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Sample records for populus tremuloides cell

  1. Rapid mortality of Populus tremuloides in southwestern Colorado, USA

    Treesearch

    James J. Worrall; Leanne Egeland; Thomas Eager; Roy A. Mask; Erik W. Johnson; Philip A. Kemp; Wayne D. Shepperd

    2008-01-01

    Concentrated patches of recent trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality covered 56,091 ha of Colorado forests in 2006. Mortality has progressed rapidly. Area affected increased 58% between 2005 and 2006 on the Mancos-Dolores Ranger District, San Juan National Forest, where it equaled nearly 10% of the aspen cover type. In four stands that were...

  2. Inoculation methods for Populus tremuloides resistant to Hypoxylon canker

    Treesearch

    S. A. Enebak; Michael E. Ostry; N. A. Anderson

    1999-01-01

    Canker expansion and the amount of callus tissue formed were measured monthly on 60 ramets from each of five trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) clones that had been inoculated in wounds with Entoleuca mammata (= Hypoxylon marnmatum (Wahl.) Mill) over a 12-month period. At the clone level, the prevalence...

  3. Widespread triploidy in western North American aspen (Populus tremuloides)

    Treesearch

    Karen E. Mock; Colin M. Callahan; M. Nurul Islam-Faridi; John D. Shaw; Hardeep S. Rai; Stewart C. Sanderson; Carol A. Rowe; Ronald J. Ryel; Michael D. Madritch; Richard S. Gardner; Paul G. Wolf

    2012-01-01

    We document high rates of triploidy in aspen (Populus tremuloides) across the western USA (up to 69% of genets), and ask whether the incidence of triploidy across the species range corresponds with latitude, glacial history (as has been documented in other species), climate, or regional variance in clone size. Using a combination of microsatellite genotyping, flow...

  4. Populus tremuloides mortality near the southwestern edge of its range

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Zegler; Margaret M. Moore; Mary L. Fairweather; Kathryn B. Ireland; Peter Z. Fule

    2012-01-01

    Mortality and crown dieback of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) were extensive on the Williams Ranger District, Kaibab National Forest in northern Arizona. We collected data from a random sample of 48 aspen sites to determine the relationship of predisposing site and stand factors and contributing agents to ramet mortality. Mortality of overstory (P10.1 cm DBH)...

  5. PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT 4 affects reactive oxygen species metabolism, cell wall and wood properties in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. × tremuloides).

    PubMed

    Ślesak, Ireneusz; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Fedak, Halina; Sidoruk, Natalia; Dąbrowska-Bronk, Joanna; Witoń, Damian; Rusaczonek, Anna; Antczak, Andrzej; Drożdżek, Michał; Karpińska, Barbara; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-07-01

    The phytoalexin deficient 4 (PAD4) gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPAD4) is involved in the regulation of plant--pathogen interactions. The role of PAD4 in woody plants is not known; therefore, we characterized its function in hybrid aspen and its role in reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent signalling and wood development. Three independent transgenic lines with different suppression levels of poplar PAD expression were generated. All these lines displayed deregulated ROS metabolism, which was manifested by an increased H2O2 level in the leaves and shoots, and higher activities of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase (CAT) in the leaves in comparison to the wild-type plants. However, no changes in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) between the transgenic lines and wild type were observed in the leaves. Moreover, changes in the ROS metabolism in the pad4 transgenic lines positively correlated with wood formation. A higher rate of cell division, decreased tracheid average size and numbers, and increased cell wall thickness were observed. The results presented here suggest that the Populus tremula × tremuloides PAD gene might be involved in the regulation of cellular ROS homeostasis and in the cell division--cell death balance that is associated with wood development.

  6. Widespread Triploidy in Western North American Aspen (Populus tremuloides)

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Karen E.; Callahan, Colin M.; Islam-Faridi, M. Nurul; Shaw, John D.; Rai, Hardeep S.; Sanderson, Stewart C.; Rowe, Carol A.; Ryel, Ronald J.; Madritch, Michael D.; Gardner, Richard S.; Wolf, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    We document high rates of triploidy in aspen (Populus tremuloides) across the western USA (up to 69% of genets), and ask whether the incidence of triploidy across the species range corresponds with latitude, glacial history (as has been documented in other species), climate, or regional variance in clone size. Using a combination of microsatellite genotyping, flow cytometry, and cytology, we demonstrate that triploidy is highest in unglaciated, drought-prone regions of North America, where the largest clone sizes have been reported for this species. While we cannot completely rule out a low incidence of undetected aneuploidy, tetraploidy or duplicated loci, our evidence suggests that these phenomena are unlikely to be significant contributors to our observed patterns. We suggest that the distribution of triploid aspen is due to a positive synergy between triploidy and ecological factors driving clonality. Although triploids are expected to have low fertility, they are hypothesized to be an evolutionary link to sexual tetraploidy. Thus, interactions between clonality and polyploidy may be a broadly important component of geographic speciation patterns in perennial plants. Further, cytotypes are expected to show physiological and structural differences which may influence susceptibility to ecological factors such as drought, and we suggest that cytotype may be a significant and previously overlooked factor in recent patterns of high aspen mortality in the southwestern portion of the species range. Finally, triploidy should be carefully considered as a source of variance in genomic and ecological studies of aspen, particularly in western U.S. landscapes. PMID:23119006

  7. Soil microbial community responses to altered lignin biosynthesis in Populus tremuloides vary among three distinct soils

    Treesearch

    Kate L. Bradley; Jessica E. Hancock; Christian P. Giardina; Kurt S. Pregitzer

    2007-01-01

    The development and use of transgenic plants has steadily increased, but there are still little data about the responses of soil microorganisms to these genetic modifications. We utilized a greenhouse trial approach to evaluate the effects of altered stem lignin in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) on soil microbial communities in three soils...

  8. Transcriptome characterization and detection of gene expression differences in aspen (Populus tremuloides)

    Treesearch

    Hardeep S. Rai; Karen E. Mock; Bryce A. Richardson; Richard C. Cronn; Katherine J. Hayden; Jessica W. Wright; Brian J. Knaus; Paul G. Wolf

    2013-01-01

    Aspen (Populus tremuloides) is a temperate North American tree species with a geographical distribution more extensive than any other tree species on the continent. Because it is economically important for pulp and paper industries and ecologically important for its role as a foundation species in forest ecosystems, the decline of aspen in large...

  9. Decline of aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Interior West [Abstract 2

    Treesearch

    Dale L. Bartos

    1997-01-01

    It is commonly recognized that aspen (Populus tremuloides) ecosystems in the Interior West provide numerous benefits: (1) forage for livestock, (2) habitat for wildlife, (3) water for downstream users, (4) esthetics, (5) sites for recreational opportunities, (6) wood fiber, and (7) landscape diversity. Loss or potential loss of aspen on these lands can be attributed...

  10. Influence of climate on the growth of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) in Colorado and southern Wyoming

    Treesearch

    M. M. Dudley; Jose Negron; N. A. Tisserat; W. D. Shepperd; W. R. Jacobi

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed a series of increment cores collected from 260 adult dominant or co-dominant quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) trees from national forests across Colorado and southern Wyoming in 2009 and 2010. Half of the cores were collected from trees in stands with a high amount of crown dieback, and half were from lightly damaged stands. We define the level of...

  11. Plant growth, biomass partitioning and soil carbon formation in response to altered lignin biosynthesis in Populus tremuloides

    Treesearch

    Jessica E. Hancock; Wendy M. Loya; Christian P. Giardina; Laigeng Li; Vincent L. Chiang; Kurt S. Pregitzer

    2007-01-01

    We conducted a glasshouse mesocosm study that combined 13C isotope techniques with wild-type and transgenic aspen (Populus tremuloides) in order to examine how altered lignin biosynthesis affects plant production and soil carbon formation. Our transgenic aspen lines expressed low stem lignin concentration but normal cellulose...

  12. Earthworms, arthropods and plant litter decomposition in aspen (Populus tremuloides) and lodgepole pine(Pinus contorta) forests in Colorado, USA

    Treesearch

    Grizelle Gonzalez; Timothy R. Seastedt; Zugeily Donato

    2003-01-01

    We compared the abundance and community composition of earthworms, soil macroarthropods, and litter microarthropods to test faunal effects on plant litter decomposition rates in two forests in the subalpine in Colorado, USA. Litterbags containing recently senesced litter of Populus tremuloides (aspen) and Pinus contorta (lodgepole pine) were placed in aspen and pine...

  13. Elevated growth temperatures alter hydraulic characteristics in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings: implications for tree drought tolerance

    Treesearch

    Danielle A. Way; Jean-Christophe Domec; Robert B. Jackson

    2013-01-01

    Although climate change will alter both soil water availability and evaporative demand, our understanding of how future climate conditions will alter tree hydraulic architecture is limited. Here, we demonstrate that growth at elevated temperatures (ambient +5 °C) affects hydraulic traits in seedlings of the deciduous boreal tree species Populus tremuloides, with the...

  14. Changes in growth, leaf abscission, and biomass associated with seasonal tropospheric ozone exposures of Populus tremuloides clones and seedlings

    Treesearch

    D.F. Karnosky; Z.E. Gagnon; R.E. Dickson; M.D. Coleman; E.H. Lee; J.G. Isebrands

    1996-01-01

    The effects of single-season tropospheric ozone (03) exposures on growth, leaf abscission, and biomass of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) rooted cuttings and seedlings were studied. Plants were grown in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan in open-top chambers with 03 exposures that ranged from...

  15. Decay of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) wood in moist and dry boreal, temperate, and tropical forest fragments

    Treesearch

    Grizelle Gonzalez; William Gould; Andrew T. Hudak; Teresa Nettleton Hollingsworth

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we set up a wood decomposition experiment to i) quantify the percent of mass remaining, decay constant and performance strength of aspen stakes (Populus tremuloides) in dry and moist boreal (Alaska and Minnesota, USA), temperate (Washington and Idaho, USA), and tropical (Puerto Rico) forest types, and ii) determine the effects of...

  16. Association of Pinus banksiana Lamb. and Populus tremuloides Michx. seedling fine roots with Sistotrema brinkmannii (Bres.) J. Erikss. (Basidiomycotina).

    PubMed

    Potvin, Lynette R; Richter, Dana L; Jurgensen, Martin F; Dumroese, R Kasten

    2012-11-01

    Sistotrema brinkmannii (Bres.) J. Erikss. (Basidiomycotina, Hydanaceae), commonly regarded as a wood decay fungus, was consistently isolated from bareroot nursery Pinus banksiana Lamb. seedlings. S. brinkmannii was found in ectomycorrhizae formed by Thelephora terrestris Ehrh., Laccaria laccata (Scop.) Cooke, and Suillus luteus (L.) Roussel. In pure culture combinations with sterile P. banksiana and Populus tremuloides Michx. seedlings, S. brinkmannii colonized root cortical cells while not killing seedlings. Colonization by S. brinkmannii appeared to be intracellular but typical endo- or ectomycorrhizae were not formed. The fungus did not decay roots, although it was shown to produce cellulase in enzyme tests. Results suggest a unique association between S. brinkmannii and seedling roots that is neither mycorrhizal nor detrimental; its exact function remains to be elucidated.

  17. Differences in leaf characteristics between ozone-sensitive and ozone-tolerant hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x Populus tremuloides) clones.

    PubMed

    Häikiö, Elina; Freiwald, Vera; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Beuker, Egbert; Holopainen, Toini; Oksanen, Elina

    2009-01-01

    The authors analyzed a suite of leaf characteristics that might help to explain the difference between ozone-sensitive and ozone-tolerant hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. x Populus tremuloides Michx.) clones. An open-field experiment comprising ambient ozone and 1.5x ambient ozone concentration (about 35 ppb) and two soil nitrogen regimes (60 and 140 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)) was conducted over two growing seasons on potted plants of eight hybrid aspen clones. Four of the clones had previously been determined to be ozone sensitive based on impaired growth in response to elevated ozone concentration. Photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, and concentrations of chlorophyll, protein and carbohydrates were analyzed three times during the second growing season, and foliar phenolic concentrations were measured at the end of the second growing season. Nitrogen amendment counteracted the effects of ozone, but had no effect on growth-related ozone sensitivity of the clones. Ozone-sensitive clones had higher photosynthetic capacity and higher concentrations of Rubisco and phenolics than ozone-tolerant clones, but the effects of ozone were similar in the sensitive and tolerant groups. Nitrogen addition had no effect on phenolic concentration, but elevated ozone concentration increased the concentrations of chlorogenic acid and (+)-catechin. This study suggests that condensed tannins and catechin, but not salicylates or flavonol glycosides, play a role in the ozone tolerance of hybrid aspen.

  18. Gender-specific and intraspecific responses of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianzhong

    I studied gender-specific and intraspecific variations in the physiological responses of Populus tremuloides to elevated CO2 as affected by soil N availability. I also synthesized leaf dark respiration data from independent studies using meta-analysis. Net CO2 assimilation rate (A) of male P. tremuloides was 17.8 and 26.2 μmol m-2 s-1 at ambient and elevated CO2, significantly higher than A of females of 15.6 and 21.0 μmol m-2 s-1 . Male trembling aspen had a higher maximum rate of CO2 fixation by Rubisco and area-based leaf dark respiration (Rda). Mass-based leaf Rd (Rdm), however, was unaffected by gender and CO2 concentration, although the results of meta-analysis on 44 independent observations showed that Rdm was reduced 18.4% by elevated CO2. We found a positive correlation between Rd a and leaf starch content, which was higher at elevated CO2, but no correlation between Rda and leaf N content was observed, suggesting the importance of starch content in determining the magnitude of respiration. Total biomass accumulation of female P. tremuloides was higher than that of males in low-N soil and at ambient CO2, but not in other treatments. Elevated CO2, on the other hand, significantly increased total biomass of both male and female trees in low- and high-N soil, with the increase ranging from 22-70% for female and 58-66% for male trees. There was a significant CO2 x genotype interaction in photosynthetic responses to CO2 enrichment, wherein A was significantly enhanced by elevated CO2 for five genotypes in high-N soil and for four genotypes in low-N soil. Enhancement of A by elevated CO2 ranged from 14% to 68%. We found a correlation between the degree of A enhancement to elevated CO2 and stomatal sensitivity to CO2. Stomatal conductance and A of different genotypes also responded differentially to drought stress. Our results suggest that P. tremuloides genotypes and genders respond differentially in A and Rd to rising atmospheric CO2 , with the degree of

  19. Genotypic variation in physiological and growth responses of Populus tremuloides to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Curtis, P S; Pregitzer, K S; Zak, D R

    2000-09-01

    Physiological and biomass responses of six genotypes of Populus tremuloides Michx., grown in ambient t (357 micromol mol(-1)) or twice ambient (707 micromol mol(-1)) CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and in low-N or high-N soils, were studied in 1995 and 1996 in northern Lower Michigan, USA. There was a significant CO2 x genotype interaction in photosynthetic responses. Net CO2 assimilation (A) was significantly enhanced by elevated [CO2] for five genotypes in high-N soil and for four genotypes in low-N soil. Enhancement of A by elevated [CO2] ranged from 14 to 68%. Genotypes also differed in their biomass responses to elevated [CO2], but biomass responses were poorly correlated with A responses. There was a correlation between magnitude of A enhancement by elevated [CO2] and stomatal sensitivity to CO2. Genotypes with low stomatal sensitivity to CO2 had a significantly higher A at elevated [CO2] than at ambient [CO2], but elevated [CO2] did not affect the ratio of intercellular [CO2] to leaf surface [CO2]. Stomatal conductance and A of different genotypes responded differentially to recovery from drought stress. Photosynthetic quantum yield and light compensation point were unaffected by elevated [CO2]. We conclude that P. tremuloides genotypes will respond differentially to rising atmospheric [CO2], with the degree of response dependent on other abiotic factors, such as soil N and water availability. The observed genotypic variation in growth could result in altered genotypic representation within natural populations and could affect the composition and structure of plant communities in a higher [CO2] environment in the future.

  20. Recovery of Populus tremuloides seedlings following severe drought causing total leaf mortality and extreme stem embolism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanyuan; Equiza, Maria Alejandra; Deng, Xiping; Tyree, Melvin T

    2010-11-01

    In contrast with other native Populus species in North America, Populus tremuloides (aspen) can successfully establish itself in drought-prone areas, yet no comprehensive analysis has been performed on the ability of seedlings to withstand and recover from a severe drought resulting in complete leaf mortality. Here, we subjected 4-month-old aspen seedlings grown in two contrasting soil media to a progressive drought until total leaf mortality, followed by a rewatering cycle. Stomatal conductance (g(s) ), photosynthesis and transpiration followed a sigmoid decline with declining fraction of extractable soil water values. Cessation of leaf expansion occurred close to the end of the linear-decrease phase, when g(s) was reduced by 95%. Leaf mortality started after g(s) reached the lowest values, which corresponded to a stem-xylem pressure potential (Ψ(xp)) of -2.0 MPa and a percent loss of stem hydraulic conductivity (PLC) of 50%. In plants with 50% leaf mortality, PLC values remained around 50%. Complete leaf mortality occurred at an average stem PLC of 90%, but all seedlings were able to resprout after 6-10 days of being rewatered. Plants decapitated at soil level before rewatering developed root suckers, while those left with a 4-cm stump or with their stems intact resprouted exclusively from axillary buds. Resprouting was accompanied by recovery of stem hydraulic conductivity, with PLC values around 30%. The percentage of resprouted buds was negatively correlated with the stem %PLC. Thus, the recovery of stem hydraulic conductivity appears as an important factor in the resprouting capacity of aspen seedlings following a severe drought. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2010.

  1. Phenology and climate relationships in aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) forest and woodland communities of southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, Gretchen A.; Brown, Jesslyn F.; Evelsizer, Ross J.; Vogelmann, James E.

    2014-01-01

    Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) occurs over wide geographical, latitudinal, elevational, and environmental gradients, making it a favorable candidate for a study of phenology and climate relationships. Aspen forests and woodlands provide numerous ecosystem services, such as high primary productivity and biodiversity, retention and storage of environmental variables (precipitation, temperature, snow–water equivalent) that affect the spring and fall phenology of the aspen woodland communities of southwestern Colorado. We assessed the land surface phenology of aspen woodlands using two phenology indices, start of season time (SOST) and end of season time (EOST), from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) database of conterminous U.S. phenological indicators over an 11-year time period (2001–2011). These indicators were developed with 250 m resolution remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer processed to highlight vegetation response. We compiled data on SOST, EOST, elevation, precipitation, air temperature, and snow water equivalent (SWE) for selected sites having more than 80% cover by aspen woodland communities. In the 11-year time frame of our study, EOST had significant positive correlation with minimum fall temperature and significant negative correlation with fall precipitation. SOST had a significant positive correlation with spring SWE and spring maximum temperature.

  2. Stomatal Conductance and Sulfur Uptake of Five Clones of Populus tremuloides Exposed to Sulfur Dioxide 1

    PubMed Central

    Kimmerer, Thomas W.; Kozlowski, T. T.

    1981-01-01

    Plants of five clones of Populus tremuloides Michx. were exposed to 0, 0.2 or 0.5 microliter per liter SO2 for 8 hours in controlled environment chambers. In the absence of the pollutant, two pollution-resistant clones maintained consistently lower daytime diffusive conductance (LDC) than did a highly susceptible clone or two moderately resistant clones. Differences in LDC among the latter three clones were not significant. At 0.2 microliter per liter SO2, LDC decreased in the susceptible clone after 8 hours fumigation while the LDC of the other clones was not affected. Fumigation with 0.5 microliter per liter SO2 decreased LDC of all five clones during the fumigation. Rates of recovery following fumigation varied with the clone, but the LDC of all clones had returned to control values by the beginning of the night following fumigation. Night LDC was higher in the susceptible clone than in the other clones. Fumigation for 16 hours (14 hours day + 2 hours night) with 0.4 microliter per liter SO2 decreased night LDC by half. Sulfur uptake studies generally confirmed the results of the conductance measurements. The results show that stomatal conductance is important in determining relative susceptibility of the clones to pollution stress. PMID:16661807

  3. Plant Community Chemical Composition Influences Trembling Aspen (Populus tremuloides) Intake by Sheep.

    PubMed

    Heroy, Kristen Y; St Clair, Samuel B; Burritt, Elizabeth A; Villalba, Juan J

    2017-07-25

    Nutrients and plant secondary compounds in aspen (Populus tremuloides) may interact with nutrients in the surrounding vegetation to influence aspen use by herbivores. Thus, this study aimed to determine aspen intake and preference by sheep in response to supplementary nutrients or plant secondary compounds (PSC) present in aspen trees. Thirty-two lambs were randomly assigned to one of four molasses-based supplementary feeds to a basal diet of tall fescue hay (N = 8) during three experiments. The supplements were as follows: (1) high-protein (60% canola meal), (2) a PSC (6% quebracho tannins), (3) 25% aspen bark, and (4) control (100% molasses). Supplements were fed from 0700 to 0900, then lambs were fed fresh aspen leaves collected from stands containing high (Experiment 1, 2) or low (Experiment 3) concentrations of phenolic glycosides (PG). In Experiment 2, lambs were simultaneously offered aspen, a forb (Lathyrus pauciflorus), and a grass (Bromus inermis) collected from the aspen understory. Animals supplemented with high protein or tannins showed greater intake of aspen leaves than animals supplemented with bark or the control diet (P < 0.05), likely because some condensed tannins have a positive effect on protein nutrition and protein aids in PSC detoxification. Overall, animals supplemented with bark showed the lowest aspen intake, suggesting PSC in bark and aspen leaves had additive inhibitory effects on intake. In summary, these results suggest that not only the concentration but also the types and proportions of nutrients and chemical defenses available in the plant community influence aspen use by herbivores.

  4. Inhibitor studies of leaf lamina hydraulic conductance in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Voicu, Mihaela C; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2010-02-01

    The present study investigated leaf water transport properties in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) leaves. Leaf lamina hydraulic conductance (K(lam)) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) were drastically suppressed by NaF (a general metabolic inhibitor). In leaves treated with 0.2 mM HgCl(2) (an aquaporin blocker), K(lam) declined by 22% when the leaves were sampled in June but the decline was not significant when the leaves were sampled in August. The leaves sampled in June that transpired 30 mM beta-mercaptoethanol following mercury application showed similar K(lam) as those in control leaves transpiring distilled water. When leaves were pressure-infiltrated with 0.1 mM HgCl(2), K(lam) significantly declined by 25%. Atrazine (a photosystem II inhibitor) drastically reduced leaf net CO(2) uptake by the leaves from seedlings and mature trees but did not have any effect on K(lam) regardless of the irradiance at the leaf level during the K(lam) measurements. When PTS(3) (trisodium 3-hydroxy-5,8,10-pyrenetrisulphonate) apoplastic tracer was pressure-infiltrated inside the leaves, its concentration in the leaf exudates did not change from ambient light to high irradiance treatment and declined in the presence of HgCl(2) in the treatment solution. Trembling aspen K(lam) appears to be linked to leaf metabolism and is uncoupled from the short-term variations in photosynthesis. Aquaporin-mediated water transport does not appear to constitute the dominant pathway for the pressure-driven water flow in the leaves of trembling aspen trees.

  5. Extrafloral Nectaries in Aspen (Populus tremuloides): Heritable Genetic Variation and Herbivore-induced Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wooley, Stuart C.; Donaldson, Jack R.; Gusse, Adam C.; Lindroth, Richard L.; Stevens, Michael T.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims A wide variety of plants produce extrafloral nectaries (EFNs) that are visited by predatory arthropods. But very few studies have investigated the relationship between plant genetic variation and EFNs. The presence of foliar EFNs is highly variable among different aspen (Populus tremuloides) genotypes and the EFNs are visited by parasitic wasps and predatory flies. The aim here was to determine the heritability of EFNs among aspen genotypes and age classes, possible trade-offs between direct and indirect defences, EFN induction following herbivory, and the relationship between EFNs and predatory insects. Methods EFN density was quantified among aspen genotypes in Wisconsin on trees of different ages and broad-sense heritability from common garden trees was calculated. EFNs were also quantified in natural aspen stands in Utah. From the common garden trees foliar defensive chemical levels were quantified to evaluate their relationship with EFN density. A defoliation experiment was performed to determine if EFNs can be induced in response to herbivory. Finally, predatory arthropod abundance among aspen trees was quantified to determine the relationship between arthropod abundance and EFNs. Key Results Broad-sense heritability for expression (0·74–0·82) and induction (0·85) of EFNs was high. One-year-old trees had 20% greater EFN density than 4-year-old trees and more than 50% greater EFN density than ≥10-year-old trees. No trade-offs were found between foliar chemical concentrations and EFN density. Predatory fly abundance varied among aspen genotypes, but predatory arthropod abundance and average EFN density were not related. Conclusions Aspen extrafloral nectaries are strongly genetically determined and have the potential to respond rapidly to evolutionary forces. The pattern of EFN expression among different age classes of trees appears to follow predictions of optimal defence theory. The relationship between EFNs and predators likely

  6. Genotypic differences and prior defoliation affect re-growth and phytochemistry after coppicing in Populus tremuloides.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Michael T; Gusse, Adam C; Lindroth, Richard L

    2012-03-01

    Although considerable research has explored how tree growth and defense can be influenced by genotype, the biotic environment, and their interaction, little is known about how genotypic differences, prior defoliation, and their interactive effects persist in trees that re-grow after damage that severs their primary stem. To address these issues, we established a common garden consisting of twelve genotypes of potted aspen (Populus tremuloides) trees, and subjected half of the trees to defoliation in two successive years. At the beginning of the third year, all trees were severed at the soil surface (coppiced) and allowed to regenerate for five months. Afterwards, we counted the number of root and stump sprouts produced and measured the basal diameter (d) and height (h) of the tallest ramet in each pot. We collected leaves one and two years after the second defoliation and assessed levels of phenolic glycosides, condensed tannins, and nitrogen. In terms of re-growth, we found that the total number of sprouts produced varied by 3.6-fold among genotypes, and that prior defoliation decreased total sprout production by 24%. The size (d(2)h) of ramets, however, did not differ significantly among genotypes or defoliation classes. In terms of phytochemistry, we observed genotypic differences in concentrations of all phytochemicals assessed both one and two years after the second defoliation. Two years after defoliation, we observed effects of prior defoliation in a genotype-by-defoliation interaction for condensed tannins. Results from this study demonstrate that genotypic differences and impacts of prior defoliation persist to influence growth and defense traits in trees even after complete removal of above-ground stems, and thus likely influence productivity and plant-herbivore interactions in forests affected by natural disturbances or actively managed through coppicing.

  7. Scale dependence of disease impacts on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality in the southwestern United States.

    PubMed

    Bell, David M; Bradford, John B; Lauenroth, William K

    2015-07-01

    Depending on how disease impacts tree exposure to risk, both the prevalence of disease and disease effects on survival may contribute to patterns of mortality risk across a species' range. Disease may accelerate tree species' declines in response to global change factors, such as drought, biotic interactions, such as competition, or functional traits, such as allometry. To assess the role of disease in mediating mortality risk in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), we developed hierarchical Bayesian models for both disease prevalence in live aspen stems and the resulting survival rates of healthy and diseased aspen near the species' southern range limit using 5088 individual trees on 281 United States Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis plots in the southwestern United States. We found that disease prevalence depended primarily on tree size, tree allometry, and spatial variation in precipitation, while mortality depended on tree size, allometry, competition, spatial variation in summer temperature, and both temporal and spatial variation in summer precipitation. Disease prevalence was highest in large trees with low slenderness found on dry sites. For healthy trees, mortality decreased with diameter, slenderness, and temporal variation in summer precipitation, but increased with competition and spatial variation in summer temperature. Mortality of diseased trees decreased with diameter and aspen relative basal area and increased with mean summer temperature and precipitation. Disease infection increased aspen mortality, especially in trees of intermediate size and trees on plots at climatic extremes (i.e., cool, wet and warm, dry climates). By examining variation in disease prevalence, mortality of healthy trees, and mortality of diseased trees, we showed that the role of disease in aspen tree mortality depended on the scale of inference. For variation among individuals in diameter, disease tended to expose intermediate-size trees experiencing moderate

  8. Elevated Rocky Mountain elk numbers prevent positive effects of fire on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, David Solance; Fettig, Stephen M.; Bowker, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) is the most widespread tree species in North America and has supported a unique ecosystem for tens of thousands of years, yet is currently threatened by dramatic loss and possible local extinctions. While multiple factors such as climate change and fire suppression are thought to contribute to aspen’s decline, increased browsing by elk (Cervus elaphus), which have experienced dramatic population increases in the last ∼80 years, may severely inhibit aspen growth and regeneration. Fires are known to favor aspen recovery, but in the last several decades the spatial scale and intensity of wildfires has greatly increased, with poorly understood ramifications for aspen growth. Here, focusing on the 2000 Cerro Grande fire in central New Mexico – one of the earliest fires described as a “mega-fire” - we use three methods to examine the impact of elk browsing on aspen regeneration after a mega-fire. First, we use an exclosure experiment to show that aspen growing in the absence of elk were 3× taller than trees growing in the presence of elk. Further, aspen that were both protected from elk and experienced burning were 8.5× taller than unburned trees growing in the presence of elk, suggesting that the combination of release from herbivores and stimulation from fire creates the largest aspen growth rates. Second, using surveys at the landscape level, we found a correlation between elk browsing intensity and aspen height, such that where elk browsing was highest, aspen were shortest. This relationship between elk browsing intensity and aspen height was stronger in burned (r = −0.53) compared to unburned (r = −0.24) areas. Third, in conjunction with the landscape-level surveys, we identified possible natural refugia, microsites containing downed logs, shrubs etc. that may inhibit elk browsing by physically blocking aspen from elk or by impeding elk’s ability to move through the forest patch. We did not find any

  9. Growth and photosynthesis of plants in response to environmental stress. [Raphanus sativus; Glycine max; Salix nigra; Alnus serrulata; Populus tremuloides

    SciTech Connect

    Greitner, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    Environmental stresses generally decrease photosynthetic rates and growth of plants, and alter biomass partitioning. Nutrient deficiency and drought cause root:shoot ratios to increase, whereas the air pollutant ozone (O[sub 3]) causes an opposite shift in carbon allocation. Plants in nature usually grow under suboptimal conditions; therefore plants were raised with O[sub 3] combined with other stresses to analyze the mechanisms whereby multiple stresses influence gas exchange and growth. Physiological and growth responses to stress were determined for radish (raphanus sativus), soybean (Glycine max) willow (Salix nigra), alder (Alnus serrulata) and aspen (Populus tremuloides) in laboratory and field trials. In willow, high-nutrient status plants had more visible injury, but a smaller decline in leaf area with O[sub 3] than did low-nutrient plants. Ultrastructure of host plant cells in alder root nodules was disrupted by O[sub 3], suggesting that this air pollutant can affect the ability of plants to acquire nutrients via symbiosis. Biomass and root:shoot ratios decreased with O[sub 3] in radish and soy-bean. Shifts in stable carbon isotope ratios were caused by O[sub 3], and this technique was used to integrate the effects of O[sub 3] on gas exchange over time. In aspen, O[sub 3] enhanced photosynthesis and foliar areas in young leaves of well-watered aspen, partially compensating for declines in older leaves. This effect was more pronounced in plants raised at a high nitrogen level than in N-deficient plants. Carboxylation efficiency decreased in older, but increased in younger leaves with O[sub 3]. Prior exposure to drought reduced effects of O[sub 3] on photosynthesis and leaf area.

  10. Stem wood properties of Populus tremuloides, Betula papyrifera and Acer saccharum saplings after three years of treatments to elevated carbon dioxide and ozone

    Treesearch

    Seija Kaakinen; Katri Kostiainen; Fredrik Ek; Pekka Saranpaa; Mark E. Kubiske; Jaak Sober; David F. Karnosky; Elina Vapaavuori

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of elevated carbon dioxide [CO2] and ozone [O3] and their interaction on wood chemistry and anatomy of five clones of 3-year-old trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.). Wood chemistry was studied also on paper birch (Betula papyrifera...

  11. A review of the potential effects of climate change on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Western United States and a new tool for surveying sudden aspen decline

    Treesearch

    Toni Lyn Morelli; Susan C. Carr

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a literature review of the effects of climate on the distribution and growth of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) in the Western United States. Based on our review, we summarize models of historical climate determinants of contemporary aspen distribution. Most quantitative climate-based models linked aspen presence and growth...

  12. Photosynthetic acclimation of overstory Populus tremuloides and understory Acer saccharum to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration: interactions with shade and soil nitrogen

    Treesearch

    Mark E. Kubiske; Donald R. Zak; Kurt S. Pregitzer; Yu Takeuchi

    2002-01-01

    We exposed Populus tremuloides Michx. and Acer saccharum Marsh. to a factorial combination of ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) and high-nitrogen (N) and low-N soil treatments in open-top chambers for 3 years. Our objective was to compare photosynthetic...

  13. The impact of vessel size on vulnerability curves: data and models for within-species variability in saplings of aspen, Populus tremuloides Michx

    Treesearch

    Jing Cai; Melvin T. Tyree

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between vulnerability to cavitation and vessel diameter within a species. We measured vulnerability curves (VCs: percentage loss hydraulic conductivity versus tension) in aspen stems and measured vessel-size distributions. Measurements were done on seed-grown, 4-month-old aspen (Populus tremuloides...

  14. Analysis of a Farquhar-von Caemmerer-Berry leaf-level photosynthetic rate model for Populus tremuloides in the context of modeling and measurement limitations

    Treesearch

    K.E. Lenz; G.E. Host; K. Roskoski; A. Noormets; A. Sober; D.F. Karnosky

    2010-01-01

    The balance of mechanistic detail with mathematical simplicity contributes to the broad use of the Farquhar, von Caemmerer and Berry (FvCB) photosynthetic rate model. Here the FvCB model was coupled with a stomatal conductance model to form an [A,gs] model, and parameterized for mature Populus tremuloides leaves under varying CO2...

  15. Histochemical and microspectrophotometric analyses of early wound responses of resistant and susceptible Populus tremuloides inoculated with Entoleuca mammata (=Hypoxylon mammatum)

    Treesearch

    B. Bucciarelli; Michael E. Ostry; R. G. Fulcher; N. A. Anderson; C. P. Vance

    1999-01-01

    Stem tissue of resistant and susceptible genotypes of Poyulus tremuloides Michx, wounded or woundinoculated with Entoleuca mammata (Wahlenberg: Fr.) J.D. Rogers & Y.M. Ju was prepared for histochemical and microspectrophotometric analysis. Samples were collected over a 96-h period. Parenchyma cell walls associated with the...

  16. Characterizing recent phenological and climate relationships in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, G.; Brown, J. F.; Vogelmann, J. E.; Evelsizer, R.

    2012-12-01

    Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides, referred hereafter as Aspen) has an especially wide geographical distribution in North America, extending from Alaska across the Canadian provinces, the U.S., and south into Mexico. This deciduous species is successional, shade intolerant, and often exists as a dominant among other species at mid-elevations. Aspen occupies wide latitudinal, elevational, and environmental gradients making it a favorable candidate for a study of phenology and climate relationships. The phenological characterization in our Aspen study is derived from a database of conterminous U.S. phenological indicators hosted by the U.S. Geological Survey (http://phenology.cr.usgs.gov/index.php). Nine satellite-derived phenological indicators are calculated from 250m resolution Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). From this database, we selected start of season (SOST), end of season (EOST), maximum NDVI (MaxN) and time integrated NDVI (TIN) to characterize and analyze the seasonal patterns of Aspen over a 10-year time period (2001-2010). Areas of continuous Aspen cover (≥ 80% Aspen cover type) derived from the LANDFIRE project were then used to extract elevation, precipitation, temperature, and snow water equivalent data. In the Rocky Mountains, Aspen recently suffered from multi-year drought stress accompanied by insect and disease infestations. Numerous studies have documented the existence of Sudden Aspen Decline (SAD) in Montana, Utah, Arizona, and Colorado, indicating that Aspen may be on the edge of its environmental tolerances in some areas. The satellite-derived phenology metrics, and climate and biogeographical indicators were the basis for characterizing Aspen seasonality and assessing the environmental context of SAD. Between several Aspen study areas, there was reasonably consistent progression in the SOST timing from low elevations to higher elevations. A less obvious progression was

  17. Stockability, growth, and yield of the circumboreal aspens (`populus tremuloides` michx., `p. tremula` l.). Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Perala, D.A.; Leary, R.A.; Cieszewski, C.J.

    1995-01-10

    The authors show elsewhere that quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) and its Eurasian counterpart, P. tremula L., form a single circumpolar superspecies when viewed from the standpoint of self-thinning rates and stockability. Here the authors expand their examination to the d.b.h.-age relationships and to growth series measurements from permanent plots of aspen stands of varying densities reported in the literature. They also attempt to account for the curvilinear trend in the self-thinning relationship they detected in young stands that forced them in their first analysis to truncate their usable data set to older stands. The resulting equations satisfy the need for a framework to study variation in aspen stockability. The equations can give useful regional estimates as well, but will need refitting to local data to satisfy needs for finer resolution.

  18. Laccaria bicolor aquaporin LbAQP1 is required for Hartig net development in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides).

    PubMed

    Navarro-RóDenas, Alfonso; Xu, Hao; Kemppainen, Minna; Pardo, Alejandro G; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2015-11-01

    The development of ectomycorrhizal associations is crucial for growth of many forest trees. However, the signals that are exchanged between the fungus and the host plant during the colonization process are still poorly understood. In this study, we have identified the relationship between expression patterns of Laccaria bicolor aquaporin LbAQP1 and the development of ectomycorrhizal structures in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings. The peak expression of LbAQP1 was 700-fold higher in the hyphae within the root than in the free-living mycelium after 24 h of direct interaction with the roots. Moreover, in LbAQP1 knock-down strains, a non-mycorrhizal phenotype was developed without the Hartig net and the expression of the mycorrhizal effector protein MiSSP7 quickly declined after an initial peak on day 5 of interaction of the fungal hyphae with the roots. The increase in the expression of LbAQP1 required a direct contact of the fungus with the root and it modulated the expression of MiSSP7. We have also determined that LbAQP1 facilitated NO, H2 O2 and CO2 transport when heterologously expressed in yeast. The report demonstrates that the L. bicolor aquaporin LbAQP1 acts as a molecular signalling channel, which is fundamental for the development of Hartig net in root tips of P. tremuloides. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Suppression subtractive hybridization-mediated transcriptome analysis from multiple tissues of aspen (Populus tremuloides) altered in phenylpropanoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Priya; Kao, Yu-Ying; Jiang, Hongying; Joshi, Chandrashekhar P; Harding, Scott A; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2004-08-01

    A PCR-based suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique was used to identify differentially expressed genes in developing tissues of control and transgenic aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) with down-regulated 4CL1 (4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase) expression and enhanced growth. A total of 11,308 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) representing 5,028 non-redundant transcripts encoding 4,224 unique proteins was obtained from shoot apex, young stem, young leaf and root tip SSH libraries. Putative functions can be assigned to 60% of these transcripts. Approximately 14% of the ESTs are not represented among the 111,000 entries already present in Populus EST databases. In general, ESTs of the metabolism class occurred at a higher frequency in control- than transgenic-enriched libraries of all tissues, whereas protein synthesis and protein fate ESTs were over-represented in meristematic tissues of transgenics where 4CL1 was relatively strongly suppressed. Among all tissues, leaves yielded the highest percentage of ESTs with either unknown protein function or insignificant similarity to other protein/DNA/EST sequences in existing databases. Of particular interest was a large number of ESTs (16%) associated with signal transduction in transgenic leaves. Among these were several leucine-rich-repeat receptor-like protein kinases with markedly elevated expression in transgenic leaves. We also identified homologs of transposable elements that were up-regulated in transgenic tissues, providing the first experimental data for active expression of DNA mobile elements in long-lived tree species.

  20. Polyphenol oxidase and herbivore defense in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides): cDNA cloning, expression, and potential substrates.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Miyoshi; Pedersen, Jens A.; Constabel, C. Peter

    2001-08-01

    The biochemical anti-herbivore defense of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) was investigated in a molecular analysis of polyphenol oxidase (PPO; EC 1.10.3.2). A PPO cDNA was isolated from a trembling aspen wounded leaf cDNA library and its nucleotide sequence determined. Southern analysis indicated the presence of two PPO genes in the trembling aspen genome. Expression of PPO was found to be induced after herbivory by forest tent caterpillar, by wounding, and by methyl jasmonate treatment. Wound induction was systemic, and occurred in unwounded leaves on wounded plants. This pattern of expression is consistent with a role of this enzyme in insect defense. A search for potential PPO substrates in ethanolic aspen leaf extracts using electron spin resonance (ESR) found no pre-existing diphenolic compounds. However, following a brief delay and several additions of oxygen, an ESR signal specific for catechol was detected. The source of this catechol was most likely the aspen phenolic glycosides tremulacin or salicortin which decomposed during ESR experiments. This was subsequently confirmed in experiments using pure salicortin.

  1. Molecular analysis of herbivore-induced condensed tannin synthesis: cloning and expression of dihydroflavonol reductase from trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides).

    PubMed

    Peters, Darren J; Constabel, C Peter

    2002-12-01

    In order to study condensed tannin synthesis and its induction by herbivory, a dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) cDNA was isolated from trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides). Bacterial overexpression demonstrated that this cDNA encodes a functional DFR enzyme, and Southern analysis revealed that DFR likely is a single-copy gene in the aspen genome. Aspen plants that were mechanically wounded showed a dramatic increase in DFR expression after 24 h in both wounded leaves and unwounded leaves on wounded trees. Feeding by forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria) and satin moth (Leucoma salicis) larvae, and treatment with methyl jasmonate, all strongly induced DFR expression. DFR enzyme activity was also induced in wounded aspen leaves, and phytochemical assays revealed that condensed tannin concentrations significantly increased in wounded and systemic leaves. The expression of other genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway were also induced by wounding. Our findings suggest that the induction of condensed tannins, compounds known to be important for defense against herbivores, is mediated by increased expression of DFR and other phenylpropanoid genes.

  2. Influence of Genotype, Environment, and Gypsy Moth Herbivory on Local and Systemic Chemical Defenses in Trembling Aspen (Populus tremuloides).

    PubMed

    Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Couture, John J; Major, Ian T; Constabel, C Peter; Lindroth, Richard L

    2015-07-01

    Numerous studies have explored the impacts of intraspecific genetic variation and environment on the induction of plant chemical defenses by herbivory. Relatively few, however, have considered how those factors affect within-plant distribution of induced defenses. This work examined the impacts of plant genotype and soil nutrients on the local and systemic phytochemical responses of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) to defoliation by gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar). We deployed larvae onto foliage on individual tree branches for 15 days and then measured chemistry in leaves from: 1) branches receiving damage, 2) undamaged branches of insect-damaged trees, and 3) branches of undamaged control trees. The relationship between post-herbivory phytochemical variation and insect performance also was examined. Plant genotype, soil nutrients, and damage all influenced phytochemistry, with genotype and soil nutrients being stronger determinants than damage. Generally, insect damage decreased foliar nitrogen, increased levels of salicinoids and condensed tannins, but had little effect on levels of a Kunitz trypsin inhibitor, TI3. The largest damage-mediated tannin increases occurred in leaves on branches receiving damage, whereas the largest salicinoid increases occurred in leaves of adjacent, undamaged branches. Foliar nitrogen and the salicinoid tremulacin had the strongest positive and negative relationships, respectively, with insect growth. Overall, plant genetics and environment concomitantly influenced both local and systemic phytochemical responses to herbivory. These findings suggest that herbivory can contribute to phytochemical heterogeneity in aspen foliage, which may in turn influence future patterns of herbivory and nutrient cycling over larger spatial scales.

  3. Nutrient concentrations in coarse and fine woody debris of Populus tremuloides Michx.-dominated forests, northern Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klockow, Paul A.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Bradford, John B.; Fraver, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary forest harvesting practices, specifically harvesting woody biomass as a source of bioenergy feedstock, may remove more woody debris from a site than conventional harvesting. Woody debris, particularly smaller diameter woody debris, plays a key role in maintaining ecosystem nutrient stores following disturbance. Understanding nutrient concentrations within woody debris is necessary for assessing the long-term nutrient balance consequences of altered woody debris retention, particularly in forests slated for use as bioenergy feedstocks. Nutrient concentrations in downed woody debris of various sizes, decay classes, and species were characterized within one such forest type, Populus tremuloides Michx.-dominated forests of northern Minnesota, USA. Nutrient concentrations differed significantly between size and decay classes and generally increased as decay progressed. Fine woody debris (≤ 7.5 cm diameter) had higher nutrient concentrations than coarse woody debris (> 7.5 cm diameter) for all nutrients examined except Na and Mn, and nutrient concentrations varied among species. Concentrations of N, Mn, Al, Fe, and Zn in coarse woody debris increased between one and three orders of magnitude, while K decreased by an order of magnitude with progressing decay. The variations in nutrient concentrations observed here underscore the complexity of woody debris nutrient stores in forested ecosystems and suggest that retaining fine woody debris at harvest may provide a potentially important source of nutrients following intensive removals of bioenergy feedstocks.

  4. Elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration leads to increased whole-plant isoprene emission in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides).

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhihong; Niinemets, Ülo; Hüve, Katja; Rasulov, Bahtijor; Noe, Steffen M

    2013-05-01

    Effects of elevated atmospheric [CO2] on plant isoprene emissions are controversial. Relying on leaf-scale measurements, most models simulating isoprene emissions in future higher [CO2] atmospheres suggest reduced emission fluxes. However, combined effects of elevated [CO2] on leaf area growth, net assimilation and isoprene emission rates have rarely been studied on the canopy scale, but stimulation of leaf area growth may largely compensate for possible [CO2] inhibition reported at the leaf scale. This study tests the hypothesis that stimulated leaf area growth leads to increased canopy isoprene emission rates. We studied the dynamics of canopy growth, and net assimilation and isoprene emission rates in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides) grown under 380 and 780 μmol mol(-1) [CO2]. A theoretical framework based on the Chapman-Richards function to model canopy growth and numerically compare the growth dynamics among ambient and elevated atmospheric [CO2]-grown plants was developed. Plants grown under elevated [CO2] had higher C : N ratio, and greater total leaf area, and canopy net assimilation and isoprene emission rates. During ontogeny, these key canopy characteristics developed faster and stabilized earlier under elevated [CO2]. However, on a leaf area basis, foliage physiological traits remained in a transient state over the whole experiment. These results demonstrate that canopy-scale dynamics importantly complements the leaf-scale processes, and that isoprene emissions may actually increase under higher [CO2] as a result of enhanced leaf area production. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Untangling the effects of root age and tissue nitrogen on root respiration in Populus tremuloides at different nitrogen supply.

    PubMed

    Ceccon, Christian; Tagliavini, Massimo; Schmitt, Armin Otto; Eissenstat, David M

    2016-05-01

    Root respiration is a major contributor to terrestrial carbon flux. Many studies have shown root respiration to increase with an increase in root tissue nitrogen (N) concentration across species and study sites. Studies have also shown that both root respiration and root N concentration typically decrease with root age. The effects of added N may directly increase respiration of existing roots or may affect respiration by shifting the age structure of a root population by stimulating growth. To the best of our knowledge, no study has ever examined the effect of added N as a function of root age on root respiration. In this study, root respiration of 13-year-old Populus tremuloides Michx. trees grown in the field and 1-year-old P. tremuloides seedlings grown in containers was analyzed for the relative influence of root age and root N concentration independent of root age on root respiration. Field roots were first tracked using root windows and then sampled at known age. Nitrogen was either applied or not to small patches beneath the windows. In a pot experiment, each plant was grown with its root system split between two separate pots and N was applied at three different levels, either at the same or at different rates between pots. Root N concentration ranged between 1.4 and 1.7% in the field experiment and 1.8 and 2.6% in the seedling experiment. We found that addition of N increased root N concentration of only older roots in the field but of roots of all ages in the potted seedlings. In both experiments, the age-dependent decline in root respiration was largely consistent, and could be explained by a negative power function. Respiration decreased ∼50% by 3 weeks of age. Although root age was the dominant factor affecting respiration in both experiments, in the field experiment, root N also contributed to root respiration independent of root age. These results add further insight into respiratory responses of roots to N addition and mechanisms underlying the

  6. Aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) intake and preference by mammalian herbivores: the role of plant secondary compounds and nutritional context.

    PubMed

    Villalba, Juan J; Burritt, Elizabeth A; St Clair, Samuel B

    2014-10-01

    Aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) has evolved a chemical defense system comprised of phenolic glycosides (PG), which effectively deter insect herbivory. However, much less is known about the role of PG and the nutritional quality of the associated plant community on aspen browse susceptibility to mammalian herbivores. In three successive periods during the growing season, we conducted experiments with sheep by offering leaves from two aspen stands with different concentrations of PG (LOW, HIGH) or aspen leaves vs. leaves from a forb (Utah pea, Lathyrus pauciflorus) or a grass (smooth brome, Bromus inermis Leyss.) growing in an aspen understory. Intake of aspen (19 to 35 % PG) was low in all periods (1 to 6 g/Kg(0.75) in 2 hr) supporting the notion that aspen's defense system may contribute to its ecological success. However, lambs ate larger amounts of LOW than of HIGH suggesting that sheep could discriminate between aspen stands with different concentrations of PG, even when both stands were relatively well defended. Concentration of nutrients and chemical defenses in aspen leaves remained fairly stable across the growing season, and preference for aspen increased over the growing season. In contrast, preference for the forb and the grass decreased across the growing season in concert with a decline in the nutritional quality of these plants. The data suggest that nutritional context of aspen and associated forage species drove preference more than contrasts in defense chemistry of aspen. There may be periods of "susceptibility" of aspen use by mammalian herbivores, despite high concentrations of chemical defenses, which can potentially be targeted by management to reduce aspen herbivory.

  7. Factors affecting fall down rates of dead aspen (Populus tremuloides) biomass following severe drought in west-central Canada.

    PubMed

    Ted Hogg, Edward H; Michaelian, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Increases in mortality of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) have been recorded across large areas of western North America following recent periods of exceptionally severe drought. The resultant increase in standing, dead tree biomass represents a significant potential source of carbon emissions to the atmosphere, but the timing of emissions is partially driven by dead-wood dynamics which include the fall down and breakage of dead aspen stems. The rate at which dead trees fall to the ground also strongly influences the period over which forest dieback episodes can be detected by aerial surveys or satellite remote sensing observations. Over a 12-year period (2000-2012), we monitored the annual status of 1010 aspen trees that died during and following a severe regional drought within 25 study areas across west-central Canada. Observations of stem fall down and breakage (snapping) were used to estimate woody biomass transfer from standing to downed dead wood as a function of years since tree death. For the region as a whole, we estimated that >80% of standing dead aspen biomass had fallen after 10 years. Overall, the rate of fall down was minimal during the year following stem death, but thereafter fall rates followed a negative exponential equation with k = 0.20 per year. However, there was high between-site variation in the rate of fall down (k = 0.08-0.37 per year). The analysis showed that fall down rates were positively correlated with stand age, site windiness, and the incidence of decay fungi (Phellinus tremulae (Bond.) Bond. and Boris.) and wood-boring insects. These factors are thus likely to influence the rate of carbon emissions from dead trees following periods of climate-related forest die-off episodes. © 2014 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Global Change Biology © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Reproduced with the permission of the Minister of Natural Resources Canada.

  8. Impacts of Climate and Insect Defoliators on Trembling Aspen (Populus tremuloides) Mortality and Productivity in Alaskan Boreal Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, M. A.; Goetz, S. J.; Rogers, B. M.; Walker, X. J.; Mack, M. C.

    2016-12-01

    Unprecedented rates of climate change have increased tree mortality and growth decline in forested ecosystems worldwide. The boreal forest has experienced a temperature increase of approximately 1.5 º C since 1970, a trend which is expected to continue. In response to the warming and drying of the boreal forest trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) has experienced recent large-scale die-back. Although die-back is thought to be primarily a result of direct climate changes, insect infestation is another possible driver of aspen mortality and may interact strongly with recent climate. Throughout interior Alaska widespread and consistent foliar damage by the aspen epidermal leaf miner Phyllocnistis populiella has been observed concurrent with some of the warmest and driest growing seasons on record. Here we use tree ring width measurements, tree ring stable carbon isotope signatures, and forest inventory data to study the influence of leaf miner and climate on aspen mortality and productivity decline in the Alaskan boreal forest. In the summer of 2016 we sampled eight Cooperative Alaska Forest Inventory (CAFI) sites established by the US Forest Service in 1994. Since establishment tree status and infestation were recorded every 5 years. Each sampled site was aspen dominated and mortality ranged from 3.5% to 8% within a 5-year sampling period. We collected a total of 24 aspen tree cores and disks from each site: 12 from dead trees and 12 from live trees. In order to assess the influence of leaf miner on radial growth and tree ring stable carbon isotope ratios, cores were also collected from aspen stands surrounding Fairbanks where the size and severity of leaf miner infestation has been recorded since 2003. We expect that prior to mortality trees will show a decline in growth that is correlated to moisture stress and leaf miner infestation. We also expect to see an enriched carbon isotope signal as a result of infestation that will be decoupled from moisture, the

  9. Plant Signals Disrupt (regulate?) Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Growth Under Enhanced Ozone and CO2 Growing Conditions for Populus tremuloides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R. M.; Podila, G. K.

    2008-12-01

    An understanding of the genetic determinants of keystone symbiotic relationships is essential to elucidating adaptive mechanisms influencing higher-order processes, including shifts in community composition following environmental perturbations. The Aspen FACE project offers a unique opportunity to address adaptive processes with an imposed three way interaction experiment composed of the atmospheric pollutant ozone (eO3), elevated CO2 (eCO2) fumigations, five Populus tremuloides (aspen) genotypes, and both arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal fungal interactions. The 10 year time span of this experiment has allowed for a realistic and mechanistic understanding of above ground responses of the aspen genotypes to eCO2, eO3 and the interaction effects of eCO2 and eO3. Even so, treatment influences to the below ground, including carbon allocation to roots and associated mycorrhizal symbionts, and rhizosphere dynamics are just beginning to be understood. We hypothesized that mycorrhizal fungal responses to eCO2, eO3, and the interaction effects of eCO2+eO3 are conditioned by the degree of response of their aspen hosts. We intend to describe the molecular mechanisms of an important critical interaction between host and fungus using microarray analysis of expression profiles, as well as metabolic profiling of aspen roots and their associated mycorrhizal partner, the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus intraradices, under eCO2, eO3 and eCO2+eO3. We present evidence that host-derived factors, expressed in response to eCO2+eO3, trigger responses in Glomus leading to the partitioning or metabolic shift in lipid biosynthesis that is associated with reduced extraradical hyphae growth and altered lipid metabolism. We then scale these lower-level responses to give better insight to fungal intraradical and extraradical allocation of biomass and fungal and root lipid and carbohydrate content in association with aspen genotype responses to the imposed treatments. By

  10. The influence of phosphorus availability and Laccaria bicolor symbiosis on phosphate acquisition, antioxidant enzyme activity, and rhizospheric carbon flux in Populus tremuloides.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shalaka; Naik, Dhiraj; Cumming, Jonathan R

    2014-07-01

    Many forest tree species are dependent on their symbiotic interaction with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi for phosphorus (P) uptake from forest soils where P availability is often limited. The ECM fungal association benefits the host plant under P limitation through enhanced soil exploration and increased P acquisition by mycorrhizas. To study the P starvation response (PSR) and its modification by ECM fungi in Populus tremuloides, a comparison was made between nonmycorrhizal (NM) and mycorrhizal with Laccaria bicolor (Myc) seedlings grown under different concentrations of phosphate (Pi) in sand culture. Although differences in growth between NM and Myc plants were small, Myc plants were more effective at acquiring P from low Pi treatments, with significantly lower k m values for root and leaf P accumulation. Pi limitation significantly increased the activity of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and guaiacol-dependent peroxidase in leaves and roots to greater extents in NM than Myc P. tremuloides. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity also increased in NM plants under P limitation, but was unchanged in Myc plants. Formate, citrate, malonate, lactate, malate, and oxalate and total organic carbon exudation by roots was stimulated by P limitation to a greater extent in NM than Myc plants. Colonization by L. bicolor reduced the solution Pi concentration thresholds where PSR physiological changes occurred, indicating that enhanced Pi acquisition by P. tremuloides colonized by L. bicolor altered host P homeostasis and plant stress responses to P limitation. Understanding these plant-symbiont interactions facilitates the selection of more P-efficient forest trees and strategies for tree plantation production on marginal soils.

  11. Impacts of greenhouse gases on epicuticular waxes of Populus tremuloides Michx.: results from an open-air exposure and a natural O3 gradient.

    PubMed

    Mankovská, B; Percy, K E; Karnosky, D F

    2005-10-01

    Epicuticular waxes of three trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) clones differing in O3 tolerance were examined over six growing seasons (1998-2003) at three bioindicator sites in the Lake States region of the USA and at FACTS II (Aspen FACE) site in Rhinelander, WI. Differences in epicuticular wax structure were determined by scanning electron microscopy and quantified by a coefficient of occlusion. Statistically significant increases in stomatal occlusion occurred for the three O3 bioindicator sites, with the higher O3 sites having the most affected stomata for all three clones as well as for all treatments including elevated CO2, elevated O3, and elevated CO2 + O3. We recorded statistically significant differences between aspen clones and between sampling period (spring, summer, fall). We found no statistically significant differences between treatments or aspen clones in stomatal frequency.

  12. Impact of simulated herbivory on water relations of aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings: the role of new tissue in the hydraulic conductivity recovery cycle.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, David A; Tyree, M T

    2009-10-01

    Physiological mechanisms behind plant-herbivore interactions are commonly approached as input-output systems where the role of plant physiology is viewed as a black box. Studies evaluating impacts of defoliation on plant physiology have mostly focused on changes in photosynthesis while the overall impact on plant water relations is largely unknown. Stem hydraulic conductivity (k(h)), stem specific conductivity (k(s)), percent loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC), CO(2) assimilation (A) and stomatal conductance (g(s)) were measured on well-irrigated 1-month-old Populus tremuloides (Michx.) defoliated and control seedlings until complete refoliation. PLC values of defoliated seedlings gradually increased during the refoliation process despite them being kept well irrigated. k(s) of defoliated seedlings gradually decreased during refoliation. PLC and k(s) values of control seedlings remained constant during refoliation. k(s) of new stems, leaf specific conductivity and A of leaves grown from new stems in defoliated and control seedlings were not significantly different, but g(s) was higher in defoliated than in control seedlings. The gradual increase of PLC and decrease of k(s) values in old stems after defoliation was unexpected under well-irrigated conditions, but appeared to have little impact on new stems formed after defoliation. The gradual loss of conductivity measured during the refoliation process under well-irrigated conditions suggests that young seedlings of P. tremuloides may be more susceptible to cavitation after herbivore damage under drought conditions.

  13. Intraspecific variation in root and leaf traits and leaf-root trait linkages in eight aspen demes (Populus tremula and P. tremuloides)

    PubMed Central

    Hajek, Peter; Hertel, Dietrich; Leuschner, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Leaf and fine root morphology and physiology have been found to vary considerably among tree species, but not much is known about intraspecific variation in root traits and their relatedness to leaf traits. Various aspen progenies (Populus tremula and P. tremuloides) with different growth performance are used in short-rotation forestry. Hence, a better understanding of the link between root trait syndromes and the adaptation of a deme to a particular environment is essential in order to improve the match between planted varieties and their growth conditions. We examined the between-deme (genetic) and within-deme (mostly environmental) variation in important fine root traits [mean root diameter, specific root area (SRA) and specific root length (SRL), root tissue density (RTD), root tip abundance, root N concentration] and their co-variation with leaf traits [specific leaf area (SLA), leaf size, leaf N concentration] in eight genetically distinct P. tremula and P. tremuloides demes. Five of the six root traits varied significantly between the demes with largest genotypic variation in root tip abundance and lowest in mean root diameter and RTD (no significant difference). Within-deme variation in root morphology was as large as between-deme variation suggesting a relatively low genetic control. Significant relationships existed neither between SLA and SRA nor between leaf N and root N concentration in a plant. Contrary to expectation, high aboveground relative growth rates (RGR) were associated with large, and not small, fine root diameters with low SRA and SRL. Compared to leaf traits, the influence of root traits on RGR was generally low. We conclude that aspen exhibits large intraspecific variation in leaf and also in root morphological traits which is only partly explained by genetic distances. A root order-related analysis might give deeper insights into intraspecific root trait variation. PMID:24155751

  14. The impact of vessel size on vulnerability curves: data and models for within-species variability in saplings of aspen, Populus tremuloides Michx.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Tyree, Melvin T

    2010-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between vulnerability to cavitation and vessel diameter within a species. We measured vulnerability curves (VCs: percentage loss hydraulic conductivity versus tension) in aspen stems and measured vessel-size distributions. Measurements were done on seed-grown, 4-month-old aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx) grown in a greenhouse. VCs of stem segments were measured using a centrifuge technique and by a staining technique that allowed a VC to be constructed based on vessel diameter size-classes (D). Vessel-based VCs were also fitted to Weibull cumulative distribution functions (CDF), which provided best-fit values of Weibull CDF constants (c and b) and P(50) = the tension causing 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity. We show that P(50) = 6.166D(-0.3134) (R(2) = 0.995) and that b and 1/c are both linear functions of D with R(2) > 0.95. The results are discussed in terms of models of VCs based on vessel D size-classes and in terms of concepts such as the 'pit area hypothesis' and vessel pathway redundancy.

  15. Effects of Elevated Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Tropospheric Ozone on Phytochemical Composition of Trembling Aspen ( Populus tremuloides ) and Paper Birch ( Betula papyrifera ).

    PubMed

    Couture, John J; Meehan, Timothy D; Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Lindroth, Richard L

    2017-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities are altering levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3). These changes can alter phytochemistry, and in turn, influence ecosystem processes. We assessed the individual and combined effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on the phytochemical composition of two tree species common to early successional, northern temperate forests. Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) and paper birch (Betula papyrifera) were grown at the Aspen FACE (Free-Air Carbon dioxide and ozone Enrichment) facility under four combinations of ambient and elevated CO2 and O3. We measured, over three years (2006-08), the effects of CO2 and O3 on a suite of foliar traits known to influence forest functioning. Elevated CO2 had minimal effect on foliar nitrogen and carbohydrate levels in either tree species, and increased synthesis of condensed tannins and fiber in aspen, but not birch. Elevated O3 decreased nitrogen levels in both tree species and increased production of sugar, condensed tannins, fiber, and lignin in aspen, but not birch. The magnitude of responses to elevated CO2 and O3 varied seasonally for both tree species. When co-occurring, CO2 offset most of the changes in foliar chemistry expressed under elevated O3 alone. Our results suggest that levels of CO2 and O3 predicted for the mid-twenty-first century will alter the foliar chemistry of northern temperate forests with likely consequences for forest community and ecosystem dynamics.

  16. Impacts of post-harvest slash and live-tree retention on biomass and nutrient stocks in Populus tremuloides Michx.-dominated forests, northern Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klockow, Paul A.; D'Amato, Anthony W.; Bradford, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Globally, there is widespread interest in using forest-derived biomass as a source of bioenergy. While conventional timber harvesting generally removes only merchantable tree boles, harvesting biomass feedstock can remove all forms of woody biomass (i.e., live and dead standing woody vegetation, downed woody debris, and stumps) resulting in a greater loss of biomass and nutrients as well as more severe habitat alteration. To investigate the potential impacts of this practice, this study examined the initial impacts (pre- and post-harvest) of various levels of slash and live-tree retention on biomass and nutrient stocks, including carbon (C), nitrogen (N), calcium (Ca), potassium (K), and phosphorus (P), in Populus tremuloides Michx.-dominated forests of northern Minnesota, USA. Treatments examined included three levels of slash retention, whole-tree harvest (WTH), 20% slash retention (20SR), and stem-only harvest (SOH), factored with three levels of green-tree retention, no trees retained (NONE), dispersed retention (DISP), and aggregate retention (AGR). Slash retention was the primary factor affecting post-harvest biomass and nutrient stocks, including woody debris pools. Compared to the unharvested control, stocks of biomass, carbon, and nutrients, including N, Ca, K, and P, in woody debris were higher in all treatments. Stem-only harvests typically contained greater biomass and nutrient stocks than WTH, although biomass and nutrients within 20SR, a level recommended by biomass harvesting guidelines in the US and worldwide, generally did not differ from WTH or SOH. Biomass in smaller-diameter slash material (typically 2.5-22.5 cm in diameter) dominated the woody debris pool following harvest regardless of slash retention level. Trends among treatments in this diameter range were generally similar to those in the total woody debris pool. Specifically, SOH contained significantly greater amounts of biomass than WTH while 20SR was not different from either WTH or

  17. Influence of over-expression of the Flowering Promoting Factor 1 gene (FPF1) from Arabidopsis on wood formation in hybrid poplar (Populus tremula L. × P. tremuloides Michx.).

    PubMed

    Hoenicka, Hans; Lautner, Silke; Klingberg, Andreas; Koch, Gerald; El-Sherif, Fadia; Lehnhardt, Denise; Zhang, Bo; Burgert, Ingo; Odermatt, Jürgen; Melzer, Siegbert; Fromm, Jörg; Fladung, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    Constitutive expression of the FPF1 gene in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. × P. tremuloides Michx.) showed a strong effect on wood formation but no effect on flowering time. Gene expression studies showed that activity of flowering time genes PtFT1, PtCO2, and PtFUL was not increased in FPF1 transgenic plants. However, the SOC1/TM3 class gene PTM5, which has been related to wood formation and flowering time, showed a strong activity in stems of all transgenic lines studied. Wood density was lower in transgenic plants, despite significantly reduced vessel frequency which was overcompensated by thinner fibre cell walls. Chemical screening of the wood by pyrolysis GC/MS showed that FPF1 transgenics have higher fractions of cellulose and glucomannan products as well as lower lignin content. The latter observation was confirmed by UV microspectrophotometry on a cellular level. Topochemical lignin distribution revealed a slower increase of lignin incorporation in the developing xylem of the transgenics when compared with the wild-type plants. In line with the reduced wood density, micromechanical wood properties such as stiffness and ultimate stress were also significantly reduced in all transgenic lines. Thus, we provide evidence that FPF1 class genes may play a regulatory role in both wood formation and flowering in poplar.

  18. Spring leaf flush in aspen (Populus tremuloides) clones is altered by long-term growth at elevated carbon dioxide and elevated ozone concentration.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Justin M; Karnosky, David F; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A

    2010-04-01

    Early spring leaf out is important to the success of deciduous trees competing for light and space in dense forest plantation canopies. In this study, we investigated spring leaf flush and how long-term growth at elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO(2)]) and elevated ozone concentration ([O(3)]) altered leaf area index development in a closed Populus tremuloides (aspen) canopy. This work was done at the Aspen FACE experiment where aspen clones have been grown since 1997 in conditions simulating the [CO(2)] and [O(3)] predicted for approximately 2050. The responses of two clones were compared during the first month of spring leaf out when CO(2) fumigation had begun, but O(3) fumigation had not. Trees in elevated [CO(2)] plots showed a stimulation of leaf area index (36%), while trees in elevated [O(3)] plots had lower leaf area index (-20%). While individual leaf area was not significantly affected by elevated [CO(2)], the photosynthetic operating efficiency of aspen leaves was significantly improved (51%). There were no significant differences in the way that the two aspen clones responded to elevated [CO(2)]; however, the two clones responded differently to long-term growth at elevated [O(3)]. The O(3)-sensitive clone, 42E, had reduced individual leaf area when grown at elevated [O(3)] (-32%), while the tolerant clone, 216, had larger mature leaf area at elevated [O(3)] (46%). These results indicate a clear difference between the two clones in their long-term response to elevated [O(3)], which could affect competition between the clones, and result in altered genotypic composition in future atmospheric conditions.

  19. Will changes in root-zone temperature in boreal spring affect recovery of photosynthesis in Picea mariana and Populus tremuloides in a future climate?

    PubMed

    Fréchette, Emmanuelle; Ensminger, Ingo; Bergeron, Yves; Gessler, Arthur; Berninger, Frank

    2011-11-01

    Future climate will alter the soil cover of mosses and snow depths in the boreal forests of eastern Canada. In field manipulation experiments, we assessed the effects of varying moss and snow depths on the physiology of black spruce (Picea -mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) and trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) in the boreal black spruce forest of western Québec. For 1 year, naturally regenerated 10-year-old spruce and aspen were grown with one of the following treatments: additional N fertilization, addition of sphagnum moss cover, removal of mosses, delayed soil thawing through snow and hay addition, or accelerated soil thawing through springtime snow removal. Treatments that involved the addition of insulating moss or snow in the spring caused lower soil temperature, while removing moss and snow in the spring caused elevated soil temperature and thus had a warming effect. Soil warming treatments were associated with greater temperature variability. Additional soil cover, whether moss or snow, increased the rate of photosynthetic recovery in the spring. Moss and snow removal, on the other hand, had the opposite effect and lowered photosynthetic activity, especially in spruce. Maximal electron transport rate (ETR(max)) was, for spruce, 39.5% lower after moss removal than with moss addition, and 16.3% lower with accelerated thawing than with delayed thawing. Impaired photosynthetic recovery in the absence of insulating moss or snow covers was associated with lower foliar N concentrations. Both species were affected in that way, but trembling aspen generally reacted less strongly to all treatments. Our results indicate that a clear negative response of black spruce to changes in root-zone temperature should be anticipated in a future climate. Reduced moss cover and snow depth could adversely affect the photosynthetic capacities of black spruce, while having only minor effects on trembling aspen.

  20. The responses of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin-expressing hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloides) exposed to 24-h herbivory: expression of hemoglobin and stress-related genes in exposed and nonorthostichous leaves.

    PubMed

    Sutela, Suvi; Ylioja, Tiina; Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile; Anttila, Anna-Kaisa; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Niemi, Karoliina; Mölläri, Tiina; Kallio, Pauli T; Häggman, Hely

    2013-11-01

    The responses of transcriptome and phenolic compounds were determined with Populus tremula L. × Populus tremuloides Michx. expressing the hemoglobin (Hb) of Vitreoscilla (VHb) and non-transformant (wt) line. After 24-h exposure of leaves to Conistra vaccinii L., the transcript levels of endogenous non-symbiotic class 1 Hb (PttHb1) and truncated Hb (PttTrHb) genes were modestly reduced and increased, respectively, in both wt and VHb-expressing line. Besides the herbivory exposed leaves showing the most significant transcriptome changes, alterations were also detected in the transcriptome of nonorthostichous leaves positioned directly above the exposed leaves. Both wt and VHb-expressing line displayed similar herbivory-induced effects on gene expression, although the extent of responses was more pronounced in the wt than in the VHb-expressing line. The contents of phenolic compounds were not altered due to herbivory and they were alike in the wt and VHb-expressing line. In addition, we determined the relative growth rates (RGRs) of Orthosia gothica L., Ectropis crepuscularia Denis & Schiff. and Orgyia antiqua L. larvae, and found no variation in the RGRs between the lines. Thus, VHb-expressing P. tremula × tremuloides lines showed to be comparable with wt in regards to the food quality of leaves.

  1. Pre- and Post-Harvest Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from an Upland Boreal Aspen (Populus tremuloides) Forest in Western Boreal Plain, Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giroux, Kayla

    The Utikuma Region Study Area (URSA) is located in north-central Alberta, Canada, in a region where aspen (Populus tremuloides) dominate the upland vegetation of the Western Boreal Plain Due to the heterogeneity of the surficial geology as well as the sub-humid climate where the water balance is dominated by evapotranspiration, the carbon balance across this landscape is highly variable. Moreover, the upland aspen regions represent significant stores of carbon. More recently, aspen stands have become valuable commercial resources for pulp and paper processing. These stands are harvested through a clear cutting process and are generally left to regenerate on their own, a process which occurs rapidly in clonal species like aspen. Since clonal species establish very quickly following harvest, information on the key ecohydrological controls on stand carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange from the years immediately following harvest are essential to understand the successional trajectory. However, most information currently available on these interactions are obtained several years following a disturbance. Thus, to determine the effects of harvest on aspen regeneration and productivity, ecosystem level fluxes of CO2 three years before and three years after timber harvest were analyzed. Prior to harvest, the ecosystem sequestered 1216 to 1286 g CO2 m-2period-1 over the growing season. Immediately after harvest, the ecosystem became a significant source of CO2 ranging from -874 to -1183 g CO2 m -2period-1, while the second growing season ranged from -233 to -577 g CO2 m-2period-1. The third growing season resulted in a net sink (76 g CO2 m -2period-1) over the same period, but if extrapolated over the whole year, the ecosystem would remain a source of carbon. The magnitude of Gross Ecosystem Productivity (GEP) returned pre-harvest range within two growing seasons. Ecosystem respiration (RE), on the other hand, increased year over year after harvest had taken place

  2. Comparative leaf growth strategies in response to low-water and low-light availability: variation in leaf physiology underlies variation in leaf mass per area in Populus tremuloides.

