypsy moth larvae were dead in 14 days after feeding on those from Cry9Aa3 transgenic lines. It was concluded that the transgenic lines of Cry1Ac + SCK and Cry1Ah3 were highly toxic to larvae of both insect species while lines with Cry9Aa3 had lower toxicity,and H. cunea larvae are more sensitive to the insecticidal proteins compared to L. dispar. Transgenic poplar lines toxic to L. dispar and H. cunea could be used to provide Lepidoptera pest resistance to selected strains of poplar trees.

  9. Genomic and functional approaches reveal a case of adaptive introgression from Populus balsamifera (balsam poplar) in P. trichocarpa (black cottonwood).

    PubMed

    Suarez-Gonzalez, Adriana; Hefer, Charles A; Christe, Camille; Corea, Oliver; Lexer, Christian; Cronk, Quentin C B; Douglas, Carl J

    2016-06-01

    Natural hybrid zones in forest trees provide systems to study the transfer of adaptive genetic variation by introgression. Previous landscape genomic studies in Populus trichocarpa, a keystone tree species, indicated genomic footprints of admixture with its sister species Populus balsamifera and identified candidate genes for local adaptation. Here, we explored the patterns of introgression and signals of local adaptation in P. trichocarpa and P. balsamifera, employing genome resequencing data from three chromosomes in pure species and admixed individuals from wild populations. Local ancestry analysis in admixed P. trichocarpa revealed a telomeric region in chromosome 15 with P. balsamifera ancestry, containing several candidate genes for local adaptation. Genomic analyses revealed signals of selection in certain genes in this region (e.g. PRR5, COMT1), and functional analyses based on gene expression variation and correlations with adaptive phenotypes suggest distinct functions of the introgressed alleles. In contrast, a block of genes in chromosome 12 paralogous to the introgressed region showed no signs of introgression or signatures of selection. We hypothesize that the introgressed region in chromosome 15 has introduced modular or cassette-like variation into P. trichocarpa. These linked adaptive mutations are associated with a block of genes in chromosome 15 that appear to have undergone neo- or subfunctionalization relative to paralogs in a duplicated region on chromosome 12 that show no signatures of adaptive variation. The association between P. balsamifera introgressed alleles with the expression of adaptive traits in P. trichocarpa supports the hypothesis that this is a case of adaptive introgression in an ecologically important foundation species.

  10. Ethanol production from poplar wood through enzymatic saccharification and fermentation by dilute acid and SPORL pretreatments

    Treesearch

    Z.J. Wang; J.Y. Zhu; Ronald S. Jr. Zalesny; K.F. Chen

    2012-05-01

    Dilute acid (DA) and Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome Recalcitrance of Lignocelluloses (SPORL) pretreatments were directly applied to wood chips of four poplar wood samples of different genotypes (hereafter referred to as poplars; Populus tremuloides Michx. ‘native aspen collection’; Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh x Populus nigra L. ‘NE222’ and ‘DN5’; P. nigra x...

  11. [Phosphorus transfer between mixed poplar and black locust seedlings].

    PubMed

    He, Wei; Jia, Liming; Hao, Baogang; Wen, Xuejun; Zhai, Mingpu

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, the 32P radio-tracer technique was applied to study the ways of phosphorus transfer between poplar (Populus euramericana cv. 'I-214') and black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia). A five compartment root box (18 cm x 18 cm x 26 cm) was used for testing the existence of the hyphal links between the roots of two tree species when inoculated with vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungus (Glomus mosseae). Populus I-214 (donor) and Robinia pseudoacacia (receiver) were grown in two terminal compartments, separated by a 2 cm root-free soil layer. The root compartments were lined with bags of nylon mesh (38 microns) that allowed the passage of hyphae but not roots. The top soil of a mixed stand of poplar and black locust, autoclaved at 121 degrees C for one hour, was used for growing seedlings for testing. In 5 compartment root box, mycorrhizal root colonization of poplar was 34%, in which VA mycorrhizal fungus was inoculated, whereas 26% mycorrhizal root colonization was observed in black locust, the other terminal compartment, 20 weeks after planting. No root colonization was observed in non-inoculated plant pairs. This indicated that the mycorrhizal root colonization of black locust was caused by hyphal spreading from the poplar. Test of tracer isotope of 32P showed that the radioactivity of the treatment significantly higher than that of the control (P < 0.05), 14 days from the tracer applied, to 27 days after, when VA mycorrhizal fungus was inoculated in poplar root. Furthermore, mycorrhizal interconnections between the roots of poplar and black locust seedlings was observed in situ by binocular in root box. All these experiments showed that the hyphal links was formed between the roots of two species of trees inoculated by VA mycorrhizal fungus. Four treatments were designed according to if there were two nets (mesh 38 microns), 2 cm apart, between the poplar and black locust, and if the soil in root box was pasteurized. Most significant differences of

  12. High rates of virus-induced gene silencing by tobacco rattle virus in Populus.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zedan; Sun, Jian; Yao, Jun; Wang, Shaojie; Ding, Mingquan; Zhang, Huilong; Qian, Zeyong; Zhao, Nan; Sa, Gang; Zhao, Rui; Shen, Xin; Polle, Andrea; Chen, Shaoliang

    2015-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been shown to be an effective tool for investigating gene functions in herbaceous plant species, but has rarely been tested in trees. The establishment of a fast and reliable transformation system is especially important for woody plants, many of which are recalcitrant to transformation. In this study, we established a tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based VIGS system for two Populus species, Populus euphratica and P. × canescens. Here, TRV constructs carrying a 266 bp or a 558 bp fragment of the phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene were Agrobacterium-infiltrated into leaves of the two poplar species. Agrobacterium-mediated delivery of the shorter insert, TRV2-PePDS266, into the host poplars resulted in expected photobleaching in both tree species, but not the longer insert, PePDS558. The efficiency of VIGS was temperature-dependent, increasing by raising the temperature from 18 to 28 °C. The optimized TRV-VIGS system at 28 °C resulted in a high silencing frequency and efficiency up to 65-73 and 83-94%, respectively, in the two tested poplars. Moreover, syringe inoculation of Agrobacterium in 100 mM acetosyringone induced a more efficient silencing in the two poplar species, compared with other agroinfiltration methods, e.g., direct injection, misting and agrodrench. There were plant species-related differences in the response to VIGS because the photobleaching symptoms were more severe in P. × canescens than in P. euphratica. Furthermore, VIGS-treated P. euphratica exhibited a higher recovery rate (50%) after several weeks of the virus infection, compared with TRV-infected P. × canescens plants (20%). Expression stability of reference genes was screened to assess the relative abundance of PePDS mRNA in VIGS-treated P. euphratica and P. × canescens. PeACT7 was stably expressed in P. euphratica and UBQ-L was selected as the most suitable reference gene for P. × canescens using three different

  13. Low temperatures counteract short-day induced nitrogen storage, but not accumulation of bark storage protein transcripts in bark of grey poplar (Populus × canescens) trees.

    PubMed

    Wildhagen, H; Bilela, S; Rennenberg, H

    2013-01-01

    According to climate change scenarios, the seasonal course of temperature will change in most regions of the world, raising the question of how this will influence seasonal nitrogen (N) storage in deciduous trees. The key to this question is a detailed understanding of the underlying regulatory mechanisms, which was addressed in this study by analysing (i) the effects of low temperatures (13-1 °C) on bark storage protein (BSP) transcription, BSP and total protein accumulation and amino acid metabolism; (ii) the effects of interactions between low temperatures and photoperiod on these processes; and (iii) the regulatory role of amino acids in the bark. For this purpose, we exposed grey poplar trees (Populus × canescens) to three different treatments of changing photoperiod at constant temperature, changing temperature at constant photoperiod, and both changing photoperiod and temperature. Under a shortened photoperiod, a substantial increase of BSP transcripts was observed that was correlated with the accumulation of bark proteins, indicating a metabolic shift to promote long-term N storage. Irrespective of the applied photoperiod, exposure to low temperatures (5 or 1 °C) caused a strong increase of BSP transcripts, which was not paralled by significant increases of BSP and total bark proteins. We conclude that the interaction between effects of photoperiod and temperature is dependent on the carbon status of the trees, and reflects a metabolic adjustment of reduced carbon consumption for BSP synthesis. These results demonstrate the differential temperature sensitivity of processes involved in seasonal N storage, implying vulnerability to changing environmental conditions.

  14. Genome-Wide Identification of the Invertase Gene Family in Populus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Gao, Kai; Su, Xiaoxing; Rao, Pian; An, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Invertase plays a crucial role in carbohydrate partitioning and plant development as it catalyses the irreversible hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. The invertase family in plants is composed of two sub-families: acid invertases, which are targeted to the cell wall and vacuole; and neutral/alkaline invertases, which function in the cytosol. In this study, 5 cell wall invertase genes (PtCWINV1-5), 3 vacuolar invertase genes (PtVINV1-3) and 16 neutral/alkaline invertase genes (PtNINV1-16) were identified in the Populus genome and found to be distributed on 14 chromosomes. A comprehensive analysis of poplar invertase genes was performed, including structures, chromosome location, phylogeny, evolutionary pattern and expression profiles. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two sub-families were both divided into two clades. Segmental duplication is contributed to neutral/alkaline sub-family expansion. Furthermore, the Populus invertase genes displayed differential expression in roots, stems, leaves, leaf buds and in response to salt/cold stress and pathogen infection. In addition, the analysis of enzyme activity and sugar content revealed that invertase genes play key roles in the sucrose metabolism of various tissues and organs in poplar. This work lays the foundation for future functional analysis of the invertase genes in Populus and other woody perennials.

  15. Genome-Wide Identification of the Invertase Gene Family in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaoxing; Rao, Pian; An, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Invertase plays a crucial role in carbohydrate partitioning and plant development as it catalyses the irreversible hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. The invertase family in plants is composed of two sub-families: acid invertases, which are targeted to the cell wall and vacuole; and neutral/alkaline invertases, which function in the cytosol. In this study, 5 cell wall invertase genes (PtCWINV1-5), 3 vacuolar invertase genes (PtVINV1-3) and 16 neutral/alkaline invertase genes (PtNINV1-16) were identified in the Populus genome and found to be distributed on 14 chromosomes. A comprehensive analysis of poplar invertase genes was performed, including structures, chromosome location, phylogeny, evolutionary pattern and expression profiles. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two sub-families were both divided into two clades. Segmental duplication is contributed to neutral/alkaline sub-family expansion. Furthermore, the Populus invertase genes displayed differential expression in roots, stems, leaves, leaf buds and in response to salt/cold stress and pathogen infection. In addition, the analysis of enzyme activity and sugar content revealed that invertase genes play key roles in the sucrose metabolism of various tissues and organs in poplar. This work lays the foundation for future functional analysis of the invertase genes in Populus and other woody perennials. PMID:26393355

  16. Thermal acclimation of leaf respiration but not photosynthesis in Populus deltoides x nigra.

    PubMed

    Ow, Lai Fern; Griffin, Kevin L; Whitehead, David; Walcroft, Adrian S; Turnbull, Matthew H

    2008-01-01

    Dark respiration and photosynthesis were measured in leaves of poplar Populus deltoides x nigra ('Veronese') saplings to investigate the extent of respiratory and photosynthetic acclimation in pre-existing and newly emerged leaves to abrupt changes in air temperature. The saplings were grown at three temperature regimes and at high and low nitrogen availabilities. Rates of photosynthesis and dark respiration (R(d)) were measured at the initial temperature and the saplings were then transferred to a different temperature regime, where the plants remained for a second and third round of measurements on pre-existing and newly emerged leaves. Acclimation of photosynthesis was limited following transfer to warmer or cooler growing conditions. There was strong evidence of cold and warm acclimation of R(d) to growth temperature, but this was limited in pre-existing leaves. Full acclimation of R(d )was restricted to newly emerged leaves grown at the new growth temperature. These findings indicate that the extent of thermal acclimation differs significantly between photosynthesis and respiration. Importantly, pre-existing leaves in poplar were capable of some respiratory acclimation, but full acclimation was observed only in newly emerged leaves. The R(d)/A(max) ratio declined at higher growth temperatures, and nitrogen status of leaves had little impact on the degree of acclimation.

  17. An optimal defense strategy for phenolic glycoside production in Populus trichocarpa--isotope labeling demonstrates secondary metabolite production in growing leaves.

    PubMed

    Massad, Tara Joy; Trumbore, Susan E; Ganbat, Gantsetseg; Reichelt, Michael; Unsicker, Sybille; Boeckler, Andreas; Gleixner, Gerd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Ruehlow, Steffen

    2014-07-01

    Large amounts of carbon are required for plant growth, but young, growing tissues often also have high concentrations of defensive secondary metabolites. Plants' capacity to allocate resources to growth and defense is addressed by the growth-differentiation balance hypothesis and the optimal defense hypothesis, which make contrasting predictions. Isotope labeling can demonstrate whether defense compounds are synthesized from stored or newly fixed carbon, allowing a detailed examination of these hypotheses. Populus trichocarpa saplings were pulse-labeled with 13CO2 at the beginning and end of a growing season, and the 13C signatures of phenolic glycosides (salicinoids), sugars, bulk tissue, and respired CO2 were traced over time. Half of the saplings were also subjected to mechanical damage. Populus trichocarpa followed an optimal defense strategy, investing 13C in salicinoids in expanding leaves directly after labeling. Salicinoids turned over quickly, and their production continued throughout the season. Salicin was induced by early-season damage, further demonstrating optimal defense. Salicinoids appear to be of great value to P. trichocarpa, as they command new C both early and late in the growing season, but their fitness benefits require further study. Export of salicinoids between tissues and biochemical pathways enabling induction also needs research. Nonetheless, the investigation of defense production afforded by isotope labeling lends new insights into plants' ability to grow and defend simultaneously.

  18. Genome analysis of poplar LRR-RLP gene clusters reveals RISP, a defense-related gene coding a candidate endogenous peptide elicitor

    PubMed Central

    Petre, Benjamin; Hacquard, Stéphane; Duplessis, Sébastien; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    In plants, cell-surface receptors control immunity and development through the recognition of extracellular ligands. Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like proteins (LRR-RLPs) constitute a large multigene family of cell-surface receptors. Although this family has been intensively studied, a limited number of ligands has been identified so far, mostly because methods used for their identification and characterization are complex and fastidious. In this study, we combined genome and transcriptome analyses to describe the LRR-RLP gene family in the model tree poplar (Populus trichocarpa). In total, 82 LRR-RLP genes have been identified in P. trichocarpa genome, among which 66 are organized in clusters of up to seven members. In these clusters, LRR-RLP genes are interspersed by orphan, poplar-specific genes encoding small proteins of unknown function (SPUFs). In particular, the nine largest clusters of LRR-RLP genes (47 LRR-RLPs) include 71 SPUF genes that account for 59% of the non-LRR-RLP gene content within these clusters. Forty-four LRR-RLP and 55 SPUF genes are expressed in poplar leaves, mostly at low levels, except for members of some clusters that show higher and sometimes coordinated expression levels. Notably, wounding of poplar leaves strongly induced the expression of a defense SPUF gene named Rust-Induced Secreted protein (RISP) that has been previously reported as a marker of poplar defense responses. Interestingly, we show that the RISP-associated LRR-RLP gene is highly expressed in poplar leaves and slightly induced by wounding. Both gene promoters share a highly conserved region of ~300 nucleotides. This led us to hypothesize that the corresponding pair of proteins could be involved in poplar immunity, possibly as a ligand/receptor couple. In conclusion, we speculate that some poplar SPUFs, such as RISP, represent candidate endogenous peptide ligands of the associated LRR-RLPs and we discuss how to investigate further this hypothesis. PMID:24734035

  19. Symplastic Phloem Loading in Poplar1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cankui; Han, Lu; Slewinski, Thomas L.; Sun, Jianlei; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Zeng-Yu; Turgeon, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sap is driven through phloem sieve tubes by an osmotically generated pressure gradient between source and sink tissues. In many plants, source pressure results from thermodynamically active loading in which energy is used to transfer sucrose (Suc) from mesophyll cells to the phloem of leaf minor veins against a concentration gradient. However, in some species, almost all trees, correlative evidence suggests that sugar migrates passively through plasmodesmata from mesophyll cells into the sieve elements. The possibility of alternate loading mechanisms has important ramifications for the regulation of phloem transport and source-sink interactions. Here, we provide experimental evidence that, in gray poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba), Suc enters the phloem through plasmodesmata. Transgenic plants were generated with yeast invertase in the cell walls to prevent Suc loading by this route. The constructs were driven either by the constitutive 35S promoter or the minor vein-specific galactinol synthase promoter. Transgenic plants grew at the same rate as the wild type without symptoms of loading inhibition, such as accumulation of carbohydrates or leaf chlorosis. Rates of photosynthesis were normal. In contrast, alfalfa (Medicago sativa) plants, which have limited numbers of plasmodesmata between mesophyll and phloem, displayed typical symptoms of loading inhibition when transformed with the same DNA constructs. The results are consistent with passive loading of Suc through plasmodesmata in poplar. We also noted defense-related symptoms in leaves of transgenic poplar when the plants were abruptly exposed to excessively high temperatures, adding to evidence that hexose is involved in triggering the hypersensitive response. PMID:25056922

  20. Leaf wax n-alkane δD values are determined early in the ontogeny of Populus trichocarpa leaves when grown under controlled environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Kahmen, Ansgar; Dawson, Todd E; Vieth, Andrea; Sachse, Dirk

    2011-10-01

    The stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) of leaf wax n-alkanes record valuable information on plant and ecosystem water relations. It remains, however, unknown if leaf wax n-alkane δD values record only environmental variation during the brief period of time of leaf growth or if leaf wax n-alkane δD values are affected by environmental variability throughout the entire lifespan of a leaf. To resolve these uncertainties, we irrigated Populus trichocarpa trees with a pulse of deuterium-enriched water and used compound-specific stable hydrogen isotope analyses to test if the applied tracer could be recovered from leaf wax n-alkanes of leaves that were at different stages of their development during the tracer application. Our experiment revealed that only leaf wax n-alkanes from leaves that had developed during the time of the tracer application were affected, while leaves that were already fully matured at the time of the tracer application were not. We conclude from our study that under controlled environmental conditions, leaf wax n-alkanes are synthesized only early in the ontogeny of a leaf. Our experiment has implications for the interpretation of leaf wax n-alkane δD values in an environmental context, as it suggests that these compounds record only a brief period of the environmental variability that a leaf experiences throughout its life.

  1. Analysis of 4,664 high-quality sequence-finished poplar full-length

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, S.; Gunter, Lee E; Tuskan, Gerald A; Douglas, Carl; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven; Marra, Marco; Bohlmann, J.

    2008-01-01

    The genus Populus includes poplars, aspens and cottonwoods, which will be collectively referred to as poplars hereafter unless otherwise specified. Poplars are the dominant tree species in many forest ecosystems in the Northern Hemisphere and are of substantial economic value in plantation forestry. Poplar has been established as a model system for genomics studies of growth, development, and adaptation of woody perennial plants including secondary xylem formation, dormancy, adaptation to local environments, and biotic interactions. As part of the poplar genome sequencing project and the development of genomic resources for poplar, we have generated a full-length (FL)-cDNA collection using the biotinylated CAP trapper method. We constructed four FLcDNA libraries using RNA from xylem, phloem and cambium, and green shoot tips and leaves from the P. trichocarpa Nisqually-1 genotype, as well as insect-attacked leaves of the P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides hybrid. Following careful selection of candidate cDNA clones, we used a combined strategy of paired end reads and primer walking to generate a set of 4,664 high-accuracy, sequence-verified FLcDNAs, which clustered into 3,990 putative unique genes. Mapping FLcDNAs to the poplar genome sequence combined with BLAST comparisons to previously predicted protein coding sequences in the poplar genome identified 39 FLcDNAs that likely localize to gaps in the current genome sequence assembly. Another 173 FLcDNAs mapped to the genome sequence but were not included among the previously predicted genes in the poplar genome. Comparative sequence analysis against Arabidopsis thaliana and other species in the non-redundant database of GenBank revealed that 11.5% of the poplar FLcDNAs display no significant sequence similarity to other plant proteins. By mapping the poplar FLcDNAs against transcriptome data previously obtained with a 15.5 K cDNA microarray, we identified 153 FLcDNA clones for genes that were differentially expressed in

  2. RNA-Seq of Early-Infected Poplar Leaves by the Rust Pathogen Melampsora larici-populina Uncovers PtSultr3;5, a Fungal-Induced Host Sulfate Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Petre, Benjamin; Hacquard, Stéphane; Da Silva, Corinne; Poulain, Julie; Delaruelle, Christine; Martin, Francis; Rouhier, Nicolas; Kohler, Annegret; Duplessis, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Biotroph pathogens establish intimate interactions with their hosts that are conditioned by the successful secretion of effectors in infected tissues and subsequent manipulation of host physiology. The identification of early-expressed pathogen effectors and early-modulated host functions is currently a major goal to understand the molecular basis of biotrophy. Here, we report the 454-pyrosequencing transcriptome analysis of early stages of poplar leaf colonization by the rust fungus Melampsora larici-populina. Among the 841,301 reads considered for analysis, 616,879 and 649 were successfully mapped to Populus trichocarpa and M. larici-populina genome sequences, respectively. From a methodological aspect, these results indicate that this single approach is not appropriate to saturate poplar transcriptome and to follow transcript accumulation of the pathogen. We identified 19 pathogen transcripts encoding early-expressed small-secreted proteins representing candidate effectors of interest for forthcoming studies. Poplar RNA-Seq data were validated by oligoarrays and quantitatively analysed, which revealed a highly stable transcriptome with a single transcript encoding a sulfate transporter (herein named PtSultr3;5, POPTR_0006s16150) showing a dramatic increase upon colonization by either virulent or avirulent M. larici-populina strains. Perspectives connecting host sulfate transport and biotrophic lifestyle are discussed. PMID:22952974

  3. Characterization of NAC domain transcription factors implicated in control of vascular cell differentiation in Arabidopsis and Populus.

    PubMed

    Grant, Emily H; Fujino, Takeshi; Beers, Eric P; Brunner, Amy M

    2010-07-01

    Wood has a wide variety of uses and is arguably the most important renewable raw material. The composition of xylem cell types in wood determines the utility of different types of wood for distinct commercial applications. Using expression profiling and phylogenetic analysis, we identified many xylem-associated regulatory genes that may control the differentiation of cells involved in wood formation in Arabidopsis and poplar. Prominent among these are NAC domain transcription factors (NACs). We studied NACs with putative involvement as negative (XND1 from Arabidopsis and its poplar orthologs PopNAC118, PopNAC122, PopNAC128, PopNAC129), or positive (SND2 and SND3 from Arabidopsis and their poplar orthologs PopNAC105, PopNAC154, PopNAC156, PopNAC157) regulators of secondary cell wall synthesis. Using quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization, we evaluated expression of these Populus NACs in a developmental gradient and in association with reaction wood and found that representatives from both groups were associated with wood-forming tissue and phloem fibers. Additionally, XND1 orthologs were expressed in mesophyll cells of developing leaves. We prepared transgenic Arabidopsis and poplar plants for overexpression of selected NACs. XND1 overexpression in poplar resulted in severe stunting. Additionally, poplar XND1 overexpressors lacked phloem fibers and showed reductions in cell size and number, vessel number, and frequency of rays in the xylem. Overexpression of PopNAC122, an XND1 ortholog, yielded an analogous phenotype in Arabidopsis. Overexpression of PopNAC154 in poplar reduced height growth and increased the relative proportion of bark versus xylem.

  4. Nitrogen metabolism of two contrasting poplar species during acclimation to limiting nitrogen availability

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2013-01-01

    To investigate N metabolism of two contrasting Populus species in acclimation to low N availability, saplings of slow-growing species (Populus popularis, Pp) and a fast-growing species (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa, Pg) were exposed to 10, 100, or 1000 μM NH4NO3. Despite greater root biomass and fine root surface area in Pp, lower net influxes of NH4 + and NO3 – at the root surface were detected in Pp compared to those in Pg, corresponding well to lower NH4 + and NO3 – content and total N concentration in Pp roots. Meanwhile, higher stable N isotope composition (δ15N) in roots and stronger responsiveness of transcriptional regulation of 18 genes involved in N metabolism were found in roots and leaves of Pp compared to those of Pg. These results indicate that the N metabolism of Pp is more sensitive to decreasing N availability than that of Pg. In both species, low N treatments decreased net influxes of NH4 + and NO3 –, root NH4 + and foliar NO3 – content, root NR activities, total N concentration in roots and leaves, and transcript levels of most ammonium (AMTs) and nitrate (NRTs) transporter genes in leaves and genes involved in N assimilation in roots and leaves. Low N availability increased fine root surface area, foliar starch concentration, δ15N in roots and leaves, and transcript abundance of several AMTs (e.g. AMT1;2) and NRTs (e.g. NRT1;2 and NRT2;4B) in roots of both species. These data indicate that poplar species slow down processes of N acquisition and assimilation in acclimation to limiting N supply. PMID:23963674

  5. Nitrogen metabolism of two contrasting poplar species during acclimation to limiting nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Li, Hong; Liu, Tongxian; Polle, Andrea; Peng, Changhui; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2013-11-01

    To investigate N metabolism of two contrasting Populus species in acclimation to low N availability, saplings of slow-growing species (Populus popularis, Pp) and a fast-growing species (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa, Pg) were exposed to 10, 100, or 1000 μM NH4NO3. Despite greater root biomass and fine root surface area in Pp, lower net influxes of NH4(+) and NO3(-) at the root surface were detected in Pp compared to those in Pg, corresponding well to lower NH4(+) and NO3(-) content and total N concentration in Pp roots. Meanwhile, higher stable N isotope composition (δ(15)N) in roots and stronger responsiveness of transcriptional regulation of 18 genes involved in N metabolism were found in roots and leaves of Pp compared to those of Pg. These results indicate that the N metabolism of Pp is more sensitive to decreasing N availability than that of Pg. In both species, low N treatments decreased net influxes of NH4(+) and NO3(-), root NH4(+) and foliar NO3(-) content, root NR activities, total N concentration in roots and leaves, and transcript levels of most ammonium (AMTs) and nitrate (NRTs) transporter genes in leaves and genes involved in N assimilation in roots and leaves. Low N availability increased fine root surface area, foliar starch concentration, δ(15)N in roots and leaves, and transcript abundance of several AMTs (e.g. AMT1;2) and NRTs (e.g. NRT1;2 and NRT2;4B) in roots of both species. These data indicate that poplar species slow down processes of N acquisition and assimilation in acclimation to limiting N supply.

  6. Evaluating ascorbate oxidase as a plant defense against leaf-chewing insects using transgenic poplar.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, Raymond V; Jaros, Adam; Yip, Lynn; Tran, Lan; Kanellis, Angelos K; Constabel, C Peter

    2008-10-01

    Ascorbate is the major water-soluble antioxidant in plants and animals, and it is an essential nutrient for most insect herbivores. Therefore, ascorbate oxidase (AO) has been proposed to function as a plant defense that decreases the availability of ascorbate to insects. This hypothesis was tested by producing transgenic poplar (Populus tremula x Populus alba; Salicaceae) with 14- to 37-fold higher foliar AO activities than control (wild type) leaves and feeding these leaves to Lymantria dispar L. (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) caterpillars and Melanoplus sanguinipes (Fabricius) (Orthoptera: Acrididae) grasshoppers. To examine potential mechanisms of activity of AO in these insects, ascorbyl radical and/or ascorbate levels were measured in gut contents. No significant changes in ascorbyl radical or ascorbate levels were found in the midgut contents of L. dispar larvae that ingested the leaves of the AO-overexpressing genotypes compared to the control genotype, and no significant decreases in ascorbate levels were found in the foregut or midgut contents of M. sanguinipes. Treatment of control leaves with commercial AO also produced no changes in the midgut biochemistry of L. dispar larvae, as measured by levels of ascorbyl radicals. Likewise, no increase in oxidative stress was observed in L. dispar that consumed tannin-treated AO-overexpressing leaves compared with tannin-treated control genotype leaves. Performance experiments were carried out on first- and fourth-instar L. dispar larvae on leaf disks and on third instars feeding on intact leaves on trees. In no case was a significant difference found in the contrast between the control and three AO-overexpressing genotypes for relative consumption rate, relative growth rate, or nutritional indices. We conclude that elevated levels of AO in poplar are unlikely to serve as a defense against herbivores such as L. dispar or M. sanguinipes and that the low oxygen levels commonly found in the guts of caterpillars and

  7. Morpho-physiological response of Populus alba to erythromycin: A timeline of the health status of the plant.

    PubMed

    Pierattini, Erika Carla; Francini, Alessandra; Raffaelli, Andrea; Sebastiani, Luca

    2016-11-01

    Populus alba Villafranca clone was chosen for a proof of concept study to determine the potential uptake and accumulation of antibiotics by trees. Plants were grown hydroponically and irrigated with a recirculating Hoagland's nutrient solution (control) and Hoagland's nutrient solution fortified with erythromycin at 0.01, 0.1 and 1mgL(-1). After 3 and 28days of treatment, poplar plants were separated into roots, stem, and leaves. Plants showed good health all over the period of treatment, and no differences in poplar growth for all the concentrations of erythromycin tested were observed. Quantification of erythromycin was performed using liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in positive ion mode using multiple reaction ion monitoring. Erythromycin was detected in all organs analyzed. Roots showed an erythromycin concentration tenfold higher than leaves. The photochemical efficiency of photosystem II did not show a dose-dependant trend. From the quenching analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence, low nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) and high photochemical quenching (qP) for the first week of erythromycin exposure was observed, depending on leaves position along the stem. Results suggest a short term adaptation of the photosynthetic apparatus of Populus alba in response to environmental realistic erythromycin concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Apoplast proteome reveals that extracellular matrix contributes to multistress response in poplar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Riverine ecosystems, highly sensitive to climate change and human activities, are characterized by rapid environmental change to fluctuating water levels and siltation, causing stress on their biological components. We have little understanding of mechanisms by which riverine plant species have developed adaptive strategies to cope with stress in dynamic environments while maintaining growth and development. Results We report that poplar (Populus spp.) has evolved a systems level "stress proteome" in the leaf-stem-root apoplast continuum to counter biotic and abiotic factors. To obtain apoplast proteins from P. deltoides, we developed pressure-chamber and water-displacement methods for leaves and stems, respectively. Analyses of 303 proteins and corresponding transcripts coupled with controlled experiments and bioinformatics demonstrate that poplar depends on constitutive and inducible factors to deal with water, pathogen, and oxidative stress. However, each apoplast possessed a unique set of proteins, indicating that response to stress is partly compartmentalized. Apoplast proteins that are involved in glycolysis, fermentation, and catabolism of sucrose and starch appear to enable poplar to grow normally under water stress. Pathogenesis-related proteins mediating water and pathogen stress in apoplast were particularly abundant and effective in suppressing growth of the most prevalent poplar pathogen Melampsora. Unexpectedly, we found diverse peroxidases that appear to be involved in stress-induced cell wall modification in apoplast, particularly during the growing season. Poplar developed a robust antioxidative system to buffer oxidation in stem apoplast. Conclusion These findings suggest that multistress response in the apoplast constitutes an important adaptive trait for poplar to inhabit dynamic environments and is also a potential mechanism in other riverine plant species. PMID:21114852

  9. Apoplast proteome reveals that extracellular matrix contributes to multi-stress response in poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Pechanova, Olga; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Adams, Joshua P.; Pechan, Tibor; Vandervelde, Lindsay; Drnevich, Jenny; Jawdy, Sara; Adeli, Ardeshir; Suttle, Jeffrey; Lawrence, Amanda; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Seguin, Armand; Yuceer, Cetin

    2010-01-01

    Riverine ecosystems, highly sensitive to climate change and human activities, are characterized by rapid environmental change to fluctuating water levels and siltation, causing stress on their biological components. We have little understanding of mechanisms by which riverine plant species have developed adaptive strategies to cope with stress in dynamic environments while maintaining growth and development. We report that poplar (Populus spp.) has evolved a systems level 'stress proteome' in the leaf-stem-root apoplast continuum to counter biotic and abiotic factors. To obtain apoplast proteins from P. deltoides, we developed pressure-chamber and water-displacement methods for leaves and stems, respectively. Analyses of 303 proteins and corresponding transcripts coupled with controlled experiments and bioinformatics demonstrate that poplar depends on constitutive and inducible factors to deal with water, pathogen, and oxidative stress. However, each apoplast possessed a unique set of proteins, indicating that response to stress is partly compartmentalized. Apoplast proteins that are involved in glycolysis, fermentation, and catabolism of sucrose and starch appear to enable poplar to grow normally under water stress. Pathogenesis-related proteins mediating water and pathogen stress in apoplast were particularly abundant and effective in suppressing growth of the most prevalent poplar pathogen Melampsora. Unexpectedly, we found diverse peroxidases that appear to be involved in stress-induced cell wall modification in apoplast, particularly during the growing season. Poplar developed a robust antioxidative system to buffer oxidation in stem apoplast. These findings suggest that multistress response in the apoplast constitutes an important adaptive trait for poplar to inhabit dynamic environments and is also a potential mechanism in other riverine plant species.

  10. Survey of twenty-six hybrid poplar lines for poplar borer

    Treesearch

    W. Doug Stone; T. Keith Beatty; T. Evan Nebeker

    2006-01-01

    An insect survey was completed on 26 lines of hybrid poplar (Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii) that had the Roundup® Ready and Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) genes. The survey was conducted in Kentucky in cooperation with MeadWestvaco. A total of 260 trees were evaluated. Survival rate averaged...

  11. Different behaviours in phytoremediation capacity of two heavy metal tolerant poplar clones in relation to iron and other trace elements.

    PubMed

    Baldantoni, Daniela; Cicatelli, Angela; Bellino, Alessandro; Castiglione, Stefano

    2014-12-15

    Plant biodiversity and intra-population genetic variability have not yet been properly exploited in the framework of phytoremediation and soil reclamation. For this reason, iron and other metal accumulation capacity of two Cu and Zn tolerant poplar clones, namely AL22 (Populus alba L.) and N12 (Populus nigra L.), was investigated in a pot experiment. Cuttings of the two clones were planted in iron rich soil collected from an urban-industrial area. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb and Zn were analysed in leaves (at different times), as well as in stems and in roots (at the end of the experiment), both in control plants and in plants grown on a soil whose Fe availability was artificially enhanced. Results showed that Cd and Zn were preferentially accumulated in leaves, whereas Cu, Fe and Pb were mainly accumulated in roots. The main differences in metal accumulation between clones were related to Cd (about tenfold higher concentrations in N12) and Cu (higher concentrations in AL22). Once soil Fe availability was enhanced, the uptake and accumulation of all metals declined, with the exception of Fe at the first sampling time in AL22 leaves. The different behaviour of the two poplar clones suggests that a thoughtful choice should be made for their use in relation to soil heavy metal remediation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Increased glutamine in leaves of poplar transgenic with pine GS1a caused greater anthranilate synthetase α-subunit (ASA1) transcript and protein abundances: an auxin-related mechanism for enhanced growth in GS transgenics?

    PubMed

    Man, Huimin; Pollmann, Stephan; Weiler, Elmar W; Kirby, Edward G

    2011-08-01

    The initial reaction in the pathway leading to the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in plants is the reaction between chorismate and glutamine to produce anthranilate, catalysed by the enzyme anthranilate synthase (ASA; EC 4.1.3.27). Compared with non-transgenic controls, leaves of transgenic poplar with ectopic expression of the pine cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1a; EC 6.3.1.2) produced significantly greater glutamine and significantly enhanced ASA α-subunit (ASA1) transcript and protein (approximately 130% and 120% higher than in the untransformed controls, respectively). Similarly, tobacco leaves fed with 30 mM glutamine and 2 mM chorismate showed enhanced ASA1 transcript and protein (175% and 90% higher than controls, respectively). Furthermore, free IAA was significantly elevated both in leaves of GS1a transgenic poplar and in tobacco leaves fed with 30 mM glutamine and 2 mM chorismate. These results indicated that enhanced cellular glutamine may account for the enhanced growth in GS transgenic poplars through the regulation of auxin biosynthesis. © 2011 The Author(s).

  13. Chloroplast parameters differ in wild type and transgenic poplars overexpressing gsh1 in the cytosol.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, L A; Ronzhina, D A; Ivanov, L A; Stroukova, L V; Peuke, A D; Rennenberg, H

    2009-07-01

    Poplar mutants overexpressing the bacterial genes gsh1 or gsh2 encoding the enzymes of glutathione biosynthesis are among the best-characterised transgenic plants. However, this characterisation originates exclusively from laboratory studies, and the performance of these mutants under field conditions is largely unknown. Here, we report a field experiment in which the wild-type poplar hybrid Populus tremula x P. alba and a transgenic line overexpressing the bacterial gene gsh1 encoding gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase in the cytosol were grown for 3 years at a relatively clean (control) field site and a field site contaminated with heavy metals. Aboveground biomass accumulation was slightly smaller in transgenic compared to wild-type plants; soil contamination significantly decreased biomass accumulation in both wild-type and transgenic plants by more than 40%. Chloroplasts parameters, i.e., maximal diameter, projection area and perimeter, surface area and volume, surface/volume ratio and a two-dimensional form coefficient, were found to depend on plant type, leaf tissue and soil contamination. The greatest differences between wild and transgenic poplars were observed at the control site. Under these conditions, chloroplast sizes in palisade tissue of transgenic poplar significantly exceeded those of the wild type. In contrast to the wild type, palisade chloroplast volume exceeded that of spongy chloroplasts in transgenic poplars at both field sites. Chlorophyll content per chloroplast was the same in wild and transgenic poplars. Apparently, the increase in chloroplast volume was not connected to changes in the photosynthetic centres. Chloroplasts of transgenic poplar at the control site were more elongated in palisade cells and close to spherical in spongy mesophyll chloroplasts. At the contaminated site, palisade and spongy cell chloroplasts of leaves from transgenic trees and the wild type were the same shape. Transgenic poplars also had a smaller chloroplast

  14. Phytostimulation of poplars and Arabidopsis exposed to silver nanoparticles and Ag⁺ at sublethal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Koo, Yeonjong; Alexander, Anne; Yang, Yu; Westerhof, Samantha; Zhang, Qingbo; Schnoor, Jerald L; Colvin, Vicki L; Braam, Janet; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2013-05-21

    The increasing likelihood of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) releases to the environment highlights the importance of understanding AgNP interactions with plants, which are cornerstones of most ecosystems. In this study, poplars (Populus deltoides × nigra) and Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed hydroponically to nanoparticles of different sizes (PEG-coated 5 and 10 nm AgNPs, and carbon-coated 25 nm AgNPs) or silver ions (Ag(+), added as AgNO₃) at a wide range of concentrations (0.01 to 100 mg/L). Whereas all forms of silver were phytotoxic above a specific concentration, a stimulatory effect was observed on root elongation, fresh weight, and evapotranspiration of both plants at a narrow range of sublethal concentrations (e.g., 1 mg/L of 25 nm AgNPs for poplar). Plants were most susceptible to the toxic effects of Ag(+) (1 mg/L for poplar, 0.05 mg/L for Arabidopsis), but AgNPs also showed some toxicity at higher concentrations (e.g., 100 mg/L of 25 nm AgNPs for poplar, 1 mg/L of 5 nm AgNPs for Arabidopsis) and this susceptibility increased with decreasing AgNP size. Both poplars and Arabidopsis accumulated silver, but silver distribution in shoot organs varied between plant species. Arabidopsis accumulated silver primarily in leaves (at 10-fold higher concentrations than in the stem or flower tissues), whereas poplars accumulated silver at similar concentrations in leaves and stems. Within the particle subinhibitory concentration range, silver accumulation in poplar tissues increased with exposure concentration and with smaller AgNP size. However, compared to larger AgNPs, the faster silver uptake associated with smaller AgNPs was offset by their toxic effect on evapotranspiration, which was exerted at lower concentrations (e.g., 1 mg/L of 5 nm AgNPs for poplar). Overall, the observed phytostimulatory effects preclude generalizations about the phytotoxicity of AgNPs and encourage further mechanistic research.

  15. Novel method to determine element concentrations in foliage of poplar and willow cuttings.

    PubMed

    Evangelou, Michael W H; Bürgi, Annina; Robinson, Brett H; Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S; Schöngens, Marcel; Schulin, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Measuring the uptake of the chemical elements by plants usually requires the destructive harvest of the plants. Analyzing individual leaves is unsatisfactory because their elemental concentration depends on their age and position on the branch or stem. We aimed to find an easy method to determine the elemental concentrations using a few suitable single leaves along the main shoot of poplar (Populus monviso) and willow (Salix viminalis) cuttings at the end of the first season. Using Ca, Cd, Mn, Fe, K, P, Pb, and Zn concentrations, measured in selected leaves along the main shoots of the cuttings, mathematical functions were derived, which described best their distribution. Elemental allocation patterns were independent of the soil characteristics and soil element concentrations. Based on these functions, three leaves from specific positions along the main shoot were selected, which could accurately describe the derived functions. The deviation of the calculated average concentration, based on the 3-leaves method, was ≤15% in approximately 65% of the cases compared to the measured concentration. This method could be used to calculate element concentrations and fluxes in phytomanagement, biomonitoring, or biomass productions projects using one-season poplar or willow cuttings.

