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Sample records for popocatpetl volcano mexico

  1. Control of the geomorphic evolution of an active crater: Popocatpetl (Mexico) 1994-2003.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés, N.; Zamorano, J. J.; Palacios, D.; Macias, J. L.; Sanjosé, J. J.

    2009-04-01

    . References.- Cruz-Reyna, S. de la; Meli, R.; Macías, J.L.; Castillo, F.; & Cabrera, B., 1998. Cyclical dome extrusions that by late 1997 filled one-third of crater capacity, In Smithsonian-GVP Monthly Reports, Popocatépetl, Smithsonian Institution. Bull. Glob. Volcanism Netw, (GVN) 23 (2), 2 - 4. Donnadieu, F.; Kelfoun, K.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.; Decchi, E.; & Merle, O., 2003. Digital photogrammetry as a tool in analogue modelling: applications to volcano instability, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 123 (1-2), 161-180. Macías, J.L. & Siebe, C., 2005. Popocatépetl crater filled to the brim: significance for hazard evaluation, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research (141) 327-330. Martín-Del Pozzo, A.L.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Bonifaz, F.; Correa, I.; & Mendiola, I.F., 2003. Timing magma ascent at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico, 2000-2001, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research ,125, 107-120. Matiella, M.A.; Watson, I.M.; Delgado, H.; Rose, W.I.; , Cárdenas, L.; & Realmuro, V.J., 2008, Volcanic emissions from Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico, quantified using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) infrared data: A case study of the December 2000-January 2001 emissions, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 170, 1-2, 76-85. Procter, J.N.; Platz, T.; & Cronin, S.J., 2006. A remnant summit lava dome and its influence on future eruptive hazards, Geophysical Research Abstracts, Vol. 8, 10211. Schilling, S.P.; Ramsey, D.W.; Messerich, J.A.; & Thompson, R.A., 2006. Map: Rebuilding Mount St. Helens. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 2928. Tanarro, L. M.; Zamorano, J.J.; & Palacios, D., 2005. Glacier degradation and lahar formation on the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) during the last eruptive period (1994-2003), Zeitschrift Geomorphologie (140) 73-92. Zamorano, J.J., Gómez, A. 1996 "Análisis geomorfoloógico a detalle,1:10 000 del cráter del volcán Popocatépetl (1989-1996)" IV Reuni

  2. Colima Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-10-29

    STS073-E-5274 (3 Nov. 1995) --- Colima was photographed with a color Electronic Still Camera (ESC) onboard the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Columbia. The volcano lies due south of Guadalajara and Lake Chapala. It is considered to be one of Mexico's most active and most dangerous volcanoes, lying not far from heavily populated areas.

  3. Volcanoe southeast of Mexico City

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-23

    ISS01-E-5316 (23 January 2001) -- Popocatépetl, or Popo, the active volcano located about 70 kilometers southeast of Mexico City, sends a plume south on January 23, 2001. The Expedition One crew onboard the International Space Station (ISS) observed and recorded this image with a digital still camera as it orbited to the northeast of the volcano. Popo has been frequently active for six years. On this day, the eruption plume reportedly rose to more than 9 kilometers above sea level (for reference, Popo's summit elevation is 5426 meters). Note the smaller ash plume below the main plume. The perspective from the ISS allowed the crew members this unique three dimensional view. Popo is situated between two large population centers: Mexico City (more than 18 million people, and just out of this image at right) and Puebla (about 1.2 million people), partially visible at lower left.

  4. Ceboruco Volcano Gravimetric Analysis, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Cordoba, J.; Espindola, J. M.; Gutierrez, Q. J.; Garcia Serrano, A.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Pinzon, J. I.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Ceboruco is a late Quaternary dacitic-andesitic stratovolcano, is located in the Tepic-Zacoalco graben in the western part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) near to Ahuacatlan and Jala towns in Mexico. There have been at least eight eruptions from this volcano in the last thousand years, and for this reason Ceboruco must be considered an active volcano whit the possibility of erupting again in the future. This work aims to contribute with a regional density contrasts model from gravity measurements of volcano area. 163 observations were measured every 500 meters with a Scintrex CG-5 gravimeter. We corrected data were measured in the area to filter information dependent of external gravitational fields or outside to object of study. Post-filtering of data, we obtained gravity anomalies distribution and with other supporting data (aeromagnetic and geological data) we made 8 profiles around Ceboruco to build an approximate model of density changes in the lithological units under the volcano.

  5. Colima Volcano, State of Jalisco, Mexico

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-05-06

    STS039-75-101 (28 April-6 May 1991) --- Spending over eight days in Earth orbit, the STS-39 crew was able to return with photographic coverage of highly variegated geographic scenery, including a number of volcanoes such as Mexico's Colima. Located south of Guadalajara, Colima is Mexico's most active volcano. The current activity started in the first part of March 1991 with avalanches occurring, followed by lava extrusion and ash emission. Colima is captured here in action. The steam plume drifts eastward from the 13,325 ft. summit. Scars from recent landslides can be seen on the southwest flank of the summit.

  6. Colima Volcano, State of Jalisco, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Located about 125 km south of Guadalajara, state of Jalisco, Mexico, the 13,325 ft. Colima (19.5N, 103.5W) is the most active volcano in Mexico. The activity depicted occurred in early March 1991 with avalanches followed soon after by lava extrusion with ash and steam emission from the caldera. The steam plume can be seen drifting eastward from the summit and groundscars from the earlier avalanches can also be seen on the southwest slope.

  7. Hazard maps of Colima volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero Ayala, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Colima volcano, also known as Volcan de Fuego (19° 30.696 N, 103° 37.026 W), is located on the border between the states of Jalisco and Colima and is the most active volcano in Mexico. Began its current eruptive process in February 1991, in February 10, 1999 the biggest explosion since 1913 occurred at the summit dome. The activity during the 2001-2005 period was the most intense, but did not exceed VEI 3. The activity resulted in the formation of domes and their destruction after explosive events. The explosions originated eruptive columns, reaching attitudes between 4,500 and 9,000 m.a.s.l., further pyroclastic flows reaching distances up to 3.5 km from the crater. During the explosive events ash emissions were generated in all directions reaching distances up to 100 km, slightly affected nearby villages as Tuxpan, Tonila, Zapotlán, Cuauhtemoc, Comala, Zapotitlan de Vadillo and Toliman. During the 2005 this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity, similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1900. Intense pre-plinian eruption in January 20, 1913, generated little economic losses in the lower parts of the volcano due to low population density and low socio-economic activities at the time. Shows the updating of the volcanic hazard maps published in 2001, where we identify whit SPOT satellite imagery and Google Earth, change in the land use on the slope of volcano, the expansion of the agricultural frontier on the east and southeast sides of the Colima volcano, the population inhabiting the area is approximately 517,000 people, and growing at an annual rate of 4.77%, also the region that has shown an increased in the vulnerability for the development of economic activities, supported by the construction of highways, natural gas pipelines and electrical infrastructure that connect to the Port of Manzanillo to Guadalajara city. The update the hazard maps are: a) Exclusion areas and moderate hazard for explosive events

  8. Geology of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, W.A.; Tilling, R.I.; Canul, R.

    1984-01-01

    The (pre-1982) 850-m-high andesitic stratovolcano El Chicho??n, active during Pleistocene and Holocene time, is located in rugged, densely forested terrain in northcentral Chiapas, Me??xico. The nearest neighboring Holocene volcanoes are 275 km and 200 km to the southeast and northwest, respectively. El Chicho??n is built on Tertiary siltstone and sandstone, underlain by Cretaceous dolomitic limestone; a 4-km-deep bore hole near the east base of the volcano penetrated this limestone and continued 770 m into a sequence of Jurassic or Cretaceous evaporitic anhydrite and halite. The basement rocks are folded into generally northwest-trending anticlines and synclines. El Chicho??n is built over a small dome-like structure superposed on a syncline, and this structure may reflect cumulative deformation related to growth of a crustal magma reservoir beneath the volcano. The cone of El Chicho??n consists almost entirely of pyroclastic rocks. The pre-1982 cone is marked by a 1200-m-diameter (explosion?) crater on the southwest flank and a 1600-m-diameter crater apparently of similar origin at the summit, a lava dome partly fills each crater. The timing of cone and dome growth is poorly known. Field evidence indicates that the flank dome is older than the summit dome, and K-Ar ages from samples high on the cone suggest that the flank dome is older than about 276,000 years. At least three pyroclastic eruptions have occurred during the past 1250 radiocarbon years. Nearly all of the pyroclastic and dome rocks are moderately to highly porphyritic andesite, with plagioclase, hornblende and clinopyroxene the most common phenocrysts. Geologists who mapped El Chicho??n in 1980 and 1981 warned that the volcano posed a substantial hazard to the surrounding region. This warning was proven to be prophetic by violent eruptions that occurred in March and April of 1982. These eruptions blasted away nearly all of the summit dome, blanketed the surrounding region with tephra, and sent

  9. Revisiting Jorullo volcano (Mexico): monogenetic or polygenetic volcano?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Granados, H.; Roberge, J.; Farraz Montes, I. A.; Victoria Morales, A.; Pérez Bustamante, J. C.; Correa Olan, J. C.; Gutiérrez Jiménez, A. J.; Adán González, N.; Bravo Cardona, E. F.

    2007-05-01

    Jorullo volcano is located near the volcanic front of the westernmost part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, which is related to the subduction of the Cocos plate beneath the North American plate. This part of the TMVB is known as the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field, a region where widespread monogenetic volcanism is present although polygenetic volcanism is also recognized (i. e. Tancítaro volcano; Ownby et al., 2006). Jorullo volcano was born in the middle of crop fields. During its birth several lava flows were emitted and several cones were constructed. The main cone is the Jorullo proper, but there is a smaller cone on the north (Volcán del Norte), and three smaller cones aligned N-S on the south (Unnamed cone, UC; Volcán de Enmedio, VE; and Volcán del Sur, VS). The cone of Jorullo volcano is made up of tephra and lava flows erupted from the crater. The three southern cones show very interesting histories not described previously. VE erupted highly vesiculated tephras including xenoliths from the granitic basement. VS is made of spatter and bombs. A very well preserved hummocky morphology reveals that VE and VS collapsed towards the west. After the collapses, phreatomagmatic activity took place at the UC blanketing VE, VS and the southern flank of the Jorullo cone with sticky surge deposits. The excellent study by Luhr and Carmichael (1985) indicates that during the course of the eruption, lavas evolved from primitive basalt to basaltic andesite, although explosive products show a reverse evolution pattern (Johnson et al., 2006). We mapped lava flows not described by the observers in the 18th century nor considered in previous geologic reports as part of the Jorullo lavas. These lavas are older, distributed to the west and south, and some of them resemble the lava flows from La Pilita volcano, a cone older than Jorullo (Luhr and Carmichael, 1985). These lava flows were not considered before because they were not extruded during the 1759

  10. Space Radar Image of Colima Volcano, Jalisco, Mexico

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-01

    This is an image of the Colima volcano in Jalisco, Mexico, a vigorously active volcano that erupted as recently as July 1994. The eruption partially destroyed a lava dome at the summit and deposited a new layer of ash on the volcano's southern slopes. Surrounding communities face a continuing threat of ash falls and volcanic mudflows from the volcano, which has been designated one of 15 high-risk volcanoes for scientific study during the next decade. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 24th orbit on October 1, 1994. The image is centered at 19.4 degrees north latitude, 103.7 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 35.7 kilometers by 37.5 kilometers (22 miles by 23 miles). This single-frequency, multi-polarized SIR-C image shows: red as L-band horizontally transmitted and received; green as L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue as the ratio of the two channels. The summit area appears orange and the recent deposits fill the valleys along the south and southwest slopes. Observations from space are helping scientists understand the behavior of dangerous volcanoes and will be used to mitigate the effects of future eruptions on surrounding populations. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01739

  11. Climbing in the high volcanoes of central Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Secor, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A chain of volcanoes extends across central Mexico along the 19th parallel, a line just south of Mexico City. The westernmost of these peaks is Nevado de Colima at 4,636 feet above sea level. A subsidiary summit of Nevado de Colima is Volcan de Colima, locally called Fuego (fire) it still emits sulphurous fumes and an occasional plume of smoke since its disastrous eruption in 1941. Parictuin, now dormant, was born in the fall of 1943 when a cornfield suddenly erupted. Within 18 months, the cone grew more than 1,700 feet. Nevado de Toluca is a 15,433-foot volcanic peak south of the city of Toluca. Just southeast of Mexico City are two high volcanoes that are permanently covered by snow: Iztaccihuatl (17,342 fet) and Popocatepetl (17,887 feet) Further east is the third highest mountain in North America: 18,700-foot Citlateptl, or El Pico de Orizaba. North of these high peaks are two volcanoes, 14, 436-foot La Malinche and Cofre de Perote at 14,048 feet. This range of mountains is known variously as the Cordillera de Anahuac, the Sierra Volcanica Transversal, or the Cordillera Neovolcanica. 

  12. Geology of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffield, Wendell A.; Tilling, Robert I.; Canul, Rene

    1984-03-01

    The (pre-1982) 850-m-high andesitic stratovolcano El Chichón, active during Pleistocene and Holocene time, is located in rugged, densely forested terrain in northcentral Chiapas, México. The nearest neighboring Holocene volcanoes are 275 km and 200 km to the southeast and northwest, respectively. El Chichón is built on Tertiary siltstone and sandstone, underlain by Cretaceous dolomitic limestone; a 4-km-deep bore hole near the east base of the volcano penetrated this limestone and continued 770 m into a sequence of Jurassic or Cretaceous evaporitic anhydrite and halite. The basement rocks are folded into generally northwest-trending anticlines and synclines. El Chichón is built over a small dome-like structure superposed on a syncline, and this structure may reflect cumulative deformation related to growth of a crustal magma reservoir beneath the volcano. The cone of El Chichón consists almost entirely of pyroclastic rocks. The pre-1982 cone is marked by a 1200-m-diameter (explosion?) crater on the southwest flank and a 1600-m-diameter crater apparently of similar origin at the summit, a lava dome partly fills each crater. The timing of cone and dome growth is poorly known. Field evidence indicates that the flank dome is older than the summit dome, and K-Ar ages from samples high on the cone suggest that the flank dome is older than about 276,000 years. At least three pyroclastic eruptions have occurred during the past 1250 radiocarbon years. Nearly all of the pyroclastic and dome rocks are moderately to highly porphyritic andesite, with plagioclase, hornblende and clinopyroxene the most common phenocrysts. Geologists who mapped El Chichón in 1980 and 1981 warned that the volcano posed a substantial hazard to the surrounding region. This warning was proven to be prophetic by violent eruptions that occurred in March and April of 1982. These eruptions blasted away nearly all of the summit dome, blanketed the surrounding region with tephra, and sent pyroclastic

  13. Holocene plinian eruption of La Virgen volcano, Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, L.; Macías, J. L.; Espíndola, J. M.; Siebe, C.

    1998-02-01

    A plinian eruption occurred approximately 6500 yr ago at La Virgen Volcano, the youngest volcano of the Tres Virgenes Volcanic Complex (TVVC), located in Baja California, Mexico. Deposits of the eruption suggest a sequence of events that started with the opening of the volcanic conduit, and development of a plinian eruption column up to 18 km in height. This eruption column produced a fallout deposit with a dispersal axis toward the southwest, an areal extent of about 500 km 2, and a minimum volume of 1.14 km 3. Vulcanian activity (hydromagmatic) followed the plinian phase, producing pyroclastic surge and fallout deposits. The eruptive activity ceased after a basaltic-andesite lava flow was emplaced closing the eruptive activity. Petrological and geochemical evidence indicates that the eruption was triggered by magma mixing processes. Our studies confirm that La Virgen is a dormant volcano with the potential for future violent eruptions. The present study provides important information for the construction of a volcanic hazards map. Significant hazards are presented to the population living within a distance of 30 km from the volcano, together with the interstate road connecting the entire peninsula of Baja California, which runs at a distance of only 3 km from the volcano.

  14. Igneous Petrogenesis of Tequila Volcano, Western Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Duarte, A.; Gómez-Tuena, A.; Díaz-Bravo, B.

    2011-12-01

    Tequila volcano belongs to a Quaternary volcanic chain that runs in parallel to the Middle American Trench, but that have been constructed within the so-called Tepic-Zacoalco rift: an extensional tectonic structure that has been active for the past 3.5 Ma. This unusual tectonic setting, and the existence of a high-resolution stratigraphy for the Tequila Volcanic Field (Lewis-Kenedi, 2005, Bull Volcanol), provide an excellent opportunity to study andesite petrogenesis. New comprehensive geochemical data allow the recognition of at least four different magmatic series around Tequila: 1) The Santa Rosa intraplate basalts (1.0 - 0.2 Ma), a volcanic plateau constructed along the Santiago River Fault north of Tequila volcano. These Na-alkaline basalts are olivine-phyric, have negligible subduction signatures (Ba/Nb= 11.75 - 49.36), and display Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions that correlate with fractionation indexes, probably indicating melt-crust interactions. 2) A group of vitreous domes and flows of dacitic to rhyolitic compositions, mostly contemporaneous to the Santa Rosa basalts, that were emplaced on the periphery of Tequila volcano. These rocks can have very low Sr and Eu contents but their isotopic compositions are remarkably constant and similar to the Santa Rosa basalts, probably indicating a genetic link through low pressure fractionation in the stability field of plagioclase. 3) The main edifice of Tequila volcano (~0.2 Ma) is made of two pyroxene andesites and dacites with strong subduction signatures (Ba/Nb= 53-112), that inversely correlate with MgO contents, but that follow a diverging evolutionary trend as the rest of the sequences. The isotopic compositions of Tequila main edifice can extend to slightly more enriched values, but do not correlate with fractionation indexes, thus indicating provenance from a different source. 4) The youngest activity on Tequila volcano (~0.09 Ma) is represented by amphibole bearing andesites that erupted through the

  15. The effects of volcanoes on health: preparedness in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Zeballos, J L; Meli, R; Vilchis, A; Barrios, L

    1996-01-01

    The article reviews the most important aspects of volcanic eruptions and presents a summary of the harmful materials they emit. The main health effects can be classified as either physical (trauma, respiratory diseases, etc.) or psychological (depression, anxiety, nightmares, neurosis, etc.). Popocatépetl, the most famous active volcano in Mexico, lies on the borders of the States of Mexico, Puebla and Morelos. In 1993, seismic activity intensified, as did as the emission of fumaroles, followed in December 1994 by moderate tremors and strong emissions of gases and ash. In 1996, a number of seismic events led to an unexpected explosion. A daily emission of 8,000 to 15,000 tonnes of sulfur dioxide has been measured. Popocatépetl is located in a densely populated region of Mexico. A complex network to monitor the volcano using sophisticated equipment has been set up, including visual surveillance, seismic, geochemical and geodesic monitoring. An early warning system (SINAPROC/CENAPRED) has been developed to keep the population permanently informed. The warning system uses colour codes: green for normal, yellow for alert, and red for warning and evacuation. An emergency plan has been prepared, including evacuation and preparation for medical centres and hospitals in the region, as well as intense public information campaigns.

  16. A Preliminary Study of Seismicity at Ceboruco, Volcano, Nayarit, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, J. J.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Trejo-Gomez, E.

    2007-12-01

    Ceboruco Volcano is located northwestern of Tepic-Zacoalco graben (Jalisco, Mexico). Its volcanic activity can be divided in four eruptive cycles differentiated by their volcano explosivity index (VEI) and chemical variations as well. As a result of andesitic effusive activity, during the first cycle the "paleo-Ceboruco" edifice was constructed. The end of this cycle is defined by a plinian eruption (VEI is estimated between 3 and 4) which occurred some 1020 years ago and formed the external caldera. During the second cycle an andesitic dome extruded in the interior of the caldera. The dome, called Dos Equis, collapsed and formed the internal caldera. The third cycle is represented by andesitic lava flows which partially cover the northern and south-southwestern part of the edifice. The last cycle is represented by historic andesitic lava flows located in the southwestern flank of the volcano. In February 2003 as part of an agreement with Nayarit Civil Defense a seismic station was installed in the SW flank of the volcano. The station is equipped with a Marslite (lennartz) digitizer with a 3DLe 1Hz. seismic sensor. Detection system is based on a STA/LTA recording algorithm. More than 2000 small earthquakes have been attributed to various local sources, and some of this earthquakes are possibly located beneath Ceboruco volcano. A preliminary classification separates high frequency and low frequency seismic events. The sources of high frequency earthquakes appear to be distributed as evidenced from waveforms variety and changing S-P arrivals separations. The low frequency seismic events also show varying signatures and some of them exhibit extended coda, including some monochromatic character.

  17. Space Radar Image of Colima Volcano, Jalisco, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the Colima volcano in Jalisco, Mexico, a vigorously active volcano that erupted as recently as July 1994. The eruption partially destroyed a lava dome at the summit and deposited a new layer of ash on the volcano's southern slopes. Surrounding communities face a continuing threat of ash falls and volcanic mudflows from the volcano, which has been designated one of 15 high-risk volcanoes for scientific study during the next decade. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 24th orbit on October 1, 1994. The image is centered at 19.4 degrees north latitude, 103.7 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 35.7 kilometers by 37.5 kilometers (22 miles by 23 miles). This single-frequency, multi-polarized SIR-C image shows: red as L-band horizontally transmitted and received; green as L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue as the ratio of the two channels. The summit area appears orange and the recent deposits fill the valleys along the south and southwest slopes. Observations from space are helping scientists understand the behavior of dangerous volcanoes and will be used to mitigate the effects of future eruptions on surrounding populations. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: the L-band (24 cm), the C-band (6 cm) and the X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature

  18. Space Radar Image of Colima Volcano, Jalisco, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the Colima volcano in Jalisco, Mexico, a vigorously active volcano that erupted as recently as July 1994. The eruption partially destroyed a lava dome at the summit and deposited a new layer of ash on the volcano's southern slopes. Surrounding communities face a continuing threat of ash falls and volcanic mudflows from the volcano, which has been designated one of 15 high-risk volcanoes for scientific study during the next decade. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 24th orbit on October 1, 1994. The image is centered at 19.4 degrees north latitude, 103.7 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 35.7 kilometers by 37.5 kilometers (22 miles by 23 miles). This single-frequency, multi-polarized SIR-C image shows: red as L-band horizontally transmitted and received; green as L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue as the ratio of the two channels. The summit area appears orange and the recent deposits fill the valleys along the south and southwest slopes. Observations from space are helping scientists understand the behavior of dangerous volcanoes and will be used to mitigate the effects of future eruptions on surrounding populations. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: the L-band (24 cm), the C-band (6 cm) and the X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature

  19. New Hypocenter Relocation Results From Volcano-Tectonic Events (1995-2006) at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, P.; Nava, F. A.; Valdes-Gonzalez, C.

    2008-12-01

    Popocatepetl, one of the most active strato-volcanoes in Mexico, started a fumarolic and seismic reactivation in December 1994. New hypocenter relocation results have been calculated for some 1,800 volcano-tectonic (VT) events recorded by the seismic network operating at Popocatepetl during 1995-2006, and previously located by the National Center for Disasters Prevention (CENAPRED). We used two location programs to determine hypocenter relocation. One is a recently developed genetic algorithm program, Disloca, which adjusts the differences in arrival times between the recording seismic stations. The second is HypoDD, which uses the double difference earthquake location algorithm. Disloca allowed evaluation of station corrections, plus location of non-clustered hypocenters, while HypoDD refined the locations of clustered ones. Thus, for a given velocity model, hypocenters of clustered events varied slightly depending on the location program. For both programs, four different crustal velocity models were used, two of which include a low velocity zone (LVZ) below 6 km depth. This LVZ represents the presence of magma, which has been suggested to exist at this depth. The spatial distribution of the relocated hypocenters varies from one model to another, but a carefully considered combination of features common to the four distributions, allows a new characterization of the VT activity at Popocatepetl. The distribution of the relocated hypocenters found in this study differs from that of former investigations at Popocatépetl, and gives new insights into the volcano's structures. Hypocenters occur mainly above 10 km depth, with a horizontal range of about 5 km. Features of the spatial distribution allow a tentative interpretation of several internal volcanic structures. Chief among these are branched dike complexes and different sized zones free of volcano-tectonic events, which are in turn surrounded by zones of magma-rock interaction, as indicated by the presence of

  20. Study of Seismic Activity at Ceboruco Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Rodríguez Ayala, N. A.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2013-12-01

    Many societies and their economies endure the disastrous consequences of destructive volcanic eruptions. The Ceboruco stratovolcano (2,280 m.a.s.l.) is located in Nayarit, Mexico, at the west of the Mexican volcanic belt and towards the Sierra de San Pedro southeast, which is a key communication point for coast of Jalisco and Nayarit and the northwest of Mexico. It last eruptive activity was in 1875, and during the following five years it presents superficial activity such as vapor emissions, ash falls and riodacitic composition lava flows along the southeast side. Although surface activity has been restricted to fumaroles near the summit, Ceboruco exhibits regular seismic unrest characterized by both low frequency seismic events and volcano-tectonic earthquakes. From March 2003 until July 2008 a three-component short-period seismograph Marslite station with a Lennartz 3D (1Hz) was deployed in the south flank (CEBN) and within 2 km from the summit to monitoring the seismic activity at the volcano. The LF seismicity recorded was classified using waveform characteristics and digital analysis. We obtained four groups: impulsive arrivals, extended coda, bobbin form, and wave package amplitude modulation earthquakes. The extended coda is the group with more earthquakes and present durations of 50 seconds. Using the moving particle technique, we read the P and S wave arrival times and estimate azimuth arrivals. A P-wave velocity of 3.0 km/s was used to locate the earthquakes, most of the hypocenters are below the volcanic edifice within a circular perimeter of 5 km of radius and its depths are calculated relative to the CEBN elevation as follows. The impulsive arrivals earthquakes present hypocenters between 0 and 1 km while the other groups between 0 and 4 km. Results suggest fluid activity inside the volcanic building that could be related to fumes on the volcano. We conclude that the Ceboruco volcano is active. Therefore, it should be continuously monitored due to the

  1. Update of the volcanic risk map of Colima volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nuñez Cornu, F. J.; Marquez-Azua, B.

    2010-12-01

    The Colima volcano, located in western Mexico (19° 30.696 N, 103° 37.026 W) began its current eruptive process in February 10, 1999. This event was the basis for the development of two volcanic hazard maps: one for ballistics (rock fall) lahars, and another one for ash fall. During the period of 2003 to 2008 this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity, similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1900. Intense pre-Plinian eruption in January 20, 1913, generated little economic losses in the lower parts of the volcano thanks to the low population density and low socio-economic activities at the time The current volcanic activity has triggered ballistic projections, pyroclastic and ash flows, and lahars, all have exceeded the maps limits established in 1999. Vulnerable elements within these areas have gradually changed due to the expansion of the agricultural frontier on the east and southeast sides of the Colima volcano. On the slopes of the northwest side, new blue agave Tequilana weber and avocado orchard crops have emerged along with important production of greenhouse tomato, alfalfa and fruit (citrus) crops that will eventually be processed and dried for exportation to the United States and Europe. Also, in addition to the above, large expanses of corn and sugar cane have been planted on the slopes of the volcano since the nineteenth century. The increased agricultural activity has had a direct impact in the reduction of the available forest land area. Coinciding with this increased activity, the 0.8% growth population during the period of 2000 - 2005, - due to the construction of the Guadalajara-Colima highway-, also increased this impact. The growth in vulnerability changed the level of risk with respect to the one identified in the year 1999 (Suarez, 2000), thus motivating us to perform an update to the risk map at 1:25,000 using vector models of the INEGI, SPOT images of different dates, and fieldwork done in order

  2. Volcanoes!

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    Volcanoes is an interdisciplinary set of materials for grades 4-8. Through the story of the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, students will answer fundamental questions about volcanoes: "What is a volcano?" "Where do volcanoes occur and why?" "What are the effects of volcanoes on the Earth system?" "What are the risks and the benefits of living near volcanoes?" "Can scientists forecast volcanic eruptions?"

  3. The Deep Crustal Seismic Structure of Colima Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardine, M.; West, M. E.; Dominguez, T.

    2009-12-01

    We present results of 3-D velocity modeling at Colima Volcano, located in the western section of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and one of North America’s most active volcano centers. From January 2006 - February 2008, twenty broadband seismometers were deployed in a wide-aperture array around the volcano as part of the IRIS/PASSCAL supported Colima Volcano Deep Seismic Experiment (CODEX). Data from this deployment, integrated with data from the Mapping of the Rivera Subduction Zone (MARS) project, have been used to characterize the seismicity along this section of the subduction zone as well as in the immediate vicinity of the volcano. We used subduction-zone earthquakes (depths > 40 km) as well as select regional crustal earthquakes to create a 1-D velocity model of the region. Using this model, slower apparent velocities are systematically seen at most stations close to the volcano. Variations in travel time residuals seen across the CODEX network were used to show initial evidence of a lower-velocity zone in the deep crust with a possible southwest-northeast trend near the volcano with depths of 20-40 km. Seismic tomography with the use of 3-D ray tracing helps to refine and better constrain the details of the low-velocity zone. It appears to be largely concentrated to the south-east of the volcano and extends approximately 30 km west-to-east. Other shallow crustal anomalies in the results match up well with surface geologic features. Additional anomalies in the crust, with a particular emphasis on velocity variations within the deep (>20 km) crust, are being investigated to achieve a better understanding of deep crustal processes underneath a prodigious subduction-zone volcano.

  4. Late Holocene Eruptive History of Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico: Implications for Future Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1995-01-01

    Detailed mapping of the strata around the Popocatepetl Volcano in central Mexico indicates that there have been major eruptions every 1000 to 2000 years. The last two of these destroyed pre- Columbian cities in the area, and a similar level of eruption today might require evacuation of as many as 30 million people.

  5. Late Holocene Eruptive History of Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico: Implications for Future Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, M.

    1995-01-01

    Detailed mapping of the strata around the Popocatepetl Volcano in central Mexico indicates that there have been major eruptions every 1000 to 2000 years. The last two of these destroyed pre- Columbian cities in the area, and a similar level of eruption today might require evacuation of as many as 30 million people.

  6. A review of recent glaciological studies at the dormant Citlaltépetl Volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes Ramos, J.; Ontiveros-Gonzalez, G.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2013-05-01

    We present the most recent instrumentation, analysis and state of the art on glaciological studies of Glaciar Norte on Citlaltépetl Volcano. The results described here are the result of glacier activity at a dormant volcano with very low activity such as slight vapor emissions. In contrast with Popocatépetl Volcano's glaciers, where the climatic signals were obscured by the eruptive activity, at Citlaltépetl Volcano the glacier represents a good indicator of the climatic change. Since the volcanic activity on Citlaltépetl consists only on minor diffuse gas emissions, this work shows how meteorological, glaciological, and energy exchange analyses allow the characterization of the behavior of this kind of mountain glaciers. Based on these results, we can tackle the separation of climatic vs. volcanic component at other glacial systems in Mexico.

  7. Volcanoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunar, L. N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the forces responsible for the eruptions of volcanoes and gives the physical and chemical parameters governing the type of eruption. Explains the structure of the earth in relation to volcanoes and explains the location of volcanic regions. (GS)

  8. Volcanoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunar, L. N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the forces responsible for the eruptions of volcanoes and gives the physical and chemical parameters governing the type of eruption. Explains the structure of the earth in relation to volcanoes and explains the location of volcanic regions. (GS)

  9. Volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R.W.; Decker, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book describes volcanoes although the authors say they are more to be experienced than described. This book poses more question than answers. The public has developed interest and awareness in volcanism since the first edition eight years ago, maybe because since the time 120 volcanoes have erupted. Of those, the more lethal eruptions were from volcanoes not included in the first edition's World's 101 Most Notorious Volcanoes.

  10. Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilling, Robert I.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, this booklet provides a non-technical introduction to the subject of volcanoes. Separate sections examine the nature and workings of volcanoes, types of volcanoes, volcanic geological structures such as plugs and maars, types of eruptions, volcanic-related activity such as geysers…

  11. Anatomy of the Colima volcano magmatic system, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spica, Zack; Perton, Mathieu; Legrand, Denis

    2017-02-01

    Colima volcano is one of the most active volcanoes in continental north America. It is located within the Colima graben on the western part of the Colima rift zone. Although extensively studied, the internal structure and deep magmatic system remains unknown. This research gives new clues to understand how and where magmas are produced and stored at depth. Using ambient seismic noise, we jointly invert for Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves for both phase and group velocity, which is applied for the first time in a volcanic environment. We invert for both the shear wave velocity and radial anisotropy. The 3D high resolution shear wave velocity model shows a deep, large and well-delineated elliptic-shape magmatic reservoir below the Colima volcano complex at a depth of about 15 km. On the other hand, the radial anisotropy model shows a significant negative feature (i.e., VSV >VSH) revealed from ≥35 km depth until the top of the magma reservoir at about 12 km depth. The latter suggests the presence of numerous vertical fractures where fluids, rooting from a well-known mantle window, can easily migrate upward and then accumulate in the magma reservoir. Furthermore, the convergence of both a low velocity zone and a negative anisotropy suggests that the magma is mainly stored in conduits or inter-fingered dykes as opposed to horizontally stratified magma reservoir.

  12. Late Pleistocene-Holocene cataclysmic eruptions at Nevado de Toluca and Jocotitlan volcanoes, central Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macias, J.L.; Garcia, P.A.; Arce, J.L.; Siebe, C.; Espindola, J.M.; Komorowski, J.C.; Scott, K.

    1997-01-01

    This field guide describes a five day trip to examine deposits of Late Pleistocene-Holocene cataclysmic eruptions at Nevado de Toluca and Jocotitlan volcanoes in central Mexico. We will discuss the stratigraphy, petrology, and sedimentological characteristics of these deposits which provide insights into the eruptive history, type of volcanic activity, and transport and emplacement mechanisms of pyroclastic materials. These parameters will allow us to discuss the kinds of hazards and the risk that they pose to populations around these volcanoes. The area to be visited is tectonically complex thus we will also discuss the location of the volcanoes with respect to the tectonic environment. The first four days of the field trip will be dedicated to Nevado de Toluca Volcano (19 degrees 09'N; 99 degrees 45'W) located at 23 km. southwest of the City of Toluca, and is the fourth highest peak in the country, reaching an elevation of 4,680 meters above sea level (m.a.s.l.). Nevado de Toluca is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano, composed of a central vent excavated upon the remains of older craters destroyed by former events. Bloomfield and Valastro, (1974, 1977) concluded that the last cycle of activity occurred nearly equal 11,600 yr. ago. For this reason Nevado de Toluca has been considered an extinct volcano. Our studies, however, indicate that Nevado de Toluca has had at least two episodes of cone destruction by sector collapse as well as several explosive episodes including plinian eruptions and dome-destruction events. These eruptions occurred during the Pleistocene but a very young eruption characterized by surge and ash flows occurred ca. 3,300 yr. BP. This new knowledge of the volcano's eruptive history makes the evaluation of its present state of activity and the geological hazards necessary. This is important because the area is densely populated and large cities such as Toluca and Mexico are located in its proximity.

  13. Hazard map for volcanic ballistic impacts at El Chichón volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatorre-Ibarguengoitia, Miguel; Ramos-Hernández, Silvia; Jiménez-Aguilar, Julio

    2014-05-01

    The 1982 eruption of El Chichón Volcano in southeastern Mexico had a strong social and environmental impact. The eruption resulted in the worst volcanic disaster in the recorded history of Mexico, causing about 2,000 casualties, displacing thousands, and producing severe economic losses. Even when some villages were relocated after the 1982 eruption, many people still live and work in the vicinities of the volcano and may be affected in the case of a new eruption. The hazard map of El Chichón volcano (Macías et al., 2008) comprises pyroclastic flows, pyroclastic surges, lahars and ash fall but not ballistic projectiles, which represent an important threat to people, infrastructure and vegetation in the case of an eruption. In fact, the fatalities reported in the first stage of the 1982 eruption were caused by roof collapse induced by ashfall and lithic ballistic projectiles. In this study, a general methodology to delimit the hazard zones for volcanic ballistic projectiles during volcanic eruptions is applied to El Chichón volcano. Different scenarios are defined based on the past activity of the volcano and parameterized by considering the maximum kinetic energy associated with ballistic projectiles ejected during previous eruptions. A ballistic model is used to reconstruct the "launching" kinetic energy of the projectiles observed in the field. The maximum ranges expected for the ballistics in the different explosive scenarios defined for El Chichón volcano are presented in a ballistic hazard map which complements the published hazard map. These maps assist the responsible authorities to plan the definition and mitigation of restricted areas during volcanic crises.

  14. Hydrogen Isotopic Composition of Hornblendes From Active Volcanoes of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Y.; Kusakabe, M.; Valdez, G.; Mora, J. C.

    2002-12-01

    Horblendes (Hb) crystallize in water-rich magmas in magma chambers or in deeper zones. Isotopic composition of hydrogen in OH-groups of Hb represents the water isotopic composition of magmatic fluid or dissolved magmatic volatiles and therefore, is an isotopic characteristics of magmatic water. At lower vapor pressure in conduits and shallower magma chambers, Hb can decompose and loose water with significant isotopic effects. We measured hydrogen isotopic composition of hornblendes from modern lavas and pyroclastics of El Chichon, Colima and Popocatepetl volcanoes. Hornblendes from the last and previous pyroclastic flows of El Chichon are the more abundant mineral phases (after plagioclase), showing pleochroism from green to brown. They are relatively uniform in composition (close to magnesian hastingsite hornblende), without chemical variations between cores and rims. Using the Johnson and Rutherford (1989) calibration of the Al-in-hornblende geobarometer, the hornblendes show equilibrium with the melt at pressure of 4 kb that correspond to 12 km of depth. These pressure conditions likely represent the location of the magma chamber below El Chichon volcano, however, these pressure estimates need to be confirmed. The water content of all analyzed Hbs is 1.5-1.8 wt%, but may be higher due to a minor amount of impurities of pyroxenes which sometimes are difficult to separate from Hb. Hydrogen isotopic composition in 10 samples of Hb from El Chichon of different age and facies (pumice, lithic fragments in pyroclastics) was in a narrow range -40 to -37 permil V-SMOW. Such isotopic signature corresponds to so-called "andesitic" waters, i.e. waters from subduction-related magmas, The origin of these waters is suggested to be the recycled water from subducted oceanic sediments. The data for El Chichon volcano are in the range of the already known values for subduction-related magmas though the tectonic setting of El Chichon is more complicated. The measured isotopic

  15. Analysis of Vulnerability Around The Colima Volcano, MEXICO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, S. P.

    2001-12-01

    The Colima volcano located in the western of the Trasmexican Volcanic Belt, in the central portion of the Colima Rift Zone, between the Mexican States of Jalisco and Colima. The volcano since January of 1998 presents a new activity, which has been characterized by two stages: the first one was an effusive phase that begin on 20 November 1998 and finish by the middle of January 1999. On February 10of 1999 a great explosion in the summit marked the beginning of an explosive phase, these facts implies that the eruptive process changes from an effusive model to an explosive one. Suárez-Plascencia et al, 2000, present hazard maps to ballistic projectiles, ashfalls and lahars for this scenario. This work presents the evaluation of the vulnerability in the areas identified as hazardous in the maps for ballistic, ashfalls and lahars, based on the economic elements located in the middle and lower sections of the volcano building, like agriculture, forestry, agroindustries and communication lines (highways, power, telephonic, railroad, etc). The method is based in Geographic Information Systems, using digital cartography scale 1:50,000, digital orthophotos from the Instituto Nacional de Estadística, Geografía e Informática, SPOT and Landsat satellite images from 1997 and 2000 in the bands 1, 2 and 3. The land use maps obtained for 1997 and 2000, were compared with the land use map reported by Suárez in 1992, from these maps an increase of the 5 porcent of the sugar cane area and corn cultivations were observed compared of those of 1990 (1225.7 km2) and a decrease of the forest surface, moving the agricultural limits uphill, and showing also some agave cultivation in the northwest and north hillslopes of the Nevado de Colima. This increment of the agricultural surface results in bigger economic activity in the area, which makes that the vulnerability also be increased to different volcanic products emitted during this phase of activity. The degradation of the soil by the

  16. A ~31 ka Plinian-subplinian eruption at Tláloc Volcano, Sierra Nevada, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, H.; Arce, J.; Macias, J.; Garcia-Palomo, A.

    2006-12-01

    Tláloc volcano (19°24`40"N; 98°42`48"W; 4,120 m.a.s.l.) is a Pliocene-Pleistocene stratovolcano located NE of México City, Mexico. It represents the northernmost volcano of the N-S Sierra Nevada Range, which consists of Tláloc-Telapón, Téyotl, Iztaccíhuatl, and Popocatépetl volcanoes. Tláloc has always been considered the oldest (and extinct) volcano of the Sierra Nevada Range, although no detailed studies had been carried out. Recent field data has revealed important new information about its eruptive history, including a large magnitude Plinian-subplinian eruption, here referred to as the Multilayered White Pumice (MWP). This eruption started with a continuous yet unstable eruptive column that reached the stratosphere, which deposited several pumice-rich horizons that total 1 m at a distance of 12 km from the volcano. A preliminary isopach map of the deposit indicates that these fall layers were distributed mainly to the north-northeast, and encompass a minimum area of 120 km2 around the volcano. The event ended with total collapse of the eruptive column, which produced four, pumice-rich pyroclastic flows dispersed on the N and E slopes of the volcano. Those flow deposits fill gullies up to 25 m in thickness, at a distance of 12 km from the vent. The deposits are massive matrix-supported layers consisting of block-size fibrous rhyolitic pumice set in an ashy matrix rich in quartz and biotite crystals. Pumice clasts contain phenocrysts of K- feldspar, quartz, biotite, and Fe-Ti oxides. Charred logs are common, and charcoal from those logs yield an age of 31,490 +1995/-1595 years BP. So far, the MWP is the youngest dated deposit of Tláloc Volcano. Our results call into question the widespread idea of a N-S migration of the volcanism in the Sierra Nevada, beginning with the formation of Tláloc volcano and ending with the active Popocatépetl volcano.

  17. Seismic structures beneath Popocatepetl (Mexico) and Gorely (Kamchatka) volcanoes derived from passive tomography studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Pavel; Koulakov, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    A number of active volcanoes are observed in different parts of the world, and they attract great interest of scientists. Comparing their characteristics helps in understanding the origin and mechanisms of their activity. One of the most effective methods for studying the deep structure beneath volcanoes is passive source seismic tomography. In this study we present results of tomographic inversions for two active volcanoes located in different parts of the world: Popocatepetl (Mexico) and Gorely (Kamchatka, Russia). In the past century both volcanoes were actively erupted that explains great interest to their detailed investigations. In both cases we made the full data analysis starting from picking the arrival times from local events. In the case of the Popocatepetl study, a temporary seismological network was deployed by GFZ for the period from December 1999 to July 2000. Note that during this period there were a very few events recorded inside the volcano. Most of recorded earthquakes occurred in surrounding areas and they probably have the tectonic nature. We performed a special analysis to ground the efficiency of using these data for studying seismic structure beneath the network installed on the volcano. The tomographic inversion was performed using the LOTOS code by Koulakov (2009). Beneath the Popocatepetl volcano we have found a zone of strong anti-correlation between P- and S-velocities that leaded to high values of Vp/Vs ratio. Similar features were found for some other volcanoes in previous studies. We interpret these anomalies as zones of high content of fluids and melts that are related to active magma sources. For the case of Gorely volcano we used the data of a temporary network just deployed in summer 2013 by our team from IPGG, Novosibirsk. Luckily, during the field works, the volcano started to manifest strong seismic activity. In this period, 100 - 200 volcanic events occurred daily. We collected the continuous seismic records from 20 stations

  18. Volcanoes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Earth's crust. Hot rock, steam, poisonous gases, and ash reach the Earth's surface when a volcano erupts. ... rain, fires, and even tsunamis. Volcanic gas and ash can damage the lungs of small infants, older ...

  19. Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.; ,

    1998-01-01

    Volcanoes destroy and volcanoes create. The catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, made clear the awesome destructive power of a volcano. Yet, over a time span longer than human memory and record, volcanoes have played a key role in forming and modifying the planet upon which we live. More than 80 percent of the Earth's surface--above and below sea level--is of volcanic origin. Gaseous emissions from volcanic vents over hundreds of millions of years formed the Earth's earliest oceans and atmosphere, which supplied the ingredients vital to evolve and sustain life. Over geologic eons, countless volcanic eruptions have produced mountains, plateaus, and plains, which subsequent erosion and weathering have sculpted into majestic landscapes and formed fertile soils.

  20. Geochemical surveillance of magmatic volatiles at Popocatepetl volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, F.; Janik, C.J.; Delgado, H.; Werner, C.; Counce, D.; Stimac, J.A.; Siebe, C.; Love, S.P.; Williams, S.N.; Fischer, T.; Johnson, L.

    1998-01-01

    Surveillance of Popocatepetl volcanic plume geochemistry and SO2 flux began in early 1994 after fumarolic and seismic activity increased significantly during 1993. Volatile traps placed around the summit were collected at near-monthly intervals until the volcano erupted on December 21, 1994. Additional trap samples were obtained in early 1996 before the volcano erupted again, emplacing a small dacite dome in the summit crater. Abundances of volatile constituents (ppm/day of Cl, Stotal, F, CO2, Hg, and As) vaaried, but most constituents were relatively high in earl\\y and late 1994. However, ratios of these constituents to Cl were highest in mid-1994. ??34S-Stotal in trap solutions ranged from 1.5??? to 6.4???; lowest values generally occurred during late 1994. ??13C-CO2 of trap solutions were greatly contaminated with atmospheric CO2 and affected by absorption kinetics. When trap data are combined with SO2 flux measurements made through November 1996, Popocatepetl released about 3.9 Mt SO2, 16 Mt CO2, 0.75 Mt HCl, 0.075 Mt HF, 260 t As, 2.6 t Hg, and roughly 200 Mt H2O. Near-vent gas concentrations in the volcanic plume measured by correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) commonly exceed human recommended exposure limits and may constitute a potential health hazard. Volatile geochemistry combined with petrologic observations and melt-inclusion studies show that mafic magma injection into a preexisting silicic chamber has accompanied renewed volcanism at Popocatepetl. Minor assimilation of Cretaceous wall rocks probably occurred in mid-1994.

  1. Upgrading the seismic and geodetic network of the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calò, Marco; Iglesias Mendoza, Arturo; Legrand, Denis; Valdés González, Carlos Miguel; Perez Campos, Xyoli

    2017-04-01

    The Popocatépetl is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico and is located only 70 km from Mexico City, populated by more than 20 millions of people, and only 35 km from the Puebla municipality with almost 1.5 millions of people living. The recent activity of the volcano is generally marked by explosions emitting ash plumes often reaching the densely populated regions. In the framework of the Mexican Fund for Prevention of Natural Disasters (FOPREDEN) we are renovating and upgrading the existing geodetic and seismic networks monitoring the volcano. In this project we are installing 10 broadband seismic stations (120s-050Hz) in shallow boreholes (3-5m depth) and 4 GPS with real time sampling rate of 1 Hz. All instruments are equipped with continuous recording systems for real time monitoring purposes and research. The Popocatépetl exceeds 5400m, and the altitude of the stations ranges from 2200 m to 4300 m making it difficult their installation and maintenance. Because of ash emissions and the hard working condition, the real-time transmission is split into two systems in order to ensure the monitoring of the volcano also during the highest expected activity. Therefore we set up a network of "first order", consisting of four stations located about 20 km from the crater and equipped with satellite transmission. These stations, being far enough from the crater, ensure the real time monitoring of the major events also during intense periods of activity of the volcano. The remaining six stations are installed near to the crater (less than 10 km) and take part of the "second order" network equipped with a telemetered radio system transmitting the data either directly to the National Center of Disaster Prevention (CENAPRED) and National Seismological Service (SSN) or to the first order stations (for the sites that have not direct visible line with the monitoring centers). The four GPS sensors are all installed in the second order sites in order to monitor the largest

  2. Magnetic precursors to the 2013 eruptive activity at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A.; Gonzalez, E.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; HernaNdez-Quintero, J.; Flores, A.

    2013-12-01

    Popocateptl volcano, 60km from Mexico City, has been erupting since 1994 with periods of more intense activity. Volcanomagnetic signals at Popocatepetl have been correlated with different volcanic phenomena especially ascent of several magma batches in pulses lasting several hours that precede increasing seismicity at the volcano. Data from the TL magnetic station on the northern flank of the volcano at 4000masl and from the CPX station at the same altitude on the southwestern flank are processed with the data from the TEO base station (weighted differences) in order to remove signals not associated with the volcano. Short term negative volcanic anomalies around 10nT preceded sharp increases in seismicity and copious ash emission during April and May 2013. They were correlated with periods of harmonic tremor and interpreted as new ascending magma batches, below the Curie point. A longer term descending magnetic trend from February on, is of thermomagnetic origen and is associated with the more mafic andesite compositions of the ash which contain higher MgO and are consistent with influx of deeper magma at higher magmatic temperatures. Sharp positive magnetic peaks are related both with explosions and seismic events, while sustained steps of positive anomalies are related with dome growth and cooling

  3. Hydrogeochemical surveillance at El Chichón volcano crater lake, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienta, María Aurora; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Ramos, Silvia; Ceniceros, Nora; Cruz, Olivia; Aguayo, Alejandra; Arcega-Cabrera, Flor

    2014-09-01

    El Chichón volcano has an eruptive record of at least 12 major eruptions in the Holocene, the latest one in March-April 1982 causing the worst volcanic disaster in the history of Mexico. After about 6 centuries of quiescence, this eruption destroyed a large dome and opened a 1 km wide crater. A lake, formed within the crater shortly after the eruption, has been an important source of information about the evolution of the post-eruptive processes. The fluctuations of the crater lake water physicochemical parameters, observed since 1983, have allowed in identifying hydrothermal waters and H2S-rich gases, influenced by tectonic and meteorological effects, as the main contributors to its composition. Here we propose some methods to help in assessing the state of the volcano derived from the relative contribution of these factors as an easy to implement volcanic surveillance method in potentially active volcanoes with crater lakes, or other volcano-influenced water sources.

  4. Temperature anomaly in the volcano Popocatepetl area, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsarenko, A.; Grimalsky, V.; Yutsis, V.; Lavana Cardenas, J. C.; Chavez, O.; Sojo-Amezquita, A., Sr.

    2014-12-01

    Anomaly changes in the diurnal behavior of the temperature measured in the near-surface soil (30-40 cm) in Tlamacas monitoring site, volcano Popocatepetl area, are presented. Results of statistical analysis show 2 essential changes for the temperature characteristics observed during 2007-2009 and 2013-2014 monitoring periods: 1.) Minimum and maximum of the diurnal temperature have moved approximately to the 14 LT and to midnight, 24 LT, respectively (Fig 1., c). Under the "normal" condition, the absolute minimum of daily temperature is observed during sunrise (about 7 LT) for the atmosphere measurements and with certain time lag (about 9 LT, Fig.1,b) for the measurements in soil (depending on the depth), and absolute temperature maximum is observed in time when Solar radiation is not enough to provide heating of the atmosphere (about 16 LT) or the Earth surface (about 17 LT, Fig.1,b). Dispersion of the residual temperature (24-hours running trend of the temperature substituted) is 6 times lower for the period of monitoring 2013-2014 (Fig.1, g and h) in comparison with a period 2007-2009 (Fig.1, e and f). In other words, a temperature variation between the maximum and minimum during the day became 6 times lower that it was before.

  5. Tremor and its duration-amplitude distribution at Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arámbula-Mendoza, R.; Valdés-González, C.; Varley, N.; Reyes-Pimentel, T. A.; Juárez-García, B.

    2016-09-01

    The duration-amplitude distribution was calculated for the tremor observed at Popocatépetl volcano during episodes of activity in 2000 and 2012-2014. An exponential function was used to obtain a good fit for the duration-amplitude distribution, and the source of volcanic tremor is probably generated by the transportation of magmatic fluids and its coupling with the host rock within the volcanic conduit. In particular, harmonic tremor has shown large amplitudes, durations, and mean values of amplitude, more than spasmodic or pulsating tremor. This is due to different generation mechanisms: in the case of harmonic tremor, it is produced during magma ascent and lava dome growth, while spasmodic and pulsating tremors are associated with fragmentation of the lava dome and gas emissions. This paper presents the duration-amplitude distribution as a method to estimate the intensity of the tremor at Popocatépetl, a volcano with the major risk in all Mexico.

  6. Eruptive and magmatic cycles at Fuego de Colima volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, Claude; Camus, Guy; Gourgaud, Alain

    1991-04-01

    The Fuego de Colima volcano displays a pattern of eruptive cyclicity, characterized by lava flows and/or slow effusions in an open crater alternating with short explosive events. Historical accounts, field investigations and petrological data allow us to refine our understanding of the relationships between recurrent acidic (acidic andesite) and "mafic" (andesitic) products and this eruptive behaviour. The second to last (1818-1913) and present (1913-present day) cycles are instructive in this respect: the short explosive events in 1818 and 1913 correspond to the initial mixing stage of a differentiated magmatic body with a new "mafic" input. Mathematical modeling shows that the pyroclastic products of 1913 result from the mixing between an acidic andesite (61.5% SiO 2) and an olivine andesite (˜56% SiO 2) in various ratios. The final andesite mixture is made of ˜38% basaltic andesite and ˜62% acidic andesite. The long effusive/extrusive phases correspond to the ensuing differentiation stage of the new magmatic body. For example, the 1961 lava flows were derived from the final mixed and homogenized magma after the eruption of 1913 by fractionation of ˜7% plagioclase, ˜9% pyroxene (clinopyroxene + orthopyroxene) and 0.7% titanomagnetite. The fractionation of 11% plagioclase, 9% pyroxene and 1.4% titanomagnetite is required to produce the composition of the 1986 summit lava dome from the same parent. In conclusion, at Fuego de Colima, an eruptive cycle begins with a short, violent explosive event related to a mixing process and continues with a long, effusive phase characterized by magmatic differentiation. This scheme differs from others that have been proposed, which consider that the eruptive cycles end with an explosive event.

  7. Miocene to Recent structural evolution of the Nevado de Toluca volcano region, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Palomo, A.; Macías, J. L.; Garduño, V. H.

    2000-03-01

    Based on aerial photography, satellite imagery, and detailed field work, a geological and structural model of Nevado de Toluca and its surroundings is presented. The Nevado de Toluca volcano is built upon the intersection of three complex fault systems of different age, orientation, and kinematics. These systems from the older to the younger are: (a) The Taxco-Querétaro Fault System (NNW-SSE) with clear expression south of the volcano; (b) The San Antonio Fault System (NE-SW) that runs between the San Antonio and Nevado de Toluca volcanoes; and (c) The Tenango Fault System (E-W) located to the east of Nevado de Toluca volcano. Our field data, supported by previous studies, suggest that these systems have coexisted since the late Miocene. In addition, the stratigraphy, chronology, and kinematics of fault planes point to the existence of at least three main deformation events that have affected the region since the late Miocene. During the early Miocene, an extensional phase with the same deformation style as the Basin and Range tectonics of northern Mexico caused the formation of horsts and grabens south of Nevado de Toluca and allowed the intrusion of sub-vertical dikes oriented NW-SE and NNW-SSE. During the middle Miocene, a transcurrent episode generated NE-SW faults that presented two main motions: the first movement was left-lateral with a σ3 oriented NW-SE and later turned into normal through a counter-clockwise rotation of σ3 up to a N-S position. The latest deformation phase started during the late Pliocene and produced oblique extension ( σ3 oriented NE-SW) along E-W-trending faults that later changed to pure extension by shifting of σ3 to a N-S orientation. These faults appear to control the late Pleistocene to Holocene monogenetic volcanism, the flank collapses of Nevado de Toluca volcano and the seismic activity of the region.

  8. Geochemistry of summit fumarole vapors and flanking thermal/mineral waters at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, C.; Goff, F.; Janik, C.J.

    1997-06-01

    Popocatepetl Volcano is potentially devastating to populations living in the greater Mexico City area. Systematic monitoring of fumarole gases and flanking thermal/mineral springs began in early 1994 after increased fumarolic and seismic activity were noticed in 1991. These investigations had two major objectives: (1) to determine if changes in magmatic conditions beneath Popocatepetl might be reflected by chemical changes in fumarolic discharges and (2) to determine if thermal/mineral spring waters in the vicinity of Popocatepetl are geochemically related to or influences by the magmatic system. This report summarizes results from these two discrete studies.

  9. Timing magma ascent at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico, 2000-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Del Pozzo, A. L.; Cifuentes, G.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Bonifaz, R.; Correa, F.; Mendiola, I. F.

    2003-07-01

    Magnetic anomalies may be used to constrain magma ascent and are useful as precursors to eruptions especially when correlated with other geophysical and geochemical data. In this paper we present multiparameter data on the magnetics, dome morphology, geochemistry and seismicity associated with the December 2000-January 2001 eruptions, the largest of the recent eruptions at Popocatepetl Volcano. A 6-month data period was studied in order to evaluate the precursors and post-eruption processes. Several cycles of dome construction and destruction occurred from September 2000 through February 2001. In December, large amplitude tremor associated with a higher effusion rate resulted in the formation of a large dome which filled the crater to within about 50 m of the lowest part of the crater rim. Seismic activity in December was marked by many volcanotectonic earthquakes and both high frequency and harmonic tremor. On December 12 and 13, an increase in the tremor amplitude was followed by ash eruptions with 1.7-5-km-high columns. Tremor amplitude increased again on December 15 and oscillated for the next four days. Activity remained high until the end of the month. On January 22, an 18-km-high plume produced ash and pumice fall to the east as well as pyroclastic flows and mudflows which reached 6 km from the crater. The eruption left three concentric explosion pits, partially destroying the December dome. Mixing of a mafic olivine-bearing melt with a more evolved magma triggered the larger eruption on January 22 as can be seen from the higher MgO concentrations in some of the ejecta and the presence of a dark andesitic scoria with lower silica content and a white andesitic pumice with higher silica content. Precursory negative magnetic anomalies up to 5 nT (-3.2 nT, -5 nT, -2.9 nT) were associated with the ascent of the larger batches of magma which preceded the increases in seismicity, before the December 2000-January 22 VEI 3-4 eruptions. No significant increases in

  10. Update of map the volcanic hazard in the Ceboruco volcano, Nayarit, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Camarena-Garcia, M. A.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    (Hibiscus sabdariffa). Recently it has established tomato and green pepper crops in greenhouses. The regional commercial activities are concentrated in the localities of Ixtlán, Jala and Ahuacatlán. The updated hazard maps are: a) Hazard map of pyroclastic flows, b) Hazard map of lahars and debris flow, and c) Hazard map of ash-fall. The cartographic and database information obtained will be the basis for updating the Operational Plan of the Ceboruco Volcano by the State Civil & Fire Protection Unit of Nayarit, Mexico, and the urban development plans of surrounding municipalities, in order to reduce their vulnerability to the hazards of the volcanic activity.

  11. Characterization of the recent ash emissions at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Del Pozzo, A. L.; González-Morán, T.; Espinasa-Pereña, R.; Butron, M. A.; Reyes, M.

    2008-02-01

    Nine representative ash emissions from 1994-1997 were studied to characterize the recent activity and the eruptive process at Popocatepetl. A series of tephra eruptions began on December 21, 1994 and intermittent activity continues to present. The first eruptions were phreatomagmatic but in mid-March 1996 they turned magmatic. Cumulative volumes (529-1810 × 10 3 m 3), were determined for the first eruptions. However, when eruptions grew larger, more widely spaced (and magmatic), the volumes were then calculated individually (22-1107 × 10 3 m 3), both using the Simpson Rule and based on 244 sampling sites. This numerical integration method is more precise than other methods especially since sub-mm isopachs are neglected in most cases. Dominant winds carried ash mainly to the east (January through April 1995 and April 1996) except for the summer months when ash fell on Mexico City to the northwest (October 28 1996 and June 30 1997). In March 1996, changing wind direction produced ash fall to the southwest as well. During the first year, volume calculations indicated that emission rate was higher at the beginning of the eruptions and then declined and stopped. Activity resumed the following year with a similar pattern until larger amounts of magma ascended. Detailed studies of the ashfall provided constraints on the dynamics of the volcanic plumbing system. Tephra emission was related with clearing (December 1994 to March 1995), and clogging of the vent (May 1995 to February 1996), until a larger new ascending batch was able to clear its way to the surface (March 1996). After April 1996, dome formation and explosive destruction were related to individual small ascending magma batches. Tephra from December 1994 to early March 1996 was made up mostly of andesitic lithic clasts and plagioclase and pyroxene crystals with minor amounts of accidental and accessory minerals. In March 1996, prior to dome formation, glass was also detected. Afterwards, ash components were

  12. Seismic Characteristics of the Vulcanian Explosions from the 2003-2005 Eruption at Colima Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez-Cornú, Francisco Javier; Espíndola, Juan Manuel; Nava Pichardo, Fidencio Alejandro; Suárez-Plascencia, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Colima Volcano (19.512°N, 103.617°W, 4000 m.a.s.l.), located on the border between the states of Jalisco and Colima in western Mexico, is the most active volcano in the country. Its activity has taken place through diverse styles of eruption, from very explosive to effusive. In the last decades it has presented frequent vulcanian eruptions with episodes of dome construction-destruction. Four of these cycles occurred from 1990 to 2005, the last one from July 2003 to September 2005. We focus on this last period, for which we analyzed seismic phases and coupled pressure airwaves from high dynamic range seismograms, both in the time and frequency domains, to determine characteristic features, propagation velocities, and origin times for both deep seismic sources and the associated explosions. The results show that the sources of the P-waves associated with the explosions are not located at the summit, but instead at different shallow locations for the different explosions, suggesting the presence of various magmatic pathways within the volcano.

  13. Analysis of the seismicity activity of the volcano Ceboruco, Nayarit, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ayala, N. A.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Escudero, C. R.; Zamora-Camacho, A.; Gomez, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Ceboruco is a stratovolcano is located in the state of Nayarit,Mexico (104 ° 30'31 .25 "W, 21 ° 7'28 .35" N, 2280msnm). This is an volcano active, as part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Nelson (1986) reports that it has had activity during the last 1000 years has averaged eruptions every 125 years or so, having last erupted in 1870, currently has fumarolic activity. In the past 20 years there has been an increase in the population and socio-economic activities around the volcano (Suárez Plascencia, 2013); which reason the Ceboruco study has become a necessity in several ways. Recent investigations of seismicity (Rodríguez Uribe et al., 2013) have classified the earthquakes in four families Ceboruco considering the waveform and spectral features. We present analysis included 57 days of seismicity from March to October 2012, in the period we located 97 events with arrivals of P and S waves clear, registered in at least three seasons, three components of the temporal network Ceboruco volcano.

  14. Monitoring Monitoring Evolving Activity at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico, 2000-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-DelPozzo, A.; Aceves, F.; Bonifaz, R.; Humberto, S.

    2001-12-01

    After 6 years of small eruptions, activity at Mexico's 5,452m high Popocatepetl Volcano in central Mexico, peaked in the December 2000-January 2001 eruptions. Precursors included an important increase in seismicity as well as in magmatic components of spring water and small scale deformation which resulted in growth of a new crater dome from January 16 on. Evacuation of the towns nearest the volcano over Christmas was decided because of the possibility of pyroclastic flows. During the previous years, crater dome growth, contraction and explosive clearing has dominated the activity. The January 22 eruption produced an eruption column approximately 17km high with associated pyroclastic flows. Ejecta was composed of both basic and evolved scoria and pumice and dome lithics. A large proportion of the juvenile material was intermediate between these 2 endmenbers (59-63percent SiO2 and 3.5 to 5.5 MgO) consistent with a small basic pulse entering a more evolved larger batch of magma. The January eruption left a large pit which has been partially infilled by another crater dome this August 2001.

  15. Eruptive history, current activity and risk estimation using geospatial information in the Colima volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Camarena-Garcia, M.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Flores-Peña, S.

    2013-12-01

    Colima volcano, also known as Volcan de Fuego (19 30.696 N, 103 37.026 W), is located on the border between the states of Jalisco and Colima, and is the most active volcano in Mexico. In January 20, 1913, Colima had its biggest explosion of the twentieth century, with VEI 4, after the volcano had been dormant for almost 40 years. In 1961, a dome reached the northeastern edge of the crater and started a new lava flow, and from this date maintains constant activity. In February 10, 1999, a new explosion occurred at the summit dome. The activity during the 2001-2005 period was the most intense, but did not exceed VEI 3. The activity resulted in the formation of domes and their destruction after explosive events. The explosions originated eruptive columns, reaching altitudes between 4,500 and 9,000 masl, further pyroclastic flows reaching distances up to 3.5 km from the crater. During the explosive events, ash emissions were generated in all directions reaching distances up to 100 km, slightly affecting the nearby villages: Tuxpan, Tonila, Zapotlan, Cuauhtemoc, Comala, Zapotitlan de Vadillo and Toliman. During 2005 to July 2013, this volcano has had an intense effusive-explosive activity; similar to the one that took place during the period of 1890 through 1905. That was before the Plinian eruption of 1913, where pyroclastic flows reached a distance of 15 km from the crater. In this paper we estimate the risk of Colima volcano through the analysis of the vulnerability variables, hazard and exposure, for which we use: satellite imagery, recurring Fenix helicopter over flights of the state government of Jalisco, the use of the images of Google Earth and the population census 2010 INEGI. With this information and data identified changes in economic activities, development, and use of land. The expansion of the agricultural frontier in the lower sides of the volcano Colima, and with the advancement of traditional crops of sugar cane and corn, increased the growth of

  16. Pleistocene cohesive debris flows at Nevado de Toluca Volcano, central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, L.; Macías, J. L.

    2000-10-01

    During the Pleistocene, intense hydrothermal alteration promoted a flank failure of the southern portion of Nevado de Toluca volcano. This event produced a debris avalanche that transformed into a cohesive debris flow (Pilcaya deposit) owing to water saturation and weakness of the altered pre-avalanche rocks. The Pilcaya debris flow traveled along a narrow tectonic depression up to a distance of 40 km and then spread over a flat plain reaching up to 55 km from the volcano summit. This transition zone corresponds with a sudden break in slope from 5 to 0.5° that caused a rapid reduction in velocity and thickening of the flow that consequently reduced its competence to transport large particles. The resulting deposit thickens from 15 to 40 m, and contains boulders up to 15 m in diameter that form hummocky morphology close to the transitional zone. Sometime after the emplacement of the Pilcaya debris flow, heavy rains and superficial drainage contributed to remobilize the upper portions of the deposit causing two secondary lahars. These debris flows called El Mogote, traveled up to 75 km from the volcano. The edifice collapse generated lahars with a total volume of 2.8 km3 that devastated an approximate area of 250 km2. The area versus volume plot for both deposits shows that the magnitude of the event is comparable to other cohesive debris flows such as the Teteltzingo lahar (Pico de Orizaba, Mexico) and the Osceola mudflow (Mount Rainier, Wa). The Pilcaya debris flow represents additional evidence of debris flow transformed from a flank failure, a potentially devastating phenomenon that could threaten distant areas from the volcano previously considered without risk.

  17. Habitat heterogeneity - biological association relationships in the asphalt volcano, SW Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, E.; Gaytan, A.