    PubMed

    Baird, Alec S; Anderegg, Leander D L; Lacey, Melissa E; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    2017-04-04

    Developmental phenotypic plasticity can allow plants to buffer the effects of abiotic and biotic environmental stressors. Therefore, it is vital to improve our understanding of how phenotypic plasticity in ecological functional traits is coordinated with variation in physiological performance in plants. To identify coordinated leaf responses to low-water (LW) versus low-light (LL) availability, we measured leaf mass per area (LMA), leaf anatomical characteristics and leaf gas exchange of juvenile Populus tremuloides Michx. trees. Spongy mesophyll tissue surface area (Asmes/A) was correlated with intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi: photosynthesis, (Aarea)/stomatal conductance (gs)). Under LW availability, these changes occurred at the cost of greater leaf tissue density and reduced expansive growth, as leaves were denser but were only 20% the final area of control leaves, resulting in elevated LMA and elevated WUEi. Low light resulted in reduced palisade mesophyll surface area (Apmes/A) while spongy mesophyll surface area was maintained (Asmes/A), with no changes to WUEi. These leaf morphological changes may be a plastic strategy to increase laminar light capture while maintaining WUEi. With reduced density and thickness, however, leaves were 50% the area of control leaves, ultimately resulting in reduced LMA. Our results illustrate that P. tremuloides saplings partially maintain physiological function in response to water and light limitation by inducing developmental plasticity in LMA with underlying anatomical changes. We discuss additional implications of these results in the context of developmental plasticity, growth trade-offs and the ecological impacts of climate change.

  3. Wood property variation in Populus

    Treesearch

    Dean W. Einspahr; Miles K. Benson; John R. Peckham

    1968-01-01

    The use of bigtooth aspen (Populus grandidentata Michx.), quaking aspen (P. tremuloides Michx.), and cottonwood (P. deltoides Bartr.) by the pulp and paper industry has increased greatly during the past decade. This expanded use has stimulated research on the genetic improvement of Populus. For the past 12 years...

  4. The Populus homeobox gene ARBORKNOX2 regulates cell differentiation during secondary growth

    Treesearch

    Juan Du; Shawn D. Mansfield; Andrew T. Groover

    2009-01-01

    The stem cells of the vascular cambium divide to produce daughter cells, which in turn divide before undergoing differentiation during the radial growth of woody stems. The genetic regulation of these developmental events is poorly understood, however. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of a Populus class-I KNOX...

  5. Knockdown of a laccase in Populus deltoides confers altered cell wall chemistry and increased sugar release.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Anthony C; Jawdy, Sara; Gunter, Lee; Gjersing, Erica; Sykes, Robert; Hinchee, Maud A W; Winkeler, Kimberly A; Collins, Cassandra M; Engle, Nancy; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Yang, Xiaohan; Tuskan, Gerald A; Muchero, Wellington; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2016-10-01

    Plant laccases are thought to function in the oxidation of monolignols which leads to higher order lignin formation. Only a hand-full of laccases in plants have been functionally evaluated, and as such little is known about the breadth of their impact on cell wall chemistry or structure. Here, we describe a previously uncharacterized laccase from Populus, encoded by locus Potri.008G064000, whose reduced expression resulted in transgenic Populus trees with changes in syringyl/guaiacyl ratios as well as altered sugar release phenotypes. These phenotypes are consistent with plant biomass exhibiting reduced recalcitrance. Interestingly, the transgene effect on recalcitrance is dependent on a mild pretreatment prior to chemical extraction of sugars. Metabolite profiling suggests the transgene modulates phenolics that are associated with the cell wall structure. We propose that this particular laccase has a range of functions related to oxidation of phenolics and conjugation of flavonoids that interact with lignin in the cell wall.

  6. Genetic variation in natural populations of Populus tremuloide

    SciTech Connect

    Cheliak, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Vegetative reproduction results in a mosaic of clones throughout the extensive natural range of this species. An electrophoretic survey of 26 loci in 222 trees from seven natural populations in Alberta demonstrated great variability. Average observed population heterozygosity was 0.52 with an average of 2.3 alleles per locus; 84% of the loci were polymorphic. A model (for a finite population with neutral alleles) was developed to investigate the effects of partial vegetative reproduction on the amount of variation in a population. Results of the survey conformed to those predicted by the model for a population with a rate of sexual establishment greater than 1/N, where N is the population size. The model states that under these conditions, vegetative reproduction has no effect on the population. Therefore, the high level of observed variation is not an artifact of the mode of natural reproduction. These results support conclusions about high population variability based on phenotypic measurements and also suggest a genetic basis for this variation, rather than simply phenotypic plasticity.

  7. Slow lifelong growth predisposes Populus tremuloides to tree mortality

    Treesearch

    Kathryn B. Ireland; Margaret M. Moore; Peter Z. Fule; Thomas J. Zegler; Robert E. Keane

    2014-01-01

    Widespread dieback of aspen forests, sometimes called sudden aspen decline, has been observed throughout much of western North America, with the highest mortality rates in the southwestern United States. Recent aspen mortality has been linked to drought stress and elevated temperatures characteristic of conditions expected under climate change, but the role of...

  8. Autumnal photosynthesis in short-rotation intensively cultured Populus clones

    Treesearch

    N.D. Nelson; D.I. Dickmann; K.W. Gottschalk

    1982-01-01

    Many exotic hybrid Populus clones grown under short-rotation intensive culture (SRIC) in the Lake States region of the U.S.A. retain green leaves in the autumn for 2-6 weeks after native aspen (P. tremuloides and P. grandidentata) have lost their leaves. Leaves on the terminal shoots of five such clones tested in...

  9. Formation of wood secondary cell wall may involve two type cellulose synthase complexes in Populus.

    PubMed

    Xi, Wang; Song, Dongliang; Sun, Jiayan; Shen, Junhui; Li, Laigeng

    2017-03-01

    Cellulose biosynthesis is mediated by cellulose synthases (CesAs), which constitute into rosette-like cellulose synthase complexe (CSC) on the plasma membrane. Two types of CSCs in Arabidopsis are believed to be involved in cellulose synthesis in the primary cell wall and secondary cell walls, respectively. In this work, we found that the two type CSCs participated cellulose biosynthesis in differentiating xylem cells undergoing secondary cell wall thickening in Populus. During the cell wall thickening process, expression of one type CSC genes increased while expression of the other type CSC genes decreased. Suppression of different type CSC genes both affected the wall-thickening and disrupted the multilaminar structure of the secondary cell walls. When CesA7A was suppressed, crystalline cellulose content was reduced, which, however, showed an increase when CesA3D was suppressed. The CesA suppression also affected cellulose digestibility of the wood cell walls. The results suggest that two type CSCs are involved in coordinating the cellulose biosynthesis in formation of the multilaminar structure in Populus wood secondary cell walls.

  10. Microsatellite primer resource for Populus developed from

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Tongming; Yang, Xiaohan; Gunter, Lee E; Tuskan, Gerald A; Wullschleger, Stan D; Huang, Prof. Minren; Li, Shuxian; Zhang, Xinye

    2008-01-01

    In this study, 148 428 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs were designed from the unambiguously mapped sequence scaffolds of the Nisqually-1 genome. The physical position of the priming sites were identified along each of the 19 Populus chromosomes, and it was specified whether the priming sequences belong to intronic, intergenic, exonic or UTR regions. A subset of 150 SSR loci were amplified and a high amplification success rate (72%) was obtained in P. tremuloides, which belongs to a divergent subgenus of Populus relative to Nisqually-1. PCR reactions showed that the amplification success rate of exonic primer pairs was much higher than that of the intronic/intergenic primer pairs. Applying ANOVA and regression analyses to the flanking sequences of microsatellites, the repeat lengths, the GC contents of the repeats, the repeat motif numbers, the repeat motif length and the base composition of the repeat motif, it was determined that only the base composition of the repeat motif and the repeat motif length significantly affect the microsatellite variability in P. tremuloides samples. The SSR primer resource developed in this study provides a database for selecting highly transferable SSR markers with known physical position in the Populus genome and provides a comprehensive genetic tool to extend the genome sequence of Nisqually-1 to genetic studies in different Populus species.

  11. Rapid Activation of Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Elicitor-Treated Hybrid Poplar (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray × Populus deltoides Marsh) Suspension-Cultured Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    de Sá, Mário Moniz; Subramaniam, Rajgopal; Williams, Frank E.; Douglas, Carl J.

    1992-01-01

    Elicitor induction of phenylpropanoid metabolism was investigated in suspension-cultured cells of the fast-growing poplar hybrid (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray × Populus deltoides Marsh) H11-11. Treatment of cells with polygalacturonic acid lyase or two fungal elicitors resulted in rapid and transient increases in extractable l-phenylalanine ammonia lyase and 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activities. The substrate specificity of the inducible 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activity appeared to differ from substrate specificity of 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activity in untreated control cells. Large and transient increases in the accumulation of l-phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase mRNAs preceded the increases in enzyme activities and were detectable by 30 minutes after the start of elicitor treatment. Chalcone synthase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, and coniferin β-glucosidase enzyme activities were unaffected by the elicitors, but a large and transient increase in β-glucosidase activity capable of hydrolyzing 4-nitrophenyl-β-glucoside was observed. Subsequent to increases in l-phenylalanine ammonialyase and 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activities, cell wall-bound thioglycolic acid-extractable compounds accumulated in elicitor-treated cultures, and these cells exhibited strong staining with phloroglucinol, suggesting the accumulation of wall-bound phenolic compounds. ImagesFigure 7Figure 9 PMID:16668702

  12. Knockdown of a laccase in Populus deltoides confers altered cell wall chemistry and increased sugar release

    DOE PAGES

    Bryan, Anthony C.; Jawdy, Sara; Gunter, Lee; ...

    2016-04-15

    Plant laccases are thought to function in the oxidation of monolignols which leads to higher order lignin formation. Only a hand-full of laccases in plants have been functionally evaluated and as such little is known about the breadth of their impact on cell wall chemistry or structure. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized laccase from Populus, encoded by locus Potri.008G06400, whose reduced expression resulted in transgenic Populus trees with changes in syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) ratios as well as altered sugar release phenotypes. These phenotypes are consistent with plant biomass exhibiting reduced recalcitrance. Interestingly, the transgene effect on recalcitrance is dependent onmore » a mild pretreatment prior to chemical extraction of sugars. Metabolite profiling suggests the transgene modulates phenolics that are associated with the cell wall structure. Finally, we propose a model in which this particular laccase has a range of functions related to oxidation of phenolics that interact with lignin in the cell wall.« less

  13. Enrichment of Root Endophytic Bacteria from Populus deltoides and Single-Cell-Genomics Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Cude, W. Nathan; Robeson, Jr., Michael S.; ...

    2016-07-15

    Bacterial endophytes that colonize Populus trees contribute to nutrient acquisition, prime immunity responses, and directly or indirectly increase both above- and below-ground biomasses. Endophytes are embedded within plant material, so physical separation and isolation are difficult tasks. Application of culture-independent methods, such as metagenome or bacterial transcriptome sequencing, has been limited due to the predominance of DNA from the plant biomass. In this paper, we present a modified differential and density gradient centrifugation-based protocol for the separation of endophytic bacteria from Populus roots. This protocol achieved substantial reduction in contaminating plant DNA, allowed enrichment of endophytic bacteria away from themore » plant material, and enabled single-cell genomics analysis. Four single-cell genomes were selected for whole-genome amplification based on their rarity in the microbiome (potentially uncultured taxa) as well as their inferred abilities to form associations with plants. Bioinformatics analyses, including assembly, contamination removal, and completeness estimation, were performed to obtain single-amplified genomes (SAGs) of organisms from the phyla Armatimonadetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, which were unrepresented in our previous cultivation efforts. Finally, comparative genomic analysis revealed unique characteristics of each SAG that could facilitate future cultivation efforts for these bacteria.« less

  14. Enrichment of Root Endophytic Bacteria from Populus deltoides and Single-Cell-Genomics Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Cude, W. Nathan; Robeson, Jr., Michael S.; Yang, Zamin Koo; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Land, Miriam L.; Allman, Steve L.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Podar, Mircea; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2016-07-15

    Bacterial endophytes that colonize Populus trees contribute to nutrient acquisition, prime immunity responses, and directly or indirectly increase both above- and below-ground biomasses. Endophytes are embedded within plant material, so physical separation and isolation are difficult tasks. Application of culture-independent methods, such as metagenome or bacterial transcriptome sequencing, has been limited due to the predominance of DNA from the plant biomass. In this paper, we present a modified differential and density gradient centrifugation-based protocol for the separation of endophytic bacteria from Populus roots. This protocol achieved substantial reduction in contaminating plant DNA, allowed enrichment of endophytic bacteria away from the plant material, and enabled single-cell genomics analysis. Four single-cell genomes were selected for whole-genome amplification based on their rarity in the microbiome (potentially uncultured taxa) as well as their inferred abilities to form associations with plants. Bioinformatics analyses, including assembly, contamination removal, and completeness estimation, were performed to obtain single-amplified genomes (SAGs) of organisms from the phyla Armatimonadetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, which were unrepresented in our previous cultivation efforts. Finally, comparative genomic analysis revealed unique characteristics of each SAG that could facilitate future cultivation efforts for these bacteria.

  15. Identification of candidate genes in Populus cell wall biosynthesis using text-mining, co-expression network and comparative genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaohan; Ye, Chuyu; Bisaria, Anjali; Tuskan, Gerald A; Kalluri, Udaya C

    2011-01-01

    Populus is an important bioenergy crop for bioethanol production. A greater understanding of cell wall biosynthesis processes is critical in reducing biomass recalcitrance, a major hindrance in efficient generation of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. Here, we report the identification of candidate cell wall biosynthesis genes through the development and application of a novel bioinformatics pipeline. As a first step, via text-mining of PubMed publications, we obtained 121 Arabidopsis genes that had the experimental evidences supporting their involvement in cell wall biosynthesis or remodeling. The 121 genes were then used as bait genes to query an Arabidopsis co-expression database and additional genes were identified as neighbors of the bait genes in the network, increasing the number of genes to 548. The 548 Arabidopsis genes were then used to re-query the Arabidopsis co-expression database and re-construct a network that captured additional network neighbors, expanding to a total of 694 genes. The 694 Arabidopsis genes were computationally divided into 22 clusters. Queries of the Populus genome using the Arabidopsis genes revealed 817 Populus orthologs. Functional analysis of gene ontology and tissue-specific gene expression indicated that these Arabidopsis and Populus genes are high likelihood candidates for functional genomics in relation to cell wall biosynthesis.

  16. Enrichment of Root Endophytic Bacteria from Populus deltoides and Single-Cell-Genomics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Utturkar, Sagar M.; Cude, W. Nathan; Robeson, Michael S.; Yang, Zamin K.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Land, Miriam L.; Allman, Steve L.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Brown, Steven D.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Podar, Mircea; Doktycz, Mitchel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial endophytes that colonize Populus trees contribute to nutrient acquisition, prime immunity responses, and directly or indirectly increase both above- and below-ground biomasses. Endophytes are embedded within plant material, so physical separation and isolation are difficult tasks. Application of culture-independent methods, such as metagenome or bacterial transcriptome sequencing, has been limited due to the predominance of DNA from the plant biomass. Here, we describe a modified differential and density gradient centrifugation-based protocol for the separation of endophytic bacteria from Populus roots. This protocol achieved substantial reduction in contaminating plant DNA, allowed enrichment of endophytic bacteria away from the plant material, and enabled single-cell genomics analysis. Four single-cell genomes were selected for whole-genome amplification based on their rarity in the microbiome (potentially uncultured taxa) as well as their inferred abilities to form associations with plants. Bioinformatics analyses, including assembly, contamination removal, and completeness estimation, were performed to obtain single-amplified genomes (SAGs) of organisms from the phyla Armatimonadetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, which were unrepresented in our previous cultivation efforts. Comparative genomic analysis revealed unique characteristics of each SAG that could facilitate future cultivation efforts for these bacteria. IMPORTANCE Plant roots harbor a diverse collection of microbes that live within host tissues. To gain a comprehensive understanding of microbial adaptations to this endophytic lifestyle from strains that cannot be cultivated, it is necessary to separate bacterial cells from the predominance of plant tissue. This study provides a valuable approach for the separation and isolation of endophytic bacteria from plant root tissue. Isolated live bacteria provide material for microbiome sequencing, single-cell genomics, and analyses

  17. The Populus homeobox gene ARBORKNOX2 regulates cell differentiation during secondary growth.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Mansfield, Shawn D; Groover, Andrew T

    2009-12-01

    The stem cells of the vascular cambium divide to produce daughter cells, which in turn divide before undergoing differentiation during the radial growth of woody stems. The genetic regulation of these developmental events is poorly understood, however. We report here the cloning and functional characterization of a Populus class-I KNOX homeobox gene, ARBORKNOX2 (ARK2), which we show influences terminal cell differentiation and cell wall properties during secondary growth. In the early stages of secondary growth, ARK2 is expressed broadly in the cambial zone and in terminally differentiating cell types, before becoming progressively restricted to the cambium. ARK2 overexpression and synthetic miRNA-suppression transgenics reveal positive correlations between ARK2 expression level and the timing of cambium formation, the width of the cambial zone and inhibition of cambial daughter cell differentiation. These phenotypes in turn correlate with changes in the expression of genes affecting transcription, cell division, auxin and cell wall synthesis. Notably, wood properties associated with secondary cell wall synthesis are negatively associated with ARK2 expression, including lignin and cellulose content. Together, our results suggest that ARK2 functions primarily to regulate a complex suite of genes that together influence cell differentiation during secondary growth. We propose that ARK2 may represent a co-evolved transcriptional module that influences complex, adaptive wood properties.

  18. Genome-Scale Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Muchero, Wellington [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2016-07-12

    Wellington Muchero from Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  19. Genome-Scale Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Muchero, Wellington

    2012-03-22

    Wellington Muchero from Oak Ridge National Laboratory gives a talk titled "Discovery of Cell Wall Biosynthesis Genes in Populus" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  20. Tubulin perturbation leads to unexpected cell wall modifications and affects stomatal behaviour in Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Swamy, Prashant S.; Hu, Hao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; ...

    2015-08-05

    Cortical microtubules are integral to plant morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, and stomatal behaviour, presumably by governing cellulose microfibril orientation. Genetic manipulation of tubulins often leads to abnormal plant development, making it difficult to probe additional roles of cortical microtubules in cell wall biogenesis. Here, it is shown that expressing post-translational C-terminal modification mimics of α-tubulin altered cell wall characteristics and guard cell dynamics in transgenic Populus tremula x alba that otherwise appear normal. 35S promoter-driven transgene expression was high in leaves but unusually low in xylem, suggesting high levels of tubulin transgene expression were not tolerated in wood-forming tissues duringmore » regeneration of transformants. Cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents were unaffected in transgenic wood, but expression of cell wall-modifying enzymes, and extractability of lignin-bound pectin and xylan polysaccharides were increased in developing xylem. The results suggest that pectin and xylan polysaccharides deposited early during cell wall biogenesis are more sensitive to subtle tubulin perturbation than cellulose and matrix polysaccharides deposited later. Tubulin perturbation also affected guard cell behaviour, delaying drought-induced stomatal closure as well as light-induced stomatal opening in leaves. Pectins have been shown to confer cell wall flexibility critical for reversible stomatal movement, and results presented here are consistent with microtubule involvement in this process. In conclusion, taken together, the data show the value of growth-compatible tubulin perturbations for discerning microtubule functions, and add to the growing body of evidence for microtubule involvement in non-cellulosic polysaccharide assembly during cell wall biogenesis.« less

  1. Tubulin perturbation leads to unexpected cell wall modifications and affects stomatal behaviour in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Prashant S.; Hu, Hao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Maloney, Victoria J.; Xiao, Hui; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Chung, Jeng-Der; Johnson, Virgil E.; Zhu, Yingying; Peter, Gary F.; Hahn, Michael G.; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2015-01-01

    Cortical microtubules are integral to plant morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, and stomatal behaviour, presumably by governing cellulose microfibril orientation. Genetic manipulation of tubulins often leads to abnormal plant development, making it difficult to probe additional roles of cortical microtubules in cell wall biogenesis. Here, it is shown that expressing post-translational C-terminal modification mimics of α-tubulin altered cell wall characteristics and guard cell dynamics in transgenic Populus tremula x alba that otherwise appear normal. 35S promoter-driven transgene expression was high in leaves but unusually low in xylem, suggesting high levels of tubulin transgene expression were not tolerated in wood-forming tissues during regeneration of transformants. Cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents were unaffected in transgenic wood, but expression of cell wall-modifying enzymes, and extractability of lignin-bound pectin and xylan polysaccharides were increased in developing xylem. The results suggest that pectin and xylan polysaccharides deposited early during cell wall biogenesis are more sensitive to subtle tubulin perturbation than cellulose and matrix polysaccharides deposited later. Tubulin perturbation also affected guard cell behaviour, delaying drought-induced stomatal closure as well as light-induced stomatal opening in leaves. Pectins have been shown to confer cell wall flexibility critical for reversible stomatal movement, and results presented here are consistent with microtubule involvement in this process. Taken together, the data show the value of growth-compatible tubulin perturbations for discerning microtubule functions, and add to the growing body of evidence for microtubule involvement in non-cellulosic polysaccharide assembly during cell wall biogenesis. PMID:26246616

  2. Bioinformatics-Based Identification of Candidate Genes from QTLs Associated with Cell Wall Traits in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjan, Priya; Yin, Tongming; Zhang, Xinye; Kalluri, Udaya C; Yang, Xiaohan; Jawdy, Sara; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2009-11-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies are an integral part of plant research and are used to characterize the genetic basis of phenotypic variation observed in structured populations and inform marker-assisted breeding efforts. These QTL intervals can span large physical regions on a chromosome comprising hundreds of genes, thereby hampering candidate gene identification. Genome history, evolution, and expression evidence can be used to narrow the genes in the interval to a smaller list that is manageable for detailed downstream functional genomics characterization. Our primary motivation for the present study was to address the need for a research methodology that identifies candidate genes within a broad QTL interval. Here we present a bioinformatics-based approach for subdividing candidate genes within QTL intervals into alternate groups of high probability candidates. Application of this approach in the context of studying cell wall traits, specifically lignin content and S/G ratios of stem and root in Populus plants, resulted in manageable sets of genes of both known and putative cell wall biosynthetic function. These results provide a roadmap for future experimental work leading to identification of new genes controlling cell wall recalcitrance and, ultimately, in the utility of plant biomass as an energy feedstock.

  3. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; ...

    2015-01-23

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcriptionmore » factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.« less

  4. High-resolution genetic mapping of allelic variants associated with cell wall chemistry in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Muchero, Wellington; Guo, Jianjun; Difazio, Stephen P.; Chen, Jay; Ranjan, Priya; Slavov, Gancho; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara; Bryan, Anthony C.; Sykes, Robert; Ziebell, Angela L.; Klapste, Jaroslav; Porth, Ilga; Skyba, Oleksandr; Unda, Faride; El-Kassaby, Yousry; Douglas, Carl; Mansfield, Shawn; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Evans, Luke M.; Czarnecki, Olaf; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2015-01-23

    We report the identification of six genetic loci and the allelic-variants associated with Populus cell wall phenotypes determined independently using pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS), saccharification assay and wet chemistry in two partially overlapping populations of P. trichocarpa genotypes sampled from multiple environments in the Pacific Northwest of North America. All 6 variants co-located with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hotspot on chromosome XIV for lignin content, syringyl to guaiacyl (S/G) ratio, 5- and 6- carbon sugars identified in an interspecific P. trichocarpa x P. deltoides pseudo-backcross mapping pedigree. Genomic intervals containing an amino acid transporter, a MYB transcription factor, an angustifolia CtBP transcription factor, a copper transport protein ATOX1-related, a Ca2+ transporting ATPase and a protein kinase were identified within 5 QTL regions. Each interval contained single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were significantly associated to cell-wall phenotypes, with associations exceeding the chromosome-wise Bonferroni-adjusted p-values in at least one environment. cDNA sequencing for allelic variants of 3 of the 6 genes identified polymorphisms leading to premature stop codons in the MYB transcription factor and protein kinase. On the other hand, variants of the Angustifolia CtBP transcription factor exhibited a polyglutamine (PolyQ) length polymorphism. Results from transient protoplast assays suggested that each of the polymorphisms conferred allelic differences in activation of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin pathway marker genes, with truncated and short PolyQ alleles exhibiting significantly reduced marker gene activation. Genes identified in this study represent novel targets for reducing cell wall recalcitrance for lignocellulosic biofuels production using plant biomass.

  5. Cellulose and lignin colocalization at the plant cell wall surface limits microbial hydrolysis of Populus biomass

    DOE PAGES

    Dumitrache, Alexandru; Tolbert, Allison; Natzke, Jace; ...

    2017-04-20

    Biorefining of plant feedstocks into fuels and specialty chemicals, using biological conversion, requires the solubilization of lignocellulosics into simpler oligomeric compounds. However, non-pretreated woody biomass has shown high resistance to hydrolysis by cellulolytic microbes or purified cellulases. We investigate the limited solubilization of Populus deltoides by the cellulolytic thermophile Clostridium thermocellum in the absence of solute inhibitors. Compared to control samples, fermented poplar revealed that the hydrolysis of carbohydrates in secondary cell walls ceased prematurely as lignin presence increased at the surface. In quantitative fluorescence colocalization analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy, the Manders’ coefficient of fractional overlap between ligninmore » and cellulose signals increased from an average of 0.67 to a near-maximum 0.92 in fermented tissue. Chemical imaging by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry revealed a 49% decline in surface cellulose and a compensatory 30% and 11% increase in surface S- and G- lignin, respectively. Although 72% of the initial glucan was still present in the lignocellulose matrix of this feedstock, subsequent treatments with cell-free purified cellulases did not significantly restore hydrolysis. This confirmed that biomass surfaces had become non-productive for the C. thermocellum hydrolytic exoproteome. This study provides direct evidence for an explicit definition of feedstock recalcitrance, whereby depletion of surface carbohydrate increases lignin exposure which leads to inhibition of enzyme activity, while the bulk residual biomass retains significant undigested carbohydrate content. The analysis presented here establishes a novel method for the quantitation of lignocellulose recalcitrance.« less

  6. Tissue and cell-type co-expression networks of transcription factors and wood component genes in Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rui; Wang, Jack P; Lin, Ying-Chung; Li, Quanzi; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Chen, Hao; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L

    2017-05-01

    Co-expression networks based on transcriptomes of Populus trichocarpa major tissues and specific cell types suggest redundant control of cell wall component biosynthetic genes by transcription factors in wood formation. We analyzed the transcriptomes of five tissues (xylem, phloem, shoot, leaf, and root) and two wood forming cell types (fiber and vessel) of Populus trichocarpa to assemble gene co-expression subnetworks associated with wood formation. We identified 165 transcription factors (TFs) that showed xylem-, fiber-, and vessel-specific expression. Of these 165 TFs, 101 co-expressed (correlation coefficient, r > 0.7) with the 45 secondary cell wall cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin biosynthetic genes. Each cell wall component gene co-expressed on average with 34 TFs, suggesting redundant control of the cell wall component gene expression. Co-expression analysis showed that the 101 TFs and the 45 cell wall component genes each has two distinct groups (groups 1 and 2), based on their co-expression patterns. The group 1 TFs (44 members) are predominantly xylem and fiber specific, and are all highly positively co-expressed with the group 1 cell wall component genes (30 members), suggesting their roles as major wood formation regulators. Group 1 TFs include a lateral organ boundary domain gene (LBD) that has the highest number of positively correlated cell wall component genes (36) and TFs (47). The group 2 TFs have 57 members, including 14 vessel-specific TFs, and are generally less correlated with the cell wall component genes. An exception is a vessel-specific basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) gene that negatively correlates with 20 cell wall component genes, and may function as a key transcriptional suppressor. The co-expression networks revealed here suggest a well-structured transcriptional homeostasis for cell wall component biosynthesis during wood formation.

  7. Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration from cell suspension and tissue cultures of mature himalayan poplar (Populus ciliata).

    PubMed

    Cheema, G S

    1989-02-01

    Somatic embryogenesis and plantlet formation were obtained from callus and cell suspension cultures of 40-year- old Himalayan Poplar (Populus ciliata Wall ex Royle). Callus and cell suspensions were obtained by transfer of inoculum of semiorganized leaf cultures, which were maintained on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with benzylaminopurine (BAP), to MS with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Reduction of 2,4-D concentration during subsequent subculture of cell suspensions resulted in the formation of embryoids. These embryoids developed further only after being transferred to agar-based MS medium supplemented with BAP and naphthalene acetic acid. Loss of embryogenic potential was observed in cell suspensions after 6 subcultures. However, callus cultures retained the embryogenic potential even after repeated subcultures for more than a year. Plantlets could be successfully hardened and grown in natural outdoor conditions.

  8. Determining the syringyl/guaiacyl lignin ratio in the vessel and fiber cell walls of transgenic Populus plants

    DOE PAGES

    Tolbert, Allison K.; Ma, Tao; Kalluri, Udaya C.; ...

    2016-06-20

    Observation of the spatial lignin distribution throughout the plant cell wall provides insight into the physicochemical characteristics of lignocellulosic biomass. The distribution of syringyl (S) and guaiacyl (G) lignin in cell walls of a genetically modified Populus deltoides and its corresponding empty vector control were analyzed with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and then mapped to determine the S/G lignin ratio of the sample surface and specific regions of interest (ROIs). The surface characterizations of transgenic cross-sections within 1 cm vertical distance of each other on the stem possess similar S/G lignin ratios. Furthermore, the analysis of the ROIsmore » determined that there was a 50% decrease in the S/G lignin ratio of the transgenic xylem fiber cell walls.« less

  9. Identification of candidate genes in Arabidopsis and Populus cell wall biosynthesis using text-mining, co-expression network analysis and comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohan; Ye, Chu-Yu; Bisaria, Anjali; Tuskan, Gerald A; Kalluri, Udaya C

    2011-12-01

    Populus is an important bioenergy crop for bioethanol production. A greater understanding of cell wall biosynthesis processes is critical in reducing biomass recalcitrance, a major hindrance in efficient generation of biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass. Here, we report the identification of candidate cell wall biosynthesis genes through the development and application of a novel bioinformatics pipeline. As a first step, via text-mining of PubMed publications, we obtained 121 Arabidopsis genes that had the experimental evidence supporting their involvement in cell wall biosynthesis or remodeling. The 121 genes were then used as bait genes to query an Arabidopsis co-expression database, and additional genes were identified as neighbors of the bait genes in the network, increasing the number of genes to 548. The 548 Arabidopsis genes were then used to re-query the Arabidopsis co-expression database and re-construct a network that captured additional network neighbors, expanding to a total of 694 genes. The 694 Arabidopsis genes were computationally divided into 22 clusters. Queries of the Populus genome using the Arabidopsis genes revealed 817 Populus orthologs. Functional analysis of gene ontology and tissue-specific gene expression indicated that these Arabidopsis and Populus genes are high likelihood candidates for functional characterization in relation to cell wall biosynthesis.

  10. Microarray and suppression subtractive hybridization analyses of gene expression in hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus tremula var. glandulosa) cell suspension cultures after exposure to NaCl.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Hyoshin; Lee, Jae-Soon; Noh, Eun-Woon; Choi, Young-Im; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Choi, Dong-Woog

    2012-09-01

    The gene expression profiles of hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus tremula var. glandulosa) cells in suspension culture after exposure to salinity (NaCl) induced stress were examined by constructing two suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries. cDNA from non-treated cells was used as a driver and cDNA samples from cell suspension cultures exposed to 150 mM NaCl for 2 or 10 h were used as testers. Randomly selected clones from each SSH library were sequenced and 727 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained and analyzed. Four novel ESTs were identified. Between the two libraries, 542 unique SSH clones were selected for placement on a cDNA microarray. In total, 18 differentially expressed genes were identified with 4 and 12 genes being significantly differentially expressed 2 and 10 h after the treatment, respectively. Genes related to metabolism and protein synthesis and several genes whose protein products are implicated in salt or other abiotic stress-related responses were expressed in the salt-stressed cells.

  11. Populus trichocarpa cell wall chemistry and ultrastructure trait variation, genetic control and genetic correlations.

    PubMed

    Porth, Ilga; Klápště, Jaroslav; Skyba, Oleksandr; Lai, Ben S K; Geraldes, Armando; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A; Douglas, Carl J; El-Kassaby, Yousry A; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2013-02-01

    The increasing ecological and economical importance of Populus species and hybrids has stimulated research into the investigation of the natural variation of the species and the estimation of the extent of genetic control over its wood quality traits for traditional forestry activities as well as the emerging bioenergy sector. A realized kinship matrix based on informative, high-density, biallelic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genetic markers was constructed to estimate trait variance components, heritabilities, and genetic and phenotypic correlations. Seventeen traits related to wood chemistry and ultrastructure were examined in 334 9-yr-old Populus trichocarpa grown in a common-garden plot representing populations spanning the latitudinal range 44° to 58.6°. In these individuals, 9342 SNPs that conformed to Hardy-Weinberg expectations were employed to assess the genomic pair-wise kinship to estimate narrow-sense heritabilities and genetic correlations among traits. The range-wide phenotypic variation in all traits was substantial and several trait heritabilities were > 0.6. In total, 61 significant genetic and phenotypic correlations and a network of highly interrelated traits were identified. The high trait variation, the evidence for moderate to high heritabilities and the identification of advantageous trait combinations of industrially important characteristics should aid in providing the foundation for the enhancement of poplar tree breeding strategies for modern industrial use.

  12. PtrCel9A6, an endo-1,4-β-glucanase, is required for cell wall formation during xylem differentiation in populus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liangliang; Sun, Jiayan; Li, Laigeng

    2013-11-01

    Endo-1,4-β-glucanases (EGases) are involved in many aspects of plant growth. Our previous study found that an EGase, PtrCel9A6, is specifically expressed in differentiating xylem cells during Populus secondary growth. In this study, the xylem-specific PtrCel9A6 was characterized for its role in xylem differentiation. The EGase is localized on the plasma membrane with catalytic domain toward the outside cell wall, hydrolyzing amorphous cellulose. Suppression of PtrCel9A6 expression caused secondary cell wall defects in xylem cells and significant cellulose reduction in Populus. Heterologous expression of PtrCel9A6 in Arabidopsis enhanced plant growth as well as increased fiber cell length. In addition, introduction of PtrCel9A6 into Arabidopsis resulted in male sterility due to defects in anther dehiscence. Together, these results demonstrate that PtrCel9A6 plays a critical role in remodeling the 1,4-β-glucan chains in the wall matrix and is required for cell wall thickening during Populus xylem differentiation.

  13. The Populus Class III HD ZIP transcription factor POPCORONA affects cell differentiation during secondary growth of woody stems.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Miura, Eriko; Robischon, Marcel; Martinez, Ciera; Groover, Andrew

    2011-02-28

    The developmental mechanisms regulating cell differentiation and patterning during the secondary growth of woody tissues are poorly understood. Class III HD ZIP transcription factors are evolutionarily ancient and play fundamental roles in various aspects of plant development. Here we investigate the role of a Class III HD ZIP transcription factor, POPCORONA, during secondary growth of woody stems. Transgenic Populus (poplar) trees expressing either a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA or a synthetic miRNA targeting POPCORONA were used to infer function of POPCORONA during secondary growth. Whole plant, histological, and gene expression changes were compared for transgenic and wild-type control plants. Synthetic miRNA knock down of POPCORONA results in abnormal lignification in cells of the pith, while overexpression of a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA results in delayed lignification of xylem and phloem fibers during secondary growth. POPCORONA misexpression also results in coordinated changes in expression of genes within a previously described transcriptional network regulating cell differentiation and cell wall biosynthesis, and hormone-related genes associated with fiber differentiation. POPCORONA illustrates another function of Class III HD ZIPs: regulating cell differentiation during secondary growth.

  14. The Populus Class III HD ZIP Transcription Factor POPCORONA Affects Cell Differentiation during Secondary Growth of Woody Stems

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Miura, Eriko; Robischon, Marcel; Martinez, Ciera; Groover, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The developmental mechanisms regulating cell differentiation and patterning during the secondary growth of woody tissues are poorly understood. Class III HD ZIP transcription factors are evolutionarily ancient and play fundamental roles in various aspects of plant development. Here we investigate the role of a Class III HD ZIP transcription factor, POPCORONA, during secondary growth of woody stems. Transgenic Populus (poplar) trees expressing either a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA or a synthetic miRNA targeting POPCORONA were used to infer function of POPCORONA during secondary growth. Whole plant, histological, and gene expression changes were compared for transgenic and wild-type control plants. Synthetic miRNA knock down of POPCORONA results in abnormal lignification in cells of the pith, while overexpression of a miRNA-resistant POPCORONA results in delayed lignification of xylem and phloem fibers during secondary growth. POPCORONA misexpression also results in coordinated changes in expression of genes within a previously described transcriptional network regulating cell differentiation and cell wall biosynthesis, and hormone-related genes associated with fiber differentiation. POPCORONA illustrates another function of Class III HD ZIPs: regulating cell differentiation during secondary growth. PMID:21386988

  15. Tubulin perturbation leads to unexpected cell wall modifications and affects stomatal behaviour in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Swamy, Prashant S.; Hu, Hao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Maloney, Victoria J.; Xiao, Hui; Xue, Liang -Jiao; Chung, Jeng -Der; Johnson, Virgil E.; Zhu, Yingying; Peter, Gary F.; Hahn, Michael G.; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung -Jui

    2015-08-05

    Cortical microtubules are integral to plant morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, and stomatal behaviour, presumably by governing cellulose microfibril orientation. Genetic manipulation of tubulins often leads to abnormal plant development, making it difficult to probe additional roles of cortical microtubules in cell wall biogenesis. Here, it is shown that expressing post-translational C-terminal modification mimics of α-tubulin altered cell wall characteristics and guard cell dynamics in transgenic Populus tremula x alba that otherwise appear normal. 35S promoter-driven transgene expression was high in leaves but unusually low in xylem, suggesting high levels of tubulin transgene expression were not tolerated in wood-forming tissues during regeneration of transformants. Cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin contents were unaffected in transgenic wood, but expression of cell wall-modifying enzymes, and extractability of lignin-bound pectin and xylan polysaccharides were increased in developing xylem. The results suggest that pectin and xylan polysaccharides deposited early during cell wall biogenesis are more sensitive to subtle tubulin perturbation than cellulose and matrix polysaccharides deposited later. Tubulin perturbation also affected guard cell behaviour, delaying drought-induced stomatal closure as well as light-induced stomatal opening in leaves. Pectins have been shown to confer cell wall flexibility critical for reversible stomatal movement, and results presented here are consistent with microtubule involvement in this process. In conclusion, taken together, the data show the value of growth-compatible tubulin perturbations for discerning microtubule functions, and add to the growing body of evidence for microtubule involvement in non-cellulosic polysaccharide assembly during cell wall biogenesis.

  16. Growth responses of Populus tremuloides clones to interacting elevated carbon dioxide and tropospheric ozone

    Treesearch

    J. G. Isebrands; E. P. McDonald; E. Kruger; G. Hendrey; K. Percy; K. Pregitzer; J. Sober; D. F. Karnosky

    2001-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change (IPCC) has concluded that the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) are increasing concomitantly globally. Little is known about the effect of these interacting gases on growth, survival, and productivity of forest ecosystems. In this study we assess...

  17. Decline of aspen (Populus tremuloides) in the Interior West [Abstract 1

    Treesearch

    Dale L. Bartos; Robert B Campbell

    1997-01-01

    Western aspen forests are unique because they reproduce primarily by suckering from the parent root system. Generally a disturbance or die back is necessary to stimulate regeneration of the stands. Unlike other tree species, if aspen stands are lost from the landscape, generally they will not return through natural processes. If current conditions continue (e.g., lack...

  18. Growth and mortality of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) in response to artificial defoliation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulinier, Julien; Lorenzetti, François; Bergeron, Yves

    2014-02-01

    To simulate the effects of forest tent caterpillar (FTC) defoliation on trembling aspen growth and mortality, an artificial defoliation experiment was performed over three years in young aspen stands of northwestern Quebec. Defoliation plots of 15 × 15 m were established on three sites, together with associated control stands of pure trembling aspen. In 2007, root collar diameters were measured and positions of all trees were mapped prior defoliation. Severe FTC defoliation was simulated for three successive years (2007-2009) by manually removing all leaves from all but 7-10% of the trees present in the defoliation plots. Yearly surveys of growth and mortality were conducted until 2010 to evaluate defoliation effects on defoliated as well as surrounding undefoliated trees. In absence of other factors, growth and mortality of trembling aspen decreased and increased, respectively, after defoliation. Our study further revealed that small diameter trees died after one year of artificial defoliation, while larger-diameter trees died after repeated defoliations. Distributions of tree mortality tended to be aggregated at small scales (<5 m), corroborating gap patterns observed in mature stands following FTC outbreaks. This experiment revealed that trembling aspen mortality can be directly attributed solely to defoliation. Repeated defoliations during FTC outbreaks have the potential to profoundly modify stand productivity and structure by reducing tree growth and increasing tree mortality in the absence of predisposing factors.

  19. Can elevated CO2 and ozone shift the genetic composition of aspen (Populus tremuloides) stands?

    PubMed

    Moran, Emily V; Kubiske, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The world's forests are currently exposed to increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and ozone (O3). Both pollutants can potentially exert a selective effect on plant populations. This, in turn, may lead to changes in ecosystem properties, such as carbon sequestration. Here, we report how elevated CO2 and O3 affect the genetic composition of a woody plant population via altered survival. Using data from the Aspen free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment (in which aspen clones were grown in factorial combinations of CO2 and O3), we develop a hierarchical Bayesian model of survival. We also examine how survival differences between clones could affect pollutant responses in the next generation. Our model predicts that the relative abundance of the tested clones, given equal initial abundance, would shift under either elevated CO2 or O3 as a result of changing survival rates. Survival was strongly affected by between-clone differences in growth responses. Selection could noticeably decrease O3 sensitivity in the next generation, depending on the heritability of growth responses and the distribution of seed production. The response to selection by CO2, however, is likely to be small. Our results suggest that the changing atmospheric composition could shift the genotypic composition and average pollutant responses of tree populations over moderate timescales. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Scale dependence of disease impacts on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, David M.; Bradford, John B.; Lauenroth, William K.

    2015-01-01

    By examining variation in disease prevalence, mortality of healthy trees, and mortality of diseased trees, we showed that the role of disease in aspen tree mortality depended on the scale of inference. For variation among individuals in diameter, disease tended to expose intermediate-size trees experiencing moderate risk to greater risk. For spatial variation in summer temperature, disease exposed lower risk populations to greater mortality probabilities, but the magnitude of this exposure depended on summer precipitation. Furthermore, the importance of diameter and slenderness in mediating responses to climate supports the increasing emphasis on trait variation in studies of ecological responses to global change.

  1. Continental-scale assessment of genetic diversity and population structure in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides)

    Treesearch

    Colin M. Callahan; Carol A. Rowe; Ronald J. Ryel; John D. Shaw; Michael D. Madritch; Karen E. Mock

    2013-01-01

    Aspen populations in the south-western portion of the range are consistent with expectations for a historically stable edge, with low within-population diversity, significant geographical population structuring, and little evidence of northward expansion. Structuring within the southwestern cluster may result from distinct gene pools separated during the Pleistocene...

  2. Time-domain NMR study of the drying of hemicellulose extracted aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.)

    Treesearch

    Thomas Elder; Carl Houtman

    2013-01-01

    The effect of hot water on aspen chips has been evaluated using time-domain low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. At moisture contents above fiber saturation point, treated chips exhibit relaxation times of free water longer than for the control. This is consistent with the removal of hemicelluloses given the hydrophilicity of these polysaccharides....

  3. Characterization of NAC domain transcription factors implicated in control of vascular cell differentiation in Arabidopsis and Populus.

    PubMed

    Grant, Emily H; Fujino, Takeshi; Beers, Eric P; Brunner, Amy M

    2010-07-01

    Wood has a wide variety of uses and is arguably the most important renewable raw material. The composition of xylem cell types in wood determines the utility of different types of wood for distinct commercial applications. Using expression profiling and phylogenetic analysis, we identified many xylem-associated regulatory genes that may control the differentiation of cells involved in wood formation in Arabidopsis and poplar. Prominent among these are NAC domain transcription factors (NACs). We studied NACs with putative involvement as negative (XND1 from Arabidopsis and its poplar orthologs PopNAC118, PopNAC122, PopNAC128, PopNAC129), or positive (SND2 and SND3 from Arabidopsis and their poplar orthologs PopNAC105, PopNAC154, PopNAC156, PopNAC157) regulators of secondary cell wall synthesis. Using quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization, we evaluated expression of these Populus NACs in a developmental gradient and in association with reaction wood and found that representatives from both groups were associated with wood-forming tissue and phloem fibers. Additionally, XND1 orthologs were expressed in mesophyll cells of developing leaves. We prepared transgenic Arabidopsis and poplar plants for overexpression of selected NACs. XND1 overexpression in poplar resulted in severe stunting. Additionally, poplar XND1 overexpressors lacked phloem fibers and showed reductions in cell size and number, vessel number, and frequency of rays in the xylem. Overexpression of PopNAC122, an XND1 ortholog, yielded an analogous phenotype in Arabidopsis. Overexpression of PopNAC154 in poplar reduced height growth and increased the relative proportion of bark versus xylem.

  4. Wood properties of Populus and Betula in long-term exposure to elevated CO₂ and O₃.

    PubMed

    Kostiainen, Katri; Saranpää, Pekka; Lundqvist, Sven-Olof; Kubiske, Mark E; Vapaavuori, Elina

    2014-06-01

    We studied the interactive effects of elevated concentrations of CO2 and O3 on radial growth and wood properties of four trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) clones and paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.) saplings. The material for the study was collected from the Aspen FACE (free-air CO2 enrichment) experiment in Rhinelander (WI, USA). Trees had been exposed to four treatments [control, elevated CO2 (560 ppm), elevated O3 (1.5 times ambient) and combined CO2 + O3 ] during growing seasons 1998-2008. Most treatment responses were observed in the early phase of experiment. Our results show that the CO2- and O3-exposed aspen trees displayed a differential balance between efficiency and safety of water transport. Under elevated CO2, radial growth was enhanced and the trees had fewer but hydraulically more efficient larger diameter vessels. In contrast, elevated O3 decreased radial growth and the diameters of vessels and fibres. Clone-specific decrease in wood density and cell wall thickness was observed under elevated CO2 . In birch, the treatments had no major impacts on wood anatomy or wood density. Our study indicates that short-term impact studies conducted with young seedlings may not give a realistic view of long-term ecosystem responses.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates cadmium toxicity through regulations of cadmium transport across the plasma and vacuolar membranes in Populus euphratica cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Wang, Ruigang; Zhang, Xuan; Yu, Yicheng; Zhao, Rui; Li, Zongyun; Chen, Shaoliang

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is emerging as a novel signalling molecule involved in plant growth and responses against abiotic stresses. However, little information is known about its role in cadmium (Cd) detoxification. In the present study, the effects of H2S on Cd toxicity were investigated in Populus euphratica cells using fluorescence imaging technique and a non-invasive vibrating ion-selective microelectrode. Pretreatment with a H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), significantly mitigated the Cd-induced programmed cell death in P. euphratica cells. The alleviation effect of NaHS was more pronounced at 50-100 μM as compared to low (25 μM) and high doses (200 μM). Under Cd stress, total activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase, were significantly enhanced in NaHS-treated cells, leading to a decline of H2O2 accumulation and lipid peroxidation. Moreover, NaHS reduced Cd accumulation in the cytoplasm but increased the fraction of Cd in the vacuole. Cd flux profiles revealed that H2S inhibited the Cd influx through the plasma membrane (PM) calcium channels that activated by H2O2. NaHS enhanced Cd influx into the vacuole, and the Cd influx was dependent on the pH gradients across the tonoplast. Taken together, these results suggest that H2S alleviates Cd toxicity via the improvement of antioxidant system and cellular Cd homeostasis. The up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes by H2S reduced the accumulation of H2O2, and thus decreased Cd influx through the H2O2-activated PM calcium channels. The H2S-simulated vacuolar Cd sequestration was presumably due to the activation of tonoplast Cd(2+)/H(+) antiporters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Altering carbon allocation in hybrid poplar ( Populus alba × grandidentata ) impacts cell wall growth and development

    DOE PAGES

    Unda, Faride; Kim, Hoon; Hefer, Charles; ...

    2017-03-04

    Galactinol synthase is a pivotal enzyme involved in the synthesis of the raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs) that function as transport carbohydrates in the phloem, as storage compounds in sink tissues and as soluble metabolites that combat both abiotic and biotic stress in several plant species. For hybrid poplar (Populus alba 9 grandidentata) overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana GolS3 (AtGolS3) gene showed clear effects on development; the extreme overexpressing lines were stunted and had cell wall traits characteristic of tension wood, whereas lines with only moderate up-regulation grew normally and had moderately altered secondary cell wall composition and ultrastructure. Stem cross-sectionsmore » of the developing xylem revealed a significant increase in the number of vessels, as well as the clear presence of a G-layer in the fibres. Furthermore, AtGolS3-OE lines possessed higher cellulose and lower lignin contents, an increase in cellulose crystallinity, and significantly altered hemicellulose-derived carbohydrates, notably manifested by their mannose and xylose contents. Additionally, the transgenic plants displayed elevated xylem starch content. Transcriptome interrogation of the transgenic plants showed a significant up-regulation of genes involved in the synthesis of myo-inositol, along with genes involved in sucrose degradation. Our results suggest that the over expression of GolS and its product galactinol may serve as a molecular signal that initiates metabolic changes, culminating in a change in cell wall development and potentially the formation of tension wood.« less

  7. Altering carbon allocation in hybrid poplar (Populus alba × grandidentata) impacts cell wall growth and development.

    PubMed

    Unda, Faride; Kim, Hoon; Hefer, Charles; Ralph, John; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2017-07-01

    Galactinol synthase is a pivotal enzyme involved in the synthesis of the raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs) that function as transport carbohydrates in the phloem, as storage compounds in sink tissues and as soluble metabolites that combat both abiotic and biotic stress in several plant species. Hybrid poplar (Populus alba × grandidentata) overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana GolS3 (AtGolS3) gene showed clear effects on development; the extreme overexpressing lines were stunted and had cell wall traits characteristic of tension wood, whereas lines with only moderate up-regulation grew normally and had moderately altered secondary cell wall composition and ultrastructure. Stem cross-sections of the developing xylem revealed a significant increase in the number of vessels, as well as the clear presence of a G-layer in the fibres. Furthermore, AtGolS3-OE lines possessed higher cellulose and lower lignin contents, an increase in cellulose crystallinity, and significantly altered hemicellulose-derived carbohydrates, notably manifested by their mannose and xylose contents. In addition, the transgenic plants displayed elevated xylem starch content. Transcriptome interrogation of the transgenic plants showed a significant up-regulation of genes involved in the synthesis of myo-inositol, along with genes involved in sucrose degradation. The results suggest that the overexpression of GolS and its product galactinol may serve as a molecular signal that initiates metabolic changes, culminating in a change in cell wall development and potentially the formation of tension wood. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Microgenomic analysis reveals cell type-specific gene expression patterns between ray and fusiform initials within the cambial meristem of Populus.

    PubMed

    Goué, Nadia; Lesage-Descauses, Marie-Claude; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Magel, Elisabeth; Label, Philippe; Sundberg, Björn

    2008-01-01

    The vascular cambium is the meristem in trees that produce wood. This meristem consists of two types of neighbouring initials: fusiform cambial cells (FCCs), which give rise to the axial cell system (i.e. fibres and vessel elements), and ray cambial cells (RCCs), which give rise to rays. There is little molecular information on the mechanisms whereby the differing characteristics of these neighbouring cells are maintained. A microgenomic approach was adopted in which the transcriptomes of FCCs and RCCs dissected out from the cambial meristem of poplar (Populus trichocarpa x Populus deltoïdes var. Boelare) were analysed, and a transcriptional database for these two cell types established. Photosynthesis genes were overrepresented in RCCs, providing molecular support for the presence of photosynthetic systems in rays. Genes that putatively encode transporters (vesicle, lipid and metal ion transporters and aquaporins) in RCCs were also identified. In addition, many cell wall-related genes showed cell type-specific expression patterns. Notably, genes involved in pectin metabolism and xyloglucan metabolism were overrepresented in RCCs and FCCs, respectively. The results demonstrate the use of microgenomics to reveal differences in biological processes in neighbouring meristematic cells, and to identify key genes involved in these processes.

  9. Intron-mediated alternative splicing of WOOD-ASSOCIATED NAC TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1B regulates cell wall thickening during fiber development in Populus species.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunjun; Sun, Jiayan; Xu, Peng; Zhang, Rui; Li, Laigeng

    2014-02-01

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism involved in regulating the development of multicellular organisms. Although many genes in plants undergo alternative splicing, little is understood of its significance in regulating plant growth and development. In this study, alternative splicing of black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) wood-associated NAC domain transcription factor (PtrWNDs), PtrWND1B, is shown to occur exclusively in secondary xylem fiber cells. PtrWND1B is expressed with a normal short-transcript PtrWND1B-s as well as its alternative long-transcript PtrWND1B-l. The intron 2 structure of the PtrWND1B gene was identified as a critical sequence that causes PtrWND1B alternative splicing. Suppression of PtrWND1B expression specifically inhibited fiber cell wall thickening. The two PtrWND1B isoforms play antagonistic roles in regulating cell wall thickening during fiber cell differentiation in Populus spp. PtrWND1B-s overexpression enhanced fiber cell wall thickening, while overexpression of PtrWND1B-l repressed fiber cell wall thickening. Alternative splicing may enable more specific regulation of processes such as fiber cell wall thickening during wood formation.

  10. A cell wall-bound anionic peroxidase, PtrPO21, is involved in lignin polymerization in Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chien-Yuan; Li, Quanzi; Tunlaya-Anukit, Sermsawat; Shi, Rui; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Wang, Jack P.; Liu, Jie; Loziuk, Philip; Edmunds, Charles W.; Miller, Zachary D.; Peszlen, Ilona; Muddiman, David C.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2016-03-11

    Class III peroxidases are members of a large plant-specific sequence-heterogeneous protein family. Several sequence-conserved homologs have been associated with lignin polymerization in Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Nicotiana tabacum, Zinnia elegans, Picea abies, and Pinus sylvestris. In Populus trichocarpa, a model species for studies of wood formation, the peroxidases involved in lignin biosynthesis have not yet been identified. To do this, we retrieved sequences of all PtrPOs from Peroxibase and conducted RNA-seq to identify candidates. Transcripts from 42 PtrPOs were detected in stem differentiating xylem (SDX) and four of them are the most xylem-abundant (PtrPO12, PtrPO21, PtrPO42, and PtrPO64). PtrPO21 shows xylem-specific expression similar to that of genes encoding the monolignol biosynthetic enzymes. Using protein cleavage-isotope dilution mass spectrometry, PtrPO21 is detected only in the cell wall fraction and not in the soluble fraction. Downregulated transgenics of PtrPO21 have a lignin reduction of ~20% with subunit composition (S/G ratio) similar to wild type. The transgenics show a growth reduction and reddish color of stem wood. The modulus of elasticity (MOE) of the stems of the downregulated PtrPO21-line 8 can be reduced to ~60% of wild type. Differentially expressed gene (DEG) analysis of PtrPO21 downregulated transgenics identified a significant overexpression of PtPrx35, suggesting a compensatory effect within the peroxidase family. No significant changes in the expression of the 49 P. trichocarpa laccases (PtrLACs) were observed.

  11. Assessment of Populus wood chemistry following the introduction of a Bt toxin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Davis, M F; Tuskan, Gerald A; Payne, M M; Meilan, R

    2006-01-01

    Unintended changes in plant physiology, anatomy and metabolism as a result of genetic engineering are a concern as more transgenic plants are commercially deployed in the ecosystem. We compared the cell wall chemical composition of three Populus lines (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & A. Gray x Populus trichocarpa Bartr. ex Marsh., Populus trichocarpa x Populus nigra L. and Populus deltoides x Populus nigra) genetically modified to express the Cry3A or Cry3B2 protein of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) with the cell wall chemistry of non-transformed isogenic control lines. Three genetically modified clones, each represented by 10 independent transgenic lines, were analyzed by pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and traditional wet chemical analytical methods to assess changes in cell wall composition. Based on the outcome of these techniques, there were no comprehensive differences in chemical composition between the transgenic and control lines for any of the studied clones.

  12. Determining the syringyl/guaiacyl lignin ratio in the vessel and fiber cell walls of transgenic Populus plants

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Allison K.; Ma, Tao; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-06-20

    Observation of the spatial lignin distribution throughout the plant cell wall provides insight into the physicochemical characteristics of lignocellulosic biomass. The distribution of syringyl (S) and guaiacyl (G) lignin in cell walls of a genetically modified Populus deltoides and its corresponding empty vector control were analyzed with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and then mapped to determine the S/G lignin ratio of the sample surface and specific regions of interest (ROIs). The surface characterizations of transgenic cross-sections within 1 cm vertical distance of each other on the stem possess similar S/G lignin ratios. Furthermore, the analysis of the ROIs determined that there was a 50% decrease in the S/G lignin ratio of the transgenic xylem fiber cell walls.

  13. Determining the syringyl/guaiacyl lignin ratio in the vessel and fiber cell walls of transgenic Populus plants

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Allison K.; Ma, Tao; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-06-20

    Observation of the spatial lignin distribution throughout the plant cell wall provides insight into the physicochemical characteristics of lignocellulosic biomass. The distribution of syringyl (S) and guaiacyl (G) lignin in cell walls of a genetically modified Populus deltoides and its corresponding empty vector control were analyzed with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and then mapped to determine the S/G lignin ratio of the sample surface and specific regions of interest (ROIs). The surface characterizations of transgenic cross-sections within 1 cm vertical distance of each other on the stem possess similar S/G lignin ratios. Furthermore, the analysis of the ROIs determined that there was a 50% decrease in the S/G lignin ratio of the transgenic xylem fiber cell walls.

  14. Assessment of Populus Wood Chemistry Following the Introduction of a Bt Toxin Gene

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M. F.; Tuskan, G. A.; Payne, P.; Tschaplinski, T. J.; Meilan, R.

    2006-01-01

    Unintended changes in plant physiology, anatomy and metabolism as a result of genetic engineering are a concern as more transgenic plants are commercially deployed in the ecosystem. We compared the cell wall chemical composition of three Populus lines (Populus trichocarpa Torr. and A. Gray x Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh., Populus trichocarpa x Populus nigra L. and Populus deltoides x Populus nigra) genetically modified to express the Cry3A or Cry3B2 protein of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) with the cellwall chemistry of non-transformed isogenic control lines. Three genetically modified clones, each represented by 10 independent transgenic lines, were analyzed by pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and traditional wet chemical analytical methods to assess changes in cell wall composition. Based on the outcome of these techniques, there were no comprehensive differences in chemical composition between the transgenic and control lines for any of the studied clones.

  15. Recent Y chromosome divergence despite ancient origin of dioecy in poplars (Populus).

    PubMed

    Geraldes, A; Hefer, C A; Capron, A; Kolosova, N; Martinez-Nuñez, F; Soolanayakanahally, R Y; Stanton, B; Guy, R D; Mansfield, S D; Douglas, C J; Cronk, Q C B

    2015-07-01

    All species of the genus Populus (poplar, aspen) are dioecious, suggesting an ancient origin of this trait. Despite some empirical counter examples, theory suggests that nonrecombining sex-linked regions should quickly spread, eventually becoming heteromorphic chromosomes. In contrast, we show using whole-genome scans that the sex-associated region in Populus trichocarpa is small and much younger than the age of the genus. This indicates that sex determination is highly labile in poplar, consistent with recent evidence of 'turnover' of sex-determination regions in animals. We performed whole-genome resequencing of 52 P. trichocarpa (black cottonwood) and 34 Populus balsamifera (balsam poplar) individuals of known sex. Genomewide association studies in these unstructured populations identified 650 SNPs significantly associated with sex. We estimate the size of the sex-linked region to be ~100 kbp. All SNPs significantly associated with sex were in strong linkage disequilibrium despite the fact that they were mapped to six different chromosomes (plus 3 unmapped scaffolds) in version 2.2 of the reference genome. We show that this is likely due to genome misassembly. The segregation pattern of sex-associated SNPs revealed this to be an XY sex-determining system. Estimated divergence times of X and Y haplotype sequences (6-7 Ma) are much more recent than the divergence of P. trichocarpa (poplar) and Populus tremuloides (aspen). Consistent with this, in P. tremuloides, we found no XY haplotype divergence within the P. trichocarpa sex-determining region. These two species therefore have a different genomic architecture of sex, suggestive of at least one turnover event in the recent past.

  16. Populus endo-beta-mannanase PtrMAN6 plays a role in coordinating cell wall remodeling with suppression of secondary wall thickening through generation of oligosaccharide signals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunjun; Song, Dongliang; Sun, Jiayan; Li, Laigeng

    2013-05-01

    Endo-1,4-β-mannanase is known to able to hydrolyze mannan-type polysaccharides in cell wall remodeling, but its function in regulating wall thickening has been little studied. Here we show that a Populus endo-1,4-β-mannanase gene, named PtrMAN6, suppresses cell wall thickening during xylem differentiation. PtrMAN6 is expressed specifically in xylem tissue and its encoded protein localizes to developing vessel cells. Overexpression of PtrMAN6 enhanced wall loosening as well as suppressed secondary wall thickening, whilst knockdown of its expression promoted secondary wall thickening. Transcriptional analysis revealed that PtrMAN6 overexpression downregulated the transcriptional program of secondary cell wall thickening, whilst PtrMAN6 knockdown upregulated transcriptional activities toward secondary wall formation. Activity of PtrMAN6 hydrolysis resulted in the generation of oligosaccharide compounds from cell wall polysaccharides. Application of the oligosaccharides resulted in cellular and transcriptional changes that were similar to those found in PtrMAN6 overexpressed transgenic plants. Overall, our results demonstrated that PtrMAN6 plays a role in hydrolysis of mannan-type wall polysaccharides to produce oligosaccharides that may serve as signaling molecules to suppress cell wall thickening during wood xylem cell differentiation. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Natural Selection and Recombination Rate Variation Shape Nucleotide Polymorphism Across the Genomes of Three Related Populus Species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Street, Nathaniel R; Scofield, Douglas G; Ingvarsson, Pär K

    2016-03-01

    A central aim of evolutionary genomics is to identify the relative roles that various evolutionary forces have played in generating and shaping genetic variation within and among species. Here we use whole-genome resequencing data to characterize and compare genome-wide patterns of nucleotide polymorphism, site frequency spectrum, and population-scaled recombination rates in three species of Populus: Populus tremula, P. tremuloides, and P. trichocarpa. We find that P. tremuloides has the highest level of genome-wide variation, skewed allele frequencies, and population-scaled recombination rates, whereas P. trichocarpa harbors the lowest. Our findings highlight multiple lines of evidence suggesting that natural selection, due to both purifying and positive selection, has widely shaped patterns of nucleotide polymorphism at linked neutral sites in all three species. Differences in effective population sizes and rates of recombination largely explain the disparate magnitudes and signatures of linked selection that we observe among species. The present work provides the first phylogenetic comparative study on a genome-wide scale in forest trees. This information will also improve our ability to understand how various evolutionary forces have interacted to influence genome evolution among related species.

  18. Chemistry and decomposition of litter from Populus tremuloides Michaux grown at elevated atmospheric CO2and varying N availability

    Treesearch

    John S. King; Kurt S. Pregitzer; Donald R. Zak; Mark E. Kubiske; Jennifer A. Ashby; William E. Holmes

    2001-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that greater production of total nonstructural carbohydrates (TNC) in foliage grown under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) will result in higher concentrations of defensive compounds in tree leaf litter, possibly leading to reduced rates of decomposition and nutrient cycling in forest ecosystems of the future....

  19. The influence of soil type and altered lignin biosynthesis on the physiology, growth and carbon allocation in Populus tremuloides

    Treesearch

    Jessica E. Hancock; Kate L. Bradley; Christian P. Giardina; Kurt S. Pregitzer

    2008-01-01

    Plants influence soil carbon (C) formation through the quality and quantity of C released to soil. Soil type, in turn can modify a plant's influence on soil through effects on plant production, tissue quality and regulation of soil C decomposition and stabilization. Wild-type aspen and three transgenic aspen lines expressing reduced stem lignin concentrations and/...

  20. Scale-dependence of desease impacts on quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) mortality risk in the southwestern U.S.

    Treesearch

    David M. Bell; John B. Bradford; William K. Lauenroth

    2015-01-01

    Depending on how disease impacts tree exposure to risk, both the prevalence of disease and disease effects on survival may contribute to patterns of mortality risk across a species’ range. Disease may accelerate tree species’ declines in response to global change factors, such as drought, biotic interactions, such as competition, or functional traits, such as allometry...

  1. Can elevated CO2 and ozone shift the genetic composition of aspen (Populus tremuloides) stands? New Phytologist

    Treesearch

    Emily V. Moran; Mark E. Kubiske

    2013-01-01

    The world's forests are currently exposed to increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) and ozone (O3). Both pollutants can potentially exert a selective effect on plant populations. This, in turn, may lead to changes in ecosystem properties, such as carbon sequestration. Here, we report how elevated CO

  2. Population genetics of Chrysomela tremulae: a first step towards management of transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis poplars Populus tremula x .P. tremuloides.

    PubMed

    Génissel, A; Viard, F; Bourguet, D

    2000-01-01

    Many strategies have been proposed for delaying the development of insect resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). The current paradigm for Bt resistance management is the high dose-refuge strategy. For this strategy to be successful: (i) heterozygotes must be killed in treated areas, (ii) resistant alleles must be rare (frequency < 10-3), and (iii) there must be a high level of gene flow between populations to ensure random mating. We studied gene flow within and between populations with a view to managing the resistance of Chrysomela tremulae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to new transgenic, highly toxic poplars expressing a synthetic Bt gene. In this study, we assessed the extent of gene flow in C. tremulae within and between 16 sites in France and Belgium, using allozyme markers. We found a high level of genetic variability in C. tremulae, with a mean of 0.206 +/- 0.16. There were no obvious limitations to gene flow between populations of C. tremulae over large geographical distances (several hundreds of kilometres). Nevertheless, a very low level of genetic differentiation was observed between a site located in the south of France and the sampled sites from the Centre region.

  3. Early regeneration response to aggregated overstory and harvest residue retention in Populus tremuloides (Michx.)-dominated forests

    Treesearch

    Miranda T. Curzon; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik

    2017-01-01

    Recent emphasis on increasing structural complexity and species diversity reflective of natural ecosystems through the use of retention harvesting approaches is coinciding with increased demand for forest-derived bioenergy feedstocks, largely sourced through the removal of harvest residues associated with whole-tree harvest. Uncertainties about the consequences of such...

  4. Growth, gas exchange, foliar nitrogen content, and water use of subirrigated and overhead irrigated Populus tremuloides Michx. seedlings

    Treesearch

    Anthony S. Davis; Matthew M. Aghai; Jeremiah R. Pinto; Kent G. Apostal

    2011-01-01

    Because limitations on water used by container nurseries has become commonplace, nursery growers will have to improve irrigation management. Subirrigation systems may provide an alternative to overhead irrigation systems by mitigating groundwater pollution and excessive water consumption. Seedling growth, gas exchange, leaf nitrogen (N) content, and water use were...

  5. Association of Pinus banksiana Lamb. and Populus tremuloides Michx. seedling fine roots with Sistotrema brinkmannii (Bres.) J. Erikss. (Basidiomycotina)

    Treesearch

    Lynette R. Potvin; Dana L. Richter; Martin F. Jurgensen; R. Kasten. Dumroese

    2012-01-01

    Sistotrema brinkmannii (Bres.) J. Erikss. (Basidiomycotina, Hydanaceae), commonly regarded as a wood decay fungus, was consistently isolated from bareroot nursery Pinus banksiana Lamb. seedlings. S. brinkmannii was found in ectomycorrhizae formed by Thelephora terrestris Ehrh., ...

  6. Extracellular ATP signaling is mediated by H₂O₂ and cytosolic Ca²⁺ in the salt response of Populus euphratica cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; Zhang, Xuan; Deng, Shurong; Zhang, Chunlan; Wang, Meijuan; Ding, Mingquan; Zhao, Rui; Shen, Xin; Zhou, Xiaoyang; Lu, Cunfu; Chen, Shaoliang

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) has been implicated in mediating plant growth and antioxidant defense; however, it is largely unknown whether eATP might mediate salinity tolerance. We used confocal microscopy, a non-invasive vibrating ion-selective microelectrode, and quantitative real time PCR analysis to evaluate the physiological significance of eATP in the salt resistance of cell cultures derived from a salt-tolerant woody species, Populus euphratica. Application of NaCl (200 mM) shock induced a transient elevation in [eATP]. We investigated the effects of eATP by blocking P2 receptors with suramin and PPADS and applying an ATP trap system of hexokinase-glucose. We found that eATP regulated a wide range of cellular processes required for salt adaptation, including vacuolar Na⁺ compartmentation, Na⁺/H⁺ exchange across the plasma membrane (PM), K⁺ homeostasis, reactive oxygen species regulation, and salt-responsive expression of genes related to Na⁺/H⁺ homeostasis and PM repair. Furthermore, we found that the eATP signaling was mediated by H₂O₂ and cytosolic Ca²⁺ released in response to high salt in P. euphratica cells. We concluded that salt-induced eATP was sensed by purinoceptors in the PM, and this led to the induction of downstream signals, like H₂O₂ and cytosolic Ca²⁺, which are required for the up-regulation of genes linked to Na⁺/H⁺ homeostasis and PM repair. Consequently, the viability of P. euphratica cells was maintained during a prolonged period of salt stress.

