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Sample records for por cryptosporidium parvum

  1. The Cryptosporidium parvum Kinome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hundreds of millions of people are infected with cryptosporidiosis annually, with immunocompromised individuals suffering debilitating symptoms and children in socioeconomically challenged regions at risk of repeated infections. There is currently no effective drug available. In order to facilitate the pursuit of anti-cryptosporidiosis targets and compounds, our study spans the classification of the Cryptosporidium parvum kinome and the structural and biochemical characterization of representatives from the CDPK family and a MAP kinase. Results The C. parvum kinome comprises over 70 members, some of which may be promising drug targets. These C. parvum protein kinases include members in the AGC, Atypical, CaMK, CK1, CMGC, and TKL groups; however, almost 35% could only be classified as OPK (other protein kinases). In addition, about 25% of the kinases identified did not have any known orthologues outside of Cryptosporidium spp. Comparison of specific kinases with their Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii orthologues revealed some distinct characteristics within the C. parvum kinome, including potential targets and opportunities for drug design. Structural and biochemical analysis of 4 representatives of the CaMK group and a MAP kinase confirms features that may be exploited in inhibitor design. Indeed, screening CpCDPK1 against a library of kinase inhibitors yielded a set of the pyrazolopyrimidine derivatives (PP1-derivatives) with IC50 values of < 10 nM. The binding of a PP1-derivative is further described by an inhibitor-bound crystal structure of CpCDPK1. In addition, structural analysis of CpCDPK4 identified an unprecedented Zn-finger within the CDPK kinase domain that may have implications for its regulation. Conclusions Identification and comparison of the C. parvum protein kinases against other parasitic kinases shows how orthologue- and family-based research can be used to facilitate characterization of promising drug targets and the search

  2. INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone inactivation rates for Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) oocysts were determined with an in-vitro excystation method based on excysted sporozoite counts. Results were consistent with published animal infectivity data for the same C. parvum strain. The inactivation kinetics...

  3. AN EVALUATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM GENOTYPING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of 11 previously described species differentiation and genotyping PCR protocols for detection of Cryptosporidium parasites. Genomic DNA from three species of Crytosporidium parasites (genotype 1 and genotype 2 of C. parvum, C. muris, a...

  4. Long-Term Transport of Cryptosporidium Parvum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrea, C.; Harter, T.; Hou, L.; Atwill, E. R.; Packman, A.; Woodrow-Mumford, K.; Maldonado, S.

    2005-12-01

    The protozoan pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum is a leading cause of waterborne disease. Subsurface transport and filtration in natural and artificial porous media are important components of the environmental pathway of this pathogen. It has been shown that the oocysts of C. parvum show distinct colloidal properties. We conducted a series of laboratory studies on sand columns (column length: 10 cm - 60 cm, flow rates: 0.7 m/d - 30 m/d, ionic strength: 0.01 - 100 mM, filter grain size: 0.2 - 2 mm, various solution chemistry). Breakthrough curves were measured over relatively long time-periods (hundreds to thousands of pore volumes). We show that classic colloid filtration theory is a reasonable tool for predicting the initial breakthrough, but it is inadequate to explain the significant tailing observed in the breakthrough of C. parvum oocyst through sand columns. We discuss the application of the Continuous Time Random Walk approach to account for the strong tailing that was observed in our experiments. The CTRW is generalized transport modeling framework, which includes the classic advection-dispersion equation (ADE), the fractional ADE, and the multi-rate mass transfer model as special cases. Within this conceptual framework, it is possible to distinguish between the contributions of pore-scale geometrical (physical) disorder and of pore-scale physico-chemical heterogeneities (e.g., of the filtration, sorption, desorption processes) to the transport of C. parvum oocysts.

  5. Rotifers ingest oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fayer, R.; Trout, J.M.; Walsh, E.; Cole, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Six genera of rotifers including Philodina, Monostyla, Epiphanes, Euchlanis, Brachionus, and Asplanchna were exposed to oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum cleaned of fecal debris. Unstained oocysts and those stained with fluorescein-conjugated monoclonal antibody were added to suspensions of viable rotifers and were examined by phase-contrast, differential interference contrast, and fluorescence microscopy. Rotifers of all six genera were observed ingesting oocysts. A maximum of 25 oocysts was observed in the stomachs of Euchlanis and Brachionus. Euchlanis and Epiphanes were observed excreting boluses containing up to eight oocysts. It was not determined whether rotifers digested or otherwise rendered oocysts nonviable.

  6. Infectious Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in final reclaimed effluent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gennaccaro, A.L.; McLaughlin, M.R.; Quintero-Betancourt, W.; Huffman, D.E.; Rose, J.B.

    2003-01-01

    Water samples collected throughout several reclamation facilities were analyzed for the presence of infectious Cryptosporidium parvum by the focus detection method-most-probable-number cell culture technique. Results revealed the presence of infectious C. parvum oocysts in 40% of the final disinfected effluent samples. Sampled effluent contained on average seven infectious oocysts per 100 liters. Thus, reclaimed water is not pathogen free but contains infectious C. parvum.

  7. Molecular epidemiological analyses of Cryptosporidium parvum virus 1 (CSpV1), a symbiotic virus of Cryptosporidium parvum, in Japan.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Fumi; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Aita, Junya; Yaita, Seiko; Kinami, Aiko; Fujimoto, Katsuhisa; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Murakami, Shin; Horimoto, Taisuke; Kato, Kentaro

    2016-01-04

    We show that Cryptosporidium parvum virus 1 (CSpV1), a member of the family Partitiviridae, genus Cryspovirus that can infect Cryptosporidium parvum, is a new candidate for high-resolution tool for tracing C. parvum. CSpV1 was detected in all C. parvum-positive samples tested. Phylogenetic analysis of dsRNA1 sequence from CSpV1 can distinguish infected areas of C. parvum on the national level. Sequences detected in samples from Iwate prefecture and other islands (Tanegashima, and Okinawa) belonged to a single clade. This system can differentiate the samples from Hokkaido and south part of Japan as well as from other countries. Samples from Iwate, Tanegashima, and Okinawa belonged to a single subclade, respectively. Therefore, the CSpV1 dsRNA sequences reflect the regional distribution of their host and have potential as a high-resolution tool to trace C. parvum IIaA15G2R1 subtype.

  8. Cryptosporidium parvum Infection Following Contact with Livestock

    PubMed Central

    Suler, Denis; Mullins, David; Rudge, Travis; Ashurst, John

    2016-01-01

    Context: Scours, or calf diarrhea, is an infectious gastrointestinal disease commonly found in the calves of dairy farms. It primarily presents with diarrhea that can be life threatening to the animal and is also contagious and threatening to the other livestock. Cryptosporidium is one of the major causes of scours and can be transmitted to humans via fecal-oral route, resulting in diarrheal illnesses. Cryptosporidiosis infection usually occurs as a waterborne outbreak with the potential to affect many people at once. Case Report: We report a case of a 24-year-old female farmer who presented to the emergency department with diarrhea after taking care of ill cattle with similar symptoms. Fecal cultures were positive for Cryptosporidium parvum. Given the patient was immunocompetent, no further treatment was warranted. Conclusion: Confirmed cases should be reported, however, treatment is only recommended in children and immunocompromised adults. Clinicians should educate patients on the importance of proper hygiene and handling techniques in order to decrease transmission and recurrence of the protozoan infection. PMID:27583243

  9. Cryptosporidium parvum is not transmissible to fish, amphibians, or reptiles.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, T K; Fayer, R; Cranfield, M R

    1996-10-01

    A recent report suggested that an isolate of Cryptosporidium parvum had established infections in fish, amphibians, and reptiles and raises concern that animals other than mammals might be a potential source of waterborne Cryptosporidium oocysts. To test this possibility, viable C. parvum oocysts, infectious for neonatal BALB/c mice, were delivered by gastric intubation to bluegill sunfish, poison-dart frogs, African clawed frogs, bearded dragon lizards, and corn snakes. Histological sections of the stomach, jejunum, ileum, and cloaca prepared from tissues collected on days 7 and 14 postinoculation (PI) were negative for Cryptosporidium developmental stages. However, inoculum-derived oocysts were detectable by fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibody in feces of inoculated animals from day 1 to day 12 PI in fish and frogs, and up to day 14 PI in lizards. Snakes did not defecate for 14 days PI. Impression smears taken at necropsy on days 7 and 14 PI revealed C. parvum oocysts in the lumen of the cloaca of 2 fish and 1 lizard on day 7 PI only. Because tissue stages of the pathogen were not found, it appears that C. parvum was not heterologously transmitted to lower vertebrates. Under certain circumstances, however, such as after the ingestion of C. parvum-infected prey, lower vertebrates may disseminate C. parvum oocysts in the environment.

  10. Cryptosporidium parvum DNA replication in cell-free culture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Sheoran, A S; Widmer, G

    2009-10-01

    The lack of robust methods for culturing Cryptosporidium parasites remains a major challenge and is hampering efforts to screen for anti-cryptosporidial drugs. In existing culture methods, monolayers of mammalian epithelial cells are inoculated with oocysts. The system supports an initial phase of asexual proliferation of the parasite. For reasons that are not clear, development rapidly declines within 2-3 days. The unexpected report of Cryptosporidium parvum culture in the absence of host cells, and the failure of others to reproduce the method, prompted us to apply quantitative PCR to measure changes in C. parvum DNA levels in cell-free cultures, and parasite-specific antibodies to identify different life cycle stages. Based on this approach, which has not been applied previously to analyze C. parvum growth in cell-free culture, we found that the concentration of C. parvum DNA increased by about 5-fold over 5 days of culture. Immuno-labeling of cultured organisms revealed morphologically distinct stages, only some of which reacted with Cryptosporidium-specific monoclonal antibodies. These observations are indicative of a modest proliferation of C. parvum in cell-free culture.

  11. A COMPARISON OF ENUMERATION TECHNIQUES FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A variety of methods have been used to enumerate Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from source or drinking waters. The reliability of these counting methods varies, in part, with suspension density, sample purity, and other factors. Frequently, the method of determination of suspens...

  12. A sensitive method for detecting and genotyping Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts represent a considerable health risk to humans and animals because the parasite has a low infectious dose and usually exists in low numbers in environmental samples, which makes detection problematic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Cryspovirus as a target f...

  13. Chlorine disinfection of recreational water for Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, C.; Fayer, R.; Trout, J.; Beach, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effects of chlorine on oocyst viability, under the conditions of controlled pH and elevated calcium concentrations required for most community swimming pools. We found that fecal material may alter the Ct values (chlorine concentration in mg/L, multiplied by time in minutes) needed to disinfect swimming pools or other recreational water for Cryptosporidium parvum. PMID:10458969

  14. The Effect of pH on Stability and Sorption of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts by Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) are waterborne pathogens, which are released into the environment through infected human or animal feces. Their ability to survive outside their host organisms in harsh environmental conditions presents one of the most challenging tasks in resea...

  15. Biochemical and structural characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Hernandez, Agustin; Speed, Haley; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2015-03-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes waterborne diseases worldwide. There is no effective therapy for C. parvum infection. The parasite depends mainly on glycolysis for energy production. Lactate dehydrogenase is a major regulator of glycolysis. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase and high resolution crystal structures of the apo-enzyme and four ternary complexes. The ternary complexes capture the enzyme bound to NAD/NADH or its 3-acetylpyridine analog in the cofactor binding pocket, while the substrate binding site is occupied by one of the following ligands: lactate, pyruvate or oxamate. The results reveal distinctive features of the parasitic enzyme. For example, C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase prefers the acetylpyridine analog of NADH as a cofactor. Moreover, it is slightly less sensitive to gossypol inhibition compared with mammalian lactate dehydrogenases and not inhibited by excess pyruvate. The active site loop and the antigenic loop in C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are considerably different from those in the human counterpart. Structural features and enzymatic properties of C. parvum lactate dehydrogenase are similar to enzymes from related parasites. Structural comparison with malate dehydrogenase supports a common ancestry for the two genes.

  16. Mechanical transmission of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by flies.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Grimes, Barbara H; Knight, Ronald; Szostakowska, Beata; Kruminis-Lozowska, Wiesława; Racewicz, Maria; Tamang, Leena; Dasilva, Alexandre J; Myjak, Przemysław

    2004-01-01

    Long term field studies and laboratory experiments demonstrated that synanthropic filth flies can mechanically transmit infectious oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum, an anthropozoonotic protozoan parasite which significantly contributes to the mortality of immunocompromised or immunosuppressed people. C. parvum oocysts are acquired from unhygienic sources, and can pass trough fly gastrointestinal track without alteration of their infectivity and can be subsequently deposited on visited surfaces. Transmission of the oocysts by adult flies occurs via: (1) mechanical dislodgement from the exoskeleton; (2) fecal deposition; and (3) regurgitation, i.e., vomits. Filth flies can cause human or animal cryptosporidiosis via deposition of infectious oocysts on the visited foodstuf, and the biology and ecology of synanthropic filth flies indicate that their potential for mechanical transmission of C. parvum is high.

  17. Identification of genetic heterogeneity in the Cryptosporidium parvum ribosomal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Carraway, M; Tzipori, S; Widmer, G

    1996-01-01

    Oocysts of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum are found in most surface waters and can contaminate municipal water supplies, as demonstrated by recent outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis. A method capable of fingerprinting C. parvum isolates from the environment would facilitate the study of epidemiology and transmission cycles and aid in the implementation of preventive measures to reduce water contamination by oocytes. In this study, we report polymorphism in C. parvum isolates on the basis of analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA and nucleotide sequences in a region of the 18S rRNA and the internal transcribed spacer 1. Isolate-specific primers for these two regions were designed, and PCR tests capable of discriminating between isolates were developed. In both PCR assays, the five C. parvum isolates analyzed segregated into two subgroups. One group consisted of isolates that originated directly from human patients, and the other group had various host origins and had been propagated in laboratory animals. These results demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing C. parvum isolates by sequence-specific PCR tests. PMID:8593074

  18. Gamma irradiation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts affects intracelluar levels of the viral symbiont CPV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown a dose-dependent effect of gamma irradiation on Cryptosporidium parvum development in neonatal mice and newborn calves. In mice, C. parvum oocysts exposed to 200 Gy showed nearly complete inability to develop as measured by C. parvum-specific quantitative PCR of ileal ti...

  19. Cryptosporidium parvum has an active hypusine biosynthesis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Nimisha; Morada, Marie; Tripathi, Pankaj; Gowri, V.S.; Mandal, Swati; Quirch, Alison; Park, Myung Hee; Yarlett, Nigel; Madhubala, Rentala

    2014-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum causes severe enteric infection and diarrheal disease with substantial morbidity and mortality in untreated AIDS patients and children in developing or resource-limited countries. No fully effective treatment is available. Hypusination of eIF5A is an important post-translational modification essential for cell proliferation. This modification occurs in a two step process catalyzed by deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS) followed by deoxyhypusine hydroxylase. An ORF of 1086 bp was identified in the C. parvum (Cp) genome which encodes for a putative polypeptide of 362 amino acids. The recombinant CpDHS protein was purified to homogeneity and used to probe the enzyme’s mechanism, structure, and inhibition profile in a series of kinetic experiments. Sequence analysis and structural modeling of CpDHS were performed to probe differences with respect to the DHS of other species. Unlike Leishmania, Trypanosomes and Entamoeba, Cryptosporidium contains only a single gene for DHS. Phylogenetic analysis shows that CpDHS is more closely related to apicomplexan DHS than kinetoplastid DHS. Important residues that are essential for the functioning of the enzyme including NAD+ binding residues, spermidine binding residues and the active site lysine are conserved between CpDHS and human DHS. N1-guanyl-1.7-diaminoheptane (GC7), a potent inhibitor of DHS caused an effective inhibition of infection and growth of C. parvum in HCT-8 cells. PMID:24893338

  20. Genetic modification of the diarrhoeal pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Vinayak, Sumiti; Pawlowic, Mattie C; Sateriale, Adam; Brooks, Carrie F; Studstill, Caleb J; Bar-Peled, Yael; Cipriano, Michael J; Striepen, Boris

    2015-07-23

    Recent studies into the global causes of severe diarrhoea in young children have identified the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium as the second most important diarrhoeal pathogen after rotavirus. Diarrhoeal disease is estimated to be responsible for 10.5% of overall child mortality. Cryptosporidium is also an opportunistic pathogen in the contexts of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-caused AIDS and organ transplantation. There is no vaccine and only a single approved drug that provides no benefit for those in gravest danger: malnourished children and immunocompromised patients. Cryptosporidiosis drug and vaccine development is limited by the poor tractability of the parasite, which includes a lack of systems for continuous culture, facile animal models, and molecular genetic tools. Here we describe an experimental framework to genetically modify this important human pathogen. We established and optimized transfection of C. parvum sporozoites in tissue culture. To isolate stable transgenics we developed a mouse model that delivers sporozoites directly into the intestine, a Cryptosporidium clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 system, and in vivo selection for aminoglycoside resistance. We derived reporter parasites suitable for in vitro and in vivo drug screening, and we evaluated the basis of drug susceptibility by gene knockout. We anticipate that the ability to genetically engineer this parasite will be transformative for Cryptosporidium research. Genetic reporters will provide quantitative correlates for disease, cure and protection, and the role of parasite genes in these processes is now open to rigorous investigation.

  1. Extensive polymorphism in Cryptosporidium parvum identified by multilocus microsatellite analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, X; Rich, S M; Akiyoshi, D; Tumwine, J K; Kekitiinwa, A; Nabukeera, N; Tzipori, S; Widmer, G

    2000-08-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA sequence analysis discern two main types of Cryptosporidium parvum. We present a survey of length polymorphism at several microsatellite loci for type 1 and type 2 isolates. A total of 14 microsatellite loci were identified from C. parvum DNA sequences deposited in public databases. All repeats were mono-, di-, and trinucleotide repeats of A, AT, and AAT, reflecting the high AT content of the C. parvum genome. Several of these loci showed significant length polymorphism, with as many as seven alleles identified for a single locus. Differences between alleles ranged from 1 to 27 bp. Karyotype analysis using probes flanking three microsatellites localized each marker to an individual chromosomal band, suggesting that these markers are single copy. In a sample of 19 isolates for which at least three microsatellites were typed, a majority of isolates displayed a unique multilocus fingerprint. Microsatellite analysis of isolates passaged between different host species identified genotypic changes consistent with changes in parasite populations.

  2. Removal of Cryptosporidium parvum in bank filtration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harter, T.; Atwill, E. R.; Hou, L. L.

    2003-04-01

    The protozoan pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum is a leading cause of waterborne disease. Many surface water systems therefore depend on filtration systems, including bank filtration systems, for the removal of the pathogenic oocysts. To better understand the effectiveness, e.g., of bank filtration systems, we have implemented a series of columns studies under various environmental conditions (column length: 10 cm - 60 cm, flow rates: 0.7 m/d - 30 m/d, ionic strength: 0.01 - 100 mM, filter grain size: 0.2 - 2 mm, various solution chemistry). We show that classic colloid filtration theory is a reasonable tool for predicting the initial breakthrough of C. parvum in pulsed injections of the oocyst through sand columns, although the model does not account for the significant tailing that occurs in C. parvum transport. Application of colloid filtration theory to bank filtration system is further limited by the intrinsic heterogeneity of the geologic systems used for bank filtration. We couple filtration theory with a stochastic subsurface transport approach and with percolation theory to account for the effects of intrinsic heterogeneity. We find that a 1-log removal can be achieved even under relatively adverse conditions (low collision efficiency, high velocity) if 85% - 90% of the sedimentary hydrofacies located within the bank filtration system or of the coarsest known hydrofacies connecting the riverbed with the extraction system has a grain-size distribution with a 10% passing diameter equal to 1 mm. One millimeter is a standard sieve size in sediment analysis.

  3. Viability of Cryptosporidium parvum during ensilage of perennial ryegrass.

    PubMed

    Merry, R J; Mawdsley, J L; Brooks, A E; Davies, D R

    1997-01-01

    The survival of Cryptosporidium parvum during ensilage of perennial ryegrass was examined in laboratory silos with herbage prepared in one of three different ways; either untreated, inoculated with a strain of Lactobacillus plantarum or by direct acidification with formic acid. The pH values of all silages initially fell below 4.5, but only formic acid-treated silage remained stable at less than pH 4 after 106 d, with the pH of the untreated and inoculant-treated silages rising to above 6. The formic acid-treated silage had a high lactic acid concentration (109 g kg-1 dry matter (DM)) and low concentrations of propionic and butyric acids after 106 d. However, the untreated and inoculant-treated silages showed an inverse relationship, with low lactic acid concentrations and high concentrations of acetic, propionic and butyric acids. These silages also contained ammonia-N concentrations in excess of 9 g kg-1 DM. In terms of the viability of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts very few differences were seen after 14 d of ensilage with ca 50% remaining viable, irrespective of treatment and total numbers had declined from the initial level of 5.9 x 10(4) to 1 x 10(4) g(-1) fresh matter. Total oocyst numbers remained approximately the same until the end of the ensiling period, with the percentage of viable oocysts declining to 46, 41 and 32% respectively for formic acid, inoculant and untreated silages. The results are discussed in terms of changes occurring during the silage fermentation, in particular the products which may influence the survival of Cryptosporidium and implications for agricultural practice and the health of silage fed livestock.

  4. Hydrophobic and electrostatic cell surface properties of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Drozd, C; Schwartzbrod, J

    1996-04-01

    Microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons and microelectrophoresis were investigated in order to characterize the surface properties of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocysts exhibited low removal rates by octane (only 20% on average), suggesting that the Cryptosporidium sp. does not demonstrate marked hydrophobic properties. A zeta potential close to -25 mV at pH 6 to 6.5 in deionized water was observed for the parasite. Measurements of hydrophobicity and zeta potential were performed as a function of pH and ionic strength or conductivity. Hydrophobicity maxima were observed at extreme pH values, with 40% of adhesion of oocysts to octane. It also appeared that ionic strength (estimated by conductivity) could influence the hydrophobic properties of oocysts. Cryptosporidium oocysts showed a pH-dependent surface charge, with zeta potentials becoming less negative as pH was reduced, starting at -35 mV for alkaline pH and reaching 0 at isoelectric points for pH 2.5. On the other hand, variation of surface charge with respect to conductivity of the suspension tested in this work was quite small. The knowledge of hydrophobic properties and surface charge of the parasite provides information useful in, for example, the choice of various flocculation treatments, membrane filters, and cleaning agents in connection with oocyst recovery.

  5. Biology, persistence and detection of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis oocyst.

    PubMed

    Carey, C M; Lee, H; Trevors, J T

    2004-02-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis are obligate enteric protozoan parasites which infect the gastrointestinal tract of animals and humans. The mechanism(s) by which these parasites cause gastrointestinal distress in their hosts is not well understood. The risk of waterborne transmission of Cryptosporidium is a serious global issue in drinking water safety. Oocysts from these organisms are extremely robust, prevalent in source water supplies and capable of surviving in the environment for extended periods of time. Resistance to conventional water treatment by chlorination, lack of correlation with biological indicator microorganisms and the absence of adequate methods to detect the presence of infectious oocysts necessitates the development of consistent and effective means of parasite removal from the water supply. Additional research into improving water treatment and sewage treatment practices is needed, particularly in testing the efficiency of ozone in oocyst inactivation. Timely and efficient detection of infectious C. parvum and C. hominis oocysts in environmental samples requires the development of rapid and sensitive techniques for the concentration, purification and detection of these parasites. A major factor confounding proper detection remains the inability to adequately and efficiently concentrate oocysts from environmental samples, while limiting the presence of extraneous materials. Molecular-based techniques are the most promising methods for the sensitive and accurate detection of C. parvum and C. hominis. With the availability of numerous target sequences, RT-PCR will likely emerge as an important method to assess oocyst viability. In addition, a multiplex PCR for the simultaneous detection of C. parvum, C. hominis and other waterborne pathogens such as Giardia lamblia would greatly benefit the water industry and protect human health.

  6. Attachment, persistence and infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in experimentally contaminated fruits and vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an environmentally resistant, abundant, and ubiquitous protozoan parasite that causes severe diarrheal disease in humans and livestock. Consumer dietary preference towards fresh and organically grown produce correlates with a heightened occurrence of foodborne outbreaks of ...

  7. EVALUATING IN VITRO INFECTIVITY FOR MEASURING UV DISINFECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS IN FINISHED WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    UV technology to inactivate Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts has become well established in the US. The challenge now is to effectively demonstrate UV reactor performance and disinfection capacity with various finished water matrices and under different operational conditions. In s...

  8. Sensitive quantitative detection/identification of infectious Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by signature lipid biomarker analysis

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.C. |; Alugupalli, S.; Schrum, D.P.

    1997-08-01

    Unique signature lipid biomarkers were found in the acid-fast oocytes of Cryptosporidium parvum. This makes possible the rapid detection/identification and potential infectivity directly from drinking water membrane filtrates.

  9. AGING OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS STUDIED BY MALDI-TF MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an obligate protozoan parasite found in surface waters. It is the etiological agent for cryptosporidiosis, a parasitic infection that causes severe gastrointestinal illness which is potentially fatal among immuno-compromised individuals. This water borne...

  10. MOLECULAR CLONING AND ANALYSIS OF THE CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM AMINOPEPTIDASE N GENE. (R829180)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum proteases have been associated with release of infective sporozoites from oocysts, and their specific inhibition blocks parasite excystation in vitro. Additionally, proteases have been implicated in the processing of parasite adhesion molecules fo...

  11. MOLECULAR CLONING AND ANALYSIS OF THE CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM AMINOPEPTIDASE N GENE. (R828035)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum proteases have been associated with release of infective sporozoites from oocysts, and their specific inhibition blocks parasite excystation in vitro. Additionally, proteases have been implicated in the processing of parasite adhesion molecules fo...

  12. Development of a Real-Time Quantitative PCR Assay to Detect Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Soil

    EPA Science Inventory

    The risk of Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum) contamination is a serious issue with respect to drinking water, as evidenced by the cryptosporidiosis outbreak in Milwaukee WI, in 1993, which involved over 400,000 infections and at least 54 deaths. Ground-water contamination by C...