  16. Ionic homeostasis and reactive oxygen species control in leaves and xylem sap of two poplars subjected to NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruigang; Chen, Shaoliang; Zhou, Xiaoyang; Shen, Xin; Deng, Lin; Zhu, Huijuan; Shao, Jie; Shi, Yong; Dai, Songxiang; Fritz, Eberhard; Hüttermann, Aloys; Polle, Andrea

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the effects of increasing soil NaCl concentration on intracellular compartmentalization of salt and on the activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbic peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR)) and their role in the regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS; O(2)(-*) and H(2)O(2)) in leaves and xylem sap of salt-tolerant Populus euphratica Oliv. and salt-sensitive P. popularis cv. 35-44. Mesophyll cells of P. euphratica exhibited a high capacity for NaCl exclusion and compartmentalization of salt in vacuoles compared with P. popularis. In P. popularis, the salt treatment resulted in large accumulations of Na(+) and Cl(-) in leaves that induced significant increases in O(2)(-*) and H(2)O(2) production despite marked increases in the activities of antioxidant enzymes in leaves and xylem sap. Separation of the isoforms of leaf SOD, APX and CAT by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by in-gel activity staining revealed that the salt-induced activities of APX and CAT were the result of increases in activities of all the isoenzymes. Leaf injury and shedding of aged leaves occurred following the oxidative burst in P. popularis, indicating that the increased activities of antioxidant enzymes in P. popularis were insufficient to counter the harmful effects of ROS at high soil NaCl concentrations. Unlike P. popularis plants, P. euphratica plants did not exhibit an oxidative burst in response to the NaCl treatments, because of (1) a high salt exclusion capacity and effective compartmentalization of salt in vacuoles, and (2) up-regulation of antioxidant enzymatic activities after the onset of salt stress. We conclude that P. euphratica plants subjected to saline conditions control ROS homeostasis through two pathways: (1) by maintaining cellular ionic homeostasis and thereby limiting the NaCl-induced enhancement of ROS production under long-term saline conditions; and (2) by rapidly up

  17. Effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on height and stem specific gravity of Populus hybrids

    Treesearch

    Roy L. Patton

    1981-01-01

    Unfumigated hybrid poplars (Populus spp.) were compared with poplars of the same nine clones fumigated with 0.15 pprn ozone or 0.25 ppm sulfur dioxide. After 102 days, plant height and stem specific gravity were measured to determine whether specific gravity is altered by the fumigants and to compare that response to height suppression, an accepted...

  18. Draft Genome Sequence of the Growth-Promoting Endophyte Paenibacillus sp. P22, Isolated from Populus

    PubMed Central

    Hanak, Anne M.; Nagler, Matthias; Weinmaier, Thomas; Sun, Xiaoliang; Fragner, Lena; Schwab, Clarissa; Rattei, Thomas; Ulrich, Kristina; Ewald, Dietrich; Engel, Marion; Schloter, Michael; Bittner, Romana; Schleper, Christa

    2014-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. P22 is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobic endospore-forming bacterium isolated from poplar hybrid 741 (♀[Populus alba × (P. davidiana + P. simonii) × P. tomentosa]). This bacterium shows strong similarities to Paenibacillus humicus, and important growth-promoting effects on in vitro grown explants of poplar hybrid 741 have been described. PMID:24723717

  19. Effects of jasmonic acid, branching and girdling on carbon and nitrogen transport in poplar.

    PubMed

    Appel, Heidi M; Arnold, Thomas M; Schultz, Jack C

    2012-07-01

    • Here, we examined the impact of jasmonate (JA) treatment, branching and phloem girdling on ¹³C and ¹⁵N import, invertase activity and polyphenol accumulation in juvenile tissues of unbranched and branched hybrid poplar saplings (Populus nigra × P. deltoides). • The import of ¹³C to juvenile tissues was positively correlated with invertase activity at the treatment site and enhanced by JA. Both invertase activity and ¹³C import were greater in shorter, younger branches and smaller, younger leaves. By contrast, JA treatments, branching and girdling had little or no impact on ¹⁵N import. • In poplar saplings with multiple lateral branches, we observed almost no ¹³C movement from subtending source leaves into lateral branches above them, with or without JA treatment. The presence of potentially competing branches, treated with JA or not, girdled or not, had no impact on carbohydrate (CHO) import or polyphenol accumulation in target branches. • We conclude that poplar branches comprise modules that are relatively independent from each other and from the stem below in terms of CHO movement, carbon-based defence production and response to elicitors. By contrast, branches are closely linked modules in terms of nitrogen movement. This should produce trees that are highly heterogeneous in quality for herbivores. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Leaf, woody, and root biomass of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; D.R. Coyle; R.B. Hall

    2007-01-01

    Poplar (Populus spp.) trees can be utilized for ecological leachate disposal when applied as an irrigation source for managed tree systems. Our objective was to evaluate differences in tree height, diameter, volume, and biomass of leaf, stem, branch, and root tissues of Populus trees after two seasons of irrigation with municipal...

  1. Proteomics of Leaf Tissues from Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Yang, Xiaohan; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Lankford, Patricia K; Shah, Manesh B; Jawdy, Sara; Gunter, Lee E; Engle, Nancy L

    2010-01-01

    Trees of the genus Populus are farmed commercially for wood and fiber, and are a potential bioenergy crop. As a scientific model organism, P. trichocarpa was the first forest tree for which the genome sequence has been determined. Knowledge of the Populus proteome will provide a deeper understanding of gene expression patterns in various tissues of the plant. To build on our previous profile of the proteome of xylem tissue in Populus (Kalluri et al., Proteomics 2009, 9, 4871), we are currently developing methods for studying the proteome of Populus leaves.

  2. Spatiotemporal distribution of essential elements through Populus leaf ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Mónica R.; Woll, Arthur; Niklas, Karl J.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the spatiotemporal distribution and accumulation of calcium (Ca), potassium (K), and zinc (Zn) during the growth and maturation of grey poplar (Populus tremula × alba) leaves covering plastochrons 01 through 10. This period spans the sugar sink-to-source transition and requires coordinated changes of multiple core metabolic processes that likely involve alterations in essential and non-essential element distributions as tissues mature and effect a reversal in phloem flow direction. Whole-leaf elemental maps were obtained from dried specimens using micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Additional cross-sections of fresh leaves were scanned to check for tissue specificity in element accumulation. The anatomical distribution of Zn and K remains relatively consistent throughout leaf development; Ca accumulation varied across leaf developmental stages. The basipetal allocation of Ca to the leaf mesophyll matched spatially and temporally the sequence of phloem maturation, positive carbon balance, and sugar export from leaves. The accumulation of Ca likely reflects the maturation of xylem in minor veins and the enhancement of the transpiration stream. Our results independently confirm that xylem and phloem maturation are spatially and temporally coordinated with the onset of sugar export in leaves. PMID:26985054

  3. [Exploration of a quantitative methodology to characterize the retention of PM2.5 and other atmospheric particulate matter by plant leaves: taking Populus tomentosa as an example].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Dan; Xi, Ben-Ye; Cao, Zhi-Guo; Jia, Li-Ming

    2014-08-01

    Taking Populus tomentosa as an example, a methodology called elution-weighing-particle size-analysis (EWPA) was proposed to evaluate quantitatively the ability of retaining fine particulate matter (PM2.5, diameter d ≤ 2.5 μm) and atmospheric particulate matter by plant leaves using laser particle size analyzer and balance. This method achieved a direct, accurate measurement with superior operability about the quality and particle size distribution of atmospheric particulate matter retained by plant leaves. First, a pre-experiment was taken to test the stability of the method. After cleaning, centrifugation and drying, the particulate matter was collected and weighed, and then its particle size distribution was analyzed by laser particle size analyzer. Finally, the mass of particulate matter retained by unit area of leaf and stand was translated from the leaf area and leaf area index. This method was applied to a P. tomentosa stand which had not experienced rain for 27 days in Beijing Olympic Forest Park. The results showed that the average particle size of the atmospheric particulate matter retained by P. tomentosa was 17.8 μm, and the volume percentages of the retained PM2.5, inhalable particulate matter (PM10, d ≤ 10 μm) and total suspended particle (TSP, d ≤ 100 μm) were 13.7%, 47.2%, and 99.9%, respectively. The masses of PM2.5, PM10, TSP and total particulate matter were 8.88 x 10(-6), 30.6 x 10(-6), 64.7 x 10(-6) and 64.8 x 10(-6) g x cm(-2) respectively. The retention quantities of PM2.5, PM10, TSP and total particulate matter by the P. tomentosa stand were 0.963, 3.32, 7.01 and 7.02 kg x hm(-2), respectively.

  4. Gradual Soil Water Depletion Results in Reversible Changes of Gene Expression, Protein Profiles, Ecophysiology, and Growth Performance in Populus euphratica, a Poplar Growing in Arid Regions1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice; Brosché, Mikael; Renaut, Jenny; Jouve, Laurent; Le Thiec, Didier; Fayyaz, Payam; Vinocur, Basia; Witters, Erwin; Laukens, Kris; Teichmann, Thomas; Altman, Arie; Hausman, Jean-François; Polle, Andrea; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; Dreyer, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    The responses of Populus euphratica Oliv. plants to soil water deficit were assessed by analyzing gene expression, protein profiles, and several plant performance criteria to understand the acclimation of plants to soil water deficit. Young, vegetatively propagated plants originating from an arid, saline field site were submitted to a gradually increasing water deficit for 4 weeks in a greenhouse and were allowed to recover for 10 d after full reirrigation. Time-dependent changes and intensity of the perturbations induced in shoot and root growth, xylem anatomy, gas exchange, and water status were recorded. The expression profiles of approximately 6,340 genes and of proteins and metabolites (pigments, soluble carbohydrates, and oxidative compounds) were also recorded in mature leaves and in roots (gene expression only) at four stress levels and after recovery. Drought successively induced shoot growth cessation, stomatal closure, moderate increases in oxidative stress-related compounds, loss of CO2 assimilation, and root growth reduction. These effects were almost fully reversible, indicating that acclimation was dominant over injury. The physiological responses were paralleled by fully reversible transcriptional changes, including only 1.5% of the genes on the array. Protein profiles displayed greater changes than transcript levels. Among the identified proteins for which expressed sequence tags were present on the array, no correlation was found between transcript and protein abundance. Acclimation to water deficit involves the regulation of different networks of genes in roots and shoots. Such diverse requirements for protecting and maintaining the function of different plant organs may render plant engineering or breeding toward improved drought tolerance more complex than previously anticipated. PMID:17158588

  5. The responses of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin-expressing hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides) exposed to 24-h herbivory: expression of hemoglobin and stress-related genes in exposed and nonorthostichous leaves.

    PubMed

    Sutela, Suvi; Ylioja, Tiina; Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile; Anttila, Anna-Kaisa; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Niemi, Karoliina; Mölläri, Tiina; Kallio, Pauli T; Häggman, Hely

    2013-11-01

    The responses of transcriptome and phenolic compounds were determined with Populus tremula L. × Populus tremuloides Michx. expressing the hemoglobin (Hb) of Vitreoscilla (VHb) and non-transformant (wt) line. After 24-h exposure of leaves to Conistra vaccinii L., the transcript levels of endogenous non-symbiotic class 1 Hb (PttHb1) and truncated Hb (PttTrHb) genes were modestly reduced and increased, respectively, in both wt and VHb-expressing line. Besides the herbivory exposed leaves showing the most significant transcriptome changes, alterations were also detected in the transcriptome of nonorthostichous leaves positioned directly above the exposed leaves. Both wt and VHb-expressing line displayed similar herbivory-induced effects on gene expression, although the extent of responses was more pronounced in the wt than in the VHb-expressing line. The contents of phenolic compounds were not altered due to herbivory and they were alike in the wt and VHb-expressing line. In addition, we determined the relative growth rates (RGRs) of Orthosia gothica L., Ectropis crepuscularia Denis & Schiff. and Orgyia antiqua L. larvae, and found no variation in the RGRs between the lines. Thus, VHb-expressing P. tremula × tremuloides lines showed to be comparable with wt in regards to the food quality of leaves.

  6. A comprehensive database of poplar research in North America from 1980 - 2010

    Treesearch

    David R. Coyle; Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S. Jr. Zalesny

    2010-01-01

    Short rotation woody crops such as Populus species and hybrids (hereafter referred to as poplars) are renewable energy feedstocks that can potentially be used to offset electricity generation and natural gas use in many temperature regions. Highly productive poplars grown primarily on marginal agricultural sites are an important component of the...

  7. Contribution factor of wood properties of three poplar clones to strength of laminated veneer lumber

    Treesearch

    Fucheng Bao; Feng Fu; Elvin Choong; Chung-Yun Hse

    2001-01-01

    The term "Contribution Factor" (c.) was introduced in this paper to indicate the contribution ratio of solid wood properties to laminated veneer lumber (LVL) strength. Three poplar (Populus sp.) clones were studied, and the results showed that poplar with good solid wood properties has high Contribution Factor. The average Contribution...

  8. An approach for siting poplar energy production systems to increase productivity and associated ecosystem services

    Treesearch

    R.S. Jr. Zalesny; D.M. Donner; D.R. Coyle; W.L. Headlee; R.B. Hall

    2010-01-01

    Short rotation woody crops (SRWC) such as Populus species and hybrids (i.e., poplars) are renewable energy feedstocks that are vital to reducing our dependence on non-renewable and foreign sources of energy used for heat, power, and transportation fuels. Highly productive poplars grown primarily on marginal agricultural sites are an important...

  9. The Wound-, Pathogen-, and Ultraviolet B-Responsive MYB134 Gene Encodes an R2R3 MYB Transcription Factor That Regulates Proanthocyanidin Synthesis in Poplar1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Mellway, Robin D.; Tran, Lan T.; Prouse, Michael B.; Campbell, Malcolm M.; Constabel, C. Peter

    2009-01-01

    In poplar (Populus spp.), the major defense phenolics produced in leaves are the flavonoid-derived proanthocyanidins (PAs) and the salicin-based phenolic glycosides. Transcriptional activation of PA biosynthetic genes leading to PA accumulation in leaves occurs following herbivore damage and mechanical wounding as well as infection by the fungal biotroph Melampsora medusae. In this study, we have identified a poplar R2R3 MYB transcription factor gene, MYB134, that exhibits close sequence similarity to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PA regulator TRANSPARENT TESTA2 and that is coinduced with PA biosynthetic genes following mechanical wounding, M. medusae infection, and exposure to elevated ultraviolet B light. Overexpression of MYB134 in poplar resulted in transcriptional activation of the full PA biosynthetic pathway and a significant plant-wide increase in PA levels, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that recombinant MYB134 protein is able to bind to promoter regions of PA pathway genes. MYB134-overexpressing plants exhibited a concomitant reduction in phenolic glycoside concentrations and other minor alterations to levels of small phenylpropanoid metabolites. Our data provide insight into the regulatory mechanisms controlling stress-induced PA metabolism in poplar, and the identification of a regulator of stress-responsive PA biosynthesis constitutes a valuable tool for manipulating PA metabolism in poplar and investigating the biological functions of PAs in resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:19395405

  10. Canopy profiles of photosynthetic parameters under elevated CO2 and N fertilization in a poplar plantation.

    PubMed

    Calfapietra, Carlo; Tulva, Ingmar; Eensalu, Eve; Perez, Marta; De Angelis, Paolo; Scarascia-Mugnozza, Giuseppe; Kull, Olevi

    2005-10-01

    A poplar plantation has been exposed to an elevated CO2 concentration for 5 years using the free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) technique. Even after such a long period of exposure, leaves of Populus x euramericana have not shown clear signs of photosynthetic acclimation. Only at the end of the growing season for shade leaves was a decrease of maximum velocity of carboxylation (Vcmax) observed. Maximum electron transport rate (Jmax) was increased by FACE treatment in July. Assimilation rates at CO2 partial pressure of 400 (A400) and 600 (A600) micromol mol(-1) were not significantly different under FACE treatment. Most notably FACE significantly decreased stomatal conductance (g(s)) both on upper and lower canopy leaves. N fertilization increased N content in the leaves on mass basis (Nm) and specific leaf area (SLA) in both CO2 treatments but did not influence the photosynthetic parameters. These data show that in poplar plantations the long-term effects of elevated CO2 on photosynthesis do not differ considerably from the short-term ones even with N deposition.

  11. A NAC domain protein family contributing to the regulation of wood formation in poplar.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Misato; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Xu, Bo; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Goué, Nadia; Shi, Fusun; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Demura, Taku

    2011-08-01

    Wood harvested from trees is one of the most widely utilized natural materials on our planet. Recent environmental issues have prompted an increase in the demand for wood, especially as a cost-effective and renewable resource for industry and energy, so it is important to understand the process of wood formation. In the present study, we focused on poplar (Populus trichocarpa) NAC domain protein genes which are homologous to well-known Arabidopsis transcription factors regulating the differentiation of xylem vessels and fiber cells. From phylogenetic analysis, we isolated 16 poplar NAC domain protein genes, and named them PtVNS (VND-, NST/SND- and SMB-related proteins) genes. Expression analysis revealed that 12 PtVNS (also called PtrWND) genes including both VND and NST groups were expressed in developing xylem tissue and phloem fiber, whereas in primary xylem vessels, only PtVNS/PtrWND genes of the VND group were expressed. By using the post-translational induction system of Arabidopsis VND7, a master regulator of xylem vessel element differentiation, many poplar genes functioning in xylem vessel differentiation downstream from NAC domain protein genes were identified. Transient expression assays showed the variation in PtVNS/PtrWND transactivation activity toward downstream genes, even between duplicate gene pairs. Furthermore, overexpression of PtVNS/PtrWND genes induced ectopic secondary wall thickening in poplar leaves as well as in Arabidopsis seedlings with different levels of induction efficiency according to the gene. These results suggest that wood formation in poplar is regulated by cooperative functions of the NAC domain proteins.

  12. Short-term effects of CO/sub 2/ on gas exchange of leaves of bigtooth aspen (Populus grandidentata) in the field

    SciTech Connect

    Jurik, T.W.; Weber, J.A.; Gates, D.M.

    1984-08-01

    The short term effects of increased levels of CO/sub 2/ on gas exchange of leaves of bigtooth aspen (Populus grandidentata Michx.) were studied at the University of Michigan Biological Station, Pellston, MI. Leaf gas exchange was measured in situ in the upper half of the canopy, 12 to 14 meters above ground. In 1900 microliters per liter CO/sub 2/, maximum CO/sub 2/ exchange rate (CER) in saturating light was increased by 151% relative to CER in 320 microliters per liter CO/sub 2/. The temperature optimum for CER shifted from 25/sup 0/C in 320 microliters per liter CO/sub 2/ to 37/sup 0/C in 1900 microliters per liter CO/sub 2/. In saturating light, increasing CO/sub 2/ level over the range 60 to 1900 microliters per liter increased CER, decreased stomatal conductance, and increased leaf water use efficiency. The initial slope of the CO/sub 2/ response curve of CER was not significantly different at 20 and 30/sup 0/C leaf temperatures, although the slope did decline significantly during leaf senescence. In 1900 microliters per liter CO/sub 2/, CER increased with increasing light. The light saturation point and maximum CER were higher in 30/sup 0/C than in 20/sup 0/C, although there was little effect of temperature in low light. The experimental results are consistent with patterns seen in laboratory studies of other C/sub 3/ species and define the parameters required by some models of aspen CER in the field. 25 references, 5 figures.

  13. Sulphur limitation and early sulphur deficiency responses in poplar: significance of gene expression, metabolites, and plant hormones

    PubMed Central

    Honsel, Anne; Kojima, Mikiko; Haas, Richard; Frank, Wolfgang; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Herschbach, Cornelia; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    The influence of sulphur (S) depletion on the expression of genes related to S metabolism, and on metabolite and plant hormone contents was analysed in young and mature leaves, fine roots, xylem sap, and phloem exudates of poplar (Populus tremula×Populus alba) with special focus on early consequences. S depletion was applied by a gradual decrease of sulphate availability. The observed changes were correlated with sulphate contents. Based on the decrease in sulphate contents, two phases of S depletion could be distinguished that were denominated as ‘S limitation’ and ‘early S deficiency’. S limitation was characterized by improved sulphate uptake (enhanced root-specific sulphate transporter PtaSULTR1;2 expression) and reduction capacities (enhanced adenosine 5′-phosphosulphate (APS) reductase expression) and by enhanced remobilization of sulphate from the vacuole (enhanced putative vacuolar sulphate transporter PtaSULTR4;2 expression). During early S deficiency, whole plant distribution of S was impacted, as indicated by increasing expression of the phloem-localized sulphate transporter PtaSULTR1;1 and by decreasing glutathione contents in fine roots, young leaves, mature leaves, and phloem exudates. Furthermore, at ‘early S deficiency’, expression of microRNA395 (miR395), which targets transcripts of PtaATPS3/4 (ATP sulphurylase) for cleavage, increased. Changes in plant hormone contents were observed at ‘early S deficiency’ only. Thus, S depletion affects S and plant hormone metabolism of poplar during ‘S limitation’ and ‘early S deficiency’ in a time series of events. Despite these consequences, the impact of S depletion on growth of poplar plants appears to be less severe than in Brassicaceae such as Arabidopsis thaliana or Brassica sp. PMID:22162873

  14. Sulphur limitation and early sulphur deficiency responses in poplar: significance of gene expression, metabolites, and plant hormones.

    PubMed

    Honsel, Anne; Kojima, Mikiko; Haas, Richard; Frank, Wolfgang; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Herschbach, Cornelia; Rennenberg, Heinz

    2012-03-01

    The influence of sulphur (S) depletion on the expression of genes related to S metabolism, and on metabolite and plant hormone contents was analysed in young and mature leaves, fine roots, xylem sap, and phloem exudates of poplar (Populus tremula×Populus alba) with special focus on early consequences. S depletion was applied by a gradual decrease of sulphate availability. The observed changes were correlated with sulphate contents. Based on the decrease in sulphate contents, two phases of S depletion could be distinguished that were denominated as 'S limitation' and 'early S deficiency'. S limitation was characterized by improved sulphate uptake (enhanced root-specific sulphate transporter PtaSULTR1;2 expression) and reduction capacities (enhanced adenosine 5'-phosphosulphate (APS) reductase expression) and by enhanced remobilization of sulphate from the vacuole (enhanced putative vacuolar sulphate transporter PtaSULTR4;2 expression). During early S deficiency, whole plant distribution of S was impacted, as indicated by increasing expression of the phloem-localized sulphate transporter PtaSULTR1;1 and by decreasing glutathione contents in fine roots, young leaves, mature leaves, and phloem exudates. Furthermore, at 'early S deficiency', expression of microRNA395 (miR395), which targets transcripts of PtaATPS3/4 (ATP sulphurylase) for cleavage, increased. Changes in plant hormone contents were observed at 'early S deficiency' only. Thus, S depletion affects S and plant hormone metabolism of poplar during 'S limitation' and 'early S deficiency' in a time series of events. Despite these consequences, the impact of S depletion on growth of poplar plants appears to be less severe than in Brassicaceae such as Arabidopsis thaliana or Brassica sp.

  15. Thaumatin-like proteins are differentially expressed and localized in phloem tissues of hybrid poplar

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Two thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) were previously identified in phloem exudate of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa × P. deltoides) using proteomics methods, and their sieve element localization confirmed by immunofluorescence. In the current study, we analyzed different tissues to further understand TLP expression and localization in poplar, and used immunogold labelling to determine intracellular localization. Results Immunofluorescence using a TLP antiserum confirmed the presence of TLP in punctate, organelle-like structures within sieve elements. On western blots, the antiserum labeled two constitutively expressed proteins with distinct expression patterns. Immunogold labelling suggested that TLPs are associated with starch granules and starch-containing plastids in sieve elements and phloem parenchyma cells. In addition, the antiserum recognized TLPs in the inner cell wall and sieve plate region of sieve elements. Conclusions TLP localization in poplar cells and tissues is complex. TLP1 is expressed predominantly in tissues with a prominent vascular system such as midveins, petioles and stems, whereas the second TLP is primarily expressed in starch-storing plastids found in young leaves and the shoot apex. PMID:20796310

  16. Thaumatin-like proteins are differentially expressed and localized in phloem tissues of hybrid poplar.

    PubMed

    Dafoe, Nicole J; Gowen, Brent E; Constabel, C Peter

    2010-08-26

    Two thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) were previously identified in phloem exudate of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides) using proteomics methods, and their sieve element localization confirmed by immunofluorescence. In the current study, we analyzed different tissues to further understand TLP expression and localization in poplar, and used immunogold labelling to determine intracellular localization. Immunofluorescence using a TLP antiserum confirmed the presence of TLP in punctate, organelle-like structures within sieve elements. On western blots, the antiserum labeled two constitutively expressed proteins with distinct expression patterns. Immunogold labelling suggested that TLPs are associated with starch granules and starch-containing plastids in sieve elements and phloem parenchyma cells. In addition, the antiserum recognized TLPs in the inner cell wall and sieve plate region of sieve elements. TLP localization in poplar cells and tissues is complex. TLP1 is expressed predominantly in tissues with a prominent vascular system such as midveins, petioles and stems, whereas the second TLP is primarily expressed in starch-storing plastids found in young leaves and the shoot apex.

  17. Sequence and expression analysis of the AMT gene family in poplar.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiangyu; Yang, Han; Qu, Chunpu; Xu, Zhiru; Li, Wei; Hao, Bingqing; Yang, Chuanping; Sun, Guangyu; Liu, Guanjun

    2015-01-01

    Ammonium transporters (AMTs) are plasma membrane proteins that exclusively transport ammonium/ammonia. These proteins are encoded by an ancient gene family with many members. The molecular characteristics and evolutionary history of AMTs in woody plants are still poorly understood. We comprehensively evaluated the AMT gene family in the latest release of the Populus trichocarpa genome (version 3.0; Phytozome 9.0), and identified 16 AMT genes. These genes formed four clusters; AMT1 (7 genes), AMT2 (2 genes), AMT3 (2 genes), and AMT4 (5 genes). Evolutionary analyses suggested that the Populus AMT gene family has expanded via whole-genome duplication events. Among the 16 AMT genes, 15 genes are located on 11 chromosomes of Populus. Expression analyses showed that 14 AMT genes were vegetative organs expressed; AMT1;1/1;3/1;6/3;2 and AMT1;1/1;2/2;2/3;1 had high transcript accumulation level in the leaves and roots, respectively and strongly changes under the nitrogen-dependent experiments. The results imply the functional roles of AMT genes in ammonium absorption in poplar.

  18. Comparative proteomics analysis of salt response reveals sex-related photosynthetic inhibition by salinity in Populus cathayana cuttings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fugui; Zhang, Sheng; Jiang, Hao; Ma, Wujun; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2011-09-02

    Male and female poplar ( Populus cathayana Rehd.) cuttings respond differently to salinity stress. To understand these differences better, comparative morphological, physiological, and proteomics analyses were performed. Treatments with different concentrations of NaCl applied to male and female poplar cuttings for 4 weeks showed that females reacted more negatively at the morphological and physiological levels than did males, visible as shriveled leaves, decreased growth, lowered photosynthetic capacities, and greater Na(+) accumulation. The proteome analysis identified 73 proteins from 82 sexually related salt-responsive spots. They were involved in photosynthesis, protein folding and assembly, synthesis and degradation, carbon, energy and steroid metabolism, plant stress and defense, redox homeostasis, signal transduction, and so forth. The sex-related changes of these proteins were consistent with the different morphological and physiological responses in males and females. In conclusion, the higher salt resistance of male P. cathayana cuttings is related to higher expression and lower degradation of proteins in the photosynthetic apparatus, more effective metabolic mechanism and protective system, and greater capacity of hydrogen peroxide scavenging. This research allows us to further understand the possible different management strategies of cellular activities in male and female Populus when confronted by salt stress.

  19. Expression Patterns of ERF Genes Underlying Abiotic Stresses in Di-Haploid Populus simonii × P. nigra

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wenjing; Jiang, Tingbo; Zhou, Boru

    2014-01-01

    176 ERF genes from Populus were identified by bioinformatics analysis, 13 of these in di-haploid Populus simonii × P. nigra were investigate by real-time RT-PCR, the results demonstrated that 13 ERF genes were highly responsive to salt stress, drought stress and ABA treatment, and all were expressed in root, stem, and leaf tissues, whereas their expression levels were markedly different in the various tissues. In roots, PthERF99, 110, 119, and 168 were primarily downregulated under drought and ABA treatment but were specifically upregulated under high salt condition. Interestingly, in poplar stems, all ERF genes showed the similar trends in expression in response to NaCl stress, drought stress, and ABA treatment, indicating that they may not play either specific or unique roles in stems in abiotic stress responses. In poplar leaves, PthERF168 was highly induced by ABA treatment, but was suppressed by high salinity and drought stresses, implying that PthERF168 participated in the ABA signaling pathway. The results of this study indicated that ERF genes could play essential but distinct roles in various plant tissues in response to different environment cues and hormonal treatment. PMID:24737991

  20. A system for dosage-based functional genomics in poplar

    Treesearch

    Isabelle M. Henry; Matthew S. Zinkgraf; Andrew T. Groover; Luca Comai

    2015-01-01

    Altering gene dosage through variation in gene copy number is a powerful approach to addressing questions regarding gene regulation, quantitative trait loci, and heterosis, but one that is not easily applied to sexually transmitted species. Elite poplar (Populus spp) varieties are created through interspecific hybridization, followed by...

  1. Transgenic manipulation of the metabolism of polyamines in poplar cells

    Treesearch

    Pratiksha Bhatnagar; Bernadette M. Glasheen; Suneet K. Bains; Stephanie L. Long; Rakesh Minocha; Christian Walter; Subhash C. Minocha

    2001-01-01

    The metabolism of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) has become the target of genetic manipulation because of their significance in plant development and possibly stress tolerance. We studied the polyamine metabolism in non-transgenic (NT) and transgenic cells of poplar (Populus nigra 3 maximowiczii) expressing a...

  2. [Ectopic expression of the PnANTL1 and PnANTL2 black poplar genes in transgenic tobacco plants].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Il'iasova, A A; Chemeris, A V

    2012-10-01

    Four putative orthologs of the AINTEGUMENTA gene were found in the poplar (Populus trichocarpa) genome. Two of them, which we called PnANTL1 and PnANTL2, were isolated from black poplar (Populus nigra L.) and transgenic tobacco plants were generated on their basis. Tobacco plants that were transgenic for the PnANTL1 gene were characterized by increased leaf length, smaller flower size, and different defects in the development of the corolla and stamens. Tobacco plants that were transgenic for the PnANTL2 gene were characterized by an increased length of leaves and larger flowers. The increase in the leaf size in all transgenic plants was determined by stimulation of cell expansion; the number of cells was even reduced in the case of the PnANTL1 gene. Ectopic expression of the PnANTL1 and PnANTL2 genes promoted an increase in the level of mRNA of some tobacco expansins. The data we obtained demonstrate the involvement of transcription factors of the AP2 subfamily in the regulation of cell expansion.

  3. PtoMYB156 is involved in negative regulation of phenylpropanoid metabolism and secondary cell wall biosynthesis during wood formation in poplar

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Zhao, Xin; Ran, Lingyu; Li, Chaofeng; Fan, Di; Luo, Keming

    2017-01-01

    Some R2R3 MYB transcription factors have been shown to be major regulators of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway and impact secondary wall formation in plants. In this study, we describe the functional characterization of PtoMYB156, encoding a R2R3-MYB transcription factor, from Populus tomentosa. Expression pattern analysis showed that PtoMYB156 is widely expressed in all tissues examined, but predominantly in leaves and developing wood cells. PtoMYB156 localized to the nucleus and acted as a transcriptional repressor. Overexpression of PtoMYB156 in poplar repressed phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes, leading to a reduction in the amounts of total phenolic and flavonoid compounds. Transgenic plants overexpressing PtoMYB156 also displayed a dramatic decrease in secondary wall thicknesses of xylem fibers and the content of cellulose, lignin and xylose compared with wild-type plants. Transcript accumulation of secondary wall biosynthetic genes was down-regulated by PtoMYB156 overexpression. Transcriptional activation assays revealed that PtoMYB156 was able to repress the promoter activities of poplar CESA17, C4H2 and GT43B. By contrast, knockout of PtoMYB156 by CRISPR/Cas9 in poplar resulted in ectopic deposition of lignin, xylan and cellulose during secondary cell wall formation. Taken together, these results show that PtoMYB156 may repress phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and negatively regulate secondary cell wall formation in poplar. PMID:28117379

  4. Over-expression of a putative poplar glycosyltransferase gene, PtGT1, in tobacco increases lignin content and causes early flowering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Wen; Wang, Wen-Chao; Jin, Shang-Hui; Wang, Jun; Wang, Bo; Hou, Bing-Kai

    2012-01-01

    Family 1 glycosyltransferases catalyse the glycosylation of small molecules and play an important role in maintaining cell homeostasis and regulating plant growth and development. In this study, a putative glycosyltransferase gene of family 1, PtGT1, was cloned from poplar (Populus tomentosa Carr.). Sequence analysis showed that this gene encodes a protein of 481 amino acid residues with a conserved PSPG box at its C-terminal, suggesting that it is active in the glycosylation of plant secondary products. The PtGT1 gene was expressed in poplar stems and leaves, with a particularly high expression level in elongating stems. Transgenic tobacco plants ectopically over-expressing PtGT1 were obtained and phenotypes were analysed. Wiesner and Mäule staining showed that stem xylem of transgenic tobacco plants stained more strongly than controls. Measurement of the Klason lignins showed much higher lignin content in the transgenic lines than in control plants. Furthermore, the ectopic over-expression of PtGT1 in tobacco resulted in an early flowering phenotype. These findings offer a possible starting point towards better understanding of the function of poplar PtGT1, and provide a novel strategy for lignin engineering and flowering control in plants through the genetic manipulation of a poplar glycosyltransferase gene. PMID:22268132

  5. The MYB182 Protein Down-Regulates Proanthocyanidin and Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Poplar by Repressing Both Structural and Regulatory Flavonoid Genes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kazuko; Ma, Dawei; Constabel, C. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Trees in the genus Populus (poplar) contain phenolic secondary metabolites including the proanthocyanidins (PAs), which help to adapt these widespread trees to diverse environments. The transcriptional activation of PA biosynthesis in response to herbivory and ultraviolet light stress has been documented in poplar leaves, and a regulator of this process, the R2R3-MYB transcription factor MYB134, has been identified. MYB134-overexpressing transgenic plants show a strong high-PA phenotype. Analysis of these transgenic plants suggested the involvement of additional MYB transcription factors, including repressor-like MYB factors. Here, MYB182, a subgroup 4 MYB factor, was found to act as a negative regulator of the flavonoid pathway. Overexpression of MYB182 in hairy root culture and whole poplar plants led to reduced PA and anthocyanin levels as well as a reduction in the expression of key flavonoid genes. Similarly, a reduced accumulation of transcripts of a MYB PA activator and a basic helix-loop-helix cofactor was observed in MYB182-overexpressing hairy roots. Transient promoter activation assays in poplar cell culture demonstrated that MYB182 can disrupt transcriptional activation by MYB134 and that the basic helix-loop-helix-binding motif of MYB182 was essential for repression. Microarray analysis of transgenic plants demonstrated that down-regulated targets of MYB182 also include shikimate pathway genes. This work shows that MYB182 plays an important role in the fine-tuning of MYB134-mediated flavonoid metabolism. PMID:25624398

  6. A preliminary investigation of the role of auxin and cytokinin in sylleptic branching of three hybrid poplar clones exhibiting contrasting degrees of sylleptic branching.

    PubMed

    Cline, Morris G; Dong-IL, Kim

    2002-09-01

    Sylleptic branches grow out from lateral buds during the same growing season in which the buds are formed. This type of branching is present in poplar and in many tropical species. It results in the production of more branches, more leaves and expanded photosynthetic capacity and is thought to assist in increasing the overall growth and biomass of the tree at a young age. However, very little is known about the physiology of sylleptic branching in poplar, which is an extremely important source of fibre and fuel. In the present study of three hybrid poplar clones (11-11, 47-174 and 49-177) of Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides exhibiting contrasting degrees of sylleptic branching, an analysis was carried out on parent shoot elongation and sylleptic branching, together with a preliminary comparison of the parent shoots' sensitivity to auxin (naphthaleneacetic acid) as a repressor of lateral bud outgrowth, and cytokinin (benzyladenine) as a promoter. Suggestive evidence was found for an inverse correlation between parent shoot sensitivity to auxin and the degree of sylleptic branching, as well as a partially positive correlation with respect to sensitivity to cytokinin. The present data are consistent with the hypothesis that auxin and cytokinin may play repressive and promotive roles, respectively, in the sylleptic branching of hybrid poplar.

  7. Beetle feeding induces a different volatile emission pattern from black poplar foliage than caterpillar herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Unsicker, Sybille B.; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Köllner, Tobias G.

    2015-01-01

    Herbivore-induced plant volatile emission is often considered to be attacker species-specific, but most experimental evidence comes from short lived herbaceous species. In a recent study we showed that black poplar (Populus nigra) trees emit a complex blend of volatiles from damaged leaves when they are attacked by generalist gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) caterpillars. Minor nitrogenous volatiles were especially characteristic of this blend. Here we show that attack on P. nigra by a beetle species, Phratora vulgatissima (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae), led to the emission of the same compounds as already observed after caterpillar herbivory, but with striking quantitative changes in the blend. The consequences for attraction of herbivore enemies are discussed. PMID:25831045

  8. Interaction of drought and ozone exposure on isoprene emission from extensively cultivated poplar.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiangyang; Calatayud, Vicent; Gao, Feng; Fares, Silvano; Paoletti, Elena; Tian, Yuan; Feng, Zhaozhong

    2016-10-01

    The combined effects of ozone (O3 ) and drought on isoprene emission were studied for the first time. Young hybrid poplars (clone 546, Populus deltoides cv. 55/56 x P. deltoides cv. Imperial) were exposed to O3 (charcoal-filtered air, CF, and non-filtered air +40 ppb, E-O3 ) and soil water stress (well-watered, WW, and mild drought, MD, one-third irrigation) for 96 days. Consistent with light-saturated photosynthesis (Asat ), intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci ) and chlorophyll content, isoprene emission depended on drought, O3 , leaf position and sampling time. Drought stimulated emission (+38.4%), and O3 decreased it (-40.4%). Ozone increased the carbon cost per unit of isoprene emission. Ozone and drought effects were stronger in middle leaves (13th-15th from the apex) than in upper leaves (6th-8th). Only Asat showed a significant interaction between O3 and drought. When the responses were up-scaled to the entire-plant level, however, drought effects on total leaf area translated into around twice higher emission from WW plants in clean air than in E-O3 . Our results suggest that direct effects on plant emission rates and changes in total leaf area may affect isoprene emission from intensively cultivated hybrid poplar under combined MD and O3 exposure, with important feedbacks for air quality.

  9. Epigenetic control of heavy metal stress response in mycorrhizal versus non-mycorrhizal poplar plants.

    PubMed

    Cicatelli, Angela; Todeschini, Valeria; Lingua, Guido; Biondi, Stefania; Torrigiani, Patrizia; Castiglione, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    It was previously shown that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) exert a significant improvement of growth in a tolerant white poplar (Populus alba L.) clone (AL35) grown on Cu- and Zn-polluted soil via foliar alterations in the levels of defence/stress-related transcripts and molecules. However, nothing is known about the epigenetic changes which occur during tolerance acquisition in response to heavy metals (HMs) in the same mycorrhizal vs. non-mycorrhizal poplar plants. In order to analyse the epigenome in leaves of AL35 plants inoculated or not with AMF and grown in a greenhouse on multimetal polluted or unpolluted soil, the Methylation Sensitive Amplification Polymorphism (MSAP) approach was adopted to detect cytosine DNA methylation. Modest changes in cytosine methylation patterns were detected at first sampling (4 months from planting), whereas extensive alterations (hypomethylation) occurred at second sampling (after 6 months) in mycorrhizal plants grown in the presence of HMs. The sequencing of MSAP fragments led to the identification of genes belonging to several Gene Ontology categories. Seven MSAP fragments, selected on the basis of DNA methylation status in treated vs control AL35 leaves at the end of the experiment, were analysed for their transcript levels by means of qRT-PCR. Gene expression varied in treated samples relative to controls in response to HMs and/or AMF inoculation; in particular, transcripts of genes involved in RNA processing, cell wall and amino acid metabolism were upregulated in the presence of AMF with or without HMs.

  10. Compositional characterization and imaging of "Wall-bound" acylesters of Populus trichocarpa Reveal Differential Accumulation of acyl Molecules in Normal and Reactive Woods

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.; Park, S; Yu, X; Liu, C

    2008-01-01

    Acylesterification is one of the common modifications of cell wall non-cellulosic polysaccharides and/or lignin primarily in monocot plants. We analyzed the cell-wall acylesters of black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and synchrotron infrared (IR) imaging facility. The results revealed that the cell wall of dicotyledonous poplar, as the walls of many monocot grasses, contains a considerable amount of acylesters, primarily acetyl and p-hydroxycinnamoyl molecules. The 'wall-bound' acetate and phenolics display a distinct tissue specific-, bending stress responsible- and developmental-accumulation pattern. The 'wall-bound' p-coumarate predominantly accumulated in young leaves and decreased in mature leaves, whereas acetate and ferulate mostly amassed in the cell wall of stems. Along the development of stem, the level of the 'wall-bound' ferulate gradually increased, while the basal level of p-coumarate further decreased. Induction of tension wood decreased the accumulation of the 'wall-bound' phenolics while the level of acetate remained constant. Synchrotron IR-mediated chemical compositional imaging revealed a close spatial distribution of acylesters with cell wall polysaccharides in poplar stem. These results indicate that different 'wall-bound' acylesters play distinct roles in poplar cell wall structural construction and/or metabolism of cell wall matrix components.