  7. Kinetic analysis using low-molecular mass xyloglucan oligosaccharides defines the catalytic mechanism of a Populus xyloglucan endotransglycosylase

    PubMed Central

    Saura-Valls, Marc; Fauré, Régis; Ragàs, Sergi; Piens, Kathleen; Brumer, Harry; Teeri, Tuula T.; Cottaz, Sylvain; Driguez, Hugues; Planas, Antoni

    2005-01-01

    Plant XETs [XG (xyloglucan) endotransglycosylases] catalyse the transglycosylation from a XG donor to a XG or low-molecular-mass XG fragment as the acceptor, and are thought to be important enzymes in the formation and remodelling of the cellulose-XG three-dimensional network in the primary plant cell wall. Current methods to assay XET activity use the XG polysaccharide as the donor substrate, and present limitations for kinetic and mechanistic studies of XET action due to the polymeric and polydisperse nature of the substrate. A novel activity assay based on HPCE (high performance capillary electrophoresis), in conjunction with a defined low-molecular-mass XGO {XG oligosaccharide; (XXXGXXXG, where G=Glcβ1,4- and X=[Xylα1,6]Glcβ1,4-)} as the glycosyl donor and a heptasaccharide derivatized with ANTS [8-aminonaphthalene-1,3,6-trisulphonic acid; (XXXG-ANTS)] as the acceptor substrate was developed and validated. The recombinant enzyme PttXET16A from Populus tremula x tremuloides (hybrid aspen) was characterized using the donor/acceptor pair indicated above, for which preparative scale syntheses have been optimized. The low-molecular-mass donor underwent a single transglycosylation reaction to the acceptor substrate under initial-rate conditions, with a pH optimum at 5.0 and maximal activity between 30 and 40 °C. Kinetic data are best explained by a ping-pong bi-bi mechanism with substrate inhibition by both donor and acceptor. This is the first assay for XETs using a donor substrate other than polymeric XG, enabling quantitative kinetic analysis of different XGO donors for specificity, and subsite mapping studies of XET enzymes. PMID:16356166

  8. Expression of a fungal glucuronoyl esterase in Populus: effects on wood properties and saccharification efficiency.

    PubMed

    Latha Gandla, Madhavi; Derba-Maceluch, Marta; Liu, Xiaokun; Gerber, Lorenz; Master, Emma R; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Jönsson, Leif J

    2015-04-01

    The secondary walls of angiosperms contain large amounts of glucuronoxylan that is thought to be covalently linked to lignin via ester bonds between 4-O-methyl-α-D-glucuronic acid (4-O-Me-GlcA) moieties in glucuronoxylan and alcohol groups in lignin. This linkage is proposed to be hydrolysed by glucuronoyl esterases (GCEs) secreted by wood-degrading fungi. We report effects of overexpression of a GCE from the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete carnosa, PcGCE, in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. x tremuloides Michx.) on the wood composition and the saccharification efficiency. The recombinant enzyme, which was targeted to the plant cell wall using the signal peptide from hybrid aspen cellulase PttCel9B3, was constitutively expressed resulting in the appearance of GCE activity in protein extracts from developing wood. Diffuse reflectance FT-IR spectroscopy and pyrolysis-GC/MS analyses showed significant alternation in wood chemistry of transgenic plants including an increase in lignin content and S/G ratio, and a decrease in carbohydrate content. Sequential wood extractions confirmed a massive (+43%) increase of Klason lignin, which was accompanied by a ca. 5% decrease in cellulose, and ca. 20% decrease in wood extractives. Analysis of the monosaccharide composition using methanolysis showed a reduction of 4-O-Me-GlcA content without a change in Xyl contents in transgenic lines, suggesting that the covalent links between 4-O-Me-GlcA moieties and lignin protect these moieties from degradation. Enzymatic saccharification without pretreatment resulted in significant decreases of the yields of Gal, Glc, Xyl and Man in transgenic lines, consistent with their increased recalcitrance caused by the increased lignin content. In contrast, the enzymatic saccharification after acid pretreatment resulted in Glc yields similar to wild-type despite of their lower cellulose content. These data indicate that whereas PcGCE expression in hybrid aspen increases lignin deposition

  9. Tissue- and Cell-Specific Cytokinin Activity in Populus × canescens Monitored by ARR5::GUS Reporter Lines in Summer and Winter

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Shanty; Wildhagen, Henning; Janz, Dennis; Teichmann, Thomas; Hänsch, Robert; Polle, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinins play an important role in vascular development. But knowledge on the cellular localization of this growth hormone in the stem and other organs of woody plants is lacking. The main focus of this study was to investigate the occurrence and cellular localization of active cytokinins in leaves, roots, and along the stem of Populus × canescens and to find out how the pattern is changed between summer and winter. An ARR5::GUS reporter construct was used to monitor distribution of active cytokinins in different tissues of transgenic poplar lines. Three transgenic lines tested under outdoor conditions showed no influence of ARR5::GUS reporter construct on the growth performance compared with the wild-type, but one line lost the reporter activity. ARR5::GUS activity indicated changes in the tissue- and cell type-specific pattern of cytokinin activity during dormancy compared with the growth phase. ARR5::GUS activity, which was present in the root tips in the growing season, disappeared in winter. In the stem apex ground tissue, ARR5::GUS activity was higher in winter than in summer. Immature leaves from tissue-culture grown plants showed inducible ARR5::GUS activity. Leaf primordia in summer showed ARR5::GUS activity, but not the expanded leaves of outdoor plants or leaf primordia in winter. In stem cross sections, the most prominent ARR5::GUS activity was detected in the cortex region and in the rays of bark in summer and in winter. In the cambial zone the ARR5::GUS activity was more pronounced in the dormant than in growth phase. The pith and the ray cells adjacent to the vessels also displayed ARR5::GUS activity. In silico analyses of the tissue-specific expression patterns of the whole PtRR type-A family of poplar showed that PtRR10, the closest ortholog to the Arabidopsis ARR5 gene, was usually the most highly expressed gene in all tissues. In conclusion, gene expression and tissue-localization indicate high activity of cytokinins not only in summer, but

  10. The Populus Class III HD ZIP transcription factor POPCORONA affects cell differentiation during secondary growth of woody stems

    Treesearch

    Juan Du; Eriko Miura; Marcel Robischon; Ciera Martinez; Andrew Groover

    2011-01-01

    The developmental mechanisms regulating cell differentiation and patterning during the secondary growth of woody tissues are poorly understood. Class III HD ZIP transcription factors are evolutionarily ancient and play fundamental roles in various aspects of plant development. Here we investigate the role of a Class III HD ZIP transcription factor, ...

  11. Populus deltoides Bartr ex Marsh.

    Treesearch

    D. T. Cooper

    1980-01-01

    Eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides), one of the largest eastern hardwoods, is short-lived but the fastest-growing commercial forest species in North America. It grows best on moist well-drained sands or silts near streams, often in pure stands. The lightweight, rather soft wood is used primarily for core stock in manufacturing fumiture and for pulpwood. Eastern...

  12. The Populus ARBORKNOX1 homeodomain transcription factor regulates woody growth through binding to evolutionarily conserved target genes of diverse function

    Treesearch

    Lijun Liu; Matthew S. Zinkgraf; H. Earl Petzold; Eric P. Beers; Vladimir Filkov; Andrew Groover

    2014-01-01

    The class I KNOX homeodomain transcription factor ARBORKNOX1 (ARK1) is a key regulator of vascular cambium maintenance and cell differentiation in Populus. Currently, basic information is lacking concerning the distribution, functional characteristics, and evolution of ARK1 binding in the Populus genome.

  13. Initial characterization of shade avoidance response suggests functional diversity between Populus phytochrome B genes.

    SciTech Connect

    Karve, Abhijit A; Weston, David; Jawdy, Sara; Gunter, Lee E; Allen, Sara M; Yang, Xiaohan; Wullschleger, Stan D; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    Shade avoidance signaling in higher plants involves perception of the incident red/far-red (R/FR) light by phytochromes and the modulation of downstream transcriptional networks to regulate developmental plasticity in relation to heterogeneous light environments. In this study, we characterized the expression and functional features of Populus phytochrome (PHY) gene family as well as the transcriptional responses of Populus to the changes in R/FR light. Expression data indicated that PHYA is the predominant PHY in the dark grown Populus seedling whereas PHYBs are most abundant in mature tissue types. Out of three Populus PHYs, PHYA is light labile and localized to cytosol in dark whereas both PHYB1 and PHYB2 are light stable and are localized to nucleus in mesophyll protoplasts. When expressed in Arabidopsis, PHYB1 rescued Arabidopsis phyB mutant phenotype whereas PHYB2 did not, suggesting functional diversification between these two gene family members. However, phenotypes of transgenic Populus lines with altered expression of PHYB1, PHYB2 or both and the expression of candidate shade response genes in these transgenic lines suggest that PHYB1 and PHYB2 may have distinct yet overlapping functions. The RNAseq results and analysis of Populus exposed to enriched-FR light indicate that genes associated in cell wall modification and brassinosteroid signaling were induced under far red light. Overall our data indicate that Populus transcriptional responses are at least partially conserved with Arabidopsis.

  14. Initial characterization of shade avoidance response suggests functional diversity between Populus phytochrome B genes.

    PubMed

    Karve, Abhijit A; Jawdy, Sara S; Gunter, Lee E; Allen, Sara M; Yang, Xiaohan; Tuskan, Gerald A; Wullschleger, Stan D; Weston, David J

    2012-11-01

    Shade avoidance signaling involves perception of incident red/far-red (R/FR) light by phytochromes (PHYs) and modulation of downstream transcriptional networks. Although these responses are well studied in Arabidopsis, little is known about the role of PHYs and the transcriptional responses to shade in the woody perennial Populus. Tissue expression and subcellular localization of Populus PHYs was studied by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and protoplast transient assay. Transgenic lines with altered PHYB1 and/or PHYB2 expression were used in phenotypic assays and transcript profiling with qRT-PCR. RNA-Seq was used to identify transcriptional responses to enriched FR light. All three PHYs were differentially expressed among tissue types and PHYBs were targeted to the nucleus under white light. Populus PHYB1 rescued Arabidopsis phyB mutant phenotypes. Phenotypes of Populus transgenic lines and the expression of candidate shade response genes suggested that PHYB1 and PHYB2 have distinct yet overlapping functions. RNA-Seq analysis indicated that genes associated with cell wall modification and brassinosteroid signaling were induced under enriched FR light in Populus. This study is an initial attempt at deciphering the role of Populus PHYs by evaluating transcriptional reprogramming to enriched FR and demonstrates functional diversity and overlap of the Populus PHYB1 and PHYB2 in regulating shade responses.

  15. Proteomics of Leaf Tissues from Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Yang, Xiaohan; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Lankford, Patricia K; Shah, Manesh B; Jawdy, Sara; Gunter, Lee E; Engle, Nancy L

    2010-01-01

    Trees of the genus Populus are farmed commercially for wood and fiber, and are a potential bioenergy crop. As a scientific model organism, P. trichocarpa was the first forest tree for which the genome sequence has been determined. Knowledge of the Populus proteome will provide a deeper understanding of gene expression patterns in various tissues of the plant. To build on our previous profile of the proteome of xylem tissue in Populus (Kalluri et al., Proteomics 2009, 9, 4871), we are currently developing methods for studying the proteome of Populus leaves.

  16. Etiology of bronze leaf disease of Populus

    Treesearch

    Jason A. Smith; R. A. Blanchette; M. E. Ostry; N. A. Anderson

    2002-01-01

    Bronze leaf disease is a potentially destructive disorder of the Populus section of the genus Populus. The causal agent has been reported to be Apioplagiostoma populi (anarnorph: Discula sp.). Based on etiological and symptomological studies, field observations of symptom development suggest that the pathogen...

  17. Prototype wood chunker used on Populus 'Tristis'

    Treesearch

    Rodger A. Arola; Roger C. Radcliffe; Sharon A. Winsauer

    1983-01-01

    Populus 'Tristis' trees grown under short-rotation, intensive culture were sampled and chunked in a prototype experimental wood chunking machine. Data presented describe the character of the trees chunked, the energy and power requirements for chunking, and the chunking rates Specific energy requirements for chunking Populus 'Tristis...

  18. Clone history shapes Populus drought responses.

    PubMed

    Raj, Sherosha; Bräutigam, Katharina; Hamanishi, Erin T; Wilkins, Olivia; Thomas, Barb R; Schroeder, William; Mansfield, Shawn D; Plant, Aine L; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2011-07-26

    Just as animal monozygotic twins can experience different environmental conditions by being reared apart, individual genetically identical trees of the genus Populus can also be exposed to contrasting environmental conditions by being grown in different locations. As such, clonally propagated Populus trees provide an opportunity to interrogate the impact of individual environmental history on current response to environmental stimuli. To test the hypothesis that current responses to an environmental stimulus, drought, are contingent on environmental history, the transcriptome- level drought responses of three economically important hybrid genotypes-DN34 (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra), Walker [P. deltoides var. occidentalis × (Populus laurifolia × P. nigra)], and Okanese [Walker × (P. laurifolia × P. nigra)]-derived from two different locations were compared. Strikingly, differences in transcript abundance patterns in response to drought were based on differences in geographic origin of clones for two of the three genotypes. This observation was most pronounced for the genotypes with the longest time since establishment and last common propagation. Differences in genome-wide DNA methylation paralleled the transcriptome level trends, whereby the clones with the most divergent transcriptomes and clone history had the most marked differences in the extent of total DNA methylation, suggesting an epigenomic basis for the clone history-dependent transcriptome divergence. The data provide insights into the interplay between genotype and environment in the ecologically and economically important Populus genus, with implications for the industrial application of Populus trees and the evolution and persistence of these important tree species and their associated hybrids.

  19. Circadian Clock Components Regulate Entry and Affect Exit of Seasonal Dormancy as Well as Winter Hardiness in Populus Trees1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Cristian; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Johansson, Mikael; Ögren, Erling; Rohde, Antje; Eriksson, Maria E.

    2010-01-01

    This study addresses the role of the circadian clock in the seasonal growth cycle of trees: growth cessation, bud set, freezing tolerance, and bud burst. Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides (Ptt) LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL1 (PttLHY1), PttLHY2, and TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1 constitute regulatory clock components because down-regulation by RNA interference of these genes leads to altered phase and period of clock-controlled gene expression as compared to the wild type. Also, both RNA interference lines show about 1-h-shorter critical daylength for growth cessation as compared to the wild type, extending their period of growth. During winter dormancy, when the diurnal variation in clock gene expression stops altogether, down-regulation of PttLHY1 and PttLHY2 expression compromises freezing tolerance and the expression of C-REPEAT BINDING FACTOR1, suggesting a role of these genes in cold hardiness. Moreover, down-regulation of PttLHY1 and PttLHY2 causes a delay in bud burst. This evidence shows that in addition to a role in daylength-controlled processes, PttLHY plays a role in the temperature-dependent processes of dormancy in Populus such as cold hardiness and bud burst. PMID:20530613

  20. Shotgun proteome profile of Populus developing xylem.

    PubMed

    Kalluri, Udaya C; Hurst, Gregory B; Lankford, Patricia K; Ranjan, Priya; Pelletier, Dale A

    2009-11-01

    Understanding the molecular pathways of plant cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling is central to interpreting biological mechanisms underlying plant growth and adaptation as well as leveraging that knowledge towards development of improved bioenergy feedstocks. Here, we report the application of shotgun MS/MS profiling to the proteome of Populus developing xylem. Nearly 6000 different proteins were identified from the xylem proteome. To identify low-abundance DNA-regulatory proteins from the developing xylem, a selective nuclear proteome profiling method was developed. Several putative transcription factors and chromatin remodeling proteins were identified using this method, such as NAC domain, CtCP-like and CHB3-SWI/SNF-related proteins. Public databases were mined to obtain information in support of subcellular localization, transcript-level expression and functional categorization of identified proteins. In addition to finding protein-level evidence of candidate cell wall biosynthesis genes from xylem (wood) tissue such as cellulose synthase, sucrose synthase and polygalacturonase, several other potentially new candidate genes in the cell wall biosynthesis pathway were discovered. Further application of such proteomics methods will aid in plant systems biology modeling efforts by enhancing the understanding not only of cell wall biosynthesis but also of other plant developmental and physiological pathways.

  1. Trade-offs between xylem hydraulic properties, wood anatomy and yield in Populus.

    PubMed

    Hajek, Peter; Leuschner, Christoph; Hertel, Dietrich; Delzon, Sylvain; Schuldt, Bernhard

    2014-07-01

    Trees face the dilemma that achieving high plant productivity is accompanied by a risk of drought-induced hydraulic failure due to a trade-off in the trees' vascular system between hydraulic efficiency and safety. By investigating the xylem anatomy of branches and coarse roots, and measuring branch axial hydraulic conductivity and vulnerability to cavitation in 4-year-old field-grown aspen plants of five demes (Populus tremula L. and Populus tremuloides Michx.) differing in growth rate, we tested the hypotheses that (i) demes differ in wood anatomical and hydraulic properties, (ii) hydraulic efficiency and safety are related to xylem anatomical traits, and (iii) aboveground productivity and hydraulic efficiency are negatively correlated to cavitation resistance. Significant deme differences existed in seven of the nine investigated branch-related anatomical and hydraulic traits but only in one of the four coarse-root-related anatomical traits; this likely is a consequence of high intra-plant variation in root morphology and the occurrence of a few 'high-conductivity roots'. Growth rate was positively related to branch hydraulic efficiency (xylem-specific conductivity) but not to cavitation resistance; this indicates that no marked trade-off exists between cavitation resistance and growth. Both branch hydraulic safety and hydraulic efficiency significantly depended on vessel size and were related to the genetic distance between the demes, while the xylem pressure causing 88% loss of hydraulic conductivity (P88 value) was more closely related to hydraulic efficiency than the commonly used P50 value. Deme-specific variation in the pit membrane structure may explain why vessel size was not directly linked to growth rate. We conclude that branch hydraulic efficiency is an important growth-influencing trait in aspen, while the assumed trade-off between productivity and hydraulic safety is weak. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  2. Using Populus as a lignocellulosic feedstock for bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Porth, Ilga; El-Kassaby, Yousry A

    2015-04-01

    Populus species along with species from the sister genus Salix will provide valuable feedstock resources for advanced second-generation biofuels. Their inherent fast growth characteristics can particularly be exploited for short rotation management, a time and energy saving cultivation alternative for lignocellulosic feedstock supply. Salicaceae possess inherent cell wall characteristics with favorable cellulose to lignin ratios for utilization as bioethanol crop. We review economically important traits relevant for intensively managed biofuel crop plantations, genomic and phenotypic resources available for Populus, breeding strategies for forest trees dedicated to bioenergy provision, and bioprocesses and downstream applications related to opportunities using Salicaceae as a renewable resource. Challenges need to be resolved for every single step of the conversion process chain, i.e., starting from tree domestication for improved performance as a bioenergy crop, bioconversion process, policy development for land use changes associated with advanced biofuels, and harvest and supply logistics associated with industrial-scale biorefinery plants using Populus as feedstock. Significant hurdles towards cost and energy efficiency, environmental friendliness, and yield maximization with regards to biomass pretreatment, saccharification, and fermentation of celluloses and the sustainability of biorefineries as a whole still need to be overcome.

  3. Energy Values of Nine Populus Clones

    Treesearch

    Terry F. Strong

    1980-01-01

    Compares calorific values for components of nine Populus clones. The components include stem wood, stem bark, and branches. Also compares calorific values for clones of balsam poplar and black cottonwood parentages.

  4. Differential interspecific incompatibility in Populus breeding

    Treesearch

    A. Assibi Mahama; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Richard B. Hall

    2006-01-01

    Interspecific hybrids of Populus are valuable in tree production systems. Hybrid vigor is achieved for various traits and is useful for transferring disease and pest resistance. Incompatibility, however, sometimes precludes such combinations.

  5. Shotgun proteome profile of Populus developing xylem

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, Udaya C; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Lankford, Patricia K; Ranjan, Priya; Pelletier, Dale A

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the molecular pathways of plant cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling is central to interpreting biological mechanisms underlying plant growth and adaptation as well as leveraging that knowledge towards development of improved bioenergy feedstocks. Here we report the application of shotgun tandem mass spectrometry profiling to the proteome of Populus developing xylem. Additionally, we mined public databases to obtain information in support of subcellular localization, transcript-level expression, and functional categorization of these proteins. Nearly 6000 different proteins were identified from the xylem proteome, with over 4400 proteins identified from one or more unique peptides. In addition to finding protein-level evidence of candidate wall biosynthesis genes from xylem (wood) tissue such as cellulose synthase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, and 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, several other potentially new candidate genes in the pathway were discovered. In order to identify low-abundance DNA-regulatory proteins from the developing xylem, a selective nuclear proteome profiling method was developed. Several putative transcription factor and chromatin remodeling proteins were identified using this method, such as LIM and NAC domain transcription factors and CHB3-SWI/SNF-related proteins. Further application of these proteomics methods will enhance understanding not only of cell wall biosynthesis in system biology modeling, but also other plant developmental and physiological pathways.

  6. Clone history shapes Populus drought responses

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Sherosha; Bräutigam, Katharina; Hamanishi, Erin T.; Wilkins, Olivia; Thomas, Barb R.; Schroeder, William; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Plant, Aine L.; Campbell, Malcolm M.

    2011-01-01

    Just as animal monozygotic twins can experience different environmental conditions by being reared apart, individual genetically identical trees of the genus Populus can also be exposed to contrasting environmental conditions by being grown in different locations. As such, clonally propagated Populus trees provide an opportunity to interrogate the impact of individual environmental history on current response to environmental stimuli. To test the hypothesis that current responses to an environmental stimulus, drought, are contingent on environmental history, the transcriptome- level drought responses of three economically important hybrid genotypes—DN34 (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra), Walker [P. deltoides var. occidentalis × (Populus laurifolia × P. nigra)], and Okanese [Walker × (P. laurifolia × P. nigra)]—derived from two different locations were compared. Strikingly, differences in transcript abundance patterns in response to drought were based on differences in geographic origin of clones for two of the three genotypes. This observation was most pronounced for the genotypes with the longest time since establishment and last common propagation. Differences in genome-wide DNA methylation paralleled the transcriptome level trends, whereby the clones with the most divergent transcriptomes and clone history had the most marked differences in the extent of total DNA methylation, suggesting an epigenomic basis for the clone history-dependent transcriptome divergence. The data provide insights into the interplay between genotype and environment in the ecologically and economically important Populus genus, with implications for the industrial application of Populus trees and the evolution and persistence of these important tree species and their associated hybrids. PMID:21746919

  7. Water relations of populus clones

    SciTech Connect

    Pallardy, S.G.; Kozlowski, T.T.

    1981-02-01

    Stomatal aperture and water balance in the field of eight Populus clones varying in growth rate were closely related to environmental factors and clonal differences were clearly expressed. Leaf water potential (psi) was influenced by solar radiation, leaf conductance, evaporative demand, and soil moisture content. The effects of soil moisture on psi were greatly modified by atmospheric conditions and stomatal conductance. Several slow-growing clones exhibited extended periods of psi below that of rapidly growing clones, despite high evaporative demand and the much greater transpiring surfaces of the fast-growing clones. Stomata of all clones responded to changes in light intensity and vapor pressure gradient (VPG). Pronounced stomatal sensitivity to VPG of two rapidly growing clones of common parentage, and the resultant capacity of these clones to moderate water deficits under high evaporative demand, were associated with drought resistance in one of the parents. Seasonal maximum leaf conductance was positively related to growth in several clones, suggesting that rapidly growing clones possess the capacity to carry on higher rates of gas exchange under favorable conditions. Analysis of changes in psi with changes in transpirational flux density (TFD) showed that for four clones, psi change per unit change in TFD decreased as TFD increased, indicating plant adaptation for prevention of damaging psi even at high TFD. More rapidly growing clones exhibited a larger initial rate of decline in psi with TFD, but reduced the rate of decline more than slow-growing clones as TFD increased. (Refs. 41).

  8. First report of the Armillaria root disease pathogen, Armillaria sinapina, on subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) and quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) in Colorado

    Treesearch

    K. S. Burns; J. W. Hanna; Ned Klopfenstein; M.-S. Kim

    2016-01-01

    In July 2014, mycelial fans (isolates CO104F, CO106F, and CO108F) of Armillaria sp. were collected from forest trees in Colorado. These isolates were all identified as A. sinapina based on a somatic pairing test against 18 tester isolates representing six North American Armillaria spp. and nucleotide sequences of the translation elongation factor 1alpha (tef-...

  9. ptr-MIR169 is a posttranscriptional repressor of PtrHAP2 during vegetative bud dormancy period of aspen (Populus tremuloides) trees

    SciTech Connect

    Potkar, Rewati; Recla, Jill; Busov, Victor

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► We show a novel microRNA-mediated mechanism for control of bud dormancy in trees. ► ptr-MIR169a and PtrHAP2–5 gene showed inverse expression during dormancy period. ► The PtrHAP2–5 decline in abundance correlated with high ptr-MIR169a levels. ► PtrHAP2–5 cleavage occurred at the miR169 site during PtrHAP2–5 transcript decline. ► Our results show that miR169 attenuates PtrHAP2–5 transcript during dormancy. -- Abstract: Dormancy is a mechanism evolved in woody perennial plants to survive the winter freezing and dehydration stress via temporary suspension of growth. We have identified two aspen microRNAs (ptr-MIR169a and ptr-MIR169h) which were highly and specifically expressed in dormant floral and vegetative buds. ptr-MIR169a and its target gene PtrHAP2–5 showed inverse expression patterns during the dormancy period. ptr-MIR169a transcript steadily increased through the first half of the dormancy period and gradually declined with the approach of active growing season. PtrHAP2–5 abundance was higher in the beginning of the dormancy period but rapidly declined thereafter. The decline of PtrHAP2–5 correlated with the high levels of ptr-MIR169a accumulation, suggesting miR169-mediated attenuation of the target PtrHAP2–5 transcript. We experimentally verified the cleavage of PtrHAP2–5 at the predicted miR169a site at the time when PtrHAP2–5 transcript decline was observed. HAP2 is a subunit of a nuclear transcription factor Y (NF-Y) complex consisting of two other units, HAP3 and HAP5. Using digital expression profiling we show that poplar HAP2 and HAP5 are preferentially detected in dormant tissues. Our study shows that microRNAs play a significant and as of yet unknown and unstudied role in regulating the timing of bud dormancy in trees.

  10. Impact of simulated herbivory on water relations of aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings: the role of new tissue in the hydraulic conductivity recovery cycle

    Treesearch

    David A. Galvez; M.T. Tyree

    2009-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms behind plant-herbivore interactions are commonly approached as input-output systems where the role of plant physiology is viewed as a black box. Studies evaluating impacts of defoliation on plant physiology have mostly focused on changes in photosynthesis while the overall impact on plant water relations is largely unknown. Stem hydraulic...

  11. ptr-MIR169 is a posttranscriptional repressor of PtrHAP2 during vegetative bud dormancy period of aspen (Populus tremuloides) trees.

    PubMed

    Potkar, Rewati; Recla, Jill; Busov, Victor

    2013-02-15

    Dormancy is a mechanism evolved in woody perennial plants to survive the winter freezing and dehydration stress via temporary suspension of growth. We have identified two aspen microRNAs (ptr-MIR169a and ptr-MIR169h) which were highly and specifically expressed in dormant floral and vegetative buds. ptr-MIR169a and its target gene PtrHAP2-5 showed inverse expression patterns during the dormancy period. ptr-MIR169a transcript steadily increased through the first half of the dormancy period and gradually declined with the approach of active growing season. PtrHAP2-5 abundance was higher in the beginning of the dormancy period but rapidly declined thereafter. The decline of PtrHAP2-5 correlated with the high levels of ptr-MIR169a accumulation, suggesting miR169-mediated attenuation of the target PtrHAP2-5 transcript. We experimentally verified the cleavage of PtrHAP2-5 at the predicted miR169a site at the time when PtrHAP2-5 transcript decline was observed. HAP2 is a subunit of a nuclear transcription factor Y (NF-Y) complex consisting of two other units, HAP3 and HAP5. Using digital expression profiling we show that poplar HAP2 and HAP5 are preferentially detected in dormant tissues. Our study shows that microRNAs play a significant and as of yet unknown and unstudied role in regulating the timing of bud dormancy in trees. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Metabolomics study of Populus type propolis.

    PubMed

    Anđelković, Boban; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Vučković, Ivan; Tešević, Vele; Vajs, Vlatka; Gođevac, Dejan

    2017-02-20

    Herein, we propose rapid and simple spectroscopic methods to determine the chemical composition of propolis derived from various Populus species using a metabolomics approach. In order to correlate variability in Populus type propolis composition with the altitude of its collection, NMR, IR, and UV spectroscopy followed by OPLS was conducted. The botanical origin of propolis was established by comparing propolis spectral data to those of buds of various Populus species. An O2PLS method was utilized to integrate two blocks of data. According to OPLS and O2PLS, the major compounds in propolis samples, collected from temperate continental climate above 500m, were phenolic glycerides originating from P. tremula buds. Flavonoids were predominant in propolis samples collected below 400m, originating from P. nigra and P. x euramericana buds. Samples collected at 400-500m were of mixed origin, with variable amounts of all detected metabolites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Epigenomics of Development in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Steve; Freitag, Michael; Mockler, Todd

    2013-01-10

    We conducted research to determine the role of epigenetic modifications during tree development using poplar (Populus trichocarpa), a model woody feedstock species. Using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) or chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), followed by high-throughput sequencing, we are analyzed DNA and histone methylation patterns in the P. trichocarpa genome in relation to four biological processes: bud dormancy and release, mature organ maintenance, in vitro organogenesis, and methylation suppression. Our project is now completed. We have 1) produced 22 transgenic events for a gene involved in DNA methylation suppression and studied its phenotypic consequences; 2) completed sequencing of methylated DNA from eleven target tissues in wildtype P. trichocarpa; 3) updated our customized poplar genome browser using the open-source software tools (2.13) and (V2.2) of the P. trichocarpa genome; 4) produced summary data for genome methylation in P. trichocarpa, including distribution of methylation across chromosomes and in and around genes; 5) employed bioinformatic and statistical methods to analyze differences in methylation patterns among tissue types; and 6) used bisulfite sequencing of selected target genes to confirm bioinformatics and sequencing results, and gain a higher-resolution view of methylation at selected genes 7) compared methylation patterns to expression using available microarray data. Our main findings of biological significance are the identification of extensive regions of the genome that display developmental variation in DNA methylation; highly distinctive gene-associated methylation profiles in reproductive tissues, particularly male catkins; a strong whole genome/all tissue inverse association of methylation at gene bodies and promoters with gene expression; a lack of evidence that tissue specificity of gene expression is associated with gene methylation; and evidence that genome methylation is a significant impediment to tissue

  14. The glutamine synthetase gene family in Populus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutamine synthetase (GS; EC: 6.3.1.2, L-glutamate: ammonia ligase ADP-forming) is a key enzyme in ammonium assimilation and metabolism of higher plants. The current work was undertaken to develop a more comprehensive understanding of molecular and biochemical features of GS gene family in poplar, and to characterize the developmental regulation of GS expression in various tissues and at various times during the poplar perennial growth. Results The GS gene family consists of 8 different genes exhibiting all structural and regulatory elements consistent with their roles as functional genes. Our results indicate that the family members are organized in 4 groups of duplicated genes, 3 of which code for cytosolic GS isoforms (GS1) and 1 which codes for the choroplastic GS isoform (GS2). Our analysis shows that Populus trichocarpa is the first plant species in which it was observed the complete GS family duplicated. Detailed expression analyses have revealed specific spatial and seasonal patterns of GS expression in poplar. These data provide insights into the metabolic function of GS isoforms in poplar and pave the way for future functional studies. Conclusions Our data suggest that GS duplicates could have been retained in order to increase the amount of enzyme in a particular cell type. This possibility could contribute to the homeostasis of nitrogen metabolism in functions associated to changes in glutamine-derived metabolic products. The presence of duplicated GS genes in poplar could also contribute to diversification of the enzymatic properties for a particular GS isoform through the assembly of GS polypeptides into homo oligomeric and/or hetero oligomeric holoenzymes in specific cell types. PMID:21867507

  15. Transcriptional and Hormonal Regulation of Gravitropism of Woody Stems in Populus

    Treesearch

    Suzanne Gerttula; Matthew S. Zinkgraf; Gloria K. Muday; Daniel R. Lewis; Farid M. Ibatullin; Harry Brumer; Foster Hart; Shawn D. Mansfield; Vladimir Filkov; Andrew Groover

    2015-01-01

    Angiosperm trees reorient their woody stems by asymmetrically producing a specialized xylem tissue, tension wood, which exerts a strong contractile force resulting in negative gravitropism of the stem. Here, we show, in Populus trees, that initial gravity perception and response occurs in specialized cells through sedimentation of starch-filled...

  16. The Genome of Black Cottonwood, Populus trichocarpa (Torr. & Gray)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuskan, G. A.; DiFazio, S.; Jansson, S.; Bohlmann, J.; Grigoriev, I.; Hellsten, U.; Putnam, N.; Ralph, S.; Rombauts, S.; Salamov, A.; Schein, J.; Sterck, L.; Aerts, A.; Bhalerao, R. R.; Bhalerao, R. P.; Blaudez, D.; Boerjan, W.; Brun, A.; Brunner, A.; Busov, V.; Campbell, M.; Carlson, J.; Chalot, M.; Chapman, J.; Chen, G.-L.; Cooper, D.; Coutinho, P. M.; Couturier, J.; Covert, S.; Cronk, Q.; Cunningham, R.; Davis, J.; Degroeve, S.; Déjardin, A.; dePamphilis, C.; Detter, J.; Dirks, B.; Dubchak, I.; Duplessis, S.; Ehlting, J.; Ellis, B.; Gendler, K.; Goodstein, D.; Gribskov, M.; Grimwood, J.; Groover, A.; Gunter, L.; Hamberger, B.; Heinze, B.; Helariutta, Y.; Henrissat, B.; Holligan, D.; Holt, R.; Huang, W.; Islam-Faridi, N.; Jones, S.; Jones-Rhoades, M.; Jorgensen, R.; Joshi, C.; Kangasjärvi, J.; Karlsson, J.; Kelleher, C.; Kirkpatrick, R.; Kirst, M.; Kohler, A.; Kalluri, U.; Larimer, F.; Leebens-Mack, J.; Leplé, J.-C.; Locascio, P.; Lou, Y.; Lucas, S.; Martin, F.; Montanini, B.; Napoli, C.; Nelson, D. R.; Nelson, C.; Nieminen, K.; Nilsson, O.; Pereda, V.; Peter, G.; Philippe, R.; Pilate, G.; Poliakov, A.; Razumovskaya, J.; Richardson, P.; Rinaldi, C.; Ritland, K.; Rouzé, P.; Ryaboy, D.; Schmutz, J.; Schrader, J.; Segerman, B.; Shin, H.; Siddiqui, A.; Sterky, F.; Terry, A.; Tsai, C.-J.; Uberbacher, E.; Unneberg, P.; Vahala, J.; Wall, K.; Wessler, S.; Yang, G.; Yin, T.; Douglas, C.; Marra, M.; Sandberg, G.; Van de Peer, Y.; Rokhsar, D.

    2006-09-01

    We report the draft genome of the black cottonwood tree, Populus trichocarpa. Integration of shotgun sequence assembly with genetic mapping enabled chromosome-scale reconstruction of the genome. More than 45,000 putative protein-coding genes were identified. Analysis of the assembled genome revealed a whole-genome duplication event; about 8000 pairs of duplicated genes from that event survived in the Populus genome. A second, older duplication event is indistinguishably coincident with the divergence of the Populus and Arabidopsis lineages. Nucleotide substitution, tandem gene duplication, and gross chromosomal rearrangement appear to proceed substantially more slowly in Populus than in Arabidopsis. Populus has more protein-coding genes than Arabidopsis, ranging on average from 1.4 to 1.6 putative Populus homologs for each Arabidopsis gene. However, the relative frequency of protein domains in the two genomes is similar. Overrepresented exceptions in Populus include genes associated with lignocellulosic wall biosynthesis, meristem development, disease resistance, and metabolite transport.

  17. The genome of black cottonwood, Populus trichocarpa (Torr.&Gray)

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, G.A.; DiFazio, S.; Jansson, S.; Bohlmann, J.; Grigoriev,I.; Hellsten, U.; Putnam, N.; Ralph, S.; Rombauts, S.; Salamov, A.; Schein, J.; Sterck, L.; Aerts, A.; Bhalerao, R.R.; Bhalerao, R.P.; Blaudez, D.; Boerjan, W.; Brun, A.; Brunner, A.; Busov, V.; Campbell, M.; Carlson, J.; Chalot, M.; Chapman, J.; Chen, G.-L.; Cooper, D.; Coutinho,P.M.; Couturier, J.; Covert, S.; Cronk, Q.; Cunningham, R.; Davis, J.; Degroeve, S.; Dejardin, A.; dePamphillis, C.; Detter, J.; Dirks, B.; Dubchak, I.; Duplessis, S.; Ehiting, J.; Ellis, B.; Gendler, K.; Goodstein, D.; Gribskov, M.; Grimwood, J.; Groover, A.; Gunter, L.; Hamberger, B.; Heinze, B.; Helariutta, Y.; Henrissat, B.; Holligan, D.; Holt, R.; Huang, W.; Islam-Faridi, N.; Jones, S.; Jones-Rhoades, M.; Jorgensen, R.; Joshi, C.; Kangasjarvi, J.; Karlsson, J.; Kelleher, C.; Kirkpatrick, R.; Kirst, M.; Kohler, A.; Kalluri, U.; Larimer, F.; Leebens-Mack, J.; Leple, J.-C.; Locascio, P.; Lou, Y.; Lucas, S.; Martin,F.; Montanini, B.; Napoli, C.; Nelson, D.R.; Nelson, D.; Nieminen, K.; Nilsson, O.; Peter, G.; Philippe, R.; Pilate, G.; Poliakov, A.; Razumovskaya, J.; Richardson, P.; Rinaldi, C.; Ritland, K.; Rouze, P.; Ryaboy, D.; Schmutz, J.; Schrader, J.; Segerman, B.; Shin, H.; Siddiqui,A.; Sterky, F.; Terry, A.; Tsai, C.; Uberbacher, E.; Unneberg, P.; Vahala, J.; Wall, K.; Wessler, S.; Yang, G.; Yin, T.; Douglas, C.; Marra,M.; Sandberg, G.; Van der Peer, Y.; Rokhsar, D.

    2006-09-01

    We report the draft genome of the black cottonwood tree, Populus trichocarpa. Integration of shotgun sequence assembly with genetic mapping enabled chromosome-scale reconstruction of the genome. Over 45,000 putative protein-coding genes were identified. Analysis of the assembled genome revealed a whole-genome duplication event, with approximately 8,000 pairs of duplicated genes from that event surviving in the Populus genome. A second, older duplication event is indistinguishably coincident with the divergence of the Populus and Arabidopsis lineages. Nucleotide substitution, tandem gene duplication and gross chromosomal rearrangement appear to proceed substantially slower in Populus relative to Arabidopsis. Populus has more protein-coding genes than Arabidopsis, ranging on average between 1.4-1.6 putative Populus homologs for each Arabidopsis gene. However, the relative frequency of protein domains in the two genomes is similar. Overrepresented exceptions in Populus include genes associated with disease resistance, meristem development, metabolite transport and lignocellulosic wall biosynthesis.

  18. Expression divergence of cellulose synthase (CesA) genes after a recent whole genome duplication event in Populus.

    PubMed

    Takata, Naoki; Taniguchi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Secondary cell wall-associated CesA genes in Populus have undergone a functional differentiation in expression pattern that may be attributable to evolutionary alteration of regulatory modules. Gene duplication is an important mechanism for functional divergence of genes. Secondary cell wall-associated cellulose synthase genes (CesA4, CesA7 and CesA8) are duplicated in Populus plants due to a recent whole genome duplication event. Here, we demonstrate that duplicate CesA genes show tissue-dependent expression divergence in Populus plants. Real-time PCR analysis of Populus CesA genes suggested that Pt × tCesA8-B was more highly expressed than Pt × tCesA8-A in phloem and secondary xylem tissue of mature stem. Histochemical and histological analyses of transformants expressing a GFP-GUS fusion gene driven by Populus CesA promoters revealed that the duplicate CesA genes showed different expression patterns in phloem fibers, secondary xylem, root cap and leaf trichomes. We predicted putative cis-regulatory motifs that regulate expression of secondary cell wall-associated CesA genes, and identified 19 motifs that are highly conserved in the CesA gene family of eudicotyledonous plants. Furthermore, a transient transactivation assay identified candidate transcription factors that affect levels and patterns of expression of Populus CesA genes. The present study reveals that secondary cell wall-associated CesA genes in Populus have undergone a functional differentiation in expression pattern that may be attributable to evolutionary alteration of regulatory modules.

  19. Insertional mutagenesis in Populus: relevance and feasibility

    Treesearch

    Victor Busov; Matthias Fladung; Andrew Groover; Steven Strauss

    2005-01-01

    The recent sequencing of the first tree genome, that of the black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), opens a new chapter in tree functional genomics. While the completion of the genome is a milestone, mobilizing this significant resource for better understanding the growth and development of woody perennials will be an even greater undertaking in the...

  20. Phytoremediation of landfill leachate using Populus

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Adam H. Wiese; Richard B. Hall; Bart Sexton

    2006-01-01

    Proper genotype selection is required for successful phytoremediation. We selected eight Populus clones (NC13460, NC14018, DM115, NC14104, NC14106, DN5, NM2, NM6) of four genomic groups after three cycles of phyto-recurrent selection for a field trial that began June 2005 at the Oneida County Landfill in Rhinelander, WI, USA.

  1. Genome Sequences of Populus tremula Chloroplast and Mitochondrion: Implications for Holistic Poplar Breeding.

    PubMed

    Kersten, Birgit; Faivre Rampant, Patricia; Mader, Malte; Le Paslier, Marie-Christine; Bounon, Rémi; Berard, Aurélie; Vettori, Cristina; Schroeder, Hilke; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Fladung, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Complete Populus genome sequences are available for the nucleus (P. trichocarpa; section Tacamahaca) and for chloroplasts (seven species), but not for mitochondria. Here, we provide the complete genome sequences of the chloroplast and the mitochondrion for the clones P. tremula W52 and P. tremula x P. alba 717-1B4 (section Populus). The organization of the chloroplast genomes of both Populus clones is described. A phylogenetic tree constructed from all available complete chloroplast DNA sequences of Populus was not congruent with the assignment of the related species to different Populus sections. In total, 3,024 variable nucleotide positions were identified among all compared Populus chloroplast DNA sequences. The 5-prime part of the LSC from trnH to atpA showed the highest frequency of variations. The variable positions included 163 positions with SNPs allowing for differentiating the two clones with P. tremula chloroplast genomes (W52, 717-1B4) from the other seven Populus individuals. These potential P. tremula-specific SNPs were displayed as a whole-plastome barcode on the P. tremula W52 chloroplast DNA sequence. Three of these SNPs and one InDel in the trnH-psbA linker were successfully validated by Sanger sequencing in an extended set of Populus individuals. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of P. tremula is the first in the family of Salicaceae. The mitochondrial genomes of the two clones are 783,442 bp (W52) and 783,513 bp (717-1B4) in size, structurally very similar and organized as single circles. DNA sequence regions with high similarity to the W52 chloroplast sequence account for about 2% of the W52 mitochondrial genome. The mean SNP frequency was found to be nearly six fold higher in the chloroplast than in the mitochondrial genome when comparing 717-1B4 with W52. The availability of the genomic information of all three DNA-containing cell organelles will allow a holistic approach in poplar molecular breeding in the future.

  2. Genome Sequences of Populus tremula Chloroplast and Mitochondrion: Implications for Holistic Poplar Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Malte; Le Paslier, Marie-Christine; Bounon, Rémi; Berard, Aurélie; Vettori, Cristina; Schroeder, Hilke; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Fladung, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Complete Populus genome sequences are available for the nucleus (P. trichocarpa; section Tacamahaca) and for chloroplasts (seven species), but not for mitochondria. Here, we provide the complete genome sequences of the chloroplast and the mitochondrion for the clones P. tremula W52 and P. tremula x P. alba 717-1B4 (section Populus). The organization of the chloroplast genomes of both Populus clones is described. A phylogenetic tree constructed from all available complete chloroplast DNA sequences of Populus was not congruent with the assignment of the related species to different Populus sections. In total, 3,024 variable nucleotide positions were identified among all compared Populus chloroplast DNA sequences. The 5-prime part of the LSC from trnH to atpA showed the highest frequency of variations. The variable positions included 163 positions with SNPs allowing for differentiating the two clones with P. tremula chloroplast genomes (W52, 717-1B4) from the other seven Populus individuals. These potential P. tremula-specific SNPs were displayed as a whole-plastome barcode on the P. tremula W52 chloroplast DNA sequence. Three of these SNPs and one InDel in the trnH-psbA linker were successfully validated by Sanger sequencing in an extended set of Populus individuals. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of P. tremula is the first in the family of Salicaceae. The mitochondrial genomes of the two clones are 783,442 bp (W52) and 783,513 bp (717-1B4) in size, structurally very similar and organized as single circles. DNA sequence regions with high similarity to the W52 chloroplast sequence account for about 2% of the W52 mitochondrial genome. The mean SNP frequency was found to be nearly six fold higher in the chloroplast than in the mitochondrial genome when comparing 717-1B4 with W52. The availability of the genomic information of all three DNA-containing cell organelles will allow a holistic approach in poplar molecular breeding in the future. PMID:26800039

  3. Terra Populus and DataNet Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugler, T.; Ruggles, S.; Fitch, C. A.; Clark, P. D.; Sobek, M.; Van Riper, D.

    2012-12-01

    Terra Populus, part of NSF's new DataNet initiative, is developing organizational and technical infrastructure to integrate, preserve, and disseminate data describing changes in the human population and environment over time. Terra Populus will incorporate large microdata and aggregate census datasets from the United States and around the world, as well as land use, land cover, climate and other environmental datasets. These data are widely dispersed, exist in a variety of data structures, have incompatible or inadequate metadata, and have incompatible geographic identifiers. Terra Populus is developing methods of integrating data from different domains and translating across data structures based on spatio-temporal linkages among data contents. The new infrastructure will enable researchers to identify and merge data from heterogeneous sources to study the relationships between human behavior and the natural world. Terra Populus will partner with data archives, data producers, and data users to create a sustainable international organization that will guarantee preservation and access over multiple decades. Terra Populus is also collaborating with the other projects in the DataNet initiative - DataONE, the DataNet Federation Consortium (DFC) and Sustainable Environment-Actionable Data (SEAD). Taken together, the four projects address aspects of the entire data lifecycle, including planning, collection, documentation, discovery, integration, curation, preservation, and collaboration; and encompass a wide range of disciplines including earth sciences, ecology, social sciences, hydrology, oceanography, and engineering. The four projects are pursuing activities to share data, tools, and expertise between pairs of projects as well as collaborating across the DataNet program on issues of cyberinfrastructure and community engagement. Topics to be addressed through program-wide collaboration include technical, organizational, and financial sustainability; semantic

  4. Barcoding poplars (Populus L.) from western China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianju; Jiang, Dechun; Shang, Huiying; Dong, Miao; Wang, Gaini; He, Xinyu; Zhao, Changming; Mao, Kangshan

    2013-01-01

    Populus is an ecologically and economically important genus of trees, but distinguishing between wild species is relatively difficult due to extensive interspecific hybridization and introgression, and the high level of intraspecific morphological variation. The DNA barcoding approach is a potential solution to this problem. Here, we tested the discrimination power of five chloroplast barcodes and one nuclear barcode (ITS) among 95 trees that represent 21 Populus species from western China. Among all single barcode candidates, the discrimination power is highest for the nuclear ITS, progressively lower for chloroplast barcodes matK (M), trnG-psbK (G) and psbK-psbI (P), and trnH-psbA (H) and rbcL (R); the discrimination efficiency of the nuclear ITS (I) is also higher than any two-, three-, or even the five-locus combination of chloroplast barcodes. Among the five combinations of a single chloroplast barcode plus the nuclear ITS, H+I and P+I differentiated the highest and lowest portion of species, respectively. The highest discrimination rate for the barcodes or barcode combinations examined here is 55.0% (H+I), and usually discrimination failures occurred among species from sympatric or parapatric areas. In this case study, we showed that when discriminating Populus species from western China, the nuclear ITS region represents a more promising barcode than any maternally inherited chloroplast region or combination of chloroplast regions. Meanwhile, combining the ITS region with chloroplast regions may improve the barcoding success rate and assist in detecting recent interspecific hybridizations. Failure to discriminate among several groups of Populus species from sympatric or parapatric areas may have been the result of incomplete lineage sorting, frequent interspecific hybridizations and introgressions. We agree with a previous proposal for constructing a tiered barcoding system in plants, especially for taxonomic groups that have complex evolutionary histories

  5. Genotyping-by-sequencing for Populus population genomics: an assessment of genome sampling patterns and filtering approaches.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Martin P; Wolf, Paul G; Duffy, Aaron M; Rai, Hardeep S; Rowe, Carol A; Richardson, Bryce A; Mock, Karen E

    2014-01-01

    Continuing advances in nucleotide sequencing technology are inspiring a suite of genomic approaches in studies of natural populations. Researchers are faced with data management and analytical scales that are increasing by orders of magnitude. With such dramatic advances comes a need to understand biases and error rates, which can be propagated and magnified in large-scale data acquisition and processing. Here we assess genomic sampling biases and the effects of various population-level data filtering strategies in a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) protocol. We focus on data from two species of Populus, because this genus has a relatively small genome and is emerging as a target for population genomic studies. We estimate the proportions and patterns of genomic sampling by examining the Populus trichocarpa genome (Nisqually-1), and demonstrate a pronounced bias towards coding regions when using the methylation-sensitive ApeKI restriction enzyme in this species. Using population-level data from a closely related species (P. tremuloides), we also investigate various approaches for filtering GBS data to retain high-depth, informative SNPs that can be used for population genetic analyses. We find a data filter that includes the designation of ambiguous alleles resulted in metrics of population structure and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium that were most consistent with previous studies of the same populations based on other genetic markers. Analyses of the filtered data (27,910 SNPs) also resulted in patterns of heterozygosity and population structure similar to a previous study using microsatellites. Our application demonstrates that technically and analytically simple approaches can readily be developed for population genomics of natural populations.

  6. PtoMYB92 is a Transcriptional Activator of the Lignin Biosynthetic Pathway During Secondary Cell Wall Formation in Populus tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaofeng; Wang, Xianqiang; Ran, Lingyu; Tian, Qiaoyan; Fan, Di; Luo, Keming

    2015-12-01

    Wood is the most abundant biomass in perennial woody plants and is mainly made up of secondary cell wall. R2R3-MYB transcription factors are important regulators of secondary wall biosynthesis in plants. In this study, we describe the identification and characterization of a poplar MYB transcription factor PtoMYB92, a homolog of Arabidopsis MYB42 and MYB85, which is involved in the regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis. PtoMYB92 is specifically expressed in xylem tissue in poplar. Subcellular localization and transcriptional activation analysis suggest that PtoMYB92 is a nuclear-localized transcriptional activator. Overexpression of PtoMYB92 in poplar resulted in an increase in secondary cell wall thickness in stems and ectopic deposition of lignin in leaves. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that PtoMYB92 specifically activated the expression of lignin biosynthetic genes. Furthermore, transient expression assays using a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene revealed that PtoMYB92 is an activator in the lignin biosynthetic pathway during secondary cell wall formation. Taken together, our results suggest that PtoMYB92 is involved in the regulation of secondary cell wall formation in poplar by controlling the biosynthesis of monolignols.

  7. Populus species from diverse habitats maintain high night-time conductance under drought.

    PubMed

    Cirelli, Damián; Equiza, María Alejandra; Lieffers, Victor James; Tyree, Melvin Thomas

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the interspecific variability in nocturnal whole-plant stomatal conductance under well-watered and drought conditions in seedlings of four species of Populus from habitats characterized by abundant water supply (mesic and riparian) or from drier upland sites. The study was carried out to determine whether (i) nocturnal conductance varies across different species of Populus according to their natural habitat, (ii) nocturnal conductance is affected by water stress similarly to daytime conductance based on species habitat and (iii) differences in conductance among species could be explained partly by differences in stomatal traits. We measured whole-plant transpiration and conductance (G) of greenhouse-grown seedlings using an automated high-resolution gravimetric technique. No relationship was found between habitat preference and daytime G (GD), but night-time G (GN) was on average 1.5 times higher in riparian and mesic species (P. deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. and P. trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) than in those from drier environments (P. tremuloides Michx. and P. × petrowskyana Schr.). GN was not significantly reduced under drought in riparian species. Upland species restricted GN significantly in response to drought, but it was still at least one order of magnitude greater that the cuticular conductance until leaf death was imminent. Under both well-watered and drought conditions, GN declined with increasing vapour pressure deficit (D). Also, a small increase in GN towards the end of the night period was observed in P. deltoides and P. × petrowskyana, suggesting the involvement of endogenous regulation. The anatomical analyses indicated a positive correlation between G and variable stomatal pore index among species and revealed that stomata are not likely to be leaky but instead seem capable of complete occlusion, which raises the question of the possible physiological role of the significant GN observed under drought. Further comparisons among

  8. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant strain shows increased cellular efficiency in response to Populus hydrolysate compared to the wild type strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum is a model organism for consolidated processing due to its efficient fermentation of cellulose. Constituents of dilute acid pretreatment hydrolysate are known to inhibit C. thermocellum and other microorganisms. To evaluate the biological impact of this type of hydrolysate, a transcriptomic analysis of growth in hydrolysate-containing medium was conducted on 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant (PM) and wild type (WT) strains of C. thermocellum. Results In two levels of Populus hydrolysate medium (0% and 10% v/v), the PM showed both gene specific increases and decreases of gene expression compared to the wild-type strain. The PM had increased expression of genes in energy production and conversion, and amino acid transport and metabolism in both standard and 10% v/v Populus hydrolysate media. In particular, expression of the histidine metabolism increased up to 100 fold. In contrast, the PM decreased gene expression in cell division and sporulation (standard medium only), cell defense mechanisms, cell envelope, cell motility, and cellulosome in both media. The PM downregulated inorganic ion transport and metabolism in standard medium but upregulated it in the hydrolysate media when compared to the WT. The WT differentially expressed 1072 genes in response to the hydrolysate medium which included increased transcription of cell defense mechanisms, cell motility, and cellulosome, and decreased expression in cell envelope, amino acid transport and metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, and lipid metabolism, while the PM only differentially expressed 92 genes. The PM tolerates up to 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate and growth in it elicited 489 genes with differential expression, which included increased expression in energy production and conversion, cellulosome production, and inorganic ion transport and metabolism and decreased expression in transcription and cell

  9. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant strain shows increased cellular efficiency in response to Populus hydrolysate compared to the wild type strain.

    PubMed

    Linville, Jessica L; Rodriguez, Miguel; Brown, Steven D; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Cox, Chris D

    2014-08-16

    The thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum is a model organism for consolidated processing due to its efficient fermentation of cellulose. Constituents of dilute acid pretreatment hydrolysate are known to inhibit C. thermocellum and other microorganisms. To evaluate the biological impact of this type of hydrolysate, a transcriptomic analysis of growth in hydrolysate-containing medium was conducted on 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant (PM) and wild type (WT) strains of C. thermocellum. In two levels of Populus hydrolysate medium (0% and 10% v/v), the PM showed both gene specific increases and decreases of gene expression compared to the wild-type strain. The PM had increased expression of genes in energy production and conversion, and amino acid transport and metabolism in both standard and 10% v/v Populus hydrolysate media. In particular, expression of the histidine metabolism increased up to 100 fold. In contrast, the PM decreased gene expression in cell division and sporulation (standard medium only), cell defense mechanisms, cell envelope, cell motility, and cellulosome in both media. The PM downregulated inorganic ion transport and metabolism in standard medium but upregulated it in the hydrolysate media when compared to the WT. The WT differentially expressed 1072 genes in response to the hydrolysate medium which included increased transcription of cell defense mechanisms, cell motility, and cellulosome, and decreased expression in cell envelope, amino acid transport and metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, and lipid metabolism, while the PM only differentially expressed 92 genes. The PM tolerates up to 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate and growth in it elicited 489 genes with differential expression, which included increased expression in energy production and conversion, cellulosome production, and inorganic ion transport and metabolism and decreased expression in transcription and cell defense mechanisms. These

  10. [Application of Populus Nigra preparations at experimental parodontitis].

    PubMed

    Kipiani, N V; Kuchukhidze, Dzh K; Chichua, Z Dzh; Kipiani, V A; Datunashvili, I V

    2007-09-01

    Severe oxidative stress, developed under experimental periodontitis is accompanied by disturbances in mitochondrial respiration in tissue cells of gingiva, membrane damage and release of Fe(2+) and Mn(2+), leading to the worsening of inflammation process and gingival tissue necrosis. Reduction of free nitric oxide in gingival tissue appeared to be characteristic for experimental parodontitis: decreases local immunity, antimicrobial resistance, and tissue regeneration, disturbs blood supply and tissue trophism, which forwards important role in deepening of inflammation process and wasting of gingival tissue. Application of preparations derived from black poplar (Populus Nigra) gemma standardizes mitochondrial respiration, reduces presentation of inflammation, and considerably improves EPR-spectrum of gingival tissue. Though the complete normalization is not achieved--hazard of peroxidation still remains, the applied preparations, due to their strong anti- oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities is as an effective and rehabilitative means to tackle gingivitis and peiodontitis.

  11. Nanometrology of delignified Populus using mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tetard, Laurene; Passian, Ali; Farahi, R H; Davison, Brian H; Jung, S; Ragauskas, A J; Lereu, Aude; Thundat, Thomas George

    2011-01-01

    The study of the spatially resolved physical and compositional properties of materials at the nanoscale is increasingly challenging due to the level of complexity of biological specimens such as those of interest in bioenergy production. Mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) has emerged as a promising metrology tool for such studies. It is shown that, by tuning the mechanical excitation of the probe-sample system, MSAFM can be used to dynamically investigate the multifaceted complexity of plant cells. The results are argued to be of importance both for the characteristics of the invoked synthesized modes and for accessing new features of the samples. As a specific system to investigate, we present images of Populus, before and after a holopulping treatment, a crucial step in the biomass delignification process.

  12. Survival and growth of 31 Populus clones in South Carolina

    Treesearch

    David R. Coyle; Mark D. Coleman; Jaclin A. Durant; Lee A. Newman

    2006-01-01

    Populus species and hybrids have many practical applications, but clonal performance is relatively undocumented in the southeastern United States outside of the Mississippi River alluvial floodplain. In spring 2001, 31 Populus clones were planted on two sites in South Carolina, USA. The sandy, upland site received irrigation and...

  13. Some implications of populus intensive culture on nongame birds

    Treesearch

    Richard L. Verch

    1983-01-01

    Intensive culture of Populus will affect nongame bird habitat. Conversion of old fields to Populus plantations will destroy habitat favorable to certain species and produce habitat that will attract different species. Effects of this conversion can be lessened by planting plantations with irregular shapes and by leaving patches (.4 hectares) of...

  14. Growth and biomass of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; David R. Coyle; Richard B. Hall

    2007-01-01

    Resource managers are challenged with waste disposal and leachate produced from its degradation. Poplar (Populus spp.) trees offer an opportunity for ecological leachate disposal as an irrigation source for managed tree systems. Our objective was to irrigate Populus trees with municipal solid waste landfill leachate or fertilized well water (control...

  15. Functional Characterization and Subcellular Localization of Poplar (Populus trichocarpa × Populus deltoides) Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase1

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Dae Kyun; Mah, Nancy; Ellis, Brian E.; Douglas, Carl J.

    2001-01-01

    Cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (C4H), a member of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase superfamily, plays a central role in phenylpropanoid metabolism and lignin biosynthesis and possibly anchors a phenylpropanoid enzyme complex to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). A full-length cDNA encoding C4H was isolated from a hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa × P. deltoides) young leaf cDNA library. RNA-blot analysis detected C4H transcripts in all organs tested, but the gene was most highly expressed in developing xylem. C4H expression was also strongly induced by elicitor-treatment in poplar cell cultures. To verify the catalytic activity of the putative C4H cDNA, two constructs, C4H and C4H fused to the FLAG epitope (C4H::FLAG), were expressed in yeast. Immunoblot analysis showed that C4H was present in the microsomal fraction and microsomal preparations from strains expressing both enzymes efficiently converted cinnamic acid to p-coumaric acid with high specific activities. To investigate the subcellular localization of C4H in vivo, a chimeric C4H-green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was engineered and stably expressed in Arabidopsis. Confocal laser microscopy analysis clearly showed that in Arabidopsis the C4H::GFP chimeric enzyme was localized to the ER. When expressed in yeast, the C4H::GFP fusion enzyme was also active but displayed significantly lower specific activity than either C4H or C4H::FLAG in in vitro and in vivo enzyme assays. These data definitively show that C4H is localized to the ER in planta. PMID:11351095

  16. Community type classification of forest vegetation in young, mixed stands, interior Alaska.

    Treesearch

    Andrew. Youngblood

    1993-01-01

    A total of 53 upland mixed communities were sampled and classified into five community types: Populus tremuloides/Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, Populus tremuloides/Shepherdla canadensis, Betula papyrifera-Populus tremuloides/Viburnum edule, Betula papyrifera-Populus tremuloldes/Alnus crispa and Picea glauca-Betula papyrlfera/Hylocomlum splendens. Community types were...

  17. Xylan hydrolysis in Populus trichocarpa × P. deltoides and model substrates during hydrothermal pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Trajano, Heather L; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Tomkins, Bruce A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Hahn, Michael G; Van Berkel, Gary J; Wyman, Charles E

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies defined easy and difficult to hydrolyze fractions of hemicellulose that may result from bonds among cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. To understand how such bonds affect hydrolysis, Populus trichocarpa × Populus deltoides, holocellulose isolated from P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides and birchwood xylan were subjected to hydrothermal flow-through pretreatment. Samples were characterized by glycome profiling, HPLC, and UPLC-MS. Glycome profiling revealed steady fragmentation and removal of glycans from solids during hydrolysis. The extent of polysaccharide fragmentation, hydrolysis rate, and total xylose yield were lowest for P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides and greatest for birchwood xylan. Comparison of results from P. trichocarpa × P. deltoides and holocellulose suggested that lignin-carbohydrate complexes reduce hydrolysis rates and limit release of large xylooligomers. Smaller differences between results with holocellulose and birchwood xylan suggest xylan-cellulose hydrogen bonds limited hydrolysis, but to a lesser extent. These findings imply cell wall structure strongly influences hydrolysis.

  18. Newly identified helper bacteria stimulate ectomycorrhizal formation in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Labbe, Jessy L.; Weston, David J.; Dunkirk, Nora; Pelletier, Dale A.; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2014-10-24

    Mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) are known to increase host root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi but the molecular mechanisms and potential tripartite trophic interactions are poorly understood. Through an effort to study Populus microbiome, we isolated 21 Pseudomonas strains from native Populus deltoides roots. These bacterial isolates were characterized and screened for MHB effectiveness on the Populus-Laccaria system. Two other Pseudomonas strains (i.e., Pf-5 and BBc6R8) from existing collections were also included as reference in the screening process. We analyzed Laccaria bicolor S238N growth rate, mycelial architecture and transcriptional changes induced by the contrasting Pseudomonas strains (i.e., inhibitory, neutral and beneficial). We characterized 17 out of the 21 Pseudomonas strains from the Populus rhizosphere with positive effects on L. bicolor S238N growth, as well as on Populus root architecture and colonization by L. bicolor S238N across three Populus species. Four of seven reporter genes, Tra1, Tectonin2, Gcn5 and Cipc1, thought to be specific to the interaction with strain BBc6R8, were induced or repressed while interacting with six (i.e., GM17, GM33, GM41, GM48, Pf-5 and BBc6R8) of the tested Pseudomonas strains. GM41 promoted the highest roots colonization across three Populus species but most notably in P. deltoides, which is otherwise, poorly colonized by L. bicolor. Here we report novel MHB strains isolated from native Populus that improve roots colonization. This tripartite relationship could be exploited in nursery production for target Populus species/genotypes as a means of improving establishment and survival in marginal lands.

  19. Newly identified helper bacteria stimulate ectomycorrhizal formation in Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Labbe, Jessy L.; Weston, David J.; Dunkirk, Nora; ...

    2014-10-24

    Mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) are known to increase host root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi but the molecular mechanisms and potential tripartite trophic interactions are poorly understood. Through an effort to study Populus microbiome, we isolated 21 Pseudomonas strains from native Populus deltoides roots. These bacterial isolates were characterized and screened for MHB effectiveness on the Populus-Laccaria system. Two other Pseudomonas strains (i.e., Pf-5 and BBc6R8) from existing collections were also included as reference in the screening process. We analyzed Laccaria bicolor S238N growth rate, mycelial architecture and transcriptional changes induced by the contrasting Pseudomonas strains (i.e., inhibitory, neutral and beneficial).more » We characterized 17 out of the 21 Pseudomonas strains from the Populus rhizosphere with positive effects on L. bicolor S238N growth, as well as on Populus root architecture and colonization by L. bicolor S238N across three Populus species. Four of seven reporter genes, Tra1, Tectonin2, Gcn5 and Cipc1, thought to be specific to the interaction with strain BBc6R8, were induced or repressed while interacting with six (i.e., GM17, GM33, GM41, GM48, Pf-5 and BBc6R8) of the tested Pseudomonas strains. GM41 promoted the highest roots colonization across three Populus species but most notably in P. deltoides, which is otherwise, poorly colonized by L. bicolor. Here we report novel MHB strains isolated from native Populus that improve roots colonization. This tripartite relationship could be exploited in nursery production for target Populus species/genotypes as a means of improving establishment and survival in marginal lands.« less

  20. Metabolic profiling reveals altered sugar and secondary metabolism in response to UGPase overexpression in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Payyavula, Raja S.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Jawdy, Sara; Sykes, Robert; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Kalluri, Udaya C.

    2014-10-07

    Background: UDP-glucose pyrophopharylase (UGPase) is a sugar metabolizing enzyme (E.C. 2.7.7.9) that catalyzes a reversible reaction of UDP-glucose and pyrophosphate from glucose-1-phosphate and uridine triphosphate glucose. UDP-glucose is a key intermediate sugar that is channeled to multiple metabolic pathways. The functional role of UGPase in woody plants such as Populus is poorly understood. Results: We characterized the functional role of UGPase in Populus deltoides by overexpressing a native gene. Overexpression of the native gene resulted in increased leaf area and leaf-to-shoot biomass ratio but decreased shoot and root growth. Metabolomic analyses showed that manipulation of UGPase results in perturbations in primary as well as secondary metabolism resulting in reduced sugar and starch levels and increased phenolics such as caffeoyl- and feruloyl conjugates. While cellulose and lignin levels in the cell walls were not significantly altered, the syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio was significantly reduced. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that UGPase plays a key role in the tightly coupled primary and secondary metabolic pathways and perturbation in its function results in pronounced effects on growth and metabolism outside of cell wall biosynthesis of Populus.

  1. Metabolic profiling reveals altered sugar and secondary metabolism in response to UGPase overexpression in Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Payyavula, Raja S.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Jawdy, Sara; ...

    2014-10-07

    Background: UDP-glucose pyrophopharylase (UGPase) is a sugar metabolizing enzyme (E.C. 2.7.7.9) that catalyzes a reversible reaction of UDP-glucose and pyrophosphate from glucose-1-phosphate and uridine triphosphate glucose. UDP-glucose is a key intermediate sugar that is channeled to multiple metabolic pathways. The functional role of UGPase in woody plants such as Populus is poorly understood. Results: We characterized the functional role of UGPase in Populus deltoides by overexpressing a native gene. Overexpression of the native gene resulted in increased leaf area and leaf-to-shoot biomass ratio but decreased shoot and root growth. Metabolomic analyses showed that manipulation of UGPase results in perturbations inmore » primary as well as secondary metabolism resulting in reduced sugar and starch levels and increased phenolics such as caffeoyl- and feruloyl conjugates. While cellulose and lignin levels in the cell walls were not significantly altered, the syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio was significantly reduced. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that UGPase plays a key role in the tightly coupled primary and secondary metabolic pathways and perturbation in its function results in pronounced effects on growth and metabolism outside of cell wall biosynthesis of Populus.« less

  2. Genome-Wide Identification of the Invertase Gene Family in Populus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Gao, Kai; Su, Xiaoxing; Rao, Pian; An, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Invertase plays a crucial role in carbohydrate partitioning and plant development as it catalyses the irreversible hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. The invertase family in plants is composed of two sub-families: acid invertases, which are targeted to the cell wall and vacuole; and neutral/alkaline invertases, which function in the cytosol. In this study, 5 cell wall invertase genes (PtCWINV1-5), 3 vacuolar invertase genes (PtVINV1-3) and 16 neutral/alkaline invertase genes (PtNINV1-16) were identified in the Populus genome and found to be distributed on 14 chromosomes. A comprehensive analysis of poplar invertase genes was performed, including structures, chromosome location, phylogeny, evolutionary pattern and expression profiles. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two sub-families were both divided into two clades. Segmental duplication is contributed to neutral/alkaline sub-family expansion. Furthermore, the Populus invertase genes displayed differential expression in roots, stems, leaves, leaf buds and in response to salt/cold stress and pathogen infection. In addition, the analysis of enzyme activity and sugar content revealed that invertase genes play key roles in the sucrose metabolism of various tissues and organs in poplar. This work lays the foundation for future functional analysis of the invertase genes in Populus and other woody perennials.

  3. Genome-Wide Identification of the Invertase Gene Family in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaoxing; Rao, Pian; An, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Invertase plays a crucial role in carbohydrate partitioning and plant development as it catalyses the irreversible hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose. The invertase family in plants is composed of two sub-families: acid invertases, which are targeted to the cell wall and vacuole; and neutral/alkaline invertases, which function in the cytosol. In this study, 5 cell wall invertase genes (PtCWINV1-5), 3 vacuolar invertase genes (PtVINV1-3) and 16 neutral/alkaline invertase genes (PtNINV1-16) were identified in the Populus genome and found to be distributed on 14 chromosomes. A comprehensive analysis of poplar invertase genes was performed, including structures, chromosome location, phylogeny, evolutionary pattern and expression profiles. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the two sub-families were both divided into two clades. Segmental duplication is contributed to neutral/alkaline sub-family expansion. Furthermore, the Populus invertase genes displayed differential expression in roots, stems, leaves, leaf buds and in response to salt/cold stress and pathogen infection. In addition, the analysis of enzyme activity and sugar content revealed that invertase genes play key roles in the sucrose metabolism of various tissues and organs in poplar. This work lays the foundation for future functional analysis of the invertase genes in Populus and other woody perennials. PMID:26393355

  4. Anthocyanins of the anthers as chemotaxonomic markers in the genus Populus L.. Differentiation between Populus nigra, Populus alba and Populus tremula.

    PubMed

    Alcalde-Eon, Cristina; García-Estévez, Ignacio; Rivas-Gonzalo, Julián C; Rodríguez de la Cruz, David; Escribano-Bailón, María Teresa

    2016-08-01

    Three main species of Popululs L. (Salicaceae) have been reported to occur in the Iberian Peninsula: Populus nigra L., Populus alba L. and Populus tremula L. The degree of pilosity of the bracts of the male catkins is a key character for their differentiation. The anthers of these poplar species possess anthocyanins that provide them a red colouration. Since these poplars are wind-pollinated and, consequently, do not need to attract pollinators, anthocyanins in the anthers might be acting as photoprotectors, shielding pollen grains from excessive sunlight. In order to verify this hypothesis, the first objective of this study was to establish if there is any relationship between the degree of pilosity of the bracts (related to the physical shading of the pollen grains) and the levels and types of anthocyanins in the anthers of these three species. This study also aimed to check the usefulness of the anthocyanins of the anthers as chemotaxonomic markers, through the study of the differences in the anthocyanin composition between these poplar species. Anthocyanins were identified from the data supplied by HPLC-DAD-MS(n) analyses. Seventeen different compounds, including mono-, di- and triglycosides and anthocyanin-derived pigments (F-A(+) dimers) have been identified. Cyanidin 3-O-glucoside was the major compound in all the samples (>60% of the total content), which may be in accordance with the photoprotective role proposed for them. However, qualitative and quantitative differences were detected among samples. Cyanidin and delphinidin 3-O-sambubiosides have been detected only in the anthers of P. tremula as well as cyanidin 3-O-(2″-O-xyloxyl)rutinoside, making them valuable chemotaxonomic markers for this species. Hierarchical Cluster and Principal Components Analyses (HCA and PCA) carried out with the anthocyanin percent composition data have allowed a separation of the samples that is in accordance with the initial classification of the samples made from the

  5. Immunohistochemical localization of enzymes that catalyze the long sequential pathways of lignin biosynthesis during differentiation of secondary xylem tissues of hybrid aspen (Populus sieboldii x Populus grandidentata).

    PubMed

    Sato, Kanna; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Mashino, Yoko; Yoshitomi, Kaori; Zhou, Jinmei; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro

    2009-12-01

    We have investigated the spatial localization of enzymes that catalyze the sequential pathways of lignin biosynthesis in developing secondary xylem tissues of hybrid aspen (Populus sieboldii Miq. x Populus grandidentata Michx.) using immunohistochemical techniques. The enzymes phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase and 4-coumarate:CoA ligase in the common phenylpropanoid pathway, cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) and peroxidase in the specific lignin pathway, 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAHPS) in the shikimate pathway and glutamine synthetase (GS) in the nitrogen reassimilation system were abundantly localized in the 6th to 9th wood fibers away from cambium; these wood fibers are likely undergoing the most intense lignification. Only weak immunolabeling of enzymes involved in the general phenylpropanoid and specific lignin pathways was detected in the cells near the cambium; lignification of these cells has likely been initiated after primary cell wall formation. In contrast, distinct localization of DAHPS and GS was observed around the cambium, which may be involved not only in lignin biosynthesis, but also in amino acid and protein synthesis, which are essential for cell survival. Our observations suggest that co-localization of enzymes related to the sequential shikimate, general phenylpropanoid and specific lignin branch pathways and to the nitrogen recycling system is associated with cell wall lignification of wood fibers during secondary xylem development.

  6. A Populus EST resource for plant functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    Sterky, Fredrik; Bhalerao, Rupali R.; Unneberg, Per; Segerman, Bo; Nilsson, Peter; Brunner, Amy M.; Charbonnel-Campaa, Laurence; Lindvall, Jenny Jonsson; Tandre, Karolina; Strauss, Steven H.; Sundberg, Björn; Gustafsson, Petter; Uhlén, Mathias; Bhalerao, Rishikesh P.; Nilsson, Ove; Sandberg, Göran; Karlsson, Jan; Lundeberg, Joakim; Jansson, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Trees present a life form of paramount importance for terrestrial ecosystems and human societies because of their ecological structure and physiological function and provision of energy and industrial materials. The genus Populus is the internationally accepted model for molecular tree biology. We have analyzed 102,019 Populus ESTs that clustered into 11,885 clusters and 12,759 singletons. We also provide >4,000 assembled full clone sequences to serve as a basis for the upcoming annotation of the Populus genome sequence. A public web-based EST database (populusdb) provides digital expression profiles for 18 tissues that comprise the majority of differentiated organs. The coding content of Populus and Arabidopsis genomes shows very high similarity, indicating that differences between these annual and perennial angiosperm life forms result primarily from differences in gene regulation. The high similarity between Populus and Arabidopsis will allow studies of Populus to directly benefit from the detailed functional genomic information generated for Arabidopsis, enabling detailed insights into tree development and adaptation. These data will also valuable for functional genomic efforts in Arabidopsis. PMID:15353603

  7. Microautoradiographic localization of phosphate and carbohydrates in mycorrhizal roots of Populus tremula x Populus alba and the implications for transfer processes in ectomycorrhizal associations.