  13. AGING OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS STUDIED BY MALDI-TOF MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite, and it causes a potentially fatal gastrointestinal illness. This water borne pathogen has been the subject of several high profile disease outbreaks in the US and abroad. C. parvum presents challenges for both compliance monitoring ...

  14. Giardia sp. Cysts and Infectious Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in the Feces of Migratory Canada Geese (Branta canadensis)

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, Thaddeus K.; Fayer, Ronald; Trout, James M.; Lewis, Earl J.; Farley, C. Austin; Sulaiman, Irshad; Lal, Altaf A.

    1998-01-01

    Fecal droppings of migratory Canada geese, Branta canadensis, collected from nine sites near the Chesapeake Bay (Maryland), were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia spp. Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts were found in feces at seven of nine sites, and Giardia cysts were found at all nine sites. The oocysts from three sites were infectious for mice and molecularly identified as the zoonotic genotype of Cryptosporidium parvum. Waterfowl can disseminate infectious C. parvum oocysts in the environment. PMID:9647860

  15. Adaptation and immunogenicity of Cryptosporidium parvum to immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tomohide; Tsuge, Yasuko; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Fujino, Takashi; Matsui, Toshihiro

    2014-03-01

    The adaptation and immunogenisity of Cryptosporidium parvum isolated from Siberian chipmunks (SC1 strain) in immunocompetent (ICR) mice were examined. The oocysts were received to the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice by repeated passage. The oocysts collected from the 18th SCID mice were inoculated to 5 ICR mice. The mice began to shed oocysts from 6 days after inoculation, the patency was 5 days, and the maximum oocysts per gram of feces (OPG) value was 10(4). The maximum of OPG value was gradually increased by successive passage, and finally that in the 22nd mice reached 10(6) (patency: 11 days). It is considered that these results indicate completion of their adaptation to ICR mice. To examine the immunogenicity of C. parvum to ICR mice, 8 groups of 5 mice each were inoculated with 1.3 × 10(6) oocysts of SC1 strain, which were collected after adaptation to SCID mice. All groups shed oocysts from 6th day, and their patency was from 8 to 12 days. On the 21st day after the primary infection, these mice were challenged with 1.3 × 10(6) oocysts. No oocysts shed from any groups, although 2 control groups shed oocysts from the 6th day, and their OPG values were more than 10(6). These results suggest that this strain has strong immunogenicity against ICR mice. Therefore, the immunological healthy mice were considered a useful experimental model to investigate immunological and drug treatments in the strain of C. parvum.

  16. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by dot-blotting using monoclonal antibodies to Cryptosporidium parvum virus 40-kDa capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Mark C; O'Brien, Celia N; Trout, James M

    2008-02-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were prepared against the 40-kDa capsid protein of Cryptosporidium parvum virus (CPV) by immunizing mice with purified recombinant CPV40 protein. In immunoblotting analysis, MAbCPV40-1 bound to a 40-kDa protein in extracts of C. parvum oocysts. This 40-kDa protein was localized in the sporozoite cytoplasm by immunofluorescence (IFA) staining with MAbCPV40-1. In a dot-blot assay, MAbCPV40-1 was capable of detecting 10(2) non-bleach-treated and 10(2)-10(3) bleach-treated C. parvum oocysts. MAbCPV40-1 was capable of detecting CPV40 antigen in both soluble and total C. parvum oocyst protein extracts, indicating a potential use for detecting this parasite in environmental samples.

  17. Quantification of hsp70 mRNA from the Cryptosporidium parvum in soil by reverse transcription real-time PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    As one of the leading causes of waterborne enteric disease, Cryptosporidium parvum poses significant threat to public health. Besides water, soil can also become an important environmental source of C. parvum once polluted. Detection of viable C. parvum in soil is a key issue whe...

  18. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in a Silicon Micromodel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Changyong; Hilpert, Markus; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S.; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B.; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2012-02-01

    Effective removal of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by granular filtration requires the knowledge of oocyst transport and deposition mechanisms, which can be obtained based on real time microscopic observation of oocyst transport in porous media. Attachment of oocysts to silica surface in a radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) cell and in a micromodel, which has 2-dimensional (2-D) microscopic pore structures consisting of an array of cylindrical collectors, was studied and compared. Real time transport of oocysts in the micromodel was recorded to determine the attached oocyst distributions in transversal and longitudinal directions. In the micromodel, oocysts attached to the forward portion of clean collectors, where the flow velocity was lowest. After initial attachment, oocysts attached onto already attached oocysts. As a result, the collectors ripened and the region available for flow was reduced. Results of attachment and detachment experiments suggest that surface charge heterogeneity allowed for oocyst attachment. In addition to experiments, Lattice-Boltzmann simulations helped understanding the slightly non-uniform flow field and explained differences in the removal efficiency in the transversal direction. However, the hydrodynamic modeling could not explain differences in attachment in the longitudinal direction.

  19. Silver Nanoparticles Decrease the Viability of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Gaiser, Birgit K.; Bhandari, Bidha; Bartley, Paul M.; Katzer, Frank; Bridle, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Oocysts of the waterborne protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum are highly resistant to chlorine disinfection. We show here that both silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver ions significantly decrease oocyst viability, in a dose-dependent manner, between concentrations of 0.005 and 500 μg/ml, as assessed by an excystation assay and the shell/sporozoite ratio. For percent excystation, the results are statistically significant for 500 μg/ml of AgNPs, with reductions from 83% for the control to 33% with AgNPs. For Ag ions, the results were statistically significant at 500 and 5,000 μg/ml, but the percent excystation values were reduced only to 66 and 62%, respectively, from 86% for the control. The sporozoite/shell ratio was affected to a greater extent following AgNP exposure, presumably because sporozoites are destroyed by interaction with NPs. We also demonstrated via hyperspectral imaging that there is a dual mode of interaction, with Ag ions entering the oocyst and destroying the sporozoites while AgNPs interact with the cell wall and, at high concentrations, are able to fully break the oocyst wall. PMID:26497464

  20. Cryptosporidium species and Cryptosporidium parvum subtypes in dairy calves and goat kids reared under traditional farming systems in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Taylan-Ozkan, Aysegul; Yasa-Duru, Sibel; Usluca, Selma; Lysen, Colleen; Ye, Jianbin; Roellig, Dawn M; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2016-11-01

    Molecular characterizations of Cryptosporidium spp. in ruminants reared under traditional animal management systems are scarce and studies conducted thus far have revealed largely an absence of the pathogenic and zoonotic species Cryptosporidium parvum in pre-weaned animals. In this study, we examined Cryptosporidium species and subtype distribution in free-range pre-weaned dairy calves and goat kids with diarrhea. Cryptosporidium-positive specimens from pre-weaned calves on 10 farms and goat kids on 4 farms in Ankara, Balikesir, Corum, Kirikkale, and Kirsehir Provinces, Turkey were genotyped by PCR-restriction length polymorphism analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene, which identified C. parvum in 27 calves and 9 goat kids and Cryptosporidium ryanae in 1 calf. Among the C. parvum isolates successfully subtyped by DNA sequence analysis of the 60 kDa glycoprotein gene, three subtypes were detected in calves, including IIaA13G2R1 (20/23), IIdA18G1 (2/23), and IIdA20G1b (1/23), and four subtypes were detected in goat kids, including IIaA13G2R1 (3/8), IIaA15G1R1 (2/8), IIdA22G1 (2/8), and IIdA18G1 (1/8). Data of the study suggest that dairy calves reared in a traditional cow-calf system in Turkey are mainly infected with a C. parvum subtype rarely seen elsewhere, whereas goat kids are infected with diverse subtypes. As all five C. parvum subtypes found in this study are known human pathogens, pre-weaned farm animals could play a potential role in the transmission of human cryptosporidiosis.

  1. Structure-activity relationship study of selective benzimidazole-based inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum IMPDH

    PubMed Central

    Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Sharling, Lisa; Zhang, Minjia; Liu, Xiaoping; Ray, Soumya S.; MacPherson, Iain S.; Striepen, Boris; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parasites are important waterborne pathogens of both humans and animals. The C. parvum and C. hominis genomes indicate that the only route to guanine nucleotides is via inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Thus the inhibition of the parasite IMPDH presents a potential strategy for treating Cryptosporidium infections. A selective benzimidazole-based inhibitor of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) was previously identified in a high throughput screen. Here we report a structure-activity relationship study of benzimidazole-based compounds that resulted in potent and selective inhibitors of CpIMPDH. Several compounds display potent antiparasitic activity in vitro. PMID:22310229

  2. Effect of sunlight on the infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum in seawater.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Abid M; Telser, Lital; Nitzan, Yeshayahu

    2007-09-01

    The prevalence of pathogenic microorganisms in seawater can result in waterborne and food borne outbreaks. This study was performed to determine the effect of sunlight and salinity on the die-off of Cryptosporidium parvum. Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, Escherichia coli, and MS2 coliphage were seeded into tap water and seawater samples and then exposed to sunlight. The die-off of C. parvum in seawater, as measured by infectivity, was greater under sunlight (-3.08 log10) than under dark conditions (-1.31 log10). While, no significant difference was recorded in the die-off of C. parvum, under dark conditions, in tap water as compared to seawater (P < 0.05), indicating that the synergistic effect of salinity and sunlight was responsible for the enhanced die-off in seawater. The die-off of MS2 coliphage and E. coli was greater than that observed for C. parvum under all tested conditions. This indicates that these microorganisms cannot serve as indicators for the presence of C. parvum oocysts in seawaters. The results of the study suggest that C. parvum can persist as infectious oocysts for a long time in seawater and can thus pose a serious hazard by direct and indirect contact with humans.

  3. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum from two different Japanese prefectures, Okinawa and Hokkaido.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Aita, Junya; Masatani, Tatsunori; Suzuki, Moemi; Nitta, Yoshiki; Tamayose, Genta; Iso, Takehiro; Suganuma, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Takashi; Matsuyama, Keita; Niikura, Tadamasa; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Yamakawa, Kazuhiro; Inokuma, Hisashi; Itagaki, Tadashi; Zakimi, Satoshi; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2015-04-01

    Infectious diarrhea is the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in neonatal calves. Cryptosporidium parvum is one of the main pathogens associated with calf diarrhea. Although diarrhea is a symptom of infection with various pathogens, investigations to detect the types of pathogens have never been performed in Japan. This study investigated the prevalence of four major diarrhea-causing pathogens in calves: C. parvum, rotavirus, coronavirus, and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (E. coli K99). Commercial immunochromatography testing of all four pathogens and molecular analysis of C. parvum with diarrhea in calves from southernmost Okinawa and northernmost Hokkaido, Japan, were conducted. The frequencies of C. parvum, rotavirus, coronavirus, and E. coli (K99) in Okinawa were 50%, 28%, 2.3%, and 4.7%, respectively. Watery fecal stools were significantly correlated with C. parvum (p<0.05). In oocyst calculations for C. parvum, no significant difference was observed between the single-infection cases and the mixed-infection cases with rotavirus. Interestingly, molecular analyses targeting small subunit ribosomal RNA as well as glycoprotein 60 (GP60) genes revealed that the C. parvum nucleotide sequences from the two prefectures were identical, indicating that C. parvum with a uniform characteristic is distributed throughout Japan. GP60 subtyping analysis identified C. parvum from Okinawa and Hokkaido as belonging to the IIaA15G2R1 subtype, a known zoonotic subtype. Hence, control of cryptosporidiosis is important not only for pre-weaned calves, but also for human health.

  4. Improved Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts propagation using dexamethasone suppressed CF-1 mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluates Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst production in dexamethasone suppressed CF-1 and C57BL/6 mice. Both models can yield 1 x 109 total oocysts over a 20 day production period; however, only 20 CF-1 mice are required to reliably achieve this goal compared...

  5. Changes in the Levels of Cryspovirus During In Vitro Development of Cryptosporidium parvum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to develop and utilize semi-quantitative RT-PCR and PCR assays for measuring the level of cryspovirus, the viral symbiont of Cryptosporidium parvum, during in vitro development of the protozoan. Cultures of human carcinoma cells (HCT-8) were inoculated with excysting C...

  6. INTESTINAL AND PULMONARY INFECTION BY Cryptosporidium parvum IN TWO PATIENTS WITH HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    REINA, Fábio Tadeu Rodrigues; RIBEIRO, Camila Aparecida; de ARAÚJO, Ronalda Silva; MATTÉ, Maria Helena; CASTANHO, Roberto Esteves Pires; TANAKA, Ioshie Ibara; VIGGIANI, Ana Maria Ferreira Sornas; MARTINS, Luciamáre Perinetti Alves

    2016-01-01

    We describe two patients with HIV/AIDS who presented pulmonary and intestinal infection caused by Cryptosporidium parvum, with a fatal outcome. The lack of available description of changes in clinical signs and radiographic characteristics of this disease when it is located in the extra-intestinal region causes low prevalence of early diagnosis and a subsequent lack of treatment. PMID:27007564

  7. PREVALENCE AND CONCENTRATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS IN BEEF CATTLE PADDOCK SOILS AND FORAGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an enteric coccidian protozoan that receives a great amount of interest because of its widespread occurrence in surface waters, its high degree of infectivity, and the difficulty of risk management associated with its presence and control. Information about environmental l...

  8. Coupled Factors Influencing the Transport and Retention of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts in Saturated Porous Media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The coupled role of solution ionic strength (IS), system hydrodynamics and pore structure on the transport and retention of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst was investigated via batch, packed-bed column, and micromodel systems. The experiments were conducted over a wide range of IS (0.1-100 mM)...

  9. Effect of Lot Variability on Ultraviolet Radiation Inactivation Kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the efficiency of ultraviolet (UV) radiation for the inactivation of oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum. In these studies inactivation is measured as reduction in oocysts. A primary goal is to estimate the UV radiation required to achiev...

  10. A new in vitro model using small intestinal epithelial cells to enhance infection of Cryptosporidium parvum

    EPA Science Inventory

    To better understand and study the infection of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, a more sensitive in vitro assay is required. In vivo, this parasite infects the epithelial cells of the microvilli layer in the small intestine. While cell infection models using colon,...

  11. Cryptosporidium parvum GP60 subtypes in dairy cattle from Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum from 73 dairy calves less than two months old from Buenos Aires province (Argentina) were molecularly characterized using sequence analysis of the GP60 gene. Seventy five sequences were obtained, and seven different subtypes were identified, all belonging to the IIa subtype f...

  12. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of a diagnostic 452-base-pair DNA fragment discriminates between Cryptosporidium parvum and C. meleagridis and between C. parvum isolates of human and animal origin.

    PubMed

    Guyot, K; Follet-Dumoulin, A; Recourt, C; Lelièvre, E; Cailliez, J C; Dei-Cas, E

    2002-04-01

    Genomic DNAs from human Cryptosporidium isolates previously typed by analysis of the 18S ribosomal DNA locus (Cryptosporidium parvum bovine genotype, C. parvum human genotype, Cryptosporidium meleagridis, and Cryptosporidium felis) were used to amplify the diagnostic fragment described by Laxer et al. (M. A. Laxer, B. K. Timblin, and R. J. Patel, Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg., 45:688-694, 1991). The obtained 452-bp amplified fragments were sequenced and aligned with the homologous Cryptosporidium wrairi sequence. Polymorphism was exploited to develop a restriction fragment length polymorphism method able to discriminate Cryptosporidium species and C. parvum genotypes.

  13. An immunomagnetic separation-real-time PCR method for quantification of Cryptosporidium parvum in water samples.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Melanie; Guillot, Emmanuelle

    2003-07-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum is known to occur widely in both raw and drinking water and is the cause of waterborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis throughout the world. The routinely used method for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water is based on an immunofluorescence assay (IFA). It is both time-consuming and nonspecific for the human pathogenic species C. parvum. We have developed a TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test that accurately quantifies C. parvum oocysts in treated and untreated water samples. The protocol consisted of the following successive steps: Envirochek capsule filtration, immunomagnetic separation (IMS), thermal lysis followed by DNA purification using Nanosep centrifugal devices and, finally, real-time PCR using fluorescent TaqMan technology. Quantification was accomplished by comparing the fluorescence signals obtained from test samples with those from standard dilutions of C. parvum oocysts. This IMS-real-time PCR assay permits rapid and reliable quantification over six orders of magnitude, with a detection limit of five oocysts for purified oocyst solutions and eight oocysts for spiked water samples. Replicate samples of spiked tap water and Seine River water samples (with approximately 78 and 775 oocysts) were tested. C. parvum oocyst recoveries, which ranged from 47.4% to 99% and from 39.1% to 68.3%, respectively, were significantly higher and less variable than those reported using the traditional US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) method 1622. This new molecular method offers a rapid, sensitive and specific alternative for C. parvum oocyst quantification in water.

  14. Natural infection with zoonotic subtype of Cryptosporidium parvum in Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Marcelo Vasconcelos; Soares, Rodrigo Martins; Bonello, Fábio; Gennari, Solange Maria

    2007-06-20

    A total of 145 capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) fecal samples from the state of São Paulo, Brazil, were screened for Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts using the malachite green method. Eight samples (5.52%) showed positive results and were further submitted to nested PCR reaction for amplification of fragments of 18S rRNA gene and 60-kDa glycoprotein gene for determination of species, alleles and subtypes of Cryptosporidium. Sequencing of the PCR products of the 18S rRNA gene fragments and 60-kDa glycoprotein gene fragments showed that for both genes all Cryptosporidium isolates from capybara were respectively 100% genetically similar to a bovine isolate of C. parvum and to C. parvum subtype IIaA15G2R1. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of Cryptosporidium infection in this rodent. The finding of zoonotic C. parvum infection in a semi-aquatic mammal that inhabits anthroponotic habitats raises the concern that human water supplies may be contaminated with zoonotic Cryptosporidium oocysts from wildlife.

  15. Multiplication of the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum in an aquatic biofilm system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In natural aquatic environments biofilms are known to act as environmental reservoirs for Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. However, the fate of these oocysts within biofilms has yet to be determined. Methods This study aimed to identify if biofilms have the ability to support the multiplication of Cryptosporidium by measuring the change in parasite number over time using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and detecting the possible extracellular developmental stages using a combination of confocal microscopy and immunolabelling techniques. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm flow cell systems were established and C. parvum oocysts were constantly supplied over a six day period. Results A significant (P < 0.001) increase in Cryptosporidium was detected as the biofilm matured, with the total number of C. parvum multiplying 2–3 fold during this period. With this, various Cryptosporidium developmental stages (sporozoites, trophozoites, type I and II meronts) were identified from the biofilm. Conclusion This is the first study demonstrating that biofilms not only serve as an environmental reservoir for oocysts, but are also capable of supporting the multiplication of Cryptosporidium over time in an aquatic environment. PMID:24330483

  16. Effects of Surfactants on Cryptosporidium parvum Mobility in Agricultural Soils from Illinois and Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnault, C. J.; Koken, E.; Jacobson, A. R.; Powelson, D.

    2011-12-01

    The occurence of the parasitic protozoan Cryptosporidium parvum in rural and agricultural watersheds due to agricultural activities and wildlife is inevitable. Understanding the behavior of C. parvum oocysts in the environment is critical for the protection of public health and the environment. To better understand the mechanisms by which the pathogen moves through soils and contaminates water resources, we study their mobility under conditions representative of real-world scenarios, where both C. parvum and chemicals that affect their fate are present in soils. Surfactants occur widely in soils due to agricultural practices such as wastewater irrigation and the application of pesticides or soil wetting agents. They affect water tension and, consequently, soil infiltration processes and the air-water interfaces in soil pores where C. parvum may be retained. We investigate the effects of surfactants on the mobility of C. parvum oocysts in agricultural soils from Illinois and Utah under unsaturated flow conditions. As it is critical to examine C. parvum in natural settings, we also developed a quantification method using RT-PCR for monitoring C. parvum oocysts in environmental soil and water samples. We optimized physico-chemical parameters to disrupt C. parvum oocysts and extract their DNA, and developed isolation methods to separate C. parvum oocysts from colloids in natural soil samples. The results of this research will lead to the development of an accurate and sensitive molecular method for the monitoring of C. parvum oocysts in environmental soil and water samples, and will further our understanding of the mechanisms controlling the behavior of C. parvum oocysts in soils, in particular the role of vadose zone processes, sorption to soil and surfactants.

  17. Spinacia oleracea L. leaf stomata harboring Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts: a potential threat to food safety.

    PubMed

    Macarisin, Dumitru; Bauchan, Gary; Fayer, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a cosmopolitan microscopic protozoan parasite that causes severe diarrheal disease (cryptosporidiosis) in mammals, including humans and livestock. There is growing evidence of Cryptosporidium persistence in fresh produce that may result in food-borne infection, including sporadic cases as well as outbreaks. However, drinking and recreational waters are still considered the major sources of Cryptosporidium infection in humans, which has resulted in prioritization of studies of parasite etiology in aquatic environments, while the mechanisms of transmission and parasite persistence on edible plants remain poorly understood. Using laser scanning confocal microscopy together with fluorescein-labeled monoclonal antibodies, C. parvum oocysts were found to strongly adhere to spinach plants after contact with contaminated water, to infiltrate through the stomatal openings in spinach leaves, and to persist at the mesophyll level. These findings and the fact that this pathogenic parasite resists washing and disinfection raise concerns regarding food safety.

  18. CHANGES IN MOUSE CIRULATING LEUKOCYTE NUMBERS IN C57BL/6 MICE IMMUNOSUPPRESSED FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Iowa strain of Cryptosporidium parvum will not propagate in immunocompetent mice, but will successfully infect genetically immunocompromised Nude or SCID mice as well as immunocompetent mice which have been immunosuppressed with glucocorticoids. Using dexamethasone - tetracy...

  19. A COMPARISON OF FOUR FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY BASED METHODS FOR PURIFYING, DETECTING AND CONFIRMING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidiosis has been traced to drinking contaminated surface water, either not treated, or ineffectively treated. Testing to detect Cryptosporidium parvum in surface water has been suggested to help prevent future outbreaks. This study compared purifications and detection...

  20. Detection and molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium parvum in British European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus).

    PubMed

    Sangster, Lucy; Blake, Damer P; Robinson, Guy; Hopkins, Timothy C; Sa, Ricardo C C; Cunningham, Andrew A; Chalmers, Rachel M; Lawson, Becki

    2016-02-15

    Surveillance was conducted for the occurrence of protozoan parasites of the genus Cryptosporidium in European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) in Great Britain. In total, 108 voided faecal samples were collected from hedgehogs newly admitted to eight wildlife casualty treatment and rehabilitation centres. Terminal large intestinal (LI) contents from three hedgehog carcasses were also analysed. Information on host and location variables, including faecal appearance, body weight, and apparent health status, was compiled. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) targeting the 18S ribosomal RNA gene, confirmed by sequencing, revealed an 8% (9/111) occurrence of Cryptosporidium parvum in faeces or LI contents, with no significant association between the host or location variables and infection. Archived small intestinal (SI) tissue from a hedgehog with histological evidence of cryptosporidiosis was also positive for C. parvum by PCR and sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene. No other Cryptosporidium species were detected. PCR and sequencing of the glycoprotein 60 gene identified three known zoonotic C. parvum subtypes not previously found in hedgehogs: IIdA17G1 (n=4), IIdA19G1 (n=1) and IIdA24G1 (n=1). These subtypes are also known to infect livestock. Another faecal sample contained C. parvum IIcA5G3j which has been found previously in hedgehogs, and for which there is one published report in a human, but is not known to affect livestock. The presence of zoonotic subtypes of C. parvum in British hedgehogs highlights a potential public health concern. Further research is needed to better understand the epidemiology and potential impacts of Cryptosporidium infection in hedgehogs.

  1. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by dot-blotting using monoclonal antibodies to CPV40 capsid protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) were prepared against the 40 kDa capsid protein of Cryptosporidium parvum virus (CPV) by immunizing mice with purified recombinant CPV40 protein. By immunoblotting analysis, one MAb, designated MAbCPV40-1, bound to a 40 kDa protein in extracts of C. parvum oocysts, which...