  11. Transgenic poplar expressing Arabidopsis YUCCA6 exhibits auxin-overproduction phenotypes and increased tolerance to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Ke, Qingbo; Wang, Zhi; Ji, Chang Yoon; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Li, Hongbing; Xu, Bingcheng; Deng, Xiping; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2015-09-01

    YUCCA6, a member of the YUCCA family of flavin monooxygenase-like proteins, is involved in the tryptophan-dependent IAA biosynthesis pathway and responses to environmental cues in Arabidopsis. However, little is known about the role of the YUCCA pathway in auxin biosynthesis in poplar. Here, we generated transgenic poplar (Populus alba × P. glandulosa) expressing the Arabidopsis YUCCA6 gene under the control of the oxidative stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SY plants). Three SY lines (SY7, SY12 and SY20) were selected based on the levels of AtYUCCA6 transcript. SY plants displayed auxin-overproduction morphological phenotypes, such as rapid shoot growth and retarded main root development with increased root hair formation. In addition, SY plants had higher levels of free IAA and early auxin-response gene transcripts. SY plants exhibited tolerance to drought stress, which was associated with reduced levels of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, SY plants showed delayed hormone- and dark-induced senescence in detached leaves due to higher photosystem II efficiency and less membrane permeability. These results suggest that the conserved IAA biosynthesis pathway mediated by YUCCA family members exists in poplar.

  12. Molecular analysis of poplar defense against herbivory: comparison of wound- and insect elicitor-induced gene expression.

    PubMed

    Major, Ian T; Constabel, C Peter

    2006-01-01

    In order to characterize defense responses of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpax P. deltoides), we profiled leaf transcript patterns elicited by wounding and by regurgitant from forest tent caterpillar (FTC; Malacosoma disstria), a Lepidopteran defoliator of poplars. Macroarrays were used to compare transcript profiles. Both FTC-regurgitant (FTC-R) and mechanical wounding with pliers elicited expression of a variety of genes, and for these genes our analysis indicated that these treatments induced qualitatively similar responses. Similarly, a comparison of responses of directly treated and systemically induced leaves indicated extensive overlap in the sets of induced genes. FTC-R was found to contain the insect-derived elicitor volicitin. The simulated herbivory treatments resulted in the induction of genes involved in poplar defense and secondary metabolism. We also identified wound-responsive genes with roles in primary metabolism, including a putative invertase, lipase, and acyl-activating enzyme; some of these genes may have roles in defense signaling. In addition, we found three unknown genes containing a ZIM motif which may represent novel transcription factors.

  13. Gaseous NO2 effects on epidermis and stomata related physiochemical characteristics of hybrid poplar leaves: chemical elements composition, stomatal functions, photosynthesis and respiration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mechanisms controlling effects of gaseous nitrogen dioxide on epidermis and stomata dynamics, and photosynthesis and respirations processes are still not fully understood. In this study, we used poplar as a model plant and investigated the effects of gaseous nitrogen dioxide (4 microliters per lite...

  14. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral "Salicoid" Genome Duplication.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-06-27

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the "salicoid" duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants.

  15. Major Chromosomal Rearrangements Distinguish Willow and Poplar After the Ancestral “Salicoid” Genome Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Dong, Zhongyuan; Lu, Mengzhu; Li, Laigeng; Yin, Tongming

    2016-01-01

    Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) are sister genera in the Salicaceae family. In both lineages extant species are predominantly diploid. Genome analysis previously revealed that the two lineages originated from a common tetraploid ancestor. In this study, we conducted a syntenic comparison of the corresponding 19 chromosome members of the poplar and willow genomes. Our observations revealed that almost every chromosomal segment had a parallel paralogous segment elsewhere in the genomes, and the two lineages shared a similar syntenic pinwheel pattern for most of the chromosomes, which indicated that the two lineages diverged after the genome reorganization in the common progenitor. The pinwheel patterns showed distinct differences for two chromosome pairs in each lineage. Further analysis detected two major interchromosomal rearrangements that distinguished the karyotypes of willow and poplar. Chromosome I of willow was a conjunction of poplar chromosome XVI and the lower portion of poplar chromosome I, whereas willow chromosome XVI corresponded to the upper portion of poplar chromosome I. Scientists have suggested that Populus is evolutionarily more primitive than Salix. Therefore, we propose that, after the “salicoid” duplication event, fission and fusion of the ancestral chromosomes first give rise to the diploid progenitor of extant Populus species. During the evolutionary process, fission and fusion of poplar chromosomes I and XVI subsequently give rise to the progenitor of extant Salix species. This study contributes to an improved understanding of genome divergence after ancient genome duplication in closely related lineages of higher plants. PMID:27352946

  16. Limited impact of elevated levels of polyphenol oxidase on tree-feeding caterpillars: assessing individual plant defenses with transgenic poplar.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, Raymond V; Jones, Christopher P; Yip, Lynn; Tran, Lan; Constabel, C Peter

    2007-11-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is commonly believed to function as an effective antiherbivore defense in plants. PPO is induced in plants following herbivory, and insect performance is often negatively correlated with PPO levels. However, induced defenses create numerous changes in plants, and very little work has been done to test the direct effects of PPO on insect herbivores separately from other changes. This study examined the impacts of high levels of PPO on the performance of two species of tree-feeding caterpillars (Lymantria dispar and Orgyia leucostigma) on poplar. Transgenic PPO-overexpressing poplar (Populus tremula x Populus alba) was used as a source of elevated-PPO leaves, thereby controlling for the multiple effects of induction. In addition, the impacts of treating poplar foliage with high levels of purified mushroom PPO were examined on the two caterpillar species. Contrary to expectation, in several cases increased PPO levels had no significant effect on insect consumption or growth rates. Although one of the mechanisms by which PPO is believed to impact herbivores is via increased oxidative stress, the ingestion of large amounts of PPO had little or no effect on semiquinone radical and oxidized protein levels in the gut contents of lymantriid caterpillars. PPO activity in caterpillars is likely limited by the low oxygen and high ascorbate levels commonly found in their gut contents. This study questions whether induced PPO functions as an effective post-ingestive defense against tree-feeding caterpillars, and indicates that controlled, mechanistic studies are needed in other plant-herbivore systems to test for a direct effect of PPO on insect performance.

  17. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the roles of overlapping heat-/drought-responsive genes in poplars exposed to high temperature and drought

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Jingbo; Zhou, Jing; Shi, Wenguang; Cao, Xu; Luo, Jie; Polle, Andrea; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2017-01-01

    High temperature (HT) and drought are both critical factors that constrain tree growth and survival under global climate change, but it is surprising that the transcriptomic reprogramming and physiological relays involved in the response to HT and/or drought remain unknown in woody plants. Thus, Populus simonii saplings were exposed to either ambient temperature or HT combined with sufficient watering or drought. RNA-sequencing analysis showed that a large number of genes were differentially expressed in poplar roots and leaves in response to HT and/or desiccation, but only a small number of these genes were identified as overlapping heat-/drought-responsive genes that are mainly involved in RNA regulation, transport, hormone metabolism, and stress. Furthermore, the overlapping heat-/drought-responsive genes were co-expressed and formed hierarchical genetic regulatory networks under each condition compared. HT-/drought-induced transcriptomic reprogramming is linked to physiological relays in poplar roots and leaves. For instance, HT- and/or drought-induced abscisic acid accumulation and decreases in auxin and other phytohormones corresponded well with the differential expression of a few genes involved in hormone metabolism. These results suggest that overlapping heat-/drought-responsive genes will play key roles in the transcriptional and physiological reconfiguration of poplars to HT and/or drought under future climatic scenarios. PMID:28233854

  18. Populus seed fibers as a natural source for production of oil super absorbents.

    PubMed

    Likon, Marko; Remškar, Maja; Ducman, Vilma; Švegl, Franc

    2013-01-15

    The genus Populus, which includes poplars, cottonwoods and aspen trees, represents a huge natural source of fibers with exceptional physical properties. In this study, the oil absorption properties of poplar seed hair fibers obtained from Populus nigra italica when tested with high-density motor oil and diesel fuel are reported. Poplar seed hair fibers are hollow hydrophobic microtubes with an external diameter between 3 and 12 μm, an average length of 4±1 mm and average tube wall thickness of 400±100 nm. The solid skeleton of the hollow fibers consists of lignocellulosic material coated by a hydrophobic waxy coating. The exceptional chemical, physical and microstructural properties of poplar seed hair fibers enable super-absorbent behavior with high absorption capacity for heavy motor oil and diesel fuel. The absorption values of 182-211 g heavy oil/g fiber and 55-60 g heavy oil/g fiber for packing densities of 0.005 g/cm(3) and 0.02 g/cm(3), respectively, surpass all known natural absorbents. Thus, poplar seed hair fibers obtained from Populus nigra italica and other trees of the genus Populus are an extremely promising natural source for the production of oil super absorbents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Some implications of populus intensive culture on nongame birds

    Treesearch

    Richard L. Verch

    1983-01-01

    Intensive culture of Populus will affect nongame bird habitat. Conversion of old fields to Populus plantations will destroy habitat favorable to certain species and produce habitat that will attract different species. Effects of this conversion can be lessened by planting plantations with irregular shapes and by leaving patches (.4 hectares) of...

  20. Inositol Hexakis Phosphate is the Seasonal Phosphorus Reservoir in the Deciduous Woody Plant Populus alba L.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Yuko; Baba, Kei'ichi; Ohnishi, Miwa; Matsubara, Ryosuke; Kosuge, Keiko; Anegawa, Aya; Shichijo, Chizuko; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kaneko, Yasuko; Hayashi, Masahiko; Suzaki, Toshinobu; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Mimura, Tetsuro

    2017-09-01

    Seasonal recycling of nutrients is an important strategy for deciduous perennials. Deciduous perennials maintain and expand their nutrient pools by the autumn nutrient remobilization and the subsequent winter storage throughout their long life. Phosphorus (P), one of the most important elements in living organisms, is remobilized from senescing leaves during autumn in deciduous trees. However, it remains unknown how phosphate is stored over winter. Here we show that in poplar trees (Populus alba L.), organic phosphates are accumulated in twigs from late summer to winter, and that IP6 (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis phosphate: phytic acid) is the primary storage form. IP6 was found in high concentrations in twigs during winter and quickly decreased in early spring. In parenchyma cells of winter twigs, P was associated with electron-dense structures, similar to globoids found in seeds of higher plants. Various other deciduous trees were also found to accumulate IP6 in twigs during winter. We conclude that IP6 is the primary storage form of P in poplar trees during winter, and that it may be a common strategy for seasonal P storage in deciduous woody plants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Transgenic modification of gai or rg/1 causes dwarfing and alters gibberellins, root growth, and metabolite profiles in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Busov, V.; Meilan, R; Pearce, D; Rood, s; Ma, C; Strauss, S

    2006-01-01

    In Arabidopsis and other plants, gibberellin (GA)-regulated responses are mediated by proteins including GAI, RGA and RGL1-3 that contain a functional DELLA domain. Through transgenic modification, we found that DELLA-less versions of GAI (gai) and RGL1 (rgl1) in a Populus tree have profound, dominant effects on phenotype, producing pleiotropic changes in morphology and metabolic profiles. Shoots were dwarfed, likely via constitutive repression of GA-induced elongation, whereas root growth was promoted two- to threefold in vitro. Applied GA{sub 3} inhibited adventitious root production in wild-type poplar, but gai/rgl1 poplars were unaffected by the inhibition. The concentrations of bioactive GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 4} in leaves of gai- and rgl1-expressing plants increased 12- to 64-fold, while the C{sub 19} precursors of GA{sub 1} (GA{sub 53}, GA{sub 44} and GA{sub 19}) decreased three- to ninefold, consistent with feedback regulation of GA 20-oxidase in the transgenic plants. The transgenic modifications elicited significant metabolic changes. In roots, metabolic profiling suggested increased respiration as a possible mechanism of the increased root growth. In leaves, we found metabolite changes suggesting reduced carbon flux through the lignin biosynthetic pathway and a shift towards allocation of secondary storage and defense metabolites, including various phenols, phenolic glucosides, and phenolic acid conjugates.

  2. A Populus TIR1 gene family survey reveals differential expression patterns and responses to 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and stress treatments

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Wenbo; Liu, Yingli; Guo, Yinghua; Zhou, Houjun; Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Shutang; Lu, Mengzhu

    2015-01-01

    The plant hormone auxin is a central regulator of plant growth. TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE 1/AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX (TIR1/AFB) is a component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex SCFTIR1/AFB and acts as an auxin co-receptor for nuclear auxin signaling. The SCFTIR1/AFB-proteasome machinery plays a central regulatory role in development-related gene transcription. Populus trichocarpa, as a model tree, has a unique fast-growth trait to which auxin signaling may contribute. However, no systematic analyses of the genome organization, gene structure, and expression of TIR1-like genes have been undertaken in this woody model plant. In this study, we identified a total of eight TIR1 genes in the Populus genome that are phylogenetically clustered into four subgroups, PtrFBL1/PtrFBL2, PtrFBL3/PtrFBL4, PtrFBL5/PtrFBL6, and PtrFBL7/PtrFBL8, representing four paralogous pairs. In addition, the gene structure and motif composition were relatively conserved in each paralogous pair and all of the PtrFBL members were localized in the nucleus. Different sets of PtrFBLs were strongly expressed in the leaves, stems, roots, cambial zones, and immature xylem of Populus. Interestingly, PtrFBL1 and 7 were expressed mainly in vascular and cambial tissues, respectively, indicating their potential but different roles in wood formation. Furthermore, Populus FBLs responded differentially upon exposure to various stresses. Finally, over-expression studies indicated a role of FBL1 in poplar stem growth and response to drought stress. Collectively, these observations lay the foundation for further investigations into the potential roles of PtrFBL genes in tree growth and development. PMID:26442033

  3. Constitutive expression of the poplar WRKY transcription factor PtoWRKY60 enhances resistance to Dothiorella gregaria Sacc. in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shenglong; Jiang, Yuanzhong; Duan, Yanjiao; Karim, Abdul; Fan, Di; Yang, Li; Zhao, Xin; Yin, Jia; Luo, Keming

    2014-10-01

    WRKY proteins are involved in various physiological processes in plants, especially in coping with diverse biotic and abiotic stresses. However, limited information is available on the roles of specific WRKY transcription factors in poplar defense. In this study, we reported the characterization of PtoWRKY60, a Group IIa WRKY member, from Populus tomentosa Carr. The gene expression profile of PtoWRKY60 in various tissues showed that it significantly accumulated in old leaves. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that PtoWRKY60 had a close relationship with AtWRKY18, AtWRKY40 and AtWRKY60. PtoWRKY60 was induced mainly by salicylic acid (SA) and slightly by Dothiorella gregaria Sacc., jasmonic acid, wounding treatment, low temperature and salinity stresses. Overexpression of PtoWRKY60 in poplar resulted in increased resistance to D. gregaria. The defense-associated genes, such as PR5.1, PR5.2, PR5.4, PR5.5 and CPR5, were markedly up-regulated in transgenic plants overexpressing PtoWRKY60. These results indicate that PtoWRKY60 might be partly involved in the signal transduction pathway initiated by SA in Populus. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Clonal variation in survival and growth of hybrid poplar and willow in an in situ trial on soils heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Edmund O. Bauer; Richard B. Hall; Jill A. Zalesny; Joshua Kunzman; Chris J. Rog; Don E. Riemenschneider

    2005-01-01

    Species and hybrids between species belonging to the genera Populus (poplar) and Salix (willow) have been used successfully for phytoremediation of contaminated soils. Our objectives were to: 1) evaluate the potential for establishing genotypes of poplar and willow on soils heavily contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and 2)...

  5. Tyloses and phenolic deposits in xylem vessels impede water transport in low-lignin transgenic poplars: a study by cryo-fluorescence microscopy

    Treesearch

    Peter Kitin; Steven L. Voelker; Frederick C. Meinzer; Hans Beekman; Steven H. Strauss; Barbara. Lachenbruch

    2010-01-01

    Of 14 transgenic poplar genotypes (Populus tremula x Populus alba) with antisense 4-coumarate:coenzynle A ligase that were grown in the field for 2 years, five that had substantial lignin reductions also had greatly reduced xylem-specific conductivity compared with that of control trees and those transgenic events with small...

  6. How does drought tolerance compare between two improved hybrids of balsam poplar and an unimproved native species?

    PubMed

    Larchevêque, Marie; Maurel, Marion; Desrochers, Annie; Larocque, Guy R

    2011-03-01

    Poplars are one of the woody plants that are very sensitive to water stress, which may reduce the productivity of fast-growing plantations. Poplars can exhibit several drought tolerance strategies that may impact productivity differently. Trees from two improved hybrids, Populus balsamifera × Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray (clone B × T) and P. balsamifera × Populus maximowiczii A. Henry (clone B × M), having P. balsamifera L. as a parent and trees from native and unimproved P. balsamifera were subjected to a 1-month drying cycle in a growth chamber and then rewatered. The unimproved and native B clone maintained higher stomatal conductance (g(s)) than the hybrids, and high photosynthetic activity and transpiration, even when soil water content was nearly zero. As a result, both instantaneous water use efficiency (WUE(i)) and leaf carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) indicated that this clone was less affected by drought than both hybrids at maximal drought stress. However, this clone shed its leaves when the drought threshold was exceeded, which implied a greater loss of productivity. The B × M hybrid showed a relatively conservative response to water stress, with the greatest decrease in transpiring versus absorbing surface (total leaf area to root biomass ratio). This clone was also the only one to develop new leaves after rewatering, and its total biomass production was not significantly decreased by drought. Among the two hybrids, clone B × T was the most vigorous, with the greatest transpiration (E(i)) and net CO(2) assimilation (A) rates, allowing for high biomass production. However, it had a more risky strategy under drought conditions by keeping its stomata open and high E(i) rates under moderate drought, resulting in a lower recovery rate after rewatering. The opposite drought response strategies of the two hybrids were reflected by clone B × T having lower WUE(i) values than clone B × M at maximal drought, with a

  7. Biodegradation of Nitro-Substituted Explosives 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene, Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine, and Octahydro-1,3,5,7-Tetranitro-1,3,5-Tetrazocine by a Phytosymbiotic Methylobacterium sp. Associated with Poplar Tissues (Populus deltoides × nigra DN34)

    PubMed Central

    Van Aken, Benoit; Yoon, Jong Moon; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2004-01-01

    A pink-pigmented symbiotic bacterium was isolated from hybrid poplar tissues (Populus deltoides × nigra DN34). The bacterium was identified by 16S and 16S-23S intergenic spacer ribosomal DNA analysis as a Methylobacterium sp. (strain BJ001). The isolated bacterium was able to use methanol as the sole source of carbon and energy, which is a specific attribute of the genus Methylobacterium. The bacterium in pure culture was shown to degrade the toxic explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazene (RDX), and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5-tetrazocine (HMX). [U-ring-14C]TNT (25 mg liter−1) was fully transformed in less than 10 days. Metabolites included the reduction derivatives amino-dinitrotoluenes and diamino-nitrotoluenes. No significant release of 14CO2 was recorded from [14C]TNT. In addition, the isolated methylotroph was shown to transform [U-14C]RDX (20 mg liter−1) and [U-14C]HMX (2.5 mg liter−1) in less than 40 days. After 55 days of incubation, 58.0% of initial [14C]RDX and 61.4% of initial [14C]HMX were mineralized into 14CO2. The radioactivity remaining in solution accounted for 12.8 and 12.7% of initial [14C]RDX and [14C]HMX, respectively. Metabolites detected from RDX transformation included a mononitroso RDX derivative and a polar compound tentatively identified as methylenedinitramine. Since members of the genus Methylobacterium are distributed in a wide diversity of natural environments and are very often associated with plants, Methylobacterium sp. strain BJ001 may be involved in natural attenuation or in situ biodegradation (including phytoremediation) of explosive-contaminated sites. PMID:14711682

  8. Biochar as a substitute for vermiculite in potting mix for hybrid poplar

    Treesearch

    William L. Headlee; Catherine E. Brewer; Richard B. Hall

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate biochar as a substitute for vermiculite in potting mixes for unrooted vegetative cuttings of hybrid poplar as represented by the clone ‘NM6’ (Populus nigra L. × Populus suaveolens Fischer subsp. maximowiczii A. Henry). We compared three treatments (peat moss (control), peat moss mixed with vermiculite, and peat moss mixed with...

  9. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming) is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1) and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2). Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types. PMID:21867507

  10. Genomics Mechanisms of Carbon Allocation and Partitioning in Poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Kirst, Matias; Peter, Gary; Martin, Timothy

    2009-07-30

    The genetic control of carbon allocation and partitioning in woody perennial plants is poorly understood despite its importance for carbon sequestration. It is also unclear how environmental cues such as nitrogen availability impact the genes that regulate growth, and biomass allocation and wood composition in trees. To address these questions we phenotyped 396 clonally replicated genotypes of an interspecific pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus for wood composition and biomass traits in above and below ground organs. The loci that regulate growth, carbon allocation and partitioning under two nitrogen conditions were identified, defining the contribution of environmental cues to their genetic control. Fifty-seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified for twenty traits analyzed. The majority of QTL are specific to one of the two nitrogen treatments, demonstrating significant nitrogen-dependent genetic control. A highly significant genetic correlation was observed between plant growth and lignin/cellulose composition, and QTL co-localization identified the genomic position of potential pleiotropic regulators. Gene expression analysis of all poplar genes was also characterized in differentiating xylem, whole-roots and developing leaves of 192 of the segregating population. By integrating the QTL and gene expression information we identified genes that regulate carbon partitioning and several biomass growth related properties. The work developed in this project resulted in the publication of three book chapters, four scientific articles (three others currently in preparation), 17 presentations in international conferences and two provisional patent applications.

  11. Cadmium interferes with auxin physiology and lignification in poplar

    PubMed Central

    Elobeid, Mudawi; Göbel, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Polle, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a phytotoxic heavy metal that causes rapid growth reduction. To investigate if Cd interferes with the metabolism of auxin, a major growth hormone in plants, poplars (Populus×canescens) expressing a heterologous GH3::GUS reporter gene were exposed to 50 μM Cd in hydroponic solutions. Growth, photosynthetic performance, lignification, peroxidase activity, auxin concentration, and GUS staining were determined in order to record the activities of GH3 enzymes in the stem apex, the elongation zone, wood in the zone of radial growth, and in roots. Cd-induced growth reductions were tissue-specific decreasing in the order: roots>wood>shoot elongation and leaf initiation, whereas Cd concentrations increased in the order: leaves

  12. Using phyto-recurrent selection to choose Populus genotypes for phytoremediation of landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Adam H. Wiese; Richard B. Hall

    2006-01-01

    Information about the response of Populus genotypes to landfill leachate irrigation is needed, along with efficient methods for choosing genotypes based on leachate composition. We irrigated poplar clones during three cycles of phyto-recurrent selection to test whether genotypes responded differently to leachate and water, and to test whether our...

  13. Selecting Populus with different adventitious root types for environmental benefits, fiber, and energy

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Jill A. Zalesny

    2009-01-01

    Primary roots from seeds, sucker roots in aspens, and adventitious roots (ARs) in poplars and their hybrids are prevalent within the genus Populus. Two AR types develop on hardwood cuttings: (i) lateral roots from either preformed or induced primordia along the length of the cutting and (ii) basal roots from callus at the base of the cutting in...

  14. Shoot position affects root initiation and growth of dormant unrooted cuttings of Populus

    Treesearch

    R.S., Jr. Zalesny; R.B. Hall; E.O. Bauer; D.E. Riemenschneider

    2003-01-01

    Rooting of dormant unrooted cuttings is crucial to the commercial deployment of intensively cultured poplar (Populus spp.) plantations because it is the first biological prerequisite to stand establishment. Rooting can be genetically controlled and subject to selection. Thus, our objective was to test for differences in rooting ability among cuttings...

  15. Bud removal affects shoot, root, and callus development of hardwood Populus cuttings

    Treesearch

    A.H. Wiese; J.A. Zalesny; D.M. Donner; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny

    2006-01-01

    The inadvertent removal and/or damage of buds during processing and planting of hardwood poplar (Populus spp.) cuttings are a concern because of their potential impact on shoot and root development during establishment. The objective of the current study was to test for differences in shoot dry mass, root dry mass, number of roots, length of the...

  16. Influence of Populus Genotype on Gene Expression by the Wood Decay Fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Treesearch

    Jill Gaskell; Amber Marty; Michael Mozuch; Philip J. Kersten; Sandra Splinter Bondurant; Grzegorz Sabat; Ali Azarpira; John Ralph; Oleksandr Skyba; Shawn D. Mansfield; Robert A. Blanchette; Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    We examined gene expression patterns in the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium when it colonizes hybrid poplar (Populus alba tremula) and syringyl (S)-rich transgenic derivatives. Acombination ofmicroarrays and liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) allowed detection of a total of 9,959 transcripts and 793...

  17. Genome Enabled Discovery of Carbon Sequestration Genes in Poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Filichkin, Sergei; Etherington, Elizabeth; Ma, Caiping; Strauss, Steve

    2007-02-22

    The goals of the S.H. Strauss laboratory portion of 'Genome-enabled discovery of carbon sequestration genes in poplar' are (1) to explore the functions of candidate genes using Populus transformation by inserting genes provided by Oakridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the University of Florida (UF) into poplar; (2) to expand the poplar transformation toolkit by developing transformation methods for important genotypes; and (3) to allow induced expression, and efficient gene suppression, in roots and other tissues. As part of the transformation improvement effort, OSU developed transformation protocols for Populus trichocarpa 'Nisqually-1' clone and an early flowering P. alba clone, 6K10. Complete descriptions of the transformation systems were published (Ma et. al. 2004, Meilan et. al 2004). Twenty-one 'Nisqually-1' and 622 6K10 transgenic plants were generated. To identify root predominant promoters, a set of three promoters were tested for their tissue-specific expression patterns in poplar and in Arabidopsis as a model system. A novel gene, ET304, was identified by analyzing a collection of poplar enhancer trap lines generated at OSU (Filichkin et. al 2006a, 2006b). Other promoters include the pGgMT1 root-predominant promoter from Casuarina glauca and the pAtPIN2 promoter from Arabidopsis root specific PIN2 gene. OSU tested two induction systems, alcohol- and estrogen-inducible, in multiple poplar transgenics. Ethanol proved to be the more efficient when tested in tissue culture and greenhouse conditions. Two estrogen-inducible systems were evaluated in transgenic Populus, neither of which functioned reliably in tissue culture conditions. GATEWAY-compatible plant binary vectors were designed to compare the silencing efficiency of homologous (direct) RNAi vs. heterologous (transitive) RNAi inverted repeats. A set of genes was targeted for post transcriptional silencing in the model Arabidopsis system; these include the floral meristem identity gene (APETALA1 or

  18. Herbivore-induced poplar cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP71 family convert aldoximes to nitriles which repel a generalist caterpillar.

    PubMed

    Irmisch, Sandra; Clavijo McCormick, Andrea; Günther, Jan; Schmidt, Axel; Boeckler, Gerhard Andreas; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Unsicker, Sybille B; Köllner, Tobias G

    2014-12-01

    Numerous plant species emit volatile nitriles upon herbivory, but the biosynthesis as well as the relevance of these nitrogenous compounds in plant-insect interactions remains unknown. Populus trichocarpa has been shown to produce a complex blend of nitrogenous volatiles, including aldoximes and nitriles, after herbivore attack. The aldoximes were previously reported to be derived from amino acids by the action of cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP79 family. Here we show that nitriles are derived from aldoximes by another type of P450 enzyme in P. trichocarpa. First, feeding of deuterium-labeled phenylacetaldoxime to poplar leaves resulted in incorporation of the label into benzyl cyanide, demonstrating that poplar volatile nitriles are derived from aldoximes. Then two P450 enzymes, CYP71B40v3 and CYP71B41v2, were characterized that produce aliphatic and aromatic nitriles from their respective aldoxime precursors. Both possess typical P450 sequence motifs but do not require added NADPH or cytochrome P450 reductase for catalysis. Since both enzymes are expressed after feeding by gypsy moth caterpillars, they are likely to be involved in herbivore-induced volatile nitrile emission in P. trichocarpa. Olfactometer experiments showed that these volatile nitriles have a strong repellent activity against gypsy moth caterpillars, suggesting they play a role in induced direct defense against poplar herbivores. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Arabidopsis EDT1/HDG11 improves drought and salt tolerance in cotton and poplar and increases cotton yield in the field.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Hui; Wu, Shen-Jie; Peng, Yi-Shu; Liu, Rui-Na; Chen, Xi; Zhao, Ping; Xu, Ping; Zhu, Jian-Bo; Jiao, Gai-Li; Pei, Yan; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Drought and salinity are two major environmental factors limiting crop production worldwide. Improvement of drought and salt tolerance of crops with transgenic approach is an effective strategy to meet the demand of the ever-growing world population. Arabidopsis ENHANCED DROUGHT TOLERANCE1/HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 (AtEDT1/HDG11), a homeodomain-START transcription factor, has been demonstrated to significantly improve drought tolerance in Arabidopsis, tobacco, tall fescue and rice. Here we report that AtHDG11 also confers drought and salt tolerance in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and woody plant poplar (Populus tomentosa Carr.). Our results showed that both the transgenic cotton and poplar exhibited significantly enhanced tolerance to drought and salt stress with well-developed root system. In the leaves of the transgenic cotton plants, proline content, soluble sugar content and activities of reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzymes were significantly increased after drought and salt stress compared with wild type. Leaf stomatal density was significantly reduced, whereas stomatal and leaf epidermal cell size were significantly increased in both the transgenic cotton and poplar plants. More importantly, the transgenic cotton showed significantly improved drought tolerance and better agronomic performance with higher cotton yield in the field both under normal and drought conditions. These results demonstrate that AtHDG11 is not only a promising candidate for crops improvement but also for woody plants.

  20. A difference gel electrophoresis study on thylakoids isolated from poplar leaves reveals a negative impact of ozone exposure on membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Bohler, Sacha; Sergeant, Kjell; Hoffmann, Lucien; Dizengremel, Pierre; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Renaut, Jenny; Jolivet, Yves

    2011-07-01

    Populus tremula L. x P. alba L. (Populus x canescens (Aiton) Smith), clone INRA 717-1-B4, saplings were subjected to 120 ppb ozone exposure for 28 days. Chloroplasts were isolated, and the membrane proteins, solubilized using the detergent 1,2-diheptanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), were analyzed in a difference gel electrophoresis (DiGE) experiment comparing control versus ozone-exposed plants. Extrinsic photosystem (PS) proteins and adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) subunits were detected to vary in abundance. The general trend was a decrease in abundance, except for ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR), which increased after the first 7 days of exposure. The up-regulation of FNR would increase NAPDH production for reducing power and detoxification inside and outside of the chloroplast. Later on, FNR and a number of PS and ATPase subunits decrease in abundance. This could be the result of oxidative processes on chloroplast proteins but could also be a way to down-regulate photochemical reactions in response to an inhibition in Calvin cycle activity.

  1. Epigenomics of Development in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Steve; Freitag, Michael; Mockler, Todd

    2013-01-10

    We conducted research to determine the role of epigenetic modifications during tree development using poplar (Populus trichocarpa), a model woody feedstock species. Using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) or chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), followed by high-throughput sequencing, we are analyzed DNA and histone methylation patterns in the P. trichocarpa genome in relation to four biological processes: bud dormancy and release, mature organ maintenance, in vitro organogenesis, and methylation suppression. Our project is now completed. We have 1) produced 22 transgenic events for a gene involved in DNA methylation suppression and studied its phenotypic consequences; 2) completed sequencing of methylated DNA from eleven target tissues in wildtype P. trichocarpa; 3) updated our customized poplar genome browser using the open-source software tools (2.13) and (V2.2) of the P. trichocarpa genome; 4) produced summary data for genome methylation in P. trichocarpa, including distribution of methylation across chromosomes and in and around genes; 5) employed bioinformatic and statistical methods to analyze differences in methylation patterns among tissue types; and 6) used bisulfite sequencing of selected target genes to confirm bioinformatics and sequencing results, and gain a higher-resolution view of methylation at selected genes 7) compared methylation patterns to expression using available microarray data. Our main findings of biological significance are the identification of extensive regions of the genome that display developmental variation in DNA methylation; highly distinctive gene-associated methylation profiles in reproductive tissues, particularly male catkins; a strong whole genome/all tissue inverse association of methylation at gene bodies and promoters with gene expression; a lack of evidence that tissue specificity of gene expression is associated with gene methylation; and evidence that genome methylation is a significant impediment to tissue

  2. Autumnal photosynthesis in short-rotation intensively cultured Populus clones

    Treesearch

    N.D. Nelson; D.I. Dickmann; K.W. Gottschalk

    1982-01-01

    Many exotic hybrid Populus clones grown under short-rotation intensive culture (SRIC) in the Lake States region of the U.S.A. retain green leaves in the autumn for 2-6 weeks after native aspen (P. tremuloides and P. grandidentata) have lost their leaves. Leaves on the terminal shoots of five such clones tested in...

  3. The poplar basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BEE3 – Like gene affects biomass production by enhancing proliferation of xylem cells in poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Seol Ah Choi, Young-Im Cho, Jin-Seong Lee, Hyoshin

    2015-06-19

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in many aspects of plant growth and development, including regulation of vascular cambium activities and cell elongation. BR-induced BEE3 (brassinosteroid enhanced expression 3) is required for a proper BR response. Here, we identified a poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) BEE3-like gene, PagBEE3L, encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-type transcription factor. Expression of PagBEE3L was induced by brassinolide (BL). Transcripts of PagBEE3L were mainly detected in stems, with the internode having a low level of transcription and the node having a relatively higher level. The function of the PagBEE3L gene was investigated through phenotypic analyses with PagBEE3L-overexpressing (ox) transgenic lines. This work particularly focused on a potential role of PagBEE3L in stem growth and development of polar. The PagBEE3L-ox poplar showed thicker and longer stems than wild-type plants. The xylem cells from the stems of PagBEE3L-ox plants revealed remarkably enhanced proliferation, resulting in an earlier thickening growth than wild-type plants. Therefore, this work suggests that xylem development of poplar is accelerated in PagBEE3L-ox plants and PagBEE3L plays a role in stem growth by increasing the proliferation of xylem cells to promote the initial thickening growth of poplar stems. - Highlights: • We identify the BEE3-like gene form hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). • We examine effects of overexpression of PagBEE3L on growth in poplar. • We found that 35S:BEE3L transgenic plants showed more rapid growth than wild-type plants. • BEE3L protein plays an important role in the development of plant stem.

  4. GENOME ENABLED MODIFICATION OF POPLAR ROOT DEVELOPMENT FOR INCREASED CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Busov, Victor

    2013-03-05

    DR5 as a reporter system to study auxin response in Populus Plant Cell Reports 32:453-463 Auxin responsive promoter DR5 reporter system is functional in Populus to monitor auxin response in tissues including leaves, roots, and stems. We described the behavior of the DR5::GUS reporter system in stably transformed Populus plants. We found several similarities with Arabidopsis, including sensitivity to native and synthetic auxins, rapid induction after treatment in a variety of tissues, and maximal responses in root tissues. There were also several important differences from Arabidopsis, including slower time to maximum response and lower induction amplitude. Young leaves and stem sections below the apex showed much higher DR5 activity than did older leaves and stems undergoing secondary growth. DR5 activity was highest in cortex, suggesting high levels of auxin concentration and/or sensitivity in this tissue. Our study shows that the DR5 reporter system is a sensitive and facile system for monitoring auxin responses and distribution at cellular resolution in poplar. The Populus AINTEGUMENTA LIKE 1 homeotic transcription factor PtAIL1 controls the formation of adventitious root primordia. Plant Physiol. 160: 1996-2006 Adventitious rooting is an essential but sometimes rate-limiting step in the clonal multiplication of elite tree germplasm, because the ability to form roots declines rapidly with age in mature adult plant tissues. In spite of the importance of adventitious rooting, the mechanism behind this developmental process remains poorly understood. We have described the transcriptional profiles that are associated with the developmental stages of adventitious root formation in the model tree poplar (Populus trichocarpa). Transcriptome analyses indicate a highly specific temporal induction of the AINTEGUMENTA LIKE1 (PtAIL1) transcription factor of the AP2 family during adventitious root formation. Transgenic poplar samples that overexpressed PtAIL1 were able to

  5. Genome-wide Identification of TCP Family Transcription Factors from Populus euphratica and Their Involvement in Leaf Shape Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaodong; Ma, Jianchao; Fan, Di; Li, Chaofeng; Jiang, Yuanzhong; Luo, Keming

    2016-09-08

    Higher plants have been shown to experience a juvenile vegetative phase, an adult vegetative phase, and a reproductive phase during its postembryonic development and distinct lateral organ morphologies have been observed at the different development stages. Populus euphratica, commonly known as a desert poplar, has developed heteromorphic leaves during its development. The TCP family genes encode a group of plant-specific transcription factors involved in several aspects of plant development. In particular, TCPs have been shown to influence leaf size and shape in many herbaceous plants. However, whether these functions are conserved in woody plants remains unknown. In the present study, we carried out genome-wide identification of TCP genes in P. euphratica and P. trichocarpa, and 33 and 36 genes encoding putative TCP proteins were found, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the poplar TCPs together with Arabidopsis TCPs indicated a biased expansion of the TCP gene family via segmental duplications. In addition, our results have also shown a correlation between different expression patterns of several P. euphratica TCP genes and leaf shape variations, indicating their involvement in the regulation of leaf shape development.

  6. An Empirical Assessment of Transgene Flow from a Bt Transgenic Poplar Plantation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xingling; Lv, Jinhui; Jia, Huixia; Zhao, Shutang; Lu, Mengzhu

    2017-01-01

    To assess the possible impact of transgenic poplar plantations on the ecosystem, we analyzed the frequency and distance of gene flow from a mature male transgenic Populus nigra plantation carrying the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin gene (Bt poplar) and the survival of Bt poplar seeds. The resultant Bt poplar seeds occurred at a frequency of ~0.15% at 0 m to ~0.02% at 500 m from the Bt poplar plantation. The germination of Bt poplar seeds diminished within three weeks in the field (germination rate from 68% to 0%) compared to 48% after three weeks of storage at 4°C. The survival rate of seedlings in the field was 0% without any treatment but increased to 1.7% under the addition of four treatments (cleaning and trimming, watering, weeding, and covering with plastic film to maintain moisture) after being seeded in the field for eight weeks. The results of this study indicate that gene flow originating from the Bt poplar plantation occurred at an extremely low level through pollen or seeds under natural conditions. This study provides first-hand field data on the extent of transgene flow in poplar plantations and offers guidance for the risk assessment of transgenic poplar plantations.

  7. Poplar maintains zinc homeostasis with heavy metal genes HMA4 and PCS1

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Joshua P.; Adeli, Ardeshir; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Harkess, Richard L.; Page, Grier P.; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Schultz, Emily B.; Yuceer, Cetin

    2011-01-01

    Perennial woody species, such as poplar (Populus spp.) must acquire necessary heavy metals like zinc (Zn) while avoiding potential toxicity. Poplar contains genes with sequence homology to genes HMA4 and PCS1 from other species which are involved in heavy metal regulation. While basic genomic conservation exists, poplar does not have a hyperaccumulating phenotype. Poplar has a common indicator phenotype in which heavy metal accumulation is proportional to environmental concentrations but excesses are prevented. Phenotype is partly affected by regulation of HMA4 and PCS1 transcriptional abundance. Wild-type poplar down-regulates several transcripts in its Zn-interacting pathway at high Zn levels. Also, overexpressed PtHMA4 and PtPCS1 genes result in varying Zn phenotypes in poplar; specifically, there is a doubling of Zn accumulation in leaf tissues in an overexpressed PtPCS1 line. The genomic complement and regulation of poplar highlighted in this study supports a role of HMA4 and PCS1 in Zn regulation dictating its phenotype. These genes can be altered in poplar to change its interaction with Zn. However, other poplar genes in the surrounding pathway may maintain the phenotype by inhibiting drastic changes in heavy metal accumulation with a single gene transformation. PMID:21504875

  8. An Empirical Assessment of Transgene Flow from a Bt Transgenic Poplar Plantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xingling; Lv, Jinhui; Jia, Huixia; Zhao, Shutang; Lu, Mengzhu

    2017-01-01

    To assess the possible impact of transgenic poplar plantations on the ecosystem, we analyzed the frequency and distance of gene flow from a mature male transgenic Populus nigra plantation carrying the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin gene (Bt poplar) and the survival of Bt poplar seeds. The resultant Bt poplar seeds occurred at a frequency of ~0.15% at 0 m to ~0.02% at 500 m from the Bt poplar plantation. The germination of Bt poplar seeds diminished within three weeks in the field (germination rate from 68% to 0%) compared to 48% after three weeks of storage at 4°C. The survival rate of seedlings in the field was 0% without any treatment but increased to 1.7% under the addition of four treatments (cleaning and trimming, watering, weeding, and covering with plastic film to maintain moisture) after being seeded in the field for eight weeks. The results of this study indicate that gene flow originating from the Bt poplar plantation occurred at an extremely low level through pollen or seeds under natural conditions. This study provides first-hand field data on the extent of transgene flow in poplar plantations and offers guidance for the risk assessment of transgenic poplar plantations. PMID:28085955

  9. Genomic insights into salt adaptation in a desert poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Tao; Wang, Junyi; Zhou, Gongke; Yue, Zhen; Hu, Quanjun; Chen, Yan; Liu, Bingbing; Qiu, Qiang; Wang, Zhuo; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Kun; Jiang, Dechun; Gou, Caiyun; Yu, Lili; Zhan, Dongliang; Zhou, Ran; Luo, Wenchun; Ma, Hui; Yang, Yongzhi; Pan, Shengkai; Fang, Dongming; Luo, Yadan; Wang, Xia; Wang, Gaini; Wang, Juan; Wang, Qian; Lu, Xu; Chen, Zhe; Liu, Jinchao; Lu, Yao; Yin, Ye; Yang, Huanming; Abbott, Richard J.; Wu, Yuxia; Wan, Dongshi; Li, Jia; Yin, Tongming; Lascoux, Martin; DiFazio, Stephen P.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Wang, Jun; Jianquan, Liu

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high economic and ecological importance of forests, our knowledge of the genomic evolution of trees under salt stress remains very limited. Here we report the genome sequence of the desert poplar, Populus euphratica, which exhibits high tolerance to sa lt stress. Its genome is very similar and collinear to that of the closely related mesophytic congener, P trichocarpa. However, we find that several gene families likely to be involved in tolerance to salt stress contain significantly more gene copies within the P euphratica lineage. Furthermore, genes showing evidence of positive selection are significantly enriched in functional categories related to salt stress. Some of these genes, and others within the same categories, are significantly upregulated under salt stress relative to their expression in another salt-sensitive poplar. Our results provide an important background for understanding tree adaptation to salt stress and facilitating the genetic improvement of cultivated poplars for saline soils.