    2007-05-01

    A new class of cold seep, named asphalt volcano, was discovered in the Campeche Knolls region of the southern Gulf of Mexico, supporting chemosynthetic communities alike those lying at similar depth on the Angolan margin and the Barbados Prism suggesting an interesting longitudinal connectivity in the faunal components. The discovery of this novel deep-sea habitat has raised questions about diversity and process dynamics in this novel poorly described milieu. Results from two previous cruises jointly sponsored by German, US and Mexican funding agencies have allowed us to recognize the presence of large densities of background benthic megafauna, mainly represented by sea-cucumbers and galatheid crabs, which occupy diverse habitats in asphalt volcano and feed on microbial assemblages on the asphalt covering extended area. Asphalt displays different degrees of hardness suggesting ongoing activity of asphalt extrusion in the site that is reflected in biological benthic communities in different states succession and complexity. The fresh asphalt and the immediately surrounding soft sediment are colonized by mats of complex microbial assemblages where both background benthic megafauna and chemosynthetic tube worms and mussels aggregate. Our results focus on the diversity of the habitats associated with methane seepage through the example of geological structures in the asphalt volcano considering the small scale with the analysis of the relationships between biological assemblages and habitat heterogeneity assessing the role of the geological structure on biological communities. Bubbling of gas, oil and the content of thermogenic gas and gas hydrate in the asphalt suggests that the asphalt plays an important role as a reservoir of methane in this marginal deep sea.

  18. Faults and volcanoes: Main volcanic structures in the Acambay Graben, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Pedrazzi, D.; Suñe-Puchol, I.; Lacan, P.

    2016-12-01

    The Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) province is best known by the major stratovolcanoes, such as Popocatepetl and Colima, but most of the province is formed by modest size stratovolcanoes and monogenetic cones. Regional fault systems were developed together with the building of the volcanic province; the most notorious one is Chapala-Tula Fault System (CTFS), which runs parallel to the central sector of the MVB, and thus it is also referred to as the Intra-Arc fault system. Acambay graben (AG) is part of this central system. It is a 20 x 70 km depression located 100 km to the NW of Mexico City, at the easternmost end of the E-W trending CTFS, and was formed as the result of NS to NE oriented extension. Seismically active normal faults, such as the Acambay-Tixmadejé fault, with a mB =7 earthquake in 1912, delimit the AG. The graben includes several volcanic structures and associated deposits ranging in age from Miocene to 3 ka. The main structures are two stratovolcanoes, Altamirano (900 m high) and Temascalcingo (800 m high). There are also several Miocene-Pliocene lava domes, and Quaternary small cinder cones and shield volcanoes. Faulting of the Acambay graben affects all these volcanic forms, but depending on their ages, the volcanoes are cut by several faults or by a few. That is the case of Altamirano and Temascalcingo volcanoes, where the former is almost unaffected whereas the latter is highly dissected by faults. Altamirano is younger than Temascalcingo; youngest pyroclastic deposits from Altamirano are dated at 12-3 ka, and those from Temascalcingo at 40-25 ka (radiocarbon ages). The relatively young ages found in volcanic deposits within the Acambay graben raise the volcanic danger level in this area, originally marked as an inactive volcanic zone, but activity could restart at any time. Supported by DGAPA-PAPIIT-UNAM grant IN-104615.

  19. TerraSAR-X Small Baseline interferometry of Popocatepetl volcano, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Zeeuw van Dalfsen, Elske; Walter, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Popocatepetl is an active 5426 m high stratovolcano, with a steep-walled, 400 by 600 m wide crater. It is located 70 km southeast of Mexico city, and its activity potentially influences up to 25 million people. More than 15 major eruptions occurred in historic times, the last one in 1947. The year 2012 has been a highly active one, with numerous ash plumes in mid-April, and explosions during July-October. We have acquired TerraSAR-X images of Popocatepetl, and the surrounding area, using strip and spot mode, covering this period. We have created small baseline interferograms from TerraSAR-X strip mode images, using the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) software. Of the resulting interferograms, several show medium to good coherence on the lower and upper flanks of the volcano and some are even coherent in the crater area. We further analysed the data that cover the time period from 27 march 2012 to 22 october 2012. During this time period the volcano has been very active, displaying on and off: gas and ash plumes, explosions injecting incandescent fragments up to 1 km from the crater and even ashfall in municipalities up to 50 km away. The short revisit time of TerraSAR-X of 11 days increases the chances of a coherent image during such active periods. We present the preliminary results from this unique data set.

  20. Sulfur dioxide and particles in quiescent volcanic plumes from Poas, Arenal, and Colima volcanos, Costa Rica and Mexico.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casadevall, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of SO2 emission rates and concentrations and of particle distribution, size, shape, and composition were made in quiescent volcanic plumes emitted into the troposphere from Poas and Arenal volcanos, Costa Rica, and Colima volcano, Mexico. SO2 emission rates were 700 +- 180 metric tons per day (t/d) for Poas, 210 +- 30 t/d for Arenal, and 320 +- 50 t/d for Colima. The concentrations of SO2 calculated from the COSPEC/lidar data were 5-380 ppb.-from Authors

  1. Lava Dome Growth at Volcan de Fuego MEXICO (Colima Volcano), October 2001 to May 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Reyes-Davila, G. A.

    2002-12-01

    The Volcan de Fuego (19.512 N, 103.617 W) is located on the border between the States of Jalisco and Colima, Mexico, it is also known as Colima Volcano or Zapotl n Volcano, is a stratovolcano rising nearly 4000 m above sea level, and is the most active volcano in Mexico. Recent activity has been characterized by at least 3 different phases since January 1998 when seismic swarms began and ended with the extrusion of blocky lava in November 22, 1998 by the West vent as the 1991 eruptive process. That extrusive period lasted until the end of January, 1999 when was possible to observe a change in the seismic pattern, which mark the beginning of a new eruptive regime, an explosive one. On February 10, 1999 at approximately 0154 local time, 0754 gmt, an explosive event happens at the summit dome of Volc n de Fuego, four more big explosions took place at the summit the last one at dawn February 22, 2001. These explosions opened a new crater at the summit with a elliptical form with radius of 260 x 225 m and depth between 40 m and 15 m. A small dome structure inside the new crater was reported by March 2001. A reconnaissance flight in August 2001 shows two main features in the main crater an steep-sided mound(scoria cone) over the West vent and an inner crater on the NE vent. On October 31 Civil Defense members at Nevado Base on Nevado de Colima observed a neddle over the main crater rim, reconnaissance flight shows a spiny, 40 m high with a diameter of 20 m grows from the NE vent, the spiny seems to formed by material of the 1976 eruption. Continuous aerial observations allow us to follow the growth of a new dome pushing out the spiny. On November 23 the dimensions of the dome under the spiny were a radius of about 14 m and 21 m high for a total extrusion of 86,000 m3 which implies a extrusion rate of 0.027m3 /seg. By December the dome push out the spiny and began to grow from the NW vent. By December 29 an increase in the rate of extrusion was observed reaching a value

  2. Observed inflation-deflation cycles at Popocatepetl volcano using tiltmeters and its possible correlation with regional seismic activity in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Ruiz Esparza, M. G., Sr.; Jimenez Velazquez, J. C., Sr.; Valdes Gonzalez, C. M., Sr.; Reyes Pimentel, T. A.; Galaviz Alonso, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Popocatepetl, the smoking mountain, is a stratovolcano located in central Mexico with an elevation of 5450 masl. The active volcano, close to some of the largest urban centers in Mexico - 60 km and 30 km far from Mexico City and Puebla, respectively - poses a high hazard to an estimated population of 500 thousand people living in the vicinity of the edifice. Accordingly, in July 1994 the Popocatepetl Volcanological Observatory (POVO) was established. The observatory is operated and supported by the National Center for Disaster Prevention of Mexico (CENAPRED), and is equipped to fully monitor different aspects of the volcanic activity. Among the instruments deployed, we use in this investigation two tiltmometers and broad-band seismometers at two sites (Chipiquixtle and Encinos), which send the information gathered continuously to Mexico City.In this research, we study the characteristics of the tiltmeters signals minutes after the occurrence of certain earthquakes. The Popocatepetl volcano starts inflation-deflation cycles due to the ground motion generated by events located at certain regions. We present the analysis of the tiltmeters and seismic signals of all the earthquakes (Mw>5) occurred from January 2013 to June 2014, recorded at Chipiquixtle and Encinos stations. First, we measured the maximum tilt variation after each earthquake. Next, we apply a band-pass filter for different frequency ranges to the seismic signals of the two seismic stations, and estimated the total energy of the strong motion phase of the seismic record. Finally, we compared both measurements and observed that the maximum tilt variations were occurring when the maximum total energy of the seismic signals were in a specific frequency range. We also observed that the earthquake records that have the maximum total energy in that frequency range were the ones with a epicentral location south-east of the volcano. We conclude that our observations can be used set the ground for an early

  3. Field Courses for Volcanic Hazards Mapping at Parícutinand Jorullo Volcanoes (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victoria Morales, A.; Delgado Granados, H.; Roberge, J.; Farraz Montes, I. A.; Linares López, C.

    2007-05-01

    During the last decades, Mexico has suffered several geologic phenomena-related disasters. The eruption of El Chichón volcano in 1982 killed >2000 people and left a large number of homeless populations and severe economic damages. The best way to avoid and mitigate disasters and their effects is by making geologic hazards maps. In volcanic areas these maps should show in a simplified fashion, but based on the largest geologic background possible, the probable (or likely) distribution in time and space of the products related to a variety of volcanic processes and events, according to likely magnitude scenarios documented on actual events at a particular volcano or a different one with similar features to the volcano used for calibration and weighing geologic background. Construction of hazards maps requires compilation and acquisition of a large amount of geological data in order to obtain the physical parameters needed to calibrate and perform controlled simulation of volcanic events under different magnitude-scenarios in order to establish forecasts. These forecasts are needed by the authorities to plan human settlements, infrastructure, and economic development. The problem is that needs are overwhelmingly faster than the adjustments of university programs to include courses. At the Earth Science División of the Faculty of Engineering at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, the students have a good background that permits to learn the methodologies for hazards map construction but no courses on hazards evaluations. Therefore, under the support of the university's Program to Support Innovation and Improvement of Teaching (PAPIME, Programa de Apoyo para la Innovación y Mejoramiento de la Enseñanza) a series of field-based intensive courses allow the Earth science students to learn what kind of data to acquire, how to record, and process in order to carry out hazards evaluations. This training ends with hazards maps that can be used immediately by the

  4. Age and archaeological implications of Xitle volcano, southwestern Basin of Mexico-City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebe, C.

    2000-12-01

    The Pedregal lavas are fresh, well-exposed basaltic flows erupted from the Xitle scoria-and-cinder cone in the southwestern part of the Basin of Mexico. These lavas cover an area of 70 km2 and were emplaced over pyramids and other buildings (e.g. Cuicuilco and Copilco archaeological sites). Today, a part of Mexico-City (including the National University) is built on the flows. Initial strombolian activity produced an ash fallout layer, which was immediately followed by effusive emplacement of lava flows. The Xitle cone grew on the north-facing slope of Ajusco volcano, and lava flowed down to the N-NE until it reached the basin floor. More than 30 radiocarbon dates have been obtained by several workers on charcoal samples from beneath the lava, and several ages for the eruption have been proposed from these dates. Most dated samples were not directly produced by Xitle's eruption but instead are artifacts of human activity that predates the eruption. Thus, these ages (mostly about 2000 BP) are older than the eruption. A new age of 1670±35 years BP (AD 245-315) obtained on charcoal samples collected just beneath the lavas is favored for the Xitle eruption. These samples originated by ignition of vegetation during the emplacement of hot scoriaceous tephra. The new age is within the Classic period of Mesoamerican archaeology, whereas the earlier reported ages are at the end of the Preclassic. The new age carries important implications for the timing of population shifts within the Basin of Mexico.

  5. Characteristics of Long-Period Events Associated With Volcanic Degassing at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega, A.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.

    2004-05-01

    Emissions of gas and ash dominate volcanic eruptive activity in Popocatepetl volcano since 1994. Volcanic eruptive activity consists of construction and destruction dome phases. Ash emissions ranged from small short-lived plumes rising a few hundred meters above the crater rim, to larger plumes reaching up to 15 km above the crater. Resulting tephra falls dusted the entire summit area. Bursts of volcanic degassing accompanied by long-period (LP) seismic signals observed as isolated events, or as sequences of discrete events with overall durations and amplitudes. Some gas emissions accompanied by persistent or spasmodic tremor. There are four families of LP events identified within the frequency range between 0.5 and 5 Hz. Family-one presents low-frequency emergent onsets with higher amplitudes at higher frequencies. Family-two includes emergent onsets with modulate amplitudes simulating tremor and dominant frequencies in defined picks in the band between 1 and 3 Hz. Family-three presents LP events with impulsive onset and decaying amplitude with time, these events present a wide range of amplitudes and dominant frequencies around 2 Hz. Family-four includes LP events with monochromatic appearance with sharp picks below 3 Hz. From thousands of LP events preliminary locations based on phase picks suggest that LP seismicity occur within uppermost 1000 m below the crater floor, consistently constrain defined clusters in the east-region of the crater and in the area where the domes growth. The network used to located LP events included 15 broadband stations distributed along radial profiles on the upper flanks of Popocatepetl. We report data collected during a broadband seismic experiment carried out at Popocatepetl Volcano as part of an international cooperative program between the GeoForschungsZentr um, Potsdam, Germany, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Institute of Geophysics, UNAM, MEXICO.

  6. Geologic Map of The Volcanoes Quadrangle, Bernalillo and Sandoval Counties, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Ren A.; Shroba, Ralph R.; Menges, Christopher M.; Schmidt, Dwight L.; Personius, Stephen F.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2009-01-01

    This geologic map, in support of the U.S. Geological Survey Middle Rio Grande Basin Geologic Mapping Project, shows the spatial distribution of surficial deposits, lava flows, and related sediments of the Albuquerque volcanoes, upper Santa Fe Group sediments, faults, and fault-related structural features. These deposits are on, along, and beneath the Llano de Albuquerque (West Mesa) west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. Some of these deposits are in the western part of Petroglyph National Monument. Artificial fill deposits are mapped chiefly beneath and near the City of Albuquerque Soil Amendment Facility and the Double Eagle II Airport. Alluvial deposits were mapped in and along stream channels, beneath terrace surfaces, and on the Llano de Albuquerque and its adjacent hill slopes. Deposits composed of alluvium and colluvium are also mapped on hill slopes. Wedge-shaped deposits composed chiefly of sandy sheetwash deposits, eolian sand, and intercalated calcic soils have formed on the downthrown-sides of faults. Deposits of active and inactive eolian sand and sandy sheetwash deposits mantle the Llano de Albuquerque. Lava flows and related sediments of the Albuquerque volcanoes were mapped near the southeast corner of the map area. They include eleven young lava flow units and, where discernable, associated vent and near-vent pyroclastic deposits associated with cinder cones. Upper Santa Fe Group sediments are chiefly fluvial in origin, and are well exposed near the western boundary of the map area. From youngest to oldest they include a gravel unit, pebbly sand unit, tan sand and mud unit, tan sand unit, tan sand and clay unit, and silty sand unit. Undivided upper Santa Fe Group sediments are mapped in the eastern part of the map area. Faults were identified on the basis of surface expression determined from field mapping and interpretation of aeromagnetic data where concealed beneath surficial deposits. Fault-related structural features are exposed and were mapped near

  7. Geophysical characterization of hydrothermal systems and intrusive bodies, El Chichón volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzeler, Martin; Varley, Nick; Roach, Michael

    2011-04-01

    The 1982 explosive eruptions of El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) destroyed the inner dome and created a 1-km-wide and 180-m-deep crater within the somma crater. A shallow hydrothermal system was exposed to the surface of the new crater floor and is characterized by an acid crater lake, a geyser-like Cl-rich spring (soap pool), and numerous fumarole fields. Multiple geophysical surveys were performed to define the internal structure of the volcanic edifice and its hydrothermal system. We carried out a high-resolution ground-based geomagnetic survey in the 1982 crater and its surroundings and 38 very low frequency (VLF) transects around the crater lake. A 3-D inversion of the ground-based magnetic data set highlighted three high-susceptibility isosurfaces, interpreted as highly magnetized bodies beneath the 1982 crater floor. Inversion of a digitized regional aeromagnetic map highlighted four major deeply rooted cryptodomes, corresponding to major topographic highs and massive lava dome outcrops outside and on the somma rim. The intracrater magnetic bodies correspond closely to the active hydrothermal vents and their modeled maximum basal depth matches the elevation of the springs on the flanks of the volcano. Position, dip, and vertical extent of active and extinct hydrothermal vents identified by VLF-EM surveys match the magnetic data set. We interpret the shallow lake spring hydrothermal system to be mostly associated with buried remnants of the 550 BP dome, but the Cl-rich soap pool may be connected to a small intrusion emplaced at shallow depth during the 1982 eruption.

  8. Bacterial diversity in fumarole environments of the Paricutín volcano, Michoacán (Mexico).

    PubMed

    Medrano-Santillana, Miguel; Souza-Brito, Elcia Margaret; Duran, Robert; Gutierrez-Corona, Felix; Reyna-López, Georgina Elena

    2017-03-13

    Active volcanoes are among the most extreme environments on Earth. The extreme temperatures, presence of toxic heavy metals and low nutrient bioavailability favor the development of extremophiles. We characterized the physical-chemical parameters of and bacterial communities (T-RFLP and 16S rRNA gene libraries) inhabiting fumarole niches of the Paricutín volcano located in Michoacán (Mexico). This volcano, which surged in 1943, is one of the youngest volcanoes on Earth and the microbial diversity in this area is yet to be characterized. The sampling stations were characterized in a pH range from 5.34 to 7.89 and showed different temperatures (soil, 27-87 °C; air, 13.6-56 °C) with high concentrations of metals such as iron and arsenic. The most abundant bacterial populations, confirmed by T-RFLP and 16S rRNA gene libraries, were related to members of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria phyla including sequences associated with thermophiles and sulfate reducing bacteria. Overall, the Paricutín volcano showed low bacterial diversity and its prokaryotic diversity was characterized by the impossibility of amplifying Archaea-related sequences.

  9. Comparing Pyroclastic Density Current (PDC) deposits at Colima (Mexico) and Tungurahua (Ecuador) volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Fabian; Varley, Nick; Bustillos, Jorge; Kueppers, Ulrich; Lavallee, Yan; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2010-05-01

    Sudden transitions from effusive to explosive eruptive behaviour have been observed at several volcanoes. As a result of explosive activity, pyroclastic density currents represent a major threat to life and infrastructure, mostly due to their unpredictability, mass, and velocity. Difficulties in direct observation force us to deduce crucial information from their deposits. Here, we present data from field work performed in 2009 on primary deposits from recent explosive episodes at Volcán de Colima (Mexico) and Tungurahua (Ecuador). Volcán de Colima, located 40km away from the Capital city Colima with 300,000 inhabitants, has been active since 1999. Activity has been primarily characterized by the slow effusion of lava dome with the daily occurrence of episodic gas (and sometimes ash) explosion events. During a period of peak activity in 2005, explosive eruptions repeatedly destroyed the dome and column collapse resulted in several PDCs that travelled down the W, S, and SE flanks. Tungurahua looms over the 20,000 inhabitants of the city of Baños, located 5km away, and is considered one of the most active volcanoes in Ecuador. The most recent eruptive cycle began in 1999 and climaxed in July and August of 2006 with the eruptions of several PDCs that traveled down the western flanks, controlled by the hydrological network. During two field campaigns, we collected an extensive data set of porosity and grain size distribution on PDCs at both volcanoes. The deposits have been mapped in detail and the porosity distribution of clasts across the surface of the deposits has been measured at more than 30 sites (> 3.000 samples). Our porosity distribution data (mean porosity values range between 17 and 24%) suggests an influence of run out distance and lateral position. Preliminary results of grain size analysis of ash and lapilli (< 5mm) has been performed at approximately 50 sites at varying longitudinal, lateral and vertical positions, and show a correlation with run

  10. Long term storage of explosively erupted magma at Nevado de Toluca volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, J. L.; Gardner, J.; Macias, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    Dacitic magmas production is common in subduction-related volcanoes, occurring in those with a long period of activity as a result of the magmatic evolution. However, in this evolution many factors (i.e. crystal fractionation, assimilation, magma mixing) can interact to produce dacites. Nevado de Toluca volcano (4,680 masl; 19°09'N; 99°45'W) Central Mexico has recorded a long period of time producing dacites explosively, at least during 42 ka of activity, involving several km3 of magma, with two important Plinian-type eruptions occurred at ~21.7 ka (Lower Toluca Pumice) and ~10.5 ka (Upper Toluca Pumice). Questions like, what was the mechanism responsible to produce voluminous dacitic magma and how the volatiles and pressure changed in the Nevado de Toluca system, remain without answers. Dacites from the Lower Toluca Pumice (LTP) contain plagioclase, amphibole, iron-titanium oxides, and minor resorbed biotite, set in a glassy-vesicular matrix and the Upper Toluca Pumice (UTP) dacites contain the same mineral phases plus orthopyroxene. Ilmenite- ulvospinel geothermometry yielded a temperature of ~860°C for the LTP dacite, a little hotter than the UTP (~ 840°C). Based on hydrothermal experiments data, amphibole is stable above 100 MPa under 900°C, while plagioclase crystallizes up to 250-100 MPa at temperatures of 850-900°C. Pyroxene occurs only at pressures of 200-100 MPa with its respective temperatures of 825-900°C. Water contents in the LTP magma (2-3.5 wt %) are similar to that calculated for the UTP magma (1.3-3.6 wt %). So, there are only small changes in temperature and pressure from ~21.7 ka to 10.5 ka. It is noteworthy that orthopyroxene is absent in the LTP, however reaction-rimmed biotite (probably xenocrystic) is commonly observed in all dacites. Hence, almost all dacitic magmas seem to be stored at relatively similar pressures, water contents, and temperatures. All of these data could suggest repetitive basic magma injections producing the

  11. Lahar simulation with SPH and field calibration at the Colima Volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Leticia; Haddad, Bouchra; Capra, Lucia; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    As a result of the frequent effusive activity of Volcán de Colima (10° 30'44''N, 103° 37'02'' W), the most active volcano in Mexico, plenty of rain triggered lahars are produced, especially during the rainy season. Along the recent period of activity, particularly from 2010, many of these lahars channelled through the main ravines of the volcano and reach large distances, representing high risk for more than 10,000 people at the surroundings. Modeling of lahars has become an important tool in the assessment of the related hazards, in order to undertake appropriate mitigation actions and reduce the associated risks. Recent lahars at the Colima Volcano are well documented, so they can be used to prove the accuracy of modelling. In this work, we used the SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) method, a depth integrated coupled model created by Pastor in 2005, to replicate the propagation stage of 3 recent Colima lahars occurred on Montegrande ravine in 1992, 2011 and 2012. The studied events include hyperconcentrated, debris and a mixture of the previous flow natures. The inputs used for the SPH simulations were the initial point, volume of each lahar and an adapted morphology of its mass. Field data used to verify the SPH results include the stopping point of the lahar, its path, velocity and height values, as the floodplain area. All this information was a result of fieldwork recognition (cross section profiles of the inner part of the ravine) and free satellite imagery analysis. The best results were obtained using Bingham rheology. The proposed parameters to simulate Colima lahars were 20 Pa of yield strength and 30 Pa.s of viscosity for the 1992 lahar (hyperconcentrated flow), 200 Pa and 50 Pa.s in case of the 2011 debris flow, and finally 20 Pa and 24 Pa.s for the 2012 event, whose nature evolved from debris to an hyperconcentrated flow. In all cases a 1900 kg/m3 density was used. Highly accurate results showed the relevant role played by rheological

  12. Palaeomagnetic dating of two recent lava flows from Ceboruco volcano, western Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhnel, Harald; Pavón-Carrasco, Francisco Javier; Sieron, Katrin; Mahgoub, Ahmed Nasser

    2016-11-01

    Two lava flows from the Ceboruco volcano in west-central Mexico were sampled for palaeomagnetic dating. The younger one was emitted in 1870 and used to validate the method, while the older one known as Ceboruco flow is of unknown age but probably younger than ˜1005 AD and older than 1528 AD. Each flow was sampled in at least four sites, in order to unravel between site variations. For the 1870 flow, between site differences were notable and additionally post-cooling block movements were important; therefore, two sites had to be rejected. Three sites from the vent area and one at the tip of the 1870 flow provided well-constrained directions. This is also true for Ceboruco lava flow, and overall mean directions and palaeointensities were then used for palaeomagnetic dating applying the Matlab tool archaeo_dating and the global palaeosecular variation model SHA.DIF.14k. For the 1870 lava flow, the dating resulted in an age ranging between 1755 and 1871 AD (95 per cent probability level), which includes the real emplacement age. In addition, the Ceboruco lava flow was dated between 1000 and 1134 AD, which is close to the large plinian Jala eruption producing the crater of Ceboruco volcano around 1005 AD. This age is older than previously assumed and suggests an emplacement only shortly after the Jala eruption. As this lava flow is considered to be the youngest one of seven post-Jala lava flows, the age also defines a period of inactivity of Ceboruco volcano of about 730-860 yr before the historic 1870 eruption. Future volcanic hazard analysis will have to take into account this result. Our work also shows that multiple sampling of single lava flows is important to obtain a reliable mean direction. Sampling sites have to be carefully selected so that they represent un-tilted parts of the flows. We interpret this to be the case for the Ceboruco lava flow, while three of the six sites of the 1870 lava flow may have been partly or completely affected by movements after

  13. Pre-eruptive conditions of the ~31 ka rhyolitic magma of Tlaloc volcano, Sierra Nevada Volcanic Range, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, J.; Arce, J.; Rueda, H.; Gardner, J.

    2008-12-01

    Tlaloc volcano is located at the northern tip of the Sierra Nevada Volcanic Range in Central Mexico. This Pleistocene to Recent volcanic range consists from north to south of Tlaloc-Telapón-Teyotl-Iztaccíhuatl-and- Popocatépetl volcanoes. While andesitic to barely dacitic volcanism dominates the southern part of the range (i.e. Popocatépetl and Iztaccíhuatl); dacitic and rare rhyolithic volcanism (i.e. Telapón, Tlaloc) dominates the northern end. The known locus of rhyolitic magmatism took place at Tlaloc volcano with a Plinian-Subplinian eruption that occurred 31 ka ago. The eruption emplaced the so-called multilayered fallout and pumiceous pyroclastic flows (~2 km3 DRE). The deposit consists of 95% vol. of juvenile particles (pumice + crystals) and minor altered lithics 5% vol. The mineral association of the pumice fragments (74-76 % wt. SiO2) consists of quartz + plagioclase + sanidine + biotite and rare oxides set in a glassy groundmass with voids. Melt inclusions in quartz phenocrysts suggest that prior to the eruption the rhyolitic contain ~7% of H2O and <110 ppm of CO 2, suggesting pressure conditions around ~2500 bars and therefore depths ~8 km below the volcano. Such depths suggest that inception of rhyolitic magmatism at Tlaloc volcano halted at deeper conditions than andesitic to dacitic eruptions of Popocatépetl volcano (~6 km) in the southern part of the Sierra Nevada Volcanic Range and than Nevado de Toluca volcano (~6 km) some 50 km to the southwest.

  14. The ~ 2000 yr BP Jumento volcano, one of the youngest edifices of the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, J. L.; Muñoz-Salinas, E.; Castillo, M.; Salinas, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Chichinautzin Volcanic Field is situated at the southern limit of the Basin of Mexico and the Metropolitan area of Mexico City, the third most populated city around the world. The Chichinautzin Volcanic field holds more than 220 monogenetic volcanoes. Xitle is the youngest of these with an estimated age of 1.6 ky BP. Xitle's eruptive activity took place during the Mesoamerican Mexican Pre-classic period and is related to the destruction of Cuicuilco Archaeological Site, the oldest civilization known in Central Mexico. However, there are still several regional cones that have not been dated. Based on 14C ages, stratigraphic and geomorphologic criteria, we conclude that the Jumento volcano, located to the west of Xitle, is one of the youngest cones of the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field. The Jumento volcano has a basaltic andesite composition, and its eruptive activity was initially hydromagmatic, followed by Strombolian and finally effusive events occurred recorded through: (1) a sequence of hydromagmatic pyroclastic surges and ashfall layers emplaced at a radius of > 5 km from the crater with charcoal fragments at its base; this activity built the Jumento's cone with slopes of 32°; and (2) lava flows that breached the southern part of the cone and flowed for up to 2.5 km from the vent. The resulting 14C ages for this volcano yielded a maximum age of 2 ky BP. Morphometric analysis indicates that the state of degradation of Jumento cone is similar to the Xitle, suggesting that the Jumento could be in the state of degradation of a volcanic structure of similar age or younger adding credence to the probable radiocarbon age of 2 ky BP for the Jumento edifice.

  15. Albedo estimation using near infrared photography at Glaciar Norte of Citlaltepetl Volcano (Mexico).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ontiveros, Guillermo; Delgado-Granados, Hugo

    2015-04-01

    In this work we show preliminary results of the application of the methodology proposed by Corripio (2004) for albedo estimation of a glacial surface using oblique photography. This analysis was performed for the Glaciar Norte of Citlaltepetl volcano (Mexico), using images obtained with a modified digital camera for capturing the portion of the near infrared spectrum starting at 950 nm and a digital elevation model with a grid of 2 m. The main goal was to obtain a picture of the spatial distribution of albedo on the glacier, in order to find out if there was any morphological evidence of the influence of the glacier energy balance. Some of the obtained results show a certain spatial distribution with comparatively higher albedo values at the lower parts of the glacier as compared with higher parts. The higher values may correspond to different metamorphism of snow/ice at different heights due to the effects of lower slope. Corripio, J. G. (2004). Snow surface albedo estimation using terrestrial photography. International journal of remote sensing, 25(24), 5705-5729.

  16. Vector analysis of chemical variation in the lavas of Parícutin volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miesch, A.T.

    1979-01-01

    Compositional variations in the lavas of Parícutin volcano, Mexico, have been examined by an extended method of Q-mode factor analysis. Each sample composition is treated as a vector projected from an original eight-dimensional space into a vector system of three dimensions. The compositions represented by the vectors after projection are closely similar to the original compositions except for Na2Oand Fe2O3.The vectors in the three-dimensional system cluster about three different planes that represent three stages of compositional change in the Parícutin lavas. Because chemical data on the compositions of the minerals in the lavas are presently lacking, interpretations of the mineral phases that may have been involved in fractional crystallization are based on CIPW norm calculations. Changes during the first stage are attributed largely to the fractional crystallization of plagioclase and olivine. Changes during the second stage can be explained by the separation of plagioclase and pyroxene. Changes during the final stage may have resulted mostly from the assimilation of a granitic material, as previously proposed by R. E. Wilcox.

  17. Reevaluation of tephra volumes for the 1982 eruption of El Chichón volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathenson, M.; Fierstein, J.

    2012-12-01

    Reevaluation of tephra volumes for the 1982 eruption of El Chichón volcano, Mexico Manuel Nathenson and Judy Fierstein U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road MS-910, Menlo Park, CA 94025 In a recent numerical simulation of tephra transport and deposition for the 1982 eruption, Bonasia et al. (2012) used masses for the tephra layers (A-1, B, and C) based on the volume data of Carey and Sigurdsson (1986) calculated by the methodology of Rose et al. (1973). For reasons not clear, using the same methodology we obtained volumes for layers A-1 and B much less than those previously reported. For example, for layer A-1, Carey and Sigurdsson (1986) reported a volume of 0.60 km3, whereas we obtain a volume of 0.23 km3. Moreover, applying the more recent methodology of tephra-volume calculation (Pyle, 1989; Fierstein and Nathenson, 1992) and using the isopachs maps in Carey and Sigurdsson (1986), we calculate a total tephra volume of 0.52 km3 (A-1, 0.135; B, 0.125; and C, 0.26 km3). In contrast, Carey and Sigurdsson (1986) report a much larger total volume of 2.19 km3. Such disagreement not only reflects the differing methodologies, but we propose that the volumes calculated with the methodology of Pyle and of Fierstein and Nathenson—involving the use of straight lines on a log thickness versus square root of area plot—better represent the actual fall deposits. After measuring the areas for the isomass contours for the HAZMAPP and FALL3D simulations in Bonasia et al. (2012), we applied the Pyle-Fierstein and Nathenson methodology to calculate the tephra masses deposited on the ground. These masses from five of the simulations range from 70% to 110% of those reported by Carey and Sigurdsson (1986), whereas that for layer B in the HAZMAP calculation is 160%. In the Bonasia et al. (2012) study, the mass erupted by the volcano is a critical input used in the simulation to produce an ash cloud that deposits tephra on the ground. Masses on the ground (as calculated by us

  18. Zircon xenocryst resorption and magmatic regrowth at El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Brenda; Schmitt, Axel K.; Roberge, Julie; Tenorio, Felipe Garcia; Damiata, Brian N.

    2016-02-01

    El Chichón volcano is the only active volcano located within the Chiapanecan Volcanic Arc in southern Mexico, which lies between the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and the Central American Volcanic Arc. Previous studies have shown that ~ 12 eruptions have occurred at El Chichón within the last 8000 years, forming a complex of lava domes with a central crater and surrounding pyroclastic deposits. Here, we report the discovery of zircon in Holocene El Chichón rocks, which were analyzed by high spatial resolution imaging (color cathodoluminescence CCL) and isotopic (secondary ionization mass spectrometry SIMS) methods to resolve core and rim crystallization ages. Pumice samples from five proximal pyroclastic flow and fall-out deposits were collected based on published stratigraphy. Two of the samples were further (re-)classified by new 14C dates. In addition, we sampled two lavas from the 1982 eruption and from remnants of the older Somma lava complex. Zircon crystals were dated using 230Th/238U disequilibrium (U-Th) and U-Pb geochronology. U-Th zircon ages fall between near eruption ages and ca. 84 ka, with overlapping ages in all samples. By contrast, zircon core U-Pb ages range between ca. 290 Ma and 1.9 Ga. These ages are consistent with xenocrystic origins and their heterogeneity indicates derivation from clastic country rocks. Strong age contrasts between inherited xenocrystic and young magmatic domains in individual zircon crystals are evidence for arrested assimilation of crustal rocks where initially zircon-undersaturated magmas cooled rapidly to form a crystal mush or subsolidus amalgamate as a crustally contaminated boundary layer. This layer contributed zircon crystals to eruptible magma during episodic recharge events followed by partial melt extraction, mixing and homogenization. Zircon overgrowths are significantly older than major minerals whose U-series ages and sharp zonation boundaries suggest crystallization only within a few ka before eruption

  19. Instrumental monitoring of lahars for warning purposes: new developments along the Colima Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coviello, Velio; Capra, Lucia; Vázquez, Rosario; Márquez, Víctor H.; Cruz, Sergio

    2017-04-01

    , upstream to downstream. Here we propose a new application and development of this method to early detect and characterize rain-triggered lahars occurring along the Colima Volcano, one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico. Two monitoring stations are installed along the Southwestern flank of the volcano, in the Montegrande and the Lumbre basins. Both sites are equipped with a GVD array and a videocamera. Along the Montegrande ravine is also installed an infrasound sensor while the Lumbre monitoring station integrates a flow stage sensor. The new detection algorithm, currently under testing, is still based on the SNR but detected by two different sensors installed at the same cross-section: a geophone paired with a stage sensor or an infrasound device. Preliminary results show how this can be an effective solution to adopt along channels where is possible to monitor only one cross-section with a heavily instrumented station.

  20. Magmatic processes at Popocatepetl volcano, Mexico: petrology, geochemistry and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, P.; Stimac, J.; Siebe, C.; Mac¡as, J.

    2003-12-01

    Popocatepetl volcano is one of the most famous and most active stratovolcanoes of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). It is located 60 km south-east of Mexico-City and 40 km west of the city of Puebla, both cities have more than 30 million inhabitants. In this contribution we present a study of Late Pleistocene to Recent products of Popocatépetl (Popo) volcano and surrounding scoria cones to better establish their genetic relationship and magmatic history. Popo and flanking vents are located within the central portion of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt, which is related to oblique subduction of young oceanic lithosphere. Current activity of Popo can be understood in the context of its past eruptions and those from surrounding scoria cones. The latest cycle of eruption began Dec. 21, 1994 with continuous to pulsating emission of phreatic ash. The last important event happened on July 19, 2003, covering Mexico-City with a thin ash-layer. Both Popo and surrounding scoria cones produced moderate-K, calc-alkaline rocks, with the two groups differing mainly in degree of differentiation, water content, and oxidation state. Some vent samples on the immediate flanks of Popo and have phenocryst assemblages and compositions transitional between typical flanking vent and stratovolcano samples. Monogenetic vents produced mainly basaltic andesites to andesites, primarily by crystal fractionation of Ol (Fo80-90)+chromite, 2PyxñOl, and 2PyxñPlagñHb assemblages, with minor assimilation of crustal debris. The andesitic to dacitic rocks of Popo are dominated by Plag-2Pyx-2OxideñHbl assemblages, with variable amounts of Ol (Fo70-90)+chromite xenocrysts. A few Popo samples contain locally abundant xenolithic debris of cognate-granitoid intrusions and their metasedimentary wallrocks. The two suites share parental Mg-rich basaltic andesite magmas, with the Popo magmas reflecting longer residence in the crust, and enhanced hydration and oxidation due to the resulting processes of

  1. Susceptibility mapping in the Río El Estado watershed, Pico de Orizaba volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legorreta Paulin, G.; Bursik, M. I.; Lugo Hubp, J.; Paredes Mejía, L.; Aceves Quesada, F.

    2013-12-01

    In volcanic terrains, dormant stratovolcanoes are very common and can trigger landslides and debris flows continually along stream systems, thereby affecting human settlements and economic activities. It is important to assess their potential impact and damage through the use of landslide inventory maps and landslide models. This poster provides an overview of the on-going research project (Grant SEP-CONACYT no 167495) from the Institute of Geography at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) that seeks to conduct a multi-temporal landslide inventory and produce a landslide susceptibility map by using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The Río El Estado watershed on the southwestern flank of Pico de Orizaba volcano, the highest mountain in Mexico, is selected as a study area. The catchment covers 5.2 km2 with elevations ranging from 2676.79 to 4248.2 m a.s.l. and hillslopes between 5° and 56°. The stream system of Río El Estado catchment erodes Tertiary and Quaternary lavas, pyroclastic flows, and fall deposits. The geologic and geomorphologic factors in combination with high seasonal precipitation, high degree of weathering, and steep slopes predispose the study area to landslides. The method encompasses two main levels of analysis to assess landslide susceptibility. The first level builds a historic landslide inventory. In the study area, an inventory of more than 100 landslides was mapped from interpretation of multi-temporal aerial orthophotographs and local field surveys to assess and describe landslide distribution. All landslides were digitized into a GIS, and the spatial geo-database of landslides was constructed from standardized GIS datasets. The second level calculates the susceptibility for the watershed. Multiple Logistic Regression (MLR) was used to examine the relationship between landsliding and several independent variables (elevation, slope, terrain curvature, flow direction, saturation, contributing area, land use, and geology

  2. Dike emplacement near Parícutin volcano, Mexico in 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardine, Matt; West, Michael E.; Cox, Tiffany

    2011-03-01

    A major seismic swarm occurred near Parícutin volcano between the end of May and early July 2006. More than 700 earthquakes with magnitude (M L ) exceeding 2.4 were located. Parícutin, located in the Michoacán-Guanajuato volcanic field in western Mexico, is well known as the site of the 1943 eruption in which a new 400 m cinder cone was constructed in what had been farmland. The 2006 swarm exhibits all of the characteristics typically associated with swarms of volcanic origins. The earthquake rate showed the typical ramp up and ramp down over the course of several days. Magnitudes were evenly distributed in time with a notably high b-value of 2.45. The earthquake locations cluster around a northeast-striking trend extending approximately 6 km. Over the first two weeks, hypocenters migrated steadily a few hundred meters per day, rising from 9 to 5 km depth and moving northeast about 5 km. On approximately June 7, the ascent of hypocenters stalled. For the next three weeks, hypocenters held their depth while migrating laterally back to the southwest. Focal mechanisms during the first part of the swarm reflected the increased stress caused by dike inflation. Following June 7, the stress orientation changed and became more consistent with the inflation of horizontal sill-like structures. Though only limited information is available from the seismic swarm preceding the 1943 eruption, several features, including the swarm duration and magnitude relationships, were comparable to those of the 2006 episode. The strong indicators of a magmatic origin to the 2006 swarm suggest that at this location there are few, if any, traditional seismic discriminants that could be used to distinguish which seismic swarms and dike emplacement events might culminate in eruption.

  3. Monitoring the Dynamic of a Fluvial Channel after Lahar Disturbance: Huiloac Gorge (Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, N.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Tanarro, L. M.; Renschler, C.; Sanjosé, J. J.; Atkinson, A.

    2009-04-01

    Capra, L.; Poblete, M.A. and Alvarado, R. 2004. The 1997 and 2001 lahars of Popocatépetl volcano (Central Mexico): textural and sedimentological constraints on their origin and hazards. Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 131: 351-369. Gran, K. y Montgomery, D., 2005. Spatial and temporal patterns in fluvial recovery following volcanic eruptions: Channel response to basin-wide sediment loading at Mount Pinatubo, Philippines. GSA Bulletin, 117; 1-2: 195-211. Hayes, S.K., Montgomery, D.R. and Newhall, C.G., 2002, Fluvial sediment transport and deposition following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. Geomorphology. Vol. 45: 211-224. Major, J.J., Pierson, T.C., Dinehart, R.L. y Costa, J.E. 2000. Sediment yield following severe volcanic disturbance- A two-decade perspective from Mount St. Helens. Geology, 28, n° 9: 819-822. Major, J.J., 2003. Post-eruption hydrology and sediment transport in volcanic river systems, Water Resources IMPACT, 5(3): 10-15. Muñoz, E. 2007. Los lahares del Popocatépetl: tratamiento de la información para la prevención de catástrofes. (PhD thesis, Universidad Complutense de Madrid.) Palacios, D., 1995. Rockslide processes on the north slope of Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico, Permafrost and Periglaciar Processes, 6: 345-356. Palacios, D., J.J. Zamorano and G. Parrilla. 1998. Proglacial debris flows in Popocatépetl North Face and their relation to 1995 eruption. Z. Geomorph. N. P., 42(3), 273-295 Palacios, D., J.J. Zamorano and A. Gómez. 2001. The impact of present lahars on the geomorphologic evolution of proglacial gorges: Popocatépetl, Mexico. Geomorphology, 37(1-2), 15-42.

  4. Magma fluxes and recurreance rate of eruptions at Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Gregor; Probst, Line; Arce, José L.; Caricchi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Forecasting the frequency and size of volcanic eruptions is a long-term goal for hazard mitigation. The frequency at which a given crustal magmatic system is driven towards a critical state and the magnitude of the resulting volcanic events are linked to the supply rate of fresh magma, crustal properties, and tectonic setting. Our ability to forecast the recurrence rate of eruptions is hampered by the lack of data on key variables such as the average magma flux locally and globally. The aim of this project is to identify the average magma supply rate and injection frequency for eruptions of different magnitude and eruptive style. We centred our study at Nevado de Toluca in Mexico, a subduction-related volcano with an eruptive history spanning about 1.5 million years of comparatively well documented effusive and explosive eruptions dominantly of dacitic composition. We carry out in-situ high precision zircon geochronology for a sequence of eruptions of different magnitude to obtain a distribution of crystal ages from which average crustal magma fluxes can be calculated. Eruptive fluxes will be constrained by extracting lava flow volumes from a digital elevation model. A combination of whole rock and mineral chemistry will provide quantitative insights on petrogenetic processes and on the frequency at which intensive parameters changed within the magma reservoir before the eruptions. Our results will be integrated in a global database including other volcanic systems and literature data to attempt to identify similarities and differences between magmatic reservoirs feeding volcanic eruptions of different magnitude. The final target of this project is to identify the physical factors controlling the recurrence rate of volcanic eruptions at regional and global scale.

  5. Reconstructing 800 years of historical eruptive activity at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Del Pozzo, Ana Lillian; Rodríguez, Alan; Portocarrero, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    Pictorial and written documents spanning 800 years were analyzed for information about historical eruptions at Popocatépetl volcano. These documents were prepared by several indigenous groups as well as by the Spanish conquistadors and missionaries during their military campaigns and long-term evangelization and colonization and later on, by Indian nobles and Spanish historians. Pre-Columbian drawings show flames coming out of Popocatépetl's crater while later descriptions from the Spanish colonial period in Mexico (1521 to 1821) refer to ash emission and ballistics, lahars, and some pumice falls, similar to what were depicted in the thirteenth to sixteenth century drawings. Graphic information from the pre-Columbian codices, colonial maps, and paintings referring to the eruptions were correlated with historical accounts and religious chronicles, thereby leading to the reconstruction of a more detailed sequence of eruptive events. From such information, it was possible for us to prepare ash distribution maps for the 1540, 1592, and 1664 eruptions. Most of the known historical eruptions seem to be similar to those that have been occurring at Popocatépetl since 1994, indicating the importance of ash emission and crater dome formation throughout its recent eruptive history. The strongest eruptions occurred in 1510, 1519, 1540, 1580, 1664, and 2001; these produced widespread ash falls that affected both populated and rural areas. Duration of eruptive episodes during the past 800 years were estimated to have ranged from less than a year to more than 30 years, separated by repose periods ranging between 7 and over 100 years.

  6. Optical remote sensing of the SO2 plume from Popocatepetl volcano (Mexico): 2D visualization and flux estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaldud, R.; Grutter, M.; Baumgardner, D.; Harig, R.; Junkerman, W.; Rivera-Cardenas, C.; Delgado, H.; Woehrnschimmel, H.

    2007-05-01

    Popocatepetl volcano (19.023N, 98.622W, 5452 masl) is a passively degassing eruptive volcano with a current average emission of 5 kt/d of sulfur dioxide, which is located in the central front of the Mexican Transvolcanic Belt . It is approx. 60 km SE of Mexico City and 45 km NW from Puebla City. SO2 emissions from the volcano are known to interact with urban pollution playing a role in the atmospheric chemistry and the formation of particles. Optical remote sensing techniques were deployed during March 2006 to study the dispersion of the volcanic plume and to quantify the SO2 fluxes. A Scanning Infrared Gas Imaging System (SIGIS) was used to acquire passive IR spectra at 4 cm-1 resolution in a two-dimensional array, from which a false-color image was produced representing the degree of correlation of a specific gaseous pollutant. A real-life animation of the SO2- distribution from the volcanic plume allows understanding dispersion phenomena in various atmospheric conditions. Passive DOAS instruments installed both on ground and from an ultra-light aircraft, allowed for discrete SO2 column measurements below the plume. Flux estimations were done using wind profiles from balloons launched periodically

  7. New Insights on the Evolution of Magmas at Paricutin Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, M. C.; Peate, D. W.; Ukstins Peate, I.

    2011-12-01

    Paricutin volcano, located within the Michoacan-Guanajuato volcanic field (MGVF), Mexico, erupted over a 9 year period (1943-1952). Often cited as the classic example of assimilation-fractional crystallization (AFC) processes, bulk compositions of the erupted lavas at Paricutin range from basaltic andesite to andesite and previous studies have correlated this change in bulk composition to increases in 87Sr/86Sr and δ18 O. In this study, we have focused on melt inclusions and new whole rock data to better understand the processes leading to the evolution of magmatic compositions at Paricutin. Olivine- and orthopyroxene hosted melt inclusions are utilized to examine the relative timing of fractionation and contamination during the different eruptive periods of Paricutin. New whole rock trace element compositions, both from this study and the literature, are also incorporated to better determine the initial diversity of magmas and the temporal evolution of bulk compositions. Melt inclusions and whole rock compositions record a complex magmatic history. Initial erupted magmas (Phase 1) are compositionally variable (Ba/Nb from 45-60). Relative to Phase 1, Phase 2 magmas and inclusions have lower Ba/Nb (~38-52) and higher K2O/TiO2 (~1-1.5), inconsistent with models for crustal contamination and fractionation. In addition, Phase 2 lavas have comparable 87Sr/86Sr but distinctive Zr/Y (~6 vs. 7-8) and LREE/HREE ratios (La/YbN: 5.3-5.7 vs. 6.6-7.2) compared to Phase 1 magmas, features that can be explained by small differences in melting. Melt inclusions also record little evidence for magma mixing between Phases 1 and 2, again reflecting the distinctive melt compositions. Phase 3 magmas, in contrast to Phases 1 and 2, record a wide compositional range (SiO2 from ~57-60.5 wt%, Ba/Nb ~53-73) that is consistent with an AFC model. Co-variations in Cl/K and K2O/TiO2 suggest that Phase 3 is assimilating dominantly mid to upper crustal material, similar to xenoliths and basement

  8. Petrologic characteristics of the 1982 and pre-1982 eruptive products of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, J.J.; Tilling, R.I.; Duffield, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Studies on a suite of rocks from this volcano indicate that the juvenile materials of the 1982 and pre-1982 eruptions of the volcano have essentially the same mineralogy and chemistry. Data suggest that chemical composition changed little over the 0.3 m.y. sample period. Modally, plagioclase is the dominant phenocryst, followed by amphibole, clinopyroxene and minor phases including anhydrite. Plagioclase phenocrysts show complex zoning: the anorthite-rich zones are probably the result of changing volatile P on the magma and may reflect the changes in the volcano's magma reservoir in response to repetitive, explosive eruptive activity.-R.E.S.

  9. Prokaryotic diversity and metabolically active microbial populations in sediments from an active mud volcano in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Robert J; Mills, Heath J; Story, Sandra; Sobecky, Patricia A

    2006-10-01

    In this study, ribosomes and genomic DNA were extracted from three sediment depths (0-2, 6-8 and 10-12 cm) to determine the vertical changes in the microbial community composition and identify metabolically active microbial populations in sediments obtained from an active seafloor mud volcano site in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Domain-specific Bacteria and Archaea 16S polymerase chain reaction primers were used to amplify 16S rDNA gene sequences from extracted DNA. Complementary 16S ribosomal DNA (crDNA) was obtained from rRNA extracted from each sediment depth that had been subjected to reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction amplification. Twelve different 16S clone libraries, representing the three sediment depths, were constructed and a total of 154 rDNA (DNA-derived) and 142 crDNA (RNA-derived) Bacteria clones and 134 rDNA and 146 crDNA Archaea clones obtained. Analyses of the 576 clones revealed distinct differences in the composition and patterns of metabolically active microbial phylotypes relative to sediment depth. For example, epsilon-Proteobacteria rDNA clones dominated the 0-2 cm clone library whereas gamma-Proteobacteria dominated the 0-2 cm crDNA library suggesting gamma to be among the most active in situ populations detected at 0-2 cm. Some microbial lineages, although detected at a frequency as high as 9% or greater in the total DNA library (i.e. Actinobacteria, alpha-Proteobacteria), were markedly absent from the RNA-derived libraries suggesting a lack of in situ activity at any depth in the mud volcano sediments. This study is one of the first to report the composition of the microbial assemblages and physiologically active members of archaeal and bacterial populations extant in a Gulf of Mexico submarine mud volcano.

  10. Compositional evolution of magma from Parícutin Volcano, Mexico: The tephra record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlund, E. J.; Cashman, K. V.; Wallace, P. J.; Pioli, L.; Rosi, M.; Johnson, E.; Granados, H. Delgado

    2010-11-01

    The birth of Parícutin Volcano, Mexico, in 1943 provides an unprecedented opportunity to document the development of a monogenetic cinder cone and its associated lava flows and tephra blanket. Three 'type' sections provide a complete tephra record for the eruption, which is placed in a temporal framework by comparing both bulk tephra and olivine phenocryst compositions to dated samples of lava and tephra. Our data support the hypothesis of Luhr (2001) that the first four months of activity were fed by a magma batch (Phase 1) that was distinct from the magma that supplied the subsequent eight years of activity. We further suggest that the earliest erupted (vanguard) magma records evidence of temporary residence at shallow levels prior to eruption, suggesting early development of a dike and sill complex beneath the vent. Depletion of this early batch led to diminished eruptive activity in June and July of 1943, while arrival of the second magma batch (Phase 2) reinvigorated activity in late July. Phase 2 fed explosive activity from mid-1943 through 1946, although most of the tephra was deposited by the end of 1945. Phase 3 of the eruption began in mid-1947 with rapid evolution of magma compositions from basaltic andesite to andesite and dominance of lava effusion. The combined physical and chemical characteristics of the erupted material present a new interpretation of the physical conditions that led to compositional evolution of the magma. We believe that syn-eruptive assimilation of wall rock in a shallow complex of dikes and sills is more likely than pre-eruptive assimilation within a large magma chamber, as previously assumed. We further suggest that waning rates of magma supply from the deep feeder system allowed evolved, shallowly stored magma to enter the conduit in 1947, thus triggering the rapid observed change in the erupted magma composition. This physical model predicts that assimilation should be observable in other monogenetic eruptions, particularly

  11. Multidisciplinary determination of Lahar Erosion Dynamics at the Colima Volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Leticia; Renschler, Crish; Haddad, Bouchra; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    Volcán de Colima (10° 30'44''N, 103° 37'02'' W) is currently the most active volcano in Mexico and the North American plate. Associated to its frequent volcanic activity, renovated in 1998 and later in 2010, secondary processes like lahars, triggered by rain mixing with the loose pyroclastic debris produced, are common. Colima lahars channelled through the main water drainages (ravines), and reach large distances along their path (from 7 to 15 km long) burying farmland and all kind of human infrastructures at the surrounding area. The inner part of the ravines is greatly affected by lahars, especially by the bulking processes, so establish an appropriate method to determine its affection rate seems to be needed. In order to analyze 1-year lahar erosion dynamics inside one of the most active ravine (Montegrande 2011-2012 period), our team proposed a multidisciplinary perspective that combines numerical modeling (ArcGeoWEPP), fieldwork recognition and free satellite imagery, in the assessment of the related hazards. On the one hand, ArcGeoWEPP model allowed simulation of watersheds and hillslope profiles within ravines, taking into account climate parameters, land and vegetation covers. This tool was especially useful in areas where the terrain complexity prevented access. The results of this model were combined with 16 real cross-section topographies observed inside the Montegrande ravine and the floodplain delineation of lahars created from satellite imagery. The total 1-year volume of debris at Montegrande was finally reached, but also the erosive, sedimentary and balanced areas were identified, so as the lahar and its deposit dimensions. 750,000 tons per year were eroded inside the Montegrande ravine during 2011-2012 lahars, 805,000 tons if the hillslopes of the surrounding area were considered, and 580,000 tons were deposited along the path. The flood plain area was 1,100,000 m2. Numerical models combined with field data obtained from different sources seems

  12. Hydrogeochemical monitoring of El Chichón Volcano crater lake, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceniceros, N.; Armienta, M. A.; Ramos, S.; Cruz, O.; Aguayo, A.

    2003-04-01

    The geochemistry of the crater lake of the El Chichón volcano has been studied since 1983. Results have been used to analyze post-eruptive processes and assessing volcanic risk. Chemical analysis has included pH, temperature, principal ions, fluoride, Iron , sulfide, boron and Silica. From 1985, all determinations have been performed at the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory of the Geophysics Institute (National University of Mexico). Such analysis were made following the standard methods, as given in APHA (1989), e.g. UV-visible, emission, and atomic absorption spectroscopy, potentiometric and volumetric techniques.. The El Chichón crater lake water showed an increasing pH from 1983 to 1986 (from 0.56 to 2.33), from then pH has fluctuated around the later value (in August 2002 pH was 1.98). Conductivity showed a high fluctuations with a general decreasing trend, ranging between 83800 uS/cm (1983, Casadevall et al., 1984) and close to 2000 uS/cm (December 1998). Water-type has changed along these years: The Chichon water could be classified as acid, calcium-chloride in 1983; in 1991 changed to Sulfate-mixed and since 1992, it has been mostly of sodium chloride type, except for a few dates when it could be classified as sulfate-mixed or calcic type. Since 1985, cation concentrations produced by environmental rock dissolution decreased in the same manner. A decreasing trend with time was observed also in anions of a potential magmatic origin like sulfate, chloride and fluoride. Molar concentrations of chloride have been mostly greater than sulfate concentrations (up to two orders of magnitude) and have varied without any observed correlation. Oxidation-reduction processes may explain the large sulfate concentration changesSulfate shows large. The geochemical modeling programs (MINTEQA2, PHREEQCE) showed saturation indices close to equilibrium for gypsum and anhydrite suggesting that sulfates also can be derived from other processes such as dissolution

  13. Pleistocene glaciation of volcano Ajusco, central Mexico, and comparison with the standard Mexican glacial sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Sidney E.; Valastro, Salvatore

    1984-01-01

    Three Pleistocene glaciations and two Holocene Neoglacial advances occurred on volcano Ajusco in central Mexico. Lateral moraines of the oldest glaciation, the Marqués, above 3250 m are made of light-gray indurated till and are extensively modified by erosion. Below 3200 m the till is dark red, decomposed, and buried beneath volcanic colluvium and tephra. Very strongly to strongly developed soil profiles (Inceptisols) have formed in the Marqués till and in overlying colluvia and tephra. Large sharp-crested moraines of the second glaciation, the Santo Tomás, above 3300 m are composed of pale-brown firm till and are somewhat eroded by gullies. Below 3250 m the till is light reddish brown, cemented, and weathered. Less-strongly developed soil profiles (Inceptisols) have formed in the Santo Tomás till and in overlying colluvia and tephra. Narrow-crested moraines of yellowish-brown loose till of the third glaciation, the Albergue, are uneroded. Weakly developed soil profiles (Inceptisols) in the Albergue till have black ash in the upper horizon. Two small Neoglacial moraines of yellowish-brown bouldery till on the cirque floor of the largest valley support weakly developed soil profiles with only A and Cox horizons and no ash in the upper soil horizons. Radiocarbon dating of organic matter of the B horizons developed in tills, volcanic ash, and colluvial volcanic sand includes ages for both the soil-organic residue and the humic-acid fraction, with differences from 140 to 660 yr. The dating provides minimum ages of about 27,000 yr for the Marqués glaciation and about 25,000 yr for the Santo Tomás glaciation. Dates for the overlying tephra indicate a complex volcanic history for at least another 15,000 yr. Comparison of the Ajusco glacial sequence with that on Iztaccíhuatl to the east suggests that the Marqués and Santo Tomás glaciations may be equivalent to the Diamantes glaciation First and Second advances, the Albergue to the Alcalican glaciations, and the

  14. Geochemical and isotopic profile of Pico de Orizaba (Citlaltépetl) volcano, Mexico: Insights for magma generation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Peter; Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo

    2010-11-01

    Pico de Orizaba or Citlaltépetl volcano is the easternmost and highest stratovolcano of the subduction-related Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) located > 400 km NNE of the Middle America Trench. This active volcano comprises four evolutionary stages, ranging in age from 0.65 Ma to the Holocene, and is surrounded by Quaternary monogenetic scoria cones and maar volcanoes. Magmatic products of the stratocone range from basaltic andesites to rhyolites and the cinder cones erupted basalts and basaltic andesites. All rock compositions form a continuous calc-alkaline suite. Petrogenetic processes involved in magma generation and evolution include fractional crystallization and mid-crustal assimilation. Trace element patterns with elevated Ba/Nb, positive Pb spikes, and Th enrichments indicate contributions from subducted sediment. Low Ba/Th ratios suggest melting of hydrous sediment without significant loss of fluid-mobile elements prior to melting. Sr-Nd isotopic ratios of Pico de Orizaba and cinder cones are nearly chondritic and are located on a mixing curve between Pacific MORB and Paleozoic crust of SE Mexico. However, vertical Nd distributions in an 87Sr/ 86Sr vs. ɛNd diagram cannot be explained by crustal assimilation and indicate contributions of a sedimentary component with unradiogenic Nd. In contrast to other eastern MVB volcanic centres, Pico de Orizaba magmas are derived almost exclusively from a depleted mantle source. Compared to other MVB stratocones, Pico de Orizaba shows the least radiogenic Nd isotope ratios at nearly identical 87Sr/ 86Sr. Steep trends in a 206Pb/ 204Pb vs. 207Pb/ 204Pb diagram favour the involvement of young, 207Pb-enriched oceanic sediments in magma generation processes of Pico de Orizaba volcano. The Pb isotope data do not support any assimilation of lower crustal Grenvillian basement.

  15. Volcanic history of El Chichon Volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) during the Holocene, and its impact on human activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Espindola, J.M.; Macias, J.L.; Tilling, R.I.; Sheridan, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    Before its devastating eruption in 1982, El Chichon Volcano was little known and did not appear on any listings of hazardous volcanoes. Subsequent geologic studies, based on stratigraphic and radiocarbon investigations, showed that at least three explosive eruptions had occurred previously at this volcano. In this paper, we present the result of recent studies on the stratigraphy of the volcano and new radiocarbon ages which show that at least 11 eruptions have taken place at El Chichon in the past 8000 years. Explosive events, most of them producing block-and-ash flow and surge deposits, occurred around 550, 900, 1250, 1500, 1600, 1900, 2000, 2500, 3100, 3700 and 7700 years BP. The juvenile products of these eruptions have a trachyandesitic composition with similar degree of evolution, as evidenced from their SiO2 abundance and depletion in MgO, CaO, TiO2, as well as trace and rare earth elements. This suggests segregation of olivine and orthopyroxene from the melt. Since human settlements in southeast Mexico and Central America can be traced as far back as approximately 2500 years BP, most of these events probably affected human activity. In fact, there are reports of pottery shards and other artifacts in deposits from the eruption of 1250 BP. Pottery fragments in deposits of an eruption that took place 2500 BP are also reported in this paper. Thus, the impact of the volcano on human activities has been frequent, with most of the repose intervals lasting between 100 to 600 years. The impact of the eruptions was probably of greater than local extent, because airfall tephra could reach distant sites and possibly even affect weather. The eruptive history of El Chichon also offers clues in the investigation of the Maya civilization. Several researchers have considered the volcano as an important factor in the answer to some intriguing questions such as the extensive use of volcanic ash in Late Classic Maya ceramics or, of greater importance, the causes of the

  16. Analysis of the 2003-2005 Eruptive Process of Colima Volcano, Mexico, using Seismic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Vargas-Bracamontes, D. M.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Sanchez, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    The current eruptive process of Colima Volcano, which began in August 1998, has presented several intermittent effusive and explosive phases. During the period this study comprises (2003-2005), a sequence of explosive events with VEI less than or equal to 3 occurred. Many of the explosive events were recorded by the digital three-component seismic stations operated by the University of Guadalajara and Jalisco Civil Defense. These signals were recorded not only by stations located on the volcanic edifice, but also by stations on the northern coast of Jalisco and Ceboruco Volcano at 184, 182 and 200 km distance, respectively. A study of these signals is presented. Each explosion was preceded by a seismic event. Nevertheless, the localized explosions did not show a common source under the volcano structure, which suggests the existence of a complex structure with more than one conduit. On the other hand, using the waveforms, spectra, time-frequency and time-scale (wavelets) representations of the seismic signals it is suggested that the source processes are non-stationary, implying that for the case of this period, a general model of the source process of the Colima volcano explosions can not be formulated. By means of seismic record sections it was determined that the sound velocities of the shock waves vary 10 per cent around the volcano. A clear relation between the magnitude of the seismic signals and the amplitude of the sonic and subsonic waves was not observed.

  17. Geostatistics and multivariate analysis as a tool to characterize volcaniclastic deposits: Application to Nevado de Toluca volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, F.; Capra, L.; Sarocchi, D.; D'Antonio, M.

    2010-03-01

    Grain size analysis of volcaniclastic deposits is mainly used to study flow transport and depositional processes, in most cases by comparing some statistical parameters and how they change with distance from the source. In this work the geospatial and multivariate analyses are presented as a strong adaptable geostatistical tool applied to volcaniclastic deposits in order to provide an effective and relatively simple methodology for texture description, deposit discrimination and interpretation of depositional processes. We choose the case of Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico) due to existing knowledge of its geological evolution, stratigraphic succession and spatial distribution of volcaniclastic units. Grain size analyses and frequency distribution curves have been carried out to characterize and compare the 28-ka block-and-ash flow deposit associated to a dome destruction episode, and the El Morral debris avalanche deposit originated from the collapse of the south-eastern sector of the volcano. The geostatistical interpolation of sedimentological data allows to realize bidimensional maps draped over the volcano topography, showing the granulometric distribution, sorting and fine material concentration into the whole deposit with respect to topographic changes. In this way, it is possible to analyze a continuous surface of the grain size distribution of volcaniclastic deposits and better understand flow transport processes. The application of multivariate statistic analysis (discriminant function) indicates that this methodology could be useful in discriminating deposits with different origin or different depositional lithofacies within the same deposit. The proposed methodology could be an interesting approach to sustain more classical analysis of volcaniclastic deposits, especially where a clear field classification appears problematic because of a homogeneous texture of the deposits or their scarce and discontinuous outcrops. Our study is an example of the

  18. Explosive dynamics of violent Strombolian eruptions: The eruption of Parícutin Volcano 1943 1952 (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioli, L.; Erlund, E.; Johnson, E.; Cashman, K.; Wallace, P.; Rosi, M.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2008-07-01

    Violent Strombolian is a term that was originally used by MacDonald [Macdonald, G.A., 1972. Volcanoes, Prentice-Hall inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 510 pp.] to describe energetic Strombolian eruptions such as some of the more explosive phases of the 1943-1952 eruption of Parícutin Volcano (Michoacán, central Mexico), eruptions that disperse 'showers of incandescent cinder and bombs…to heights of a few thousand feet' and during which 'a great black ash cloud rises above the volcano'. Here we re-examine accounts of the Parícutin eruption and compare them with new stratigraphic data and physical features of the tephra deposit to improve the definition of violent Strombolian activity and to better elucidate the mechanisms that can cause this distinctive eruptive style. We find characteristic violent Strombolian activity to be strongly pulsatory, with production of moderately high eruption columns (2-6 km) that eject abundant fine ash. Also characteristic is simultaneous lava effusion from lateral vents. At Parícutin, violent Strombolian activity occurred at magma eruption rates of 10 4 to 10 5 kg/s, intermediate between Strombolian and subplinian rates. A progressive decline in magma flux during the eruption led to a decrease in the relative proportion of both erupted tephra and glassy vesicular fragments in the fallout layers. Eruption characteristics can be explained by varying degrees of shallow gas segregation from water-rich basaltic magma that modulate both transitions between two-phase flow regimes in the upper conduit and effusion of degassed lava from the base of the cone.

  19. Eruptive dynamics of the “Citlaltépetl Pumice” at Citlaltépetl volcano, Eastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossotti, Andrea; Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo; Rosi, Mauro; Di Muro, Andrea

    2006-11-01

    Citlaltépetl (Pico de Orizaba) is Mexico's highest (5675 m a.s.l.) potentially active volcano, which is presently in a dormant state. Between 9.0 and 8.5 ky B.P., a sequence of volcanic eruptions occurred at Citlaltépetl volcano as part of the most explosive Holocene episode. This sequence is associated with the deposition of an intercalation of pumice fallout and scoria and pumice-rich pyroclastic flow deposits, named here as "Citlaltépetl Pumice" (C.P.). Detailed stratigraphic and petrographic correlation of over 100 measured sections, in conjunction with the analysis of the physical characteristics of the juvenile and lithic portions of each main layer of the sequence, provided the basis to reconstruct the eruptive episodes and to assert the eruptive dynamics of the whole sequence, which was divided into eight main eruptions separated by three brief periods of quiescence. The eruption sequence started with a phreatic phase that soon developed into a bread-crusted, bomb-bearing phase. This was followed by a sequence of vigorous Plinian explosive eruptions separated by brief periods of repose and a short dome-collapse activity. It was followed by another cycle of alternated scoria pyroclastic flows-forming and Plinian activity. This eruptive sequence shows the complexity of single eruptive events with alternated contrasting styles suggested by the compositional differences between the pyroclastic flow and fallout products.