  2. In vitro inhibition of Cryptosporidium parvum infection by human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, B C; Wisnewski, A V; Johnson, J; Fenwick-Smith, D; Wiest, P; Hamer, D; Kresina, T; Flanigan, T P

    1997-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum infection of the small epithelial intestine causes unremitting diarrhea and malabsorption that can lead to chronic and sometimes fatal illness in patients with AIDS. The illness may be ameliorated by passive oral immunoglobulin therapy. The objective of this study was to produce anti-Cryptosporidium human monoclonal antibodies for evaluation as potential therapy. All human monoclonal cell lines that produced C. parvum antibodies were originally generated from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a human immunodeficiency virus-seronegative woman. She had recovered from C. parvum infection and had a high specific antibody titer. Hybridization of these lymphocytes with a tumor cell line was accomplished by hypo-osmolar electrofusion. Twelve clones were identified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as secreting anti-Cryptosporidium antibodies after the initial hybridization. From the 12 positive clones, two high antibody-secreting clones, 17A and 17B, were maintained in long-term culture. A second hybridization produced two other human monoclonal cell lines, EC5 and BB2. Human monoclonal antibody from the first two cell lines bound to C. parvum sporozoites and oocysts by immunofluorescence. The ability of human monoclonal antibodies to inhibit C. parvum infection in vitro was assessed by using a human enterocyte cell line, HT29.74. The antibodies of the four different human hybridomas inhibited infection by 35 to 68% (P < 0.05) compared to a control irrelevant human monoclonal antibody derived in a similar fashion. Human monoclonal antibodies are candidate molecules for immunotherapy of C. parvum infection. PMID:9284173

  3. Cryptosporidium parvum scavenges LDL-derived cholesterol and micellar cholesterol internalized into enterocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenman, Karen; Wanyiri, Jane W.; Bhat, Najma; Ward, Honorine D.; Coppens, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. are responsible for devastating diarrhea in immunodeficient individuals. In the intestinal tract, the developmental stages of the parasite are confined to the apical surfaces of epithelial cells. Upon invasion, Cryptosporidium incorporates the microvillous membrane of the enterocyte to form the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) and sequesters itself from the host cytoplasm by rearranging the host cytoskeleton. Cryptosporidium parvum has minimal anabolic capabilities and relies on transporters and salvage pathways to meet its basic metabolic requirements. The cholesterol salvage pathway is crucial for the development of protozoan parasites. In this study, we have examined the sources of cholesterol from C. parvum infecting enterocytes. We illustrated that the intracellular stages of Cryptosporidium as well as the oocysts shed by the host, contain cholesterol. Incubation of infected enterocytes in lipoprotein-free medium impairs parasite development and results in substantial decrease in cholesterol content associated with the PV. Among lipoproteins, LDL constitutes an important source of cholesterol for Cryptosporidium. Dietary cholesterol incorporated into micelles is internalized into enterocytes by the NPC1L1 transporter. We showed that C. parvum also obtains cholesterol from micelles in enterocytes. Pharmacological blockade of NPC1L1 function by ezetimibe or moderate down-regulation of NPC1L1 expression decreases parasite infectivity. These observations indicate that, despite its dual sequestration from the intestinal lumen and the host cytoplasm, C. parvum can, in fact, obtain cholesterol both from the gut’s lumen and the host cell. This study highlights the evolutionary advantages for epicellular pathogens to access to nutrients from the outside and inside of the host cell. PMID:23311949

  4. Efficacy of Common Laboratory Disinfectants on the Infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Weir, Susan C.; Pokorny, Nicholas J.; Carreno, Ramon A.; Trevors, Jack T.; Lee, Hung

    2002-01-01

    Nine liquid disinfectants were tested for their ability to reduce infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in cell culture. A 4-min exposure to 6% hydrogen peroxide and a 13-min exposure to ammonium hydroxide-amended windshield washer fluid reduced infectivity 1,000-fold. Other disinfectants tested (70% ethanol, 37% methanol, 6% sodium hypochlorite, 70% isopropanol, and three commercial disinfectants) did not reduce the infectivity after a 33-min exposure. The results indicate that hydrogen peroxide and windshield washer fluid or ammonium hydroxide disinfectant may be suitable laboratory disinfectants against C. parvum oocysts. PMID:11976138

  5. Multicentric Evaluation of a New Real-Time PCR Assay for Quantification of Cryptosporidium spp. and Identification of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis

    PubMed Central

    Chapey, E.; Dutoit, E.; Guyot, K.; Hasseine, L.; Jeddi, F.; Menotti, J.; Paraud, C.; Pomares, C.; Rabodonirina, M.; Rieux, A.; Derouin, F.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite responsible for gastroenteritis, especially in immunocompromised patients. Laboratory diagnosis of cryptosporidiosis relies on microscopy, antigen detection, and nucleic acid detection and analysis. Among the numerous molecular targets available, the 18S rRNA gene displays the best sensitivity and sequence variations between species and can be used for molecular typing assays. This paper presents a new real-time PCR assay for the detection and quantification of all Cryptosporidium species associated with the identification of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum. The sensitivity and specificity of this new PCR assay were assessed on a multicentric basis, using well-characterized Cryptosporidium-positive and -negative human stool samples, and the efficiencies of nine extraction methods were comparatively assessed using Cryptosporidium-seeded stool samples and phosphate-buffered saline samples. A comparison of extraction yields showed that the most efficient extraction method was the Boom technique in association with mechanical grinding, and column extraction showed higher binding capacity than extraction methods based on magnetic silica. Our PCR assay was able to quantify at least 300 oocysts per gram of stool. Satisfactory reproducibility between laboratories was observed. The two main species causing human disease, Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum, were identified using a duplex real-time PCR assay with specific TaqMan minor-groove-binding ligand (MGB) probes for the same amplicon. To conclude, this one-step quantitative PCR is well suited to the routine diagnosis of cryptosporidiosis since practical conditions, including DNA extraction, quantification using well-defined standards, and identification of the two main species infecting humans, have been positively assessed. PMID:23720792

  6. Cryptosporidium erinacei and C. parvum in a group of overwintering hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Hofmannová, Lada; Hauptman, Karel; Huclová, Kristýna; Květoňová, Dana; Sak, Bohumil; Kváč, Martin

    2016-10-01

    This study describes cryptosporidiosis in an overwintering group of 15 European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus), comprising 3 adults and 12 juveniles. Four juvenile hedgehogs were hospitalised with anorexia, malodorous diarrhoea and dehydration. Immediate parasitological examinations revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium sp. in these animals and also in 5 other juveniles. All hedgehogs were coproscopically monitored for 4 months over the winter season. Shedding of Cryptosporidium oocysts persisted from 6 to 70 days. Repeated shedding of Cryptosporidium oocysts occurred in 3 animals after 4 months subsequent to the first outbreak. Clinical signs were observed only at the beginning of the outbreak (apathy, anorexia, general weakness, mild dehydration, and malodorous faeces with changed consistence - soft/diarrhoea) in the 4 hospitalised juveniles. Overall 11 hedgehogs were Cryptosporidium-positive, both microscopically and by PCR methods. Sequence analyses of SSU rRNA and gp60 genes revealed the presence of C. parvum IIdA18G1 subtype in all positive hedgehogs. Moreover, 3 hedgehogs had a mixed infection of the zoonotic C. parvum and C. erinacei XIIIaA19R13 subtype. Cryptosporidium infections can be rapidly spread among debilitated animals and the positive hedgehogs released back into the wild can be a source of the infection for individuals weakened after hibernation.

  7. Cryptosporidium parvum infections in Bergen, Norway, during an extensive outbreak of waterborne giardiasis in autumn and winter 2004.

    PubMed

    Robertson, L J; Forberg, T; Hermansen, L; Gjerde, B K; Alvsvåg, J O; Langeland, N

    2006-03-01

    During a large waterborne giardiasis outbreak in Norway, many diarrheic patients were found to have Cryptosporidium infections. Gene sequencing identified these infections as Cryptosporidium parvum infections, although they were not identical. Whether these infections were due to a simultaneous outbreak of waterborne cryptosporidiosis or reflected background levels not normally detected is discussed.

  8. Effect of chlorine, blanching, freezing, and microwave heating on Cryptosporidium parvum viability inoculated on green peppers.

    PubMed

    Duhain, G L M C; Minnaar, A; Buys, E M

    2012-05-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts have been found on the surface of vegetables in both developed and developing countries. C. parvum can contaminate vegetables via various routes, including irrigation water. This study investigated the effect of individual treatments of chlorine, blanching, blast freezing, and microwave heating, as well as combined treatments of chlorine and freezing, and chlorine and microwave heating on the viability of C. parvum oocysts inoculated on green peppers. The viability of the oocysts after the treatments was assessed using propidium iodide and a flow cytometer. Based on the propidium iodide staining, the chlorine treatments did not affect the viability of the oocysts. Blast freezing significantly inactivated 20% of the oocysts. Microwave heating and blanching significantly inactivated 93% of oocysts. Treatment with chlorine followed by blast freezing did not affect the viability of the oocysts significantly. Treatment with chlorine and microwave heating was significantly more effective than microwave heating alone and inactivated 98% of the oocysts. The study indicates that C. parvum oocysts are sensitive to heat and, to some extent, to blast freezing, but are resistant to chlorine. Therefore, the use of chlorine during vegetable processing is not a critical control point for C. parvum oocysts, and the consumption of raw or minimally processed vegetables may constitute a health risk as C. parvum oocysts can still be found viable on ready-to-eat, minimally processed vegetables.

  9. Effect of high-rate algal ponds on viability of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed

    Araki, S; Martín-Gomez, S; Bécares, E; De Luis-Calabuig, E; Rojo-Vazquez, F

    2001-07-01

    The physicochemical conditions of high-rate algal ponds were responsible for a more than 97% reduction in the infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in neonatal mice. The use of semipermeable bags of cellulose showed that pH, ammonia, and/or light seems to be a major factor for the inactivation of oocysts in wastewater, supporting the importance of alga-based systems for safer reuse of treated wastewater.

  10. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability

    SciTech Connect

    Korich, D.G.; Mead, J.R.; Madore, M.S.; Sinclair, N.A.; Sterling, C.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water.

  11. Effects of ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst viability.

    PubMed Central

    Korich, D G; Mead, J R; Madore, M S; Sinclair, N A; Sterling, C R

    1990-01-01

    Purified Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were comparatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlorine and monochloramine did. Greater than 90% inactivation as measured by infectivity was achieved by treating oocysts with 1 ppm of ozone (1 mg/liter) for 5 min. Exposure to 1.3 ppm of chlorine dioxide yielded 90% inactivation after 1 h, while 80 ppm of chlorine and 80 ppm of monochloramine required approximately 90 min for 90% inactivation. The data indicate that C. parvum oocysts are 30 times more resistant to ozone and 14 times more resistant to chlorine dioxide than Giardia cysts exposed to these disinfectants under the same conditions. With the possible exception of ozone, the use of disinfectants alone should not be expected to inactivate C. parvum oocysts in drinking water. PMID:2339894

  12. Detection of Infectious Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Cockles (Cerastoderma edule)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Bautista, M.; Ortega-Mora, L. M.; Tabares, E.; Lopez-Rodas, V.; Costas, E.

    2000-01-01

    Infective Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were detected in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and cockles (Cerastoderma edule) from a shellfish-producing region (Gallaecia, northwest Spain, bounded by the Atlantic Ocean) that accounts for the majority of European shellfish production. Shellfish were collected from bay sites with different degrees of organic pollution. Shellfish harboring C. parvum oocysts were recovered only from areas located near the mouths of rivers with a high density of grazing ruminants on their banks. An approximation of the parasite load of shellfish collected in positive sites indicated that each shellfish transported more than 103 oocysts. Recovered oocysts were infectious for neonatal mice, and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis demonstrated a profile similar to that described for genotype C or 2 of the parasite. These results demonstrate that mussels and cockles could act as a reservoir of C. parvum infection for humans. Moreover, estuarine shellfish could be used as an indicator of river water contamination. PMID:10788352

  13. Susceptibility of germfree or antibiotic-treated adult mice to Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Harp, J A; Wannemuehler, M W; Woodmansee, D B; Moon, H W

    1988-08-01

    Adult mice are more resistant than neonatal mice to intestinal colonization with the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum. Development of a mature intestinal flora may play a role in this resistance. We compared susceptibilities to colonization with C. parvum in adult conventional mice, adult germfree mice, and adult conventional mice treated with oral antibiotics to deplete the intestinal flora. Germfree mice of both CD1 and BALB/c strains were colonized at day 7 following inoculation with C. parvum oocysts isolated from the feces of an infected, diarrheic calf. Age-matched conventional mice of the same strains were comparatively resistant to colonization. Conventional mice treated with antibiotics remained resistant to colonization. These results suggest that the microflora in the intestine was not the sole determinant of resistance or susceptibility to colonization. The germfree adult mouse as an experimental model of cryptosporidiosis is discussed.

  14. Resistance of calves to Cryptosporidium parvum: effects of age and previous exposure.

    PubMed Central

    Harp, J A; Woodmansee, D B; Moon, H W

    1990-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a coccidian parasite that causes diarrheal disease in many vertebrate species, including young (less than or equal to 1 month old) calves. Older calves and adult cattle are resistant to infection. In this study, newborn calves were raised in isolation from C. parvum for 1 week to 3 months before experimental challenge with the parasite. Calves orally challenged with C. parvum at 1 week of age shed oocysts in their feces and had diarrhea after challenge exposure. When these calves were rechallenged at 1 and 3 months of age, they neither shed oocysts nor had diarrhea. There was no significant increase in the mean anticryptosporidium enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay serum antibody titer in these calves following any of the challenge exposures. Calves orally inoculated with C. parvum for the first time at 1 month of age shed oocysts, had diarrhea after challenge exposure, and were resistant to rechallenge at 3 months of age. These calves had a twofold increase in serum antibody titer after the first challenge and no increase after the second challenge. Calves orally inoculated with C. parvum for the first time at 3 months of age shed oocysts, and two of seven animals had diarrhea. These calves had a 10-fold increase in serum antibody to C. parvum after exposure. This study demonstrates that calves raised in isolation from C. parvum remain susceptible to challenge until at least 3 months of age. Furthermore, within this time period, initial exposure and recovery renders calves resistant to further challenge with the parasite. The data also suggest that exposure of young calves to C. parvum may inhibit the development of a serum antibody response to the parasite. PMID:2365460

  15. CP2 gene as a useful viability marker for Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Ung; Joung, Migyo; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Huh, Sun; Song, Hyunje; Park, Woo-Yoon; Yu, Jae-Ran

    2008-02-01

    The validity of the CP2 gene of Cryptosporidium parvum as a viability marker was evaluated using absolute quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Total ribonucleic acid (RNA) was isolated from live and heat-killed C. parvum oocysts, and complementary deoxyribonucleic acid was synthesized and used as a template. The most accurate number of viable C. parvum oocysts was predicted when the CP2 gene was used as a target gene. The lower detection limit of the CP2 gene was ten oocysts, which was the most sensitive among examined target genes. With heat shock induction, only hsp70 messenger RNA (mRNA) was induced, and the predicted viable oocyst number was increased by heat shock for this marker. The CP2, hsp70, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, and beta-tubulin mRNAs were not detected in heat-killed oocysts, but the 18S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (rRNA) showed heat stability until 48 h after heat killing. Although the 18S rRNA demonstrated the fastest response in crossing point (CP) value among the examined primer sets in qPCR, overestimation of viable oocysts was noted in the analysis with this gene. In conclusion, the CP2 gene was identified as the most sensitive, reliable, and accurate candidate of a viability marker of C. parvum by qPCR evaluation.

  16. Cryptosporidium parvum-induced ileo-caecal adenocarcinoma and Wnt signaling in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Benamrouz, Sadia; Conseil, Valerie; Chabé, Magali; Praet, Marleen; Audebert, Christophe; Blervaque, Renaud; Guyot, Karine; Gazzola, Sophie; Mouray, Anthony; Chassat, Thierry; Delaire, Baptiste; Goetinck, Nathalie; Gantois, Nausicaa; Osman, Marwan; Slomianny, Christian; Dehennaut, Vanessa; Lefebvre, Tony; Viscogliosi, Eric; Cuvelier, Claude; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Creusy, Colette; Certad, Gabriela

    2014-06-01

    Cryptosporidium species are apicomplexan protozoans that are found worldwide. These parasites constitute a large risk to human and animal health. They cause self-limited diarrhea in immunocompetent hosts and a life-threatening disease in immunocompromised hosts. Interestingly, Cryptosporidium parvum has been related to digestive carcinogenesis in humans. Consistent with a potential tumorigenic role of this parasite, in an original reproducible animal model of chronic cryptosporidiosis based on dexamethasone-treated or untreated adult SCID mice, we formerly reported that C. parvum (strains of animal and human origin) is able to induce digestive adenocarcinoma even in infections induced with very low inoculum. The aim of this study was to further characterize this animal model and to explore metabolic pathways potentially involved in the development of C. parvum-induced ileo-caecal oncogenesis. We searched for alterations in genes or proteins commonly involved in cell cycle, differentiation or cell migration, such as β-catenin, Apc, E-cadherin, Kras and p53. After infection of animals with C. parvum we demonstrated immunohistochemical abnormal localization of Wnt signaling pathway components and p53. Mutations in the selected loci of studied genes were not found after high-throughput sequencing. Furthermore, alterations in the ultrastructure of adherens junctions of the ileo-caecal neoplastic epithelia of C. parvum-infected mice were recorded using transmission electron microscopy. In conclusion, we found for the first time that the Wnt signaling pathway, and particularly the cytoskeleton network, seems to be pivotal for the development of the C. parvum-induced neoplastic process and cell migration of transformed cells. Furthermore, this model is a valuable tool in understanding the host-pathogen interactions associated with the intricate infection process of this parasite, which is able to modulate host cytoskeleton activities and several host-cell biological

  17. Chlorine Dioxide Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts and Bacterial Spore Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Chauret, Christian P.; Radziminski, Chris Z.; Lepuil, Michael; Creason, Robin; Andrews, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum, which is resistant to chlorine concentrations typically used in water treatment, is recognized as a significant waterborne pathogen. Recent studies have demonstrated that chlorine dioxide is a more efficient disinfectant than free chlorine against Cryptosporidium oocysts. It is not known, however, if oocysts from different suppliers are equally sensitive to chlorine dioxide. This study used both a most-probable-number–cell culture infectivity assay and in vitro excystation to evaluate chlorine dioxide inactivation kinetics in laboratory water at pH 8 and 21°C. The two viability methods produced significantly different results (P < 0.05). Products of disinfectant concentration and contact time (Ct values) of 1,000 mg · min/liter were needed to inactivate approximately 0.5 log10 and 2.0 log10 units (99% inactivation) of C. parvum as measured by in vitro excystation and cell infectivity, respectively, suggesting that excystation is not an adequate viability assay. Purified oocysts originating from three different suppliers were evaluated and showed marked differences with respect to their resistance to inactivation when using chlorine dioxide. Ct values of 75, 550, and 1,000 mg · min/liter were required to achieve approximately 2.0 log10 units of inactivation with oocysts from different sources. Finally, the study compared the relationship between easily measured indicators, including Bacillus subtilis (aerobic) spores and Clostridium sporogenes (anaerobic) spores, and C. parvum oocysts. The bacterial spores were found to be more sensitive to chlorine dioxide than C. parvum oocysts and therefore could not be used as direct indicators of C. parvum inactivation for this disinfectant. In conclusion, it is suggested that future studies address issues such as oocyst purification protocols and the genetic diversity of C. parvum, since these factors might affect oocyst disinfection sensitivity. PMID:11425712

  18. ENHANCED PRODUCTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS IN IMMUNOSUPPRESSED MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recently there has been an increase in the need for fresh C. parvum oocysts for engineering and biomedical research applications. In our laboratory the emphsis has shifted from the use of dairy calves to inbred C57BL/67n mice, primarily for reasons of ease of collection and proce...

  19. [Cryptosporidium parvum infection in a pregnant immunocompetent woman with occupational risk].

    PubMed

    Neira, Patricia; Muñoz, Nelson; Rosales, José

    2010-08-01

    Cryptosporidioses is a parasitic zoonoses generated by diverse Cryptosporidium species. This coccidiosis affects multiple vertebrate species, including human beings. In Chile, as it happens in other countries, cryptosporidioses is a low frequency infection in immunocompetent individuals, acquiring a big relevance in immunocompromised ones. We present the following case: a recently graduated student from Veterinary medical school, with a 20 week pregnancy, living in "Laguna Verde" area in the Region of Valparaiso and who was infected with Cryptosporidium sp. Etiologic diagnosis was made by Ziehl Neelsen, and nested PCR followed by PCR product sequencing. During the same period, the infection was detected in her cats which were asymptomatic. In all of them, her and the cats, the species identified was Cryptosporidium parvum. Her husband and her other pets were all asymptomatic and non infected. This is the first report of a possible cryptosporidioses transmission between humans and cat.

  20. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum in Surface Waters: Interplay of Hydrodynamic Processes, Sediments, and Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searcy, K. E.; Packman, A. I.; Atwill, E. R.; Harter, T.

    2005-05-01

    Understanding the movement of pathogens in the environment is necessary to ensure the safety and protection of municipal water supply systems. Cryptosporidium parvum is a human pathogen of particular concern as it is common in surface waters of the United States, it can survive for long periods of time in the environment, and it is difficult to disinfect in water treatment plants. The transport of oocysts through watersheds can be mediated by interactions with the stream channel and suspended particles in the water column. For example, the association of C. parvum oocysts with suspended particles can alter the effective physical properties of the oocysts and increase their settling velocity. The hydrodynamic coupling of the overlying water with the pore water of the sediment bed can carry oocysts from the surface water into the sediment bed. Surface-attached communities of microorganisms, called biofilms, are ubiquitous in surface water systems and can capture C. parvum oocysts. Laboratory experiments were conducted at multiple scales (flowcell, batch, and flume) to determine the association of oocysts with sediments and biofilm communities and to assess the impact of this association on C. parvum transport. The effects of flow conditions, water chemistry, sediment composition, biofilm composition, and biofilm structure on these associations were all evaluated. The experimental results demonstrate that oocyst-sediment-biofilm interactions have significant implications for the propagation of C. parvum oocysts through watersheds and should generally be considered when predicting the fate of pathogens in the environment.

  1. Serological detection and epidemiology of Neospora caninum and Cryptosporidium parvum antibodies in cattle in southern Egypt.

    PubMed

    Fereig, Ragab M; AbouLaila, Mahmoud Rezk; Mohamed, Samy G A; Mahmoud, Hassan Y A H; Ali, Alsagher O; Ali, Asmaa F; Hilali, Mosaad; Zaid, Anis; Mohamed, Adel Elsayed Ahmed; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi

    2016-10-01

    Neospora caninum and Cryptosporidium parvum are intracellular protozoan parasites that are distributed worldwide and of major economical concern in cattle industry. N. caninum can cause abortion storms and high culling rates, whereas C. parvum has zoonotic implications and can cause diarrhea in calves. There are currently no data on the prevalence of neosporosis and cryptosporidiosis in humans or animals in southern Egypt. Prevalence of these two infections was determined in a sample of cattle from two different areas in southern Egypt, Sohag and Qena, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A total 301 cattle were sampled, of which 18.9% were positive for N. caninum, 35.9% were positive for C. parvum and 10.0% were positive for both. Geographical location and breeding system were considered as potential risk factors for C. parvum infection. A higher prevalence of infection was identified on small scale farms, compared with larger, intensive systems, with a prevalence of 50.2% compared with 37.8%, respectively. Animals in Sohag had a significantly higher prevalence compared with Qena, with a seroprevalence of 46.1% compared with 31.6%, respectively. In brief, marked seroprevalence recorded in this study indicates a high incidence of N. caninum and C. parvum infections in cattle, and this necessitates the application of more effective strategies for combating these types of infections on farms in Egypt.

  2. Multiplex-Touchdown PCR to Simultaneously Detect Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Cyclospora cayetanensis, the Major Causes of Traveler's Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji-Hun; Lee, Sang-Eun; Kim, Tong Soo; Ma, Da-Won; Chai, Jong-Yil; Shin, Eun-Hee

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to develop a multiplex-touchdown PCR method to simultaneously detect 3 species of protozoan parasites, i.e., Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Cyclospora cayetanensis, the major causes of traveler's diarrhea and are resistant to standard antimicrobial treatments. The target genes included the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein for C. parvum, Glutamate dehydrogenase for G. lamblia, and 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) for C. cayetanensis. The sizes of the amplified fragments were 555, 188, and 400 bps, respectively. The multiplex-touchdown PCR protocol using a primer mixture simultaneously detected protozoa in human stools, and the amplified gene was detected in >1×10(3) oocysts for C. parvum, >1×10(4) cysts for G. lamblia, and >1 copy of the 18S rRNA gene for C. cayetanensis. Taken together, our protocol convincingly demonstrated the ability to simultaneously detect C. parvum, G. lamblia, and C. cayetanenesis in stool samples.

  3. The Ultra-Structural Similarities between Cryptosporidium parvum and the Gregarines.

    PubMed

    Aldeyarbi, Hebatalla M; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Using a transmission electron microscopy-based approach, this study details the striking similarities between Cryptosporidium parvum and the gregarines during in vitro axenic development at high ultra-structural resolution. C. parvum zoites displayed three unusual regions within uninucleated parasites: epimerite-like, protomerite-like, and the cell body; these regions exhibited a high degree of morphological similarity to gregarine-like trophozoites. The presence of a mucron-like bulging structure at the side of the free ovoid gregarine-like zoites was observed after 2 h of cultivation. An irregular pattern of epicytic-like folds were found to cover the surface of the parasites 24 h postcultivation. Some extracellular stages were paired in laterocaudal or side-side syzygy, with the presence of a fusion zone between some of these zoites. The present findings are in agreement with phylogenetic studies that have proposed a sister relationship with gregarines. Cryptosporidium appears to exhibit tremendous variety in cell structure depending on the surrounding environment, thereby mimicking the "primitive" gregarines in terms of the co-evolution strategy between the parasites and their environments. Given this degree of similarity, different aspects of the evolutionary biology of Cryptosporidium need to be examined, considering the knowledge gained from the study of gregarines.

  4. Detection system of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by brackish water benthic shellfish (Corbicula japonica) as a biological indicator in river water.

    PubMed

    Izumi, T; Yagita, K; Endo, T; Ohyama, T

    2006-11-01

    The brackish water benthic shellfish, Corbicula japonica, was experimentally exposed to Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts at 1.51x10(4)oocysts/clam/day for 7 or 14 days. Oocysts were predominantly eliminated through the feces of Corbicula japonica in both cases by microscopic and PCR methods. The fecal excretion rates of oocysts within 4 days after the last exposure to Corbicula japonica were 87.6% for the 7-day exposure group and 86.0% for the 14-day exposure group. The tissue residue level of oocysts in the gastrointestinal tract 3 days after the last exposure was 2.7% of total exposed oocysts and that of 7 days was 1.1% for the 7-day exposure case and 1.6 and 0.5% for the 14-day exposure case, respectively, maintaining infectivity to cultured cells (HCT-8) in vitro. At the same time, field tests of Corbicula japonica for collecting oocysts showed that this clam could certainly collect Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in the natural river and, furthermore, the gene type of C. parvum could be also identified proving its effectiveness as a biological indicator. The present study showed that the brackish water benthic shellfish Corbicula japonica may be capable of gathering and preserving Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts to a considerable extent under the natural ecological conditions, and further suggests the effectiveness of Corbicula japonica as a practical and general bioindicator for estimates of river water contamination by oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum.