  10. Wood reinforcement of poplar by rice NAC transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Takata, Naoki; Oshima, Yoshimi; Yoshida, Kouki; Taniguchi, Toru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2016-01-27

    Lignocellulose, composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, in the secondary cell wall constitutes wood and is the most abundant form of biomass on Earth. Enhancement of wood accumulation may be an effective strategy to increase biomass as well as wood strength, but currently only limited research has been undertaken. Here, we demonstrated that OsSWN1, the orthologue of the rice NAC Secondary-wall Thickening factor (NST) transcription factor, effectively enhanced secondary cell wall formation in the Arabidopsis inflorescence stem and poplar (Populus tremula×Populus tremuloides) stem when expressed by the Arabidopsis NST3 promoter. Interestingly, in transgenic Arabidopsis and poplar, ectopic secondary cell wall deposition in the pith area was observed in addition to densification of the secondary cell wall in fiber cells. The cell wall content or density of the stem increased on average by up to 38% and 39% in Arabidopsis and poplar, respectively, without causing growth inhibition. As a result, physical strength of the stem increased by up to 57% in poplar. Collectively, these data suggest that the reinforcement of wood by NST3pro:OsSWN1 is a promising strategy to enhance wood-biomass production in dicotyledonous plant species.

  11. Wood reinforcement of poplar by rice NAC transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Takata, Naoki; Oshima, Yoshimi; Yoshida, Kouki; Taniguchi, Toru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulose, composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, in the secondary cell wall constitutes wood and is the most abundant form of biomass on Earth. Enhancement of wood accumulation may be an effective strategy to increase biomass as well as wood strength, but currently only limited research has been undertaken. Here, we demonstrated that OsSWN1, the orthologue of the rice NAC Secondary-wall Thickening factor (NST) transcription factor, effectively enhanced secondary cell wall formation in the Arabidopsis inflorescence stem and poplar (Populus tremula×Populus tremuloides) stem when expressed by the Arabidopsis NST3 promoter. Interestingly, in transgenic Arabidopsis and poplar, ectopic secondary cell wall deposition in the pith area was observed in addition to densification of the secondary cell wall in fiber cells. The cell wall content or density of the stem increased on average by up to 38% and 39% in Arabidopsis and poplar, respectively, without causing growth inhibition. As a result, physical strength of the stem increased by up to 57% in poplar. Collectively, these data suggest that the reinforcement of wood by NST3pro:OsSWN1 is a promising strategy to enhance wood-biomass production in dicotyledonous plant species. PMID:26812961

  12. Leafing-out date not indicative of growth rate in hybrid poplars

    Treesearch

    Harold F. Ford; Edward I. Sucoff

    1961-01-01

    In breeding trees for rapid growth, testing the progeny usually requires many years. To shorten the testing period, geneticists have tried to find characteristics in juvenile trees that would indicate mature-tree performance. With hybrid poplars (Populus spp.), work at the Northeastern Forest Experiment Station has shown that the thickness of bark on...

  13. Growth of five hybrid poplar genotypes exposed to interacting elevated CO2 and O3

    Treesearch

    R.E. Dickson; M.D. Coleman; D.E. Riemenschneider; J.G. Isebrands; G.D. Hogan; D.F. Karnosky

    1998-01-01

    A wide variety of hybrid poplar clones are being introduced for intensive culture biomass production, but the potential clonal or genotypic response to increasing tropospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), ozone (O3), and their interactions are unknown. To study these effects, we exposed five different hybrid Populus...

  14. Putrescine overproduction does not affect the catabolism of spermidine and spermine in poplar and Arabidopsis

    Treesearch

    Lin Shao; Pratiksha Bhatnagar; Rajtilak Majumdar; Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha

    2014-01-01

    The effect of up-regulation of putrescine (Put) production by genetic manipulation on the turnover of spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm) was investigated in transgenic cells of poplar (Populus nigra x maximowiczii) and seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana. Several-fold increase in Put production was achieved by expressing a mouse...

  15. Analysis of genetic and environmental effects on hybrid poplar rooting in Central and Northern Minnesota, USA

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Don Riemenschneider; Edmund Bauer

    2000-01-01

    We studied genetic and environmental effects on adventitious root initiation and growth because rooting is biologically prerequisite to the establishment of hybrid poplar plantations. Six clones from two pedigrees (pure Populus deltoides "cottonwoods" and P. deltoides x P. maximowiczii hybrids) were...

  16. Transgenic poplars with reduced lignin show impaired xylem conductivity, growth efficiency and survival

    Treesearch

    Steven L. Voelker; Barbara Lachenbruch; Frederick C. Meinzer; Peter Kitin; Steven H. Strauss

    2011-01-01

    We studied xylem anatomy and hydraulic architecture in 14 transgenic insertion events and a control line of hybrid poplar (Populus spp.) that varied in lignin content. Transgenic events had different levels of down-regulation of two genes encoding 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL). Two-year-old trees were characterized after...

  17. Contrasting fine-root production, survival and soil CO2 efflux in pine and poplar plantation

    Treesearch

    M. D. Coleman; Richard E. Dickson; J. G. Isebrands

    2000-01-01

    Tree root activity, including fine-root production, turnover and metabolic activity are significant components of forest productivity and nutrient cycling. Differences in root activity among forest types are not well known. A 3-year study was undertaken in red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) and hybrid poplar (Populus tristis X P.

  18. Contrasting fine-root production, survival and soil CO2 efflux in pine and poplar plantations

    Treesearch

    M.D. Coleman; R.E. Dickson; J.G. Isebrands

    2000-01-01

    Tree root activity, including fine-root production, turnover and metabolic activity are significant components of forest productivity and nutrient cycling. Differences in root activity among forest types are not well known. A 3-year study was undertaken in red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) and hybrid poplar (Populus tristis X P.

  19. Putrescine overproduction negatively impacts the oxidative state of poplar cells in culture

    Treesearch

    Sridev Mohapatra; Rakesh Minocha; Stephanie Long

    2009-01-01

    While polyamines (PAs) have been suggested to protect cells against Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), their catabolism is known to generate ROS. We compared the activities of several enzymes and cellular metabolites involved in the ROS scavenging pathways in two isogenic cell lines of poplar (Populus nigra × maximowiczii) differing in their PA...

  20. Genetic manipulation of the metabolism of polyamines in poplar cells. The regulation of putrescine catabolism

    Treesearch

    Pratiksha Bhatnagar; Rakesh Minocha; Subhash C. Minocha

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the catabolism of putrescine (Put) in a non-transgenic (NT) and a transgenic cell line of poplar (Populus nigra x maximowiczii) expressing a mouse (Mus musculus) ornithine (Orn) decarboxylase (odc) cDNA. The transgenic cells produce 3- to 4-fold higher amounts of Put than the NT...

  1. An approach for siting poplar energy production systems to increase productivity and associated ecosystem services

    Treesearch

    Ronald S. Zalesny; Deahn M. Donner; David R. Coyle; William L. Headlee

    2012-01-01

    Short rotation woody crops such as Populus spp. and their hybrids (i.e., poplars) are a significant component of the total biofuels and bioenergy feedstock resource in the USA. Production of these dedicated energy crops may result in large-scale land conversion, which leads to questions about their economic, logistic, and ecologic feasibility. To...

  2. Energy partitioning and surface resistance of a poplar plantation in northern China

    Treesearch

    M. Kang; Z. Zhang; A. Noormets; X. Fang; T. Zha; J. Zhou; G. Sun; S. G. McNulty; J. Chen

    2015-01-01

    Poplar (Populus sp.) plantations have been, on the one hand, broadly used in northern China for urban greening, combating desertification, as well as for paper and wood production. On the other hand, such plantations have been questioned occasionally for their possible negative impacts on water availability due to the higher water-use nature of...

  3. An Investigation of Crystalline Intensity of the Wood of Poplar Clones Grown in Jiangsu Province, China

    Treesearch

    Bernard R. Parresol; Fuliang Cao

    1998-01-01

    To establish manmade poplar (Populus spp.) clonal forests for industrial uses, two requirements must be met. First, forests must have high yield;and second, wood fibers must have specific mechanical properties. For example, both fiberboard and plywood require fibers with a certain stiffness and strength. In fact, fiber characteristics are closely related to the fiber?s...

  4. Effects of irrigating poplar energy crops with landfill leachate on soil micro- and meso-fauna

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; David R. Coyle; Ronald S. Jr. Zalesny; Adam H. Wiese

    2009-01-01

    Increased municipal solid waste generated worldwide combined with substantial demand for renewable energy has prompted testing and deployment of woody feedstock production systems that reuse and recycle wastewaters as irrigation and fertilization for the trees. Populus species and hybrids (i.e., poplars) are ideal for such systems given their fast...

  5. Production of Hybrid Poplar under Short-Term, Intensive Culture in Western Colorado

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An irrigated study was conducted at the Western Colorado Research Center at Fruita for 6 yr to evaluate eight hybrid poplar clones under short-term, intensive culture. The eight clones included in the study were Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii (NM6), P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides (52225, OP367), and...

  6. Light-use efficiency of native and hybrid poplar genotypes at high levels of intracanopy competition

    Treesearch

    D. Scott Green; Eric L. Kruger; Glen R, Stanosz; J. G. Isebrands

    2001-01-01

    In southern Wisconsin, U.S.A., tree growth and associated canopy traits were compared among five native and hybrid genotypes of poplar (Populus spp.) in replicated, monoclonal stands planted at a 1 x 1 m spacing. The overall objective of this study was to assess clonal suitability to cultural conditions entailing high levels of intracanopy...

  7. Thaumatin-like proteins are differentially expressed and localized in phloem tissue of hybrid poplar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) were previously identified in phloem exudate of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides) using proteomics methods, and their sieve element localization confirmed by immunofluorescence. In the current study, we analyzed different tissues to further underst...

  8. Changes in clonal poplar leaf chemistry caused by stem galls alter herbivory and leaf litter decomposition.

    PubMed

    Künkler, Nora; Brandl, Roland; Brändle, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Gall-inducing insects are highly specialized herbivores that modify the phenotype of their host plants. Beyond the direct manipulation of plant morphology and physiology in the immediate environment of the gall, there is also evidence of plant-mediated effects of gall-inducing insects on other species of the assemblages and ecosystem processes associated with the host plant. We analysed the impact of gall infestation by the aphid Pemphigus spirothecae on chemical leaf traits of clonal Lombardy poplars (Populus nigra var. italica) and the subsequent effects on intensity of herbivory and decomposition of leaves across five sites. We measured the herbivory of two feeding guilds: leaf-chewing insects that feed on the blade (e.g. caterpillars and sawfly larvae) and skeletonising insects that feed on the mesophyll of the leaves (e.g. larvae of beetles). Galled leaves had higher phenol (35%) and lower nitrogen and cholorophyll contents (35% respectively 37%) than non-galled leaves, and these differences were stronger in August than in June. Total herbivory intensity was 27% higher on galled than on non-galled leaves; damage by leaf chewers was on average 61% higher on gall infested leaves, whereas damage by skeletonising insects was on average 39% higher on non-galled leaves. After nine months the decomposition rate of galled leaf litter was 15% lower than that of non-galled leaf litter presumably because of the lower nitrogen content of the galled leaf litter. This indicated after-life effects of gall infestation on the decomposers. We found no evidence for galling x environment interactions.

  9. Rating poplars for Melampsora leaf rust infection

    Treesearch

    Ernst J. Schreiner

    1959-01-01

    Melampsora leaf rust occurs in all countries where poplars are native or where they have been introduced for ornamental use or timber culture. The rust is easily recognized by the bright orange-yellow spore masses on the undersides of the leaves during most of the growing season.

  10. Rhizosphere carbon deposition, oxidative stress and nutritional changes in two poplar species exposed to aluminum.

    PubMed

    Naik, Dhiraj; Smith, Ernest; Cumming, Jonathan R

    2009-03-01

    Species and hybrids in the genus Populus have become the focus of investigation for use in biofuels production and their capacity to sequester carbon (C) in the environment. The identification of species resistant to marginal edaphic sites may be important in both of these endeavors. Plant growth, total dissolved organic carbon (TOC) and low molecular weight organic acid (OA) production, antioxidative enzyme activities and mineral content were assessed in Populus tremuloides L. and Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray seedlings under exposure to aluminum (Al). Both species were sensitive to Al, with significant reductions in shoot and root biomass at and above 50 microM Al. Exposure to Al induced 40-fold increases in TOC deposition in P. tremuloides and 100-fold increases in P. trichocarpa. In P. tremuloides, Al treatment induced root exudation of malic and citric acids, while Al increased exudation of citrate and oxalate in P. trichocarpa. Organic acids accounted for 20-64% of total C released upon Al exposure, with the proportion of OAs increasing in P. tremuloides and decreasing in P. trichocarpa. Dose-dependent responses of catalase and ascorbate peroxidase were observed in both root and leaf tissues, indicating that Al exposure induced oxidative stress in poplar. Treatment at and above 100 microM Al reduced the concentrations of calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) in roots and leaves, whereas Al at or above 50 microM reduced root and leaf phosphorous (P) concentrations. The majority of Al taken up was retained in the root system. Even with the induction of OA exudation and accumulation, P. tremuloides and P. trichocarpa remained sensitive to Al, as evidenced by elevated antioxidative enzyme activities, which may reflect inhibition of Ca or P uptake and destabilization of cell homeostasis in these poplar species. Although plants exhibited reductions in growth and evidence of oxidative and nutritional stress, total C rhizodeposition rates for both species increased with

  11. Agrobacterium-Mediated Stable Genetic Transformation of Populus angustifolia and Populus balsamifera

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Priti; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated stable genetic transformation of two species of poplarPopulus angustifolia and Populus balsamifera. The binary vector pCAMBIA-Npro-long-Luc containing the luciferase reporter gene was used to transform stem internode and axillary bud explants. Putative transformants were regenerated on selection-free medium using our previously established in vitro regeneration method. Explant type, genotype, effect of pre-culture, Agrobacterium concentration, a time period of infection and varying periods of co-culture with bacteria were tested for the transformation frequency. The highest frequency of transformation was obtained with stem internode explants pre-cultured for 2 days, infected with Agrobacterium culture at the concentration of OD600 = 0.5 for 10 min and co-cultivated with Agrobacterium for 48 h. Out of the two genotypes tested, P. balsamifera exhibited a higher transformation rate in comparison to P. angustifolia. The primary transformants that exhibited luciferase activity in a bioluminescence assay under the CCD camera when subjected to polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis revealed a stable single-copy integration of luc in their genomes. The reported protocol is highly reproducible and can be applied to other species of poplar; it will also be useful for future genetic engineering of one of the most important families of woody plants for sustainable development. PMID:27014319

  12. An Integrated Functional Genomics Consortium to Increase Carbon Sequestration in Poplars: Optimizing Aboveground Carbon Gain

    SciTech Connect

    Karnosky, David F; Podila, G Krishna; Burton, Andrew J

    2009-02-17

    This project used gene expression patterns from two forest Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments (Aspen FACE in northern Wisconsin and POPFACE in Italy) to examine ways to increase the aboveground carbon sequestration potential of poplars (Populus). The aim was to use patterns of global gene expression to identify candidate genes for increased carbon sequestration. Gene expression studies were linked to physiological measurements in order to elucidate bottlenecks in carbon acquisition in trees grown in elevated CO2 conditions. Delayed senescence allowing additional carbon uptake late in the growing season, was also examined, and expression of target genes was tested in elite P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa hybrids. In Populus euramericana, gene expression was sensitive to elevated CO2, but the response depended on the developmental age of the leaves. Most differentially expressed genes were upregulated in elevated CO2 in young leaves, while most were downregulated in elevated CO2 in semi-mature leaves. In P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa hybrids, leaf development and leaf quality traits, including leaf area, leaf shape, epidermal cell area, stomatal number, specific leaf area, and canopy senescence were sensitive to elevated CO2. Significant increases under elevated CO2 occurred for both above- and belowground growth in the F-2 generation. Three areas of the genome played a role in determining aboveground growth response to elevated CO2, with three additional areas of the genome important in determining belowground growth responses to elevated CO2. In Populus tremuloides, CO2-responsive genes in leaves were found to differ between two aspen clones that showed different growth responses, despite similarity in many physiological parameters (photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and leaf area index). The CO2-responsive clone shunted C into pathways associated with active defense/response to stress, carbohydrate/starch biosynthesis and subsequent growth. The CO2

  13. N-fertilization has different effects on the growth, carbon and nitrogen physiology, and wood properties of slow- and fast-growing Populus species.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Li, Mengchun; Luo, Jie; Cao, Xu; Qu, Long; Gai, Ying; Jiang, Xiangning; Liu, Tongxian; Bai, Hua; Janz, Dennis; Polle, Andrea; Peng, Changhui; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2012-10-01

    To investigate how N-fertilization affects the growth, carbon and nitrogen (N) physiology, and wood properties of poplars with contrasting growth characteristics, slow-growing (Populus popularis, Pp) and fast-growing (P. alba×P. glandulosa, Pg) poplar saplings were exposed to different N levels. Above-ground biomass, leaf area, photosynthetic rates (A), instantaneous photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE (i)), chlorophyll and foliar sugar concentrations were higher in Pg than in Pp. Foliar nitrate reductase (NR) activities and root glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activities were higher in Pg than in Pp as were the N amount and NUE of new shoots. Lignin contents and calorific values of Pg wood were less than that of Pp wood. N-fertilization reduced root biomass of Pg more than of Pp, but increased leaf biomass, leaf area, A, and PNUE(i) of Pg more than of Pp. Among 13 genes involved in the transport of ammonium or nitrate or in N assimilation, transcripts showed more pronounced changes to N-fertilization in Pg than in Pp. Increases in NR activities and N contents due to N-fertilization were larger in Pg than in Pp. In both species, N-fertilization resulted in lower calorific values as well as shorter and wider vessel elements/fibres. These results suggest that growth, carbon and N physiology, and wood properties are more sensitive to increasing N availability in fast-growing poplars than in slow-growing ones, which is probably due to prioritized resource allocation to the leaves and accelerated N physiological processes in fast-growing poplars under higher N levels.

  14. Early responses to cadmium of two poplar clones that differ in stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Di Baccio, Daniela; Castagna, Antonella; Tognetti, Roberto; Ranieri, Annamaria; Sebastiani, Luca

    2014-11-15

    Soil cadmium (Cd) contamination is becoming a matter of great global concern. The identification of plants differentially sensitive to Cd excess is of interest for the selection of genotype adaptive to grow and develop in polluted areas and capable of ameliorating or reducing the negative environmental effects of this toxic metal. The two poplar clones I-214 (Populus×canadensis) and Eridano (Populus deltoides×maximowiczii) are, respectively, tolerant and sensitive to ozone (O3) exposure. Because stress tolerance is mediated by an array of overlapping defence mechanisms, we tested the hypothesis that these two clones differently sensitive to O3 stress factor also exhibit different tolerance to Cd. With this purpose, an outdoor pot experiment was designed to study the responses of I-214 and Eridano to the distribution of different Cd solutions enriched with CdCl2 (0, 50 and 150μM) for 35 days. Changes in leaf area, biomass allocation and Cd uptake, photosynthesis, chlorophyll fluorescence, leaf concentration of nutrients and pigments, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) production and thiol compounds were investigated. The two poplar clones showed similar sensitivity to excess Cd in terms of biomass production, photosynthesis activity and Cd accumulation, though physiological and biochemical traits revealed different defence strategies. In particular, Eridano maintained in any Cd treatment the number of its constitutively wider blade leaves, while the number of I-214 leaves (with lower size) was reduced. H2O2 increased 4.5- and 13-fold in I-214 leaves after the lowest (L) and highest (H) Cd treatments, respectively, revealing the induction of oxidative burst. NO, constitutively higher in I-214 than Eridano, progressively increased in both clones with the enhancement of Cd concentration in the substrate. I-214 showed a more elevated antioxidative capacity (GSH/GSSG) and higher photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) and de-epoxidation degree of

  15. Two Herbivore-Induced Cytochrome P450 Enzymes CYP79D6 and CYP79D7 Catalyze the Formation of Volatile Aldoximes Involved in Poplar Defense[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Irmisch, Sandra; Clavijo McCormick, Andrea; Boeckler, G. Andreas; Schmidt, Axel; Reichelt, Michael; Schneider, Bernd; Block, Katja; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Unsicker, Sybille B.; Köllner, Tobias G.

    2013-01-01

    Aldoximes are known as floral and vegetative plant volatiles but also as biosynthetic intermediates for other plant defense compounds. While the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP) from the CYP79 family forming aldoximes as biosynthetic intermediates have been intensively studied, little is known about the enzymology of volatile aldoxime formation. We characterized two P450 enzymes, CYP79D6v3 and CYP79D7v2, which are involved in herbivore-induced aldoxime formation in western balsam poplar (Populus trichocarpa). Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that both enzymes produce a mixture of different aldoximes. Knockdown lines of CYP79D6/7 in gray poplar (Populus × canescens) exhibited a decreased emission of aldoximes, nitriles, and alcohols, emphasizing that the CYP79s catalyze the first step in the formation of a complex volatile blend. Aldoxime emission was found to be restricted to herbivore-damaged leaves and is closely correlated with CYP79D6 and CYP79D7 gene expression. The semi-volatile phenylacetaldoxime decreased survival and weight gain of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) caterpillars, suggesting that aldoximes may be involved in direct defense. The wide distribution of volatile aldoximes throughout the plant kingdom and the presence of CYP79 genes in all sequenced genomes of angiosperms suggest that volatile formation mediated by CYP79s is a general phenomenon in the plant kingdom. PMID:24220631

  16. Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Pyruvate Decarboxylase Activity in Leaves and Roots of Eastern Cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) and Soybean (Glycine max L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Kimmerer, Thomas W.

    1987-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC, EC 4.1.1.1) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, EC 1.1.1.1) are responsible for the anaerobic production of acetaldehyde and ethanol in higher plants. In developing soybean embryos, ADH activity increased upon imbibition and then declined exponentially with development, and was undetectable in leaves by 30 days after imbibition. PDC was not detectable in soybean leaves. In contrast, ADH activity remained high in developing cottonwood seedlings, with no decline in activity during development. ADH activity in the first fully expanded leaf of cottonwood was 230 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram dry weight, and increased with leaf age. Maximal PDC activity of cottonwood leaves was 10 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram dry weight. ADH activity in cottonwood roots was induced by anaerobic stress, increasing from 58 to 205 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram dry weight in intact plants in 48 hours, and from 38 to 246 micromoles NADH oxidized per minute per gram dry weight in detached roots in 48 hours. Leaf ADH activity increased by 10 to 20% on exposure to anaerobic conditions. Crude leaf enzyme extracts with high ADH activity reduced little or no NADH when other aldehydes, such as trans-2-hexenal, were provided as substrate. ADH and PDC are constitutive enzyme in cottonwood leaves, but their metabolic role is not known. PMID:16665586

  17. Anthocyanins of the anthers as chemotaxonomic markers in the genus Populus L.. Differentiation between Populus nigra, Populus alba and Populus tremula.

    PubMed

    Alcalde-Eon, Cristina; García-Estévez, Ignacio; Rivas-Gonzalo, Julián C; Rodríguez de la Cruz, David; Escribano-Bailón, María Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Three main species of Popululs L. (Salicaceae) have been reported to occur in the Iberian Peninsula: Populus nigra L., Populus alba L. and Populus tremula L. The degree of pilosity of the bracts of the male catkins is a key character for their differentiation. The anthers of these poplar species possess anthocyanins that provide them a red colouration. Since these poplars are wind-pollinated and, consequently, do not need to attract pollinators, anthocyanins in the anthers might be acting as photoprotectors, shielding pollen grains from excessive sunlight. In order to verify this hypothesis, the first objective of this study was to establish if there is any relationship between the degree of pilosity of the bracts (related to the physical shading of the pollen grains) and the levels and types of anthocyanins in the anthers of these three species. This study also aimed to check the usefulness of the anthocyanins of the anthers as chemotaxonomic markers, through the study of the differences in the anthocyanin composition between these poplar species. Anthocyanins were identified from the data supplied by HPLC-DAD-MS(n) analyses. Seventeen different compounds, including mono-, di- and triglycosides and anthocyanin-derived pigments (F-A(+) dimers) have been identified. Cyanidin 3-O-glucoside was the major compound in all the samples (>60% of the total content), which may be in accordance with the photoprotective role proposed for them. However, qualitative and quantitative differences were detected among samples. Cyanidin and delphinidin 3-O-sambubiosides have been detected only in the anthers of P. tremula as well as cyanidin 3-O-(2″-O-xyloxyl)rutinoside, making them valuable chemotaxonomic markers for this species. Hierarchical Cluster and Principal Components Analyses (HCA and PCA) carried out with the anthocyanin percent composition data have allowed a separation of the samples that is in accordance with the initial classification of the samples made from the

  18. Inoculation of hybrid poplar with the endophytic bacterium Enterobacter sp. 638 increases biomass but does not impact leaf level physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, A.; McDonald, K.; Muehlbauer, M. F.; Hoffman, A.; Koenig, K.; Newman, L.; Taghavi, S.; Van Der Lelie, D.

    2011-01-01

    Endophytic bacteria have been shown to provide several advantages to their host, including enhanced growth. Inoculating biofuel species with endophytic bacteria is therefore an attractive option to increase the productivity of biofuel feedstocks. Here, we investigated the effect of inoculating hard wood cuttings of Populus deltoides Bartr. x Populus. nigra L. clone OP367 with Enterobacter sp. 638. After 17 weeks, plants inoculated with Enterobacter sp. 638 had 55% greater total biomass than un-inoculated control plants. Study of gas exchange and fluorescence in developing and mature leaves over a diurnal cycle and over a 5 week measurement campaign revealed no effects of inoculation on photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, photosynthetic water use efficiency or the maximum and operating efficiency of photosystem II. However, plants inoculated with Enterobacter sp. 638 had a canopy that was 39% larger than control plants indicating that the enhanced growth was fueled by increased leaf area, not by improved physiology. Leaf nitrogen content was determined at two stages over the 5 week measurement period. No effect of Enterobacter sp. 638 on leaf nitrogen content was found indicating that the larger plants were acquiring sufficient nitrogen. Enterobacter sp. 638 lacks the genes for N{sub 2} fixation, therefore the increased availability of nitrogen likely resulted from enhanced nitrogen acquisition by the 84% larger root system. These data show that Enterobacter sp. 638 has the potential to dramatically increase productivity in poplar. If fully realized in the production environment, these results indicate that an increase in the environmental and economic viability of poplar as a biofuel feedstock is possible when inoculated with endophytic bacteria like Enterobacter sp. 638.

  19. The Atlantic-Mediterranean watershed, river basins and glacial history shape the genetic structure of Iberian poplars.

    PubMed

    Macaya-Sanz, D; Heuertz, M; López-de-Heredia, U; De-Lucas, A I; Hidalgo, E; Maestro, C; Prada, A; Alía, R; González-Martínez, S C

    2012-07-01

    Recent phylogeographic studies have elucidated the effects of Pleistocene glaciations and of Pre-Pleistocene events on populations from glacial refuge areas. This study investigates those effects in riparian trees (Populus spp.), whose particular features may convey enhanced resistance to climate fluctuations. We analysed the phylogeographic structure of 44 white (Populus alba), 13 black (Populus nigra) and two grey (Populus x canescens) poplar populations in the Iberian Peninsula using plastid DNA microsatellites and sequences. We also assessed fine-scale spatial genetic structure and the extent of clonality in four white and one grey poplar populations using nuclear microsatellites and we determined quantitative genetic differentiation (Q(ST) ) for growth traits in white poplar. Black poplar displayed higher regional diversity and lower differentiation than white poplar, reflecting its higher cold-tolerance. The dependence of white poplar on phreatic water was evidenced by strong differentiation between the Atlantic and Mediterranean drainage basins and among river basins, and by weaker isolation by distance within than among river basins. Our results suggest confinement to the lower river courses during glacial periods and moderate interglacial gene exchange along coastlines. In northern Iberian river basins, white poplar had lower diversity, fewer private haplotypes and larger clonal assemblies than in southern basins, indicating a stronger effect of glaciations in the north. Despite strong genetic structure and frequent asexual propagation in white poplar, some growth traits displayed adaptive divergence between drainage and river basins (Q(ST) >F(ST)), highlighting the remarkable capacity of riparian tree populations to adapt to regional environmental conditions. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Leaving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Within this article, the author presents a personal story, "Leaving," which highlights the problematic experience of opposing established practice. The tale tells of the difficulty faced by creative agency when confronted by a constraining structural hegemony. Specifically, it draws attention to the professionalization of academic life through a…

  1. Leaving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robyn L.

    2011-01-01

    Within this article, the author presents a personal story, "Leaving," which highlights the problematic experience of opposing established practice. The tale tells of the difficulty faced by creative agency when confronted by a constraining structural hegemony. Specifically, it draws attention to the professionalization of academic life through a…

  2. Investigation on metal tolerance and phytoremoval activity in the poplar hybrid clone "Monviso" under Cu-spiked water: Potential use for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Pietrini, Fabrizio; Di Baccio, Daniela; Iori, Valentina; Veliksar, Sofia; Lemanova, Natalia; Juškaitė, Liudvika; Maruška, Audrius; Zacchini, Massimo

    2017-08-15

    A serious concern for the environmental and human health is represented by the increasing copper (Cu) occurrence in agricultural soils and waters, because of the possible food contamination and bioaugmentation along the trophic chain. The request for the decontamination of different matrices with an environmentally sustainable technology as the phytoremediation should be addressed by selecting plant materials with improved pollutant tolerance and removal capability. With this purpose, plants of the hybrid poplar clone "Monviso" (Populus×generosa A. Henry×P. nigra L.) were grown in growth chamber under hydroponics and exposed to excess Cu concentrations (T1, 75μM Cu; T2, 150μM Cu), selected as about 5 and 10 times higher than those allowed by the Italian regulation on water use. Results evidenced a notable Cu tolerance by poplar plants, particularly at the lowest Cu concentration. At organ level, the root system was the most affected by Cu treatment, especially in T2-exposed plants. Copper determinations revealed that the metal was mostly bioaccumulated in the roots, with a limited amount reaching the shoots. Chlorophyll content and fluorescence analyses confirmed the visible symptoms in leaves, highlighting a good physiological status in T1-exposed plants. Contrarily, an impairment of the main processes associated to photosynthesis was observed in T2-exposed plants also by gas exchange measurements. Remarkably, the Cu content analysis of the spiked water solutions revealed that poplar plants succeeded in removing almost the 50% of the total Cu amount added. These results strengthen the evidence that poplar plants represent a useful eco-friendly bio-tool for the decontamination of metal polluted waters.

  3. The MYB182 protein down-regulates proanthocyanidin and anthocyanin biosynthesis in poplar by repressing both structural and regulatory flavonoid genes.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazuko; Ma, Dawei; Constabel, C Peter

    2015-03-01

    Trees in the genus Populus (poplar) contain phenolic secondary metabolites including the proanthocyanidins (PAs), which help to adapt these widespread trees to diverse environments. The transcriptional activation of PA biosynthesis in response to herbivory and ultraviolet light stress has been documented in poplar leaves, and a regulator of this process, the R2R3-MYB transcription factor MYB134, has been identified. MYB134-overexpressing transgenic plants show a strong high-PA phenotype. Analysis of these transgenic plants suggested the involvement of additional MYB transcription factors, including repressor-like MYB factors. Here, MYB182, a subgroup 4 MYB factor, was found to act as a negative regulator of the flavonoid pathway. Overexpression of MYB182 in hairy root culture and whole poplar plants led to reduced PA and anthocyanin levels as well as a reduction in the expression of key flavonoid genes. Similarly, a reduced accumulation of transcripts of a MYB PA activator and a basic helix-loop-helix cofactor was observed in MYB182-overexpressing hairy roots. Transient promoter activation assays in poplar cell culture demonstrated that MYB182 can disrupt transcriptional activation by MYB134 and that the basic helix-loop-helix-binding motif of MYB182 was essential for repression. Microarray analysis of transgenic plants demonstrated that down-regulated targets of MYB182 also include shikimate pathway genes. This work shows that MYB182 plays an important role in the fine-tuning of MYB134-mediated flavonoid metabolism. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. A genomics investigation of partitioning into and among flavonoid-derived condensed tannins for carbon sequestration in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, Scott, A; Tsai, Chung-jui; Lindroth, Richard, L

    2013-03-24

    The project set out to use comparative (genotype and treatment) and transgenic approaches to investigate the determinants of condensed tannin (CT) accrual and chemical variability in Populus. CT type and amount are thought to effect the decomposition of plant detritus in the soil, and thereby the sequestering of carbon in the soil. The stated objectives were: 1. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling (microarrays) to analyze structural gene, transcription factor and metabolite control of CT partitioning; 2. Transcriptomic (microarray) and chemical analysis of ontogenetic effects on CT and PG partitioning; and 3. Transgenic manipulation of flavonoid biosynthetic pathway genes to modify the control of CT composition. Objective 1: A number of approaches for perturbing CT content and chemistry were tested in Objective 1, and those included nitrogen deficit, leaf wounding, drought, and salicylic acid spraying. Drought had little effect on CTs in the genotypes we used. Plants exhibited unpredictability in their response to salicylic acid spraying, leading us to abandon its use. Reduced plant nitrogen status and leaf wounding caused reproducible and magnitudinally striking increases in leaf CT content. Microarray submissions to NCBI from those experiments are the following: GSE ID 14515: Comparative transcriptomics analysis of Populus leaves under nitrogen limitation: clone 1979. Public on Jan 04, 2010; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C GSE ID 14893: Comparative transcriptomics analysis of Populus leaves under nitrogen limitation: clone 3200. Public on Feb 19, 2009; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C GSE ID 16783 Wound-induced gene expression changes in Populus: 1 week; clone RM5. Status Public on Dec 01, 2009; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C GSE ID 16785 Wound-induced gene expression changes in Populus: 90 hours; clone RM5 Status Public on Dec 01, 2009; Contributor(s) Harding SA, Tsai C Although CT amount changed in response to treatments, CT composition was essentially

  5. Investigating the Role of Extensin Proteins in Poplar Biomass Recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Margaret Brigham; Decker, Stephen R.; Bedinger, Patricia A.

    2016-02-03

    The biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to biofuel is hindered by cell wall recalcitrance, which can limit the ability of cellulases to access and break down cellulose. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hydroxyproline-rich cell wall proteins (extensins) are present in poplar stem biomass, and whether these proteins may contribute to recalcitrance. Three classical extensin genes were identified in Populus trichocarpa through bioinformatic analysis of poplar genome sequences, with the following proposed names: PtEXTENSIN1 (Potri.001G019700); PtEXTENSIN2 (Potri.001G020100); PtEXTENSIN3 (Potri.018G050100). Tissue print immunoblots localized the extensin proteins in poplar stems to regions near the vascular cambium. Different thermochemical pretreatments reduced but did not eliminate hydroxyproline (Hyp, a proxy for extensins) from the biomass. Protease treatment of liquid hot water-pretreated poplar biomass reduced Hyp content by a further 16% and increased subsequent glucose yield by 20%. These data suggest that extensins may contribute to recalcitrance in pretreated poplar biomass, and that incorporating protease treatment into pretreatment protocols could result in a small but significant increase in the yield of fermentable glucose.

  6. Investigating the Role of Extensin Proteins in Poplar Biomass Recalcitrance

    DOE PAGES

    Fleming, Margaret Brigham; Decker, Stephen R.; Bedinger, Patricia A.

    2016-02-03

    The biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to biofuel is hindered by cell wall recalcitrance, which can limit the ability of cellulases to access and break down cellulose. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hydroxyproline-rich cell wall proteins (extensins) are present in poplar stem biomass, and whether these proteins may contribute to recalcitrance. Three classical extensin genes were identified in Populus trichocarpa through bioinformatic analysis of poplar genome sequences, with the following proposed names: PtEXTENSIN1 (Potri.001G019700); PtEXTENSIN2 (Potri.001G020100); PtEXTENSIN3 (Potri.018G050100). Tissue print immunoblots localized the extensin proteins in poplar stems to regions near the vascular cambium. Different thermochemicalmore » pretreatments reduced but did not eliminate hydroxyproline (Hyp, a proxy for extensins) from the biomass. Protease treatment of liquid hot water-pretreated poplar biomass reduced Hyp content by a further 16% and increased subsequent glucose yield by 20%. These data suggest that extensins may contribute to recalcitrance in pretreated poplar biomass, and that incorporating protease treatment into pretreatment protocols could result in a small but significant increase in the yield of fermentable glucose.« less

  7. Investigating the Role of Extensin Proteins in Poplar Biomass Recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Margaret Brigham; Decker, Stephen R.; Bedinger, Patricia A.

    2016-04-13

    The biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to biofuel is hindered by cell wall recalcitrance, which can limit the ability of cellulases to access and break down cellulose. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hydroxyproline-rich cell wall proteins (extensins) are present in poplar stem biomass, and whether these proteins may contribute to recalcitrance. Three classical extensin genes were identified in Populus trichocarpa through bioinformatic analysis of poplar genome sequences, with the following proposed names: PtEXTENSIN1 (Potri.001G019700); PtEXTENSIN2 (Potri.001G020100); PtEXTENSIN3 (Potri.018G050100). Tissue print immunoblots localized the extensin proteins in poplar stems to regions near the vascular cambium. Different thermochemical pretreatments reduced but did not eliminate hydroxyproline (Hyp, a proxy for extensins) from the biomass. Protease treatment of liquid hot water-pretreated poplar biomass reduced Hyp content by a further 16% and increased subsequent glucose yield by 20%. These data suggest that extensins may contribute to recalcitrance in pretreated poplar biomass, and that incorporating protease treatment into pretreatment protocols could result in a small but significant increase in the yield of fermentable glucose.

  8. Ectomycorrhizal colonization and diversity in relation to tree biomass and nutrition in a plantation of transgenic poplars with modified lignin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Lara; Lohaus, Gertrud; Sirrenberg, Anke; Karlovsky, Petr; Bastien, Catherine; Pilate, Gilles; Polle, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Wood from biomass plantations with fast growing tree species such as poplars can be used as an alternative feedstock for production of biofuels. To facilitate utilization of lignocellulose for saccharification, transgenic poplars with modified or reduced lignin contents may be useful. However, the potential impact of poplars modified in the lignification pathway on ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi, which play important roles for plant nutrition, is not known. The goal of this study was to investigate EM colonization and community composition in relation to biomass and nutrient status in wildtype (WT, Populus tremula × Populus alba) and transgenic poplar lines with suppressed activities of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, caffeate/5-hydroxyferulate O-methyltransferase, and cinnamoyl-CoA reductase in a biomass plantation. In different one-year-old poplar lines EM colonization varied from 58% to 86%, but the EM community composition of WT and transgenic poplars were indistinguishable. After two years, the colonization rate of all lines was increased to about 100%, but separation of EM communities between distinct transgenic poplar genotypes was observed. The differentiation of the EM assemblages was similar to that found between different genotypes of commercial clones of Populus × euramericana. The transgenic poplars exhibited significant growth and nutrient element differences in wood, with generally higher nutrient accumulation in stems of genotypes with lower than in those with higher biomass. A general linear mixed model simulated biomass of one-year-old poplar stems with high accuracy (adjusted R(2) = 97%) by two factors: EM colonization and inverse wood N concentration. These results imply a link between N allocation and EM colonization, which may be crucial for wood production in the establishment phase of poplar biomass plantations. Our data further support that multiple poplar genotypes regardless whether generated by transgenic approaches or conventional

  9. Ectomycorrhizal Colonization and Diversity in Relation to Tree Biomass and Nutrition in a Plantation of Transgenic Poplars with Modified Lignin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, Lara; Lohaus, Gertrud; Sirrenberg, Anke; Karlovsky, Petr; Bastien, Catherine; Pilate, Gilles; Polle, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Wood from biomass plantations with fast growing tree species such as poplars can be used as an alternative feedstock for production of biofuels. To facilitate utilization of lignocellulose for saccharification, transgenic poplars with modified or reduced lignin contents may be useful. However, the potential impact of poplars modified in the lignification pathway on ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi, which play important roles for plant nutrition, is not known. The goal of this study was to investigate EM colonization and community composition in relation to biomass and nutrient status in wildtype (WT, Populus tremula × Populus alba) and transgenic poplar lines with suppressed activities of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, caffeate/5-hydroxyferulate O-methyltransferase, and cinnamoyl-CoA reductase in a biomass plantation. In different one-year-old poplar lines EM colonization varied from 58% to 86%, but the EM community composition of WT and transgenic poplars were indistinguishable. After two years, the colonization rate of all lines was increased to about 100%, but separation of EM communities between distinct transgenic poplar genotypes was observed. The differentiation of the EM assemblages was similar to that found between different genotypes of commercial clones of Populus × euramericana. The transgenic poplars exhibited significant growth and nutrient element differences in wood, with generally higher nutrient accumulation in stems of genotypes with lower than in those with higher biomass. A general linear mixed model simulated biomass of one-year-old poplar stems with high accuracy (adjusted R2 = 97%) by two factors: EM colonization and inverse wood N concentration. These results imply a link between N allocation and EM colonization, which may be crucial for wood production in the establishment phase of poplar biomass plantations. Our data further support that multiple poplar genotypes regardless whether generated by transgenic approaches or conventional

  10. Nine-year performance of a variety of Populus taxa on an upland site in western Kentucky

    Treesearch

    Randall J. Rousseau; Joshua P. Adams; David W. Wilkerson

    2013-01-01

    A variety of hybrid poplars have been planted on upland sites throughout the Midwest and Midsouth regions of the United States. Very few of these clones have proven to be worthwhile due to susceptibility to a variety of diseases. Five different Populus taxa were planted on an upland site in western Kentucky as a means of assessing resistance to local...