    PubMed

    Bücking, H; Heyser, W

    2001-02-01

    Microautoradiographic studies were carried out to examine the distribution and exchange of phosphate and labeled carbohydrates in mycorrhizal roots of Populus tremula x Populus alba L. following application of 33P-orthophosphate (Pi) and 14CO2. Labeled Pi was not homogeneously distributed along the mycorrhizal longitudinal axis. The fungal sheath and the Hartig net contained more 33Pi in the median parts of the root than in the apical or basal root zones, indicating that uptake and transfer of Pi to the host plant was localized mainly in this area. The Pi was translocated by the Hartig net and the interfacial apoplast to the host plant. It was distributed by way of the stele within the plant. Young leaves and meristematic tissue in the shoot tip were the main sinks for Pi. In plants that were left in the dark for 5 days before 33Pi application, the reduced carbohydrate supply caused a decrease in Pi absorption by mycorrhizal roots. Microautoradiography of mycorrhizal roots after assimilation of 14CO2 revealed that: (1) the fungal partner had a high capacity to attract photosynthates; (2) the main transfer of carbohydrates was localized in the median zone of a mycorrhizal root; (3) carbohydrates that were absorbed by the mycorrhizal fungus were translocated to the fungal sheath and were homogeneously distributed; and (4) in the main exchange zone, cortical cell nuclei showed a high sink capacity, indicating increased metabolic activity in these cells. We postulate that (1) the phosphate demand of the host plant regulates absorption of Pi by the fungus, and (2) a bidirectional transfer of carbohydrates and Pi occurs across the same interface structure in ectomycorrhizal roots of Populus.

  8. Plasma membrane microdomains from hybrid aspen cells are involved in cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bessueille, Laurence; Sindt, Nicolas; Guichardant, Michel; Djerbi, Soraya; Teeri, Tuula T; Bulone, Vincent

    2009-04-28

    Detergent-resistant plasma membrane microdomains [DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes)] were isolated recently from several plant species. As for animal cells, a large range of cellular functions, such as signal transduction, endocytosis and protein trafficking, have been attributed to plant lipid rafts and DRMs. The data available are essentially based on proteomics and more approaches need to be undertaken to elucidate the precise function of individual populations of DRMs in plants. We report here the first isolation of DRMs from purified plasma membranes of a tree species, the hybrid aspen Populus tremula x tremuloides, and their biochemical characterization. Plasma membranes were solubilized with Triton X-100 and the resulting DRMs were isolated by flotation in sucrose density gradients. The DRMs were enriched in sterols, sphingolipids and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins and thus exhibited similar properties to DRMs from other species. However, they contained key carbohydrate synthases involved in cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis, namely callose [(1-->3)-beta-D-glucan] and cellulose synthases. The association of these enzymes with DRMs was demonstrated using specific glucan synthase assays and antibodies, as well as biochemical and chemical approaches for the characterization of the polysaccharides synthesized in vitro by the isolated DRMs. More than 70% of the total glucan synthase activities present in the original plasma membranes was associated with the DRM fraction. In addition to shedding light on the lipid environment of callose and cellulose synthases, our results demonstrate the involvement of DRMs in the biosynthesis of important cell wall polysaccharides. This novel concept suggests a function of plant membrane microdomains in cell growth and morphogenesis.

  9. Chemical responses to modified lignin composition in tension wood of hybrid poplar (Populus tremula x Populus alba).

    PubMed

    Al-Haddad, Jameel M; Kang, Kyu-Young; Mansfield, Shawn D; Telewski, Frank W

    2013-04-01

    The effect of altering the expression level of the F5H gene was investigated in three wood tissues (normal, opposite and tension wood) in 1-year-old hybrid poplar clone 717 (Populus tremula × Populus alba L.), containing the F5H gene under the control of the C4H promoter. Elevated expression of the F5H gene in poplar has been previously reported to increase the percent syringyl content of lignin. The wild-type and three transgenic lines were inclined 45° for 3 months to induce tension wood formation. Tension and opposite wood from inclined trees, along with normal wood from control trees, were analyzed separately for carbohydrates, lignin, cellulose crystallinity and microfibril angle (MFA). In the wild-type poplar, the lignin in tension wood contained a significantly higher percentage of syringyl than normal wood or opposite wood. However, there was no significant difference in the percent syringyl content of the three wood types within each of the transgenic lines. Increasing the F5H gene expression caused an increase in the percent syringyl content and a slight decrease in the total lignin in normal wood. In tension wood, the addition of a gelatinous layer in the fiber walls resulted in a consistently lower percentage of total lignin in the tissue. Acid-soluble lignin was observed to increase by up to 2.3-fold in the transgenic lines. Compared with normal wood and opposite wood, cell wall crystallinity in tension wood was higher and the MFA was smaller, as expected, with no evidence of an effect from modifying the syringyl monomer ratio. Tension wood in all the lines contained consistently higher total sugar and glucose percentages when compared with normal wood within the respective lines. However, both sugar and glucose percentages were lower in the tension wood of transgenic lines when compared with the tension wood of wild-type trees. Evaluating the response of trees with altered syringyl content to gravity will improve our understanding of the changes

  10. Community type classification of forest vegetation in young, mixed stands, interior Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, A.

    1993-04-01

    A total of 53 upland mixed communities were sampled and classified into five community types: Populus tremuloides/Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, Populus tremuloides/Shepherdia canadensis, Betula papyrifera-Populus tremuloides/Viburnum edule, Betula papyrifera-Populus tremuloides/Alnus crispa and Picea glauca-Betula papyrifera/ Hylocomlum splendens. Community types were described by distribution and physical environment, vegetation composition, structural features, and relation to previously described vegetation units.

  11. Mathematical modeling of RDX and HMX metabolism in poplar (Populus deltoides x Populus nigra, DN34) tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Mezzari, Melissa P; Van Aken, Benoit; Yoon, Jong M; Just, Craig L; Schnoor, Jerald L

    2004-01-01

    Three mathematical models were developed based on a fate study as an approach to define transformation pathways of hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) within plant cells. [U-14C]RDX and [U-14C]HMX were added in Murashige and Skoog (MS) liquid media containing Populus deltoides x P. nigra (DN34) tissue cultures. Radioactivity of samples was analyzed using HPLC, a bio-oxidizer and liquid scintillation counter. Based on information collected, transformation pathways of nitramine compounds were fitted with the raw data obtained and using a modified "green liver" model. Ordinary differential equations were developed and simulations were performed with MicroMath Scientist version 2.0 (MicroMath Inc., St. Louis, MO, USA). The three models, with different sequential transformation processes, were tested in order to support the raw data (model I) and the assumptions of the modified "green liver" model (models II and III). The results showed a high correlation between the collected data and the simulated concentrations for all models. Thus, the simplest model developed (model I) is the best model description of these particular results. The results obtained suggest that the principle of parsimony should be applied. The "green liver"-based models also demonstrated a reliable approach for the investigation of degradation pathways of nitramines within plant cells.

  12. Newly identified helper bacteria stimulate ectomycorrhizal formation in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, Jessy L.; Weston, David J.; Dunkirk, Nora; Pelletier, Dale A.; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2014-01-01

    Mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB) are known to increase host root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi but the molecular mechanisms and potential tripartite interactions are poorly understood. Through an effort to study Populus microbiome, we isolated 21 Pseudomonas strains from native Populus deltoides roots. These bacterial isolates were characterized and screened for MHB effectiveness on the Populus-Laccaria system. Two additional Pseudomonas strains (i.e., Pf-5 and BBc6R8) from existing collections were included for comparative purposes. We analyzed the effect of co-cultivation of these 23 individual Pseudomonas strains on Laccaria bicolor “S238N” growth rate, mycelial architecture and transcriptional changes. Nineteen of the 23 Pseudomonas strains tested had positive effects on L. bicolor S238N growth, as well as on mycelial architecture, with strains GM41 and GM18 having the most significant effect. Four of seven L. bicolor reporter genes, Tra1, Tectonin2, Gcn5, and Cipc1, thought to be regulated during the interaction with MHB strain BBc6R8, were induced or repressed, while interacting with Pseudomonas strains GM17, GM33, GM41, GM48, Pf-5, and BBc6R8. Strain GM41 promoted the highest roots colonization across three Populus species but most notably in P. deltoides, which is otherwise poorly colonized by L. bicolor. Here we report novel MHB strains isolated from native Populus that improve L. bicolor root colonization on Populus. This tripartite relationship could be exploited for Populus species/genotypes nursery production as a means of improving establishment and survival in marginal lands. PMID:25386184

  13. Revisiting the sequencing of the first tree genome: Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Wullschleger, Stan D; Weston, D J; DiFazio, S P; Tuskan, G A

    2013-04-01

    Ten years ago, it was announced that the Joint Genome Institute with funds provided by the Department of Energy, Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research would sequence the black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) genome. This landmark decision was the culmination of work by the forest science community to develop Populus as a model system. Since its public release in late 2006, the availability of the Populus genome has spawned research in plant biology, morphology, genetics and ecology. Here we address how the tree physiologist has used this resource. More specifically, we revisit our earlier contention that the rewards of sequencing the Populus genome would depend on how quickly scientists working with woody perennials could adopt molecular approaches to investigate the mechanistic underpinnings of basic physiological processes. Several examples illustrate the integration of functional and comparative genomics into the forest sciences, especially in areas that target improved understanding of the developmental differences between woody perennials and herbaceous annuals (e.g., phase transitions). Sequencing the Populus genome and the availability of genetic and genomic resources has also been instrumental in identifying candidate genes that underlie physiological and morphological traits of interest. Genome-enabled research has advanced our understanding of how phenotype and genotype are related and provided insights into the genetic mechanisms whereby woody perennials adapt to environmental stress. In the future, we anticipate that low-cost, high-throughput sequencing will continue to facilitate research in tree physiology and enhance our understanding at scales of individual organisms and populations. A challenge remains, however, as to how genomic resources, including the Populus genome, can be used to understand ecosystem function. Although examples are limited, progress in this area is encouraging and will undoubtedly improve as

  14. The SHORT-ROOT-like gene PtSHR2B is involved in Populus phellogen activity.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Andreia; Milhinhos, Ana; Novák, Ondřej; Jones, Brian; Miguel, Célia M

    2016-03-01

    SHORT-ROOT (SHR) is a GRAS transcription factor first characterized for its role in the specification of the stem cell niche and radial patterning in Arabidopsis thaliana (At) roots. Three SHR-like genes have been identified in Populus trichocarpa (Pt). PtSHR1 shares high similarity with AtSHR over the entire length of the coding sequence. The two other Populus SHR-like genes, PtSHR2A and PtSHR2B, are shorter in their 5' ends when compared with AtSHR. Unlike PtSHR1, that is expressed throughout the cambial zone of greenhouse-grown Populus trees, PtSHR2Bprom:uidA expression was detected in the phellogen. Additionally, PtSHR1 and PtSHR2B expression patterns markedly differ in the shoot apex and roots of in vitro plants. Transgenic hybrid aspen expressing PtSHR2B under the 35S constitutive promoter showed overall reduced tree growth while the proportion of bark increased relative to the wood. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) revealed increased transcript levels of cytokinin metabolism and response-related genes in the transgenic plants consistent with an increase of total cytokinin levels. This was confirmed by cytokinin quantification by LC-MS/MS. Our results indicate that PtSHR2B appears to function in the phellogen and therefore in the regulation of phellem and periderm formation, possibly acting through modulation of cytokinin homeostasis. Furthermore, this work points to a functional diversification of SHR after the divergence of the Populus and Arabidopsis lineages. This finding may contribute to selection and breeding strategies of cork oak in which, unlike Populus, the phellogen is active throughout the entire tree lifespan, being at the basis of a highly profitable cork industry.

  15. Biomass and genotype × environment interactions of Populus energy crops in the midwestern United States

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Richard B. Hall; Jill A. Zalesny; Bernard G. McMahon; William E. Berguson; Glen R. Stanosz

    2009-01-01

    Using Populus feedstocks for biofuels, bioenergy, and bioproducts is becoming economically feasible as global fossil fuel prices increase. Maximizing Populus biomass production across regional landscapes largely depends on understanding genotype × environment interactions, given broad genetic variation at strategic (...

  16. Effects of Cottonwood Leaf Beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Larval Defoliation, Clone, and Season on Populus Foliar Phagostimulants

    Treesearch

    David R. Coyle; Joel D. McMillin; Richard B. Hall; Elwood R. Hart

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: The cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta F., is a serious defoliator of plantation Populus in the United States. Current control methods include biorational and synthetic chemicals as well as selecting Populus clones resistant or tolerant to C. scripta...

  17. Nesterenkonia populi sp. nov., an actinobacterium isolated from Populus euphratica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Meng; Tuo, Li; Habden, Xugela; Guo, Lin; Jiang, Zhong-Ke; Liu, Xian-Fu; Chen, Li; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Sun, Cheng-Hang

    2015-05-01

    An alkaliphilic and moderately halophilic actinobacterium, designated strain GP10-3(T), was isolated from Populus euphratica collected from the southern edge of Taklimakan desert, Xinjiang, China. Cells of this strain were Gram-stain-positive, non-motile and non-spore-forming short rods. Strain GP10-3(T) grew optimally at 37 °C on LB agar media in the presence of 5-10% (w/v) NaCl at pH 9.0. The menaquinones were MK-7, MK-8 and MK-9. The major fatty acids (>10%) were anteiso-C17 : 0, anteiso-C15 : 0 and iso-C16 : 0. The peptidoglycan type was variation A4α, L-Lys-L-Glu. The polar lipids consisted of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycolipid, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, glycolipid and an unidentified phospholipid. The DNA G+C content was 67.4 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain GP10-3(T) belonged to the genus Nesterenkonia , sharing 94.6-96.9% sequence similarity with the type strains of species within this genus with validly published names. Based on the evidence of the polyphasic taxonomic study, strain GP10-3(T) represents a novel species of the genus Nesterenkonia , for which the name Nesterenkonia populi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GP10-3(T) ( = DSM 27959(T) = KCTC 29119(T)).

  18. Molecular evolution and expression divergence of the Populus polygalacturonase supergene family shed light on the evolution of increasingly complex organs in plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Ling; Liu, Hai-Jing; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Zeng, Qing-Yin

    2013-03-01

    Plant polygalacturonases (PGs) are involved in cell separation processes during many stages of plant development. Investigation into the diversification of this large gene family in land plants could shed light on the evolution of structural development. We conducted whole-genome annotation, molecular evolution and gene expression analyses of PG genes in five species of land plant: Populus, Arabidopsis, rice, Selaginella and Physcomitrella. We identified 75, 44, 16 and 11 PG genes from Populus, rice, Selaginella and Physcomitrella genomes, respectively, which were divided into three classes. We inferred rapid expansion of class I PG genes in Populus, Arabidopsis and rice, while copy numbers of classes II and III PG genes were relatively conserved in all five species. Populus, Arabidopsis and rice class I PG genes were under more relaxed selection constraints than class II PG genes, while this selective pressure divergence was not observed in Selaginella and Physcomitrella PG families. In addition, class I PG genes underwent marked expression divergence in Populus, rice and Selaginella. Our results suggest that PG gene expansion occurred after the divergence of the lycophytes and euphyllophytes, and this expansion was likely paralleled by the evolution of increasingly complex organs in land plants.

  19. Conservation and divergence of microRNAs in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Abdelali; Wall, Phillip K; DiLoreto, Scott; dePamphilis, Claude W; Carlson, John E

    2007-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNAs (sRNA) ~21 nucleotides in length that negatively control gene expression by cleaving or inhibiting the translation of target gene transcripts. miRNAs have been extensively analyzed in Arabidopsis and rice and partially investigated in other non-model plant species. To date, 109 and 62 miRNA families have been identified in Arabidopsis and rice respectively. However, only 33 miRNAs have been identified from the genome of the model tree species (Populus trichocarpa), of which 11 are Populus specific. The low number of miRNA families previously identified in Populus, compared with the number of families identified in Arabidopsis and rice, suggests that many miRNAs still remain to be discovered in Populus. In this study, we analyzed expressed small RNAs from leaves and vegetative buds of Populus using high throughput pyrosequencing. Results Analysis of almost eighty thousand small RNA reads allowed us to identify 123 new sequences belonging to previously identified miRNA families as well as 48 new miRNA families that could be Populus-specific. Comparison of the organization of miRNA families in Populus, Arabidopsis and rice showed that miRNA family sizes were generally expanded in Populus. The putative targets of non-conserved miRNA include both previously identified targets as well as several new putative target genes involved in development, resistance to stress, and other cellular processes. Moreover, almost half of the genes predicted to be targeted by non-conserved miRNAs appear to be Populus-specific. Comparative analyses showed that genes targeted by conserved and non-conserved miRNAs are biased mainly towards development, electron transport and signal transduction processes. Similar results were found for non-conserved miRNAs from Arabidopsis. Conclusion Our results suggest that while there is a conserved set of miRNAs among plant species, a large fraction of miRNAs vary among species. The non-conserved miRNAs may

  20. Variable Nitrogen Fixation in Wild Populus

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Sharon L.; Sher, Andrew W.; Fleck, Neil D.; Khorasani, Mahsa; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Khan, Zareen; Ko, Andrew W. K.; Kim, Soo-Hyung; DeLuca, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The microbiome of plants is diverse, and like that of animals, is important for overall health and nutrient acquisition. In legumes and actinorhizal plants, a portion of essential nitrogen (N) is obtained through symbiosis with nodule-inhabiting, N2-fixing microorganisms. However, a variety of non-nodulating plant species can also thrive in natural, low-N settings. Some of these species may rely on endophytes, microorganisms that live within plants, to fix N2 gas into usable forms. Here we report the first direct evidence of N2 fixation in the early successional wild tree, Populus trichocarpa, a non-leguminous tree, from its native riparian habitat. In order to measure N2 fixation, surface-sterilized cuttings of wild poplar were assayed using both 15N2 incorporation and the commonly used acetylene reduction assay. The 15N label was incorporated at high levels in a subset of cuttings, suggesting a high level of N-fixation. Similarly, acetylene was reduced to ethylene in some samples. The microbiota of the cuttings was highly variable, both in numbers of cultured bacteria and in genetic diversity. Our results indicated that associative N2-fixation occurred within wild poplar and that a non-uniformity in the distribution of endophytic bacteria may explain the variability in N-fixation activity. These results point to the need for molecular studies to decipher the required microbial consortia and conditions for effective endophytic N2-fixation in trees. PMID:27196608

  1. Characterization of DWARF14 Genes in Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Kaijie; Wang, Xiaoping; Weighill, Deborah A.; ...

    2016-02-15

    Strigolactones are a new class of plant hormones regulating shoot branching and symbiotic interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Studies of branching mutants in herbaceous plants have identified several key genes involved in strigolactone biosynthesis or signaling. The strigolactone signal is perceived by a member of the α/β-fold hydrolase superfamily, known as DWARF14 (D14). However, little is known about D14 genes in the woody perennial plants. Here we report the identification of D14 homologs in the model woody plant Populus trichocarpa. We showed that there are two D14 homologs in P. trichocarpa, designated as PtD14a and PtD14b that are over 95%more » similar at the amino acid level. Expression analysis indicated that the transcript level of PtD14a is generally more abundant than that of PtD14b. However, only PtD14a was able to complement Arabidopsis d14 mutants, suggesting that PtD14a is the functional D14 ortholog. Amino acid alignment and structural modeling revealed substitutions of several highly conserved amino acids in the PtD14b protein including a phenylalanine near the catalytic triad of D14 proteins. Ultimately, we find this study lays a foundation for further characterization of strigolactone pathway and its functions in the woody perennial plants.« less

  2. Characterization of DWARF14 Genes in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Kaijie; Wang, Xiaoping; Weighill, Deborah A.; Guo, Hao-Bo; Xie, Meng; Yang, Yongil; Yang, Jun; Wang, Shucai; Jacobson, Daniel A.; Guo, Hong; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2016-02-15

    Strigolactones are a new class of plant hormones regulating shoot branching and symbiotic interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Studies of branching mutants in herbaceous plants have identified several key genes involved in strigolactone biosynthesis or signaling. The strigolactone signal is perceived by a member of the α/β-fold hydrolase superfamily, known as DWARF14 (D14). However, little is known about D14 genes in the woody perennial plants. Here we report the identification of D14 homologs in the model woody plant Populus trichocarpa. We showed that there are two D14 homologs in P. trichocarpa, designated as PtD14a and PtD14b that are over 95% similar at the amino acid level. Expression analysis indicated that the transcript level of PtD14a is generally more abundant than that of PtD14b. However, only PtD14a was able to complement Arabidopsis d14 mutants, suggesting that PtD14a is the functional D14 ortholog. Amino acid alignment and structural modeling revealed substitutions of several highly conserved amino acids in the PtD14b protein including a phenylalanine near the catalytic triad of D14 proteins. Ultimately, we find this study lays a foundation for further characterization of strigolactone pathway and its functions in the woody perennial plants.

  3. Characterization of DWARF14 Genes in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Kaijie; Wang, Xiaoping; Weighill, Deborah A.; Guo, Hao-Bo; Xie, Meng; Yang, Yongil; Yang, Jun; Wang, Shucai; Jacobson, Daniel A.; Guo, Hong; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2016-01-01

    Strigolactones are a new class of plant hormones regulating shoot branching and symbiotic interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Studies of branching mutants in herbaceous plants have identified several key genes involved in strigolactone biosynthesis or signaling. The strigolactone signal is perceived by a member of the α/β-fold hydrolase superfamily, known as DWARF14 (D14). However, little is known about D14 genes in the woody perennial plants. Here we report the identification of D14 homologs in the model woody plant Populus trichocarpa. We showed that there are two D14 homologs in P. trichocarpa, designated as PtD14a and PtD14b that are over 95% similar at the amino acid level. Expression analysis indicated that the transcript level of PtD14a is generally more abundant than that of PtD14b. However, only PtD14a was able to complement Arabidopsis d14 mutants, suggesting that PtD14a is the functional D14 ortholog. Amino acid alignment and structural modeling revealed substitutions of several highly conserved amino acids in the PtD14b protein including a phenylalanine near the catalytic triad of D14 proteins. This study lays a foundation for further characterization of strigolactone pathway and its functions in the woody perennial plants. PMID:26875827

  4. Variable Nitrogen Fixation in Wild Populus.

    PubMed

    Doty, Sharon L; Sher, Andrew W; Fleck, Neil D; Khorasani, Mahsa; Bumgarner, Roger E; Khan, Zareen; Ko, Andrew W K; Kim, Soo-Hyung; DeLuca, Thomas H

    2016-01-01

    The microbiome of plants is diverse, and like that of animals, is important for overall health and nutrient acquisition. In legumes and actinorhizal plants, a portion of essential nitrogen (N) is obtained through symbiosis with nodule-inhabiting, N2-fixing microorganisms. However, a variety of non-nodulating plant species can also thrive in natural, low-N settings. Some of these species may rely on endophytes, microorganisms that live within plants, to fix N2 gas into usable forms. Here we report the first direct evidence of N2 fixation in the early successional wild tree, Populus trichocarpa, a non-leguminous tree, from its native riparian habitat. In order to measure N2 fixation, surface-sterilized cuttings of wild poplar were assayed using both 15N2 incorporation and the commonly used acetylene reduction assay. The 15N label was incorporated at high levels in a subset of cuttings, suggesting a high level of N-fixation. Similarly, acetylene was reduced to ethylene in some samples. The microbiota of the cuttings was highly variable, both in numbers of cultured bacteria and in genetic diversity. Our results indicated that associative N2-fixation occurred within wild poplar and that a non-uniformity in the distribution of endophytic bacteria may explain the variability in N-fixation activity. These results point to the need for molecular studies to decipher the required microbial consortia and conditions for effective endophytic N2-fixation in trees.

  5. Agrobacterium-Mediated Stable Genetic Transformation of Populus angustifolia and Populus balsamifera

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Priti; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated stable genetic transformation of two species of poplar – Populus angustifolia and Populus balsamifera. The binary vector pCAMBIA-Npro-long-Luc containing the luciferase reporter gene was used to transform stem internode and axillary bud explants. Putative transformants were regenerated on selection-free medium using our previously established in vitro regeneration method. Explant type, genotype, effect of pre-culture, Agrobacterium concentration, a time period of infection and varying periods of co-culture with bacteria were tested for the transformation frequency. The highest frequency of transformation was obtained with stem internode explants pre-cultured for 2 days, infected with Agrobacterium culture at the concentration of OD600 = 0.5 for 10 min and co-cultivated with Agrobacterium for 48 h. Out of the two genotypes tested, P. balsamifera exhibited a higher transformation rate in comparison to P. angustifolia. The primary transformants that exhibited luciferase activity in a bioluminescence assay under the CCD camera when subjected to polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis revealed a stable single-copy integration of luc in their genomes. The reported protocol is highly reproducible and can be applied to other species of poplar; it will also be useful for future genetic engineering of one of the most important families of woody plants for sustainable development. PMID:27014319

  6. Defining hybrid poplar (Populus deltoides x Populus trichocarpa) tolerance to ozone: identifying key parameters.

    PubMed

    Ryan, A; Cojocariu, C; Possell, M; Davies, W J; Hewitt, C N

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether two genotypes of hybrid poplar (Populus deltoides x Populus trichocarpa), previously classified as ozone tolerant and ozone sensitive, had differing physiological and biochemical responses when fumigated with 120 nL L(-1) ozone for 6 h per day for eight consecutive days. Isoprene emission rate, ozone uptake and a number of physiological and biochemical parameters were investigated before, during and after fumigation with ozone. Previous studies have shown that isoprene protects plants against oxidative stress. Therefore, it was hypothesized that these two genotypes would differ in either their basal isoprene emission rates or in the response of isoprene to fumigation by ozone. Our results showed that the basal emission rates of isoprene, physiological responses and ozone uptake rates were all similar. However, significant differences were found in visible damage, carotenoids, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), thiobarbituric acid reactions (TBARS) and post-fumigation isoprene emission rates. It is shown that, although the classification of ozone tolerance or sensitivity had been previously clearly and carefully defined using one particular set of parameters, assessment of other key variables does not necessarily lead to the same conclusions. Thus, it may be necessary to reconsider the way in which plants are classified as ozone tolerant or sensitive.

  7. The cytoskeleton facilitates a three-dimensional symplasmic continuum in the long-lived ray and axial parenchyma cells of angiosperm trees.

    PubMed

    Chaffey, N; Barlow, P

    2001-09-01

    The microtubule (MT), microfilament (MF) and myosin components of the cytoskeleton were studied in the long-lived ray and axial parenchyma cells of the secondary xylem (wood) and secondary phloem of two angiosperm trees, Aesculus hippocastanum L. (horse-chestnut) and Populus tremula L. x P. tremuloides Michx. (hybrid aspen), using indirect immunofluorescence localisation and transmission electron microscopy. MTs and MFs were bundled and oriented axially (parallel to the cell's long axis) within all parenchyma cell types after they had fully differentiated. Additionally, actin and myosin were immunolocalised at the thin-walled membranes of the pits, which linked cells in neighbouring files of both ray and axial parenchyma, and at the pits between axial and ray parenchyma cells themselves. Anti-callose antibody immunolocated the plasmodesmata at the pit membranes, and in the same pattern as that of anti-myosin. Ray cells are important symplasmic pathways between the xylem and the phloem throughout the life of trees. We hypothesise that the MT and MF components of the cytoskeleton in the ray and axial parenchyma cells are involved in the transport of materials within those cells, and, in association with the acto-myosin of plasmodesmata at pit fields, are also important in intercellular transport. Thus, the symplasmic coupling between ray cells, between axial parenchyma cells, and between axial parenchyma and ray cells represents an extensive three-dimensional communication pathway permeating the tree from the phloem through the cambium into the wood. We suggest that this cytoskeletal pathway has an important role in delivery of photosynthate, and mobilised reserves, to the actively dividing cambium, and in the movement of materials to sites of reserve deposition, principally within the wood. This pathway could also have an important role in co-ordinating developmental processes throughout the tree.

  8. [Morphological analysis of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the PnEXPA3 gene of black poplar (Populus nigra)].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Safiullina, M G; Kniazev, A V; Chemeris, A V

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the PnEXPA3 gene of black poplar (Populus nigra), which encodes alpha-expansin, were obtained. The transgenic plants were characterized by increased size of epidermic and mesophyll cells of leaves. However, the size of leaves remained normal. Overexpression of the PnEXPA3 gene provided stimulatory effect only on the stem length. Other morphological traits of the transgenic plants remained unchanged.

  9. Evolutionary Quantitative Genomics of Populus trichocarpa

    PubMed Central

    McKown, Athena D.; La Mantia, Jonathan; Guy, Robert D.; Ingvarsson, Pär K.; Hamelin, Richard; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Ehlting, Jürgen; Douglas, Carl J.; El-Kassaby, Yousry A.

    2015-01-01

    Forest trees generally show high levels of local adaptation and efforts focusing on understanding adaptation to climate will be crucial for species survival and management. Here, we address fundamental questions regarding the molecular basis of adaptation in undomesticated forest tree populations to past climatic environments by employing an integrative quantitative genetics and landscape genomics approach. Using this comprehensive approach, we studied the molecular basis of climate adaptation in 433 Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood) genotypes originating across western North America. Variation in 74 field-assessed traits (growth, ecophysiology, phenology, leaf stomata, wood, and disease resistance) was investigated for signatures of selection (comparing QST -FST) using clustering of individuals by climate of origin (temperature and precipitation). 29,354 SNPs were investigated employing three different outlier detection methods and marker-inferred relatedness was estimated to obtain the narrow-sense estimate of population differentiation in wild populations. In addition, we compared our results with previously assessed selection of candidate SNPs using the 25 topographical units (drainages) across the P. trichocarpa sampling range as population groupings. Narrow-sense QST for 53% of distinct field traits was significantly divergent from expectations of neutrality (indicating adaptive trait variation); 2,855 SNPs showed signals of diversifying selection and of these, 118 SNPs (within 81 genes) were associated with adaptive traits (based on significant QST). Many SNPs were putatively pleiotropic for functionally uncorrelated adaptive traits, such as autumn phenology, height, and disease resistance. Evolutionary quantitative genomics in P. trichocarpa provides an enhanced understanding regarding the molecular basis of climate-driven selection in forest trees and we highlight that important loci underlying adaptive trait variation also show relationship to

  10. Evolutionary Quantitative Genomics of Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Porth, Ilga; Klápště, Jaroslav; McKown, Athena D; La Mantia, Jonathan; Guy, Robert D; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Hamelin, Richard; Mansfield, Shawn D; Ehlting, Jürgen; Douglas, Carl J; El-Kassaby, Yousry A

    2015-01-01

    Forest trees generally show high levels of local adaptation and efforts focusing on understanding adaptation to climate will be crucial for species survival and management. Here, we address fundamental questions regarding the molecular basis of adaptation in undomesticated forest tree populations to past climatic environments by employing an integrative quantitative genetics and landscape genomics approach. Using this comprehensive approach, we studied the molecular basis of climate adaptation in 433 Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood) genotypes originating across western North America. Variation in 74 field-assessed traits (growth, ecophysiology, phenology, leaf stomata, wood, and disease resistance) was investigated for signatures of selection (comparing QST-FST) using clustering of individuals by climate of origin (temperature and precipitation). 29,354 SNPs were investigated employing three different outlier detection methods and marker-inferred relatedness was estimated to obtain the narrow-sense estimate of population differentiation in wild populations. In addition, we compared our results with previously assessed selection of candidate SNPs using the 25 topographical units (drainages) across the P. trichocarpa sampling range as population groupings. Narrow-sense QST for 53% of distinct field traits was significantly divergent from expectations of neutrality (indicating adaptive trait variation); 2,855 SNPs showed signals of diversifying selection and of these, 118 SNPs (within 81 genes) were associated with adaptive traits (based on significant QST). Many SNPs were putatively pleiotropic for functionally uncorrelated adaptive traits, such as autumn phenology, height, and disease resistance. Evolutionary quantitative genomics in P. trichocarpa provides an enhanced understanding regarding the molecular basis of climate-driven selection in forest trees and we highlight that important loci underlying adaptive trait variation also show relationship to climate

  11. Molecular linkage maps of the Populus genome.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tongming; Zhang, Xinye; Huang, Minren; Wang, Minxiu; Zhuge, Qiang; Tu, Shengming; Zhu, Li-Huang; Wu, Rongling

    2002-06-01

    We report molecular genetic linkage maps for an interspecific hybrid population of Populus, a model system in forest-tree biology. The hybrids were produced by crosses between P. deltoides (mother) and P. euramericana (father), which is a natural hybrid of P. deltoides (grandmother) and P. nigra (grandfather). Linkage analysis from 93 of the 450 backcross progeny grown in the field for 15 years was performed using random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs), amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), and inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSRs). Of a total of 839 polymorphic markers identified, 560 (67%) were testcross markers heterozygous in one parent but null in the other (segregating 1:1), 206 (25%) were intercross dominant markers heterozygous in both parents (segregating 3:1), and the remaining 73 (9%) were 19 non-parental RAPD markers (segregating 1:1) and 54 codominant AFLP markers (segregating 1:1:1:1). A mixed set of the testcross markers, non-parental RAPD markers, and codominant AFLP markers was used to construct two linkage maps, one based on the P. deltoides (D) genome and the other based on P. euramericana (E). The two maps showed nearly complete coverage of the genome, spanning 3801 and 3452 cM, respectively. The availability of non-parental RAPD and codominant AFLP markers as orthologous genes allowed for a direct comparison of the rate of meiotic recombination between the two different parental species. Generally, the rate of meiotic recombination was greater for males than females in our interspecific poplar hybrids. The confounded effect of sexes and species causes the mean recombination distance of orthologous markers to be 11% longer for the father (P. euramericana; interspecific hybrid) than for the mother (P. deltoides; pure species). The linkage maps constructed and the interspecific poplar hybrid population in which clonal replicates for individual genotypes are available present a comprehensive foundation for future genomic studies and

  12. Lignin content in natural Populus variants affects sugar release

    PubMed Central

    Studer, Michael H.; DeMartini, Jaclyn D.; Davis, Mark F.; Sykes, Robert W.; Davison, Brian; Keller, Martin; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Wyman, Charles E.

    2011-01-01

    The primary obstacle to producing renewable fuels from lignocellulosic biomass is a plant's recalcitrance to releasing sugars bound in the cell wall. From a sample set of wood cores representing 1,100 individual undomesticated Populus trichocarpa trees, 47 extreme phenotypes were selected across measured lignin content and ratio of syringyl and guaiacyl units (S/G ratio). This subset was tested for total sugar release through enzymatic hydrolysis alone as well as through combined hot-water pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis using a high-throughput screening method. The total amount of glucan and xylan released varied widely among samples, with total sugar yields of up to 92% of the theoretical maximum. A strong negative correlation between sugar release and lignin content was only found for pretreated samples with an S/G ratio < 2.0. For higher S/G ratios, sugar release was generally higher, and the negative influence of lignin was less pronounced. When examined separately, only glucose release was correlated with lignin content and S/G ratio in this manner, whereas xylose release depended on the S/G ratio alone. For enzymatic hydrolysis without pretreatment, sugar release increased significantly with decreasing lignin content below 20%, irrespective of the S/G ratio. Furthermore, certain samples featuring average lignin content and S/G ratios exhibited exceptional sugar release. These facts suggest that factors beyond lignin and S/G ratio influence recalcitrance to sugar release and point to a critical need for deeper understanding of cell-wall structure before plants can be rationally engineered for reduced recalcitrance and efficient biofuels production. PMID:21444820

  13. Salt stress induces the formation of a novel type of 'pressure wood' in two Populus species.

    PubMed

    Janz, Dennis; Lautner, Silke; Wildhagen, Henning; Behnke, Katja; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Rennenberg, Heinz; Fromm, Jörg; Polle, Andrea

    2012-04-01

    • Salinity causes osmotic stress and limits biomass production of plants. The goal of this study was to investigate mechanisms underlying hydraulic adaptation to salinity. • Anatomical, ecophysiological and transcriptional responses to salinity were investigated in the xylem of a salt-sensitive (Populus × canescens) and a salt-tolerant species (Populus euphratica). • Moderate salt stress, which suppressed but did not abolish photosynthesis and radial growth in P. × canescens, resulted in hydraulic adaptation by increased vessel frequencies and decreased vessel lumina. Transcript abundances of a suite of genes (FLA, COB-like, BAM, XET, etc.) previously shown to be activated during tension wood formation, were collectively suppressed in developing xylem, whereas those for stress and defense-related genes increased. A subset of cell wall-related genes was also suppressed in salt-exposed P. euphratica, although this species largely excluded sodium and showed no anatomical alterations. Salt exposure influenced cell wall composition involving increases in the lignin : carbohydrate ratio in both species. • In conclusion, hydraulic stress adaptation involves cell wall modifications reciprocal to tension wood formation that result in the formation of a novel type of reaction wood in upright stems named 'pressure wood'. Our data suggest that transcriptional co-regulation of a core set of genes determines reaction wood composition.

  14. Genomics of Secondary Metabolism in Populus: Interactions with Biotic and Abiotic Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.; Liu, C.; Tschaplinski, T. J.; Zhao, N.

    2009-09-01

    Populus trees face constant challenges from the environment during their life cycle. To ensure their survival and reproduction, Populus trees deploy various types of defenses, one of which is the production of a myriad of secondary metabolites. Compounds derived from the shikimate-phenylpropanoid pathway are the most abundant class of secondary metabolites synthesized in Populus. Among other major classes of secondary metabolites in Populus are terpenoids and fatty acid-derivatives. Some of the secondary metabolites made by Populus trees have been functionally characterized. Some others have been associated with certain biological/ecological processes, such as defense against insects and microbial pathogens or acclimation or adaptation to abiotic stresses. Functions of many Populus secondary metabolites remain unclear. The advent of various novel genomic tools will enable us to explore in greater detail the complexity of secondary metabolism in Populus. Detailed data mining of the Populus genome sequence can unveil candidate genes of secondary metabolism. Metabolomic analysis will continue to identify new metabolites synthesized in Populus. Integrated genomics that combines various 'omics' tools will prove to be the most powerful approach in revealing the molecular and biochemical basis underlying the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in Populus. Characterization of the biological/ecological functions of secondary metabolites as well as their biosynthesis will provide knowledge and tools for genetically engineering the production of seconday metabolites that can lead to the generation of novel, improved Populus varieties.

  15. Genome structure and primitive sex chromosome revealed in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Yin, Tongming; Gunter, Lee E; Blaudez, D

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a comprehensive genetic map for Populus and ordered 332 Mb of sequence scaffolds along the 19 haploid chromosomes in order to compare chromosomal regions among diverse members of the genus. These efforts lead us to conclude that chromosome XIX in Populus is evolving into a sex chromosome. Consistent segregation distortion in favor of the sub-genera Tacamahaca alleles provided evidence of divergent selection among species, particularly at the proximal end of chromosome XIX. A large microsatellite marker (SSR) cluster was detected in the distorted region even though the genome-wide distribute SSR sites was uniform across the physical map. The differences between the genetic map and physical sequence data suggested recombination suppression was occurring in the distorted region. A gender-determination locus and an overabundance of NBS-LRR genes were also co-located to the distorted region and were put forth as the cause for divergent selection and recombination suppression. This hypothesis was verified by using fine-scale mapping of an integrated scaffold in the vicinity of the gender-determination locus. As such it appears that chromosome XIX in Populus is in the process of evolving from an autosome into a sex chromosome and that NBS-LRR genes may play important role in the chromosomal diversification process in Populus.

  16. Successful grafting in poplar species (Populus spp.) breeding

    Treesearch

    A. Assibi Mahama; Brian Sparks; Ronald S., Zalesny; Richard B. Hall

    2006-01-01

    Poor rooting of Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh hardwood cuttings often has contributed to delays in breeding progress as a result of failures of scion wood before and/or after pollination. Seventeen clones were used, and the study was conducted in the greenhouse to test an "intervenous feeding" (IV) method, along with three different...

  17. Creation and genomic analysis of irradiation hybrids in Populus

    Treesearch

    Matthew S. Zinkgraf; K. Haiby; M.C. Lieberman; L. Comai; I.M. Henry; Andrew Groover

    2016-01-01

    Establishing efficient functional genomic systems for creating and characterizing genetic variation in forest trees is challenging. Here we describe protocols for creating novel gene-dosage variation in Populus through gamma-irradiation of pollen, followed by genomic analysis to identify chromosomal regions that have been deleted or inserted in...

  18. Drought induces alterations in the stomatal development program in Populus.

    PubMed

    Hamanishi, Erin T; Thomas, Barb R; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2012-08-01

    Much is known about the physiological control of stomatal aperture as a means by which plants adjust to water availability. By contrast, the role played by the modulation of stomatal development to limit water loss has received much less attention. The control of stomatal development in response to water deprivation in the genus Populus is explored here. Drought induced declines in stomatal conductance as well as an alteration in stomatal development in two genotypes of Populus balsamifera. Leaves that developed under water-deficit conditions had lower stomatal indices than leaves that developed under well-watered conditions. Transcript abundance of genes that could hypothetically underpin drought-responsive changes in stomatal development was examined, in two genotypes, across six time points, under two conditions, well-watered and with water deficit. Populus homologues of STOMAGEN, ERECTA (ER), STOMATA DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION 1 (SDD1), and FAMA had variable transcript abundance patterns congruent with their role in the modulation of stomatal development in response to drought. Conversely, there was no significant variation in transcript abundance between genotypes or treatments for the Populus homologues of YODA (YDA) and TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM). The findings highlight the role that could be played by stomatal development during leaf expansion as a longer term means by which to limit water loss from leaves. Moreover, the results point to the key roles played by the regulation of the homologues of STOMAGEN, ER, SDD1, and FAMA in the control of this response in poplar.

  19. Herbicide Trials in Intensively Cultured Populus Plantations in Northern Wisconsin

    Treesearch

    Daniel A. Netzer; Nonan V. Noste

    1978-01-01

    Populus had good survival and growth when planting sites had been treated with linuron, a pre-emergent herbicide, alone or in combination with paraquat, a post-emergent herbicide. the herbicide treatments that are most effective in intensive culture are discussed.

  20. Micropropagation, genetic engineering, and molecular biology of Populus

    Treesearch

    N. B. Klopfenstein; Y. W. Chun; M. -S. Kim; M. A. Ahuja; M. C. Dillon; R. C. Carman; L. G. Eskew

    1997-01-01

    Thirty-four Populus biotechnology chapters, written by 85 authors, are comprised in 5 sections: 1) in vitro culture (micropropagation, somatic embryogenesis, protoplasts, somaclonal variation, and germplasm preservation); 2) transformation and foreign gene expression; 3) molecular biology (molecular/genetic characterization); 4) biotic and abiotic resistance (disease,...

  1. Shoot Morphogenesis Associated With Flowering in Populus deltoides (Salicaceae)

    Treesearch

    Cetin Yuceer; Samuel B. Land; Mark E. Kubiske; Richard L. Harkess

    2003-01-01

    Temporal and spatial formation and differentiation of axillary buds in developing shoots of mature eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides) were investigated. Shoots sequentially initiate early vegetative, floral, and late vegetative buds. Associated with these buds is the formation of three distinct leaf types. In May of the first growing season, the...

  2. The genome of black cottonwood, Populus trichocarpa (Torr. & Gray)

    Treesearch

    G.A. Tuskan; S. DiFazio; S. Jansson; J. Bohlmann; I. Grigoriev; U. Hellsten; N. Putnam; S. Ralph; S. Rombauts; A. Salamov; J. Schein; L. Sterck; A. Aerts; R.R. Bhalerao; R.P. Bhalerao; D. Blaudez; W. Boerjan; A. Brun; A. Brunner; V. Busov; M. Campbell; J. Carlson; M. Chalot; J. Chapman; G.-L. Chen; D. Cooper; P.M. Coutinho; J. Couturier; S. Covert; Q. Cronk; R. Cunningham; J. Davis; S. Degroeve; A. Dejardin; C. dePamphilis; J. Detter; B. Dirks; U. Dubchak; S. Duplessis; J. Ehlting; B. Ellis; K. Gendler; D. Goodstein; M. Gribskov; J. Grimwood; A. Groover; L. Gunter; B. Hamberger; B. Heinze; Y. Helariutta; B. Henrissat; D. Holligan; R. Holt; W. Huang; N. Islam-Faridi; S. Jones; M. Jones-Rhoades; R. Jorgensen; C. Joshi; J. Kangasjarvi; J. Karlsson; C. Kelleher; R. Kirkpatrick; M. Kirst; A. Kohler; U. Kalluri; F. Larimer; J. Leebens-Mack; J.-C. Leple; P. Locascio; Y. Lou; S. Lucas; F. Martin; B. Montanini; C. Napoli; D.R. Nelson; C. Nelson; K. Nieminen; O. Nilsson; V. Pereda; G. Peter; R. Philippe; G. Pilate; A. Poliakov; J. Razumovskaya; P. Richardson; C. Rinaldi; K. Ritland; P. Rouze; D. Ryaboy; J. Schumtz; J. Schrader; B. Segerman; H. Shin; A. Siddiqui; F. Sterky; A. Terry; C.-J. Tsai; E. Uberbacher; P. Unneberg; J. Vahala; K. Wall; S. Wessler; G. Yang; T. Yin; C. Douglas; M. Marra; G. Sandberg; Y. Van de Peer; D. Rokhsar

    2006-01-01

    We report the draft genome of the black cottonwood tree, Populus trichocarpa. Integration of shotgun sequence assembly with genetic mapping enabled chromosome-scale reconstruction of the genome. More than 45,000 putative protein-coding genes were identified. Analysis of the assembled genome revealed a whole-genome duplication event; about 8000 pairs...

  3. Fine root dynamics in a developing Populus deltoides plantation

    Treesearch

    Christel C. Kern; Alexander L. Friend; Jane M.-F. Johnson; Mark D. Coleman

    2004-01-01

    A closely spaced (1 x 1 m) cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) plantation was established to evaluate the effects of nutrient availability on fine root dynamics. Slow-release fertilizer (17:6:12 N,P,K plus micronutrients) was applied to 225-m2 plots at 0,50,10O and 200 kg N ha-1, and plots were...

  4. Fine root dynamics in a developing Populus deltoides plantation

    Treesearch

    Christel C. Kern; Alexander L. Friend; Jane M. Johnson; Mark D. Coleman

    2004-01-01

    A closely spaced (1 x 1 m) cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) platation was established to evaluate the effects of nutrient availability on fine root dynamics. Slow-release fertilizer (17:6:12 N,P,K plus micronutrients) was applied to 225-m2 plots at 0, 50, 100, 200 kg N ha-1, and plots were monitored...

  5. Pathogenicity of Cytospora, Phomopsis, and Hypomyces on Populus deltoides

    Treesearch

    T. H. Filer

    1967-01-01

    Cytospora chrysosperma, Phomopsis macrospora, and Hypomyces solani are pathogenic on cottonwood (Populus deltoides). These canker-causing fungi were most virulent in November, when rains were frequent and temperatures were between 20 and 30 C. Trees growing on an unfavorable site were more susceptible to

  6. Comparative interrogation of the developing xylem transcriptomes of two wood-forming species: Populus trichocarpa and Eucalyptus grandis.

    PubMed

    Hefer, Charles A; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Myburg, Alexander A; Douglas, Carl J; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2015-06-01

    Wood formation is a complex developmental process governed by genetic and environmental stimuli. Populus and Eucalyptus are fast-growing, high-yielding tree genera that represent ecologically and economically important species suitable for generating significant lignocellulosic biomass. Comparative analysis of the developing xylem and leaf transcriptomes of Populus trichocarpa and Eucalyptus grandis together with phylogenetic analyses identified clusters of homologous genes preferentially expressed during xylem formation in both species. A conserved set of 336 single gene pairs showed highly similar xylem preferential expression patterns, as well as evidence of high functional constraint. Individual members of multi-gene orthologous clusters known to be involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis also showed conserved xylem expression profiles. However, species-specific expression as well as opposite (xylem versus leaf) expression patterns observed for a subset of genes suggest subtle differences in the transcriptional regulation important for xylem development in each species. Using sequence similarity and gene expression status, we identified functional homologs likely to be involved in xylem developmental and biosynthetic processes in Populus and Eucalyptus. Our study suggests that, while genes involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis show high levels of gene expression conservation, differential regulation of some xylem development genes may give rise to unique xylem properties.

  7. Suppression of PtrDUF579-3 Expression Causes Structural Changes of the Glucuronoxylan in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dongliang; Gui, Jinshan; Liu, Chenchen; Sun, Jiayan; Li, Laigeng

    2016-01-01

    DUF579 (domain unknown function 579) genes have been reported to play diverse roles in cell wall biosynthesis, such as in glucuronoxylan (GX) synthesis. As GX is a major type of hemicelluloses in hard wood species, how DUF579 genes function in wood formation remains to be demonstrated in planta. This study reports a Populus DUF579 gene, PtrDUF579-3, which is characterized for its function in wood cell wall formation. PtrDUF579-3 is localized in Golgi apparatus and catalyzes methylation of the glucuronic acid (GlcA) in GX biosynthesis. Suppression of PtrDUF579-3 expression in Populus caused a reduction in both the GlcA side chain number and GlcA side chain methylation on the GX backbone. The modified GX polymer through PtrDUF579-3 suppression was more susceptible to acid treatment and the PtrDUF579-3 suppressed plants displayed enhanced cellulose digestibility. These results suggest that PtrDUF579-3 is involved in GX biosynthesis and GX structure can be modified through PtrDUF579-3 suppression in Populus. PMID:27148318

  8. Differential Detection of Genetic Loci Underlying Stem and Root Lignin Content in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Tongming; Zhang, Xinye; Gunter, Lee E; Ranjan, Priya; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Dr. Mark F.; Wullschleger, Stan D; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we established a comprehensive genetic map with a large number of progeny from a three-generation hybrid Populus intercross, and phenotyped the lignin content, S/G ratio and 28 cell wall subcomponents both in stems and roots for the mapping individuals. Phenotypic analysis revealed that lignin content and syringyl-to-guaiacyl (S/G) ratio using pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectroscopy (pyMBMS) varied among mapping individuals. Phenotypic analysis revealed that stem lignin content is significantly higher than that in root and the quantified traits can be classified into four distinct groups, with strong correlations observed among components within organs. Altogether, 179 coordinating QTLs were detected, and they were co-localized into 49 genetic loci, 27 of which appear to be pleiotropic. Many of the detected genetic loci were detected differentially in stem and root. This is the first report of separate genetic loci controlling cell wall phenotypes above and below ground. These results suggest that it may be possible to modify lignin content and composition via breed and/or engineer as a means of simultaneously improving Populus for cellulosic ethanol production and carbon sequestration.

  9. Differential detection of genetic loci underlying stem and root lignin content in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Yin, Tongming; Zhang, Xinye; Gunter, Lee E; Ranjan, Priya; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Dr. Mark F.; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2010-11-01

    For simultaneous applications directed towards improved pulp yields, enhanced bioethanol production and increased carbon sequestration, it would be desirable to reduce lignin in the harvested stem while increasing the lignin content in nonharvested roots. In this study, we established a comprehensive genetic map with a large number of progeny from a three-generation hybrid Populus intercross, and phenotyped the lignin content, S/G ratio and 28 cell wall subcomponents both in stems and roots for the mapping individuals. Phenotypic analysis revealed that lignin content and syringyl-to-guaiacyl (S/G) ratio using pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectroscopy (pyMBMS) varied among mapping individuals. Phenotypic analysis revealed that stem lignin content is significantly higher than that in root and the quantified traits can be classified into four distinct groups, with strong correlations observed among components within organs. Altogether, 179 coordinating QTLs were detected, and they were co-localized into 49 genetic loci, 27 of which appear to be pleiotropic. Many of the detected genetic loci were detected differentially in stem and root. This is the first report of separate genetic loci controlling cell wall phenotypes above and below ground. These results suggest that it may be possible to modify lignin content and composition via breed and/or engineer as a means of simultaneously improving Populus for cellulosic ethanol production and carbon sequestration.

  10. Natural acetylation impacts carbohydrate recovery during deconstruction of Populus trichocarpa wood

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Amanda M.; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; ...

    2017-02-23

    Significant variation in the inherent degree of acetylation naturally exists in the xylem cell walls of Populus trichocarpa. During pretreatment, endogenous acetate hydrolyzes to acetic acid that can subsequently catalyze the breakdown of poplar wood, increasing the efficiency of biomass pretreatment. Poplar genotypes varying in cell wall composition were pretreated in 0.3% H2SO4 in non-isothermal batch reactors. Acetic acid released from the wood was positively related to sugar release during pretreatment (R ≥ 0.9), and inversely proportional to the lignin content of the poplar wood (R = 0.6). There is significant variation in wood chemistry among P. trichocarpa genotypes. Asmore » a result, this study elucidated patterns of cell wall deconstruction and clearly links carbohydrate solubilization to acetate release. Tailoring biomass feedstocks for acetate release could enhance pretreatment efficiencies.« less

  11. Isolation and expression analysis of low temperature-induced genes in white poplar (Populus alba).

    PubMed

    Maestrini, Pierluigi; Cavallini, Andrea; Rizzo, Milena; Giordani, Tommaso; Bernardi, Rodolfo; Durante, Mauro; Natali, Lucia

    2009-09-15

    Poplar is an important crop and a model system to understand molecular processes of growth, development and responses to environmental stimuli in trees. In this study, we analyzed gene expression in white poplar (Populus alba) plants subjected to chilling. Two forward suppression-subtractive-hybridization libraries were constructed from P. alba plants exposed to low non-freezing temperature for 6 or 48h. Hundred and sixty-two cDNAs, 54 from the 6-h library and 108 from the 48-h library, were obtained. Isolated genes belonged to six categories of genes, specifically those that: (i) encode stress and defense proteins; (ii) are involved in signal transduction; (iii) are related to regulation of gene expression; (iv) encode proteins involved in cell cycle and DNA processing; (v) encode proteins involved in metabolism and energetic processes; and (vi) are involved in protein fate. Different expression patterns at 3, 6, 12, 24, 48h at 4 degrees C and after a recovery of 24h at 20 degrees C were observed for isolated genes, as expected according to the class in which the gene putatively belongs. Forty-four of 162 genes contained DRE/LTRE cis-elements in the 5' proximal promoter of their orthologs in Populus trichocarpa, suggesting that they putatively belong to the CBF regulon. The results contribute new data to the list of possible candidate genes involved in cold response in poplar.

  12. Methylation of miRNA genes in the response to temperature stress in Populus simonii

    PubMed Central

    Ci, Dong; Song, Yuepeng; Tian, Min; Zhang, Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation and miRNAs provide crucial regulation of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional responses to abiotic stress. In this study, we used methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphisms to identify 1066 sites that were differentially methylated in response to temperature stress in Populus simonii. Among these loci, BLAST searches of miRBase identified seven miRNA genes. Expression analysis by quantitative real-time PCR suggested that the methylation pattern of these miRNA genes probably influences their expression. Annotation of these miRNA genes in the sequenced genome of Populus trichocarpa found three target genes (Potri.007G090400, Potri.014G042200, and Potri.010G176000) for the miRNAs produced from five genes (Ptc-MIR396e and g, Ptc-MIR156i and j, and Ptc-MIR390c) respectively. The products of these target genes function in lipid metabolism to deplete lipid peroxide. We also constructed a network based on the interactions between DNA methylation and miRNAs, miRNAs and target genes, and the products of target genes and the metabolic factors that they affect, including H2O2, malondialdehyde, catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase. Our results suggested that DNA methylation probably regulates the expression of miRNA genes, thus affecting expression of their target genes, likely through the gene-silencing function of miRNAs, to maintain cell survival under abiotic stress conditions. PMID:26579167

  13. Fractionation of alkali-solubilized hemicelluloses from delignified Populus gansuensis: structure and properties.

    PubMed

    Peng, Feng; Ren, Jun-Li; Xu, Feng; Bian, Jing; Peng, Pai; Sun, Run-Cang

    2010-05-12

    The dewaxed cell walls of Populus gansuensis were delignified with NaClO(2) and then sequentially extracted with 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 M KOH under a solid to liquid ratio of 1: 25 (g mL(-1)) at 25 degrees C for 10 h. The successive treatments together resulted in the dissolution of 83.7% of original hemicelluloses. The solubilized hemicellulosic fractions were further fractionated into six hemicellulosic subfractions by an iodine-complex precipitation technique. Their chemical and physical characteristics were determined by HPAEC, GPC, FT-IR, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Neutral sugar composition and molecular weight analysis showed that, for each extract, the hemicellulosic subfractions that precipitated with aqueous potassium iodide-iodine had lower overall uronic acid/xylose (Uro/Xyl) ratios and higher molecular weights (M(w)) than those remaining in the solution. FT-IR, (1)H, and (13)C NMR spectroscopy analysis indicated that the alkali-soluble hemicelluloses of Populus gansuensis had a structure composed of the (1 --> 4)-linked beta-D-xylopyranosyl backbone with 4-O-methyl-alpha-D-glucuronic acid attached to O-2 of the xylose residues.

  14. Ultra-structural organisation of cell wall polymers in normal and tension wood of aspen revealed by polarisation FTIR microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Anne-Mari; Bjurhager, Ingela; Gerber, Lorenz; Sundberg, Björn; Salmén, Lennart

    2011-06-01

    Polarisation Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) microspectroscopy was used to characterize the organisation and orientation of wood polymers in normal wood and tension wood from hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides). It is shown that both xylan and lignin in normal wood are highly oriented in the fibre wall. Their orientation is parallel with the cellulose microfibrils and hence in the direction of the fibre axis. In tension wood a similar orientation of lignin was found. However, in tension wood absorption peaks normally assigned to xylan exhibited a 90° change in the orientation dependence of the vibrations as compared with normal wood. The molecular origin of these vibrations are not known, but they are abundant enough to mask the orientation dependence of the xylan signal from the S₂ layer in tension wood and could possibly come from other pentose sugars present in, or associated with, the gelatinous layer of tension wood fibres.

  15. The Populus homeobox gene ARBORKNOX1 reveals overlapping mechanisms regulating the shoot apical meristem and the vascular cambium.

    PubMed

    Groover, Andrew T; Mansfield, Shawn D; DiFazio, Stephen P; Dupper, Gayle; Fontana, Joseph R; Millar, Ryan; Wang, Yvonne

    2006-08-01

    Secondary growth is supported by a dividing population of meristematic cells within the vascular cambium whose daughter cells are recruited to differentiate within secondary phloem and xylem tissues. We cloned a Populus Class 1 KNOX homeobox gene, ARBORKNOX1 (ARK1), which is orthologous to Arabidopsis SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM). ARK1 is expressed in the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and the vascular cambium, and is down-regulated in the terminally differentiated cells of leaves and secondary vascular tissues that are derived from these meristems. Transformation of Populus with either ARK1 or STM over-expression constructs results in similar morphological phenotypes characterized by inhibition of the differentiation of leaves, internode elongation, and secondary vascular cell types in stems. Microarray analysis showed that 41% of genes up-regulated in the stems of ARK1 over-expressing plants encode proteins involved in extracellular matrix synthesis or modification, including proteins involved in cell identity and signaling, cell adhesion, or cell differentiation. These gene expression differences are reflected in alterations of cell wall biochemistry and lignin composition in ARK1 over-expressing plants. Our results suggest that ARK1 has a complex mode of action that may include regulating cell fates through modification of the extracellular matrix. Our findings support the hypothesis that the SAM and vascular cambium are regulated by overlapping genetic programs.

  16. Elucidating the Structural Changes to Populus Lignin during Consolidated Bioprocessing with Clostridium thermocellum

    DOE PAGES

    Akinosho, Hannah O.; Yoo, Chang Geun; Dumitrache, Alexandru; ...

    2017-07-20

    During consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), Clostridium thermocellum hydrolyzes several plant cell wall components. Cellulose hydrolysis, specifically, liberates sugars for fermentation, which generates ethanol, acetate, hydrogen, and other products. While several studies indicate that C. thermocellum hydrolyzes carbohydrates in biomass, the structural changes to lignin during CBP remain unclear. In this paper, the whole plant cell walls of untreated and C. thermocellum-treated Populus trichocarpa were characterized using NMR and FTIR. The results suggest that C. thermocellum reduces the β-O-4 linkage content and increases the lignin S/G ratio. Finally, this investigation indicates that C. thermocellum not only modifies lignin in order to accessmore » cellulose but also leaves behind a suitable lignin substrate for value-added applications in the cellulosic ethanol production scheme.« less

  17. Increasing the productivity of short-rotation Populus plantations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeBell, D.S.; Harrington, C.A.; Clendenen, G.W.; Radwan, M.A.; Zasada, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    This final report represents the culmination of eight years of biological research devoted to increasing the productivity of short rotation plantations of Populus trichocarpa and Populus hybrids in the Pacific Northwest. Studies provide an understanding of tree growth, stand development and biomass yield at various spacings, and how patterns differ by Populus clone in monoclonal and polyclonal plantings. Also included is some information about factors related to wind damage in Populus plantings, use of leaf size as a predictor of growth potential, and approaches for estimating tree and stand biomass and biomass growth. Seven research papers are included which provide detailed methods, results, and interpretations on these topics.

  18. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling reveals molecular signatures of secondary xylem differentiation in Populus tomentosa.

    PubMed

    Yang, X H; Li, X G; Li, B L; Zhang, D Q

    2014-11-11

    Wood formation occurs via cell division, primary cell wall and secondary wall formation, and programmed cell death in the vascular cambium. Transcriptional profiling of secondary xylem differentiation is essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying wood formation. Differential gene expression in secondary xylem differentiation of Populus has been previously investigated using cDNA microarray analysis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms from a genome-wide perspective. In this study, the Affymetrix poplar genome chips containing 61,413 probes were used to investigate the changes in the transcriptome during secondary xylem differentiation in Chinese white poplar (Populus tomentosa). Two xylem tissues (newly formed and lignified) were sampled for genome-wide transcriptional profiling. In total, 6843 genes (~11%) were identified with differential expression in the two xylem tissues. Many genes involved in cell division, primary wall modification, and cellulose synthesis were preferentially expressed in the newly formed xylem. In contrast, many genes, including 4-coumarate:cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), and caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT), associated with lignin biosynthesis were more transcribed in the lignified xylem. The two xylem tissues also showed differential expression of genes related to various hormones; thus, the secondary xylem differentiation could be regulated by hormone signaling. Furthermore, many transcription factor genes were preferentially expressed in the lignified xylem, suggesting that wood lignification involves extensive transcription regulation. The genome-wide transcriptional profiling of secondary xylem differentiation could provide additional insights into the molecular basis of wood formation in poplar species.

  19. Downregulation of GAUT12 in Populus deltoides by RNA silencing results in reduced recalcitrance, increased growth and reduced xylan and pectin in a woody biofuel feedstock

    DOE PAGES

    Biswal, Ajaya K.; Hao, Zhangying; Pattathil, Sivakumar; ...

    2015-03-12

    Background The inherent recalcitrance of woody bioenergy feedstocks is a major challenge for their use as a source of second-generation biofuel. Secondary cell walls that constitute the majority of hardwood biomass are rich in cellulose, xylan, and lignin. The interactions among these polymers prevent facile accessibility and deconstruction by enzymes and chemicals. Plant biomass that can with minimal pretreatment be degraded into sugars is required to produce renewable biofuels in a cost-effective manner. Results GAUT12/IRX8 is a putative glycosyltransferase proposed to be involved in secondary cell wall glucuronoxylan and/or pectin biosynthesis based on concomitant reductions of both xylan and themore » pectin homogalacturonan (HG) in Arabidopsis irx8 mutants. Two GAUT12 homologs exist in Populus trichocarpa, PtGAUT12.1 and PtGAUT12.2. Knockdown expression of both genes simultaneously has been shown to reduce xylan content in Populus wood. We tested the proposition that RNA interference (RNAi) downregulation of GAUT12.1 alone would lead to increased sugar release in Populus wood, that is, reduced recalcitrance, based on the hypothesis that GAUT12 synthesizes a wall structure required for deposition of xylan and that cell walls with less xylan and/or modified cell wall architecture would have reduced recalcitrance. Using an RNAi approach, we generated 11 Populus deltoides transgenic lines with 50 to 67% reduced PdGAUT12.1 transcript expression compared to wild type (WT) and vector controls. Ten of the eleven RNAi lines yielded 4 to 8% greater glucose release upon enzymatic saccharification than the controls. The PdGAUT12.1 knockdown (PdGAUT12.1-KD) lines also displayed 12 to 52% and 12 to 44% increased plant height and radial stem diameter, respectively, compared to the controls. Knockdown of PdGAUT12.1 resulted in a 25 to 47% reduction in galacturonic acid and 17 to 30% reduction in xylose without affecting total lignin content, revealing that in Populus wood

  20. Stable transformation of Populus and incorporation of pest resistance by electric discharge particle acceleration.

    PubMed

    McCown, B H; McCabe, D E; Russell, D R; Robison, D J; Barton, K A; Raffa, K F

    1991-02-01

    Three different target tissues (protoplast-derived cells, nodules, and stems) and two unrelated hybrid genotypes of Populus (P. alba x P. grandidentata 'Crandon' and P. nigra 'Betulifolia' x P. trichocarpa) have been stably transformed by electric discharge particle acceleration using a 18.7 kb plasmid containing NOS-NPT, CaMV 35S-GUS, and CaMV 35S-BT. Four transformed plants of one hybrid genotype, NC5339, containing all 3 genes were recovered and analyzed. Two expressed GUS and one was highly resistant to feeding by 2 lepidopteran pests (the forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria, and the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar.) Pretreatment of the target tissues, fine-tuning of the bombardment parameters, and the use of a selection technique employing flooding of the target tissues were important for reliable recovery of transformed plants.

  1. Cottonwood Leaf Beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Larval Performance on Eight Populus Clones

    Treesearch

    David R. Coyle; Joel D. McMillin; Richard B. Hall; Elwood R. Hart

    2001-01-01

    Abstract: The cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta F., is the most serious defoliator of young plantation-grown Populus in the eastern United States, yet there is a paucity of data on larval feeding performance across Populus clones used in tree breeding. Field experiments were conducted in 1998 and 1999...

  2. Multiple factors affect pest and pathogen damage on 31 Populus clones in South Carolina

    Treesearch

    David R. Coyle; Mark D. Coleman; Jaclin A. Durant; Lee A. Newman

    2006-01-01

    Populus species and hybrids have many practical applications, but there is a paucity of data regarding selections that perform well in the southeastern US. We compared pest susceptibility of 31 Populus clones over 3 years in South Carolina, USA. Cuttings were planted in spring 2001 on two study sites. Clones planted in the...

  3. Genetic and environmental factors affecting early rooting of six Populus genomic groups: implications for tree improvement

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny

    2006-01-01

    Genetic and environmental factors affect the early rooting of Populus planted as unrooted hardwood cuttings. Populus genotypes of six genomic groups were tested in numerous studies for the quantitative genetics of rooting, along with effects of preplanting treatments and soil temperature. Genetics data (e.g. heritabilities,...

  4. Effect of Alnus glutinosa on hybrid populus growth and soil nitrogen concentration in a mixed plantation

    Treesearch

    Jeffrey O. Dawson; Edward A. Hansen

    1983-01-01

    Height growth of hybrid Populusand soil nitrogen concentration around Alnus glutinosa stems differed significantly both spatially and with the Alnus/Populus mixture in a short-rotation intensively cultured mixed planting. Populus height growth comparable to that obtained from optimal rates of...

  5. Leaf, woody, and root biomass of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; D.R. Coyle; R.B. Hall

    2007-01-01

    Poplar (Populus spp.) trees can be utilized for ecological leachate disposal when applied as an irrigation source for managed tree systems. Our objective was to evaluate differences in tree height, diameter, volume, and biomass of leaf, stem, branch, and root tissues of Populus trees after two seasons of irrigation with municipal...

  6. Alternative splicing and gene duplication differentially shaped the regulation of isochorismate synthase in Populus and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yinan; Chung, Jeng-Der; Fu, Xueyan; Johnson, Virgil E.; Ranjan, Priya; Booth, Sarah L.; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2009-01-01

    Isochorismate synthase (ICS) converts chorismate to isochorismate for the biosynthesis of phylloquinone, an essential cofactor for photosynthetic electron transport. ICS is also required for salicylic acid (SA) synthesis during Arabidopsis defense. In several other species, including Populus, SA is derived primarily from the phenylpropanoid pathway. We therefore sought to investigate ICS regulation in Populus to learn the extent of ICS involvement in SA synthesis and defense. Arabidopsis harbors duplicated AtICS genes that differ in their exon-intron structure, basal expression, and stress inducibility. In contrast, we found a single ICS gene in Populus and six other sequenced plant genomes, pointing to the AtICS duplication as a lineage-specific event. The Populus ICS encodes a functional plastidic enzyme, and was not responsive to stresses that stimulated phenylpropanoid accumulation. Populus ICS underwent extensive alternative splicing that was rare for the duplicated AtICSs. Sequencing of 184 RT-PCR Populus clones revealed 37 alternative splice variants, with normal transcripts representing ≈50% of the population. When expressed in Arabidopsis, Populus ICS again underwent alternative splicing, but did not produce normal transcripts to complement AtICS1 function. The splice-site sequences of Populus ICS are unusual, suggesting a causal link between junction sequence, alternative splicing, and ICS function. We propose that gene duplication and alternative splicing of ICS evolved independently in Arabidopsis and Populus in accordance with their distinct defense strategies. AtICS1 represents a divergent isoform for inducible SA synthesis during defense. Populus ICS primarily functions in phylloquinone biosynthesis, a process that can be sustained at low ICS transcript levels. PMID:19996170

  7. Antisense expression of the fasciclin-like arabinogalactan protein FLA6 gene in Populus inhibits expression of its homologous genes and alters stem biomechanics and cell wall composition in transgenic trees

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haihai; Jiang, Chunmei; Wang, Cuiting; Yang, Yang; Yang, Lei; Gao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs) play important roles in the growth and development of roots, stems, and seeds in Arabidopsis. However, their biological functions in woody plants are largely unknown. In this work, we investigated the possible function of PtFLA6 in poplar. Quantitative real-time PCR, PtFLA6–yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion protein subcellular localization, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the PtFLA6 gene was expressed specifically in the xylem of mature stem, and PtFLA6 protein was distributed ubiquitous in plant cells and accumulated predominantly in stem xylem fibres. Antisense expression of PtFLA6 in the aspen hybrid clone Poplar davidiana×Poplar bolleana reduced the transcripts of PtFLA6 and its homologous genes. Transgenic plants that showed a significant reduction in the transcripts of PtFLAs accumulated fewer PtFLA6 and arabinogalactan proteins than did the non-transgenic plants, leading to reduced stem flexural strength and stiffness. Further studies revealed that the altered stem biomechanics of transgenic plants could be attributed to the decreased cellulose and lignin composition in the xylem. In addition expression of some xylem-specific genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis was downregulated in these transgenic plants. All these results suggest that engineering the expression of PtFLA6 and its homologues could modulate stem mechanical properties by affecting cell wall composition in trees. PMID:25428999

  8. Comparative nucleotide diversity across North American and European populus species.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Mohamed; Soolanayakanahally, Raju Y; Ingvarsson, Pär K; Guy, Robert D; Jansson, Stefan; Silim, Salim N; El-Kassaby, Yousry A

    2012-06-01

    Nucleotide polymorphisms in two North American balsam poplars (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray and P. balsamifera L.; section Tacamahaca), and one Eurasian aspen (P. tremula L.; section Populus) were compared using nine loci involved in defense, stress response, photoperiodism, freezing tolerance, and housekeeping. Nucleotide diversity varied among species and was highest for P. tremula (θ(w) = 0.005, π(T) = 0.007) as compared to P. balsamifera (θ(w) = 0.004, π(T) = 0.005) or P. trichocarpa (θ(w) = 0.002, π(T) = 0.003). Across species, the defense and the stress response loci accounted for the majority of the observed level of nucleotide diversity. In general, the studied loci did not deviate from neutral expectation either at the individual locus (non-significant normalized Fay and Wu's H) or at the multi-locus level (non-significant HKA test). Using molecular clock analysis, section Tacamahaca probably shared a common ancestor with section Populus approximately 4.5 million year ago. Divergence between the two closely related balsam poplars was about 0.8 million years ago, a pattern consistent with an isolation-with-migration (IM) model. As expected, P. tremula showed a five-fold higher substitution rate (2 × 10(-8) substitution/site/year) compared to the North American species (0.4 × 10(-8) substitution/site/year), probably reflecting its complex demographic history. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) varied among species with a more rapid decay in the North American species (<400 bp) in comparison to P. tremula (≫400 bp). The similarities in nucleotide diversity pattern and LD decay of the two balsam poplar species likely reflects the recent time of their divergence.