  5. Development of electrochemical based sandwich enzyme linked immunosensor for Cryptosporidium parvum detection in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Thiruppathiraja, Chinnasamy; Saroja, Veerappan; Kamatchiammal, Senthilkumar; Adaikkappan, Periyakaruppan; Alagar, Muthukaruppan

    2011-10-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is one of the most important biological contaminants in drinking water and generates significant risks to public health. Due to low infectious dose of C. parvum, remarkably sensitive detection methods are required for water and food industry analysis. This present study describes a simple, sensitive, enzyme amplified sandwich form of an electrochemical immunosensor using dual labeled gold nanoparticles (alkaline phosphatase and anti-oocysts monoclonal antibody) in indium tin oxide (ITO) as an electrode to detect C. parvum. The biosensor was fabricated by immobilizing the anti-oocysts McAb on a gold nanoparticle functionalized ITO electrode, followed by the corresponding capture of analytes and dual labeled gold nanoparticle probe to detect the C. parvum target. The outcome shows the sensitivity of electrochemical immune sensor enhanced by gold nanoparticles with a limit of detection of 3 oocysts/mL in a minimal processing period. Our results demonstrated the sensitivity of the new approach compared to the customary method and the immunosensors showed acceptable precision, reproducibility, stability, and could be readily applied to multi analyte determination for environmental monitoring.

  6. ANTIPARASITIC ACTIVITY OF SILVER AND COPPER OXIDE NANOPARTICLES AGAINST ENTAMOEBA HISTOLYTICA AND CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM CYSTS.

    PubMed

    Saad, Halim A; Soliman, Mohamed I; Azzam, Ahmed M; Mostafa, B

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have received more attention as antiparasitic agents. In the present study, silver and copper nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The antiparasitic activity of Ag and CuO nanoparticles were tested against two of the most environmentally spread parasites in Egypt (Entamoeba histolytica and Cryptosporidium parvum). The average sizes of synthesized Ag NPs and CuO NPs were 9 & 29 nm respectively and a significant reduction for cysts viability (p > 0.05) was observed for CuO NPs against E. histolytica cysts and Ag NPs against C. parvum oocysts. Moreover, LC50-3h of CuO NPs for E. histolytica and C. parvum were 0.13 and 0.72 mg/l, while Ag NPs recorded 0.34 and 0.54 mg/l respectively. Accordingly, these NPs could be suggested as a new nanoform agent for safe and effective treatment of E. histolytica and C. parvum parasites.

  7. Efficacy of using harmless Bacillus endospores to estimate the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Mary; Clifford, Eoghan; O'Reilly, Edmond; Rowan, Neil J

    2013-06-01

    The need to use complex in vitro cell culture, expensive equipment, and highly-trained technicians that are available only to specialist laboratories has significantly limited studies assessing the potential of pulsed UV light (PUV) to inactivate the waterborne parasite Cryptosporidium parvum in drinking water. This constitutes the first study to report on the use of different non-pathogenic Bacillus endospores as potential surrogate organisms to indicate the PUV inactivation performance of a C. parvum oocyst suspended in water. Findings showed that PUV effectively inactivated approximately 5 log10 CFU/ml Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus pumilus endospores suspended in water at a UV dose of 9.72 μJ/cm(2) that also inactivated statistically similar levels of C. parvum oocysts (P < 0.05), as determined by combined in vitro HCT-8 cell culture and quantitative PCR. Specifically, this study demonstrated that B. megaterium exhibited greater or similar PUV-inactivation kinetic data compared to that of similarly treated C. parvum over the UV dose range 6.4 to 12.9 μJ/cm(2). Therefore, the former may be used as an indicator organism for safely investigating the PUV-inactivation performance of this chlorine-resistant, waterborne parasite at the waste-water treatment plant level. Findings presented will impact positively on future water quality studies and on public health.

  8. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium parvum in private drinking water cisterns in Bani-Kenanah district, northern Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abo-Shehada, Mahmoud; Hindyia, Mona; Saiah, Abbass

    2004-10-01

    Due to water scarcity in Jordan, the water authority only pump the water once or twice a week to the population. Thus people in rural areas, including the Bani-Kenanah district, make the most of their water resources by storing rainwater in private reservoirs for use during periods of water shortage. These reservoirs include; underground cisterns and concrete or metal tanks. The water collected in these reservoirs is at risk of contamination. During the period March-July 2002, the three types of reservoirs from 368 households were surveyed for presence of Escherichia coli and Cryptosporidium parvum, indicators of contamination. The cistern was the most contaminated reservoir with 17% (95% CI: 13,22) for E. coli (significant, P<0.05), and 2% (95% CI: 1,4) for C. parvum. Only 1% (95% CI: 1,6) of the metal reservoirs had E. coli, while concrete reservoirs were free. No C. parvum oocysts were detected in either the concrete or metal reservoirs. Reservoirs opening at floor level and the bucket kept outside the reservoir were significant (P<0.05) enhancing risk factors for contamination with C. parvum.

  9. Mechanical transport and transmission of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by wild filth flies.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, T K; Fayer, R; Knight, R; Mhangami-Ruwende, B; Trout, J M; Da Silva, A J; Pieniazek, N J

    2000-01-01

    Over the course of six months wild filth flies were collected from traps left for 7-10 days in a barn with or without a calf shedding Cryptosporidium parvum Genotype 2 oocysts in diarrheic feces. The oocysts of C. parvum transported on the flies' exoskeletons and eluted from their droplets left on visited surfaces were infectious for mice. The mean number of oocysts carried by a fly varied from 4 to 131, and the total oocyst number per collection varied from 56 to approximately 4.56 x 10(3). Fly abundance and intensity of mechanical transmission of infectious C. parvum oocysts were positively correlated, and both increased significantly when an infected calf was in the barn. Molecular data showed that the oocysts shed by infected calves were carried by flies for at least 3 weeks. Filth flies can acquire infectious C. parvum oocysts from unsanitary sites, deposit them on visited surfaces, and therefore may be involved in human or animal cryptosporidiosis.

  10. Application of an ELISA-type screen printed electrode-based potentiometric assay to the detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed

    Laczka, Olivier; Skillman, Lucy; Ditcham, William G; Hamdorf, Brenton; Wong, Danny K Y; Bergquist, Peter; Sunna, Anwar

    2013-11-01

    We report a novel electrochemical method for the rapid detection of the parasitic protozoan, Cryptosporidium parvum. An antibody-based capture format was transferred onto screen-printed electrodes and the presence of horseradish peroxidase-labelled antibodies binding to the oocysts was potentiometrically detected. This method allowed the detection of 5 × 10(2)Cryptosporidium oocysts per mL in 60 min.

  11. Investigating Attachment Behaviors of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts Using Collision Efficiency in Laboratory Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.; Hou, L.; Atwill, R.; Packman, A. I.; Harter, T.

    2009-12-01

    Cryptosporidium is one of the most common enteric parasites of humans and domestic animals, and a number of outbreaks of Cryprosporidiosis, a diarrheal disease caused by Cryptosporidium have been reported worldwide. Natural porous media has been demonstrated to be an effective filter for removing Cryptosporidium parvum from contaminated water and the amount of Cryptosporidium filtered is known to be highly dependent on physical and chemical conditions of the porous media and the water. Cryptosporidium deposition in saturated porous media involves two main steps: approach and attachment. In contrast to the approach mechanisms, attachment processes have not been systematically described to predict a priori because theories that represent attachment behavior (colloid stability) such as DLVO are insufficient to explain experimental data. For this reason, attachment efficiency is calculated based on empirical data, typically experimental breakthrough curves in laboratory columns or field experiments. In this study, collision (attachment) efficiencies (α) of C. parvum oocyst were calculated to test the effect of chemical property changes on the association of oocysts with sand grains. The breakthrough curve data obtained from twelve column experiments and three models were employed to calculate single collector efficiency (η) and α. The first ten experiments were conducted by changing ionic strength and pH, and mixing with natural sediments under the same physical properties (same η). Our experiment results show that iron coating or clay/suspended solids mixture drastically enhanced oocyst deposition. The experiments also showed that increase in ionic strength and decrease in pH enhanced the attachment efficiency. However, the experiment with 100mM NaCl resulted in low attachment efficiency and the experiment with pH 8.5 showed similar attachment efficiency to the one at pH 7. Based on the results from two additional experiments with different flow velocities, it

  12. Low-level detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in field water using optical microfluidic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Scott V.; Kwon, Hyuck-Jin; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2012-03-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a difficult-to-detect protozoan that causes diarrhea in the healthy adults and death in immunocompromised individuals. While it is easy to understand the transmission routes of Cryptosporidium, it is currently difficult to identify low concentrations of Cryptosporidium, especially when following EPA method 1623, which can easily require tens of liters of water to get a positive signal. The current detection method is unacceptable and severely inefficient when taking into account the time that goes into concentrating a sample, actual assays, and training associated with the assays. Using our method, it is possible to use only 15 μL of sample, which is an immunoagglutination assay that uses Mie scatter intensity changes to detect different Cryptosporidium concentrations. In addition to creating a standard curve using a clean sample matrix (i.e., phosphate buffered saline), field samples were collected from a chlorine treated swimming pool, a sump located on a farm, and a turtle pond. Each sample had different intensity changes but the trend represented within the data was the same. This assay has a detection limit of 100-101 oocysts/mL and can be done in as little as 10 minutes.

  13. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in recycled waters used for irrigation and first description of Cryptosporidium parvum and C. muris in Greece.

    PubMed

    Spanakos, Gregory; Biba, Anastasia; Mavridou, Athena; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2015-05-01

    Here, we present the first time findings regarding the occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in sewage waters and the first molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium species in Greece. Biological treatment plants from three regions in Greece have been investigated. The detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts was by modified Ziehl-Neelsen acid fast (MZN-AF) and by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFT) for Cryptosporidium and Giardia (oo)cysts, whereas nested PCR based on the SSU rDNA assay was used for molecular detection of Cryptosporidium followed by sequencing for the genetic characterization of the species. In total, 73 samples (37 raw sewage samples and 38 of treated water samples) were collected and analyzed. Of the 73 water samples, 4 samples were Cryptosporidium-positive by IFT and staining, 12 samples were Cryptosporidium-positive by nested PCR; 9 samples were Giardia-positive by IFT. We showed that Cryptosporidium cysts are found both in the input and the discharge of the biological treatment plants. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium based on the small subunit ribosomal DNA gene resulted in the determination of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium muris Greek isolates. This is the first report of Cryptosporidium and Giardia occurrence in wastewaters and the first molecular identification of Cryptosporidium species in Greek environments. As the treated water is used for irrigation, or it is discharged into the sea, our findings indicate that biological treatment facilities constitute a possible risk for public health because the related species are prevalent in humans; the results invite for further epidemiological investigations to evaluate the real public health risk in Greece.

  14. Sequential inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum using ozone and chlorine.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Finch, G R; Smith, D W; Belosevic, M

    2001-12-01

    Inactivation of bovine-derived C. parvum oocysts was studied at bench-scale in oxidant demand free 0.05 M phosphate buffer using free chlorine alone or ozone followed by free chlorine at temperatures of 1 degrees C, 10 degrees C and 22 degrees C at pH 6. Animal infectivity using neonatal CD-1 mice was used for evaluation of oocyst viability after treatment. Kinetic models based on the linear Chick-Watson model were developed for free chlorine inactivation and ozone/free chlorine sequential inactivation for 0.4 or 1.6 log-units of ozone primary kill. At 22 degrees C. ozone pre-treatment increased the efficacy of free chlorine for about 4-6 times depending on the level of ozone primary kills. Gross kills of the ozone/free chlorine sequential inactivation were a function of ozone primary kills and increased linearly with the free chlorine C(avg)t (arithmetic average of the initial and final residual x contact time) product. Temperature was critical for both single and sequential inactivation, and the efficacy of free chlorine after 1.6 log-units of ozone primary inactivation decreased by a factor of 1.8 for every 10 degrees C temperature decrease. Given an ozone primary kill of 1.6 log-units, the free chlorine C(avg)t products required for a gross kill of 3.0 log-units were 1000, 2000 and 3,300 mgmin/L for 22 degrees C. 10 degrees C and 1degrees C, respectively.

  15. Cryptosporidium parvum Long-Chain Fatty Acid Elongase▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fritzler, Jason M.; Millership, Jason J.; Zhu, Guan

    2007-01-01

    We report the presence of a new fatty acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) elongation system in Cryptosporidium and the functional characterization of the key enzyme, a single long-chain fatty acid elongase (LCE), in this parasite. This enzyme contains conserved motifs and predicted transmembrane domains characteristic to the elongase family and is placed within the ELO6 family specific for saturated substrates. CpLCE1 gene transcripts are present at all life cycle stages, but the levels are highest in free sporozoites and in stages at 36 h and 60 h postinfection that typically contain free merozoites. Immunostaining revealed localization to the outer surface of sporozoites and to the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane. Recombinant CpLCE1 displayed allosteric kinetics towards malonyl-CoA and palmitoyl-CoA and Michaelis-Menten kinetics towards NADPH. Myristoyl-CoA (C14:0) and palmitoyl-CoA (C16:0) display the highest activity when used as substrates, and only one round of elongation occurs. CpLCE1 is fairly resistant to cerulenin, an inhibitor for both type I and II fatty acid synthases (i.e., maximum inhibitions of 20.5% and 32.7% were observed when C16:0 and C14:0 were used as substrates, respectively). These observations ultimately validate the function of CpLCE1. PMID:17827345

  16. Biofilm roughness determines Cryptosporidium parvum retention in environmental biofilms.

    PubMed

    DiCesare, E A Wolyniak; Hargreaves, B R; Jellison, K L

    2012-06-01

    The genus Cryptosporidium is a group of waterborne protozoan parasites that have been implicated in significant outbreaks of gastrointestinal infections throughout the world. Biofilms trap these pathogens and can contaminate water supplies through subsequent release. Biofilm microbial assemblages were collected seasonally from three streams in eastern Pennsylvania and used to grow biofilms in laboratory microcosms. Daily oocyst counts in the influx and efflux flow allowed the calculation of daily oocyst retention in the biofilm. Following the removal of oocysts from the influx water, oocyst attachment to the biofilm declined to an equilibrium state within 5 days that was sustained for at least 25 days. Varying the oocyst loading rate for the system showed that biofilm retention could be saturated, suggesting that discrete binding sites determined the maximum number of oocysts retained. Oocyst retention varied seasonally but was consistent across all three sites; however, seasonal oocyst retention was not consistent across years at the same site. No correlation between oocyst attachment and any measured water quality parameter was found. However, oocyst retention was strongly correlated with biofilm surface roughness and roughness varied among seasons and across years. We hypothesize that biofilm roughness and oocyst retention are dependent on environmentally driven changes in the biofilm community rather than directly on water quality conditions. It is important to understand oocyst transport dynamics to reduce risks of human infection. Better understanding of factors controlling biofilm retention of oocysts should improve our understanding of oocyst transport at different scales.

  17. Report of fatal mixed infection with Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia intestinalis in neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yuu; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Nukata, Satoko; Shibahara, Tomoyuki; Ayukawa, Osamu; Kondo, Yasuko; Matsuo, Tomohide; Uni, Shigehiko; Furuya, Masaru; Tani, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Naotoshi; Sasai, Kazumi

    2017-03-01

    In the production and management of beef and dairy cattle, controlling diarrhea is one of the important concerns. Pathogenic agents of the disease, protozoan parasites including Cryptosporidium spp., are difficult to control, making prevention, diagnoses, and treatment of diarrhea. In the present study, we investigated a farm with a history of calf deaths over a period of 10 years in order to determine the cause of disease and to clarify the detailed distribution of the pathogens. In four examined calves that were reared in calf pens, all were positive with Cryptosporidium and/or Giardia, while the other breeding stock and adult cattle were negative. Molecular analyses revealed that the isolates from calves were C. parvum subtype IIaA15G2R1 as a zoonotic and G. intestinalis assemblage E. Other pathogenic bacteria and diarrhea-causing viruses were not detected. After treating the calf pens with boiling water and milk of lime (Ca[OH]2), oocysts of C. parvum and cysts of G. intestinalis were not found and no additional calves died. This is the first report to describe the mixed infection of both parasites in Japan.

  18. A unique hexokinase in Cryptosporidium parvum, an apicomplexan pathogen lacking the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yonglan; Zhang, Haili; Guo, Fengguang; Sun, Mingfei; Zhu, Guan

    2014-09-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum may cause virtually untreatable infections in AIDS patients, and is recently identified as one of the top four diarrheal pathogens in children in developing countries. Cryptosporidium differs from other apicomplexans (e.g., Plasmodium and Toxoplasma) by lacking many metabolic pathways including the Krebs cycle and cytochrome-based respiratory chain, thus relying mainly on glycolysis for ATP production. Here we report the molecular and biochemical characterizations of a hexokinase in C. parvum (CpHK). Our phylogenetic reconstructions indicated that apicomplexan hexokinases including CpHK were highly divergent from those of humans and animals (i.e., at the base of the eukaryotic clade). CpHK displays unique kinetic features that differ from those in mammals and Toxoplasma gondii (TgHK) in the preference towards various hexoses and its capacity to use ATP and other NTPs. CpHK also displays substrate inhibition by ATP. Moreover, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) could not only inhibit the CpHK activity, but also the parasite growth in vitro at concentrations nontoxic to host cells (IC(50) = 0.54 mM). While the exact action of 2-deoxy-D-glucose on the parasite is subject to further verification, our data suggest that CpHK and the glycolytic pathway may be explored for developing anti-cryptosporidial therapeutics.

  19. Selective and potent urea inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5′ monophosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Kavitha, Mandapati; Zhang, Minjia; Liu, Xiaoping; Sharling, Lisa; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Striepen, Boris; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and related species are zoonotic intracellular parasites of the intestine. Cryptosporidium is a leading cause of diarrhea in small children around the world. Infection can cause severe pathology in children and immunocompromised patients. This waterborne parasite is resistant to common methods of water treatment and therefore a prominent threat to drinking and recreation water even in countries with strong water safety systems. The drugs currently used to combat these organisms are ineffective. Genomic analysis revealed that the parasite relies solely on inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) for the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Herein, we report a selective urea-based inhibitor of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) identified by high throughput screening. We performed a SAR study of these inhibitors with some analogues exhibiting high potency (IC50 < 2 nM) against CpIMPDH, excellent selectivity > 1000-fold versus human IMPDH type 2 and good stability in mouse liver microsomes. A subset of inhibitors also displayed potent antiparasitic activity in a Toxoplasma gondii model. PMID:22950983

  20. Quantitative risk assessment for zoonotic transmission of Cryptosporidium parvum infection attributable to recreational use of farmland.

    PubMed

    Hill, A; Nally, P; Chalmers, R M; Pritchard, G C; Giles, M

    2011-08-01

    Cryptosporidiosis caused by Cryptosporidium parvum infection is a major cause of enteric illness in man and there is a significant reservoir in animals, particularly young ruminant species. To preliminary assess the magnitude of the risk posed by contact with faeces produced by infected livestock, two microbiological risk assessments have been developed: one for the risk of human infection with C. parvum while camping on contaminated land recently grazed by infected suckler cattle and a comparable risk assessment for camping on land recently spread with contaminated cattle slurry. Using a worst-case scenario approach, the upper level of risk was estimated to be one infection in every 6211 person-visits for a camping event on land recently grazed by infected cattle. Translated into camping events of 100 persons, this risk estimate would most likely lead to zero (98% likelihood) or one infection (1% likelihood). The results for cattle slurry model are similar despite different pathways. Sensitivity analysis was conducted for the grazing cattle model only. This suggested that the time between grazing and camping was the most important control strategy, but increasing hand-washing frequency and the removal of cattle faeces before camping would also be beneficial. If the upper level of risk were to be judged unacceptable then further data would be required to more accurately estimate the risk of infection through these scenarios. Further research would also be required to assess the fraction of cases attributable to camping and/or environmental contact with Cryptosporidium oocysts.

  1. A COMPARISON OF FOUR FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY-BASED METHODS FOR PURIFYING, DETECTING, AND CONFIRMING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM IN SURFACE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidiosis has been traced to drinking contaminated surface water, which was either not treated or was ineffectively treated. Testing to detect Cryptosporidium parvum in surface water has been suggested to help prevent future outbreaks. In the present study, the same sampl...

  2. MODELING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST INACTIVATION AND BROMATE IN A FLOW-THROUGH OZONE CONTACTOR TREATING NATURAL WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A reactive transport model was developed to simultaneously predict Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst inactivation and bromate formation during ozonation of natural water. A mechanistic model previously established to predict bromate formation in organic-free synthetic waters w...

  3. A BAYESIAN METHOD OF ESTIMATING KINETIC PARAMETERS FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH CHLORINE DIOXIDE AND OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objective of this paper is to use Bayesian methods to estimate the kinetic parameters for the inactivation kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts with chlorine dioxide or ozone which are characterized by the delayed Chick-Watson model, i.e., a lag phase or shoulder f...

  4. Experimental infection with Cryptosporidium parvum IIaA21G1R1 subtype in immunosuppressed mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum subtype IIaA21G1R1 oocysts were used to infect dexamethasone immunosuppressed N: NIH Swiss mice. Histology showed developmental stages in the duodenum, proximal and distal jejunum, ileum, cecum and colon, with the small intestine remaining infected until day 35 post infection....

  5. Modeling Fate and Transport of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts in Overland and Near- surface Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, R.; Kalita, P.; Kuhlenschmidt, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a manure-borne protozoan parasite which is common in the environment. It has been recognized as an important microbial contaminant of water and can cause infection and diarrhea in many mammalian hosts, including humans. The laboratory experiments carried out have demonstrated that recovery of C. parvum oocysts was significantly affected by climatic and surface conditions like slope, rainfall and surface cover. The objective of this study is to develop a model for simulating transport of C. parvum oocysts in overland and near-surface flow. Modeling can help understanding oocysts transport pathways. Accordingly, best management practices (BMP) can be developed. Transport of oocysts in overland flow can be simulated mathematically by including terms for the concentration of the oocysts in the liquid phase (in suspension or free-floating) and the solid phase (adsorbed to the fine solid particles like clay). Oocysts adsorption, advection and decay processes are considered. These processes are solved using numerical technique to predict spatial and temporal changes in oocyst concentrations in solid and liquid phases. The model results are compared with experimental data to validate the model outcome. The model output reproduced observed recovery kinetics for 1.5% slope but not for higher slopes (3.0% and 4.5%).

  6. In vitro inhibitory effects of plant-derived by-products against Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Teichmann, Klaus; Kuliberda, Maxime; Schatzmayr, Gerd; Pacher, Thomas; Zitterl-Eglseer, Karin; Joachim, Anja; Hadacek, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Disposal of organic plant wastes and by-products from the food or pharmaceutical industries usually involves high costs. In the present study, 42 samples derived from such by-products were screened in vitro against Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan parasite that may contaminate drinking water and cause diarrhoea. The novel bioassay was previously established in the microtitre plate format. Human ileocaecal adenocarcinoma (HCT-8) cell cultures were seeded with C. parvum oocysts and parasite development was monitored by an indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT) and microscopic assessment for clusters of secondary infection (CSI). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and potential detrimental effects on the host cells were determined. An ethanolic extract from olive (Olea europaea) pomace, after oil pressing and phenol recovery, reproducibly inhibited C. parvum development (MIC = 250–500 μg mL−1, IC50 = 361 (279–438) μg mL−1, IC90 = 467 (398–615) μg mL−1). Accordingly, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, trans-coniferyl alcohol and oleuropein were selected as reference test compounds, but their contributions to the observed activity of the olive pomace extract were insignificant. The established test system proved to be a fast and efficient assay for identifying anti-cryptosporidial activities in biological waste material and comparison with selected reference compounds. PMID:27627637

  7. Triazole inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Sushil K.; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Zhang, Minjia; Johnson, Corey R.; Benjamin, Nicole N.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an important human pathogen and potential bioterrorism agent. This protozoan parasite cannot salvage guanine or guanosine and therefore relies on inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) for biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides and hence for survival. Since C. parvum IMPDH is highly divergent from the host counterpart, selective inhibitors could potentially be used to treat cryptosporidiosis with minimal effects on its mammalian host. A series of 1,2,3-triazole containing ether CpIMPDH inhibitors are described. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that a small alkyl group on the alpha-position of the ether was required with the (R)-enantiomer significantly more active than the (S)-enantiomer. Electron-withdrawing groups in the 3- and/or 4-positions of the pendent phenyl ring were best and conversion of the quinoline containing inhibitors to quinoline-N-oxides retained inhibitory activity both in the presence and absence of bovine serum albumin. The 1,2,3-triazole CpIMPDH inhibitors provide new tools for elucidating the role of IMPDH in C. parvum and may serve as potential therapeutics for treating cryptosporidiosis. PMID:19624136

  8. Pseudo-Second-Order Calcium-Mediated Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst Attachment to Environmental Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xia; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Jellison, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts are able to infect a wide range of mammals, including humans, via fecal-oral transmission. The remobilization of biofilm-associated C. parvum oocysts back into the water column by biofilm sloughing or bulk erosion poses a threat to public health and may be responsible for waterborne outbreaks; thus, the investigation of C. parvum attachment mechanisms to biofilms, particularly the physical and chemical factors controlling oocyst attachment to biofilms, is essential to predict the behavior of oocysts in the environment. In our study, biofilms were grown in rotating annular bioreactors using prefiltered stream water (0.2-μm retention) and rock biofilms (6-μm retention) until the mean biofilm thickness reached steady state. Oocyst deposition followed a calcium-mediated pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Kinetic parameters (i.e., initial oocyst deposition rate constant and total number of oocysts adhered to biofilms at equilibrium) from the model were then used to evaluate the impact of water conductivity on the attachment of oocysts to biofilms. Oocyst deposition was independent of solution ionic strength; instead, the presence of calcium enhanced oocyst attachment, as demonstrated by deposition tests. Calcium was identified as the predominant factor that bridges the carboxylic functional groups on biofilm and oocyst surfaces to cause attachment. The pseudo-second-order kinetic profile fit all experimental conditions, regardless of water chemistry and/or lighting conditions.