  11. Projected and actual biomass production of 2- to 10- year-old intensively cultured Populus 'Tristis # 1'

    Treesearch

    J. Zavitkovski

    1983-01-01

    Intensively cultured plantations of Populus 'Tristis # 1' produce more than 10 mt/ha/year of woody biomass at most spacings as long as they are harvested when mean annual biomass increment (MABI) culminates. In addition, fully stocked plantations produce up to 4.4 mt/ha of leaf litter. Plantations of other poplar clones produce about 30% more woody biomass,...

  12. Field performance of Populus in short-rotation intensive culture plantations in the north-central U.S.

    Treesearch

    Edward A. Hansen; Michael E. Ostry; Wendell D. Johnson; David N. Tolsted; Daniel A. Netzer; William E. Berguson; Richard B. Hall

    1994-01-01

    Describes a network of short-rotation, Populus research and demonstration plantations that has been established across a 5-state region in the north-central U.S. to identify suitable hybrid poplar clones for large-scale biomass plantations in the region. Reports 6-year results.

  13. Molecular dissection of xylan biosynthesis during wood formation in poplar.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chanhui; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2011-07-01

    Xylan, being the second most abundant polysaccharide in dicot wood, is considered to be one of the factors contributing to wood biomass recalcitrance for biofuel production. To better utilize wood as biofuel feedstock, it is crucial to functionally characterize all the genes involved in xylan biosynthesis during wood formation. In this report, we investigated roles of poplar families GT43 and GT8 glycosyltransferases in xylan biosynthesis during wood formation. There exist seven GT43 genes in the genome of poplar (Populus trichocarpa), five of which, namely PtrGT43A, PtrGT43B, PtrGT43C, PtrGT43D, and PtrGT43E, were shown to be highly expressed in the developing wood and their encoded proteins were localized in the Golgi. Comprehensive genetic complementation coupled with chemical analyses demonstrated that overexpression of PtrGT43A/B/E but not PtrGT43C/D was able to rescue the xylan defects conferred by the Arabidopsis irx9 mutant, whereas overexpression of PtrGT43C/D but not PtrGT43A/B/E led to a complementation of the xylan defects in the Arabidopsis irx14 mutant. The essential roles of poplar GT43 members in xylan biosynthesis was further substantiated by RNAi down-regulation of GT43B in the hybrid poplar (Populus alba x tremula) leading to reductions in wall thickness and xylan content in wood, and an elevation in the abundance of the xylan reducing end sequence. Wood digestibility analysis revealed that cellulase digestion released more glucose from the wood of poplar GT43B RNAi lines than the control wood, indicating a decrease in wood biomass recalcitrance. Furthermore, RNAi down-regulation of another poplar wood-associated glycosyltransferase, PoGT8D, was shown to cause decreases in wall thickness and xylan content as well as in the abundance of the xylan reducing end sequence. Together, these findings demonstrate that the poplar GT43 members form two functionally non-redundant groups, namely PtrGT43A/B/E as functional orthologs of Arabidopsis IRX9 and Ptr

  14. Gypsy moth caterpillar feeding has only a marginal impact on phenolic compounds in old-growth black poplar.

    PubMed

    Boeckler, G Andreas; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Unsicker, Sybille B

    2013-10-01

    Species of the Salicaceae produce phenolic compounds that may function as anti-herbivore defenses. Levels of these compounds have been reported to increase upon herbivory, but only rarely have these changes in phenolics been studied under natural conditions. We profiled the phenolics of old-growth black poplar (Populus nigra L.) and studied the response to gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) herbivory in two separate field experiments. In a first experiment, foliar phenolics of 20 trees were monitored over 4 weeks after caterpillar infestation, and in a second experiment the bark and foliar phenolics of a single tree were measured over a week. Of the major groups of phenolics, salicinoids (phenolic glycosides) showed no short term response to caterpillar feeding, but after 4 weeks they declined up to 40 % in herbivore damaged and adjacent undamaged leaves on the same branch when compared to leaves of control branches. Flavonol glycosides, low molecular weight flavan-3-ols, and condensed tannins were not affected by herbivory in the first experiment. However, in the single-tree experiment, foliar condensed tannins increased by 10-20 % after herbivory, and low molecular weight flavan-3-ols decreased by 10 % in the leaves but increased by 10 % in the bark. Despite 15 % experimental leaf area loss followed by a 5-fold increase in foliar jasmonate defense hormones, we found no evidence for substantial induction of phenolic defense compounds in old growth black poplar trees growing in a native stand. Thus, if phenolics in these trees function as defenses against herbivory, our results suggest that they act mainly as constitutive defenses.

  15. Different autosomes evolved into sex chromosomes in the sister genera of Salix and Populus.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Zhang, Defang; Chen, Yingnan; Fang, Lecheng; Dai, Xiaogang; Yin, Tongming

    2015-03-13

    Willows (Salix) and poplars (Populus) are dioecious plants in Salicaceae family. Sex chromosome in poplar genome was consistently reported to be associated with chromosome XIX. In contrast to poplar, this study revealed that chromosome XV was sex chromosome in willow. Previous studies revealed that both ZZ/ZW and XX/XY sex-determining systems could be present in some species of Populus. In this study, sex of S. suchowensis was found to be determined by the ZW system in which the female was the heterogametic gender. Gene syntenic and collinear comparisons revealed macrosynteny between sex chromosomes and the corresponding autosomes between these two lineages. By contrast, no syntenic segments were found to be shared between poplar's and willow's sex chromosomes. Syntenic analysis also revealed substantial chromosome rearrangements between willow's alternate sex chromatids. Since willow and poplar originate from a common ancestor, we proposed that evolution of autosomes into sex chromosomes in these two lineages occurred after their divergence. Results of this study indicate that sex chromosomes in Salicaceae are still at the early stage of evolutionary divergence. Additionally, this study provided valuable information for better understanding the genetics and evolution of sex chromosome in dioecious plants.

  16. Variable Nitrogen Fixation in Wild Populus

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Sharon L.; Sher, Andrew W.; Fleck, Neil D.; Khorasani, Mahsa; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Khan, Zareen; Ko, Andrew W. K.; Kim, Soo-Hyung; DeLuca, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiome of plants is diverse, and like that of animals, is important for overall health and nutrient acquisition. In legumes and actinorhizal plants, a portion of essential nitrogen (N) is obtained through symbiosis with nodule-inhabiting, N2-fixing microorganisms. However, a variety of non-nodulating plant species can also thrive in natural, low-N settings. Some of these species may rely on endophytes, microorganisms that live within plants, to fix N2 gas into usable forms. Here we report the first direct evidence of N2 fixation in the early successional wild tree, Populus trichocarpa, a non-leguminous tree, from its native riparian habitat. In order to measure N2 fixation, surface-sterilized cuttings of wild poplar were assayed using both 15N2 incorporation and the commonly used acetylene reduction assay. The 15N label was incorporated at high levels in a subset of cuttings, suggesting a high level of N-fixation. Similarly, acetylene was reduced to ethylene in some samples. The microbiota of the cuttings was highly variable, both in numbers of cultured bacteria and in genetic diversity. Our results indicated that associative N2-fixation occurred within wild poplar and that a non-uniformity in the distribution of endophytic bacteria may explain the variability in N-fixation activity. These results point to the need for molecular studies to decipher the required microbial consortia and conditions for effective endophytic N2-fixation in trees. PMID:27196608

  17. Variable Nitrogen Fixation in Wild Populus.

    PubMed

    Doty, Sharon L; Sher, Andrew W; Fleck, Neil D; Khorasani, Mahsa; Bumgarner, Roger E; Khan, Zareen; Ko, Andrew W K; Kim, Soo-Hyung; DeLuca, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    The microbiome of plants is diverse, and like that of animals, is important for overall health and nutrient acquisition. In legumes and actinorhizal plants, a portion of essential nitrogen (N) is obtained through symbiosis with nodule-inhabiting, N2-fixing microorganisms. However, a variety of non-nodulating plant species can also thrive in natural, low-N settings. Some of these species may rely on endophytes, microorganisms that live within plants, to fix N2 gas into usable forms. Here we report the first direct evidence of N2 fixation in the early successional wild tree, Populus trichocarpa, a non-leguminous tree, from its native riparian habitat. In order to measure N2 fixation, surface-sterilized cuttings of wild poplar were assayed using both 15N2 incorporation and the commonly used acetylene reduction assay. The 15N label was incorporated at high levels in a subset of cuttings, suggesting a high level of N-fixation. Similarly, acetylene was reduced to ethylene in some samples. The microbiota of the cuttings was highly variable, both in numbers of cultured bacteria and in genetic diversity. Our results indicated that associative N2-fixation occurred within wild poplar and that a non-uniformity in the distribution of endophytic bacteria may explain the variability in N-fixation activity. These results point to the need for molecular studies to decipher the required microbial consortia and conditions for effective endophytic N2-fixation in trees.

  18. Comparative nucleotide diversity across North American and European populus species.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mohamed; Soolanayakanahally, Raju Y; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Guy, Robert D; Jansson, Stefan; Silim, Salim N; El-Kassaby, Yousry A

    2012-06-01

    Nucleotide polymorphisms in two North American balsam poplars (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray and P. balsamifera L.; section Tacamahaca), and one Eurasian aspen (P. tremula L.; section Populus) were compared using nine loci involved in defense, stress response, photoperiodism, freezing tolerance, and housekeeping. Nucleotide diversity varied among species and was highest for P. tremula (θ(w) = 0.005, π(T) = 0.007) as compared to P. balsamifera (θ(w) = 0.004, π(T) = 0.005) or P. trichocarpa (θ(w) = 0.002, π(T) = 0.003). Across species, the defense and the stress response loci accounted for the majority of the observed level of nucleotide diversity. In general, the studied loci did not deviate from neutral expectation either at the individual locus (non-significant normalized Fay and Wu's H) or at the multi-locus level (non-significant HKA test). Using molecular clock analysis, section Tacamahaca probably shared a common ancestor with section Populus approximately 4.5 million year ago. Divergence between the two closely related balsam poplars was about 0.8 million years ago, a pattern consistent with an isolation-with-migration (IM) model. As expected, P. tremula showed a five-fold higher substitution rate (2 × 10(-8) substitution/site/year) compared to the North American species (0.4 × 10(-8) substitution/site/year), probably reflecting its complex demographic history. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) varied among species with a more rapid decay in the North American species (<400 bp) in comparison to P. tremula (≫400 bp). The similarities in nucleotide diversity pattern and LD decay of the two balsam poplar species likely reflects the recent time of their divergence.

  19. Fitness dynamics within a poplar hybrid zone: I. Prezygotic and postzygotic barriers impacting a native poplar hybrid stand

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Amanda D; MacQuarrie, Chris J K; Gros-Louis, Marie-Claude; Simpson, J Dale; Lamarche, Josyanne; Beardmore, Tannis; Thompson, Stacey L; Tanguay, Philippe; Isabel, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization and introgression are pervasive evolutionary phenomena that provide insight into the selective forces that maintain species boundaries, permit gene flow, and control the direction of evolutionary change. Poplar trees (Populus L.) are well known for their ability to form viable hybrids and maintain their distinct species boundaries despite this interspecific gene flow. We sought to quantify the hybridization dynamics and postzygotic fitness within a hybrid stand of balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera L.), eastern cottonwood (P. deltoides Marsh.), and their natural hybrids to gain insight into the barriers maintaining this stable hybrid zone. We observed asymmetrical hybrid formation with P. deltoides acting as the seed parent, but with subsequent introgression biased toward P. balsamifera. Native hybrids expressed fitness traits intermediate to the parental species and were not universally unfit. That said, native hybrid seedlings were absent from the seedling population, which may indicate additional selective pressures controlling their recruitment. It is imperative that we understand the selective forces maintaining this native hybrid zone in order to quantify the impact of exotic poplar hybrids on this native system. PMID:24967081

  20. Bt-Cry3Aa expression reduces insect damage and improves growth in field-grown hybrid poplar

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We investigated growth and insect resistance in hybrid poplar expressing the cry3Aa gene in two field trials. An initial screening of 502 trees comprising 51 transgenic gene insertion events in four clonal backgrounds (Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides, clones 24-305, 50-197, and 198-434; and P. d...

  1. Antisense down-regulation of 4CL expression alters lignification, tree growth, and saccharification potential of field-grown poplar

    Treesearch

    Steven L. Voelker; Barbara Lachenbruch; Frederick C. Meinzer; Michael Jourdes; Chanyoung Ki; Ann M. Patten; Laurence B. Davin; Norman G. Lewis; Gerald A. Tuskan; Lee Gunter; Stephen R. Decker; Michael J. Selig; Robert Sykes; Michael E. Himmel; Peter Kitin; Olga Shevchenko; Steven H. Strauss

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic down-regulation of the Pt4CL1 gene family encoding 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) has been reported as a means for reducing lignin content in cell walls and increasing overall growth rates, thereby improving feedstock quality for paper and bioethanol production. Using hybrid poplar (Populus tremula...

  2. Effects of nutrient availabiiity on biomass allocation as well as constitutive and rapid induced herbivore resistance in poplar

    Treesearch

    Carolyn Glynn; Daniel A. Herms; Marie Egawa; Robert Hansen; William J. Mattson

    2003-01-01

    Many studies have examined effects of nutrient availability on constitutive herbivore resistance of plants, but few have addressed effects on expression of rapid induced resistance (RIR). We quantified effects of two levels of nutrient availability on growth, biomass allocation, photosynthesis, and constitutive secondary metabolism of black poplar (>i>Populus...

  3. Expression of the poplar Flowering Locus T1 (FT1) gene reduces the generation time in plum (Prunus domestica L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plums normally begin to flower and fruit three to seven years from seed. To shorten this generation time, early flowering plum genotypes were produced by transforming plum hypocotyls with the poplar (Populus trichocarpa) Flowering Locus T1 (PtFT1) gene. Ectopic expression of 35S::PtFT1 induced ear...

  4. Higher photosynthetic capacity from higher latitude: foliar characteristics and gas exchange of southern, central and northern populations of Populus angustifolia.

    PubMed

    Kaluthota, Sobadini; Pearce, David W; Evans, Luke M; Letts, Matthew G; Whitham, Thomas G; Rood, Stewart B

    2015-09-01

    Narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia James) is an obligate riparian poplar that is a foundation species in river valleys along the Rocky Mountains, spanning 16° of latitude from southern Arizona, USA to southern Alberta, Canada. Its current distribution is fragmented, and genetic variation shows regional population structure consistent with the effects of geographic barriers and past climate. It is thus very well-suited for investigating ecophysiological adaptation associated with latitude. In other section Tacamahaca poplar species, genotypes from higher latitudes show evidence of short-season adaptation with foliar traits that contribute to higher photosynthetic capacity. We tested for similar adaptation in three populations of narrowleaf cottonwoods: from Arizona (south), Alberta (north) and Utah, near the centre of the latitudinal distribution. We propagated 20 genotypes from each population in a common garden in Alberta, and measured foliar and physiological traits after 3 years. Leaves of genotypes from the northern population had higher leaf mass per area (LMA), increased nitrogen (N) content and higher carotenoid and chlorophyll content, and these were associated with higher light-saturated net photosynthesis (Asat). In leaves of all populations the majority of stomata were abaxial, with the proportion of abaxial stomata highest in the southern population. Stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration rates were higher in the northern population but water-use efficiency (Asat/gs) and leaf carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) did not differ across the populations. These results (i) establish links between Asat and gs, N, chlorophyll and LMA among populations within this species, (ii) are consistent with the discrimination of populations from prior investigation of genetic variation and (iii) support the concept of latitudinal adaptation, whereby deciduous trees from higher latitudes display higher photosynthetic capacity, possibly compensating for a

  5. The poplar Phi class glutathione transferase: expression, activity and structure of GSTF1

    PubMed Central

    Pégeot, Henri; Koh, Cha San; Petre, Benjamin; Mathiot, Sandrine; Duplessis, Sébastien; Hecker, Arnaud; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes with essential roles in cellular detoxification and secondary metabolism in plants as in other organisms. Several plant GSTs, including those of the Phi class (GSTFs), require a conserved catalytic serine residue to perform glutathione (GSH)-conjugation reactions. Genomic analyses revealed that terrestrial plants have around ten GSTFs, eight in the Populus trichocarpa genome, but their physiological functions and substrates are mostly unknown. Transcript expression analyses showed a predominant expression of all genes both in reproductive (female flowers, fruits, floral buds) and vegetative organs (leaves, petioles). Here, we show that the recombinant poplar GSTF1 (PttGSTF1) possesses peroxidase activity toward cumene hydroperoxide and GSH-conjugation activity toward model substrates such as 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, benzyl and phenetyl isothiocyanate, 4-nitrophenyl butyrate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal but interestingly not on previously identified GSTF-class substrates. In accordance with analytical gel filtration data, crystal structure of PttGSTF1 showed a canonical dimeric organization with bound GSH or 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid molecules. The structure of these protein-substrate complexes allowed delineating the residues contributing to both the G and H sites that form the active site cavity. In sum, the presence of GSTF1 transcripts and proteins in most poplar organs especially those rich in secondary metabolites such as flowers and fruits, together with its GSH-conjugation activity and its documented stress-responsive expression suggest that its function is associated with the catalytic transformation of metabolites and/or peroxide removal rather than with ligandin properties as previously reported for other GSTFs. PMID:25566286

  6. Genome Survey and Characterization of Endophytic Bacteria Exhibiting a Beneficial Effect on Growth and Development of Poplar Trees ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Garafola, Craig; Monchy, Sébastien; Newman, Lee; Hoffman, Adam; Weyens, Nele; Barac, Tanja; Vangronsveld, Jaco; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The association of endophytic bacteria with their plant hosts has a beneficial effect for many different plant species. Our goal is to identify endophytic bacteria that improve the biomass production and the carbon sequestration potential of poplar trees (Populus spp.) when grown in marginal soil and to gain an insight in the mechanisms underlying plant growth promotion. Members of the Gammaproteobacteria dominated a collection of 78 bacterial endophytes isolated from poplar and willow trees. As representatives for the dominant genera of endophytic gammaproteobacteria, we selected Enterobacter sp. strain 638, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia R551-3, Pseudomonas putida W619, and Serratia proteamaculans 568 for genome sequencing and analysis of their plant growth-promoting effects, including root development. Derivatives of these endophytes, labeled with gfp, were also used to study the colonization of their poplar hosts. In greenhouse studies, poplar cuttings (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra DN-34) inoculated with Enterobacter sp. strain 638 repeatedly showed the highest increase in biomass production compared to cuttings of noninoculated control plants. Sequence data combined with the analysis of their metabolic properties resulted in the identification of many putative mechanisms, including carbon source utilization, that help these endophytes to thrive within a plant environment and to potentially affect the growth and development of their plant hosts. Understanding the interactions between endophytic bacteria and their host plants should ultimately result in the design of strategies for improved poplar biomass production on marginal soils as a feedstock for biofuels. PMID:19060168

  7. Genome survey and characterization of endophytic bacteria exhibiting a beneficial effect on growth and development of poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Garafola, Craig; Monchy, Sébastien; Newman, Lee; Hoffman, Adam; Weyens, Nele; Barac, Tanja; Vangronsveld, Jaco; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    The association of endophytic bacteria with their plant hosts has a beneficial effect for many different plant species. Our goal is to identify endophytic bacteria that improve the biomass production and the carbon sequestration potential of poplar trees (Populus spp.) when grown in marginal soil and to gain an insight in the mechanisms underlying plant growth promotion. Members of the Gammaproteobacteria dominated a collection of 78 bacterial endophytes isolated from poplar and willow trees. As representatives for the dominant genera of endophytic gammaproteobacteria, we selected Enterobacter sp. strain 638, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia R551-3, Pseudomonas putida W619, and Serratia proteamaculans 568 for genome sequencing and analysis of their plant growth-promoting effects, including root development. Derivatives of these endophytes, labeled with gfp, were also used to study the colonization of their poplar hosts. In greenhouse studies, poplar cuttings (Populus deltoides x Populus nigra DN-34) inoculated with Enterobacter sp. strain 638 repeatedly showed the highest increase in biomass production compared to cuttings of noninoculated control plants. Sequence data combined with the analysis of their metabolic properties resulted in the identification of many putative mechanisms, including carbon source utilization, that help these endophytes to thrive within a plant environment and to potentially affect the growth and development of their plant hosts. Understanding the interactions between endophytic bacteria and their host plants should ultimately result in the design of strategies for improved poplar biomass production on marginal soils as a feedstock for biofuels.

  8. A heterogeneous boron distribution in soil influences the poplar root system architecture development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, R.; Robinson, B. H.; Hartmann, S.; Lehmann, E.; Schulin, R.

    2009-04-01

    Poplars are well suited for the phytomanagement of boron (B)-contaminated sites, due to their high transpiration rate and tolerance to elevated soil B concentrations. However, the uptake and the fate of B in poplar stands are not well understood. This information is crucial to improve the design of phytomanagement systems, where the primary role of poplars is to reduce B leaching by reducing the water flux through the contaminated material. Like other trace elements, B occurs heterogeneously in soils. Concentrations can differ up to an order of magnitude within centimetres. These gradients affect plant root growth and thus via preferential flow along the roots water and mass transport in soils to ground and surface waters. Generally there are three possible reactions of plant roots to patches with elevated trace element concentrations in soils: indifference, avoidance, or foraging. While avoidance or indifference might seem to be the most obvious strategies, foraging cannot be excluded a priori, because of the high demand of poplars for B compared to other tree species. We aimed to determine the rooting strategies of poplars in soils where B is either homo- or heterogeneously distributed. We planted 5 cm cuttings of Populus tremula var. Birmensdorf clones in aluminum (Al) containers with internal dimensions of 64 x 67 x 1.2 cm. The soil used was subsoil from northern Switzerland with a naturally low B and organic C concentration. We setup two treatments and a control with three replicates each. We spiked a bigger and a smaller portion of the soil with the same amount of B(OH)3-salt, in order to obtain soil concentrations of 7.5 mg B kg-1 and 20 mg B kg-1. We filled the containers with (a) un-spiked soil, (b) the 7.5 mg B kg-1 soil and (c) heterogeneously. The heterogeneous treatment consisted of one third 20 mg B kg-1 soil and two thirds control soil. We grew the poplars in a small greenhouse over 2 months and from then on in a climate chamber for another 3 months

  9. Overexpression of poplar wounding-inducible genes in Arabidopsis caused improved resistance against Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rongfeng; Wang, Jiehua; Ji, Yan; Song, Yingjin; Yang, Shaohui

    2012-01-01

    Four highly inducible genes of poplar trees, PtdKTI5, PtdWIN4, PtdPOP3 from hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa × P. deltoides) and PtKTI2 from trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) have been individually transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana for overexpression. High transcriptional level of each transgene in transgenic Arabidopsis lines was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. The development, body weight and survivorship of cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera) fed on four types of transgenic Arabidopis plants were evaluated in the laboratory. Our data indicated that these four Populus defense-related genes exhibited various degree of insectital activity on larval and postlarval development of cotton bollworm and may be utilized for herbivore resistance improvement in plant genetic engineering. PMID:23226090

  10. Some important physical properties of laminated veneer lumber (Lvl) made from oriental beech and Lombardy poplar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıç, Murat

    2012-09-01

    This study examined some physical characteristics of laminated veneer lumber (LVL) obtained in different compositions from cut veneers of Oriental beech (Fagus Orientalis Lipsky) and Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra) with thicknesses of 4 mm and 5 mm. Five each beech and poplar trees were felled with this objective. The PVAc (Kleiberit 303) and PU (Bizon Timber PU-Max Express) types of adhesive were used in lamination. The air-dry and oven dry densities, cell wall density and porosity, the value of volume density, shrinkage in a tangential and radial direction and volume swelling amounts were determined by preparing the specimens in accordance with the standards.

  11. Functional repression of PtSND2 represses growth and development by disturbing auxin biosynthesis, transport and signaling in transgenic poplar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haihai; Tang, Renjie; Wang, Cuiting; Qi, Qi; Gai, Ying; Jiang, Xiangning; Zhang, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Using chimeric repressor silencing technology, we previously reported that functional repression of PtSND2 severely arrested wood formation in transgenic poplar (Populus). Here, we provide further evidence that auxin biosynthesis, transport and signaling were disturbed in these transgenic plants, leading to pleiotropic defects in their growth patterns, including inhibited leaf enlargement and vascular tissue development in the leaf central vein, suppressed cambial growth and fiber elongation in the stem, and arrested growth in the root system. Two transgenic lines, which displayed the most remarkable phenotypic deviation from the wild-type, were selected for detailed studies. In both transgenic lines, expression of genes for auxin biosynthesis, transport and signaling was down-regulated, and indole-3-acetic acid distribution was severely disturbed in the apical buds, leaves, stems and roots of field-grown transgenic plants. Transient transcription dual-luciferase assays of ProPtTYDC2::LUC, ProPttLAX2::LUC and ProPoptrIAA20.2::LUC in poplar protoplasts revealed that expression of auxin-related genes might be regulated by PtSND2 at the transcriptional level. All these results indicate that functional repression of PtSND2 altered auxin biosynthesis, transport and signaling, and thereby disturbed the normal growth and development of transgenic plants. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Intra- and inter-annual variation of Cd, Zn, Mn and Cu in foliage of poplars on contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lettens, S; Vandecasteele, B; De Vos, B; Vansteenkiste, D; Verschelde, P

    2011-05-01

    The uptake of trace metals in the leaves of fast-growing woody species is a crucial factor in ecological risk assessment and in the evaluation of phytoextraction potentials. In this study, we present a long-term data series of foliar Cd, Zn, Mn and Cu concentrations in poplar (Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides). Leaves were collected every three weeks from 2001 until 2007 on three sites, (i) a new plantation on an alluvial soil polluted by river sediments, (ii) a new plantation on an unpolluted soil and (iii) a 10-year old plantation on a polluted dredged sediment soil. In addition, tree rings were measured on the alluvial soil in order to better assess growth over the past seven years. Foliar concentrations of Cd, Zn and Mn decreased considerably with time in the new plantation on polluted soil. Concentrations of Zn and Mn decreased in the new plantation on unpolluted soil as well. The older plantation on polluted soil did not show changes in foliar concentrations for Cd, Zn or Mn. Foliar Cu concentrations slightly increased for all sites. Within one growing season, foliar concentrations of Cd, Zn, Cu and Mn increased towards the end of the season. The tree ring data of the poplars on the alluvial soil indicated a strong decrease in growth due to declining tree condition from 2005 onwards, the same year that foliar Cd and Zn concentrations markedly decreased. Lower transpiration rates probably induced a lower uptake of dissolved trace metals. It is concluded that stand health and growth rate have a strong impact on the variation of foliar trace metal concentrations over time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from hybrid poplar depend on CO2 concentration and genotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eller, A. S.; de Gouw, J. A.; Monson, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    Hybrid poplar is a fast-growing tree species that is likely to be an important source of biomass for the production of cellulose-based biofuels and may influence regional atmospheric chemistry through the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We used proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry to measure VOC emissions from the leaves of four different hybrid poplar genotypes grown under ambient (400 ppm) and elevated (650 ppm) carbon dioxide concentration (CO2). The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether VOC emissions are different among genotypes and whether these emissions are likely to change as atmospheric CO2 rises. Methanol and isoprene made up over 90% of the VOC emissions and were strongly dependent on leaf age, with young leaves producing primarily methanol and switching to isoprene production as they matured. Monoterpene emissions were small, but tended to be higher in young leaves. Plants grown under elevated CO2 emitted smaller quantities of both methanol and isoprene, but the magnitude of the effect was dependent on genotype. Isoprene emission rates from mature leaves dropped from ~35 to ~28 nmol m-2 s-1 when plants were grown under elevated CO2. Emissions from individuals grown under ambient CO2 varied more based on genotype than those grown under elevated CO2, which means that we might expect smaller differences between genotypes in the future. Genotype and CO2 also affected how much carbon (C) individuals allocated to the production of VOCs. The emission rate of C from VOCs was 0.5 - 2% of the rate at which C was assimilated via net photosynthesis. The % C emitted was strongly related to genotype; clones from crosses between Populus deltoides and P. trichocarpa (T x D) allocated a greater % of their C to VOC emissions than clones from crosses of P. deltoids and P. nigra (D x N). Individuals from all four genotypes allocated a smaller % of their C to the emission of VOCs when they were grown under elevated CO2. These results

  14. Cytokinin signaling regulates cambial development in poplar.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Immanen, Juha; Laxell, Marjukka; Kauppinen, Leila; Tarkowski, Petr; Dolezal, Karel; Tähtiharju, Sari; Elo, Annakaisa; Decourteix, Mélanie; Ljung, Karin; Bhalerao, Rishikesh; Keinonen, Kaija; Albert, Victor A; Helariutta, Ykä

    2008-12-16

    Although a substantial proportion of plant biomass originates from the activity of vascular cambium, the molecular basis of radial plant growth is still largely unknown. To address whether cytokinins are required for cambial activity, we studied cytokinin signaling across the cambial zones of 2 tree species, poplar (Populus trichocarpa) and birch (Betula pendula). We observed an expression peak for genes encoding cytokinin receptors in the dividing cambial cells. We reduced cytokinin levels endogenously by engineering transgenic poplar trees (P. tremula x tremuloides) to express a cytokinin catabolic gene, Arabidopsis CYTOKININ OXIDASE 2, under the promoter of a birch CYTOKININ RECEPTOR 1 gene. Transgenic trees showed reduced concentration of a biologically active cytokinin, correlating with impaired cytokinin responsiveness. In these trees, both apical and radial growth was compromised. However, radial growth was more affected, as illustrated by a thinner stem diameter than in WT at same height. To dissect radial from apical growth inhibition, we performed a reciprocal grafting experiment. WT scion outgrew the diameter of transgenic stock, implicating cytokinin activity as a direct determinant of radial growth. The reduced radial growth correlated with a reduced number of cambial cell layers. Moreover, expression of a cytokinin primary response gene was dramatically reduced in the thin-stemmed transgenic trees. Thus, a reduced level of cytokinin signaling is the primary basis for the impaired cambial growth observed. Together, our results show that cytokinins are major hormonal regulators required for cambial development.

  15. Genome-wide identification and characterization of the Populus WRKY transcription factor family and analysis of their expression in response to biotic and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuanzhong; Duan, Yanjiao; Yin, Jia; Ye, Shenglong; Zhu, Jingru; Zhang, Faqi; Lu, Wanxiang; Fan, Di; Luo, Keming

    2014-12-01

    WRKY proteins are a large family of regulators involved in various developmental and physiological processes, especially in coping with diverse biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, 100 putative PtrWRKY genes encoded the proteins contained in the complete WRKY domain in Populus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the members of this superfamily among poplar, Arabidopsis, and other species were divided into three groups with several subgroups based on the structures of the WRKY protein sequences. Various cis-acting elements related to stress and defence responses were found in the promoter regions of PtrWRKY genes by promoter analysis. High-throughput transcriptomic analyses identified that 61 of the PtrWRKY genes were induced by biotic and abiotic treatments, such as Marssonina brunnea, salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA), wounding, cold, and salinity. Among these PtrWRKY genes, transcripts of 46 selected genes were observed in different tissues, including roots, stems, and leaves. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis further confirmed the induced expression of 18 PtrWRKY genes by one or more stress treatments. The overexpression of an SA-inducible gene, PtrWRKY89, accelerated expression of PR protein genes and improved resistance to pathogens in transgenic poplar, suggesting that PtrWRKY89 is a regulator of an SA-dependent defence-signalling pathway in poplar. Taken together, our results provided significant information for improving the resistance and stress tolerance of woody plants. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. Relocation, high-latitude warming and host genetic identity shape the foliar fungal microbiome of poplars.

    PubMed

    Bálint, Miklós; Bartha, László; O'Hara, Robert B; Olson, Matthew S; Otte, Jürgen; Pfenninger, Markus; Robertson, Amanda L; Tiffin, Peter; Schmitt, Imke

    2015-01-01

    Micro-organisms associated with plants and animals affect host fitness, shape community structure and influence ecosystem properties. Climate change is expected to influence microbial communities, but their reactions are not well understood. Host-associated micro-organisms are influenced by the climate reactions of their hosts, which may undergo range shifts due to climatic niche tracking, or may be actively relocated to mitigate the effects of climate change. We used a common-garden experiment and rDNA metabarcoding to examine the effect of host relocation and high-latitude warming on the complex fungal endophytic microbiome associated with leaves of an ecologically dominant boreal forest tree (Populus balsamifera L.). We also considered the potential effects of poplar genetic identity in defining the reactions of the microbiome to the treatments. The relocation of hosts to the north increased the diversity of the microbiome and influenced its structure, with results indicating enemy release from plausible pathogens. High-latitude warming decreased microbiome diversity in comparison with natural northern conditions. The warming also caused structural changes, which made the fungal communities distinct in comparison with both low-latitude and high-latitude natural communities, and increased the abundance of plausible pathogens. The reactions of the microbiome to relocation and warming were strongly dependent on host genetic identity. This suggests that climate change effects on host-microbiome systems may be mediated by the interaction of environmental factors and the population genetic processes of the hosts.

  17. Trade-offs between biomass growth and inducible biosynthesis of polyhydroxybutyrate in transgenic poplar.

    PubMed

    Dalton, David A; Ma, Cathleen; Shrestha, Shreya; Kitin, Peter; Strauss, Steven H

    2011-09-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a bioplastic that can be produced in transgenic plants by the coexpression of three bacterial genes for its biosynthesis. PHB yields from plants have been constrained by the negative impacts on plant health that result from diversion of resources into PHB production; thus, we employed an ecdysone analogue-based system for induced gene expression. We characterized 49 insertion events in hybrid transgenic poplar (Populus tremula x alba) that were produced using Agrobacterium transformation and studied two high-producing events in detail. Regenerated plants contained up to 1-2% PHB (dry weight) in leaves after 6-8 weeks of induction. Strong induction was observed with 1-10 mm Intrepid and limited direct toxicity observed. Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize PHB granules in chloroplasts after chemical treatment to reduce autofluorescence. A greenhouse study indicated that there were no negative consequences of PHB production on growth unless the PHB content exceeded 1% of leaf weight; at PHB levels above 1%, growth (height, diameter and total mass) decreased by 10%-34%. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Exploiting Natural Variation to Uncover an Alkene Biosynthetic Enzyme in Poplar[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    La Mantia, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Alkenes are linear hydrocarbons with one or more double bonds. Despite their potential as biofuels and precursors for specialty chemicals, the underlying biochemistry and genetics of alkene biosynthesis in plants remain elusive. Here, we report on a screen of natural accessions of poplar (Populus trichocarpa), revealing that the leaf cuticular waxes are predominantly composed of alkanes and alkenes. Interestingly, the accumulation of alkenes increases with leaf development, is limited to the abaxial side of the leaf, and is impaired in a few accessions. Among other genes, a β-ketoacyl CoA synthase gene (PotriKCS1) was downregulated in leaves from non-alkene-producing accessions. We demonstrated biochemically that PotriKCS1 elongates monounsaturated fatty acids and is responsible for the recruitment of unsaturated substrates to the cuticular wax. Moreover, we found significant associations between the presence of alkenes and tree growth and resistance to leaf spot. These findings highlight the crucial role of cuticular waxes as the first point of contact with the environment, and they provide a foundation for engineering long-chain monounsaturated oils in other species. PMID:28729404

  19. The SUPERMAN gene family in Populus: nucleotide diversity and gene expression in a dioecious plant.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuepeng; Ma, Kaifeng; Ci, Dong; Tian, Xueyuan; Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2013-08-01

    SUP gene family expression and regulation patterns reported in dioecious woody plant. Phylogenetic and nucleotide diversity analysis indicated PtoSUP1 is highly conserved and has undergone strong purifying selection. The molecular basis of SUPERMAN (SUP) regulation during floral development in monoecious plants has been extensively studied, but little is known of the SUP gene family in dioecious woody plants. In this study, we systematically examined the diversification of the SUP gene family in Populus, integrating genomic organization, expression, and phylogeny data. SUP family members showed sex-specific expression throughout flower development. Transcript profiling of rare gynomonoecious poplar flowers revealed that a significant reduction in PtoSUP1 mRNA might be important for stamen development in gynomonoecious poplar flowers. We found that the coding regions of Populus SUP genes are very highly conserved and that synonymous sites in exon regions have undergone strong purifying selection during SUP evolution in Populus. These results indicate that SUP genes play an important role in floral development of dioecious plants. Expression analysis of SUP suggested possible regulatory mechanisms for gynomonoecious poplar flower development. These findings provide an important insight into the mechanisms of the evolution of SUP function and may help enable engineered regulation of flower development for breeding improved tree varieties.

  20. Isoprene emission-free poplars--a chance to reduce the impact from poplar plantations on the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Behnke, Katja; Grote, Rüdiger; Brüggemann, Nicolas; Zimmer, Ina; Zhou, Guanwu; Elobeid, Mudawi; Janz, Dennis; Polle, Andrea; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter

    2012-04-01

    • Depending on the atmospheric composition, isoprene emissions from plants can have a severe impact on air quality and regional climate. For the plant itself, isoprene can enhance stress tolerance and also interfere with the attraction of herbivores and parasitoids. • Here, we tested the growth performance and fitness of Populus × canescens in which isoprene emission had been knocked down by RNA interference technology (PcISPS-RNAi plants) for two growing seasons under outdoor conditions. • Neither the growth nor biomass yield of the PcISPS-RNAi poplars was impaired, and they were even temporarily enhanced compared with control poplars. Modelling of the annual carbon balances revealed a reduced carbon loss of 2.2% of the total gross primary production by the absence of isoprene emission, and a 6.9% enhanced net growth of PcISPS-RNAi poplars. However, the knock down in isoprene emission resulted in reduced susceptibility to fungal infection, whereas the attractiveness for herbivores was enhanced. • The present study promises potential for the use of non- or low-isoprene-emitting poplars for more sustainable and environmentally friendly biomass production, as reducing isoprene emission will presumably have positive effects on regional climate and air quality.

  1. Effect of applying an arsenic-resistant and plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium to enhance soil arsenic phytoremediation by Populus deltoides LH05-17.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Xiong, D; Zhao, P; Yu, X; Tu, B; Wang, G

    2011-11-01

    Bioremediation of highly arsenic (As)-contaminated soil is difficult because As is very toxic for plants and micro-organisms. The aim of this study was to investigate soil arsenic removal effects using poplar in combination with the inoculation of a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). A rhizobacterium D14 was isolated and identified within Agrobacterium radiobacter. This strain was highly resistant to arsenic and produced indole acetic acid and siderophore. Greenhouse pot bioremediation experiments were performed for 5 months using poplar (Populus deltoides LH05-17) grown on As-amended soils, inoculated with strain D14. The results showed that P. deltoides was an efficient arsenic accumulator; however, high As concentrations (150 and 300 mg kg(-1)) inhibited its growth. With the bacterial inoculation, in the 300 mg kg(-1) As-amended soils, 54% As in the soil was removed, which was higher than the uninoculated treatments (43%), and As concentrations in roots, stems and leaves were significantly increased by 229, 113 and 291%, respectively. In addition, the As translocation ratio [(stems + leaves)/roots = 0·8] was significantly higher than the uninoculated treatments (0·5). About 45% As was translocated from roots to the above-ground tissues. The plant height and dry weight of roots, stems and leaves were all enhanced; the contents of chlorophyll and soluble sugar, and the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were all increased; and the content of a toxic compound malondialdehyde was decreased. The results indicated that the inoculation of strain D14 could contribute to the increase in the As tolerance of P. deltoides, promotion of the growth, increase in the uptake efficiency and enhancement of As translocation. The use of P. deltoides in combination with the inoculation of strain D14 provides a potential application for efficient soil arsenic bioremediation. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology ©2011 The Society for Applied

  2. Genetic variation of the bud and leaf phenology of seventeen poplar clones in a short rotation coppice culture.

    PubMed

    Pellis, A; Laureysens, I; Ceulemans, R

    2004-01-01

    Leaf phenology of 17 poplar ( Populus spp.) clones, encompassing spring phenology, length of growth period and end-of-year phenology, was examined over several years of different rotations. The 17 poplar clones differed in their latitude of origin (45 degrees 30'N to 51 degrees N) and were studied on a short rotation experimental field plantation, situated in Boom (province of Antwerpen, Belgium; 51 degrees 05'N, 04 degrees 22'E). A similar, clear pattern of bud burst was observed during the different years of study for all clones. Clones Columbia River, Fritzi Pauley, Trichobel (Populus trichocarpa) and Balsam Spire (Populus trichocarpa x Populus balsamifera) from 45 degrees 30'N to 49 degrees N reached bud burst (expressed as day of the year or degree day sums) almost every year earlier than clones Wolterson (Populus nigra), Gaver, Gibecq and Primo (Populus deltoides x Populus nigra) (50 degrees N to 51 degrees N). This observation could not be generalised to end-of-season phenology, for which a yearly returning pattern for all clones was lacking. Late bud burst and early leaf fall of some clones (Beaupré, Boelare, IBW1, IBW2, IBW3) was brought about by increasing rust incidence during the years of observation. For these clones, the variability in leaf phenology was reflected in high coefficients of variation among years. The patterns of genetic variation in leaf phenology have implications for short rotation intensive culture forestry and management of natural populations. Moreover, the variation in phenology reported here is relevant with regard to the genetic mapping of poplar.