  20. Sulfur dioxide and particles in quiescent volcanic plumes from Poas, Arenal, and Colima volcanos, Costa Rica and Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casadevall, T. J.; Rose, W. I., Jr.; Fuller, W. H.; Hunt, W. H.; Woods, D. C.; Hart, M. A.; Moyers, J. L.; Chuan, R. L.; Friend, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of SO2 emission rates and concentrations and of particle distribution, size, shape, and composition were made in quiescent volcanic plumes emitted into the troposphere from Poas and Arenal volcanos, Costa Rica, and Colima volcano, Mexico. SO2 emission rates were 700 + or - 180 metric tons per day (t/d) for Poas, 210 + or - 30 t/d for Arenal, and 320 + or - 50 t/d for Colima. The concentrations of SO2 calculated from the COSPEC/lidar data were 5-380 ppb. Concentrations of SO2 measured directly by flame photometry were 10-250 ppb. Particles collected in the plumes with a quartz crystal microbalance impactor were mostly less than 3 microns in diameter and consisted of droplets of dilute sulfur-bearing solutions and minor amounts of layer silicate particles coated with a sulfur-bearing film or crust. Total particle concentrations were 4.7 micrograms per cu.m for Poas and 18.8 micrograms per cu.m for Colima. Comparison of concentrations of SO2 in the plumes with gas samples collected at fumaroles on the ground suggests that the plumes are diluted by the atmosphere by factors of up to 100,000.

  1. Crust-Mantle Interactions at Pico de Orizaba (Citlaltepetl) Volcano, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, P.; Carrasco, G.

    2006-12-01

    Pico de Orizaba (Citlaltepetl) volcano constitutes the easternmost and highest stratovolcano of the subduction- related Plio-Quaternary Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). The volcano can be divided into three main constructional stages. Its activity started during the mid-Pleistocene. The present cone was built on the remnants of the ancestral buildings by eruption of amphibole-two pyroxene dacitic lava flows, the most recent of which was erupted in the seventeenth century. The volcano is surrounded to the SW by monogenetic Quaternary cindercones and maars. All representative units were sampled in this work for geochemical and isotopic purposes, including a small quartzitic xenolith found in the basaltic monogenetic suite. Volcanic products of the stratocone are quite heterogeneous and range from calc-alkaline basaltic andesites to dome rhyolites, also displayed by a wide range of SiO2 and MgO (72.6-53.2 and 7.0-0.3 wt. %, respectively). In comparison to other TMVB stratovolcanoes (e.g., Colima, Nevado de Toluca), Pico de Orizaba shows similar 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7037-0.7048) but considerably more evolved Nd-Pb isotopic ratios (eNd: -1.8 to + 1.4; 206Pb/204Pb: 18.61-18.78). Elevated LILE concentrations and depleted HFSE witness the importance of slab- derived aqueous fluids and metasomatic reactions between the subducting lithosphere and overlying mantle wedge. On the other hand, Pico de Orizaba volcano shows additionally high crustal contributions of a source with depleted Sr and enriched Nd and Pb isotopic signatures, best explained by considerable assimilation of the local Grenvillian basement in magma generation processes. In contrast to Popocatépetl volcano with a high-level magma reservoir emplacement (7-8 km) and obvious interaction with the carbonate-dominated shallow basement rocks (e.g. elevated 87Sr/86Sr ratios and CO2 in gas plumes), this effect cannot be observed at Pico de Orizaba volcano, although a regional Cretaceous limestone basement is also

  2. Origin and age of the Volcanic Rocks of Tláloc Volcano, Sierra Nevada, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, M.; Grobéty, B.; Arce, J. L.; Rueda, H.

    2007-05-01

    The Tláloc volcano (TV) is a 4125 m high stratovolcano of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) and is located in the northern end of the N-S trending Sierra Nevada, 30 km NE of Mexico City. Few data on the petrological and temporal evolution of TV have been published to date. Recently dated deposits gave ages between 32'000 and 34'500±500 years BP (Huddart and Gonzalez, 2004). Mapping and sampling of extrusive rocks in the summit region of TV revealed a dome structure with radiating lava flows consisting of dacitic rocks containing plagioclase and hornblende phenocrysts. Some flows, however, seem to be associated with a collapse structure E of the main summit. Crossing relationships indicate that this structure is older (“Paleo Tláloc”). A stratigraphy of the pyroclastic deposits was established along the northern slope of TV. From the numerous pyroclastic flows, separated by paleosoils and fluviatile deposits, only two pumice and one block and ash flow (BAF) have regional extent. Their thickness - distance relationship and their granulometry point to major explosive events. A carbonized wood sample from the BAF deposit gave ages similar to the previous ages (33'180±550 yr BP and 23'170±270 yr BP), a sample from a pyroclastic flow gave even a younger age (16'620±110 yr BP), suggesting that TV remained active also after the volcanoes Iztaccíhuatl and Popocatépetl further to the South started their activity. Based on these preliminary data it may be necessary to reconsider the accepted scenario of the temporal evolution of the central section of the TMVB, which assumes that the activity migrates from North to South with time. Huddart, D. and Gonzalez, S., 2004. Pyroclastic flows and associated sediments, Tláloc-Telapón, piedmont fringe of the eastern basin of Mexico. In: G.J. Aguirre-Diaz, Macías, J.L., and Siebe, C., (Editor), Penrose Conference. UNAM, Metepec, Puebla, Mexico, pp. 35.

  3. Lessons from Popocatepetl Volcano (Mexico): Ancient Settlement Buried by Lavas, Mudflows, and Air-Fall Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, H.; Panfil, M.; Gonzalez, E. A.; Coyoacan, C. U.; Urangaela, G.; Plunket, P.; Gardner, T.; Abrams, M.

    1994-01-01

    Popocatepetl volcano is 5452 m in altitude and capped by glaciers with a long Late Pleistocene-Holocene history. Volcanic activity has been intense during the last 10 000 years. Therefore, the valleys at the NE foothills of the volcano, covered by air-fall ejecta and drained by the runoff of the glaciers, became very attractive to ancient inhabitants of the Xalizintla Valley (XV) west of Puebla City, because of fertility of soils. The XV was occupied by humans about 2000 years ago who witnessed five events related to volcanic activity related to Popo. These events, described in this paper, are being taken into account for volcanic risk evaluation since several towns with a population of more than 23 000 people reoccupied again the Xalizintla Valley.

  4. Fossil Foraminifera from four active mud volcanoes in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Barry; Roberts, Harry H.

    1994-06-01

    Samples were collected for foraminiferal studies by the Johnson Sea-Link I and II manned submersibles on the Louisiana continental slope. This paper documents that the mud, extruded onto the sea floor from depth by four mud volcanoes, ranges in age from Miocene to Pleistocene based on studies of the planktonic foraminiferal fauna. The vents are in water depths ranging from 300 to 690 m located in Garden Banks Block 382, Green Canyon Blocks 143 and 272, and Mississippi Canyon Block 929. Two mud volcanoes in GB 382 and MC 929 also have rich fossil foraminiferal microfaunas. We suggest that the extrusion of fossil sediments onto the sea floor during the Quaternary is a reasonable explanation for frequent occurrences of displaced fossil microfaunas encountered at depth in wells drilling on the flanks of salt diapirs in the slope environment. Results of this study have important implications for age dating subsurface sediments in bathyal locations.

  5. Lessons from Popocatepetl Volcano (Mexico): Ancient Settlement Buried by Lavas, Mudflows, and Air-Fall Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delgado, H.; Panfil, M.; Gonzalez, E. A.; Coyoacan, C. U.; Urangaela, G.; Plunket, P.; Gardner, T.; Abrams, M.

    1994-01-01

    Popocatepetl volcano is 5452 m in altitude and capped by glaciers with a long Late Pleistocene-Holocene history. Volcanic activity has been intense during the last 10 000 years. Therefore, the valleys at the NE foothills of the volcano, covered by air-fall ejecta and drained by the runoff of the glaciers, became very attractive to ancient inhabitants of the Xalizintla Valley (XV) west of Puebla City, because of fertility of soils. The XV was occupied by humans about 2000 years ago who witnessed five events related to volcanic activity related to Popo. These events, described in this paper, are being taken into account for volcanic risk evaluation since several towns with a population of more than 23 000 people reoccupied again the Xalizintla Valley.

  6. Hazard map for volcanic ballistic impacts at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel A.; Delgado-Granados, Hugo; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2012-11-01

    During volcanic explosions, volcanic ballistic projectiles (VBP) are frequently ejected. These projectiles represent a threat to people, infrastructure, vegetation, and aircraft due to their high temperatures and impact velocities. In order to protect people adequately, it is necessary to delimit the projectiles' maximum range within well-defined explosion scenarios likely to occur in a particular volcano. In this study, a general methodology to delimit the hazard zones for VBP during volcanic eruptions is applied to Popocatépetl volcano. Three explosion scenarios with different intensities have been defined based on the past activity of the volcano and parameterized by considering the maximum kinetic energy associated with VBP ejected during previous eruptions. A ballistic model is used to reconstruct the "launching" kinetic energy of VBP observed in the field. In the case of Vulcanian eruptions, the most common type of activity at Popocatépetl, the ballistic model was used in concert with an eruptive model to correlate ballistic range with initial pressure and gas content, parameters that can be estimated by monitoring techniques. The results are validated with field data and video observations of different Vulcanian eruptions at Popocatépetl. For each scenario, the ballistic model is used to calculate the maximum range of VBP under optimum "launching" conditions: ballistic diameter, ejection angle, topography, and wind velocity. Our results are presented in the form of a VBP hazard map with topographic profiles that depict the likely maximum ranges of VBP under explosion scenarios defined specifically for Popocatépetl volcano. The hazard zones shown on the map allow the responsible authorities to plan the definition and mitigation of restricted areas during volcanic crises.

  7. Comparative Spectrograms Between the Popocatepetl Volcano Magnetic Station and the Teoloyucan Magnetic Observatory, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifuentes-Nava, G.; Hernandez-Quintero, J. E.; Cabral-Cano, E.; Martin-Del Pozzo, A. L.; Chavez-Segura, R. E.

    2007-05-01

    We present a comparative spectrogram analysis for the Popocatepetl Volcano magnetic station (70.943° N CoLat, 261.363° E, 4029 m) and the Teoloyucan Magnetic Observatory (70.254° N CoLat, 260.807º E, 2280 m) time series between 1997 and 2003. Instrumentation at both sites include a Geometrics G856 proton-precession magnetometer operating at a 60 second sampling rate and is complemented with the magnetic record from a dF fluxgate variograph at the Teoloyucan Magnetic Observatory (TEO). Popocatepetl's total magnetic field record is reconstructed using a harmonic analysis technique, and subtracted to the TEO record, which is considered as a reference site. The resulting difference shows a significant diurnal component, presumably from a local magnetic induction or from ionospheric origin. This is in sharp contrast with our initial considerations for geomagnetic volcano monitoring that considered the distance between both sites to be close enough and assumed similar ionospheric conditions at both sites. This diurnal component influence can be removed using a normalized difference approach or by cancellation during the harmonic reconstruction process. This analysis will improve previously used techniques such as normalized differences or correlation in magnetic data analysis for short, middle and long term active volcano magnetic monitoring.

  8. Lahars simulation and field calibration in Popocatépetl Volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, B.; Zamorano, J. J.; Pastor, M.; Andrés, N.; Tanarro, L. M.; Palacios, D.

    2012-04-01

    The term "lahar" refers to the process generated in volcanoes by high sediment concentration flows that range from hyperconcentrated to Debris flows. This complex dynamic system represents a threat to people living near volcanoes. In order to delimitate hazardous area, mathematical models should be applied and tested. These models depend strongly on data collected in the field and, an additionally, good DEM is required to produce satisfactory results. Recent Popocatépetl lahars are well documented and as a result, they can be used to assess the accuracy of numerical models. In this work, SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) depth integrated model created by Pastor in 2005 is applied to reproduce Popocatépetl lahars. The mathematical model is derived from the velocity-pressure version of the Biot-Zienkiewicz model and the assumed rheology corresponds to the Bingham model. On the other hand, a systematic collection of field data it's carried out by GFAM group in Popocatépetl volcano and it's included updating channel topography; as well as the factors: i) run out area boundary; ii) estimation of the velocity of the flow and iii) depth distribution of lahar's deposit. All this field data it's used for back analyses and calibration of the rheological parameters. Besides the calibration of rheological parameters, it is also investigated the effect of the topographic mesh resolution. Moreover, flow depth obtained by SPH model is systematically compared with field evidences along the lahar's path. Research funded by CGL2009-7343 project, Government of Spain.

  9. Experimental determination of drag coefficient for volcanic materials: Calibration and application of a model to Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) ballistic projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatorre-Ibargüengoitia, Miguel A.; Delgado-Granados, Hugo

    2006-06-01

    This study shows the results of experiments performed in a subsonic wind tunnel to measure drag coefficients (Cd) for volcanic particles emitted by Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico). The results indicate that volcanic projectiles move in a range of Reynolds number (Re) values where Cd is independent of Re. Drag coefficients of volcanic fragments were found between the values of spheres and cubes with low values. In this study, initial conditions of the ballistic equations were calibrated with the ``launching'' kinetic energy from ballistics expelled by Popocatépetl volcano during the eruptive event of December 17, 1998. The maximum range of the projectiles calculated with the experimentally measured drag coefficient is in better agreement with the field and observational data reported here than using the values of geometrical bodies as in previous studies. Our study can be useful for definition of safety zones around volcanoes to protect people and infrastructure adequately.

  10. Eruptive History of the Rhyolitic Guangoche Volcano, Los Azufres Volcanic Field, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangel Granados, E.; Arce, J. L.; Macias, J. L.; Layer, P. W.

    2014-12-01

    Guangoche is a rhyolitic and polygenetic volcano with a maximum elevation of 2,760 meters above sea level. It is situated to the southwest of the Los Azufres Volcanic Field (LAVF), in the central sector of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Guangoche volcano is the youngest volcano described within the LAVF. It shows a horseshoe shaped crater open to the south, with a central lava dome. Its eruptive history during late Pleistocene has been intense with six explosive eruptions that consists of: 1) A southwards sector collapse of the volcano that generated a debris avalanche deposit with megablocks of heterogenous composition; 2) A plinian-type eruption that generated a pumice fall deposit and pyroclastic density currents by column collapse at 30.6 ka; 3) A plinian-type eruption "White Pumice Sequence" (29 ka) that developed a 22-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 7.0 x 107 kg/s (vol. = 0.53 km3); 4) A dome-destruction event, "Agua Blanca Pyroclastic Sequence" at 26.7 ka, that deposited a block-and-ash flow deposit; 5) A subplinian-plinian type eruption "Ochre Pyroclastic Sequence" (<26 ka) with an important initial phreatomagmatic phase, that generated pyroclastic density currents and pumice fallouts. The subplinian-plinian event generated a 16-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 1.9 x 107 kg/s, and magma volume of 0.38 km3; 6) The eruptive history ended with a subplinian eruption (<<26 ka), that generated a multilayered fall deposit, that developed a 11-km-high eruptive column, with a MDR of 2.9 x 106 kg/s and a magma volume of 0.26 km3. Volcanic activity at Guangoche volcano has been intense and future activity should not be discarded. Unfortunately, the last two events have not been dated yet. Guangoche rhyolitic magma is characterized by low-Ba contents suggesting crystal mush extraction for their genesis.

  11. Hazard assessment of long-range tephra dispersal for a Plinian eruptive scenario at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico). Inplications on civil aviation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonasia, R.; Scaini, C.; Capra, L.; Nathenson, M.; Siebe, C.; Arana-Salinas, L.; Folch, A.

    2013-12-01

    Popocatépetl is one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico threatening a densely populated area that includes Mexico City with more than 20 million inhabitants. The destructive potential of this volcano is demonstrated by its Late Pleistocene-Holocene eruptive activity, which has been characterized by recurrent Plinian eruptions of large magnitude. The current volcanic hazards map, reconstructed after the crisis occurred in 1994, considers the potential occurrence of different volcanic phenomena, including pyroclastic density currents and lahars. However, no quantitative assessment of the tephra dispersal hazard, especially related to atmospheric dispersal, has been performed. Given the high number of important airports in the surroundings of Popocatépetl volcano and considering the potential threat posed to civil aviation in Mexico and adjacent regions in case of a Plinian eruption, a hazard assessment for tephra dispersal is strongly required. In this work we present the first probabilistic tephra dispersal hazard assessment for Popocatépetl volcano. We compute probabilistic hazard maps for critical thresholds of airborne ash concentrations at different flight levels. Tephra dispersal modelling is performed using the FALL3D numerical model. Probabilistic hazard maps are built for a Plinian eruptive scenario defined on the basis of geological field data for the 'Ochre Pumice' Plinian eruption (4965 14C yrBP). FALL3D model input eruptive parameters are constrained through an inversion method carried out with the semi-analytical HAZMAP model and are varied sampling them on the base of a Probability Density Function. We analyze the influence of seasonal variations on ash dispersal and estimate the average persistence of critical ash concentrations at relevant locations and airports. This study assesses the impact that a Plinian eruption similar to the Ochre Pumice eruption would have on the main airports of Mexico and adjacent areas. The hazard maps presented here

  12. Seismic activity related to the 1991 eruption of Colima Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez-Cornú, Francisco; Nava, F. Alejandro; La Cruz-Reyna, Servando De; Jiménez, Zenón; Valencia, Carmen; García-Arthur, Rosalía

    1994-08-01

    Ten years after the last effusive eruption and at least 15 years of seismic quiescence, volcanic seismic activity started at Colima volcano on 14 February 1991, with a seismic crisis which reached counts of more than 100 per day and showed a diversity of earthquake types. Four other distinct seismic crises followed, before a mild effusive eruption in April 1991. The second crisis preceded the extrusion of an andesitic scoriaceous lava lobe, first reported on 1 March; during this crisis an interesting temporary concentration of seismic foci below the crater was observed shortly before the extrusion was detected. The third crisis was constituted by shallow seismicity, featuring possible mild degassing explosion-induced activity in the form of hiccups (episodes of simple wavelets that repeat with diminishing amplitude), and accompanied by increased fumarolic activity. The growth of the new lava dome was accompanied by changing seismicity. On 16 April during the fifth crisis which consisted of some relatively large, shallow, volcanic earthquakes and numerous avalanches of older dome material, part of the newly extruded dome, which had grown towards the edge of the old dome, collapsed, producing the largest avalanches and ash flows. Afterwards, block lava began to flow slowly along the SW flank of the volcano, generating frequent small incandescent avalanches. The seismicity associated with the stages of this eruptive activity shows some interesting features: most earthquake foci were located north of the summit, some of them relatively deep (7 11 km below the summit level), underneath the saddle between the Colima and the older Nevado volcanoes. An apparently seismic quiet region appears between 4 and 7 km below the summit level. In June, harmonic tremors were detected for the first time, but no changes in the eruptive activity could be correlated with them. After June, the seismicity decreasing trend was established, and the effusive activity stopped on September 1991.

  13. Analysis of Seismicity Related to the December 2002 - February 2003 Eruptions at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quezada-Reyes, A.; Valdes-Gonzalez, C.; Lesage, P.

    2007-05-01

    Since its reactivation in 1994 Popocatepetl Volcano has undergone several activity stages, some of which comprise cycles of intrusion, extrusion and destruction of a lava dome. Popocatepetl has produced up to several tens of daily long-period (LP) events and several volcanic tremor episodes, along with a few volcano-tectonic earthquakes. A lava dome was extruded on May 2002 and subsequently destroyed by 19 explosions from December 2002 to February 2003. The seismicity accompanying the destruction of the lava dome was dominated by long-period (LP) events and a mix of harmonic and spasmodic tremor. We analysed the seismity related to this explosive phase and classified the majority of LP events into three families according to their frequency content. Most of the LP events are characterized by a dominant frequency near 2 Hz throughout the eruptive period. Many events also exhibited a low-amplitude short-period (SP) phase ocurring a few seconds before the LP signal. The SP signal was not observed without the LP event, although several events occurred in the absence of the precursory signal. We also found a notably decrease of LP events activity prior to December 18, 2002 and February 14 to 28, 2003 explosive episodes. Three different types of tremor lasting from a few minutes to several hours were also observed: spasmodic, harmonic and a very low-amplitude pulse-like type of tremor, the latter occurring on November 11, 12 and 30 with a duration of about 120 minutes each. Harmonic tremor episodes lasted from a few minutes to a few hours and there was no tremor occurrence days before the explosive events. Tremor spectra display a fundamental frequency which can vary in the range 0.6-1.3 Hz within a one-hour-long series of tremor. Similar observations are obtained for the peak spacing of the harmonic tremor spectra. These variations may reflect short-term fluctuations of the acoustic properties of the source while no long-term evolutions of the LP sources are detected

  14. Comparison of Eruptive Processes of the years 1903 and 2015 of the Colima Volcano, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez-Plascencia, C.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.; Hernandez-Rodriguez, A.; Suarez, G. B. V.; Arreola-Ochoa, L. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Colima volcano eruption processes during the months of January - July 2015, was characterized by two types of activity: From January to May we registered 923 exhalations and smaller explosions. Having up to 31 events per day, the columns of ash reached an altitude between 4500 and 7000 masl. Each event frequently averaging between 50 and 500 meters from about 442 or 48% of the total events this period. The reports of falling ash came from as far as the city of Salamanca at 278 km to the NE. The intense activity destroyed the original dome forming a new one with an elliptical crater 224 m by 166 m and 35 m deep. On May 15 we observed the growth of a new dome. On July 4, this created the falling of rocks along the slopes and the formation of three Andesitic lava flows at the N, SW and S flanks. By July 11 the volume of lava extruded was about 6 x106 m3, with a rate extrusion of 1.21 m3per sec. 2. Based on three flyby observations, it was noted that the lava flows on the S and SW sectors had a higher extrusion rate in the N sector. The first two were placed on a slope with an average gradient of 36º, while on the northern slope gradient is 23º, as a result of the interaction of extrusion speed, slope and height of the lava front, there were constant landslides, causing at least 4 Merapi type pyroclastic flows, that flowed by the gullies of Montegrande and San Antonio. The first flow reached distances of 7 km and 10.4 km. It is the largest lava flow recorded since January 20, 1913. The devastating results were the burning of 500 meters of the Templado Forest, burning along the Montegrande Creek and finally affecting many crops and livestock. This type of activity already had shown in 1975 and 1991 by the lava flow and S NE flank where the pyroclastic flows had no destructive effects, except for some small fires in forested areas at the base of the volcano (Thorpe, et al, 1977). In March 1903 Colima volcano showed similar activity per Arreola J. and Diaz Severo

  15. Very long-period signals associated with vulcanian explosions at Popocatepetl volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Chouet, B.A.; Dawson, P.

    1999-01-01

    Very long period (VLP) seismic signals associated with large summit eruptions of Popocatepetl volcano in the last four years are investigated using data from a broadband seismometer (0.04-120 s) deployed on the north flank of the volcano at a radial distance of 5 km from the active crater. The VLP signals associated with individual eruptions share similar waveforms. Discrete VLP signals accompanying long-period (LP) events also share similar signatures and have dominant periods that are nearly identical to those observed in the VLP waveforms of explosions. The VLP particle motions for eruption onsets consistently point to a source located a few km beneath the crater. The VLP ground displacement response to each explosion is marked by a compression, followed by a dilatation and terminating with another compression, suggesting a sequence of pressurization-depressurization-repressurization of the conduit. The repetitive nature of the waveforms points to a non-destructive source process which has remained active in the magmatic system of Popocatepetl at least since April 1997.Very long period (VLP) seismic signals associated with large summit eruptions of Popocatepetl volcano in the last four years are investigated using data from a broadband seismometer (0.04-120 s) deployed on the north flank of the volcano at a radial distance of 5 km from the active crater. The VLP signals associated with individual eruptions share similar waveforms. Discrete VLP signals accompanying long-period (LP) events also share similar signatures and have dominant periods that are nearly identical to those observed in the VLP waveforms of explosions. The VLP particle motions for eruption onsets consistently point to a source located a few km beneath the crater. The VLP ground displacement response to each explosion is marked by a compression, followed by a dilatation and terminating with another compression, suggesting a sequence of pressurization-depressurization-repressurization of the

  16. Volcanic Risk Perception in Five Communities Located near the Chichón Volcano, Northern Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, F.; Novelo-Casanova, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Chichón volcano (17° 19’ N and 93° 15’ W) is located in the state of Chiapas, Mexico. This volcano is classified by UNESCO as one of the ten most dangerous volcanos in the world. The eruptions of March and April in 1982 affected at least 51 communities located in the surroundings of the volcano and caused the death of about 2000 people. In this work we evaluate the risk perception in five communities highly populated: Juárez, Ostuacán, Pichucalco, Reforma and Sunuapa. We selected these communities because they have a high possibility to be affected by a volcanic eruption in the future. Our survey was carried out during February and March 2006. A total of 222 families were interviewed using a questionnaire to measure risk perception. These questionnaires retrieved general information as how long people had been living there and their reasons to do so; their experiences during the 1982 events, their opinion about the authorities participation and their perception of volcanic risk; the plans of the community for disaster prevention and mitigation. Some of the most important results are: (1). People perceive a very low volcanic risk and the 70% of interviewees believe that a new eruption in the future is almost improbable because it happened in 1982. This result is particularly interesting because, according to the state government, more than 100,000 inhabitants will be directly affected in case of a new similar eruption; (2). About 95% of the population do not know the current activity of the volcano and consider that the authorities do not inform properly to their communities; (3). The response of the authorities during the events of 1982 was ranked as deficient mainly because they were unable provide shelters, storage facilities, food as well as medicine and health care access; (4). Approximately 60% of the community will accept to be re-located again in case of a new eruption; (5). About 70% of the population will not accept to be re-located because

  17. Stratigraphic and sedimetological study of relevant lahar deposits of La Lumbre ravine, Colima volcano (Mexico): preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarocchi, D.; Rodriguez-Sedano, L. A.; Saucedo, R.; Capra, L.

    2009-04-01

    Volcán de Colima is the most active volcano of Mexico with more than fifty eruptions documented in the last four centuries. The great amount of pyroclastic material deposited in the volcano slopes represents a perfect source for an intense lahar activity. Despite the intense volcanic activity with production of explosive eruptions and pyroclastic flows, lahars are greatly the most dangerous phenomena at Volcán de Colima. Pyroclastic flows did not reach long distances, generally less than 5 km from the crater. In contrast, lahars travel long distances, up to 10 km, causing damage to infrastructure and being able to affect populated areas. For this reason in the last 100 years more than 350 people died for lahars in the Colima Volcanic Complex and only 8 lost their lives for pyroclastic flows in 1913 plinian eruption. "La Lumbre" ravine is a very important morphological feature in the western-southwestern sector of the volcano, there, it gathers the main drainage system and collects water from "El Playon", a wide intra-caldera basin delimited by the Volcán de Colima to the south and the "Paleofuego" caldera rim to the north. This ravine produced huge lahars such as the 1906 lahar which killed almost 325 people, or the lahars associated with the great 1913 eruption, other associated with de 1990-91 volcanic crisis, and is still very active, continuously remobilizing the 1998-99 pyroclastic flow deposits. In 2002 near the confluence between "La Lumbre" and "El Zarco" Ravine, a house was destroyed fortunately with no danger for people. In order to perform future accurate lahar numerical simulation and obtain reliable hazard study along this ravine, is very important to reconstruct the complex stratigraphy and understand which of such important deposits is related with the 1906, 1913 or 1991 eruptive crisis. For this reason we are performing a detailed stratigraphic study of the lahars sequence. We selected the best outcrops at different distances from the crater. In

  18. Kinematics and age of Early Tertiary trench parallel volcano-tectonic lineaments in southern Mexico: Tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, M.; Ferrari, L.; Lopez Martinez, M.; Cerca Martinez, M.; Serrano Duran, L.

    2007-05-01

    We present new geological, structural, and geochronological data that constrain the timing and geometry of Early Tertiary strike slip deformation in southwestern Mexico and its relation with the concurrent magmatic activity. Geologic mapping in Guerrero and Michoacan States documented two regional WNW trending volcano-tectonic lineaments sub parallel to the present trench. The southernmost lineament runs for ~140 km from San Miguel Totolapan area (NW Guerrero) to Sanchiqueo (SE Michoacan), and passes through Ciudad Altamirano. Its southeastern part is marked by the alignment of at least eleven silicic to intermediate major domes as well as by the course of the Balsas River. The northwestern part of the lineament is characterized by ductile left lateral shear zones in Early Tertiary plutonic rocks observed in the Rio Chiquito valley. Domes near Ciudad Altamirano are unaffected by ductile shearing and yielded a ~42 Ma 40Ar/39Ar age, setting a minimum age for this deformation. The northern volcano-tectonic lineament runs for ~190 km between the areas of Huitzuco in northern Guerrero and the southern part of the Tzitzio fold in eastern Michoacan. The Huautla, Tilzapotla, Taxco, La Goleta and Nanchititla silicic centers (all in the range 37-34 Ma) are emplaced along this lineament, which continues to the WNW trough a mafic dike swarm exposed north of Tiquicheo (37-35 Ma) and the Purungueo subvolcanic body (~42 Ma). These rocks, unaffected by ductile shearing, give a minimum age of deformation similar to the southern Totolapan-Sanquicheo lineament. Post ~42 Ma deformation is essentially brittle and is characterized by several left lateral and right lateral transcurrent faults with typical Riedel patterns. Other trench-parallel left lateral shear zones active in pre-Oligocene times were recently reported in western Oaxaca. The recognizing of Early Tertiary trench-parallel and left-lateral ductile shearing in internal areas of southern Mexico suggest a field of widely

  19. The ongoing dome emplacement and destruction cyclic process at Popocatépetl volcano, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Vazquez, Angel; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing eruptive activity of Popocatépetl volcano has been characterized by emplacement and subsequent destruction of a succession of lava domes. Between the onset of the current eruption in 1994 and the time of this submission, 38 episodes of lava dome formation and removal have been identified. Each dome has showed particular features related to the magma extrusion process. Among other manifestations, dome-emplacement events have been usually accompanied by relatively low-intensity, protracted explosions referred to as exhalations. After variable times of residence, emplacements have ended in partial or total destruction of the domes by strong vulcanian explosions that produced sizeable ash plumes, with most of them also ejecting incandescent debris onto the volcano flanks. Here, we present a detailed account for the observed activity related to the domes' growth and destruction, related seismic monitoring signals, and morphological features of the domes based on 19 years of visual observations and image analysis. We then discuss a model for the process of dome growth and destruction and its hazard implications.

  20. Stability Evaluation Of Previous Volcanic Edifice Collapse At Pico De Orizaba Volcano, Mexico, Using Geotechnical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha-Dimas, A.; Watters, R. J.

    2001-12-01

    Pico de Orizaba volcano has collapsed twice during its geologic evolution (Carrasco-Nuñez, 1997). The initial stage of evolution for this volcano is known as the Torrecillas cone that collapsed 0.21 Ma b.p., and the related deposits formed the Jamapa avalanche which traveled eastward 75 km. A second, superimposed constructional stage is the Espolón de Oro cone that also ended with a collapse 20 000 years b.p., forming the Tetelzingo avalanche-lahar that traveled 85 km. Samples from the remains of old summit cores and their corresponding collapse deposits were collected and tested in order to obtain strength parameters of altered rock from old volcanic edifices. Hydrothermal alteration and variations of strength of the two avalanche deposits were correlated with the strength values and alterations from the in situ corresponding sources. Strength values: Hoek and Brown's parameters, Uniaxial Compressive Strength (50-300 kPa), cohesion (480-2000 kPa), angle of friction (6° - 35° ); and degree of alteration give insights of rock mass quality and maximum intact rock strengths of the edifice rock mass. These values provide the upper limits for numerical model input parameter values for evaluation of flank stability. Rock strength from numerical model of previous failures can be compared with those obtained for the rock mass and intact rock of the actual edifice. This would permit the assessment of future avalanche hazards.

  1. Late Pleistocene Holocene stratigraphy and radiocarbon dating of La Malinche volcano, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Govea, Renato; Siebe, Claus

    2007-04-01

    Previous studies of La Malinche identified and radiocarbon dated several volcanic layers, the youngest of which yielded an age of ca. 7.5 ka. An additional ash fallout layer that crops out at high altitudes was considered the most recent deposit, with an estimated age of 6 ka. In the present work 38 new radiocarbon ages are presented. From these, several date the young ash fallout layer and lie around 3.1 ka. With the aid of these dates a new and comprehensive stratigraphy documenting the Late Pleistocene-Holocene eruptive history of La Malinche is presented. The stratigraphy indicates two main stages of volcanic activity: Pre-Malinche and Malinche. The first undoubtedly comprises the major part of the eruptive history, but its deposits are largely covered by the products of the latter stage, on which this study is focused. The Malinche stage was subdivided into three eruptive periods. Period 1 started with the emplacement of the Huamantla Pumice more than 45 ka ago. This deposit consists of a thick pumice fallout overlain by pyroclastic flow deposits. Subsequently, several episodes of construction and collapse of summit domes occurred. The oldest dome was dated at ca. 45 ka. Period 2 started 21.5 ka ago with the Malinche Pumice I, a widespread pumice fallout covering the entire slopes of the volcano. Pyroclastic flows and lahars related to this eruption were channeled along deep barrancas and reached considerable distances. Deposits produced by partial sector collapse and dated at ca. 20.9 ka, and a pumice-and-ash flow deposit dated at 15.9 ka were also generated during this period. The last period started with the eruption of the Malinche Pumice II, a distinctive fallout deposit overlain by ash flow deposits on the NE slope of the volcano. The age of this pumice layer is estimated between 12 and 9 ka. Formation of block-and-ash flows, lahars and pumice-and-ash flows followed during this period, and peaked in a most intensive episode that was dated at 7.5 ka

  2. Tree-ring based reconstruction of rockfalls at Cofre de Perote volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Ramos, Osvaldo; Stoffel, Markus; Vázquez-Selem, Lorenzo

    2017-08-01

    In this study, dendrogeomorphic techniques are employed to analyse the temporal frequency and spatial distribution of rockfalls on a talus slope of La Teta valley, located on the NW slopes of Cofre de Perote volcano at 4000 m above sea level. Based on the interpretation of disturbance signals in growth rings of old-growth Pinus hartwegii Lindl. trees, we identify 100 growth disturbances related with rockfall events dated between 1780 and 2011, with slightly more than half of these events being dated to the last 50 years. The sectors most susceptible to rockfall correspond with the young rock lobes located at the foot of scarps. Roughly three in ten events has been triggered by regional, M > 6 earthquakes, whereas half of the events activity coincides with periods characterized by severe, prolonged summer rainfalls such as the ones occurred in 1995, 1998, 2005 and 2011.

  3. Tremor Signals and Their Eruptive Event Characteristics: Case Study Popocatepetl Volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega, A.; Delgado, H.; Roberge, J.; Corona, P.; Hernandez, E.

    2006-12-01

    Seismic activity at Popocatepetl Volcano is characterized by a variety of signals in a wider frequency band (0.06s 30s), associated with its eruptive behavior. Since Popocatepetl reawakened in 1994 volcanic eruptive behavior has consisted of construction and destruction dome phases, strong volcanic degassing, and ash emissions ranged from small short-lived plumes rising a few hundred meters above the crater rim, to large plumes reaching 15 km above the crater with powerful ejection of ballistic projectiles associated with the destruction of lava domes. These eruptive events have been accompanied by persistent or spasmodic tremor signals before, during or after the eruption. Persistent tremor was first observed 22 hrs after the onset of explosions which marked the reawakening of Popocatepetl volcano on December 21, 1994, this kind of sustained tremor also occurred during lava effusion episodes. Tremor signals present a wide range of amplitudes and dominant periods in the range from 0.2-20~s, their duration may last from few minutes to days. We analyzed broadband records of tremor from stations of permanent and temporal networks associated with eruptive episodes occurred in May to July, 1997, September to December, 1998, and February to May and December, 2000. The tremor characteristics of these particular events are comparing with tremor episodes that are not related to eruption events and with sustained low-amplitude tremor observed to persist for hours. We correlate temporal, frequency and waveform characteristics of different tremor episodes with punctual measurements of sulfur dioxide emission rates, standard deviation and geochemistry analysis of ashes of the corresponding eruptive event. The results of correlation analyses indicate that tremor characteristics and properties of its associated eruptive event reflect conditions in the volcanic eruptive behavior and may help in monitoring eruptive dynamics.

  4. Monitoring of volcanic emissions for risk assessment at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, Hugo; Campion, Robin; Fickel, Matthias; Cortés Ramos, Jorge; Alvarez Nieves, José Manuel; Taquet, Noemi; Grutter, Michel; Osiris García Gómez, Israel; Darío Sierra Mondragón, Rubén; Meza Hernández, Israel

    2015-04-01

    In January 2014, the Mexican Agency FOPREDEN (Natural Disaster Prevention Fund) accepted to fund a project to renew, upgrade and complement the gas monitoring facilities. The UNAM-CENAPRED (National Center for Disaster Prevention) gas monitoring system currently consists of: • A COSPEC instrument and two mini-DOAS used for mobile traverse measurements • An SO2 camera used for punctual campaign • A network of three permanent scanning mini-DOAS (NOVAC type 1 instrument) and one permanent mini-DOAS (NOVAC type II, currently under repair). The activity planed in the framework of the new project, of which several of them are already successfully implemented, include: • Completely refurbished permanent scanning mini-DOAS network consisting of four stations and the punctual deployment of three RADES (Rapid Deployment System) for assessing plume geometry and chemistry or for responding to emergency situations. • Prolongation of the mobile traverse measurements in order to continuously update the 20 years-long SO2 flux database obtained with the COSPEC, now coupled with a mobile DOAS for redundancy. • The development and installation of a permanent SO2 camera, for monitoring in real time the short timescale variations of the SO2 emissions. • The installation of two permanent FTIR spectrometers, one measuring the plume thermal emissions and the other measuring with the solar occultation geometry, for frequent measurements of molecular ratio between SO2, HCl, HF and SiF4 • The exploitation in near-real time of the satellite imagery (OMI, MODIS and ASTER) available for the volcano. A special attention will be paid to increase the reliability and graphical representation of these data stream in order to facilitate their use for decision-making by the civil protection authority in charge of the volcano.

  5. Temporal and spectral characteristics of seismicity observed at Popocatepetl volcano, central Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Valdes-Gonzalez, C.; Dawson, P.

    2000-01-01

    Popocatepetl volcano entered an eruptive phase from December 21, 1994 to March 30, 1995, which was characterized by ash and fumarolic emissions. During this eruptive episode, the observed seismicity consisted of volcano-tectonic (VT) events, long-period (LP) events and sustained tremor. Before the initial eruption on December 21, VT seismicity exhibited no increase in number until a swarm of VT earthquakes was observed at 01:31 hours local time. Visual observations of the eruption occurred at dawn the next morning. LP activity increased from an average of 7 events a day in October 1994 to 22 events per day in December 1994. At the onset of the eruption, LP activity peaked at 49 events per day. LP activity declined until mid-January 1995 when no events were observed. Tremor was first observed about one day after the initial eruption and averaged 10 h per episode. By late February 1995, tremor episodes became more intermittent, lasting less than 5 min, and the number of LP events returned to pre-eruption levels (7 events per day). Using a spectral ratio technique, low-frequency oceanic microseismic noise with a predominant peak around 7 s was removed from the broadband seismic signal of tremor and LP events. Stacks of corrected tremor episodes and LP events show that both tremor and LP events contain similar frequency features with major peaks around 1.4 Hz. Frequency analyses of LP events and tremor suggest a shallow extended source with similar radiation pattern characteristics. The distribution of VT events (between 2.5 and 10 km) also points to a shallow source of the tremor and LP events located in the first 2500 m beneath the crater. Under the assumption that the frequency characteristics of the signals are representative of an oscillator we used a fluid-filled-crack model to infer the length of the resonator.

  6. Hot and Cold: Complex Biochemical Processes in a Mud Volcano Setting on the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, S.; Aharon, P.; Pape, T.

    2006-12-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps on the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) seafloor are conventionally defined as "cold", being characterized by hydrocarbon-rich fluid emissions at ambient sea floor temperature, mineralization of gas hydrates, precipitation of carbonates depleted in 13C, association with chemosynthetic fauna (mussel beds, tube worms etc.) and dominance of microbial processes fueled by venting hydrocarbons within the sediments. Analyses of carbonate phases, pore-fluids and biomarkers from cores (length~25cm) taken by ALVIN from an active mud volcano on the northern Gulf of Mexico slope (GC-272, 27°41`25"; 91°32`28") point towards a vent setting far more complex than sites previously investigated. We argue that the mud volcano setting in GC-272 is distinguished by episodes of cold methane venting when gas hydrates are forming in the sediment pore spaces (visually confirmed) alternating with periodic hot venting of warm brines (formation fluids) advected on the sea floor. We support our argument with the evidence that follows. Scalenohedral calcite crystals (1-2 mm in size) scattered within the sediment exhibit unusually negative δ18O values (down to -6‰ PDB) and δ13C values ranging from -2 ‰ to - 20‰ PDB. Temperature calculations based on the δ18O composition of the calcites and coexisting pore fluids yield a fluid temperature of ~45°C which is far higher than the recorded bottom water temperatures of ~8°C at a depth of 680 m. Pore fluid Na/Cl ratios (0.92-1.2) confirm the mixing of cold GOM bottom waters (Na/Cl=0.82) with advecting hot brines (Na/Cl=~1.0) resulting in a brine fluid at 45°C. The δ13C of the calcites is isotopically heavier by comparison with typical seep carbonates from the GOM suggesting a mixed carbon source consisting of pore fluid DIC, brine DIC and bottom seawater DIC. Hence the scalenohedral calcites are the product of hot venting episodes and are precipitated within the sediments from calcite-saturated pore-fluids (SI= ~5). Biomarker assays

  7. Long-range hazard assessment of volcanic ash dispersal for a Plinian eruptive scenario at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico): implications for civil aviation safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonasia, Rosanna; Scaini, Chiara; Capra, Lucia; Nathenson, Manuel; Siebe, Claus; Arana-Salinas, Lilia; Folch, Arnau

    2014-01-01

    Popocatépetl is one of Mexico's most active volcanoes threatening a densely populated area that includes Mexico City with more than 20 million inhabitants. The destructive potential of this volcano is demonstrated by its Late Pleistocene-Holocene eruptive activity, which has been characterized by recurrent Plinian eruptions of large magnitude, the last two of which destroyed human settlements in pre-Hispanic times. Popocatépetl's reawakening in 1994 produced a crisis that culminated with the evacuation of two villages on the northeastern flank of the volcano. Shortly after, a monitoring system and a civil protection contingency plan based on a hazard zone map were implemented. The current volcanic hazards map considers the potential occurrence of different volcanic phenomena, including pyroclastic density currents and lahars. However, no quantitative assessment of the tephra hazard, especially related to atmospheric dispersal, has been performed. The presence of airborne volcanic ash at low and jet-cruise atmospheric levels compromises the safety of aircraft operations and forces re-routing of aircraft to prevent encounters with volcanic ash clouds. Given the high number of important airports in the surroundings of Popocatépetl volcano and considering the potential threat posed to civil aviation in Mexico and adjacent regions in case of a Plinian eruption, a hazard assessment for tephra dispersal is required. In this work, we present the first probabilistic tephra dispersal hazard assessment for Popocatépetl volcano. We compute probabilistic hazard maps for critical thresholds of airborne ash concentrations at different flight levels, corresponding to the situation defined in Europe during 2010, and still under discussion. Tephra dispersal mode is performed using the FALL3D numerical model. Probabilistic hazard maps are built for a Plinian eruptive scenario defined on the basis of geological field data for the "Ochre Pumice" Plinian eruption (4965 14C yr BP

  8. Magnetotelluric data in the middle Rio Grande basin, Albuquerque volcanoes, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Jackie M.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    The population in the Albuquerque-Santa Fe region of New Mexico is rapidly growing. The Santa Fe Group aquifer in the Middle Rio Grande Basin is the main source of municipal water for the greater Albuquerque metropolitan area. The capacity of this aquifer is more limited than previously thought (Thorn et al., 1993). The Middle Rio Grande Basin, as defined hydrologically and used here, is the area within the Rio Grande Valley extending from Cochiti Dam downstream to the community of San Acacia (Figure 1). Because approximately 600,000 people (40 percent of the population of New Mexico) live in the study area (Bartolino, 1999), water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depends on accurate assessment and protection of the region’s groundwater resources. An important issue in defining the ground water resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the other sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift.

  9. Recent glaciological and meteorological studies of Citlaltépetl volcano's glaciers in Mexico: A comparison with tropical and temperate glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, J.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2012-12-01

    Past studies on Citlaltépetl volcano's glaciers have documented the glacial retreat since the end of the Little Ice Age. Currently, photogrammetry and data analysis have shown the effect of the climatic changes to glacial shrinkage on Citlaltépetl volcano. Citlaltépetl volcano has had the highest glacial system in Mexico (Glaciar Norte) covering an area of ~0.6 km2 on its north face. This work shows the most recent analysis of the glacial retreat on Citlaltépetl volcano for three years of meteorological data collected in the period of 2006-2009. This data analysis is supported by image processing of the glacier surface with satellite and air images. All of these works reflect the strong relationship between the temperature, radiation, and precipitation with the shrinkage of the glacier surface. That behavior suggests a strong influence of net radiation on the melting processes where temperature and precipitation should be the main meteorological parameters responsible of the snow accumulation and deficit. This could mean a pattern of accumulation/ablation dominated by precipitation and temperature which are influenced by the energy exchanges on the glacial surface. Results were compared with the well-documented characteristic patterns of tropical and temperate glacier. Then a comparison was established between Mexican glaciers (19°N) with tropical and temperate glaciers.

  10. Gabbroic xenoliths in alkaline lavas in the region of Sanganguey Volcano, Nayarit, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Giosa, T.A.; Nelson, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Gabbroic xenoliths occur in alkaline cinder cones and lava flows erupted from vents along five parallel lines trending through the calc-alkaline volcano, Sanganguey in the northwestern portion of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. The xenoliths consist of varying proportions of olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and plagioclase. The complete lack of hydrous phases indicates that the gabbros crystallized under conditions of low PH/sub 2/O. Many xenoliths show textures indicative of a cumulate origin and others exhibit recrystallization indicative of subsolidus reactions prior to incorporation in the host liquids. Reaction between xenolithic minerals and host liquids are also observed. The range of Mg numbers calculated for liquids that would have been in equilibrium with olivines in the xenoliths suggests that these olivines crystallized from magmas such as those represented by either calc-alkaline basaltic andesites and andesites or the more evolved alkalic rocks which occur throughout the area. Crystal fractionation models show that the xenoliths may be related to such magmas. The fact that xenoliths occur most commonly in the alkaline rocks suggests that alkaline magmas rise to the surface more rapidly than the more chemically evolved calc-alkaline and alkaline magmas. Alternatively the lack of xenoliths in the more evolved magmas produced by high level crystal fractionation may indicate that the xenoliths are derived from zones below that from which the differentiated magmas begin their final ascent to the surface.

  11. Long-Period and Very-Long-Period Seismicity Associated with Lava Extrusions and Volcanic Degassing at Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega, A.; Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.; Asch, G.; Dietel, C.

    2003-12-01

    From November 1999 through July 2000 a broadband seismic experiment was carried out at Popocatepetl Volcano as part of an international cooperative program between the GeoForschungsZentrum in Potsdam, Germany, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the Institute of Geophysics at UNAM, Mexico. The goal of this experiment was to record seismic activity at Popocatepetl over a wide period range (0.04 to 100 s). The network deployed included 15 stations distributed along radial profiles on the upper flanks of Popocatepetl, and 7 stations at lower elevations on the volcano's western flank. All significant vulcanian events were well recorded by our network. Volcanic activity during the experiment was characterized by emissions of gas and ash, and by the formation of a lava dome within the summit crater. Ash emissions ranged from small short-lived plumes rising a few hundred meters above the crater rim, to larger plumes reaching up to 5 km above the crater. Resulting tephra falls dusted the entire summit area. Bursts of volcanic degassing were accompanied by long-period (LP) seismic signals observed as isolated events, or as sequences of discrete events with overall durations comparable to those of visible activity documented by video. Some gas emissions were accompanied by persistent or spasmodic tremor. LP events and tremor episodes increased in frequency and intensity in early February 2000. Individual LP signals, tremor, and swarms of hybrid events were frequently observed during intervals of active dome growth. Very-long-period (VLP) signals accompanying degassing activity were also clearly recorded at stations closest to the crater. The VLP signals exhibit quasi-identical pulse shapes with periods near 25 s from event to event. VLP signals with periods near 30 s and VLP tremor with periods in the range 15-22 s, lasting 20 min or more, clearly correlated with vulcanian processes. Preliminary locations of LP events based on phase picks, and particle-motion analyses of VLP

  12. Pre-eruptive Volatile Contents and Magma Evolution of Pelagatos Volcano, Sierra Chichinautzin, Mexico, from Olivine- hosted melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, J.; Guilbaud, M.; Reyes Luna, P. C.

    2011-12-01

    Exsolution and loss of volatiles, particularly H2O, CO2 and S, leads to major changes in the crystal content, density, and viscosity of the magma and lava, which in turn can produce important shifts in eruption style (explosive to effusive). We investigate variations in volatile content and magma composition of the Pelagatos scoria cone to characterize magma ascent and eruption processes. Pelagatos monogenetic volcano erupted < 14 000 years B.P and is part of the Sierra Chichinautzin volcanic field in the central portion of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt (south-east of Mexico City). Petrological and textural data from previous work by Guilbaud et al. (2009) indicate that Pelagatos magma was initially hot (>1200°C), gas-rich (up to 5 wt.% H2O), crystal-poor (~10 vol.% Fo90 olivine phenocrysts) and thus poorly viscous (40-80 Pa s) producing rapid magma rise. This in turns delayed degassing/cooling-induced crystallization up to shallow levels, driving the violent Strombolian eruptive stylem which is evident by the morphology and structure of the pyroclastic deposits. However, the Guilbaud et al. (2009) estimate of the initial magma water content was indirect and based on models calibrated by experimental work, and melt-inclusion analyses of similar magmas elsewhere. To better constrain eruptive style of Pelagatos volcano, we constrained the pre-eruptive volatile content of the magma by analyzing major element composition and volatile content (H2O, CO2, Cl, S) in olivine-hosted melt inclusions from 4 different tephra layers within the eruption stratigraphy. Olivine host crystals for the melt inclusions are Fo83-90. The melt inclusions are basaltic andesite to andesite in composition, with 1.84 - 6.02 wt% MgO, 51.95 - 59.21 wt% SiO2 and 0.64 - 1.55 wt% K2O. Their range in composition in comparison with existing whole-rock and matrix glass data suggest that the melt inclusions represent melt quenched after various degrees of differentiation in the conduit. Our

  13. Development of lithic-breccias in the 1982 pyroclastic flow deposits of El Chichón Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, J. L.; Espíndola, J. M.; Bursik, M.; Sheridan, M. F.

    1998-08-01

    Pyroclastic flow deposit F1 (volume 0.02 km 3) produced during Phase III of the 1982 eruption of El Chichón Volcano, Mexico, contains basal lithic breccias. The breccia layers are well exposed in El Platanar gully between 2 and 4 km east of the volcano crater. The lithic breccias are inversely graded as defined by lithics, dense juvenile blocks, and pumice supported in a coarse sandy matrix composed of the same constituents. The contact between the main body of the pyroclastic flow deposit and the lithic breccias is generally sharp and planar but not erosive. In some outcrops it is gradational, and is only shown by an alignment of lithic clasts. The origin of these beds is interpreted to be due to a hydraulic jump in the moving pyroclastic flow formed after a pronounced slope break (from 11° to 3°), at the site where the flow began to be funnelled into the El Platanar gully. We have investigated the possible modes of formation of the lithic breccias with analog laboratory experiments. The experiments show that coarse localized segregations could form through a number of mechanisms. The field observations interpreted with the assistance of the laboratory results suggest that pyroclastic flow 1 (which produced deposit F1) moved as a kind of density stratified flow, with a basal lithic-rich zone transporting larger particles and an upper, less-dense zone transporting smaller particles in suspension. At the slope break, flow 1 lost competence and dumped the largest particles, forming a piled-up breccia. Downstream, somewhat smaller lithic particles may have been deposited as ballistics from a low-angle, jetlike structure comprising a hydraulic jump. This deposit thins with distance downstream. Once the deposit was sufficiently thick on its upstream end, particles may have been re-entrained into the jet, to be deposited further along the flow in a low-angle, downstream prograding, bouldery dune. Reverse grading in the dune beds may result from kinetic sieving. We

  14. Search for Impact Craters in the Volcanic and Volcano-Sedimentary Terrains of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartali, R.; Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2011-12-01

    It has long been recognized that the numbers of impact craters documented in the terrestrial record are small compared to those of the Moon and other planets and satellites. Processes acting on the Earth surface including tectonics, volcanism and erosion contribute to erase, modify and cover evidence of crater-forming impacts that have occurred through Earth's history. Even evidence on large impact structures is limited to few examples, with only three complex multi-ring structures so far recognized. Chicxulub is a ~200 km diameter multi-ring crater formed by an impact in the southern Gulf of Mexico about 65.5 Ma ago at the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary. Chicxulub is the only impact structure documented in Mexico, Central and northern South America (http:www.unb.ca/passc/ImpactDatabase). Chicxulub, located in the Yucatan platform buried under a kilometer of carbonate rocks, was initially identified from its concentric semi-circular gravity and magnetic anomaly patterns. Yucatan peninsula has a low-relief topography and high contrasts in physical properties between carbonate rocks, impact lithologies and deformed target rocks. In contrast, most of the country has an abrupt topography with limited outcrops of Paleozoic and Precambrian terrains. The extensive igneous cover of the Sierra Madre Occidental, Trans-Mexican volcanic belt and Sierra Madre del Sur makes search for impact craters a difficult task. Early attempts were limited by the numerous volcanic craters and lack of high-resolution geophysical data. As part of a new country-wide search program, we have been conducting studies in northern Mexico using remote sensing and geophysical data to document circular and semi-circular crater-like features. The search has identified several structures, some well exposed and characterized by simple crater morphologies and topographic rims. These landforms have been mapped, estimating their dimensions, distribution and characterizing the surrounding terrains

  15. Eruptive activity of enigmatic medium-sized volcanoes in the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (MGVF), Central Mexico: The case of El Metate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrel, M.; Siebe, C.; Guilbaud, M. N.

    2014-12-01

    The MGVF has a total area of ca. 40,000 km2 and is well known for being the host of the only two monogenetic volcanoes in Mexico that were born in historical times: Jorullo (1759-1774) and Paricutin (1943-1952). Another particularity of the MGVF is its high number of eruptive vents with over 1000 small monogenetic cones and associated lava flows (average vol. of 0.021 km3) and ca. 400 medium-sized volcanoes (average vol. from 0.5 to 50 km3). Most of these medium-sized volcanoes may be characterized as shields that were produced dominantly by effusive activity as opposed to the small cones formed also by explosive phases of activity. The products of the small cones range from olivine basalts to andesites whereas the medium-sized volcanoes are restricted to a smaller compositional range in the andesitic domain. Although the medium-sized volcanoes are more sparsely distributed in time and space and less abundant than the small cones, the risks associated with renewal of this type of activity should not be neglected. This study focuses on El Metate which is probably the youngest shield of the MGVF (< 3,700 y. BP). Unlike a typical shield volcano composed of a succession of thin fluid basaltic flows, El Metate consists of well-preserved >60 m thick andesite flows distributed radially around a summit dome. Detailed mapping and sampling allowed us to reconstruct its eruptive activity and the time sequence of lava flow emplacement. We have identified 13 individual lava flows with lengths ranging between 3 and 15 km covering 103 km2 and average thicknesses between 60 and 150 m. Individual volumes range between 0.5 and 3.5 km3 for a total of 11 to 15 km3. Estimates of flow emplacement parameters indicate maximum average effusion rates ranging between 15 and 100 m3.s-1 and a cumulative duration from 15 to 30 years. Such a short emplacement time is comparable to the historical monogenetic eruption of nearby Paricutin volcano (9 years) but the erupted volume of lava is

  16. The Large-Scale Debris Avalanche From The Tancitaro Volcano (Mexico): Characterization And Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelli, S.; Gigli, G.; Falorni, G.; Garduno Monroy, V. H.; Arreygue, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Tancitaro is an andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano located in the Michoacán Guanajuato volcanic field within the west-central portion of the trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. The volcanism in this area is characterized by two composite volcanoes, the highest of which is the Tancitaro volcanic edifice (3840 m), some low angle lava cones and more than 1,000 monogenetic cinder cones. The distribution of the cinder cones is controlled by NE-SW active faults, although there are also additional faults with NNW-SSE trends along which some cones are aligned. The Tancitaro stratovolcano is located at the intersection of the tectonical structures that originate these alignments. All this geological activity has contributed to the gravitational instability of the volcano, leading to a huge sector collapse which produced the investigated debris avalanche. The collapse structure is an east-facing horseshoe-shaped crater (4 km wide and 5.3 km long), related with a large fan that was deposited within the Tepalcatepec depression. The deposit starts only 7 km downslope from the failure scar, it is 66 km long and covers an area of approximately 1155 km2. The landslide magnitude is about 20 km3 and it was firstly determined by the reconstruction of the paleo-edifice using a GIS software and then validated by the observation of significant outcrops. The fan was primarily formed by the deposit of this huge debris avalanche and subsequently by debris flow and fluvial deposits. Field investigations on the fan area highlighted the presence of two texturally distinct parts, which are referred to the 'block facies' and the 'matrix facies'. The first sedimentary structure is responsible for the typical hummock morphologies in the proximal area, as seen in many other debris avalanche deposits. Instead in the distal zones, the deposit is made up by the 'mixed block and matrix facies'. Blocks and megablocks, some of which are characterized by a jigsaw puzzle texture, gradually decrease in size

  17. Jorullo Volcano, Michoacan, Mexico: the earliest stages of fractionation in calc-alkaline magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Luhr, J.; Carmichael, I.S.E.

    1985-01-01

    Between 1759 and 1774, Jorullo Volcano and four associated cinder cones erupted approximately 2 km/sup 3/ of magma which evolved progressively with time from early ol-hy-normative primitive basalts (Mgnumber=73, 516 ppm Cr, 260 ppm Ni) to late-stage qtz-hy-normative basaltic andesites. All lavas contain <6 vol% phenocrysts of magnesian olivine (fO/sub 90-70/) with Cr-Al-Mg spinel inclusions, and microphenocrysts of plagioclase and augite. Smooth whole-rock major and trace element compositional trends through the suite can be largely modeled by simple crystal fractionation of olivine, augite, plagioclase, and minor spinel. In order for augite and plagioclase to have been near-liquidus phases, the modeled crystal fractionation event must have occurred at lower-crustal to upper-mantle pressures (8-15 Kb). The crystals actually present in the Jorullo lavas, however, formed at low pressures. Compared to modeled abundances, La, Ce, Rb, Sr, Ba, Hf, Th, and Ta are anomalously enriched in the late-stage basaltic andesites and Dy, Yb, and Lu are anomalously depleted. These discrepancies apparently indicate the importance of other magma-chamber processes. Most high-alumina basalts reported in the literature have 18 to 21 wt% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, but are too depleted in MgO, Cr, and Ni to be direct mantle products. These high-alumina basalts have probably undergone significant fractionation of olivine, augite, plagioclase, and spinel from primitive parental basalt similar to the early Jorullo magmas. For hydraulic reasons, such primitive basalts are rarely erupted in mature arcs, and may be completely absent from mature stratovolcanoes.

  18. Magma mixing, recharge and eruption histories recorded in plagioclase phenocrysts from El Chichon Volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tepley, F. J.; Davidson, J.P.; Tilling, R.I.; Arth, Joseph G.

    2000-01-01

    Consistent core-to-rim decreases of 87Sr/86Sr ratios and coincident increases in Sr concentrations in plagioclase phenocrysts of varying size (~ 1 cm to 2 mm) are reported from samples of the 1982 and pre-1982 (~ 200 ka) eruptions of El Chichon Volcano. Maximum 87Sr/86Sr ratios of ~ 0.7054, significantly higher than the whole-rock isotopic ratios (~ 0.7040-0.7045), are found in the cores of plagioclase phenocrysts, and minimum 87Sr/86Sr ratios of ~ 0.7039 are found near some of the rims. Plagioclase phenocrysts commonly display abrupt fluctuations in An content (up to 25 mol %) that correspond to well-developed dissolution surfaces The isotopic, textural and compositional characteristics suggest that these plagioclase phenocrysts grew in a system that was periodically recharged by higher-temperature magma with a lower 87Sr/86Sr ratio and a higher Sr concentration. Rim 87Sr/86Sr ratios in plagioclase phenocrysts of rocks from the 200 ka eruption indicate that, at that time, the magma had already attained the lowest recorded 87Sr/86Sr value of the system (~ 0.7039). In contrast, cores from plagioclase phenocrysts of the 1982 eruption, inferred to have grown in the past few thousand years, have the highest recorded 87Sr/86Sr ratios of the system. Collectively, the Sr isotopic data (for plagioclase and whole rock), disequilibrium textural features of the phenocrysts, known eruption frequencies, and inferred crystal-residence times of the plagioclases are best interpreted in terms of an intermittent magma chamber model. Similar processes, including crustal contamination, magma mixing, periodic recharge by addition of more mafic magma to induce plagioclase disequilibrium (possibly triggering eruption) and subsequent re-equilibration, apparently were operative throughout the 200 ky history of the El Chichon magma system.

  19. The 1982 eruptions of El Chichon volcano, Mexico (3): Physical properties of pyroclastic surges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S. N.; Fisher, R. V.

    1987-04-01

    Two major pyroclastic surges generated during the 4 April 1982 eruption of El Chichon devastated an area of 153 km2 with a quasi-radial distribution around the volcano. The hot surge clouds carbonized wood throughout their extent and were too hot to allow accretionary lapilli formation by vapor condensation. Field evidence indicates voidage fraction of 0.99 in the surge cloud with extensive entrainment of air. Thermal calculations indicate that heat content of pyroclasts can heat entrained air and maintain high temperatures in the surge cloud. The dominant bed form of the surge deposits are sand waves shaped in dune forms with vertical form index of 10 20, characterized by stoss-side erosion and lee-side deposition of 1 10 cm reversely graded laminae. A systematic decrease in maximum lithic diameter with distance from source is accompanied by decrease in wavelength and amplitude. Modal analysis indicates fractionation of glass and pumice from the surge cloud relative to crystals, resulting in loss of at least 10% 25% of the cloud mass due to winnowing out of fines during surge emplacement. Greatest fractionation from the -1.0 0.0-∅ grain sizes reflects relatively lower pumice particle density in this range and segregation in the formative stages of the surge cloud. Extensive pumice rounding indicates abrasion during bed-load transport. Flow of pyroclastic debris in the turbulent surge cloud was by combination of bed-load and suspended-load transport. The surges are viewed as expanding pyroclastic gravity flows, which entrain and mix with air during transport. The balance between sedimentation at the base of the surge cloud and expansion due to entrainment of air contributed to low cloud density and internal turbulence, which persisted to the distal edge of the surge zone.

  20. Immediate Identification of Volcanic Eruption Intensity: Promising Test of a New Monitoring System Based on Short-Term Electrostatic Field Variations at the Active Volcano Popocatepetl, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, P.

    2006-12-01

    Experiments by the Physikalisch Vulkanologisches Labor (PVL) in Wuerzburg, Germany, have shown that the intensity of violent volcanic eruptions, occurring when magma undergoes brittle fragmentation, is mirrored within brief electrical charges that can be detected on a short timescale (ms). Laboratory studies and certain explosion experiments offer the opportunity to calibrate the energy release of volcanic eruptions. Based on these results, a new high-precision, low-cost, real-time surveillance system is developed and tested at the active volcano of Popocatepetl, Mexico. This volcano, situated about 60 km southeast of Mexico City, offers excellent testing conditions, erupting regularly and intensively. The system, which detects short-term electrostatic field gradients (dc voltage against local ground), mainly consists of an antenna and a specially- designed amplifier. Depending on eruption intensity, as little as two or three eruptions will provide a sufficient amount of data. Amount, size, and shape of erupted particles give important indications about the physical fragmentation process which formed the pyroclasts, and hence about the type and intensity of the eruption. The evaluation and analysis of the samples collected at the volcano after each documented eruption will be carried out at the PVL. This physics lab, with a specially-designed experimental setup, allows controlled explosion experiments wherein rock from lava or bombs - related to the sampled pyroclasts - will be melted and subsequently brought to explosion. The energy released during these laboratory experiments will be calibrated to Popocatepetl using the ejecta volume of the observed eruptions, allowing a correlation of the actual energy release to the registered electrical field data. The aims of the project are: (1) quantification of individual magma properties of Popocatepetl (2) on-line measurement of mechanical energy release and mass flux and (3) immediate risk assessment of ongoing volcanic

  1. Calm Before the Storm? Immediate Identification of Volcanic Eruption Intensity: Promising Test of a New Monitoring System at the Active Volcano Popocatépetl, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, P.