  9. Characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, Matthew L.; Owens, James H.; Kelty, Catherine A.

    2000-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) was used to investigate whole and freeze-thawed Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. Whole oocysts revealed some mass spectral features. Reproducible patterns of spectral markers and increased sensitivity were obtained after the oocysts were lysed with a freeze-thaw procedure. Spectral-marker patterns for C. parvum were distinguishable from those obtained for Cryptosporidium muris. One spectral marker appears specific for the genus, while others appear specific at the species level. Three different C. parvum lots were investigated, and similar spectral markers were observed in each. Disinfection of the oocysts reduced and/or eliminated the patterns of spectral markers. PMID:11055915

  10. MicroRNA-221 controls expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in epithelial cells in response to Cryptosporidium parvum infection

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ai-Yu; Hu, Guoku; Zhou, Rui; Liu, Jun; Feng, Yaoyu; Soukup, Garrett A.; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite that infects gastrointestinal epithelial cells and causes diarrheal disease in humans and animals globally. Pathological changes following C. parvum infection include crypt hyperplasia, a modest inflammatory reaction with increased infiltration of lymphocytes into intestinal mucosa. Expression of adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), on infected epithelial cell surfaces may facilitate adhesion and recognition of lymphocytes at infection sites. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules of 23 nucleotides that negatively regulate protein-coding gene expression via translational suppression or mRNA degradation. We recently reported that microRNA-221 (miR-221) regulates ICAM-1 translation through targeting the ICAM-1 3′-untranslated region (UTR). In this study, we tested the role of miR-221 in regulating ICAM-1 expression in epithelial cells in response to C. parvum infection using an in vitro model of human biliary cryptosporidiosis. Up-regulation of ICAM-1 at both message and protein levels was detected in epithelial cells following C. parvum infection. Inhibition of ICAM-1 transcription with actinomycin D could only partially block C. parvum-induced ICAM-1 expression at the protein level. Cryptosporidium parvum infection decreased miR-221 expression in infected epithelial cells. When cells were transfected with a luciferase reporter construct covering the miR-221 binding site in the ICAM-1 3′-UTR and then exposed to C. parvum, an enhanced luciferase activity was detected. Transfection of miR-221 precursor abolished C. parvum-stimulated ICAM-1 protein expression. In addition, expression of ICAM-1 on infected epithelial cells facilitated epithelial adherence of co-cultured Jurkat cells. These results indicate that miR-221-mediated translational suppression controls ICAM-1 expression in epithelial cells in response to C. parvum infection. PMID:21236259

  11. Comparison of microscopy, rapid immunoassay, and molecular techniques for the detection of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Elsafi, Salah H; Al-Maqati, Thekra N; Hussein, Mohi I; Adam, Ahmed A; Hassan, Mohamed M Abu; Al Zahrani, Eidan M

    2013-04-01

    Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum are recognized as the most common protozoan infections in Saudi Arabia. Microscopic examination of stool samples, either direct or concentrated, for the recovery of G. lamblia cysts and trophozoites and C. parvum oocysts is still the most commonly used for the diagnosis of both parasites. We compared the conventional parasitological techniques of iodine-stained wet mount for G. lamblia and Kinyoun's acid-fast for C. parvum against ImmunoCard STAT® Cryptosporidium/Giardia and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detecting the 18S rRNA gene of G. lamblia and conventional PCR detecting the same gene of C. parvum at a tertiary hospital in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Out of 148 stool samples, 19 and 12 true positives were identified for G. lamblia and C. parvum, respectively, using a composite reference standard. In this case, true positives and negatives were considered as those with at least two positive or negative results out of the three tests. Both ImmunoCard STAT! and PCR methods were more sensitive than the microscopic tests of a single stool specimen of 85.7% (CI=62.6-96.2%) and 85.7% (CI=56.2-97.5%) for G. lamblia and C. parvum, respectively. However, specificity of microscopic tests was higher than other techniques for both parasites. Although PCR seems to be most sensitive for both G. lamblia and C. parvum, its low specificity may render its superiority over other techniques. When a single stool sample is used for detection of G. lamblia and C. parvum, better results can be obtained when coupled with serological testing. Although PCR is the most sensitive method for the detection of both G. lamblia and C. parvum, its use requires attention in relation to the increased possible false positives.

  12. Characterization of an Intestinal Epithelial Cell Receptor Recognized by the Cryptosporidium parvum Sporozoite Ligand CSL

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Rebecca C.; Schaefer, Deborah A.; Riggs, Michael W.

    2001-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum is a leading cause of diarrhea in humans and neonatal calves. The absence of approved parasite-specific drugs, vaccines, and immunotherapies for cryptosporidiosis relates in part to limited knowledge on the pathogenesis of zoite attachment and invasion. We recently reported that the C. parvum apical complex glycoprotein CSL contains a zoite ligand for intestinal epithelial cells which is defined by monoclonal antibody (MAb) 3E2. In the present study, the host cell receptor for CSL was characterized. For these studies, a panel of epithelial and mesenchymal cell lines was examined for permissiveness to C. parvum and the ability to bind CSL. Cells of epithelial origin were significantly more permissive and bound significantly greater quantities of CSL than cells of mesenchymal origin. Caco-2 intestinal cells were selected from the epithelial panel for further characterization of the CSL receptor. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that CSL bound initially to the surface of Caco-2 cells and was rapidly internalized. The molecule bound by CSL was identified as an 85-kDa Caco-2 cell surface protein by radioimmunoprecipitation and CSL affinity chromatography. Sporozoite incubation with the isolated 85-kDa protein reduced binding of MAb 3E2. Further, attachment and invasion were significantly inhibited when sporozoites were incubated with the 85-kDa protein prior to inoculation onto Caco-2 cells. These observations indicate that the 85-kDa protein functions as a Caco-2 cell receptor for CSL. CSL also bound specifically to intestinal epithelium from calves, indicating receptor expression in a second important host species. Molecular characterization of the CSL receptor may lead to novel avenues for disrupting ligand-receptor interactions in the pathogenesis of C. parvum infection. PMID:11179341

  13. A cysteine protease inhibitor rescues mice from a lethal Cryptosporidium parvum infection.

    PubMed

    Ndao, Momar; Nath-Chowdhury, Milli; Sajid, Mohammed; Marcus, Victoria; Mashiyama, Susan T; Sakanari, Judy; Chow, Eric; Mackey, Zachary; Land, Kirkwood M; Jacobson, Matthew P; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; McKerrow, James H; Arrowood, Michael J; Caffrey, Conor R

    2013-12-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, can stunt infant growth and can be lethal in immunocompromised individuals. The most widely used drugs for treating cryptosporidiosis are nitazoxanide and paromomycin, although both exhibit limited efficacy. To investigate an alternative approach to therapy, we demonstrate that the clan CA cysteine protease inhibitor N-methyl piperazine-Phe-homoPhe-vinylsulfone phenyl (K11777) inhibits C. parvum growth in mammalian cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, using the C57BL/6 gamma interferon receptor knockout (IFN-γR-KO) mouse model, which is highly susceptible to C. parvum, oral or intraperitoneal treatment with K11777 for 10 days rescued mice from otherwise lethal infections. Histologic examination of untreated mice showed intestinal inflammation, villous blunting, and abundant intracellular parasite stages. In contrast, K11777-treated mice (210 mg/kg of body weight/day) showed only minimal inflammation and no epithelial changes. Three putative protease targets (termed cryptopains 1 to 3, or CpaCATL-1, -2, and -3) were identified in the C. parvum genome, but only two are transcribed in infected mammals. A homology model predicted that K11777 would bind to cryptopain 1. Recombinant enzymatically active cryptopain 1 was successfully targeted by K11777 in a competition assay with a labeled active-site-directed probe. K11777 exhibited no toxicity in vitro and in vivo, and surviving animals remained free of parasites 3 weeks after treatment. The discovery that a cysteine protease inhibitor provides potent anticryptosporidial activity in an animal model of infection encourages the investigation and development of this biocide class as a new, and urgently needed, chemotherapy for cryptosporidiosis.

  14. A Cysteine Protease Inhibitor Rescues Mice from a Lethal Cryptosporidium parvum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nath-Chowdhury, Milli; Sajid, Mohammed; Marcus, Victoria; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Sakanari, Judy; Chow, Eric; Mackey, Zachary; Land, Kirkwood M.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; McKerrow, James H.; Arrowood, Michael J.; Caffrey, Conor R.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, can stunt infant growth and can be lethal in immunocompromised individuals. The most widely used drugs for treating cryptosporidiosis are nitazoxanide and paromomycin, although both exhibit limited efficacy. To investigate an alternative approach to therapy, we demonstrate that the clan CA cysteine protease inhibitor N-methyl piperazine-Phe-homoPhe-vinylsulfone phenyl (K11777) inhibits C. parvum growth in mammalian cell lines in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, using the C57BL/6 gamma interferon receptor knockout (IFN-γR-KO) mouse model, which is highly susceptible to C. parvum, oral or intraperitoneal treatment with K11777 for 10 days rescued mice from otherwise lethal infections. Histologic examination of untreated mice showed intestinal inflammation, villous blunting, and abundant intracellular parasite stages. In contrast, K11777-treated mice (210 mg/kg of body weight/day) showed only minimal inflammation and no epithelial changes. Three putative protease targets (termed cryptopains 1 to 3, or CpaCATL-1, -2, and -3) were identified in the C. parvum genome, but only two are transcribed in infected mammals. A homology model predicted that K11777 would bind to cryptopain 1. Recombinant enzymatically active cryptopain 1 was successfully targeted by K11777 in a competition assay with a labeled active-site-directed probe. K11777 exhibited no toxicity in vitro and in vivo, and surviving animals remained free of parasites 3 weeks after treatment. The discovery that a cysteine protease inhibitor provides potent anticryptosporidial activity in an animal model of infection encourages the investigation and development of this biocide class as a new, and urgently needed, chemotherapy for cryptosporidiosis. PMID:24060869

  15. Efficacy of Two Peroxygen-Based Disinfectants for Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    PubMed Central

    Quilez, Joaquin; Sanchez-Acedo, Caridad; Avendaño, Catalina; del Cacho, Emilio; Lopez-Bernad, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    Two commercial peroxygen-based disinfectants containing hydrogen peroxide plus either peracetic acid (Ox-Virin) or silver nitrate (Ox-Agua) were tested for their ability to inactivate Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. Oocysts were obtained from naturally infected goat kids and exposed to concentrations of 2, 5, and 10% Ox-Virin or 1, 3, and 5% Ox-Agua for 30, 60, and 120 min. In vitro excystation, vital dyes (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide), and infectivity in neonatal BALB/c mice were used to assess the viability and infectivity of control and disinfectant-treated oocysts. Both disinfectants had a deleterious effect on the survival of C. parvum oocysts, since disinfection significantly reduced and in some cases eliminated their viability and infectivity. When in vitro assays were compared with an infectivity assay as indicators of oocyst inactivation, the excystation assay showed 98.6% inactivation after treatment with 10% Ox-Virin for 60 min, while the vital-dye assay showed 95.2% inactivation and the infectivity assay revealed 100% inactivation. Treatment with 3% Ox-Agua for 30 min completely eliminated oocyst infectivity for mice, although we were able to observe only 74.7% inactivation as measured by excystation assays and 24.3% with vital dyes (which proved to be the least reliable method for predicting C. parvum oocyst viability). These findings indicate the potential efficacy of both disinfectants for C. parvum oocysts in agricultural settings where soil, housing, or tools might be contaminated and support the argument that in comparison to the animal infectivity assay, vital-dye and excystation methods overestimate the viability of oocysts following chemical disinfection. PMID:15870337

  16. Symptomatic and asymptomatic secondary transmission of Cryptosporidium parvum following two related outbreaks in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Ø H; Hanevik, K; Thrana, F; Carlson, A; Stachurska-Hagen, T; Skaare, D; Robertson, L J

    2015-06-01

    Two related outbreaks (in 2009 and 2012) of cryptosporidiosis in Norwegian schoolchildren during a stay at a remote holiday farm provided us with a natural experiment to investigate possible secondary transmission of Cryptosporidium parvum IIa A19G1R1. After the children had returned home, clinical data and stool samples were obtained from their household contacts. Samples were investigated for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts by immunofluorescence antibody test. We found both asymptomatic and symptomatic infections, which are likely to have been secondary transmission. Laboratory-confirmed transmission rate was 17% [4/23, 95% confidence interval (CI) 7·0-37·1] in the 2009 outbreak, and 0% (95% CI 0-16·8) in the 2012 outbreak. Using a clinical definition, the probable secondary transmission rate in the 2012 outbreak was 8% (7/83, 95% CI 4·1-16·4). These findings highlight the importance of hygienic and public health measures during outbreaks or individual cases of cryptosporidiosis. We discuss our findings in light of previous studies reporting varying secondary transmission rates of Cryptosporidium spp.

  17. Efficacy of Pyrvinium Pamoate against Cryptosporidium parvum Infection In Vitro and in a Neonatal Mouse Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Downey, Autumn S.; Chong, Curtis R.; Graczyk, Thaddeus K.; Sullivan, David J.

    2008-01-01

    No effective approved drug therapy exists for Cryptosporidium infection of immunocompromised patients. Here we investigated the nonabsorbed anthelmintic drug pyrvinium pamoate for inhibition of the growth of the intestinal protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum. The concentration of pyrvinium that effected 50% growth inhibition in human enterocytic HCT-8 cells by a quantitative alkaline phosphatase immunoassay was 354 nM. For comparison, in the same assay, 50% growth inhibition was obtained with 711 μM paromomycin or 27 μM chloroquine. We used a neonatal mouse model to measure the anti-Cryptosporidium activity of pyrvinium pamoate in vivo. Beginning 3 days after infection, pyrvinium at 5 or 12.5 mg/kg of body weight/day was administered to the treatment group mice for 4 or 6 consecutive days. Nine days after infection, the mice were sacrificed, and drug efficacy was determined by comparing the numbers of oocysts in the fecal smears of treated versus untreated mice. The intensities of trophozoite infection in the ileocecal intestinal regions were also compared using hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained histological slides. We observed a >90% reduction in infection intensity in pyrvinium-treated mice relative to that in untreated controls, along with a substantial reduction in tissue pathology. Based on these results, pyrvinium pamoate is a potential drug candidate for the treatment of cryptosporidiosis in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals. PMID:18591280

  18. Real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) assay targeting MIC1 for detection of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis oocysts.

    PubMed

    Hønsvall, Birgitte K; Robertson, Lucy J

    2017-01-01

    Both Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis are often associated with cryptosporidiosis in humans, but whereas humans are the main host for C. hominis, C. parvum is zoonotic and able to infect a variety of species. The oocyst transmission stages of both species of parasites are morphologically identical and molecular techniques, usually polymerase chain reaction (PCR), are required to distinguish between oocysts detected by standard methods in environmental samples, such as water. In this study, we developed two primer sets for real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), targeting the MIC1 transcript in C. parvum (CpMIC1) and C. hominis (ChMIC1). Using these primer sets, we were not only able to detect low numbers of C. parvum and C. hominis oocysts (down to 5 oocysts in 10 μl, and down to 1 oocyst using diluted RNA samples), but also distinguish between them. One of the primer sets targeted an exon only occurring in CpMIC1, thereby providing a tool for distinguishing C. parvum from other Cryptosporidium species. Although mRNA has been suggested as a tool for assessing viability of Cryptosporidium oocysts, as it is short-lived and may have high transcription, this NASBA assay detected MIC1 mRNA in inactivated oocysts. RNA within the oocysts seems to be protected from degradation, even when the oocysts have been killed by heating or freeze-thawing. Thus, our approach detects both viable and non-viable oocysts, and RNA does not seem to be a suitable marker for assessing oocyst viability.

  19. Leaching of Salmonella Senftenberg and Cryptosporidium Parvum in Intact Clay Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, T. B.; Forslund, A.; Dalsgaard, A.; Jacobsen, O.; Jacobsen, C. S.

    2008-12-01

    Manure application on land has been associated with both environmental and public health problems, even when management is within the current guidelines. Outbreaks of infection have been associated with water or food, including processed fruits and vegetables, contaminated with animal manure. A wide range of pathogenic microorganisms can be found in animal waste, including bacteria, protozoan, and viruses. When animal waste is disposed on agricultural land different factors will influence the risk for contaminating the groundwater. 1) Animal waste application method, rate, volume and frequency will have an effect on contamination. 2) Survival of the pathogens in the soil will e.g. depend on soil water content, temperature and pH. Salmonella species can survive up to 332 days and Cryptosporidium species can remain viable for several years in the soil environment. In the present study we compared the transport between the pathogenic bacteria S. senftenberg and the pathogenic protozoan C. parvum in intact clay columns. Furthermore, we compared the effect from surface and sub-surface manure application on the transport potential. 15 intact clay columns were placed in an outdoor multi-column lysimeter for 36 days. Manure inoculated with S. senftenberg, C. parvum and chloride was added to the soil surface or injected 8 cm into the columns. Drainage water was collected from the soil columns and DNA was extracted to quantify S. senftenberg and C. parvum by quantitative PCR. In addition S. senftenberg was enumerated by plate counting. Acid yellow was applied to selected columns to visualize the pathway down through the soil column. The highest concentration of S. senftenberg was in the first drainage sample ranging from 100-10000 CFU/ml. Breakthrough curves for chloride and S. senftenberg indicates the importance of preferential flow as well as a faster transport for the bacteria compared to chloride. C. parvum is retained to a higher degree in the soil but is still found

  20. Role of CpSUB1, a subtilisin-like protease, in Cryptosporidium parvum infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wanyiri, Jane W; Techasintana, Patsharaporn; O'Connor, Roberta M; Blackman, Michael J; Kim, Kami; Ward, Honorine D

    2009-04-01

    The apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium is a significant cause of diarrheal disease worldwide. Previously, we reported that a Cryptosporidium parvum subtilisin-like serine protease activity with furin-type specificity cleaves gp40/15, a glycoprotein that is proteolytically processed into gp40 and gp15, which are implicated in mediating infection of host cells. Neither the enzyme(s) responsible for the protease activity in C. parvum lysates nor those that process gp40/15 are known. There are no furin or other proprotein convertase genes in the C. parvum genome. However, a gene encoding CpSUB1, a subtilisin-like serine protease, is present. In this study, we cloned the CpSUB1 genomic sequence and expressed and purified the recombinant prodomain. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of RNA from C. parvum-infected HCT-8 cells revealed that CpSUB1 is expressed throughout infection in vitro. In immunoblots, antiserum to the recombinant CpSUB1 prodomain revealed two major bands, of approximately 64 kDa and approximately 48 kDa, for C. parvum lysates and proteins "shed" during excystation. In immunofluorescence assays, the antiserum reacted with the apical region of sporozoites and merozoites. The recombinant prodomain inhibited protease activity and processing of recombinant gp40/15 by C. parvum lysates but not by furin. Since prodomains are often selective inhibitors of their cognate enzymes, these results suggest that CpSUB1 may be a likely candidate for the protease activity in C. parvum and for processing of gp40/15. Importantly, the recombinant prodomain inhibited C. parvum infection of HCT-8 cells. These studies indicate that CpSUB1 plays a significant role in infection of host cells by the parasite and suggest that this enzyme may serve as a target for intervention.

  1. Viability and fate of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia in tubular anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Kinyua, Maureen N; Trimmer, John; Izurieta, Ricardo; Cunningham, Jeffrey; Ergas, Sarina J

    2016-06-01

    In many developing countries where pathogenic diseases of animal waste origin, such as giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis, are often prevalent, facilities are limited to treat livestock waste. However, household-scale anaerobic digesters are currently being promoted for bioenergy production from livestock manure. Since the effluent is often used as a fertilizer for food crops, it is critical to understand the effect of environmental conditions within household-scale digesters on the viability of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and Giardia lamblia cysts. In this study, key environmental parameters affecting (oo)cyst inactivation were measured in four tubular anaerobic digesters, which are a type of household-scale digester promoted for treatment of swine waste in rural Costa Rica. Interviews and participant observations were used to understand digester operation and maintenance procedures. Ambient temperatures (21-24°C), near-neutral pH, total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) concentrations<250 mg/L and hydraulic retention times (HRTs) between 23 and 180 days were observed. Laboratory (oo)cysts inactivation studies were performed in bench-scale digesters, which were maintained under conditions similar to those observed in the field. Apparent first-order inactivation rate coefficients for Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum were 0.155 ± 0.041 and 0.054 ± 0.006 day(-1), respectively. Temperature and volatile fatty acids were the main factors contributing to Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia inactivation. A mathematical model was developed that predicts the concentration of (oo)cysts in the liquid effluent of tubular digesters like those observed in Costa Rica. A mathematical model was developed that predicts the concentration of (oo)cysts in the liquid effluent of tubular digesters like those observed in Costa Rica. Two dimensionless groups can be used to predict the performance of the digesters for inactivating pathogens; both dimensionless groups depend upon

  2. A QSAR model of benzoxazole derivatives as potential inhibitors for inosine 5`-monophosphate dehydrogenase from Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Teotia, Pratibha; Prakash Dwivedi, Surya; Dwivedi, Neeraja

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is the common enteric protozoan pathogen causing cryptosporidiosis in human. Available drugs to treat cryptosporidiosis are ineffective and there is yet no vaccine against C. parvum. Therefore, it is of interest to design an improved yet effective drug against C. parvum. Here, we docked benzoxazole derivatives (collected from literature) with inosine 5`- monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) from Cryptosporidium parvum using the program AutoDock 4.2. The docked protein - inhibitor complex structure was optimized using molecular dynamics simulation for 5 ps with the CHARMM-22 force field using NAMD (NAnoscale Molecular Dynamics program) incorporated in visual molecular dynamics (VMD 1.9.2) and then evaluating the stability of complex structure by calculating RMSD values. NAMD is a parallel, object-oriented molecular dynamics code designed for high-performance simulation of large biomolecular systems. A quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model was built using energy-based descriptors as independent variable and pIC50 value as dependent variable of fifteen known benzoxazole derivatives with C. parvum IMPDH protein, yielding correlation coefficient r2 of 0.7948. The predictive performance of QSAR model was assessed using different cross-validation procedures. Our results suggest that a ligand-receptor binding interaction for inosine 5`-monophosphate dehydrogenase using a QSAR model is promising approach to design more potent inosine 5`-monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors prior to their synthesis. PMID:28149045

  3. Simultaneous detection of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum (oo)cysts in soil using immunomagnetic separation and direct fluorescent antibody staining.

    PubMed

    Orlofsky, Ezra; Gillor, Osnat; Melli, Ann; Miller, Woutrina; Wuertz, Stefan; Bernstein, Nirit; Shapiro, Karen

    2013-09-01

    An improved approach for simultaneous detection of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia (oo)cysts in soil is described. Recoveries>70% were obtained for concentrations>55 and 21 (oo)cysts g(-1) for C. parvum and G. lamblia, respectively. The limits of detection were determined to be<5 (oo)cysts g(-1) soil.

  4. Parasites and malignancies, a review, with emphasis on digestive cancer induced by Cryptosporidium parvum (Alveolata: Apicomplexa)

    PubMed Central

    Benamrouz, S.; Conseil, V.; Creusy, C.; Calderon, E.; Dei-Cas, E.; Certad, G.

    2012-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) identifies ten infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, parasites) able to induce cancer disease in humans. Among parasites, a carcinogenic role is currently recognized to the digenetic trematodes Schistosoma haematobium, leading to bladder cancer, and to Clonorchis sinensis or Opisthorchis viverrini, which cause cholangiocarcinoma. Furthermore, several reports suspected the potential association of other parasitic infections (due to Protozoan or Metazoan parasites) with the development of neoplastic changes in the host tissues. The present work shortly reviewed available data on the involvement of parasites in neoplastic processes in humans or animals, and especially focused on the carcinogenic power of Cryptosporidium parvum infection. On the whole, infection seems to play a crucial role in the etiology of cancer. PMID:22348213

  5. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in soil columns following applications of raw and separated liquid slurries.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Heidi H; Enemark, Heidi L; Olsen, Annette; Amin, M G Mostofa; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2012-09-01

    The potential for the transport of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts through soil to land drains and groundwater was studied using simulated rainfall and intact soil columns which were applied raw slurry or separated liquid slurry. Following irrigation and weekly samplings over a 4-week period, C. parvum oocysts were detected from all soil columns regardless of slurry type and application method, although recovery rates were low (<1%). Soil columns with injected liquid slurry leached 73 and 90% more oocysts compared to columns with injected and surface-applied raw slurries, respectively. Among leachate samples containing oocysts, 44/72 samples yielded viable oocysts as determined by a dye permeability assay (DAPI [4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole]/propidium iodide) with the majority (41%) of viable oocysts found in leachate from soil columns with added liquid slurry. The number of viable oocysts was positively correlated (r = 0.63) with the total number of oocysts found. Destructively sampling of the soil columns showed that type of slurry and irrigation played a role in the vertical distribution of oocysts, with more oocysts recovered from soil columns added liquid slurry irrespective of the irrigation status. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of different slurry separation technologies to remove oocysts and other pathogens, as well as whether the application of separated liquid slurry to agricultural land may represent higher risks for groundwater contamination compared to application of raw slurry.