  3. Natural acetylation impacts carbohydrate recovery during deconstruction of Populus trichocarpa wood

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Amanda M.; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; ...

    2017-02-23

    Significant variation in the inherent degree of acetylation naturally exists in the xylem cell walls of Populus trichocarpa. During pretreatment, endogenous acetate hydrolyzes to acetic acid that can subsequently catalyze the breakdown of poplar wood, increasing the efficiency of biomass pretreatment. Poplar genotypes varying in cell wall composition were pretreated in 0.3% H2SO4 in non-isothermal batch reactors. Acetic acid released from the wood was positively related to sugar release during pretreatment (R ≥ 0.9), and inversely proportional to the lignin content of the poplar wood (R = 0.6). There is significant variation in wood chemistry among P. trichocarpa genotypes. Asmore » a result, this study elucidated patterns of cell wall deconstruction and clearly links carbohydrate solubilization to acetate release. Tailoring biomass feedstocks for acetate release could enhance pretreatment efficiencies.« less

  4. Hydrolyzable tannins as "quantitative defenses": limited impact against Lymantria dispar caterpillars on hybrid poplar.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, Raymond V; Jaros, Adam; Lee, Grace; Mozola, Cara; Weir, Quentin; Salminen, Juha-Pekka

    2009-04-01

    The high levels of tannins in many tree leaves are believed to cause decreased insect performance, but few controlled studies have been done. This study tested the hypothesis that higher foliar tannin levels produce higher concentrations of semiquinone radicals (from tannin oxidation) in caterpillar midguts, and that elevated levels of radicals are associated with increased oxidative stress in midgut tissues and decreased larval performance. The tannin-free leaves of hybrid poplar (Populus tremulaxP. alba) were treated with hydrolyzable tannins, producing concentrations of 0%, 7.5% or 15% dry weight, and fed to Lymantria dispar caterpillars. As expected, larvae that ingested control leaves contained no measurable semiquinone radicals in the midgut, those that ingested 7.5% hydrolyzable tannin contained low levels of semiquinone radicals, and those that ingested 15% tannin contained greatly increased levels of semiquinone radicals. Ingested hydrolyzable tannins were also partially hydrolyzed in the midgut. However, increased levels of semiquinone radicals in the midgut were not associated with oxidative stress in midgut tissues. Instead, it appears that tannin consumption was associated with increased metabolic costs, as measured by the decreased efficiency of conversion of digested matter to body mass (ECD). Decreased ECD, in turn, decreased the overall efficiency of conversion of ingested matter to body mass (ECI). Contrary to our hypothesis, L. dispar larvae were able to maintain similar growth rates across all tannin treatment levels, in part, because of compensatory feeding. We conclude that hydrolyzable tannins act as "quantitative defenses" in the sense that high levels appear to be necessary to increase levels of semiquinone radicals in the midguts of caterpillars. However, these putative resistance factors are not sufficient to decrease the performance of tannin-tolerant caterpillars such as L. dispar.

  5. Environmental benefits of poplar culture

    Treesearch

    J. G. Isebrands; D.F. Karnosky.

    2001-01-01

    Poplars have important values above and beyond wood or fiber production. Poplars have been planted for environmental purposes for centuries. There are reports of poplar plantings dating back to early Chinese history and biblical times in the Middle East, When immigrants came to North America in the 18th and 19th century, they often brought cuttings of their favorite...

  6. PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 affects reactive oxygen species metabolism, cell wall and wood properties in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. × tremuloides).

    PubMed

    Ślesak, Ireneusz; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Fedak, Halina; Sidoruk, Natalia; Dąbrowska-Bronk, Joanna; Witoń, Damian; Rusaczonek, Anna; Antczak, Andrzej; Drożdżek, Michał; Karpińska, Barbara; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-07-01

    The phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4) gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPAD4) is involved in the regulation of plant--pathogen interactions. The role of PAD4 in woody plants is not known; therefore, we characterized its function in hybrid aspen and its role in reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent signalling and wood development. Three independent transgenic lines with different suppression levels of poplar PAD expression were generated. All these lines displayed deregulated ROS metabolism, which was manifested by an increased H2O2 level in the leaves and shoots, and higher activities of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase (CAT) in the leaves in comparison to the wild-type plants. However, no changes in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) between the transgenic lines and wild type were observed in the leaves. Moreover, changes in the ROS metabolism in the pad4 transgenic lines positively correlated with wood formation. A higher rate of cell division, decreased tracheid average size and numbers, and increased cell wall thickness were observed. The results presented here suggest that the Populus tremula × tremuloides PAD gene might be involved in the regulation of cellular ROS homeostasis and in the cell division--cell death balance that is associated with wood development.

  7. Male poplars have a stronger ability to balance growth and carbohydrate accumulation than do females in response to a short-term potassium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanni; Jiang, Hao; Wang, Maolin; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2015-12-01

    Potassium (K) deficiency influences plant performance, such as ion uptake and carbohydrate transport. However, little is known about differences between males and females in response to K deficiency. In this study, dry matter accumulation, photosynthetic capacity, allocation patterns of K(+) , Na(+) and carbohydrates, and ultrastructural changes in males and females of Populus cathayana exposed to K deficiency were investigated. The results indicated that males maintained a significantly higher K(+) content and K(+) /Na(+) ratio in leaves and stems than did females under K deficiency. Moreover, K deficiency significantly increased the sucrose content of females, whereas no significant effect on males was detected. In addition, a comparative analysis showed that males allocated more resources to roots, while females allocated more to leaves, which resulted in sexually different root/shoot (R/S) ratios. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observations showed that males suffered fewer injuries than did females. These results suggested that males have a better ability to cope with K deficiency. In addition, the combined effects of salinity and K deficiency on poplars were studied. The results indicated that salt stress aggravates the negative effects caused by K deficiency. Taken together, our study provided evidence for gender-specific strategies in ion and carbohydrate allocation in poplars exposed to a short-term K deficiency. In leaves and stems, the lower K(+) accumulation inhibited sucrose translocation and resulted in a decreased R/S ratio, which may contribute to males having a stronger ability to balance growth and carbohydrate accumulation when compared with females. © 2015 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  8. Populus euphratica HSF binds the promoter of WRKY1 to enhance salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zedan; Yao, Jun; Sun, Jian; Chang, Liwei; Wang, Shaojie; Ding, Mingquan; Qian, Zeyong; Zhang, Huilong; Zhao, Nan; Sa, Gang; Hou, Peichen; Lang, Tao; Wang, Feifei; Zhao, Rui; Shen, Xin; Chen, Shaoliang

    2015-06-01

    Poplar species increase expressions of transcription factors to deal with salt environments. We assessed the salt-induced transcriptional responses of heat-shock transcription factor (HSF) and WRKY1 in Populus euphratica, and their roles in salt tolerance. High NaCl (200mM) induced PeHSF and PeWRKY1 expressions in P. euphratica, with a rapid rise in roots than in leaves. Moreover, the salt-elicited PeHSF reached its peak level 6h earlier than PeWRKY1 in leaves. PeWRKY1 was down-regulated in salinized P. euphratica when PeHSF was silenced by tobacco rattle virus-based gene silencing. Subcellular assays in onion epidermal cells and Arabidopsis protoplasts revealed that PeHSF and PeWRKY1 were restricted to the nucleus. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing PeWRKY1 showed improved salt tolerance in terms of survival rate, root growth, photosynthesis, and ion fluxes. We further isolated an 1182-bp promoter fragment upstream of the translational start of PeWRKY1 from P. euphratica. Promoter sequence analysis revealed that PeWRKY1 harbours four tandem repeats of heat shock element (HSE) in the upstream regulatory region. Yeast one-hybrid assay showed that PeHSF directly binds the cis-acting HSE. To determine whether the HSE cluster was important for salt-induced PeWRKY1 expression, the promoter-reporter construct PeWRKY1-pro::GUS was transferred to tobacco plants. β-glucuronidase activities increased in root, leaf, and stem tissues under salt stress. Therefore, we conclude that salinity increased PeHSF transcription in P. euphratica, and that PeHSF binds the cis-acting HSE of the PeWRKY1 promoter, thus activating PeWRKY1 expression.

  9. A System for Dosage-Based Functional Genomics in Poplar[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Altering gene dosage through variation in gene copy number is a powerful approach to addressing questions regarding gene regulation, quantitative trait loci, and heterosis, but one that is not easily applied to sexually transmitted species. Elite poplar (Populus spp) varieties are created through interspecific hybridization, followed by clonal propagation. Altered gene dosage relationships are believed to contribute to hybrid performance. Clonal propagation allows for replication and maintenance of meiotically unstable ploidy or structural variants and provides an alternative approach to investigating gene dosage effects not possible in sexually propagated species. Here, we built a genome-wide structural variation system for dosage-based functional genomics and breeding of poplar. We pollinated Populus deltoides with gamma-irradiated Populus nigra pollen to produce >500 F1 seedlings containing dosage lesions in the form of deletions and insertions of chromosomal segments (indel mutations). Using high-precision dosage analysis, we detected indel mutations in ∼55% of the progeny. These indels varied in length, position, and number per individual, cumulatively tiling >99% of the genome, with an average of 10 indels per gene. Combined with future phenotype and transcriptome data, this population will provide an excellent resource for creating and characterizing dosage-based variation in poplar, including the contribution of dosage to quantitative traits and heterosis. PMID:26320226

  10. Molecular linkage maps of the Populus genome.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tongming; Zhang, Xinye; Huang, Minren; Wang, Minxiu; Zhuge, Qiang; Tu, Shengming; Zhu, Li-Huang; Wu, Rongling

    2002-06-01

    We report molecular genetic linkage maps for an interspecific hybrid population of Populus, a model system in forest-tree biology. The hybrids were produced by crosses between P. deltoides (mother) and P. euramericana (father), which is a natural hybrid of P. deltoides (grandmother) and P. nigra (grandfather). Linkage analysis from 93 of the 450 backcross progeny grown in the field for 15 years was performed using random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs), amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), and inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSRs). Of a total of 839 polymorphic markers identified, 560 (67%) were testcross markers heterozygous in one parent but null in the other (segregating 1:1), 206 (25%) were intercross dominant markers heterozygous in both parents (segregating 3:1), and the remaining 73 (9%) were 19 non-parental RAPD markers (segregating 1:1) and 54 codominant AFLP markers (segregating 1:1:1:1). A mixed set of the testcross markers, non-parental RAPD markers, and codominant AFLP markers was used to construct two linkage maps, one based on the P. deltoides (D) genome and the other based on P. euramericana (E). The two maps showed nearly complete coverage of the genome, spanning 3801 and 3452 cM, respectively. The availability of non-parental RAPD and codominant AFLP markers as orthologous genes allowed for a direct comparison of the rate of meiotic recombination between the two different parental species. Generally, the rate of meiotic recombination was greater for males than females in our interspecific poplar hybrids. The confounded effect of sexes and species causes the mean recombination distance of orthologous markers to be 11% longer for the father (P. euramericana; interspecific hybrid) than for the mother (P. deltoides; pure species). The linkage maps constructed and the interspecific poplar hybrid population in which clonal replicates for individual genotypes are available present a comprehensive foundation for future genomic studies and

  11. Study on adsorption and remediation of heavy metals by poplar and larch in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Jia, Youngfeng

    2010-08-01

    Field experiments at the Shenyang Experimental Station of Ecology were conducted to study the adsorption, accumulation, and remediation of heavy metals by poplar and larch grown in artificially contaminated soil. The soil was spiked with a combination of Cd, Cu, and Zn at concentrations of 1.5, 100, and 200 mg.kg(-1), respectively. The results showed that the biomass of poplar (Populus canadensis Moench) was lower by 26.0% in the soil spiked with a mixture of Cd, Cu, and Zn, compared with the control. Concentrations of Cd in poplar leaf and Cu in poplar roots in the treated soil were 4.11 and 14.55 mg kg(-1), respectively, which are much greater than in corresponding controls. The migration of heavy metals in woody plant body was in the order Cd > Zn > Cu. Poplar had higher metal concentrations in aboveground tissues and a higher biomass compared with larch of the same age and therefore is potentially more suitable for remediation. In the heavy metal-polluted soil of this study, phytoremediation by poplar may take 56 and 245 years for Cd and Cu, respectively, for meeting the soil standards of heavy metals, and the corresponding phytoremediation times by larch would take 211 and 438 years. The research findings could be used as a basis to develop ecological engineering technologies for environmental control and remediation of pollution caused by heavy metals in soils.

  12. Isoprene biosynthesis in hybrid poplar impacts ozone tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, K.; Kleist, E.; Uerlings, R.; Wildt, J.; Rennenberg, H.; Schnitzler, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    Isoprene is the most abundant volatile compound emitted by vegetation. It influences air chemistry and is thought to take part in plant defense reactions against abiotic stress such as high temperature or ozone. However, whether or not isoprene emission interacts with ozone tolerance of plants is still in discussion. We exploited transgenic non-isoprene emitting Grey poplar (Populus x canescens) in a biochemical and physiological model study to investigate the effect of acute ozone stress on the elicitation of defense-related emissions of plant volatiles, photosynthesis and the antioxidative system. We recorded that non-isoprene emitting poplars are more resistant to ozone as indicated by less damaged leaf area and higher assimilation rates compared to ozone-exposed wild type plants. The integral of green leaf volatile (GLV) emissions was different between the two poplar phenotypes and a reliable early marker for subsequent leaf damage. For other stress-induced volatiles like mono-, homo-, and sesquiterpenes, and methyl salicylate similar time profiles, pattern and emission intensities were observed in both transgenic and wild type plants. However, un-stressed non-isoprene emitting poplars are characterized by elevated levels of ascorbate and α-tocopherol as well as a more effective de-epoxidation ratio of xanthophylls than in wild type plants. Since ozone quenching properties of ascorbate are much higher than those of isoprene and furthermore α-tocopherol also is an essential antioxidant, non-isoprene emitting poplars might benefit from changes within the antioxidative system by providing them with enhanced ozone tolerance.

  13. Aquaporins and leaf hydraulics: poplar sheds new light.

    PubMed

    Lopez, David; Venisse, Jean-Stéphane; Fumanal, Boris; Chaumont, François; Guillot, Esther; Daniels, Mark J; Cochard, Hervé; Julien, Jean-Louis; Gousset-Dupont, Aurélie

    2013-12-01

    To help understand leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) modulation under high irradiance, well-watered poplars (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray ex Hook and Populus nigra L.) were studied diurnally at molecular and ecophysiological scales. Transcriptional and translational modulations of plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) aquaporins were evaluated in leaf samples during diurnal time courses. Among the 15 poplar PIP genes, a subset of two PIP1s and seven PIP2s are precociously induced within the first hour of the photoperiod concomitantly with a Kleaf increase. Since expression patterns were cyclic and reproducible over several days, we hypothesized that endogenous signals could be involved in PIP transcriptional regulation. To address this question, plants were submitted to forced darkness during their subjective photoperiod and compared with their control counterparts, which showed that some PIP1s and PIP2s have circadian regulation while others did not. Promoter analysis revealed that a large number of hormone, light, stress response and circadian elements are present. Finally, involvement of aquaporins is supported by the reduction of Kleaf by HgCl2 treatment.

  14. Effect of Continuous Cropping Generations on Each Component Biomass of Poplar Seedlings during Different Growth Periods

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jiangbao; Zhang, Shuyong; Li, Tian; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Ronghua; Zhang, Guangcan

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the change rules and response characteristics of growth status on each component of poplar seedling followed by continuous cropping generations and growth period, we clear the biomass distribution pattern of poplar seedling, adapt continuous cropping, and provide theoretical foundation and technical reference on cultivation management of poplar seedling, the first generation, second generation, and third generation continuous cropping poplar seedlings were taken as study objects, and the whole poplar seedling was harvested to measure and analyze the change of each component biomass on different growth period poplar leaves, newly emerging branches, trunks and root system, and so forth. The results showed that the whole biomass of poplar seedling decreased significantly with the leaf area and its ratio increased, and the growth was inhibited obviously. The biomass aboveground was more than that underground. The ratios of leaf biomass and newly emerging branches biomass of first continuous cropping poplar seedling were relatively high. With the continuous cropping generations and growth cycle increasing, poplar seedling had a growth strategy to improve the ratio of root-shoot and root-leaf to adapt the limited soil nutrient of continuous cropping. PMID:25401150

  15. Effect of continuous cropping generations on each component biomass of poplar seedlings during different growth periods.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jiangbao; Zhang, Shuyong; Li, Tian; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Ronghua; Zhang, Guangcan

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the change rules and response characteristics of growth status on each component of poplar seedling followed by continuous cropping generations and growth period, we clear the biomass distribution pattern of poplar seedling, adapt continuous cropping, and provide theoretical foundation and technical reference on cultivation management of poplar seedling, the first generation, second generation, and third generation continuous cropping poplar seedlings were taken as study objects, and the whole poplar seedling was harvested to measure and analyze the change of each component biomass on different growth period poplar leaves, newly emerging branches, trunks and root system, and so forth. The results showed that the whole biomass of poplar seedling decreased significantly with the leaf area and its ratio increased, and the growth was inhibited obviously. The biomass aboveground was more than that underground. The ratios of leaf biomass and newly emerging branches biomass of first continuous cropping poplar seedling were relatively high. With the continuous cropping generations and growth cycle increasing, poplar seedling had a growth strategy to improve the ratio of root-shoot and root-leaf to adapt the limited soil nutrient of continuous cropping.

  16. Evaluation of two hybrid poplar clones as constructed wetland plant species for treating saline water high in boron and selenium, or waters only high in boron

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wetland mesocosms were constructed to assess two salt- and B-tolerant hybrid poplar clones (Populus trichocarpa ×P. deltoides×P. nigra '345-1' and '347-14') for treating saline water high in boron (B) and selenium (Se). In addition, a hydroponic experiment was performed to test the B tolerance and B...

  17. Physiological responses of wild type and putrescine-overproducing transgenic cells of poplar to variations in the form and concentration of nitrogen in the medium

    Treesearch

    Rakesh Minocha; Jae Soon Lee; Stephanie Long; Pratiksha Bhatnagar; Subhash C. Minocha

    2004-01-01

    We determined: (a) the physiological consequences of overproduction of putrescine in transgenic poplar (Populus nigra x mnrimoviczir) cells expressing an omithine decarboxylase transgene; and (b) effects of variation in nitrogen (N) concentration of the medium on cellular polyamine concentration in transgenic and non-transgenic cells. Cells grown in...

  18. Symptoms of Nutrient Deficiency in Yellow-Poplar Seedlings

    Treesearch

    Albert F. Ike

    1968-01-01

    Visual symptoms are described for leaves of yellow-poplar seedlings supplied N, P. and K in varying concentrations ranging from minimal to excessive. Probability of growth responses to added N is high when tissue levels are below 2 percent; no response is likely when they exceed 3 percent.

  19. Energy partitioning and surface resistance of a poplar plantation in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Zhang, Z.; Noormets, A.; Fang, X.; Zha, T.; Zhou, J.; Sun, G.; McNulty, S. G.; Chen, J.

    2015-07-01

    Poplar (Populus sp.) plantations have been, on the one hand, broadly used in northern China for urban greening, combating desertification, as well as for paper and wood production. On the other hand, such plantations have been questioned occasionally for their possible negative impacts on water availability due to the higher water-use nature of poplar trees compared with other tree species in water-limited dryland regions. To further understand the acclimation of poplar species to semiarid environments and to evaluate the potential impacts of these plantations on the broader context of the region's water supply, we examine the variability of bulk resistance parameters and energy partitioning in a poplar (Populus euramericana cv. "74/76") plantation located in northern China over a 4-year period, encompassing both dry and wet conditions. The partitioning of available energy to latent heat flux (LE) decreased from 0.62 to 0.53 under mediated meteorological drought by irrigation applications. A concomitant increase in sensible heat flux (H) resulted in the increase of a Bowen ratio from 0.83 to 1.57. Partial correlation analysis indicated that surface resistance (Rs) normalized by leaf area index (LAI; Rs:LAI) increased by 50 % under drought conditions and was the dominant factor controlling the Bowen ratio. Furthermore, Rs was the main factor controlling LE during the growing season, even in wet years, as indicated by the decoupling coefficient (Ω = 0.45 and 0.39 in wet and dry years, respectively). Rs was also a major regulator of the LE / LEeq ratio, which decreased from 0.81 in wet years to 0.68 in dry years. All physiological and bioclimatological metrics indicated that the water demands of the poplar plantation were greater than the amount available through precipitation, highlighting the poor match of a water-intensive species like poplar for this water-limited region.

  20. Wood property variation in Populus

    Treesearch

    Dean W. Einspahr; Miles K. Benson; John R. Peckham

    1968-01-01

    The use of bigtooth aspen (Populus grandidentata Michx.), quaking aspen (P. tremuloides Michx.), and cottonwood (P. deltoides Bartr.) by the pulp and paper industry has increased greatly during the past decade. This expanded use has stimulated research on the genetic improvement of Populus. For the past 12 years...

  1. Dissecting nutrient-related co-expression networks in phosphate starved poplars

    PubMed Central

    Kavka, Mareike; Polle, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential plant nutrient, but its availability is often limited in soil. Here, we studied changes in the transcriptome and in nutrient element concentrations in leaves and roots of poplars (Populus × canescens) in response to P deficiency. P starvation resulted in decreased concentrations of S and major cations (K, Mg, Ca), in increased concentrations of N, Zn and Al, while C, Fe and Mn were only little affected. In roots and leaves >4,000 and >9,000 genes were differently expressed upon P starvation. These genes clustered in eleven co-expression modules of which seven were correlated with distinct elements in the plant tissues. One module (4.7% of all differentially expressed genes) was strongly correlated with changes in the P concentration in the plant. In this module the GO term “response to P starvation” was enriched with phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinases, phosphatases and pyrophosphatases as well as regulatory domains such as SPX, but no phosphate transporters. The P-related module was also enriched in genes of the functional category “galactolipid synthesis”. Galactolipids substitute phospholipids in membranes under P limitation. Two modules, one correlated with C and N and the other with biomass, S and Mg, were connected with the P-related module by co-expression. In these modules GO terms indicating “DNA modification” and “cell division” as well as “defense” and “RNA modification” and “signaling” were enriched; they contained phosphate transporters. Bark storage proteins were among the most strongly upregulated genes in the growth-related module suggesting that N, which could not be used for growth, accumulated in typical storage compounds. In conclusion, weighted gene coexpression network analysis revealed a hierarchical structure of gene clusters, which separated phosphate starvation responses correlated with P tissue concentrations from other gene modules, which most likely represented

  2. Tissue- and Cell-Specific Cytokinin Activity in Populus × canescens Monitored by ARR5::GUS Reporter Lines in Summer and Winter

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Shanty; Wildhagen, Henning; Janz, Dennis; Teichmann, Thomas; Hänsch, Robert; Polle, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinins play an important role in vascular development. But knowledge on the cellular localization of this growth hormone in the stem and other organs of woody plants is lacking. The main focus of this study was to investigate the occurrence and cellular localization of active cytokinins in leaves, roots, and along the stem of Populus × canescens and to find out how the pattern is changed between summer and winter. An ARR5::GUS reporter construct was used to monitor distribution of active cytokinins in different tissues of transgenic poplar lines. Three transgenic lines tested under outdoor conditions showed no influence of ARR5::GUS reporter construct on the growth performance compared with the wild-type, but one line lost the reporter activity. ARR5::GUS activity indicated changes in the tissue- and cell type-specific pattern of cytokinin activity during dormancy compared with the growth phase. ARR5::GUS activity, which was present in the root tips in the growing season, disappeared in winter. In the stem apex ground tissue, ARR5::GUS activity was higher in winter than in summer. Immature leaves from tissue-culture grown plants showed inducible ARR5::GUS activity. Leaf primordia in summer showed ARR5::GUS activity, but not the expanded leaves of outdoor plants or leaf primordia in winter. In stem cross sections, the most prominent ARR5::GUS activity was detected in the cortex region and in the rays of bark in summer and in winter. In the cambial zone the ARR5::GUS activity was more pronounced in the dormant than in growth phase. The pith and the ray cells adjacent to the vessels also displayed ARR5::GUS activity. In silico analyses of the tissue-specific expression patterns of the whole PtRR type-A family of poplar showed that PtRR10, the closest ortholog to the Arabidopsis ARR5 gene, was usually the most highly expressed gene in all tissues. In conclusion, gene expression and tissue-localization indicate high activity of cytokinins not only in summer, but

  3. Heavy metal accumulation by poplar in calcareous soil with various degrees of multi-metal contamination: implications for phytoextraction and phytostabilization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yahu; Nan, Zhongren; Su, Jieqiong; Wang, Ning

    2013-10-01

    The object of this study was to assess the capacity of Populus alba L. var. pyramidalis Bunge for phytoremediation of heavy metals on calcareous soils contaminated with multiple metals. In a pot culture experiment, a multi-metal-contaminated calcareous soil was mixed at different ratios with an uncontaminated, but otherwise similar soil, to establish a gradient of soil metal contamination levels. In a field experiment, poplars with different stand ages (3, 5, and 7 years) were sampled randomly in a wastewater-irrigated field. The concentrations of cadmium (Cd), Cu, lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in the poplar tissues and soil were determined. The accumulation of Cd and Zn was greatest in the leaves of P. pyramidalis, while Cu and Pb mainly accumulated in the roots. In the pot experiment, the highest tissue concentrations of Cd (40.76 mg kg(-1)), Cu (8.21 mg kg(-1)), Pb (41.62 mg kg(-1)), and Zn (696 mg kg(-1)) were all noted in the multi-metal-contaminated soil. Although extremely high levels of Cd and Zn accumulated in the leaves, phytoextraction using P. pyramidalis may take at least 24 and 16 years for Cd and Zn, respectively. The foliar concentrations of Cu and Pb were always within the normal ranges and were never higher than 8 and 5 mg kg(-1), respectively. The field experiment also revealed that the concentrations of all four metals in the bark were significantly higher than that in the wood. In addition, the tissue metal concentrations, together with the NH4NO3-extractable concentrations of metals in the root zone, decreased as the stand age increased. P. pyramidalis is suitable for phytostabilization of calcareous soils contaminated with multiple metals, but collection of the litter fall would be necessary due to the relatively high foliar concentrations of Cd and Zn.

  4. First Record of the Genus Zygina from a Neotropical Region on Populus spp.: Taxonomic and Biological Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, M.I.; Brentassi, M.E.; Paradell, S. L.; Remes de Lenicov, A.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    The typhlocybine, Zygina nivea Mulsant & Rey 1855, was found in urban areas of Argentina colonizing trees of poplar (Populus alba L. and P. nigra L.). This is the first mention of the genus Zygina Fieber from the Neotropical region. In this paper redescription of the male, description of the female, distributional and host plant data, and behavioural observations of this species are given. PMID:21870983

  5. Enzymatic digestibility and pretreatment degradation products of AFEX-treated hardwoods (Populus nigra).

    PubMed

    Balan, Venkatesh; Sousa, Leonardo da Costa; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Marshall, Derek; Sharma, Lekh N; Chambliss, C Kevin; Dale, Bruce E

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing need to find alternatives to crude oil as the primary feed stock for the chemicals and fuel industry and ethanol has been demonstrated to be a viable alternative. Among the various feed stocks for producing ethanol, poplar (Populus nigra x Populus maximowiczii) is considered to have great potential as a biorefinery feedstock in the United States, due to their widespread availability and good productivity in several parts of the country. We have optimized AFEX pretreatment conditions (180 degrees C, 2:1 ammonia to biomass loading, 233% moisture, 30 minutes residence time) and by using various combinations of enzymes (commercical celluloses and xylanases) to achieve high glucan and xylan conversion (93 and 65%, respectively). We have also identified and quantified several important degradation products formed during AFEX using liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). As a part of degradation product analysis, we have also quantified oligosaccharides in the AFEX water wash extracts by acid hydrolysis. It is interesting to note that corn stover (C4 grass) can be pretreated effectively using mild AFEX pretreatment conditions, while on the other hand hardwood poplar requires much harsher AFEX conditions to obtain equivalent sugar yields upon enzymatic hydrolysis. Comparing corn stover and poplar, we conclude that pretreatment severity and enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency are dictated to a large extent by lignin carbohydrate complexes and arabinoxylan cross-linkages for AFEX.

  6. Molecular and biochemical characterization of the jasmonic acid methyltransferase gene from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Nan; Yao, Jianzhuang; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Li, Guanglin; Guan, Ju; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Guo, Hong; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate is a metabolite known to be produced by many plants and has roles in diverse biological processes. It is biosynthesized by the action of S-adenosyl-L-methionine:jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (JMT), which belongs to the SABATH family of methyltransferases. Herein is reported the isolation and biochemical characterization of a JMT gene from black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa). The genome of P. trichocarpa contains 28 SABATH genes (PtSABATH1 to PtSABATH28). Recombinant PtSABATH3 expressed in Escherichia coli showed the highest level of activity with jasmonic acid (JA) among carboxylic acids tested. It was therefore renamed PtJMT1. PtJMT1 also displayed activity with benzoic acid (BA), with which the activity was about 22% of that with JA. PtSABATH2 and PtSABATH4 were most similar to PtJMT1 among all PtSABATHs. However, neither of them had activity with JA. The apparent Km values of PtJMT1 using JA and BA as substrate were 175 lM and 341 lM, respectively. Mutation of Ser-153 and Asn-361, two residues in the active site of PtJMT1, to Tyr and Ser respectively, led to higher specific activity with BA than with JA. Homology-based structural modeling indicated that substrate alignment, in which Asn-361 is involved, plays a role in determining the substrate specificity of PtJMT1. In the leaves of young seedlings of black cottonwood, the expression of PtJMT1 was induced by plant defense signal molecules methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid and a fungal elicitor alamethicin, suggesting that PtJMT1 may have a role in plant defense against biotic stresses. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that PtJMT1 shares a common ancestor with the Arabidopsis JMT, and functional divergence of these two apparent JMT orthologs has occurred since the split of poplar and Arabidopsis lineages.

  7. Poplar MYB115 and MYB134 Transcription Factors Regulate Proanthocyanidin Synthesis and Structure1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dawei; Mellway, Robin; Yoshida, Kazuko; Tran, Lan; Stewart, Don; Reichelt, Michael; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Séguin, Armand

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of proanthocyanidins is regulated by a complex of transcription factors composed of R2R3 MYB, basic helix-loop-helix, and WD40 proteins that activate the promoters of biosynthetic genes. In poplar (genus Populus), MYB134 is known to regulate proanthocyanidin biosynthesis by activating key flavonoid genes. Here, we characterize a second MYB regulator of proanthocyanidins, MYB115. Transgenic poplar overexpressing MYB115 showed a high-proanthocyanidin phenotype and reduced salicinoid accumulation, similar to the effects of MYB134 overexpression. Transcriptomic analysis of MYB115- and MYB134-overexpressing poplar plants identified a set of common up-regulated genes encoding proanthocyanidin biosynthetic enzymes and several novel uncharacterized MYB transcriptional repressors. Transient expression experiments demonstrated the capacity of both MYB134 and MYB115 to activate flavonoid promoters, but only in the presence of a basic helix-loop-helix cofactor. Yeast two-hybrid experiments confirmed the direct interaction of these transcription factors. The unexpected identification of dihydromyricetin in leaf extracts of both MYB115- and MYB134-overexpressing poplar led to the discovery of enhanced flavonoid B-ring hydroxylation and an increased proportion of prodelphinidins in proanthocyanidin of the transgenics. The dramatic hydroxylation phenotype of MYB115 overexpressors is likely due to the up-regulation of both flavonoid 3′,5′-hydroxylases and cytochrome b5. Overall, this work provides new insight into the complexity of the gene regulatory network for proanthocyanidin synthesis in poplar. PMID:28348066

  8. Poplar MYB115 and MYB134 Transcription Factors Regulate Proanthocyanidin Synthesis and Structure.

    PubMed

    James, Amy Midori; Ma, Dawei; Mellway, Robin; Gesell, Andreas; Yoshida, Kazuko; Walker, Vincent; Tran, Lan; Stewart, Don; Reichelt, Michael; Suvanto, Jussi; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Séguin, Armand; Constabel, C Peter

    2017-05-01

    The accumulation of proanthocyanidins is regulated by a complex of transcription factors composed of R2R3 MYB, basic helix-loop-helix, and WD40 proteins that activate the promoters of biosynthetic genes. In poplar (genus Populus), MYB134 is known to regulate proanthocyanidin biosynthesis by activating key flavonoid genes. Here, we characterize a second MYB regulator of proanthocyanidins, MYB115. Transgenic poplar overexpressing MYB115 showed a high-proanthocyanidin phenotype and reduced salicinoid accumulation, similar to the effects of MYB134 overexpression. Transcriptomic analysis of MYB115- and MYB134-overexpressing poplar plants identified a set of common up-regulated genes encoding proanthocyanidin biosynthetic enzymes and several novel uncharacterized MYB transcriptional repressors. Transient expression experiments demonstrated the capacity of both MYB134 and MYB115 to activate flavonoid promoters, but only in the presence of a basic helix-loop-helix cofactor. Yeast two-hybrid experiments confirmed the direct interaction of these transcription factors. The unexpected identification of dihydromyricetin in leaf extracts of both MYB115- and MYB134-overexpressing poplar led to the discovery of enhanced flavonoid B-ring hydroxylation and an increased proportion of prodelphinidins in proanthocyanidin of the transgenics. The dramatic hydroxylation phenotype of MYB115 overexpressors is likely due to the up-regulation of both flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylases and cytochrome b5 Overall, this work provides new insight into the complexity of the gene regulatory network for proanthocyanidin synthesis in poplar. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Identification and analysis of phosphorylation status of proteins in dormant terminal buds of poplar.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Cai; Liu, Chang-Fu; Wang, Hong-Xia; Shen, Zhi-Ying; Yang, Chuan-Ping; Wei, Zhi-Gang

    2011-11-11

    Although there has been considerable progress made towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of bud dormancy, the roles of protein phosphorylation in the process of dormancy regulation in woody plants remain unclear. We used mass spectrometry combined with TiO₂ phosphopeptide-enrichment strategies to investigate the phosphoproteome of dormant terminal buds (DTBs) in poplar (Populus simonii × P. nigra). There were 161 unique phosphorylated sites in 161 phosphopeptides from 151 proteins; 141 proteins have orthologs in Arabidopsis, and 10 proteins are unique to poplar. Only 34 sites in proteins in poplar did not match well with the equivalent phosphorylation sites of their orthologs in Arabidopsis, indicating that regulatory mechanisms are well conserved between poplar and Arabidopsis. Further functional classifications showed that most of these phosphoproteins were involved in binding and catalytic activity. Extraction of the phosphorylation motif using Motif-X indicated that proline-directed kinases are a major kinase group involved in protein phosphorylation in dormant poplar tissues. This study provides evidence about the significance of protein phosphorylation during dormancy, and will be useful for similar studies on other woody plants.

  10. Two Highly Similar Poplar Paleo-subgenomes Suggest an Autotetraploid Ancestor of Salicaceae Plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinzhe; Wang, Jinpeng; Ge, Weina; Wang, Zhenyi; Li, Yuxian; Yang, Nanshan; Sun, Sangrong; Zhang, Liwei; Wang, Xiyin

    2017-01-01

    As a model plant to study perennial trees in the Salicaceae family, the poplar (Populus trichocarpa) genome was sequenced, revealing recurrent paleo-polyploidizations during its evolution. A comparative and hierarchical alignment of its genome to a well-selected reference genome would help us better understand poplar's genome structure and gene family evolution. Here, by adopting the relatively simpler grape (Vitis vinifera) genome as reference, and by inferring both intra- and inter-genomic gene collinearity, we produced a united alignment of these two genomes and hierarchically distinguished the layers of paralogous and orthologous genes, as related to recursive polyploidizations and speciation. We uncovered homologous blocks in the grape and poplar genomes and also between them. Moreover, we characterized the genes missing and found that poplar had two considerably similar subgenomes (≤0.05 difference in gene deletion) produced by the Salicaceae-common tetraploidization, suggesting its autotetraploid nature. Taken together, this work provides a timely and valuable dataset of orthologous and paralogous genes for further study of the genome structure and functional evolution of poplar and other Salicaceae plants.

  11. Rhizosphere Competitiveness of Trichloroethylene-Degrading, Poplar-Colonizing Recombinant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Hojae; Chauhan, Sadhana; Ryoo, Doohyun; Bowers, Kally; Thomas, Stuart M.; Canada, Keith A.; Burken, Joel G.; Wood, Thomas K.

    2000-01-01

    Indigenous bacteria from poplar tree (Populus canadensis var. eugenei ‘Imperial Carolina’) and southern California shrub rhizospheres, as well as two tree-colonizing Rhizobium strains (ATCC 10320 and ATCC 35645), were engineered to express constitutively and stably toluene o-monooxygenase (TOM) from Burkholderia cepacia G4 by integrating the tom locus into the chromosome. The poplar and Rhizobium recombinant bacteria degraded trichloroethylene at a rate of 0.8 to 2.1 nmol/min/mg of protein and were competitive against the unengineered hosts in wheat and barley rhizospheres for 1 month (colonization occurred at a level of 1.0 × 105 to 23 × 105 CFU/cm of root). In addition, six of these recombinants colonized poplar roots stably and competitively with populations as large as 79% ± 12% of all rhizosphere bacteria after 28 days (0.2 × 105 to 31 × 105 CFU/cm of root). Furthermore, five of the most competitive poplar recombinants (e.g., Pb3-1 and Pb5-1, which were identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain PsK recombinants) retained the ability to express TOM for 29 days as 100% ± 0% of the recombinants detected in the poplar rhizosphere expressed TOM constitutively. PMID:11055909

  12. [Application of Populus Nigra preparations at experimental parodontitis].

    PubMed

    Kipiani, N V; Kuchukhidze, Dzh K; Chichua, Z Dzh; Kipiani, V A; Datunashvili, I V

    2007-09-01

    Severe oxidative stress, developed under experimental periodontitis is accompanied by disturbances in mitochondrial respiration in tissue cells of gingiva, membrane damage and release of Fe(2+) and Mn(2+), leading to the worsening of inflammation process and gingival tissue necrosis. Reduction of free nitric oxide in gingival tissue appeared to be characteristic for experimental parodontitis: decreases local immunity, antimicrobial resistance, and tissue regeneration, disturbs blood supply and tissue trophism, which forwards important role in deepening of inflammation process and wasting of gingival tissue. Application of preparations derived from black poplar (Populus Nigra) gemma standardizes mitochondrial respiration, reduces presentation of inflammation, and considerably improves EPR-spectrum of gingival tissue. Though the complete normalization is not achieved--hazard of peroxidation still remains, the applied preparations, due to their strong anti- oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities is as an effective and rehabilitative means to tackle gingivitis and peiodontitis.

  13. Phosphorus and nitrogen physiology of two contrasting poplar genotypes when exposed to phosphorus and/or nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Gan, Honghao; Jiao, Yu; Jia, Jingbo; Wang, Xinli; Li, Hong; Shi, Wenguang; Peng, Changhui; Polle, Andrea; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) are the two essential macronutrients for tree growth and development. To elucidate the P and N physiology of woody plants during acclimation to P and/or N starvation, we exposed saplings of the slow-growing Populus simonii Carr (Ps) and the fast-growing Populus × euramericana Dode (Pe) to complete nutrients or starvation of P, N or both elements (NP). P. × euramericana had lower P and N concentrations and greater P and N amounts due to higher biomass production, thereby resulting in greater phosphorus use efficiency/N use efficiency (PUE/NUE) compared with Ps. Compared with the roots of Ps, the roots of Pe exhibited higher enzymatic activities in terms of acid phosphatases (APs) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH), which are involved in P mobilization, and nitrate reductase (NR), glutamate synthase (GOGAT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), which participate in N assimilation. The responsiveness of the transcriptional regulation of key genes encoding transporters for phosphate, ammonium and nitrate was stronger in Pe than in Ps. These results suggest that Pe possesses a higher capacity for P/N uptake and assimilation, which promote faster growth compared with Ps. In both poplars, P or NP starvation caused significant decreases in the P concentrations and increases in PUE. Phosphorus deprivation induced the activity levels of APs, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and MDH in both genotypes. Nitrogen or NP deficiency resulted in lower N concentrations, amino acid levels, NR and GOGAT activities, and higher NUE in both poplars. Thus, in Ps and Pe, the mRNA levels of PHT1;5, PHT1;9, PHT2;1, AMT2;1 and NR increased in the roots, while PHT1;9, PHO1;H1, PHO2, AMT1;1 and NRT2;1 increased in the leaves during acclimation to P, N or NP deprivation. These results suggest that both poplars suppress P/N uptake, mobilization and assimilation during acclimation to P, N or NP starvation.