  9. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of desert poplar (Populus euphratica).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qun-jie; Gao, Li-zhi

    2016-01-01

    The complete chloroplast sequence of the desert poplar (Populus euphratica), a plant well-adapted to salt stress, was determined in this study. The genome consists of 156,766 bp containing a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 16,591 bp separated by a large single-copy region and a small single-copy region of 84,888 bp and 27,646 bp, respectively. The chloroplast genome contains 130 known genes, including 89 protein-coding genes, 8 ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 tRNA genes; 18 of these are located in the inverted repeat region.

  10. Antisense expression of the fasciclin-like arabinogalactan protein FLA6 gene in Populus inhibits expression of its homologous genes and alters stem biomechanics and cell wall composition in transgenic trees.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haihai; Jiang, Chunmei; Wang, Cuiting; Yang, Yang; Yang, Lei; Gao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Hongxia

    2015-03-01

    Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs) play important roles in the growth and development of roots, stems, and seeds in Arabidopsis. However, their biological functions in woody plants are largely unknown. In this work, we investigated the possible function of PtFLA6 in poplar. Quantitative real-time PCR, PtFLA6-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion protein subcellular localization, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the PtFLA6 gene was expressed specifically in the xylem of mature stem, and PtFLA6 protein was distributed ubiquitous in plant cells and accumulated predominantly in stem xylem fibres. Antisense expression of PtFLA6 in the aspen hybrid clone Poplar davidiana×Poplar bolleana reduced the transcripts of PtFLA6 and its homologous genes. Transgenic plants that showed a significant reduction in the transcripts of PtFLAs accumulated fewer PtFLA6 and arabinogalactan proteins than did the non-transgenic plants, leading to reduced stem flexural strength and stiffness. Further studies revealed that the altered stem biomechanics of transgenic plants could be attributed to the decreased cellulose and lignin composition in the xylem. In addition expression of some xylem-specific genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis was downregulated in these transgenic plants. All these results suggest that engineering the expression of PtFLA6 and its homologues could modulate stem mechanical properties by affecting cell wall composition in trees. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  11. Water use sources of desert riparian Populus euphratica forests.

    PubMed

    Si, Jianhua; Feng, Qi; Cao, Shengkui; Yu, Tengfei; Zhao, Chunyan

    2014-09-01

    Desert riparian forests are the main body of natural oases in the lower reaches of inland rivers; its growth and distribution are closely related to water use sources. However, how does the desert riparian forest obtains a stable water source and which water sources it uses to effectively avoid or overcome water stress to survive? This paper describes an analysis of the water sources, using the stable oxygen isotope technique and the linear mixed model of the isotopic values and of desert riparian Populus euphratica forests growing at sites with different groundwater depths and conditions. The results showed that the main water source of Populus euphratica changes from water in a single soil layer or groundwater to deep subsoil water and groundwater as the depth of groundwater increases. This appears to be an adaptive selection to arid and water-deficient conditions and is a primary reason for the long-term survival of P. euphratica in the desert riparian forest of an extremely arid region. Water contributions from the various soil layers and from groundwater differed and the desert riparian P. euphratica forests in different habitats had dissimilar water use strategies.

  12. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera).

    PubMed

    Olson, Matthew S; Robertson, Amanda L; Takebayashi, Naoki; Silim, Salim; Schroeder, William R; Tiffin, Peter

    2010-04-01

    *Current perceptions that poplars have high levels of nucleotide variation, large effective population sizes, and rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium are based primarily on studies from one poplar species, Populus tremula. *We analysed 590 gene fragments (average length 565 bp) from each of 15 individuals from different populations from throughout the range of Populus balsamifera. *Nucleotide diversity (theta(total) = 0.0028, pi = 0.0027) was low compared with other trees and model agricultural systems. Patterns of nucleotide diversity and site frequency spectra were consistent with purifying selection on replacement and intron sites. When averaged across all loci we found no evidence for decay of linkage disequilibrium across 750 bp, consistent with the low estimates of the scaled recombination parameter, rho = 0.0092. *Compared with P. tremula, a well studied congener with a similar distribution, P. balsamifera has low diversity and low effective recombination, both of which indicate a lower effective population size in P. balsamifera. Patterns of diversity and linkage indicate that there is considerable variation in population genomic patterns among poplar species and unlike P. tremula, association mapping techniques in balsam poplar should consider sampling single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at well-spaced intervals.

  13. Comparative “Golgi” Proteome Study of Lolium multiflorum and Populus trichocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Kristina L.; Chin, Tony; Srivastava, Vaibhav; Zeng, Wei; Doblin, Monika S.; Bulone, Vincent; Bacic, Antony

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus (GA) is a crucial organelle in the biosynthesis of non-cellulosic polysaccharides, glycoproteins and proteoglycans that are primarily destined for secretion to the cell surface (plasma membrane, cell wall and apoplast). Only a small proportion of the proteins involved in these processes have been identified in plants, with the majority of their functions still unknown. The availability of a GA proteome would greatly assist plant biochemists, cell and molecular biologists in determining the precise function of the cell wall-related proteins. There has been some progress towards defining the GA proteome in the model plant system Arabidopsis thaliana, yet in commercially important species, such as either the cereals or woody species there has been relatively less progress. In this study, we applied discontinuous sucrose gradient centrifugation to partially enrich GA from suspension cell cultures (SCCs) and combined this with stable isotope labelling (iTRAQ) to determine protein sub-cellular locations. Results from a representative grass species, Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) and a dicot species, black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) are compared. The results confirm that membrane fractionation approaches that provide effective GA-enriched fractions for proteomic analyses in Arabidopsis are much less effective in the species examined here and highlight the complexity of the GA, both within and between species. PMID:28248233

  14. Comparative analysis of GT14/GT14-like family genes in Arabidopsis, Oryza, Populus, Sorghum and Vitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chuyu; Li, Ting; Tuskan, Gerald A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Yang, Xiaohan

    2011-01-01

    Glycosyltransferase family14 (GT14) belongs to the glycosyltransferase (GT) superfamily that plays important roles in the biosynthesis of cell walls, the most abundant source of cellulosic biomass for bioethanol production. It has been hypothesized that DUF266 proteins are a new class of GTs related to GT14. In this study, we identified 62 GT14 and 106 DUF266 genes (named GT14-like herein) in Arabidopsis, Oryza, Populus, Sorghum and Vitis. Our phylogenetic analysis separated GT14 and GT14-like genes into two distinct clades, which were further divided into eight and five groups, respectively. Similarities in protein domain, 3D structure and gene expression were uncovered between the two phylogenetic clades, supporting the hypothesis that GT14 and GT14-like genes belong to one family. Therefore, we proposed a new family name, GT14/GT14-like family that combines both subfamilies. Variation in gene expression and protein subcellular localization within the GT14-like subfamily were greater than those within the GT14 subfamily. One-half of the Arabidopsis and Populus GT14/GT14-like genes were found to be preferentially expressed in stem/xylem, indicating that they are likely involved in cell wall biosynthesis. This study provided new insights into the evolution and functional diversification of the GT14/GT14-like family genes.

  15. Tubulin C-terminal Post-translational Modifications Do Not Occur in Wood Forming Tissue of Populus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Gu, Xi; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Swamy, Prashant S.; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2016-01-01

    Cortical microtubules (MTs) are evolutionarily conserved cytoskeletal components with specialized roles in plants, including regulation of cell wall biogenesis. MT functions and dynamics are dictated by the composition of their monomeric subunits, α- (TUA) and β-tubulins (TUB), which in animals and protists are subject to both transcriptional regulation and post-translational modifications (PTM). While spatiotemporal regulation of tubulin gene expression has been reported in plants, whether and to what extent tubulin PTMs occur in these species remain poorly understood. We chose the woody perennial Populus for investigation of tubulin PTMs in this study, with a particular focus on developing xylem where high tubulin transcript levels support MT-dependent secondary cell wall deposition. Mass spectrometry and immunodetection concurred that detyrosination, non-tyrosination and glutamylation were essentially absent in tubulins isolated from wood-forming tissues of P. deltoides and P. tremula ×alba. Label-free quantification of tubulin isotypes and RNA-Seq estimation of tubulin transcript abundance were largely consistent with transcriptional regulation. However, two TUB isotypes were detected at noticeably lower levels than expected based on RNA-Seq transcript abundance in both Populus species. These findings led us to conclude that MT composition during wood formation depends exclusively on transcriptional and, to a lesser extent, translational regulation of tubulin isotypes. PMID:27790223

  16. Genome Analyses and Supplement Data from the International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    DOE Data Explorer

    International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC)

    The sequencing of the first tree genome, that of Populus, was a project initiated by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE’s Office of Science. The International Populus Genome Consortium (IPGC) was formed to help develop and guide post-sequence activities. The IPGC website, hosted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides draft sequence data as it is made available from DOE Joint Genome Institute, genome analyses for Populus, lists of related publications and resources, and the science plan. The data are available at http://www.ornl.gov/sci/ipgc/ssr_resource.htm.

  17. Characterization of cellulose structure of Populus plants modified in candidate cellulose biosynthesis genes

    DOE PAGES

    Bali, Garima; Khunsupat, Ratayakorn; Akinosho, Hannah; ...

    2016-09-10

    Here, the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass is a combined effect of several factors such as high crystallinity and high degree of polymerization of cellulose, lignin content and structure, and the available surface area for enzymatic degradation (i.e., accessibility). Genetic improvement of feedstock cell wall properties is a path to reducing recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass and improving conversion to various biofuels. An advanced understanding of the cellulose biosynthesis pathway is essential to precisely modify cellulose properties of plant cell walls. Here we report on the impact of modified expression of candidate cellulose biosynthesis pathway genes on the ultra-structure of cellulose,more » a key carbohydrate polymer of Populus cell wall using advanced nuclear magnetic resonance approaches. Noteworthy changes were observed in the cell wall characteristics of downregulated KORRIGAN 1 (KOR) and KOR 2 transgenic plants in comparison to the wild-type control. It was observed that all of the transgenic lines showed variation in cellulose ultrastructure, increase in cellulose crystallinity and decrease in the cellulose degree of polymerization. Additionally, the properties of cellulose allomorph abundance and accessibility were found to be variable. Application of such cellulose characterization techniques beyond the traditional measurement of cellulose abundance to comprehensive studies of cellulose properties in larger transgenic and naturally variable populations is expected to provide deeper insights into the complex nature of lignocellulosic material, which can significantly contribute to the development of precisely tailored plants for enhanced biofuels production.« less

  18. Characterization of cellulose structure of Populus plants modified in candidate cellulose biosynthesis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, Garima; Khunsupat, Ratayakorn; Akinosho, Hannah; Payyavula, Raja S.; Samuel, Reichel; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-09-10

    Here, the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass is a combined effect of several factors such as high crystallinity and high degree of polymerization of cellulose, lignin content and structure, and the available surface area for enzymatic degradation (i.e., accessibility). Genetic improvement of feedstock cell wall properties is a path to reducing recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass and improving conversion to various biofuels. An advanced understanding of the cellulose biosynthesis pathway is essential to precisely modify cellulose properties of plant cell walls. Here we report on the impact of modified expression of candidate cellulose biosynthesis pathway genes on the ultra-structure of cellulose, a key carbohydrate polymer of Populus cell wall using advanced nuclear magnetic resonance approaches. Noteworthy changes were observed in the cell wall characteristics of downregulated KORRIGAN 1 (KOR) and KOR 2 transgenic plants in comparison to the wild-type control. It was observed that all of the transgenic lines showed variation in cellulose ultrastructure, increase in cellulose crystallinity and decrease in the cellulose degree of polymerization. Additionally, the properties of cellulose allomorph abundance and accessibility were found to be variable. Application of such cellulose characterization techniques beyond the traditional measurement of cellulose abundance to comprehensive studies of cellulose properties in larger transgenic and naturally variable populations is expected to provide deeper insights into the complex nature of lignocellulosic material, which can significantly contribute to the development of precisely tailored plants for enhanced biofuels production.

  19. Topochemical Studies on Modified Lignin Distribution in the Xylem of Poplar (Populus spp.) after Wounding

    PubMed Central

    FRANKENSTEIN, C.; SCHMITT, U.; KOCH, G.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Information on the influence of wounding on lignin synthesis and distribution in differentiating xylem tissue is still scarce. The present paper provides information on cell modifications with regard to wall ultrastructure and lignin distribution on cellular and subcellular levels in poplar after wounding. • Methods Xylem of Populus spp. close to a wound was collected and processed for light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and cellular UV microspectrophotometry. Cell wall modification with respect to lignin distribution was examined at different stages of wound tissue development. Scanning UV microspectrophotometry and point measurements were used to determine the lignin distribution. • Key Results Xylem fibres within a transition zone between differentiated xylem laid down prior to wounding and the tissues formed after wounding developed distinctively thickened secondary cell walls. Those modified walls and cell corners showed, on average, a higher lignin content and an inhomogeneous lignin distribution within the individual wall layers. • Conclusions The work presented shows that wounding of the xylem may induce a modified wall architecture and lignin distribution in tissues differentiating at the time of wounding. An increasing lignin content and distinctively thickened walls can contribute to improved resistance as part of the compartmentalization process. PMID:16354725

  20. Characterization of cellulose structure of Populus plants modified in candidate cellulose biosynthesis genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, Garima; Khunsupat, Ratayakorn; Akinosho, Hannah; Payyavula, Raja S.; Samuel, Reichel; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.

    2016-09-10

    Here, the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass is a combined effect of several factors such as high crystallinity and high degree of polymerization of cellulose, lignin content and structure, and the available surface area for enzymatic degradation (i.e., accessibility). Genetic improvement of feedstock cell wall properties is a path to reducing recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass and improving conversion to various biofuels. An advanced understanding of the cellulose biosynthesis pathway is essential to precisely modify cellulose properties of plant cell walls. Here we report on the impact of modified expression of candidate cellulose biosynthesis pathway genes on the ultra-structure of cellulose, a key carbohydrate polymer of Populus cell wall using advanced nuclear magnetic resonance approaches. Noteworthy changes were observed in the cell wall characteristics of downregulated KORRIGAN 1 (KOR) and KOR 2 transgenic plants in comparison to the wild-type control. It was observed that all of the transgenic lines showed variation in cellulose ultrastructure, increase in cellulose crystallinity and decrease in the cellulose degree of polymerization. Additionally, the properties of cellulose allomorph abundance and accessibility were found to be variable. Application of such cellulose characterization techniques beyond the traditional measurement of cellulose abundance to comprehensive studies of cellulose properties in larger transgenic and naturally variable populations is expected to provide deeper insights into the complex nature of lignocellulosic material, which can significantly contribute to the development of precisely tailored plants for enhanced biofuels production.

  1. Populus cathayana males are less affected than females by excess manganese: comparative proteomic and physiological analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fugui; Zhang, Sheng; Zhu, Guoping; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2013-08-01

    The comprehension of sexually different responses in dioecious plants to excess manganese (Mn) stress requires molecular explanation. Physiological and proteomic changes in leaves of Populus cathayana males and females were analyzed after 4 wk of exposure to Mn stress. Under excess Mn conditions, shoot height and photosynthesis decreased more in females than in males. Females also showed severe browning and subcellular damage, higher Mn2+ absorption, and different antioxidant enzyme activities compared with males. There were ten differently regulated protein spots induced by excess Mn stress. They were mainly related to photosynthesis, ROS cleaning, and cell signaling associated to ROS, plant cell death, heat shock, cell defense and rescue, and gene expression and regulation. Variation in protein expression between the sexes clearly showed that males have evolved more efficient photosynthesis capacity, more stable gene expression and regulation, and better cell defense and rescue to prevent further injury under excess Mn stress. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. PtaRHE1, a Populus tremula × Populus alba RING-H2 protein of the ATL family, has a regulatory role in secondary phloem fibre development.

    PubMed

    Baldacci-Cresp, Fabien; Moussawi, Jihad; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Van Acker, Rebecca; Kohler, Annegret; Candiracci, Julie; Twyffels, Laure; Spokevicius, Antanas V; Bossinger, Gerd; Laurans, Françoise; Brunel, Nicole; Vermeersch, Marjorie; Boerjan, Wout; El Jaziri, Mondher; Baucher, Marie

    2015-06-01

    REALLY INTERESTING NEW GENE (RING) proteins play important roles in the regulation of many processes by recognizing target proteins for ubiquitination. Previously, we have shown that the expression of PtaRHE1, encoding a Populus tremula × Populus alba RING-H2 protein with E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, is associated with tissues undergoing secondary growth. To further elucidate the role of PtaRHE1 in vascular tissues, we have undertaken a reverse genetic analysis in poplar. Within stem secondary vascular tissues, PtaRHE1 and its corresponding protein are expressed predominantly in the phloem. The downregulation of PtaRHE1 in poplar by artificial miRNA triggers alterations in phloem fibre patterning, characterized by an increased portion of secondary phloem fibres that have a reduced cell wall thickness and a change in lignin composition, with lower levels of syringyl units as compared with wild-type plants. Following an RNA-seq analysis, a biological network involving hormone stress signalling, as well as developmental processes, could be delineated. Several candidate genes possibly associated with the altered phloem fibre phenotype observed in amiRPtaRHE1 poplar were identified. Altogether, our data suggest a regulatory role for PtaRHE1 in secondary phloem fibre development.

  3. Using low energy x-ray radiography to evaluate root initiation and growth of Populus

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; A. L. Friend; B. Kodrzycki; D.W. McDonald; R. Michaels; A.H. Wiese; J.W. Powers

    2007-01-01

    Populus roots have been studied less than aboveground tissues. However, there is an overwhelming need to evaluate root initiation and growth in order to understand the genetics and physiology of rooting, along with genotype x environment interactions.

  4. Stress-responsive hydroxycinnamate glycosyltransferase modulates phenylpropanoid metabolism in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Babst, Benjamin A.; Chen, Han-Yi; Wang, Hong-Qiang; Payyavula, Raja S.; Thomas, Tina P.; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of phenylpropanoids offers a rich inventory of bioactive chemicals that can be exploited for plant improvement and human health. Recent evidence suggests that glycosylation may play a role in the partitioning of phenylpropanoid precursors for a variety of downstream uses. This work reports the functional characterization of a stress-responsive glycosyltransferase, GT1-316 in Populus. GT1-316 belongs to the UGT84A subfamily of plant glycosyltransferase family 1 and is designated UGT84A17. Recombinant protein analysis showed that UGT84A17 is a hydroxycinnamate glycosyltransferase and able to accept a range of unsubstituted and substituted cinnamic and benzoic acids as substrates in vitro. Overexpression of GT1-316 in transgenic Populus led to plant-wide increases of hydroxycinnamoyl-glucose esters, which were further elevated under N-limiting conditions. Levels of the two most abundant flavonoid glycosides, rutin and kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, decreased, while levels of other less abundant flavonoid and phenylpropanoid conjugates increased in leaves of the GT1-316-overexpressing plants. Transcript levels of representative phenylpropanoid pathway genes were unchanged in transgenic plants, supporting a glycosylation-mediated redirection of phenylpropanoid carbon flow as opposed to enhanced phenylpropanoid pathway flux. The metabolic response of N-replete transgenic plants overlapped with that of N-stressed wild types, as the majority of phenylpropanoid derivatives significantly affected by GT1-316 overexpression were also significantly changed by N stress in the wild types. These results suggest that UGT84A17 plays an important role in phenylpropanoid metabolism by modulating biosynthesis of hydroxycinnamoyl-glucose esters and their derivatives in response to developmental and environmental cues. PMID:24803501

  5. Highly efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted mutagenesis of multiple genes in Populus.

    PubMed

    Tingting, Liu; Di, Fan; Lingyu, Ran; Yuanzhong, Jiang; Rui, Liu; Keming, Luo

    2015-10-01

    The typeⅡCRISPR/Cas9 system (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats /CRISPR-associated 9) has been widely used in bacteria, yeast, animals and plants as a targeted genome editing technique. In previous work, we have successfully knocked out the endogenous phytoene dehydrogenase (PDS) gene in Populus tomentosa Carr. using this system. To study the effect of target design on the efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knockout in Populus, we analyzed the efficiency of mutagenesis using different single-guide RNA (sgRNA) that target PDS DNA sequence. We found that mismatches between the sgRNA and the target DNA resulted in decreased efficiency of mutagenesis and even failed mutagenesis. Moreover, complementarity between the 3' end nucleotide of sgRNA and target DNA is especially crucial for efficient mutagenesis. Further sequencing analysis showed that two PDS homologs in Populus, PtPDS1 and PtPDS2, could be knocked out simultaneously using this system with 86.4% and 50% efficiency, respectively. These results indicated the possibility of introducing mutations in two or more endogenous genes efficiently and obtaining multi-mutant strains of Populus using this system. We have indeed generated several knockout mutants of transcription factors and structural genes in Populus, which establishes a foundation for future studies of gene function and genetic improvement of Populus.

  6. Association Genetics of Populus trichocarpa or Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics (2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    Tuskan, Gerry

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Gerry Tuskan of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Resequencing in Populus: Towards Genome Wide Association Genetics" at the 6th annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 23, 2011

  7. Transcriptional and Hormonal Regulation of Gravitropism of Woody Stems in Populus.

    PubMed

    Gerttula, Suzanne; Zinkgraf, Matthew; Muday, Gloria K; Lewis, Daniel R; Ibatullin, Farid M; Brumer, Harry; Hart, Foster; Mansfield, Shawn D; Filkov, Vladimir; Groover, Andrew

    2015-10-01

    Angiosperm trees reorient their woody stems by asymmetrically producing a specialized xylem tissue, tension wood, which exerts a strong contractile force resulting in negative gravitropism of the stem. Here, we show, in Populus trees, that initial gravity perception and response occurs in specialized cells through sedimentation of starch-filled amyloplasts and relocalization of the auxin transport protein, PIN3. Gibberellic acid treatment stimulates the rate of tension wood formation and gravibending and enhances tissue-specific expression of an auxin-responsive reporter. Gravibending, maturation of contractile fibers, and gibberellic acid (GA) stimulation of tension wood formation are all sensitive to transcript levels of the Class I KNOX homeodomain transcription factor-encoding gene ARBORKNOX2 (ARK2). We generated genome-wide transcriptomes for trees in which gene expression was perturbed by gravistimulation, GA treatment, and modulation of ARK2 expression. These data were employed in computational analyses to model the transcriptional networks underlying wood formation, including identification and dissection of gene coexpression modules associated with wood phenotypes, GA response, and ARK2 binding to genes within modules. We propose a model for gravitropism in the woody stem in which the peripheral location of PIN3-expressing cells relative to the cambium results in auxin transport toward the cambium in the top of the stem, triggering tension wood formation, while transport away from the cambium in the bottom of the stem triggers opposite wood formation. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential transcriptome analysis between Populus and its synthesized allotriploids driven by second-division restitution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shiping; Huang, Zhen; Li, Yun; Liao, Ting; Suo, Yujing; Zhang, Pingdong; Wang, Jun; Kang, Xiangyang

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we compared transcriptomic differences between a synthetic Populus section Tacamahaca triploid driven by second-division restitution and its parents using a high-throughput RNA-seq method. A total of 4,080 genes were differentially expressed between the high-growth vigor allotriploids (SDR-H) and their parents, and 719 genes were non-additively expressed in SDR-H. Differences in gene expression between the allotriploid and male parent were more significant than those between the allotriploid and female parent, which may be caused by maternal effects. We observed 3,559 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the SDR-H and male parent. Notably, the genes were mainly involved in metabolic process, cell proliferation, DNA methylation, cell division, and meristem and developmental growth. Among the 1,056 DEGs between SDR-H and female parent, many genes were associated with metabolic process and carbon utilization. In addition, 1,789 DEGs between high- and low-growth vigor allotriploid were mainly associated with metabolic process, auxin poplar transport, and regulation of meristem growth. Our results indicated that the higher poplar ploidy level can generate extensive transcriptomic diversity compared with its parents. Overall, these results increased our understanding of the driving force for phenotypic variation and adaptation in allopolyploids driven by second-division restitution.

  9. Epidermal Micromorphology and Mesophyll Structure of Populus euphratica Heteromorphic Leaves at Different Development Stages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yubing; Li, Xinrong; Chen, Guoxiong; Li, Mengmeng; Liu, Meiling; Liu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Leaf epidermal micromorphology and mesophyll structure during the development of Populus euphratica heteromorphic leaves, including linear, lanceolate, ovate, dentate ovate, dentate rhombic, dentate broad-ovate and dentate fan-shaped leaves, were studied by using electron and light microscopy. During development of heteromorphic leaves, epidermal appendages (wax crystals and trichomes) and special cells (mucilage cells and crystal idioblasts) increased in all leaf types while chloroplast ultrastructure and stomatal characters show maximum photosynthetic activity in dentate ovate and rhombic leaves. Also, functional analysis by subordinate function values shows that the maximum adaptability to adverse stress was exhibited in the broad type of mature leaves. The 12 heteromorphic leaf types are classified into three major groups by hierarchical cluster analysis: young, developing and mature leaves. Mature leaves can effectively obtain the highest stress resistance by combining the protection of xerophytic anatomy from drought stress, regulation of water uptake in micro-environment by mucilage and crystal idioblasts, and assistant defense of transpiration reduction through leaf epidermal appendages, which improves photosynthetic activity under arid desert conditions. Our data confirms that the main leaf function is differentiated during the developing process of heteromorphic leaves. PMID:26356300

  10. Transcriptional and Hormonal Regulation of Gravitropism of Woody Stems in Populus[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Gerttula, Suzanne; Zinkgraf, Matthew; Lewis, Daniel R.; Brumer, Harry; Hart, Foster; Filkov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Angiosperm trees reorient their woody stems by asymmetrically producing a specialized xylem tissue, tension wood, which exerts a strong contractile force resulting in negative gravitropism of the stem. Here, we show, in Populus trees, that initial gravity perception and response occurs in specialized cells through sedimentation of starch-filled amyloplasts and relocalization of the auxin transport protein, PIN3. Gibberellic acid treatment stimulates the rate of tension wood formation and gravibending and enhances tissue-specific expression of an auxin-responsive reporter. Gravibending, maturation of contractile fibers, and gibberellic acid (GA) stimulation of tension wood formation are all sensitive to transcript levels of the Class I KNOX homeodomain transcription factor-encoding gene ARBORKNOX2 (ARK2). We generated genome-wide transcriptomes for trees in which gene expression was perturbed by gravistimulation, GA treatment, and modulation of ARK2 expression. These data were employed in computational analyses to model the transcriptional networks underlying wood formation, including identification and dissection of gene coexpression modules associated with wood phenotypes, GA response, and ARK2 binding to genes within modules. We propose a model for gravitropism in the woody stem in which the peripheral location of PIN3-expressing cells relative to the cambium results in auxin transport toward the cambium in the top of the stem, triggering tension wood formation, while transport away from the cambium in the bottom of the stem triggers opposite wood formation. PMID:26410302

  11. Digital Gene Expression Analysis of Populus simonii × P. nigra Pollen Germination and Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li-Juan; Yuan, Hong-Mei; Guo, Wen-Dong; Yang, Chuan-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Pollen tubes are an ideal model for the study of cell growth and morphogenesis because of their extreme elongation without cell division; however, the genetic basis of pollen germination and tube growth remains largely unknown. Using the Illumina/Solexa digital gene expression system, we identified 13,017 genes (representing 28.3% of the unigenes on the reference genes) at three stages, including mature pollen, hydrated pollen, and pollen tubes of Populus simonii × P. nigra. Comprehensive analysis of P. simonii × P. nigra pollen revealed dynamic changes in the transcriptome during pollen germination and pollen tube growth (PTG). Gene ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes showed that genes involved in functional categories such as catalytic activity, binding, transporter activity, and enzyme regulator activity were overrepresented during pollen germination and PTG. Some highly dynamic genes involved in pollen germination and PTG were detected by clustering analysis. Genes related to some key pathways such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, calcium signaling, and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis were significantly changed during pollen germination and PTG. These data provide comprehensive molecular information toward further understanding molecular mechanisms underlying pollen germination and PTG. PMID:27379121

  12. Comparative expression analysis of resistant and susceptible Populus clones inoculated with Septoria musiva.

    PubMed

    Liang, Haiying; Staton, Margaret; Xu, Yi; Xu, Tao; Leboldus, Jared

    2014-06-01

    Septoria musiva is a major pathogen of Populus and can cause leaf spots and stem cankers in susceptible clones. In order to investigate defense mechanisms of Populus in response to S. musiva, differential gene expression in leaf tissues of two resistant (DN34, P. deltoides×nigra; NM6, P. nigra×maximowiczii) and two susceptible clones (DN164, P. deltoides×nigra; NC11505, P. maximowiczii×trichocarpa) was analyzed by RNA-Seq. Of the 511 million reads obtained, 78% and 0.01% were successfully aligned to the genomes of P. trichocarpa and S. musiva, respectively. Functional annotation of differentially expressed genes based on comparisons between resistant and susceptible clones revealed that there were significant differences in the expression of genes involved in disease/stress resistance and oxidation-reduction in mock-inoculated leaves. Four days post inoculation with S. musiva, 36 differentially expressed genes were found to be regulated in the same direction in both resistant clones. The 22 up-regulated loci in resistant clones included genes involved in protein fate, cell wall structure, and responsiveness to various biotic and abiotic stresses. In particular, Potri.008G187100 locus encodes a putative multi antimicrobial extrusion protein and Potri.006G272600 encodes a family1 glycosyltransferase required for pathogen resistance. The differentially expressed loci with increased expression in the susceptible clones corresponded to NB-ARC domain-containing disease resistance protein, phospholipase A 2A, MutT/nudix family protein, and an elicitor-activated gene 3-1 product. The results from this study indicate that strong defense mechanisms involved in oxidation-reduction, protein fate, secondary metabolism, and accumulation of defense-related gene products may contribute to Septoria resistance in DN34 and NM6, while increased expression of hypersensitive response-loci, particularly those encoding NB-ARC domain-containing disease resistance proteins, may

  13. Downregulation of GAUT12 in Populus deltoides by RNA silencing results in reduced recalcitrance, increased growth and reduced xylan and pectin in a woody biofuel feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Biswal, Ajaya K.; Hao, Zhangying; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Yang, Xiaohan; Winkeler, Kim; Collins, Cassandra; Mohanty, Sushree S.; Richardson, Elizabeth A.; Gelineo-Albersheim, Ivana; Hunt, Kimberly; Ryno, David; Sykes, Robert W.; Turner, Geoffrey B.; Ziebell, Angela; Gjersing, Erica; Lukowitz, Wolfgang; Davis, Mark F.; Decker, Stephen R.; Hahn, Michael G.; Mohnen, Debra

    2015-03-12

    Background The inherent recalcitrance of woody bioenergy feedstocks is a major challenge for their use as a source of second-generation biofuel. Secondary cell walls that constitute the majority of hardwood biomass are rich in cellulose, xylan, and lignin. The interactions among these polymers prevent facile accessibility and deconstruction by enzymes and chemicals. Plant biomass that can with minimal pretreatment be degraded into sugars is required to produce renewable biofuels in a cost-effective manner. Results GAUT12/IRX8 is a putative glycosyltransferase proposed to be involved in secondary cell wall glucuronoxylan and/or pectin biosynthesis based on concomitant reductions of both xylan and the pectin homogalacturonan (HG) in Arabidopsis irx8 mutants. Two GAUT12 homologs exist in Populus trichocarpa, PtGAUT12.1 and PtGAUT12.2. Knockdown expression of both genes simultaneously has been shown to reduce xylan content in Populus wood. We tested the proposition that RNA interference (RNAi) downregulation of GAUT12.1 alone would lead to increased sugar release in Populus wood, that is, reduced recalcitrance, based on the hypothesis that GAUT12 synthesizes a wall structure required for deposition of xylan and that cell walls with less xylan and/or modified cell wall architecture would have reduced recalcitrance. Using an RNAi approach, we generated 11 Populus deltoides transgenic lines with 50 to 67% reduced PdGAUT12.1 transcript expression compared to wild type (WT) and vector controls. Ten of the eleven RNAi lines yielded 4 to 8% greater glucose release upon enzymatic saccharification than the controls. The PdGAUT12.1 knockdown (PdGAUT12.1-KD) lines also displayed 12 to 52% and 12 to 44% increased plant height and radial stem diameter, respectively, compared to the controls. Knockdown of PdGAUT12.1 resulted in a 25 to 47% reduction in galacturonic acid and 17 to 30% reduction in xylose without affecting total lignin content, revealing that in Populus wood as in

  14. Sex-related adaptive responses to interaction of drought and salinity in Populus yunnanensis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lianghua; Zhang, Sheng; Zhao, Hongxia; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2010-10-01

    We used Populus yunnanensis Dode., a native dioecious species in southwestern China, as a model species to study morphological, physiological, biochemical and ultrastructural responses to drought, salinity and their combination. Females exhibited more growth inhibition, gas exchange rate depression and reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation; higher lipid peroxide levels, lower osmotic adjustment capacity and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzyme activities; and more damage to cell organelles than did males under drought, salinity and especially under their combination. In addition, we found sex-specific responses in total chlorophyll content (TC), carotenoid concentration and carbon isotope composition under different osmotic stresses. Our results indicated that: (1) females are more sensitive and suffer from greater negative effects than do males under drought, salinity and especially under their combination; (2) sexual differences in adaptive responses to drought, salinity and their combination are context dependent; and (3) sex-specific reactions under a combination of stresses are distinct from single-stress responses. Thus, these results provide evidence for adaptive differentiation between sexes in responses to osmotic stresses and in the sensitivity to environmental change.

  15. A transcriptomic network underlies microstructural and physiological responses to cadmium in Populus x canescens.

    PubMed

    He, Jiali; Li, Hong; Luo, Jie; Ma, Chaofeng; Li, Shaojun; Qu, Long; Gai, Ying; Jiang, Xiangning; Janz, Dennis; Polle, Andrea; Tyree, Melvin; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2013-05-01

    Bark tissue of Populus × canescens can hyperaccumulate cadmium, but microstructural, transcriptomic, and physiological response mechanisms are poorly understood. Histochemical assays, transmission electron microscopic observations, energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis, and transcriptomic and physiological analyses have been performed to enhance our understanding of cadmium accumulation and detoxification in P. × canescens. Cadmium was allocated to the phloem of the bark, and subcellular cadmium compartmentalization occurred mainly in vacuoles of phloem cells. Transcripts involved in microstructural alteration, changes in nutrition and primary metabolism, and stimulation of stress responses showed significantly differential expression in the bark of P. × canescens exposed to cadmium. About 48% of the differentially regulated transcripts formed a coregulation network in which 43 hub genes played a central role both in cross talk among distinct biological processes and in coordinating the transcriptomic regulation in the bark of P. × canescens in response to cadmium. The cadmium transcriptome in the bark of P. × canescens was mirrored by physiological readouts. Cadmium accumulation led to decreased total nitrogen, phosphorus, and calcium and increased sulfur in the bark. Cadmium inhibited photosynthesis, resulting in decreased carbohydrate levels. Cadmium induced oxidative stress and antioxidants, including free proline, soluble phenolics, ascorbate, and thiol compounds. These results suggest that orchestrated microstructural, transcriptomic, and physiological regulation may sustain cadmium hyperaccumulation in P. × canescens bark and provide new insights into engineering woody plants for phytoremediation.

  16. Inositol Hexakis Phosphate is the Seasonal Phosphorus Reservoir in the Deciduous Woody Plant Populus alba L.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Yuko; Baba, Kei'ichi; Ohnishi, Miwa; Matsubara, Ryosuke; Kosuge, Keiko; Anegawa, Aya; Shichijo, Chizuko; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kaneko, Yasuko; Hayashi, Masahiko; Suzaki, Toshinobu; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Mimura, Tetsuro

    2017-09-01

    Seasonal recycling of nutrients is an important strategy for deciduous perennials. Deciduous perennials maintain and expand their nutrient pools by the autumn nutrient remobilization and the subsequent winter storage throughout their long life. Phosphorus (P), one of the most important elements in living organisms, is remobilized from senescing leaves during autumn in deciduous trees. However, it remains unknown how phosphate is stored over winter. Here we show that in poplar trees (Populus alba L.), organic phosphates are accumulated in twigs from late summer to winter, and that IP6 (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis phosphate: phytic acid) is the primary storage form. IP6 was found in high concentrations in twigs during winter and quickly decreased in early spring. In parenchyma cells of winter twigs, P was associated with electron-dense structures, similar to globoids found in seeds of higher plants. Various other deciduous trees were also found to accumulate IP6 in twigs during winter. We conclude that IP6 is the primary storage form of P in poplar trees during winter, and that it may be a common strategy for seasonal P storage in deciduous woody plants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. In vitro shoot regeneration from leaf mesophyll protoplasts of hybrid poplar (Populus nigra x P. maximowiczii).

    PubMed

    Park, Y G; Son, S H

    1992-02-01

    Protoplasts were isolated from leaf mesophyll of hybrid poplar (Populus nigra X P. maximowiczii) with a mean yield of 10.4 x 10(6) protoplasts per g fresh weight using 2.0% Cellulase 'Onozuka' R-10, 0.8% Macerozyme R-10, 1.2% Hemicellulase, 2.0% Driselase, and 0.05% Pectolyase Y-23 with CPW salts solution containing 0.6 M mannitol, 0.002 M DTT, 3 mM MES at pH 5.6. A liquid plating method produced the highest frequency of dividing protoplasts (48.6%) using an MS medium without NH4NO3. The highest percent of colony formation was 22.8%, produced with fabric supported semi-solid (0.5% w/v) agar plating method using the same culture medium. Growing cell colonies and/or micro-calli were transferred to a fresh semisolid agar medium containing 0.44 μM BAP and 9.0 μM 2,4-D. Multiple shoots were produced from protoplast-derived callus after culture on MS medium containing 6.8 μM zeatin. After root induction on half-strength MS medium that lacked growth regulators, shoots were transferred to pots containing artificial soil mix.

  18. Comprehensive analysis of trihelix genes and their expression under biotic and abiotic stresses in Populus trichocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhanchao; Liu, Quangang; Wang, Hanzeng; Zhang, Haizhen; Xu, Xuemei; Li, Chenghao; Yang, Chuanping

    2016-01-01

    Trihelix genes play important roles in plant growth and development and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we identified 56 full-length trihelix genes in Populus trichocarpa and classified them into five groups. Most genes within a given group had similar gene structures and conserved motifs. The trihelix genes were unequally distributed across 19 different linkage groups. Fifteen paralogous pairs were identified, 14 of which have undergone segmental duplication events. Promoter cis-element analysis indicated that most trihelix genes contain stress- or phytohormone-related cis-elements. The expression profiles of the trihelix genes suggest that they are primarily expressed in leaves and roots. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that members of the trihelix gene family are significantly induced in response to osmotic, abscisic acid, salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate and pathogen infection. PtrGT10 was identified as a target gene of miR172d, which is involved in the osmotic response. Repression of PtrGT10 could increase reactive oxygen species scavenging ability and decrease cell death. This study provides novel insights into the phylogenetic relationships and functions of the P. trichocarpa trihelix genes, which will aid future functional studies investigating the divergent roles of trihelix genes belonging to other species. PMID:27782188

  19. Chemical, ultrastructural and supramolecular analysis of tension wood in Populus tremula x alba as a model substrate for reduced recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect

    Foston, Marcus B; Hubbell, Christopher A; Samuel, Reichel; Jung, Seung-Yong; Ding, Shi-You; Zeng, Yining; Jawdy, Sara; Sykes, Virginia R; Tuskan, Gerald A; Kalluri, Udaya C; Ragauskas, Arthur J

    2011-01-01

    Biomass is one of the most abundant potential sustainable sources for fuel and material production, however to fully realize this potential an improved understanding of lignocellulosic recalcitrance must be developed. In an effort to appreciate the underlying phenotypic, biochemical and morphological properties associated with the reduced recalcitrance observed in tension stress-induced reaction wood, we report the increased enzymatic sugar yield and corresponding chemical and ultrastructural properties of Populus tension wood. Populus tremula x alba (PTA) was grown under tension and stem segments containing three different wood types: normal wood (NW), tension wood (TW) from the elongated stem side and opposite wood (OW) from the compressed stem side were collected. A variety of analytical techniques were used to describe changes occurring as a result of the tension stress-induced formation of a gelatinous cell wall layer (G-layer). For example, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) revealed that the molecular weight and crystallinity of cellulose in TW is greater than that of cellulose acquired from NW. Whole cell ionic liquid and other solid-state NMR analysis detailed the structure of lignin and hemicellulose in the samples, detecting the presence of variations in lignin and hemicellulose sub-units, linkages and semi-quantitatively estimating the relative amounts of syringyl (S), guaiacyl (G) and p-hydroxybenzoate (PB) monolignol units. It was confirmed that TW displayed an increase in PB or H-like lignin and S to G ratio from 1.25 to 1.50 when compared to the NW sample. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) were also used to evaluate the morphology and corresponding spatial distribution of the major lignocellulosic components. We found changes in a combination of cell wall properties appear to influence recalcitrance more than any single factor alone.

  20. Diurnal regulation of plastid genes in Populus deltoides.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M S; Naithani, S; Tuli, R; Sane, P V

    2000-12-01

    Light regulates leaf and chloroplast development, together with overall chloroplast gene expression at various levels. Plants respond to diurnal and seasonal changes in light by changing expression of photosynthesis genes and metabolism. In Populus deltoides, a deciduous tree species, leaf development begins in the month of March and leaf maturation is attained by summer, which is subsequently followed by autumnal senescence and fall. In the present study, diurnal changes in the steady state transcript levels of plastid genes were examined in the fully developed leaves during summer season. Our results show that steady state level of the psaA/B, psbA, psbEFLJ and petA transcripts showed differential accumulation during diurnal cycle in summer. However, there was no significant change in the pigment composition during the day/night cycle. Our studies suggest that the diurnal regulation of steady state mRNA accumulation may play a crucial role during daily adjustments in plants life with rapidly changing light irradiance and temperature.

  1. Spatiotemporal distribution of essential elements through Populus leaf ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Mónica R.; Woll, Arthur; Niklas, Karl J.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the spatiotemporal distribution and accumulation of calcium (Ca), potassium (K), and zinc (Zn) during the growth and maturation of grey poplar (Populus tremula × alba) leaves covering plastochrons 01 through 10. This period spans the sugar sink-to-source transition and requires coordinated changes of multiple core metabolic processes that likely involve alterations in essential and non-essential element distributions as tissues mature and effect a reversal in phloem flow direction. Whole-leaf elemental maps were obtained from dried specimens using micro X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Additional cross-sections of fresh leaves were scanned to check for tissue specificity in element accumulation. The anatomical distribution of Zn and K remains relatively consistent throughout leaf development; Ca accumulation varied across leaf developmental stages. The basipetal allocation of Ca to the leaf mesophyll matched spatially and temporally the sequence of phloem maturation, positive carbon balance, and sugar export from leaves. The accumulation of Ca likely reflects the maturation of xylem in minor veins and the enhancement of the transpiration stream. Our results independently confirm that xylem and phloem maturation are spatially and temporally coordinated with the onset of sugar export in leaves. PMID:26985054

  2. Rhizobacteria of Populus euphratica Promoting Plant Growth Against Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Donglin; Ouyang, Liming; Xu, Zhaohui; Zhang, Lili

    2015-01-01

    The heavy metal-resistant bacteria from rhizospheric soils of wild Populus euphratica forest growing in arid and saline area of northwestern China were investigated by cultivation-dependent methods. After screening on medium sparked with zinc, copper, nickel and lead, 146 bacteria strains with different morphology were isolated and most of them were found to be resistant to at least two kinds of heavy metals. Significant increase in fresh weight and leaf surface area of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under metal stress were noticed after inoculated with strains especially those having multiple-resistance to heavy metals such as Phyllobacterium sp. strain C65. Investigation on relationship between auxin production and exogenous zinc concentration revealed that Phyllobacterium sp. strain C65 produced auxin, and production decreased as the concentration of zinc in medium increased. For wheat seedlings treated with zinc of 2 mM, zinc contents in roots of inoculated plants decreased by 27% (P < 0.05) compared to the uninoculated control. Meanwhile, zinc accumulation in the above-ground tissues increased by 22% (P < 0.05). The translocation of zinc from root to above-ground tissues induced by Phyllobacterium sp. strain C65 helped host plants extract zinc from contaminated environments more efficiently thus alleviated the growth inhibition caused by heavy metals.

  3. Adaptive evolution and functional innovation of Populus-specific recently evolved microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohui; Song, Yuepeng; Du, Qingzhang; Li, Ying; Chen, Jinhui; Zhang, Deqiang

    2017-01-01

    Lineage-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) undergo rapid turnover during evolution; however, their origin and functional importance have remained controversial. Here, we examine the origin, evolution, and potential roles in local adaptation of Populus-specific miRNAs, which originated after the recent salicoid-specific, whole-genome duplication. RNA sequencing was used to generate extensive, comparable miRNA and gene expression data for six tissues. A natural population of Populus trichocarpa and closely related species were used to study the divergence rates, evolution, and adaptive variation of miRNAs. MiRNAs that originated in 5' untranslated regions had higher expression levels and their expression showed high correlation with their host genes. Compared with conserved miRNAs, a significantly higher proportion of Populus-specific miRNAs appear to target genes that were duplicated in salicoids. Examination of single nucleotide polymorphisms in Populus-specific miRNA precursors showed high amounts of population differentiation. We also characterized the newly emerged MIR6445 family, which could trigger the production of phased small interfering RNAs from NAC mRNAs, which encode a transcription factor with primary roles in a variety of plant developmental processes. Together, these observations provide evolutionary insights into the birth and potential roles of Populus-specific miRNAs in genome maintenance, local adaptation, and functional innovation.

  4. Nucleotide diversity among natural populations of a North American poplar (Populus balsamifera, Salicaceae).

    PubMed

    Breen, Amy L; Glenn, Elise; Yeager, Adam; Olson, Matthew S

    2009-01-01

    Poplars (Populus spp.) comprise an important component of circumpolar boreal forest ecosystems and are the model species for tree genomics. In this study, we surveyed genetic variation and population differentiation in three nuclear genes among populations of balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera) in North America. We examined nucleotide sequence variation in alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3pdh), two well-studied nuclear loci in plants, and abscisic acid insensitivity 1B (ABI1B), a locus coincident with timing of seasonal dormancy in quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies of hybrid poplars. We compared estimates of baseline population genetic parameters for these loci with those obtained in studies of other poplar species, particularly European aspen (Populus tremula). Average pairwise nucleotide diversity (pi(tot) = 0.00216-0.00353) was equivalent to that in Populus trichocarpa, but markedly less than that in P. tremula. Elevated levels of population structure were observed in ABI1B between the northern and southern regions (F(CT) = 0.184, P < 0.001) and among populations (F(ST) = 0.256, P < 0.001). These results suggest that geographic or taxonomic factors are important for understanding patterns of variation throughout the genus Populus. Our findings have the potential to aid in the design of sampling regimes for conservation and breeding stock and contribute to historical inferences regarding the factors that shaped the genetic diversity of boreal plant species.

  5. A survey of Populus PIN-FORMED family genes reveals their diversified expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bobin; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Lin; Li, Jianbo; Zheng, Huanquan; Chen, Jun; Lu, Mengzhu

    2014-06-01

    The plant hormone auxin is a key regulator of plant development, and its uneven distribution maintained by polar intercellular auxin transport in plant tissues can trigger a wide range of developmental processes. Although the roles of PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins in intercellular auxin flow have been extensively characterized in Arabidopsis, their roles in woody plants remain unclear. Here, a comprehensive analysis of PIN proteins in Populus is presented. Fifteen PINs are encoded in the genome of Populus, including four PIN1s, one PIN2, two PIN3s, three PIN5s, three PIN6s, and two PIN8s. Similar to Arabidopsis AtPIN proteins, PtPINs share conserved topology and transmembrane domains, and are either plasma membrane- or endoplasmic reticulum-localized. The more diversified expansion of the PIN family in Populus, comparing to that in Arabidopsis, indicates that some auxin-regulated developmental processes, such as secondary growth, may exhibit unique features in trees. More importantly, different sets of PtoPINs have been found to be strongly expressed in the roots, leaves, and cambium in Populus; the dynamic expression patterns of selected PtoPINs were further examined during the regeneration of shoots and roots. This genome-wide analysis of the Populus PIN family provides important cues for their potential roles in tree growth and development.

  6. Effects of Clone, Silvicultural, and Miticide Treatments on Cottonwood Leafcurl Mite (Acari: Eriophyidae) Damage in Plantation Populus

    Treesearch

    David R. Coyle

    2002-01-01

    Aculops lobuliferus (Keifer) is a little known pest of plantation Populus spp., which is capable of causing substantial damage. This is the First documented occurrence of A. lobuliferus in South Carolina. Previous anecdotal data indicated clonal variation in Populus susceptibility to A...

  7. Clonal variation in morphology of Populus root systems following irrigation with landfill leachate or water during 2 years of establishment

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; David R. Coyle; Richard B. Hall; Edmund O. Bauer

    2009-01-01

    Increased municipal solid waste generation in North America has prompted the use of Populus for phytoremediation of waste waters including landfill leachate. Populus species and hybrids are ideal for such applications because of their high water usage rates, fast growth, and extensive root systems. Adventitious rooting (i.e.,...

  8. Uptake of macro- and micro-nutrients into leaf, woody, and root tissue of Populus after irrigation with landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Adam H. Wiese; Bart T. Sexton; Richard B. Hall

    2008-01-01

    Information about macro- and micro-nutrient uptake and distribution into tissues of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate helps to maximize biomass production and understand impacts of leachate chemistry on tree health. We irrigated eight Populus clones (NC 13460, NCI4O18, NC14104, NC14106, DM115, DN5, NM2, NM6) with fertilized (N, P, K) well...

  9. Phytoaccumulation of sodium and chloride into leaf, woody, and root tissue of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Adam H. Wiese; Bart T. Sexton; Richard B. Hall

    2007-01-01

    Information is limited about the response of Populus to elevated levels of sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-). We irrigated eight Populus clones (NC13460, NC14018, NC14104, NC14106, DM115, DN5, NM2, NM6) with fertilized well water (control) (N, P, K) or municipal solid waste landfill leachate weekly during...

  10. Sodium and chloride accumulation in leaf, woody, and root tissue of Populus after irrigation with landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Adam H. Wiese; Bart Sexton; Richard B. Hall

    2008-01-01

    The response of Populus to irrigation sources containing elevated levels of sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-) is poorly understood. We irrigated eight Populus clones with fertilized well water (control) (N, P, K) or municipal solid waste landfill leachate weekly during 2005 and 2006 in...

  11. Shipping coal to Newcastle: are SRIC populus plantations a viable fiber production option for the central hardwoods region?

    Treesearch

    C.H. Strauss

    1991-01-01

    Production costs for short rotation, intensive culture (SRIC) Populus biomass were developed from commercial-sized plantations under investigation throughout the eastern U.S. Populus hybrid planted on good quality plantation sites at a density of 850 cuttings/acre was projected to yield an average of 7 ovendry (OD) tons/acre/year....

  12. Genome-wide analysis of Aux/IAA and ARF gene families in Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, Udaya C; DiFazio, Stephen P; Brunner, A.; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2007-01-01

    Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA) and Auxin Response Factor (ARF) transcription factors are key regulators of auxin responses in plants. A total of 35 Aux/IAA and 39 ARF genes were identified in the Populus genome. Comparative phylogenetic analysis revealed that the subgroups PoptrARF2, 6, 9 and 16 and PoptrIAA3, 16, 27 and 29 have differentially expanded in Populus relative to Arabidopsis. Activator ARFs were found to be two fold-overrepresented in the Populus genome. PoptrIAA and PoptrARF gene families appear to have expanded due to high segmental and low tandem duplication events. Furthermore, expression studies showed that genes in the expanded PoptrIAA3 subgroup display differential expression. The gene-family analysis reported here will be useful in conducting future functional genomics studies to understand how the molecular roles of these large gene families translate into a diversity of biologically meaningful auxin effects.

  13. Genome-wide identification of lineage-specific genes in Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaohan; Jawdy, Sara; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2009-01-01

    Protein sequences were compared among Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus to identify differential gene (DG) sets that are in one but not the other two genomes. The DG sets were screened against a plant transcript database, the NR protein database and six newly-sequenced genomes (Carica, Glycine, Medicago, Sorghum, Vitis and Zea) to identify a set of species-specific genes (SS). Gene expression, protein motif and intron number were examined. 192, 641 and 109 SS genes were identified in Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus, respectively. Some SS genes were preferentially expressed in flowers, roots, xylem and cambium or up-regulated by stress. Six conserved motifs in Arabidopsis and Oryza SS proteins were found in other distant lineages. The SS gene sets were enriched with intronless genes. The results reflect functional and/or anatomical differences between monocots and eudicots or between herbaceous and woody plants. The Populus-specific genes are candidates for carbon sequestration and biofuel research.

  14. Analysis on active molecules in Populus nigra wood extractives by GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongli; Peng, Wanxi; Ge, Shengbo; Mo, Bo; Zhang, Zhongfeng; Qin, Daochun

    2014-11-01

    Populus nigra has been introduced and largely planted in China, and the waste wood was still abandoned. Therefore, the wood extractives of Populus nigra were studied to further utilize the bio-resources. The result shown that the optimal extraction time of ethanol/methanol extraction, petroleum ether/acetic ether extraction, and benzene/alcohol extraction were 1h, 7h and 3h, respectively. Among sequential extractions, EPB extraction was the optimum extraction mode for the LR was 17.32%. The wood extractives included hexanedioic acid, bis(2-ethylhexyl) ester, phthalic acid derivatives, squalene, 3,3,7,11- tetramethyltricyclo [5.4.0.0(4,11)]undecan-1-ol, other rare drug and biomedical activities. The wood extractives of Populus nigra was fit to extract rare dibutyl phthalate and squalene.

  15. Patterns of molecular evolution and predicted function in thaumatin-like proteins of Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jia Ping; Su, Xiao Hua

    2010-09-01

    Some pathogenesis-related proteins (PR proteins) are subject to positive selection, while others are under negative selection. Here, we report the patterns of molecular evolution in thaumatin-like protein (TLP, PR5 protein) genes of Populus trichocarpa. Signs of positive selection were found in 20 out of 55 Populus TLPs using the likelihood ratio test and ML-based Bayesian methods. Due to the connection between the acidic cleft and the antifungal activity, the secondary structure and three-dimensional structure analyses predicted antifungal activity beta-1,3-glucanase activities in these TLPs. Moreover, the coincidence with variable basic sites in the acidic cleft and positively selected sites suggested that fungal diseases may have been the main environmental stress that drove rapid adaptive evolution in Populus.

  16. Establishment of Populus deltoides under simulated alluvial groundwater declines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Segelquist, Charles A.; Scott, Michael L.; Auble, Gregor T.

    1993-01-01

    Establishment, growth, and survival of seedlings of Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera (plains cottonwood) were examined in an experimental facility simulating five rates of declining alluvial groundwater. The treatments were permanent saturation, drawdown rates of 0.4, 0.7, 2.9 cm/d and immediate drainage. The experiment was conducted outdoors in planters near Fort Collins, Colorado. Seedling survival was highest under the two slowest drawdown rates and declined significantly with faster drawdown rates. The highest growth rate was associated with the drawdown rate of 0.4 cm/d, in which mean shoot height was 2.4 cm and mean root length was 39 am 98 days after planting. Growth of shoots and roots was reduced both by saturated conditions and by the more rapid drawdown rates of 0.7 and 2.9 cm/d. No establishment was observed in the immediate drawdown treatment. Whereas maximum biomass accumulation is associated with the most gradual drawdown or saturated conditions, seedling establishing naturally under such conditions are also most likely to be removed by ice or subsequent flooding. Seedlings establishing in higher topographic positions, in contrast, are subject to increased mortality and reduced shoot growth, resulting from reduced soil moisture. Rapid root extension following establishment allows P. deltoides seedlings to grow across a wide range of groundwater drawdown rates, and thus a variety of positions across a gradient of riparian soil moisture. Our results indicate that in coarse alluvial sands of low fertility, 47% of germinating P. deltoides seeds were able to survive in associated with a drawdown rate of 2.9 cm/d and a final water table depth of 80 cm.

  17. Stress-responsive microRNAs in Populus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shanfa; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Chiang, Vincent L

    2008-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a group of small non-coding RNAs, have recently become the subject of intense study. They are a class of post-transcriptional negative regulators playing vital roles in plant development and growth. However, little is known about their regulatory roles in the responses of trees to the stressful environments incurred over their long-term growth. Here, we report the cloning of small RNAs from abiotic stressed tissues of Populus trichocarpa (Ptc) and the identification of 68 putative miRNA sequences that can be classified into 27 families based on sequence homology. Among them, nine families are novel, increasing the number of the known Ptc-miRNA families from 33 to 42. A total of 346 targets was predicted for the cloned Ptc-miRNAs using penalty scores of

  18. Soil plant interactions of Populus alba in contrasting environments.

    PubMed

    Ciadamidaro, Lisa; Madejón, Engracia; Robinson, Brett; Madejón, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the Populus alba tree on different biochemical soil properties, growing in a contaminated area, were studied for two years under field conditions. Two types of trace element contaminated soils were studied: a neutral contaminated soil (NC) and an acid contaminated soil (AC). One neutral non-contaminated area was studied as control. Soil samples were collected at depths of 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm. Leaves and litter samples were analysed. The addition of organic matter, through root exudates and litter, contributed to an increase in soil pH, especially in acid soil. Microbial Biomass Carbon (MBC) was significantly increased by the presence of the trees in all studied areas, especially in the upper soil layer. Similar results were also observed for protease activity. Both MBC and Protease activity were more sensitive to contamination than β-glucosidase activity. These changes resulted in a decrease of available trace element concentrations in soil and in an improvement of soil quality after a 2-year study. The total concentration of Cd and Zn in soil did not increase over time due to litter deposition. Analysis of P. alba leaves did not show a significant nutritional imbalance and trace element concentrations were normal for plants, except for Cd and Zn. These results indicate that P. alba is suitable for the improvement of soil quality in riparian contaminated areas. However, due to the high Cd and Zn concentrations in leaves, further monitoring of this area is required.

  19. Examining Mechanisms of Methane Transport in Populus trichocarpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenstiel, T. N.; Kutschera, E.; Rice, A. L.; Kahlil, A.

    2016-12-01

    Although the dynamics of methane (CH4 ) emission from croplands and wetlands have been fairly well investigated, the contribution of trees to global CH4 emission and the mechanisms of tree transport are relatively unknown. CH4 emissions from the common wetland tree species Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood) native to the Pacific Northwest were measured under hydroponic conditions in order to separate plant transport mechanisms from the influence of soil processes. Roots were exposed to CH4 enriched water and whole-canopy emissions of CH4 were measured. The average flux for 34 trials (at temperatures ranging from 17 to 25 C) was 2.8 ± 2.2 μg CH4 min-1(whole canopy). Overall intra-tree CH4 flux increased with temperature. Compared to the isotopic composition of root water CH4 , δ13 C values were depleted for canopy CH4 where the warmest temperatures (24.4-28.7 C) resulted in an epsilon of 2.8 ± 4.7‰; midrange temperatures (20.4- 22.1 C) produced an epsilon of 7.5 ±3.1 ‰; and the coolest temperatures examined (16.0-19.1 C) produced an epsilon of 10.2 ± 3.2 ‰. From these results it is concluded that there msy br multiple transport processes at work in CH4 transport through trees and the dominance of these processes clearly changes with temperature. Overall, the intra-tree transport mechanisms that dominates at lower temperatures and during lower fluxes results in a larger overall fractionation, while the transport mechanisms that prevail at higher temperatures and higher and higher overall fluxes produces a smaller isotopic fractionation. These findings, as well as additional lab and field-based measures will be presented. Finally, the implications of possibly distinct forms of CH4 gas transport within trees, and it's impact on understanding of biogeochemical processes, will be discussed.

  20. Structural characterization of lignin from triploid of Populus tomentosa Carr.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tong-Qi; Sun, Shao-Ni; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2011-06-22

    To improve yields while minimizing the extent of mechanical action (just 2 h of planetary ball-milling), the residual wood meal obtained from extraction of milled wood lignin (MWL) was sequentially treated with cellulolytic enzyme and alkali, and the yields of MWL, cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL), and alkaline lignin (AL) were 5.4, 23.2, and 16.3%, respectively. The chemical structures of the lignin fractions obtained were characterized by carbohydrate analysis, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and various advanced NMR spectroscopic techniques. The results showed that the lignin isolated as MWL during the early part of ball milling may originate mainly from the middle lamella. This lignin fraction was less degradable and contained more linear hemicelluloses and more C═O in unconjugated groups as well as more phenolic OH groups. Both 1D and 2D NMR spectra analyses confirmed that the lignin in triploid of Populus tomentosa Carr. is GSH-type and partially acylated at the γ-carbon of the side chain. Two-dimensional heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (¹³C-¹H) NMR of MWL, CEL, and AL showed a predominance of β-O-4' aryl ether linkages (81.1-84.5% of total side chains), followed by β-β' resinol-type linkages (12.2-16.4%), and lower amounts of β-5' phenylcoumaran (2.1-2.6%) and β-1' spirodienone-type (0.4-1.4%) linkages. The syringyl (S)/guaiacyl (G) ratios were estimated to be 1.43, 2.29, and 2.83 for MWL, CEL, and AL, respectively.

  1. Microbacterium populi sp. nov., isolated from Populus×euramericana bark.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Wang, Tao; Fang, Wei; Xue, Han; Piao, Chun-gen; Guo, Min-wei; Zhu, Tian-hui

    2015-05-01

    Five non-spore-forming, aerobic and Gram-stain-positive bacterial strains, 10-107-8(T), 1C-4, NHI3_6, 4107_1_2, and 3D-3, were isolated from Populus × euramericana bark collected in Puyang City, Henan Province, PR China. The isolates grew at 15-40 °C and pH 5-10. The optimum temperature and pH for growth were 30 °C and pH 8.0, respectively. Chemotaxonomic features included MK-10 and MK-11 as major menaquinones (type strain); predominating iso- and anteiso-branched cellular fatty acids; diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol as major polar lipids (type strain); ornithine as the principal diamino acid of the cell-wall peptidoglycan (type strain); glycolyl type as cell-wall acyl type; and DNA G+C content of 66.8-67.6 mol%. These features were consistent with classification in the genus Microbacterium . Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequence data indicated that the five isolates belonged to the genus Microbacterium and were closely related to Microbacterium halotolerans . A high 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 96.97% to M. halotolerans YIM 70130(T) was observed. The five isolates showed less than 96.20% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to the other species of the genus Microbacterium with validly published names. DNA-DNA relatedness of the five isolates with M. halotolerans JCM 13013(T) ranged from 35.62% to 44.36%. Considering the results of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and the physiological and biochemical characteristics, we propose that the five strains should be assigned to a novel species of the genus Microbacterium . The name proposed for the five strains is Microbacterium populi sp. nov., and the type strain is 10-107-8(T) ( =CFCC 11275(T) =KCTC 29152(T)).

  2. Paenibacillus populi sp. nov., a novel bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of Populus alba.

    PubMed

    Han, Tong-Yan; Tong, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Yan-Wei; Wang, Hui-Min; Chen, Xiao-Rong; Kong, De-Long; Guo, Xiang; Ruan, Zhi-Yong

    2015-09-01

    A novel aerobic bacterium, designated strain LAM0705(T), was isolated from the rhizosphere of Populus alba in the Peking University Third Hospital. Cells of strain LAM0705(T) were observed to be Gram-stain positive, motile, spore-forming and rod-shaped. The optimal temperature and pH for growth were found to be 30 °C and pH 7.5, respectively. Strain LAM0705(T) was found to be able to grow in the presence 0-5 % NaCl (w/v) (optimum 1.0 %). The major fatty acids of strain LAM0705(T) were identified as anteiso-C15:0, C16:0 and iso-C16:0. The dominant polar lipids were found to consist of diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol. The cell wall peptidoglycan of strain LAM0705(T) was found to contain meso-diaminopimelic acid. The predominant menaquinone was identified as MK-7. The G+C content of genomic DNA was found to be 48 mol% when determined by the T m method. The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity analysis indicated that strain LAM0705(T) is closely related to Paenibacillus agaridevorans DSM 1355(T) and Paenibacillus thailandensis KCTC 13043(T) with 97.8 and 96.1 % sequence similarity, respectively. The DNA-DNA hybridization value between strain LAM0705(T) and P. agaridevorans DSM 1355(T) was 47 ± 0.8 %. On the basis of its phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic characteristics, strain LAM0705(T) is concluded to represent a novel species of the genus Paenibacillus, for which the name Paenibacillus populi sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LAM0705(T) (=ACCC 06427(T) = JCM 19843(T)).

  3. Association genetics, geography and ecophysiology link stomatal patterning in Populus trichocarpa with carbon gain and disease resistance trade-offs.

    PubMed

    McKown, Athena D; Guy, Robert D; Quamme, Linda; Klápště, Jaroslav; La Mantia, Jonathan; Constabel, C P; El-Kassaby, Yousry A; Hamelin, Richard C; Zifkin, Michael; Azam, M S

    2014-12-01

    Stomata are essential for diffusive entry of gases to support photosynthesis, but may also expose internal leaf tissues to pathogens. To uncover trade-offs in range-wide adaptation relating to stomata, we investigated the underlying genetics of stomatal traits and linked variability in these traits with geoclimate, ecophysiology, condensed foliar tannins and pathogen susceptibility in black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa). Upper (adaxial) and lower (abaxial) leaf stomatal traits were measured from 454 accessions collected throughout much of the species range. We calculated broad-sense heritability (H(2) ) of stomatal traits and, using SNP data from a 34K Populus SNP array, performed a genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to uncover genes underlying stomatal trait variation. H(2) values for stomatal traits were moderate (average H(2) = 0.33). GWAS identified genes associated primarily with adaxial stomata, including polarity genes (PHABULOSA), stomatal development genes (BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE 2) and disease/wound-response genes (GLUTAMATE-CYSTEINE LIGASE). Stomatal traits correlated with latitude, gas exchange, condensed tannins and leaf rust (Melampsora) infection. Latitudinal trends of greater adaxial stomata numbers and guard cell pore size corresponded with higher stomatal conductance (gs ) and photosynthesis (Amax ), faster shoot elongation, lower foliar tannins and greater Melampsora susceptibility. This suggests an evolutionary trade-off related to differing selection pressures across the species range. In northern environments, more adaxial stomata and larger pore sizes reflect selection for rapid carbon gain and growth. By contrast, southern genotypes have fewer adaxial stomata, smaller pore sizes and higher levels of condensed tannins, possibly linked to greater pressure from natural leaf pathogens, which are less significant in northern ecosystems. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The Cytokinin Type-B Response Regulator PtRR13 Is a Negative Regulator of Adventitious Root Development in Populus1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Carvajal, Gustavo A.; Morse, Alison M.; Dervinis, Christopher; Davis, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Adventitious root formation at the base of plant cuttings is an innate de novo organogenesis process that allows massive vegetative propagation of many economically and ecologically important species. The early molecular events following shoot excision are not well understood. Using whole-genome microarrays, we detected significant transcriptome remodeling during 48 h following shoot removal in Populus tremula × Populus alba softwood cuttings in the absence of exogenous auxin, with 27% and 36% of the gene models showing differential abundance between 0 and 6 h and between 6 and 24 h, respectively. During these two time intervals, gene networks involved in protein turnover, protein phosphorylation, molecular transport, and translation were among the most significantly regulated. Transgenic lines expressing a constitutively active form of the Populus type-B cytokinin response regulator PtRR13 (ΔDDKPtRR13) have a delayed rooting phenotype and cause misregulation of CONTINUOUS VASCULAR RING1, a negative regulator of vascularization; PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE TRANSPORTER9, an auxin efflux transporter; and two APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR genes with sequence similarity to TINY. Inappropriate cytokinin action via ΔDDKPtRR13 expression appeared to disrupt adventitious root development 24 h after shoot excision, when root founder cells are hypothesized to be sensitive to the negative effects of cytokinin. Our results are consistent with PtRR13 acting downstream of cytokinin to repress adventitious root formation in intact plants, and that reduced cytokinin signaling after shoot excision enables coordinated expression of ethylene, auxin, and vascularization pathways leading to adventitious root development. PMID:19395410

  5. Response to drought and salt stress in leaves of poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa): expression profiling by oligonucleotide microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seo-Kyung; Park, Eung-Jun; Choi, Young-Im; Bae, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Joon-Hyeok; Park, So-Young; Kang, Kyu-Suk; Lee, Hyoshin

    2014-11-01

    Drought and salt stresses are major environmental constraints on forest productivity. To identify genes responsible for stress tolerance, we conducted a genome-wide analysis in poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) leaves exposed to drought and salt (NaCl) stresses. We investigated gene expression at the mRNA level using oligonucleotide microarrays containing 44,718 genes from Populus trichocarpa. A total of 1604 and 1042 genes were up-regulated (≥2-fold; P value < 0.05) by drought and salt stresses, respectively, and 765 genes were up-regulated by both stresses. In addition, 2742 and 1685 genes were down-regulated by drought and salt stresses, respectively, and 1564 genes were down-regulated by both stresses. The large number of genes regulated by both stresses suggests that crosstalk occurs between the drought and salt stress responses. Most up-regulated genes were involved in functions such as subcellular localization, signal transduction, metabolism, and transcription. Among the up-regulated genes, we identified 47 signaling proteins, 65 transcription factors, and 43 abiotic stress-related genes. Several genes were modulated by only one of the two stresses. About 25% of the genes significantly regulated by these stresses are of unknown function, suggesting that poplar may provide an opportunity to discover novel stress-related genes.

  6. Dense genetic linkage maps of three Populus species (Populus deltoides, P. nigra and P. trichocarpa) based on AFLP and microsatellite markers.

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, M T; Storme, V; Ivens, B; Gusmão, J; Liu, B H; Hostyn, V; Van Slycken, J; Van Montagu, M; Boerjan, W

    2001-01-01

    Populus deltoides, P. nigra, and P. trichocarpa are the most important species for poplar breeding programs worldwide. In addition, Populus has become a model for fundamental research on trees. Linkage maps were constructed for these three species by analyzing progeny of two controlled crosses sharing the same female parent, Populus deltoides cv. S9-2 x P. nigra cv. Ghoy and P. deltoides cv. S9-2 x P. trichocarpa cv. V24. The two-way pseudotestcross mapping strategy was used to construct the maps. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers that segregated 1:1 were used to form the four parental maps. Microsatellites and sequence-tagged sites were used to align homoeologous groups between the maps and to merge linkage groups within the individual maps. Linkage analysis and alignment of the homoeologous groups resulted in 566 markers distributed over 19 groups for P. deltoides covering 86% of the genome, 339 markers distributed over 19 groups for P. trichocarpa covering 73%, and 369 markers distributed over 28 groups for P. nigra covering 61%. Several tests for randomness showed that the AFLP markers were randomly distributed over the genome. PMID:11404342

  7. The obscure events contributing to the evolution of an incipient sex chromosome in Populus A retrospective working hypothesis.

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Chen, Jay; Labbe, Jessy L; Ranjan, Priya; DiFazio, Steven P; Slavov, Goncho T.; Yin, Tongming

    2012-01-01

    Genetic determination of gender is a fundamental developmental and evolutionary process in plants. Although it appears that dioecy in Populus is partially genetically controlled, the precise gender-determining systems remain unclear. The recently-released second draft assembly and annotated gene set of the Populus genome provided an opportunity to re-visit this topic. We hypothesized that over evolutionary time, selective pressure has reformed the genome structure and gene composition in the peritelomeric region of the chromosome XIX which has resulted in a distinctive genome structure and cluster of genes contributing to gender determination in Populus. Multiple lines of evidence support this working hypothesis. First, the peritelomeric region of the chromosome XIX contains significantly fewer single nucleotide polymorphisms than the rest of Populus genome and has a distinct evolutionary history. Second, the peritelomeric end of chromosome XIX contains the largest cluster of the nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) class of disease resistances genes in the entire Populus genome. Third, there is a high occurrence of small microRNAs on chromosome XIX coincident to the region containing the putative gender-determining locus and the major cluster of NBS-LRR genes. Further, by analyzing the metabolomic profiles of floral bud in male and female Populus trees using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we found there are gender-specific accumulations of phenolic glycosides. Taken together, these findings provide new insights into the genetic control of gender determination in Populus.

  8. Seedling competition between native Populus deltoides (Salicaceae) and exotic Tamarix ramosissima (Tamaricaceae) across water regimes and substrate types.