  6. Optimization of benzoxazole-based inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Kavitha, Mandapati; Zhang, Minjia; Chin, James En Wai; Liu, Xiaoping; Striepen, Boris; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an enteric protozoan parasite that has emerged as a major cause of diarrhea, malnutrition and gastroenteritis as well as posing a potential bioterrorism threat. C. parvum synthesizes guanine nucleotides from host adenosine in a streamlined pathway that relies on inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). We have previously identified several parasite-selective C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) inhibitors by high-throughput screening. In this paper, we report the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for a series of benzoxazole derivatives with many compounds demonstrating CpIMPDH IC50 values in the nanomolar range and > 500-fold selectivity over human IMPDH (hIMPDH). Unlike previously reported CpIMPDH inhibitors, these compounds are competitive inhibitors versus NAD+. The SAR study reveals that pyridine and other small heteroaromatic substituents are required at the 2-position of the benzoxazole for potent inhibitory activity. In addition, several other SAR conclusions are highlighted with regard to the benzoxazole and the amide portion of the inhibitor, including preferred stereochemistry. An x-ray crystal structure of a representative E•IMP•inhibitor complex is also presented. Overall, the secondary amine derivative 15a (Q67) demonstrated excellent CpIMPDH inhibitory activity (IC50 = 0.5 ± 0.1 nM) and moderate stability (t1/2 = 44 min) in mouse liver microsomes. Compound 73, the racemic version of 15a, also displayed superb antiparasitic activity in a Toxoplasma gondii strain that relies on CpIMPDH (EC50 = 20 ± 20 nM), and selectivity versus a wild-type T. gondii strain (200-fold). No toxicity was observed (LD50 > 50 μM) against a panel of four mammalian cells lines. PMID:23668331

  7. Infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts after storage of experimentally contaminated apples.

    PubMed

    Macarisin, Dumitru; Santín, Mónica; Bauchan, Gary; Fayer, Ronald

    2010-10-01

    Irrigation water and washing water have been inferred to be associated with contamination of fresh fruits and vegetables with pathogenic microorganisms infectious for humans. The objective of the present study was to determine whether apples experimentally contaminated with Cryptosporidium oocysts represent a food safety concern. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed no morphological changes in Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts attached to apples after 6 weeks of cold storage, suggesting that oocysts might remain viable and possibly infectious during prolonged storage. Mice were fed apple peels from experimentally contaminated apples to determine whether oocysts had remained infectious on apples stored for 4 weeks. All mice developed cryptosporidiosis. To evaluate the strength of oocyst attachment to apples, washing methods that have been reported to be helpful for recovery of oocysts from various foodstuffs were evaluated, except that the intensity of washing was increased in the present study. None of the tested washing methods succeeded in completely removing oocysts from the apple peel. The most efficient removal (37.5%) was achieved by rigorous manual washing in water with a detergent and by agitation in an orbital shaker with Tris-sodium dodecyl sulfate buffer. Glycine and phosphate-buffered saline buffers had no effect on oocyst removal. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that some oocysts were attached in deep natural crevices in the apple exocarp and others were attached to the smooth surface of the peel. Some oocysts were closely associated with what appeared to be an amorphous substance with which they might have been attached to the apple surface.

  8. Environmental load of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from cattle manure in feedlots from the central and western United States.

    PubMed

    Atwill, Edward R; Pereira, Maria Das Gracas C; Alonso, L Herrera; Elmi, Cyrus; Epperson, William B; Smith, Robert; Riggs, Walter; Carpenter, Linda V; Dargatz, David A; Hoar, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    The first step in assessing the risk of water contamination by Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from feedlot cattle (Bos taurus) production systems is to quantify the number of C. parvum oocysts present in the fecal material deposited by feedlot cattle. Our primary objective for this project was to estimate the daily environmental load of C. parvum oocysts in fecal material deposited by feedlot cattle from across the central and western USA. Our secondary goal was to genotype isolates of C. parvum from feedlot cattle to help facilitate proper identification of mammalian sources of waterborne C. parvum. Based on 5274 fecal samples from 22 feedlots in seven states (California, Washington, Colorado, Oklahoma, Texas, Nebraska, and South Dakota), we estimated a point prevalence of C. parvum of 0.99 to 1.08% in fecal material from feedlot pens from a wide range of climates and a diverse range of feedlot management systems. On average, fresh fecal material from throughout feedlot systems (recent arrivals to nearing slaughter) contained about 1.3 to 3.6 oocysts/g feces, which roughly translates to about 2.8 x 10(4) to 1.4 x 10(5) oocysts/animal per day.

  9. Evaluation of DNA encoding acidic ribosomal protein P2 of Cryptosporidium parvum as a potential vaccine candidate for cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Alvaro; Priest, Jeffrey W; Ehigiator, Humphrey N; McNair, Nina; Mead, Jan R

    2011-11-15

    The Cryptosporidium parvum acidic ribosomal protein P2 (CpP2) is an important immunodominant marker in C. parvum infection. In this study, the CpP2 antigen was evaluated as a vaccine candidate using a DNA vaccine model in adult C57BL/6 IL-12 knockout (KO) mice, which are susceptible to C. parvum infection. Our data show that subcutaneous immunization in the ear with DNA encoding CpP2 (CpP2-DNA) cloned into the pUMVC4b vector induced a significant anti-CpP2 IgG antibody response that was predominantly of the IgG1 isotype. Compared to control KO mice immunized with plasmid alone, CpP2-immunized mice demonstrated specific in vitro spleen cell proliferation as well as enhanced IFN-γ production to recombinant CpP2. Further, parasite loads in CpP2 DNA-immunized mice were compared to control mice challenged with C. parvum oocysts. Although a trend in reduction of infection was observed in the CpP2 DNA-immunized mice, differences between groups were not statistically significant. These results suggest that a DNA vaccine encoding the C. parvum P2 antigen is able to provide an effective means of eliciting humoral and cellular responses and has the potential to generate protective immunity against C. parvum infection but may require using alternative vectors or adjuvant to generate a more potent and balanced response.

  10. Real-time, sensitive electrical detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts based on chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    It Wong, Jen; Wang, Lu; Shi, Yumeng; Palacios, Tomás; Kong, Jing; Dong, Xiaochen; Ying Yang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a common intestinal parasitic protozoan that causes gastroenteritis in man and animals. It poses high risks to drinking water supply because of its ubiquitous distribution in water and their oocysts are resistant to harsh environment conditions. In this work, we demonstrated the use of large-size chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown graphene films configured as field-effect device for rapid electrical detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts (Cp. oocysts). The presence of Cp. oocysts causes the change in the transport characteristics of the antibody-functionalized graphene device, which can be measured in terms of the dependence of the drain current on the sweep of the gate voltage or the real-time drain current data under a constant gate voltage. The high sensor sensitivity of 25 oocysts per milliliter solution and good specificity were evaluated, indicating it a promising candidate for detecting waterborne pathogens in water quality control.

  11. CpABC, a Cryptosporidium parvum ATP-binding cassette protein at the host–parasite boundary in intracellular stages

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Margaret E.; Riojas, Ynolde A.; Wu, Teresa W.; Le Blancq, Sylvie M.

    1999-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Cryptosporidium parvum develops inside a vacuole at the apex of its epithelial host cell. The developing parasite is separated from the host cell cytoplasm by a zone of attachment that consists of an extensively folded membranous structure known as the feeder organelle. It has been proposed that the feeder organelle is the site of regulation of transport of nutrients and drugs into the parasite. In this report, we localize an ≈200-kDa integral membrane protein, CpABC, from Cryptosporidium parvum to the host–parasite boundary, possibly the feeder organelle. The predicted amino acid sequence of CpABC has significant structural similarity with the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator and the multidrug resistance protein subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins. This is an example of a parasite-encoded transport protein localized at the parasite–host interface of an intracellular protozoan. PMID:10318953

  12. Pomegranate (Punica granatum) peel is effective in a murine model of experimental Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Al-Mathal, Ebtisam M; Alsalem, Afaf M

    2012-07-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, a major health issue for neonatal calves, is caused by the parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, which is highly resistant to drug treatments. To date, many anti-parasitic drugs have been tested, but only a few have been shown to be partially effective in treating cryptosporidiosis. Previous studies have indicated that pomegranate (Punica granatum) possesses anti-plasmodium, anti-cestode, and anti-nematode activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of P. granatum peel on suckling mice infected with experimental C. parvum. At 4days of age, 72 neonatal albino mice were randomly divided into five groups: G1: healthy controls, G2: infected/untreated controls, G3: uninfected/distilled water-treated, G4: uninfected/P. granatum peel-treated, and G5: infected/P. granatum peel-treated. Mice were experimentally-infected by oral administration of 1×10(3)C. parvum oocysts per animal. On day 7 post-inoculation (pi), treated mice received an aqueous suspension of P. granatum peel orally (3g/kg body weight). The presence of diarrhea, oocyst shedding, and weight gain/loss, and the histopathology of ileal sections were examined. Infected mice treated with the P. granatum peel suspension showed improvement in all parameters examined. Additionally, these mice did not exhibit any clinical symptoms and no deaths occurred. Oocyst shedding was very significantly reduced in the P. granatum-treated mice by day 14 pi (P<.05), and was completely eliminated by day 28 pi. The mean weight gain of the P. granatum-treated mice was significantly higher than that of the infected/untreated controls throughout the study (P<.01). Histopathological analysis of ileal sections further supported the clinical and parasitological findings. The histological architecture of villi from the P. granatum-treated mice on day 14 pi showed visible improvement in comparison with the infected/untreated controls, including renewed brush borders, reduced numbers of C. parvum

  13. Cryptosporidium parvum genotype IIa and Giardia duodenalis assemblage A in Mytilus galloprovincialis on sale at local food markets.

    PubMed

    Giangaspero, Annunziata; Papini, Roberto; Marangi, Marianna; Koehler, Anson V; Gasser, Robin B

    2014-02-03

    To date, there has been no study to establish the genotypic or subgenotypic identities of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in edible shellfish. Here, we explored the genetic composition of these protists in Mytilus galloprovincialis (Mediterranean mussel) purchased from three markets in the city of Foggia, Italy, from May to December 2012. Samples from the digestive glands, gills and haemolymph were tested by nested PCR, targeting DNA regions within the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene of Cryptosporidium, and the triose-phosphate isomerase (tpi) and β-giardin genes of Giardia. In total, Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected in 66.7% of mussels (M. galloprovincialis) tested. Cryptosporidium was detected mostly between May and September 2012. Sequencing of amplicons showed that 60% of mussels contained Cryptosporidium parvum genotype IIa (including subgenotypes A15G2R1, IIaA15G2 and IIaA14G3R1), 23.3% Giardia duodenalis assemblage A, and 6.6% had both genetic types. This is the first report of these types in fresh, edible shellfish, particularly the very commonly consumed M. galloprovincialis from highly frequented fish markets. These genetic types of Cryptosporidium and Giardia are known to infect humans and thus likely to represent a significant public health risk. The poor observance of hygiene rules by vendors, coupled to the large numbers of M. galloprovincialis sold and the eating habits of consumers in Italy, call for more effective sanitary measures pertaining to the selling of fresh shellfish in street markets.

  14. Obtaining hyperimmune anti-Cryptosporidium parvum ovine colostrum. A study of the humoral immune response in immunized sheep.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gómez, S; Alvarez-Sánchez, M A; Rojo-Vázquez, F A

    2006-01-01

    Three ewes were immunized five times over a 2-month period prior to giving birth by intramuscular injection, oral administration and intramammary infusion of antigen and viable or freeze-dried Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst solution emulsified with Freund's complete and incomplete adjuvant. Two animals served as controls and another two as adjuvant controls. Serum was collected at first immunization and thereafter every 2 to 4 weeks. Colostrum and milk were collected as well. All samples were assayed for C. parvum-specific antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methodology, and Western blotting was used to recognize the C. parvum antigens. Hyperimmunization resulted in a progressive and significant increase in specific anti-C. parvum serum IgG, IgA and IgM titres, with the highest values noted at the point of lambing. Titres decreased slightly in milk, although they were in all cases higher than those in the control animals. Moreover, some 30 bands of C. parvum were recognized.

  15. Induction of murine immune responses by DNA encoding a 23-kDa antigen of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Ehigiator, Humphrey N; Romagnoli, Pablo; Priest, Jeffrey W; Secor, W Evan; Mead, Jan R

    2007-09-01

    Cp23 has been identified as one of the immunodominant antigens involved in the immune response to Cryptosporidium parvum infection. Thus, in this study, Cp23 antigen was investigated as a vaccine candidate using the DNA vaccine model in adult interleukin-12 (IL-12) knockout (KO) mice, which are susceptible to C. parvum infection. Our data show that subcutaneous immunization in the ear with DNA encoding Cp23 (Cp23-DNA) cloned into the pUMVCb4 vector induced a significant anti-Cp23 immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and IgG2a antibody response and specific in vitro spleen cell proliferation to recombinant Cp23 as compared to control mice. Long-term memory responses were also detected after administration of the Cp23-DNA vaccine. Furthermore, Cp23-DNA vaccination induced a 50-60% reduction in oocysts shedding, indicating a partial protection against C. parvum infection in IL-12 KO mice. However, it is possible that this protective response was nonspecific because mice immunized with vector only also exhibited lower oocyst shedding than the naive controls. These results suggest that DNA encoding for immunodominant C. parvum antigens may provide an effective means of eliciting humoral and cellular responses and possibly in generating protective immunity against C. parvum infections in mammals.

  16. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium parvum infection in children along the Texas-Mexico border and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Leach, C T; Koo, F C; Kuhls, T L; Hilsenbeck, S G; Jenson, H B

    2000-05-01

    We examined the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium parvum in children aged 6 months to 13 years living in 1) colonias along the border (n = 105), 2) a clinic in an urban border community (n = 65), and 3) clinics in a large urban nonborder area (n = 109). Serum IgG and IgA anticryptosporidial antibodies were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Overall, 70.2% (196/279) of subjects had detectable C. parvum antibodies. Prevalence rates were higher (93/105 [89%]) in the colonias and urban border community (53/65 [82%]) compared to the urban nonborder community (50/109 [46%]). Within colonias, independent risk factors for C. parvum infection included consumption of municipal water instead of bottled water, older age, and lower household income. Children living along the Texas-Mexico border have a higher rate of infection with C. parvum compared to children living in a large nonborder urban area. Within colonias, C. parvum infection was associated with source of water supply, age, and socioeconomic status.

  17. Expression of Cryptosporidium parvum thioredoxin peroxidase in COS-7 cells confers radioprotection.

    PubMed

    Hong, Semie; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Yoon, Sejoung; Kim, Kyoungjin; Sim, Seobo; Park, Woo-Yoon; Yu, Jae-Ran

    2016-04-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is one of the most radioresistant organisms identified to date. In a previous study, we found that thioredoxin peroxidase (CpTPx) was significantly upregulated in this species following exposure to high dose (10 kGy) of γ-irradiation. To assess the potential of CpTPx to confer radioprotection in mammalian cells, it was expressed in COS-7 African green monkey kidney cells (CpTPx-COS7). For comparison, the thioredoxin peroxidase of Cryptosporidium muris (CmTPx) was also expressed in these cells (CmTPx-COS7 cells), which has been confirmed to have lesser antioxidant activity than CpTPx in the previous study. Notably, the survival rates of CpTPx-COS7 cells were significantly higher (12-22%) at 72 h after 8 Gy irradiation than CmTPx-COS7 or non-transfected COS-7 (ntCOS-7) counterparts. In addition, CpTPx revealed a 50% of ROS reduction in irradiated CpTPx-COS7 cells, while γ-H2AX DNA damage marker expression was not significantly changed. Furthermore, the amount of apoptosis only increased to about 120% after 2-8 Gy irradiation compared to 200-300% increase observed in ntCOS-7 cells. CmTPx was shown to have antioxidant and DNA damage protection activities; however, these activities were always lower than those of CpTPx. These results suggest that the potent antioxidant and protective activities of CpTPx are well conserved in this cell-based system and that CpTPx contributed to the radioprotection of mammalian cells through its exceptional antioxidant activity.

  18. Surface complexation of carboxylate adheres Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts to the hematite-water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gao, X.; Metge, D.W.; Ray, C.; Harvey, R.W.; Chorover, J.

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of viable Cryptosporidium parvum ??ocysts at the hematite (??-Fe2O3)-water interface was examined over a wide range in solution chemistry using in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Spectra for hematite-sorbed ??ocysts showed distinctchangesin carboxylate group vibrations relative to spectra obtained in the absence of hematite, indicative of direct chemical bonding between carboxylate groups and Fe metal centers of the hematite surface. The data also indicate that complexation modes vary with solution chemistry. In NaCl solution, ??ocysts are bound to hematite via monodentate and binuclear bidentate complexes. The former predominates at low pH, whereas the latter becomes increasingly prevalent with increasing pH. In a CaCl2 solution, only binuclear bidentate complexes are observed. When solution pH is above the point of zero net proton charge (PZNPC) of hematite, ??ocyst surface carboxylate groups are bound to the mineral surface via outer-sphere complexes in both electrolyte solutions. ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  19. Depletion of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts from Contaminated Sewage by Using Freshwater Benthic Pearl Clams (Hyriopsis schlegeli)

    PubMed Central

    Yagita, Kenji; Izumiyama, Shinji; Endo, Takuro; Itoh, Yasoo

    2012-01-01

    The freshwater benthic pearl clam, Hyriopsis schlegeli, was experimentally exposed to Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, and it was verified that the oocysts were eliminated predominantly via the fecal route, retaining their ability to infect cultured cells (HCT-8). The total fecal oocyst elimination rate was more than 90% within 5 days after exposure to the oocysts. H. schlegeli was able to survive in the final settling pond of a sewage plant for long periods, as confirmed by its pearl production. In the light of these findings, the clam was placed in the final settling pond in a trial to test its long-term efficacy in depleting oocysts contaminating the pond water. The number of clams placed was set to ensure a theoretical oocyst removal rate of around 50%, and the turbidity and the density of feed microbes in the overflow trough water of the pond were about 35% and 40 to 60% lower, respectively, than in the control water throughout the year. It was found that the clam feces containing oocysts were sufficiently heavy for them to settle to the bottom of the pond, despite the upward water flow. From these results, we concluded that efficient depletion of oocysts in the sewage water of small or midscale sewage treatment plants can be achieved by appropriate placement of H. schlegeli clams. PMID:22904053

  20. Characterization of a low molecular weight glycolipid antigen from Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Priest, Jeffrey W; Mehlert, Angela; Arrowood, Michael J; Riggs, Michael W; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2003-12-26

    Cryptosporidium parvum, an Apicomplexan parasite of the mammalian gut epithelium, causes a diarrheal illness in a wide range of hosts and is transmitted by contamination of food or water with oocyst-laden feces from an infected animal. We have identified a glycosylinositol phospholipid from the sporozoite stage of the parasite that is frequently recognized by serum antibodies from human cryptosporidiosis patients. The humoral immune response is dominated by IgG1 subclass antibodies but can also include IgA and IgM antibodies. The glycosylinositol phospholipids were purified by butanol extraction of a Triton X-114-soluble fraction followed by octyl-Sepharose column chromatography and preparative high performance TLC and were shown to include at least 5 species. By using mass spectrometry and radiolabeled neutral glycan analysis, we found that the structure of the dominant glycosylinositol phospholipid antigen contained a C18:0 lyso-acylglycerol, a C16:0-acylated inositol, and an unsubstituted mannose3-glucosamine glycan core. Other diacyl species were also identified, most notably a series of glycosylinositol phospholipids having an acyl-linked C20:0 to C28:0 lipid on the inositol ring. Less abundant species having three acyl-linked fatty acids and species with an additional 1-3 hexoses linked to the mannose core were also observed. We are currently working to determine the role that these glycolipids may play in the development of disease and in the clearance of infection.

  1. Inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts with ozone and monochloramine at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Driedger, A M; Rennecker, J L; Mariñas, B J

    2001-01-01

    The rate of Cryptosporidium parvum inactivation decreased with decreasing temperature (1-20 degrees C) for ozone and for monochloramine applied alone as well as after pre-treatment with ozone. Synergy was observed at all temperatures studied for the ozone/monochloramine sequential disinfection scheme. The synergistic effect was found to increase with decreasing temperature. The inactivation rate with monochloramine after ozone pre-treatment was 5 times faster at 20 degrees C and 22 times faster at 1 degree C than the corresponding post-lag phase rates of inactivation with monochloramine at these temperatures when no ozone pre-treatment was applied. The CT required for achieving 2-logs of inactivation ranged from 11,400 mg min l-1 at 20 degrees C to 64,600 mg min l-1 at 1 degree C when monochloramine was applied alone. In contrast, the CT required for an overall sequential inactivation of 2-logs ranged from 721 mg min l-1 at 20 degrees C to 1350 mg min l-1 at 1 degree C when applying monochloramine after ozone pre-treatment. The presence of excess ammonia in the monochloramine solutions was not responsible for the synergy observed in ozone/monochloramine sequential disinfection.

  2. Evaluating the Transport of Bacillus subtilis Spores as a Potential Surrogate for Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Scott A; Kim, Hyunjung; Headd, Brendan; Torkzaban, Saeed

    2016-02-02

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has recommended the use of aerobic spores as an indicator for Cryptosporidium oocysts when determining groundwater under the direct influence of surface water. Surface properties, interaction energies, transport, retention, and release behavior of B. subtilis spores were measured over a range of physicochemical conditions, and compared with reported information for C. parvum oocysts. Interaction energy calculations predicted a much larger energy barrier and a shallower secondary minimum for spores than oocysts when the solution ionic strength (IS) equaled 0.1, 1, and 10 mM, and no energy barrier when the IS = 100 mM. Spores and oocysts exhibited similar trends of increasing retention with IS and decreasing Darcy water velocity (qw), and the predicted setback distance to achieve a six log removal was always larger for spores than oocysts. However, low levels of observed spore and oocyst release significantly influenced the predicted setback distance, especially when the fraction of reversibly retained microbes (Frev) was high. An estimate for Frev was obtained from large release pulses of spore and oocyst when the IS was reduced to deionized water. The value of Frev always increased with qw, whereas an opposition trend for Frev with IS was observed for spores (decreasing) and oocysts (increasing).

  3. Confirmed detection of Cyclospora cayetanesis, Encephalitozoon intestinalis and Cryptosporidium parvum in water used for drinking.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Scot E; John, David; Eliopolus, James; Gerba, Charles P; Naranjo, Jaime; Klein, Robert; López, Beatriz; de Mejía, Maricruz; Mendoza, Carlos E; Pepper, Ian L

    2003-09-01

    Human enteropathogenic microsporidia (HEM), Cryptosporidium parvum, Cyclospora cayetanesis, and Giardia lamblia are associated with gastrointestinal disease in humans. To date, the mode of transmission and environmental occurrence of HEM (Encephalitozoon intestinalis and Enterocytozoon bieneusi) and Cyclospora cayetanesis have not been fully elucidated due to lack of sensitive and specific environmental screening methods. The present study was undertaken with recently developed methods, to screen various water sources used for public consumption in rural areas around the city of Guatemala. Water concentrates collected in these areas were subjected to community DNA extraction followed by PCR amplification, PCR sequencing and computer database homology comparison (CDHC). All water samples screened in this study had been previously confirmed positive for Giardia spp. by immunofluorescent assay (IFA). Of the 12 water concentrates screened, 6 showed amplification of microsporidial SSU-rDNA and were subsequently confirmed to be Encephalitozoon intestinalis. Five of the samples allowed for amplification of Cyclospora 18S-rDNA; three of these were confirmed to be Cyclospora cayetanesis while two could not be identified because of inadequate sequence information. Thus, this study represents the first confirmed identification of Cyclospora cayetanesis and Encephalitozoon intestinalis in source water used for consumption. The fact that the waters tested may be used for human consumption indicates that these emerging protozoa may be transmitted by ingestion of contaminated water.

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of a M17 leucine aminopeptidase of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Kang, J-M; Ju, H-L; Sohn, W-M; Na, B-K

    2011-05-01

    Leucine aminopeptidases (LAPs) are a group of metalloexopeptidases that catalyse the sequential removal of amino acids from the N-termini of polypeptides or proteins. They play an important role in regulating the balance between catabolism and anabolism in living cells. LAPs of apicomplexa parasitic protozoa have been intensively investigated due to their crucial roles in parasite biology as well as their potentials as drug targets. In this study, we identified an M17 leucine aminopeptidase of Cryptosporidium parvum (CpLAP) and characterized the biochemical properties of the recombinant protein. Multiple sequence alignment of the deduced amino acid sequence of CpLAP with those of other organisms revealed that typical amino acid residues essential for metal binding and active-site formation in M17 LAPs were well conserved in CpLAP. Recombinant CpLAP shared similar biochemical properties such as optimal pH, stability at neutral pHs, and metal-binding characteristics with other characterized LAPs. The enzyme showed a marked preference for Leu and its activity was effectively inhibited by bestatin. These results collectively suggest that CpLAP is a typical member of the M17 LAP family and may play an important role in free amino acid regulation in the parasite.

  5. A novel Cryptosporidium parvum antigen, CP2, preferentially associates with membranous structures.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Steven P; Yu, Jae-Ran; Lin, Jim Jung-Ching

    2004-03-01

    The present study addresses the cloning and characterization of a Cryptosporidium parvum antigen, CP2. Sequencing of cDNA and genomic clones revealed a novel gene capable of coding a message of 2,136 nucleotides flanked by 28 and 140 nucleotides of the 5'- and 3'-noncoding regions, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequence suggests that CP2 is a secreted and/or membrane protein. Immunofluorescence microscopy detected CP2 enrichment in sporozoites that subsequently appeared to encase type I meronts in infected HCT-8 cells. Immunogold electron microscopy revealed that CP2 consistently localized to membranous structures throughout development. In addition, progression from macrogametocyte to sporulated oocyst revealed CP2 initially at the periphery of amylopectin-like granules, in the cytoplasm and discrete vesicles, the parasitophorous vacuole, on the surface of sporozoites, and finally on the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM). The observed expression pattern suggests that CP2 may be involved in the invasion process and/or PVM integrity.

  6. Impact of bathers on levels of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and Giardia lamblia cysts in recreational beach waters.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Deirdre; Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Tamang, Leena; Breysse, Patrick N

    2007-08-01

    Recreational beach water samples collected on weekends and weekdays during 11 consecutive summer weeks were tested for potentially viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and Giardia lamblia cysts using the multiplexed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method. The levels of oocysts and cysts on weekends were significantly higher than on the weekdays (P<0.01). Concentrations of oocysts in weekend samples (n=27) ranged from 2 to 42 oocysts/L (mean: 13.7 oocysts/L), and cyst concentration ranged from 0 to 33 cysts/L (mean: 9.1 cysts/L). For the samples collected on weekdays (n=33), the highest oocyst concentration was 7 oocysts/L (mean: 1.5 oocysts/L), and the highest cyst concentration was 4 cysts/L (mean: 0.6 cysts/L). The values of water turbidity were significantly higher on weekends than on weekdays, and were correlated with the number of bathers and concentration of C. parvum oocysts and G. lamblia cysts (P<0.04). The study demonstrated positive relationships between number of bathers and levels of waterborne C. parvum oocysts and G. lamblia cysts in recreational beach water. It is essential to test recreational waters for Cryptosporidium and Giardia when numbers of bathers are greatest, or limit the number of bathers in a recreational beach area.