  14. Conservation and divergence of microRNAs in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Abdelali; Wall, Phillip K; DiLoreto, Scott; dePamphilis, Claude W; Carlson, John E

    2007-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs (sRNA) ~21 nucleotides in length that negatively control gene expression by cleaving or inhibiting the translation of target gene transcripts. miRNAs have been extensively analyzed in Arabidopsis and rice and partially investigated in other non-model plant species. To date, 109 and 62 miRNA families have been identified in Arabidopsis and rice respectively. However, only 33 miRNAs have been identified from the genome of the model tree species (Populus trichocarpa), of which 11 are Populus specific. The low number of miRNA families previously identified in Populus, compared with the number of families identified in Arabidopsis and rice, suggests that many miRNAs still remain to be discovered in Populus. In this study, we analyzed expressed small RNAs from leaves and vegetative buds of Populus using high throughput pyrosequencing. Results Analysis of almost eighty thousand small RNA reads allowed us to identify 123 new sequences belonging to previously identified miRNA families as well as 48 new miRNA families that could be Populus-specific. Comparison of the organization of miRNA families in Populus, Arabidopsis and rice showed that miRNA family sizes were generally expanded in Populus. The putative targets of non-conserved miRNA include both previously identified targets as well as several new putative target genes involved in development, resistance to stress, and other cellular processes. Moreover, almost half of the genes predicted to be targeted by non-conserved miRNAs appear to be Populus-specific. Comparative analyses showed that genes targeted by conserved and non-conserved miRNAs are biased mainly towards development, electron transport and signal transduction processes. Similar results were found for non-conserved miRNAs from Arabidopsis. Conclusion Our results suggest that while there is a conserved set of miRNAs among plant species, a large fraction of miRNAs vary among species. The non-conserved miRNAs may

  15. Forest biorefinery: Potential of poplar phytochemicals as value-added co-products.

    PubMed

    Devappa, Rakshit K; Rakshit, Sudip K; Dekker, Robert F H

    2015-11-01

    The global forestry industry after experiencing a market downturn during the past decade has now aimed its vision towards the integrated biorefinery. New business models and strategies are constantly being explored to re-invent the global wood and pulp/paper industry through sustainable resource exploitation. The goal is to produce diversified, innovative and revenue generating product lines using on-site bioresources (wood and tree residues). The most popular product lines are generally produced from wood fibers (biofuels, pulp/paper, biomaterials, and bio/chemicals). However, the bark and other tree residues like foliage that constitute forest wastes, still remain largely an underexploited resource from which extractives and phytochemicals can be harnessed as by-products (biopharmaceuticals, food additives and nutraceuticals, biopesticides, cosmetics). Commercially, Populus (poplar) tree species including hybrid varieties are cultivated as a fast growing bioenergy crop, but can also be utilized to produce bio-based chemicals. This review identifies and underlines the potential of natural products (phytochemicals) from Populus species that could lead to new business ventures in biorefineries and contribute to the bioeconomy. In brief, this review highlights the importance of by-products/co-products in forest industries, methods that can be employed to extract and purify poplar phytochemicals, the potential pharmaceutical and other uses of >160 phytochemicals identified from poplar species - their chemical structures, properties and bioactivities, the challenges and limitations of utilizing poplar phytochemicals, and potential commercial opportunities. Finally, the overall discussion and conclusion are made considering the recent biotechnological advances in phytochemical research to indicate the areas for future commercial applications from poplar tree species.

  16. Yellow-poplar seedfall pattern

    Treesearch

    LaMont G. Engle

    1960-01-01

    Knowing the pattern of seedfall can be helpful when trying to regenerate yellow-poplar. This is especially true if the stand contains only scattered yellow-poplar seed trees. Information obtained from seed collections in Indiana shows that most of the seed falls north and northeast of seed trees.

  17. Interactive effects of nitrogen and water availabilities on gas exchange and whole-plant carbon allocation in poplar.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, L.; Proe, M. F.; Cameron, A. D.

    1998-07-01

    Cuttings of balsam spire hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa var. Hastata Henry x Populus balsamifera var. Michauxii (Dode) Farwell) were grown in sand culture and irrigated every 2 (W) or 10 (w) days with a solution containing either 3.0 (N) or 0.5 (n) mol nitrogen m(-3) for 90 days. Trees in the WN (control) and wn treatments had stable leaf nitrogen concentrations averaging 19.4 and 8.4 mg g(-1), respectively, over the course of the experiment. Trees in the Wn and wN treatments had a similar leaf nitrogen concentration, which increased from 12.0 to 15.8 mg g(-1) during the experiment. By the final harvest, mean stomatal conductances of trees in the wN and wn treatments were less than those of trees in the Wn and WN treatments (1.8 versus 4.6 mm s(-1)). Compared to the WN treatment, biomass at the final harvest was reduced by 61, 72 and 75% in the Wn, wN and wn treatments, respectively. At the final harvest, WN trees had a mean total leaf area of 4750 +/- 380 cm(2) tree(-1) and carried 164 +/- 8 leaves tree(-1) with a specific leaf area of 181 +/- 16 cm(2) g(-1), whereas Wn trees had a smaller mean total leaf area (1310 +/- 30 cm(2) tree(-1)), because of the production of fewer leaves (41 +/- 6) with a smaller specific leaf area (154 +/- 2 cm(2) g(-1)). A greater proportion of biomass was allocated to roots in Wn trees than in WN trees, but component nitrogen concentrations adjusted such that there was no Wn treatment effect on nitrogen allocation. Compared with WN trees, rates of photosynthesis and respiration per unit weight of tissue of Wn trees decreased by 28 and 31%, respectively, but the rate of photosynthesis per unit leaf nitrogen remained unaltered. The wN and Wn trees had similar leaf nitrogen concentrations; however, compared with the Wn treatment, the wN treatment decreased mean total leaf area (750 +/- 50 cm(2) tree(-1)), number of leaves per tree (29 +/- 2) and specific leaf area (140 +/- 6 cm(2) g(-1)), but increased the allocation of biomass and

  18. Proteome Analysis of Poplar Seed Vigor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Wei-Qing; Liu, Shu-Jun; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Seed vigor is a complex property that determines the seed’s potential for rapid uniform emergence and subsequent growth. However, the mechanism for change in seed vigor is poorly understood. The seeds of poplar (Populus × Canadensis Moench), which are short-lived, were stored at 30°C and 75±5% relative humidity for different periods of time (0–90 days) to obtain different vigor seeds (from 95 to 0% germination). With decreasing seed vigor, the temperature range of seed germination became narrower; the respiration rate of the seeds decreased markedly, while the relative electrolyte leakage increased markedly, both levelling off after 45 days. A total of 81 protein spots showed a significant change in abundance (≥ 1.5-fold, P < 0.05) when comparing the proteomes among seeds with different vigor. Of the identified 65 proteins, most belonged to the groups involved in metabolism (23%), protein synthesis and destination (22%), energy (18%), cell defense and rescue (17%), and storage protein (15%). These proteins accounted for 95% of all the identified proteins. During seed aging, 53 and 6 identified proteins consistently increased and decreased in abundance, respectively, and they were associated with metabolism (22%), protein synthesis and destination (22%), energy (19%), cell defense and rescue (19%), storage proteins (15%), and cell growth and structure (3%). These data show that the decrease in seed vigor (aging) is an energy-dependent process, which requires protein synthesis and degradation as well as cellular defense and rescue. PMID:26172265

  19. Proteome Analysis of Poplar Seed Vigor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Wei-Qing; Liu, Shu-Jun; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Seed vigor is a complex property that determines the seed's potential for rapid uniform emergence and subsequent growth. However, the mechanism for change in seed vigor is poorly understood. The seeds of poplar (Populus × Canadensis Moench), which are short-lived, were stored at 30 °C and 75 ± 5% relative humidity for different periods of time (0-90 days) to obtain different vigor seeds (from 95 to 0% germination). With decreasing seed vigor, the temperature range of seed germination became narrower; the respiration rate of the seeds decreased markedly, while the relative electrolyte leakage increased markedly, both levelling off after 45 days. A total of 81 protein spots showed a significant change in abundance (≥ 1.5-fold, P < 0.05) when comparing the proteomes among seeds with different vigor. Of the identified 65 proteins, most belonged to the groups involved in metabolism (23%), protein synthesis and destination (22%), energy (18%), cell defense and rescue (17%), and storage protein (15%). These proteins accounted for 95% of all the identified proteins. During seed aging, 53 and 6 identified proteins consistently increased and decreased in abundance, respectively, and they were associated with metabolism (22%), protein synthesis and destination (22%), energy (19%), cell defense and rescue (19%), storage proteins (15%), and cell growth and structure (3%). These data show that the decrease in seed vigor (aging) is an energy-dependent process, which requires protein synthesis and degradation as well as cellular defense and rescue.

  20. Interaction between isoprene and ozone fluxes in a poplar plantation and its impact on air quality at the European level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenone, Terenzio; Hendriks, Carlijn; Brilli, Federico; Fransen, Erik; Gioli, Beniamio; Portillo-Estrada, Miguel; Schaap, Martijn; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2016-09-01

    The emission of isoprene and other biogenic volatile organic compounds from vegetation plays an important role in tropospheric ozone (O3) formation. The potentially large expansion of isoprene emitting species (e.g., poplars) for bioenergy production might, therefore, impact tropospheric O3 formation. Using the eddy covariance technique we have simultaneously measured fluxes isoprene, O3 and of CO2 from a poplar (Populus) plantation grown for bioenergy production. We used the chemistry transport model LOTOS-EUROS to scale-up the isoprene emissions associated with the existing poplar plantations in Europe, and we assessed the impact of isoprene fluxes on ground level O3 concentrations. Our findings suggest that isoprene emissions from existing poplar-for-bioenergy plantations do not significantly affect the ground level of O3 concentration. Indeed the overall land in Europe covered with poplar plantations has not significantly changed over the last two decades despite policy incentives to produce bioenergy crops. The current surface area of isoprene emitting poplars-for-bioenergy remains too limited to significantly enhance O3 concentrations and thus to be considered a potential threat for air quality and human health.

  1. Effect of clonal variation among hybrid poplars on susceptibility of gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Nichole A; Vasquez, Eric; Handelsman, Jo; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2010-06-01

    Trees in the genus Populus can provide substantial commercial and ecological benefits, including sustainable alternatives to traditional forestry. Realization of this potential requires intensive management, but damage by defoliating insects can severely limit productivity in such systems. Two approaches to limiting these losses include cultivation of poplar varieties with inherent resistance to pests and application of microbial pesticides. Little is known about the interaction between host resistance and the ability of poplars to support the efficacy of biocontrol agents. The research described here was conducted to survey the effect of hybrid poplar clones on gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae), a pest on these trees. We assessed the effect of various poplar clones on larval performance and susceptibility to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki. Larvae were reared from hatching on the foliage of 25 hybrid poplar clones and we monitored larval survival, development time, and weight at fourth instar. Eight of these clones showed high resistance against gypsy moth. The remaining clones showed high variation in their effect on larval performance. We evaluated the susceptibility of third-instar larvae to B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki when reared on the 17 remaining clones. There was a significant effect of poplar clone on time to death after ingestion of B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki. The susceptibility of gypsy moth larvae to B. thuringiensis on various clones was not correlated with the effects of these clones on larval performance in the absence of B. thuringiensis, suggesting this interaction is more complex than merely reflecting higher mortality to previously stressed larvae.

  2. Stimulation of hybrid poplar growth in petroleum-contaminated soils through oxygen addition and soil nutrient amendments.

    PubMed

    Rentz, Jeremy A; Chapman, Brad; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Schnoor, Jerald L

    2003-01-01

    Hybrid poplar trees (Populus deltoides x nigra DN34) were grown in a green-house using hydrocarbon-contaminated soil from a phytoremediation demonstration site in Health, Ohio. Two independent experiments investigated the effect of nutrient addition on poplar growth and the importance of oxygen addition to root development and plant growth. Biomass measurements, poplar height, and leaf color were used as indicators of plant health in the selection of a 10/5/5 NPK fertilizer applied at 1121 kg/ha (112 kg-N, 24.4 kg-P, 46.5 kg-K per ha) to enhance hybrid poplar growth at the Health site. Five passive methods of oxygen delivery were examined, including aeration tubes, gravel addition, and an Oxygen Release Compound (ORC). When ORC was placed in coffee filters above hydrocarbon-contaminated soil, a statistically significant increase of 145% was observed in poplar biomass growth, relative to unamended controls. The ORC in filters also stimulated significant increases in root density. A 15.2-cm interval of soil directly below ORC addition exhibited an increase from 2.6 +/- 1.0 mg/cm3 to 4.8 +/- 1.0 mg/cm3, showing stimulation of root growth in hydrocarbon-stained soil. The positive response of hybrid poplars to oxygen amendments suggests that overcoming oxygen limitation to plants should be considered in phytoremediation projects when soil contamination exerts a high biochemical oxygen demand, such as in former refinery sites.

  3. Interaction between isoprene and ozone fluxes in a poplar plantation and its impact on air quality at the European level

    PubMed Central

    Zenone, Terenzio; Hendriks, Carlijn; Brilli, Federico; Fransen, Erik; Gioli, Beniamio; Portillo-Estrada, Miguel; Schaap, Martijn; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2016-01-01

    The emission of isoprene and other biogenic volatile organic compounds from vegetation plays an important role in tropospheric ozone (O3) formation. The potentially large expansion of isoprene emitting species (e.g., poplars) for bioenergy production might, therefore, impact tropospheric O3 formation. Using the eddy covariance technique we have simultaneously measured fluxes isoprene, O3 and of CO2 from a poplar (Populus) plantation grown for bioenergy production. We used the chemistry transport model LOTOS-EUROS to scale-up the isoprene emissions associated with the existing poplar plantations in Europe, and we assessed the impact of isoprene fluxes on ground level O3 concentrations. Our findings suggest that isoprene emissions from existing poplar-for-bioenergy plantations do not significantly affect the ground level of O3 concentration. Indeed the overall land in Europe covered with poplar plantations has not significantly changed over the last two decades despite policy incentives to produce bioenergy crops. The current surface area of isoprene emitting poplars-for-bioenergy remains too limited to significantly enhance O3 concentrations and thus to be considered a potential threat for air quality and human health. PMID:27615148

  4. Interaction between isoprene and ozone fluxes in a poplar plantation and its impact on air quality at the European level.

    PubMed

    Zenone, Terenzio; Hendriks, Carlijn; Brilli, Federico; Fransen, Erik; Gioli, Beniamio; Portillo-Estrada, Miguel; Schaap, Martijn; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2016-09-12

    The emission of isoprene and other biogenic volatile organic compounds from vegetation plays an important role in tropospheric ozone (O3) formation. The potentially large expansion of isoprene emitting species (e.g., poplars) for bioenergy production might, therefore, impact tropospheric O3 formation. Using the eddy covariance technique we have simultaneously measured fluxes isoprene, O3 and of CO2 from a poplar (Populus) plantation grown for bioenergy production. We used the chemistry transport model LOTOS-EUROS to scale-up the isoprene emissions associated with the existing poplar plantations in Europe, and we assessed the impact of isoprene fluxes on ground level O3 concentrations. Our findings suggest that isoprene emissions from existing poplar-for-bioenergy plantations do not significantly affect the ground level of O3 concentration. Indeed the overall land in Europe covered with poplar plantations has not significantly changed over the last two decades despite policy incentives to produce bioenergy crops. The current surface area of isoprene emitting poplars-for-bioenergy remains too limited to significantly enhance O3 concentrations and thus to be considered a potential threat for air quality and human health.

  5. Hydroponic screening of poplar for trace element tolerance and accumulation.

    PubMed

    Migeon, Aude; Richaud, Pierre; Guinet, Frédéric; Blaudez, Damien; Chalot, Michel

    2012-04-01

    Using the nutrient film technique, we screened 21 clones of poplar for growth in the presence of a mix of trace elements (TE) and for TE accumulation capacities. Poplar cuttings were exposed for four weeks to a multipollution solution consisting in 10 microM Cd, Cu, Ni, and Pb, and 200 microM Zn. Plant biomass and TE accumulation patterns in leaves varied greatly between clones. The highest Cd and Zn concentrations in leaves were detected in P. trichocarpa and P. trichocarpa hybrids, with the clone Skado (P. trichocarpa x P. maximowiczii) accumulating up to 108 mg Cd kg(-1) DW and 1510 mg Zn kg(-1) DW when exposed to a multipollution context. Our data also confirm the importance of pH and multipollution, as these factors greatly affect TE accumulation in above ground biomass. The NFT technique applied here to a large range of poplar clones also revealed the potential of the Rochester, AFO662 and AFO678 poplar clones for use in phytostabilization programs and bioenergy production, where production of less contaminated above ground biomass is suitable.

  6. Expression of jasmonic ethylene responsive factor gene in transgenic poplar tree leads to increased salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Li, Yiliang; Su, Xiaohua; Zhang, Bingyu; Huang, Qinjun; Zhang, Xianghua; Huang, Rongfeng

    2009-02-01

    The stress resistance of plants can be enhanced by regulating the expression of multiple downstream genes associated with stress resistance. We used the Agrobacterium method to transfer the tomato jasmonic ethylene responsive factors (JERFs) gene that encodes the ethylene response factor (ERF) like transcription factor to the genome of a hybrid poplar (Populus alba x Populus berolinensis). Eighteen resistant plants were obtained, of which 13 were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), reverse transcriptase PCR and Southern blot analyses as having incorporated the JERFs gene and able to express it at the transcriptional level. Salinity tests were conducted in a greenhouse with 0, 100, 200 and 300 mM NaCl. In the absence of NaCl, the transgenic plants were significantly taller than the control plants, but no statistically significant differences in the concentrations of proline and chlorophyll were observed. With increasing salinity, the extent of damage was significantly less in transgenic plants than that in control plants, and the reductions in height, basal diameter and biomass were less in transgenic plants than those in control plants. At 200 and 300 mM NaCl concentrations, transgenic plants were 128.9% and 98.8% taller, respectively, and had 199.8% and 113.0% more dry biomass, respectively, than control plants. The saline-induced reduction in leaf water content and increase in root/crown ratio were less in transgenic plants than in control plants. Foliar proline concentration increased more in response to salt treatment in transgenic plants than in control plants. Foliar Na(+) concentration was higher in transgenic plants than in control plants. In the coastal area in Panjin of Liaoning where the total soil salt concentration is 0.3%, a salt tolerance trial of transgenic plants indicated that 3-year-old transgenic plants were 14.5% and 33.6% taller than the control plants at two field sites. The transgenic plants at the two field sites were growing

  7. Silvical Characteristics of Yellow-Poplar

    Treesearch

    David F. Olson

    1969-01-01

    Yellow-poplar (Liriorlentlron tulipifera L.) is also commonly known as tulip poplar, tulip tree, white-poplar, whitewood, and "poplar" (60). It gets its name from the tulip-like flowers which it bears in the late spring. Because of the excellent form and rapid growth of the tree, plus the fine working qualities of the wood, yellow-poplar is one of the most...

  8. Water consumption and biomass production of protoplast fusion lines of poplar hybrids under drought stress

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Anne; Kleinschmit, Jörg R. G.; Schoneberg, Sebastian; Löffler, Sonja; Janßen, Alwin; Polle, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Woody crops such as poplars (Populus) can contribute to meet the increasing energy demand of a growing human population and can therefore enhance the security of energy supply. Using energy from biomass increases ecological sustainability as biomass is considered to play a pivotal role in abating climate change. Because areas for establishing poplar plantations are often confined to marginal sites drought tolerance is one important trait for poplar genotypes cultivated in short rotation coppice. We tested 9-month-old plants of four tetraploid Populus tremula (L.) × P. tremuloides (Michx.) lines that were generated by protoplast fusion and their diploid counterpart for water consumption and drought stress responses in a greenhouse experiment. The fusion lines showed equivalent or decreased height growth, stem biomass and total leaf area compared to the diploid line. The relative height increment of the fusion lines was not reduced compared to the diploid line when the plants were exposed to drought. The fusion lines were distinguished from the diploid counterpart by stomatal characteristics such as increased size and lower density. The changes in the stomatal apparatus did not affect the stomatal conductance. When exposed to drought the carbohydrate concentrations increased more strongly in the fusion lines than in the diploid line. Two fusion lines consumed significantly less water with regard to height growth, producing equivalent or increased relative stem biomass under drought compared to their diploid relative. Therefore, these tetraploid fusion lines are interesting candidates for short rotation biomass plantation on dry sites. PMID:26042130

  9. Water consumption and biomass production of protoplast fusion lines of poplar hybrids under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Hennig, Anne; Kleinschmit, Jörg R G; Schoneberg, Sebastian; Löffler, Sonja; Janßen, Alwin; Polle, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Woody crops such as poplars (Populus) can contribute to meet the increasing energy demand of a growing human population and can therefore enhance the security of energy supply. Using energy from biomass increases ecological sustainability as biomass is considered to play a pivotal role in abating climate change. Because areas for establishing poplar plantations are often confined to marginal sites drought tolerance is one important trait for poplar genotypes cultivated in short rotation coppice. We tested 9-month-old plants of four tetraploid Populus tremula (L.) × P. tremuloides (Michx.) lines that were generated by protoplast fusion and their diploid counterpart for water consumption and drought stress responses in a greenhouse experiment. The fusion lines showed equivalent or decreased height growth, stem biomass and total leaf area compared to the diploid line. The relative height increment of the fusion lines was not reduced compared to the diploid line when the plants were exposed to drought. The fusion lines were distinguished from the diploid counterpart by stomatal characteristics such as increased size and lower density. The changes in the stomatal apparatus did not affect the stomatal conductance. When exposed to drought the carbohydrate concentrations increased more strongly in the fusion lines than in the diploid line. Two fusion lines consumed significantly less water with regard to height growth, producing equivalent or increased relative stem biomass under drought compared to their diploid relative. Therefore, these tetraploid fusion lines are interesting candidates for short rotation biomass plantation on dry sites.

  10. Essential Role of Caffeoyl Coenzyme A O-Methyltransferase in Lignin Biosynthesis in Woody Poplar Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Morrison, W. Herbert; Himmelsbach, David S.; Poole, Farris L.; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2000-01-01

    Caffeoyl coenzyme A O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT) has recently been shown to participate in lignin biosynthesis in herbacious tobacco plants. Here, we demonstrate that CCoAOMT is essential in lignin biosynthesis in woody poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba) plants. In poplar stems, CCoAOMT was found to be expressed in all lignifying cells including vessel elements and fibers as well as in xylem ray parenchyma cells. Repression of CCoAOMT expression by the antisense approach in transgenic poplar plants caused a significant decrease in total lignin content as detected by both Klason lignin assay and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The reduction in lignin content was the result of a decrease in both guaiacyl and syringyl lignins as determined by in-source pyrolysis mass spectrometry. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy indicated that the reduction in lignin content resulted in a less condensed and less cross-linked lignin structure in wood. Repression of CCoAOMT expression also led to coloration of wood and an elevation of wall-bound p-hydroxybenzoic acid. Taken together, these results indicate that CCoAOMT plays a dominant role in the methylation of the 3-hydroxyl group of caffeoyl CoA, and the CCoAOMT-mediated methylation reaction is essential to channel substrates for 5-methoxylation of hydroxycinnamates. They also suggest that antisense repression of CCoAOMT is an efficient means for genetic engineering of trees with low lignin content. PMID:11027707

  11. Non-destructive Analysis Chlorophyll Content of Different Genotypes of Poplars Based on Hyperspectral Reflectance Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, S.; Dian, Y.; Wang, R.; Peng, L.; Liu, X.; Zhou, Z.; Zhong, S.; Wang, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Leaf Chlorophyll content (Ct) indicates plant physiological status and can be detected by hyperspectral measurements. However, it is difficult to conclude that different genotypes of same species have the same relationship with the hyperspectral data. The aim of this paper was to test that whether the different genotypes of same species have the similar relationship with hyperspectral reflectance. First of all, spectral reflectance of populus simonii (Populus simonii Carr) and I-72 poplar (Populus euramericana cv. ‘San Martino I-72/58’) were collected by spectrometric meter, and then extract chlorophyll index (CI) and other 11 types of vegetation indices from the hyperspectral reflectance data. At last, relationships between different vegetation indices and Ct of the two genotypes of poplar were compared. Results show that (1) the relationships between SPAD value and Ct are different in the low and high Ct level, we can choose proper vegetation index, REPIG, mSR705 and SDr/SDb et al to predict the Ct value. (2) Meanwhile, we can use PSSRb and PRI to distinguish fine difference between different genotypes.

  12. Effect of Temperature on Postillumination Isoprene Emission in Oak and Poplar1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ziru; Ratliff, Ellen A.; Sharkey, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Isoprene emission from broadleaf trees is highly temperature dependent, accounts for much of the hydrocarbon emission from plants, and has a profound effect on atmospheric chemistry. We studied the temperature response of postillumination isoprene emission in oak (Quercus robur) and poplar (Populus deltoides) leaves in order to understand the regulation of isoprene emission. Upon darkening a leaf, isoprene emission fell nearly to zero but then increased for several minutes before falling back to nearly zero. Time of appearance of this burst of isoprene was highly temperature dependent, occurring sooner at higher temperatures. We hypothesize that this burst represents an intermediate pool of metabolites, probably early metabolites in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway, accumulated upstream of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP). The amount of this early metabolite(s) averaged 2.9 times the amount of plastidic DMADP. DMADP increased with temperature up to 35°C before starting to decrease; in contrast, the isoprene synthase rate constant increased up to 40°C, the highest temperature at which it could be assessed. During a rapid temperature switch from 30°C to 40°C, isoprene emission increased transiently. It was found that an increase in isoprene synthase activity is primarily responsible for this transient increase in emission levels, while DMADP level stayed constant during the switch. One hour after switching to 40°C, the amount of DMADP fell but the rate constant for isoprene synthase remained constant, indicating that the high temperature falloff in isoprene emission results from a reduction in the supply of DMADP rather than from changes in isoprene synthase activity. PMID:21177471

  13. Variation in genomic methylation in natural populations of chinese white poplar.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kaifeng; Song, Yuepeng; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2013-01-01

    It is thought that methylcytosine can be inherited through meiosis and mitosis, and that epigenetic variation may be under genetic control or correlation may be caused by neutral drift. However, DNA methylation also varies with tissue, developmental stage, and environmental factors. Eliminating these factors, we analyzed the levels and patterns, diversity and structure of genomic methylcytosine in the xylem of nine natural populations of Chinese white poplar. On average, the relative total methylation and non-methylation levels were approximately 26.567% and 42.708% (P<0.001), respectively. Also, the relative CNG methylation level was higher than the relative CG methylation level. The relative methylation/non-methylation levels were significantly different among the nine natural populations. Epigenetic diversity ranged from 0.811 (Gansu) to 1.211 (Shaanxi), and the coefficients of epigenetic differentiation (GST  = 0.159) were assessed by Shannon's diversity index. Co-inertia analysis indicated that methylation-sensitive polymorphism (MSP) and genomic methylation pattern (CG-CNG) profiles gave similar distributions. Using a between-group eigen analysis, we found that the Hebei and Shanxi populations were independent of each other, but the Henan population intersected with the other populations, to some degree. Genome methylation in Populus tomentosa presented tissue-specific characteristics and the relative 5'-CCGG methylation level was higher in xylem than in leaves. Meanwhile, the genome methylation in the xylem shows great epigenetic variation and could be fixed and inherited though mitosis. Compared to genetic structure, data suggest that epigenetic and genetic variation do not completely match.

  14. The poplar basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BEE3 - Like gene affects biomass production by enhancing proliferation of xylem cells in poplar.

    PubMed

    Noh, Seol Ah; Choi, Young-Im; Cho, Jin-Seong; Lee, Hyoshin

    2015-06-19

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in many aspects of plant growth and development, including regulation of vascular cambium activities and cell elongation. BR-induced BEE3 (brassinosteroid enhanced expression 3) is required for a proper BR response. Here, we identified a poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) BEE3-like gene, PagBEE3L, encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-type transcription factor. Expression of PagBEE3L was induced by brassinolide (BL). Transcripts of PagBEE3L were mainly detected in stems, with the internode having a low level of transcription and the node having a relatively higher level. The function of the PagBEE3L gene was investigated through phenotypic analyses with PagBEE3L-overexpressing (ox) transgenic lines. This work particularly focused on a potential role of PagBEE3L in stem growth and development of polar. The PagBEE3L-ox poplar showed thicker and longer stems than wild-type plants. The xylem cells from the stems of PagBEE3L-ox plants revealed remarkably enhanced proliferation, resulting in an earlier thickening growth than wild-type plants. Therefore, this work suggests that xylem development of poplar is accelerated in PagBEE3L-ox plants and PagBEE3L plays a role in stem growth by increasing the proliferation of xylem cells to promote the initial thickening growth of poplar stems.

  15. Identification of 4CL Genes in Desert Poplars and Their Changes in Expression in Response to Salt Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cai-Hua; Ma, Tao; Luo, Wen-Chun; Xu, Jian-Mei; Liu, Jian-Quan; Wan, Dong-Shi

    2015-09-18

    4-Coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) genes are critical for the biosynthesis of plant phenylpropanoids. Here we identified 20 4CL genes in the genomes of two desert poplars (Populus euphratica and P. pruinosa) and salt-sensitive congener (P. trichocarpa), but 12 in Salix suchowensis (Salix willow). Phylogenetic analyses clustered all Salicaceae 4CL genes into two clades, and one of them (corresponding to the 4CL-like clade from Arabidopsis) showed signals of adaptive evolution, with more genes retained in Populus than Salix and Arabidopsis. We also found that 4CL12 (in 4CL-like clade) showed positive selection along the two desert poplar lineages. Transcriptional profiling analyses indicated that the expression of 4CL2, 4CL11, and 4CL12 changed significantly in one or both desert poplars in response to salt stress compared to that of in P. trichocarpa. Our results suggest that the evolution of the 4CL genes may have contributed to the development of salt tolerance in the two desert poplars.

  16. Down-regulation of GIGANTEA-like genes increases plant growth and salt stress tolerance in poplar.

    PubMed

    Ke, Qingbo; Kim, Ho Soo; Wang, Zhi; Ji, Chang Yoon; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Choi, Young-Im; Xu, Bingcheng; Deng, Xiping; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2017-03-01

    The flowering time regulator GIGANTEA (GI) connects networks involved in developmental stage transitions and environmental stress responses in Arabidopsis. However, little is known about the role of GI in growth, development and responses to environmental challenges in the perennial plant poplar. Here, we identified and functionally characterized three GI-like genes (PagGIa, PagGIb and PagGIc) from poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). PagGIs are predominantly nuclear localized and their transcripts are rhythmically expressed, with a peak around zeitgeber time 12 under long-day conditions. Overexpressing PagGIs in wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis induced early flowering and salt sensitivity, while overexpressing PagGIs in the gi-2 mutant completely or partially rescued its delayed flowering and enhanced salt tolerance phenotypes. Furthermore, the PagGIs-PagSOS2 complexes inhibited PagSOS2-regulated phosphorylation of PagSOS1 in the absence of stress, whereas these inhibitions were eliminated due to the degradation of PagGIs under salt stress. Down-regulation of PagGIs by RNA interference led to vigorous growth, higher biomass and enhanced salt stress tolerance in transgenic poplar plants. Taken together, these results indicate that several functions of Arabidopsis GI are conserved in its poplar orthologues, and they lay the foundation for developing new approaches to producing salt-tolerant trees for sustainable development on marginal lands worldwide.

  17. Expression Pattern of ERF Gene Family under Multiple Abiotic Stresses in Populus simonii × P. nigra.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wenjing; Zhang, Xuemei; Zhou, Boru; Zhao, Kai; Li, Renhua; Jiang, Tingbo

    2017-01-01

    Identification of gene expression patterns of key genes across multiple abiotic stresses is critical for mechanistic understanding of stress resistance in plant. In the present study, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in di-haploid Populus simonii × P. nigra under respective stresses of NaCl, KCl, CdCl2, and PEG. On the basis of RNA-Seq, we detected 247 DEGs that are shared by the four stresses in wild type poplar, and mRNA abundance of the DEGs were validated in transgenic poplar overexpressing ERF76 gene by RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR. Results from gene ontology analysis indicated that these genes are enriched in significant pathways, such as phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, phenylalanine metabolism, starch and sucrose metabolism, and plant hormone signal transduction. Ethylene response factor (ERF) gene family plays significant role in plant abiotic stress responses. We also investigated expression pattern of ERF gene family under the four stresses. The ERFs and DEGs share similar expression pattern across the four stresses. The transgenic poplar is superior to WT in morphologic, physiological and biochemical traits, which demonstrated the ERF76 gene plays a significant role in stress resistance. These studies will give a rise in understanding the stress response mechanisms in poplar.

  18. Expression Pattern of ERF Gene Family under Multiple Abiotic Stresses in Populus simonii × P. nigra

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wenjing; Zhang, Xuemei; Zhou, Boru; Zhao, Kai; Li, Renhua; Jiang, Tingbo

    2017-01-01

    Identification of gene expression patterns of key genes across multiple abiotic stresses is critical for mechanistic understanding of stress resistance in plant. In the present study, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in di-haploid Populus simonii × P. nigra under respective stresses of NaCl, KCl, CdCl2, and PEG. On the basis of RNA-Seq, we detected 247 DEGs that are shared by the four stresses in wild type poplar, and mRNA abundance of the DEGs were validated in transgenic poplar overexpressing ERF76 gene by RNA-Seq and RT-qPCR. Results from gene ontology analysis indicated that these genes are enriched in significant pathways, such as phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, phenylalanine metabolism, starch and sucrose metabolism, and plant hormone signal transduction. Ethylene response factor (ERF) gene family plays significant role in plant abiotic stress responses. We also investigated expression pattern of ERF gene family under the four stresses. The ERFs and DEGs share similar expression pattern across the four stresses. The transgenic poplar is superior to WT in morphologic, physiological and biochemical traits, which demonstrated the ERF76 gene plays a significant role in stress resistance. These studies will give a rise in understanding the stress response mechanisms in poplar. PMID:28265277

  19. Extensive structural renovation of retrogenes in the evolution of the Populus genome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenglin; Zhang, Yong; Long, Manyuan

    2009-12-01

    Retroposition, as an important copy mechanism for generating new genes, was believed to play a negligible role in plants. As a representative dicot, the genomic sequences of Populus (poplar; Populus trichocarpa) provide an opportunity to investigate this issue. We identified 106 retrogenes and found the majority (89%) of them are associated with functional signatures in sequence evolution, transcription, and (or) translation. Remarkably, examination of gene structures revealed extensive structural renovation of these retrogenes: we identified 18 (17%) of them undergoing either chimerization to form new chimerical genes and (or) intronization (transformation into intron sequences of previously exonic sequences) to generate new intron-containing genes. Such a change might occur at a high speed, considering eight out of 18 such cases occurred recently after divergence between Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Populus. This pattern also exists in Arabidopsis, with 15 intronized retrogenes occurring after the divergence between Arabidopsis and papaya (Carica papaya). Thus, the frequency of intronization in dicots revealed its importance as a mechanism in the evolution of exon-intron structure. In addition, we also examined the potential impact of the Populus nascent sex determination system on the chromosomal distribution of retrogenes and did not observe any significant effects of the extremely young sex chromosomes.

  20. Extensive Structural Renovation of Retrogenes in the Evolution of the Populus Genome1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhenglin; Zhang, Yong; Long, Manyuan

    2009-01-01

    Retroposition, as an important copy mechanism for generating new genes, was believed to play a negligible role in plants. As a representative dicot, the genomic sequences of Populus (poplar; Populus trichocarpa) provide an opportunity to investigate this issue. We identified 106 retrogenes and found the majority (89%) of them are associated with functional signatures in sequence evolution, transcription, and (or) translation. Remarkably, examination of gene structures revealed extensive structural renovation of these retrogenes: we identified 18 (17%) of them undergoing either chimerization to form new chimerical genes and (or) intronization (transformation into intron sequences of previously exonic sequences) to generate new intron-containing genes. Such a change might occur at a high speed, considering eight out of 18 such cases occurred recently after divergence between Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Populus. This pattern also exists in Arabidopsis, with 15 intronized retrogenes occurring after the divergence between Arabidopsis and papaya (Carica papaya). Thus, the frequency of intronization in dicots revealed its importance as a mechanism in the evolution of exon-intron structure. In addition, we also examined the potential impact of the Populus nascent sex determination system on the chromosomal distribution of retrogenes and did not observe any significant effects of the extremely young sex chromosomes. PMID:19789289

  1. The response of Populus spp. to cadmium stress: chemical, morphological and proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Marta; Imperiale, Davide; Maestri, Elena; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2013-10-01

    Poplar (Populus) species are seen as candidates for removing heavy metal contamination from polluted soil. A bottom-up multidisciplinary approach was utilized to compare the performances of clones 58-861 and Poli (Populus nigra) and A4A, a Populus nigra × Populus deltoides hybrid to Cd toxicity. Qualitative and quantitative differences in their tolerance to Cd exposure and the uptake, accumulation and translocation of Cd were noted following the hydroponic exposure of rooted cuttings to 20 μM CdSO₄ for either 48 h or 14 d. Cadmium was less toxic for the hybrid clone A4A as compared to Poli and 58-861. Cd uptake and root to shoot translocation were determined by AAS, and its compartmentation was analyzed using SEM/EDX. A comparative proteomic approach was utilized to identify changes in proteins expression according to dose and time of exposure. Toxicity to Cd mainly influenced proteins related to general defense, stress response and carbohydrate metabolism.

  2. RepPop: A Database for Repetitive Elements in Populus Trichocarpa

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zhou, Fengfeng; Xu, Ying

    The populus was selected as the first tree with the genome to be sequenced, mainly due to its small genome size, the wide deployment worldwide (30+ species), and its short juvenile period. Its rich content of cellulose, which is one of the most important source for biofuel. A female clone of P. trichocarpa was chosen to be sequenced. The current assembly of Populus genome is release 1.0, whose small insert end-sequence coverage is 7.5X, and it was released in June 2004. It consists of 22,012 sequences (including the 19 chromosomes) and the total length is 485,510,911 bps. The data was downloaded from the offical site of the Populus trichocarpa genome sequencing project. The latest version of the genome can be found at the Poplar Genome Project at JGI Eukaryotic Genomics. Duplication regions introduce significant difficulties into the correct assemblying of sequence contigs. We identified all the repetitive elements in the populus genome. We further assign each of them as different classes of repetitive elements, including DNA transposons, RNA retrotransposons, Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITE), Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR), and Segmental Duplications (SD), etc. We organized the annotations into this easily browsable, searchable, and blastable database, RepPop, for the whole community.[From website for RepPop at http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/~ffzhou/RepPop/

  3. Dechlorination of PCBs in the rhizosphere of Switchgrass and Poplar

    PubMed Central

    Meggo, Richard E.; Schnoor, Jerald L.; Hu, Dingfei

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (PCB 52, 77, and 153) singly and in mixture were spiked and aged in soil microcosms and subsequently planted with switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) or poplar (Populus deltoids x nigra DN34). The planted reactors showed significantly greater reductions in PCB parent compounds when compared to unplanted systems after 32 weeks. There was evidence of reductive dechlorination in both planted and unplanted systems, but the planted microcosms with fully developed roots and rhizospheres showed greater biotransformation than the unplanted reactors. These dechlorination products accounted for approximately all of the molar mass of parent compound lost. Based on the transformation products, reductive dechlorination pathways are proposed for rhizospheric biotransformation of PCB 52, 77, and 153. This is the first report of rhizosphere biotransformation pathways for reductive dechlorination in marginally aerobic, intermittently flooded soil as evidenced by a mass balance on transformation products. PMID:23603468

  4. Land use and wind direction drive hybridization between cultivated poplar and native species in a Mediterranean floodplain environment.

    PubMed

    Paffetti, Donatella; Travaglini, Davide; Labriola, Mariaceleste; Buonamici, Anna; Bottalico, Francesca; Materassi, Alessandro; Fasano, Gianni; Nocentini, Susanna; Vettori, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Deforestation and intensive land use management with plantations of fast-growing tree species, like Populus spp., may endanger native trees not only by eliminating or reducing their habitats, but also by diminishing their species integrity via hybridization and introgression. The genus Populus has persistent natural hybrids because clonal and sexual reproduction is common. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of land use management of poplar plantations on the spatial genetic structure and species composition in poplar stands. Specifically, we studied the potential breeding between natural and cultivated poplar populations in the Mediterranean environment to gain insight into spontaneous hybridization events between exotic and native poplars; we also used a GIS-based model to evaluate the potential threats related to an intensive land use management. Two study areas, both near to poplar plantations (P.×euramericana), were designated in the native mixed stands of P. alba, P. nigra and P.×canescens within protected areas. We found that the spatial genetic structure differed between the two stands and their differences depended on their environmental features. We detected a hybridization event with P.×canescens that was made possible by the synchrony of flowering between the poplar plantation and P.×canescens and facilitated by the wind intensity and direction favoring the spread of pollen. Taken together, our results indicate that natural and artificial barriers are crucial to mitigate the threats, and so they should be explicitly considered in land use planning. For example, our results suggest the importance of conserving rows of trees and shrubs along rivers and in agricultural landscapes. In sum, it is necessary to understand, evaluate, and monitor the spread of exotic species and genetic material to ensure effective land use management and mitigation of their impact on native tree populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  5. PtrWRKY73, a salicylic acid-inducible poplar WRKY transcription factor, is involved in disease resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yanjiao; Jiang, Yuanzhong; Ye, Shenglong; Karim, Abdul; Ling, Zhengyi; He, Yunqiu; Yang, Siqi; Luo, Keming

    2015-05-01

    A salicylic acid-inducible WRKY gene, PtrWRKY73, from Populus trichocarpa , was isolated and characterized. Overexpression of PtrWRKY73 in Arabidopsis thaliana increased resistance to biotrophic pathogens but reduced resistance against necrotrophic pathogens. WRKY transcription factors are commonly involved in plant defense responses. However, limited information is available about the roles of the WRKY genes in poplar defense. In this study, we isolated a salicylic acid (SA)-inducible WRKY gene, PtrWRKY73, from Populus trichocarpa, belonging to group I family and containing two WRKY domains, a D domain and an SP cluster. PtrWRKY73 was expressed predominantly in roots, old leaves, sprouts and stems, especially in phloem and its expression was induced in response to treatment with exogenous SA. PtrWRKY73 was localized to the nucleus of plant cells and exhibited transcriptional activation. Overexpression of PtrWRKY73 in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in increased resistance to a virulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae (PstDC3000), but more sensitivity to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. The SA-mediated defense-associated genes, such as PR1, PR2 and PAD4, were markedly up-regulated in transgenic plants overexpressing PtrWRKY73. Arabidopsis non-expressor of PR1 (NPR1) was not affected, whereas a defense-related gene PAL4 had reduced in PtrWRKY73 overexpressor plants. Together, these results indicated that PtrWRKY73 plays a positive role in plant resistance to biotrophic pathogens but a negative effect on resistance against necrotrophic pathogens.