    PubMed

    Sher, Anna A; Marshall, Diane L

    2003-03-01

    Populus deltoides subsp. wislizinii (Salicaceae), a cottonwood native to the Middle Rio Grande of New Mexico, must potentially compete against exotic Tamarix ramosissima (Tamaricaceae) during establishment after flooding. We investigated competitive interactions between seedlings of Tamarix and Populus in two substrates representing field textures and declining (i.e., draw-down) or stagnant water tables. The experiment was performed using a full-additive series design and interpreted with response surface models for each species. As reflected in both aboveground mass and height, Populus suppressed aboveground growth of Tamarix across all treatments, whereas competitive effects of Tamarix against Populus could only be seen at low Populus densities. Clay substrates with draw-down stimulated the greatest growth and created the most intense competitive environment for both species. Tamarix was competitively suppressed in every substrate tested, with the weakest response in sand with no draw-down, where growth of Populus was poorest. These results suggest that stream flow management that promotes Populus establishment could also aid in controlling Tamarix invasion across a range of substrates.

  9. Expansion and diversification of the SET domain gene family following whole-genome duplications in Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Lei, Li; Zhou, Shi-Liang; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Liang-Sheng

    2012-04-12

    Histone lysine methylation modifies chromatin structure and regulates eukaryotic gene transcription and a variety of developmental and physiological processes. SET domain proteins are lysine methyltransferases containing the evolutionarily-conserved SET domain, which is known to be the catalytic domain. We identified 59 SET genes in the Populus genome. Phylogenetic analyses of 106 SET genes from Populus and Arabidopsis supported the clustering of SET genes into six distinct subfamilies and identified 19 duplicated gene pairs in Populus. The chromosome locations of these gene pairs and the distribution of synonymous substitution rates showed that the expansion of the SET gene family might be caused by large-scale duplications in Populus. Comparison of gene structures and domain architectures of each duplicate pair indicated that divergence took place at the 3'- and 5'-terminal transcribed regions and at the N- and C-termini of the predicted proteins, respectively. Expression profile analysis of Populus SET genes suggested that most Populus SET genes were expressed widely, many with the highest expression in young leaves. In particular, the expression profiles of 12 of the 19 duplicated gene pairs fell into two types of expression patterns. The 19 duplicated SET genes could have originated from whole genome duplication events. The differences in SET gene structure, domain architecture, and expression profiles in various tissues of Populus suggest that members of the SET gene family have a variety of developmental and physiological functions. Our study provides clues about the evolution of epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression.

  10. Solution-state 2D NMR of ball-milled plant cell wall gels in DMSO-d6/pyridine-d5†

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, John

    2014-01-01

    NMR fingerprinting of the components of finely divided plant cell walls swelled in DMSO has been recently described. Cell wall gels, produced directly in the NMR tube with perdeutero-dimethylsulfoxide, allowed the acquisition of well resolved/dispersed 2D 13C–1H correlated solution-state NMR spectra of the entire array of wall polymers, without the need for component fractionation. That is, without actual solubilization, and without apparent structural modification beyond that inflicted by the ball milling and ultrasonication steps, satisfactorily interpretable spectra can be acquired that reveal compositional and structural details regarding the polysaccharide and lignin components in the wall. Here, the profiling method has been improved by using a mixture of perdeuterated DMSO and pyridine (4:1, v/v). Adding pyridine provided not only easier sample handling because of the better mobility compared to the DMSO-d6-only system but also considerably elevated intensities and improved resolution of the NMR spectra due to the enhanced swelling of the cell walls. This modification therefore provides a more rapid method for comparative structural evaluation of plant cell walls than is currently available. We examined loblolly pine (Pinus taeda, a gymnosperm), aspen (Populus tremuloides, an angiosperm), kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus, an herbaceous plant), and corn (Zea mays L., a grass, i.e., from the Poaceae family). In principle, lignin composition (notably, the syringyl : guaiacyl : p-hydroxyphenyl ratio) can be quantified without the need for lignin isolation. Correlations for p-coumarate units in the corn sample are readily seen, and a variety of the ferulate correlations are also well resolved; ferulates are important components responsible for cell wall cross-linking in grasses. Polysaccharide anomeric correlations were tentatively assigned for each plant sample based on standard samples and various literature data. With the new potential for chemometric analysis

  11. Overexpression of Populus trichocarpa CYP85A3 promotes growth and biomass production in transgenic trees.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yan-Li; Tang, Ren-Jie; Wang, Hai-Hai; Jiang, Chun-Mei; Bao, Yan; Yang, Yang; Liang, Mei-Xia; Kong, Fanjing; Li, Bei; Zhang, Hong-Xia

    2017-03-04

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are essential hormones that play crucial roles in plant growth, reproduction and response to abiotic and biotic stress. In Arabidopsis, AtCYP85A2 works as a bifunctional cytochrome P450 monooxygenase to catalyze the conversion of castasterone (CS) to brassinolide (BL), a final rate-limiting step in the BR biosynthetic pathway. Here, we report the functional characterizations of PtCYP85A3, one of the three AtCYP85A2 homologous genes from Populus trichocarpa. PtCYP85A3 shares the highest similarity with AtCYP85A2 and can rescue the retarded-growth phenotype of the Arabidopsis cyp85a2-2 and tomato d(x) mutants. Constitutive expression of PtCYP85A3, driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, increased the endogenous BR levels and significantly promoted the growth and biomass production in both transgenic tomato and poplar. Compared to the wild type (WT), plant height, shoot fresh weight and fruit yield increased 50%, 56% and 43%, respectively, in transgenic tomato plants. Similarly, plant height and stem diameter increased 15% and 25%, respectively, in transgenic poplar plants. Further study revealed that overexpression of PtCYP85A3 enhanced xylem formation without affecting the composition of cellulose and lignin, as well as the cell wall thickness in transgenic poplar. Our finding suggest that PtCYP85A3 could be used as a potential candidate gene for engineering fast growing trees with improved wood production. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Populus euphratica HSF binds the promoter of WRKY1 to enhance salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zedan; Yao, Jun; Sun, Jian; Chang, Liwei; Wang, Shaojie; Ding, Mingquan; Qian, Zeyong; Zhang, Huilong; Zhao, Nan; Sa, Gang; Hou, Peichen; Lang, Tao; Wang, Feifei; Zhao, Rui; Shen, Xin; Chen, Shaoliang

    2015-06-01

    Poplar species increase expressions of transcription factors to deal with salt environments. We assessed the salt-induced transcriptional responses of heat-shock transcription factor (HSF) and WRKY1 in Populus euphratica, and their roles in salt tolerance. High NaCl (200mM) induced PeHSF and PeWRKY1 expressions in P. euphratica, with a rapid rise in roots than in leaves. Moreover, the salt-elicited PeHSF reached its peak level 6h earlier than PeWRKY1 in leaves. PeWRKY1 was down-regulated in salinized P. euphratica when PeHSF was silenced by tobacco rattle virus-based gene silencing. Subcellular assays in onion epidermal cells and Arabidopsis protoplasts revealed that PeHSF and PeWRKY1 were restricted to the nucleus. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing PeWRKY1 showed improved salt tolerance in terms of survival rate, root growth, photosynthesis, and ion fluxes. We further isolated an 1182-bp promoter fragment upstream of the translational start of PeWRKY1 from P. euphratica. Promoter sequence analysis revealed that PeWRKY1 harbours four tandem repeats of heat shock element (HSE) in the upstream regulatory region. Yeast one-hybrid assay showed that PeHSF directly binds the cis-acting HSE. To determine whether the HSE cluster was important for salt-induced PeWRKY1 expression, the promoter-reporter construct PeWRKY1-pro::GUS was transferred to tobacco plants. β-glucuronidase activities increased in root, leaf, and stem tissues under salt stress. Therefore, we conclude that salinity increased PeHSF transcription in P. euphratica, and that PeHSF binds the cis-acting HSE of the PeWRKY1 promoter, thus activating PeWRKY1 expression.

  13. Flavitalea populi gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from soil of a Euphrates poplar (Populus euphratica) forest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Cai, Feng; Tang, Yali; Dai, Jun; Qi, Huan; Rahman, Erkin; Peng, Fang; Fang, Chengxiang

    2011-07-01

    A novel strain, designated HY-50R(T), isolated from soil of a Euphrates poplar (Populus euphratica) forest in Xinjiang, China, was characterized using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. Cells of the isolate were gram-reaction-negative, strictly aerobic, rod-shaped, non-motile, oxidase-negative and catalase-positive. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the isolate was a member of the phylum Bacteroidetes, its closest relatives being Niastella populi THYL-44(T) (93.6 % similarity), Flavisolibacter ginsengisoli Gsoil 643(T) (93.5 %), Terrimonas ferruginea IAM 15098(T) (93.3 %) and Flavisolibacter ginsengiterrae Gsoil 492(T) (93.2 %). The major fatty acids were iso-C(15 : 1) G (11.7 %), iso-C(15 : 0) (19.6 %) and iso-C(17 : 0) 3-OH (19.3 %). The predominant menaquinone of strain HY-50R(T) was MK-7 and the genomic DNA G+C content was 46.8 mol%. Flexirubin-type pigments were not produced. Based on phylogenetic evidence and the results of phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic analysis, strain HY-50R(T) represents a novel species of a novel genus, for which the name Flavitalea populi gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HY-50R(T) ( = CCTCC AB 208255(T)  = NRRL B-59222(T)).

  14. Sex-specific responses of Populus yunnanensis exposed to elevated CO2 and salinity.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Zhang, Yuanbin; Luo, Jianxun; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang

    2013-04-01

    Populus yunnanensis Dode., a native dioecious woody plant in southwestern China, was employed as a model species to study sex-specific morphological, physiological and biochemical responses to elevated CO2 and salinity. To investigate the effects of elevated CO2 , salinity and their combination, the cuttings were exposed to two CO2 regimes (ambient CO2 and double ambient CO2 ) and two salt treatments in growth chambers. Males exhibited greater downregulation of net photosynthesis rate (Anet ) and carboxylation efficiency (CE) than females at elevated CO2 , whereas these sexual differences were lessened under salt stress. On the other hand, salinity induced a higher decrease in Anet and CE, more growth inhibition and leaf Cl(-) accumulation and more damage to cell organelles in females than in males, whereas the sexual differences in photosynthesis and growth were lessened at elevated CO2 . Moreover, elevated CO2 exacerbated membrane lipid peroxidation and organelle damage in females but not in males under salt stress. Our results indicated that: (1) females are more sensitive and suffer from greater negative effects than do males under salt stress, and elevated CO2 lessens the sexual differences in photosynthesis and growth under salt stress; (2) elevated CO2 tends to aggravate the negative effects of salinity in females; and (3) sex-specific reactions under the combination of elevated CO2 and salinity are distinct from single-stress responses. Therefore, these results provide evidence for different adaptive responses between plants of different sexes exposed to elevated CO2 and salinity. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  15. Identification and characterization of nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis in Populus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bowen; Du, Qingzhang; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Deqiang

    2014-03-27

    The gap between the real and potential photosynthetic rate under field conditions suggests that photosynthesis could potentially be improved. Nuclear genes provide possible targets for improving photosynthetic efficiency. Hence, genome-wide identification and characterization of the nuclear genes affecting photosynthetic traits in woody plants would provide key insights on genetic regulation of photosynthesis and identify candidate processes for improvement of photosynthesis. Using microarray and bulked segregant analysis strategies, we identified differentially expressed nuclear genes for photosynthesis traits in a segregating population of poplar. We identified 515 differentially expressed genes in this population (FC ≥ 2 or FC ≤ 0.5, P < 0.05), 163 up-regulated and 352 down-regulated. Real-time PCR expression analysis confirmed the microarray data. Singular Enrichment Analysis identified 48 significantly enriched GO terms for molecular functions (28), biological processes (18) and cell components (2). Furthermore, we selected six candidate genes for functional examination by a single-marker association approach, which demonstrated that 20 SNPs in five candidate genes significantly associated with photosynthetic traits, and the phenotypic variance explained by each SNP ranged from 2.3% to 12.6%. This revealed that regulation of photosynthesis by the nuclear genome mainly involves transport, metabolism and response to stimulus functions. This study provides new genome-scale strategies for the discovery of potential candidate genes affecting photosynthesis in Populus, and for identification of the functions of genes involved in regulation of photosynthesis. This work also suggests that improving photosynthetic efficiency under field conditions will require the consideration of multiple factors, such as stress responses.

  16. Identification and characterization of nuclear genes involved in photosynthesis in Populus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The gap between the real and potential photosynthetic rate under field conditions suggests that photosynthesis could potentially be improved. Nuclear genes provide possible targets for improving photosynthetic efficiency. Hence, genome-wide identification and characterization of the nuclear genes affecting photosynthetic traits in woody plants would provide key insights on genetic regulation of photosynthesis and identify candidate processes for improvement of photosynthesis. Results Using microarray and bulked segregant analysis strategies, we identified differentially expressed nuclear genes for photosynthesis traits in a segregating population of poplar. We identified 515 differentially expressed genes in this population (FC ≥ 2 or FC ≤ 0.5, P < 0.05), 163 up-regulated and 352 down-regulated. Real-time PCR expression analysis confirmed the microarray data. Singular Enrichment Analysis identified 48 significantly enriched GO terms for molecular functions (28), biological processes (18) and cell components (2). Furthermore, we selected six candidate genes for functional examination by a single-marker association approach, which demonstrated that 20 SNPs in five candidate genes significantly associated with photosynthetic traits, and the phenotypic variance explained by each SNP ranged from 2.3% to 12.6%. This revealed that regulation of photosynthesis by the nuclear genome mainly involves transport, metabolism and response to stimulus functions. Conclusions This study provides new genome-scale strategies for the discovery of potential candidate genes affecting photosynthesis in Populus, and for identification of the functions of genes involved in regulation of photosynthesis. This work also suggests that improving photosynthetic efficiency under field conditions will require the consideration of multiple factors, such as stress responses. PMID:24673936

  17. Characterization of Dof Transcription Factors and Their Responses to Osmotic Stress in Poplar (Populus trichocarpa).

    PubMed

    Wang, Han; Zhao, Shicheng; Gao, Yuchi; Yang, Jingli

    2017-01-01

    The DNA-binding One Zinc Finger (Dof) genes are ubiquitous in many plant species and are especial transcription regulators that participate in plant growth, development and various procedures, including biotic and abiotic stress reactions. In this study, we identified 41 PtrDof members from Populus trichocarpa genomes and classified them into four groups. The conserved motifs and gene structures of some PtrDof genes belonging to the same subgroup were almost the same. The 41 PtrDof genes were dispersed on 18 of the 19 Populus chromosomes. Many key stress- or phytohormone-related cis-elements were discovered in the PtrDof gene promoter regions. Consequently, we undertook expression profiling of the PtrDof genes in leaves and roots in response to osmotic stress and abscisic acid. A total of seven genes (PtrDof14, 16, 25, 27, 28, 37 and 39) in the Populus Dof gene family were consistently upregulated at point in all time in the leaves and roots under osmotic and abscisic acid (ABA) stress. We observed that 12 PtrDof genes could be targeted by 15 miRNAs. Moreover, we mapped the cleavage site in PtrDof30 using the 5'RLM-RACE. The results showed that PtrDofs may have a role in resistance to abiotic stress in Populus trichocarpa.

  18. Influence of irrigation and fertilization on transpiration and hydraulic properties of Populus deltoides

    Treesearch

    Lisa J. Samuelson; Thomas A. Stokes; Mark D. Coleman

    2007-01-01

    Long-term hydraulic acclimation to resource availability was explored in 3-year-old Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. clones by examining transpiration. leaf-specific hydraulic conductance (GL), canopy stomatal conductance (Gs) and leaf to sapwood area ratio (AL:Asi)n response to irrigation (13 and 551 mm in addition to ambient precipitation) and...

  19. Gibberellin-associated cisgenes modify growth, stature and wood properties in Populus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We studied the effects on plant growth from insertion of five cisgenes involved in gibberellic acid metabolism or signaling. We cloned intact genomic copies of GA20ox7, GA2ox2, RGL1_1, RGL1_2, and GAI1 genes from the genome sequenced Populus trichocarpa clone Nisqually-1, transformed them into Popul...

  20. Genome structure and emerging evidence of an incipient sex chromosome in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Tongming; DiFazio, Stephen P; Gunter, Lee E; Zhang, Xinye; Sewell, Mitchell; Woolbright, Dr. Scott; Allan, Dr. Gery; Kelleher, Colin; Douglas, Carl; Wang, Prof. Mingxiu; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2008-01-01

    The genus Populus consists of dioecious woody species with largely unknown genetic mechanisms for gender determination. We have discovered genetic and genomic features in the peritelomeric region of chromosome XIX that suggest this region of the Populus genome is in the process of developing characteristics of a sex chromosome. We have identified a gender-associated locus that consistently maps to this region. Furthermore, comparison of genetic maps across multiple Populus families reveals consistently distorted segregation within this region. We have intensively characterized this region using an F1 interspecific cross involving the female genotype that was used for genome sequencing. This region shows suppressed recombination and high divergence between the alternate haplotypes, as revealed by dense map-based genome assembly using microsatellite markers. The suppressed recombination, distorted segregation, and haplotype divergence were observed only for the maternal parent in this cross. Furthermore, the progeny of this cross showed a strongly male-biased sex ratio, in agreement with Haldane's rule that postulates that the heterogametic sex is more likely to be absent, rare, or sterile in interspecific crosses. Together, these results support the role of chromosome XIX in sex determination and suggest that sex determination in Populus occurs through a ZW system in which the female is the heterogametic gender.

  1. Characterization of Dof Transcription Factors and Their Responses to Osmotic Stress in Poplar (Populus trichocarpa)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han; Zhao, Shicheng; Gao, Yuchi; Yang, Jingli

    2017-01-01

    The DNA-binding One Zinc Finger (Dof) genes are ubiquitous in many plant species and are especial transcription regulators that participate in plant growth, development and various procedures, including biotic and abiotic stress reactions. In this study, we identified 41 PtrDof members from Populus trichocarpa genomes and classified them into four groups. The conserved motifs and gene structures of some PtrDof genes belonging to the same subgroup were almost the same. The 41 PtrDof genes were dispersed on 18 of the 19 Populus chromosomes. Many key stress- or phytohormone-related cis-elements were discovered in the PtrDof gene promoter regions. Consequently, we undertook expression profiling of the PtrDof genes in leaves and roots in response to osmotic stress and abscisic acid. A total of seven genes (PtrDof14, 16, 25, 27, 28, 37 and 39) in the Populus Dof gene family were consistently upregulated at point in all time in the leaves and roots under osmotic and abscisic acid (ABA) stress. We observed that 12 PtrDof genes could be targeted by 15 miRNAs. Moreover, we mapped the cleavage site in PtrDof30 using the 5’RLM-RACE. The results showed that PtrDofs may have a role in resistance to abiotic stress in Populus trichocarpa. PMID:28095469

  2. Evaluation of Populus and Salix continuously irrigated with landfill leachate I. Genotype-specific elemental phytoremediation

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Edmund O. Bauer

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for the identification and selection of specific tree genotypes that can sequester elements from contaminated soils, with elevated rates of uptake. We irrigated Populus (DN17, DN182, DN34, NM2, NM6) and Salix (94003, 94012, S287, S566, SX61) genotypes planted in large soil-filled containers with landfill leachate or...

  3. Sodium and chloride concentration in leaf, woody, and root tissue of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; A.H. Wiese; B. Sexton; R.B. Hall

    2007-01-01

    There are few reports in the literature about the response of different genomic groups and clones of Populus to elevated levels of sodium (Na+) and chloride (Cl-). In addition, there is an increasing need to understand the variation in salt tolerance and tissue composition of such genotypes over multiple...

  4. Effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on height and stem specific gravity of Populus hybrids

    Treesearch

    Roy L. Patton

    1981-01-01

    Unfumigated hybrid poplars (Populus spp.) were compared with poplars of the same nine clones fumigated with 0.15 pprn ozone or 0.25 ppm sulfur dioxide. After 102 days, plant height and stem specific gravity were measured to determine whether specific gravity is altered by the fumigants and to compare that response to height suppression, an accepted...

  5. Cutting Diameter Influences Early Survival and Growth of Several Populus Clones

    Treesearch

    Donald Dickmann; Howard Phipps; Daniel Netzer

    1980-01-01

    The effects of cutting diameter on early survival and growth of several Populus clones were studied in field tests in Wisconsin and Michigan. Generally, large diameter cuttings survived and grew better than small diameter cuttings. Response differences among clones were evident.

  6. Use of belowground growing degree days to predict rooting of dormant hardwood cuttings of Populus

    Treesearch

    R.S., Jr. Zalesny; E.O. Bauer; D.E. Riemenschneider

    2004-01-01

    Planting Populus cuttings based on calendar days neglects soil temperature extremes and does not promote rooting based on specific genotypes. Our objectives were to: 1) test the biological efficacy of a thermal index based on belowground growing degree days (GDD) across the growing period, 2) test for interactions between belowground GDD and clones,...

  7. Extensive structural renovation of retrogenes in the evolution of the Populus genome.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenglin; Zhang, Yong; Long, Manyuan

    2009-12-01

    Retroposition, as an important copy mechanism for generating new genes, was believed to play a negligible role in plants. As a representative dicot, the genomic sequences of Populus (poplar; Populus trichocarpa) provide an opportunity to investigate this issue. We identified 106 retrogenes and found the majority (89%) of them are associated with functional signatures in sequence evolution, transcription, and (or) translation. Remarkably, examination of gene structures revealed extensive structural renovation of these retrogenes: we identified 18 (17%) of them undergoing either chimerization to form new chimerical genes and (or) intronization (transformation into intron sequences of previously exonic sequences) to generate new intron-containing genes. Such a change might occur at a high speed, considering eight out of 18 such cases occurred recently after divergence between Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Populus. This pattern also exists in Arabidopsis, with 15 intronized retrogenes occurring after the divergence between Arabidopsis and papaya (Carica papaya). Thus, the frequency of intronization in dicots revealed its importance as a mechanism in the evolution of exon-intron structure. In addition, we also examined the potential impact of the Populus nascent sex determination system on the chromosomal distribution of retrogenes and did not observe any significant effects of the extremely young sex chromosomes.

  8. Extensive Structural Renovation of Retrogenes in the Evolution of the Populus Genome1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhenglin; Zhang, Yong; Long, Manyuan

    2009-01-01

    Retroposition, as an important copy mechanism for generating new genes, was believed to play a negligible role in plants. As a representative dicot, the genomic sequences of Populus (poplar; Populus trichocarpa) provide an opportunity to investigate this issue. We identified 106 retrogenes and found the majority (89%) of them are associated with functional signatures in sequence evolution, transcription, and (or) translation. Remarkably, examination of gene structures revealed extensive structural renovation of these retrogenes: we identified 18 (17%) of them undergoing either chimerization to form new chimerical genes and (or) intronization (transformation into intron sequences of previously exonic sequences) to generate new intron-containing genes. Such a change might occur at a high speed, considering eight out of 18 such cases occurred recently after divergence between Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Populus. This pattern also exists in Arabidopsis, with 15 intronized retrogenes occurring after the divergence between Arabidopsis and papaya (Carica papaya). Thus, the frequency of intronization in dicots revealed its importance as a mechanism in the evolution of exon-intron structure. In addition, we also examined the potential impact of the Populus nascent sex determination system on the chromosomal distribution of retrogenes and did not observe any significant effects of the extremely young sex chromosomes. PMID:19789289

  9. The response of Populus spp. to cadmium stress: chemical, morphological and proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Marta; Imperiale, Davide; Maestri, Elena; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2013-10-01

    Poplar (Populus) species are seen as candidates for removing heavy metal contamination from polluted soil. A bottom-up multidisciplinary approach was utilized to compare the performances of clones 58-861 and Poli (Populus nigra) and A4A, a Populus nigra × Populus deltoides hybrid to Cd toxicity. Qualitative and quantitative differences in their tolerance to Cd exposure and the uptake, accumulation and translocation of Cd were noted following the hydroponic exposure of rooted cuttings to 20 μM CdSO₄ for either 48 h or 14 d. Cadmium was less toxic for the hybrid clone A4A as compared to Poli and 58-861. Cd uptake and root to shoot translocation were determined by AAS, and its compartmentation was analyzed using SEM/EDX. A comparative proteomic approach was utilized to identify changes in proteins expression according to dose and time of exposure. Toxicity to Cd mainly influenced proteins related to general defense, stress response and carbohydrate metabolism.

  10. Inheritance of compartmentalization of wounds in sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) and eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.)

    Treesearch

    P. W. Garrett; W. K. Randall; A. L. Shigo; W. C. Shortle

    1979-01-01

    Studies of half-sib progeny tests of sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) and clonal plantings of eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides) in Mississippi indicate that rate of wound closure and size of discolored columns associated with the wounds are both heritable traits. Both are independent of stem diameter, which was used as a...

  11. Intercontinental divergence in the Populus-associated ectomycorrhizal fungus, Tricholoma populinum

    Treesearch

    L.C. Grubisha; N. Levsen; M.S. Olson; D.L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    The ectomycorrhizal fungus Tricholoma populinum is host-specific with Populus species. T. populinum has wind-dispersed progagules and may be capable of long-distance dispersal. In this study, we tested the hypothesis of a panmictic population between Scandinavia and North America. DNA sequences from five...

  12. Leaf chemical composition of twenty-one Populus hybrid clones grown under intensive culture

    Treesearch

    Richard E. Dickson; Philip R. Larson

    1976-01-01

    Leaf material from 21 nursery-grown Populus hybrid clones was analyzed for three nitrogen fractions (total N, soluble protein, and soluble amino acids) and three carbhydrate fractions (reducing sugars, total soluble sugars, and total nonstructural carbohydrates-TNC). In addition, nursery-grown green ash and silver maple, field-grown bigtooth and trembling aspen, and...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Growth-Promoting Endophyte Paenibacillus sp. P22, Isolated from Populus

    PubMed Central

    Hanak, Anne M.; Nagler, Matthias; Weinmaier, Thomas; Sun, Xiaoliang; Fragner, Lena; Schwab, Clarissa; Rattei, Thomas; Ulrich, Kristina; Ewald, Dietrich; Engel, Marion; Schloter, Michael; Bittner, Romana; Schleper, Christa

    2014-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. P22 is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobic endospore-forming bacterium isolated from poplar hybrid 741 (♀[Populus alba × (P. davidiana + P. simonii) × P. tomentosa]). This bacterium shows strong similarities to Paenibacillus humicus, and important growth-promoting effects on in vitro grown explants of poplar hybrid 741 have been described. PMID:24723717

  14. Using phyto-recurrent selection to choose Populus genotypes for phytoremediation of landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Adam H. Wiese; Richard B. Hall

    2006-01-01

    Information about the response of Populus genotypes to landfill leachate irrigation is needed, along with efficient methods for choosing genotypes based on leachate composition. We irrigated poplar clones during three cycles of phyto-recurrent selection to test whether genotypes responded differently to leachate and water, and to test whether our...

  15. Above- and below-ground characteristics associated with wind toppling in a young Populus plantation.

    Treesearch

    Constance A. Harrington; Dean S. DeBell

    1996-01-01

    Damage from a dormant-season windstorm in a 3-year-old Populus research trial differed among four clones and three spacings and between monoclonal and polyclonal plots. Clonal differences in susceptibility to toppling (or leaning) were associated with both above and below-ground characteristics. Susceptible clones had less taper in the lower stem...

  16. Draft genome sequences of four Streptomyces isolates from the Populus trichocarpa root endosphere and rhizosphere

    DOE PAGES

    Klingeman, Dawn M.; Utturkar, Sagar; Lu, Tse -Yuan S.; ...

    2015-11-12

    Draft genome sequences for four Actinobacteria from the genus Streptomyces are presented. Streptomyces is a metabolically diverse genus that is abundant in soils and has been reported in association with plants. The strains described in this study were isolated from the Populus trichocarpa endosphere and rhizosphere.

  17. Productivity of Populus in monoclonal and polyclonal blocks at three spacings.

    Treesearch

    Dean S. DeBell; Constance A. Harrington

    1997-01-01

    Four Populus clones were grown at three spacings (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m) in monoclonal plots and in polyclonal plots with all clones in intimate mixture. After the third year, many individual tree and stand traits differed significantly by clone, spacing, deployment method, and their interactions. Differences among clones in growth and stem form were...

  18. Genome-wide analysis of the structural genes regulating defense phenylpropanoid metabolism in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tsai, Chung-Jui; Harding, Scott A; Lindroth, richard L; Yuan, Yinan

    2006-01-01

    Salicin-based phenolic glycosides, hydroxycinnamate derivatives and flavonoid-derived condensed tannins comprise up to one-third of Populus leaf dry mass. Genes regulating the abundance and chemical diversity of these substances have not been comprehensively analysed in tree species exhibiting this metabolically demanding level of phenolic metabolism. Here, shikimate-phenylpropanoid pathway genes thought to give rise to these phenolic products were annotated from the Populus genome, their expression assessed by semiquantitative or quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and metabolic evidence for function presented. Unlike Arabidopsis, Populus leaves accumulate an array of hydroxycinnamoyl-quinate esters, which is consistent with broadened function of the expanded hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA transferase gene family. Greater flavonoid pathway diversity is also represented, and flavonoid gene families are larger. Consistent with expanded pathway function, most of these genes were upregulated during wound-stimulated condensed tannin synthesis in leaves. The suite of Populus genes regulating phenylpropanoid product accumulation should have important application in managing phenolic carbon pools in relation to climate change and global carbon cycling.

  19. Identification of quantitative trait loci and candidate genes for cadmium tolerance in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Induri, Brahma R; Ellis, Danielle R; Slavov, Goncho T.; Yin, Tongming; Zhang, Xinye; Tuskan, Gerald A; DiFazio, Steven P

    2012-01-01

    Understanding genetic variation for the response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray and Populus deltoides Bart. was characterized for growth and performance traits after Cd exposure. A total of 16 quantitative trait loci (QTL) at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio 2.5 were detected for total dry weight, its components and root volume. Major QTL for Cd responses were mapped to two different linkage groups and the relative allelic effects were in opposing directions on the two chromosomes, suggesting differential mechanisms at these two loci. The phenotypic variance explained by Cd QTL ranged from 5.9 to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. A whole-genome microarray study led to the identification of nine Cd-responsive genes from these QTL. Promising candidates for Cd tolerance include an NHL repeat membrane-spanning protein, a metal transporter and a putative transcription factor. Additional candidates in the QTL intervals include a putative homolog of a glutamate cysteine ligase, and a glutathione-S-transferase. Functional characterization of these candidate genes should enhance our understanding of Cd metabolism and transport and phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  20. Mensurational and Biomass Relations for Populus ''Tristis #1'' Under Intensive Culture

    Treesearch

    Alan R. Ek

    1980-01-01

    Tree measurement data from plantations established in 1970 and 1973 and grown under intensive culture were used to establish various dimensional relations and biomass equations for Populus ''Tristis #1''. These equations subsequently have been used to estimate yields on study plots and for projections of future yields. They are presented here for...

  1. Selecting Populus with different adventitious root types for environmental benefits, fiber, and energy

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Jill A. Zalesny

    2009-01-01

    Primary roots from seeds, sucker roots in aspens, and adventitious roots (ARs) in poplars and their hybrids are prevalent within the genus Populus. Two AR types develop on hardwood cuttings: (i) lateral roots from either preformed or induced primordia along the length of the cutting and (ii) basal roots from callus at the base of the cutting in...

  2. Differential interspecific incompatibility among Populus hybrids in sections Aigeiros Duby and Tacamahaca Spach

    Treesearch

    Assiti A. Mahama; Richard B. Hall; Ronald S. Zalesny

    2011-01-01

    In our previous Populus breeding, compatible crosses between P. maximowiczii A. Henry and P. deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh corroborated the potential of interspecific hybrids, despite low seed set. Our current objective was to test the range of incompatibility among intraspecific and interspecific crosses using...

  3. Bulked segregant analysis identifies molecular markers linked to Melampsora medusae resistance in Populus deltoides

    Treesearch

    G. M. Tabor; Thomas L. Kubisiak; N. B. Klopfenstein; R. B. Hall; Henry S. McNabb

    2000-01-01

    In the north central United States, leaf rust caused by Melampsora medusae is a major disease problem on Populus deltoides. In this study we identified molecular markers linked to a M. medusae resistance locus (Lrd1) that was segregating 1:1 within an intraspecific P. deltoides...

  4. Selecting and utilizing Populus and Salix for landfill covers: implications for leachate irrigation

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Edmund O. Bauer

    2007-01-01

    The success of using Populus and Salix for phytoremediation has prompted further use of leachate as a combination of irrigation and fertilization for the trees. A common protocol for such efforts has been to utilize a limited number of readily-available genotypes with decades of deployment in other applications, such as fiber or...

  5. Environmental Influences on Wood Chemistry and Density of Populus and Loblolly Pine

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, G.A.

    2006-08-11

    The objectives of the study are to: (1) determine the degree to which physical and chemical wood properties vary in association with environmental and silvicultural practices in Populus and loblolly pine and (2) develop and verify species-specific empirical models in an effort to create a framework for understanding environmental influences on wood quality.

  6. Carbon allocation and nitrogen acquisition in a developing Populus deltoides plantation

    Treesearch

    Mark D. Coleman; Alexander L. Friend; Christel C. Kern

    2004-01-01

    We established Populus deltoides Bartr. stands differing in nitrogen (N) availability and tested if: (1) N-induced carbon (C) allocation could be explained by developmental allocation controls; and (2) N uptake per unit root mass, i.e., specific N-uptake rate, increased with N availability. Closely spaced (1 x 1 m) stands were treated with 50, 100...

  7. Early root development of poplars ( Populus spp.) in relation to moist and saturated soil conditions

    Treesearch

    Rebecka Mc Carthy; Magnus Löf; Emile S. Gardiner

    2017-01-01

    Poplars (Populus spp.) are among the fastest growing trees raised in temperate regions of the world. Testing of newly developed cultivars informs assessment of potential planting stock for local environments. Initial rooting by nine poplar clones was tested in moist and saturated soil conditions during an 18-day greenhouse experiment. Clones responded differently to...

  8. RepPop: A Database for Repetitive Elements in Populus Trichocarpa

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zhou, Fengfeng; Xu, Ying

    The populus was selected as the first tree with the genome to be sequenced, mainly due to its small genome size, the wide deployment worldwide (30+ species), and its short juvenile period. Its rich content of cellulose, which is one of the most important source for biofuel. A female clone of P. trichocarpa was chosen to be sequenced. The current assembly of Populus genome is release 1.0, whose small insert end-sequence coverage is 7.5X, and it was released in June 2004. It consists of 22,012 sequences (including the 19 chromosomes) and the total length is 485,510,911 bps. The data was downloaded from the offical site of the Populus trichocarpa genome sequencing project. The latest version of the genome can be found at the Poplar Genome Project at JGI Eukaryotic Genomics. Duplication regions introduce significant difficulties into the correct assemblying of sequence contigs. We identified all the repetitive elements in the populus genome. We further assign each of them as different classes of repetitive elements, including DNA transposons, RNA retrotransposons, Miniature Inverted-repeat Transposable Elements (MITE), Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR), and Segmental Duplications (SD), etc. We organized the annotations into this easily browsable, searchable, and blastable database, RepPop, for the whole community.[From website for RepPop at http://csbl.bmb.uga.edu/~ffzhou/RepPop/

  9. Chloride and sodium uptake potential over an entire rotation of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for information about the response of Populus genotypes to repeated application of high-salinity water and nutrient sources throughout an entire rotation. We have combined establishment biomass and uptake data with mid- and full-rotation growth data to project potential chloride (Cl−) and sodium (Na...

  10. Drought effects on leaf abscission and leaf production in Populus clones

    Treesearch

    Stephen G. Pallardy; Julie L. Rhoads

    1997-01-01

    Leaf abscission and foliation responses to water stress were studied in potted plants of five Populus clones grown in a greenhouse. As predawn leaf water potential (Ψ1) fell to -3 MPa, drought-induced leaf abscission increased progressively to 30% for data pooled across clones. As predawn Ψ1...

  11. The practice and physiological basis of collecting, storing and planting Populus hardwood cuttings

    Treesearch

    Anne S. Fege

    1983-01-01

    Producing healthy hardwood cuttings for Populus plantation establishment requires attention to the management of clonal nurseries, timely collection of cuttings, adequate grading of cuttings, storage temperature and conditions, preplanting treatments, and planting operations. Recommended nursery practices are outlined, along with their grounding in...

  12. Recent advances in research of some pest problems of hybrid populus in Michigan and Wisconsin

    Treesearch

    Lincoln M. Moore; Louis F. Wilson

    1983-01-01

    Hybrid Populus clones were examined for impact from and resistance to attack from several insects and diseases. Cottonwood leaf beetle, poplar-and-willow borer, and Septoria canker were most injurious. The spotted poplar aphid and poplar-gall saperda, even when abundant, caused only minor impact. The tarnished plant bug, a newly identified pest of...

  13. Populus seed fibers as a natural source for production of oil super absorbents.

    PubMed

    Likon, Marko; Remškar, Maja; Ducman, Vilma; Švegl, Franc

    2013-01-15

    The genus Populus, which includes poplars, cottonwoods and aspen trees, represents a huge natural source of fibers with exceptional physical properties. In this study, the oil absorption properties of poplar seed hair fibers obtained from Populus nigra italica when tested with high-density motor oil and diesel fuel are reported. Poplar seed hair fibers are hollow hydrophobic microtubes with an external diameter between 3 and 12 μm, an average length of 4±1 mm and average tube wall thickness of 400±100 nm. The solid skeleton of the hollow fibers consists of lignocellulosic material coated by a hydrophobic waxy coating. The exceptional chemical, physical and microstructural properties of poplar seed hair fibers enable super-absorbent behavior with high absorption capacity for heavy motor oil and diesel fuel. The absorption values of 182-211 g heavy oil/g fiber and 55-60 g heavy oil/g fiber for packing densities of 0.005 g/cm(3) and 0.02 g/cm(3), respectively, surpass all known natural absorbents. Thus, poplar seed hair fibers obtained from Populus nigra italica and other trees of the genus Populus are an extremely promising natural source for the production of oil super absorbents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Shoot position affects root initiation and growth of dormant unrooted cuttings of Populus

    Treesearch

    R.S., Jr. Zalesny; R.B. Hall; E.O. Bauer; D.E. Riemenschneider

    2003-01-01

    Rooting of dormant unrooted cuttings is crucial to the commercial deployment of intensively cultured poplar (Populus spp.) plantations because it is the first biological prerequisite to stand establishment. Rooting can be genetically controlled and subject to selection. Thus, our objective was to test for differences in rooting ability among cuttings...

  15. Clonal variation in lateral and basal rooting of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    R.S. Zalesny Jr.; J.A. Zalesny

    2011-01-01

    Successful establishment and productivity of Populus depends upon adventitious rooting from: 1) lateral roots that develop from either preformed or induced primordia and 2) basal roots that differentiate from callus at the base of the cutting in response to wounding. Information is needed for phytotechnologies about the degree to which ...

  16. Soil temperature and precipitation affect the rooting ability of dormant hardwood cuttings of Populus

    Treesearch

    R.S., Jr. Zalesny; R.B. Hall; E.O. Bauer; D.E. Riemenschneider

    2005-01-01

    In addition to genetic control, responses to environmental stimuli affect the success of rooting. Our objectives were to: 1) assess the variation in rooting ability among 21 Populus clones grown under varying soil temperatures and amounts of precipitation and 2) identify combinations of soil temperature and precipitation that promote rooting. The...

  17. Bud removal affects shoot, root, and callus development of hardwood Populus cuttings

    Treesearch

    A.H. Wiese; J.A. Zalesny; D.M. Donner; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny

    2006-01-01

    The inadvertent removal and/or damage of buds during processing and planting of hardwood poplar (Populus spp.) cuttings are a concern because of their potential impact on shoot and root development during establishment. The objective of the current study was to test for differences in shoot dry mass, root dry mass, number of roots, length of the...

  18. Anatomy and dry weight yields of two Populus clones grown under intensive culture.

    Treesearch

    John B. Crist; David H. Dawson

    1975-01-01

    Two Populus clones grown for short rotations at three dense planting spacings produced some extremely high yields of material of acceptable quality. However, variation in yields and quality illustrates that selection of genetic material and the cultured regime under which a species is growth are significant factors that must be determined in maximum-yield systems....

  19. Cryopreservation of Populus trichocarpa and Salix using dormant buds with recovery by grafting or direct rooting

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Populus trichocarpa and Salix can be successfully cryopreserved by using dormant scions as the source explants. These scions (either at their original moisture content of 48 to 60% or dried to 30%) were slowly cooled to –35 degree Celsius, transferred to the vapor phase of liquid nitrogen (LNV,-160...

  20. Influence of Populus Genotype on Gene Expression by the Wood Decay Fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Treesearch

    Jill Gaskell; Amber Marty; Michael Mozuch; Philip J. Kersten; Sandra Splinter Bondurant; Grzegorz Sabat; Ali Azarpira; John Ralph; Oleksandr Skyba; Shawn D. Mansfield; Robert A. Blanchette; Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    We examined gene expression patterns in the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium when it colonizes hybrid poplar (Populus alba tremula) and syringyl (S)-rich transgenic derivatives. Acombination ofmicroarrays and liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) allowed detection of a total of 9,959 transcripts and 793...

  1. Evaluation of Populus and Salix continuously irrigated with landfill leachate II. Soils and early tree development

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Edmund O. Bauer

    2007-01-01

    Soil contaminant levels and early tree growth data are helpful for assessing phytoremediation systems. Populus (DN17, DN182, DN34, NM2, and NM6) and Salix (94003, 94012, S287, S566, and SX61) genotypes were irrigated with landfill leachate or municipal water and tested for differences in 1) element concentrations (P, K, Ca, Mg, S,...

  2. Auxin gradients are associated with polarity changes in trees.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Eric M; Lewandowski, Michael; Beri, Satvik; Bernard, Jessica; Borkowski, Matthew; Borkowski, Michael H; Burchfield, Laura Ann; Mathisen, Brenda; Normanly, Jennifer

    2008-06-20

    Models of plant growth and development propose that changes in cell polarity are mediated by gradients of the plant hormone auxin. With use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we measured the redistribution of endogenous auxin in stems of quaking aspen trees (Populus tremuloides) after wounding. Persistent (lasting at least 24 hours) auxin gradients were observed in the region of the cambium where cell polarity was changing. A computer model of the auxin redistribution shows agreement with measured concentrations.

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Fasciclin-Like Arabinogalactan Protein Gene Family Reveals Differential Expression Patterns, Localization, and Salt Stress Response in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Lina; Zheng, Tangchun; Chu, Yanguang; Ding, Changjun; Zhang, Weixi; Huang, Qinjun; Su, Xiaohua

    2015-01-01

    Fasciclin-like arabinogalactan proteins (FLAs) are a subclass of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) involved in plant growth, development and response to abiotic stress. Although many studies have been performed to identify molecular functions of individual family members, little information is available on genome-wide identification and characterization of FLAs in the genus Populus. Based on genome-wide analysis, we have identified 35 Populus FLAs which were distributed on 16 chromosomes and phylogenetically clustered into four major groups. Gene structure and motif composition were relatively conserved in each group. All the members contained N-terminal signal peptide, 23 of which included predicted glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) modification sites and were anchored to plasma membranes. Subcellular localization analysis showed that PtrFLA2/20/26 were localized in cell membrane and cytoplasm of protoplasts from Populus stem-differentiating xylem. The Ka/Ks ratios showed that purifying selection has played a leading role in the long-term evolutionary period which greatly maintained the function of this family. The expression profiles showed that 32 PtrFLAs were differentially expressed in four tissues at four seasons based on publicly available microarray data. 18 FLAs were further verified with qRT-PCR in different tissues, which indicated that PtrFLA1/2/3/7/11/12/20/21/22/24/26/30 were significantly expressed in male and female flowers, suggesting close correlations with the reproductive development. In addition, PtrFLA1/9/10/11/17/21/23/24/26/28 were highly expressed in the stems and differentiating xylem, which may be involved in stem development. To determine salt response of FLAs, qRT-PCR was performed to analyze the expression of 18 genes under salinity stress across two time points. Results demonstrated that all the 18 FLAs were expressed in root tissues; especially, PtrFLA2/12/20/21/24/30 were significantly induced at different time points. In summary

  4. Identification of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) and Candidate Genes for Cadmium Tolerance in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Induri, Brahma R; Ellis, Danielle R; Slavov, Gancho; Yin, Tongming; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A; DiFazio, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of genetic variation in response of Populus to heavy metals like cadmium (Cd) is an important step in understanding the underlying mechanisms of tolerance. In this study, a pseudo-backcross pedigree of Populus trichocarpa and Populus deltoides was characterized for Cd exposure. The pedigree showed significant variation for Cd tolerance thus enabling the identification of relatively tolerant and susceptible genotypes for intensive characterization. A total of 16 QTLs at logarithm of odds (LOD) ratio > 2.5, were found to be associated with total dry weight, its components, and root volume. Four major QTLs for total dry weight were mapped to different linkage groups in control (LG III) and Cd conditions (LG XVI) and had opposite allelic effects on Cd tolerance, suggesting that these genomic regions were differentially controlled. The phenotypic variation explained by Cd QTL for all traits under study varied from 5.9% to 11.6% and averaged 8.2% across all QTL. Leaf Cd contents also showed significant variation suggesting the phytoextraction potential of Populus genotypes, though heritability of this trait was low (0.22). A whole-genome microarray study was conducted by using two genotypes with extreme responses for Cd tolerance in the above study and differentially expressed genes were identified. Candidate genes including CAD2 (CADMIUM SENSITIVE 2), HMA5 (HEAVY METAL ATPase5), ATGTST1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Glutathione S-Transferase1), ATGPX6 (Glutathione peroxidase 6), and ATMRP 14 (Arabidopsis thaliana Multidrug Resistance associated Protein 14) were identified from QTL intervals and microarray study. Functional characterization of these candidate genes could enhance phytoremediation capabilities of Populus.

  5. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  6. Genome-wide association implicates numerous genes and pleiotropy underlying ecological trait variation in natural populations of Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    McKown, Athena; Klapste, Jaroslav; Guy, Robert; Geraldes, Armando; Porth, Ilga; Hannemann, Jan; Friedmann, Michael; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A; Ehlting, Juergen; Cronk, Quentin; El-Kassaby, Yousry; Mansfield, Shawn; Douglas, Carl

    2014-01-01

    To uncover the genetic basis of phenotypic trait variation, we used 448 unrelated wild accessions of black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) from natural populations throughout western North America. Extensive information from large-scale trait phenotyping (with spatial and temporal replications within a common garden) and genotyping (with a 34K Populus SNP array) of all accessions were used for gene discovery in a genome-wide association study (GWAS).

  7. Genome resequencing in Populus: Revealing large-scale genome variation and implications on specialized-trait genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Muchero, Wellington; Labbe, Jessy L; Priya, Ranjan; DiFazio, Steven P; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2014-01-01

    To date, Populus ranks among a few plant species with a complete genome sequence and other highly developed genomic resources. With the first genome sequence among all tree species, Populus has been adopted as a suitable model organism for genomic studies in trees. However, far from being just a model species, Populus is a key renewable economic resource that plays a significant role in providing raw materials for the biofuel and pulp and paper industries. Therefore, aside from leading frontiers of basic tree molecular biology and ecological research, Populus leads frontiers in addressing global economic challenges related to fuel and fiber production. The latter fact suggests that research aimed at improving quality and quantity of Populus as a raw material will likely drive the pursuit of more targeted and deeper research in order to unlock the economic potential tied in molecular biology processes that drive this tree species. Advances in genome sequence-driven technologies, such as resequencing individual genotypes, which in turn facilitates large scale SNP discovery and identification of large scale polymorphisms are key determinants of future success in these initiatives. In this treatise we discuss implications of genome sequence-enable technologies on Populus genomic and genetic studies of complex and specialized-traits.

  8. Productivity, water-use efficiency and tolerance to moderate water deficit correlate in 33 poplar genotypes from a Populus deltoides x Populus trichocarpa F1 progeny.

    PubMed

    Monclus, R; Villar, M; Barbaroux, C; Bastien, C; Fichot, R; Delmotte, F M; Delay, D; Petit, J-M; Bréchet, C; Dreyer, E; Brignolas, F

    2009-11-01

    Genotypic variability for productivity, water-use efficiency and leaf traits in 33 genotypes selected from an F1 progeny of Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh x Populus trichocarpa L. was explored under optimal and moderate water-deficit conditions. Saplings of the 33 genotypes were grown in a two-plot open field at INRA Orléans (France) and coppiced every year. A moderate water deficit was induced during two successive years on one plot by withholding irrigation, while the second one remained irrigated (control). Stem biomass and leaf structure (e.g., specific leaf area and leaf area) were measured in 2004 and 2005 and functional leaf traits (e.g., carbon isotope discrimination, Delta) were measured only in 2004. Tolerance to water deficit was estimated at genotype level as the ability to limit losses in biomass production in water deficit versus control trees. Stem biomass, leaf structure and Delta displayed a significant genotypic variability whatever the irrigation regime. For all traits, genotype ranks remained stable across years for similar irrigation conditions. Carbon isotope discrimination scaled negatively with productivity and leaf nitrogen content in controls. The most productive genotypes were the least tolerant to moderate water deficit. No relationship was evidenced between Delta and the level of tolerance to water deficit. The relationships between traits evidenced in this collection of P. deltoides x P. trichocarpa F1 genotypes contrast with the ones that were previously detected in a collection of P. deltoides x Populus nigra L. cultivars tested in the same field trial.

  9. Auxin is a long-range signal that acts independently of ethylene signaling on leaf abscission in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xu; Zimmermann, Jorma; Polle, Andrea; Fischer, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Timing of leaf abscission is an important trait for biomass production and seasonal acclimation in deciduous trees. The signaling leading to organ separation, from the external cue (decreasing photoperiod) to ethylene-regulated hydrolysis of the middle lamellae in the abscission zone, is only poorly understood. Data from annual species indicate that the formation of an auxin gradient spanning the abscission zone regulates the timing of abscission. We established an experimental system in Populus to induce leaf shedding synchronously under controlled greenhouse conditions in order to test the function of auxin in leaf abscission. Here, we show that exogenous auxin delayed abscission of dark-induced leaves over short and long distances and that a new auxin response maximum preceded the formation of an abscission zone. Several auxin transporters were down-regulated during abscission and inhibition of polar auxin transport delayed leaf shedding. Ethylene signaling was not involved in the regulation of these auxin transporters and in the formation of an abscission zone, but was required for the expression of hydrolytic enzymes associated with cell separation. Since exogenous auxin delayed abscission in absence of ethylene signaling auxin likely acts independently of ethylene signaling on cell separation. PMID:26322071

  10. Biochemical basis of drought tolerance in hybrid Populus grown under field production conditions. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tschaplinski, T.J.; Tuskan, G.A.; Wierman, C.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this cooperative effort was to assess the use of osmotically active compounds as molecular selection criteria for drought tolerance in Populus in a large-scale field trial. It is known that some plant species, and individuals within a plant species, can tolerate increasing stress associated with reduced moisture availability by accumulating solutes. The biochemical matrix of such metabolites varies among species and among individuals. The ability of Populus clones to tolerate drought has equal value to other fiber producers, i.e., the wood products industry, where irrigation is used in combination with other cultural treatments to obtain high dry weight yields. The research initially involved an assessment of drought stress under field conditions and characterization of changes in osmotic constitution among the seven clones across the six moisture levels. The near-term goal was to provide a mechanistic basis for clonal differences in productivity under various irrigation treatments over time.

  11. Cytogenetic Analysis of Populus trichocarpa - Ribosomal DNA, Telomere Repeat Sequence, and Marker-selected BACs

    SciTech Connect

    Tuskan, Gerald A; Gunter, Lee E; DiFazio, Stephen P

    2009-01-01

    The 18S-28S rDNA and 5S rDNA loci in Populus trichocarpa were localized using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Two 18S-28S rDNA sites and one 5S rDNA site were identified and located at the ends of 3 different chromosomes. FISH signals from the Arabidopsis -type telomere repeat sequence were observed at the distal ends of each chromosome. Six BAC clones selected from 2 linkage groups based on genome sequence assembly (LG-I and LG-VI) were localized on 2 chromosomes, as expected. BACs from LG-I hybridized to the longest chromosome in the complement. All BAC positions were found to be concordant with sequence assembly positions. BAC-FISH will be useful for delineating each of the Populus trichocarpa chromosomes and improving the sequence assembly of this model angiosperm tree species.

  12. Genome resequencing reveals multiscale geographic structure and extensive linkage disequilibrium in the forest tree Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Slavov, Gancho; DiFazio, Stephen P; Martin, Joel R; Schackwitz, Wendy; Muchero, Wellington; Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Lipphardt, Mindie; Pennacchio, Christa; Hellsten, Uffe; Pennacchio, Len; Gunter, Lee; Ranjan, Priya; Strauss, Steven; Rokhsar, Daniel; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    Population genomics of forest trees provides crucial information for breeding, conservation, and bioenergy feedstock development. As part of a large-scale association study, we resequenced 16 genomes of the model tree Populus trichocarpa to an average depth of 39 . Analyses of the resulting data revealed surprisingly extensive population genetic structure and decay of linkage disequilibrium over much larger physical distances than the expected based on previous, smaller-scale studies. Rates of recombination varied widely across the genome but were largely predictable based on DNA sequence and methylation patterns. Our results suggest that genomewide association studies and accurate prediction of phenotypes from DNA data are more feasible in Populus than previously assumed, thereby laying the foundation for a step change in our understanding of tree biology.

  13. Cytogenetic analysis of Populus trichocarpa--ribosomal DNA, telomere repeat sequence, and marker-selected BACs.

    PubMed

    Islam-Faridi, M N; Nelson, C D; DiFazio, S P; Gunter, L E; Tuskan, G A

    2009-01-01

    The 18S-28S rDNA and 5S rDNA loci in Populus trichocarpa were localized using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Two 18S-28S rDNA sites and one 5S rDNA site were identified and located at the ends of 3 different chromosomes. FISH signals from the Arabidopsis-type telomere repeat sequence were observed at the distal ends of each chromosome. Six BAC clones selected from 2 linkage groups based on genome sequence assembly (LG-I and LG-VI) were localized on 2 chromosomes, as expected. BACs from LG-I hybridized to the longest chromosome in the complement. All BAC positions were found to be concordant with sequence assembly positions. BAC-FISH will be useful for delineating each of the Populus trichocarpa chromosomes and improving the sequence assembly of this model angiosperm tree species.

  14. Isolating a functionally relevant guild of fungi from the root microbiome of Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Bonito, Gregory; Hameed, Khalid; Ventura, Rafael; Krishnan, Jay; Schadt, Christopher W.; Vilgalys, Rytas

    2016-05-27

    Plant roots interact with a bewilderingly complex community of microbes, including root-associated fungi that are essential for maintaining plant health. To improve understanding of the diversity of fungi in the rhizobiome of Populus deltoides, Populus trichocarpa and co-occurring plant hosts Quercus alba and Pinus taeda, we conducted field and greenhouse studies and sampled, isolated, and characterized the diversity of culturable root-associated fungi on these hosts. Using both general and selective isolation media we obtained more than 1800 fungal isolates from individual surface sterilized root tips. Sequences from the ITS and/or D1– D2 regions of the LSU rDNA were obtained from 1042 of the >1800 pure culture isolates and were compared to accessions in the NCBI nucleotide database and analyzed through phylogenetics for preliminary taxonomic identification. Sequences from these isolates were also compared to 454 sequence datasets obtained directly from the Populus rhizosphere and endosphere. Although most of the ectomycorrhizal taxa known to associate with Populus evaded isolation, many of the abundant sequence types from rhizosphere and endosphere 454 datasets were isolated, including novel species belonging to the Atractiellales. Isolation and identification of key endorrhizal fungi will enable more targeted study of plant-fungal interactions. Genome sequencing is currently underway for a subset of our culture library with the aim of understanding the mechanisms involved in host-endophyte establishment and function. As a result, this diverse culture library of fungal root associates will be a valuable resource for metagenomic research, experimentation and further studies on plant-fungal interactions.

  15. Cytogenetic Analysis of Populus trichocarpa - Ribosomal DNA, Telomere Repeat Sequence, and Marker-selected BACs

    Treesearch

    M.N. lslam-Faridi; C.D. Nelson; S.P. DiFazio; L.E. Gunter; G.A. Tuskan

    2009-01-01

    The 185-285 rDNA and 55 rDNA loci in Populus trichocarpa were localized using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Two 185-285 rDNA sites and one 55 rDNA site were identified and located at the ends of 3 different chromosomes. FISH signals from the Arabidopsis-type telomere repeat sequence were observed at the distal ends of each chromosome. Six BAC clones...

  16. Isolating a functionally relevant guild of fungi from the root microbiome of Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Bonito, Gregory; Hameed, Khalid; Ventura, Rafael; Krishnan, Jay; Schadt, Christopher W.; Vilgalys, Rytas

    2016-05-27

    Plant roots interact with a bewilderingly complex community of microbes, including root-associated fungi that are essential for maintaining plant health. To improve understanding of the diversity of fungi in the rhizobiome of Populus deltoides, Populus trichocarpa and co-occurring plant hosts Quercus alba and Pinus taeda, we conducted field and greenhouse studies and sampled, isolated, and characterized the diversity of culturable root-associated fungi on these hosts. Using both general and selective isolation media we obtained more than 1800 fungal isolates from individual surface sterilized root tips. Sequences from the ITS and/or D1– D2 regions of the LSU rDNA were obtained from 1042 of the >1800 pure culture isolates and were compared to accessions in the NCBI nucleotide database and analyzed through phylogenetics for preliminary taxonomic identification. Sequences from these isolates were also compared to 454 sequence datasets obtained directly from the Populus rhizosphere and endosphere. Although most of the ectomycorrhizal taxa known to associate with Populus evaded isolation, many of the abundant sequence types from rhizosphere and endosphere 454 datasets were isolated, including novel species belonging to the Atractiellales. Isolation and identification of key endorrhizal fungi will enable more targeted study of plant-fungal interactions. Genome sequencing is currently underway for a subset of our culture library with the aim of understanding the mechanisms involved in host-endophyte establishment and function. As a result, this diverse culture library of fungal root associates will be a valuable resource for metagenomic research, experimentation and further studies on plant-fungal interactions.

  17. Isolating a functionally relevant guild of fungi from the root microbiome of Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Bonito, Gregory; Hameed, Khalid; Ventura, Rafael; ...

    2016-05-27

    Plant roots interact with a bewilderingly complex community of microbes, including root-associated fungi that are essential for maintaining plant health. To improve understanding of the diversity of fungi in the rhizobiome of Populus deltoides, Populus trichocarpa and co-occurring plant hosts Quercus alba and Pinus taeda, we conducted field and greenhouse studies and sampled, isolated, and characterized the diversity of culturable root-associated fungi on these hosts. Using both general and selective isolation media we obtained more than 1800 fungal isolates from individual surface sterilized root tips. Sequences from the ITS and/or D1– D2 regions of the LSU rDNA were obtained frommore » 1042 of the >1800 pure culture isolates and were compared to accessions in the NCBI nucleotide database and analyzed through phylogenetics for preliminary taxonomic identification. Sequences from these isolates were also compared to 454 sequence datasets obtained directly from the Populus rhizosphere and endosphere. Although most of the ectomycorrhizal taxa known to associate with Populus evaded isolation, many of the abundant sequence types from rhizosphere and endosphere 454 datasets were isolated, including novel species belonging to the Atractiellales. Isolation and identification of key endorrhizal fungi will enable more targeted study of plant-fungal interactions. Genome sequencing is currently underway for a subset of our culture library with the aim of understanding the mechanisms involved in host-endophyte establishment and function. As a result, this diverse culture library of fungal root associates will be a valuable resource for metagenomic research, experimentation and further studies on plant-fungal interactions.« less

  18. Intra-annual growth and mortality of four Populus clones in pure and mixed plantings

    Treesearch

    Warren D. Devine; Constance A. Harrington; Dean S. DeBell

    2010-01-01

    Intra-annual growth rates were assessed during 3 years for four Populus clones grown in pure and mixed clonal stands at square spacings of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 m in western Washington, USA. Height growth rate peaked in August, except at the 0.5-m spacing where it peaked in July and June in years 2 and 3, respectively. Diameter growth rate generally...

  19. Genetic analysis of post-mating reproductive barriers in hybridizing European Populus species

    PubMed Central

    Macaya-Sanz, D; Suter, L; Joseph, J; Barbará, T; Alba, N; González-Martínez, S C; Widmer, A; Lexer, C

    2011-01-01

    Molecular genetic analyses of experimental crosses provide important information on the strength and nature of post-mating barriers to gene exchange between divergent populations, which are topics of great interest to evolutionary geneticists and breeders. Although not a trivial task in long-lived organisms such as trees, experimental interspecific recombinants can sometimes be created through controlled crosses involving natural F1's. Here, we used this approach to understand the genetics of post-mating isolation and barriers to introgression in Populus alba and Populus tremula, two ecologically divergent, hybridizing forest trees. We studied 86 interspecific backcross (BC1) progeny and >350 individuals from natural populations of these species for up to 98 nuclear genetic markers, including microsatellites, indels and single nucleotide polymorphisms, and inferred the origin of the cytoplasm of the cross with plastid DNA. Genetic analysis of the BC1 revealed extensive segregation distortions on six chromosomes, and >90% of these (12 out of 13) favored P. tremula donor alleles in the heterospecific genomic background. Since selection was documented during early diploid stages of the progeny, this surprising result was attributed to epistasis, cyto-nuclear coadaptation, heterozygote advantage at nuclear loci experiencing introgression or a combination of these. Our results indicate that gene flow across ‘porous' species barriers affects these poplars and aspens beyond neutral, Mendelian expectations and suggests the mechanisms responsible. Contrary to expectations, the Populus sex determination region is not protected from introgression. Understanding the population dynamics of the Populus sex determination region will require tests based on natural interspecific hybrid zones. PMID:21587301

  20. Carbon allocation and nitrogen acquisition in a developing Populus deltoides plantation

    Treesearch

    Mark D. Coleman; Alexander L. Friend; Christel C. Kern

    2004-01-01

    We established Populus deltoides Bartr. stands differing in nitrogen (N) availability and tested if: (1) N-induced carbon (C) allocation could be explained by develop- mental allocation controls; and (2) N uptake per unit root mass, i.e., specific N-uptake rate, increased with N availability. Closely spaced (1 × 1 m) stands were treated with 50, 100 and 200 kg N ha ­...

  1. Patterns of interaction between Populus Esch5 and Piriformospora indica: a transition from mutualism to antagonism.

    PubMed

    Kaldorf, M; Koch, B; Rexer, K-H; Kost, G; Varma, A

    2005-03-01

    Piriformospora indica (Sebacinaceae, Basidiomycota) is an axenically cultivable, plant growth promoting root endophyte with a wide host range, including Populus. Rooting of Populus Esch5 explants started within 6 days after transfer to WPM medium. If such plantlets with roots were inoculated with P. indica, there was an increase in root biomass, and the number of 2nd order roots was increased significantly. A totally different observation was recorded when the explants were placed into WPM with pre-grown P. indica. The interaction led to complete blocking of root production and severely inhibited plant growth. Additionally, branched aerial roots appeared which did not penetrate the medium. On contact with the fungal colony or the medium, the ends of the aerial roots became inflated. Prolonged incubation stimulated the fungus to colonize aerial parts of the plant (stem and leaves). Mycelium not only spread on the surface of the aerial parts, but also invaded the cortical tissues inter- and intracellularly. Detached Populus leaves remained vital for 4 - 5 weeks on sterile agar media or on AspM medium with pre-grown P. indica. When the fungus was pre-grown on culture media such as WPM, containing ammonium as the main source of nitrogen, leaves in contact with the cultures turned brownish within 4 - 12 h. Thereafter, the leaves bleached, and about one day later had become whitish. Thus, cultural conditions could alter the behaviour of the fungus drastically: the outcome of the interaction between plant and fungus can be directed from mutualistic to antagonistic, characterized by fungal toxin formation and extension of the colonization to Populus shoots.

  2. Dendrochronological and palynological observations on Populus balsamifera in northern Alaska, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.E.; Dunwiddie, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Sexual and clonal reproduction is occurring in a stand of Populus balsamifera on the Alaskan North Slope. Both even-aged and gradually expanding clones were observed. Trees attain ages in excess of 230 yr, but are slender due to slow diametrical growth (1.4 to 2.5 mm yr/sup -1/). A tree-ring chronology developed using 16 trees exhibited higher mean sensitivity (0.48) and lower first-order autocorrelation (0.43) than other high-latitude chronologies. Ring-width indices were most highly correlated with June temperature (r = 0.50). This species may be useful in expanding the array of climatically sensitive tree-ring sites in the Arctic. Moss polster samples in the vicinity of the stand indicate that although abundant Populus pollen is produced, little is found in surface samples > 30 m from the trees. It is suggested that Populus balsamifera was considerably more abundant in Beringia during the early Holocene due to warm early summer temperatures and widespread substrates favorable for its growth.

  3. Polyphenol oxidase overexpression in transgenic Populus enhances resistance to herbivory by forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiehua; Constabel, C Peter

    2004-11-01

    In order to functionally analyze the predicted defensive role of leaf polyphenol oxidase (PPO; EC 1.10.3.1) in Populus, transgenic hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. alba) plants overexpressing a hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa x P. deltoides) PtdPPO1 gene were constructed. Regenerated transgenic plants showed high PPO enzyme activity, PtdPPO1 mRNA levels and PPO protein accumulation. In leaf disk bioassays, forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria) larvae feeding on PPO-overexpressing transgenics experienced significantly higher mortality and reduced average weight gain compared to larvae feeding on control leaves. However, this effect was observed only when older egg masses were used and the resulting larvae showed reduced growth and vigor. In choice tests, no effect of PPO overexpression was detected. Although PPO in poplar leaves is latent and requires activation with detergents or trypsin for full enzymatic activity, in caterpillar frass the enzyme was extracted in the fully activated form. This activation correlated with partial proteolytic cleavage, suggesting that PPO latency and activation during digestion could be an adaptive and defense-related feature of poplar PPO.

  4. Plants remember past weather: a study for atmospheric pollen concentrations of Ambrosia, Poaceae and Populus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyasovszky, István; Makra, László; Csépe, Zoltán; Sümeghy, Zoltán; Deák, Áron József; Pál-Molnár, Elemér; Tusnády, Gábor

    2015-10-01

    After extreme dry (wet) summers or years, pollen production of different taxa may decrease (increase) substantially. Accordingly, studying effects of current and past meteorological conditions on current pollen concentrations for different taxa have of major importance. The purpose of this study is separating the weight of current and past weather conditions influencing current pollen productions of three taxa. Two procedures, namely multiple correlations and factor analysis with special transformation are used. The 11-year (1997-2007) data sets include daily pollen counts of Ambrosia (ragweed), Poaceae (grasses) and Populus (poplar), as well as daily values of four climate variables (temperature, relative humidity, global solar flux and precipitation). Multiple correlations of daily pollen counts with simultaneous values of daily meteorological variables do not show annual course for Ambrosia, but do show definite trends for Populus and Poaceae. Results received using the two methods revealed characteristic similarities. For all the three taxa, the continental rainfall peak and additional local showers in the growing season can strengthen the weight of the current meteorological elements. However, due to the precipitation, big amount of water can be stored in the soil contributing to the effect of the past climate elements during dry periods. Higher climate sensitivity (especially water sensitivity) of the herbaceous taxa ( Ambrosia and Poaceae) can be definitely established compared to the arboreal Populus. Separation of the weight of the current and past weather conditions for different taxa involves practical importance both for health care and agricultural production.

  5. Genome resequencing reveals multiscale geographic structure and extensive linkage disequilibrium in the forest tree Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Slavov, Gancho T; DiFazio, Stephen P; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Muchero, Wellington; Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Lipphardt, Mindie F; Pennacchio, Christa P; Hellsten, Uffe; Pennacchio, Len A; Gunter, Lee E; Ranjan, Priya; Vining, Kelly; Pomraning, Kyle R; Wilhelm, Larry J; Pellegrini, Matteo; Mockler, Todd C; Freitag, Michael; Geraldes, Armando; El-Kassaby, Yousry A; Mansfield, Shawn D; Cronk, Quentin C B; Douglas, Carl J; Strauss, Steven H; Rokhsar, Dan; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2012-11-01

    • Plant population genomics informs evolutionary biology, breeding, conservation and bioenergy feedstock development. For example, the detection of reliable phenotype-genotype associations and molecular signatures of selection requires a detailed knowledge about genome-wide patterns of allele frequency variation, linkage disequilibrium and recombination. • We resequenced 16 genomes of the model tree Populus trichocarpa and genotyped 120 trees from 10 subpopulations using 29,213 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. • Significant geographic differentiation was present at multiple spatial scales, and range-wide latitudinal allele frequency gradients were strikingly common across the genome. The decay of linkage disequilibrium with physical distance was slower than expected from previous studies in Populus, with r(2) dropping below 0.2 within 3-6 kb. Consistent with this, estimates of recent effective population size from linkage disequilibrium (N(e) ≈ 4000-6000) were remarkably low relative to the large census sizes of P. trichocarpa stands. Fine-scale rates of recombination varied widely across the genome, but were largely predictable on the basis of DNA sequence and methylation features. • Our results suggest that genetic drift has played a significant role in the recent evolutionary history of P. trichocarpa. Most importantly, the extensive linkage disequilibrium detected suggests that genome-wide association studies and genomic selection in undomesticated populations may be more feasible in Populus than previously assumed. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. The SUPERMAN gene family in Populus: nucleotide diversity and gene expression in a dioecious plant.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuepeng; Ma, Kaifeng; Ci, Dong; Tian, Xueyuan; Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2013-08-01

    SUP gene family expression and regulation patterns reported in dioecious woody plant. Phylogenetic and nucleotide diversity analysis indicated PtoSUP1 is highly conserved and has undergone strong purifying selection. The molecular basis of SUPERMAN (SUP) regulation during floral development in monoecious plants has been extensively studied, but little is known of the SUP gene family in dioecious woody plants. In this study, we systematically examined the diversification of the SUP gene family in Populus, integrating genomic organization, expression, and phylogeny data. SUP family members showed sex-specific expression throughout flower development. Transcript profiling of rare gynomonoecious poplar flowers revealed that a significant reduction in PtoSUP1 mRNA might be important for stamen development in gynomonoecious poplar flowers. We found that the coding regions of Populus SUP genes are very highly conserved and that synonymous sites in exon regions have undergone strong purifying selection during SUP evolution in Populus. These results indicate that SUP genes play an important role in floral development of dioecious plants. Expression analysis of SUP suggested possible regulatory mechanisms for gynomonoecious poplar flower development. These findings provide an important insight into the mechanisms of the evolution of SUP function and may help enable engineered regulation of flower development for breeding improved tree varieties.

  7. [Effects of cadmium stress on the microbial biodiversity in purple soil and alluvial soil potted with a poplar (Populus deltoides x Populus nigra)].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ao; Wu, Fu-Zhong; Yang, Wan-Qin; Zhou, Li-Qiang; Wang, Xu-Xi; Han, Yu

    2011-07-01

    Effects of current Cd contamination levels on microbial biodiversity were studied under the typical Cd contaminated soils in the Yangtze Basin. Purple soil and alluvial soil potted with a poplar (Populus deltoides x Populus nigra) were selected, and the culturable soil microbial amounts by flat method, microbial biomass and bacterial community structure by PCR-DGGE were investigated. Cd supplies significantly increased the culturable amounts of bacteria and actinomyces in purple soil, but decreased the culturable amounts of fungi and the content of microbial biomass N. Fingerprint of DGGE also showed that bacterial community structure have obviously changed under different Cd supplies. In contrast, the lower Cd supplies slightly increased the culturable amounts of bacteria and fungi in alluvial soil, but higher Cd supply treatment decreased the culturable amounts of bacteria, actinomyces and fungi, and the content of microbial biomass N. However, only a slight change was observed under different Cd supplies by DGGE fingerprint. Additionally, there were few effects of Cd supplies on the content of microbial biomass C in both purple soil and alluvial soil. The results provided basic data to understand the effects of present Cd contamination levels on soil microbial characteristics.

  8. Common trade-offs between xylem resistance to cavitation and other physiological traits do not hold among unrelated Populus deltoides x Populus nigra hybrids.

    PubMed

    Fichot, Régis; Barigah, Têtè S; Chamaillard, Sylvain; LE Thiec, Dider; Laurans, Françoise; Cochard, Hervé; Brignolas, Franck

    2010-09-01

    We examined the relationships between xylem resistance to cavitation and 16 structural and functional traits across eight unrelated Populus deltoides x Populus nigra genotypes grown under two contrasting water regimes. The xylem water potential inducing 50% loss of hydraulic conductance (Psi(50)) varied from -1.60 to -2.40 MPa. Drought-acclimated trees displayed a safer xylem, although the extent of the response was largely genotype dependent, with Psi(50) being decreased by as far as 0.60 MPa. At the tissue level, there was no clear relationship between xylem safety and either xylem water transport efficiency or xylem biomechanics; the only structural trait to be strongly associated with Psi(50) was the double vessel wall thickness, genotypes exhibiting a thicker double wall being more resistant. At the leaf level, increased cavitation resistance was associated with decreased stomatal conductance, while no relationship could be identified with traits associated with carbon uptake or bulk leaf carbon isotope discrimination, a surrogate of intrinsic water-use efficiency. At the whole-plant level, increased safety was associated with higher shoot growth potential under well-irrigated regime only. We conclude that common trade-offs between xylem resistance to cavitation and other physiological traits that are observed across species may not necessarily hold true at narrower scales.