  7. Multiplex-Touchdown PCR to Simultaneously Detect Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Cyclospora cayetanensis, the Major Causes of Traveler’s Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji-Hun; Lee, Sang-Eun; Kim, Tong Soo; Ma, Da-Won; Chai, Jong-Yil; Shin, Eun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a multiplex-touchdown PCR method to simultaneously detect 3 species of protozoan parasites, i.e., Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Cyclospora cayetanensis, the major causes of traveler’s diarrhea and are resistant to standard antimicrobial treatments. The target genes included the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein for C. parvum, Glutamate dehydrogenase for G. lamblia, and 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) for C. cayetanensis. The sizes of the amplified fragments were 555, 188, and 400 bps, respectively. The multiplex-touchdown PCR protocol using a primer mixture simultaneously detected protozoa in human stools, and the amplified gene was detected in >1×103 oocysts for C. parvum, >1×104 cysts for G. lamblia, and >1 copy of the 18S rRNA gene for C. cayetanensis. Taken together, our protocol convincingly demonstrated the ability to simultaneously detect C. parvum, G. lamblia, and C. cayetanenesis in stool samples. PMID:27853120

  8. The Cryptosporidium parvum ApiAP2 gene family: insights into the evolution of apicomplexan AP2 regulatory systems

    PubMed Central

    Oberstaller, Jenna; Pumpalova, Yoanna; Schieler, Ariel; Llinás, Manuel; Kissinger, Jessica C.

    2014-01-01

    We provide the first comprehensive analysis of any transcription factor family in Cryptosporidium, a basal-branching apicomplexan that is the second leading cause of infant diarrhea globally. AP2 domain-containing proteins have evolved to be the major regulatory family in the phylum to the exclusion of canonical regulators. We show that apicomplexan and perkinsid AP2 domains cluster distinctly from other chromalveolate AP2s. Protein-binding specificity assays of C. parvum AP2 domains combined with motif conservation upstream of co-regulated gene clusters allowed the construction of putative AP2 regulons across the in vitro life cycle. Orthologous Apicomplexan AP2 (ApiAP2) expression has been rearranged relative to the malaria parasite P. falciparum, suggesting ApiAP2 network rewiring during evolution. C. hominis orthologs of putative C. parvum ApiAP2 proteins and target genes show greater than average variation. C. parvum AP2 domains display reduced binding diversity relative to P. falciparum, with multiple domains binding the 5′-TGCAT-3′, 5′-CACACA-3′ and G-box motifs (5′-G[T/C]GGGG-3′). Many overrepresented motifs in C. parvum upstream regions are not AP2 binding motifs. We propose that C. parvum is less reliant on ApiAP2 regulators in part because it utilizes E2F/DP1 transcription factors. C. parvum may provide clues to the ancestral state of apicomplexan transcriptional regulation, pre-AP2 domination. PMID:24957599

  9. Impact of zooplankton grazing on the excystation, viability, and infectivity of the protozoan pathogens Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Connelly, S J; Wolyniak, E A; Dieter, K L; Williamson, C E; Jellison, K L

    2007-11-01

    Very little is known about the ability of the zooplankton grazer Daphnia pulicaria to reduce populations of Giardia lamblia cysts and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in surface waters. The potential for D. pulicaria to act as a biological filter of C. parvum and G. lamblia was tested under three grazing pressures (one, two, or four D. pulicaria grazers per 66 ml). (Oo)cysts (1 x 10(4) per 66 ml) were added to each grazing bottle along with the algal food Selenastrum capricornutum (6.6 x 10(4) cells per 66 ml) to stimulate normal grazing. Bottles were rotated (2 rpm) to prevent settling of (oo)cysts and algae for 24 h (a light:dark cycle of 16 h:8 h) at 20 degrees C. The impact of D. pulicaria grazing on (oo)cysts was assessed by (i) (oo)cyst clearance rates, (ii) (oo)cyst viability, (iii) (oo)cyst excystation, and (iv) oocyst infectivity in cell culture. Two D. pulicaria grazers significantly decreased the total number of C. parvum oocysts by 52% and G. lamblia cysts by 44%. Furthermore, two D. pulicaria grazers significantly decreased C. parvum excystation and infectivity by 5% and 87%, respectively. Two D. pulicaria grazers significantly decreased the viability of G. lamblia cysts by 52%, but analysis of G. lamblia excystation was confounded by observed mechanical disruption of the cysts after grazing. No mechanical disruption of the C. parvum oocysts was observed, presumably due to their smaller size. The data provide strong evidence that zooplankton grazers have the potential to substantially decrease the population of infectious C. parvum and G. lamblia in freshwater ecosystems.

  10. The Effect of the Anionic Surfactant Aerosol-80 on the Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts through Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, A. R.; Powelson, D.; Darnault, C.

    2012-12-01

    Transport of the pathogenic protozoan Cryptosporidium parvum through soils threatens ground and surface waters. C. parvum may be introduced into soils in the manure of infected calves. The presence of other chemicals in the soil applied as or with amendments, may affect the transport of the C. parvum oocysts. Surfactants, which are used in many herbicide formulations, decrease water tension and may disrupt the air-water interface where oocysts are thought to accumulate. We investigate the effect of the anionic surfactant Aerosol-80, at two concentrations, on the transport of C. parvum oocysts by unsaturated flow through "undisturbed" soil columns from Illinois and Utah. Following each experiment oocysts in the leachate and distributed throughout the soil profile are quantified by real time PCR. We find that the presence of the surfactant accelerates the transport of the oocysts through preferential flow paths. On the other hand, when connected macropores are not present in the soils, the presence of the surfactant retards the transport of the oocysts through the soil matrix by straining oocyst-surfactant-Ca flocs. Surfactant efficacy is affected by soil type.

  11. Adhesion of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia to solid surfaces: the role of surface charge and hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Dai, X; Boll, J; Hayes, M E; Aston, D E

    2004-04-15

    Adhesion of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia to four materials of different surface charge and hydrophobicity was investigated. Glass beads were used with and without three polymer coatings: aminosilines (A0750), fluorosilines (T2494), an amino cationic polymer. Surface charge density and hydrophobicity of the beads were characterized by measuring the zeta potential (ZP) and the contact angle, respectively. Adhesion was derived from batch experiments where negatively charged (oo)cysts were mixed with the beads and recovery was determined by counting (oo)cysts remaining in suspension using a flow cytometer. Experimental results clearly show that adhesion to solid surfaces of C. parvum is different from G. lamblia. Adhesion of C. parvum to positively charged, hydrophilic beads (82% recovery relative to control) indicated that surface charge was the more important factor for C. parvum, dominating any hydrophobic effects. Adhesion of G. lamblia cysts to negatively charged, hydrophobic beads (0% recovery relative to control) indicated that although hydrophobicity and surface charge both played a role in the adhesion of G. lamblia to solid surfaces, hydrophobicity was more important than surface charge.

  12. Attempts to protect severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice with antibody enriched for reactivity to Cryptosporidium parvum surface antigen-1.

    PubMed

    Tatalick, L M; Perryman, L E

    1995-07-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoal pathogen which infects the gastrointestinal epithelium of mammals causing diarrhoea, the duration and severity of which is determined by the immunocompetency of the host. Currently, there is no effective treatment or prevention. We evaluated the ability of surface antigen-1 (SA-1), defined as those antigens recognized by neutralizing mAb 17.41, to elicit a protective antibody response when used as an immunogen. A SA-1 enriched fraction was obtained by immunoaffinity chromatography and was used to immunize a naive Holstein calf. SA-1 immune serum from this calf detected C. parvum epitopes to a 1:10,000 dilution in a dot blot assay, and sporozoite surface epitopes at a 1:10,000 dilution in a live immunofluorescence assay. Western blot analysis showed that SA-1 immune bovine serum recognized a similar pattern of C. parvum antigens as the defining mAb 17.41. Oral passive transfer of SA-1 immune bovine serum did not protect severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice or suckling BALB/c mice from initial infection with C. parvum, or terminate a persistent infection in scid mice.

  13. Determination of pyrimidine dimers in Escherichia coli and Cryptosporidium parvum during UV light inactivation, photoreactivation, and dark repair.

    PubMed

    Oguma, K; Katayama, H; Mitani, H; Morita, S; Hirata, T; Ohgaki, S

    2001-10-01

    UV inactivation, photoreactivation, and dark repair of Escherichia coli and Cryptosporidium parvum were investigated with the endonuclease sensitive site (ESS) assay, which can determine UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in the genomic DNA of microorganisms. In a 99.9% inactivation of E. coli, high correlation was observed between the dose of UV irradiation and the number of pyrimidine dimers induced in the DNA of E. coli. The colony-forming ability of E. coli also correlated highly with the number of pyrimidine dimers in the DNA, indicating that the ESS assay is comparable to the method conventionally used to measure colony-forming ability. When E. coli were exposed to fluorescent light after a 99.9% inactivation by UV irradiation, UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in the DNA were continuously repaired and the colony-forming ability recovered gradually. When kept in darkness after the UV inactivation, however, E. coli showed neither repair of pyrimidine dimers nor recovery of colony-forming ability. When C. parvum were exposed to fluorescent light after UV inactivation, UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in the DNA were continuously repaired, while no recovery of animal infectivity was observed. When kept in darkness after UV inactivation, C. parvum also showed no recovery of infectivity in spite of the repair of pyrimidine dimers. It was suggested, therefore, that the infectivity of C. parvum would not recover either by photoreactivation or by dark repair even after the repair of pyrimidine dimers in the genomic DNA.

  14. Electron microscopic observation of the early stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual multiplication and development in in vitro axenic culture.

    PubMed

    Aldeyarbi, Hebatalla M; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-02-01

    The stages of Cryptosporidium parvum asexual exogenous development were investigated at high ultra-structural resolution in cell-free culture using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Early C. parvum trophozoites were ovoid in shape, 1.07 × 1.47 μm(2) in size, and contained a large nucleus and adjacent Golgi complex. Dividing and mature meronts containing four to eight developing merozoites, 2.34 × 2.7 μm(2) in size, were observed within the first 24h of cultivation. An obvious peculiarity was found within the merozoite pellicle, as it was composed of the outer plasma membrane with underlying middle and inner membrane complexes. Further novel findings were vacuolization of the meront's residuum and extension of its outer pellicle, as parasitophorous vacuole-like membranes were also evident. The asexual reproduction of C. parvum was consistent with the developmental pattern of both eimerian coccidia and Arthrogregarinida (formerly Neogregarinida). The unique cell-free development of C. parvum described here, along with the establishment of meronts and merozoite formation, is the first such evidence obtained from in vitro cell-free culture at the ultrastructural level.

  15. Revisiting the reference genomes of human pathogenic Cryptosporidium species: reannotation of C. parvum Iowa and a new C. hominis reference.

    PubMed

    Isaza, Juan P; Galván, Ana Luz; Polanco, Victor; Huang, Bernice; Matveyev, Andrey V; Serrano, Myrna G; Manque, Patricio; Buck, Gregory A; Alzate, Juan F

    2015-11-09

    Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis are the most relevant species of this genus for human health. Both cause a self-limiting diarrhea in immunocompetent individuals, but cause potentially life-threatening disease in the immunocompromised. Despite the importance of these pathogens, only one reference genome of each has been analyzed and published. These two reference genomes were sequenced using automated capillary sequencing; as of yet, no next generation sequencing technology has been applied to improve their assemblies and annotations. For C. hominis, the main challenge that prevents a larger number of genomes to be sequenced is its resistance to axenic culture. In the present study, we employed next generation technology to analyse the genomic DNA and RNA to generate a new reference genome sequence of a C. hominis strain isolated directly from human stool and a new genome annotation of the C. parvum Iowa reference genome.

  16. An Outbreak of Cryptosporidium parvum across England & Scotland Associated with Consumption of Fresh Pre-Cut Salad Leaves, May 2012

    PubMed Central

    McKerr, Caoimhe; Adak, Goutam K.; Nichols, Gordon; Gorton, Russell; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Kafatos, George; Cosford, Paul; Charlett, Andre; Reacher, Mark; Pollock, Kevin G.; Alexander, Claire L.; Morton, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Background We report a widespread foodborne outbreak of Cryptosporidium parvum in England and Scotland in May 2012. Cases were more common in female adults, and had no history of foreign travel. Over 300 excess cases were identified during the period of the outbreak. Speciation and microbiological typing revealed the outbreak strain to be C. parvum gp60 subtype IIaA15G2R1. Methods Hypothesis generation questionnaires were administered and an unmatched case control study was undertaken to test the hypotheses raised. Cases and controls were interviewed by telephone. Controls were selected using sequential digit dialling. Information was gathered on demographics, foods consumed and retailers where foods were purchased. Results Seventy-four laboratory confirmed cases and 74 controls were included in analyses. Infection was found to be strongly associated with the consumption of pre-cut mixed salad leaves sold by a single retailer. This is the largest documented outbreak of cryptosporidiosis attributed to a food vehicle. PMID:26017538

  17. Revisiting the reference genomes of human pathogenic Cryptosporidium species: reannotation of C. parvum Iowa and a new C. hominis reference

    PubMed Central

    Isaza, Juan P.; Galván, Ana Luz; Polanco, Victor; Huang, Bernice; Matveyev, Andrey V.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Manque, Patricio; Buck, Gregory A.; Alzate, Juan F.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis are the most relevant species of this genus for human health. Both cause a self-limiting diarrhea in immunocompetent individuals, but cause potentially life-threatening disease in the immunocompromised. Despite the importance of these pathogens, only one reference genome of each has been analyzed and published. These two reference genomes were sequenced using automated capillary sequencing; as of yet, no next generation sequencing technology has been applied to improve their assemblies and annotations. For C. hominis, the main challenge that prevents a larger number of genomes to be sequenced is its resistance to axenic culture. In the present study, we employed next generation technology to analyse the genomic DNA and RNA to generate a new reference genome sequence of a C. hominis strain isolated directly from human stool and a new genome annotation of the C. parvum Iowa reference genome. PMID:26549794

  18. Identification and Characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum Clec, a Novel C-Type Lectin Domain-Containing Mucin-Like Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Bhalchandra, Seema; Ludington, Jacob; Coppens, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium species are waterborne apicomplexan parasites that cause diarrheal disease worldwide. Although the mechanisms underlying Cryptosporidium-host cell interactions are not well understood, mucin-like glycoproteins of the parasite are known to mediate attachment and invasion in vitro. We identified C. parvum Clec (CpClec), a novel mucin-like glycoprotein that contains a C-type lectin domain (CTLD) and has orthologs in C. hominis and C. muris. CTLD-containing proteins are ligand-binding proteins that function in adhesion and signaling and are present in a wide range of organisms, from humans to viruses. However, this is the first report of a CTLD-containing protein in protozoa and in Apicomplexa. CpClec is predicted to be a type 1 membrane protein, with a CTLD, an O-glycosylated mucin-like domain, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail containing a YXXϕ sorting motif. The predicted structure of CpClec displays several characteristics of canonical CTLD-containing proteins, including a long loop region hydrophobic core associated with calcium-dependent glycan binding as well as predicted calcium- and glycan-binding sites. CpClec expression during C. parvum infection in vitro is maximal at 48 h postinfection, suggesting that it is developmentally regulated. The 120-kDa mass of native CpClec is greater than predicted, most likely due to O-glycosylation. CpClec is localized to the surface of the apical region and to dense granules of sporozoites and merozoites. Taken together, these findings, along with the known functions of C. parvum mucin-like glycoproteins and of CTLD-containing proteins, strongly implicate a significant role for CpClec in Cryptosporidium-host cell interactions. PMID:23817613

  19. Comparison of in vitro cell culture and a mouse assay for measuring infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Rochelle, Paul A; Marshall, Marilyn M; Mead, Jan R; Johnson, Anne M; Korich, Dick G; Rosen, Jeffrey S; De Leon, Ricardo

    2002-08-01

    In vitro cell cultures were compared to neonatal mice for measuring the infectivity of five genotype 2 isolates of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocyst doses were enumerated by flow cytometry and delivered to animals and cell monolayers by using standardized procedures. Each dose of oocysts was inoculated into up to nine replicates of 9 to 12 mice or 6 to 10 cell culture wells. Infections were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining in CD-1 mice, by reverse transcriptase PCR in HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells, and by immunofluorescence microscopy in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Infectivity was expressed as a logistic transformation of the proportion of animals or cell culture wells that developed infection at each dose. In most instances, the slopes of the dose-response curves were not significantly different when we compared the infectivity models for each isolate. The 50% infective doses for the different isolates varied depending on the method of calculation but were in the range from 16 to 347 oocysts for CD-1 mice and in the ranges from 27 to 106, 31 to 629, and 13 to 18 oocysts for HCT-8, Caco-2, and MDCK cells, respectively. The average standard deviations for the percentages of infectivity for all replicates of all isolates were 13.9, 11.5, 13.2, and 10.7% for CD-1 mice, HCT-8 cells, Caco-2 cells, and MDCK cells, respectively, demonstrating that the levels of variability were similar in all assays. There was a good correlation between the average infectivity for HCT-8 cells and the results for CD-1 mice across all isolates for untreated oocysts (r = 0.85, n = 25) and for oocysts exposed to ozone and UV light (r = 0.89, n = 29). This study demonstrated that in vitro cell culture was equivalent to the "gold standard," mouse infectivity, for measuring the infectivity of C. parvum and should therefore be considered a practical and accurate alternative for assessing oocyst infectivity and inactivation. However, the high levels of variability displayed by all

  20. Coupled factors influencing the transport and retention of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjung N; Walker, Sharon L; Bradford, Scott A

    2010-02-01

    The coupled role of solution ionic strength (IS), hydrodynamic force, and pore structure on the transport and retention of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst was investigated via batch, packed-bed column, and micromodel systems. The experiments were conducted over a wide range of IS (0.1-100 mM), at two Darcy velocities (0.2 and 0.5 cm/min), and in two sands (median diameters of 275 and 710 microm). Overall, the results suggested that oocyst retention was a complex process that was very sensitive to the solution IS, the Darcy velocity, and the grain size. Increasing IS led to enhanced retention of oocysts in the column, which is qualitatively consistent with predictions of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory. Conversely, increasing velocity and grain size resulted in less retention of oocysts in the column due to the difference in the fluid drag force and the rates of mass transfer from the liquid to the solid phase and from high to low velocity regions. Oocyst retention was controlled by a combined role of low velocity regions, weak attractive interactions, and/or steric repulsion. The contribution of each mechanism highly depended on the solution IS. In particular, micromodel observations indicated that enhanced oocyst retention occurred in low velocity regions near grain-grain contacts under highly unfavorable conditions (IS=0.1 mM). Oocyst retention was also found to be influenced by weak attractive interactions (induced by the secondary energy minimum, surface roughness, and/or nanoscale chemical heterogeneity) when the IS=1 mM. Reversible retention of oocysts to the sand in batch and column studies under favorable attachment conditions (IS=100 mM) was attributed to steric repulsion between the oocysts and the sand surface due to the presence of oocyst surface macromolecules. Comparison of experimental observations and theoretical predictions from classic filtration theory further supported the presence of this weak interaction due to steric repulsion.

  1. Multicenter Evaluation of BD Max Enteric Parasite Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium hominis, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Madison-Antenucci, S; Relich, R F; Doyle, L; Espina, N; Fuller, D; Karchmer, T; Lainesse, A; Mortensen, J E; Pancholi, P; Veros, W; Harrington, S M

    2016-11-01

    Common causes of chronic diarrhea among travelers worldwide include protozoan parasites. The majority of parasitic infections are caused by Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Cryptosporidium hominis Similarly, these species cause the majority of parasitic diarrhea acquired in the United States. Detection of parasites by gold standard microscopic methods is time-consuming and requires considerable expertise; enzyme immunoassays and direct fluorescent-antibody (DFA) stains have lowered hands-on time for testing, but improvements in sensitivity and technical time may be possible with a PCR assay. We performed a clinical evaluation of a multiplex PCR panel, the enteric parasite panel (EPP), for the detection of these common parasites using the BD Max instrument, which performs automated extraction and amplification. A total of 2,495 compliant specimens were enrolled, including 2,104 (84%) specimens collected prospectively and 391 (16%) specimens collected retrospectively. Approximately equal numbers were received in 10% formalin (1,273 specimens) and unpreserved (1,222 specimens). The results from the EPP were compared to those from alternate PCR and bidirectional sequencing (APCR), as well as DFA (G. duodenalis and C. parvum or C. hominis) or trichrome stain (E. histolytica). The sensitivity and specificity for prospective and retrospective specimens combined were 98.2% and 99.5% for G. duodenalis, 95.5% and 99.6 for C. parvum or C. hominis, and 100% and 100% for E. histolytica, respectively. The performance of the FDA-approved BD Max EPP compared well to the reference methods and may be an appropriate substitute for microscopic examination or immunoassays.

  2. Multicenter Evaluation of BD Max Enteric Parasite Real-Time PCR Assay for Detection of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium hominis, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Relich, R. F.; Doyle, L.; Espina, N.; Fuller, D.; Karchmer, T.; Lainesse, A.; Mortensen, J. E.; Pancholi, P.; Veros, W.; Harrington, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Common causes of chronic diarrhea among travelers worldwide include protozoan parasites. The majority of parasitic infections are caused by Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Cryptosporidium hominis. Similarly, these species cause the majority of parasitic diarrhea acquired in the United States. Detection of parasites by gold standard microscopic methods is time-consuming and requires considerable expertise; enzyme immunoassays and direct fluorescent-antibody (DFA) stains have lowered hands-on time for testing, but improvements in sensitivity and technical time may be possible with a PCR assay. We performed a clinical evaluation of a multiplex PCR panel, the enteric parasite panel (EPP), for the detection of these common parasites using the BD Max instrument, which performs automated extraction and amplification. A total of 2,495 compliant specimens were enrolled, including 2,104 (84%) specimens collected prospectively and 391 (16%) specimens collected retrospectively. Approximately equal numbers were received in 10% formalin (1,273 specimens) and unpreserved (1,222 specimens). The results from the EPP were compared to those from alternate PCR and bidirectional sequencing (APCR), as well as DFA (G. duodenalis and C. parvum or C. hominis) or trichrome stain (E. histolytica). The sensitivity and specificity for prospective and retrospective specimens combined were 98.2% and 99.5% for G. duodenalis, 95.5% and 99.6 for C. parvum or C. hominis, and 100% and 100% for E. histolytica, respectively. The performance of the FDA-approved BD Max EPP compared well to the reference methods and may be an appropriate substitute for microscopic examination or immunoassays. PMID:27535690

  3. Biotin- and Glycoprotein-Coated Microspheres as Surrogates for Studying Filtration Removal of Cryptosporidium parvum in a Granular Limestone Aquifer Medium.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, M E; Blaschke, A P; Toze, S; Sidhu, J P S; Ahmed, W; van Driezum, I H; Sommer, R; Kirschner, A K T; Cervero-Aragó, S; Farnleitner, A H; Pang, L

    2015-07-01

    Members of the genus Cryptosporidium are waterborne protozoa of great health concern. Many studies have attempted to find appropriate surrogates for assessing Cryptosporidium filtration removal in porous media. In this study, we evaluated the filtration of Cryptosporidium parvum in granular limestone medium by the use of biotin- and glycoprotein-coated carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (CPMs) as surrogates. Column experiments were carried out with core material taken from a managed aquifer recharge site in Adelaide, Australia. For the experiments with injection of a single type of particle, we observed the total removal of the oocysts and glycoprotein-coated CPMs, a 4.6- to 6.3-log10 reduction of biotin-coated CPMs, and a 2.6-log10 reduction of unmodified CPMs. When two different types of particles were simultaneously injected, glycoprotein-coated CPMs showed a 5.3-log10 reduction, while the uncoated CPMs displayed a 3.7-log10 reduction, probably due to particle-particle interactions. Our results confirm that glycoprotein-coated CPMs are the most accurate surrogates for C. parvum; biotin-coated CPMs are slightly more conservative, while unmodified CPMs are markedly overly conservative for predicting C. parvum removal in granular limestone medium. The total removal of C. parvum observed in our study suggests that granular limestone medium is very effective for the filtration removal of C. parvum and could potentially be used for the pretreatment of drinking water and aquifer storage recovery of recycled water.

  4. The Cryptosporidium parvum C-Type Lectin CpClec Mediates Infection of Intestinal Epithelial Cells via Interactions with Sulfated Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Ludington, Jacob G.