    2007-12-01

    Experiments by the Physikalisch Vulkanologisches Labor (PVL) in Wuerzburg, Germany, have shown that the intensity of violent volcanic eruptions, occurring when magma undergoes brittle fragmentation, is mirrored within brief electrical charges that can be detected on a short timescale (ms). Laboratory studies and certain explosion experiments offer the opportunity to calibrate the energy release of volcanic eruptions. Based on these results, a new high-precision, low-cost, real-time surveillance system is developed and tested at the active volcano of Popocat´{e}petl, Mexico. This volcano, situated about 60 km southeast of Mexico City, offers excellent testing conditions, erupting regularly and intensively and violent eruptions are expected in the near future. The system, which detects short-term electrostatic field gradients (dc voltage against local ground), mainly consists of an antenna and a specially-designed amplifier. Depending on eruption intensity, as little as two or three eruptions will provide a sufficient amount of data. Amount, size, and shape of erupted particles give important indications about the physical fragmentation process which formed the pyroclasts, and hence about the type and intensity of the eruption. The evaluation and analysis of the samples collected at the volcano after each documented eruption will be carried out at the PVL. This physics lab, with a specially-designed experimental setup, allows controlled explosion experiments wherein rock from lava or bombs - related to the sampled pyroclasts - will be melted and subsequently brought to explosion. The energy released during these laboratory experiments will be calibrated to Popocat´{e}petl using the ejecta volume of the observed eruptions, allowing a correlation of the actual energy release to the registered electrical field data. The aims of the project are: (1) quantification of individual magma properties of Popocat´{e}petl (2) on-line measurement of mechanical energy release

  2. Smoothed particle hydrodynamic modeling of volcanic debris flows: Application to Huiloac Gorge lahars (Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Bouchra; Palacios, David; Pastor, Manuel; Zamorano, José Juan

    2016-09-01

    Lahars are among the most catastrophic volcanic processes, and the ability to model them is central to mitigating their effects. Several lahars recently generated by the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) moved downstream through the Huiloac Gorge towards the village of Santiago Xalitzintla. The most dangerous was the 2001 lahar, in which the destructive power of the debris flow was maintained throughout the extent of the flow. Identifying the zone of hazard can be based either on numerical or empirical models, but a calibration and validation process is required to ensure hazard map quality. The Geoflow-SPH depth integrated numerical model used in this study to reproduce the 2001 lahar was derived from the velocity-pressure version of the Biot-Zienkiewicz model, and was discretized using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The results of the calibrated SPH model were validated by comparing the simulated deposit depth with the field depth measured at 16 cross sections distributed strategically along the gorge channel. Moreover, the dependency of the results on topographic mesh resolution, initial lahar mass shape and dimensions is also investigated. The results indicate that to accurately reproduce the 2001 lahar flow dynamics the channel topography needed to be discretized using a mesh having a minimum 5 m resolution, and an initial lahar mass shape that adopted the source area morphology. Field validation of the calibrated model showed that there was a satisfactory relationship between the simulated and field depths, the error being less than 20% for 11 of the 16 cross sections. This study demonstrates that the Geoflow-SPH model was able to accurately reproduce the lahar path and the extent of the flow, but also reproduced other parameters including flow velocity and deposit depth.

  3. Long-range hazard assessment of volcanic ash dispersal for a Plinian eruptive scenario at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico): implications for civil aviation safety

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonasia, Rosanna; Scaini, Chirara; Capra, Lucia; Nathenson, Manuel; Siebe, Claus; Arana-Salinas, Lilia; Folch, Arnau

    2013-01-01

    Popocatépetl is one of Mexico’s most active volcanoes threatening a densely populated area that includes Mexico City with more than 20 million inhabitants. The destructive potential of this volcano is demonstrated by its Late Pleistocene–Holocene eruptive activity, which has been characterized by recurrent Plinian eruptions of large magnitude, the last two of which destroyed human settlements in pre-Hispanic times. Popocatépetl’s reawakening in 1994 produced a crisis that culminated with the evacuation of two villages on the northeastern flank of the volcano. Shortly after, a monitoring system and a civil protection contingency plan based on a hazard zone map were implemented. The current volcanic hazards map considers the potential occurrence of different volcanic phenomena, including pyroclastic density currents and lahars. However, no quantitative assessment of the tephra hazard, especially related to atmospheric dispersal, has been performed. The presence of airborne volcanic ash at low and jet-cruise atmospheric levels compromises the safety of aircraft operations and forces re-routing of aircraft to prevent encounters with volcanic ash clouds. Given the high number of important airports in the surroundings of Popocatépetl volcano and considering the potential threat posed to civil aviation in Mexico and adjacent regions in case of a Plinian eruption, a hazard assessment for tephra dispersal is required. In this work, we present the first probabilistic tephra dispersal hazard assessment for Popocatépetl volcano. We compute probabilistic hazard maps for critical thresholds of airborne ash concentrations at different flight levels, corresponding to the situation defined in Europe during 2010, and still under discussion. Tephra dispersal mode is performed using the FALL3D numerical model. Probabilistic hazard maps are built for a Plinian eruptive scenario defined on the basis of geological field data for the “Ochre Pumice” Plinian eruption (4965 14C

  4. Glacier melting during lava dome growth at Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico): Evidences of a major threat before main eruptive phases at ice-caped volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, L.; Roverato, M.; Groppelli, G.; Caballero, L.; Sulpizio, R.; Norini, G.

    2015-03-01

    Nevado de Toluca volcano is one of the largest stratovolcanoes in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. During Late Pleistocene its activity was characterized by large dome growth and subsequent collapse emplacing large block and ash flow deposits, intercalated by Plinian eruptions. Morphological and paleoclimate studies at Nevado de Toluca and the surrounding area evidenced that the volcano was affected by extensive glaciation during Late Pleistocene and Holocene. During the older recognized glacial period (27-60 ka, MIS 3), the glacier was disturbed by the intense magmatic and hydrothermal activity related to two dome extrusion episodes (at 37 ka and 28 ka). Glacier reconstruction indicates maximum ice thickness of 90 m along main valleys, as at the Cano ravines, the major glacial valley on the northern slope of the volcano. Along this ravine, both 37 and 28 ka block-and-ash deposits are exposed, and they directly overlay a fluviatile sequence, up to 40 m-thick, which 14C ages clearly indicate that their emplacement occurred just before the dome collapsed. These evidences point to a clear interaction between the growing dome and its hydrothermal system with the glacier. During dome growth, a large amount of melting water was released along major glacial valleys forming thick fluvioglacial sequences that were subsequently covered by the block-and-ash flow deposits generated by the collapse of the growing dome. Even though this scenario is no longer possible at the Nevado de Toluca volcano, the data presented here indicate that special attention should be paid to the possible inundation areas from fluviatile/lahar activity prior to the main magmatic eruption at ice-capped volcanoes.

  5. Late Holocene stratigraphy of the Tetimpa archaeological sites, northeast flank of Popocatepetl volcano, central Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panfil, M.S.; Gardner, T.W.; Hirth, K.G.

    1999-01-01

    Late Holocene (240 km2 on the east side of the volcano with >25 cm of tephra. Lavas from eruptive sequence I dammed drainage in the lowland area near the town of San Nicolas and caused local upstream deposition of as much as 30 m of lacustrine silts, clays, and sands. These lacustrine deposits record an eruptive hiatus for the Tetimpa area of about 750 14C yr: between ca. 2100 and ca. 1350 yr B.P., no major tephras were deposited in the Tetimpa area. In upland areas, this time period is represented by an unconformity and by Entisols formed in the top of pumice deposits and lavas from eruptive sequence I. Artifacts, agricultural furrows, and dwellings record human reoccupation of this surface. At the end of this hiatus, several lahars were deposited above the lacustrine sequence and locally above the Entisol in upland positions adjacent to streams. Between ca. 1350 and ca. 1200 yr B.P., tephras from eruptive sequence II buried these paleosols, occupation sites, lacustrine sediments, and lahars. Andesitic (~62% SiO2) pumice lapilli deposits in the Tetimpa area record three pumice-fall eruptions directed northeast and east of the crater. The first and smallest of these (maximum Tetimpa area thickness = 12 cm; >52 km2 covered by >25 cm) took place at ca. 1350 yr B.P. and was accompanied by pyroclastic surge events preserved in the Tetimpa area by charcoal, sand waves, and cross-stratified sand-sized tephra. At ca. 1200 yr B.P., the products of two Plinian-style events and additional pyroclastic surges reached the Tetimpa area. The largest of these tephra-fall events covered the Tetimpa area with 0.5-1 m of tephra and blanketed an area of >230 km2 with a thickness of >25 cm. The Tetimpa record confirms two of the four periods of explosive volcanism recognized by studies conducted around Popocatepetl in the past 30 yr. Eruptive sequence I corresponds to the explosive period between 2100 and 2500 yr B.P., and eruptive sequence II corresponds to the period between 900 and

  6. Plio-pleistocene volcano-tectonic evolution of la Reforma Caldera, Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demant, Alain; Ortlieb, Luc

    1981-01-01

    La Reforma volcanic complex, in east-central Baja California, shows a characteristic caldera structure, 10 km in diameter. The first eruptive stage, during the Pliocene, was manifested by ash and pumice falls and by subaqueous pumitic flows. In a second stage basic flows were deposited in a near-shore environment (subaerial and pillow lavas). During the early Pleistocene a large ignimbritic eruption, producing mainly pantelleritic tuffs, immediately predated the formation of the caldera itself. Afterwards, along marginal fractures of the caldera, some rhyolitic domes and flows partially covered the thick ignimbritic sheet. A block of Miocene substratum, in the center of the caldera, has been uplifted, nearly 1 km, by "resurgent doming". Small outcrops of diorite might constitute the top of coarse-grained crystallized magmatic bodies, and thus support the "resurgent doming" interpretation. A few basaltic cones were finally built on the flanks of the caldera complex; the latter are not related to the caldera history but to the extension tectonics of the Gulf of California which are also responsible for the Tortuga Island and the Holocene Tres Virgenes tholeiitic cones. South of la Reforma are found the highest (+300 m) Pleistocene marine deposits of the Gulf coast of Baja California. The uplift of this area is due in part to the positive epeirogenic movements of the whole peninsular crustal block, and also to the late doming of the caldera. On the coastal (eastern) flank of La Reforma complex up to seven stepped wave-cut terraces have been preserved, the highest reaching more than +150 m and the lowest ones +25 m. Lateral correlations of the marine terraces along the whole Gulf of California suggest that this volcano-tectonic uplift, that is still active, is of the order of 240 mm/10 3 y. The set of terraces is interpreted to be Middle (700-125 × 10 3y) to Upper (125-80 × 10 3y) Pleistocene, and is tentatively correlated with the paleoclimatic chronology of deep

  7. Comments on cladocerans of crater lakes of the Nevado de Toluca Volcano (Central Mexico), with the description of a new species, Alona manueli sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Sinev, Artem Y; Zawisza, Edyta

    2013-01-01

    Cladoceran communities of two lakes of Nevado de Toluca Volcano, Central Mexico, were studied. A new species of Aloninae, Alona manueli sp. nov., is described. It was previously confused with Palearctic Alona intermedia Sars, 1862, but clearly differs from it in the morphology of postabdomen, head shield and head pores, and thoracic limbs. Position of Alona manueli sp. nov. within the genus is unclear, it did not belong to any species-group within Alona s. lato. Other species recorded in the studied lakes are Alona ossiani Sinev, 1998, Alonella pulchella Herrick, 1884, Chydorus belonging to sphaericus-group, Eurycercus longirostris Hann, 1982 and Pleuroxus cf. denticulatus Birge, 1879.

  8. Crater lake and post-eruption hydrothermal activity, El Chichón Volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casadevall, Thomas J.; de la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Rose, William I.; Bagley, Susan; Finnegan, David L.; Zoller, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Explosive eruptions of Volcán El Chichón in Chiapas, Mexico on March 28 and April 3–4, 1982 removed 0.2 km3 of rock to form a 1-km-wide 300-m-deep summit crater. By late April 1982 a lake had begun to form on the crater floor, and by November 1982 it attained a maximum surface area of 1.4 × 105 m2 and a volume of 5 × 106 m3. Accumulation of 4–5 m of rainfall between July and October 1982 largely formed the lake. In January 1983, temperatures of fumaroles on the crater floor and lower crater walls ranged from 98 to 115°C; by October 1983 the maximum temperature of fumarole emissions was 99°C. In January 1983 fumarole gas emissions were greater than 99 vol. % H2O with traces of CO2, SO2, and H2S. The water of the lake was a hot (T = 52–58°C), acidic (pH = 0.5), dilute solution (34,046 mg L−1 dissolved solids; Cl/S = 20.5). Sediment from the lake contains the same silicate minerals as the rocks of the 1982 pyroclastic deposits, together with less than 1% of elemental sulfur. The composition and temperature of the lake water is attributed to: (1) solution of fumarole emissions; (2) reaction of lake water with hot rocks beneath the lake level; (3) sediments washed into the lake from the crater walls; (4) hydrothermal fluids leaching sediments and formational waters in sedimentary rocks of the basement; (5) evaporation; and (6) precipitation.

  9. Petroleum degradation and associated microbial signatures at the Chapopote asphalt volcano, Southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubotz, Florence; Lipp, Julius S.; Elvert, Marcus; Kasten, Sabine; Mollar, Xavier Prieto; Zabel, Matthias; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    At the Chapopote Knoll in the Southern Gulf of Mexico, deposits of asphalt provide the substrate for a prolific cold seep ecosystem extensively colonized by chemosynthetic communities. This study investigates microbial life and associated biological processes within the asphalts and surrounding oil-impregnated sediments by analysis of intact polar membrane lipids (IPLs), petroleum hydrocarbons and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ 13C) of hydrocarbon gases. Asphalt samples are lightly to heavily biodegraded suggesting that petroleum-derived hydrocarbons serve as substrates for the chemosynthetic communities. Accordingly, detection of bacterial diester and diether phospholipids in asphalt samples containing finely dispersed gas hydrate suggests the presence of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. Biological methanogenesis contributes a substantial fraction to the methane captured as hydrate in the shallow asphalt deposits evidenced by significant depletion in 13C relative to background thermogenic methane. In sediments, petroleum migrating from the subsurface stimulates both methanogenesis and methanotrophy at a sulfate-methane transition zone 6-7 m below the seafloor. In this zone, microbial IPLs are dominated by archaeal phosphohydroxyarchaeols and archaeal diglycosidic diethers and tetraethers. Bacterial IPLs dominate surface sediments that are impregnated by severely biodegraded oil. In the sulfate-reduction zone, diagnostic IPLs indicate that sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) play an important role in petroleum degradation. A diverse mixture of phosphohydroxyarchaeols and mixed phospho- and diglycosidic archaeal tetraethers in shallow oil-impregnated sediments point to the presence of anaerobic methane-oxidizing ANME-2 and ANME-1 archaea, respectively, or methanogens. Archaeal IPLs increase in relative abundance with increasing sediment depth and decreasing sulfate concentrations, accompanied by a shift of archaeol-based to tetraether-based archaeal IPLs. The

  10. Renewed Volcano-Stratigraphc Studies of Calderas with Geothermal Potential in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias, J. L.; Arce, J. L.; García-Tenorio, F.; Layer, P. W.; Saucedo, R.; Castro, R.; Garduño, V. H.; Jimenez, A.; Pérez, H.; Valdez, G.; Meriggi, L.

    2014-12-01

    During the past six years we have carried out volcanologic fieldwork either in active geothermal fields in Mexico (Los Azufres, Tres Vírgenes, and Cerro Prieto) or in potential sites in which some geothermal exploration studied had been done by the National Power Company (CFE). These studies have been very successful in reassessing the location of the geothermal reservoirs within the volcanic successions through detailed mapping of the volcanic units using high resolution topography and satellite imagery to produce 3-D imagery in conjunction with field work to produce preliminary geologic maps. Detailed stratigraphy of volcanic units, assisted with 40Ar/39Ar and radiocarbon geochronology have redefined the evolution of some of these complexes. For example, our studies at Los Azufres geothermal field located in the State of Michoacán indicate that the volcanic complex of the same name sits upon a structural high transected by E-W faults related to the youngest structures of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. The volcanic complex has been emplaced during the past ~1.5 Ma. During this time, magmas evolved from basaltic to rhyolitic in composition with the emplacement of circa 100 vents. Several landforms have undergone intense hydrothermal alteration and, in some cases, generated debris avalanches. The revised stratigraphy based on drill holes and new dates of cores suggested that the geothermal reservoir is hosted in Miocene rocks bracketed between the Miocene Sierra de Mil Cumbres volcanics (17-22 Ma) and the products of the volcanic field itself. Similar studies will be carried out at four other Pleistocene calderas (Acoculco, La Primavera, Aguajito and Reforma) attempting to refine their volcanic stratigraphy, evolution, and the location of the geothermal system, and those results will help in the design of exploration strategies for geothermal sources.

  11. Recent Eruptive History of La Malinche Volcano, Mexico: Towards the Construction of a Hazards Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Govea, R.; Siebe, C.; Abrams, M.

    2001-12-01

    La Malinche (4,461 m asl) is a potentially active andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano situated 25 km to the NE of Puebla, Mexico (1.3 million inhabitants). The oldest rocks in the area are Cretaceous limestones that crop out to the S and SE of La Malinche. To the W and N Tertiary lacustrine sediments are covered by younger sedimentary and pyroclastic material. The northern lacustrine sediments are overlain by andesitic rocks that form a chain of lava domes along a general E-W trend. La Malinche's eruptive history has been predominantly explosive during the last 45,000 y. Episodes of dome growth at the summit culminate with the emplacement of pyroclastic flows from dome colapse, and associated lahars. Four important pumice fall events are registered in the stratigraphy: The two oldest are more than 39,000 y. B.P., the next was dated at 21,500 y. B.P. and the youngest has an age that ranges beetwen 12,000 and 9,000 y. B.P. All of these events also produced pyroclastic flows. The oldest pyroclastic flow deposits dated are >39,000 y. B.P., and the youngest are 9,000 and 7,500 years old. Two minor partial edifice colapse events were dated at 29,500 y. B.P. and less than 23,700 y. B.P. The most recent eruption from La Malinche produced an ash-fall layer and ash-flow deposits dated at 3,100 y. B.P. In the documented stratigraphy, block-and-ash flows and pumice-and-ash flows have had maximum runouts in the range of 7-15 km. The two debris avalanche events had maximum runouts of 14 and 17 km. Lahar deposits can be observed more than 20 km from the summit. Because the area around La Malinche is densely populated, we are concerned with the lack of an adequate hazards map. In addition to stratigraphic results we plan to employ computer tools that will simulate runout distances and travel times of potential future flow events to produce a hazards map.

  12. Morphological analysis of Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico): new insights into the structure and evolution of an andesitic to dacitic stratovolcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norini, Gianluca; Groppelli, Gianluca; Capra, Lucia; De Beni, Emanuela

    2004-09-01

    We present a morphological analysis of Nevado de Toluca volcano located 80 km WSW of Mexico City based on digital elevation model study, where slope and aspect maps have been generated and analysed. Aerial photograph and satellite image observations improve the morphological analysis. The synoptic view which is offered by this analysis allowed for recognition and localization of the main volcanic and tectonic features of the area. On the basis of digital elevation model value distribution and surface textures, five morphological domains were defined. The most interesting domain, south of the crater, reflects the occurrence of an ancient complex volcano distinct from the adjacent areas. Interaction between the volcanic and volcano-tectonic evolution and the basement produced the other domains. Single volcanic edifices, like lava domes and scoria cones, and eruptive fractures were recognized. Finally, flank collapse scarps opened to the east and to the north were identified and four relevant morphostructural lineaments and their possible role in the Nevado de Toluca geological and structural evolution are discussed.

  13. Assessing landslide susceptibility, hazards and sediment yield in the Río El Estado watershed, Pico de Orizaba volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legorreta Paulin, G.; Bursik, M. I.; Lugo Hubp, J.; Aceves Quesada, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    This work provides an overview of the on-going research project (Grant SEP-CONACYT # 167495) from the Institute of Geography at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) that seeks to conduct a multi-temporal landslide inventory, analyze the distribution of landslides, and characterize landforms that are prone to slope instability by using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The study area is the Río El Estado watershed that covers 5.2 km2 and lies on the southwestern flank of Pico de Orizaba volcano.The watershed was studied by using aerial photographs, fieldwork, and adaptation of the Landslide Hazard Zonation Protocol of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, USA. 107 gravitational slope failures of six types were recognized: shallow landslides, debris-avalanches, deep-seated landslides, debris flows, earthflows, and rock falls. This analysis divided the watershed into 12 mass-wasting landforms on which gravitational processes occur: inner gorges, headwalls, active scarps of deep-seated landslides, meanders, plains, rockfalls, non-rule-identified inner gorges, non-rule-identified headwalls, non-rule-identified converging hillslopes and three types of hillslopes classified by their gradient: low, moderate, and high. For each landform the landslide area rate and the landslide frequency rate were calculated as well as the overall hazard rating. The slope-stability hazard rating has a range that goes from low to very high. The overall hazard rating for this watershed was very high. The shallow slide type landslide was selected and area and volume of individual landslides were retrieved from the watershed landslide inventory geo-database, to establish an empirical relationship between area and volume that takes the form of a power law. The relationship was used to estimate the total volume of landslides in the study area. The findings are important to understand the long-term evolution of the southwestern flank stream system of Pico de

  14. Petrogenesis and metal budget of Pelagatos volcano in the Chichinautzin monogenetic field, Mexico: A Melt Inclusion Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, J.; Mercer, C. N.; Kent, A. J.; Guilbaud, M.

    2013-12-01

    Melt inclusions are now widely used to quantify pre-eruptive volatile contents and to track the compositional evolution of magma. In recent years, the use of melt inclusions has also increased markedly for research in economic geology. Melt inclusions are becoming a powerful tool to track metal contents in ore-forming magmatic reservoirs and metals like Ag, Cu, Li, Mo, Sn, Pb, W, Zn are now commonly included in trace element analyses. Investigating metal reservoirs in currently active volcanic systems provides insight into the conditions that favor mineralization in ore-forming deposits compared to barren systems. In this work, we present volatiles (H2O, CO2, S, Cl) and major and trace element contents of olivine-hosted melt inclusion from 4 samples spanning the entire eruption of Pelagatos scoria cone. Pelagatos is a small and young (less than 14 000 years B.P.) monogenetic volcano within the Sierra Chichinautzin volcanic field located in the central portion of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt (south-east of Mexico City). The melt inclusions are basaltic andesite to andesite in composition, with 1.84 - 6.02 wt% MgO, 51.95 - 59.21 wt% SiO2 and 0.64 - 1.55 wt% K2O. The H2O varies from 0.5 to 4.3 wt% whereas CO2 varies from below detection up to 976 ppm. Sulfur contents vary from 35 to 1451 ppm, showing a decrease with increasing MgO content suggesting that S is being lost with progressive differentiation, but since S concentrations do not correlate with any other gas phase (H2O, CO2, Cl) we hypothesize that it partitioned into an immiscible fluid or mineral phase. On the other hand, Cl contents are broadly constant (900 to 1267 ppm), and shows no correlation with MgO or K2O. All analyzed metals (Ag, Cu, Li, Mo, Sn, Pb, W, Zn ) behave incompatibly showing a positive correlation with La. Cu (18 to 82 ppm), Pb (2 to 8 ppm) Zn (30 to 107 ppm) and Mo correlate positively together indicating that fractional crystallization concentrates these elements. These results provide

  15. Scientific and public responses to the ongoing volcanic crisis at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico: Importance of an effective hazards-warning system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Tilling, Robert I.

    2008-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions and other potentially hazardous natural phenomena occur independently of any human actions. However, such phenomena can cause disasters when a society fails to foresee the hazardous manifestations and adopt adequate measures to reduce its vulnerability. One of the causes of such a failure is the lack of a consistent perception of the changing hazards posed by an ongoing eruption, i.e., with members of the scientific community, the Civil Protection authorities and the general public having diverging notions about what is occurring and what may happen. The problem of attaining a perception of risk as uniform as possible in a population measured in millions during an evolving eruption requires searching for communication tools that can describe—as simply as possible—the relations between the level of threat posed by the volcano, and the level of response of the authorities and the public. The hazards-warning system adopted at Popocatépetl Volcano, called the Volcanic Traffic Light Alert System(VTLAS), is a basic communications protocol that translates volcano threat into seven levels of preparedness for the emergency-management authorities, but only three levels of alert for the public (color coded green–yellow–red). The changing status of the volcano threat is represented as the most likely scenarios according to the opinions of an official scientific committee analyzing all available data. The implementation of the VTLAS was intended to reduce the possibility of ambiguous interpretations of intermediate levels by the endangered population. Although the VTLAS is imperfect and has not solved all problems involved in mass communication and decision-making during a volcanic crisis, it marks a significant advance in the management of volcanic crises in Mexico.

  16. Stratigraphic reconstruction of the 13 ka BP debris avalanche deposit at Colima volcano (Mexico): effect of climatic conditions on the flow mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roverato, M.; Capra, L.

    2010-12-01

    Colima volcano is an andesitic stratovolcano located in the western part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB) and at the southern end of the N-S trending Colima graben, about 70 km from the Pacific Ocean coast. It is probably the most active Mexican volcano in historic time and one of the most active of North America. Colima volcano yielded numerous partial edifice collapses with emplacement of debris avalanche deposits (DADs) of contrasting volume, morphology, texture and origin. This work has the aim to provide the evidences of how the climatic condition during the 13 ka flank collapse of the Colima volcano affected the textural characteristic and the mobility of the debris avalanche and debris flow originated from this event that occurred just after the Last Glacial Maximum in Mexico (18.4-14.5 ka 14C BP with snow line at 3600 m a.s.l. up to 13 ka BP). The 13,000 yrs old debris avalanche deposit, here named Tonila (TDAD) presents the typical debris avalanche textural characteristics (angular to sub-angular clasts, coarse matrix, jigsaw fit) but at approximately 13 km from the source, the deposit transforms to an hybrid phase with debris avalanche fragments imbedded in a finer, homogenous and indurated matrix more similar to a debris flow deposit. The debris avalanche deposit is directly overly by debris flows, often more than 10 m thick that contains large amount of logs from pine tree, mostly accumulated toward the base and imbricated down flow. Fluvial deposits also occur throughout all successions, representing periods of stream and river reworking highly localized and re-establishment. All these evidences point to the presence of water in the mass previous to the failure. The event here described represent an anomalous event between the previously described deposit associated to volcanic complex, and evidence as climatic condition can alter and modifies the depositional sequences incrementing the hazard.

  17. Scientific and public responses to the ongoing volcanic crisis at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico: Importance of an effective hazards-warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Tilling, Robert I.

    2008-02-01

    Volcanic eruptions and other potentially hazardous natural phenomena occur independently of any human actions. However, such phenomena can cause disasters when a society fails to foresee the hazardous manifestations and adopt adequate measures to reduce its vulnerability. One of the causes of such a failure is the lack of a consistent perception of the changing hazards posed by an ongoing eruption, i.e., with members of the scientific community, the Civil Protection authorities and the general public having diverging notions about what is occurring and what may happen. The problem of attaining a perception of risk as uniform as possible in a population measured in millions during an evolving eruption requires searching for communication tools that can describe—as simply as possible—the relations between the level of threat posed by the volcano, and the level of response of the authorities and the public. The hazards-warning system adopted at Popocatépetl Volcano, called the Volcanic Traffic Light Alert System (VTLAS), is a basic communications protocol that translates volcano threat into seven levels of preparedness for the emergency-management authorities, but only three levels of alert for the public (color coded green-yellow-red). The changing status of the volcano threat is represented as the most likely scenarios according to the opinions of an official scientific committee analyzing all available data. The implementation of the VTLAS was intended to reduce the possibility of ambiguous interpretations of intermediate levels by the endangered population. Although the VTLAS is imperfect and has not solved all problems involved in mass communication and decision-making during a volcanic crisis, it marks a significant advance in the management of volcanic crises in Mexico.

  18. The three-dimensional structure beneath the Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) based on local earthquake seismic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, P. Y.; Koulakov, I. Yu

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a new seismic velocity model (P- and S-wave velocities and Vp/Vs ratio) beneath the Popocatépetl volcano to a depth of ~ 4 km below sea level (bsl). This model is based on the tomographic inversion of P- and S-wave arrival time data from earthquakes in the region of the volcano. These data were recorded by the 15 stations of a temporary seismic network that was deployed on the volcano in 1999 and 2000. The recording period was during a relatively quiet period between two strong eruptions, which occurred before and after the experiment. This period is characterized by low levels of volcano-related seismicity. Most of the recorded events occurred across an area much larger than the network. In this study, we conducted several synthetic tests, which validate the use of the out-of-network events to improve the resolution of the tomographic inversion beneath the stations. In the resulting model, we see that the main volcanic edifice is associated with high velocities that have a mushroom shape and that these high velocities are most prominent in the P-wave model. This feature may indicate the presence of overpressured solidified igneous rocks, which comprise the edifice of Popocatépetl. Below the summit of the volcano, we observe a prominent high Vp/Vs anomaly, which reaches a value of 1.9. This anomaly probably indicates the existence of cracks and pores filled with melts and fluids, and it may represent a fracture zone that serves as a conduit feeding the volcano. This model characterizes the interior structure of the Popocatépetl volcano prior to the strong September 2000 eruption, which occurred a few months after the termination of the experiment.

  19. Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semaan, Leslie

    The text explores Mexico's history, geography, art, religion, and lifestyles in the context of its complex economy. The text focuses on Mexico's economy and reasons for its current situation. Part I of this teaching unit includes: Teacher Overview, Why Study Mexico, Mexico Fact Sheet, Map of Mexico, the Land and Climate, History, Government,…

  20. The anatomy of a cinder cone: preliminary paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, structural, and petrologic data from the La Cienega volcano, Cerros del Rio volcanic field, northern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronis, M. S.; Foucher, M.; Lineline, J.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Cerros del Rio volcanic field is one of several middle Pliocene to Pleistocene basaltic volcanic fields of the axial Rio Grande Rift in central and northern New Mexico. It is a monogenetic volcanic field that comprises about 60 cinder-spatter cones, occupies ~ 700 km2, and ranges in age from 2.7 Ma to 1.1 Ma. Eruptive centers are typically central vent volcanoes, ranging from low-relief shields to steep-sided, breached cinder and spatter cone remnants. They represent short eruptive events that likely were derived from rapidly evolving reservoir-conduit systems. Mining activity has exposed the volcanic plumbing system of the Cienega Mine cinder cone, just west of Santa Fe, NM. Here, geologists from France and USA have been investigating the exposed roots of this eviscerated Pliocene volcano to investigate magma conduit geometry, magma flow structures, and eruption patterns. We are testing models for magma transport and volcano construction using a variety of field and laboratory tools. Common models of volcanic construction envision the magma feeder as a dike or pipe-like conduit transporting molten rock from a deep reservoir to the eruptive vent. We posit that small volcanic pluming systems are inherently more complex and actually involve numerous feeder geometries throughout the volcano lifespan. Our preliminary work suggests that the simple exteriors of some cinder cones hide a long life and complex history, both of which would change the appreciation of the related volcanic hazards in active systems. The Cienega Mine cinder cone consists of several meter- to decimeter-wide intrusions that connect to eruptive centers. These intrusions show a continuity of brittle to ductile structures from their margins to interiors. We have collected samples across each intrusion as well as along strike for anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and petrographic analysis in order to establish magma flow patterns. AMS results yield a remarkably consistent dataset that

  1. Scaling laws of the size-distribution of monogenetic volcanoes within the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-López, R.; Legrand, D.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; Rodríguez-Pascua, M. A.; Giner-Robles, J. L.

    2011-04-01

    The Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field displays about 1040 monogenetic volcanoes mainly composed of basaltic cinder cones. This monogenetic volcanic field is the consequence of a dextral transtensive tectonic regime within the Transmexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB), the largest intra continental volcanic arc around the world, related to the subduction of the Rivera and Cocos plates underneath the North American Plate. We performed a statistical analysis for the size-distribution of the basal diameter (Wco) for cinder cones. Dataset used here was compiled by Hasenaka and Carmichael (1985). Monogenetic volcanoes obey a power-law very similar to the Gutenberg-Richter law for earthquakes, with respect to their size-distribution: log 10 ( N >= Wco ) = α - β log10( Wco), with β = 5.01 and α = 2.98. Therefore, the monogenetic volcanoes exhibit a (Wco) size-distribution empirical power-law, suggesting a self-organized criticality phenomenon.

  2. Metal enrichment of soils following the April 2012-2013 eruptive activity of the Popocatépetl volcano, Puebla, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Espinosa, P F; Jonathan, M P; Morales-García, S S; Villegas, Lorena Elizabeth Campos; Martínez-Tavera, E; Muñoz-Sevilla, N P; Cardona, Miguel Alvarado

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed the total (Zn, Pb, Ni, Hg, Cr, Cd, Cu, As) and partially leachable metals (PLMs) in 25 ash and soil samples from recent (2012-2013) eruptions of the Popocatépetl Volcano in Central Mexico. More recent ash and soil samples from volcanic activity in 2012-2013 had higher metal concentrations than older samples from eruptions in 1997 suggesting that the naturally highly volatile and mobile metals leach into nearby fresh water sources. The higher proportions of As (74.72%), Zn (44.64%), Cu (42.50%), and Hg (32.86%) reflect not only their considerable mobility but also the fact that they are dissolved and accumulated quickly following an eruption. Comparison of our concentration patterns with sediment quality guidelines indicates that the Cu, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, and Pb concentrations are higher than permissible limits; this situation must be monitored closely as these concentrations may reach lethal levels in the future.

  3. Degassing of volatiles (H 2O, CO 2, S, Cl) during ascent, crystallization, and eruption at mafic monogenetic volcanoes in central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Emily R.; Wallace, Paul J.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Delgado Granados, Hugo

    2010-11-01

    Mafic monogenetic volcanoes (cinder cones, maars) have eruption styles that include highly explosive, mildly explosive, and effusive regimes. Here we investigate the degassing and vapor-melt partitioning of volatiles (H 2O, CO 2, S, Cl) in monogenetic volcanoes from the subduction-related Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (MGVF) in central Mexico. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions from these volcanoes contain variably degassed melts that were trapped over a wide range of pressures from < 50 MPa to ˜ 300 MPa. Variations in melt compositions and volatile contents provide evidence that crystallization and differentiation were driven by degassing of H 2O. Melt CO 2 and H 2O concentrations are highly variable, and much of the variation does not conform to equilibrium open- or closed-system degassing paths. Instead, we suggest that gas-fluxing - partial re-equilibration of magmas with CO 2-rich gases rising from depth - can explain the variable CO 2 and H 2O concentrations in the melts. Such fluxing may be common in basaltic systems, and it increases the extent of crystallization during magma ascent by removing dissolved H 2O from vapor-saturated (but H 2O-undersaturated) melts. Strong degassing of S and Cl during magma ascent and crystallization begins at pressures of approximately 50 MPa. Using the relationship between degassing and crystallization, we calculate apparent vapor-melt partition coefficients for S and Cl. Our results show that, overall, S partitions more strongly into the vapor phase than Cl, consistent with published experimental data and thermodynamic models, and that vapor-melt partitioning of S increases more strongly with decreasing pressure than Cl. The S and Cl partitioning behavior inferred from the melt inclusion data are consistent with the gas fluxing model suggested by the H 2O and CO 2 data.

  4. The Upper Toluca Pumice (10.5 kyr): Product of the last major Plinian eruption of Nevado de Toluca volcano, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, J. L.; Macias, J. L.

    2001-12-01

    The last Plinian eruption at Nevado de Toluca volcano occurred 10.5 kyr ago producing the Upper Toluca Pumice (UTP). The UTP consists of four widespread fallout layers, interbedded with pyroclastic flow and surge deposits. The UTP event occurred under open vent conditions starting with hydromagmatic explosions that emplaced a hot pyroclastic flow (F0) on the east and northern flanks of the volcano. This explosion decompressed the magmatic system allowing almost immediately the formation of a 21 km high Plinian column that was dispersed by predominant winds 5o to the NE (PC0), which waned after some time. The eruption recommenced with the establishment of three Plinian columns that were dispersed in a NE-E direction, reaching heights of 39, 42, and 28 km, and deposited fall layers (PC1, PC2, and PC3) respectively. These Plinian columns were interrupted several times by phreatomagmatic and collapse events that emplaced pyroclastic flows (F1, F2, and F3) and surges (S1, and S2), mainly on the eastern and northern flanks of the volcano. The juvenile components of the UTP sequence are white, gray and banded pumice and gray juvenile lithic clasts both of dacitic composition (63-66wt% SiO2), and minor accidental lithics. The fallout deposits (PC1 and PC2) covered a minimum area of 2000 km2 with a total volume of 14 km3 (ca. 6 km3 D.R.E.); a mass eruption rate ranging from 3\\times107 to 5\\times108 kg/s and a total mass of 1.2\\times1013 kg. The UTP emplaced 1.5 m of gravel-sized pumice in the modern City of Toluca region and ca. 20 cm of fine sand in the Mexico City region. A future event of this magnitude might represent a major catastrophe to the 30 million people living in these cities and their surroundings.

  5. A voluminous avalanche-induced lahar from Citlaltépetl volcano, Mexico: Implications for hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo; Vallance, James W.; Rose, William I.

    1993-12-01

    During the late Pleistocene the ancestral edifice of Citlaltépetl volcano (also known as Pico de Orizaba) collapsed to form a clay-rich deposit that extends 85 km from its source, has a volume of 1.8 km 3, and covers an area of 143 km 2 east of the volcano. The deposit has clay content ranging from 10 to 16% and contains secondary alteration minerals such as smectite and kaolinite. The deposit's features suggest that it had an origin as a sector collapse of hydrothermally altered rock that transformed from a debris avalanche to a cohesive lahar very close to its source. The presence of glacier ice and a hydrothermal system during late Pleistocene times apparently provided a source of pore water which enhanced the hydrothermal alteration of the summit of Citlaltépetl and was the origin of most of the water for the lahar. This deposit and several others suggest that glaciated volcanoes are sites where hydrothermal alteration and resulting cohesive lahars are most likely. Although cohesive lahars and debris avalanches both have origins as sector collapses, cohesive lahars are more mobile than similar-sized debris avalanches. Thus potential hazard of edifice collapse at glaciated volcanoes, especially those with large volumes of hydrothermally altered rock, includes the possibility of large-volume cohesive lahars.

  6. Archeomagnetic dating of the eruption of Xitle volcano (Mexico) from a reappraisal of the paleointensity with the MSP-DSC protocol.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Ayala, Manuel; Camps, Pierre; Alva-Valdivia, Luis; Poidras, Thierry; Nicol, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    The Xitle volcano, located south of Mexico City, is a monogenic volcano that has provided seven lava flows in a time interval of a few years. The age of these eruptions, estimated by means of radiocarbon dates on charcoal from beneath the flows, is still very poorly known, ranging from 4765±90 BC to 520±200 AD (see Siebe, JVGR, 2000 for a review). This lava field was emplaced over the archaeological city of Cuicuilco whose occupation is estimated between 700 BC and 150 AD. Thus a question is still pending: Is the downfall of Cuicuilco directly attributable to the eruption of Xitle? It seems that the answer is negative if we consider the latest radiocarbon dating by Siebe (2000), which sets the age of the eruption to 280±35 AD, that is significantly younger to the abandon of the city. Because this new age has direct implications on the history of the movements of ancient populations in the Central Valley of Mexico, we propose in the present study to check this estimate by archaeomagnetic dating. Xitle lava have been investigated several times for paleomagnetism, including directional analyses and absolute paleointensity determinations (see Alva, EPS, 57, 839-853, 2005 for a review). The characteristic Remanence direction is precisely determined. It is much more difficult to estimate precisely the paleointensity with the Thellier method: values scatter between 40 and 90 μT in a single flow (Alva, 2005). We propose here to estimate the paleointensity by means of the MSP-DSC protocol (Fabian and Leonhardt, 2010) with the new ultra-fast heating furnace FUReMAG developed in Montpellier (France). The sampling was performed along four profiles, one vertical through the entire thickness of the flow and three horizontal (at the top, middle and the bottom of the flow). Our preliminary results show that there is no difference between the values found in the different profiles, all providing a value around 62 μT. The comparison of our results (Dec = 359.0°, Inc = 35.2

  7. Mexico City, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    In this rare clear view of Mexico City, Mexico (19.5N, 99.0W), the network of broad avenues and plazas of the capital city are very evident. The city, built on the remnants of a lake in the caldera of a tremendous extinct volcano, is home to over twenty million people and is slowly sinking as subsidence takes it's toll on the lakebed.

  8. Gender differences and regionalization of the cultural significance of wild mushrooms around La Malinche volcano, Tlaxcala, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Montoya, A; Torres-García, E A; Kong, A; Estrada-Torres, A; Caballero, J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cultural significance of wild mushrooms in 10 communities on the slopes of La Malinche volcano, Tlaxcala. The frequency and order of mention of each mushroom species in interviews of 200 individuals were used as indicators of the relative cultural significance of each species. A X(2) analysis was used to compare the frequency of mention of each species between males and females, and a Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the difference in the total number of fungi mentioned by either gender. Traditional names for mushroom species were documented and frequency of mention assessed through multivariate statistics. The fungi with highest frequency of mention were Amanita basii, Lyophyllum decastes, Boletus pinophilus, Gomphus floccosus and Cantharellus cibarius complex. We found significant differences in the frequency of mention of different fungi by males and females but no significant difference was found for the total number of fungi mentioned by either gender. Principal component analysis suggested a cultural regionalization of La Malinche volcano communities based on preferences for consumption and use of traditional names. We observed two groups: one formed by communities on the eastern part of the volcano (with mixed cultures) and the other including communities on the western slope (ethnic Nahua towns). San Isidro Buensuceso is the most distinct community, according to the criteria in this study.

  9. Pre-eruptive conditions of dacitic magma erupted during the 21.7 ka Plinian event at Nevado de Toluca volcano, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce, J. L.; Gardner, J. E.; Macías, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    The Nevado de Toluca volcano in Central Mexico has been active over the last ca. 42 ka, during which tens of km3 of pyroclastic material were erupted and two important Plinian-type eruptions occurred at ca. 21.7 ka (Lower Toluca Pumice: LTP) and ca. 10.5 ka (Upper Toluca Pumice: UTP). Samples from both the LTP and UTP contain plagioclase, amphibole, iron-titanium oxides, and minor anhedral biotite, set in a vesicular, rhyolitic, glassy matrix. In addition, UTP dacites contain orthopyroxene. Analysis of melt inclusions in plagioclase phenocrysts yields H2O contents of 2-3.5 wt.% for LTP and 1.3-3.6 wt.% for UTP samples. Ilmenite-ulvospinel geothermometry yields an average temperature of ~ 868 °C for the LTP magma (hotter than the UTP magma, ~ 842 °C; Arce et al., 2006), whereas amphibole-plagioclase geothermometry yields a temperature of 825-859 °C for the LTP magma. Water-saturated experiments using LTP dacite suggest that: (i) amphibole is stable above 100 MPa and below 900 °C; (ii) plagioclase crystallizes below 250-100 MPa at temperatures of 850-900 °C; and (iii) pyroxene is stable only below pressures of 200-100 MPa and temperatures of 825-900 °C. Comparison of natural and experimental data suggests that the LTP dacitic magma was stored at 150-200 MPa (5.8-7.7 km below the volcano summit). No differences in pressure found between 21.7 ka and 10.5 ka suggest that these two magmas were stored at similar depths. Orthopyroxene produced in lower temperature LTP experiments is compositionally different to those found in UTP natural samples, suggesting that they originated in two different magma batches. Whole-rock chemistry, petrographic features, and mineral compositions suggest that magma mixing was responsible for the generation of the dacitic Plinian LTP eruption.

  10. Hydrochemical dynamics of the “lake spring” system in the crater of El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouwet, D.; Taran, Y.; Inguaggiato, S.; Varley, N.; Santiago Santiago, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    El Chichón volcano (Chiapas, Mexico) erupted violently in March-April 1982, breaching through the former volcano-hydrothermal system. Since then, the 1982 crater has hosted a shallow (1-3.3 m, acidic (pH ˜ 2.2) and warm (˜ 30 °C) crater lake with a strongly varying chemistry (Cl/SO 4 = 0-79 molar ratio). The changes in crater lake chemistry and volume are not systematically related to the seasonal variation of rainfall, but rather to the activity of near-neutral geyser-like springs in the crater (Soap Pool). These Soap Pool springs are the only sources of Cl for the lake. Their geyser-like behaviour with a long-term (months to years) periodicity is due to a specific geometry of the shallow boiling aquifer beneath the lake, which is the remnant of the 1983 Cl-rich (24,000 mg/l) crater lake water. The Soap Pool springs decreased in Cl content over time. The zero-time extrapolation (1982, year of the eruption) approaches the Cl content in the initial crater lake, meanwhile the extrapolation towards the future indicates a zero-Cl content by 2009 ± 1. This particular situation offers the opportunity to calculate mass balance and Cl budget to quantify the lake-spring system in the El Chichón crater. These calculations show that the water balance without the input of SP springs is negative, implying that the lake should disappear during the dry season. The isotopic composition of lake waters (δD and δ 18O) coincide with this crater lake-SP dynamics, reflecting evaporation processes and mixing with SP geyser and meteoric water. Future dome growth, not observed yet in the post-1982 El Chichón crater, may be anticipated by changes in lake chemistry and dynamics.

  11. The ˜AD 1250 effusive eruption of El Metate shield volcano (Michoacán, Mexico): magma source, crustal storage, eruptive dynamics, and lava rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrel, Magdalena Oryaëlle; Guilbaud, Marie-Noëlle; Siebe, Claus

    2016-04-01

    Medium-sized volcanoes, also known as Mexican shields due to their andesitic composition and slightly higher slope angles in comparison to Icelandic shields, occur across the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and represent nearly one third of all volcanic edifices in the Michoacán-Guanajuato Volcanic Field (MGVF). Many questions about their origin and eruptive dynamics remain unanswered. Here, we focus on El Metate, the youngest (˜AD 1250) monogenetic shield volcano of the MGVF and the most voluminous (˜9.2 km3 dense rock equivalent) Holocene eruption in Mexico. Its eruptive history was reconstructed through detailed mapping, geochemical analysis (major and trace elements, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data), and rheological study of its thick andesitic flows. Early and late flow units have distinct morphologies, chemical and mineralogical compositions, and isotopic signatures which show that these lavas were fed by two separate magma batches that originated from a heterogeneous mantle source and followed distinct differentiation paths during their ascent. Thermobarometry calculations constraining the conditions of crystallization indicate a temporary storage of the last erupted magma batch at a depth of ˜7-10 km. Lava rheology was estimated using petrographic characteristics, geochemical data, and flow dimensions. The magma viscosity increased from 102-103 Pa s prior to eruption through 106-108 Pa s during ascent, to 109-1011 Pa s during lava emplacement. Though magma viscosity was quite high, the eruption was purely effusive. The explosive eruption of such a large magma volume was probably avoided due to efficient open system degassing (outgassing) of the magma as it ascended through the uppermost crust and erupted at the surface.

  12. Glacier Inventory Update at Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico by Digital Photogrammetry: Documentation of Glacier Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julio-Miranda, P.; Delgado-Granados, H.; Ortega-del-Valle, S.; Huggel, C.

    2001-12-01

    Monitoring of glaciers at volcanoes at inter-tropical latitudes is very important for several reasons. Glacier fluctuations provide insights to the climate change in these latitudes. Also, inventory of glaciers at volcanoes allows evaluation of hazards during eruptive periods. However, glaciological work is a difficult task during eruptions and becomes hazardous to researchers. In this context, a tool such as digital photogrammetry helps in fast, accurate and safe updating of glacier inventories. Popocatépetl volcano's glaciers have been studied during the last decade but after the onset of the present eruption in late 1994 glaciological work has been very difficult and at the same time, very much needed for debris-flow-related risk assessment. Glacier tongues have retreated strongly for their size but have reached the maximum elevation they could before they started to decrease in volume by thinning. The morphology of the glaciers has changed from a lobed-hanging glacier to a chaotic series of elongated seracs of a range of dimensions and forms. They trend always perpendicular to the slope. Aerial photographs obtained on December 16, 2000 were processed by digital photogrammetry and the estimated total glaciated area resulted in 0.255 km2 (< 0.25 km2 correspond to Ventorrillo Glacier and the rest to Noroccidental Glacier). The decrease in glaciated area since the first inventory represents 72 % of the total area reported in 1958. This information allows to state that the current glacier retreat precludes their extinction. Studies made for the last 7 years of eruptive activity reveal a strong glacier retreat forced by global, regional, and local climate changes, as well as by volcanic activity.

  13. Flux rates and sulfur isotopic composition of pore fluids from three mud volcanoes in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilhooly, W. P.; Ruppel, C. D.; Dickens, G. R.; Berg, P.; Macko, S. A.

    2010-12-01

    Chloride and sulfate pore water analyses were performed on a total of 29 piston and gravity cores collected along center to flank transects across 3 mud volcanoes, which were located on the Louisiana continental slope in Garden Banks (GB425), Green Canyon (CG185), and Mississippi Canyon (MC852). All three sites are known areas of oil and gas discharge. In addition, seepage at GC185 and GB425 supports highly developed chemosynthetic communities, whereas no known communities have been observed at MC852. Comparison of pore water chemistry (sulfur concentrations and sulfur isotope compositions) among these 3 sites provides initial insight about fluid migration processes and advection rates and about the connection between fluid flux and the establishment of chemosynthetic communities. Pore water advection velocities were calculated from chloride profiles using a steady-state one dimensional advection-diffusion model. In general, chloride concentrations increased with depth to more than four times seawater concentrations. Incidences of pore water freshening are likely associated with hydrate dissociation. Chloride profiles show characteristic concave-up shapes at the center of each mud volcano and concave-down shapes along the flanks, a pattern that we previously interpreted and modeled (doi:10.1029/2004GL021909; doi:10.1111/j.1468-8123.2007.00191.x) in terms of seawater recharge-discharge. The depth of the sulfate-methane interface (SMI) shoals toward the center of the mud volcanoes, indicating potentially rapid anaerobic methane oxidation in these areas. Where the SMI is shallow, pore water sulfide S-isotope values are correspondingly elevated (~ +10 ‰) relative to seawater sulfate (δ34S = +21‰) and presumably represent near-quantitative reduction of pore water sulfate at GB425 and MC852. There is no such pattern at GC185. Such differences potentially reflect advection rates, the ages of the fluids, timing of fluid efflux, and differences in their chemistry.

  14. Late Holocene Peléan-style eruption at Tacaná volcano, Mexico and Guatemala: past, present, and future hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macías, J. L.; Espíndola, J. M.; Garcia-Palomo, A.; Scott, K.M.; Hughes, S.; Mora, J C.

    2000-01-01

    Tacaná volcano, located on the border between Mexico and Guatemala, marks the northern extent of the Central American volcanic chain. Composed of three volcanic structures, it is a volcanic complex that has had periodic explosive eruptions for at least the past 40 k.y. The most recent major eruption occurred at the San Antonio volcano, the youngest volcanic edifice forming the complex, about 1950 yr ago. The Peléan style eruption, issued from the southwest part of the dome, and swept a 30° sector with a hot block and ash flow that traveled about 14 km along the Cahoacán ravine. Deposits from this event are well exposed around the town of Mixcun and were therefore given the name of that town, the Mixcun flow deposit. The Mixcun flow deposit is, in the channel facies, a light gray, massive, thick (>10 m), matrix-supported unit with dispersed lithic clasts of gravel to boulder size, divisible in some sections into a variable number of flow units. The overbank facies is represented by a thin (2 and has a minimum estimated volume of 0.12 km3. Basaltic-andesite inclusions (54% SiO2) and various signs of disequilibrium in the mineral assemblage of the two-pyroxene andesitic products (60%–63% SiO2) suggest that magma mixing may have triggered the eruption. Following deposition of the Mixcun flow deposit andesitic to dacitic (62%–64% SiO2) lava flows were extruded and a dacitic dome (64.4% SiO2) at the San Antonio summit formed. Syn-eruptive and posteruptive lahars flooded the main drainages of the Cahoacán and Izapa-Mixcun valleys in the area of the present city of Tapachula (population 250000) and the pre-Hispanic center of Izapa. Three radiocarbon ages date this event between A.D. 25 and 72 (range ±1σ, 38 B.C.–A.D. 216), which correlates with a halt in construction at Izapa (Hato phase of ca. 50 B.C.–A.D. 100), probably due to temporary abandonment of the city caused by lahars. Another similar event would produce extensive damage to the towns (population

  15. Magmatic volatile contents and degassing-induced crystallization at Volcán Jorullo, Mexico: Implications for melt evolution and the plumbing systems of monogenetic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Emily R.; Wallace, Paul J.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Granados, Hugo Delgado; Kent, Adam J. R.

    2008-05-01

    Monogenetic basaltic cinder cones are abundant on Earth and exhibit a wide range of eruptive styles, including violent explosions. However, the mechanisms driving explosive cinder cone eruptions are still poorly understood. Here we investigate relations between volatiles, degassing, and crystallization in a long-lived, historical, cinder cone eruption to better understand the plumbing systems of monogenetic volcanoes. We present volatile (H 2O, CO 2, S, Cl), major, and trace element data for olivine-hosted melt inclusions, estimates of olivine residence times based on Fe-Mg zoning, and measurements of groundmass crystallinity for tephra from the eruption of Volcán Jorullo, Mexico. Jorullo melt inclusions trapped some of the most volatile-rich (≤ 5.3 wt.% H 2O, ≤ 1000 ppm CO 2), primitive (≤ 10.5 wt.% MgO) melts yet measured in an arc setting, as well as more degassed, evolved compositions. Furthermore, the melt inclusions record temporal changes in both melt composition and crystallization. Early erupted inclusions are Mg-rich and record variable trapping pressures (10-400 MPa), whereas late inclusions were trapped only shallowly beneath the volcano (3-19 MPa) and contain increasingly evolved melts. Disparities between the compositions of the melt inclusions and the whole-rock lava samples provide evidence for a two-stage crystallization process: 1) cooling-induced fractionation of amphibole + olivine ± clinopyroxene in the lower crust, which drove the bulk melt evolution over time; and 2) degassing-induced crystallization of melts during ascent at pressures < 400 MPa. Additionally, olivine residence times calculated from diffusion profiles suggest that as the eruption progressed, olivine crystals were being stored for longer periods of time (up to 1300 days) within more evolved melts that had risen from depth. These data, taken together with temporal decreases in crystallization depths and increases in groundmass crystallinity, suggest the formation of a

  16. A Reassessment of the Seismicity Related to the 1998-1999 Eruption of Colima Volcano, Western Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora-Camacho, A.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.; Espindola, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    The 1998-1999 activity of Colima volcano (19.514°N, 103.62°W, 3850 m a.s.l.) consisted of a climactic episode on 20 November, 1998. On this date, a dome formed on the small summit crater during the previous few days, collapsed generating block-and-ash flows. The event was preceded by almost twelve months of seismic activity, which continued afterwards for several more months. In a previous work (Zamora-Camacho et al., 2007; Pure Appl. Geophys. 164, 39-52) we analyzed the seismic activity occurred from 20 March, 1998 to 31 March, 1999. However the seismicity related to the activity did not dwindled down to pre-eruptive levels until January 2000. In this work we present the results of our analysis of the period March-December 1999, which completes the sequence of events related to the eruption. This analysis is of importance because constitutes the most complete study of the seismicity of an eruptive period of Colima volcano, in the sense that we determined most of the events recorded by the seismic net (RESCO) and located all of those that were amenable to location. The whole period of seismic activity consisted of more than 11,000 events of which 1156 belonging to the period March-December 1999 were located. Of this group 1082 have magnitude (Mc) between 1 and 3.5 and depths mostly in the 0-10 km range.

  17. Spatio-temporal reconstruction of lahars on the southern slopes of Colima volcano, Mexico - A dendrogeomorphic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Ramos, Osvaldo; Stoffel, Markus; Vázquez-Selem, Lorenzo; Capra, Lucia

    2013-11-01

    Historical records of lahar occurrence and distribution are typically scarce in volcanic environments, even more so if they occur outside of human settlements. In the context of hazard assessment and process understanding, documenting their temporal frequency and drivers of activity might be crucial. On forested volcanoes, lahars may significantly damage trees along their flow paths, and sometimes even eliminate entire forest stands. This study is based on growth disturbances in trees affected by lahars (i) to assess the potential of dendrogeomorphic techniques in lahar research and (ii) to analyze the temporal frequency and spatial patterns of lahars at Montegrande and Arena, two of the most active of the ephemeral streams on the southern sector of Colima volcano. A total of 78 Pinus leiophylla live trees were sampled along the ravines, yielding evidence for 20 lahar events after the AD 1913 eruption, adding seven events to the historic records. Although the number of lahars reconstructed with tree-ring records can only be considered as a minimum frequency, the method clearly improves the local lahar chronology. Despite the scarcity of meteorological records at the study sites, the timing of reconstructed lahars points to heavy rainfalls after explosive activity as the main driver of events.

  18. Gravity Survey at the Ceboruco Volcano Area (Nayarit, Mexico): a 3-D Model of the Subsurface Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Cordoba, Jhonattan; Zamora-Camacho, Araceli; Espindola, Juan Manuel

    2017-07-01

    Ceboruco volcano (-104°30', 21°7', 2150 m asl) is located in the western portion of the trans-Mexican volcanic belt and NW extreme of the Tepic-Zacoalco rift zone, a structure composed of a series of NNW-trending en echelon fault-bounded basins constituting the NE boundary between the north-American plate and the Jalisco block (JB). Ceboruco experimented a Plinian eruption about 1000 years ago and several more of different styles afterward; the last one in 1870 CE. This volcano poses a significant risk because of the relatively large population in its surroundings. Ceboruco has been studied by mostly from the point of view of petrology, geochemistry, and physical volcanology; however, no geophysical studies about its internal structure have been published. In this paper, we present the results of a gravimetric survey carried out in its surroundings and a model of the internal structure obtained from inversion of the data. The Ceboruco area is characterized by a negative Bouguer anomaly spanning the volcanic structure. The probable causative body modeled with the data of the survey is located about 1 km below mean sea level and has a volume of 163 km3. We propose that this body is the magma chamber from where the products of its eruptions in the last 1000 years ensued.

  19. Modeling the 1913 eruption of Colima volcano, Mexico, based on data collected by Jim Luhr and colleagues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, L. J.; Connor, C.

    2007-12-01

    Jim Luhr and colleagues spent more than a decade characterizing the explosive eruptions of Colima volcano, particularly the January 20, 1913 Plinian eruption that sent a tephra cloud to the NNE of the volcano, by some reports depositing tephra up to 725 km from the volcano. Their data are modeled using TEPHRA2, a computer model that calculates the expected accumulation of tephra at specific geographical locations as a result of a volcanic eruption with specific input parameters using the advection diffusion equation. TEPHRA2 has numerous input parameters so it is literally impossible to find a best-fit solution using brute force iteration. Instead, we use nonlinear inversion techniques to explore best-fit solutions. Here we use a downhill simplex inversion algorithm. No parameter correlations (for example between eruption column height and eruption mass) are assumed a priori in the inversion. Overall, it appears from inversion results that acceptable solutions for total eruption mass lie between 0.8 x 1011 kg and 1.3 x 1011 kg and acceptable solutions for eruption column height lie between about 20 and 38 km above mean sea-level. In order to better understand the solution space, we ran the inversion numerous times, each time limiting the ranges of eruption column height and erupted mass. All other eruption parameters are allowed to vary over wide ranges to identify best-fit solutions. These results show that best-fit solutions for total erupted mass are constrained between approximately 0.6 x 1011 kg and 1.6 x 1011 kg. Best-fit solutions of essentially equal quality are identified for a wide range of eruption column heights (20-40 km). The plot of best-fit solutions suggests that slightly better results are obtained by the model in the region of 30-38 km and 1.4 x 1010 to 1.8 x 1011 kg, with all other parameters allowed to vary over their entire ranges. We note that eruption physics places some additional constraints on the maximum column height. For an

  20. The ~ 31 ka rhyolitic Plinian to sub-Plinian eruption of Tlaloc Volcano, Sierra Nevada, central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueda, H.; Macías, J. L.; Arce, J. L.; Gardner, J. E.; Layer, P. W.

    2013-02-01

    Tlaloc is a late Pleistocene stratovolcano located NE of México City. It is the northernmost volcano of the N-S Sierra Nevada Volcanic Range, which consists from north to south of Tlaloc, Telapón, Iztaccíhuatl, and Popocatépetl volcanoes. Tlaloc has always been considered the oldest (and extinct) volcano of the Sierra Nevada Volcanic Range. Recent field data revealed that Tlaloc was very active during late Pleistocene through a series of explosive eruptions. One of these eruptions produced the Multilayered White Pumice (MWP) a rhyolitic pyroclastic sequence. The eruption began with a 24-km high Plinian column MWP-F1 that was dispersed to the NE by prevailing winds. It was interrupted by fountaining of the column with the generation of a pyroclastic density current that emplaced MWP-S1 layer. Then, followed five unstable sub-Plinian columns (MWP-F2 to F6) that reached altitudes between 16 and 19 km. Fall deposits as a whole are 1 m thick at 12 km from the vent, cover a minimum area of 577 km2 for a total volume of 4.68 km3 (DRE 1.58 km3). The eruption ejected a total mass of 3.45 × 1012 kg at different mass discharges. The last sub-Plinian column (MWP-F6) collapsed and produced dense pyroclastic density currents that deposited pumiceous pyroclastic flows (MWP-PF) following main ravines to the north and east of the vent. These density currents filled gullies with 23 m-thick deposits at a distance of 12 km from the vent totaling a minimum DRE volume of 0.2 km3. Pyroclastic flow deposits charred tree trunks that yielded an age of 31,490 + 1995/- 1595 yr B.P. that closely date the age of the eruption. Rain during this phase of the eruption generated syn-eruptive lahars (MWP-DF). Post-eruptive lahars (MWP-ED) finally swept the volcano flanks. The MWP deposits consist of abundant white pumice (up to 96 vol.%), rare gray pumice, cognate lithics, accidental altered lithics, xenocrysts. White and gray pumice clasts contain phenocrysts of quartz, plagioclase, sanidine

  1. Constraining the degassing processes of Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico: A vesicle size distribution and glass geochemistry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, J. K.; Roberge, J.; Jerram, D. A.

    2012-05-01

    The explosive activity of Popocatépetl Volcano is a threat to the surrounding densely populated areas and it is therefore important to recognize indicators of change in eruptive style (explosive to dome building) within a short period of time. In this study we present results of vesicle size distributions (VSDs) and compositional analysis of matrix glass from juvenile clasts from five of the main plinian eruptions of Popocatépetl (ca. 23-1.2 ka), the 2001 small eruption during partial dome collapse and four eruptions during 1997 (May 11th and June 14th, 15th and 30th). Major element analysis of matrix glass (WDS-EPMA) allows the estimation of the depth from which the erupted magma went into disequilibrium (between crystals and melt), by calculating the equilibrium pressure using the quartz-albite-orthoclase ternary system of Blundy and Cashman (2001). Quantitative interpretation of texture in juvenile (pumice or scoria) clasts via VSD analysis using CSD software was used to link physical changes experienced by magma during ascent, with conditions responsible for eruptions. The extent and style of vesiculation in juvenile clasts is also related to eruption style and duration and has specifically allowed the recognition of changes in vesicular texture that represent variations from explosive to dome building activity (Mangan and Sisson, 2000; Adams et al., 2006). This study highlights a more complicated story in terms of magma storage, than that previously accepted for the Popocatépetl volcanic system and is an important contribution to ongoing research at the volcano.

  2. Holocene block-and-ash flows from summit dome activity of Citlaltépetl volcano, Eastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco-Núñez, Gerardo

    1999-01-01

    A major eruption produced several block-and-ash flows about 4,100 years B.P. at Citlaltépetl volcano (Pico de Orizaba), an ice-capped, 5670-m-high, andesitic, active stratovolcano located at the eastern end of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. Repetitive gravitational collapse of a dacitic dome at the summit crater produced a series of block-and-ash flows, lahars, and floods, which were channeled through two main river-valleys on the west and south flanks of the volcano. The total erupted volume is estimated to be at least 0.27 km 3. The deposits in both areas are similar in composition, and size, but they differ in the area covered, distribution, and structure. The western deposits form a large fan, cover a larger area, and include numerous laharic and fluviatile deposits. In contrast, the southern deposits form prominent terraces where confined in narrow channels, and have associated laharic units in distal areas, where the flows reach a maximum distance of 30 km from the vent. Directed disruptions of a central summit dome occurred, possibly first to the west and then to the southeast, perhaps due to minor modifications of the summit dome morphology, producing the voluminous block-and-ash flow deposits documented here. The flows were strongly controlled by topography, influencing the deposition of the moving particles. Grain-size variations along the flow paths are hardly detectable suggesting no evident lateral downstream transformations. Because sudden changes in dome morphology may cause significant variations in the direction of future dome collapse, specific areas of potential affectation cannot be predicted. Therefore, about 350,000 inhabitants living within a radius of 35-km from the vent could be potentially impacted if catastrophic block-and-ash flows were to recur in the future from similar summit dome activity. Recognition of these deposits is therefore important for hazard assessment because some seemingly safe areas may be at high risk.

  3. Observation of cosmic ray hadrons at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico with the SciCRT prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, E.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Matsubara, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Hurtado, A.; Musalem, O.; García, R.; Anzorena, M. A.; González, L. X.; Itow, Y.; Sako, T.; Lopez, D.; Sasai, Y.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Kozai, M.; Shibata, S.; Takamaru, H.; Kojima, H.; Watanabe, K.; Tsuchiya, H.; Koi, T.

    2016-02-16

    In this study we report the flux of protons and neutral emission measured at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano at 4600 m.a.s.l. (575 g/cm2), in Eastern Mexico. As an example of the capability of the mini-SciCR as a cosmic ray detector we present the Forbush decrease recorded on March 7, 2012. These data were obtained with a cosmic ray detector prototype called mini-SciCR that was operating from October 2010 to July 2012. Our main aims were to measure the hadronic component flux of the secondary cosmic ray and to show the appropriate performance of all system of the detector. To separate the signals of protons from other charged particles we obtained the energy deposition pattern when they cross the detector using a Monte Carlo simulation, and to separate the signals of neutral emission we used an anticoincidence system between the edge bars and the internal bars of the detector. The mini-SciCR is a prototype of a new cosmic ray detector called SciBar Cosmic Ray Telescope (SciCRT) installed in the same place, which is in the process of calibration. The SciCRT will work mainly as a Solar Neutron and Muon Telescope, it is designed to achieve: (1) larger effective area than the current Solar Neutron Telescope, (2) higher energy resolution to determine the energy spectrum of solar neutrons, (3) lower energy threshold, and (4) higher particle identification ability.

  4. Observation of cosmic ray hadrons at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico with the SciCRT prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, E.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Matsubara, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Hurtado, A.; Musalem, O.; García, R.; Anzorena, M. A.; González, L. X.; Itow, Y.; Sako, T.; Lopez, D.; Sasai, Y.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Kozai, M.; Shibata, S.; Takamaru, H.; Kojima, H.; Watanabe, K.; Tsuchiya, H.; Koi, T.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we report the flux of protons and neutral emission measured at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano at 4600 m.a.s.l. (575 g/cm2), in Eastern Mexico. As an example of the capability of the mini-SciCR as a cosmic ray detector we present the Forbush decrease recorded on March 7, 2012. These data were obtained with a cosmic ray detector prototype called mini-SciCR that was operating from October 2010 to July 2012. Our main aims were to measure the hadronic component flux of the secondary cosmic ray and to show the appropriate performance of all system of the detector. To separate the signals of protons from other charged particles we obtained the energy deposition pattern when they cross the detector using a Monte Carlo simulation, and to separate the signals of neutral emission we used an anticoincidence system between the edge bars and the internal bars of the detector. The mini-SciCR is a prototype of a new cosmic ray detector called SciBar Cosmic Ray Telescope (SciCRT) installed in the same place, which is in the process of calibration. The SciCRT will work mainly as a Solar Neutron and Muon Telescope, it is designed to achieve: (1) larger effective area than the current Solar Neutron Telescope, (2) higher energy resolution to determine the energy spectrum of solar neutrons, (3) lower energy threshold, and (4) higher particle identification ability.

  5. A 550-year-old Plinian eruption at El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico: Explosive volcanism linked to reheating of the magma reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacíAs, J. L.; Arce, J. L.; Mora, J. C.; EspíNdola, J. M.; Saucedo, R.; Manetti, P.