  9. Expansion and diversification of the SET domain gene family following whole-genome duplications in Populus trichocarpa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Histone lysine methylation modifies chromatin structure and regulates eukaryotic gene transcription and a variety of developmental and physiological processes. SET domain proteins are lysine methyltransferases containing the evolutionarily-conserved SET domain, which is known to be the catalytic domain. Results We identified 59 SET genes in the Populus genome. Phylogenetic analyses of 106 SET genes from Populus and Arabidopsis supported the clustering of SET genes into six distinct subfamilies and identified 19 duplicated gene pairs in Populus. The chromosome locations of these gene pairs and the distribution of synonymous substitution rates showed that the expansion of the SET gene family might be caused by large-scale duplications in Populus. Comparison of gene structures and domain architectures of each duplicate pair indicated that divergence took place at the 3'- and 5'-terminal transcribed regions and at the N- and C-termini of the predicted proteins, respectively. Expression profile analysis of Populus SET genes suggested that most Populus SET genes were expressed widely, many with the highest expression in young leaves. In particular, the expression profiles of 12 of the 19 duplicated gene pairs fell into two types of expression patterns. Conclusions The 19 duplicated SET genes could have originated from whole genome duplication events. The differences in SET gene structure, domain architecture, and expression profiles in various tissues of Populus suggest that members of the SET gene family have a variety of developmental and physiological functions. Our study provides clues about the evolution of epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression. PMID:22497662

  10. Populus euphratica XTH overexpression enhances salinity tolerance by the development of leaf succulence in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Han, Yansha; Wang, Wei; Sun, Jian; Ding, Mingquan; Zhao, Rui; Deng, Shurong; Wang, Feifei; Hu, Yue; Wang, Yang; Lu, Yanjun; Du, Liping; Hu, Zanmin; Diekmann, Heike; Shen, Xin; Polle, Andrea; Chen, Shaoliang

    2013-11-01

    Populus euphratica is a salt-tolerant tree species that develops leaf succulence after a prolonged period of salinity stress. In the present study, a putative xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase gene (PeXTH) from P. euphratica was isolated and transferred to tobacco plants. PeXTH localized exclusively to the endoplasmic reticulum and cell wall. Plants overexpressing PeXTH were more salt tolerant than wild-type tobacco with respect to root and leaf growth, and survival. The increased capacity for salt tolerance was due mainly to the anatomical and physiological alterations caused by PeXTH overexpression. Compared with the wild type, PeXTH-transgenic plants contained 36% higher water content per unit area and 39% higher ratio of fresh weight to dry weight, a hallmark of leaf succulence. However, the increased water storage in the leaves in PeXTH-transgenic plants was not accompanied by greater leaf thickness but was due to highly packed palisade parenchyma cells and fewer intercellular air spaces between mesophyll cells. In addition to the salt dilution effect in response to NaCl, these anatomical changes increased leaf water-retaining capacity, which lowered the increase of salt concentration in the succulent tissues and mesophyll cells. Moreover, the increased number of mesophyll cells reduced the intercellular air space, which improved carbon economy and resulted in a 47-78% greater net photosynthesis under control and salt treatments (100-150 mM NaCl). Taken together, the results indicate that PeXTH overexpression enhanced salt tolerance by the development of succulent leaves in tobacco plants without swelling.

  11. The Role of Water Channel Proteins in Facilitating Recovery of Leaf Hydraulic Conductance from Water Stress in Populus trichocarpa

    PubMed Central

    Laur, Joan; Hacke, Uwe G.

    2014-01-01

    Gas exchange is constrained by the whole-plant hydraulic conductance (Kplant). Leaves account for an important fraction of Kplant and may therefore represent a major determinant of plant productivity. Leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) decreases with increasing water stress, which is due to xylem embolism in leaf veins and/or the properties of the extra-xylary pathway. Water flow through living tissues is facilitated and regulated by water channel proteins called aquaporins (AQPs). Here we assessed changes in the hydraulic conductance of Populus trichocarpa leaves during a dehydration-rewatering episode. While leaves were highly sensitive to drought, Kleaf recovered only 2 hours after plants were rewatered. Recovery of Kleaf was absent when excised leaves were bench-dried and subsequently xylem-perfused with a solution containing AQP inhibitors. We examined the expression patterns of 12 highly expressed AQP genes during a dehydration-rehydration episode to identify isoforms that may be involved in leaf hydraulic adjustments. Among the AQPs tested, several genes encoding tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) showed large increases in expression in rehydrated leaves, suggesting that TIPs contribute to reversing drought-induced reductions in Kleaf. TIPs were localized in xylem parenchyma, consistent with a role in facilitating water exchange between xylem vessels and adjacent living cells. Dye uptake experiments suggested that reversible embolism formation in minor leaf veins contributed to the observed changes in Kleaf. PMID:25406088

  12. A Transcriptomic Network Underlies Microstructural and Physiological Responses to Cadmium in Populus × canescens1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiali; Li, Hong; Luo, Jie; Ma, Chaofeng; Li, Shaojun; Qu, Long; Gai, Ying; Jiang, Xiangning; Janz, Dennis; Polle, Andrea; Tyree, Melvin; Luo, Zhi-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Bark tissue of Populus × canescens can hyperaccumulate cadmium, but microstructural, transcriptomic, and physiological response mechanisms are poorly understood. Histochemical assays, transmission electron microscopic observations, energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis, and transcriptomic and physiological analyses have been performed to enhance our understanding of cadmium accumulation and detoxification in P. × canescens. Cadmium was allocated to the phloem of the bark, and subcellular cadmium compartmentalization occurred mainly in vacuoles of phloem cells. Transcripts involved in microstructural alteration, changes in nutrition and primary metabolism, and stimulation of stress responses showed significantly differential expression in the bark of P. × canescens exposed to cadmium. About 48% of the differentially regulated transcripts formed a coregulation network in which 43 hub genes played a central role both in cross talk among distinct biological processes and in coordinating the transcriptomic regulation in the bark of P. × canescens in response to cadmium. The cadmium transcriptome in the bark of P. × canescens was mirrored by physiological readouts. Cadmium accumulation led to decreased total nitrogen, phosphorus, and calcium and increased sulfur in the bark. Cadmium inhibited photosynthesis, resulting in decreased carbohydrate levels. Cadmium induced oxidative stress and antioxidants, including free proline, soluble phenolics, ascorbate, and thiol compounds. These results suggest that orchestrated microstructural, transcriptomic, and physiological regulation may sustain cadmium hyperaccumulation in P. × canescens bark and provide new insights into engineering woody plants for phytoremediation. PMID:23530184

  13. The role of water channel proteins in facilitating recovery of leaf hydraulic conductance from water stress in Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Laur, Joan; Hacke, Uwe G

    2014-01-01

    Gas exchange is constrained by the whole-plant hydraulic conductance (Kplant). Leaves account for an important fraction of Kplant and may therefore represent a major determinant of plant productivity. Leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) decreases with increasing water stress, which is due to xylem embolism in leaf veins and/or the properties of the extra-xylary pathway. Water flow through living tissues is facilitated and regulated by water channel proteins called aquaporins (AQPs). Here we assessed changes in the hydraulic conductance of Populus trichocarpa leaves during a dehydration-rewatering episode. While leaves were highly sensitive to drought, Kleaf recovered only 2 hours after plants were rewatered. Recovery of Kleaf was absent when excised leaves were bench-dried and subsequently xylem-perfused with a solution containing AQP inhibitors. We examined the expression patterns of 12 highly expressed AQP genes during a dehydration-rehydration episode to identify isoforms that may be involved in leaf hydraulic adjustments. Among the AQPs tested, several genes encoding tonoplast intrinsic proteins (TIPs) showed large increases in expression in rehydrated leaves, suggesting that TIPs contribute to reversing drought-induced reductions in Kleaf. TIPs were localized in xylem parenchyma, consistent with a role in facilitating water exchange between xylem vessels and adjacent living cells. Dye uptake experiments suggested that reversible embolism formation in minor leaf veins contributed to the observed changes in Kleaf.

  14. Ethylene and jasmonic acid act as negative modulators during mutualistic symbiosis between Laccaria bicolor and Populus roots.

    PubMed

    Plett, Jonathan M; Khachane, Amit; Ouassou, Malika; Sundberg, Björn; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis

    2014-04-01

    The plant hormones ethylene, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid have interconnecting roles during the response of plant tissues to mutualistic and pathogenic symbionts. We used morphological studies of transgenic- or hormone-treated Populus roots as well as whole-genome oligoarrays to examine how these hormones affect root colonization by the mutualistic ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N. We found that genes regulated by ethylene, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid were regulated in the late stages of the interaction between L. bicolor and poplar. Both ethylene and jasmonic acid treatments were found to impede fungal colonization of roots, and this effect was correlated to an increase in the expression of certain transcription factors (e.g. ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR1) and a decrease in the expression of genes associated with microbial perception and cell wall modification. Further, we found that ethylene and jasmonic acid showed extensive transcriptional cross-talk, cross-talk that was opposed by salicylic acid signaling. We conclude that ethylene and jasmonic acid pathways are induced late in the colonization of root tissues in order to limit fungal growth within roots. This induction is probably an adaptive response by the plant such that its growth and vigor are not compromised by the fungus. © 2013 The Authors New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Identification of microRNAs Involved in Regeneration of the Secondary Vascular System in Populus tomentosa Carr

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fang; Wei, Hairong; Zhao, Shutang; Wang, Lijuan; Zheng, Huanquan; Lu, Mengzhu

    2016-01-01

    Wood formation is a complex developmental process primarily controlled by a regulatory transcription network. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can modulate the expression of target genes involved in plant growth and development by inducing mRNA degradation and translational repression. In this study, we used a model of secondary vascular system regeneration established in Populus tomentosa to harvest differentiating xylem tissues over time for high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs. Analysis of the sequencing data identified 209 known and 187 novel miRNAs during this regeneration process. Degradome sequencing analysis was then performed, revealing 157 and 75 genes targeted by 21 known and 30 novel miRNA families, respectively. Gene ontology enrichment of these target genes revealed that the targets of 15 miRNAs were enriched in the auxin signaling pathway, cell differentiation, meristem development, and pattern specification process. The major biological events during regeneration of the secondary vascular system included the sequential stages of vascular cambium initiation, formation, and differentiation stages in sequence. This study provides the basis for further analysis of these miRNAs to gain greater insight into their regulatory roles in wood development in trees. PMID:27303419

  16. Comparative Physiological and Proteomic Analysis Reveals the Leaf Response to Cadmium-Induced Stress in Poplar (Populus yunnanensis).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunqiang; Li, Xiong; Yang, Shihai; Zhou, Yanli; Dong, Chao; Ren, Jian; Sun, Xudong; Yang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Excess amounts of heavy metals are important environmental pollutants with significant ecological and nutritional effects. Cdmium (Cd) is of particular concern because of its widespread occurrence and high toxicity. We conducted physiological and proteomic analyses to improve our understanding of the responses of Populus yunnanensis to Cd stress. The plantlets experienced two apparent stages in their response to Cd stress. During the first stage, transiently induced defense-response molecules, photosynthesis- and energy-associated proteins, antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs) accumulated to enhance protein stability and establish a new cellular homeostasis. This activity explains why plant photosynthetic capability during this period barely changed. During the second stage, a decline of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO) and HSP levels led to imbalance of the plant photosynthetic system. Additionally, the expression of Mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MPK3), Mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 (MPK6) and a homeobox-leucine zipper protein was higher in the second stage. Higher expression of caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT) may regulate plant cell wall synthesis for greater Cd storage. These genes may be candidates for further research and use in genetic manipulation of poplar tolerance to Cd stress.

  17. Identifying gene coexpression networks underlying the dynamic regulation of wood-forming tissues in Populus under diverse environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Zinkgraf, Matthew; Liu, Lijun; Groover, Andrew; Filkov, Vladimir

    2017-03-01

    Trees modify wood formation through integration of environmental and developmental signals in complex but poorly defined transcriptional networks, allowing trees to produce woody tissues appropriate to diverse environmental conditions. In order to identify relationships among genes expressed during wood formation, we integrated data from new and publically available datasets in Populus. These datasets were generated from woody tissue and include transcriptome profiling, transcription factor binding, DNA accessibility and genome-wide association mapping experiments. Coexpression modules were calculated, each of which contains genes showing similar expression patterns across experimental conditions, genotypes and treatments. Conserved gene coexpression modules (four modules totaling 8398 genes) were identified that were highly preserved across diverse environmental conditions and genetic backgrounds. Functional annotations as well as correlations with specific experimental treatments associated individual conserved modules with distinct biological processes underlying wood formation, such as cell-wall biosynthesis, meristem development and epigenetic pathways. Module genes were also enriched for DNase I hypersensitivity footprints and binding from four transcription factors associated with wood formation. The conserved modules are excellent candidates for modeling core developmental pathways common to wood formation in diverse environments and genotypes, and serve as testbeds for hypothesis generation and testing for future studies.

  18. Comparative Physiological and Proteomic Analysis Reveals the Leaf Response to Cadmium-Induced Stress in Poplar (Populus yunnanensis)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shihai; Zhou, Yanli; Dong, Chao; Ren, Jian; Sun, Xudong; Yang, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    Excess amounts of heavy metals are important environmental pollutants with significant ecological and nutritional effects. Cdmium (Cd) is of particular concern because of its widespread occurrence and high toxicity. We conducted physiological and proteomic analyses to improve our understanding of the responses of Populus yunnanensis to Cd stress. The plantlets experienced two apparent stages in their response to Cd stress. During the first stage, transiently induced defense-response molecules, photosynthesis- and energy-associated proteins, antioxidant enzymes and heat shock proteins (HSPs) accumulated to enhance protein stability and establish a new cellular homeostasis. This activity explains why plant photosynthetic capability during this period barely changed. During the second stage, a decline of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBisCO) and HSP levels led to imbalance of the plant photosynthetic system. Additionally, the expression of Mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 (MPK3), Mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 (MPK6) and a homeobox-leucine zipper protein was higher in the second stage. Higher expression of caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT) may regulate plant cell wall synthesis for greater Cd storage. These genes may be candidates for further research and use in genetic manipulation of poplar tolerance to Cd stress. PMID:26349064

  19. AspWood: High-Spatial-Resolution Transcriptome Profiles Reveal Uncharacterized Modularity of Wood Formation in Populus tremula[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sundell, David; Kumar, Manoj; Kucukoglu, Melis; Kumar, Vikash; Mannapperuma, Chanaka; Niittylä, Totte

    2017-01-01

    Trees represent the largest terrestrial carbon sink and a renewable source of ligno-cellulose. There is significant scope for yield and quality improvement in these largely undomesticated species, and efforts to engineer elite varieties will benefit from improved understanding of the transcriptional network underlying cambial growth and wood formation. We generated high-spatial-resolution RNA sequencing data spanning the secondary phloem, vascular cambium, and wood-forming tissues of Populus tremula. The transcriptome comprised 28,294 expressed, annotated genes, 78 novel protein-coding genes, and 567 putative long intergenic noncoding RNAs. Most paralogs originating from the Salicaceae whole-genome duplication had diverged expression, with the exception of those highly expressed during secondary cell wall deposition. Coexpression network analyses revealed that regulation of the transcriptome underlying cambial growth and wood formation comprises numerous modules forming a continuum of active processes across the tissues. A comparative analysis revealed that a majority of these modules are conserved in Picea abies. The high spatial resolution of our data enabled identification of novel roles for characterized genes involved in xylan and cellulose biosynthesis, regulators of xylem vessel and fiber differentiation and lignification. An associated web resource (AspWood, http://aspwood.popgenie.org) provides interactive tools for exploring the expression profiles and coexpression network. PMID:28655750

  20. Can the capacity for isoprene emission acclimate to environmental modifications during autumn senescence in temperate deciduous tree species Populus tremula?

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhihong; Copolovici, Lucian; Niinemets, Ülo

    2012-03-01

    Changes in isoprene emission (Φ(isoprene)), and foliage photosynthetic (A) rates, isoprene precursor dimethylallyldiphosphate (DMADP), and nitrogen and carbon contents were studied from late summer to intensive leaf fall in Populus tremula to gain insight into the emission controls by temperature and endogenous, senescence-induced, modifications. Methanol emissions, characterizing degradation of cell wall pectins, were also measured. A rapid reduction in Φ(isoprene) and A of 60-70% of the initial value was observed in response to a rapid reduction of ambient temperature by ca. 15°C (cold stress). Later phases of senescence were associated with further reductions in Φ(isoprene) and A, with simultaneous major decrease in nitrogen content. However, during episodes of temperature increase, A and in particular, Φ(isoprene) partly recovered. Variation in Φ(isoprene) during senescence was correlated with average temperature of preceding days, with the highest degree of explained variance observed with average temperature of 6 days. Throughout the study, methanol emissions were small, but a large burst of methanol emission was associated with leaf yellowing and abscission. Overall, these data demonstrate that the capacity for isoprene emission can adjust to environmental conditions in senescing leaves as well, but the responsiveness is low compared with mid-season and is also affected by stress.

  1. Elucidating the evolutionary history and expression patterns of nucleoside phosphorylase paralogs (vegetative storage proteins) in Populus and the plant kingdom

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nucleoside phosphorylases (NPs) have been extensively investigated in human and bacterial systems for their role in metabolic nucleotide salvaging and links to oncogenesis. In plants, NP-like proteins have not been comprehensively studied, likely because there is no evidence of a metabolic function in nucleoside salvage. However, in the forest trees genus Populus a family of NP-like proteins function as an important ecophysiological adaptation for inter- and intra-seasonal nitrogen storage and cycling. Results We conducted phylogenetic analyses to determine the distribution and evolution of NP-like proteins in plants. These analyses revealed two major clusters of NP-like proteins in plants. Group I proteins were encoded by genes across a wide range of plant taxa while proteins encoded by Group II genes were dominated by species belonging to the order Malpighiales and included the Populus Bark Storage Protein (BSP) and WIN4-like proteins. Additionally, we evaluated the NP-like genes in Populus by examining the transcript abundance of the 13 NP-like genes found in the Populus genome in various tissues of plants exposed to long-day (LD) and short-day (SD) photoperiods. We found that all 13 of the Populus NP-like genes belonging to either Group I or II are expressed in various tissues in both LD and SD conditions. Tests of natural selection and expression evolution analysis of the Populus genes suggests that divergence in gene expression may have occurred recently during the evolution of Populus, which supports the adaptive maintenance models. Lastly, in silico analysis of cis-regulatory elements in the promoters of the 13 NP-like genes in Populus revealed common regulatory elements known to be involved in light regulation, stress/pathogenesis and phytohormone responses. Conclusion In Populus, the evolution of the NP-like protein and gene family has been shaped by duplication events and natural selection. Expression data suggest that previously

  2. Elucidating the evolutionary history and expression patterns of nucleoside phosphorylase paralogs (vegetative storage proteins) in Populus and the plant kingdom.

    PubMed

    Pettengill, Emily A; Pettengill, James B; Coleman, Gary D

    2013-08-19

    Nucleoside phosphorylases (NPs) have been extensively investigated in human and bacterial systems for their role in metabolic nucleotide salvaging and links to oncogenesis. In plants, NP-like proteins have not been comprehensively studied, likely because there is no evidence of a metabolic function in nucleoside salvage. However, in the forest trees genus Populus a family of NP-like proteins function as an important ecophysiological adaptation for inter- and intra-seasonal nitrogen storage and cycling. We conducted phylogenetic analyses to determine the distribution and evolution of NP-like proteins in plants. These analyses revealed two major clusters of NP-like proteins in plants. Group I proteins were encoded by genes across a wide range of plant taxa while proteins encoded by Group II genes were dominated by species belonging to the order Malpighiales and included the Populus Bark Storage Protein (BSP) and WIN4-like proteins. Additionally, we evaluated the NP-like genes in Populus by examining the transcript abundance of the 13 NP-like genes found in the Populus genome in various tissues of plants exposed to long-day (LD) and short-day (SD) photoperiods. We found that all 13 of the Populus NP-like genes belonging to either Group I or II are expressed in various tissues in both LD and SD conditions. Tests of natural selection and expression evolution analysis of the Populus genes suggests that divergence in gene expression may have occurred recently during the evolution of Populus, which supports the adaptive maintenance models. Lastly, in silico analysis of cis-regulatory elements in the promoters of the 13 NP-like genes in Populus revealed common regulatory elements known to be involved in light regulation, stress/pathogenesis and phytohormone responses. In Populus, the evolution of the NP-like protein and gene family has been shaped by duplication events and natural selection. Expression data suggest that previously uncharacterized NP-like proteins may

  3. New insights into pioneer root xylem development: evidence obtained from Populus trichocarpa plants grown under field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bagniewska-Zadworna, Agnieszka; Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Smoliński, Dariusz J.; Stelmasik, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Effective programmed xylogenesis is critical to the structural framework of the plant root system and its central role in the acquisition and long-distance transport of water and nutrients. The process of xylem differentiation in pioneer roots under field conditions is poorly understood. In this study it is hypothesized that xylogenesis, an example of developmental programmed cell death (PCD), in the roots of woody plants demonstrates a clearly defined sequence of events resulting in cell death. A comprehensive analysis was therefore undertaken to identify the stages of xylogenesis in pioneer roots from procambial cells to fully functional vessels with lignified cell walls and secondary cell wall thickenings. Methods Xylem differentiation was monitored in the pioneer roots of Populus trichocarpa at the cytological level using rhizotrons under field conditions. Detection and localization of the signalling molecule nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was undertaken and a detailed examination of nuclear changes during xylogenesis was conducted. In addition, analyses of the expression of genes involved in secondary cell wall synthesis were performed in situ. Key Results The primary event in initially differentiating tracheary elements (TEs) was a burst of NO in thin-walled cells, followed by H2O2 synthesis and the appearance of TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling)-positive nuclei. The first changes in nuclear structure were observed in the early stages of xylogenesis of pioneer roots, prior to lignification; however, the nucleus was detectable under transmission electron microscopy in differentiating cells until the stage at which vacuole integrity was maintained, indicating that their degradation was slow and prolonged. The subsequent sequence of events involved secondary cell wall formation and autophagy. Potential gene markers from the cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) gene family that were

  4. New insights into pioneer root xylem development: evidence obtained from Populus trichocarpa plants grown under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Bagniewska-Zadworna, Agnieszka; Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena; Smoliński, Dariusz J; Stelmasik, Agnieszka

    2014-06-01

    Effective programmed xylogenesis is critical to the structural framework of the plant root system and its central role in the acquisition and long-distance transport of water and nutrients. The process of xylem differentiation in pioneer roots under field conditions is poorly understood. In this study it is hypothesized that xylogenesis, an example of developmental programmed cell death (PCD), in the roots of woody plants demonstrates a clearly defined sequence of events resulting in cell death. A comprehensive analysis was therefore undertaken to identify the stages of xylogenesis in pioneer roots from procambial cells to fully functional vessels with lignified cell walls and secondary cell wall thickenings. Xylem differentiation was monitored in the pioneer roots of Populus trichocarpa at the cytological level using rhizotrons under field conditions. Detection and localization of the signalling molecule nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was undertaken and a detailed examination of nuclear changes during xylogenesis was conducted. In addition, analyses of the expression of genes involved in secondary cell wall synthesis were performed in situ. The primary event in initially differentiating tracheary elements (TEs) was a burst of NO in thin-walled cells, followed by H2O2 synthesis and the appearance of TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling)-positive nuclei. The first changes in nuclear structure were observed in the early stages of xylogenesis of pioneer roots, prior to lignification; however, the nucleus was detectable under transmission electron microscopy in differentiating cells until the stage at which vacuole integrity was maintained, indicating that their degradation was slow and prolonged. The subsequent sequence of events involved secondary cell wall formation and autophagy. Potential gene markers from the cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) gene family that were related to secondary wall synthesis were

  5. Genome-wide identification, classification, and expression analysis of CDPK and its closely related gene families in poplar (Populus trichocarpa).

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ran; Hu, Ruibo; Chai, Guohua; Xu, Meiling; Qi, Guang; Kong, Yingzhen; Zhou, Gongke

    2013-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are Ca(2+)-binding proteins known to play crucial roles in Ca(2+) signal transduction pathways which have been identified throughout plant kingdom and in certain types of protists. Genome-wide analysis of CDPKs have been carried out in Arabidopsis, rice and wheat, and quite a few of CDPKs were proved to play crucial roles in plant stress responsive signature pathways. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of Populus CDPK and its closely related gene families was performed, including phylogeny, chromosome locations, gene structures, and expression profiles. Thirty Populus CDPK genes and twenty closely related kinase genes were identified, which were phylogenetically clustered into eight distinct subfamilies and predominately distributed across fifteen linkage groups (LG). Genomic organization analyses indicated that purifying selection has played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of Populus CDPK gene family. Furthermore, microarray analysis showed that a number of Populus CDPK and its closely related genes differentially expressed across disparate tissues and under various stresses. The expression profiles of paralogous pairs were also investigated to reveal their evolution fates. In addition, quantitative real-time RT-PCR was performed on nine selected CDPK genes to confirm their responses to drought stress treatment. These observations may lay the foundation for future functional analysis of Populus CDPK and its closely related gene families to unravel their biological roles.

  6. Differentiation of Populus species using chloroplast single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers--essential for comprehensible and reliable poplar breeding.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, H; Hoeltken, A M; Fladung, M

    2012-03-01

    Within the genus Populus several species belonging to different sections are cross-compatible. Hence, high numbers of interspecies hybrids occur naturally and, additionally, have been artificially produced in huge breeding programmes during the last 100 years. Therefore, determination of a single poplar species, used for the production of 'multi-species hybrids' is often difficult, and represents a great challenge for the use of molecular markers in species identification. Within this study, over 20 chloroplast regions, both intergenic spacers and coding regions, have been tested for their ability to differentiate different poplar species using 23 already published barcoding primer combinations and 17 newly designed primer combinations. About half of the published barcoding primers yielded amplification products, whereas the new primers designed on the basis of the total sequenced cpDNA genome of Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray yielded much higher amplification success. Intergenic spacers were found to be more variable than coding regions within the genus Populus. The highest discrimination power of Populus species was found in the combination of two intergenic spacers (trnG-psbK, psbK-psbl) and the coding region rpoC. In barcoding projects, the coding regions matK and rbcL are often recommended, but within the genus Populus they only show moderate variability and are not efficient in species discrimination.

  7. Twenty-One Genome Sequences from Pseudomonas Species and 19 Genome Sequences from Diverse Bacteria Isolated from the Rhizosphere and Endosphere of Populus deltoides

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Utturkar, Sagar M; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Martin, Stanton; Land, Miriam L; Lu, Tse-Yuan; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Pelletier, Dale A

    2012-01-01

    To aid in the investigation of the Populus deltoides microbiome we generated draft genome sequences for twenty one Pseudomonas and twenty one other diverse bacteria isolated from Populus deltoides roots. Genome sequences for isolates similar to Acidovorax, Bradyrhizobium, Brevibacillus, Burkholderia, Caulobacter, Chryseobacterium, Flavobacterium, Herbaspirillum, Novosphingobium, Pantoea, Phyllobacterium, Polaromonas, Rhizobium, Sphingobium and Variovorax were generated.

  8. Contrasting responses in the growth and energy utilization properties of sympatric Populus and Salix to different altitudes: implications for sexual dimorphism in Salicaceae.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yanbao; Chen, Ke; Jiang, Hao; Yu, Lei; Duan, Baoli

    2017-01-01

    An interesting ecological and evolutionary puzzle arises from the observations of male-biased sex ratios in genus Populus, whereas in the taxonomically related Salix, females are generally more dominant. In the present study, we combined results from a field investigation into the sex ratios of the Salicaceous species along an altitudinal gradient on Gongga Mountain, and a pot experiment by monitoring growth and energy utilization properties to elucidate the mechanisms governing sexual dimorphism. At middle altitudes 2000 and 2300 m, the sex ratios were consistent with a 1:1 equilibrium in sympatric Populus purdomii and Salix magnifica. However, at the lower and higher ends of the altitudinal gradient, skewed sex ratios were observed. For example, the male:female ratios were 1.33 and 2.36 in P. purdomii at 1700 and 2600 m respectively; for S. magnifica the ratio was 0.62 at 2600 m. At 2300 m, the pot-grown seedlings of both species exhibited the highest biomass accumulation and total leaf area, simultaneously with the balanced sex ratios in the field. At 3300 m, the specific leaf area in male P. purdomii was 23.9% higher than that of females, which may be the morphological cause for the observed 19.3% higher nitrogen allocation to Rubisco, and 20.6% lower allocation to cell walls. As such, male P. purdomii showed a 32.9% higher foliar photosynthetic capacity, concomitant with a 12.0% lower construction cost. These properties resulted in higher photosynthetic nitrogen- and energy-use efficiencies, and shorter payback time (24.4 vs 40.1 days), the time span that a leaf must photosynthesize to amortize the carbon investment. Our results thus suggested that male P. purdomii evolved a quicker energy-return strategy. Consequently, these superior energy gain-cost related traits and the higher total leaf area contributed to the higher growth rate and tolerance in stress-prone environments, which might, in part, shed new light on the male-biased sex ratios in

  9. Economic injury level for second-generation cottonwood leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in two-year-old Populus.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ying; Pedigo, Larry P; Colletti, Joe P; Hart, Elwood R

    2002-04-01

    The cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta F., is a major defoliating pest of Populus in North America. As the use of Populus in short-rotation woody crop plantations continues to increase, there are increasing economic and environmental needs to develop rational pest management programs to reduce the impact of this insect. Our objective was to determine the economic injury levels for the second generation of the cottonwood leaf beetle during plantation establishment. Integrating the cost of the management, market value, insect injury, and host response to the injury, the economic injury levels for second generation cottonwood leaf beetle on 2-yr-old Populus were determined to be from 0.2 to 0.9 egg masses per actively growing terminal.

  10. Diversification and Expression of the PIN, AUX/LAX, and ABCB Families of Putative Auxin Transporters in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Carraro, Nicola; Tisdale-Orr, Tracy Eizabeth; Clouse, Ronald Matthew; Knöller, Anne Sophie; Spicer, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Intercellular transport of the plant hormone auxin is mediated by three families of membrane-bound protein carriers, with the PIN and ABCB families coding primarily for efflux proteins and the AUX/LAX family coding for influx proteins. In the last decade our understanding of gene and protein function for these transporters in Arabidopsis has expanded rapidly but very little is known about their role in woody plant development. Here we present a comprehensive account of all three families in the model woody species Populus, including chromosome distribution, protein structure, quantitative gene expression, and evolutionary relationships. The PIN and AUX/LAX gene families in Populus comprise 16 and 8 members respectively and show evidence for the retention of paralogs following a relatively recent whole genome duplication. There is also differential expression across tissues within many gene pairs. The ABCB family is previously undescribed in Populus and includes 20 members, showing a much deeper evolutionary history, including both tandem and whole genome duplication as well as probable gene loss. A striking number of these transporters are expressed in developing Populus stems and we suggest that evolutionary and structural relationships with known auxin transporters in Arabidopsis can point toward candidate genes for further study in Populus. This is especially important for the ABCBs, which is a large family and includes members in Arabidopsis that are able to transport other substrates in addition to auxin. Protein modeling, sequence alignment and expression data all point to ABCB1.1 as a likely auxin transport protein in Populus. Given that basipetal auxin flow through the cambial zone shapes the development of woody stems, it is important that we identify the full complement of genes involved in this process. This work should lay the foundation for studies targeting specific proteins for functional characterization and in situ localization. PMID:22645571

  11. Condensed tannin biosynthesis and polymerization synergistically condition carbon use, defense, sink strength and growth in Populus.

    PubMed

    Harding, Scott A; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Du, Lei; Nyamdari, Batbayar; Lindroth, Richard L; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Mark F; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2014-11-01

    The partitioning of carbon for growth, storage and constitutive chemical defenses is widely framed in terms of a hypothetical sink-source differential that varies with nutrient supply. According to this framework, phenolics accrual is passive and occurs in source leaves when normal sink growth is not sustainable due to a nutrient limitation. In assessing this framework, we present gene and metabolite evidence that condensed tannin (CT) accrual is strongest in sink leaves and sequesters carbon in a way that impinges upon foliar sink strength and upon phenolic glycoside (PG) accrual in Populus. The work was based on two Populus fremontii × angustifolia backcross lines with contrasting rates of CT accrual and growth, and equally large foliar PG reserves. However, foliar PG accrual was developmentally delayed in the high-CT, slow-growth line (SG), and nitrogen-limitation led to increased foliar PG accrual only in the low-CT, fast-growth line (FG). Metabolite profiling of developing leaves indicated comparatively carbon-limited amino acid metabolism, depletion of several Krebs cycle intermediates and reduced organ sink strength in SG. Gene profiling indicated that CT synthesis decreased as leaves expanded and PGs increased. A most striking finding was that the nitrogenous monoamine phenylethylamine accumulated only in leaves of SG plants. The potential negative impact of CT hyper-accumulation on foliar sink strength, as well as a mechanism for phenylethylamine involvement in CT polymerization in Populus are discussed. Starch accrual in source leaves and CT accrual in sink leaves of SG may both contribute to the maintenance of a slow-growth phenotype suited to survival in nutrient-poor habitats. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Interaction of nitrogen nutrition and salinity in Grey poplar (Populus tremula x alba).

    PubMed

    Ehlting, B; Dluzniewska, P; Dietrich, H; Selle, A; Teuber, M; Hänsch, R; Nehls, U; Polle, A; Schnitzler, J-P; Rennenberg, H; Gessler, A

    2007-07-01

    Salinity represents an increasing environmental problem in managed ecosystems. Populus spp. is widely used for wood production by short-rotation forestry in fertilized plantations and can be grown on saline soil. Because N fertilization plays an important role in salt tolerance, we analysed Grey poplar (Populus tremula x alba, syn. Populus canescens) grown with either 1 mM nitrate or ammonium subjected to moderate 75 mM NaCl. The impact of N nutrition on amelioration of salt tolerance was analysed on different levels of N metabolism such as N uptake, assimilation and N (total N, proteins and amino compounds) accumulation. Na concentration increased in all tissues over time of salt exposure. The N nutrition-dependent effects of salt exposure were more intensive in roots than in leaves. Application of salt reduced root increment as well as stem height increase and, at the same time, increased the concentration of total amino compounds more intensively in roots of ammonium-fed plants. In leaves, salt treatment increased concentrations of total N more intensively in nitrate-fed plants and concentrations of amino compounds independently of N nutrition. The major changes in N metabolism of Grey poplar exposed to moderate salt concentrations were detected in the significant increase of amino acid concentrations. The present results indicate that N metabolism of Grey poplar exposed to salt performed better when the plants were fed with nitrate instead of ammonium as sole N source. Therefore, nitrate fertilization of poplar plantations grown on saline soil should be preferred.

  13. Diversity of Pseudomonas Genomes, Including Populus-Associated Isolates, as Revealed by Comparative Genome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Jun, Se-Ran; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Nookaew, Intawat; Hauser, Loren; Wanchai, Visanu; Land, Miriam; Timm, Collin M; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Schadt, Christopher W; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Pelletier, Dale A; Ussery, David W

    2015-10-30

    The Pseudomonas genus contains a metabolically versatile group of organisms that are known to occupy numerous ecological niches, including the rhizosphere and endosphere of many plants. Their diversity influences the phylogenetic diversity and heterogeneity of these communities. On the basis of average amino acid identity, comparative genome analysis of >1,000 Pseudomonas genomes, including 21 Pseudomonas strains isolated from the roots of native Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood) trees resulted in consistent and robust genomic clusters with phylogenetic homogeneity. All Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomes clustered together, and these were clearly distinct from other Pseudomonas species groups on the basis of pangenome and core genome analyses. In contrast, the genomes of Pseudomonas fluorescens were organized into 20 distinct genomic clusters, representing enormous diversity and heterogeneity. Most of our 21 Populus-associated isolates formed three distinct subgroups within the major P. fluorescens group, supported by pathway profile analysis, while two isolates were more closely related to Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas putida. Genes specific to Populus-associated subgroups were identified. Genes specific to subgroup 1 include several sensory systems that act in two-component signal transduction, a TonB-dependent receptor, and a phosphorelay sensor. Genes specific to subgroup 2 contain hypothetical genes, and genes specific to subgroup 3 were annotated with hydrolase activity. This study justifies the need to sequence multiple isolates, especially from P. fluorescens, which displays the most genetic variation, in order to study functional capabilities from a pangenomic perspective. This information will prove useful when choosing Pseudomonas strains for use to promote growth and increase disease resistance in plants.

  14. Repeated unidirectional introgression towards Populus balsamifera in contact zones of exotic and native poplars.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stacey Lee; Lamothe, Manuel; Meirmans, Patrick G; Périnet, Pierre; Isabel, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    As the evolutionary significance of hybridization is largely dictated by its extent beyond the first generation, we broadly surveyed patterns of introgression across a sympatric zone of two native poplars (Populus balsamifera, Populus deltoides) in Quebec, Canada within which European exotic Populus nigra and its hybrids have been extensively planted since the 1800s. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that appeared fixed within each species were characterized by DNA-sequencing pools of pure individuals. Thirty-five of these diagnostic SNPs were employed in a high-throughput assay that genotyped 635 trees of different age classes, sampled from 15 sites with various degrees of anthropogenic disturbance. The degree of admixture within sampled trees was then assessed through Bayesian clustering of genotypes. Hybrids were present in seven of the populations, with 2.4% of all sampled trees showing spontaneous admixture. Sites with hybrids were significantly more disturbed than pure stands, while hybrids comprised both immature juveniles and trees of reproductive age. All three possible F1s were detected. Advanced-generation hybrids were consistently biased towards P. balsamifera regardless of whether hybridization had occurred with P. deltoides or P. nigra. Gene exchange between P. deltoides and P. nigra was not detected beyond the F1 generation; however, detection of a trihybrid demonstrates that even this apparent reproductive isolation does not necessarily result in an evolutionary dead end. Collectively, results demonstrate the natural fertility of hybrid poplars and suggest that introduced genes could potentially affect the genetic integrity of native trees, similar to that arising from introgression between natives.

  15. Compositional characterization and imaging of "Wall-bound" acylesters of Populus trichocarpa Reveal Differential Accumulation of acyl Molecules in Normal and Reactive Woods

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.; Park, S; Yu, X; Liu, C

    2008-01-01

    Acylesterification is one of the common modifications of cell wall non-cellulosic polysaccharides and/or lignin primarily in monocot plants. We analyzed the cell-wall acylesters of black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and synchrotron infrared (IR) imaging facility. The results revealed that the cell wall of dicotyledonous poplar, as the walls of many monocot grasses, contains a considerable amount of acylesters, primarily acetyl and p-hydroxycinnamoyl molecules. The 'wall-bound' acetate and phenolics display a distinct tissue specific-, bending stress responsible- and developmental-accumulation pattern. The 'wall-bound' p-coumarate predominantly accumulated in young leaves and decreased in mature leaves, whereas acetate and ferulate mostly amassed in the cell wall of stems. Along the development of stem, the level of the 'wall-bound' ferulate gradually increased, while the basal level of p-coumarate further decreased. Induction of tension wood decreased the accumulation of the 'wall-bound' phenolics while the level of acetate remained constant. Synchrotron IR-mediated chemical compositional imaging revealed a close spatial distribution of acylesters with cell wall polysaccharides in poplar stem. These results indicate that different 'wall-bound' acylesters play distinct roles in poplar cell wall structural construction and/or metabolism of cell wall matrix components.

  16. Towards a map of the Populus biomass protein-protein interaction network

    SciTech Connect

    Beers, Eric; Brunner, Amy; Helm, Richard; Dickerman, Allan

    2015-07-31

    Biofuels can be produced from a variety of plant feedstocks. The value of a particular feedstock for biofuels production depends in part on the degree of difficulty associated with the extraction of fermentable sugars from the plant biomass. The wood of trees is potentially a rich source fermentable sugars. However, the sugars in wood exist in a tightly cross-linked matrix of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, making them largely recalcitrant to release and fermentation for biofuels production. Before breeders and genetic engineers can effectively develop plants with reduced recalcitrance to fermentation, it is necessary to gain a better understanding of the fundamental biology of the mechanisms responsible for wood formation. Regulatory, structural, and enzymatic proteins are required for the complicated process of wood formation. To function properly, proteins must interact with other proteins. Yet, very few of the protein-protein interactions necessary for wood formation are known. The main objectives of this project were to 1) identify new protein-protein interactions relevant to wood formation, and 2) perform in-depth characterizations of selected protein-protein interactions. To identify relevant protein-protein interactions, we cloned a set of approximately 400 genes that were highly expressed in the wood-forming tissue (known as secondary xylem) of poplar (Populus trichocarpa). We tested whether the proteins encoded by these biomass genes interacted with each other in a binary matrix design using the yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) method for protein-protein interaction discovery. We also tested a subset of the 400 biomass proteins for interactions with all proteins present in wood-forming tissue of poplar in a biomass library screen design using Y2H. Together, these two Y2H screens yielded over 270 interactions involving over 75 biomass proteins. For the second main objective we selected several interacting pairs or groups of interacting proteins for in

  17. Comparative genome analysis of Pseudomonas genomes including Populus-associated isolates

    DOE PAGES

    Jun, Se Ran; Wassenaar, Trudy; Nookaew, Intawat; ...

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas genus contains a metabolically versatile group of organisms that are known to occupy numerous ecological niches including the rhizosphere and endosphere of many plants influencing phylogenetic diversity and heterogeneity. In this study, comparative genome analysis was performed on over one thousand Pseudomonas genomes, including 21 Pseudomonas strains isolated from the roots of native Populus deltoides. Based on average amino acid identity, genomic clusters were identified within the Pseudomonas genus, which showed agreements with clades by NCBI and cliques by IMG. The P. fluorescens group was organized into 20 distinct genomic clusters, representing enormous diversity and heterogeneity. The speciesmore » P. aeruginosa showed clear distinction in their genomic relatedness compared to other Pseudomonas species groups based on the pan and core genome analysis. The 19 isolates of our 21 Populus-associated isolates formed three distinct subgroups within the P. fluorescens major group, supported by pathway profiles analysis, while two isolates were more closely related to P. chlororaphis and P. putida. The specific genes to Populus-associated subgroups were identified where genes specific to subgroup 1 include several sensory systems such as proteins which act in two-component signal transduction, a TonB-dependent receptor, and a phosphorelay sensor; specific genes to subgroup 2 contain unique hypothetical genes; and genes specific to subgroup 3 organisms have a different hydrolase activity. IMPORTANCE The comparative genome analyses of the genus Pseudomonas that included Populus-associated isolates resulted in novel insights into high diversity of Pseudomonas. Consistent and robust genomic clusters with phylogenetic homogeneity were identified, which resolved species-clades that are not clearly defined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis alone. The genomic clusters may be reflective of distinct ecological niches to which the organisms have adapted, but

  18. Comparative genome analysis of Pseudomonas genomes including Populus-associated isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Se Ran; Wassenaar, Trudy; Nookaew, Intawat; Hauser, Loren John; Wanchai, Visanu; Land, Miriam L.; Timm, Collin M.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Pelletier, Dale A; Ussery, David W

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas genus contains a metabolically versatile group of organisms that are known to occupy numerous ecological niches including the rhizosphere and endosphere of many plants influencing phylogenetic diversity and heterogeneity. In this study, comparative genome analysis was performed on over one thousand Pseudomonas genomes, including 21 Pseudomonas strains isolated from the roots of native Populus deltoides. Based on average amino acid identity, genomic clusters were identified within the Pseudomonas genus, which showed agreements with clades by NCBI and cliques by IMG. The P. fluorescens group was organized into 20 distinct genomic clusters, representing enormous diversity and heterogeneity. The species P. aeruginosa showed clear distinction in their genomic relatedness compared to other Pseudomonas species groups based on the pan and core genome analysis. The 19 isolates of our 21 Populus-associated isolates formed three distinct subgroups within the P. fluorescens major group, supported by pathway profiles analysis, while two isolates were more closely related to P. chlororaphis and P. putida. The specific genes to Populus-associated subgroups were identified where genes specific to subgroup 1 include several sensory systems such as proteins which act in two-component signal transduction, a TonB-dependent receptor, and a phosphorelay sensor; specific genes to subgroup 2 contain unique hypothetical genes; and genes specific to subgroup 3 organisms have a different hydrolase activity. IMPORTANCE The comparative genome analyses of the genus Pseudomonas that included Populus-associated isolates resulted in novel insights into high diversity of Pseudomonas. Consistent and robust genomic clusters with phylogenetic homogeneity were identified, which resolved species-clades that are not clearly defined by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis alone. The genomic clusters may be reflective of distinct ecological niches to which the organisms have adapted, but this

  19. Tree rings, Populus nigra L., as mercury data logger in aquatic environments: case study of an historically contaminated environment.

    PubMed

    Abreu, S N; Soares, A M V M; Nogueira, A J A; Morgado, F

    2008-03-01

    In this study, a tree (Populus nigra L.) has been presented as data logger of mercury release in aquatic environments using tree rings chemistry to provide chronological historical monitoring of mercury discharge from a chlor-alkali industrial effluent to a coastal lagoon. Tree rings (Populus nigra L.) as mercury data logger is suggested by mercury accumulation trends in the tree rings reflecting the industrial plant capacity increments in the early stages of mercury discharges and enhancing industrial plant controls to minimize mercury discharges in the last two decades after imposed global regulations on mercury emissions.

  20. Consolidated bioprocessing of Populus using Clostridium (Ruminiclostridium) thermocellum: a case study on the impact of lignin composition and structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrache, Alexandru; Akinosho, Hannah; Rodriguez, Miguel; Meng, Xianzhi; Yoo, Chang Geun; Natzke, Jace; Engle, Nancy L.; Sykes, Robert W.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Muchero, Wellington; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Davison, Brian H.; Brown, Steven D.

    2016-02-04

    Background: Higher ratios of syringyl-to-guaiacyl (S/G) lignin components of Populus were shown to improve sugar release by enzymatic hydrolysis using commercial blends. Cellulolytic microbes are often robust biomass hydrolyzers and may offer cost advantages; however, it is unknown whether their activity can also be significantly influenced by the ratio of different monolignol types in Populus biomass. Hydrolysis and fermentation of autoclaved, but otherwise not pretreated Populus trichocarpa by Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 was compared using feedstocks that had similar carbohydrate and total lignin contents but differed in S/G ratios. Results: Populus with an S/G ratio of 2.1 was converted more rapidly and to a greater extent compared to similar biomass that had a ratio of 1.2. For either microbes or commercial enzymes, an approximate 50% relative difference in total solids solubilization was measured for both biomasses, which suggests that the differences and limitations in the microbial breakdown of lignocellulose may be largely from the enzymatic hydrolytic process. Unexpectedly, the reduction in glucan content per gram solid in the residual microbially processed biomass was similar (17–18%) irrespective of S/G ratio, pointing to a similar mechanism of solubilization that proceeded at different rates. Fermentation metabolome testing did not reveal the release of known biomass-derived alcohol and aldehyde inhibitors that could explain observed differences in microbial hydrolytic activity. Biomass-derived p-hydroxybenzoic acid was up to ninefold higher in low S/G ratio biomass fermentations, but was not found to be inhibitory in subsequent test fermentations. Cellulose crystallinity and degree of polymerization did not vary between Populus lines and had minor changes after fermentation. However, lignin molecular weights and cellulose accessibility determined by Simons’ staining were positively correlated to the S/G content. Conclusions: Higher S

  1. Consolidated bioprocessing of Populus using Clostridium (Ruminiclostridium) thermocellum: a case study on the impact of lignin composition and structure

    DOE PAGES

    Dumitrache, Alexandru; Akinosho, Hannah; Rodriguez, Miguel; ...

    2016-02-04

    Background: Higher ratios of syringyl-to-guaiacyl (S/G) lignin components of Populus were shown to improve sugar release by enzymatic hydrolysis using commercial blends. Cellulolytic microbes are often robust biomass hydrolyzers and may offer cost advantages; however, it is unknown whether their activity can also be significantly influenced by the ratio of different monolignol types in Populus biomass. Hydrolysis and fermentation of autoclaved, but otherwise not pretreated Populus trichocarpa by Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 was compared using feedstocks that had similar carbohydrate and total lignin contents but differed in S/G ratios. Results: Populus with an S/G ratio of 2.1 was converted moremore » rapidly and to a greater extent compared to similar biomass that had a ratio of 1.2. For either microbes or commercial enzymes, an approximate 50% relative difference in total solids solubilization was measured for both biomasses, which suggests that the differences and limitations in the microbial breakdown of lignocellulose may be largely from the enzymatic hydrolytic process. Unexpectedly, the reduction in glucan content per gram solid in the residual microbially processed biomass was similar (17–18%) irrespective of S/G ratio, pointing to a similar mechanism of solubilization that proceeded at different rates. Fermentation metabolome testing did not reveal the release of known biomass-derived alcohol and aldehyde inhibitors that could explain observed differences in microbial hydrolytic activity. Biomass-derived p-hydroxybenzoic acid was up to ninefold higher in low S/G ratio biomass fermentations, but was not found to be inhibitory in subsequent test fermentations. Cellulose crystallinity and degree of polymerization did not vary between Populus lines and had minor changes after fermentation. However, lignin molecular weights and cellulose accessibility determined by Simons’ staining were positively correlated to the S/G content. Conclusions: Higher

  2. Populus euphratica APYRASE2 Enhances Cold Tolerance by Modulating Vesicular Trafficking and Extracellular ATP in Arabidopsis Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shurong; Sun, Jian; Zhao, Rui; Ding, Mingquan; Zhang, Yinan; Sun, Yuanling; Wang, Wei; Tan, Yeqing; Liu, Dandan; Ma, Xujun; Hou, Peichen; Wang, Meijuan; Lu, Cunfu; Shen, Xin; Chen, Shaoliang

    2015-01-01

    Apyrase and extracellular ATP play crucial roles in mediating plant growth and defense responses. In the cold-tolerant poplar, Populus euphratica, low temperatures up-regulate APYRASE2 (PeAPY2) expression in callus cells. We investigated the biochemical characteristics of PeAPY2 and its role in cold tolerance. We found that PeAPY2 predominantly localized to the plasma membrane, but punctate signals also appeared in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. PeAPY2 exhibited broad substrate specificity, but it most efficiently hydrolyzed purine nucleotides, particularly ATP. PeAPY2 preferred Mg2+ as a cofactor, and it was insensitive to various, specific ATPase inhibitors. When PeAPY2 was ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), cold tolerance was enhanced, based on root growth measurements and survival rates. Moreover, under cold stress, PeAPY2-transgenic plants maintained plasma membrane integrity and showed reduced cold-elicited electrolyte leakage compared with wild-type plants. These responses probably resulted from efficient plasma membrane repair via vesicular trafficking. Indeed, transgenic plants showed accelerated endocytosis and exocytosis during cold stress and recovery. We found that low doses of extracellular ATP accelerated vesicular trafficking, but high extracellular ATP inhibited trafficking and reduced cell viability. Cold stress caused significant increases in root medium extracellular ATP. However, under these conditions, PeAPY2-transgenic lines showed greater control of extracellular ATP levels than wild-type plants. We conclude that Arabidopsis plants that overexpressed PeAPY2 could increase membrane repair by accelerating vesicular trafficking and hydrolyzing extracellular ATP to avoid excessive, cold-elicited ATP accumulation in the root medium and, thus, reduced ATP-induced inhibition of vesicular trafficking. PMID:26224801

  3. Populus euphratica APYRASE2 Enhances Cold Tolerance by Modulating Vesicular Trafficking and Extracellular ATP in Arabidopsis Plants.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shurong; Sun, Jian; Zhao, Rui; Ding, Mingquan; Zhang, Yinan; Sun, Yuanling; Wang, Wei; Tan, Yeqing; Liu, Dandan; Ma, Xujun; Hou, Peichen; Wang, Meijuan; Lu, Cunfu; Shen, Xin; Chen, Shaoliang

    2015-09-01

    Apyrase and extracellular ATP play crucial roles in mediating plant growth and defense responses. In the cold-tolerant poplar, Populus euphratica, low temperatures up-regulate APYRASE2 (PeAPY2) expression in callus cells. We investigated the biochemical characteristics of PeAPY2 and its role in cold tolerance. We found that PeAPY2 predominantly localized to the plasma membrane, but punctate signals also appeared in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. PeAPY2 exhibited broad substrate specificity, but it most efficiently hydrolyzed purine nucleotides, particularly ATP. PeAPY2 preferred Mg(2+) as a cofactor, and it was insensitive to various, specific ATPase inhibitors. When PeAPY2 was ectopically expressed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), cold tolerance was enhanced, based on root growth measurements and survival rates. Moreover, under cold stress, PeAPY2-transgenic plants maintained plasma membrane integrity and showed reduced cold-elicited electrolyte leakage compared with wild-type plants. These responses probably resulted from efficient plasma membrane repair via vesicular trafficking. Indeed, transgenic plants showed accelerated endocytosis and exocytosis during cold stress and recovery. We found that low doses of extracellular ATP accelerated vesicular trafficking, but high extracellular ATP inhibited trafficking and reduced cell viability. Cold stress caused significant increases in root medium extracellular ATP. However, under these conditions, PeAPY2-transgenic lines showed greater control of extracellular ATP levels than wild-type plants. We conclude that Arabidopsis plants that overexpressed PeAPY2 could increase membrane repair by accelerating vesicular trafficking and hydrolyzing extracellular ATP to avoid excessive, cold-elicited ATP accumulation in the root medium and, thus, reduced ATP-induced inhibition of vesicular trafficking. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  4. The developing xylem transcriptome and genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing in Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood) populations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alternative splicing (AS) of genes is an efficient means of generating variation in protein structure and function. AS variation has been observed between tissues, cell types, and different treatments in non-woody plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) and rice. However, little is known about AS patterns in wood-forming tissues and how much AS variation exists within plant populations. Results Here we used high-throughput RNA sequencing to analyze the Populus trichocarpa (P. trichocarpa) xylem transcriptome in 20 individuals from different populations across much of its range in western North America. Deep transcriptome sequencing and mapping of reads to the P. trichocarpa reference genome identified a suite of xylem-expressed genes common to all accessions. Our analysis suggests that at least 36% of the xylem-expressed genes in P. trichocarpa are alternatively spliced. Extensive AS was observed in cell-wall biosynthesis related genes such as glycosyl transferases and C2H2 transcription factors. 27902 AS events were documented and most of these events were not conserved across individuals. Differences in isoform-specific read densities indicated that 7% and 13% of AS events showed significant differences between individuals within geographically separated southern and northern populations, a level that is in general agreement with AS variation in human populations. Conclusions This genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing reveals high levels of AS in P. trichocarpa and extensive inter-individual AS variation. We provide the most comprehensive analysis of AS in P. trichocarpa to date, which will serve as a valuable resource for the plant community to study transcriptome complexity and AS regulation during wood formation. PMID:23718132

  5. Induction of cambial reactivation by localized heating in a deciduous hardwood hybrid poplar (Populus sieboldii x P. grandidentata).

    PubMed

    Begum, Shahanara; Nakaba, Satoshi; Oribe, Yuichiro; Kubo, Takafumi; Funada, Ryo

    2007-09-01

    The timing of cambial reactivation plays an important role in the control of both the quantity and the quality of wood. The effect of localized heating on cambial reactivation in the main stem of a deciduous hardwood hybrid poplar (Populus sieboldii x P. grandidentata) was investigated. Electric heating tape (20-22 degrees C) was wrapped at one side of the main stem of cloned hybrid poplar trees at breast height in winter. Small blocks were collected from both heated and non-heated control portions of the stem for sequential observations of cambial activity and for studies of the localization of storage starch around the cambium from dormancy to reactivation by light microscopy. Cell division in phloem began earlier than cambial reactivation in locally heated portions of stems. Moreover, the cambial reactivation induced by localized heating occurred earlier than natural cambial reactivation. In heated stems, well-developed secondary xylem was produced that had almost the same structure as the natural xylem. When cambial reactivation was induced by heating, the buds of trees had not yet burst, indicating that there was no close temporal relationship between bud burst and cambial reactivation. In heated stems, the amount of storage starch decreased near the cambium upon reactivation of the cambium. After cambial reactivation, storage starch disappeared completely. Storage starch appeared again, near the cambium, during xylem differentiation in heated stems. The results suggest that, in deciduous diffuse-porous hardwood poplar growing in a temperate zone, the temperature in the stem is a limiting factor for reactivation of phloem and cambium. An increase in temperature might induce the conversion of storage starch to sucrose for the activation of cambial cell division and secondary xylem. Localized heating in poplar stems provides a useful experimental system for studies of cambial biology.

  6. Prevalence of LuxR- and LuxI-type quorum sensing circuits in members of the Populus deltoides microbiome

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Amy L; Lappala, Colin; Morlen, Ryan; Pelletier, Dale A; Lu, Tse-Yuan; Lankford, Patricia K; Harwood, Caroline S; Greenberg, E. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We are interested in the root microbiome of the fast-growing Eastern cottonwood tree, Populus 25 deltoides. There is a large bank of bacterial isolates from P. deltoides and there are 44 draft 26 genomes of bacterial endophyte and rhizosphere isolates. As a first step in efforts to understand 27 the roles of bacterial communication and plant-bacterial signaling in P. deltoides we focused on 28 the prevalence of acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) quorum sensing signal production and 29 reception in members of the P. deltoides microbiome. We screened 129 bacterial isolates for 30 AHL production using a broad-spectrum bioassay that responds to many but not all AHLs, and 31 we queried the available genome sequences of microbiome isolates for homologs of AHL 32 synthase and receptor genes. AHL signal production was detected in 40% of 129 strains tested. 33 Positive isolates included -, - and -Proteobacteria. Members of the luxI family of AHL 34 synthases were identified in 18 of 39 Proteobacteria genomes including genomes of some 35 isolates that tested negative in the bioassay. Members of the luxR family of transcription factors, 36 that include AHL-responsive factors, were more abundant than luxI homologs. There were 72 in 37 the 39 Proteobacteria genomes. Some of the luxR homologs appear to be members of a 38 subfamily of LuxRs that respond to as yet unknown plant signals rather than bacterial AHLs. 39 Apparently, there is a substantial capacity for AHL cell-to-cell communication in Proteobacteria 40 of the P. deltoides microbiota and there are also Proteobacteria with LuxR homologs of the type 41 hypothesized to respond to plant signals or cues.

  7. Monolignol Pathway 4-Coumaric Acid:Coenzyme A Ligases in Populus. trichocarpa: Novel Specificity, Metabolic Regulation, and Simulation of Coenzyme A Ligation Fluxes1[W

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Song, Jina; Williams, Cranos M.; Shuford, Christopher M.; Liu, Jie; Wang, Jack P.; Li, Quanzi; Shi, Rui; Gokce, Emine; Ducoste, Joel; Muddiman, David C.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2013-01-01

    4-Coumaric acid:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) is involved in monolignol biosynthesis for lignification in plant cell walls. It ligates coenzyme A (CoA) with hydroxycinnamic acids, such as 4-coumaric and caffeic acids, into hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA thioesters. The ligation ensures the activated state of the acid for reduction into monolignols. In Populus spp., it has long been thought that one monolignol-specific 4CL is involved. Here, we present evidence of two monolignol 4CLs, Ptr4CL3 and Ptr4CL5, in Populus trichocarpa. Ptr4CL3 is the ortholog of the monolignol 4CL reported for many other species. Ptr4CL5 is novel. The two Ptr4CLs exhibited distinct Michaelis-Menten kinetic properties. Inhibition kinetics demonstrated that hydroxycinnamic acid substrates are also inhibitors of 4CL and suggested that Ptr4CL5 is an allosteric enzyme. Experimentally validated flux simulation, incorporating reaction/inhibition kinetics, suggested two CoA ligation paths in vivo: one through 4-coumaric acid and the other through caffeic acid. We previously showed that a membrane protein complex mediated the 3-hydroxylation of 4-coumaric acid to caffeic acid. The demonstration here of two ligation paths requiring these acids supports this 3-hydroxylation function. Ptr4CL3 regulates both CoA ligation paths with similar efficiencies, whereas Ptr4CL5 regulates primarily the caffeic acid path. Both paths can be inhibited by caffeic acid. The Ptr4CL5-catalyzed caffeic acid metabolism, therefore, may also act to mitigate the inhibition by caffeic acid to maintain a proper ligation flux. A high level of caffeic acid was detected in stem-differentiating xylem of P. trichocarpa. Our results suggest that Ptr4CL5 and caffeic acid coordinately modulate the CoA ligation flux for monolignol biosynthesis. PMID:23344904

  8. Phenolic composition and antioxidant properties of poplar bud (Populus nigra) extract: individual antioxidant contribution of phenolics and transcriptional effect on skin aging.

    PubMed

    Dudonné, Stéphanie; Poupard, Pascal; Coutière, Philippe; Woillez, Marion; Richard, Tristan; Mérillon, Jean-Michel; Vitrac, Xavier

    2011-05-11

    The Populus species possess great potential for therapeutical applications, especially for their known anti-inflammatory properties. The antioxidant properties of propolis, a hive product collected by honey bees mainly from poplar bud exudates, suggest that poplar buds also possess antioxidant properties. Here is reported the characterization of the antioxidant properties of an aqueous poplar bud (Populus nigra) extract. It presented a high total phenolic content, and moderate antioxidant properties as determined by ORAC assay. The main phenolic compounds identified were phenolic acids and flavonoid aglycons. These phenolic compounds were analyzed by ORAC assay for their individual antioxidant activity, in order to determine the major contributors to the total antioxidant activity of the extract. Thanks to their high antioxidant activity, caffeic and p-coumaric acids were identified as the major antioxidant components. Representing only 3.5% of its dry weight, these compounds represented together about 50% of the total antioxidant activity of the extract. The antioxidant properties of poplar bud extract and the phenolic compounds identified were also analyzed by cellular antioxidant activity assay (CAA), which was weakly correlated with ORAC assay. The transcriptional effect of poplar bud extract on skin aging was evaluated in vitro on a replicative senescence model of normal human dermal fibroblasts, using a customized DNA macroarray specifically designed to investigate skin aging markers. Among the detected genes, poplar bud extract significantly regulated genes involved in antioxidant defenses, inflammatory response and cell renewal. The collective antioxidant properties and transcriptional effect of this extract suggest potential antiaging properties which could be utilized in cosmetic and nutraceutical formulations.

  9. Down-regulation of KORRIGAN-like endo-β-1,4-glucanase genes impacts carbon partitioning, mycorrhizal colonization and biomass production in Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Kalluri, Udaya C; Engle, Nancy L.; Bali, Garima; ...

    2016-10-04

    Here, a greater understanding of the genetic regulation of plant cell wall remodeling and the impact of modified cell walls on plant performance is important for the development of sustainable biofuel crops. Here, we studied the impact of down-regulating KORRIGAN-like cell wall biosynthesis genes, belonging to the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene family, on Populus growth, metabolism and the ability to interact with symbiotic microbes. The reductions in cellulose content and lignin syringyl-to-guaiacyl unit ratio, and increase in cellulose crystallinity of cell walls of PdKOR RNAi plants corroborated the functional role of PdKOR in cell wall biosynthesis. Altered metabolism and reduced growth characteristicsmore » of RNAi plants revealed new implications on carbon allocation and partitioning. The distinctive metabolome phenotype comprised of a higher phenolic and salicylic acid content, and reduced lignin, shikimic acid and maleic acid content relative to control. Plant sustainability implications of modified cell walls on beneficial plant-microbe interactions were explored via co-culture with an ectomycorrhizal fungus, Laccaria bicolor. A significant increase in the mycorrhization rate was observed in transgenic plants, leading to measurable beneficial growth effects. These findings present new evidence for functional interconnectedness of cellulose biosynthesis pathway, metabolism and mycorrhizal association in plants, and further emphasize the consideration of the sustainability implications of plant trait improvement efforts.« less

  10. Down-Regulation of KORRIGAN-Like Endo-β-1,4-Glucanase Genes Impacts Carbon Partitioning, Mycorrhizal Colonization and Biomass Production in Populus

    PubMed Central

    Kalluri, Udaya C.; Payyavula, Raja S.; Labbé, Jessy L.; Engle, Nancy; Bali, Garima; Jawdy, Sara S.; Sykes, Robert W.; Davis, Mark; Ragauskas, Arthur; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    A greater understanding of the genetic regulation of plant cell wall remodeling and the impact of modified cell walls on plant performance is important for the development of sustainable biofuel crops. Here, we studied the impact of down-regulating KORRIGAN-like cell wall biosynthesis genes, belonging to the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene family, on Populus growth, metabolism and the ability to interact with symbiotic microbes. The reductions in cellulose content and lignin syringyl-to-guaiacyl unit ratio, and increase in cellulose crystallinity of cell walls of PdKOR RNAi plants corroborated the functional role of PdKOR in cell wall biosynthesis. Altered metabolism and reduced growth characteristics of RNAi plants revealed new implications on carbon allocation and partitioning. The distinctive metabolome phenotype comprised of a higher phenolic and salicylic acid content, and reduced lignin, shikimic acid and maleic acid content relative to control. Plant sustainability implications of modified cell walls on beneficial plant-microbe interactions were explored via co-culture with an ectomycorrhizal fungus, Laccaria bicolor. A significant increase in the mycorrhization rate was observed in transgenic plants, leading to measurable beneficial growth effects. These findings present new evidence for functional interconnectedness of cellulose biosynthesis pathway, metabolism and mycorrhizal association in plants, and further emphasize the consideration of the sustainability implications of plant trait improvement efforts. PMID:27757116

  11. Physico-Chemical Properties and Biodegradability of Genetically Modified Populus trichocarpa and Pinus taeda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmunds, Charles Warren

    Increasing concerns over greenhouse gas emissions and the finite supply of fossil fuels lead to the goal of utilizing lignocellulosic feedstocks for biofuels, platform chemicals, and biocomposites. Lignin is responsible for the recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass and is a major barrier to its deconstruction. Great progress has been made in mapping and modifying the lignin biosynthetic pathway. However, the link between the genetic modification, resulting chemical and physical properties of the wood, and how these properties influence the thermomechanical and recalcitrance to biological and chemical degradation needs further investigation. In this dissertation, the study of modified Populus trichocarpa and Pinus taeda were utilized to accomplish this goal. Thermo-mechanical properties of genetically modified P. trichocarpa with altered lignin content and/or lignin structure were measured with a series of tools including; dynamic mechanical analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance, and wet chemistry techniques. Results demonstrated lignin content and lignin structure likely influence the glass transition temperature (Tg), and that decreased lignin content and the corresponding higher proportion of cell wall carbohydrates may contribute to increased molecular mobility in the wood polymer structure. The effect of lignin biosynthetic pathway modification on biological degradation of these transgenic wood specimens was of interest. However, experimental methods for fungal treatment on small young greenhouse-grown wood specimens are not well established. Therefore, a project was undertaken to develop a method for fungal inoculation and incubation for these unique specimens. Several parameters were tested, and a fungal treatment method was identified with sufficient weight loss after decay and significant reduction in variation of weight loss between replicates compared to previous experiments by direct inoculation of wood with liquid malt extract fungal culture

  12. Populus trichocarpa encodes small, effector-like secreted proteins that are highly induced during mutualistic symbiosis

    DOE PAGES

    Plett, Jonathan M.; Yin, Hengfu; Mewalal, Ritesh; ...

    2017-03-23

    During symbiosis, organisms use a range of metabolic and protein-based signals to communicate. Of these protein signals, one class is defined as ‘effectors’, i.e., small secreted proteins (SSPs) that cause phenotypical and physiological changes in another organism. To date, protein-based effectors have been described in aphids, nematodes, fungi and bacteria. Using RNA sequencing of Populus trichocarpa roots in mutualistic symbiosis with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor, we sought to determine if host plants also contain genes encoding effector-like proteins. We identified 417 plant-encoded putative SSPs that were significantly regulated during this interaction, including 161 SSPs specific to P. trichocarpa andmore » 15 SSPs exhibiting expansion in Populus and closely related lineages. We demonstrate that a subset of these SSPs can enter L. bicolor hyphae, localize to the nucleus and affect hyphal growth and morphology. Finally, we conclude that plants encode proteins that appear to function as effector proteins that may regulate symbiotic associations.« less

  13. Extensive allelic variation in gene expression in populus F1 hybrids.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yan; Adams, Keith L

    2007-12-01

    Hybridization between plant species can induce speciation as well as phenotypic novelty and heterosis. Hybrids also can show genome rearrangements and gene expression changes compared with their parents. Here we determined the allelic variation in gene expression in Populus trichocarpa x Populus deltoides F(1) hybrids. Among 30 genes analyzed in four independently formed hybrids, 17 showed >1.5-fold expression biases for one of the two alleles, and there was monoallelic expression of one gene. Expression ratios of the alleles differed between leaves and stems for 10 genes. The results suggest differential regulation of the two parental alleles in the hybrids. To determine if the allelic expression biases were caused by hybridization we compared the ratios of species-specific transcripts between an F(1) hybrid and its parents. Thirteen of 19 genes showed allelic expression ratios in the hybrid that were significantly different from the ratios of the parental species. The P. deltoides allele of one gene was silenced in the hybrid. Modes of gene regulation were inferred from the hybrid-parent comparisons. Cis-regulation was inferred for 6 genes, trans-regulation for 1 gene, and combined cis- and trans-regulation for 9 genes. The results from this study indicate that hybridization between plant species can have extensive effects on allelic expression patterns, some of which might lead to phenotypic changes.

  14. Fermentation of dilute acid pretreated Populus by Clostridium thermocellum, Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis

    DOE PAGES

    Yee, Kelsey L.; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; ...

    2015-07-25

    Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), which merges enzyme production, biomass hydrolysis, and fermentation into a single step, has the potential to become an efficient and economic strategy for the bioconversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to transportation fuels or chemicals. In this study, we evaluated Clostridium thermocellum, Caldicellulosiruptor bescii, and Caldicellulosiruptor obsidiansis, three , thermophilic,cellulolytic, mixed-acid fermenting candidate CBP microorganisms, for their fermentation capabilities using dilute acid pretreated Populus as a model biomass feedstock. Under pH controlled, anaerobic fermentation conditions, each candidate successfully digested a minimum of 75% of the cellulose from dilute acid pretreated Populus, as indicated by an increase in planktonic cellsmore » and end-product metabolites and a concurrent decrease in glucan content. C. thermocellum, which employs a cellulosomal approach to biomass degradation, required 120 hours to achieve 75% cellulose utilization. In contrast, the non-cellulosomal, secreted hydrolytic enzyme system of the Caldicellulosiruptor sp. required 300 hours to achieve similar results. End-point fermentation conversions for C. thermocellum, C. bescii, and C. obsidiansis were determined to be 0.29, 0.34, and 0.38 grams of total metabolites per gram of loaded glucan, respectively. This data provide a starting point for future strain engineering efforts that can serve to improve the biomass fermentation capabilities of these three promising candidate CBP platforms.« less

  15. Phytoremediation of trichlorophenol by Phase II metabolism in transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing a Populus glucosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhen-Hong; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Peng, Ri-He; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Zhao, Wei; Han, Hong-Juan; Yao, Quan-Hong; Wu, Ai-Zhong

    2012-04-03

    Trichlorophenol (TCP) and its derivatives are introduced into the environment through numerous sources, including wood preservatives and biocides. Environmental contamination by TCPs is associated with human health risks, necessitating the development of cost-effective remediation techniques. Efficient phytoremediation of TCP is potentially feasible because it contains a hydroxyl group and is suitable for direct phase II metabolism. In this study, we present a system for TCP phytoremediation based on sugar conjugation by overexpressing a Populus putative UDP-glc-dependent glycosyltransferase (UGT). The enzyme PtUGT72B1 displayed the highest TCP-conjugating activity among all reported UGTs. Transgenic Arabidopsis demonstrated significantly enhanced tolerances to 2,4,5-TCP and 2,4,6-TCP. Transgenic plants also exhibited a strikingly higher capacity to remove TCP from their media. This work indicates that Populus UGT overexpression in Arabidopsis may be an efficient method for phytoremoval and degradation of TCP. Our findings have the potential to provide a suitable remediation strategy for sites contaminated by TCP.