  6. Gender determination in populus

    SciTech Connect

    McLetchie, D.N.; Tuskan, G.A.

    1994-12-31

    Gender, the expression of maleness or femaleness, in dioecious plants has been associated with changes in morphology, physiology, ecological position, and commercial importance of several species, including members of the Salicaceae family. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain the expression of gender in Salicaceae, including sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian genes, quantitative genes, environment, and genotype-by-environment interactions. Published reports would favor a genetic basis for gender. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers associated with gender in a segregating family of hybrid poplars. Bulked segregant analysis and chi-squared analysis were used to test for the occurrence of sex chromosomes, individual loci, and chromosome ratios (i.e., ploidy levels) as the mechanisms for gender determination. Examination of 2488 PCR based RAPD markers from 1219 primers revealed nine polymorphic bands between male and female bulked samples. However, linkage analysis indicated that none of these markers were significantly associated with gender. Chisquared results for difference in male-to-female ratios between diploid and triploid genotypes also revealed no significant differences. These findings suggest gender is not controlled via sex chromosomes, simple Mendelian loci or ratios of autosome to gender-determining loci. It is possible that gender is determined genetically by regions of the genome not sampled by the tested markers or by a complex of loci operating in an additive threshold manner or in an epistatic manner. It is also possible that gender is determined environmentally at an early zygote stage, canalizing gender expression.

  7. Isolation and characterization of galactinol synthases from hybrid poplar

    PubMed Central

    Unda, Faride; Canam, Thomas; Preston, Lindsay; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2012-01-01

    The raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs) serve as transport carbohydrates in the phloem, storage compounds in sink tissues, and putative biological agents to combat both abiotic and biotic stress in several plant species. To investigate further the functional roles of this class of compounds in trees, two cDNAs encoding galactinol synthase (GolS, EC 2.4.1.123), which catalyses the first step in the biosynthesis of RFOs, were identified and cloned from hybrid poplar (Populus alba×grandidentata). Phylogenetic analyses of the Populus GolS isoforms with other known GolS proteins suggested a putative role for these enzymes during biotic or abiotic stress in hybrid poplar. The predicted protein sequences of both isoforms (Pa×gGolSI and Pa×gGolSII) showed characteristics of GolS proteins from other species, including a serine phosphorylation site and the ASAAP pentapeptide hydrophobic domain. Kinetic analyses of recombinant Pa×gGolSI and Pa×gGolSII resulted in Km values for UPD-galactose of 0.80 and 0.65 mM and Vmax values of 657.5 and 1245 nM min−1, respectively. Pa×gGolSI inherently possessed a broader pH and temperature range when compared with Pa×gGolSII. Interestingly, spatial and temporal expression analyses revealed that Pa×gGolSII transcript levels varied seasonally, while Pa×gGolSI did not, implying temperature-regulated transcriptional control of this gene in addition to the observed thermosensitivity of the respective enzyme. This evidence suggested that Pa×gGolSI may be involved in basic metabolic activities such as storage, while Pa×gGolSII is probably involved in seasonal mobilization of carbohydrates. PMID:22197892

  8. The zinc finger protein PtaZFP2 negatively controls stem growth and gene expression responsiveness to external mechanical loads in poplar.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ludovic; Decourteix, Mélanie; Badel, Eric; Huguet, Stéphanie; Moulia, Bruno; Julien, Jean-Louis; Leblanc-Fournier, Nathalie

    2014-07-01

    Mechanical cues are essential signals regulating plant growth and development. In response to wind, trees develop a thigmomorphogenetic response characterized by a reduction in longitudinal growth, an increase in diameter growth, and changes in mechanical properties. The molecular mechanisms behind these processes are poorly understood. In poplar, PtaZFP2, a C2H2 transcription factor, is rapidly up-regulated after stem bending. To investigate the function of PtaZFP2, we analyzed PtaZFP2-overexpressing poplars (Populus tremula × Populus alba). To unravel the genes downstream PtaZFP2, a transcriptomic analysis was performed. PtaZFP2-overexpressing poplars showed longitudinal and cambial growth reductions together with an increase in the tangent and hardening plastic moduli. The regulation level of mechanoresponsive genes was much weaker after stem bending in PtaZFP2-overexpressing poplars than in wild-type plants, showing that PtaZFP2 negatively modulates plant responsiveness to mechanical stimulation. Microarray analysis revealed a high proportion of down-regulated genes in PtaZFP2-overexpressing poplars. Among these genes, several were also shown to be regulated by mechanical stimulation. Our results confirmed the important role of PtaZFP2 during plant acclimation to mechanical load, in particular through a negative control of plant molecular responsiveness. This desensitization process could modulate the amplitude and duration of the plant response during recurrent stimuli.

  9. Precocious flowering in trees: the FLOWERING LOCUS T gene as a research and breeding tool in Populus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanling; Harry, David E; Ma, Cathleen; Yuceer, Cetin; Hsu, Chuan-Yu; Vikram, Vikas; Shevchenko, Olga; Etherington, Elizabeth; Strauss, Steven H

    2010-06-01

    Expression of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) and its homologues has been shown to accelerate the onset of flowering in a number of plant species, including poplar (Populus spp.). The application of FT should be of particular use in forest trees, as it could greatly accelerate and enable new kinds of breeding and research. Recent evidence showing the extent to which FT is effective in promoting flowering in trees is discussed, and its effectiveness in poplar is reported. Results using one FT gene from Arabidopsis and two from poplar, all driven by a heat-inducible promoter, transformed into two poplar genotypes are also described. Substantial variation in flowering response was observed depending on the FT gene and genetic background. Heat-induced plants shorter than 30 cm failed to flower as well as taller plants. Plants exposed to daily heat treatments lasting 3 weeks tended to produce fewer abnormal flowers than those in heat treatments of shorter durations; increasing the inductive temperature from 37 degrees C to 40 degrees C produced similar benefits. Using optimal induction conditions, approximately 90% of transgenic plants could be induced to flower. When induced FT rootstocks were grafted with scions that lacked FT, flowering was only observed in rootstocks. The results suggest that a considerable amount of species- or genotype-specific adaptation will be required to develop FT into a reliable means for shortening the generation cycle for breeding in poplar.

  10. Sulfur content of hybrid poplar cuttings fumigated with sulfur dioxide

    Treesearch

    Keith F. Jensen

    1975-01-01

    Hybrid poplar cuttings were fumigated with sulfur dioxide ranging in concentration from 0.1 to 5 ppm for periods of 5 to 80 hours. At the end of the fumigation periods, the cuttings were harvested and the sulfur and chlorophyll contents of the leaves were measured. At 0.1 ppm and 0.25 ppm the sulfur content initially increased, but decreased as fumigation continued. At...

  11. Phylogenetic and Taxonomic Status Analyses of the Abaso Section from Multiple Nuclear Genes and Plastid Fragments Reveal New Insights into the North America Origin of Populus (Salicaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xia; Wang, Zhaoshan; Shao, Wenhao; Ye, Zhanyang; Zhang, Jianguo

    2017-01-01

    Although, the Abaso section is widely accepted as an independent section, the taxonomic status of Populus mexicana (section Abaso) has not yet been resolved due to the limited availability markers and/or the lack of P. mexicana specimens in previous studies. Thirty-one poplar species that represent six sections of the Populus genus were sampled, and 23 single-copy nuclear DNA and 34 chloroplast fragments were sequenced. The present study obtained two updated phylogenies of Populus. We found that monophyly of the genus Populus is strongly supported by nuclear and plastid gene, which is consistent with previous studies. P. mexicana, diverged first in the nuclear DNA tree, which occupied the basal position, implying that the section Abaso may be the most ancestral lineage in extant populous species. Given that the short branches and low statistical support for the divergence of sections Abaso and Turanga, this observation probably indicated that a rapid radiation evolution following the early split of the genus Populus. In the plastid tree, P. mexicana clustered with modern-day species of section Tacamahaca in the plastid tree. Based on cytoplasmic and single-copy nuclear marker sequences, we hypothesized that chloroplast capture resulted in the inconsistent position of P. mexicana between the phylogenetic trees. Given the first unequivocal records of poplar fossils from the Eocene with similar leaf morphology to the extant P. mexicana and the phylogenetic positions of P. mexicana in our study, we support the hypothesis that the Populus genus originated in North America, which will provide new insights to the development of the origin of Populus species. PMID:28101098

  12. Yellow-Poplar Rooting Habits

    Treesearch

    John K. Francis

    1979-01-01

    Although the configuration of pole-sized yellow-poplar root systems in Tennessee is quite variable, a branched taproot with several widely spreading laterals is typical. Rooting depth is particularly limited by clayey texture, wetness, and firmness of subsoils.

  13. Stomatal factors and vulnerability of stem xylem to cavitation in poplars.

    PubMed

    Arango-Velez, Adriana; Zwiazek, Janusz J; Thomas, Barb R; Tyree, Melvin T

    2011-10-01

    The relationships between the vulnerability of stem xylem to cavitation, stomatal conductance, stomatal density, and leaf and stem water potential were examined in six hybrid poplar (P38P38, Walker, Okanese, Northwest, Assiniboine and Berlin) and balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) clones. Stem xylem cavitation resistance was examined with the Cavitron technique in well-watered plants grown in the greenhouse. To investigate stomatal responses to drought, plants were subjected to drought stress by withholding watering for 5 (mild drought) and 7 (severe drought) days and to stress recovery by rewatering severely stressed plants for 30 min and 2 days. The clones varied in stomatal sensitivity to drought and vulnerability to stem xylem cavitation. P38P38 reduced stomatal conductance in response to mild stress while the balsam poplar clone maintained high leaf stomatal conductance under more severe drought stress conditions. Differences between the severely stressed clones were also observed in leaf water potentials with no or relatively small decreases in Assiniboine, P38P38, Okanese and Walker. Vulnerability to drought-induced stem xylem embolism revealed that balsam poplar and Northwest clones reached loss of conductivity at lower stem water potentials compared with the remaining clones. There was a strong link between stem xylem resistance to cavitation and stomatal responsiveness to drought stress in balsam poplar and P38P38. However, the differences in stomatal responsiveness to mild drought suggest that other drought-resistant strategies may also play a key role in some clones of poplars exposed to drought stress. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2011.

  14. Lonsdalea quercina subsp. populi subsp. nov., isolated from bark canker of poplar trees.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Tímea; Lakatos, Tamás; Koltay, András

    2013-06-01

    Seven Gram-negative bacterial strains were isolated from oozing bark canker of poplar (Populus × euramericana) trees in Hungary. They showed high (>98.3%) 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to Lonsdalea quercina; however, they differed from this species in several phenotypic characteristics. Multilocus sequence analysis based on three housekeeping genes (gyrB, atpD and infB) revealed, and DNA-DNA hybridization analysis confirmed, that this group of bacterial strains forms a distinct lineage within the species Lonsdalea quercina. A detailed study of phenotypic and physiological characteristics confirmed the separation of isolates from poplars from other subspecies of L. quercina; therefore, a novel subspecies, Lonsdalea quercina subsp. populi, type strain NY060(T) (=DSM 25466(T)=NCAIM B 02483(T)), is proposed.

  15. Expression of specific genes involved in Cd uptake, translocation, vacuolar compartmentalisation and recycling in Populus alba Villafranca clone.

    PubMed

    Romè, Chiara; Huang, Xin-Yuan; Danku, John; Salt, David E; Sebastiani, Luca

    2016-09-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a heavy metal toxic to humans and its occurrence in soils represents a significant environmental problem. Poplar trees may provide one possible option to help remove Cd contamination from soil. However, before this is practicable, the ability of poplar to accumulate Cd needs to be enhanced. A better understanding of the genes involved in Cd accumulation in poplar would help to achieve this goal. Here, we monitored the expression of genes known to be involved in Cd uptake, accumulation and translocation from other species, in order to provide information on their potential role in Cd accumulation in poplar. Cd concentration in poplar was significantly higher in roots than in stem and leaves in Cd treated plants. Expression of the poplar homologues of IRT1, NRAMP and OPT3 was initially increased after exposure to Cd but reduced after longer term Cd exposure. Exposure to Cd also influenced the accumulation of Fe, Ca, Cu, Mg and Mn in poplar. In particular, Cd treated plants had a higher concentration of Fe, Ca, Cu, and Mg in leaves and stem compared to control plants after one day and one week of experiment; while in roots after one month Cd treated plants had a lower concentration of Mn, Fe, Cu, Co, and Mg. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Enantioselective Transport and Biotransformation of Chiral Hydroxylated Metabolites of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in Whole Poplar Plants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxylated metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) have been found to be ubiquitous in the environment due to the oxidative metabolism of their parent PCBs. With more polarity, OH-PCBs may be more toxic and mobile than their parent compounds. However, the behavior and fate of OH-PCBs have been neglected in the environment because they are not the original contaminants. Some of these hydroxylated metabolites are chiral, and chiral compounds can be used to probe biological metabolic processes. Therefore, chiral OH-PCBs were selected to study their uptake, translocation, transformation, and enantioselectivity in plants in this work. Poplars (Populus deltoides × nigra, DN34), a model plant with complete genomic sequence, were hydroponically exposed to 5-hydroxy-2,2′,3,4′,6-pentachlorobiphenyl (5-OH-PCB91) and 5-hydroxy-2,2′,3,5′,6-pentachlorobiphenyl (5-OH-PCB95) for 10 days. Chiral 5-OH-PCB91 and 5-OH-PCB95 were clearly shown to be sorbed, taken up, and translocated in whole poplars, and they were detected in various tissues of whole poplars. However, the enantioselectivity of poplar for 5-OH-PCB91 and 5-OH-PCB95 proved to be quite different. The second-eluting enantiomer of OH-PCB95, separated on a chiral column (Phenomenex Lux Cellulose-1), was enantioselectively removed in whole poplar. Enantiomeric fractions in the middle xylem, top bark, top xylem, and stem, reached 0.803 ± 0.022, 0.643 ± 0.110, 0.835 ± 0.087, and 0.830 ± 0.029, respectively. Therefore, 5-OH-PCB95 was significantly enantioselectively biotransformed inside poplar tissues, in contrast to nearly racemic mixtures of 5-OH-PCB95 remaining in hydroponic solutions. Unlike 5-OH-PCB95, 5-OH-PCB91 remained nearly racemic in most tissues of whole poplars during 10 day exposure, suggesting the enantiomers of 5-OH-PCB91 were equally transported and metabolized in whole poplars. This is the first evidence of enantioselectivity of chiral OH-PCBs and suggests that poplars can

  17. Poplar PtabZIP1-like enhances lateral root formation and biomass growth under drought stress

    DOE PAGES

    Dash, Madhumita; Yordanov, Yordan S.; Georgieva, Tatyana; ...

    2017-02-10

    Developing drought-resistance varieties is a major goal for bioenergy crops, such as poplar (Populus), which will be grown on marginal lands with little or no water input. Root architecture can affect drought resistance, but few genes that affect root architecture in relation to water availability have been identified. Here in this study, using activation tagging in the prime bioenergy crop poplar, we have identified a mutant that overcomes the block of lateral root (LR) formation under osmotic stress. Positioning of the tag, validation of the activation and recapitulation showed that the phenotype is caused by the poplar PtabZIP1-like (PtabZIP1L) genemore » with highest homology to bZIP1 from Arabidopsis. PtabZIP1L is predominantly expressed in roots, particularly in zones where lateral root primordia (LRP) initiate and LR differentiate and emerge. Transgenics overexpressing PtabZIP1L showed precocious LRP and LR development, while PtabZIP1L suppression significantly delayed both LRP and LR formation. Transgenic overexpression and suppression of PtabZIP1L also resulted in modulation of key metabolites like proline, asparagine, valine and several flavonoids. Consistently, expression of both of the poplar Proline Dehydrogenase orthologs and two of the Flavonol Synthases genes was also increased and decreased in overexpressed and suppressed transgenics, respectively. These findings suggest that PtabZIP1L mediates LR development and drought resistance through modulation of multiple metabolic pathways.« less

  18. Poplar PtabZIP1-like enhances lateral root formation and biomass growth under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Dash, Madhumita; Yordanov, Yordan S; Georgieva, Tatyana; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Yordanova, Elena; Busov, Victor

    2017-02-01

    Developing drought-resistance varieties is a major goal for bioenergy crops, such as poplar (Populus), which will be grown on marginal lands with little or no water input. Root architecture can affect drought resistance, but few genes that affect root architecture in relation to water availability have been identified. Here, using activation tagging in the prime bioenergy crop poplar, we have identified a mutant that overcomes the block of lateral root (LR) formation under osmotic stress. Positioning of the tag, validation of the activation and recapitulation showed that the phenotype is caused by the poplar PtabZIP1-like (PtabZIP1L) gene with highest homology to bZIP1 from Arabidopsis. PtabZIP1L is predominantly expressed in roots, particularly in zones where lateral root primordia (LRP) initiate and LR differentiate and emerge. Transgenics overexpressing PtabZIP1L showed precocious LRP and LR development, while PtabZIP1L suppression significantly delayed both LRP and LR formation. Transgenic overexpression and suppression of PtabZIP1L also resulted in modulation of key metabolites like proline, asparagine, valine and several flavonoids. Consistently, expression of both of the poplar Proline Dehydrogenase orthologs and two of the Flavonol Synthases genes was also increased and decreased in overexpressed and suppressed transgenics, respectively. These findings suggest that PtabZIP1L mediates LR development and drought resistance through modulation of multiple metabolic pathways.

  19. Evaluation of Appropriate Reference Genes for Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR Studies in Different Tissues of a Desert Poplar via Comparision of Different Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hou-Ling; Li, Lan; Tang, Sha; Yuan, Chao; Tian, Qianqian; Su, Yanyan; Li, Hui-Guang; Zhao, Lin; Yin, Weilun; Zhao, Rui; Xia, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Despite the unshakable status of reverse transcription-quantitative PCR in gene expression analysis, it has certain disadvantages, including that the results are highly dependent on the reference genes selected for data normalization. Since inappropriate endogenous control genes will lead to inaccurate target gene expression profiles, the validation of suitable internal reference genes is essential. Given the increasing interest in functional genes and genomics of Populus euphratica, a desert poplar showing extraordinary adaptation to salt stress, we evaluated the expression stability of ten candidate reference genes in P. euphratica roots, stems, and leaves under salt stress conditions. We used five algorithms, namely, ΔCt, NormFinder, geNorm, GrayNorm, and a rank aggregation method (RankAggreg) to identify suitable normalizers. To support the suitability of the identified reference genes and to compare the relative merits of these different algorithms, we analyzed and compared the relative expression levels of nine P. euphratica functional genes in different tissues. Our results indicate that a combination of multiple reference genes recommended by GrayNorm algorithm (e.g., a combination of Actin, EF1α, GAPDH, RP, UBQ in root) should be used instead of a single reference gene. These results are valuable for research of gene identification in different P. euphratica tissues. PMID:26343648

  20. Dense genetic linkage maps of three Populus species (Populus deltoides, P. nigra and P. trichocarpa) based on AFLP and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, M T; Storme, V; Ivens, B; Gusmão, J; Liu, B H; Hostyn, V; Van Slycken, J; Van Montagu, M; Boerjan, W

    2001-01-01

    Populus deltoides, P. nigra, and P. trichocarpa are the most important species for poplar breeding programs worldwide. In addition, Populus has become a model for fundamental research on trees. Linkage maps were constructed for these three species by analyzing progeny of two controlled crosses sharing the same female parent, Populus deltoides cv. S9-2 x P. nigra cv. Ghoy and P. deltoides cv. S9-2 x P. trichocarpa cv. V24. The two-way pseudotestcross mapping strategy was used to construct the maps. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers that segregated 1:1 were used to form the four parental maps. Microsatellites and sequence-tagged sites were used to align homoeologous groups between the maps and to merge linkage groups within the individual maps. Linkage analysis and alignment of the homoeologous groups resulted in 566 markers distributed over 19 groups for P. deltoides covering 86% of the genome, 339 markers distributed over 19 groups for P. trichocarpa covering 73%, and 369 markers distributed over 28 groups for P. nigra covering 61%. Several tests for randomness showed that the AFLP markers were randomly distributed over the genome. PMID:11404342

  1. Septoria Pathosystem Studies for Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Ostry, M.E.; Ward, R.T.

    2003-02-05

    A summary of research directed at the goal of minimizing damage of hybrid poplars and aspens caused by several diseases in the north central United States. Three approaches were taken: (1) validation to disease resistance among field planted somaclones (2) assessment of the genetic and pathosenic variation in Septoria and (3) selection to disease resistant clones in regional field trials.

  2. PtaRHE1, a Populus tremula × Populus alba RING-H2 protein of the ATL family, has a regulatory role in secondary phloem fibre development.

    PubMed

    Baldacci-Cresp, Fabien; Moussawi, Jihad; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Van Acker, Rebecca; Kohler, Annegret; Candiracci, Julie; Twyffels, Laure; Spokevicius, Antanas V; Bossinger, Gerd; Laurans, Françoise; Brunel, Nicole; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Boerjan, Wout; El Jaziri, Mondher; Baucher, Marie

    2015-06-01

    REALLY INTERESTING NEW GENE (RING) proteins play important roles in the regulation of many processes by recognizing target proteins for ubiquitination. Previously, we have shown that the expression of PtaRHE1, encoding a Populus tremula × Populus alba RING-H2 protein with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, is associated with tissues undergoing secondary growth. To further elucidate the role of PtaRHE1 in vascular tissues, we have undertaken a reverse genetic analysis in poplar. Within stem secondary vascular tissues, PtaRHE1 and its corresponding protein are expressed predominantly in the phloem. The downregulation of PtaRHE1 in poplar by artificial miRNA triggers alterations in phloem fibre patterning, characterized by an increased portion of secondary phloem fibres that have a reduced cell wall thickness and a change in lignin composition, with lower levels of syringyl units as compared with wild-type plants. Following an RNA-seq analysis, a biological network involving hormone stress signalling, as well as developmental processes, could be delineated. Several candidate genes possibly associated with the altered phloem fibre phenotype observed in amiRPtaRHE1 poplar were identified. Altogether, our data suggest a regulatory role for PtaRHE1 in secondary phloem fibre development.

  3. PdEPF1 regulates water-use efficiency and drought tolerance by modulating stomatal density in poplar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congpeng; Liu, Sha; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ying; Geng, Anke; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2016-03-01

    Water deficiency is a critical environmental condition that is seriously reducing global plant production. Improved water-use efficiency (WUE) and drought tolerance are effective strategies to address this problem. In this study, PdEPF1, a member of the EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR (EPF) family, was isolated from the fast-growing poplar clone NE-19 [Populus nigra × (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra)]. Significantly, higher PdEPF1 levels were detected after induction by dehydration and abscisic acid. To explore the biological functions of PdEPF1, transgenic triploid white poplars (Populus tomentosa 'YiXianCiZhu B385') overexpressing PdEPF1 were constructed. PdEPF1 overexpression resulted in increased water deficit tolerance and greater WUE. We confirmed that the transgenic lines with greater instantaneous WUE had approximately 30% lower transpiration but equivalent CO2 assimilation. Lower transpiration was associated with a 28% reduction in abaxial stomatal density. PdEPF1 overexpression not only strongly enhanced WUE, but also greatly improved drought tolerance, as measured by the leaf relative water content and water potential, under limited water conditions. In addition, the growth of these oxPdEPF1 plants was less adversely affected by reduced water availability than plants with a higher stomatal density, indicating that plants with a low stomatal density may be well suited to grow in water-scarce environments. Taken together, our data suggest that PdEPF1 improves WUE and confers drought tolerance in poplar; thus, it could be used to breed drought-tolerant plants with increased production under conditions of water deficiency.

  4. Populus deltoides Bartr ex Marsh.

    Treesearch

    D. T. Cooper

    1980-01-01

    Eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides), one of the largest eastern hardwoods, is short-lived but the fastest-growing commercial forest species in North America. It grows best on moist well-drained sands or silts near streams, often in pure stands. The lightweight, rather soft wood is used primarily for core stock in manufacturing fumiture and for pulpwood. Eastern...

  5. Modelling the growth of Populus species using Ecosystem Demography (ED) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Lebauer, D. S.; Feng, X.; Dietze, M. C.

    2010-12-01

    Hybrid poplar plantations are an important source being evaluated for biomass production. Effective management of such plantations requires adequate growth and yield models. The Ecosystem Demography model (ED) makes predictions about the large scales of interest in above- and belowground ecosystem structure and the fluxes of carbon and water from a description of the fine-scale physiological processes. In this study, we used a workflow management tool, the Predictive Ecophysiological Carbon flux Analyzer (PECAn), to integrate literature data, field measurement and the ED model to provide predictions of ecosystem functioning. Parameters for the ED ensemble runs were sampled from the posterior distribution of ecophysiological traits of Populus species compiled from the literature using a Bayesian meta-analysis approach. Sensitivity analysis was performed to identify the parameters which contribute the most to the uncertainties of the ED model output. Model emulation techniques were used to update parameter posterior distributions using field-observed data in northern Wisconsin hybrid poplar plantations. Model results were evaluated with 5-year field-observed data in a hybrid poplar plantation at New Franklin, MO. ED was then used to predict the spatial variability of poplar yield in the coterminous United States (United States minus Alaska and Hawaii). Sensitivity analysis showed that root respiration, dark respiration, growth respiration, stomatal slope and specific leaf area contribute the most to the uncertainty, which suggests that our field measurements and data collection should focus on these parameters. The ED model successfully captured the inter-annual and spatial variability of the yield of poplar. Analyses in progress with the ED model focus on evaluating the ecosystem services of short-rotation woody plantations, such as impacts on soil carbon storage, water use, and nutrient retention.

  6. Ecology and silviculture of poplar plantations

    Treesearch

    John A. Stanturf; Cees van Oosten; Daniel A. Netzer; Mark D. Coleman; C. Jeffrey Portwood

    2002-01-01

    Poplars are some of the fastest growing trees in North America and foresters have sought to capitalize on this potential since the 1940s. Interest in growing poplars has fluctuated, and objectives have shifted between producing sawlogs, pulp-wood, or more densely spaced "woodgrass" or biofuels. Currently, most poplar plantations are established for pulpwood...

  7. Insect enemies of yellow-poplar

    Treesearch

    Denver P. Burns; Denver P. Burns

    1970-01-01

    Yellow-poplar, like the other desirable hardwoods, is attacked by a variety of insects. However, only four species of insects are considered economically important: the tuliptree scale, the yellow-poplar weevil, the root-collar borer, and the Columbian timber beetle. These are native enemies of yellow-poplar (Liriodendvon tzllipifera L.) wherever the tree grows.

  8. Roles of Gibberellin Catabolism and Signaling in Growth and Physiological Response to Drought and Short-Day Photoperiods in Populus Trees

    PubMed Central

    Zawaski, Christine; Busov, Victor B.

    2014-01-01

    Survival and productivity of perennial plants in temperate zones are dependent on robust responses to prolonged and seasonal cycles of unfavorable conditions. Here we report whole-genome microarray, expression, physiological, and transgenic evidence in hybrid poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba) showing that gibberellin (GA) catabolism and repressive signaling mediates shoot growth inhibition and physiological adaptation in response to drought and short-day (SD) induced bud dormancy. Both water deprivation and SDs elicited activation of a suite of poplar GA2ox and DELLA encoding genes. Poplar transgenics with up-regulated GA 2-oxidase (GA2ox) and DELLA domain proteins showed hypersensitive growth inhibition in response to both drought and SDs. In addition, the transgenic plants displayed greater drought resistance as evidenced by increased pigment concentrations (chlorophyll and carotenoid) and reductions in electrolyte leakage (EL). Comparative transcriptome analysis using whole-genome microarray showed that the GA-deficiency and GA-insensitivity, SD-induced dormancy, and drought response in poplar share a common regulon of 684 differentially-expressed genes, which suggest GA metabolism and signaling plays a role in plant physiological adaptations in response to alterations in environmental factors. Our results demonstrate that GA catabolism and repressive signaling represents a major route for control of growth and physiological adaptation in response to immediate or imminent adverse conditions. PMID:24465967

  9. Inhibition of Cytochromes P450 and the Hydroxylation of 4-Monochlorobiphenyl in Whole Poplar

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Guangshu; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2013-01-01

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are potential enzymes responsible for hydroxylation of many xenobiotics and endogenous chemicals in living organisms. It has been found that 4-monochlorobiphenyl (PCB3), mainly an airborne pollutant, can be metabolized to hydroxylated transformation products (OH-PCB3s) in whole poplars. However, the enzymes involved in the hydroxylation of PCB3 in whole poplars have not been identified. Therefore, two CYP suicide inhibitors, 1-aminobenzotriazole (ABT) and 17-octadecynoic acid (ODYA), were selected to probe the hydroxylation reaction of PCB3 in whole poplars in this work. Poplars (Populus deltoides × nigra, DN34) were exposed to PCB3 with or without inhibitor for 11 days. Results showed both ABT and ODYA can decrease the concentrations and yields of five OH-PCB3s in different poplar parts via the inhibition of CYPs. Furthermore, both ABT and ODYA demonstrated a dose-dependent relationship to the formation of OH-PCB3s in whole poplars. The higher the inhibitor concentrations, the lower the total yields of OH-PCB3s. For ABT spiked-additions, the total mass yield of five OH-PCB3s was inhibited by a factor of 1.6 times at an ABT concentration of 2.5 mg L−1, 4.0 times at 12.5 mg L−1, and 7.0 times at 25 mg L−1. For the inhibitor ODYA, the total mass of five OH-PCB3s was reduced by 2.1 times compared to the control at an ODYA concentration of 2.5 mg L−1. All results pointed to the conclusion that CYP enzymes were the agents which metabolized PCB3 to OH-PCB3s in whole poplars because suicide CYP inhibitors ABT and ODYA both led to sharp decreases of OH-PCB3s formation in whole poplars. A dose-response curve for each of the suicide inhibitors was developed. PMID:23320482

  10. Soils organic C sequestration under poplar and willow agroforestry systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunina, Anna; Tariq, Azeem; Lamersdorf, Norbert

    2015-04-01

    Short rotation coppices (SRC) as monocultures or as agroforestry (AF) applications (e.g. alley cropping) are two techniques to implement forest into agricultural practices. Despite afforestation promotes soil carbon (C) accumulation, age and type of the tree stand can affect the C accumulation in different degrees. Here, we studied the impact of afforestation on C accumulation for: i) pure SCR of willow (Salix viminalis x Salix schwerinii) and poplar (Populus nigra x Populus maximowiczii) and ii) AF cropping system with willow. Forest systems have been established within the BEST agroforestry project in Germany. Adjacent agricultural field have been used as a control. Soil samples were collected in 2014, three years after plantation establishment, from three soil depths: 0-3, 3-20, and 20-30 cm. Total organic C, labile C (incubation of 20 g soil during 100 days with measuring of CO2) and aggregate structure were analysed. Additionally, density fractionation of the samples from 0-3 cm was applied to separate particulate organic matter (POM) and mineral fractions. Aggregates and density fractions were analyzed for C content. High input of plant litter as well as root exudates have led to increases of organic C in AF and SRC plots compare to cropland, mainly in the top 0-3 cm. The highest C content was found for willow SRC (18.2 g kg-1 soil), followed by willow-AF (15.6 g kg-1 soil), and poplar SRC (13.7 g kg-1 soil). Carbon content of cropland was 12.5 g kg-1 soil. Absence of ploughing caused increase portion of macroaggregates (>2000 μm) under SRC and AF in all soil layers as well as the highest percentage of C in that aggregate size class (70-80%). In contrast, C in cropland soil was mainly accumulated in small macroaggregates (250-2000 μm). Intensive mineralisation of fresh litter and old POM, taking place during first years of trees development, resulted to similar portions of free POM for willow AF, willow SRC and cropland (8%), and even lower ones for poplar

  11. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling reveals molecular signatures of secondary xylem differentiation in Populus tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Yang, X H; Li, X G; Li, B L; Zhang, D Q

    2014-11-11

    Wood formation occurs via cell division, primary cell wall and secondary wall formation, and programmed cell death in the vascular cambium. Transcriptional profiling of secondary xylem differentiation is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying wood formation. Differential gene expression in secondary xylem differentiation of Populus has been previously investigated using cDNA microarray analysis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms from a genome-wide perspective. In this study, the Affymetrix poplar genome chips containing 61,413 probes were used to investigate the changes in the transcriptome during secondary xylem differentiation in Chinese white poplar (Populus tomentosa). Two xylem tissues (newly formed and lignified) were sampled for genome-wide transcriptional profiling. In total, 6843 genes (~11%) were identified with differential expression in the two xylem tissues. Many genes involved in cell division, primary wall modification, and cellulose synthesis were preferentially expressed in the newly formed xylem. In contrast, many genes, including 4-coumarate:cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), and caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT), associated with lignin biosynthesis were more transcribed in the lignified xylem. The two xylem tissues also showed differential expression of genes related to various hormones; thus, the secondary xylem differentiation could be regulated by hormone signaling. Furthermore, many transcription factor genes were preferentially expressed in the lignified xylem, suggesting that wood lignification involves extensive transcription regulation. The genome-wide transcriptional profiling of secondary xylem differentiation could provide additional insights into the molecular basis of wood formation in poplar species.

  12. Down-regulation of plasma intrinsic protein1 aquaporin in poplar trees is detrimental to recovery from embolism.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Francesca; Zwieniecki, Maciej A

    2014-04-01

    During their lifecycles, trees encounter multiple events of water stress that often result in embolism formation and temporal decreases in xylem transport capacity. The restoration of xylem transport capacity requires changes in cell metabolic activity and gene expression. Specifically, in poplar (Populus spp.), the formation of xylem embolisms leads to a clear up-regulation of plasma membrane protein1 (PIP1) aquaporin genes. To determine their role in poplar response to water stress, transgenic Populus tremula × Populus alba plants characterized by the strong down-regulation of multiple isoforms belonging to the PIP1 subfamily were used. Transgenic lines showed that they are more vulnerable to embolism, with 50% percent loss of conductance occurring 0.3 MPa earlier than in wild-type plants, and that they also have a reduced capacity to restore xylem conductance during recovery. Transgenic plants also show symptoms of a reduced capacity to control percent loss of conductance through stomatal conductance in response to drought, because they have a much narrower vulnerability safety margin. Finally, a delay in stomatal conductance recovery during the period of stress relief was observed. The presented results suggest that PIP1 genes are involved in the maintenance of xylem transport system capacity, in the promotion of recovery from stress, and in contribution to a plant's control of stomatal conductance under water stress.

  13. Cell-Specific and Conditional Expression of Caffeoyl-Coenzyme A-3-O-Methyltransferase in Poplar1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cuiying; Meyermans, Hugo; Burggraeve, Bart; De Rycke, Riet M.; Inoue, Kentaro; De Vleesschauwer, Vera; Steenackers, Marijke; Van Montagu, Marc C.; Engler, Gilbert J.; Boerjan, Wout A.

    2000-01-01

    Caffeoyl coenzyme A-3-O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT) plays an important role in lignin biosynthesis and is encoded by two genes in poplar (Populus trichocarpa). Here, we describe the expression pattern conferred by the two CCoAOMT promoters when fused to the gus-coding sequence in transgenic poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba). Both genes were expressed similarly in xylem and differentially in phloem. In xylem, expression was preferentially observed in vessels and contact rays, whereas expression was barely detectable in storage rays and fibers, suggesting different routes to monolignol biosynthesis in the different xylem types. Furthermore, after wounding, fungal infection, and bending, the expression of both genes was induced concomitantly with de novo lignin deposition. Importantly, upon bending and leaning of the stem, the cell-specific expression pattern was lost, and both genes were expressed in all cell types of the xylem. CCoAOMT promoter activity correlated well with the presence of the CCoAOMT protein, as shown by immunolocalization. These expression data may explain, at least in part, the heterogeneity in lignin composition that is observed between cell types and upon different environmental conditions. PMID:10889235

  14. Phenotypic and developmental plasticity of xylem in hybrid poplar saplings subjected to experimental drought, nitrogen fertilization, and shading

    PubMed Central

    Plavcová, Lenka

    2012-01-01

    Variation in xylem structure and function has been extensively studied across different species with a wide taxonomic, geographical, and ecological coverage. In contrast, our understanding of how xylem of a single species can adjust to different growing condition remains limited. Here phenotypic and developmental plasticity in xylem traits of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa×deltoides) was studied. Clonally propagated saplings were grown under experimental drought, nitrogen fertilization, and shade for >30 d. Xylem hydraulic and anatomical traits were subsequently examined in stem segments taken from two different vertical positions along the plant’s main axis. The experimental treatments affected growth and development and induced changes in xylem phenotype. Across all treatments, the amount of leaf area supported by stem segments (AL) scaled linearly with stem native hydraulic conductivity (K native), suggesting that the area of assimilating leaves is constrained by the xylem transport capacity. In turn, K native was mainly driven by the size of xylem cross-sectional area (AX). Moreover, the structural and functional properties of xylem varied significantly. Vulnerability to cavitation, measured as the xylem pressure inducing 50% loss of conductivity (P50), ranged from –1.71MPa to –0.15MPa in saplings subjected to drought and nitrogen fertilization, respectively. Across all treatments and stem segment positions, P50 was tightly correlated with wood density. In contrast, no relationship between P50 and xylem-specific conductivity (K S) was observed. The results of this study enhance our knowledge of plant hydraulic acclimation and provide insights into common trade-offs that exist in xylem structure and function. PMID:23095999

  15. Phenotypic and developmental plasticity of xylem in hybrid poplar saplings subjected to experimental drought, nitrogen fertilization, and shading.

    PubMed

    Plavcová, Lenka; Hacke, Uwe G

    2012-11-01

    Variation in xylem structure and function has been extensively studied across different species with a wide taxonomic, geographical, and ecological coverage. In contrast, our understanding of how xylem of a single species can adjust to different growing condition remains limited. Here phenotypic and developmental plasticity in xylem traits of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa×deltoides) was studied. Clonally propagated saplings were grown under experimental drought, nitrogen fertilization, and shade for >30 d. Xylem hydraulic and anatomical traits were subsequently examined in stem segments taken from two different vertical positions along the plant's main axis. The experimental treatments affected growth and development and induced changes in xylem phenotype. Across all treatments, the amount of leaf area supported by stem segments (A(L)) scaled linearly with stem native hydraulic conductivity (K (native)), suggesting that the area of assimilating leaves is constrained by the xylem transport capacity. In turn, K (native) was mainly driven by the size of xylem cross-sectional area (A(X)). Moreover, the structural and functional properties of xylem varied significantly. Vulnerability to cavitation, measured as the xylem pressure inducing 50% loss of conductivity (P50), ranged from -1.71 MPa to -0.15 MPa in saplings subjected to drought and nitrogen fertilization, respectively. Across all treatments and stem segment positions, P50 was tightly correlated with wood density. In contrast, no relationship between P50 and xylem-specific conductivity (K (S)) was observed. The results of this study enhance our knowledge of plant hydraulic acclimation and provide insights into common trade-offs that exist in xylem structure and function.

  16. Effects of Biomass Accessibility and Klason Lignin Contents during Consolidated Bioprocessing in Populus trichocarpa

    DOE PAGES

    Akinosho, Hannah; Dumitrache, Alexandru; Natzke, Jace; ...

    2017-04-26

    The bacterium Clostridium thermocellum offers a distinct and integrated approach to ethanol production through consolidated bioprocessing (CBP). The Simons’ stain technique, which assays the accessibility of lignocellulosic biomass, has been traditionally applied to fungal cellulase systems; however, its application to CBP has not been fully explored. For this reason, the structural properties of eight Populus trichocarpa with either high or low biomass densities were compared in this paper to determine bioconversion differences during separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and CBP with C. thermocellum. Simons’ staining generally identifies low density poplar as more accessible than high density poplar. Additionally, low densitymore » P. trichocarpa generally contained less Klason lignin than high density poplar. SHF and CBP treatments consistently identified BESC-7 (high density, low accessibility, low surface roughness) as a low ethanol yielding biomass and GW-9914 (low density, high accessibility, high surface roughness) as a high ethanol yielding biomass. Upon further investigat