    2003-12-01

    Some 550 years ago (1320-1433 A.D.), a powerful Plinian eruption at El Chichón Volcano in southern Mexico produced a widespread pumice fall deposit. We subdivided the deposit into three parts on the basis of structural and textural characteristics, pumice lithology and density, granulometry, and petrologic-geochemical attributes. The deposit covers an area of 1500 km2 within the 1-cm isopach and has a minimum estimated bulk volume of 2.8 km3 (1.1 km3 dense rock equivalent (DRE)); its eruptive column reached an altitude of ˜31 km. Consideration of field evidence, the presence and nature of mafic enclaves, and chemical data strongly suggest that the 550 year B.P. eruption is linked with the intrusion of a high-temperature basaltic magma into preexisting but stagnated trachyandesitic magma beneath El Chichón. Thorough mixing of the two magmas produced a compositionally uniform hybrid trachyandesite magma (average SiO2 55.3 wt %), which subsequently underwent crystal growth and gas exsolution, ultimately overpressurizing the zoned magmatic system to erupt explosively. On the basis of El Chichón's known eruptive history, the intrusion-mixing event occurred sometime after the 900 year B.P. eruption. The hybrid magma had a preeruption temperature of 820-830°C and was water undersaturated (5-6 wt % H2O) at pressures of ˜2-2.5 kbar.

  6. Observation of cosmic ray hadrons at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico with the SciCRT prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, E.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Matsubara, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Hurtado, A.; Musalem, O.; García, R.; Anzorena, M. A.; González, L. X.; Itow, Y.; Sako, T.; Lopez, D.; Sasai, Y.; Munakata, K.; Kato, C.; Kozai, M.; Shibata, S.; Takamaru, H.; Kojima, H.; Watanabe, K.; Tsuchiya, H.; Koi, T.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we report the flux of protons and neutral emission measured at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano at 4600 m.a.s.l. (575 g/cm2), in Eastern Mexico. As an example of the capability of the mini-SciCR as a cosmic ray detector we present the Forbush decrease recorded on March 7, 2012. These data were obtained with a cosmic ray detector prototype called mini-SciCR that was operating from October 2010 to July 2012. Our main aims were to measure the hadronic component flux of the secondary cosmic ray and to show the appropriate performance of all system of the detector. To separate the signals of protons from other charged particles we obtained the energy deposition pattern when they cross the detector using a Monte Carlo simulation, and to separate the signals of neutral emission we used an anticoincidence system between the edge bars and the internal bars of the detector. The mini-SciCR is a prototype of a new cosmic ray detector called SciBar Cosmic Ray Telescope (SciCRT) installed in the same place, which is in the process of calibration. The SciCRT will work mainly as a Solar Neutron and Muon Telescope, it is designed to achieve: (1) larger effective area than the current Solar Neutron Telescope, (2) higher energy resolution to determine the energy spectrum of solar neutrons, (3) lower energy threshold, and (4) higher particle identification ability.

  7. Paleomagnetic study of El Metate shield volcano (Michoacán, Mexico) confirms its monogenetic nature and young age ( 1250 CE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahgoub, Ahmed Nasser; Böhnel, Harald; Siebe, Claus; Chevrel, Magdalena Oryaëlle

    2017-04-01

    In a recent study, Chevrel et al. (2016a, b) radiocarbon-dated the oldest lava flow of the voluminous ( 9.2 km3) El Metate shield volcano (Michoacán, Mexico) at cal 1250-1260 CE and proposed that its eruption was monogenetic in origin, with twelve younger lava flows emplaced during a short period of only 35 years, but certainly < 275 years. In order to test this hypothesis, we undertook a detailed paleomagnetic study of five lava flows from El Metate to check the consistency of their paleomagnetic directions. Additionally, a group of representative specimens was treated with the double-heating Thellier experiment using the IZZI protocol for paleointensity determination. Flow mean paleomagnetic directions obtained for four of the flows are indistinguishable, and discordant directions were obtained from the site of the 5th flow measured, probably due to the tilting of the sampled block after remanence acquisition. Mean paleodirections and intensities were used for paleomagnetic dating applying the global paleosecular variation model SHA.DIF.14k. The resulting age range for the eruption is 1150-1290 CE, which overlaps with the range previously determined by the 14C method by Chevrel et al. (2016a). Accepting the 14C age of the oldest flow as the maximum age, the age range would be reduced to 1250-1290 CE, which strongly supports the hypothesis of a monogenetic nature of the El Metate eruption.

  8. Inter-laboratory comparison of X-ray fluorescence analyses of eruptive products of El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.; Bornhorst, Theodore J.; Taggart, Joseph E.; Rose, William I.; McGee, James J.

    1987-01-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison has been made of X-ray fluorescence analyses of 10 samples of lava and pumices from El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico. Some determinations of major-element constituents agree within analytical uncertainty, whereas others exchibit significant bias. Analyses carried out at the Michigan Technological University (MTU) laboratory are systematically lower in MgO (26–48%), Fetotal(5–18%), CaO (4–15%) and higher in K2O (0–15%) than analyses made at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Denver laboratory. These differences are ascribed in part to a complex combination of calibration assumptionsand mineralogical and particle-size effects inherent in the use of pressed rock-powder pellets in the analytical procedure of the MTU laboratory. Other, but as yet unknown, differences in sample preparation and/or analytical technique may also be important; effects related to natural sample inhomogeneityare believed to be insignificant. The inter-laboratory differences in the analytical data complicated accurate assessment of whether El Chichón magmas have changed composition during the past 300 000 a. Knowledge of such change is needed for understanding petrogenetic history and for such related studies as evaluation of volcanic hazards.

  9. Sr, Nd and Pb isotope and geochemical data from the Quaternary Nevado de Toluca volcano, a source of recent adakitic magmatism, and the Tenango Volcanic Field, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Serrano, Raymundo G.; Schaaf, Peter; Solís-Pichardo, Gabriela; Hernández-Bernal, Ma. del Sol; Hernández-Treviño, Teodoro; Julio Morales-Contreras, Juan; Macías, José Luis

    2004-11-01

    Volcanic activity at Nevado de Toluca (NT) volcano began 2.6 Ma ago with the emission of andesitic lavas, but over the past 40 ka, eruptions have produced mainly lava flows and pyroclastic deposits of predominantly orthopyroxene-hornblende dacitic composition. In the nearby Tenango Volcanic Field (TVF) pyroclastic products and lava flows ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to andesite were erupted at most of 40 monogenetic volcanic centers and were coeval with the last stages of NT. All volcanic rocks in the study area are characterized by a calc-alkaline affinity that is consistent with a subduction setting. Relatively high concentrations of Sr (>460 ppm) coupled with low Y (<21 ppm), along with relatively low HREE contents and Pb isotopic values similar to MORB-EPR, suggest a possible geochemical adakitic signature for the majority of the volcanic rocks of NT. The HFS- and LIL-element patterns for most rocks of the TVF suggest a depleted source in the subcontinental lithosphere modified by subduction fluids, similar to most rocks from the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). The isotopic compositions are similar for volcanic rocks of NT and TVF regions ( 87Sr/ 86Sr: 0.703853-0.704226 and 0.703713-0.704481; ɛNd: +4.23-+5.34 and +2.24-+6.85; 206Pb/ 204Pb: 18.55-18.68 and 18.58-18.69; 207Pb/ 204Pb: 15.54-15.62 and 15.56-15.61; 208Pb/ 204Pb: 38.19-38.47 and 38.28-38.50, respectively), suggesting a MORB-like source with low crustal contamination. Metamorphic xenoliths from deeper continental crust beneath NT volcano show isotopic patterns similar to those of Grenvillian rocks of north-central Mexico ( 87Sr/ 86Sr: 0.715653-0.721984, ɛNd: -3.8 to -7.2, 206Pb/ 204Pb: 18.98-19.10, 207Pb/ 204Pb: 15.68-15.69, 208Pb/ 204Pb: 39.16-39.26 and Nd model age (T DM) of 1.2-1.3 Ga). In spite of a thick continental crust (>45 km) that underlies the volcanoes of the study area, the geochemical and isotopic patterns of these rocks indicate low interaction with this crust. NT

  10. Paleomagnetic, Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility, and 40AR/39AR Data from the Cienega Volcano, Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, M. S.; Petronis, M. S.; Lindline, J.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.

    2012-12-01

    Cinder cone eruptions are typically interpreted to have formed by the ascension of magma through a simple conduit. Recent field work and laboratory studies on different excavated volcanoes around the world suggest that magma transport within cinder cones can involve a complex system of feeder geometries. We studied the Cienega volcano, a cinder cone in the Cerros del Rio volcanic field, northern New Mexico, in order to better understand the complexity and the evolution of volcanic plumbing systems in the development of cinder cone volcanoes. We hypothesized that cinder cone plumbing systems are inherently complex and involve numerous feeder geometries (e.g. dikes, sills) and flow patterns both towards and away from the central vent complex. The Cienega volcano comprises tephra fall deposits as well as several vents, multiple intrusions, and numerous lava flow sequences. We inspected the magmatic plumbing system using different laboratory methods including paleomagnetic, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), rock magnetic and thin section studies. We collected samples across each outcrop of the feeder system. The dikes are olivine porphyritic basalts with major clinopyroxene, calcic plagioclase feldspar, magnetite, and xenocrystic quartz. Most samples display a trachytic texture with plagioclase crystals showing a preferred orientation parallel to the dike margins. The magnetic information is held predominantly by a cubic phase magnetite with a low- to moderate-Ti composition of Single or Pseudo-Single Domain grains. The AMS results show various flow directions. Three of six dikes yielded magma flow directions away from the vent. The other dikes showed both a subvertical flow, which corresponds to the typical movement of magma in a dike originating from a deeper crustal level, and a downward flow direction. We concluded that magma initially flowed upward from the magma chamber until it encountered flow resistance. At this structural level (the current

  11. Iceland Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-23

    article title:  Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, Volcano Ash Cloud     View larger ... Europe and captured this image of the Eyjafjallajökull Volcano ash cloud as it continued to drift over the continent. Unlike other ...

  12. Syrian Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-23

    This MOC image shows a small volcano in the Syria Planum region of Mars. Today, the lava flows that compose this small volcano are nearly hidden by a mantle of rough-textured, perhaps somewhat cemented, dust

  13. Nicaraguan Volcanoes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    article title:  Nicaraguan Volcanoes     View Larger Image Nicaraguan volcanoes, February 26, 2000 . The true-color image at left is a ... February 26, 2000 - Plumes from the San Cristobal and Masaya volcanoes. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  14. Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of Mexico was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. In areal extent, Mexico is the third largest country on the continent of North America (not counting Greenland, which is a province of Denmark), comprised of almost 2 million square kilometers (756,000 square miles) of land. Home to roughly 100 million people, Mexico is second only to the United States in population, making it the world's largest Spanish-speaking nation. To the north, Mexico shares its border with the United States-a line that runs some 3,100 kilometers (1,900 miles) east to west. About half of this border is defined by the Rio Grande River, which runs southeast to the Gulf of Mexico (partially obscured by clouds in this image) and marks the dividing line between Texas and Mexico. Toward the upper left (northwest) corner of this image is the Baja California peninsula, which provides the western land boundary for the Gulf of California. Toward the northwestern side of the Mexican mainland, you can see the Sierra Madre Occidental Mountains (brownish pixels) running southeast toward Lake Chapala and the city of Guadalajara. About 400 km (250 miles) east and slightly south of Lake Chapala is the capital, Mexico City. Extending northward from Mexico City is the Sierra Madre Oriental Mountains, the irregular line of brownish pixels that seem to frame the western edges of the bright white cumulus clouds in this image. Between these two large mountain ranges is a large, relatively dry highland region. To the south, Mexico shares borders with Guatemala and Belize, both of which are located south of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Image courtesy Reto Stockli, Brian Montgomery, and Robert Simmon, based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  15. Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of Mexico was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. In areal extent, Mexico is the third largest country on the continent of North America (not counting Greenland, which is a province of Denmark), comprised of almost 2 million square kilometers (756,000 square miles) of land. Home to roughly 100 million people, Mexico is second only to the United States in population, making it the world's largest Spanish-speaking nation. To the north, Mexico shares its border with the United States-a line that runs some 3,100 kilometers (1,900 miles) east to west. About half of this border is defined by the Rio Grande River, which runs southeast to the Gulf of Mexico (partially obscured by clouds in this image) and marks the dividing line between Texas and Mexico. Toward the upper left (northwest) corner of this image is the Baja California peninsula, which provides the western land boundary for the Gulf of California. Toward the northwestern side of the Mexican mainland, you can see the Sierra Madre Occidental Mountains (brownish pixels) running southeast toward Lake Chapala and the city of Guadalajara. About 400 km (250 miles) east and slightly south of Lake Chapala is the capital, Mexico City. Extending northward from Mexico City is the Sierra Madre Oriental Mountains, the irregular line of brownish pixels that seem to frame the western edges of the bright white cumulus clouds in this image. Between these two large mountain ranges is a large, relatively dry highland region. To the south, Mexico shares borders with Guatemala and Belize, both of which are located south of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Image courtesy Reto Stockli, Brian Montgomery, and Robert Simmon, based on data from the MODIS Science Team

  16. Remote Sensing Strategies for Enhancing the Spectral Response of Geology in ASTER Images of the Colima Volcano Region, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloutier, J. L.; Gaonach, H.

    2004-05-01

    The Fuego de Colima is the most active volcano in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. This mountainous region contains recent volcanic and sedimentary deposits as well as older Mesozoic to Tertiary lithological units. Different types of vegetation such as varied crops, bushy savannahs, deciduous forest and coniferous forest also cover the study area. The surface rocks and deposits are affected by various degrees of weathering such as alteration of silicate minerals and oxidation of iron bearing minerals. In this subtropical region, it is difficult to find unvegetated outcrops, except for very recent volcanic deposits. Hence, studying such volcanic environment on a synoptic remotely sensed perspective implies better understanding the resulting mixing spectral response of geology and vegetation. An ASTER satellite image from 2001 was acquired to map and characterize the geology, the flora and the weathering of this volcanic environment. The wide range of wavelength covered by all nine VNIR and SWIR spectral bands allows us to detect spectral features that are specific to each element of the image. In this study, two types of image manipulations are presented: 1) Band Ratioing is a useful tool enabling us to highlight interesting surface elements while reducing shadow effects. 2) Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is another powerful tool to manipulate multidimensional data sets such as multispectral images. With the addition of recent field data I will discuss the resulting images that distinguish the various volcanic deposits as well as the vegetation covers related to the underlying geology.

  17. Tectonic and magmatic controls on the location of post-subduction monogenetic volcanoes in Baja California, Mexico, revealed through spatial analysis of eruptive vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germa, Aurélie; Connor, Laura J.; Cañon-Tapia, Edgardo; Le Corvec, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Post-subduction (12.5 Ma to less than 1 Ma) monogenetic volcanism on the Baja California peninsula, Mexico, formed one of the densest intra-continental areas of eruptive vents on Earth. It includes about 900 vents within an area ˜700 km long (N-S) and 70 to 150 km wide (W-E). This study shows that post-subduction volcanic activity was distributed along this arc and that modes exist in the volcano distribution, indicating that productivity of the magma source region was not uniform along the length of the arc. Vent clustering, vent alignments, and cone elongations were measured within eight monogenetic volcanic fields located along the peninsula. Results indicate that on a regional scale, vent clustering varies from north to south with denser spatial clustering in the north on the order of 1.9 × 10-1 vents/km2 to less dense clustering in the south on the order of 7.8 × 10-2 vents/km2. San Quintin, San Carlos, Jaraguay, and Santa Clara are spatially distinct volcanic fields with higher eruptive vent densities suggesting the existence of individual melt columns that may have persisted over time. In contrast, the San Borja, Vizcaino, San Ignacio, and La Purisima vent fields show lower degrees of vent clustering and no obvious spatial gaps between fields, thus indicating an area of more distributed volcanism. Insight into the lithospheric stress field can be gained from vent alignments and vent elongation measurements. Within the fields located along the extinct, subduction-related volcanic arc, elongation patterns of cinder cones and fissure-fed spatter cones, vent clusters, and vent alignments trend NW-SE and N-S. Within the Santa Clara field, located more to the west within the forearc, elongation patterns of the same volcanic features trend NE-SW. These patterns suggest that magmatism was more focused in the forearc and in the northern part of Baja California than in its southern region. Within the extinct arc, magma ascent created volcano alignments and elongate

  18. Evaluation of ASTER and SRTM DEM data for lahar modeling: A case study on lahars from Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggel, C.; Schneider, D.; Miranda, P. Julio; Delgado Granados, H.; Kääb, A.

    2008-02-01

    Lahars are among the most serious and far-reaching volcanic hazards. In regions with potential interactions of lahars with populated areas and human structures the assessment of the related hazards is crucial for undertaking appropriate mitigating actions and reduce the associated risks. Modeling of lahars has become an important tool in such assessments, in particular where the geologic record of past events is insufficient. Mass-flow modeling strongly relies on digital terrain data. Availability of digital elevation models (DEMs), however, is often limited and thus an obstacle to lahar modeling. Remote-sensing technology has now opened new perspectives in generating DEMs. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of DEMs derived from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) for lahar modeling on Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico. Two GIS-based models are used for lahar modeling, LAHARZ and a flow-routing-based debris-flow model (modified single-flow direction model, MSF), both predicting areas potentially affected by lahars. Results of the lahar modeling show that both the ASTER and SRTM DEMs are basically suitable for use with LAHARZ and MSF. Flow-path prediction is found to be more reliable with SRTM data, though with a coarser spatial resolution. Errors of the ASTER DEM affecting the prediction of flow paths due to the sensor geometry are associated with deeply incised gorges with north-facing slopes. LAHARZ is more sensitive to errors of the ASTER DEM than the MSF model. Lahar modeling with the ASTER DEM results in a more finely spaced predicted inundation area but does not add any significant information in comparison with the SRTM DEM. Lahars at Popocatépetl are modeled with volumes of 1 × 10 5 to 8 × 10 6 m 3 based on ice-melt scenarios of the glaciers on top of the volcano and data on recent and historical lahar events. As regards recently observed lahars, the travel

  19. Mexico.

    PubMed

    1988-02-01

    Focus in this discussion of Mexico is on the following: geography; the people; history; political conditions; the economy; foreign relations; and relations between the US and Mexico. As of July 1987, the population of Mexico numbered 81.9 million with an estimated annual growth rate of 2.09%. 60% of the population is Indian-Spanish (mestizo), 30% American Indian, 9% white, and 1% other. Mexico is the most populous Spanish-speaking country in the world and the 2nd most populous country in Latin America. Education is decentralized and expanded. Mexico's topography ranges from low desert plains and jungle-like coastal strips to high plateaus and rugged mountains. Hernan Cortes conquered Mexico in 1919-21 and founded a Spanish colony that lasted for almost 300 years. Independence from Spain was proclaimed by Father Miguel Hidalgo on September 16, 1810; the republic was established on December 6, 1822. Mexico's constitution of 1917 provides for a federal republic with a separation of powers into independent executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government. Significant political themes of the administration of President Miguel de la Madrid Hurtado, who began his 6-year term in 1982, have been restructuring the economy, liberalizing trade practices, decentralizing government services, and eliminating corruption among public servants. In 1987, estimates put the real growth of the Mexican economy at 1.5%; the gross domestic product (GDP) had shrunk by 3.5% in 1986. Yet, on the positive side, Mexico's international reserves increased to record levels in 1987 (to about $15 billion), and its current account surplus reached more than $3 billion. Mexico has made considerable progress in moving to restructure its economy. It has substantially reduced impediments to international trade and has moved to reduce the number of parastatal firms. 1987 was the 2nd consecutive year in which Mexico recorded triple-digit inflation; inflation reached 158.8%. Other problems include

  20. Sulfur and oxygen isotopic systematics of the 1982 eruptions of El Chichón Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, R.O.; Luhr, J.F.; Wasserman, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    Thermometers based on sulfur and oxygen isotopic compositions of anhydrite, pyrrhotite, titanomagnetite, and plagioclase crystals from fresh pumices of the 1982 eruptions of El Chichón Volcano indicate a pre-eruption temperature of 810 ± 40°C, confirming textural evidence that the anhydrite precipitated directly from the melt. The isotopic composition of sulfate leached from fresh ashfall samples shows it to be a mixture of anhydrite microphenocrysts and adsorbed sulfate derived from oxidized sulfur (SO2) in the eruption plume. The leachate data show no evidence for rapid oxidation of significant amounts of H2S in the eruption cloud even though the fugacity ratio of H2S/SO2 in the gas phase of the magma was >400. This may indicate kinetic inhibition of H2S to SO2 conversion in the eruption cloud. Prior to eruption, the magma contained an estimated 2.6 wt. % sulfur (as SO3). The estimated δ 34S of the bulk magma is 5.8‰. Such a high value may reflect assimilation of 34S-enriched evaporites or the prior loss of 34S-depleted H2S to a fluid or gas phase during formation of a small prophyry-type hydrothermal system or ore deposit. In either case, the original magma must have been very sulfur rich. It is likely that the initial high sulfur content of the magma and at least some of its 34S enrichment reflects involvement of subducted volcanogenic massive sulfides deposits during Benioff-zone partial melting. Isotopic data on mineralized, accidental lithic fragments support the possible development of a porphyry-type system at El Chichón.

  1. On the Radon mechanism of the Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling. Tlamacas mountain case study, volcano Popocatepetl area, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsarenko, A.; Grimalsky, V.; Yutsis, V. V.; Koshevaya, S.; Bravo Osuna, A.

    2013-05-01

    Results on Radon monitoring in 3 different sites in volcano Popocatepetl and referent site revealed Radon depletion anticipating 9 cases of moderate eruptive activity among 23 total events. The most pronounced reaction was observed in Tlamacas observational site. The averaged Radon concentration in Paso de Cortes and Tlamacas 2 sites is significantly lower in comparison with that at Tlamacas; the Radon variation in the mentioned sites has many specific features meanwhile in the Tlamacas site Radon behavior emphasizes a more individual character. The combined study by means of Radon survey, Gamma ray, Uranium, Thorium and Potassium spectrometry revealed an anomalously increased diffusion Radon emanation localized in the area of Tlamacas. Complementary geophysical studies by methods of gravimetric and magnetic prospection make credible postulation about volcanic origin of Tlamacas mountain. Observed zonal geological structures in the Tlamacas mountain and surrounding area may stimulate intensive Radon emanation from the volcanic depth. A new conception is proposed regarding a Lithosphere-Atmosphere coupling in the case of Tlamacas being similar in nature with a shortened electrical circuit Earth—thunderstorm clouds (high-altitude mountains) so that an enhanced ionization caused by intensive Radon release may explain in a novel way the noise-like geomagnetic emission observed before destructive earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Numerical simulation gives values of geomagnetic perturbations 10-3 - 10-1 nT under "normal" conditions which can easily transform into the range 1 - 10 nT in the case of higher electric field E > 1 kV/m which is typical for mountains.

  2. Observation of cosmic ray hadrons at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico with the SciCRT prototype

    DOE PAGES

    Ortiz, E.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Matsubara, Y.; ...

    2016-02-16

    In this study we report the flux of protons and neutral emission measured at the top of the Sierra Negra volcano at 4600 m.a.s.l. (575 g/cm2), in Eastern Mexico. As an example of the capability of the mini-SciCR as a cosmic ray detector we present the Forbush decrease recorded on March 7, 2012. These data were obtained with a cosmic ray detector prototype called mini-SciCR that was operating from October 2010 to July 2012. Our main aims were to measure the hadronic component flux of the secondary cosmic ray and to show the appropriate performance of all system of themore » detector. To separate the signals of protons from other charged particles we obtained the energy deposition pattern when they cross the detector using a Monte Carlo simulation, and to separate the signals of neutral emission we used an anticoincidence system between the edge bars and the internal bars of the detector. The mini-SciCR is a prototype of a new cosmic ray detector called SciBar Cosmic Ray Telescope (SciCRT) installed in the same place, which is in the process of calibration. The SciCRT will work mainly as a Solar Neutron and Muon Telescope, it is designed to achieve: (1) larger effective area than the current Solar Neutron Telescope, (2) higher energy resolution to determine the energy spectrum of solar neutrons, (3) lower energy threshold, and (4) higher particle identification ability.« less

  3. The rain-triggered Atenquique volcaniclastic debris flow of October 16, 1955 at Nevado de Colima Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucedo, R.; Macías, J. L.; Sarocchi, D.; Bursik, M.; Rupp, B.

    2008-06-01

    On October 16, 1955, at 10:45 a.m. (local time), after three days of intense rain (140 mm) that was twice the monthly average precipitation, a devastating flood surge formed a volcaniclastic debris flow on the eastern slopes of Nevado de Colima Volcano. Nearly simultaneous flood surges formed in the Arroyo Seco, Los Platanos, and Dos Volcanes ravines that coalesced with the larger flow in the Atenquique ravine. At each confluence with a tributary, the flow was diluted. The texture and structure of the preserved 1955 deposits near high water marks indicate that the downstream flow was mainly in the lower range of debris flow concentration (60% sediment concentration by weight). Downstream the tributaries, the flood encountered a ˜ 0.06 × 10 6 m 3 water reservoir that failed, significantly increasing the surge volume. Additional entrained sediment also increased the flow volume. Downstream, the flood wave reached the town of Atenquique as an 8-9 m catastrophic wave causing the death of more than 23 people, the partial destruction of the town, and losses of ˜ 13,000,000 pesos (˜ 1 million US dollars today) to a paper mill and company facilities. According to eyewitness accounts the flood wave had a peak discharge that lasted ca. 10 to 15 minutes at Atenquique. Deposits at the site and the high-water marks observed from photographs of the town's church indicate that sediment concentration was ca. 60 wt.%. The flood continued for about 1 km to its junction with the Tuxpan River where it was diluted by mixing with normal flood flow. The deposits covered an area of ˜ 1.2 km 2 and had a minimum volume of ˜ 3.2 × 10 6 m 3. The main deposit consists of a single unit, averaging 4 m in thickness, with weak textural variations that suggest surging within the flood wave. The deposit is heterolithologic and consists of boulders set in a matrix of sand-size sediment, with polymodal or bimodal distributions and normal grading varying with distance from source. The town of

  4. Morphology of ash aggregates from wet pyroclastic surges of the 1982 eruption of El Chichón Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Macías, J. L.; Sheridan, M. F.; Hughes, S. R.

    2005-12-01

    The detailed stratigraphic study of the pyroclastic surge units S1, IU, and S3 produced during the most violent phases of the 1982 eruption of El Chichón volcano, contains a complex succession of hydromagmatic events triggered by the interaction of different proportions of magma and external water. Component analyses of the horizons within single units reveal that almost all wet and cohesive horizons contain ash aggregates. Based on their morphology and internal structure four different types of aggregates were distinguished: (a) accretionary lapilli, (b) armored lapilli, (c) irregular aggregates, and (d) cylindrical aggregates. The first three types have been described in the volcanological literature (field and experimental studies); cylindrical forms are reported here for the first time. These hollow cylindrical aggregates consist of concentric layers of crystals and glass fragments set in a finer-grained matrix. They formed around millimeter-size foliage fragments that are locally preserved in the interior of the aggregates as scorched or completely carbonized vestiges. SEM analyses suggest different mechanisms of formation for the four types of aggregates. Irregular aggregates and armored lapilli formed nearly instantaneously, whereas accretionary lapilli and cylindrical aggregates resulted from progressive aggregation of ash in different regions of the eruptive cloud. All types of ash aggregates contain fractured particles. This common feature suggests that particles ruptured during fragmentation prior to the growth of the aggregates. Broken clasts with cracks filled by a fine-grained matrix only occur inside the cylindrical ash aggregates and to a lesser degree in some types of accretionary lapilli. This suggests that small thermal contrasts at the contact of warm particles with the colder fine-grained matrix of the aggregate cause existing small fractures to propagate and open as the already weakened clasts deform slightly. The occurrence of all four types

  5. Broadband seismic measurements of degassing activity associated with lava effusion at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Chouet, Bernard; Dawson, Phillip; Asch, Guenter

    2008-02-01

    From November 1999 through July 2000, a broadband seismic experiment was carried out at Popocatépetl Volcano to record seismic activity over a wide period range (0.04-100 s). We present an overview of the seismicity recorded during this experiment and discuss results of analyses of long-period (LP) and very-long-period (VLP) seismic signals recorded at stations nearest to the crater over a four-month interval December 1999-March 2000. Three families of LP signals (Types-I, II, and III) are identified based on distinctive waveform features observed periods shorter than 1 s, periods longer than 15 s, and within the period range 0.5-2.5 s. Type-I LP events have impulsive first arrivals and exhibit a characteristic harmonic wave train with dominant periods in the 1.4-1.9 s range during the first 10 s of signal. These events are also associated with a remarkable VLP wavelet with period near 30 s. Type-II LP events represent pairs of events occurring in rapid succession and whose signatures are superimposed. These are typically marked by slowly emergent first arrivals and by a characteristic VLP wave train with dominant period near 30 s, made of two successive wavelets whose shapes are quasi-identical to those of the VLP wavelets associated with Type-I events. Type-III LP events represent the most energetic signals observed during our experiment. These have an emergent first arrival and display a harmonic signature with dominant period near 1.1 s. They are dominated by periods in the 0.25-0.35 s band and contain no significant energy at periods longer than 15 s. Hypocentral locations of the three types of LP events obtained from phase picks point to shallow seismic sources clustered at depths shallower than 2 km below the crater floor. Observed variations in volcanic eruptive activity correlate with defined LP families. Most of the observed seismicity consists of Type-I events that occur in association with 1-3-min-long degassing bursts ("exhalations"). Eruptive

  6. Eruptive conditions and depositional processes of Narbona Pass Maar volcano, Navajo volcanic field, Navajo Nation, New Mexico (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Brittany D.; Clarke, Amanda B.; Semken, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Phreatomagmatic deposits at Narbona Pass, a mid-Tertiary maar in the Navajo volcanic field (NVF), New Mexico (USA), were characterized in order to reconstruct the evolution and dynamic conditions of the eruption. Our findings shed light on the temporal evolution of the eruption, dominant depositional mechanisms, influence of liquid water on deposit characteristics, geometry and evolution of the vent, efficiency of fragmentation, and the relative importance of magmatic and external volatiles. The basal deposits form a thick (5-20 m), massive lapilli tuff to tuff-breccia deposit. This is overlain by alternating bedded sequences of symmetrical to antidune cross-stratified tuff and lapilli tuff; and diffusely-stratified, clast-supported, reversely-graded lapilli tuffs that pinch and swell laterally. This sequence is interpreted to reflect an initial vent-clearing phase that produced concentrated pyroclastic density currents, followed by a pulsating eruption that produced multiple density currents with varying particle concentrations and flow conditions to yield the well-stratified deposits. Only minor localized soft-sediment deformation was observed, no accretionary lapilli were found, and grain accretion occurs on the lee side of dunes. This suggests that little to no liquid water existed in the density currents during deposition. Juvenile material is dominantly present as blocky fine ash and finely vesiculated fine to coarse lapilli pumice. This indicates that phreatomagmatic fragmentation was predominant, but also that the magma was volatile-rich and vesiculating at the time of eruption. This is the first study to document a significant magmatic volatile component in an NVF maar-diatreme eruption. The top of the phreatomagmatic sequence abruptly contacts the overlying minette lava flows, indicating no gradual drying-out period between the explosive and effusive phases. The lithology of the accidental clasts is consistent throughout the vertical pyroclastic

  7. Broadband seismic measurements of degassing activity associated with lava effusion at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip; Asch, Guenter

    2008-01-01

    From November 1999 through July 2000, a broadband seismic experiment was carried out at Popocatépetl Volcano to record seismic activity over a wide period range (0.04–100 s). We present an overview of the seismicity recorded during this experiment and discuss results of analyses of long-period (LP) and very-long-period (VLP) seismic signals recorded at stations nearest to the crater over a four-month interval December 1999–March 2000. Three families of LP signals (Types-I, II, and III) are identified based on distinctive waveform features observed periods shorter than 1 s, periods longer than 15 s, and within the period range 0.5–2.5 s. Type-I LP events have impulsive first arrivals and exhibit a characteristic harmonic wave train with dominant periods in the 1.4–1.9 s range during the first 10 s of signal. These events are also associated with a remarkable VLP wavelet with period near 30 s. Type-II LP events represent pairs of events occurring in rapid succession and whose signatures are superimposed. These are typically marked by slowly emergent first arrivals and by a characteristic VLP wave train with dominant period near 30 s, made of two successive wavelets whose shapes are quasi-identical to those of the VLP wavelets associated with Type-I events. Type-III LP events represent the most energetic signals observed during our experiment. These have an emergent first arrival and display a harmonic signature with dominant period near 1.1 s. They are dominated by periods in the 0.25–0.35 s band and contain no significant energy at periods longer than 15 s. Hypocentral locations of the three types of LP events obtained from phase picks point to shallow seismic sources clustered at depths shallower than 2 km below the crater floor. Observed variations in volcanic eruptive activity correlate with defined LP families. Most of the observed seismicity consists of Type-I events that occur in association with 1–3-min-long degassing bursts (

  8. The Early Oligocene Copperas Creek Volcano and geology along New Mexico Higway 15 between Sapillo Creek and the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument, Grant and Catron Counties, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ratté, James C.; Mack, Greg; Witcher, James; Lueth, Virgil W.

    2008-01-01

    The section of New Mexico Highway 15 between the intersection of NM-15 and NM 35 (aka Sapillo junction) at the south and the Gila Cliff Dwellings National Monument at the north end of NM –15 occupies an approximately 18 mile long, mile wide, corridor through the eastern part of the Gila Wilderness (Fig. 1). Whereas most of the Gila Wilderness is dominated by silicic, caldera-forming supervolcanoes of Eocene to Oligocene age, this part of NM-15 traverses a volcanic terrain of similar age, but composed mainly of intermediate composition lava flows and minor associated rhyolitic intrusions and pyroclastic rocks, which are related to the here-named Copperas Creek volcano. This volcanic complex is bounded by Basin and Range structures: on the south by the Sapillo Creek graben, and on the north by the Gila Hot Springs graben, both of which are filled with Gila Conglomerate of late Tertiary to Pleistocene(?) age. Hot springs in the Gila River valley are localized along faults in the deepest part of the Gila Hot Springs graben. The cliff dwellings of the National Monument were constructed in caves in Gila Conglomerate in the western part of the Gila Hot Springs graben. The eastern edge of the Gila Cliff Dwellings caldera is buried by younger rocks east of the cliff dwellings, but spectacular cliffs of Bloodgood Canyon Tuff, which fills the caldera, can be viewed along the West Fork of the Gila River from the trail starting at the cliff dwellings. Although this is not intended as a formal road log, highway mileage markers (MM) will be used to locate geologic features more or less progressively from south to north along NM-15.

  9. Mexico City

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... sides by mountains and snow-capped volcanoes. Since incident solar radiation does not vary significantly with season at tropical latitudes, ... respectively. Mexico City can be identified in the center panel by the large area of haze accumulation above image center. Two small ...

  10. Mexico.

    PubMed

    1993-01-01

    The background notes on Mexico provide text and recent statistical information on the geography, population, government, economy, and foreign relations, specifically the North American Free Trade Agreement with US. The 1992 population is estimated at 89 million of which 60% are mestizo (Indian-Spanish), 30% are American Indian, 9% are Caucasian, and 1% are other. 90% are Roman Catholic. There are 8 years of compulsory education. Infant mortality is 30/1000 live births. Life expectancy for males is 68 years and 76 years for females. The labor force is comprised of 30% in services, 24% in agriculture and fishing, 19% in manufacturing, 13% in commerce, 7% in construction, 4% in transportation and communication, and .4% in mining. There are 31 states and a federal district. Gross domestic product (GDP) per capita was $3200 in 1991. Military expenditures were .5% of GDP in 1991. The average inflation rate is 19%. Mexico City with 20 million is the largest urban center in the world. In recent years, the economy has been restructured with market oriented reforms; the result has been a growth of GDP of 3.6% in 1991 from 2% in 1987. Dependence on oil exports has decreased. There has been privatization and deregulation of state-owned companies. Subsidies to inefficient companies have been stopped. Tariff rates were reduced. The financial debt has been reduced and turned into a surplus of .8% in 1992. Mexico's foreign debt has been reduced from its high in 1987 of $107 billion. Agricultural reforms have been ongoing for 50 years. Land was redistributed, but standards of living and productivity have improved only slightly. Rural land tenure regulations have been changed, and other economic reforms are expected. Mexico engages in ad hoc international groups and is selective about membership in international organizations.

  11. Dante's Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  12. Dante's volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-09-01

    This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

  13. Volcano Infrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. B.; Fee, D.; Matoza, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    Open-vent volcanoes generate prodigious low frequency sound waves that tend to peak in the infrasound (<20 Hz) band. These long wavelength (> ~20 m) atmospheric pressure waves often propagate long distances with low intrinsic attenuation and can be well recorded with a variety of low frequency sensitive microphones. Infrasound records may be used to remotely monitor eruptions, identify active vents or track gravity-driven flows, and/or characterize source processes. Such studies provide information vital for both scientific study and volcano monitoring efforts. This presentation proposes to summarize and standardize some of the terminology used in the still young, yet rapidly growing field of volcano infrasound. Herein we suggest classification of typical infrasound waveform types, which include bimodal pulses, blast (or N-) waves, and a variety of infrasonic tremors (including broadband, harmonic, and monotonic signals). We summarize various metrics, including reduced pressure, intensity, power, and energy, in which infrasound excess pressures are often quantified. We also describe the spectrum of source types and radiation patterns, which are typically responsible for recorded infrasound. Finally we summarize the variety of propagation paths that are common for volcano infrasound radiating to local (<10 km), regional (out to several hundred kilometers), and global distances. The effort to establish common terminology requires community feedback, but is now timely as volcano infrasound studies proliferate and infrasound becomes a standard component of volcano monitoring.

  14. Dynamical parameter analysis of continuous seismic signals of Popocatépetl volcano (Central Mexico): A case of tectonic earthquakes influencing volcanic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárraga, Marta; Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana; Carniel, Roberto; Martínez-Bringas, Alicia; García, Alicia; Ortiz, Ramon

    2012-06-01

    The continuous background seismic activity contains information on the internal state of a volcanic system. Here, we report the influence of major regional tectonic earthquakes (M > 5 in most cases) on such state, reflected as changes in the spectral and dynamical parameters of the volcano continuous seismic data. Although changes do not always occur, analysis of five cases of earthquake-induced variations in the signals recorded at Popocatépetl volcano in central México reveal significant fluctuations following the tectonic earthquakes. External visible volcanic activity, such as small to moderate explosions and ash emissions, were related to those fluctuations. We briefly discuss possible causes of the variations. We conclude that recognition of fluctuations in the dynamical parameters in volcano monitoring seismic signals after tectonic earthquakes, even those located in the far field, hundreds of kilometers away, may provide an additional criterion for eruption forecasting, and for decision making in the definition of volcanic alert levels.

  15. Syrian Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    23 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small volcano in the Syria Planum region of Mars. Today, the lava flows that compose this small volcano are nearly hidden by a mantle of rough-textured, perhaps somewhat cemented, dust. The light-toned streaks that cross the scene were formed by passing dust devils, a common occurrence in Syria.

    Location near: 13.0oS, 102.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  16. Syrian Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    23 July 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small volcano in the Syria Planum region of Mars. Today, the lava flows that compose this small volcano are nearly hidden by a mantle of rough-textured, perhaps somewhat cemented, dust. The light-toned streaks that cross the scene were formed by passing dust devils, a common occurrence in Syria.

    Location near: 13.0oS, 102.6oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Autumn

  17. Chilean Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On the border between Chile and the Catamarca province of Argentina lies a vast field of currently dormant volcanoes. Over time, these volcanoes have laid down a crust of magma roughly 2 miles (3.5 km) thick. It is tinged with a patina of various colors that can indicate both the age and mineral content of the original lava flows. This image was acquired by Landsat 7's Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor on May 15, 1999. This is a false-color composite image made using shortwave infrared, infrared, and green wavelengths. Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  18. Volcano Hazards Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Myers, Bobbie; Driedger, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Diagram of common volcano hazards. The U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) monitors unrest and eruptions at U.S. volcanoes, assesses potential hazards, responds to volcanic crises, and conducts research on how volcanoes work. When conditions change at a monitored volcano, the VHP issues public advisories and warnings to alert emergency-management authorities and the public. See http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/ to learn more about volcanoes and find out what's happening now.

  19. Nyiragonga Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-02-01

    This image of the Nyiragonga volcano eruption in the Congo was acquired on January 28, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters about 50 to 300 feet ), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. Image: A river of molten rock poured from the Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo on January 18, 2002, a day after it erupted, killing dozens, swallowing buildings and forcing hundreds of thousands to flee the town of Goma. The flow continued into Lake Kivu. The lave flows are depicted in red on the image indicating they are still hot. Two of them flowed south form the volcano's summit and went through the town of Goma. Another flow can be seen at the top of the image, flowing towards the northwest. One of Africa's most notable volcanoes, Nyiragongo contained an active lava lake in its deep summit crater that drained catastrophically through its outer flanks in 1977. Extremely fluid, fast-moving lava flows draining from the summit lava lake in 1977 killed 50 to 100 people, and several villages were destroyed. The image covers an area of 21 x 24 km and combines a thermal band in red, and two infrared bands in green and blue. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03462

  20. Klyuchevskaya Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Klyuchevskaya Volcano on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula continued its ongoing activity by releasing another plume on May 24, 2007. The same day, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image, at 01:00 UTC. In this image, a hotspot marks the volcano's summit. Outlined in red, the hotspot indicates where MODIS detected unusually warm surface temperatures. Blowing southward from the summit is the plume, which casts its shadow on the clouds below. Near the summit, the plume appears gray, and it lightens toward the south. With an altitude of 4,835 meters (15,863 feet), Klyuchevskaya (sometimes spelled Klyuchevskoy or Kliuchevskoi) is both the highest and most active volcano on the Kamchatka Peninsula. As part of the Pacific 'Ring of Fire,' the peninsula experiences regular seismic activity as the Pacific Plate slides below other tectonic plates in the Earth's crust. Klyuchevskaya is estimated to have experienced more than 100 flank eruptions in the past 3,000 years. Since its formation 6,000 years ago, the volcano has seen few periods of inactivity. NASA image courtesy the MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. The Rapid Response Team provides daily images of this region.

  1. Chikurachki Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... southeast. The darker areas of the plume typically indicate volcanic ash, while the white portions of the plume indicate entrained water droplets and ice. According to the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruptions Response Team (KVERT), the temperature of the plume near the volcano ...

  2. Evolution of Popocatépetl volcano's glaciers in Mexico with and without volcanic activity: diagnosis from a minimal mass balance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ontiveros-Gonzalez, G.; Cortes Ramos, J.; Delgado Granados, H.

    2013-05-01

    This work describes the influence of eruptive activity on the evolution of the glacial cover on Popocatepetl volcano. Here, we try to answer a simple question: what had happened if this glacier had not been affected by the volcanic activity? In order to answer this question we modeled the mass balance evolution of this glacier using meteorological data and a minimal mass balance model developed for glaciers elsewhere. For this model we assumed no volcanic activity. These results were compared with measurements available for the actual situation at Popocatépetl Volcano. It was possible to separate the influence of the volcanic activity on the evolution of this glacier system considering two scenarios: one was modeled with a simulation of the mass balance where volcanic activity does not affect, and a second scenario is based on the documented studies developed around the glacial disappearance of the glaciers.

  3. ~20 years of SO2 measurements at Popocatépetl volcano (Mexico) using COSPEC: volcanological interpretation of the data and use for validation of instrumental developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Granados, H.; Cardenas Gonzalez, L.

    2013-12-01

    On February 1st 1994, the first COSPEC measurements were carried out at Popocatépetl volcano. Since the first measurements, the volcano showed very high emission rates. Along the last ~20 years, measurements have been carried out using several modes (ground-static, ground-mobile, airborne-fixed wing, airborne-rotatory wing); trajectories (diagonal to, across, and along the plume); and during different activity episodes (passive degassing and effusive and explosive periods); as well as together with other instrumental developments and resources (DOAS, UV-cameras, MODIS, ASTER, OMI). Popocatépetl volcano has emitted nearly 40Mt of SO2 in ~20years and has shown very large variations in the average emissions depending on the state of activity, having a maximum emission rate of ~170 Kt in December 2000. This work shows a summary of results of the measurements obtained during this period emphasizing the volcanological meaning of the existing database so far. In addition, the use of these data for validation of other data sets is discussed.

  4. The deglaciation of Iztaccíhuatl volcano (Mexico) from the Little Ice Age maximum to the present, determined by photogrametry and lichenometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, D.; García-Sancho, L.; Zamorano, J. J.; Andrés, N.; Pintado, A.

    2012-04-01

    Iztaccíhualt Volcano (19°10'20''N, 98°38'30''W, 5230 m asl) preserves an important moraine complex from the Little Ice Age (LIA), which stretches to 4300 m asl. These moraines are different from former ones because they are not covered by ash fall from the last plinian explosive phases of the nearby Popocatépetl volcano. In fact, the last emission of those pyroclasts took place during the XI century (Vázquez-Selem, 2000). The summit area of the Iztaccíhualt volcano still has glaciers whose terminus are located around 5000 m asl. From the end of the LIA until present the glacier terminus have ascended 700 m. To study the deglaciation process in Iztaccíhualt volcano from the LIA maximum to present, the Ayoloco valley was selected as it is the most important valley of the western slope of the volcano. Taking this valley as a reference, we determined the limits of glaciers in different dates by georeferencing the aerial and panoramic photographs (from 1897 to 2000) and analysing the 1958 field cartography of the glacial limits (Lorenzo, 1964). On the one hand, we carried out a statistical analysis of the size of the Rhizocarpon geographicum thallus and, on the other hand, we undertook a statistical study of the biodiversity of the lichen species through a number of cross-sections from the lowest LIA moraines to the current glacier snouts. This methodology allowed dating the exact moment in which the glacier retreated over certain points of the analysed cross-sections and determining the ecesis and the growth curve of the Rhizocarpon geographicum specie. In the Ayoloco valley the average growth rate is of 0.23 mm per year. From this information, we could deduce the evolution of the glacier from the LIA maximum to present. The results indicate that two main advances took place during the XVII and the XIX centuries. At the beginning of the XX century the glacier terminus were very close to the moraines of the maximum advance. An intense glacial retreat took place

  5. Assessing lahars from ice-capped volcanoes using ASTER satellite data, the SRTM DTM and two different flow models: case study on Iztaccíhuatl (Central Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D.; Delgado Granados, H.; Huggel, C.; Kääb, A.

    2008-06-01

    Lahars frequently affect the slopes of ice-capped volcanoes. They can be triggered by volcano-ice interactions during eruptions but also by processes such as intense precipitation or by outbursts of glacial water bodies not directly related to eruptive activity. We use remote sensing, GIS and lahar models in combination with ground observations for an initial lahar hazard assessment on Iztaccíhuatl volcano (5230 m a.s.l.), considering also possible future developments of the glaciers on the volcano. Observations of the glacial extent are important for estimations of future hazard scenarios, especially in a rapidly changing tropical glacial environment. In this study, analysis of the glaciers on Iztaccíhuatl shows a dramatic retreat during the last 150 years: the glaciated area in 2007 corresponds to only 4% of the one in 1850 AD and the glaciers are expected to survive no later than the year 2020. Most of the glacial retreat is considered to be related to climate change but in-situ observations suggest also that geo- and hydrothermal heat flow at the summit-crater area can not be ruled out, as emphasized by fumarolic activity documented in a former study. However, development of crater lakes and englacial water reservoirs are supposed to be a more realistic scenario for lahar generation than sudden ice melting by rigorous volcano-ice interaction. Model calculations show that possible outburst floods have to be larger than ~5×105 m3 or to achieve an H/L ratio (Height/runout Length) of 0.2 and lower in order to reach the populated lower flanks. This threshold volume equals 2.4% melted ice of Iztaccíhuatl's total ice volume in 2007, assuming 40% water and 60% volumetric debris content of a potential lahar. The model sensitivity analysis reveals important effects of the generic type of the Digital Terrain Model (DTM) used on the results. As a consequence, the predicted affected areas can vary significantly. For such hazard zonation, we therefore suggest the use of

  6. Santorini Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  7. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Orr, Tim R.

    2008-01-01

    Lava from Kilauea volcano flowing through a forest in the Royal Gardens subdivision, Hawai'i, in February 2008. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) monitors the volcanoes of Hawai'i and is located within Hawaiian Volcanoes National Park. HVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Kilauea and HVO at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

  8. Ash Aggregates Found in Pyroclastic Surge Deposits Produced during the 1982 Eruption of El Chichon Volcano, Chiapas, Mexico: considerations on their Origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scolamacchia, T.; Macias, J. L.

    2001-12-01

    During the most violent phase of the 1982 eruption of El Chichon volcano, at 0135 (GMT) April 4, pyroclastic surges, S1, S2 and S3 (1,2), were produced. With the exception of S2, associated to a pyroclastic flow, the origin of the deposits is controversial. Field studies up to 8 km from the source in different sectors of the volcano indicate that S1 exceeds the previously traced northern limit showing a distribution with a N-S largest axis. The depositional structures of S1 and S3 suggest emplacement from diluted pyroclastic density currents of hydromagmatic origin. Component analysis of samples from different horizons of S1and S3 showed the presence of ash aggregates of different types, most of which formed around cores of millimetric-sized vegetal fragments. The eruptive clouds were thus characterized by temperatures insufficient to burn wood. The granulometric distributions of different horizons of S1 and S3 layers have similarities suggesting that they derived from the same fragmentation mechanism. SEM observations indicate the presence of structures like hydration cracks and hydration skin on glass shards characterized by blocky forms or low degree of vesicularity, corroborating that fragmentation was generated by the interaction between magma and external water. 1 Macias J.L., Sheridan M.F., Espindola J.M. (1997). Bull. Volc. 59 (6): 459-471. 2 Sigurdsson H., Carey S.N., Fisher R.V. (1987). Bull. Volc. 49: 467-488

  9. The CO2 flux and the chemistry of the crater lake in 2013-2015 evidence for the enhanced activity of El Chichon volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jácome Paz, Mariana Patricia; Taran, Yuri; Inguaggiato, Salvatore; Collard, Nathalie

    2016-04-01

    During 2013-2015, four CO2 flux surveys were performed in the El Chichon crater both, from the lake surface and from the soil of the crater floor. The chemistry of the lake water, as well as its physical parameters (surface area, depth, temperature) were also determined. The CO2 flux in 2014-2015 compared to the 2007-2008 data (Mazot et al., 2011, BV, 73: 423-441) increased almost one order of magnitude (from ~ 140 t/d in 2008 to ~ 840 t/d in 2014). During the last two years the lake became the largest for the whole time of observations with the maximum surface area more than 18 ha covering completely the NE fumarolic field and all thermal springs feeding the lake with mineralized water. Despite the maximum volume of the lake it was characterized in 2015 by the highest since 2007 chloride content (~2500 ppm) and temperature (34°C). A large degassing spot in the middle of the lake for the first time was observed in April 2015 with more than 10,000 g m-2 d-1 of the CO2 flux. These observations evidence that the volcano-hydrothermal system of El Chichon volcano came into a new stage of activity associated most probably with changes in the magmatic activity at depth.

  10. Klyuchevskaya Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Shiveluch volcano on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula. This is a false-color satellite image, acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on March 10, 2010. To download a full high res version of this image and to learn more go to: earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=43103 Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, based on data from the NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. Instrument: Terra - ASTER For more information about the Goddard Space Flight Center go here: www.nasa.gov/centers/goddard/home/index.html

  11. Mud Volcanoes Formation And Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guliyev, I. S.

    2007-12-01

    Mud volcanoes are natural phenomena, which occur throughout the globe. They are found at a greater or lesser scale in Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Georgia, on the Kerch and Taman peninsulas, on Sakhalin Island, in West Kuban, Italy, Romania, Iran, Pakistan, India, Burma, China, Japan, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Mexico, Colombia, Trinidad and Tobago, Venezuela and Ecuador. Mud volcanoes are most well-developed in Eastern Azerbaijan, where more than 30% of all the volcanoes in the world are concentrated. More than 300 mud volcanoes have already been recognized here onshore or offshore, 220 of which lie within an area of 16,000 km2. Many of these mud volcanoes are particularly large (up to 400 m high). The volcanoes of the South Caspian form permanent or temporary islands, and numerous submarine banks. Many hypotheses have been developed regarding the origin of mud volcanoes. Some of those hypotheses will be examined in the present paper. Model of spontaneous excitation-decompaction (proposed by Ivanov and Guliev, 1988, 2002). It is supposed that one of major factors of the movement of sedimentary masses and formation of hydrocarbon deposits are phase transitions in sedimentary basin. At phase transitions there are abnormal changes of physical and chemical parameters of rocks. Abnormal (high and negative) pressure takes place. This process is called as excitation of the underground environment with periodicity from several tens to several hundreds, or thousand years. The relationship between mud volcanism and the generation of hydrocarbons, particularly methane, is considered to be a critical factor in mud volcano formation. At high flow rates the gas and sediment develops into a pseudo-liquid state and as flow increases the mass reaches the "so-called hover velocity" where mass transport begins. The mass of fluid moves as a quasi-uniform viscous mass through the sediment pile in a piston like manner until expelled from the surface as a "catastrophic eruption

  12. The 21,700 yr b.p. Lower Toluca Pumice Plinian Eruption of Nevado de Toluca Volcano (Mexico): Evidences of Magma Mixing Process as Triggering Mechanism.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, L.; Arce, J.; Macias, J.

    2006-05-01

    Approximately 21,700 yr B.P., after a period of quiescence of 4800 yr, Nevado de Toluca volcano erupted, producing the Lower Toluca Pumice deposit. The activity generated a 24-km-high Plinian column that lasted ~11 h and dispersed 2.3 km3 (0.8 km3 dense rock equivalent) of tephra toward the NE, blanketing the Lerma basin, an area occupied today by the city of Toluca, with up to 5 cm of ash. Subsequent eruptive pulses were sub-Plinian in style, accompanied by phreatomagmatic explosions that emplaced surge deposits. Finally, the column collapsed toward the NE with the emplacement of a pumice flow deposit. The high vesicularity of the pumice from the basal Plinian layer, up to 83% by volume, indicates that exsolution was dominantly magmatic, and that pressurization of the magma chamber was probably due to a magma mixing process. Evidence for this includes the compositional range of juvenile products (from 55 to 65 wt% SiO2), as well as the presence of two types of plagioclase, one in equilibrium and the other one with disequilibrium textures and reverse zoning. This suggests input of an andesitic liquid into the dacitic magma chamber. Based on the eruptive record, the most likely future eruptive activity at Nevado de Toluca volcano will be Plinian. Although quiet for more than 3250 yr, Plinian activity could occur after a long period of quiescence, and it could represent a hazard for the entire Toluca basin, where more than one million people live today.

  13. The Colima volcano magmatic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spica, Z.; Perton, M.; Legrand, D.

    2016-12-01

    We show how and where magmas are produced and stored at Colima volcano, Mexico, by performing an ambient noise tomography inverting jointly the Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves for both phase and group velocities. We obtain shear wave velocity and radial anisotropy models. The shear wave velocity model shows a deep, large and well-delineated elliptic-shape magmatic reservoir below the Colima volcano complex at a depth of about 15 km. The radial anisotropy model shows an important negative feature rooting up to ≥35 km depth until the roof of the magma reservoir, suggesting the presence of vertical fractures where fluids migrate upward and accumulate in the magma reservoir. The convergence of both a low velocity zone and a negative anisotropy suggests that the magma is mainly stored in conduits or inter-fingered dykes as opposed to horizontally stratified magma reservoir.

  14. Nyiragonga Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of the Nyiragonga volcano eruption in the Congo was acquired on January 28, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters about 50 to 300 feet ), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    Image: A river of molten rock poured from the Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo on January 18, 2002, a day after it erupted, killing dozens, swallowing buildings and forcing hundreds of thousands to flee the town of Goma. The flow continued into Lake Kivu. The lave flows are depicted in red on the image indicating they are still hot. Two of them flowed south form the volcano's summit and went through the town of Goma. Another flow can be seen at the top of the image, flowing towards the northwest. One of Africa's most notable volcanoes, Nyiragongo contained an active lava lake in its deep summit crater that drained catastrophically through its outer flanks in 1977. Extremely fluid, fast-moving lava flows draining from the summit lava lake in 1977 killed 50 to 100 people, and several villages were destroyed. The image covers an area of 21 x 24 km and combines a thermal band in red, and two infrared bands in green and blue.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the

  15. Nyiragonga Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of the Nyiragonga volcano eruption in the Congo was acquired on January 28, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters about 50 to 300 feet ), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    Image: A river of molten rock poured from the Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo on January 18, 2002, a day after it erupted, killing dozens, swallowing buildings and forcing hundreds of thousands to flee the town of Goma. The flow continued into Lake Kivu. The lave flows are depicted in red on the image indicating they are still hot. Two of them flowed south form the volcano's summit and went through the town of Goma. Another flow can be seen at the top of the image, flowing towards the northwest. One of Africa's most notable volcanoes, Nyiragongo contained an active lava lake in its deep summit crater that drained catastrophically through its outer flanks in 1977. Extremely fluid, fast-moving lava flows draining from the summit lava lake in 1977 killed 50 to 100 people, and several villages were destroyed. The image covers an area of 21 x 24 km and combines a thermal band in red, and two infrared bands in green and blue.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the

  16. Tectonic evolution of the central-eastern sector of Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt and its influence on the eruptive history of the Nevado de Toluca volcano (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, F.; Capra, L.; Groppelli, G.; Norini, G.

    2006-11-01

    The Nevado de Toluca is an andesitic to dacitic stratovolcano of Late Pliocene-Holocene age located within the central and eastern sectors of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt. Morphostructural analysis, aerial photograph and satellite image interpretation, structural analysis and geological fieldwork were methods used to investigate the relationship between the evolution of the volcano and the tectonic framework of its basement. The study revealed that the area of Nevado de Toluca is affected by three main fault systems that intersect close to the volcanic edifice. These are from oldest to youngest, the Taxco-Querétaro, San Antonio and Tenango fault systems. The NNW-SSE Taxco-Querétaro fault system was active in the area since Early Miocene, and is characterized by right-lateral transtensive movement. Its reactivation during Early to Middle Pleistocene was responsible for the emplacement of andesitic to dacitic lava flows and domes of La Cieneguilla Supersynthem. The NE-SW San Antonio fault system was active during Late Pliocene, before the reactivation of the Taxco-Querétaro fault system, and is characterized by extensional left-lateral oblique-slip kinematics. The youngest is the E-W Tenango fault system that has been active since Late Pleistocene. This fault system is characterized by transtensive left-lateral strike-slip movement, and partly coeval with the youngest eruptive phase, the Nevado Supersynthem, which formed the present summit cone of the Nevado de Toluca volcano. The stress re-orientation from the Taxco-Querétaro to the Tenango fault system during Late Pleistocene is responsible for the ˜ 1 Ma hiatus in the magmatic activity between 1.15 Ma and 42 ka. After this period of repose, the eruptive style drastically changed from effusive to explosive with the emission of dacitic products. The methodology presented here furnish new data that can be used to better assess the complex structural evolution of this sector of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt

  17. Magmatic controls on eruption dynamics of the 1950 yr B.P. eruption of San Antonio Volcano, Tacaná Volcanic Complex, Mexico-Guatemala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Juan Carlos; Gardner, James Edward; Macías, José Luis; Meriggi, Lorenzo; Santo, Alba Patrizia

    2013-07-01

    San Antonio Volcano, in the Tacaná Volcanic Complex, erupted ~ 1950 yr. B.P., with a Pelean type eruption that produced andesitic pyroclastic surges and block-and-ash flows destroying part of the volcano summit and producing a horse-shoe shaped crater open to the SW. Between 1950 and 800 yr B.P. the eruption continued with effusive andesites followed by a dacite lava flow and a summit dome, all from a single magma batch. All products consist of phenocrysts and microphenocrysts of zoned plagioclase, amphibole, pyroxene, magnetite ± ilmenite, set in partially crystallized groundmass of glass and microlites of the same mineral phases, except for the lack of amphibole. Included in the andesitic blocks of the block-and-ash flow deposit are basaltic andesite enclaves with elongated and ellipsoidal forms and chilled margins. The enclaves have intersertal textures with brown glass between microphenocrysts of plagioclase, hornblende, pyroxene, and olivine, and minor proportions of phenocrysts of plagioclase, hornblende, and pyroxene. A compositional range obtained of blocks and enclaves resulted from mixing between andesite (866 °C ± 22) and basaltic andesite (enclaves, 932 °C ± 22), which may have triggered the explosive Pelean eruption. Vestiges of that mixing are preserved as complex compositional zones in plagioclase and clinopyroxene-rich reaction rims in amphibole in the andesite. Whole-rock chemistry, geothermometry, experimental petrology and modeling results suggest that after the mixing event the eruption tapped hybrid andesitic magma (≤ 900 °C) and ended with effusive dacitic magma (~ 825 °C), all of which were stored at ~ 200 MPa water pressure. A complex open-system evolution that involved crustal end-members best explains the generation of effusive dacite from the hybrid andesite. Amphibole in the dacite is rimmed by reaction products of plagioclase, orthopyroxene, and Fe-Ti oxides produced by decompression during ascent. Amphibole in the andesite

  18. Santorini Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiken, Grant

    What is it about Santorini (Thera) that attracts volcanologists? This small archipelago in the Aegean has captivated volcanic pilgrims since Fouque published his geologic study of the volcanic field in 1879 [Fouqué, 1879].It must be the combination of its spectacular setting, rising out of the blue waters of the Aegean, the remarkable exposures that lay open its violent past for everyone to see, or possibly the slower pace of life and remarkable Greek hospitality Perhaps it is the Lower Bronze Age town of Akrotiri, destroyed yet preserved by a large explosive eruption 3600 years ago. There are thousands of volcanoes yet to be studied on our planet, but for 140 years, groups of volcanologists have regularly visited this flooded caldera complex to add yet another bit of information to the foundation laid by Fouqué.

  19. Sem Analysis of particles from the 28, 000 B.P El Zaguan debris avalanche deposit, Nevado de Toluca volcano, Central Mexico: evidences of flow behavior during emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, L.; Capra, L.

    2008-12-01

    The Zaguan deposit originated at 28, 000 yr. B.P from the flank collapse of the Nevado de Toluca volcano, a dacitic stratovolcano of the Transmexican Volcanic Belt. A Scanning Electron Microprobe analysis (SEM) was made to some clasts of this deposit to observe microtextures produced during transport and emplacement of the debris avalanche flow. Particles from 2, 0 and -2 Φ granulometric classes were randomly selected and their surface textures were described. The textures observed were divided in two groups, collision and shear structures indicating different clast interaction. Shear textures were observed predominantly on the basal part of the deposit and consisted of parallel ridges, parallel grooves, scratches and lips. Collision textures were mainly present in the upper part of the deposit and consisted of fractures, percussion marks, and broken or grinded crystals. These characteristics, coupled with field observation, like the presence of clast dikes and deformed lacustrine megaclasts, indicate that the basal part of the debris avalanche was moving in a partially liquefied state, were particles were not able to move freely because of the confinement exerted by the upper part of the flow, so shear stresses dominated. On the contrary, the particles in the upper part were able to move freely so the principal mechanism of interaction between particles was collision. These microscopic textures are in agreement with previously described behavior of emplacement of debris avalanches of volcanic origin, that suggest a stratified flow dominated by different transport and depositional mechanism depending on flow depth and possible fluid content at their base.

  20. Geomorphological evolution of volcanic fluvial channels: Eighteen years of morphological monitoring of the upper strect of the Tenenepanco Gorge, Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanarro, Luis Miguel; Juan Zamorano, Jose; Andres, Nuria; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    During volcanic eruptions a significant volume of material accumulates on the slopes and pre-existing gorges of the stratovolcanoes. This abundance of loose and unconsolidated material is very likely to be mobilized by rapid flows or lahars generated by sudden heavy rain or melting snow and ice. Thus, volcanic gorges are affected by complex cycles of incision, filling and widening, altering the equilibrium of river systems due to the major changes that lahars cause in channel morphology. These geomorphological dynamics characterize the gorges located on the north flank of the Popocatépetl volcano (19°02' N, 98°62' W, 5424 m). This volcano, located in the centre of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, began its most recent eruptive period in December 1994, when a glacier partially covered the northern slope. Since then, the interaction of volcanic and glacier activity triggered the formation of lahars in the gorges, causing significant morphological changes in the channel (especially in April 1995, July 1997 and January 2001). The most recent major eruption at Popocatépetl took place on 19 July 2003, and since then a series of smaller eruptions has reduced the glacier to near extinction. The aim of this study is to assess the morphological response of the Tenenepanco channel over an 18-year period, from 1995-2013, where two main scenarios can be observed: a) the period from 1995 to 2001 of volcanic activity and glacier retreat with the formation of flows and b) the period from 2002 to 2013 of relative volcanic calm, the almost complete extinction of the glacier, and the formation of secondary lahars associated with heavy rainfall. Monitoring of the gorge has consisted in the elaboration of 14 geomorphological maps during field studies (November 14, 1995, December 5, 1997, February 7, 1998, October 6, 2001, November 14, 1995, December 5, 1997, February 7, 1998, October 6, 2001, Julio 16, 2002, February 11, 2004, September 8, 2004, February 5, 2006, November 2, 2008

  1. An overview of a GIS method for mapping landslides and assessing landslide susceptibility in the Río La Carbonera watershed, on the SE flank of Pico de Orizaba Volcano, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legorreta Paulin, G.; Bursik, M. I.; Contreras, T.

    2015-12-01

    This poster provides an overview of the on-going research project (Grant PAPIIT # IN102115) from the Institute of Geography at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) that seeks to conduct a multi-temporal landslide inventory, produce a landslide susceptibility map, and estimate sediment production by using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The Río La Carbonera watershed on the southeastern flank of Pico de Orizaba volcano, the highest mountain in Mexico, is selected as a study area. The catchment covers 71.9 km2 with elevations ranging from 1224 to 3643 m a.s.l. and hillslopes between <5° and 68°. The stream system of Río La Carbonera catchment erodes Tertiary and Quaternary lavas, pyroclastic flows, and fall deposits. The geologic and geomorphologic factors in combination with high seasonal precipitation, high degree of weathering, and steep slopes predispose the study area to landslides. The methodology encompasses three main stages of analysis to assess landslide hazards: Stage 1 builds a historic landslide inventory. In the study area, an inventory of more than 200 landslides is created from multi-temporal aerial-photo-interpretation and local field surveys to assess landslide distribution. All landslides were digitized into a geographic information system (GIS), and a spatial geo-database of landslides was constructed from standardized GIS datasets. Stage 2 calculates the susceptibility for the watershed. During this stage, (SINMAP using default values) is evaluated. Stage 3 Estimate the potential total material delivered to the main stream drainage channel by all landslides in the catchment. Detailed geometric measurements of individual landslides visited during the field work will be carried out to obtain the landslide area and volume. These measurements revealed an empirical relationship between area and volume that took the form of a power law. This relationship will be used to estimate the potential volume of material delivered to the

  2. An overview of a GIS method for mapping landslides and assessing landslide hazards at Río El Estado watershed, on the SW flank of Pico de Orizaba Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legorreta Paulin, G.; Bursik, M. I.; Contreras, T.; Polenz, M.; Ramírez Herrera, M.; Paredes Mejía, L.; Arana Salinas, L.