  16. Artificial defoliation effect on Populus growth, biomass production, and total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbacker, R.R.; Hart, E.R.; Schultz, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    The impact of artificial defoliation on Populus growth, biomass production, and total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration was examined. Four Populus clones were field planted and artificially defoliated. Assigned defoliation levels (0, 25, 50, or 75%) were applied to leaves of leaf plastochron index 0 through 8 during a 6-d period in a 3-step incremental manner to simulate cottonwood leaf beetle, Chrysomela scripta F., larval feeding patterns. Artificial defoliations were timed to coincide with the outbreaks of natural beetle populations in adjacent areas. After 2 growing seasons, trees were measured for height, diameter, and biomass accumulation. Root samples were collected from 0 and 75% defoliation treatments for each clone. Biomass was reduced an average of 33% as defoliation level increased from 0 to 75%. As defoliation level increased from 0 to 75%, a consistent allocation ratio of biomass to 2/3 above and 1/3 below ground components continued in all clones. An overcompensation response occurred in above ground biomass when a defoliation level of 25% was applied. Between 25 and 75% a strong linear trend of decreasing biomass as defoliation increased was indicated. Vitality of the tree, as indicated by total nonstructural carbohydrate content, was affected only slightly by increasing defoliation. 26 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  17. The transcriptome of Populus in elevated CO2 reveals increased anthocyanin biosynthesis during delayed autumnal senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Tallis, M.J.; Rogers, A.; Lin, Y.; Zhang, J.; Street, N. R.; Miglietta, F.; Karnosky, D. F.; Angelis, P. D.; Calfapietra, C.; Taylor, G.

    2010-03-01

    The delay in autumnal senescence that has occurred in recent decades has been linked to rising temperatures. Here, we suggest that increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} may partly account for delayed autumnal senescence and for the first time, through transcriptome analysis, identify gene expression changes associated with this delay. Using a plantation of Populus x euramericana grown in elevated [CO{sub 2}] (e[CO{sub 2}]) with free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) technology, we investigated the molecular and biochemical basis of this response. A Populus cDNA microarray was used to identify genes representing multiple biochemical pathways influenced by e[CO{sub 2}] during senescence. Gene expression changes were confirmed through real-time quantitative PCR, and leaf biochemical assays. Pathways for secondary metabolism and glycolysis were significantly up-regulated by e[CO{sub 2}] during senescence, in particular, those related to anthocyanin biosynthesis. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) representing the two most significantly up-regulated transcripts in e[CO{sub 2}], LDOX (leucoanthocyanidin dioxgenase) and DFR (dihydroflavonol reductase), gave (e[CO{sub 2}]/ambient CO{sub 2} (a[CO{sub 2}])) expression ratios of 39.6 and 19.3, respectively. We showed that in e[CO{sub 2}] there was increased autumnal leaf sugar accumulation and up-regulation of genes determining anthocyanin biosynthesis which, we propose, prolongs leaf longevity during natural autumnal senescence.

  18. Effect of rotation, site, and clone on the chemical composition of Populus hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Blanckenhorn, P.R.; Bowersox, T.W.; Kuklewski, K.M.; Stimely, S.L.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical content values were determined for three Populus clones grown on two dissimilar sites by component (wood, bark, and wood/bark specimens), tissue age (1-, 2- and 4-year-old), and rotation. The chemical content values obtained included extractives, holocellulose, ..alpha..-cellulose, and lignin. In general, analysis of the data for the wood, bark, and wood/bark specimens indicated that: 1) wood was high in holocellulose and ..alpha..-cellulose content compared to bark, 2) bark was high in lignin and extractive content values compared to wood, and 3) wood/bark chemical content values were between the values for the wood and bark specimens. The chemical content data were analyzed to identify: 1) significant differences between rotations by component (wood, bark and wood/bark) for a given age, clone, and site, and 2) significant differences between sites for four-year-old wood, bark and wood/bark specimens of a given rotation, and clone. Statistical analyses indicated that significant differences existed among clones, sites, ages, and rotations. Within the wood, bark and wood/bark specimens, tissue age, rotation, and site influenced the chemical content values more than the parentage. Potential chemical yields derived from the three Populus hybrid clones investigated will depend on component, age, rotation, and site with limited parentage effects.

  19. Transport and use of CO sub 2 in the xylem sap of Populus deltoides

    SciTech Connect

    Stringer, J.W.; Kimmerer, T.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Results of recent experiments indicate an internal cycling of respiratory CO{sub 2} in woody plants. The CO{sub 2} concentration of xylem sap expressed from the twigs of field grown Populus deltoides ranged from .14 to .50 mM. The pH of the xylem sap was 5.7 to 6.7, providing a significant bicarbonate concentration in many samples. Total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC = CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}CO{sub 3} + HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) was 0.5 mM to 1.3 mM. Results from the analysis of xylem sap of 10 other species of woody plants were similar. To determine the fate of DIC delivered to the leaves of Populus deltoides, excised leaves were fed 1mM NaHCO{sub 3} (2 {mu}Ci NaH{sup 14}CO{sub 3} ml{sup {minus}1}). Less than 0.4% of the label escaped from the leaves, and {ge}93% was fixed. Of the carbon fixed 56% of the {sup 14}C was found in the petiole and midrib, and 14% was in the major veins, with the remaining 30% in the minor veins and lamina. Shading of the peptiole and midrib of leaves decreased the amount of fixed carbon in these tissues to 38% and increased the amount in the lamina to 55%.

  20. Leaf and whole tree adaptations to mild salinity in field grown Populus euphratica.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fanjiang; Yan, Hailong; Arndt, Stefan K

    2009-10-01

    Populus euphratica Oliv. is a highly salt tolerant tree species, and this study represents the first comprehensive investigation of salt tolerance mechanisms of mature trees of P. euphratica in the field. We measured NaCl concentration in xylem sap, NaCl accumulation in leaves, the effect of NaCl on leaf physiological parameters and osmotic adjustment and the allocation and distribution of NaCl between different plant organs on a whole plant level in trees exposed to mild saline groundwater (around 30 mM) in China. Populus euphratica showed three key mechanisms of salt tolerance. The primary mechanism had a strong control over Na(+) and Cl(-) uptake with effective exclusion mechanisms for Cl(-) with up to 99% of the external NaCl being excluded from the xylem. Secondly, the trees allocated large proportions of NaCl into the leaves, which served as a salt elimination mechanism as the leaves are ultimately shed at the end of the growing season. Thirdly, the trees tolerated high foliar Na(+) concentrations through a combination of osmotic adjustment using sucrose and probable sequestering of Na(+) in the apoplast. Our results indicate that the control of Na(+) and Cl(-) uptake and the regulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) delivery to the shoot are key to salt tolerance of P. euphratica in the field with tolerance of high Na(+) concentrations in leaves being a critical component.

  1. Enzymatic digestibility and pretreatment degradation products of AFEX-treated hardwoods (Populus nigra).

    PubMed

    Balan, Venkatesh; Sousa, Leonardo da Costa; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Marshall, Derek; Sharma, Lekh N; Chambliss, C Kevin; Dale, Bruce E

    2009-01-01

    There is a growing need to find alternatives to crude oil as the primary feed stock for the chemicals and fuel industry and ethanol has been demonstrated to be a viable alternative. Among the various feed stocks for producing ethanol, poplar (Populus nigra x Populus maximowiczii) is considered to have great potential as a biorefinery feedstock in the United States, due to their widespread availability and good productivity in several parts of the country. We have optimized AFEX pretreatment conditions (180 degrees C, 2:1 ammonia to biomass loading, 233% moisture, 30 minutes residence time) and by using various combinations of enzymes (commercical celluloses and xylanases) to achieve high glucan and xylan conversion (93 and 65%, respectively). We have also identified and quantified several important degradation products formed during AFEX using liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). As a part of degradation product analysis, we have also quantified oligosaccharides in the AFEX water wash extracts by acid hydrolysis. It is interesting to note that corn stover (C4 grass) can be pretreated effectively using mild AFEX pretreatment conditions, while on the other hand hardwood poplar requires much harsher AFEX conditions to obtain equivalent sugar yields upon enzymatic hydrolysis. Comparing corn stover and poplar, we conclude that pretreatment severity and enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency are dictated to a large extent by lignin carbohydrate complexes and arabinoxylan cross-linkages for AFEX.

  2. Rapid phytochemical analysis of birch (Betula) and poplar (Populus) foliage by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Holeski, Liza M; Couture, John J; Gusse, Adam; Undersander, Daniel J; Lindroth, Richard L

    2013-02-01

    Poplar (Populus) and birch (Betula) species are widely distributed throughout the northern hemisphere, where they are foundation species in forest ecosystems and serve as important sources of pulpwood. The ecology of these species is strongly linked to their foliar chemistry, creating demand for a rapid, inexpensive method to analyze phytochemistry. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) as an inexpensive, high-throughput tool for determining primary (e.g., nitrogen, sugars, starch) and secondary (e.g., tannins, phenolic glycosides) foliar chemistry of Populus and Betula species, and identifies conditions necessary for obtaining reliable quantitative data. We developed calibrations with high predictive power (residual predictive deviations ≤ 7.4) by relating phytochemical concentrations determined with classical analytical methods (e.g., spectrophotometric assays, liquid chromatography) to NIR spectra, using modified partial least squares regression. We determine that NIRS, although less sensitive and precise than classical methods for some compounds, provides useful predictions in a much faster, less expensive manner than do classical methods.

  3. Different autosomes evolved into sex chromosomes in the sister genera of Salix and Populus.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jing; Ye, Ning; Zhang, Defang; Chen, Yingnan; Fang, Lecheng; Dai, Xiaogang; Yin, Tongming

    2015-03-13

    Willows (Salix) and poplars (Populus) are dioecious plants in Salicaceae family. Sex chromosome in poplar genome was consistently reported to be associated with chromosome XIX. In contrast to poplar, this study revealed that chromosome XV was sex chromosome in willow. Previous studies revealed that both ZZ/ZW and XX/XY sex-determining systems could be present in some species of Populus. In this study, sex of S. suchowensis was found to be determined by the ZW system in which the female was the heterogametic gender. Gene syntenic and collinear comparisons revealed macrosynteny between sex chromosomes and the corresponding autosomes between these two lineages. By contrast, no syntenic segments were found to be shared between poplar's and willow's sex chromosomes. Syntenic analysis also revealed substantial chromosome rearrangements between willow's alternate sex chromatids. Since willow and poplar originate from a common ancestor, we proposed that evolution of autosomes into sex chromosomes in these two lineages occurred after their divergence. Results of this study indicate that sex chromosomes in Salicaceae are still at the early stage of evolutionary divergence. Additionally, this study provided valuable information for better understanding the genetics and evolution of sex chromosome in dioecious plants.

  4. Extensive Allelic Variation in Gene Expression in Populus F1 Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yan; Adams, Keith L.

    2007-01-01

    Hybridization between plant species can induce speciation as well as phenotypic novelty and heterosis. Hybrids also can show genome rearrangements and gene expression changes compared with their parents. Here we determined the allelic variation in gene expression in Populus trichocarpa × Populus deltoides F1 hybrids. Among 30 genes analyzed in four independently formed hybrids, 17 showed >1.5-fold expression biases for one of the two alleles, and there was monoallelic expression of one gene. Expression ratios of the alleles differed between leaves and stems for 10 genes. The results suggest differential regulation of the two parental alleles in the hybrids. To determine if the allelic expression biases were caused by hybridization we compared the ratios of species-specific transcripts between an F1 hybrid and its parents. Thirteen of 19 genes showed allelic expression ratios in the hybrid that were significantly different from the ratios of the parental species. The P. deltoides allele of one gene was silenced in the hybrid. Modes of gene regulation were inferred from the hybrid–parent comparisons. Cis-regulation was inferred for 6 genes, trans-regulation for 1 gene, and combined cis- and trans-regulation for 9 genes. The results from this study indicate that hybridization between plant species can have extensive effects on allelic expression patterns, some of which might lead to phenotypic changes. PMID:18073418

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associated with Populus-Salix stands in a semiarid riparian ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beauchamp, Vanessa B.; Stromberg, J.C.; Stutz, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    ??? This study examined the activity, species richness, and species composition of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) community of Populus-Salix stands on the Verde River (Arizona, USA), quantified patterns of AMF richness and colonization along complex floodplain gradients, and identified environmental variables responsible for structuring the AMF community. ??? Samples from 61 Populus-Salix stands were analyzed for AMF and herbaceous composition, AMF colonization, gravimetric soil moisture, soil texture, per cent organic matter, pH, and concentrations of nitrate, bicarbonate phosphorus and exchangeable potassium. ??? AMF species richness declined with stand age and distance from and elevation above the channel and was positively related to perennial species cover and richness and gravimetric soil moisture. Distance from and elevation above the active channel, forest age, annual species cover, perennial species richness, and exchangeable potassium concentration all played a role in structuring the AMF community in this riparian area. ??? Most AMF species were found across a wide range of soil conditions, but a subset of species tended to occur more often in hydric areas. This group of riparian affiliate AMF species includes several not previously encountered in the surrounding Sonoran desert. ?? New Phytologist (2006).

  6. How to Regenerate and Protect Desert Riparian Populus euphratica Forest in Arid Areas

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hongbo; Zhang, Pei; Xu, Hailiang; Zhao, Xinfeng

    2015-01-01

    We found that the most suitable flooding disturbance model for regenerating Populus euphratica forest was two to three times per year with a duration of 15–20 days and an intensity of 25–30 m3/s. The flooding should take place during the seed emergence to young tree growth stages, and should be based on flooding experiments and data from vegetation quadrats and ecological water conveyance. Furthermore, we found that tree-ring width index for P. euphratica declined as the groundwater depth increased, and ascertained that the minimum groundwater depths for young trees, near-mature trees, mature trees and over-mature trees were 4.0 m, 5.0–5.4 m, 6.9 m and 7.8 m, respectively. These were derived from a quantitative relationship model between groundwater depth and tree-ring width index. The range for ecological water conveyance volume was 311–320 million m3 in the lower reaches of the Tarim River. This study not only provides a technical basis for sustainable ecological water conveyance in the Tarim River Basin, but also offers a theoretical guide and scientific information that could be used in similar areas to regenerate and protect Populus euphratica around the world. PMID:26481290

  7. Uptake, translocation, and transformation of quantum dots with cationic versus anionic coatings by Populus deltoides × nigra cuttings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Yu; Zhu, Huiguang; Braam, Janet; Schnoor, Jerald L; Alvarez, Pedro J J

    2014-06-17

    Manipulation of the organic coatings of nanoparticles such as quantum dots (QDs) to enhance specific applications may also affect their interaction and uptake by different organisms. In this study, poplar trees (Populus deltoides × nigra) were exposed hydroponically to 50-nM CdSe/CdZnS QDs coated with cationic polyethylenimine (PEI) (35.3 ± 6.6 nm) or poly(ethylene glycol) of anionic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA-EG) (19.5 ± 7.2 nm) to discern how coating charge affects nanoparticle uptake, translocation, and transformation within woody plants. Uptake of cationic PEI-QDs was 10 times faster despite their larger hydrodynamic size and higher extent of aggregation (17 times larger than PAA-EG-QDs after 11-day incubation in the hydroponic medium), possibly due to electrostatic attraction to the negatively charged root cell wall. QDs cores aggregated upon root uptake, and their translocation to poplar shoots (negligible for PAA-EG-QDs and 0.7 ng Cd/mg stem for PEI-QDs) was likely limited by the endodermis. After 2-day exposure, PEI and PAA-EG coatings were likely degraded from the internalized QDs inside the plant, leading to the aggregation of the metallic cores and a "red-shift" of fluorescence. The fluorescence of PEI-QD aggregates was stable inside the roots through the 11-day exposure period. In contrast, the PAA-EG-QD aggregates lost fluorescence inside the plant after 11 days probably due to destabilization of the coating, even though these QDs were stable in the hydroponic solution. Overall, these results highlight the importance of coating properties in the rate and extent to which nanoparticles are assimilated by plants and potentially introduced into food webs.

  8. Emissions of volatile organic compounds and leaf structural characteristics of European aspen (Populus tremula) grown under elevated ozone and temperature.

    PubMed

    Hartikainen, Kaisa; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Kivimäenpää, Minna; Kontunen-Soppela, Sari; Mäenpää, Maarit; Oksanen, Elina; Rousi, Matti; Holopainen, Toini

    2009-09-01

    Northern forest trees are challenged to adapt to changing climate, including global warming and increasing tropospheric ozone (O(3)) concentrations. Both elevated O(3) and temperature can cause significant changes in volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions as well as in leaf anatomy that can be related to adaptation or increased stress tolerance, or are signs of damage. Impacts of moderately elevated O(3) (1.3x ambient) and temperature (ambient + 1 degrees C), alone and in combination, on VOC emissions and leaf structure of two genotypes (2.2 and 5.2) of European aspen (Populus tremula L.) were studied in an open-field experiment in summer 2007. The impact of O(3) on measured variables was minor, but elevated temperature significantly increased emissions of total monoterpenes and green leaf volatiles. Genotypic differences in the responses to warming treatment were also observed. alpha-Pinene emission, which has been suggested to protect plants from elevated temperature, increased from genotype 5.2 only. Isoprene emission from genotype 2.2 decreased, whereas genotype 5.2 was able to retain high isoprene emission level also under elevated temperature. Elevated temperature also caused formation of thinner leaves, which was related to thinning of epidermis, palisade and spongy layers as well as reduced area of palisade cells. We consider aspen genotype 5.2 to have better potential for adaptation to increasing temperature because of thicker photosynthetic active palisade layer and higher isoprene and alpha-pinene emission levels compared to genotype 2.2. Our results show that even a moderate elevation in temperature is efficient enough to cause notable changes in VOC emissions and leaf structure of these aspen genotypes, possibly indicating the effort of the saplings to adapt to changing climate.

  9. Constitutively Elevated Salicylic Acid Levels Alter Photosynthesis and Oxidative State but Not Growth in Transgenic Populus[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Liang-Jiao; Guo, Wenbing; Yuan, Yinan; Anino, Edward O.; Nyamdari, Batbayar; Wilson, Mark C.; Frost, Christopher J.; Chen, Han-Yi; Babst, Benjamin A.; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2013-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) has long been implicated in plant responses to oxidative stress. SA overproduction in Arabidopsis thaliana leads to dwarfism, making in planta assessment of SA effects difficult in this model system. We report that transgenic Populus tremula × alba expressing a bacterial SA synthase hyperaccumulated SA and SA conjugates without negative growth consequences. In the absence of stress, endogenously elevated SA elicited widespread metabolic and transcriptional changes that resembled those of wild-type plants exposed to oxidative stress-promoting heat treatments. Potential signaling and oxidative stress markers azelaic and gluconic acids as well as antioxidant chlorogenic acids were strongly coregulated with SA, while soluble sugars and other phenylpropanoids were inversely correlated. Photosynthetic responses to heat were attenuated in SA-overproducing plants. Network analysis identified potential drivers of SA-mediated transcriptome rewiring, including receptor-like kinases and WRKY transcription factors. Orthologs of Arabidopsis SA signaling components NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 and thioredoxins were not represented. However, all members of the expanded Populus nucleoredoxin-1 family exhibited increased expression and increased network connectivity in SA-overproducing Populus, suggesting a previously undescribed role in SA-mediated redox regulation. The SA response in Populus involved a reprogramming of carbon uptake and partitioning during stress that is compatible with constitutive chemical defense and sustained growth, contrasting with the SA response in Arabidopsis, which is transient and compromises growth if sustained. PMID:23903318

  10. Increased leaf area dominates carbon flux response to elevated CO2 in stands of Populus deltoides (Bartr.)

    Treesearch

    Ramesh Murthy; Greg Barron-Gafford; Philip M. Dougherty; Victor c. Engels; Katie Grieve; Linda Handley; Christie Klimas; Mark J. Postosnaks; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Jianwei Zhang

    2005-01-01

    We examined the effects of atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and soil moisture stress (SMS) on leaf- and stand-level CO2 exchange in model 3-year-old coppiced cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) plantations using the large-scale, controlled environments of the Biosphere 2 Laboratory. A short-term experiment was imposed...

  11. Sapflow of hybrid poplar (Populus nigra L. x P. maximowiczii A. Henry 'NM6') during phytoremediation of landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Adam H. Wiese; Edmund O. Bauer; Don E. Riemenschneider

    2006-01-01

    Poplars are ideal for phytoremediation because of their high water usage, fast growth, and deep root systems. We measured in 2002 and 2003 the sapflow of hybrid poplars (Populus nigra L. x P. maximowiczii A. Henry 'NM6') planted in 1999 for phytoremediation of a landfill in Rhinelander, WI, USA (45.6?N, 89.4?W).

  12. Drought-Induced Xylem Dysfunction in Petioles, Branches, and Roots of Populus balsamifera L. and Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.

    PubMed Central

    Hacke, U.; Sauter, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    Variation in vulnerability to xylem cavitation was measured within individual organs of Populus balsamifera L. and Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn. Cavitation was quantified by three different techniques: (a) measuring acoustic emissions, (b) measuring loss of hydraulic conductance while air-dehydrating a branch, and (c) measuring loss of hydraulic conductance as a function of positive air pressure injected into the xylem. All of these techniques gave similar results. In Populus, petioles were more resistant than branches, and branches were more resistant than roots. This corresponded to the pattern of vessel width: maximum vessel diameter in 1- to 2-year-old roots was 140 [mu]m, compared to 65 and 45 [mu]m in rapidly growing 1-year-old shoots and petioles, respectively. Cavitation in Populus petioles started at a threshold water potential of -1.1 MPa. The lowest leaf water potential observed was -0.9 MPa. In Alnus, there was no relationship between vessel diameter and the cavitation response of a plant organ. Although conduits were narrower in petioles than in branches, petioles were more vulnerable to cavitation. Cavitation in petioles was detected when water potential fell below -1.2 MPa. This value equaled midday leaf water potential in late June. As in Populus, roots were the most vulnerable organ. The significance of different cavitation thresholds in individual plant organs is discussed. PMID:12226296

  13. Economics of Afforestation with Eastern Cottonwood (Populus Deltoides) of Agricultural Land in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    Treesearch

    John A. Stanturf; C. Jeffrey Portwood

    1999-01-01

    Higher prices for hardwood stumpage and changes in agricultural policies may favor afforestation on sites in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV) which are suitable for Eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.). We examined the potential returns to a landowner growing cottonwood on three soil classes common to the LMAV. We specified the...

  14. Macro- and micro-nutrient concentration in leaf, woody, and root tissue of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate

    Treesearch

    Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Adam H. Wiese; Bart T. Sexton; Richard B. Hall

    2007-01-01

    Landfill leachate offers an opportunity to supply water and plant nutritional benefits at a lower cost than traditional sources. Information about nutrient uptake and distribution into tissues of Populus irrigated with landfill leachate helps increase biomass production along with evaluating the impacts of leachate chemistry on tree health.

  15. Nine-year performance of a variety of Populus taxa on an upland site in western Kentucky

    Treesearch

    Randall J. Rousseau; Joshua P. Adams; David W. Wilkerson

    2013-01-01

    A variety of hybrid poplars have been planted on upland sites throughout the Midwest and Midsouth regions of the United States. Very few of these clones have proven to be worthwhile due to susceptibility to a variety of diseases. Five different Populus taxa were planted on an upland site in western Kentucky as a means of assessing resistance to local...

  16. Differential phylogenetic expansions in BAHD acyltransferases across five angiosperm taxa and evidence of divergent expression among Populus paralogues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background BAHD acyltransferases are involved in the synthesis and elaboration of a wide variety of secondary metabolites. Previous research has shown that characterized proteins from this family fall broadly into five major clades and contain two conserved protein motifs. Here, we aimed to expand the understanding of BAHD acyltransferase diversity in plants through genome-wide analysis across five angiosperm taxa. We focus particularly on Populus, a woody perennial known to produce an abundance of secondary metabolites. Results Phylogenetic analysis of putative BAHD acyltransferase sequences from Arabidopsis, Medicago, Oryza, Populus, and Vitis, along with previously characterized proteins, supported a refined grouping of eight major clades for this family. Taxon-specific clustering of many BAHD family members appears pervasive in angiosperms. We identified two new multi-clade motifs and numerous clade-specific motifs, several of which have been implicated in BAHD function by previous structural and mutagenesis research. Gene duplication and expression data for Populus-dominated subclades revealed that several paralogous BAHD members in this genus might have already undergone functional divergence. Conclusions Differential, taxon-specific BAHD family expansion via gene duplication could be an evolutionary process contributing to metabolic diversity across plant taxa. Gene expression divergence among some Populus paralogues highlights possible distinctions between their biochemical and physiological functions. The newly discovered motifs, especially the clade-specific motifs, should facilitate future functional study of substrate and donor specificity among BAHD enzymes. PMID:21569431

  17. Growth, dry weight yields, and specific gravity of 3-year-old Populus grown under intensive culture.

    Treesearch

    David H. Dawson; J.G Isebrands; John C. Gordon

    1976-01-01

    In a nearly optimal cultural environment, Populus 'Tristis #1' grown for 3 years, planted at 9 by 9 inch spacing produced the equivalent of over 4 tons/acre/year of ovendry wood with specific gravity comparable to native aspen wood. Trees planted at wider spacings yielded less.

  18. Projected and actual biomass production of 2- to 10- year-old intensively cultured Populus 'Tristis # 1'

    Treesearch

    J. Zavitkovski

    1983-01-01

    Intensively cultured plantations of Populus 'Tristis # 1' produce more than 10 mt/ha/year of woody biomass at most spacings as long as they are harvested when mean annual biomass increment (MABI) culminates. In addition, fully stocked plantations produce up to 4.4 mt/ha of leaf litter. Plantations of other poplar clones produce about 30% more woody biomass,...

  19. Field performance of Populus in short-rotation intensive culture plantations in the north-central U.S.

    Treesearch

    Edward A. Hansen; Michael E. Ostry; Wendell D. Johnson; David N. Tolsted; Daniel A. Netzer; William E. Berguson; Richard B. Hall

    1994-01-01

    Describes a network of short-rotation, Populus research and demonstration plantations that has been established across a 5-state region in the north-central U.S. to identify suitable hybrid poplar clones for large-scale biomass plantations in the region. Reports 6-year results.

  20. Early rooting of dormant hardwood cuttings of Populus: analysis of quantitative genetics and genotype x environment interactions

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; Don E. Riemenschneider; Richard B. Hall

    2005-01-01

    Rooting of hardwood cuttings is under strong genetic control, although genotype x environment interactions affect selection of promising genotypes. Our objectives were (1) to assess the variation in rooting ability among 21 Populus clones and (2) to examine genotype x environment interactions to refine clonal recommendations. The clones belonged to...

  1. Growth under field conditions affects lignin content and productivity in transgenic Populus trichocarpa with altered lignin biosynthesis

    Treesearch

    Anna T. Stout; Aletta A. Davis; Jean-Christophe Domec; Chenmin Yang; Rui Shi; John S. King

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential of transgenic Populus trichocarpa with antisense 4CL for reduced total lignin and sense Cald5H for increased S/G ratio in a short rotation woody cropping (SRWC) system for bioethanol production in the Southeast USA. Trees produced from tissue-culture were planted in the Coastal Plain, Piedmont, and Mountain regions of North Carolina,...

  2. Comparative physiology of allopatric Populus species: geographic clines in photosynthesis, height growth, and carbon isotope discrimination in common gardens.

    PubMed

    Soolanayakanahally, Raju Y; Guy, Robert D; Street, Nathaniel R; Robinson, Kathryn M; Silim, Salim N; Albrectsen, Benedicte R; Jansson, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Populus species with wide geographic ranges display strong adaptation to local environments. We studied the clinal patterns in phenology and ecophysiology in allopatric Populus species adapted to similar environments on different continents under common garden settings. As a result of climatic adaptation, both Populus tremula L. and Populus balsamifera L. display latitudinal clines in photosynthetic rates (A), whereby high-latitude trees of P. tremula had higher A compared to low-latitude trees and nearly so in P. balsamifera (p = 0.06). Stomatal conductance (g s) and chlorophyll content index (CCI) follow similar latitudinal trends. However, foliar nitrogen was positively correlated with latitude in P. balsamifera and negatively correlated in P. tremula. No significant trends in carbon isotope composition of the leaf tissue (δ(13)C) were observed for both species; but, intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) was negatively correlated with the latitude of origin in P. balsamifera. In spite of intrinsically higher A, high-latitude trees in both common gardens accomplished less height gain as a result of early bud set. Thus, shoot biomass was determined by height elongation duration (HED), which was well approximated by the number of days available for free growth between bud flush and bud set. We highlight the shortcoming of unreplicated outdoor common gardens for tree improvement and the crucial role of photoperiod in limiting height growth, further complicating interpretation of other secondary effects.

  3. Photosynthesis of Nuttall oak (Quercus nuttallii Palm.) seedlings interplanted beneath an eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. Ex Marsh.) nurse crop

    Treesearch

    Emile S. Gardiner; Callie J. Schweitzer; John A. Stanturf

    2001-01-01

    An afforestation system which utilizes the pioneer species eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh.) as a nurse for slower growing, disturbance-dependent species is under evaluation as a forest rehabilitation tool on former agricultural land in the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, USA. The primary objectives...

  4. Effects of light regime and IBA concentration on adventitious rooting of an eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides) clone

    Treesearch

    Alexander P. Hoffman; Joshua P. Adams; Andrew Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides) has received a substantial amount of interest from invitro studies within the past decade. The ability to efficiently multiply the stock of established clones such as clone 110412 is a valuable asset for forest endeavors. However, a common problem encountered is initiating adventitious rooting in new micropropagation protocols....

  5. Comparative physiology of allopatric Populus species: geographic clines in photosynthesis, height growth, and carbon isotope discrimination in common gardens

    PubMed Central

    Soolanayakanahally, Raju Y.; Guy, Robert D.; Street, Nathaniel R.; Robinson, Kathryn M.; Silim, Salim N.; Albrectsen, Benedicte R.; Jansson, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Populus species with wide geographic ranges display strong adaptation to local environments. We studied the clinal patterns in phenology and ecophysiology in allopatric Populus species adapted to similar environments on different continents under common garden settings. As a result of climatic adaptation, both Populus tremula L. and Populus balsamifera L. display latitudinal clines in photosynthetic rates (A), whereby high-latitude trees of P. tremula had higher A compared to low-latitude trees and nearly so in P. balsamifera (p = 0.06). Stomatal conductance (gs) and chlorophyll content index (CCI) follow similar latitudinal trends. However, foliar nitrogen was positively correlated with latitude in P. balsamifera and negatively correlated in P. tremula. No significant trends in carbon isotope composition of the leaf tissue (δ13C) were observed for both species; but, intrinsic water-use efficiency (WUEi) was negatively correlated with the latitude of origin in P. balsamifera. In spite of intrinsically higher A, high-latitude trees in both common gardens accomplished less height gain as a result of early bud set. Thus, shoot biomass was determined by height elongation duration (HED), which was well approximated by the number of days available for free growth between bud flush and bud set. We highlight the shortcoming of unreplicated outdoor common gardens for tree improvement and the crucial role of photoperiod in limiting height growth, further complicating interpretation of other secondary effects. PMID:26236324

  6. Date of shoot collection, genotype, and original shoot position affect early rooting of dormant hardwood cuttings of Populus

    Treesearch

    R. S., Jr. Zalesny; A.H. Wiese

    2006-01-01

    Identifying superior combinations among date of dormant- season shoot collection, genotype, and original shoot position can increase the rooting potential of Populus cuttings. Thus, the objectives of our study were to: 1) evaluate variation among clones in early rooting from hardwood cuttings processed every three weeks from shoots collected...

  7. PtrWRKY19, a novel WRKY transcription factor, contributes to the regulation of pith secondary wall formation in Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Zhao, Xin; Yang, Fan; Fan, Di; Jiang, Yuanzhong; Luo, Keming

    2016-01-28

    WRKY proteins are one of the largest transcription factor families in higher plants and play diverse roles in various biological processes. Previous studies have shown that some WRKY members act as negative regulators of secondary cell wall formation in pith parenchyma cells. However, the regulatory mechanism of pith secondary wall formation in tree species remains largely unknown. In this study, PtrWRKY19 encoding a homolog of Arabidopsis WRKY12 was isolated from Populus trichocarpa. PtrWRKY19 was expressed in all tissues tested, with highest expression in stems, especially in pith. PtrWRKY19 was located in the nucleus and functioned as a transcriptional repressor. Ectopic expression of PtrWRKY19 in an atwrky12 mutant successfully rescued the phenotype in pith cell walls caused by the defect of AtWRKY12, suggesting that PtrWRKY19 had conserved functions for homologous AtWRKY12. Overexpression of PtrWRKY19 in poplar plants led to a significant increase in the number of pith parenchyma cells. qRT-PCR analysis showed that lignin biosynthesis-related genes were repressed in transgenic plants. In transcient reporter assays, PtrWRKY19 was identified to repress transcription from the PtoC4H2 promoter containing the conserved W-box elements. These results indicated that PtrWRKY19 may function as a negative regulator of pith secondary wall formation in poplar.

  8. On the irrigation requirements of cottonwood (Populus fremontii and Populus deltoides var. wislizenii) and willow (Salix gooddingii) grown in a desert environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartwell, S.; Morino, K.; Nagler, P.L.; Glenn, E.P.

    2010-01-01

    Native tree plots have been established in river irrigation districts in the western U.S. to provide habitat for threatened and endangered birds. Information is needed on the effective irrigation requirements of the target species. Cottonwood (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix gooddingii) trees were grown for seven years in an outdoor plot in a desert environment in Tucson, Arizona. Plants were allowed to achieve a nearly complete canopy cover over the first four years, then were subjected to three daily summer irrigation schedules of 6.20??mm??d-1; 8.26??mm??d-1 and 15.7??mm??d-1. The lowest irrigation rate was sufficient to maintain growth and high leaf area index for cottonwoods over three years, while willows suffered considerable die-back on this rate in years six and seven. These irrigation rates were applied April 15-September 15, but only 0.88??mm??d-1 was applied during the dormant period of the year. Expressed as a fraction of reference crop evapotranspiration (ETo), recommended annual water applications plus precipitation (and including some deep drainage) were 0.83 ETo for cottonwood and 1.01 ETo for willow. Current practices tend to over-irrigate restoration plots, and this study can provide guidelines for more efficient water use. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. A 34K SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa: design, application to the study of natural populations and transferability to other Populus species.

    PubMed

    Geraldes, A; Difazio, S P; Slavov, G T; Ranjan, P; Muchero, W; Hannemann, J; Gunter, L E; Wymore, A M; Grassa, C J; Farzaneh, N; Porth, I; McKown, A D; Skyba, O; Li, E; Fujita, M; Klápště, J; Martin, J; Schackwitz, W; Pennacchio, C; Rokhsar, D; Friedmann, M C; Wasteneys, G O; Guy, R D; El-Kassaby, Y A; Mansfield, S D; Cronk, Q C B; Ehlting, J; Douglas, C J; Tuskan, G A

    2013-03-01

    Genetic mapping of quantitative traits requires genotypic data for large numbers of markers in many individuals. For such studies, the use of large single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping arrays still offers the most cost-effective solution. Herein we report on the design and performance of a SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood). This genotyping array was designed with SNPs pre-ascertained in 34 wild accessions covering most of the species latitudinal range. We adopted a candidate gene approach to the array design that resulted in the selection of 34 131 SNPs, the majority of which are located in, or within 2 kb of, 3543 candidate genes. A subset of the SNPs on the array (539) was selected based on patterns of variation among the SNP discovery accessions. We show that more than 95% of the loci produce high quality genotypes and that the genotyping error rate for these is likely below 2%. We demonstrate that even among small numbers of samples (n = 10) from local populations over 84% of loci are polymorphic. We also tested the applicability of the array to other species in the genus and found that the number of polymorphic loci decreases rapidly with genetic distance, with the largest numbers detected in other species in section Tacamahaca. Finally, we provide evidence for the utility of the array to address evolutionary questions such as intraspecific studies of genetic differentiation, species assignment and the detection of natural hybrids.

  10. Genome-wide identification and characterization of novel lncRNAs in Populus under nitrogen deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Wang, Chenlu; Bao, Hai; Chen, Hui; Wang, Yanwei

    2016-08-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified as important regulatory factors of gene expression in eukaryotic species, such as Homo sapiens, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Oryza sativa. However, the systematic identification of potential lncRNAs in trees is comparatively rare. In particular, the characteristics, expression, and regulatory roles of lncRNAs in trees under nutrient stress remain largely unknown. A genome-wide strategy was used in this investigation to identify and characterize novel and low-nitrogen (N)-responsive lncRNAs in Populus tomentosa; 388 unique lncRNA candidates belonging to 380 gene loci were detected and only seven lncRNAs were found to belong to seven conserved non-coding RNA families indicating the majority of P. tomentosa lncRNAs are species-specific. In total, 126 lncRNAs were significantly altered under low-N stress; 8 were repressed, and 118 were induced. Furthermore, 9 and 5 lncRNAs were detected as precursors of 11 known and 14 novel Populus miRNAs, respectively, whereas 4 lncRNAs were targeted by 29 miRNAs belonging to 5 families, including 22 conserved and 7 non-conserved miRNAs. In addition, 15 antisense lncRNAs were identified to be generated from opposite strands of 14 corresponding protein-coding genes. In total, 111 protein-coding genes with regions complementary to 38 lncRNAs were also predicted with some lncRNAs corresponding to multiple genes and vice versa, and their functions were annotated, which further demonstrated the complex regulatory relationship between lncRNAs and protein-coding genes in plants. Moreover, an interaction network among lncRNAs, miRNAs, and mRNAs was investigated. These findings enrich our understanding of lncRNAs in Populus, expand the methods of miRNA identification. Our results present the first global characterization of lncRNAs and their potential target genes in response to nitrogen stress in trees, which provides more information on low-nutrition adaptation mechanisms in woody plants.

  11. Investigating the Relationship Between Liquid Water and Leaf Area in Clonal Populus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dar; Brown, K.; Green, R.; Ustin, S.; Hinckley, T.

    1998-01-01

    to increase following a gradient of increasing LAI ranging from grasslands to coniferous forests. In that study, it was observed that forests, which showed little variation in NDVI, showed significant variation in liquid water. In order to test this hypothesis, we analyzed field spectra measured over Populus resprouts of known LAI and monitored changes in liquid water in young Populus stands as they aged over a 4-year time span. The study was conducted in south-central Washington, in a clonal Populus fiber farm owned and operated by Boise-Cascade near the town of Wallula.

  12. High rates of virus-induced gene silencing by tobacco rattle virus in Populus.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zedan; Sun, Jian; Yao, Jun; Wang, Shaojie; Ding, Mingquan; Zhang, Huilong; Qian, Zeyong; Zhao, Nan; Sa, Gang; Zhao, Rui; Shen, Xin; Polle, Andrea; Chen, Shaoliang

    2015-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been shown to be an effective tool for investigating gene functions in herbaceous plant species, but has rarely been tested in trees. The establishment of a fast and reliable transformation system is especially important for woody plants, many of which are recalcitrant to transformation. In this study, we established a tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based VIGS system for two Populus species, Populus euphratica and P. × canescens. Here, TRV constructs carrying a 266 bp or a 558 bp fragment of the phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene were Agrobacterium-infiltrated into leaves of the two poplar species. Agrobacterium-mediated delivery of the shorter insert, TRV2-PePDS266, into the host poplars resulted in expected photobleaching in both tree species, but not the longer insert, PePDS558. The efficiency of VIGS was temperature-dependent, increasing by raising the temperature from 18 to 28 °C. The optimized TRV-VIGS system at 28 °C resulted in a high silencing frequency and efficiency up to 65-73 and 83-94%, respectively, in the two tested poplars. Moreover, syringe inoculation of Agrobacterium in 100 mM acetosyringone induced a more efficient silencing in the two poplar species, compared with other agroinfiltration methods, e.g., direct injection, misting and agrodrench. There were plant species-related differences in the response to VIGS because the photobleaching symptoms were more severe in P. × canescens than in P. euphratica. Furthermore, VIGS-treated P. euphratica exhibited a higher recovery rate (50%) after several weeks of the virus infection, compared with TRV-infected P. × canescens plants (20%). Expression stability of reference genes was screened to assess the relative abundance of PePDS mRNA in VIGS-treated P. euphratica and P. × canescens. PeACT7 was stably expressed in P. euphratica and UBQ-L was selected as the most suitable reference gene for P. × canescens using three different

  13. Investigating the Relationship Between Liquid Water and Leaf Area in Clonal Populus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dar; Brown, K.; Green, R.; Ustin, S.; Hinckley, T.

    1998-01-01

    to increase following a gradient of increasing LAI ranging from grasslands to coniferous forests. In that study, it was observed that forests, which showed little variation in NDVI, showed significant variation in liquid water. In order to test this hypothesis, we analyzed field spectra measured over Populus resprouts of known LAI and monitored changes in liquid water in young Populus stands as they aged over a 4-year time span. The study was conducted in south-central Washington, in a clonal Populus fiber farm owned and operated by Boise-Cascade near the town of Wallula.

  14. Populus simonii × Populus nigra WRKY70 is involved in salt stress and leaf blight disease responses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Jiang, Jing; Li, Kailong; Liu, Guifeng; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2017-03-22

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) are important regulators in the complex stress response signaling networks in plants, but the detailed mechanisms underlying these regulatory networks have not been fully characterized. In the present study, we identified a Group III WRKY gene (PsnWRKY70, Potri.016G137900) from Populussimonii × Populusnigra and explored its function under salt and pathogen stresses. The promoter sequence that is located 2471-bp upstream from the start codon (SC) of PsnWRKY70 contained many stress-responsive cis-elements. Yeast one-hybrid assay suggested the upstream regulators, PsnWRKY70, PsnNAM (Potri.009G141600), PsnMYB (Potri.006G000800) and PsnGT1 (Potri.010G055000), probably modulate the expression of the PsnWRKY70 gene by specifically binding to the W-box or GT1GMSCAM4 (GT1) element. Yeast two-hybrid assay and transcriptome analysis revealed that HP1 (Potri.004G092100), RRM (Potri.008G146700), Ulp1 (Potri.002G105700) and some mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade members probably interact with PsnWRKY70 TF to response to salt stress. Compared with non-transgenic (NT) plants, PsnWRKY70-overexpressing (OEX) plants exhibited improved leaf blight disease resistance, while PsnWRKY70-repressing (REX) plants displayed enhanced salt stress tolerance. PsnWRKY70, PsnNAM, PsnMYB and PsnGT1 exhibited similar expression patterns in NT under salt and leaf blight disease stresses. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) from NT vs OEX1 and the DEGs from NT vs REX1 exhibited considerable diversification. Most of the DEGs between NT and OEX1 were involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis, secondary metabolism, programmed cell death, peroxisomes and disease resistance. Most of the DEGs between NT and REX1 were related to desiccation response, urea transmembrane transport, abscisic acid response, calcium ion transport and hydrogen peroxide transmembrane transport. Our findings not only revealed the salt stress response signal transduction pathway of Psn

  15. Expression of chloroplastic genes during autumnal senescence in a deciduous tree Populus deltiodes.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M S; Trivedi, P K; Tuli, R; Sane, P V

    1997-10-01

    In Populus deltoides, a deciduous tree, the development on new leaves starts in the month of March, the leaves reach maturity by October and fall by December. Changes in the composition and function of the photosynthetic apparatus were analysed during autumnal senescence. With the progress of senescence, there was an initial increase followed by a decrease in the steady state levels of psbA, psbD/C and psaA/B gene transcripts. Decrease in the steady state level of D1 protein was faster than that of Cytochrome f. The decline in LHCP level was seen only during late senescence. Although the leaves continue to look green and healthy till late November, the electron transport driven by individual photosystems started declining by October end suggesting the onset of senescence.

  16. Population genomics of Populus trichocarpa identifies signatures of selection and adaptive trait associations

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Luke M; Slavov, Gancho; Rodgers-Melnick, Eli; Martin, Joel; Ranjan, Priya; Muchero, Wellington; Brunner, Amy M.; Schackwitz, Wendy; Gunter, Lee E; Chen, Jay; Tuskan, Gerald A; Difazio, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Forest trees are dominant components of terrestrial ecosystems that have global ecological and economic importance. Despite distributions that span wide environmental gradients, many tree populations are locally adapted, and mechanisms underlying this adaptation are poorly understood. Here we use a combination of whole-genome selection scans and association analyses of 544 Populus trichocarpa trees to reveal genomic bases of adaptive variation across a wide latitudinal range. Three hundred ninety-seven genomic regions showed evidence of recent positive and/or divergent selection and enrichment for associations with adaptive traits that also displayed patterns consistent with natural selection. These regions also provide unexpected insights into the evolutionary dynamics of duplicated genes and their roles in adaptive trait variation.

  17. Towards a holistic understanding of the beneficial interactions across the Populus microbiome

    DOE PAGES

    Hacquard, Stéphane; Schadt, Christopher W.

    2014-11-24

    Interactions between trees and microorganisms are extremely complex and the multispecies networks resulting from these associations have consequences for plant growth and productivity. However, a more holistic view is needed to better understand trees as ecosystems and superorganisms, where many interacting species contribute to the overall stability of the system. While much progress has been made on microbial communities associated with individual tree niches and the molecular interactions between model symbiotic partners, there is still a lack of knowledge of the multi-component interactions necessary for holistic ecosystem-level understanding. Finally, we review recent studies in Populus to emphasize the importance ofmore » such holistic efforts across the leaf, stem and rooting zones, and discuss prospects for future research in these important ecosystems.« less

  18. Climate, migration, and the local food security context: Introducing Terra Populus.

    PubMed

    Nawrotzki, Raphael J; Schlak, Allison M; Kugler, Tracy A

    2016-12-01

    Studies investigating the connection between environmental factors and migration are difficult to execute because they require the integration of microdata and spatial information. In this article, we introduce the novel, publically available data extraction system Terra Populus (TerraPop), which was designed to facilitate population-environment studies. We showcase the use of TerraPop by exploring variations in the climate-migration association in Burkina Faso and Senegal based on differences in the local food security context. Food security was approximated using anthropometric indicators of child stunting and wasting derived from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and linked to the TerraPop extract of climate and migration information. We find that an increase in heat waves was associated with a decrease in international migration from Burkina Faso, while excessive precipitation increased international moves from Senegal. Significant interactions reveal that the adverse effects of heat waves and droughts are strongly amplified in highly food insecure Senegalese departments.

  19. Climate, migration, and the local food security context: Introducing Terra Populus

    PubMed Central

    Schlak, Allison M.; Kugler, Tracy A.

    2016-01-01

    Studies investigating the connection between environmental factors and migration are difficult to execute because they require the integration of microdata and spatial information. In this article, we introduce the novel, publically available data extraction system Terra Populus (TerraPop), which was designed to facilitate population-environment studies. We showcase the use of TerraPop by exploring variations in the climate-migration association in Burkina Faso and Senegal based on differences in the local food security context. Food security was approximated using anthropometric indicators of child stunting and wasting derived from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and linked to the TerraPop extract of climate and migration information. We find that an increase in heat waves was associated with a decrease in international migration from Burkina Faso, while excessive precipitation increased international moves from Senegal. Significant interactions reveal that the adverse effects of heat waves and droughts are strongly amplified in highly food insecure Senegalese departments. PMID:27974863

  20. In-situ reduced silver nanoparticles on populus fiber and the catalytic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Miaomiao; Gong, Yumei; Wang, Wenheng; Xu, Guangpeng; Liu, Yuanfa; Guo, Jing

    2017-02-01

    One kind of composites involved in silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) loading in-situ on natural populus fiber (PF) matrix was prepared by polyamidoxime (PAO) functionalized the cellulose fiber. In which PAO worked as trapping and stabilizing agents chelating silver ions and made it reduced in-situ to obtain AgNPs by borohydride at room temperature. The synthesized composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Moreover, the composites showed significant catalytic activity 1.87 s-1 g-1 and repeated usability more than 7 cycles in reducing 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) into 4-aminophenol (4-AP) detected by UV-vis spectrophotometer in aqueous solution due to the surface-enhanced immobility and large amount of AgNPs. The natural cellulose fiber provides a green platform to react and support other noble metals for wide catalytic reactions.

  1. A Putative PP2C-Encoding Gene Negatively Regulates ABA Signaling in Populus euphratica.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhuan; Zhang, Dongzhi; Zhang, Chong; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun; Tian, Qianqian

    2015-01-01

    A PP2C homolog gene was cloned from the drought-treated cDNA library of Populus euphratica. Multiple sequence alignment analysis suggested that the gene is a potential ortholog of HAB1. The expression of this HAB1 ortholog (PeHAB1) was markedly induced by drought and moderately induced by ABA. To characterize its function in ABA signaling, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing this gene. Transgenic lines exhibited reduced responses to exogenous ABA and reduced tolerance to drought compared to wide-type lines. Yeast two-hybrid analyses indicated that PeHAB1 could interact with the ABA receptor PYL4 in an ABA-independent manner. Taken together; these results indicated that PeHAB1 is a new negative regulator of ABA responses in poplar.

  2. Biochemical and physiological studies on the effects of senescence leaves of Populus deltoides on Triticum vulgare.

    PubMed

    Khaket, Tejinder Pal; Kumar, Viney; Singh, Jasbir; Dhanda, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Triticum vulgare (Wheat) based products are the major dietary source of food in developing countries. In India, it grows in association with boundary plantations of Populus deltoids (poplar). During winter, poplar enters in dormancy which cause a heavy leaf fall at the time of wheat seed germination. Large number of poplar senescence leaves may adversely affect the wheat. Therefore, the present study was performed to examine the effect of senescence poplar leaves on wheat germ and some other biochemical parameters. Seed's germination rate was determined by measuring root and shoot lengths, percent germination, germination index, and inhibition percentage. Biochemical parameters, namely, pigment, carbohydrate, protein, and phenol content, were estimated. Activities of catalase and polyphenol oxidase which are stress marker enzymes were also measured. Results revealed that germination and other biochemical parameters of wheat were severely affected by senescence poplar leaves even at very low concentration. So, intercropping of poplar along with wheat may be chosen carefully as wheat is the major dietary staple.

  3. Incorporation of 14C-Photosynthate into Protein during Leaf Development in Young Populus Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Dickmann, Donald I.; Gordon, John C.

    1975-01-01

    Gas exchange and protein metabolism were studied in expanding, mature, and near-senescent leaves of young clonal Populus × euramericana cv. Wisconsin-5 plants. Dark respiration, CO2 evolution in the light, and CO2 compensation concentrations were highest in unexpanded leaves but declined markedly as leaves matured and aged. Net photosynthesis was highest in nearly mature leaves. Fresh weight continued to increase after leaf expansion was complete, whereas soluble protein levels declined. Changes in the distribution of photosynthetically incorporated 14C indicated that a high level of protein synthesis and rapid formation of structural components occurred only in expanding leaves. Protein turnover was slight in expanding leaves but was substantial after leaves were mature. Expanding leaves synthesized predominantly fraction I protein (ribulose diphosphate carboxylase). However, formation of this protein from photosynthate was slight once leaves matured. PMID:16659251

  4. Characterization of a novel, ubiquitous fungal endophyte from the rhizosphere and root endosphere of Populus trees

    DOE PAGES

    Vélez, Jessica M.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Vilgalys, Rytas; ...

    2017-04-07

    Here, we examined variation in growth rate, patterns of nitrogen utilization, and competitive interactions of Atractiellarhizophila isolates from the roots of Populus hosts. Atractiella grew significantly faster on media substituted with inorganic nitrogen sources and slower in the presence of another fungal genus. In order to determine plausible causal mechanisms we used metabolomics to explore competitive interactions between Atractiella strains and Fusarium oxysporum or Leptosphaerulina chartarum. Metabolomic screening of potential microbial inhibitors showed increased levels of glycosides produced in vitro by Atractiella when grown with a different fungal genus, relative to when grown alone. Overall, our results suggest Atractiella ismore » a poor competitor with other fungi via direct routes e.g. faster growth rates, but may utilize chemical interactions and possibly nitrogen sources to defend itself, and niche partition its way to abundance in the plant host root and rhizosphere.« less

  5. Biodegradation of naphthalene and anthracene by chemo-tactically active rhizobacteria of populus deltoides

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Sandeep; Pandey, Piyush; Sood, Anchal; Sharma, Shivesh; Bisht, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Several naphthalene and anthracene degrading bacteria were isolated from rhizosphere of Populus deltoides, which were growing in non-contaminated soil. Among these, four isolates, i.e. Kurthia sp., Micrococcus varians, Deinococcus radiodurans and Bacillus circulans utilized chrysene, benzene, toluene and xylene, in addition to anthracene and naphthalene. Kurthia sp and B. circulans showed positive chemotactic response for naphthalene and anthracene. The mean growth rate constant (K) of isolates were found to increase with successive increase in substrate concentration (0.5 to 1.0 mg/50ml). B. circulans SBA12 and Kurthia SBA4 degraded 87.5% and 86.6% of anthracene while, Kurthia sp. SBA4, B. circulans SBA12, and M. varians SBA8 degraded 85.3 %, 95.8 % and 86.8 % of naphthalene respectively after 6 days of incubation as determined by HPLC analysis. PMID:24031572

  6. Genotypic variation in a foundation tree (Populus tremula L.) explains community structure of associated epiphytes.

    PubMed

    Davies, Chantel; Ellis, Christopher J; Iason, Glenn R; Ennos, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Community genetics hypothesizes that within a foundation species, the genotype of an individual significantly influences the assemblage of dependent organisms. To assess whether these intra-specific genetic effects are ecologically important, it is required to compare their impact on dependent organisms with that attributable to environmental variation experienced over relevant spatial scales. We assessed bark epiphytes on 27 aspen (Populus tremula L.) genotypes grown in a randomized experimental array at two contrasting sites spanning the environmental conditions from which the aspen genotypes were collected. We found that variation in aspen genotype significantly influenced bark epiphyte community composition, and to the same degree as environmental variation between the test sites. We conclude that maintaining genotypic diversity of foundation species may be crucial for conservation of associated biodiversity.

  7. Arsenic tolerance and phytoremediation potential of Conocarpus erectus L. and Populus deltoides L.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sajad; Akram, Muhammad; Abbas, Ghulam; Murtaza, Behzad; Shahid, Muhammad; Shah, Noor S; Bibi, Irshad; Niazi, Nabeel Khan

    2017-03-21

    The present study was conducted to explore arsenic (As) tolerance and phytostabilization potential of the two tree species, Buttonwood (Conocarpus erectus) and Eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides). Both plant species were exposed to various soil As levels (control, 5, 10, 15 and 20 mg kg(-1)) in pots. The plants were harvested after nine months for evaluation of growth parameters as well as root and shoot As concentrations. With increasing soil As levels, plant height stress tolerance index (PHSTI) was significantly decreased in both tree species, whereas root length stress tolerance index (RLSTI) and dry matter stress tolerance index (DMSTI) were not affected. Root and shoot As concentrations significantly increased in both tree species with increasing soil As levels. Translocation factor and bioconcentration factor were less than 1.0 for both plant species. This study revealed that both tree species are non-hyperaccumulators of As, but could be used for phytostabilization of As-contaminated soils.

  8. Within tree variability of lignin composition in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, Robert; Kodrzycki, Bob; Tuskan, Gerald A; Foutz, Kirk; Davis, M F

    2008-01-01

    Clonal variability among trees has been studied and found to have profound effects on nearly all measured phenotypes. However, when estimating wood properties it is important to consider variability within the tree. The position in which a tree is sampled could have a large influence on biomass characterization. We looked at variability in lignin content as height increases and as the number of rings from the pith increase in Populus species. Seven trees were destructively sampled; subsamples were obtained along a 2.4 m length of each stem and across increment rings. All samples were analyzed by pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectroscopy to map the variability across sampling heights and/or ring positions inlignin content. The results of this study indicate that when sampling a tree, there is more variability from ring to ring than at different heights going up the stem.

  9. Towards a holistic understanding of the beneficial interactions across the Populus microbiome

    SciTech Connect

    Hacquard, Stéphane; Schadt, Christopher W.

    2014-11-24

    Interactions between trees and microorganisms are extremely complex and the multispecies networks resulting from these associations have consequences for plant growth and productivity. However, a more holistic view is needed to better understand trees as ecosystems and superorganisms, where many interacting species contribute to the overall stability of the system. While much progress has been made on microbial communities associated with individual tree niches and the molecular interactions between model symbiotic partners, there is still a lack of knowledge of the multi-component interactions necessary for holistic ecosystem-level understanding. Finally, we review recent studies in Populus to emphasize the importance of such holistic efforts across the leaf, stem and rooting zones, and discuss prospects for future research in these important ecosystems.

  10. Atractiella rhizophila , sp. nov., an endorrhizal fungus isolated from the Populus root microbiome

    DOE PAGES

    Bonito, Gregory; Hameed, Khalid; Toome-Heller, Merje; ...

    2017-01-09

    We discovered a new endorrhizal fungal species belonging to the rust lineage Pucciniomycotina among fungi isolated from healthy root mycobiomes of Populus and described here as Atractiella rhizophila. Here, we characterized this species by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), phylogenetic analysis, and plant bioassay experiments. Phylogenetic sequence analysis of isolates and available environmental and reference sequences indicates that this new species, A. rhizophila, has a broad geographic and host range. Atractiella rhizophila appears to be present in North America, Australia, Asia, and Africa and is associated with trees, orchids, and other agriculturally important species, including soybean, corn, and rice. Despite themore » large geographic and host range of this species sampling, A. rhizophila appears to have exceptionally low sequence variation within nuclear rDNA markers examined. With inoculation studies, we show that A. rhizophila is nonpathogenic, asymptomatically colonizes plant roots, and appears to foster plant growth and elevated photosynthesis rates.« less

  11. Determination of the relative uptake of ground vs. surface water by Populus deltoides during phytoremediation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clinton, B.D.; Vose, J.M.; Vroblesky, D.A.; Harvey, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    The use of plants to remediate polluted groundwater is becoming an attractive alternative to more expensive traditional techniques. In order to adequately assess the effectiveness of the phytoremediation treatment, a clear understanding of water-use habits by the selected plant species is essential. We examined the relative uptake of surface water (i.e., precipitation) vs. groundwater by mature Populus deltoides by applying irrigation water at a rate equivalent to a 5-cm rain event. We used stable isotopes of hydrogen (D) and oxygen (18O) to identify groundwater and surface water (irrigation water) in the xylem sap water. Pretreatment isotopic ratios of both deuterium and 18O, ranked from heaviest to lightest, were irrigation water > groundwater > xylem sap. The discrepancy in preirrigation isotopic signatures between groundwater and xylem sap suggests that in the absence of a surface source of water (i.e., between rain events) there is an unknown amount of water being extracted from sources other than groundwater (i.e., soil surface water). We examined changes in volumetric soil water content (%), total hourly sapflux rates, and trichloroethene (TCE) concentrations. Following the irrigation treatment, volumetric soil water increased by 86% and sapflux increased by as much as 61%. Isotopic signatures of the xylem sap became substantially heavier following irrigation, suggesting that the applied irrigation water was quickly taken up by the plants. TCE concentrations in the xylem sap were diluted by an average of 21% following irrigation; however, dilution was low relative to the increase in sapflux. Our results show that water use by Populus deltoides is variable. Hence, studies addressing phytoremediation effectiveness must account for the relative proportion of surface vs. groundwater uptake.

  12. Influence of irrigation and fertilization on transpiration and hydraulic properties of Populus deltoides.

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, Lisa, J.; Stokes, Thomas, A.; Coleman, Mark, D.

    2007-02-01

    Summary Long-term hydraulic acclimation to resource availability was explored in 3-year-bld Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. clones by examining transpiration. leaf-specific hydraulic conductance (GL), canopy stomatal conductance (Gs) and leaf to sapwood area ratio (AL:Asi)n response to imgation (13 and 551 mm year in addition to ambient precipitation) and fertilization (0 and 120 kg N ha-' year-'). Sap flow was measured continuously over one growing season with thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization had a greater effect on growth and hydraulic properties than imgation, and fertilization effects were independent of irrigation treatment. Transpiration on a ground area basis (E) ranged between 0.3 and 1.8 mm day-', and increased 66% and 90% in response to imgation and fertilization, respectively. Increases in GL, Gs at a reference vapor pressure deficit of 1 kPa, and transpiration per unit leaf areain response to increases in resource availability were associated with reductions in AL:As and consequently a minimal change in the water potential gradient from soil to leaf. Imgation and fertilization increased leaf area index similarly, from an average 1.16 in control stands to 1.45, but sapwood area was increased from 4.0 to 6.3 m ha-' by irrigation and from 3.7 to 6.7 m2 ha-' by fertilization. The balance between leaf area and sapwood area was important in understanding long-term hydraulic acclimation to resource availability and mechanisms controlling maximum productivity in Populus deltoides.

  13. Distinct Microbial Communities within the Endosphere and Rhizosphere of Populus deltoides Roots across Contrasting Soil Types.

    SciTech Connect

    Gottel, Neil R; Castro Gonzalez, Hector F; Kerley, Marilyn K; Yang, Zamin; Pelletier, Dale A; Podar, Mircea; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Uberbacher, Edward C; Tuskan, Gerald A; Vilgalys, Rytas; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2011-01-01

    The root-rhizosphere interface of Populus is the nexus of a variety of associations between bacteria, fungi, and the host plant and an ideal model for studying interactions between plants and microorganisms. However, such studies have generally been confined to greenhouse and plantation systems. Here we analyze microbial communities from the root endophytic and rhizospheric habitats of Populus deltoides in mature natural trees from both upland and bottomland sites in central Tennessee. Community profiling utilized 454 pyrosequencing with separate primers targeting the V4 region for bacterial 16S rRNA and the D1/D2 region for fungal 28S rRNA genes. Rhizosphere bacteria were dominated by Acidobacteria (31%) and Alphaproteobacteria (30%), whereas most endophytes were from the Gammaproteobacteria (54%) as well as Alphaproteobacteria (23%). A single Pseudomonas-like operational taxonomic unit (OTU) accounted for 34% of endophytic bacterial sequences. Endophytic bacterial richness was also highly variable and 10-fold lower than in rhizosphere samples originating from the same roots. Fungal rhizosphere and endophyte samples had approximately equal amounts of the Pezizomycotina (40%), while the Agaricomycotina were more abundant in the rhizosphere (34%) than endosphere (17%). Both fungal and bacterial rhizosphere samples were highly clustered compared to the more variable endophyte samples in a UniFrac principal coordinates analysis, regardless of upland or bottomland site origin. Hierarchical clustering of OTU relative abundance patterns also showed that the most abundant bacterial and fungal OTUs tended to be dominant in either the endophyte or rhizosphere samples but not both. Together, these findings demonstrate that root endophytic communities are distinct assemblages rather than opportunistic subsets of the rhizosphere.

  14. Stem injection of Populus nigra with EDU to study ozone effects under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Bortier, K; Dekelver, G; De Temmerman, L; Ceulemans, R

    2001-01-01

    EDU or ethylenediurea (N-[2-(2-oxo-1-imidazolidinyl)ethyl]-N'-phenylurea) has been used in experiments to assess ozone effects on vegetation under field conditions because it provides protection against oxidative damage. Tests have mainly been conducted on crop plants, but for woody species only few reports have provided evidence that it can be used in long-term experiments. In this study we tested the technique of stem injection of EDU to study the effects of ozone exposure on Populus nigra cv. Wolterson over one growing season. Cuttings of Populus nigra were grown in pots in the field and between mid-July and early September plants were repeatedly injected with EDU solution (5 mg/plant) or with water at 14-day intervals. Significant differences were found between EDU- and water-injected plants: water-treated plants had more foliar injury, more chlorotic leaves, and shedding of leaves started earlier, suggesting EDU was effective in preventing visible ozone injury and acceleration of senescence. Photosynthetic rates, measured for one leaf age, showed no differences but were mostly higher for the EDU-treated plants. At the end of the growing season diameter increment was 16% higher and there was a non-significant trend for above-ground biomass to be increased by 9% for the EDU-treated plants. This experiment has provided evidence that for this clone serious ozone damage occurs at relatively low concentrations and that EDU can provide protection against visible injury, as well as against longer term growth reductions.

  15. Influence of irrigation and fertilization on transpiration and hydraulic properties of Populus deltoides.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Lisa J; Stokes, Thomas A; Coleman, Mark D

    2007-05-01

    Long-term hydraulic acclimation to resource availability was explored in 3-year-old Populus deltoides Bartr. ex Marsh. clones by examining transpiration, leaf-specific hydraulic conductance (G(L)), canopy stomatal conductance (G(S)) and leaf to sapwood area ratio (A(L):A(S)) in response to irrigation (13 and 551 mm year(-1) in addition to ambient precipitation) and fertilization (0 and 120 kg N ha(-1) year(-1)). Sap flow was measured continuously over one growing season with thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization had a greater effect on growth and hydraulic properties than irrigation, and fertilization effects were independent of irrigation treatment. Transpiration on a ground area basis (E) ranged between 0.3 and 1.8 mm day(-1), and increased 66% and 90% in response to irrigation and fertilization, respectively. Increases in G(L), G(S) at a reference vapor pressure deficit of 1 kPa, and transpiration per unit leaf area in response to increases in resource availability were associated with reductions in A(L):A(S) and consequently a minimal change in the water potential gradient from soil to leaf. Irrigation and fertilization increased leaf area index similarly, from an average 1.16 in control stands to 1.45, but sapwood area was increased from 4.0 to 6.3 m(2) ha(-1) by irrigation and from 3.7 to 6.7 m(2) ha(-1) by fertilization. The balance between leaf area and sapwood area was important in understanding long-term hydraulic acclimation to resource availability and mechanisms controlling maximum productivity in Populus deltoides.

  16. Elevated CO2 differentially affects photosynthetic induction response in two Populus species with different stomatal behavior.

    PubMed

    Tomimatsu, Hajime; Tang, Yanhong

    2012-08-01

    To understand dynamic photosynthetic characteristics in response to fluctuating light under a high CO(2) environment, we examined photosynthetic induction in two poplar genotypes from two species, Populus koreana 9 trichocarpa cv. Peace and Populus euramericana cv. I-55, respectively. Stomata of cv. Peace barely respond to changes in photosynthetic photon flux density (PFD), whereas those of cv. I-55 show a normal response to variations in PFD at ambient CO(2). The plants were grown under three CO2 regimes (380, 700, and 1,020 μmol CO(2) mol(-1) in air) for approximately 2 months. CO2 gas exchange was measured in situ in the three CO2 regimes under a sudden PFD increase from 20 to 800 μmol m(-2) s(-1). In both genotypes, plants grown under higher CO(2) conditions had a higher photosynthetic induction state, shorter induction time, and reduced induction limitation to photosynthetic carbon gain. Plants of cv. I-55 showed a much larger increase in induction state and decrease in induction time under high CO(2) regimes than did plants of cv. Peace. These showed that, throughout the whole induction process, genotype cv. I-55 had a much smaller reduction of leaf carbon gain under the two high CO(2) regimes than under the ambient CO(2) regime, while the high CO(2) effect was smaller in genotype cv. Peace. The results suggest that a high CO(2) environment can reduce both biochemical and stomatal limitations of leaf carbon gain during the photosynthetic induction process, and that a rapid stomatal response can further enhance the high CO(2) effect.

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of ethanol extracts of Chinese propolis and buds from poplar (Populus×canadensis).

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Zhang, Jianglin; Ping, Shun; Ma, Quanxin; Chen, Xuan; Xuan, Hongzhuan; Shi, Jinhu; Zhang, Cuiping; Hu, Fuliang

    2014-08-08

    Propolis is used widely in a number of cultures as a folk medicine and is gaining wider recognition for its potential therapeutic use, due to its wide range of biological properties and pharmacological activities, especially its anti-inflammatory effects. Despite an increasing number of studies focused on the biological activities of propolis together with its botanical sources, studies on Chinese propolis are insufficient. This study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of ethanol extracts from Chinese propolis (EECP) and poplar buds (EEPB) from Populus×canadensis Moench (Salicaceae family). Phytochemical analysis of EECP and EEPB was performed via total phenolic and flavonoid content measurements followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. DPPH and ABTS free-radical scavenging methods were used to evaluate their anti-oxidant properties. The anti-inflammatory effects of EECP and EEPB were investigated in vitro by evaluating their modulating effects on the key inflammatory cytokines and mediators in LPS/IFN-γ co-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and by measuring nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in TNF-α or IL-1β stimulation HEK 293 cells using reporter gene assays. Their effects on acute inflammatory symptoms (LPS-induced endotoxemia and acute pulmonary damage) were also examined in mice. EECP and EEPB exhibited strong free-radical scavenging activity and significant in vitro anti-inflammatory effects by modulating key inflammatory mediators of mRNA transcription, inhibiting the production of specific inflammatory cytokines, and blocking the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. The administration of EECP and EEPB (25 and 100 mg/kg) provided significant protective effects by attenuating lung histopathological changes and suppressing the secretion of LPS-stimulated inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, MCP-1, TNF-α and IL-12p70 production in endotoxemic mice. The results presented here reveal

  18. A 34K SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa: design, application to the study of natural populations and transferability to other Populus species

    SciTech Connect

    Geraldes, Armando; Hannemann, Jan; Grassa, Chris; Farzaneh, Nima; Porth, Ilga; McKown, Athena; Skyba, Oleksandr; Li, Eryang; Mike, Fujita; Friedmann, Michael; Wasteneys, Geoffrey; Guy, Robert; El-Kassaby, Yousry; Mansfield, Shawn; Cronk, Quentin; Ehlting, Juergen; Douglas, Carl; DiFazio, Stephen P; Slavov, Gancho; Ranjan, Priya; Muchero, Wellington; Gunter, Lee E; Wymore, Ann; Tuskan, Gerald A; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Pennacchio, Christa; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Genetic mapping of quantitative traits requires genotypic data for large numbers of markers in many individuals. Despite the declining costs of genotyping by sequencing, for most studies, the use of large SNP genotyping arrays still offers the most cost-effective solution for large-scale targeted genotyping. Here we report on the design and performance of a SNP genotyping array for Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood). This genotyping array was designed with SNPs pre-ascertained in 34 wild accessions covering most of the species range. Due to the rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium in P. trichocarpa we adopted a candidate gene approach to the array design that resulted in the selection of 34,131 SNPs, the majority of which are located in, or within 2 kb, of 3,543 candidate genes. A subset of the SNPs (539) was selected based on patterns of variation among the SNP discovery accessions. We show that more than 95% of the loci produce high quality genotypes and that the genotyping error rate for these is likely below 2%, indicating that high-quality data are generated with this array. We demonstrate that even among small numbers of samples (n=10) from local populations over 84% of loci are polymorphic. We also tested the applicability of the array to other species in the genus and found that due to ascertainment bias the number of polymorphic loci decreases rapidly with genetic distance, with the largest numbers detected in other species in section Tacamahaca (P. balsamifera and P. angustifolia). Finally, we provide evidence for the utility of the array for intraspecific studies of genetic differentiation and for species assignment and the detection of natural hybrids.

  19. Drought, salt and wounding stress induce the expression of the plasma membrane intrinsic protein 1 gene in poplar (Populus alba×P. tremula var. glandulosa).

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Hyoshin; Lee, Jae-Soon; Noh, Eun-Woon

    2011-09-01

    Water uptake across cell membranes is a principal requirement for plant growth at both the cellular and whole-plant levels; water movement through plant membranes is regulated by aquaporins (AQPs) or major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). We examined the expression characteristics of the poplar plasma membrane intrinsic protein 1 gene (PatPIP1), a type of MIP, which was isolated from a suspension cell cDNA library of Populus alba×P. tremula var. glandulosa. Examination of protoplasts expressing the p35S-PatPIP1::sGFP fusion protein revealed that the protein was localized in the plasma membrane. Northern blot analysis revealed that the gene was strongly expressed in poplar roots and leaves. Gene expression was inducible by abiotic factors including drought, salinity, cold temperatures and wounding, and also by plant hormones including gibberellic acid, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid. Since we found that the PatPIP1 gene was strongly expressed in response to mannitol, NaCl, jasmonic acid and wounding, we propose that PatPIP1 plays an essential role in the defense of plants against water stress.

  20. Subcellular Relocalization and Positive Selection Play Key Roles in the Retention of Duplicate Genes of Populus Class III Peroxidase Family[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lin-Ling; Liu, Yan-Jing; Liu, Hai-Jing; Qian, Ting-Ting; Qi, Li-Wang; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Zeng, Qing-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication is the primary source of new genes and novel functions. Over the course of evolution, many duplicate genes lose their function and are eventually removed by deletion. However, some duplicates have persisted and evolved diverse functions. A particular challenge is to understand how this diversity arises and whether positive selection plays a role. In this study, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of the class III peroxidase (PRX) genes from the Populus trichocarpa genome. PRXs are plant-specific enzymes that play important roles in cell wall metabolism and in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. We found that two large tandem-arrayed clusters of PRXs evolved from an ancestral cell wall type PRX to vacuole type, followed by tandem duplications and subsequent functional specification. Substitution models identified seven positively selected sites in the vacuole PRXs. These positively selected sites showed significant effects on the biochemical functions of the enzymes. We also found that positive selection acts more frequently on residues adjacent to, rather than directly at, a critical active site of the enzyme, and on flexible regions rather than on rigid structural elements of the protein. Our study provides new insights into the adaptive molecular evolution of plant enzyme families. PMID:24934172