    2012-12-01

    This poster provides an overview of the on-going research project (Grant SEP-CONACYT no 167495) from the Institute of Geography at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) that seeks to conduct a multi-temporal landslide inventory, produce a landslide susceptibility map, and estimate sediment production by using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The Río El Estado watershed on the southwestern flank of Pico de Orizaba volcano, the highest mountain in Mexico, is selected as a study area. The catchment covers 5.2 km2 with elevations ranging from 2676.79 to 4248.2 m a.s.l. and hillslopes between 0° and 56°. The stream system of Río El Estado catchment erodes Tertiary and Quaternary lavas, pyroclastic flows, and fall deposits. The geologic and geomorphologic factors in combination with high seasonal precipitation, high degree of weathering, and steep slopes predispose the study area to landslides. The methodology encompasses three main stages of analysis to assess landslide hazards: Stage 1 builds a historic landslide inventory. In the study area, an inventory of more than 170 landslides is created from multi-temporal aerial-photo-interpretation and local field surveys to assess landslide distribution. All landslides were digitized into a geographic information system (GIS), and a spatial geo-database of landslides was constructed from standardized GIS datasets. Stage 2 Calculates the susceptibility for the watershed. During this stage, Multiple Logistic Regression and SINMAP) will be evaluated to select the one that provides scientific accuracy, technical accessibility, and applicability. Stage 3 Estimate the potential total material delivered to the main stream drainage channel by all landslides in the catchment. Detailed geometric measurements of individual landslides visited during the field work will be carried out to obtain the landslide area and volume. These measurements revealed an empirical relationship between area and volume that took the

  3. Application of HydroGeoSphere to model the response to anthropogenic climate change of three-dimensional hydrological processes in the geologically, geothermally, and topographically complex Valles Caldera super volcano, New Mexico: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wine, M.; Cadol, D. D.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is expected to reduce streamflow in the southwestern USA due to reduction in precipitation and increases in evaporative demand. Understanding the effects of climate change in this region is particularly important for mountainous areas since these are primary sources of recharge in arid and semi-arid environments. Therefore we undertook to model effects of climate change on the hydrological processes in Valles Caldera (448 km2), located in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. In Valles Caldera modeling the surficial, hydrogeological, and geothermal processes that influence hydrologic fluxes each present challenges. The surficial dynamics of evaporative demand and snowmelt both serve to control recharge dynamics, but are complicated by the complex topography and spatiotemporal vegetation dynamics. Complex factors affecting evaporative demand include leaf area index, temperature, albedo, and radiation affected by topographic shading; all of these factors vary in space and time. Snowmelt processes interact with evaporative demand and geology to serve as an important control on streamflow generation, but modeling the effects of spatiotemporal snow distributions on streamflow generation remains a challenge. The complexity of Valles Caldera's geology—and its associated hydraulic properties—rivals that of its surficial hydrologic forcings. Hydrologically important geologic features that have formed in the Valles Caldera are three-dimensionally intricate and include a dense system of faults, alluvium, landslides, lake deposits, and features associated with the eruption and collapse of this super volcano. Coupling geothermally-driven convection to the hydrologic cycle in this still-active geothermal system presents yet an additional challenge in modeling Valles Caldera. Preliminary results from applying the three-dimensional distributed hydrologic finite element model HydroGeoSphere to a sub-catchment of Valles Caldera will be

  4. Source mechanism of Vulcanian degassing at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico, determined from waveform inversions of very long period signals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, Bernard A.; Dawson, Phillip B.; Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra

    2005-01-01

    The source mechanism of very long period (VLP) signals accompanying volcanic degassing bursts at Popocatépetl is analyzed in the 15–70 s band by minimizing the residual error between data and synthetics calculated for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium. The waveforms of two eruptions (23 April and 23 May 2000) representative of mild Vulcanian activity are well reproduced by our inversion, which takes into account volcano topography. The source centroid is positioned 1500 m below the western perimeter of the summit crater, and the modeled source is composed of a shallow dipping crack (sill with easterly dip of 10°) intersecting a steeply dipping crack (northeast striking dike dipping 83° northwest), whose surface extension bisects the vent. Both cracks undergo a similar sequence of inflation, deflation, and reinflation, reflecting a cycle of pressurization, depressurization, and repressurization within a time interval of 3–5 min. The largest moment release occurs in the sill, showing a maximum volume change of 500–1000 m3, pressure drop of 3–5 MPa, and amplitude of recovered pressure equal to 1.2 times the amplitude of the pressure drop. In contrast, the maximum volume change in the dike is less (200–300 m3), with a corresponding pressure drop of 1–2 MPa and pressure recovery equal to the pressure drop. Accompanying these volumetric sources are single-force components with magnitudes of 108 N, consistent with melt advection in response to pressure transients. The source time histories of the volumetric components of the source indicate that significant mass movement starts within the sill and triggers a mass movement response in the dike within a few seconds. Such source behavior is consistent with the opening of a pathway for escape of pent-up gases from slow pressurization of the sill driven by magma crystallization. The opening of this pathway and associated rapid evacuation of volcanic gases induces the pressure drop. Pressure

  5. Source mechanism of Vulcanian degassing at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico, determined from waveform inversions of very long period signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, Bernard; Dawson, Phillip; Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra

    2005-07-01

    The source mechanism of very long period (VLP) signals accompanying volcanic degassing bursts at Popocatépetl is analyzed in the 15-70 s band by minimizing the residual error between data and synthetics calculated for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium. The waveforms of two eruptions (23 April and 23 May 2000) representative of mild Vulcanian activity are well reproduced by our inversion, which takes into account volcano topography. The source centroid is positioned 1500 m below the western perimeter of the summit crater, and the modeled source is composed of a shallow dipping crack (sill with easterly dip of 10°) intersecting a steeply dipping crack (northeast striking dike dipping 83° northwest), whose surface extension bisects the vent. Both cracks undergo a similar sequence of inflation, deflation, and reinflation, reflecting a cycle of pressurization, depressurization, and repressurization within a time interval of 3-5 min. The largest moment release occurs in the sill, showing a maximum volume change of 500-1000 m3, pressure drop of 3-5 MPa, and amplitude of recovered pressure equal to 1.2 times the amplitude of the pressure drop. In contrast, the maximum volume change in the dike is less (200-300 m3), with a corresponding pressure drop of 1-2 MPa and pressure recovery equal to the pressure drop. Accompanying these volumetric sources are single-force components with magnitudes of 108 N, consistent with melt advection in response to pressure transients. The source time histories of the volumetric components of the source indicate that significant mass movement starts within the sill and triggers a mass movement response in the dike within a few seconds. Such source behavior is consistent with the opening of a pathway for escape of pent-up gases from slow pressurization of the sill driven by magma crystallization. The opening of this pathway and associated rapid evacuation of volcanic gases induces the pressure drop. Pressure recovery in the

  6. Source Mechanism of Vulcanian Degassing at Popocatépetl Volcano, Mexico, Determined From Moment-Tensor Inversion of Very-long-period Seismic Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, B.; Dawson, P.; Arciniega, A.

    2004-12-01

    The source mechanism of very-long-period (VLP) signals accompanying degassing exhalations at Popocatépetl is analyzed in the 15-70~s band by minimizing the residual error between data and synthetics calculated for a point source embedded in a homogeneous medium. The waveforms of two events (04/23/00, 05/23/00) representative of mild Vulcanian eruptions are well reproduced by our inversion, which takes into account volcano topography. The source centroid is positioned 1500~m below the western perimeter of the summit crater, and the modeled source is composed of a shallow-dipping crack (sill with easterly dip of 10° ) intersecting a steeply-dipping crack (northeast striking dike with northwest dip of 83° ), whose surface trace bisects the vent. Both cracks undergo a similar sequence of inflation, deflation, and reinflation --- reflecting a cycle of pressurization, depressurization, and repressurization within a time interval of 3-5~min. The largest moment release occurs in the sill, showing a maximum volume change of 500-1000\\:m3, pressure drop of 3-5~MPa, and amplitude of recovered pressure equal to 1.2 times the amplitude of the pressure drop. In contrast, the maximum volume change in the dike is 200-300\\:m3, with a corresponding pressure drop of 1-2~MPa and pressure recovery equal to the pressure drop. Accompanying these volumetric sources is a single force with magnitude of 5 × 108~N, consistent with melt advection in response to the pressure transients. The source-time history of the three components of this force confirms that significant mass movement starts in the sill and triggers a mass movement response in the dike within ˜ 5~s. Such source behavior is consistent with the opening of an escape pathway for accumulated gases from slow pressurization of the sill driven by magma crystallization. The opening of a pathway for pent-up gases in the sill and rapid evacuation of this separated gas phase induces the pressure drop. Pressure recovery in the magma

  7. Sheveluch Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-04-05

    Sheveluch Volcano in Kamchatka, Siberia, is one of the frequently active volcanoes located in eastern Siberia. In this image from NASA Terra spacecraft, brownish ash covers the southern part of the mountain, under an ash-laden vertical eruption plume.

  8. Focus: alien volcanos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Michael; Lopes, Rosaly

    2007-03-01

    Part 1: Volcanoes on Earth - blowing their top; Part 2: Volcanoes of the inner Solar System - dead or alive: the Moon, Mercury, Mars, Venus; Part 3: Volcanoes of the outer Solar System - fire and ice: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Miranda, Titan, Triton, Enceladus.

  9. A Scientific Excursion: Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Henry, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews an educationally valuable and reasonably well-designed simulation of volcanic activity in an imaginary land. VOLCANOES creates an excellent context for learning information about volcanoes and for developing skills and practicing methods needed to study behavior of volcanoes. (Author/JN)

  10. A Scientific Excursion: Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Henry, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews an educationally valuable and reasonably well-designed simulation of volcanic activity in an imaginary land. VOLCANOES creates an excellent context for learning information about volcanoes and for developing skills and practicing methods needed to study behavior of volcanoes. (Author/JN)

  11. Volatile (H2O, CO2, F, Cl, S) Budgets and Their Evolution in Explosively Erupted Magmas: Insights from 23 ky of eruptions of Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, G.; Gardner, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    The compositional diversity of erupted magmas results from an interplay of crystallization, magma mixing, and country-rock assimilation, all occurring at different levels in the volcanic plumbing system. Each of those processes will alter the abundances of volatiles as well as introduce different types of volatiles to the system, and so the volatile budget of magma can have a rich and complex history. To investigate how volatile budgets evolve in active magma systems, we have analyzed the abundances of volatiles (H2O, CO2, F, Cl, and S) in numerous glass inclusions trapped in phenocrysts from multiple andesitic and dacitic magmas erupted from Popocatepetl Volcano over the past 23 ky, including that erupted in 2001 A.D. We combine that information with extensive compositional and isotopic information about the magmas erupted in those Plinian events in order to infer the sources and evolution of volatiles with time. We focused mainly on inclusions in plagioclase, but augmented those with pyroxene-hosted inclusions. Although the compositions of some inclusions appear to have been altered by post-entrapment crystallization of their hosts, many do not, and define a compositional array that matches those of the bulk rocks. Overall, glass inclusions range in composition from mafic dacite to rhyolite (SiO2=64-74 wt.%), with K2O contents ranging from 1.4 to 4.8 wt.%. Water and CO2 contents range from ~1.0 to 6.5 wt.% and 35-480 ppm, respectively. Magmas erupted before ca. 14 ka are more water-rich, with lower CO2 contents. The most recent magma is the most water-poor and CO2-rich, although some of the most Plinian eruptions contain inclusions that have comparable water and CO2 contents. Assuming fluid saturation, those contents imply entrapment at pressures from 10 to 200 MPa, approximately .5 to 8 km depth. The implied composition of the fluid ranges from almost pure water to very CO2-rich, indicating that the volatile abundances do not reflect simple open-system degassing

  12. Volcano Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouet, B.

    - A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic

  13. Volcano seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, B.

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic

  14. Cascades Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Driedger, Carolyn; Pallister, John

    2008-01-01

    Washington's Mount St. Helens volcano reawakens explosively on October 1, 2004, after 18 years of quiescence. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) study and observe Mount St. Helens and other volcanoes of the Cascade Range in Washington, Oregon, and northern California that hold potential for future eruptions. CVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Mount St. Helens and CVO at http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/.

  15. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  16. GlobVolcano: Earth Observation Services for global monitoring of active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampellini, L.; Ratti, R.; Borgström, S.; Seifert, F. M.; Solaro, G.

    2009-04-01

    The GlobVolcano project is part of the Data User Element (DUE) programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The objective of the project is to demonstrate EO-based (Earth Observation) services able to support the Volcanological Observatories and other mandate users (Civil Protection, scientific communities of volcanoes) in their monitoring activities. The information service is assessed in close cooperation with the user organizations for different types of active volcano, from various geographical areas in various climatic zones. Users are directly and actively involved in the validation of the Earth Observation products, by comparing them with ground data available at each site. The following EO-based information services have been defined, harmonising the user requirements provided by a worldwide selection of user organizations. - Deformation Mapping - Surface Thermal Anomalies - Volcanic Gas Emission (SO2) - Volcanic Ash Tracking During the first phase of the project (completed in June 2008) a pre-operational information system has been designed, implemented and validated, involving a limited number of test areas and respective user organizations (i.e. Piton de la Fournaise in La Reunion Island, Karthala in Comore Islands, Stromboli, Volcano and Etna in Italy, Soufrière Hills in Montserrat Island, Colima in Mexico, Merapi in Indonesia). The second phase of the project (currently on-going) concerns the service provision on pre-operational basis. Fifteen volcanic sites located in four continents are regularly monitored and as many user organizations are involved and cooperating with the project team. Based on user requirements, the GlobVolcano Information System has been developed following system engineering rules and criteria, besides most recent interoperability standards for geospatial data. The GlobVolcano Information System includes two main elements: 1. The GlobVolcano Data Processing System, which consists of seven of EO data processing subsystems

  17. Volcanoes: Nature's Caldrons Challenge Geochemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews various topics and research studies on the geology of volcanoes. Areas examined include volcanoes and weather, plate margins, origins of magma, magma evolution, United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano hazards program, USGS volcano observatories, volcanic gases, potassium-argon dating activities, and volcano monitoring strategies.…

  18. Volcanoes: Nature's Caldrons Challenge Geochemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews various topics and research studies on the geology of volcanoes. Areas examined include volcanoes and weather, plate margins, origins of magma, magma evolution, United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano hazards program, USGS volcano observatories, volcanic gases, potassium-argon dating activities, and volcano monitoring strategies.…

  19. Galactic Super Volcano Similar to Iceland Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This composite image from NASAs Chandra X-ray Observatory with radio data from the Very Large Array shows a cosmic volcano being driven by a black hole in the center of the M87 galaxy. This eruptio...

  20. Volcanoes: observations and impact

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurber, Clifford; Prejean, Stephanie G.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanoes are critical geologic hazards that challenge our ability to make long-term forecasts of their eruptive behaviors. They also have direct and indirect impacts on human lives and society. As is the case with many geologic phenomena, the time scales over which volcanoes evolve greatly exceed that of a human lifetime. On the other hand, the time scale over which a volcano can move from inactivity to eruption can be rather short: months, weeks, days, and even hours. Thus, scientific study and monitoring of volcanoes is essential to mitigate risk. There are thousands of volcanoes on Earth, and it is impractical to study and implement ground-based monitoring at them all. Fortunately, there are other effective means for volcano monitoring, including increasing capabilities for satellite-based technologies.

  1. The Volcano Adventure Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, Fraser

    2005-05-01

    Adventure travels to volcanoes offer chance encounters with danger, excitement, and romance, plus opportunities to experience scientific enlightenment and culture. To witness a violently erupting volcano and its resulting impacts on landscape, climate, and humanity is a powerful personal encounter with gigantic planetary forces. To study volcano processes and products during eruptions is to walk in the footsteps of Pliny himself. To tour the splendors and horrors of 25 preeminent volcanoes might be the experience of a lifetime, for scientists and nonscientists alike. In The Volcano Adventure Guide, we now have the ultimate tourist volume to lead us safely to many of the world's famous volcanoes and to ensure that we will see the important sites at each one.

  2. Volcanoes, Observations and Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurber, Clifford; Prejean, Stephanie

    Volcanoes are critical geologic hazards that challenge our ability to make long-term forecasts of their eruptive behaviors. They also have direct and indirect impacts on human lives and society. As is the case with many geologic phenomena, the time scales over which volcanoes evolve greatly exceed that of a human lifetime. On the other hand, the time scale over which a volcano can move from inactivity to eruption can be rather short: months, weeks, days, and even hours. Thus, scientific study and monitoring of volcanoes is essential to mitigate risk. There are thousands of volcanoes on Earth, and it is impractical to study and implement ground-based monitoring at them all. Fortunately, there are other effective means for volcano monitoring, including increasing capabilities for satellite-based technologies.

  3. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An Expedition Two crewmember aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  4. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    An Expedition Two crewmember aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  5. Geomorphometric comparative analysis of Latin-American volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camiz, Sergio; Poscolieri, Maurizio; Roverato, Matteo

    2017-07-01

    The geomorphometric classifications of three groups of volcanoes situated in the Andes Cordillera, Central America, and Mexico are performed and compared. Input data are eight local topographic gradients (i.e. elevation differences) obtained by processing each volcano raster ASTER-GDEM data. The pixels of each volcano DEM have been classified into 17 classes through a K-means clustering procedure following principal component analysis of the gradients. The spatial distribution of the classes, representing homogeneous terrain units, is shown on thematic colour maps, where colours are assigned according to mean slope and aspect class values. The interpretation of the geomorphometric classification of the volcanoes is based on the statistics of both gradients and morphometric parameters (slope, aspect and elevation). The latter were used for a comparison of the volcanoes, performed through classes' slope/aspect scatterplots and multidimensional methods. In this paper, we apply the mentioned methodology on 21 volcanoes, randomly chosen from Mexico to Patagonia, to show how it may contribute to detect geomorphological similarities and differences among them. As such, both its descriptive and graphical abilities may be a useful complement to future volcanological studies.

  6. Volcano hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Mastin, Larry G.; Scott, William E.; Schilling, Steven P.

    1997-01-01

    Newberry volcano is a broad shield volcano located in central Oregon. It has been built by thousands of eruptions, beginning about 600,000 years ago. At least 25 vents on the flanks and summit have been active during several eruptive episodes of the past 10,000 years. The most recent eruption 1,300 years ago produced the Big Obsidian Flow. Thus, the volcano's long history and recent activity indicate that Newberry will erupt in the future. The most-visited part of the volcano is Newberry Crater, a volcanic depression or caldera at the summit of the volcano. Seven campgrounds, two resorts, six summer homes, and two major lakes (East and Paulina Lakes) are nestled in the caldera. The caldera has been the focus of Newberry's volcanic activity for at least the past 10,000 years. Other eruptions during this time have occurred along a rift zone on the volcano's northwest flank and, to a lesser extent, the south flank. Many striking volcanic features lie in Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service. The monument includes the caldera and extends along the northwest rift zone to the Deschutes River. About 30 percent of the area within the monument is covered by volcanic products erupted during the past 10,000 years from Newberry volcano. Newberry volcano is presently quiet. Local earthquake activity (seismicity) has been trifling throughout historic time. Subterranean heat is still present, as indicated by hot springs in the caldera and high temperatures encountered during exploratory drilling for geothermal energy. This report describes the kinds of hazardous geologic events that might occur in the future at Newberry volcano. A hazard-zonation map is included to show the areas that will most likely be affected by renewed eruptions. In terms of our own lifetimes, volcanic events at Newberry are not of day-to-day concern because they occur so infrequently; however, the consequences of some types of eruptions can be severe. When Newberry

  7. Mud volcanoes on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, Paul D.

    1991-01-01

    The term mud volcano is applied to a variety of landforms having in common a formation by extrusion of mud from beneath the ground. Although mud is the principal solid material that issues from a mud volcano, there are many examples where clasts up to boulder size are found, sometimes thrown high into the air during an eruption. Other characteristics of mud volcanoes (on Earth) are discussed. The possible presence of mud volcanoes, which are common and widespread on Earth, on Mars is considered.

  8. Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Lowenstern, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Eruption of Yellowstone's Old Faithful Geyser. Yellowstone hosts the world's largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features, which are the surface expression of magmatic heat at shallow depths in the crust. The Yellowstone system is monitored by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO), a partnership among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park, and the University of Utah. YVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Yellowstone and YVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo.

  9. Small Tharsis Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    30 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small volcano located southwest of the giant volcano, Pavonis Mons, near 2.5oS, 109.4oW. Lava flows can be seen to have emanated from the summit region, which today is an irregularly-shaped collapse pit, or caldera. A blanket of dust mantles this volcano. Dust covers most martian volcanoes, none of which are young or active today. This picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  10. Volcano infrasound: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jeffrey Bruce; Ripepe, Maurizio

    2011-09-01

    Exploding volcanoes, which produce intense infrasound, are reminiscent of the veritable explosion of volcano infrasound papers published during the last decade. Volcano infrasound is effective for tracking and quantifying eruptive phenomena because it corresponds to activity occurring near and around the volcanic vent, as opposed to seismic signals, which are generated by both surface and internal volcanic processes. As with seismology, infrasound can be recorded remotely, during inclement weather, or in the dark to provide a continuous record of a volcano's unrest. Moreover, it can also be exploited at regional or global distances, where seismic monitoring has limited efficacy. This paper provides a literature overview of the current state of the field and summarizes applications of infrasound as a tool for better understanding volcanic activity. Many infrasound studies have focused on integration with other geophysical data, including seismic, thermal, electromagnetic radiation, and gas spectroscopy and they have generally improved our understanding of eruption dynamics. Other work has incorporated infrasound into volcano surveillance to enhance capabilities for monitoring hazardous volcanoes and reducing risk. This paper aims to provide an overview of volcano airwave studies (from analog microbarometer to modern pressure transducer) and summarizes how infrasound is currently used to infer eruption dynamics. It also outlines the relative merits of local and regional infrasound surveillance, highlights differences between array and network sensor topologies, and concludes with mention of sensor technologies appropriate for volcano infrasound study.

  11. Reunion Island Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On January 16, 2002, lava that had begun flowing on January 5 from the Piton de la Fournaise volcano on the French island of Reunion abruptly decreased, marking the end of the volcano's most recent eruption. These false color MODIS images of Reunion, located off the southeastern coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, were captured on the last day of the eruption (top) and two days later (bottom). The volcano itself is located on the southeast side of the island and is dark brown compared to the surrounding green vegetation. Beneath clouds (light blue) and smoke, MODIS detected the hot lava pouring down the volcano's flanks into the Indian Ocean. The heat, detected by MODIS at 2.1 um, has been colored red in the January 16 image, and is absent from the lower image, taken two days later on January 18, suggesting the lava had cooled considerably even in that short time. Earthquake activity on the northeast flank continued even after the eruption had stopped, but by January 21 had dropped to a sufficiently low enough level that the 24-hour surveillance by the local observatory was suspended. Reunion is essentially all volcano, with the northwest portion of the island built on the remains of an extinct volcano, and the southeast half built on the basaltic shield of 8,630-foot Piton de la Fournaise. A basaltic shield volcano is one with a broad, gentle slope built by the eruption of fluid basalt lava. Basalt lava flows easily across the ground remaining hot and fluid for long distances, and so they often result in enormous, low-angle cones. The Piton de la Fournaise is one of Earth's most active volcanoes, erupting over 150 times in the last few hundred years, and it has been the subject of NASA research because of its likeness to the volcanoes of Mars. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  12. Reunion Island Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On January 16, 2002, lava that had begun flowing on January 5 from the Piton de la Fournaise volcano on the French island of Reunion abruptly decreased, marking the end of the volcano's most recent eruption. These false color MODIS images of Reunion, located off the southeastern coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, were captured on the last day of the eruption (top) and two days later (bottom). The volcano itself is located on the southeast side of the island and is dark brown compared to the surrounding green vegetation. Beneath clouds (light blue) and smoke, MODIS detected the hot lava pouring down the volcano's flanks into the Indian Ocean. The heat, detected by MODIS at 2.1 um, has been colored red in the January 16 image, and is absent from the lower image, taken two days later on January 18, suggesting the lava had cooled considerably even in that short time. Earthquake activity on the northeast flank continued even after the eruption had stopped, but by January 21 had dropped to a sufficiently low enough level that the 24-hour surveillance by the local observatory was suspended. Reunion is essentially all volcano, with the northwest portion of the island built on the remains of an extinct volcano, and the southeast half built on the basaltic shield of 8,630-foot Piton de la Fournaise. A basaltic shield volcano is one with a broad, gentle slope built by the eruption of fluid basalt lava. Basalt lava flows easily across the ground remaining hot and fluid for long distances, and so they often result in enormous, low-angle cones. The Piton de la Fournaise is one of Earth's most active volcanoes, erupting over 150 times in the last few hundred years, and it has been the subject of NASA research because of its likeness to the volcanoes of Mars. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  13. Volcanoes. A planetary perspective.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, P.

    In this book, the author gives an account of the familiar violent aspects of volcanoes and the various forms that eruptions can take. He explores why volcanoes exist at all, why volcanoes occur where they do, and how examples of major historical eruptions can be interpreted in terms of physical processes. Throughout he attempts to place volcanism in a planetary perspective, exploring the pre-eminent role of submarine volcanism on Earth and the stunning range of volcanic phenomena revealed by spacecraft exploration of the solar system.

  14. Shaking up volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prejean, Stephanie G.; Haney, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Most volcanic eruptions that occur shortly after a large distant earthquake do so by random chance. A few compelling cases for earthquake-triggered eruptions exist, particularly within 200 km of the earthquake, but this phenomenon is rare in part because volcanoes must be poised to erupt in order to be triggered by an earthquake (1). Large earthquakes often perturb volcanoes in more subtle ways by triggering small earthquakes and changes in spring discharge and groundwater levels (1, 2). On page 80 of this issue, Brenguier et al. (3) provide fresh insight into the interaction of large earthquakes and volcanoes by documenting a temporary change in seismic velocity beneath volcanoes in Honshu, Japan, after the devastating Tohoku-Oki earthquake in 2011.

  15. Eruption of Kliuchevskoi volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-04

    STS068-273-060 (4 October 1994) --- Astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour recorded this follow-up 70mm frame of the Kliuchevskoi volcano on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia. The volcano was near its peak on launch day, five days earlier, but only a small steam plume was rising from the summit in this Day 5 photo. Tendrils of ash are airborne on the northern flank of the volcano. Scientists feel that the source of these plumes is from a flow down the mountain's northern flank. The entire summit region is covered in ash. As various members of the six-person crew were using handheld cameras to record the various stages of the volcano, hardware in Endeavour's cargo bay was taking radar data of the event in support of the Space Radar Laboratory (SRL-2) mission.

  16. Volcano Chaiten, Chile

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-15

    Chaiten Volcano, Chile continues to erupt after first exploding in May 2008 following about 9,000 years of inactivity. This image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows vegetation in red. You can clearly see the extent of the plume.

  17. Northern Arizona Volcanoes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-05-01

    Northern Arizona is best known for the Grand Canyon. Less widely known are the hundreds of geologically young volcanoes, at least one of which buried the homes of local residents. This image was acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  18. Eruption of Kliuchevskoi volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-05

    STS068-155-094 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- (Kliuchevskoi Volcano) The crewmembers used a Linhof large format Earth observation camera to photograph this nadir view of the Kamchatka peninsula's week-old volcano. The eruption and the follow-up environmental activity was photographed from 115 nautical miles above Earth. Six NASA astronauts spent a week and a half aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour in support of the Space Radar Laboratory 2 (SRL-2) mission.

  19. Identification of a potential monogenetic volcano using seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, Denis; Bataille, Klaus; Cembrano, Jose; Pavez, Andres; Bashkar, Kundu; Gahalaut, Vineet; Perez, Raul

    2014-05-01

    Some monogenetic volcano fields are very close to cities, such as in New Zealand or in México. A new monogenetic volcano may appear at any place and at any time, which could be potentially hazardous for nearby regions. The ability to detect a new one in advance is obviously very important and challenging. The existence of nearby seismometers may help for such detection. Magma sometimes reaches the surface with the birth of a volcano which can be monogenetic, but in other cases the magma does not reach the surface How to detect such movements? How to be sure the magma will reach the surface? Some observations may detect them, such as seismicity which is distributed as a swarm, with a very peculiar distribution in time and magnitudes. In particular, it is important to distinguish between a tectonic swarm and a volcanic swarm. Scaling laws of seismicity in magnitude and time help to perform such a distinction. We show three cases: a seismic swarm in Chile, in the 2007 Aysen crisis, corresponding to an aborted birth of a monogenetic volcano; a seismic swarm triggered after the 2004 great Mw~9.2 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake over an old monogenetic volcano; and a spatial study of monogenetic volcanoes in Mexico (Michoacán) showing the difficulty to forecast the place and time of the birth of a monogenetic cone without seismological records.

  20. Volcanoes: Coming Up from Under.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Provides specific information about the eruption of Mt. St. Helens in March 1980. Also discusses how volcanoes are formed and how they are monitored. Words associated with volcanoes are listed and defined. (CS)

  1. Volcanoes: Coming Up from Under.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Provides specific information about the eruption of Mt. St. Helens in March 1980. Also discusses how volcanoes are formed and how they are monitored. Words associated with volcanoes are listed and defined. (CS)

  2. Eruption of Kliuchevskoi volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-09

    STS068-258-028 (9 October 1994) --- Astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour recorded this final 70mm frame of the Kliuchevskoi volcano on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia. The volcano was near its peak on launch day, 10 days earlier, but a snowstorm left very little indication of the major event that had occurred here, except for the ash-covered summit and the large black flow down the northern flank of the mountain. As various members of the six-person crew were using handheld cameras to record the various stages of the volcano, hardware in Endeavour's cargo bay was taking radar data of the event in support of the Space Radar Laboratory (SRL-2) mission.

  3. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy in October 2002. Triggered by a series of earthquakes on October 27, 2002, this eruption was one of Etna's most vigorous in years. This image shows the ash plume curving out toward the horizon. The lighter-colored plumes down slope and north of the summit seen in this frame are produced by forest fires set by flowing lava. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  4. Erupting Volcano Mount Etna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Expedition Five crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy in October 2002. Triggered by a series of earthquakes on October 27, 2002, this eruption was one of Etna's most vigorous in years. This image shows the ash plume curving out toward the horizon. The lighter-colored plumes down slope and north of the summit seen in this frame are produced by forest fires set by flowing lava. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

  5. Ice-clad volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waitt, Richard B.; Edwards, B.R.; Fountain, Andrew G.; Huggel, C.; Carey, Mark; Clague, John J.; Kääb, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    An icy volcano even if called extinct or dormant may be active at depth. Magma creeps up, crystallizes, releases gas. After decades or millennia the pressure from magmatic gas exceeds the resistance of overlying rock and the volcano erupts. Repeated eruptions build a cone that pokes one or two kilometers or more above its surroundings - a point of cool climate supporting glaciers. Ice-clad volcanic peaks ring the northern Pacific and reach south to Chile, New Zealand, and Antarctica. Others punctuate Iceland and Africa (Fig 4.1). To climb is irresistible - if only “because it’s there” in George Mallory’s words. Among the intrepid ascents of icy volcanoes we count Alexander von Humboldt’s attempt on 6270-meter Chimborazo in 1802 and Edward Whymper’s success there 78 years later. By then Cotopaxi steamed to the north.

  6. Organizational changes at Earthquakes & Volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Primary responsibility for the preparation of Earthquakes & Volcanoes within the Geological Survey has shifted from the Office of Scientific Publications to the Office of Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Engineering (OEVE). As a consequence of this reorganization, Henry Spall has stepepd down as Science Editor for Earthquakes & Volcanoes(E&V).

  7. On the morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low angle edifices that have convex up topographic profiles and are built primarily by the accumulation of lava flows. This generic view of shields' morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galapagos). Here, the morphometry of over 150 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes, identified inthe Global Volcanism Network database, are analysed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 20 volcanoes identified as stratovolcanoes but having low slopes and being dominantly built up by accumulation of lava flows are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes range from 0.1 to >1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width ratios range from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients, elongation and summit truncation. Correlation and principal component analysis of the obtained quantitative database enables to identify 4 key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Using these descriptors through clustering analysis, a new classification scheme is proposed. It highlights the control of the magma feeding system - either central, along a linear structure, or spatially diffuse - on the resulting shield volcano morphology. Genetic relationships and evolutionary trends between contrasted morphological end-members can be highlighted within this new scheme. Additional findings are that the Galapagos-type morphology with a central deep caldera and steep upper flanks are characteristic of other shields. A series of large oceanic shields have slopes systematically much steeper than the low gradients (<4-8°) generally attributed to large Hawaiian-type shields. Finally, the continuum of morphologies from flat shields to steeper complex volcanic constructs considered as stratovolcanoes calls for a revision of this oversimplified

  8. Eruption of Kliuchevskoi volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-30

    STS068-150-045 (30 September 1994) --- (Kliuchevskoi Volcano) The major eruption that began September 30, 1994 (launch day) got almost immediate coverage by the astronauts aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour. The eruption cloud reached 60,000 feet above sea level, and the winds carried ash as far as 640 miles southeast from the volcano into the North Pacific air routes. This picture was made with a large format Linhof camera. While astronauts used handheld camera's to keep up with the Kamchatka event, instruments in the cargo bay of Endeavour recorded data to support the Space Radar Laboratory (SRL-2) mission.

  9. Volcano-electromagnetic effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, Malcolm J. S.

    2007-01-01

    Volcano-electromagnetic effects—electromagnetic (EM) signals generated by volcanic activity—derive from a variety of physical processes. These include piezomagnetic effects, electrokinetic effects, fluid vaporization, thermal demagnetization/remagnetization, resistivity changes, thermochemical effects, magnetohydrodynamic effects, and blast-excited traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). Identification of different physical processes and their interdependence is often possible with multiparameter monitoring, now common on volcanoes, since many of these processes occur with different timescales and some are simultaneously identified in other geophysical data (deformation, seismic, gas, ionospheric disturbances, etc.). EM monitoring plays an important part in understanding these processes.

  10. Hawaii's volcanoes revealed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eakins, Barry W.; Robinson, Joel E.; Kanamatsu, Toshiya; Naka, Jiro; Smith, John R.; Takahashi, Eiichi; Clague, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Hawaiian volcanoes typically evolve in four stages as volcanism waxes and wanes: (1) early alkalic, when volcanism originates on the deep sea floor; (2) shield, when roughly 95 percent of a volcano's volume is emplaced; (3) post-shield alkalic, when small-volume eruptions build scattered cones that thinly cap the shield-stage lavas; and (4) rejuvenated, when lavas of distinct chemistry erupt following a lengthy period of erosion and volcanic quiescence. During the early alkalic and shield stages, two or more elongate rift zones may develop as flanks of the volcano separate. Mantle-derived magma rises through a vertical conduit and is temporarily stored in a shallow summit reservoir from which magma may erupt within the summit region or be injected laterally into the rift zones. The ongoing activity at Kilauea's Pu?u ?O?o cone that began in January 1983 is one such rift-zone eruption. The rift zones commonly extend deep underwater, producing submarine eruptions of bulbous pillow lava. Once a volcano has grown above sea level, subaerial eruptions produce lava flows of jagged, clinkery ?a?a or smooth, ropy pahoehoe. If the flows reach the ocean they are rapidly quenched by seawater and shatter, producing a steep blanket of unstable volcanic sediment that mantles the upper submarine slopes. Above sea level then, the volcanoes develop the classic shield profile of gentle lava-flow slopes, whereas below sea level slopes are substantially steeper. While the volcanoes grow rapidly during the shield stage, they may also collapse catastrophically, generating giant landslides and tsunami, or fail more gradually, forming slumps. Deformation and seismicity along Kilauea's south flank indicate that slumping is occurring there today. Loading of the underlying Pacific Plate by the growing volcanic edifices causes subsidence, forming deep basins at the base of the volcanoes. Once volcanism wanes and lava flows no longer reach the ocean, the volcano continues to submerge, while

  11. Structure and dynamics of the volcano feeding systems from seismic tomography studies (overview)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, Ivan; Jakovlev, Andrey; West, Michael; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Ivanov, Arseny; Kukarina, Ekaterina

    2013-04-01

    We consider several tomographic models for different volcanoes of the world and discuss some common features in structure and dynamics of the magmatic systems. First we present the result of 4D tomography model for the Klyuchevskoy volcano giving the information on the evolution of magmatic reservoirs in a time period from 1999 to 2009. We observe a clear correlation of seismic property changes with the main activation stages of Klyuchevskoy and Bezymianny volcanoes. The structure beneath the Bezymianny volcano has been enhanced using the data of a temporary seismic network (PIRE) operated between 2007 and 2010. In the derived seismic images, we have detected a conduit which directly links the Bezymianny volcano with the mantle sources. This is different of the Klyuchevskoy volcano, where several intermediate magma sources are observed in the crust. Similar analysis has been performed for the Spurr volcano in Alaska. For this volcano, we have constructed a time-lapse seismic model which covers the period of permanent observations from 1989 to 2012. It can be seen, that during the activation phases of the volcano in 1994 and 2005 a clear conduit beneath the volcano is detected as an anomaly of high Vp/Vs ratio. For the last activation period in 2005, the results were enhanced using the data of relatively dense network which operated for several months. We present also an integral of the results of tomographic inversions for other Alaskan volcanoes (Redoubt, Korovin, Akutan, Augustine, Makushin) and Popokatepetl in Mexico which allow revealing common features of the structure and dynamics of the magmatic systems beneath different volcanoes of the world.

  12. Mexico City, Mexico as seen from STS-62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This image is the clearest photo of Mexico City, Mexico taken from U.S. Manned Spacecraft. North is to the upper right. Mexico City sits in a basin surrounded by large volcanoes. The restricted atmospheric circulation in the basin, coupled with the inevitable air emissions produced by a city of 20 million people has created a critical air pollution problem for the city. In most photographs of the region, Mexico City is obscured by haze. The clarity of the photograph allows many key cultural features to be identified, including all of the major boulevards, the horse track (western part of the city), the university (south of the city), and the museum areas. Large, man-made ponds east of the city also stand out.

  13. Mexico City, Mexico as seen from STS-62

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This image is the clearest photo of Mexico City, Mexico taken from U.S. Manned Spacecraft. North is to the upper right. Mexico City sits in a basin surrounded by large volcanoes. The restricted atmospheric circulation in the basin, coupled with the inevitable air emissions produced by a city of 20 million people has created a critical air pollution problem for the city. In most photographs of the region, Mexico City is obscured by haze. The clarity of the photograph allows many key cultural features to be identified, including all of the major boulevards, the horse track (western part of the city), the university (south of the city), and the museum areas. Large, man-made ponds east of the city also stand out.

  14. Geology of kilauea volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Trusdell, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, but the focus is on its lower cast rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems that develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water. Important features of some of these hydrothermal-convection systems are known through studies of surface geology and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past two centuries, detailed geologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, and paleomagnetic secular-variation studies indicate that Kilauea has erupted frequently from its summit and two radial rift zones during Quaternary time. Petrologic studies have established that Kilauea erupts only tholeiitic basalt. Extensive ash deposits at Kilauea's summit and on its LERZ record locally violent, but temporary, disruptions of local hydrothermal-convection systems during the interaction of water or steam with magma. Recent drill holes on the LERZ provide data on the temperatures of the hydrothermal-convection systems, intensity of dike intrusion, porosity and permeability, and an increasing amount of hydrothermal alteration with depth. The prehistoric and historic record of volcanic and seismic activity indicates that magma will continue to be supplied to deep and shallow reservoirs beneath Kilauea's summit and rift zones and that the volcano will be affected by eruptions and earthquakes for many thousands of years. ?? 1993.

  15. Volcano evolution on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Pete; Wilson, Lionel

    1987-01-01

    The diversity of volcanic activity on Mars throughout geologic time was one of the major factors that has controlled the spatial distribution of surface mineralogies. The traditional view of Martian volcanism is one in which effusive activity has dominated the entire preserved geologic history of the planet, with the minor exception of phreatomagnetic activity and associated volcano ground-ice interactions. However, two lines of evidence have caused reconsidering of this view, and have led to the possible role of explosive volcanism on Mars. First, detailed analysis of high resolution Viking Orbiter images has provided good evidence for explosive activity on Hecates Tholus and Alba Patera. Secondly, the problems believed to exist in associating explosive volcanism with silicic magmas on Mars, and the consequent unusual magmatic evolutionary trend for Martian volcanoes from silica-rich to silica-poor, may now be circumvented by the consideration of basatic plinian activity similar in kind to terrestrial eruptions such as the 1886 Tarawera eruption. The morphologic evidence for an early phase of explosive activity on Mars is briefly reviewed, and a model is presented for the emplacement of ash-flow deposits on Martian volcanoes. The volcanoes Alba Patera and Olympus Mons are considered in this context, along with some of the older Martian tholi and paterae

  16. Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

  17. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This true-color image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 28, 2002. Nyamuragira is situated roughly in the center of this scene, roughly 100 km south of Lake Edward and just north of Lake Kivu (which is mostly obscured by the haze from the erupting volcano and the numerous fires burning in the surrounding countryside). Due south of Lake Kivu is the long, narrow Lake Tanganyika running south and off the bottom center of this scene.

  18. Geology of Kilauea volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.B. . Federal Center); Trusdell, F.A. . Hawaiian Volcano Observatory)

    1993-08-01

    This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, but the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems that develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water. Important features of some of these hydrothermal-convection systems are known through studies of surface geology and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past two centuries, detailed geologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, and paleomagnetic secular-variation studies indicate that Kilauea has erupted frequently from its summit and two radial rift zones during Quaternary time. Petrologic studies have established that Kilauea erupts only tholeiitic basalt. Extensive ash deposits at Kilauea's summit and on its LERZ record locally violent, but temporary, disruptions of local hydrothermal-convection systems during the interaction of water or steam with magma. Recent drill holes on the LERZ provide data on the temperatures of the hydrothermal-convection systems, intensity of dike intrusion, porosity and permeability, and an increasing amount of hydrothermal alteration with depth. The prehistoric and historic record of volcanic and seismic activity indicates that magma will continue to be supplied to deep and shallow reservoirs beneath Kilauea's summit and rift zones and that the volcano will be affected by eruptions and earthquakes for many thousands of years. 71 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Spying on volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Matthew

    2017-07-01

    Active volcanoes can be incredibly dangerous, especially to those who live nearby, but how do you get close enough to observe one in action? Matthew Watson explains how artificial drones are providing volcanologists with insights that could one day save human lives

  20. Volcano evolution on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Pete; Wilson, Lionel

    1987-01-01

    The diversity of volcanic activity on Mars throughout geologic time was one of the major factors that has controlled the spatial distribution of surface mineralogies. The traditional view of Martian volcanism is one in which effusive activity has dominated the entire preserved geologic history of the planet, with the minor exception of phreatomagnetic activity and associated volcano ground-ice interactions. However, two lines of evidence have caused reconsidering of this view, and have led to the possible role of explosive volcanism on Mars. First, detailed analysis of high resolution Viking Orbiter images has provided good evidence for explosive activity on Hecates Tholus and Alba Patera. Secondly, the problems believed to exist in associating explosive volcanism with silicic magmas on Mars, and the consequent unusual magmatic evolutionary trend for Martian volcanoes from silica-rich to silica-poor, may now be circumvented by the consideration of basatic plinian activity similar in kind to terrestrial eruptions such as the 1886 Tarawera eruption. The morphologic evidence for an early phase of explosive activity on Mars is briefly reviewed, and a model is presented for the emplacement of ash-flow deposits on Martian volcanoes. The volcanoes Alba Patera and Olympus Mons are considered in this context, along with some of the older Martian tholi and paterae

  1. The Volcano Adventure Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Rosaly

    2005-02-01

    This guide contains vital information for anyone wishing to visit, explore, and photograph active volcanoes safely and enjoyably. Following an introduction that discusses eruption styles of different types of volcanoes and how to prepare for an exploratory trip that avoids volcanic dangers, the book presents guidelines to visiting 42 different volcanoes around the world. It is filled with practical information that includes tour itineraries, maps, transportation details, and warnings of possible non-volcanic dangers. Three appendices direct the reader to a wealth of further volcano resources in a volume that will fascinate amateur enthusiasts and professional volcanologists alike. Rosaly Lopes is a planetary geology and volcanology specialist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. In addition to her curatorial and research work, she has lectured extensively in England and Brazil and written numerous popular science articles. She received a Latinas in Science Award from the Comision Feminil Mexicana Nacional in 1991 and since 1992, has been a co-organizer of the United Nations/European Space Agency/The Planetary Society yearly conferences on Basic Science for the Benefit of Developing Countries.

  2. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This pair of images was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 26. The image on the left shows the scene in true color. The small purple box in the upper righthand corner marks the location of Nyamuragira's hot summit. The false-color image on the right shows the plume from the volcano streaming southwestward. This image was made using MODIS' channels sensitive at wavelengths from 8.5 to 11 microns. Red pixels indicate high concentrations of sulphur dioxide. Image courtesy Liam Gumley, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  3. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This pair of images was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 26. The image on the left shows the scene in true color. The small purple box in the upper righthand corner marks the location of Nyamuragira's hot summit. The false-color image on the right shows the plume from the volcano streaming southwestward. This image was made using MODIS' channels sensitive at wavelengths from 8.5 to 11 microns. Red pixels indicate high concentrations of sulphur dioxide. Image courtesy Liam Gumley, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  4. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This true-color image was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 28, 2002. Nyamuragira is situated roughly in the center of this scene, roughly 100 km south of Lake Edward and just north of Lake Kivu (which is mostly obscured by the haze from the erupting volcano and the numerous fires burning in the surrounding countryside). Due south of Lake Kivu is the long, narrow Lake Tanganyika running south and off the bottom center of this scene.

  5. Volcanoes and the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, Edited By Joan; Ernst, Gerald G. J.

    2005-10-01

    Volcanoes and the Environment is a comprehensive and accessible text incorporating contributions from some of the world's authorities in volcanology. This book is an indispensable guide for those interested in how volcanism affects our planet's environment. It spans a wide variety of topics from geology to climatology and ecology; it also considers the economic and social impacts of volcanic activity on humans. Topics covered include how volcanoes shape the environment, their effect on the geological cycle, atmosphere and climate, impacts on health of living on active volcanoes, volcanism and early life, effects of eruptions on plant and animal life, large eruptions and mass extinctions, and the impact of volcanic disasters on the economy. This book is intended for students and researchers interested in environmental change from the fields of earth and environmental science, geography, ecology and social science. It will also interest policy makers and professionals working on natural hazards. An all-inclusive text that goes beyond the geological working of volcanoes to consider their environmental and sociological impacts Each chapter is written by one of the world's leading authorities on the subject Accessible to students and researchers from a wide variety of backgrounds

  6. Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

  7. Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Gudmundsson, Magnus T.; Vogfjord, Kristin; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Oddsson, Bjorn; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2016-04-01

    The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a newly developed open-access web resource in English intended to serve as an official source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland GOSVÁ (commenced in 2012), as well as being part of the effort of FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016) on establishing an Icelandic volcano supersite. Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene (the time since the end of the last glaciation - approximately the last 11,500 years). In the last 50 years, over 20 eruptions have occurred in Iceland displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and the distribution lava and tephra. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in numerous scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU through the FP7 project FUTUREVOLC. The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes is a collaboration of the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Civil Protection Department of the National Commissioner of the Iceland Police, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The Catalogue is built up of chapters with texts and various

  8. Catalogue of Icelandic volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrun; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnus; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdottir, Sigrun

    2015-04-01

    Volcanic activity in Iceland occurs on volcanic systems that usually comprise a central volcano and fissure swarm. Over 30 systems have been active during the Holocene. In the last 100 years, over 30 eruptions have occurred displaying very varied activity in terms of eruption styles, eruptive environments, eruptive products and their distribution. Although basaltic eruptions are most common, the majority of eruptions are explosive, not the least due to magma-water interaction in ice-covered volcanoes. Extensive research has taken place on Icelandic volcanism, and the results reported in scientific papers and other publications. In 2010, the International Civil Aviation Organisation funded a 3 year project to collate the current state of knowledge and create a comprehensive catalogue readily available to decision makers, stakeholders and the general public. The work on the Catalogue began in 2011, and was then further supported by the Icelandic government and the EU. The Catalogue forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland (commenced in 2012), and the EU FP7 project FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016), establishing an Icelandic volcano Supersite. The Catalogue is a collaborative effort between the Icelandic Meteorological Office (the state volcano observatory), the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Icelandic Civil Protection, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere. The catalogue is scheduled for opening in the first half of 2015 and once completed, it will be an official publication intended to serve as an accurate and up to date source of information about active volcanoes in Iceland and their characteristics. The Catalogue is an open web resource in English and is composed of individual chapters on each of the volcanic systems. The chapters include information on the geology and structure of the volcano; the eruption history, pattern and products; the known precursory signals

  9. The diversity of mud volcanoes in the landscape of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidov, Tofig

    2014-05-01

    As the natural phenomenon the mud volcanism (mud volcanoes) of Azerbaijan are known from the ancient times. The historical records describing them are since V century. More detail study of this natural phenomenon had started in the second half of XIX century. The term "mud volcano" (or "mud hill") had been given by academician H.W. Abich (1863), more exactly defining this natural phenomenon. All the previous definitions did not give such clear and capacious explanation of it. In comparison with magmatic volcanoes, globally the mud ones are restricted in distribution; they mainly locate within the Alpine-Himalayan, Pacific and Central Asian mobile belts, in more than 30 countries (Columbia, Trinidad Island, Italy, Romania, Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Iran, Pakistan, Indonesia, Burma, Malaysia, etc.). Besides it, the zones of mud volcanoes development are corresponded to zones of marine accretionary prisms' development. For example, the South-Caspian depression, Barbados Island, Cascadia (N.America), Costa-Rica, Panama, Japan trench. Onshore it is Indonesia, Japan, and Trinidad, Taiwan. The mud volcanism with non-accretionary conditions includes the areas of Black Sea, Alboran Sea, the Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana coast), Salton Sea. But new investigations reveal more new mud volcanoes and in places which were not considered earlier as the traditional places of mud volcanoes development (e.g. West Nile Rive delta). Azerbaijan is the classic region of mud volcanoes development. From over 800 world mud volcanoes there are about 400 onshore and within the South-Caspian basin, which includes the territory of East Azerbaijan (the regions of Shemakha-Gobustan and Low-Kura River, Absheron peninsula), adjacent water area of South Caspian (Baku and Absheron archipelagoes) and SW Turkmenistan and represents an area of great downwarping with thick (over 25 km) sedimentary series. Generally, in the modern relief the mud volcanoes represent more or less large uplifts

  10. Volcano-hazard zonation for San Vicente volcano, El Salvador

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Major, J.J.; Schilling, S.P.; Pullinger, C.R.; Escobar, C.D.; Howell, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    San Vicente volcano, also known as Chichontepec, is one of many volcanoes along the volcanic arc in El Salvador. This composite volcano, located about 50 kilometers east of the capital city San Salvador, has a volume of about 130 cubic kilometers, rises to an altitude of about 2180 meters, and towers above major communities such as San Vicente, Tepetitan, Guadalupe, Zacatecoluca, and Tecoluca. In addition to the larger communities that surround the volcano, several smaller communities and coffee plantations are located on or around the flanks of the volcano, and major transportation routes are located near the lowermost southern and eastern flanks of the volcano. The population density and proximity around San Vicente volcano, as well as the proximity of major transportation routes, increase the risk that even small landslides or eruptions, likely to occur again, can have serious societal consequences. The eruptive history of San Vicente volcano is not well known, and there is no definitive record of historical eruptive activity. The last significant eruption occurred more than 1700 years ago, and perhaps long before permanent human habitation of the area. Nevertheless, this volcano has a very long history of repeated, and sometimes violent, eruptions, and at least once a large section of the volcano collapsed in a massive landslide. The oldest rocks associated with a volcanic center at San Vicente are more than 2 million years old. The volcano is composed of remnants of multiple eruptive centers that have migrated roughly eastward with time. Future eruptions of this volcano will pose substantial risk to surrounding communities.

  11. The Alaska Volcano Observatory - Expanded Monitoring of Volcanoes Yields Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brantley, Steven R.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent explosive eruptions at some of Alaska's 52 historically active volcanoes have significantly affected air traffic over the North Pacific, as well as Alaska's oil, power, and fishing industries and local communities. Since its founding in the late 1980s, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has installed new monitoring networks and used satellite data to track activity at Alaska's volcanoes, providing timely warnings and monitoring of frequent eruptions to the aviation industry and the general public. To minimize impacts from future eruptions, scientists at AVO continue to assess volcano hazards and to expand monitoring networks.

  12. Small Syrian Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-498, 29 September 2003

    Today, 29 September 2003, is the first day of southern summer, and the first day of northern winter on Mars. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small volcano in Syria Planum near 12.9oS, 102.7oW. The volcano and surrounding terrain have been thickly mantled by dust; this dust has subsequently been eroded so that it appears textured rather than smooth. The thin, light streaks that crisscross the image are the tracks left by passing dust devils. Not all dust devils on Mars make streaks, and not all streaks are darker than their surroundings--those found in Syria Planum are invariably lighter in tone. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  13. Anatahan Volcano, Mariana Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    In the early hours of February 7, ASTER captured this nighttime thermal infrared image of an eruption of Anatahan Volcano in the central Mariana Islands. The summit of the volcano is bright indicating there is a very hot area there. Streaming to the west is an ash plume, visible by the red color indicating the presence of silicate-rich particles. Dark grey areas are clouds that appear colder than the ocean. Anatahan is a stratovolcano that started erupting in May 2003, forming a new crater.

    The image covers an area of 56.3 x 41.8 km, and is located 16 degrees north latitude and 145.6 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  14. Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A distance of about 80 kilometers (50 miles) separates Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula. Despite this distance, however, the two acted in unison on April 26, 2007, when the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite caught them both erupting simultaneously. ASTER 'sees' a slightly different portion of the light spectrum than human eyes. Besides a portion of visible light, ASTER detects thermal energy, meaning it can detect volcanic activity invisible to human eyes. Inset in each image above is a thermal infrared picture of the volcano's summit. In these insets, dark red shows where temperatures are coolest, and yellowish-white shows where temperatures are hottest, heated by molten lava. Both insets show activity at the crater. In the case of Klyuchevskaya, some activity at the crater is also visible in the larger image. In the larger images, the landscapes around the volcanoes appear in varying shades of blue-gray. Dark areas on the snow surface are likely stains left over from previous eruptions of volcanic ash. Overhead, clouds dot the sky, casting their shadows on the snow, especially southeast of Shiveluch and northeast of Klyuchevskaya. To the northwest of Klyuchevskaya is a large bank of clouds, appearing as a brighter white than the snow surface. Shiveluch (sometimes spelled Sheveluch) and Klyuchevskaya (sometimes spelled Klyuchevskoy or Kliuchevskoi) are both stratovolcanoes composed of alternating layers of hardened lava, solidified ash, and rocks from earlier eruptions. Both volcanoes rank among Kamchatka's most active. Because Kamchatka is part of the Pacific 'Ring of Fire,' the peninsula experiences regular seismic activity as the Pacific Plate slides below other tectonic plates in the Earth's crust. Large-scale plate tectonic activity causing simultaneous volcanic eruptions in Kamchatka is not uncommon.

  15. Ice Volcanoes and Topography

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-10

    Scientists using New Horizons images of Pluto's surface to make 3-D topographic maps have discovered that two of Pluto's mountains, informally named Wright Mons and Piccard Mons, could possibly be ice volcanoes. The color is shown to depict changes in elevation, with blue indicating lower terrain and brown showing higher elevation; green terrains are at intermediate heights. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20050

  16. 4D volcano gravimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Gottsmann, J.; Carbone, D.; Fernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent gravimetric measurements can detect subsurface processes long before magma flow leads to earthquakes or other eruption precursors. The ability of gravity measurements to detect subsurface mass flow is greatly enhanced if gravity measurements are analyzed and modeled with ground-deformation data. Obtaining the maximum information from microgravity studies requires careful evaluation of the layout of network benchmarks, the gravity environmental signal, and the coupling between gravity changes and crustal deformation. When changes in the system under study are fast (hours to weeks), as in hydrothermal systems and restless volcanoes, continuous gravity observations at selected sites can help to capture many details of the dynamics of the intrusive sources. Despite the instrumental effects, mainly caused by atmospheric temperature, results from monitoring at Mt. Etna volcano show that continuous measurements are a powerful tool for monitoring and studying volcanoes.Several analytical and numerical mathematical models can beused to fit gravity and deformation data. Analytical models offer a closed-form description of the volcanic source. In principle, this allows one to readily infer the relative importance of the source parameters. In active volcanic sites such as Long Valley caldera (California, U.S.A.) and Campi Flegrei (Italy), careful use of analytical models and high-quality data sets has produced good results. However, the simplifications that make analytical models tractable might result in misleading volcanological inter-pretations, particularly when the real crust surrounding the source is far from the homogeneous/ isotropic assumption. Using numerical models allows consideration of more realistic descriptions of the sources and of the crust where they are located (e.g., vertical and lateral mechanical discontinuities, complex source geometries, and topography). Applications at Teide volcano (Tenerife) and Campi Flegrei demonstrate the

  17. Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A distance of about 80 kilometers (50 miles) separates Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula. Despite this distance, however, the two acted in unison on April 26, 2007, when the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite caught them both erupting simultaneously. ASTER 'sees' a slightly different portion of the light spectrum than human eyes. Besides a portion of visible light, ASTER detects thermal energy, meaning it can detect volcanic activity invisible to human eyes. Inset in each image above is a thermal infrared picture of the volcano's summit. In these insets, dark red shows where temperatures are coolest, and yellowish-white shows where temperatures are hottest, heated by molten lava. Both insets show activity at the crater. In the case of Klyuchevskaya, some activity at the crater is also visible in the larger image. In the larger images, the landscapes around the volcanoes appear in varying shades of blue-gray. Dark areas on the snow surface are likely stains left over from previous eruptions of volcanic ash. Overhead, clouds dot the sky, casting their shadows on the snow, especially southeast of Shiveluch and northeast of Klyuchevskaya. To the northwest of Klyuchevskaya is a large bank of clouds, appearing as a brighter white than the snow surface. Shiveluch (sometimes spelled Sheveluch) and Klyuchevskaya (sometimes spelled Klyuchevskoy or Kliuchevskoi) are both stratovolcanoes composed of alternating layers of hardened lava, solidified ash, and rocks from earlier eruptions. Both volcanoes rank among Kamchatka's most active. Because Kamchatka is part of the Pacific 'Ring of Fire,' the peninsula experiences regular seismic activity as the Pacific Plate slides below other tectonic plates in the Earth's crust. Large-scale plate tectonic activity causing simultaneous volcanic eruptions in Kamchatka is not uncommon.

  18. Volcanoes and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.

    1982-01-01

    The evidence that volcanic eruptions affect climate is reviewed. Single explosive volcanic eruptions cool the surface by about 0.3 C and warm the stratosphere by several degrees. Although these changes are of small magnitude, there have been several years in which these hemispheric average temperature changes were accompanied by severely abnormal weather. An example is 1816, the "year without summer" which followed the 1815 eruption of Tambora. In addition to statistical correlations between volcanoes and climate, a good theoretical understanding exists. The magnitude of the climatic changes anticipated following volcanic explosions agrees well with the observations. Volcanoes affect climate because volcanic particles in the atmosphere upset the balance between solar energy absorbed by the Earth and infrared energy emitted by the Earth. These interactions can be observed. The most important ejecta from volcanoes is not volcanic ash but sulfur dioxide which converts into sulfuric acid droplets in the stratosphere. For an eruption with its explosive magnitude, Mount St. Helens injected surprisingly little sulfur into the stratosphere. The amount of sulfuric acid formed is much smaller than that observed following significant eruptions and is too small to create major climatic shifts. However, the Mount St. Helens eruption has provided an opportunity to measure many properties of volcanic debris not previously measured and has therefore been of significant value in improving our knowledge of the relations between volcanic activity and climate.

  19. Volcanoes generate devastating waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lockridge, P. )

    1988-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the eruption itself. Some historic records are reviewed. Refined historical data are increasingly useful in predicting future events. The U.S. National Geophysical Data Center/World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics has developed data bases to further tsunami research. These sets of data include marigrams (tide gage records), a wave-damage slide set, digital source data, descriptive material, and a tsunami wall map. A digital file contains information on methods of tsunami generation, location, and magnitude of generating earthquakes, tsunami size, event validity, and references. The data can be used to describe areas mot likely to generate tsunamis and the locations along shores that experience amplified effects from tsunamis.

  20. Volcanoes and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.

    1982-01-01

    The evidence that volcanic eruptions affect climate is reviewed. Single explosive volcanic eruptions cool the surface by about 0.3 C and warm the stratosphere by several degrees. Although these changes are of small magnitude, there have been several years in which these hemispheric average temperature changes were accompanied by severely abnormal weather. An example is 1816, the "year without summer" which followed the 1815 eruption of Tambora. In addition to statistical correlations between volcanoes and climate, a good theoretical understanding exists. The magnitude of the climatic changes anticipated following volcanic explosions agrees well with the observations. Volcanoes affect climate because volcanic particles in the atmosphere upset the balance between solar energy absorbed by the Earth and infrared energy emitted by the Earth. These interactions can be observed. The most important ejecta from volcanoes is not volcanic ash but sulfur dioxide which converts into sulfuric acid droplets in the stratosphere. For an eruption with its explosive magnitude, Mount St. Helens injected surprisingly little sulfur into the stratosphere. The amount of sulfuric acid formed is much smaller than that observed following significant eruptions and is too small to create major climatic shifts. However, the Mount St. Helens eruption has provided an opportunity to measure many properties of volcanic debris not previously measured and has therefore been of significant value in improving our knowledge of the relations between volcanic activity and climate.

  1. Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Larsen, Gudrún; Gudmundsson, Magnús T.; Vogfjörd, Kristin; Jonsson, Trausti; Oddsson, Björn; Reynisson, Vidir; Pagneux, Emmanuel; Barsotti, Sara; Karlsdóttir, Sigrún; Bergsveinsson, Sölvi; Oddsdóttir, Thorarna

    2017-04-01

    The Catalogue of Icelandic Volcanoes (CIV) is a newly developed open-access web resource (http://icelandicvolcanoes.is) intended to serve as an official source of information about volcanoes in Iceland for the public and decision makers. CIV contains text and graphic information on all 32 active volcanic systems in Iceland, as well as real-time data from monitoring systems in a format that enables non-specialists to understand the volcanic activity status. The CIV data portal contains scientific data on all eruptions since Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and is an unprecedented endeavour in making volcanological data open and easy to access. CIV forms a part of an integrated volcanic risk assessment project in Iceland GOSVÁ (commenced in 2012), as well as being part of the European Union funded effort FUTUREVOLC (2012-2016) on establishing an Icelandic volcano supersite. The supersite concept implies integration of space and ground based observations for improved monitoring and evaluation of volcanic hazards, and open data policy. This work is a collaboration of the Icelandic Meteorological Office, the Institute of Earth Sciences at the University of Iceland, and the Civil Protection Department of the National Commissioner of the Iceland Police, with contributions from a large number of specialists in Iceland and elsewhere.

  2. Sulfur volcanoes on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Fink, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    The unusual rheological properties of sulfur are discussed in order to determine the distinctive volcanic flow morphologies which indicate the presence of sulfur volcanoes on the Saturnian satellite Io. An analysis of high resolution Voyager imagery reveals three features which are considered to be possible sulfur volcanoes: Atar Patera, Daedalus Patera, and Kibero Patera. All three features are distinguished by circular-to-oval central masses surrounded by irregular widespread flows. The central zones of the features are interpreted to be domes formed of high temperature sulfur. To confirm the interpretations of the satellite data, molten sulfur was extruded in the laboratory at a temperature of 210 C on a flat surface sloping 0.5 deg to the left. At this temperature, the sulfur formed a viscous domelike mass over the event. As parts of the mass cooled to 170 C the viscosity decreased to a runny stage, forming breakout flows. It is concluded that a case can be made for sulfur volcanoes on Io sufficient to warrant further study, and it is recommended that the upcoming Galileo mission examine these phenomena.

  3. Monitoring volcano threats from space

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, Kenneth A.; Wessels, Rick L.; Ramsey, Michael; Dehn, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Volcanoes can have extremely wide ranging effects. Even a single eruption can cause disastrous climate changes at great distance from the source. Thus, it is important to have a system to monitor even the most remote volcanoes. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on the Terra spacecraft and other satellite sensors provide imagery that is critical to the global volcano monitoring solution.

  4. Introduction to Special Section on How Volcanoes Work: Part 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilling, Robert I.

    1988-12-01

    The nine papers in this issue represent the third, and final, part of the special section on "How Volcanoes Work." Part 1 of this special section was published in the December 1987 [Tilling, 1987] and part 2 in May 1988 [Tilling, 1988] all three parts will be published together as a separate volume titled "How Volcanoes Work" by the American Geophysical Union. In its entirety, the special section gives a good sampling of the nearly 300 papers presented at an international symposium of the same name held in Hilo, Hawaii, in January 1987 in commemoration of the Diamond Jubilee (75th Anniversary) of the founding of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory [Wright and Decker, 1987]. The breadth of topics covered in all three parts of the special section (Table 1) amply attests to the multidisciplinary nature of modern studies of volcanic phenomena. Collectively, these studies also comprise a most fitting tribute to Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., who founded the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1912 and was a dominant force in quantifying the science of volcanology. Not only was Jaggar a scientific visionary, but he also stressed that the scientific knowledge on volcanoes must be applied to reduce death and destruction from volcanic hazards. It is clear from the papers contained in the special section of the Journal of Geophysical Research that great strides have been made in our scientific understanding of how volcanoes work since Jaggar's time. But the destructive eruptions at Mount St. Helens (United States, May 1980), E1 Chichón (Mexico, March-April 1982), and Nevado del Ruiz (Colombia, November 1985), each causing the worst volcanic disaster in the recorded history of each of these countries [Tilling and Newhall, 1987] are tragic reminders that commensurate advances in reducing volcanic risk on a global basis have not yet been achieved.

  5. A Study of the Source Processes of Colima Volcano Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Vargas-Bracamontes, D.; Sanchez, J. J.; Suarez-Plascencia, C.

    2007-12-01

    Colima volcano, considered as Mexico's most active volcano, has presented several intermittent effusive and explosive phases in recent years. During 2005, a sequence of explosive events with VEI less than or equal to 3 occurred. This activity presented the most intense explosions since the seismic network was deployed. Many of the explosive events were recorded by the digital three-component seismic stations operated by the University of Guadalajara and Jalisco State Civil Defense. These signals were recorded not only by stations located on the volcanic edifice, but also by stations on the northern coast of Jalisco (MCUJ, BSSJ) and Ceboruco Volcano at 184, 182 and 200 km distance, respectively. A study of these signals will be presented. Each explosion was preceded by a seismic event. Nevertheless, the located earthquakes preceding the explosions did not show a common source under the volcano structure, which suggests the existence of a complex structure with possibly more than one conduit, this is also confirmed from a first motion analysis for station F03J, located 12 km at north of the volcano. From analysis of the first ten seconds of the seismic signal on F03J using different representations of the seismic signals, such as waveforms, spectra, time-frequency and time-scale analysis, it is suggested that the source processes are non-stationary, implying that for the case of this period, a general model of the source process of the Colima volcano explosions can not be formulated. The size of the events is evaluated using different criteria. A clear relation between the magnitude of the seismic signals and the amplitude of the sonic and infrasonic waves was not observed.

  6. Mexico City, Mexico as seen from STS-62

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-03-05

    STS062-84-028 (4-18 March 1994) --- According to NASA scientists this image is the clearest photo of Mexico City taken from United States manned spacecraft. North is to the upper right. Mexico City sits in a basin surrounded by large volcanoes. The restricted atmospheric circulation in the basin, coupled with the inevitable air emissions produced by a city of 20 million people has created a critical air pollution problem for the city. In most photographs of the region, Mexico City is obscured by haze. Scientists feel the clear atmosphere in this photograph may be due, in part, to the stringent air emission restrictions now in place. The clarity of the photograph allows many key cultural features to be identified, including all of the major boulevards, the horse track (western part of the city), the university (south of the city), and the museum areas. Large, man-made ponds east of the city also stand out.

  7. Effect of the ash Fall on the Human Health at Colima Volcano During 2005-2006.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, A.; Martin, A. L.; Fonseca, R.; Garcia, M.

    2007-05-01

    Colima Volcano in western Mexico had several small ash emitting eruptions during 2005-2006. In this time period we studied the impact of the ash fall on human health through field observations, interviews and health data processing. The volcano was most active in May-June 2005. Data from 15.000 medical records of the Colima and Jalisco State Health Departments show two main health problems in humans during this time: Conjunctivitis was detected in 1,933 people and respiratory disease in 12,630 people in an area of 1,841,283 km2 which was affected by small amounts of ash fall near the volcano in 2005. Ash emissions from Colima Volcano correlate well with increased affections. When emissions increased so did the frequency of these health problems in the population.

  8. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Sherrod, D.R.; Mastin, L.G.; Scott, W.E.

    2008-01-01

    Newberry volcano is a broad shield volcano located in central Oregon, the product of thousands of eruptions, beginning about 600,000 years ago. At least 25 vents on the flanks and summit have been active during the past 10,000 years. The most recent eruption 1,300 years ago produced the Big Obsidian Flow. Thus, the volcano's long history and recent activity indicate that Newberry will erupt in the future. Newberry Crater, a volcanic depression or caldera has been the focus of Newberry's volcanic activity for at least the past 10,000 years. Newberry National Volcanic Monument, which is managed by the U.S. Forest Service, includes the caldera and extends to the Deschutes River. Newberry volcano is quiet. Local earthquake activity (seismicity) has been trifling throughout historic time. Subterranean heat is still present, as indicated by hot springs in the caldera and high temperatures encountered during exploratory drilling for geothermal energy. The report USGS Open-File Report 97-513 (Sherrod and others, 1997) describes the kinds of hazardous geologic events that might occur in the future at Newberry volcano. A hazard-zonation map is included to show the areas that will most likely be affected by renewed eruptions. When Newberry volcano becomes restless, the eruptive scenarios described herein can inform planners, emergency response personnel, and citizens about the kinds and sizes of events to expect. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layers used to produce the Newberry volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 97-513 are included in this data set. Scientists at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory created a GIS data layer to depict zones subject to the effects of an explosive pyroclastic eruption (tephra fallout, pyroclastic flows, and ballistics), lava flows, volcanic gasses, and lahars/floods in Paulina Creek. A separate GIS data layer depicts drill holes on the flanks of Newberry Volcano that were used to estimate the probability

  9. Volcano Hazards Assessment for Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Nathenson, Manuel; Champion, Duane E.; Ramsey, David W.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Ewert, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) is a very large shield-shaped volcano located in northern California where it forms part of the southern Cascade Range of volcanoes. It has erupted hundreds of times during its half-million-year history, including nine times during the past 5,200 years, most recently 950 years ago. This record represents one of the highest eruptive frequencies among Cascade volcanoes and includes a wide variety of different types of lava flows and at least two explosive eruptions that produced widespread fallout. Compared to those of a typical Cascade stratovolcano, eruptive vents at MLV are widely distributed, extending 55 km north-south and 40 km east-west. The total area covered by MLV lavas is >2,000 km2, about 10 times the area of Mount St. Helens, Washington. Judging from its long eruptive history and its frequent eruptions in recent geologic time, MLV will erupt again. Although the probability of an eruption is very small in the next year (one chance in 3,600), the consequences of some types of possible eruptions could be severe. Furthermore, the documented episodic behavior of the volcano indicates that once it becomes active, the volcano could continue to erupt for decades, or even erupt intermittently for centuries, and very likely from multiple vents scattered across the edifice. Owing to its frequent eruptions, explosive nature, and proximity to regional infrastructure, MLV has been designated a 'high threat volcano' by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Volcano Early Warning System assessment. Volcanic eruptions are typically preceded by seismic activity, but with only two seismometers located high on the volcano and no other USGS monitoring equipment in place, MLV is at present among the most poorly monitored Cascade volcanoes.

  10. Remote sensing of Italian volcanos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianchi, R.; Casacchia, R.; Coradini, A.; Duncan, A. M.; Guest, J. E.; Kahle, A.; Lanciano, P.; Pieri, D. C.; Poscolieri, M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a July 1986 remote sensing campaign of Italian volcanoes are reviewed. The equipment and techniques used to acquire the data are described and the results obtained for Campi Flegrei and Mount Etna are reviewed and evaluated for their usefulness for the study of active and recently active volcanoes.

  11. Changing volcanoes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Volcanoes on Jupiter's moon Io are compared in these images from NASA's Galileo spacecraft (right) taken in early September of this year, and from the Voyager spacecraft (left) taken in 1979. Prometheus (bright ring in upper right) was first seen as an erupting volcano by the Voyager spacecraft and still features an active plume. A smaller active plume was discovered at the volcano Culann Patera (dark feature at lower left) by the Galileo spacecraft.

    Prometheus has displayed similar characteristics such as size, shape and brightness to Galileo's cameras as it did to Voyager's. However, several intriguing differences are also apparent. There appears to be a new dark lava flow emanating from the vent of Prometheus, and the plume is now erupting from a position about 75 kilometers (46.5 miles) west from where the hot spot resided in 1979. It is not known if the plume source is the same or if the plume is now emanating from a new source. Overall, scientists studying Galileo images of Io see that a wide variety of surface changes have occurred on Io since 1979. The Galileo image was taken at a range of about 487,000 kilometers (about 302,000 miles) from Io. The Voyager image was taken from about 800,000 kilometers (about 500,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at http:// www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  12. Italian Volcano Supersites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, G.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are among the geohazards that may have a substantial economic and social impact, even at worldwide scale. Large populated regions are prone to volcanic hazards worldwide. Even local phenomena may affect largely populated areas and in some cases even megacities, producing severe economic losses. On a regional or global perspective, large volcanic eruptions may affect the climate for years with potentially huge economic impacts, but even relatively small eruptions may inject large amounts of volcanic ash in the atmosphere and severely affect air traffic over entire continents. One of main challenges of the volcanological community is to continuously monitor and understand the internal processes leading to an eruption, in order to give substantial contributions to the risk reduction. Italian active volcanoes constitute natural laboratories and ideal sites where to apply the cutting-edge volcano observation systems, implement new monitoring systems and to test and improve the most advanced models and methods for investigate the volcanic processes. That's because of the long tradition of volcanological studies resulting into long-term data sets, both in-situ and from satellite systems, among the most complete and accurate worldwide, and the large spectrum of the threatening volcanic phenomena producing high local/regional/continental risks. This contribution aims at presenting the compound monitoring systems operating on the Italian active volcanoes, the main improvements achieved during the recent studies direct toward volcanic hazard forecast and risk reductions and the guidelines for a wide coordinated project aimed at applying the ideas of the GEO Supersites Initiative at Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei / Vesuvius areas.

  13. Volcanoes, Central Java, Indonesia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-08-08

    The island of Java (8.0S, 112.0E), perhaps better than any other, illustrates the volcanic origin of Pacific Island groups. Seen in this single view are at least a dozen once active volcano craters. Alignment of the craters even defines the linear fault line of Java as well as the other some 1500 islands of the Indonesian Archipelago. Deep blue water of the Indian Ocean to the south contrasts to the sediment laden waters of the Java Sea to the north.

  14. Ijen Volcano, Indonesia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-14

    West of Gunung Merapi, East Java, Indonesia, is the Ijen volcano, which has a one-kilometer-wide turquoise-colored acidic crater lake. The lake is the site of a labor-intensive sulfur mining operation, in which sulfur-laden baskets are carried by hand from the crater floor. The lake is recognized as the largest highly acidic crater lake in the world, with a pH of 0.5. The image was acquired 17 September 2008, covers an area of 24 by 39 kilometers, and is located at 8 degrees south, 114.2 degrees east. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21787

  15. Volcanoes, Central Java, Indonesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The island of Java (8.0S, 112.0E), perhaps better than any other, illustrates the volcanic origin of Pacific Island groups. Seen in this single view are at least a dozen once active volcano craters. Alignment of the craters even defines the linear fault line of Java as well as the other some 1500 islands of the Indonesian Archipelago. Deep blue water of the Indian Ocean to the south contrasts to the sediment laden waters of the Java Sea to the north.

  16. Ruiz Volcano: Preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Volcano, Colombia (4.88°N, 75.32°W). All times are local (= GMT -5 hours).An explosive eruption on November 13, 1985, melted ice and snow in the summit area, generating lahars that flowed tens of kilometers down flank river valleys, killing more than 20,000 people. This is history's fourth largest single-eruption death toll, behind only Tambora in 1815 (92,000), Krakatau in 1883 (36,000), and Mount Pelée in May 1902 (28,000). The following briefly summarizes the very preliminary and inevitably conflicting information that had been received by press time.

  17. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Great Sitkin Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Miller, Thomas P.; Nye, Christopher J.

    2003-01-01

    Great Sitkin Volcano is a composite andesitic stratovolcano on Great Sitkin Island (51°05’ N latitude, 176°25’ W longitude), a small (14 x 16 km), circular volcanic island in the western Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Great Sitkin Island is located about 35 kilometers northeast of the community of Adak on Adak Island and 130 kilometers west of the community of Atka on Atka Island. Great Sitkin Volcano is an active volcano and has erupted at least eight times in the past 250 years (Miller and others, 1998). The most recent eruption in 1974 caused minor ash fall on the flanks of the volcano and resulted in the emplacement of a lava dome in the summit crater. The summit of the composite cone of Great Sitkin Volcano is 1,740 meters above sea level. The active crater is somewhat lower than the summit, and the highest point along its rim is about 1,460 meters above sea level. The crater is about 1,000 meters in diameter and is almost entirely filled by a lava dome emplaced in 1974. An area of active fumaroles, hot springs, and bubbling hot mud is present on the south flank of the volcano at the head of Big Fox Creek (see the map), and smaller ephemeral fumaroles and steam vents are present in the crater and around the crater rim. The flanking slopes of the volcano are gradual to steep and consist of variously weathered and vegetated blocky lava flows that formed during Pleistocene and Holocene eruptions. The modern edifice occupies a caldera structure that truncates an older sequence of lava flows and minor pyroclastic rocks on the east side of the volcano. The eastern sector of the volcano includes the remains of an ancestral volcano that was partially destroyed by a northwest-directed flank collapse. In winter, Great Sitkin Volcano is typically completely snow covered. Should explosive pyroclastic eruptions occur at this time, the snow would be a source of water for volcanic mudflows or lahars. In summer, much of the snowpack melts, leaving only a patchy

  18. Monitoring Mount Baker Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malone, S.D.; Frank, D.

    1976-01-01

    Hisotrically active volcanoes in the conterminous United States are restricted to the Cascade Range and extend to the Cascade Range and extend from Mount Baker near the Canadian border to Lassen Peak in northern California. Since 1800 A.D, most eruptive activity has been on a relatively small scale and has not caused loss of life or significant property damage. However, future  volcanism predictably will have more serious effects because of greatly increased use of land near volcanoes during the present century. (See "Appraising Volcanic Hazards of the Cascade Range of the Northwestern United States," Earthquake Inf. Bull., Sept.-Oct. 1974.) The recognition an impending eruption is highly important in order to minimize the potential hazard to people and property. Thus, a substantial increase in hydrothermal activity at Mount Baker in March 1975 ( see "Mount Baker Heating Up," July-Aug. 1975 issue) was regarded as a possible first signal that an eruption might occur, and an intensive monitoring program was undertaken. 

  19. Sulfur Volcanoes on Io?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, R.; Fink, J.

    1985-01-01

    The unusual rheological properties of molten sulfur, in which viscosity decreases approximately four orders of magnitude as it cools from 170 to 120 C, may result in distinctive volcanic flow morphologies that allow sulfur flows and volcanoes to be identified on Io. Search of high resolution Voyager images reveals three features--Atar Patera, Daedalus Patera, and Kibero Patera--considered to be possible sulfur volcanoes based on their morphology. All three average 250 km in diameter and are distinguished by circular-to-oval central masses surrounded by irregular, widespread flows. Geometric relations indicate that the flows were emplaced after the central zone and appear to have emanated from their margins. The central zones are interpreted to be domes representing the high temperature stage of sulfur formed initially upon eruption. Rapid quenching formed a crust which preserved this phase of the emplacement. Upon cooling to 170 C, the sulfur reached a low viscosity runny stage and was released as the thin, widespread flows.

  20. Soufriere Hills Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-11-07

    In this ASTER image of Soufriere Hills Volcano on Montserrat in the Caribbean, continued eruptive activity is evident by the extensive smoke and ash plume streaming towards the west-southwest. Significant eruptive activity began in 1995, forcing the authorities to evacuate more than 7,000 of the island's original population of 11,000. The primary risk now is to the northern part of the island and to the airport. Small rockfalls and pyroclastic flows (ash, rock and hot gases) are common at this time due to continued growth of the dome at the volcano's summit. This image was acquired on October 29, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03880

  1. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Iliamna Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Miller, Thomas P.

    1999-01-01

    Iliamna Volcano is a 3,053-meter-high, ice- and snow-covered stratovolcano in the southwestern Cook Inlet region about 225 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and about 100 kilometers northwest of Homer. Historical eruptions of Iliamna Volcano have not been positively documented; however, the volcano regularly emits steam and gas, and small, shallow earthquakes are often detected beneath the summit area. The most recent eruptions of the volcano occurred about 300 years ago, and possibly as recently as 90-140 years ago. Prehistoric eruptions have generated plumes of volcanic ash, pyroclastic flows, and lahars that extended to the volcano flanks and beyond. Rock avalanches from the summit area have occurred numerous times in the past. These avalanches flowed several kilometers down the flanks and at least two large avalanches transformed to cohesive lahars. The number and distribution of known volcanic ash deposits from Iliamna Volcano indicate that volcanic ash clouds from prehistoric eruptions were significantly less voluminous and probably less common relative to ash clouds generated by eruptions of other Cook Inlet volcanoes. Plumes of volcanic ash from Iliamna Volcano would be a major hazard to jet aircraft using Anchorage International Airport and other local airports, and depending on wind direction, could drift at least as far as the Kenai Peninsula and beyond. Ashfall from future eruptions could disrupt oil and gas operations and shipping activities in Cook Inlet. Because Iliamna Volcano has not erupted for several hundred years, a future eruption could involve significant amounts of ice and snow that could lead to the formation of large lahars and downstream flooding. The greatest hazards in order of importance are described below and shown on plate 1.

  2. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Kanaga Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Miller, Thomas P.; Nye, Christopher J.

    2002-01-01

    Kanaga Volcano is a steep-sided, symmetrical, cone-shaped, 1307 meter high, andesitic stratovolcano on the north end of Kanaga Island (51°55’ N latitude, 177°10’ W longitude) in the western Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Kanaga Island is an elongated, low-relief (except for the volcano) island, located about 35 kilometers west of the community of Adak on Adak Island and is part of the Andreanof Islands Group of islands. Kanaga Volcano is one of the 41 historically active volcanoes in Alaska and has erupted numerous times in the past 11,000 years, including at least 10 eruptions in the past 250 years (Miller and others, 1998). The most recent eruption occurred in 1993-95 and caused minor ash fall on Adak Island and produced blocky aa lava flows that reached the sea on the northwest and west sides of the volcano (Neal and others, 1995). The summit of the volcano is characterized by a small, circular crater about 200 meters in diameter and 50-70 meters deep. Several active fumaroles are present in the crater and around the crater rim. The flanking slopes of the volcano are steep (20-30 degrees) and consist mainly of blocky, linear to spoonshaped lava flows that formed during eruptions of late Holocene age (about the past 3,000 years). The modern cone sits within a circular caldera structure that formed by large-scale collapse of a preexisting volcano. Evidence for eruptions of this preexisting volcano mainly consists of lava flows exposed along Kanaton Ridge, indicating that this former volcanic center was predominantly effusive in character. In winter (October-April), Kanaga Volcano may be covered by substantial amounts of snow that would be a source of water for lahars (volcanic mudflows). In summer, much of the snowpack melts, leaving only a patchy distribution of snow on the volcano. Glacier ice is not present on the volcano or on other parts of Kanaga Island. Kanaga Island is uninhabited and is part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge, managed by

  3. Lava dome emplacement and destruction cyclic process at Popocatépetl volcano, Mexico: The distribution of dome volumes and its consequences on the hazard associated to the current activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Gomez-Vazquez, Angel; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Popocatépetl is a large stratovolcano surrounded by one of the most densely populated areas of the world. Its eruptive history includes a wide range of eruption types, from moderate effusive episodes to Plinian phases and even massive debris avalanches. The historical record of the last 500 years describes several episodes similar to the current one that began in 1994. The current activity is characterized by the cyclic emplacement and destruction of lava domes, with a count of at least 38 between 1996 and 2015. The previous historical episode (1919-1927) probably emplaced around 10 domes. However, 1200 yBP a major Plinian phase affected human settlements, and at least six other major explosive eruptions have been reported in the Holocene. Such eruptive history leads to question the significance of the ongoing activity in the context of a volcano capable to produce extreme eruptions. The analysis of dome parameters characterizing the current activity offers some insight into the underlying physical process sustaining the eruption, and the conditions that may signal an evolution into higher-intensity phases. Although the process is irregular and non-stationary in the time domain, the maximum volumes and thicknesses of the domes estimated from aerial images are well described by an exponential survival distribution N=No*exp(-V/Va), where No is the number of emplaced domes, Va their average volume, and N the number of domes with volumes equal or exceeding V. A variable buoyancy force caused by the variable density contrast between volatile-rich magma and country rock may offer a possible interpretation of the process. The cyclic character of magma ascent may be a consequence of a self-regulating process caused by intense outgassing of magma controlling buoyancy. The proposed scaling law may then be a consequence of the gravitational energy release of the buoyancy force governing the height and volume of the domes. A significant departure from that scaling law in

  4. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  5. Volcano spacing and plate rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, U. )

    1991-04-01

    In-plane stresses, which accompany the flexural deformation of the lithosphere under the load adjacent volcanoes, may govern the spacing of volcanoes in hotspot provinces. Specifically, compressive stresses in the vicinity of a volcano prevent new upwelling in this area, forcing a new volcano to develop at a minimum distance that is equal to the distance in which the radial stresses change from compressional to tensile (the inflection point). If a volcano is modeled as a point load on a thin elastic plate, then the distance to the inflection point is proportional to the thickness of the plate to the power of 3/4. Compilation of volcano spacing in seven volcanic groups in East Africa and seven volcanic groups of oceanic hotspots shows significant correlation with the elastic thickness of the plate and matches the calculated distance to the inflection point. In contrast, volcano spacing in island arcs and over subduction zones is fairly uniform and is much larger than predicted by the distance to the inflection point, reflecting differences in the geometry of the source and the upwelling areas.

  6. Volcano spacing and plate rigidity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    1991-01-01

    In-plane stresses, which accompany the flexural deformation of the lithosphere under the load of adjacent volcanoes, may govern the spacing of volcanoes in hotspot provinces. Specifically, compressive stresses in the vicinity of a volcano prevent new upwelling in this area, forcing a new volcano to develop at a minimum distance that is equal to the distance in which the radial stresses change from compressional to tensile (the inflection point). If a volcano is modeled as a point load on a thin elastic plate, then the distance to the inflection point is proportional to the thickness of the plate to the power of 3/4. Compilation of volcano spacing in seven volcanic groups in East Africa and seven volcanic groups of oceanic hotspots shows significant correlation with the elastic thickness of the plate and matches the calculated distance to the inflection point. In contrast, volcano spacing in island arcs and over subduction zones is fairly uniform and is much larger than predicted by the distance to the inflection point, reflecting differences in the geometry of the source and the upwelling areas.

  7. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  8. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  9. Activity at Shiveluch Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA image acquired Sept 7, 2010 Shiveluch (also spelled Sheveluch) is one of the largest and most active volcanoes on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula. It has been spewing ash and steam intermittently—with occasional dome collapses, pyroclastic flows, and lava flows, as well—for the past decade. Shiveluch is a stratovolcano, a steep-sloped formation of alternating layers of hardened lava, ash, and rocks thrown out by earlier eruptions. A lava dome has been growing southwest of the 3,283-meter (10,771-foot) summit. The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite acquired this image on September 7, 2010. Brown and tan debris—perhaps ash falls, perhaps mud from lahars—covers the southern landscape of the volcano, while the hills on the northern side remain covered in snow and ice. The Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) reported that seismic activity at Shiveluch was "above background levels" from September 3-10. Ash plumes rose to an altitude of 6.5 kilometers (21,300 feet) on September 3-4, and gas-and-ash plumes were reported on September 7, when this image was acquired. According to the Smithsonian Institution's volcano program, at least 60 large eruptions of Shiveluch have occurred during the current Holocene Epoch of geological history. Intermittent explosive eruptions began in the 1990s, and the largest historical eruptions from Shiveluch occurred in 1854 and 1964. NASA Earth Observatory image created by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using EO-1 ALI data provided courtesy of the NASA EO-1 team. Caption by Mike Carlowicz. Instrument: EO-1 - ALI Credit: NASA Earth Observatory NASA Goddard Space Flight Center contributes to NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s endeavors by providing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on

  10. Counterfactual Volcano Hazard Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Gordon

    2013-04-01

    , if a major storm surge happens to arrive at a high astronomical tide, sea walls may be overtopped and flooding may ensue. In the domain of geological hazards, periods of volcanic unrest may generate precursory signals suggestive of imminent volcanic danger, but without leading to an actual eruption. Near-miss unrest periods provide vital evidence for assessing the dynamics of volcanoes close to eruption. Where the volcano catalogue has been diligently revised to include the maximum amount of information on the phenomenology of unrest periods, dynamic modelling and hazard assessment may be significantly refined. This is illustrated with some topical volcano hazard examples, including Montserrat and Santorini.

  11. Soufriere Hills Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this ASTER image of Soufriere Hills Volcano on Montserrat in the Caribbean, continued eruptive activity is evident by the extensive smoke and ash plume streaming towards the west-southwest. Significant eruptive activity began in 1995, forcing the authorities to evacuate more than 7,000 of the island's original population of 11,000. The primary risk now is to the northern part of the island and to the airport. Small rockfalls and pyroclastic flows (ash, rock and hot gases) are common at this time due to continued growth of the dome at the volcano's summit.

    This image was acquired on October 29, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is

  12. Groundwater at Mayon, Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albano, S. E.; Sandoval, T.; Toledo, R.

    2001-12-01

    Around Mayon Volcano, Philippines, anecdotal evidence and rainfall normalized spring discharge data suggest that the water table 8 km from the summit of the volcano drops prior to eruptions. Residents report that they had to deepen their shallow wells in 1993 (some before and others following the eruption). In some cases they had to dig as far as 5 meters deeper to reach the water table. Significant decreases in spring discharge were recorded prior to the 1999 phreatic explosions and explosive eruption in 2000. A lesser decrease in spring discharge was recorded prior to the 2001 explosive eruptions. The cause of the observed correlation is not yet understood. Mechanisms consider include decrease in rainfall and boiling away of groundwater due to magmatic intrusion. Dilatation of the volcano may cause an increase in pore pressure, opening of cracks, and inflation of the ground surface that would all result in lower water table levels and decreases in spring discharges. Lack of significant hydraulic precursors prior to the 2001 eruptions may be due to a sustained state of inflation following the eruption of 2000. To better understand the relationship between changes in the volcanic system and changes in the groundwater system surrounding Mayon, instruments were installed about eight kilometers from the summit immediately following the explosive eruption of 26 July 2001. Parameters monitored include rainfall data, water levels in four shallow wells, discharge in the main river basin, and spring discharge. The aquifers at eight kilometers are predominantly poorly sorted lahar flow deposits. Characterization of these highly permeable aquifers has been conducted. Preliminary data include porosity ranges, hydraulic conductivity estimates, and response to rainfall. Water samples have been collected that are intended for geo-chemical analysis to determine if the water is predominantly meteoric or magmatic in origin. Numerical modeling of the system using the above mentioned

  13. The California Volcano Observatory: Monitoring the state's restless volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stovall, Wendy K.; Marcaida, Mae; Mangan, Margaret T.

    2014-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions happen in the State of California about as frequently as the largest earthquakes on the San Andreas Fault Zone. At least 10 eruptions have taken place in California in the past 1,000 years—most recently at Lassen Peak in Lassen Volcanic National Park (1914 to 1917) in the northern part of the State—and future volcanic eruptions are inevitable. The U.S. Geological Survey California Volcano Observatory monitors the State's potentially hazardous volcanoes.

  14. Monitoring active volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most spectacular, awesomely beautiful, and at times destructive displays of natural energy is an erupting volcano, belching fume and ash thousands of meters into the atmosphere and pouring out red-hot molten lava in fountains and streams. Countless eruptions in the geologic past have produced volcanic rocks that form much of the Earth's present surface. The gradual disintegration and weathering of these rocks have yielded some of the richest farmlands in the world, and these fertile soils play a significant role in sustaining our large and growing population. Were it not for volcanic activity, the Hawaiian Islands with their sugar cane and pineapple fields and magnificent landscapes and seascapes would not exist to support their residents and to charm their visitors. Yet, the actual eruptive processes are catastrophic and can claim life and property.

  15. Active submarine volcano sampled

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.

    1983-01-01

    On June 4, 1982, two full dredge hauls of fresh lava were recovered from the upper flanks of Kavachi submarine volcano, Solomon Islands, in the western Pacific Ocean, from the water depths of 1,200 and 2,700 feet. the shallower dredge site was within 0.5 mile of the active submarine vent shown at the surface by an area of slick water, probably caused by gas emissions. Kavachi is a composite stratovolcano that has been observed to erupt every year or two for at least the last 30 years (see photographs). An island formed in 1952, 1961, 1965, and 1978; but, in each case, it rapidly eroded below sea level. The latest eruption was observed by Solair pilots during the several weeks up to and including May 18, 1982. 

  16. Living with volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Thomas L.; Pierson, Thomas C.

    1992-01-01

    The 1980 cataclysmic eruption of Mount St. Helens (Lipman and Mullineaux, 1981) in southwestern Washington ushered in a decade marked by more worldwide volcanic disasters and crises than any other in recorded history. Volcanoes killed more people (over 28,500) in the 1980's than during the 78 years following 1902 eruption of Mount Pelee (Martinique). Not surprisingly, volcanic phenomena and attendant hazards received attention from government authorities, the news media, and the general public. As part of this enhanced global awareness of volcanic hazards, the U.S. Geological Survey (Bailey and others, 1983) in response to the eruptions or volcanic unrest during the 1980's at Mount St. Helens and Redoubt are still erupting intermittently, and the caldera unrest at Long Valley also continues, albeit less energetically than during the early 1980's.

  17. A Diminutive Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 15 October 2003

    The small Tharsis volcano called Biblis Patera is nearly lost amongst its gigantic neighbors. With a height of less than 10,000 feet, it is even dwarfed by many volcanoes on Earth. The gaping caldera of Biblis Patera shows evidence for multiple episodes of collapse, producing the concentric topography seen in the image. Several slope streaks are visible, indicators of a more recent and much smaller form of collapse: avalanches of the dust that thickly mantles the terrain.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 2.3, Longitude 236.4 East (123.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Chiliques Volcano, Chile

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-04-19

    A January 6, 2002 ASTER nighttime thermal infrared image of Chiliques volcano in Chile shows a hot spot in the summit crater and several others along the upper flanks of the edifice, indicating new volcanic activity. Examination of an earlier nighttime thermal infrared image from May 24, 2000 showed no thermal anomaly. Chiliques volcano was previously thought to be dormant. Rising to an elevation of 5778 m, Chiliques is a simple stratovolcano with a 500-m-diameter circular summit crater. This mountain is one of the most important high altitude ceremonial centers of the Incas. It is rarely visited due to its difficult accessibility. Climbing to the summit along Inca trails, numerous ruins are encountered; at the summit there are a series of constructions used for rituals. There is a beautiful lagoon in the crater that is almost always frozen. The daytime image was acquired on November 19, 2000 and was created by displaying ASTER bands 1,2 and 3 in blue, green and red. The nighttime image was acquired January 6, 2002, and is a color-coded display of a single thermal infrared band. The hottest areas are white, and colder areas are darker shades of red. Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude. Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03493

  19. Unzen Volcano, Japan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-11-13

    This is a space radar image of the area around the Unzen volcano, on the west coast of Kyushu Island in southwestern Japan. Unzen, which appears in this image as a large triangular peak with a white flank near the center of the peninsula, has been continuously active since a series of powerful eruptions began in 1991. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 93rd orbit on April 15, 1994. The image shows an area 41.5 kilometers by 32.8 kilometers (25.7 miles by 20.3 miles) that is centered at 32.75 degrees north latitude and 130.15 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left of the image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (vertically transmitted and received); green represents the average of L-band and C-band (vertically transmitted and received); blue represents the C-band (vertically transmitted and received). Unzen is one of 15 "Decade" volcanoes identified by the scientific community as posing significant potential threats to large local populations. The city of Shimabara sits along the coast at the foot of Unzen on its east and northeast sides. At the summit of Unzen a dome of thick lava has been growing continuously since 1991. Collapses of the sides of this dome have generated deadly avalanches of hot gas and rock known as pyroclastic flows. Volcanologists can use radar image data to monitor the growth of lava domes, to better understand and predict potentially hazardous collapses. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00504

  20. Flank tectonics of Martian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Paul J.; Squyres, Steven W.; Carr, Michael H.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of the numerous terraces on the flanks of the Olympus Mons volcano on Mars, seen on space images to be arranged in a roughly concentric pattern, is investigated. The images of the volcano show that the base of each terrace is marked by a modest but abrupt change in slope, suggesting that these terraces could be thrust faults caused by a compressional failure of the cone. The mechanism of faulting and the possible effect of the interior structure of Olympus Mons was investigated using a numerical model for elastic stresses within a Martian volcano, constructed for that purpose. Results of the analysis supports the view that the terraces on Olympus Mons, as well as on other three Martian volcanoes, including Ascraeus Mons, Arsia Mons, and Pavonis Mons are indeed thrust faults.

  1. Klyuchevskaya, Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, CIS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-05-06

    STS039-151-179 (28 April-6 May 1991) --- A large format frame of one of the USSR's volcanic complex (Kamchatka area) with the active volcano Klyuchevskaya (Kloo-chevs'-ska-ya), 15,584 feet in elevation. The last reported eruption of the volcano was on April 8, but an ash and steam plume extending to the south was observed by the STS-39 crew almost three weeks later. The south side of the volcano is dirty from the ash fall and landslide activity. The summit is clearly visible, as is the debris flow from an earlier eruption. Just north of the Kamchatka River is Shiveluch, a volcano which was active in early April. There are more than 100 volcanic edifices recognized on Kamchatka, with 15 classified as active.

  2. Volcano warning systems: Chapter 67

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregg, Chris E.; Houghton, Bruce F.; Ewert, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Messages conveying volcano alert level such as Watches and Warnings are designed to provide people with risk information before, during, and after eruptions. Information is communicated to people from volcano observatories and emergency management agencies and from informal sources and social and environmental cues. Any individual or agency can be both a message sender and a recipient and multiple messages received from multiple sources is the norm in a volcanic crisis. Significant challenges to developing effective warning systems for volcanic hazards stem from the great diversity in unrest, eruption, and post-eruption processes and the rapidly advancing digital technologies that people use to seek real-time risk information. Challenges also involve the need to invest resources before unrest to help people develop shared mental models of important risk factors. Two populations of people are the target of volcano notifications–ground- and aviation-based populations, and volcano warning systems must address both distinctly different populations.

  3. Layers in Arsia Mons Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-28

    This observance from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter covers a pit in the lower West flank of Arsia Mons, one of the four giant volcanos of the Tharsis region. Many layers are exposed in the pit, probably marking individual lava flows.

  4. Venus - Volcanos in Guinevere Planitia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-03-14

    This image from NASA Magellan spacecraft, with radar illumination from west to east, shows three unusual volcanoes located in the Guinevere Planitia lowland. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00261

  5. Mahukona: The missing Hawaiian volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.O.; Muenow, D.W. ); Kurz, M.D. )

    1990-11-01

    New bathymetric and geochemical data indicate that a seamount west of the island of Hawaii, Mahukona, is a Hawaiian shield volcano. Mahukona has weakly alkalic lavas that are geochemically distinct. They have high {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios (12-21 times atmosphere), and high H{sub 2}O and Cl contents, which are indicative of the early state of development of Hawaiian volcanoes. The He and Sr isotopic values for Mahukona lavas are intermediate between those for lavas from Loihi and Manuna Loa volcanoes and may be indicative of a temporal evolution of Hawaiian magmas. Mahukona volcano became extinct at about 500 ka, perhaps before reaching sea level. It fills the previously assumed gap in the parallel chains of volcanoes forming the southern segment of the Hawaiian hotspot chain. The paired sequence of volcanoes was probably caused by the bifurcation of the Hawaiian mantle plume during its ascent, creating two primary areas of melting 30 to 40 km apart that have persisted for at least the past 4 m.y.

  6. Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrat, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Mount St. Helens' eruption has taught geologists invaluable lessons about how volcanoes work. Such information will be crucial in saving lives and property when other dormant volcanoes in the northwestern United States--and around the world--reawaken, as geologists predict they someday will. Since 1912, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have pioneered the study of volcanoes through work on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. In Vancouver, Wash., scientists at the Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory are studying the after-effects of Mount St. Helens' catalysmic eruption as well as monitoring a number of other now-dormant volcanoes in the western United States. This paper briefly reviews the similarities and differences between the Hawaiian and Washington volcanoes and what these volcanoes are teaching the volcanologists.

  7. Application of TanDEM-X interferometry in volcano monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubanek, Julia; Westerhaus, Malte; Heck, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    Traditional repeat-pass SAR interferometry (InSAR) has proven to be useful to monitor deformations at active volcanoes. In this so called monostatic mode, images recorded during different satellite passes from slightly changing antenna positions are used to map topographic changes of the earth surface on centimeter scale. However, problems regarding changing atmospheric conditions between the different satellite passes influence the quality of the results. Moreover, the backscattering conditions between two passes need to be tolerably stable to be used for interferometry. As far as the changes in the volcanic environment are slow, repeat-pass InSAR is a great monitoring tool. However, fast changing backscattering conditions result in low coherency, making a classical interferometric deformation analysis impossible. Especially dome-building volcanoes can change on meter scale per second in active phases, preventing the observation with repeat-pass InSAR. To solve these problems, we are currently testing the ability of the German TanDEM-X mission to monitor large deformations at active volcanos. The bistatic TanDEM-X mission consists of two radar satellites (TerraSAR-X and TanDEM-X) flying in a close formation, taking images of the earth surface at the same time. In contrast to the repeat pass mode, this results in two nearly absolutely coherent images, which means that there are no atmospheric disturbances and backscattering errors in the interferometric pair. This allows generating digital elevation models (DEMs) at several times. A simple time series analysis of the models enables for the first time to quantify large topographic changes at active dome-building volcanoes. We chose Volcán de Colima, Mexico as test site. While being a dome building volcano, phases of quiescence are interrupted every few years by dome collapses, pyroclastic flows and deposition of volcanic material. At present, Volcán de Colima seems to be stable. Nevertheless, an explosion at the

  8. Vertical Motions of Oceanic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Oceanic volcanoes offer abundant evidence of changes in their elevations through time. Their large-scale motions begin with a period of rapid subsidence lasting hundreds of thousands of years caused by isostatic compensation of the added mass of the volcano on the ocean lithosphere. The response is within thousands of years and lasts as long as the active volcano keeps adding mass on the ocean floor. Downward flexure caused by volcanic loading creates troughs around the growing volcanoes that eventually fill with sediment. Seismic surveys show that the overall depression of the old ocean floor beneath Hawaiian volcanoes such as Mauna Loa is about 10 km. This gross subsidence means that the drowned shorelines only record a small part of the total subsidence the islands experienced. In Hawaii, this history is recorded by long-term tide-gauge data, the depth in drill holes of subaerial lava flows and soil horizons, former shorelines presently located below sea level. Offshore Hawaii, a series of at least 7 drowned reefs and terraces record subsidence of about 1325 m during the last half million years. Older sequences of drowned reefs and terraces define the early rapid phase of subsidence of Maui, Molokai, Lanai, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau. Volcanic islands, such as Maui, tip down toward the next younger volcano as it begins rapid growth and subsidence. Such tipping results in drowned reefs on Haleakala as deep as 2400 m where they are tipped towards Hawaii. Flat-topped volcanoes on submarine rift zones also record this tipping towards the next younger volcano. This early rapid subsidence phase is followed by a period of slow subsidence lasting for millions of years caused by thermal contraction of the aging ocean lithosphere beneath the volcano. The well-known evolution along the Hawaiian chain from high to low volcanic island, to coral island, and to guyot is due to this process. This history of rapid and then slow subsidence is interrupted by a period of minor uplift

  9. Chiliques volcano, Chile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A January 6, 2002 ASTER nighttime thermal infrared image of Chiliques volcano in Chile shows a hot spot in the summit crater and several others along the upper flanks of the edifice, indicating new volcanic activity. Examination of an earlier nighttime thermal infrared image from May 24,2000 showed no thermal anomaly. Chiliques volcano was previously thought to be dormant. Rising to an elevation of 5778 m, Chiliques is a simple stratovolcano with a 500-m-diameter circular summit crater. This mountain is one of the most important high altitude ceremonial centers of the Incas. It is rarely visited due to its difficult accessibility. Climbing to the summit along Inca trails, numerous ruins are encountered; at the summit there are a series of constructions used for rituals. There is a beautiful lagoon in the crater that is almost always frozen.

    The daytime image was acquired on November 19, 2000 and was created by displaying ASTER bands 1,2 and 3 in blue, green and red. The nighttime image was acquired January 6, 2002, and is a color-coded display of a single thermal infrared band. The hottest areas are white, and colder areas are darker shades of red. Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude.

    Both images cover an area of 7.5 x 7.5 km, and are centered at 23.6 degrees south latitude, 67.6 degrees west longitude.

    These images were acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A

  10. Northern Arizona Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Northern Arizona is best known for the Grand Canyon. Less widely known are the hundreds of geologically young volcanoes, at least one of which buried the homes of local residents. San Francisco Mtn., a truncated stratovolcano at 3887 meters, was once a much taller structure (about 4900 meters) before it exploded some 400,000 years ago a la Mt. St. Helens. The young cinder cone field to its east includes Sunset Crater, that erupted in 1064 and buried Native American homes. This ASTER perspective was created by draping ASTER image data over topographic data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Elevation Data.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 20.4 by 24.6 kilometers (12.6 by 15.2 miles) Location: 35.3 degrees North latitude, 111

  11. "Mediterranean volcanoes vs. chain volcanoes in the Carpathians"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivarean, Radu

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes have always represent an attractive subject for students. Europe has a small number of volcanoes and Romania has none active ones. The curricula is poor in the study of volcanoes. We want to make a parallel between the Mediterranean active volcanoes and the old extinct ones in the Oriental Carpathians. We made an comparison of the two regions in what concerns their genesis, space and time distribution, the specific relief and the impact in the landscape, consequences of their activities, etc… The most of the Mediterranean volcanoes are in Italy, in the peninsula in Napoli's area - Vezuviu, Campi Flegrei, Puzzoli, volcanic islands in Tirenian Sea - Ischia, Aeolian Islands, Sicily - Etna and Pantelleria Island. Santorini is located in Aegean Sea - Greece. Between Sicily and Tunisia there are 13 underwater volcanoes. The island called Vulcano, it has an active volcano, and it is the origin of the word. Every volcano in the world is named after this island, just north of Sicily. Vulcano is the southernmost of the 7 main Aeolian Islands, all volcanic in origin, which together form a small island arc. The cause of the volcanoes appears to be a combination of an old subduction event and tectonic fault lines. They can be considered as the origin of the science of volcanology. The volcanism of the Carpathian region is part of the extensive volcanic activity in the Mediterranean and surrounding regions. The Carpathian Neogene/Quaternary volcanic arc is naturally subdivided into six geographically distinct segments: Oas, Gutai, Tibles, Calimani, Gurghiu and Harghita. It is located roughly between the Carpathian thrust-and-fold arc to the east and the Transylvanian Basin to the west. It formed as a result of the convergence between two plate fragments, the Transylvanian micro-plate and the Eurasian plate. Volcanic edifices are typical medium-sized andesitic composite volcanoes, some of them attaining the caldera stage, complicated by submittal or peripheral domes

  12. Thermal surveillance of volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A systematic aircraft program to monitor changes in the thermal emission from volcanoes of the Cascade Range has been initiated and is being carried out in conjunction with ERTS-1 thermal surveillance experiments. Night overflights by aircraft equipped with thermal infrared scanners sensitive to terrestrial emission in the 4-5.5 and 8-14 micron bands are currently being carried out at intervals of a few months. Preliminary results confirm that Mount Rainier, Mount Baker, Mount Saint Helens, Mount Shasta, and the Lassen area continue to be thermally active, although with the exception of Lassen which erupted between 1914 and 1917, and Mount Saint Helens which had a series of eruptions between 1831 and 1834, there has been no recent eruptive activity. Excellent quality infrared images recorded over Mount Rainier, as recently as April, 1972, show similar thermal patterns to those reported in 1964-1966. Infrared images of Mount Baker recorded in November 1970 and again in April 1972 revealed a distinct array of anomalies 1000 feet below the crater rim and associated with fumaroles or structures permitting convective heat transfer to the surface.

  13. Sand Volcano Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Sand boil or sand volcano measuring 2 m (6.6 ft.) in length erupted in median of Interstate Highway 80 west of the Bay Bridge toll plaza when ground shaking transformed loose water-saturated deposit of subsurface sand into a sand-water slurry (liquefaction) in the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Vented sand contains marine-shell fragments. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: J.C. Tinsley, U.S. Geological Survey)

  14. Sand Volcano Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Sand boil or sand volcano measuring 2 m (6.6 ft.) in length erupted in median of Interstate Highway 80 west of the Bay Bridge toll plaza when ground shaking transformed loose water-saturated deposit of subsurface sand into a sand-water slurry (liquefaction) in the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Vented sand contains marine-shell fragments. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: J.C. Tinsley, U.S. Geological Survey)

  15. Chapopote Asphalt Volcano may have been generated by supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovland, M.; MacDonald, I. R.; Rueslåtten, H.; Johnsen, H. K.; Naehr, T.; Bohrmann, G.

    Asphalt volcanoes and lava-like flows of solidified asphalt on the seafloor (Figure 1) were first discovered and described by MacDonald et al. [2004]. The flows covered more than one square kilometer of a dissected salt dome at abyssal depths (˜3000 m) in the southern Gulf of Mexico. “Chapopote” (93°26‧W, 21°54‧N) was one of two asphalt volcanoes they discovered. MacDonald et al. determined that the apparently fresh asphalt must initially have flowed in a hot state, and subsequently chilled, contracted, and solidified, much in the same way as normal lava does on the surface of the Earth.The two asphalt-volcanoes discovered occur at the apex of salt domes that pierce through the seafloor. These “piercement salt domes,” known as the Campeche Knolls, are pertinent features of the deep Campeche Sedimentary Basin, which has a sediment thickness of about 10 km. According to conventional theory [Vendeville and Jackson, 1992], piercement salt domes represent “salt diapirs” that have risen up, due partly to density contrasts between salt and clay/sand from the “mother salt” located between 7 and 10 km below seafloor. A salt diapir is a vertical body of sub-surface salt, which is most often circular in cross section, is one to several kilometers in diameter, and can be 8-10 km high.

  16. Ambient Seismic Noise Studies of The Colima Volcano Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, C. R.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Colima Volcanic Complex (CVC) located in the western sector of the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt is the most active Mexican volcano. The CVC is part of the active Colima Rift, a regional north south striking extensional structure. We use ambient seismic noise recorded by the Mapping the Riviera Subduction Zone (MARS) and the Colima Volcano Deep Seismic Experiment (CODEX) deployed in western Mexico. We compute the cross-correlations of vertical component continuous records ambient noise data to extracted empirical Greens functions. These functions provide signals compared to direct Rayleigh waves. Then we perform two analyses: dispersion curves and seismic tomography. Using the estimated Green function, the group and phase speeds as a function of period can be measured to obtain detailed images of Rayleigh wave group dispersion curves and therefore velocity structure between station pairs. We also pick the arrival times of Rayleigh waves for a given period to estimated lateral variations in velocity for a given period using 2D tomography. To sampling different depths we perform the inversions for different periods that together provide information on velocity variations with depth. The study aim to better understand the geometry, and the seismic surface wave velocity structure of the CVC and relate it with the volcano structure, the geology setting of the region.

  17. Seismic signals from Lascar Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, M.

    1999-03-01

    Lascar, the most active volcano in northern Chile, lies near the center of the region studied during the Proyecto de Investigación Sismológica de la Cordillera Occidental 94 (PISCO '94). Its largest historical eruption occurred on 19 April 1993. By the time of the PISCO '94 deployment, its activity consisted mainly of a plume of water vapor and SO 2. In April and May 1994, three short-period, three-component seismometers were placed on the flanks of the volcano, augmenting the broadband seismometer located on the NW flank of the volcano during the entire deployment. In addition to the usual seismic signals recorded at volcanoes, Lascar produced two unique tremor types: Rapid-fire tremor and harmonic tremor. Rapid-fire tremor appears to be a sequence of very similar, but independent, "impulsive" events with a large range of amplitudes. Harmonic tremor, on the other hand, is a continuous, cyclic signal lasting several hours. It is characterized by a spectrum with peaks at a fundamental frequency and its integer multiples. Both types of tremor seem to be generated by movement of fluids in the volcano, most probably water, steam or gas.

  18. Lifespans of Cascade Arc volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    Compiled argon ages reveal inception, eruptive episodes, ages, and durations of Cascade stratovolcanoes and their ancestral predecessors. Geologic mapping and geochronology show that most Cascade volcanoes grew episodically on multiple scales with periods of elevated behavior lasting hundreds of years to ca. 100 kyr. Notable examples include the paleomag-constrained, few-hundred-year-long building of the entire 15-20 km3 Shastina edifice at Mt. Shasta, the 100 kyr-long episode that produced half of Mt. Rainier's output, and the 30 kyr-long episode responsible for all of South and Middle Sister. Despite significant differences in timing and rates of construction, total durations of active and ancestral volcanoes at discrete central-vent locations are similar. Glacier Peak, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Adams, Mt. Hood, and Mt. Mazama all have inception ages of 400-600 ka. Mt. St. Helens, Mt. Jefferson, Newberry Volcano, Mt. Shasta and Lassen Domefield have more recent inception ages of 200-300 ka. Only the Sisters cluster and Mt. Baker have established eruptive histories spanning less than 50 kyr. Ancestral volcanoes centered 5-20 km from active stratocones appear to have similar total durations (200-600 kyr), but are less well exposed and dated. The underlying mechanisms governing volcano lifecycles are cryptic, presumably involving tectonic and plumbing changes and perhaps circulation cycles in the mantle wedge, but are remarkably consistent along the arc.

  19. Earthquakes & Volcanoes, Volume 23, Number 6, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Gordon, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Earthquakes and Volcanoes is published bimonthly by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide current information on earthquakes and seismology, volcanoes, and related natural hazards of interest to both generalized and specialized readers.

  20. Ubinas Volcano Activity in Peruvian Andes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-05-01

    On April 28, 2014, NASA Terra spacecraft spotted signs of activity at Ubinas volcano in the Peruvian Andes. The appearance of a new lava dome in March 2014 and frequent ash emissions are signs of increasing activity at this volcano.

  1. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Eyjafjallajökull Volcano Plume Heights     View ... and stereo plume   Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano produced its second major ash plume of 2010 beginning on May 7. Unlike ...

  2. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Eyjafjallajökull Volcano Ash Plume Particle Properties     ... satellite flew over Iceland's erupting Eyjafjallajökull volcano on April 19, 2010, its Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) ...

  3. NASA Spacecraft Captures Fury of Russian Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-27

    This nighttime thermal infrared image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows Shiveluch volcano, one of the largest and most active volcanoes in Russia Kamchatka Peninsula; the bright, hot summit lava dome is evident in the center of the image.

  4. Unzen Volcano, Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This is a space radar image of the area around the Unzen volcano, on the west coast of Kyushu Island in southwestern Japan. Unzen, which appears in this image as a large triangular peak with a white flank near the center of the peninsula, has been continuously active since a series of powerful eruptions began in 1991. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 93rd orbit on April 15, 1994. The image shows an area 41.5 kilometers by 32.8 kilometers (25.7 miles by 20.3 miles) that is centered at 32.75 degrees north latitude and 130.15 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left of the image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (vertically transmitted and received); green represents the average of L-band and C-band (vertically transmitted and received); blue represents the C-band (vertically transmitted and received). Unzen is one of 15 'Decade' volcanoes identified by the scientific community as posing significant potential threats to large local populations. The city of Shimabara sits along the coast at the foot of Unzen on its east and northeast sides. At the summit of Unzen a dome of thick lava has been growing continuously since 1991. Collapses of the sides of this dome have generated deadly avalanches of hot gas and rock known as pyroclastic flows. Volcanologists can use radar image data to monitor the growth of lava domes, to better understand and predict potentially hazardous collapses.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The

  5. Volcanoes and global catastrophes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simkin, Tom

    1988-01-01

    The search for a single explanation for global mass extinctions has let to polarization and the controversies that are often fueled by widespread media attention. The historic record shows a roughly linear log-log relation between the frequency of explosive volcanic eruptions and the volume of their products. Eruptions such as Mt. St. Helens 1980 produce on the order of 1 cu km of tephra, destroying life over areas in the 10 to 100 sq km range, and take place, on the average, once or twice a decade. Eruptions producing 10 cu km take place several times a century and, like Krakatau 1883, destroy life over 100 to 1000 sq km areas while producing clear global atmospheric effects. Eruptions producting 10,000 cu km are known from the Quaternary record, and extrapolation from the historic record suggests that they occur perhaps once in 20,000 years, but none has occurred in historic time and little is known of their biologic effects. Even larger eruptions must also exist in the geologic record, but documentation of their volume becomes increasingly difficult as their age increases. The conclusion is inescapable that prehistoric eruptions have produced catastrophes on a global scale: only the magnitude of the associated mortality is in question. Differentiation of large magma chambers is on a time scale of thousands to millions of years, and explosive volcanoes are clearly concentrated in narrow belts near converging plate margins. Volcanism cannot be dismissed as a producer of global catastrophes. Its role in major extinctions is likely to be at least contributory and may well be large. More attention should be paid to global effects of the many huge eruptions in the geologic record that dwarf those known in historic time.

  6. Global Volcano Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Loughlin, S. C.; Cottrell, E.; Valentine, G.; Newhall, C.; Jolly, G.; Papale, P.; Takarada, S.; Crosweller, S.; Nayembil, M.; Arora, B.; Lowndes, J.; Connor, C.; Eichelberger, J.; Nadim, F.; Smolka, A.; Michel, G.; Muir-Wood, R.; Horwell, C.

    2012-04-01

    Over 600 million people live close enough to active volcanoes to be affected when they erupt. Volcanic eruptions cause loss of life, significant economic losses and severe disruption to people's lives, as highlighted by the recent eruption of Mount Merapi in Indonesia. The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland in 2010 illustrated the potential of even small eruptions to have major impact on the modern world through disruption of complex critical infrastructure and business. The effects in the developing world on economic growth and development can be severe. There is evidence that large eruptions can cause a change in the earth's climate for several years afterwards. Aside from meteor impact and possibly an extreme solar event, very large magnitude explosive volcanic eruptions may be the only natural hazard that could cause a global catastrophe. GVM is a growing international collaboration that aims to create a sustainable, accessible information platform on volcanic hazard and risk. We are designing and developing an integrated database system of volcanic hazards, vulnerability and exposure with internationally agreed metadata standards. GVM will establish methodologies for analysis of the data (eg vulnerability indices) to inform risk assessment, develop complementary hazards models and create relevant hazards and risk assessment tools. GVM will develop the capability to anticipate future volcanism and its consequences. NERC is funding the start-up of this initiative for three years from November 2011. GVM builds directly on the VOGRIPA project started as part of the GRIP (Global Risk Identification Programme) in 2004 under the auspices of the World Bank and UN. Major international initiatives and partners such as the Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program, State University of New York at Buffalo - VHub, Earth Observatory of Singapore - WOVOdat and many others underpin GVM.

  7. Mount Rainier: A decade volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Donald A.; Malone, Stephen D.; Samora, Barbara A.

    Mount Rainier, the highest (4392 m) volcano in the Cascade Range, towers over a population of more than 2.5 million in the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, and its drainage system via the Columbia River potentially affects another 500,000 residents of southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon (Figure 1). Mount Rainier is the most hazardous volcano in the Cascades in terms of its potential for magma-water interaction and sector collapse. Major eruptions, or debris flows even without eruption, pose significant dangers and economic threats to the region. Despite such hazard and risk, Mount Rainier has received little study; such important topics as its petrologic and geochemical character, its proximal eruptive history, its susceptibility to major edifice failure, and its development over time have been barely investigated. This situation may soon change because of Mount Rainier's recent designation as a “Decade Volcano.”

  8. Volcano Hazards - A National Threat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2006-01-01

    When the violent energy of a volcano is unleashed, the results are often catastrophic. The risks to life, property, and infrastructure from volcanoes are escalating as more and more people live, work, play, and travel in volcanic regions. Since 1980, 45 eruptions and 15 cases of notable volcanic unrest have occurred at 33 U.S. volcanoes. Lava flows, debris avalanches, and explosive blasts have invaded communities, swept people to their deaths, choked major riverways, destroyed bridges, and devastated huge tracts of forest. Noxious volcanic gas emissions have caused widespread lung problems. Airborne ash clouds have disrupted the health, lives, and businesses of hundreds of thousands of people; caused millions of dollars of aircraft damage; and nearly brought down passenger flights.

  9. High Rate GPS on Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattia, M.

    2005-12-01

    The high rate GPS data processing can be considered as the "new deal" in geodetic monitoring of active volcanoes. Before an eruption, infact, transient episodes of ground displacements related to the dynamics of magmatic fluids can be revealed through a careful analysis of high rate GPS data. In the very first phases of an eruption the real time processing of high rate GPS data can be used by the authorities of Civil Protection to follow the opening of fractures field on the slopes of the volcanoes. During an eruption large explosions, opening of vents, migration of fractures fields, landslides and other dangerous phenomena can be followed and their potential of damage estimated by authorities. Examples from the recent eruption of Stromboli volcano and from the current activities of high rate GPS monitoring on Mt. Etna are reported, with the aim to show the great potential and the perspectives of this technique.

  10. Remote sensing of volcanos and volcanic terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Francis, Peter W.; Wilson, Lionel; Pieri, David C.; Self, Stephen; Rose, William I.; Wood, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of using remote sensing to monitor potentially dangerous volcanoes is discussed. Thermal studies of active volcanoes are considered along with using weather satellites to track eruption plumes and radar measurements to study lava flow morphology and topography. The planned use of orbiting platforms to study emissions from volcanoes and the rate of change of volcanic landforms is considered.

  11. Multiphase modelling of mud volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Simone; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Clarke, Amanda B.

    2015-04-01

    Mud volcanism is a worldwide phenomenon, classically considered as the surface expression of piercement structures rooted in deep-seated over-pressured sediments in compressional tectonic settings. The release of fluids at mud volcanoes during repeated explosive episodes has been documented at numerous sites and the outflows resemble the eruption of basaltic magma. As magma, the material erupted from a mud volcano becomes more fluid and degasses while rising and decompressing. The release of those gases from mud volcanism is estimated to be a significant contributor both to fluid flux from the lithosphere to the hydrosphere, and to the atmospheric budget of some greenhouse gases, particularly methane. For these reasons, we simulated the fluid dynamics of mud volcanoes using a newly-developed compressible multiphase and multidimensional transient solver in the OpenFOAM framework, taking into account the multicomponent nature (CH4, CO2, H2O) of the fluid mixture, the gas exsolution during the ascent and the associated changes in the constitutive properties of the phases. The numerical model has been tested with conditions representative of the LUSI, a mud volcano that has been erupting since May 2006 in the densely populated Sidoarjo regency (East Java, Indonesia), forcing the evacuation of 40,000 people and destroying industry, farmland, and over 10,000 homes. The activity of LUSI mud volcano has been well documented (Vanderkluysen et al., 2014) and here we present a comparison of observed gas fluxes and mud extrusion rates with the outcomes of numerical simulations. Vanderkluysen, L.; Burton, M. R.; Clarke, A. B.; Hartnett, H. E. & Smekens, J.-F. Composition and flux of explosive gas release at LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, 15, 2932-2946

  12. Of Rings and Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    show it. The bright spot close to the equator is the remnant of a giant storm in Saturn's extended atmosphere that has lasted more than 5 years. The present photo provides what is possibly the sharpest view of the ring system ever achieved from a ground-based observatory . Many structures are visible, the most obvious being the main ring sections, the inner C-region (here comparatively dark), the middle B-region (here relatively bright) and the outer A-region, and also the obvious dark "divisions", including the well-known, broad Cassini division between the A- and B-regions, as well as the Encke division close to the external edge of the A-region and the Colombo division in the C-region. Moreover, many narrow rings can be seen at this high image resolution , in particular within the C-region - they may be compared with those seen by the Voyager spacecraft during the flybys, cf. the weblinks below. This image demonstrates the capability of NAOS-CONICA to observe also extended objects with excellent spatial resolution. It is a composite of four short-exposure images taken through the near-infrared H (wavelength 1.6 µm) and K (2.2 µm) filters. This observation was particularly difficult because of the motion of Saturn during the exposure. To provide the best possible images, the Adaptive Optics system of NAOS was pointed towards the Saturnian moon Tethys , while the image of Saturn was kept at a fixed position on the CONICA detector by means of "differential tracking" (compensating for the different motions in the sky of Saturn and Tethys). This is also why the (faint) image of Tethys - visible south of Saturn (i.e., below the planet in PR Photo 04a/02 ) - appears slightly trailed. Io - volcanoes and sulphur ESO PR Photo 04b/02 ESO PR Photo 04b/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 478 pix - 39k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 955 pix - 112k] ESO PR Photo 04c/02 ESO PR Photo 04c/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 469 pix - 58k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 937 pix - 368k] Caption : PR Photo 04b/02 shows

  13. GlobVolcano pre-operational services for global monitoring active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampellini, Lucia; Ratti, Raffaella; Borgström, Sven; Seifert, Frank Martin; Peltier, Aline; Kaminski, Edouard; Bianchi, Marco; Branson, Wendy; Ferrucci, Fabrizio; Hirn, Barbara; van der Voet, Paul; van Geffen, J.

    2010-05-01

    The GlobVolcano project (2007-2010) is part of the Data User Element programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The project aims at demonstrating Earth Observation (EO) based integrated services to support the Volcano Observatories and other mandate users (e.g. Civil Protection) in their monitoring activities. The information services are assessed in close cooperation with the user organizations for different types of volcano, from various geographical areas in various climatic zones. In a first phase, a complete information system has been designed, implemented and validated, involving a limited number of test areas and respective user organizations. In the currently on-going second phase, GlobVolcano is delivering pre-operational services over 15 volcanic sites located in three continents and as many user organizations are involved and cooperating with the project team. The set of GlobVolcano offered EO based information products is composed as follows: Deformation Mapping DInSAR (Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry) has been used to study a wide range of surface displacements related to different phenomena (e.g. seismic faults, volcanoes, landslides) at a spatial resolution of less than 100 m and cm-level precision. Permanent Scatterers SAR Interferometry method (PSInSARTM) has been introduced by Politecnico of Milano as an advanced InSAR technique capable of measuring millimetre scale displacements of individual radar targets on the ground by using multi-temporal data-sets, estimating and removing the atmospheric components. Other techniques (e.g. CTM) have followed similar strategies and have shown promising results in different scenarios. Different processing approaches have been adopted, according to data availability, characteristic of the area and dynamic characteristics of the volcano. Conventional DInSAR: Colima (Mexico), Nyiragongo (Congo), Pico (Azores), Areanal (Costa Rica) PSInSARTM: Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island

  14. Large landslides from oceanic volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holcomb, R.T.; Searle, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    Large landslides are ubiquitous around the submarine flanks of Hawaiian volcanoes, and GLORIA has also revealed large landslides offshore from Tristan da Cunha and El Hierro. On both of the latter islands, steep flanks formerly attributed to tilting or marine erosion have been reinterpreted as landslide headwalls mantled by younger lava flows. These landslides occur in a wide range of settings and probably represent only a small sample from a large population. They may explain the large volumes of archipelagic aprons and the stellate shapes of many oceanic volcanoes. Large landslides and associated tsunamis pose hazards to many islands. -from Authors

  15. Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adleman, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at

  16. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Waitt, Richard B.

    1998-01-01

    Augustine Volcano is a 1250-meter high stratovolcano in southwestern Cook Inlet about 280 kilometers southwest of Anchorage and within about 300 kilometers of more than half of the population of Alaska. Explosive eruptions have occurred six times since the early 1800s (1812, 1883, 1935, 1964-65, 1976, and 1986). The 1976 and 1986 eruptions began with an initial series of vent-clearing explosions and high vertical plumes of volcanic ash followed by pyroclastic flows, surges, and lahars on the volcano flanks. Unlike some prehistoric eruptions, a summit edifice collapse and debris avalanche did not occur in 1812, 1935, 1964-65, 1976, or 1986. However, early in the 1883 eruption, a portion of the volcano summit broke loose forming a debris avalanche that flowed to the sea. The avalanche initiated a small tsunami reported on the Kenai Peninsula at English Bay, 90 kilometers east of the volcano. Plumes of volcanic ash are a major hazard to jet aircraft using Anchorage International and other local airports. Ashfall from future eruptions could disrupt oil and gas operations and shipping activities in Cook Inlet. Eruptions similar to the historical and prehistoric eruptions are likely in Augustine's future.

  17. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Nye, Christopher J.

    2001-01-01

    Mount Spurr volcano is an ice- and snow-covered stratovolcano complex located in the north-central Cook Inlet region about 100 kilometers west of Anchorage, Alaska. Mount Spurr volcano consists of a breached stratovolcano, a lava dome at the summit of Mount Spurr, and Crater Peak vent, a small stratocone on the south flank of Mount Spurr volcano. Historical eruptions of Crater Peak occurred in 1953 and 1992. These eruptions were relatively small but explosive, and they dispersed volcanic ash over areas of interior, south-central, and southeastern Alaska. Individual ash clouds produced by the 1992 eruption drifted east, north, and south. Within a few days of the eruption, the south-moving ash cloud was detected over the North Atlantic. Pyroclastic flows that descended the south flank of Crater Peak during both historical eruptions initiated volcanic-debris flows or lahars that formed temporary debris dams across the Chakachatna River, the principal drainage south of Crater Peak. Prehistoric eruptions of Crater Peak and Mount Spurr generated clouds of volcanic ash, pyroclastic flows, and lahars that extended to the volcano flanks and beyond. A flank collapse on the southeast side of Mount Spurr generated a large debris avalanche that flowed about 20 kilometers beyond the volcano into the Chakachatna River valley. The debris-avalanche deposit probably formed a large, temporary debris dam across the Chakachatna River. The distribution and thickness of volcanic-ash deposits from Mount Spurr volcano in the Cook Inlet region indicate that volcanic-ash clouds from most prehistoric eruptions were as voluminous as those produced by the 1953 and 1992 eruptions. Clouds of volcanic ash emitted from the active vent, Crater Peak, would be a major hazard to all aircraft using Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport and other local airports and, depending on wind direction, could drift a considerable distance beyond the volcano. Ash fall from future eruptions could disrupt many

  18. Laboratory volcano geodesy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Færøvik Johannessen, Rikke; Galland, Olivier; Mair, Karen

    2014-05-01

    intrusion can be excavated and photographed from several angles to compute its 3D shape with the same photogrammetry method. Then, the surface deformation pattern can be directly compared with the shape of underlying intrusion. This quantitative dataset is essential to quantitatively test and validate classical volcano geodetic models.

  19. Io Volcano Observer (IVO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Spencer, J.; Thomas, N.; Johnson, T.; Christensen, P.; Wurz, P.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Shinohara, C.; Girard, T.

    2009-04-01

    In early FY2008, NASA solicited study concepts for Discovery/Scout-class missions that would be enabled by use of 2 Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRGs). We proposed an Io Volcano Observer (IVO) study concept, because the ASRGs enable pointing flexibility and a high data rate from a low-cost mission in Jupiter orbit. Io presents a rich array of inter-connected orbital, geophysical, atmospheric, and plasma phenomena and is the only place in the Solar System (including Earth) where we can watch very large-scale silicate volcanic processes in action. Io is the best place to study tidal heating, which greatly expands the habitable zones of planetary systems. The coupled orbital-tidal evolution of Io and Europa is key to understanding the histories of both worlds. IVO utilizes an elliptical orbit inclined > 45° to Jupiter's orbital plane with repeated fast flybys of Io. Io will have nearly constant illumination at each flyby, which facilitates monitoring of changes over time. The view of Io on approach and departure will be nearly polar, enabling unique measurement and monitoring of polar heat flow (key to tidal heating models), equatorial plumes, and magnetospheric interactions. We expect to collect and return 20 Gbits per flyby via 34-m DSN stations, >1000 times the Io data return of Galileo. The minimal payload we considered included (1) a narrow-angle camera, (2) a thermal mapper, (3) an ion and neutral mass spectrometer, and (4) a pair of fluxgate magnetometers. The camera will acquire global km-scale monitoring and sampling down to 10 m/pixel or better. One key objective is to acquire nearly simultaneous (<0.1 s) multispectral measurements to determine the peak lava temperatures, which in turn constrains the temperature and rheology of Io's mantle and whether or not the heat flow is in equilibrium with tidal heating. The thermal mapper will be similar to THEMIS on Mars Odyssey, but with bandpasses designed to monitor volcanic activity, measure heat

  20. On the geometric form of volcanoes - Comment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The model of Lacey et al. (1981) accounting for the geometric regularity and approximate cone shape of volcanoes is discussed. It is pointed out that, contrary to the model, volcano eruptions do not occur randomly in elevation and azimuth, but are commonly restricted to summit vents and a few well defined flank zones, so that the form of a volcano is determined by its vent locations and styles of eruption. Other false predictions of the model include the constancy of lava volumes at all vent elevations, the increase in volcano radius as the square root of time, a critical height for volcano growth, the influence of planetary gravity on volcano height and the negligible influence of ash falls and flows and erosional deposition. It is noted that the model of Shteynberg and Solov'yev, in which cone shape is related to stresses due to increasing cone height, may provide a better understanding of volcano morphology.

  1. Mount Rainier, a decade volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, S.C.; Hooper, P.R. . Dept. of Geology); Eggers, A.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Mount Rainier, recently designated as a decade volcano, is a 14,410 foot landmark which towers over the heavily populated southern Puget Sound Lowland of Washington State. It last erupted in the mid-1800's and is an obvious threat to this area, yet Rainier has received little detailed study. Previous work has divided Rainier into two distinct pre-glacial eruptive episodes and one post-glacial eruptive episode. In a pilot project, the authors analyzed 253 well-located samples from the volcano for 27 major and trace elements. Their objective is to test the value of chemical compositions as a tool in mapping the stratigraphy and understanding the eruptive history of the volcano which they regard as prerequisite to determining the petrogenesis and potential hazard of the volcano. The preliminary data demonstrates that variation between flows is significantly greater than intra-flow variation -- a necessary condition for stratigraphic use. Numerous flows or groups of flows can be distinguished chemically. It is also apparent from the small variation in Zr abundances and considerable variation in such ratios as Ba/Nb that fractional crystallization plays a subordinate role to some form of mixing process in the origin of the Mount Rainier lavas.

  2. Klyuchevskaya, Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, CIS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-05-06

    STS039-77-010 (28 April 1991) --- The Kamchatka Peninsula, USSR. This oblique view of the eastern margin of the Kamchatka Peninsula shows pack-ice along the coast, which is drifting along with local currents and delineates the circulation patterns. Also visible are the Kamchatka River (left of center), and the volcanic complex with the active volcano Klyuchevskaya (Kloo-chevs'-ska-ya), 15,584 feet in elevation. The last reported eruption of the volcano was on April 8, but an ash and steam plume extending to the south can be seen in this photograph, taken almost three weeks later (April 28). On April 29, the crew observed and photographed the volcano again, and it was no longer visibly active. However, the flanks of the mountain are dirty from the ash fall. Just north of the Kamchatka River (to the left, just off frame) is Shiveluch, a volcano which was active in early April. There are more than 100 volcanic edifices recognized on Kamchatka, with 15 classified as active.

  3. What Happened to Our Volcano?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiante, Elaine Silva

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an investigative approach to "understanding Earth changes." The author states that students were familiar with earthquakes and volcanoes in other regions of the world but never considered how the land beneath their feet had experienced changes over time. Here, their geology unit helped them understand…

  4. Infrared surveys of Hawaiian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fischer, W. A.; Moxham, R.M.; Polcyn, F.; Landis, G.H.

    1964-01-01

    Aerial infrared-sensor surveys of Kilauea volcano have depicted the areal extent and the relative intensity of abnormal thermal features in the caldera area of the volcano and along its associated rift zones. Many of these anomalies show correlation with visible steaming and reflect convective transfer of heat to the surface from subterranean sources. Structural details of the volcano, some not evident from surface observation, are also delineated by their thermal abnormalities. Several changes were observed in the patterns of infrared emission during the period of study; two such changes show correlation in location with subsequent eruptions, but the cause-and-effect relationship is uncertain.Thermal anomalies were also observed on the southwest flank of Mauna Loa; images of other volcanoes on the island of Hawaii, and of Haleakala on the island of Maui, revealed no thermal abnormalities.Approximately 25 large springs issuing into the ocean around the periphery of Hawaii have been detected.Infrared emission varies widely with surface texture and composition, suggesting that similar observations may have value for estimating surface conditions on the moon or planets.

  5. What Happened to Our Volcano?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiante, Elaine Silva

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents an investigative approach to "understanding Earth changes." The author states that students were familiar with earthquakes and volcanoes in other regions of the world but never considered how the land beneath their feet had experienced changes over time. Here, their geology unit helped them understand…

  6. Scoria cone formation through a violent Strombolian eruption: Irao Volcano, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyosugi, Koji; Horikawa, Yoshiyuki; Nagao, Takashi; Itaya, Tetsumaru; Connor, Charles B.; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Scoria cones are common volcanic features and are thought to most commonly develop through the deposition of ballistics produced by gentle Strombolian eruptions and the outward sliding of talus. However, some historic scoria cones have been observed to form with phases of more energetic violent Strombolian eruptions (e.g., the 1943-1952 eruption of Parícutin, central Mexico; the 1975 eruption of Tolbachik, Kamchatka), maintaining volcanic plumes several kilometers in height, sometimes simultaneous with active effusive lava flows. Geologic evidence shows that violent Strombolian eruptions during cone formation may be more common than is generally perceived, and therefore it is important to obtain additional insights about such eruptions to better assess volcanic hazards. We studied Irao Volcano, the largest basaltic monogenetic volcano in the Abu Monogenetic Volcano Group, SW Japan. The geologic features of this volcano are consistent with a violent Strombolian eruption, including voluminous ash and fine lapilli beds (on order of 10-1 km3 DRE) with simultaneous scoria cone formation and lava effusion from the base of the cone. The characteristics of the volcanic products suggest that the rate of magma ascent decreased gradually throughout the eruption and that less explosive Strombolian eruptions increased in frequency during the later stages of activity. During the eruption sequence, the chemical composition of the magma became more differentiated. A new K-Ar age determination for phlogopite crystallized within basalt dates the formation of Irao Volcano at 0.4 ± 0.05 Ma.

  7. Another Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Carlin

    2009-01-01

    A Mexican saying holds that "Como Mexico no hay dos"--There is only one Mexico. American media these days interpret that notion with a vengeance. Story after story depicts a country overrun by out-of-control drug wars and murder, where corrupt police officers trip over beheaded victims more often than they nab perpetrators. South of the…

  8. Another Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Carlin

    2009-01-01

    A Mexican saying holds that "Como Mexico no hay dos"--There is only one Mexico. American media these days interpret that notion with a vengeance. Story after story depicts a country overrun by out-of-control drug wars and murder, where corrupt police officers trip over beheaded victims more often than they nab perpetrators. South of the…

  9. Eruptive and structural controls on the evolution of Mexican maar volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, G.; Ort, M. H.

    2013-05-01

    Although monogenetic volcanoes seem to have a very simple eruptive history, the geologic evolution of maar volcanoes is more complex because they involve a fluctuating explosive behavior due to rapid changes in how an ascending magma interacts with a source of external water. Maar volcanoes evolve in different ways depending on several factors such as magma extrusion rate, explosion depth variation, water/magma ratio, increasing cratering, viscosity, as well as characteristics of the country rock and structural features of the regional setting., Three main maar volcano fields, San Luis Potosí, Valle de Santiago and Serdán-Oriental, occur in central Mexico. In the first two fields, a strong tectonic control is evident for the general distribution of the volcanoes, while in the third case, a more local influence of shallow crustal fractures seems to control the migration of the explosion locus, causing elongated or craters shapes. Initial magma extrusion rates may have played an important role in producing different types of maar volcanoes. Also, the location of the explosions within the upper unconsolidated granular aquifer (brown tuff) or the deeper highly-fractured bedrock aquifer may control the efficiency of the explosions. Deepening and lateral migration of explosion loci are commonly observed in maar volcanoes, and lateral migration is strongly controlled by the regional stress regime. Eruptive styles vary from surge- and blast-dominated eruptions to alternating strombolian and vulcanian activity. Some show a drying-upward trend but others change from dry magmatic activity (hawaiian lava flows, followed by strombolian scoria) to highly fragmented hydromagmatic maar-forming explosions, which includes the periodic injection of juvenile material, particularly at the end of the eruptive phase.

  10. Iridium emissions from Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Miller, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    Particle and gas samples were collected at Mauna Loa volcano during and after its eruption in March and April, 1984 and at Kilauea volcano in 1983, 1984, and 1985 during various phases of its ongoing activity. In the last two Kilauea sampling missions, samples were collected during eruptive activity. The samples were collected using a filterpack system consisting of a Teflon particle filter followed by a series of 4 base-treated Whatman filters. The samples were analyzed by INAA for over 40 elements. As previously reported in the literature, Ir was first detected on particle filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory and later from non-erupting high temperature vents at Kilauea. Since that time Ir was found in samples collected at Kilauea and Mauna Loa during fountaining activity as well as after eruptive activity. Enrichment factors for Ir in the volcanic fumes range from 10,000 to 100,000 relative to BHVO. Charcoal impregnated filters following a particle filter were collected to see if a significant amount of the Ir was in the gas phase during sample collection. Iridium was found on charcoal filters collected close to the vent, no Ir was found on the charcoal filters. This indicates that all of the Ir is in particulate form very soon after its release. Ratios of Ir to F and Cl were calculated for the samples from Mauna Loa and Kilauea collected during fountaining activity. The implications for the KT Ir anomaly are still unclear though as Ir was not found at volcanoes other than those at Hawaii. Further investigations are needed at other volcanoes to ascertain if basaltic volcanoes other than hot spots have Ir enrichments in their fumes.

  11. The 1982 eruption of El Chichon volcano, southeastern Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, R.I.; Spall, Henry

    1982-01-01

    Late in the evening on March 28, El Chichon roared into life with a tremendous explosion that sent a column of ash and gases 10 miles high within an hour. There were no immediate warning signals of the eruption of El Chichon, although increased earthquake activity had been noted for months, possibly a few years, before the explosion. Sound waves from the explosion were detected by instruments 7000 miles away in Antarctica.

  12. Holocene eruptive activity of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilling, R. I.; Rubin, M.; Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S.; Duffield, W. A.; Rose, W. I.

    1984-05-01

    Geologic and radiometric-age data indicate that El Chichon was frequently and violently active during the Holocene, including eruptive episodes about 600, 1250, and 1700 years ago and several undated, older eruptions. These episodes, involving explosive eruptions of sulfur-rich magma and associated domegrowth processes, were apparently separated by intervals of approximately 350 to 650 years. Some of El Chichon's eruptions may correlate with unusual atmospheric phenomena around A.D. 1300 and possibly A.D. 623.

  13. Holocene eruptive activity of El Chichon volcano, Chiapas, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilling, R. I.; Rubin, M.; Sigurdsson, H.; Carey, S.; Duffield, W. A.; Rose, W. I.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic and radiometric-age data indicate that El Chichon was frequently and violently active during the Holocene, including eruptive episodes about 600, 1250, and 1700 years ago and several undated, older eruptions. These episodes, involving explosive eruptions of sulfur-rich magma and associated domegrowth processes, were apparently separated by intervals of approximately 350 to 650 years. Some of El Chichon's eruptions may correlate with unusual atmospheric phenomena around A.D. 1300 and possibly A.D. 623.

  14. Seismic Attenuation beneath Tateyama Volcano, Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, K.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface structures beneath active volcanoes have frequently been investigated (e.g., Oikawa et al., 1994: Sudo et al., 1996), and seismic attenuation beneath some active volcanoes are reported to be strong. On the other hand, few local subsurface structures beneath volcanoes whose volcanic activities are low have been investigated in detail, though it is important to study them to understand the potential of volcanic activity of these volcanoes. Then, we analyzed the seismic attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano (Midagahara volcano) located in central Japan, whose volcanic activity is quite low. We used seismograms obtained by Hi-net deployed by NIED (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention). Hi-net is one of the densest seismic station networks in the world, and the spatial interval of their seismographs is about 20 km, which is suitable for investigating local structure beneath an individual volcano. We estimated S-wave attenuation using seismograms at five stations near Tateyama volcano for nineteen small, local, shallow earthquakes (M 2.7-4.0) that occurred from January 2012 to December 2013. We divided these earthquakes into six groups according to their hypocenter locations. We used twofold spectral ratios around the first S-arrivals to investigate the S-wave attenuation when S-waves passed through the region beneath Tateyama volcano. We focused on station pairs located on opposite sides of Tateyama volcano to each other, and earthquake pairs whose epicenters were located almost along the line connecting Tateyama volcano and the two stations, so that the spectral ratios reflect a local structure beneath Tateyama volcano. Twofold spectral ratios of all seismograms for S waves having northwestern or southeastern sources show strong attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano. On the other hand, those of seismograms having northeastern or southwestern sources show much weaker attenuation, which suggested that the region of strong

  15. Preliminary Volcano-Hazard Assessment for Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Dorava, Joseph M.; Miller, Thomas P.; Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    Redoubt Volcano is a stratovolcano located within a few hundred kilometers of more than half of the population of Alaska. This volcano has erupted explosively at least six times since historical observations began in 1778. The most recent eruption occurred in 1989-90 and similar eruptions can be expected in the future. The early part of the 1989-90 eruption was characterized by explosive emission of substantial volumes of volcanic ash to altitudes greater than 12 kilometers above sea level and widespread flooding of the Drift River valley. Later, the eruption became less violent, as developing lava domes collapsed, forming short-lived pyroclastic flows associated with low-level ash emission. Clouds of volcanic ash had significant effects on air travel as they drifted across Alaska, over Canada, and over parts of the conterminous United States causing damage to jet aircraft. Economic hardships were encountered by the people of south-central Alaska as a result of ash fallout. Based on new information gained from studies of the 1989-90 eruption, an updated assessment of the principal volcanic hazards is now possible. Volcanic hazards from a future eruption of Redoubt Volcano require public awareness and planning so that risks to life and property are reduced as much as possible.

  16. Morphometric properties of Martian volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plescia, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data have been used to construct Digital Elevation Models (DEM) of the Martian volcanoes in order to determine height, flank slope, caldera depth, and volumes. Summit elevations range from 21.1 km to -0.5 km, and relief varies from 1.0 km to almost 22 km. Average flank slopes are in the range of <1?? to ???10??, consistent with basaltic shield volcanism. The very low slopes of highland patera are also consistent with pyroclastic volcanism. Minimum volumes range from <1012 to 1015 m3. Estimates of the time required to build these volcanoes, on the basis of long-term terrestrial eruption rates, range from hundreds of thousands to tens of millions of years. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Laboratory simulation of volcano seismicity.

    PubMed

    Benson, Philip M; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Meredith, Philip G; Young, R Paul

    2008-10-10

    The physical processes generating seismicity within volcanic edifices are highly complex and not fully understood. We report results from a laboratory experiment in which basalt from Mount Etna volcano (Italy) was deformed and fractured. The experiment was monitored with an array of transducers around the sample to permit full-waveform capture, location, and analysis of microseismic events. Rapid post-failure decompression of the water-filled pore volume and damage zone triggered many low-frequency events, analogous to volcanic long-period seismicity. The low frequencies were associated with pore fluid decompression and were located in the damage zone in the fractured sample; these events exhibited a weak component of shear (double-couple) slip, consistent with fluid-driven events occurring beneath active volcanoes.

  18. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. E.; Dehn, J.; Webley, P.; Skoog, R.

    2006-12-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Google Earth is being used as a visualization tool for operational satellite monitoring of the region's volcanoes. Through the abilities of the Keyhole Markup Language (KML) utilized by Google Earth, different datasets have been integrated into this virtual globe browser. Examples include the ability to browse thermal satellite image overlays with dynamic control, to look for signs of volcanic activity. Webcams can also be viewed interactively through the Google Earth interface to confirm current activity. Other applications include monitoring the location and status of instrumentation; near real-time plotting of earthquake hypocenters; mapping of new volcanic deposits; and animated models of ash plumes within Google Earth, created by a combination of ash dispersion modeling and 3D visualization packages. The globe also provides an ideal interface for displaying near real-time information on detected thermal anomalies or "hotspot"; pixels in satellite images with elevated brightness temperatures relative to the background temperature. The Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska collects AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) through its own receiving station. The automated processing that follows includes application of algorithms that search for hotspots close to volcano location, flagging those that meet certain criteria. Further automated routines generate folders of KML placemarkers, which are linked to Google Earth through the network link function. Downloadable KML files have been created to provide links to various data products for different volcanoes and past eruptions, and to demonstrate examples of the monitoring tools developed. These KML files will be made accessible through a new website that will become publicly available in December 2006.

  19. Glaciation of Haleakala volcano, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.G.; Mark, R. ); Porter, S.C. . Quaternary Research Center)

    1993-04-01

    Early debates regarding the large (5 [times] 10 km) summit crater'' of Haleakala volcano (3,055 m altitude) on the island of Maui attributed its origin to renting, rifting, caldera collapse, or erosion. It now is commonly assumed to have resulted from headward expansion of giant canyons by stream erosion (Stearns, 1942). Slope maps and shaded relief images based on new USGS digital elevation data point to the apparent overfit of the canyons that drain the summit depression. Studies of drowned coral reefs and terraces on the offshore east rift of Haleakala indicate that this part of the volcano has undergone submergence of about 2 km, as well as tilting, since 850 ka ago. Such subsidence indicates that the summit altitude at the end of the shield-building phase reached ca. 5,000 m, well above both the present and full-glacial snowlines. A comparison with the radiometrically dated glacial record of Mauna Kea and its reconstructed snowline history suggests that Haleakala experienced 10 or more glaciations, the most extensive during marine isotope stages 20, 18, and 16. By isotope stage 10, the summit had subsided below the full-glacial snowline. Diamictons on the south slope of the volcano, previously described as mudflows, contain lava clasts with superchilled margins, identical to margins of subglacially erupted lavas on Mauna Kea. Glacier ice that mantled the upper slopes of the volcano continuously for several hundred thousand years and intermittently thereafter, is inferred to have carved Haleakala crater and the upper reaches of large canyons radiating from it.

  20. New studies of Martian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Zisk, S. H.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the morphology, topography, and evolution of volcanic constructs on Mars, researchers have been studying the volcanoes Olympus Mons, Tyrrhena Patera, and Apollinaris Patera. These studies relied upon the analysis of digital Viking orbiter images to measure the depth and slopes of the summit area of Olympus Mons, upon new Earth-based radar measurements for the analysis of the slopes of Tyrrhena Patera, and upon the color characteristics of the flanks of Apollinaris Patera for information regarding surface properties.

  1. Venus - Volcano With Massive Landslides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This Magellan full-resolution mosaic which covers an area 143 by 146 kilometers (89 by 91 miles) is centered at 55 degrees north latitude, 266 degrees east longitude. The bright feature, slightly south of center is interpreted to be a volcano, 15-20 kilometers (9.3 to 12.4 miles) in diameter with a large apron of blocky debris to its right and some smaller aprons to its left. A preferred explanation is that several massive catastrophic landslides dropped down steep slopes and were carried by their momentum out into the smooth, dark lava plains. At the base of the east-facing or largest scallop on the volcano is what appears to be a large block of coherent rock, 8 to 10 kilometers (5 to 6 miles) in length. The similar margin of both the scallop and block and the shape in general is typical of terrestrial slumped blocks (masses of rock which slide and rotate down a slope instead of breaking apart and tumbling). The bright lobe to the south of the volcano may either be a lava flow or finer debris from other landslides. This volcanic feature, characterized by its scalloped flanks is part of a class of volcanoes called scalloped or collapsed domes of which there are more than 80 on Venus. Based on the chute-like shapes of the scallops and the existence of a spectrum of intermediate to well defined examples, it is hypothesized that all of the scallops are remnants of landslides even though the landslide debris is often not visible. Possible explanations for the missing debris are that it may have been covered by lava flows, the debris may have weathered or that the radar may not be recognizing it because the individual blocks are too small

  2. Egade, Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubany, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Presents a business school design in Mexico, whose spiral building sits atop a parking structure creating a compact, symbolic form for an arid urban landscape. Includes seven photographs, a floor plan, and sectional drawing. (GR)

  3. Tequila, Mexico

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-11-14

    This image from NASA Terra spacecraft shows the city of Tequila, Mexico. Its red volcanic soil surrounding Tequila is particularly well suited to the growing of blue agave, and more than 300 million plants are harvested each year.

  4. Egade, Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubany, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01

    Presents a business school design in Mexico, whose spiral building sits atop a parking structure creating a compact, symbolic form for an arid urban landscape. Includes seven photographs, a floor plan, and sectional drawing. (GR)

  5. Magma ascent, degassing, and crystallization in monogenetic volcanoes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E. R.; Wallace, P. J.; Cashman, K. V.

    2009-12-01

    Monogenetic basaltic volcanoes, although small in volume, exhibit wide ranges of eruptive styles and durations. Factors that affect eruption style include magma supply rate, volatile content, degassing conditions, and the presence of external H2O. We investigate the complexities of monogenetic eruptions, with a focus on the volatile contents, ascent, degassing and crystallization of the basaltic melts. We have studied basaltic cinder cones and a tuff ring from Mexico and a maar from the Oregon Cascades. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) from basaltic cinder cones in Mexico trapped volatile-rich melts (<5.75 wt% H2O, <2000 ppm CO2). Volatiles in MI from individual eruptions are highly variable, suggesting that degassing and olivine crystallization occurred over a wide range of pressures (<400 MPa). Gas-fluxing, or the upward percolation of a CO2-rich vapor (40-75 mol% CO2) from depth, can be recognized by MI that contain higher CO2 for a given H2O content. Conversely, MI trapped during a maar-forming eruption in Oregon show a very restricted range in volatiles (3-4 wt% H2O, 800-900ppm CO2), suggesting that these melts underwent very little degassing and crystallized over a narrow range of pressures (200-300 MPa). Magmatic crystallization also occurs at variable depths beneath monogenetic volcanoes. Magma erupted during the long-lived (15 year) eruption of Volcán Jorullo underwent a multi-stage crystallization process. Magma initially ponded in the lower crust and fractionated amphibole + olivine +/- clinopyroxene. The fractionated melts then ascended and crystallized olivine over a wide range of pressures (400-50 MPa), probably as a consequence of both fluxing and dehydration of the melt by CO2-rich gas and by H2O exsolution during decompression. As the eruption progressed, crystallization shifted to a shallow sill-like region beneath the volcano. Additionally, low pressure (< 50 MPa) degassing drove extensive crystallization of the melts, visible in the high

  6. Manam Volcano, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA image acquired June 16, 2010. Papua New Guinea’s Manam Volcano released a thin, faint plume on June 16, 2010, as clouds clustered at the volcano’s summit. The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite took this picture the same day. Rivulets of brown rock interrupt the carpet of green vegetation on the volcano’s slopes. Opaque white clouds partially obscure the satellite’s view of Manam. The clouds may result from water vapor from the volcano, but may also have formed independent of volcanic activity. The volcanic plume appears as a thin, blue-gray veil extending toward the northwest over the Bismarck Sea. Located 13 kilometers (8 miles) off the coast of mainland Papua New Guinea, Manam forms an island 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide. It is a stratovolcano. The volcano has two summit craters, and although both are active, most historical eruptions have arisen from the southern crater. NASA Earth Observatory image created by Jesse Allen, using EO-1 ALI data provided courtesy of the NASA EO-1 team. Caption by Michon Scott. Instrument: EO-1 - ALI To view the full image go to: earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=4430... NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe.

  7. Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-01-03

    On the night of June 4, 2001, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 2,447 meters (8,028 feet). The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25-kilometer (15-mile) ash plume, seen as a cold "cloud" streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred here during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964. Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and Asia, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The area is part of the "Ring of Fire," a string of volcanoes that encircles the Pacific Ocean. The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color-coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas. The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA03514

  8. Earthquakes - Volcanoes (Causes and Forecast)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, E.

    2009-04-01

    EARTHQUAKES - VOLCANOES (CAUSES AND FORECAST) ELIAS TSIAPAS RESEARCHER NEA STYRA, EVIA,GREECE TEL.0302224041057 tsiapas@hol.gr The earthquakes are caused by large quantities of liquids (e.g. H2O, H2S, SO2, ect.) moving through lithosphere and pyrosphere (MOHO discontinuity) till they meet projections (mountains negative projections or projections coming from sinking lithosphere). The liquids are moved from West Eastward carried away by the pyrosphere because of differential speed of rotation of the pyrosphere by the lithosphere. With starting point an earthquake which was noticed at an area and from statistical studies, we know when, where and what rate an earthquake may be, which earthquake is caused by the same quantity of liquids, at the next east region. The forecast of an earthquake ceases to be valid if these components meet a crack in the lithosphere (e.g. limits of lithosphere plates) or a volcano crater. In this case the liquids come out into the atmosphere by the form of gasses carrying small quantities of lava with them (volcano explosion).

  9. Active Deformation of Etna Volcano Combing IFSAR and GPS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The surface deformation of an active volcano is an important indicator of its eruptive state and its hazard potential. Mount Etna volcano in Sicily is a very active volcano with well documented eruption episodes.

  10. Active Deformation of Etna Volcano Combing IFSAR and GPS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, Paul

    1997-01-01

    The surface deformation of an active volcano is an important indicator of its eruptive state and its hazard potential. Mount Etna volcano in Sicily is a very active volcano with well documented eruption episodes.

  11. 2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF MEDIAN. NOTE VOLCANIC STONE CURBING (EDGING) TYPICAL OF MOST PARKING AREAS; TRIANGLING AT END NOT TYPICAL. MAUNA LOA VOLCANO IN BACK. - Crater Rim Drive, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  12. Thematic mapper studies of Andean volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, P. W.

    1986-01-01

    The primary objective was to identify all the active volcanoes in the Andean region of Bolivia. Morphological features of the Tata Sabaya volcano, Bolivia, were studied with the thematic mapper. Details include marginal levees on lava and pyroclastic flows, and summit crater structure. Valley glacier moraine deposits, not easily identified on the multispectral band scanner, were also unambiguous, and provide useful marker horizons on large volcanic edifices which were built up in preglacial times but which were active subsequently. With such high resolution imagery, it is not only possible to identify potentially active volcanoes, but also to use standard photogeological interpretation to outline the history of individual volcanoes.

  13. ASTER Images Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-26

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image the Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. This false color infrared image of Mt Usu volcano is dominated by Lake Toya, an ancient volcanic caldera. On the south shore is the active Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 11,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. "Mount Usu has had seven significant eruptions that we know of, and at no time has it ended quickly with only a small scale eruption," said Yoshio Katsui, a professor at Hokkaido University. This was the seventh major eruption of Mount Usu in the past 300 years. Fifty people died when the volcano erupted in 1822, its worst known eruption. In the image, most of the land is covered by snow. Vegetation, appearing red in the false color composite, can be seen in the agricultural fields, and forests in the mountains. Mt. Usu is crossed by three dark streaks. These are the paths of ash deposits that rained out from eruption plumes two days earlier. The prevailing wind was from the northwest, carrying the ash away from the main city of Date. Ash deposited can be traced on the image as far away as 10 kilometers (16 miles

  14. Ambient seismic noise tomography of the Colima Volcano Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Christian R.; Bandy, William L.

    2017-02-01

    The Colima Volcanic Complex (CVC) located in the western sector of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt contains the most active Mexican volcano, Volcan Colima. The CVC is located within the Colima Rift, a regional north south striking extensional structure. We used ambient seismic noise recorded by stations deployed in western Mexico during the Mapping the Rivera Subduction Zone (MARS) and the Colima Volcano Deep Seismic Experiment (CODEX). We computed the cross-correlations of the vertical component of continuous records of ambient noise data to extract empirical Greens functions. These functions provide detailed images of Rayleigh wave group velocity for different periods. Using the arrival travel time of these waves for a given period, estimates can be obtained of the lateral variations in velocity for a given period using 2D tomography. The study aims to better understand the geometry and the seismic surface wave velocity structure of the CVC and relate it to the volcanoes' structure and the geologic setting of the region. Source of low velocity anomaly over CVC is distributed fairly continuously with depth in the subsurface, which indicates magma rising along fractures. The progressive increasing toward the south in the size of low velocity anomalies indicates migration towards the south of the melting that correlates with the trend of the stratovolcanoes that form the CVC. The zone of magma generation presently fully developed under Volcan de Fuego might be starting to shift towards south to the area NW of Armería where a new void in the tear zone may be starting to form.

  15. Slope instability related to permafrost changes on Mexican volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Granados, Hugo; Molina, Victor Soto

    2015-04-01

    Permafrost is present above 4,500 meters at the three highest Mexican mountains, Citlaltépetl, Popocatépetl and Iztaccihuatl (5,675, 5,452 and 5,286m asl, respectively), all active volcanoes. During the rainy season in the central region of Mexico, the occurrence of small debris-flows in the ice-free parts of the mountains, as well as small lanslides is frequent. At Popocatépetl volcano, flows are mostly related to a combination of the eruptive activity and climatic factors. However, the volcanic activity is different at Citlaltépetl and Iztaccihuatl where there is no eruptive activity, but landslides have occurred in recent years on their steep slopes because its stability has been altered as a result of an increase in the air temperature which in turn has caused variations in the thickness of the active layer of permafrost, causing as a consequence, the increase of an even more unstable soil. Additionally, cracks in the rock walls are subject to an increasing hydrostatic pressure due to continuous daily freezing and thawing of seasonal water produced by a warmer and less solid precipitation accumulating in the cracks over time and in the unconsolidated potentially unstable material.

  16. Alaska Volcano Observatory at 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 in the wake of the 1986 Augustine eruption through a congressional earmark. Even within the volcanological community, there was skepticism about AVO. Populations directly at risk in Alaska were small compared to Cascadia, and the logistical costs of installing and maintaining monitoring equipment were much higher. Questions were raised concerning the technical feasibility of keeping seismic stations operating through the long, dark, stormy Alaska winters. Some argued that AVO should simply cover Augustine with instruments and wait for the next eruption there, expected in the mid 90s (but delayed until 2006), rather than stretching to instrument as many volcanoes as possible. No sooner was AVO in place than Redoubt erupted and a fully loaded passenger 747 strayed into the eruption cloud between Anchorage and Fairbanks, causing a powerless glide to within a minute of impact before the pilot could restart two engines and limp into Anchorage. This event forcefully made the case that volcano hazard mitigation is not just about people and infrastructure on the ground, and is particularly important in the heavily traveled North Pacific where options for flight diversion are few. In 1996, new funding became available through an FAA earmark to aggressively extend volcano monitoring far into the Aleutian Islands with both ground-based networks and round-the-clock satellite monitoring. Beyond the Aleutians, AVO developed a monitoring partnership with Russians volcanologists at the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. The need to work together internationally on subduction phenomena that span borders led to formation of the Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) consortium. JKASP meets approximately biennially in Sapporo, Petropavlovsk, and Fairbanks. In turn, these meetings and support from NSF and the Russian Academy of Sciences led to new international education and

  17. Quaternary glacial stratigraphy and chronology of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Sidney E.

    The volcano Iztaccihuatl in central Mexico was glaciated twice during the middle Pleistocene, once probably in pre-Illinoian (or pre-Bull Lake) time, and once in late Illinoian (or Bull Lake) time. Glaciation during the late Pleistocene was restricted to the late Wisconsin (or Pinedale). A maximum advance and one readvance are recorded in the early part, and one readvance in the latter part. Three or four small neoglacial advances occurred during the Holocene. Two other volcanoes nearby, Ajusco and Malinche, have a partial record of late Pleistocene and Holocene glaciations. Three others, Popocatépetl, Pico de Orizaba, and Nevado de Toluca, have a full Holocene record of three to five glacial advances during Neoglaciation.

  18. Results from the Autonomous Triggering of in situ Sensors on Kilauea Volcano, HI, from Eruption Detection by Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubleday, J.; Behar, A.; Davies, A.; Mora-Vargas, A.; Tran, D.; Abtahi, A.; Pieri, D. C.; Boudreau, K.; Cecava, J.

    2008-12-01

    Response time in acquiring sensor data in volcanic emergencies can be greatly improved through use of autonomous systems. For instance, ground-based observations and data processing applications of the JPL Volcano Sensor Web have promptly triggered spacecraft observations [e.g., 1]. The reverse command and information flow path can also be useful, using autonomous analysis of spacecraft data to trigger in situ sensors. In this demonstration project, SO2 sensors were incorporated into expendable "Volcano Monitor" capsules and placed downwind of the Pu'u 'O'o vent of Kilauea volcano, Hawai'i. In nominal (low) power conservation mode, data from these sensors were collected and transmitted every hour to the Volcano Sensor Web through the Iridium Satellite Network. When SO2 readings exceeded a predetermined threshold, the modem within the Volcano Monitor sent an alert to the Sensor Web, and triggered a request for prompt Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) spacecraft data acquisition. The Volcano Monitors were also triggered by the Sensor Web in response to an eruption detection by the MODIS instrument on Terra. During these pre- defined "critical events" the Sensor Web ordered the SO2 sensors within the Volcano Monitor to increase their sampling frequency to every 5 minutes (high power "burst mode"). Autonomous control of the sensors' sampling frequency enabled the Sensor Web to monitor and respond to rapidly evolving conditions, and allowed rapid compilation and dissemination of these data to the scientific community. Reference: [1] Davies et al., (2006) Eos, 87, (1), 1 and 5. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Support was provided by the NASA AIST program, the Idaho Space Grant Consortium, and the New Mexico Space Grant Program. We also especially thank the personnel of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory for their invaluable scientific guidance and logistical assistance.

  19. Volcanic Hazards Associated with the NE Sector of Tacaná Volcano, Guatemala.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, S. R.; Saucedo, R.; Macias, J.; Arce, J.; Garcia-Palomo, A.; Mora, J.; Scolamacchia, T.

    2003-12-01

    Tacaná volcano, with a height of 4,030 m above sea level, straddles the southern Mexico/Guatemala border. Last active in 1986, when there was a small phreatic event with a duration of a few days, this volcano presents an impending hazard to over 250,000 people. The NE sector of the volcano reveals the violent volcanic history of Tacaná that may be indicative of a serious potential risk to the area. Its earliest pyroclastic history appears to consist of fall, flow, and surge deposits, together with lavas, that have formed megablocks within a series of old debris avalanche deposits. This sector collapse event is overlain by a sequence of pumice fall and ash flow deposits, of which the youngest, less-altered pumice fall deposit shows a minimum thickness of > 4 m, with a dispersal axis trending toward the NE. A second debris avalanche deposit, separated from the above deposits by a paleosoil, is dominated by megablocks of lava and scoriaceous dome material. The current topography around the northeastern flank of the volcano is determined by a third, and most recent debris avalanche deposit, a thick (> 20 m) sequence of six block and ash flows dated at around 16,000 years BP, each separated by 1-10 cm thick ash cloud surge deposit, together with secondary lahar deposits. These are followed by a at least 4 lava flows that extend 2 km down the flank of the volcano. It appears that the most recent pyroclastic event at Tacaná is also recorded in this sector of the volcano: above the block and ash flows occurs a > 1 m thick ash flow unit that can be seen at least 5 km from the vent. Lastly, the Santa Maria Ash fall deposit, produced in 1902, has capped most of the deposits at Tacaná.

  20. Smithsonian Volcano Data on Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venzke, E.; Siebert, L.; Luhr, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    Interactive global satellite imagery datasets such as hosted by Google Earth provide a dynamic platform for educational outreach in the Earth Sciences. Users with widely varied backgrounds can easily view geologic features on a global-to-local scale, giving access to educational background on individual geologic features or events such as volcanoes and earthquakes. The Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) volcano data became available as a Google Earth layer on 11 June 2006. Locations for about 1550 volcanoes with known or possible Holocene activity are shown as red triangles with associated volcano names that appear when zooming in to a regional-scale view. Clicking on a triangle opens an informational balloon that displays a photo, geographic data, and a brief paragraph summarizing the volcano's geologic history. The balloon contains links to a larger version of the photo with credits and a caption and to more detailed information on the volcano, including eruption chronologies, from the GVP website. Links to USGS and international volcano observatories or other websites focusing on regional volcanoes are also provided, giving the user ready access to a broad spectrum of volcano data. Updates to the GVP volcano layer will be provided to Google Earth. A downloadable file with the volcanoes organized regionally is also available directly from the GVP website (www.volcano.si.edu) and provides the most current volcano data set. Limitations of the implied accuracy of spacially plotted data at high zoom levels are also apparent using platforms such as Google Earth. Real and apparent mismatches between plotted locations and the summits of some volcanoes seen in Google Earth satellite imagery occur for reasons including data precision (deg/min vs. deg/min/sec) and the GVP convention of plotting the center-point of large volcanic fields, which often do not correspond to specific volcanic vents. A more fundamental problem originates from the fact that

  1. Volcanic hazards at Atitlan volcano, Guatemala

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haapala, J.M.; Escobar Wolf, R.; Vallance, James W.; Rose, William I.; Griswold, J.P.; Schilling, S.P.; Ewert, J.W.; Mota, M.

    2006-01-01

    Atitlan Volcano is in the Guatemalan Highlands, along a west-northwest trending chain of volcanoes parallel to the mid-American trench. The volcano perches on the southern rim of the Atitlan caldera, which contains Lake Atitlan. Since the major caldera-forming eruption 85 thousand years ago (ka), three stratovolcanoes--San Pedro, Toliman, and Atitlan--have formed in and around the caldera. Atitlan is the youngest and most active of the three volcanoes. Atitlan Volcano is a composite volcano, with a steep-sided, symmetrical cone comprising alternating layers of lava flows, volcanic ash, cinders, blocks, and bombs. Eruptions of Atitlan began more than 10 ka [1] and, since the arrival of the Spanish in the mid-1400's, eruptions have occurred in six eruptive clusters (1469, 1505, 1579, 1663, 1717, 1826-1856). Owing to its distance from population centers and the limited written record from 200 to 500 years ago, only an incomplete sample of the volcano's behavior is documented prior to the 1800's. The geologic record provides a more complete sample of the volcano's behavior since the 19th century. Geologic and historical data suggest that the intensity and pattern of activity at Atitlan Volcano is similar to that of Fuego Volcano, 44 km to the east, where active eruptions have been observed throughout the historical period. Because of Atitlan's moderately explosive nature and frequency of eruptions, there is a need for local and regional hazard planning and mitigation efforts. Tourism has flourished in the area; economic pressure has pushed agricultural activity higher up the slopes of Atitlan and closer to the source of possible future volcanic activity. This report summarizes the hazards posed by Atitlan Volcano in the event of renewed activity but does not imply that an eruption is imminent. However, the recognition of potential activity will facilitate hazard and emergency preparedness.

  2. Volcán Las Navajas, a Pliocene-Pleistocene trachyte/peralkaline rhyolite volcano in the northwestern Mexican volcanic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Stephen A.; Hegre, Joann

    1990-01-01

    Volcán Las Navajas, a Pliocene-Pleistocene volcano located in the northwestern portion of the Mexican volcanic belt, erupted lavas ranging in composition from alkali basalt through peralkaline rhyolite, and is the only volcano in mainland Mexico known to have erupted pantellerites. Las Navajas is located near the northwestern end of the Tepic-Zacoalco rift and covers a 200-m-thick pile of alkaline basaltic lavas, one of which has been dated at 4.3 Ma. The eruptive history of the volcano can be divided into three stages separated by episodes of caldera formation. During the first stage a broad shield volcano made up of alkali basalts, mugearites, benmoreites, trachytes, and peralkaline rhyolites was constructed. Eruption of a chemically zoned ash flow then caused collapse of the structure to form the first caldera. The second stage consisted of eruptions of glassy pantellerite lavas that partially filled the caldera and overflowed its walls. This stage ended about 200 000 years ago with the eruption of pumice falls and ash flows, which led to the collapse of the southern portion of the volcano to form the second caldera. During the third stage, two benmoreite cinder cones and a benmoreite lava flow were emplaced on the northwestern flank of the volcano. Finally, the calc-alkaline volcano Sanganguey was built on the southern flank of Las Lavajas. Alkaline volcanism continued in the area with eruptions of alkali basalt from cinder cones located along NW-trending fractures through the area. Although other mildly peralkaline rhyolites are found in the rift zones of western Mexico, only Las Navajas produced pantellerites. Greater volumes of basic alkaline magma have erupted in the Las Navajas region than in the other areas of peralkaline volcanism in Mexico, a factor which may be necessary to provide the initial volume of material and heat to drive the differentiation process to such extreme peralkaline compositions.

  3. Recurrent Mudflows at Popocatepetl Volcano: Impact on the Population over several Thousand Years and possible Precursors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. L.; Nieto, A.; Portocarrero, J.; Jaimes-Viera, M. D. C.; Fonseca, R.

    2014-12-01

    Popocatepetl Volcano in central Mexico has been erupting since 1994 with relatively small Strombolian and Vulcanian eruptions, expect for the 2 larger eruptions in 1997 and 2001 that produced more widespread pumice and ash fall, mud flows and in 2001, pumice flows. As part of the recent studies that have focused on monitoring eruptive behavior for risk reduction in this heavily populated area, we are updating the Hazard Map (1995). Here we present the results of the new data for the northwestern sector of the volcano where large mudflows reached 40km from the volcano toward Mexico City (14Ka). The 5Ka mudflows are overlain by several flows that covered pre-Columbian pre-classic settlements at around 2Ka BP. Buildings with ceramics from the classic and postclassic periods (around 1.5Ka and 0.9Ka BP) also indicate that settlements were abandoned and resettled several hundred years later. So far, it seems that inhabitants fled at the beginning of these larger eruptions, since no bodies have been found in the excavations. Since the XVI century, several smaller mudflows have reached the towns, but many are related with secondary deposits (for example, the Nexapa 2010 mudflow reached 15 km from the crater). Although this area has been inhabited for thousands of years, increased population shows that risk is considerable.

  4. ASTER Images Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image the Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    This false color infrared image of Mt Usu volcano is dominated by Lake Toya, an ancient volcanic caldera. On the south shore is the active Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 11,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. 'Mount Usu has had seven significant eruptions that we know of, and at no time has it ended quickly with only a small scale eruption,' said Yoshio Katsui, a professor at Hokkaido University. This was the seventh major eruption of Mount Usu in the past 300 years. Fifty people died when the volcano erupted in 1822, its worst known eruption.

    In the image, most of the land is covered by snow. Vegetation, appearing red in the false color composite, can be seen in the agricultural fields, and forests in the mountains. Mt. Usu is crossed by three dark streaks. These are the paths of ash deposits that rained out from eruption plumes two days earlier. The prevailing wind was from the northwest, carrying the ash away from the main city of Date. Ash deposited can be traced on the image as far away as 10 kilometers (16

  5. Water in Aleutian Arc Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plank, T.; Zimmer, M. M.; Hauri, E. H.

    2011-12-01

    In the past decade, baseline data have been obtained on pre-eruptive water contents for several volcanic arcs worldwide. One surprising observation is that parental magmas contain ~ 4 wt% H2O on average at each arc worldwide [1]. Within each arc, the variation from volcano to volcano is from 2 to 6 w% H2O, with few exceptions. The similar averages at different arcs are unexpected given the order of magnitude variations in the concentration of other slab tracers. H2O is clearly different from other tracers, however, being both a major driver of melting in the mantle and a major control of buoyancy and viscosity in the crust. Some process, such as mantle melting or crustal storage, apparently modulates the water content of mafic magmas at arcs. Mantle melting may deliver a fairly uniform product to the Moho, if the wet melt process includes a negative feedback. On the other hand, magmas with variable water content may be generated in the mantle, but a crustal filter may lead to magma degassing up to a common mid-to-upper crustal storage region. Testing between these two end-member scenarios is critical to our understanding of subduction dehydration, global water budgets, magmatic plumbing systems, melt generation and eruptive potential. The Alaska-Aleutian arc is a prime location to explore this fundamental problem in the subduction water cycle, because active volcanoes vary more than elsewhere in the world in parental H2O contents (based on least-degassed, mafic melt inclusions hosted primarily in olivine). For example, Shishaldin volcano taps magma with among the lowest H2O contents globally (~ 2 wt%) and records low pressure crystal fractionation [2], consistent with a shallow magma system (< 1 km bsl). At the other extreme, Augustine volcano is fed by a mafic parent that contains among the highest H2O globally (~ 7 wt%), and has evolved by deep crystal fractionation [2], consistent with a deep magma system (~ 14 km bsl). Do these magmas stall at different depths

  6. ASTER Images Mt. Usu Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    On April 3, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra Satellite captured this image of the erupting Mt. Usu volcano in Hokkaido, Japan. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image the Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    This false color infrared image of Mt Usu volcano is dominated by Lake Toya, an ancient volcanic caldera. On the south shore is the active Usu volcano. On Friday, March 31, more than 11,000 people were evacuated by helicopter, truck and boat from the foot of Usu, that began erupting from the northwest flank, shooting debris and plumes of smoke streaked with blue lightning thousands of feet in the air. Although no lava gushed from the mountain, rocks and ash continued to fall after the eruption. The region was shaken by thousands of tremors before the eruption. People said they could taste grit from the ash that was spewed as high as 2,700 meters (8,850 ft) into the sky and fell to coat surrounding towns with ash. 'Mount Usu has had seven significant eruptions that we know of, and at no time has it ended quickly with only a small scale eruption,' said Yoshio Katsui, a professor at Hokkaido University. This was the seventh major eruption of Mount Usu in the past 300 years. Fifty people died when the volcano erupted in 1822, its worst known eruption.

    In the image, most of the land is covered by snow. Vegetation, appearing red in the false color composite, can be seen in the agricultural fields, and forests in the mountains. Mt. Usu is crossed by three dark streaks. These are the paths of ash deposits that rained out from eruption plumes two days earlier. The prevailing wind was from the northwest, carrying the ash away from the main city of Date. Ash deposited can be traced on the image as far away as 10 kilometers (16

  7. Geoflicks Reviewed--Films about Hawaiian Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1994-01-01

    Reviews 11 films on volcanic eruptions in the United States. Films are given a one- to five-star rating and the film's year, length, source and price are listed. Top films include "Inside Hawaiian Volcanoes" and "Kilauea: Close up of an Active Volcano." (AIM)

  8. Io's Volcanoes: Possible Influence on Spin Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, P. R.; Jurdy, D. M.

    2002-03-01

    Massive outpourings of lava in short intervals could cause an instability in Io's rotation and a reorientation of its spin axis. The volcanos and mountains exhibit a complementary distribution, with the maximum principal inertia axis for volcanos close to the position of the rotation axis.

  9. Geoflicks Reviewed--Films about Hawaiian Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bykerk-Kauffman, Ann

    1994-01-01

    Reviews 11 films on volcanic eruptions in the United States. Films are given a one- to five-star rating and the film's year, length, source and price are listed. Top films include "Inside Hawaiian Volcanoes" and "Kilauea: Close up of an Active Volcano." (AIM)

  10. Micro-earthquake signal analysis and hypocenter determination around Lokon volcano complex

    SciTech Connect

    Firmansyah, Rizky; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Kristianto

    2015-04-24

    Mount Lokon is one of five active volcanoes which is located in the North Sulawesi region. Since June 26{sup th}, 2011, standby alert set by the Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM) for this mountain. The Mount Lokon volcano erupted on July 4{sup th}, 2011 and still continuously erupted until August 28{sup th}, 2011. Due to its high seismic activity, this study is focused to analysis of micro-earthquake signal and determine the micro-earthquake hypocenter location around the complex area of Lokon-Empung Volcano before eruption phase in 2011 (time periods of January, 2009 up to March, 2010). Determination of the hypocenter location was conducted with Geiger Adaptive Damping (GAD) method. We used initial model from previous study in Volcan de Colima, Mexico. The reason behind the model selection was based on the same characteristics that shared between Mount Lokon and Colima including andesitic stratovolcano and small-plinian explosions volcanian types. In this study, a picking events was limited to the volcano-tectonics of A and B types, hybrid, long-period that has a clear signal onset, and local tectonic with different maximum S – P time are not more than three seconds. As a result, we observed the micro-earthquakes occurred in the area north-west of Mount Lokon region.

  11. Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 2,447 meters (8,028 feet). The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25-kilometer (15-mile) ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred here during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964.

    Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and Asia, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The area is part of the 'Ring of Fire,' a string of volcanoes that encircles the Pacific Ocean.

    The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color-coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

  12. Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On the night of June 4, 2001, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) captured this thermal image of the erupting Shiveluch volcano. Located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, Shiveluch rises to an altitude of 2,447 meters (8,028 feet). The active lava dome complex is seen as a bright (hot) area on the summit of the volcano. To the southwest, a second hot area is either a debris avalanche or hot ash deposit. Trailing to the west is a 25-kilometer (15-mile) ash plume, seen as a cold 'cloud' streaming from the summit. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred here during the last 10,000 years; the largest historical eruptions were in 1854 and 1964.

    Because Kamchatka is located along the major aircraft routes between North America/Europe and Asia, this area is constantly monitored for potential ash hazards to aircraft. The area is part of the 'Ring of Fire,' a string of volcanoes that encircles the Pacific Ocean.

    The lower image is the same as the upper, except it has been color-coded: red is hot, light greens to dark green are progressively colder, and gray/black are the coldest areas.

    The image is located at 56.7 degrees north latitude, 161.3 degrees east longitude.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched Dec. 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

  13. The duration, magnitude, and frequency of subaerial volcano deformation events: New InSAR results from Latin America and a global synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Fournier, T.; Riddick, S.; Jay, J.; Henderson, S. T.

    2009-12-01

    We combine new observations of volcano deformation in Latin America with more than 100 previous deformation studies in other areas of the world to constrain the frequency, magnitude, and duration of subaerial volcano deformation events. We discuss implications for eruptive hazards from a given deformation event and the optimum repeat interval for proposed InSAR satellite missions. We use L-band (23.6 cm wavelength) satellite-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to make the first systematic search for deformation in all volcanic arcs of Latin America (including Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and the northern and southern Andes), spanning 2006-2008. We combine L- and C-band (5.6 cm wavelength) InSAR observations over the southern Andes volcanoes to extend the time series from 2002-2008 and assess the capabilities of the different radars -- L-band gives superior results in highly vegetated areas. Our observations reveal 11 areas of volcano deformation, some of them in areas that were thought to be dormant. There is a lack of deformation at several erupting volcanoes, probably due to temporal aliasing. The total number of deforming volcanoes in the central and southern Andes now totals 15, comparable to the Alaska/Aleutian arc. Globally, volcanoes deform across a variety of timescales (from seconds to centuries) often without eruption, and with no apparent critical observation timescale, although observations made every minute are sometimes necessary to see precursors to eruption.

  14. Duration, magnitude, and frequency of subaerial volcano deformation events: New results from Latin America using InSAR and a global synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, T. J.; Pritchard, M. E.; Riddick, S. N.

    2010-01-01

    We combine new observations of volcano deformation in Latin America with more than 100 previous deformation studies in other areas of the world to constrain the frequency, magnitude, and duration of subaerial volcano deformation events. We discuss implications for eruptive hazards from a given deformation event and the optimum repeat interval for proposed InSAR satellite missions. We use L band (23.6 cm wavelength) satellite-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) to make the first systematic search for deformation in all volcanic arcs of Latin America (including Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and the northern and southern Andes), spanning 2006-2008. We combine L and C band (5.6 cm wavelength) InSAR observations over the southern Andes volcanoes to extend the time series from 2002 to 2008 and assess the capabilities of the different radars: L band gives superior results in highly vegetated areas. Our observations reveal 11 areas of volcano deformation, some of them in areas that were thought to be dormant. There is a lack of observed deformation at several erupting volcanoes, probably due to temporal aliasing. The total number of deforming volcanoes in the central and southern Andes now totals 15 (from observations between 1992 and 2008), comparable to the Alaska/Aleutian arc. Globally, volcanoes deform across a variety of time scales (from seconds to centuries) often without eruption and with no apparent critical observation time scale, although observations made every minute are sometimes necessary to see precursors to eruption.

  15. Soufriere Hills Volcano Resumes Activity

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    A massive eruption of Montserrat’s Soufrière Hills Volcano covered large portions of the island in debris. The eruption was triggered by a collapse of Soufrière Hills’ summit lava dome on February 11, 2010. Pyroclastic flows raced down the northern flank of the volcano, leveling trees and destroying buildings in the village of Harris, which was abandoned after Soufrière Hills became active in 1995. The Montserrat Volcano Observatory reported that some flows, about 15 meters (49 feet) thick, reached the sea at Trant’s Bay. These flows extended the island’s coastline up to 650 meters (2,100 feet). These false-color satellite images show the southern half of Montserrat before and after the dome collapse. The top image shows Montserrat on February 21, 2010, just 10 days after the event. For comparison, the bottom image shows the same area on March 17, 2007. Red areas are vegetated, clouds are white, blue/black areas are ocean water, and gray areas are covered by flow deposits. Fresh deposits tend to be lighter than older deposits. On February 21, the drainages leading down from Soufrière Hills, including the White River Valley, the Tar River Valley, and the Belham River Valley, were filled with fresh debris. According to the Montserrat Volcano Observatory, pyroclastic flows reached the sea through Aymers Ghaut on January 18, 2010, and flows entered the sea near Plymouth on February 5, 2010. NASA Earth Observatory image by Robert Simmon, using data from the NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team. Caption by Robert Simmon. To read more go to: earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=42792 NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  16. Infrasound Studies of Alaskan Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNutt, S. R.; Arnoult, K.; Szuberla, C.; Olson, J. V.; Wilson, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    Infrasound has been used to study a number of Alaskan volcanic eruptions over the last 15 years. Arrays include the I53US array of 8 sensors in Fairbanks installed in 2002 under the CTBT umbrella; an array of 4 sensors installed at Okmok Volcano in summer 2010 by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO); and a 6-sensor array installed in Dillingham in September 2010 by the UAF Infrasound Group. Individual sensors have been installed by AVO at Pavlof (1996), Shishaldin (1997), Augustine (2006), Fourpeaked (2006), and Redoubt (2009) volcanoes. These have been especially valuable because they provide precise source timing and signal strength that allow the correct identification of atmospheric paths. Small volcanic explosions have been recorded at local stations only for Pavlof, Shishaldin and Fourpeaked volcanoes. The more interesting large explosive eruptions have been recorded on both local stations and arrays from eruptions at Augustine in 2006 (13 events), Fourpeaked in 2006 (2 events), Cleveland in 2007 (1 event), Okmok in 2008 (1 sustained event), Kasatochi in 2008 (5 events), and Redoubt in 2009 (over 30 events). Pressures up to 6 Pa have been recorded for the largest Redoubt event at a distance of 547 km from the array, and 1.2 Pa for the largest Kasatochi event at a distance of 2104 km. We determined reduced pressures (equivalent pressure at 1 km assuming 1/r decay) and find that Kasatochi exceeds 2500 Pa and Redoubt 1600 Pa. The smaller explosive eruptions at Augustine yield reduced pressures of 40 to 300 Pa. There is reasonable correlation between measured pressures and signal durations and the ash cloud heights and tephra volumes, hence the infrasound data are useful for hazard assessment. However, the long travel times (3 sec per km) suggest that infrasound array data arrive too late for primary detection but are good for estimating other attributes such as size. Infrasound data may also be combined with seismic data to determine the partitioning of energy

  17. Analytical volcano deformation source models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Primary volcanic landforms are created by the ascent and eruption of magma. The ascending magma displaces and interacts with surrounding rock and fluids as it creates new pathways, flows through cracks or conduits, vesiculates, and accumulates in underground reservoirs. The formation of new pathways and pressure changes within existing conduits and reservoirs stress and deform the surrounding rock. Eruption products load the crust. The pattern and rate of surface deformation around volcanoes reflect the tectonic and volcanic processes transmitted to the surface through the mechanical properties of the crust.

  18. The Colima Volcano WebGIS: system acquisition, application and database development in an open-source environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, M.; Norini, G.; Capra, L.; Manea, V. C.

    2009-04-01

    The Colima Volcano is currently the most active Mexican volcano. After the 1913 plinian activity the volcano presented several eruptive phases that lasted few years, but since 1991 its activity became more persistent with vulcanian eruptions, lava and dome extrusions. During the last 15 years the volcano suffered several eruptive episodes as in 1991, 1994, 1998-1999, 2001-2003, 2004 and 2005 with the emplacement of pyroclastic flows. During rain seasons lahars are frequent affecting several infrastructures such as bridges and electric towers. Researchers from different institutions (Mexico, USA, Germany, Italy, and Spain) are currently working on several aspects of the volcano, from remote sensing, field data of old and recent deposits, structural framework, monitoring (rain, seismicity, deformation and visual observations) and laboratory experiments (analogue models and numerical simulations). Each investigation is focused to explain a single process, but it is fundamental to visualize the global status of the volcano in order to understand its behavior and to mitigate future hazards. The Colima Volcano WebGIS represents an initiative aimed to collect and store on a systematic basis all the data obtained so far for the volcano and to continuously update the database with new information. The Colima Volcano WebGIS is hosted on the Computational Geodynamics Laboratory web server and it is based entirely on Open Source software. The web pages, written in php/html will extract information from a mysql relational database, which will host the information needed for the MapBender application. There will be two types of intended users: 1) researchers working on the Colima Volcano, interested in this project and collaborating in common projects will be provided with open access to the database and will be able to introduce their own data, results, interpretation or recommendations; 2) general users, interested in accessing information on Colima Volcano will be provided

  19. Costa Rica's Chain of laterally collapsed volcanoes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, E.; Fernandez, E.

    2007-05-01

    From the NW extreme to the SW end of Costa Rica's volcanic backbone, a number of laterally collapsed volcanoes can be observed. Due to several factors, attention has been given to active volcanoes disregarding the importance of collapsed features in terms of assessing volcanic hazards for future generations around inhabited volcanoes. In several cases the typical horseshoe shape amphitheater-like depression can be easily observed. In other cases due to erosion, vegetation, topography, seismic activity or drastic weather such characteristics are not easily recognized. In the order mentioned above appear: Orosi-Cacao, Miravalles, Platanar, Congo, Von Frantzius, Cacho Negro and Turrialba volcanoes. Due to limited studies on these structures it is unknown if sector collapse occurred in one or several phases. Furthermore, in the few studied cases no evidence has been found to relate collapses to actual eruptive episodes. Detailed studies on the deposits and materials composing dome-like shapes will shed light on unsolved questions about petrological and chemical composition. Volume, form and distance traveled by deposits are part of the questions surrounding most of these collapsed volcanoes. Although most of these mentioned structures are extinct, at least Irazú volcano (active volcano) has faced partial lateral collapses recently. It did presented strombolian activity in the early 60s. Collapse scars show on the NW flank show important mass removal in historic and prehistoric times. Moreover, in 1994 a minor hydrothermal explosion provoked the weakening of a deeply altered wall that holds a crater lake (150m diameter, 2.6x106 ). A poster will depict images of the collapsed volcanoes named above with mayor descriptive characteristics. It will also focus on the importance of deeper studies to assess the collapse potential of Irazú volcano with related consequences. Finally, this initiative will invite researchers interested in such topic to join future studies in

  20. Activity at Klyuchevskaya Volcano Resumes

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA image acquired December 4, 2010 After a respite of less than a month, Klyuchevskaya Volcano resumed erupting in late November 2010. The Global Volcanism Program reported several ash plumes that rose up to 7.9 kilometers (26,000 feet) above sea level from November 25–29. According to the Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) seismicity was “slightly above background levels” on November 26th and 27th, and they reported observations of strombolian activity on December 1st and 2nd. A plume of ash, steam, and other volcanic gases streamed from Klyuchevskaya on December 4, 2010, visible in this natural-color image acquired by the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) aboard the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. In the large image, a much smaller plume is visible above neighboring Bezymianny Volcano. NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen & Robert Simmon, using ALI data from the NASA EO-1 team. Caption by Robert Simmon. Instrument: EO-1 - ALI Credit: NASA Earth Observatory NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  1. Newberry Volcano's youngest lava flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Joel E.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    The central caldera is visible in the lower right corner of the center map, outlined by the black dashed line. The caldera collapsed about 75,000 years ago when massive explosions sent volcanic ash as far as the San Francisco Bay area and created a 3,000-ft-deep hole in the center of the volcano. The caldera is now partly refilled by Paulina and East Lakes, and the byproducts from younger eruptions, including Newberry Volcano’s youngest rhyolitic lavas, shown in red and orange. The majority of Newberry Volcano’s many lava flows and cinder cones are blanketed by as much as 5 feet of volcanic ash from the catastrophic eruption of Mount Mazama that created Crater Lake caldera approximately 7,700 years ago. This ash supports abundant tree growth and obscures the youthful appearance of Newberry Volcano. Only the youngest volcanic vents and lava flows are well exposed and unmantled by volcanic ash. More than one hundred of these young volcanic vents and lava flows erupted 7,000 years ago during Newberry Volcano’s northwest rift zone eruption.

  2. Nicaraguan Volcanoes, 26 February 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The true-color image at left is a downward-looking (nadir) view of the area around the San Cristobal volcano, which erupted the previous day. This image is oriented with east at the top and north at the left. The right image is a stereo anaglyph of the same area, created from red band multi-angle data taken by the 45.6-degree aftward and 70.5-degree aftward cameras on the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite. View this image through red/blue 3D glasses, with the red filter over the left eye. A plume from San Cristobal (approximately at image center) is much easier to see in the anaglyph, due to 3 effects: the long viewing path through the atmosphere at the oblique angles, the reduced reflection from the underlying water, and the 3D stereoscopic height separation. In this image, the plume floats between the surface and the overlying cumulus clouds. A second plume is also visible in the upper right (southeast of San Cristobal). This very thin plume may originate from the Masaya volcano, which is continually degassing at as low rate. The spatial resolution is 275 meters (300 yards). MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  3. Mayon volcano, southeast Luzon, Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mayon volcano is the most active volcano in the Philippines, located just north of the coastal town of Legaspi in southern Luzon about 325 km southeast of Manila. Mayon is a near-perfect cone; its steep, forested slopes look rather like a bull's eye when viewed from above. For scale, Mayon's circular footprint is about 16 km in diameter. This photograph was taken from the Space Shuttle on April 8, 1997. At the time the photo was taken, Mayon sported a steam plume from the summit. The lighter (non-forested) regions that radiate from the summit to the southern slopes are flows from eruptions that have occurred over the past twenty-five years. The current eruption, which started June 24, 2001, is sending flows down the southeast slope in the general direction of Legaspi. Image STS083-747-88 was provided by the by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  4. Nicaraguan Volcanoes, 26 February 2000

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-04-19

    The true-color image at left is a downward-looking (nadir) view of the area around the San Cristobal volcano, which erupted the previous day. This image is oriented with east at the top and north at the left. The right image is a stereo anaglyph of the same area, created from red band multi-angle data taken by the 45.6-degree aftward and 70.5-degree aftward cameras on the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite. View this image through red/blue 3D glasses, with the red filter over the left eye. A plume from San Cristobal (approximately at image center) is much easier to see in the anaglyph, due to 3 effects: the long viewing path through the atmosphere at the oblique angles, the reduced reflection from the underlying water, and the 3D stereoscopic height separation. In this image, the plume floats between the surface and the overlying cumulus clouds. A second plume is also visible in the upper right (southeast of San Cristobal). This very thin plume may originate from the Masaya volcano, which is continually degassing at as low rate. The spatial resolution is 275 meters (300 yards). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02600

  5. Volcanic hazard zonation of the Nevado de Toluca volcano, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capra, L.; Norini, G.; Groppelli, G.; Macías, J. L.; Arce, J. L.

    2008-10-01

    The Nevado de Toluca is a quiescent volcano located 20 km southwest of the City of Toluca and 70 km west of Mexico City. It has been quiescent since its last eruptive activity, dated at ˜ 3.3 ka BP. During the Pleistocene and Holocene, it experienced several eruptive phases, including five dome collapses with the emplacement of block-and-ash flows and four Plinian eruptions, including the 10.5 ka BP Plinian eruption that deposited more than 10 cm of sand-sized pumice in the area occupied today by Mexico City. A detailed geological map coupled with computer simulations (FLOW3D, TITAN2D, LAHARZ and HAZMAP softwares) were used to produce the volcanic hazard assessment. Based on the final hazard zonation the northern and eastern sectors of Nevado de Toluca would be affected by a greater number of phenomena in case of reappraisal activity. Block-and-ash flows will affect deep ravines up to a distance of 15 km and associated ash clouds could blanket the Toluca basin, whereas ash falls from Plinian events will have catastrophic effects for populated areas within a radius of 70 km, including the Mexico City Metropolitan area, inhabited by more than 20 million people. Independently of the activity of the volcano, lahars occur every year, affecting small villages settled down flow from main ravines.

  6. Mexico's Oxbridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haussman, Fay

    1979-01-01

    For 400 years the National Autonomous University of Mexico has remained at the hub of the country's intellectual and political life. The history of the University from the Mayas and the Aztecs, University expansion, upward mobility of students, and student pressure groups and politics are described. (MLW)

  7. Exploring Geology on the World-Wide Web--Volcanoes and Volcanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schimmrich, Steven Henry; Gore, Pamela J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on sites on the World Wide Web that offer information about volcanoes. Web sites are classified into areas of Global Volcano Information, Volcanoes in Hawaii, Volcanoes in Alaska, Volcanoes in the Cascades, European and Icelandic Volcanoes, Extraterrestrial Volcanism, Volcanic Ash and Weather, and Volcano Resource Directories. Suggestions…

  8. Exploring Geology on the World-Wide Web--Volcanoes and Volcanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schimmrich, Steven Henry; Gore, Pamela J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on sites on the World Wide Web that offer information about volcanoes. Web sites are classified into areas of Global Volcano Information, Volcanoes in Hawaii, Volcanoes in Alaska, Volcanoes in the Cascades, European and Icelandic Volcanoes, Extraterrestrial Volcanism, Volcanic Ash and Weather, and Volcano Resource Directories. Suggestions…

  9. Instrumentation Recommendations for Volcano Monitoring at U.S. Volcanoes Under the National Volcano Early Warning System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Seth C.; Freymueller, Jeff T.; LaHusen, Richard G.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Poland, Michael P.; Power, John A.; Schmidt, David A.; Schneider, David J.; Stephens, George; Werner, Cynthia A.; White, Randall A.

    2008-01-01

    As magma moves toward the surface, it interacts with anything in its path: hydrothermal systems, cooling magma bodies from previous eruptions, and (or) the surrounding 'country rock'. Magma also undergoes significant changes in its physical properties as pressure and temperature conditions change along its path. These interactions and changes lead to a range of geophysical and geochemical phenomena. The goal of volcano monitoring is to detect and correctly interpret such phenomena in order to provide early and accurate warnings of impending eruptions. Given the well-documented hazards posed by volcanoes to both ground-based populations (for example, Blong, 1984; Scott, 1989) and aviation (for example, Neal and others, 1997; Miller and Casadevall, 2000), volcano monitoring is critical for public safety and hazard mitigation. Only with adequate monitoring systems in place can volcano observatories provide accurate and timely forecasts and alerts of possible eruptive activity. At most U.S. volcanoes, observatories traditionally have employed a two-component approach to volcano monitoring: (1) install instrumentation sufficient to detect unrest at volcanic systems likely to erupt in the not-too-distant future; and (2) once unrest is detected, install any instrumentation needed for eruption prediction and monitoring. This reactive approach is problematic, however, for two reasons. 1. At many volcanoes, rapid installation of new ground-1. based instruments is difficult or impossible. Factors that complicate rapid response include (a) eruptions that are preceded by short (hours to days) precursory sequences of geophysical and (or) geochemical activity, as occurred at Mount Redoubt (Alaska) in 1989 (24 hours), Anatahan (Mariana Islands) in 2003 (6 hours), and Mount St. Helens (Washington) in 1980 and 2004 (7 and 8 days, respectively); (b) inclement weather conditions, which may prohibit installation of new equipment for days, weeks, or even months, particularly at

  10. A global database of composite volcano morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Euillades, Pablo A.; Euillades, Leonardo D.; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    We present a global database on the subaerial morphometry of composite volcanoes. Data was extracted from the 90-m resolution Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM). The 759 volcanoe