    2016-01-01

    The apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium causes significant diarrheal disease worldwide. Effective anticryptosporidial agents are lacking, in part because the molecular mechanisms underlying Cryptosporidium-host cell interactions are poorly understood. Previously, we identified and characterized a novel Cryptosporidium parvum C-type lectin domain-containing mucin-like glycoprotein, CpClec. In this study, we evaluated the mechanisms underlying interactions of CpClec with intestinal epithelial cells by using an Fc-tagged recombinant protein. CpClec-Fc displayed Ca2+-dependent, saturable binding to HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells and competitively inhibited C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells. Binding of CpClec-Fc was specifically inhibited by sulfated glycosaminoglycans, particularly heparin and heparan sulfate. Binding was reduced after the removal of heparan sulfate and following the inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation in HCT-8 cells. Like CpClec-Fc binding, C. parvum attachment to and infection of HCT-8 cells were inhibited by glycosaminoglycans and were reduced after heparan sulfate removal or inhibition of glycosaminoglycan synthesis or sulfation. Lastly, CpClec-Fc binding and C. parvum sporozoite attachment were significantly decreased in CHO cell mutants defective in glycosaminoglycan synthesis. Together, these results indicate that CpClec is a novel C-type lectin that mediates C. parvum attachment and infection via Ca2+-dependent binding to sulfated proteoglycans on intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:26975991

  5. Biotin- and Glycoprotein-Coated Microspheres as Surrogates for Studying Filtration Removal of Cryptosporidium parvum in a Granular Limestone Aquifer Medium

    PubMed Central

    Blaschke, A. P.; Toze, S.; Sidhu, J. P. S.; Ahmed, W.; van Driezum, I. H.; Sommer, R.; Kirschner, A. K. T.; Cervero-Aragó, S.; Farnleitner, A. H.; Pang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genus Cryptosporidium are waterborne protozoa of great health concern. Many studies have attempted to find appropriate surrogates for assessing Cryptosporidium filtration removal in porous media. In this study, we evaluated the filtration of Cryptosporidium parvum in granular limestone medium by the use of biotin- and glycoprotein-coated carboxylated polystyrene microspheres (CPMs) as surrogates. Column experiments were carried out with core material taken from a managed aquifer recharge site in Adelaide, Australia. For the experiments with injection of a single type of particle, we observed the total removal of the oocysts and glycoprotein-coated CPMs, a 4.6- to 6.3-log10 reduction of biotin-coated CPMs, and a 2.6-log10 reduction of unmodified CPMs. When two different types of particles were simultaneously injected, glycoprotein-coated CPMs showed a 5.3-log10 reduction, while the uncoated CPMs displayed a 3.7-log10 reduction, probably due to particle-particle interactions. Our results confirm that glycoprotein-coated CPMs are the most accurate surrogates for C. parvum; biotin-coated CPMs are slightly more conservative, while unmodified CPMs are markedly overly conservative for predicting C. parvum removal in granular limestone medium. The total removal of C. parvum observed in our study suggests that granular limestone medium is very effective for the filtration removal of C. parvum and could potentially be used for the pretreatment of drinking water and aquifer storage recovery of recycled water. PMID:25888174

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A CT EQUATION TAKING INTO CONSIDERATION THE EFFECT OF LOT VARIABILITY ON THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts are prevalent in surface water and ground water under the influence of surface water, and are difficult to inactivate using free chlorine, the most common disinfectant currently used for treating drinking water. In contrast, it has been shown...

  7. Processes affecting the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum and other persistent pathogens in surface- and ground-waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packman, A. I.; Lau, B. L.; Harter, T.; Atwill, E. R.

    2007-12-01

    Waterborne diseases are transmitted through numerous environmental pathways, and their migration is strongly mediated by interaction with a wide variety of sediments and other natural materials during transport. Here we provide an overview of factors that affect the fate of persistent water-borne pathogens, focusing particularly on the zoonotic pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum as an example. While individual microbial cells are both small and have low specific gravity, suggesting that they should be highly mobile and remain suspended for long periods of time, attachment to a variety of background materials can substantially reduce pathogen mobility. Cryptosporidium oocysts readily associate with both inorganic and organic particles, resulting in the formation of aggregates. This process tends to increase the effective settling velocity of C. parvum in surface waters. Similarly, pathogens readily become associated with the solid matrix during transport in groundwater, resulting in removal by filtration. However, this process is reversible with C. parvum, resulting in a slow long-term release following the initial deposition. Pathogens also become associated with biofilms, which are surface-attached communities of microorganisms in a gelatinous matrix. The presence of biofilms increases the immobilization and retention of Cryptosporidium on solid surfaces. All of these processes influence pathogen transmission in surface waters such as rivers and water-supply canals. In these environments, pathogens can be immobilized by deposition into stable sediment beds by a combination of gravitational sedimentation and advection into pore waters followed by subsurface filtration. Association with background suspended matter tends to increase pathogen deposition by sedimentation, and the presence of benthic (sedimentary) biofilms also tends to increase pathogen retention. For pathogens that remain viable for long periods of time in natural aquatic systems, as is the case with

  8. Capture of water-borne colloids in granular beds using external electric fields: improving removal of Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Pramod; Dutari, Gabriel; Weingeist, David; Adin, Avner; Haught, Roy; Biswas, Pratim

    2005-03-01

    Suboptimal coagulation in water treatment plants often results in reduced removal efficiency of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by several orders of magnitude (J. AWWA 94(6) (2002) 97, J. AWWA 93(12) (2001) 64). The effect of external electric field on removal of C. parvum oocysts in packed granular beds was studied experimentally. A cylindrical configuration of electrodes, with granular media in the annular space was used. A negative DC potential was applied to the central electrode. No coagulants or flocculants were used and filtration was performed with and without application of an electric field to obtain improvement in removal efficiency. Results indicate that removal of C. parvum increased from 10% to 70% due to application of field in fine sand media and from 30% to 96% in MAGCHEM media. All other test particles (Kaolin and polystyrene latex microspheres) used in the study also exhibited increased removal in the presence of an electric field. Single collector efficiencies were also computed using approximate trajectory analysis, modified to account for the applied external electric field. The results of these calculations were used to qualitatively explain the trends in the experimental observations.

  9. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in secondary effluents using a most probable number-polymerase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed

    Tsuchihashi, Ryujiro; Loge, Frank J; Darby, Jeannie L

    2003-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in secondary effluent samples collected from activated-sludge facilities. Serial dilutions of the purified nucleic acid extracts from the samples were made and PCR was conducted to estimate the C. parvum oocyst concentration via a Poisson distribution-based most probable number (MPN). The degree of oocysts associated with wastewater particles was also evaluated. The sensitivity of the MPN-PCR assay was 20 oocysts/PCR unit. The detection limit of the concentration, extraction, and purification protocols in phosphate buffer saline spiked with a known concentration of oocysts ranged from 1.1 to 4.6 oocysts/L; the detection limit for the wastewater samples ranged from 11 to 4200 oocysts/L depending on the extent of inhibition in each sample. The recovery efficiency of the oocysts ranged from 48 to 59% in most samples. Oocysts were found in two out of seven samples with concentrations of 203 and 308 oocysts/L, as estimated by the MPN-PCR method. The oocysts were found only in the filtrate of the grab samples; particle-associated oocysts were not detected. Association of spiked C. parvum oocysts with particles in secondary effluent drawn from wastewater plants with varying operating conditions indicated a weak correlation between the degree of association and the mean cell residence time of the system.

  10. Infectivity to experimental rodents of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts from Siberian chipmunks (Tamias sibiricus) originated in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Matsui, T; Fujino, T; Kajima, J; Tsuji, M

    2000-05-01

    We isolated Cryptosporidium parvum-type oocysts from naturally infected siberian chipmunks which originated in the People's Republic of China and examined the infectivity to rodents as experimental animals. The naturally infected chipmunks did not show any clinical symptoms. The oocysts were 4.8 x 4.2 microm on average in size. They were ovoid and morphologically similar to the C. parvum oocysts isolated from human and cattle. Experimental rodents were inoculated with 1.6 x 10(6) original oocysts each. SCID mice began to shed oocysts on day 7 and the OPG value was 10(5) from 50 days. The oocysts were found from ICR mice on days 13 and 16 by only sugar flotation method, however, any oocysts were not detected from the rats, guinea pigs and rabbits until 30 days. Two infected SCID mice were necropsied on days 100 and 102 and examined for coccidian organisms. Merozoites and oocysts were found in the low part of jejunum and ileum, however, no parasites were detected in the stomach. Consequently, it was considered that the present species was C. parvum and was probably genotype 2 from result of infectivity to rodents.

  11. Characterization of a > 900,000-M(r) Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoite glycoprotein recognized by protective hyperimmune bovine colostral immunoglobulin.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, C; Gut, J; Doyle, P S; Crabb, J H; Nelson, R G; Leech, J H

    1992-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum, a zoonotic Apicomplexan pathogen, causes profound diarrhea, malnutrition, and dehydration in patients with AIDS. A less severe, self-limited disease occurs in immunocompetent individuals, particularly children, animal handlers, and residents of the developing world. Very little is known about the biology of the organism, the pathophysiology of the disease process, or the mechanism of protective immunity. There is no effective therapy for cryptosporidiosis, but hyperimmune bovine colostrum raised against Cryptosporidium oocysts and sporozoites has ameliorated infection and disease in some patients with AIDS, and a variety of monoclonal antibodies, as well as hyperimmune bovine colostrum, have significantly reduced cryptosporidial infection of mice and calves. We report here the identification and initial characterization of a > 900,000-M(r) Cryptosporodium sporozoite glycoprotein (GP900) that is a prominent antigen recognized by protective hyperimmune bovine colostral immunoglobulin. Three of six murine anticryptosporidial monoclonal antibodies reacted with GP900, indicating that the molecule is highly immunogenic in mice as well as in cows. GP900 is Triton X-100 soluble and N glycosylated. Western blotting of the N-deglycosylated protein, detected with antibodies eluted from recombinant clones expressing a partial GP900 fusion protein, suggested that the polypeptide backbone of the glycoprotein has an M(r) of < 190,000. GP900 is encoded by a single-copy gene that resides on the largest Cryptosporidium chromosome. Images PMID:1452347

  12. Effect of storage media, temperature, and time on preservation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts for PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, L F; Gajadhar, A A

    2009-03-23

    The effect of storage media, temperature, and time on suitability of oocysts for use in subsequent molecular studies was examined. Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were stored for 3, 6, 9, or 12 months in sterile dH(2)O, 70 or 95% ethanol, (room temperature [RT], 4, -20, and -70 degrees C), 10% formalin (RT and 4 degrees C), PBS, TE buffer, antibiotic-antimycotic (A-A) solution (4, -20 and -70 degrees C), 2% sulphuric acid, 2.5% potassium dichromate (4 degrees C), and gDNA from 10(4) oocysts was extracted in triplicate and subjected to PCR. To determine the effect of storage media on PCR sensitivity, gDNA from 10(4), 10(2), and 10(0) oocysts stored for 15 months in the media listed above at RT or 4 degrees C was also extracted in triplicate and subjected to PCR. At RT, ethanol was suitable for up to 15 months, while gDNA from oocysts stored in dH(2)O amplified inconsistently after 3 months. At 4 degrees C, all tested media except dH(2)O and formalin were suitable for storage of 10(4) oocysts up to 15 months, but only 70% ethanol, A-A solution, 2% sulphuric acid and 2.5% potassium dichromate supported amplification of gDNA from fewer than 100 oocysts. At -20 degrees C, 95% ethanol, PBS, or TE were suitable for up to 9 months, while 70% ethanol and A-A solution were effective up to 12 months, and gDNA from oocysts stored in dH(2)O was inconsistently amplified after 6 months. Storage at -70 degrees C for up to 12 months was effective regardless of media type. Oocysts stored in formalin at RT or 4 degrees C could not be amplified by PCR despite washing prior to gDNA extraction. To maintain gDNA quality suitable for PCR, it is recommended that coccidian oocysts be stored at -70 degrees C in dH(2)O, ethanol, PBS, TE or A-A solution, at 4 degrees C in A-A or ethanol, or at RT in ethanol where refrigerated storage is unavailable.

  13. Detection of the Cryptosporidium parvum "human" genotype in a dugong (Dugong dugon).

    PubMed

    Morgan, U M; Xiao, L; Hill, B D; O'Donoghue, P; Limor, J; Lal, A; Thompson, R C

    2000-12-01

    The Cryptosporidium "human" genotype was identified in a paraffin-embedded tissue section from a dugong (Dugong dugon) by 2 independent laboratories. DNA sequencing and polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene and the acetyl CoA synthethase gene clearly identified the genotype as that of the Cryptosporidium variant that infects humans. This is the first report of the human Cryptosporidium genotype in a nonprimate host.

  14. Sensitive and Rapid Detection of Viable Giardia Cysts and Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Large-Volume Water Samples with Wound Fiberglass Cartridge Filters and Reverse Transcription-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kaucner, Christine; Stinear, Timothy

    1998-01-01

    We recently described a reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for detecting low numbers of viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts spiked into clarified environmental water concentrates. We have now modified the assay for direct analysis of primary sample concentrates with simultaneous detection of viable C. parvum oocysts, Giardia cysts, and a novel type of internal positive control (IPC). The IPC was designed to assess both efficiency of mRNA isolation and potential RT-PCR inhibition. Sensitivity testing showed that low numbers of organisms, in the range of a single viable cyst and oocyst, could be detected when spiked into 100-μl packed pellet volumes of concentrates from creek and river water samples. The RT-PCR was compared with an immunofluorescence (IF) assay by analyzing 29 nonspiked environmental water samples. Sample volumes of 20 to 1,500 liters were concentrated with a wound fiberglass cartridge filter. Frequency of detection for viable Giardia cysts increased from 24% by IF microscopy to 69% by RT-PCR. Viable C. parvum oocysts were detected only once by RT-PCR (3%) in contrast to detection of viable Cryptosporidium spp. in four samples by IF microscopy (14%), suggesting that Cryptosporidium species other than C. parvum were present in the water. This combination of the large-volume sampling method with RT-PCR represents a significant advance in terms of protozoan pathogen monitoring and in the wider application of PCR technology to this field of microbiology. PMID:9572946

  15. Cryptosporidium parvum: identification of a new surface adhesion protein on sporozoite and oocyst by screening of a phage-display cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Yao, Longquan; Yin, Jigang; Zhang, Xichen; Liu, Quan; Li, Jianhua; Chen, Lifeng; Zhao, Yueping; Gong, Pengtao; Liu, Chengwu

    2007-04-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a significant cause of diarrheal disease worldwide. The specific molecules that mediate C. parvum-host interaction and the molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are unknown. In this study we described a novel phage display method to identify surface adhesion proteins of C. parvum. A cDNA library of the sporozoite and oocyst stages of C. parvum expressed on the surface of T7 phage was screened with intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from the newborn Cryptosporidium-free Holstein calves. Proteins that selectively and specifically bound to IECs were then enriched using a multi-step panning procedure. Two proteins of C. parvum were selected, one was previously reported (p23), which was an important surface adhesion protein; the other was a novel surface adherence protein (CP12). Sequence analysis showed that CP12 has a N-terminal signal peptide, a transmembrane region, a N-glycosylation site, a casein kinase II phosphorylation site and two N-myristoylation sites. Immunofluorescence assay (IFA) using antibody specific for rCP12 demonstrated that the antibody can specifically bind the surface of sporozoite and oocyst, especially apical region of sporozoite. The surface localization of CP12 and its involvement in the host-parasite interaction suggest that it may serve as an effective target for specific preventive and therapeutic measures for cryptosporidiosis.

  16. Spinacia oleracea L. leaf stomata harboring Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts: A potential threat for food safety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scientific literature documents the prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in irrigation waters and on fresh produce. In the present study spinach leaves were experimentally exposed to Cryptosporidium oocysts which were subsequently irrigated with clean water daily for 5 days. As determined by confoc...

  17. Comparison of immunofluorescence assay and immunomagnetic electrochemiluminescence in detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in karst water samples.

    PubMed

    Kuczynska, Ewa; Boyer, Douglas G; Shelton, Daniel R

    2003-04-01

    Immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and immunomagnetic electrochemiluminescence (IM-ECL) were used for comparison of the percent recovery of Cryptosporidium parvum in environmental water samples obtained from a spring draining a karst basin. The monoclonal antibodies to C. parvum, isotype IgG3 were used for optimization of the IM-ECL protocol. The combination of biotinylated and TAG-labeled anti-C. parvum antibodies with the streptavidin beads gave a linear regression slope for log ECL vs. log fresh oocysts of 0.79 (from 5 to 5,000 oocysts), which indicates a constant ECL signal per oocyst. Standard curves gave a dynamic range of 5 to 5,000 oocysts/ml (fresh) and 10 to 100,000 cells/ml (4-month-old oocysts) with the maximum limit of linear detection higher than 100,000. The linear slope of 4-month-old oocysts decreased to 0.62, which indicates that ECL signal is a function of oocyst age. The experiment associated with bead storage time shows that even after 4 months of storage of the biotinylated antibodies, the complex retains the ability for binding the oocysts and generating the ECL signal. Based on the IFA results in the experiment evaluating different protocols for oocysts recovery from karst water samples, the most efficient protocol involved dispersion, followed by flotation and immunomagnetic separation (IMS) (24% recovery). The ECL results obtained in that experiment were very similar to the results obtained in the IFA method, which indicates that the IM-ECL method is accurate. Results of the IFA in the study of the prevalence of C. parvum in the groundwater showed that oocysts were present in 78% of 1 L water samples with average number of oocysts of 6.4+/-5.5 and ranged from 0 (13 samples) to 23.3 (2 samples). The ECL signal generated from these water samples ranged from 3,771 to 622 (average 1,620+/-465). However, the background value estimated in groundwater samples with low number of oocysts detected by IFA was highly variable and elevated (from 3,702 to

  18. Removal and fate of Cryptosporidium parvum, Clostridium perfringens and small-sized centric diatoms (Stephanodiscus hantzschii) in slow sand filters.

    PubMed

    Hijnen, Wim A M; Dullemont, Yolanda J; Schijven, Jack F; Hanzens-Brouwer, Anke J; Rosielle, Martine; Medema, Gertjan

    2007-05-01

    The decimal elimination capacity (DEC) of slow sand filtration (SSF) for Cryptosporidium parvum was assessed to enable quantitative microbial risk analysis of a drinking water production plant. A mature pilot plant filter of 2.56m(2) was loaded with C. parvum oocysts and two other persistent organisms as potential surrogates; spores of Clostridium perfringens (SCP) and the small-sized (4-7microm) centric diatom (SSCD) Stephanodiscus hantzschii. Highly persistent micro-organisms that are retained in slow sand filters are expected to accumulate and eventually break through the filter bed. To investigate this phenomenon, a dosing period of 100 days was applied with an extended filtrate monitoring period of 150 days using large-volume sampling. Based on the breakthrough curves the DEC of the filter bed for oocysts was high and calculated to be 4.7log. During the extended filtrate monitoring period the spatial distribution of the retained organisms in the filter bed was determined. These data showed little risk of accumulation of oocysts in mature filters most likely due to predation by zooplankton. The DEC for the two surrogates, SCP and SSCD, was 3.6 and 1.8log, respectively. On basis of differences in transport behaviour, but mainly because of the high persistence compared to the persistence of oocysts, it was concluded that both spores of sulphite-reducing clostridia (incl. SCP) and SSCD are unsuited for use as surrogates for oocyst removal by slow sand filters. Further research is necessary to elucidate the role of predation in Cryptosporidium removal and the fate of consumed oocysts.

  19. The fine structure of sexual stage development and sporogony of Cryptosporidium parvum in cell-free culture.

    PubMed

    Aldeyarbi, Hebatalla M; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2016-05-01

    The sexual stages and new oocysts development of Cryptosporidium parvum were investigated in a cell-free culture system using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Sexual development was extremely rapid after inoculation of oocysts into the medium. The process began within 1/2-12 h and was completed with new oocyst formation 120 h post-inoculation. The macrogamonts were bounded by two membranes and had amylopectin granules and two distinct types of wall-forming bodies. The microgamonts had a large nucleus showing lobe projections and condensation of chromatin, giving rise to peripherally budding microgametes. The microgametes contained a large area of granular substance containing groups of microtubules surrounding the electron-dense nucleus. In some instances, the dividing microgamy was observed in cell-free cultures with no preceding merogonic process. Fertilization was observed with the bullet-shaped microgamete penetrating an immature macrogamont at 24 and 216 h. The new thin- and thick-walled oocysts had a large residuum with polysaccharide granules and sporogony noted inside these oocysts. Novel immature four-layer walled thick oocysts with irregular knob-like protrusions on the outer layer resembling the immature Eimeria oocysts were also observed. The present study confirms the gametogony and sporogony of C. parvum in cell-free culture and describes their ultra-structure for the first time.

  20. Stress-induced Hsp70 gene expression and inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts by chlorine-based oxidants.

    PubMed

    Bajszár, George; Dekonenko, Alexander

    2010-03-01

    Our research on the mechanisms of action of chlorine-based oxidants on Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in water revealed a dual-phase effect: (i) response to oxidative stress, which was demonstrated by induced expression of the Hsp70 heat shock gene, and (ii) oocyst inactivation as a result of long-term exposure to oxidants. The relative biocidal effects of sodium hypochlorite (bleach) and electrolytically generated mixed oxidant solution (MOS) on C. parvum oocysts were compared at identical free chlorine concentrations. Oocyst inactivation was determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) amplification of the heat-induced Hsp70 mRNA and compared with tissue culture infectivity. According to both assays, within the range between 25 and 250 mg/liter free chlorine and with 4 h contact time, MOS exhibits a higher efficacy in oocyst inactivation than hypochlorite. Other RNA-based viability assays, aimed at monitoring the levels of beta-tubulin mRNA and 18S rRNA, showed relatively slow decay rates of these molecules following disinfection by chlorine-based oxidants, rendering these molecular diagnostic viability markers inappropriate for disinfection efficacy assessment.

  1. Serum and colostrum antibody responses induced by jet-injection of sheep with DNA encoding a Cryptosporidium parvum antigen.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M; Kerr, D; Fayer, R; Wall, R

    1995-12-01

    In an effort to generate high titer colostrum for immunotherapy of cryptosporidiosis, a study was conducted to test the efficacy of immunizing sheep with recombinant plasmid DNA (pCMV-CP15/60) encoding epitopes of 15 and 60 kDa surface antigens of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites. The plasmid DNA was used to immunize preparturient ewes at three dose levels by jet-injection into either hind limb muscle (IM) or mammary tissue (IMAM). Regardless of route of injection, a dose-dependent anti-CP15/60 immunoglobulin response was observed in sera and colostrum from sheep immunized with pCMV-CP15/60 plasmid DNA. High titer antibody responses were observed in one of three animals per group receiving an IM injection of 100 or 1000 micrograms pCMV-CP15/60. IMAM immunization with 100 or 1000 micrograms pCMV-CP15/60 plasmid DNA elicited higher titer colostrum responses and more consistent serum responses compared to IM injections. A negligible serum and colostrum anti-CP15/60 response was observed in ewes injected IM with 10 micrograms pCMV-CP15/60 or 1000 micrograms control plasmid DNA. Immunoblotting of native C. parvum sporozoite/oocyst protein with hyperimmune serum and colostrum corroborated the increased titers against CP15/60 antigen. Serum and colostrum antibodies from pCMV-CP15/60-immunized sheep were eluted from native CP15 protein and bound a surface antigen of C. parvum sporozoites as indicated by indirect immunofluorescence staining.

  2. Assessment of a dye permeability assay for determination of inactivation rates of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, M B; Anguish, L J; Bowman, D D; Walker, M J; Ghiorse, W C

    1997-01-01

    The ability to determine inactivation rates of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in environmental samples is critical for assessing the public health hazard of this gastrointestinal parasite in watersheds. We compared a dye permeability assay, which tests the differential uptake of the fluorochromes 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and propidium iodide (PI) by the oocysts (A. T. Campbell, L. J. Robertson, and H. V. Smith, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:3488-3493, 1992), with an in vitro excystation assay, which tests their ability to excyst and, thus, their metabolic potential and potential for infectivity (J.B. Rose, H. Darbin, and C.P. Gerba, Water Sci. Technol. 20:271-276, 1988). Formaldehyde-fixed (killed) oocysts and untreated oocysts were permeabilized with sodium hypochlorite and subjected to both assays. The results of the dye permeability assays were the same, while the excystation assay showed that no excystation occurred in formaldehyde-fixed oocysts. This confirmed that oocyst wall permeability, rather than metabolic activity potential, was the basis of the dye permeability viability assessment. A previously developed protocol (L. J. Anguish and W. C. Ghiorse, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:724-733, 1997) for determining viability of oocysts in soil and sediment was used to examine further the use of oocyst permeability status as an indicator of oocyst viability in fecal material stored at 4 degrees C and in water at various temperatures. Most of the oocysts in fresh calf feces were found to be impermeable to the fluorochromes. They were also capable of excystation, as indicated by the in vitro excystation assay, and were infective, as indicated by a standard mouse infectivity assay. The dye permeability assay further showed that an increase in the intermediate population of oocysts permeable to DAPI but not to PI occurred over time. There was also a steady population of oocysts permeable to both dyes. Further experiments with purified oocysts suspended in

  3. Pilot-Scale Pulsed UV Light Irradiation of Experimentally Infected Raspberries Suppresses Cryptosporidium parvum Infectivity in Immunocompetent Suckling Mice.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, L; Hubert, B; Favennec, L; Villena, I; Ballet, J J; Agoulon, A; Orange, N; Gargala, G

    2015-12-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., a significant cause of foodborne infection, have been shown to be resistant to most chemical food disinfectant agents and infective for weeks in irrigation waters and stored fresh vegetal produce. Pulsed UV light (PL) has the potential to inactivate Cryptosporidium spp. on surfaces of raw or minimally processed foods or both. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of PL on viability and in vivo infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts present on raspberries, a known source of transmission to humans of oocyst-forming apicomplexan pathogens. The skin of each of 20 raspberries was experimentally inoculated with five 10-μl spots of an oocyst suspension containing 6 × 10(7) oocysts per ml (Nouzilly isolate). Raspberries were irradiated by PL flashes (4 J/cm(2) of total fluence). This dose did not affect colorimetric or organoleptic characteristics of fruits. After immunomagnetic separation from raspberries, oocysts were bleached and administered orally to neonatal suckling mice. Seven days after infection, mice were euthanized, and the number of oocysts in the entire small intestine was individually assessed by immunofluorescence flow cytometry. Three of 12 and 12 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10 and 100 oocysts isolated from nonirradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Four of 12 and 2 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Oocyst counts were lower in animals inoculated with 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries (92 ± 144 and 38 ± 82, respectively) than in animals infected with 100 oocysts from nonirradiated raspberries (35,785 ± 66,221, P = 0.008). PL irradiation achieved oocyst reductions of 2 and 3 log for an inoculum of 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts, respectively. The present pilot-scale evaluation suggests that PL is an effective mode of decontamination for raspberries and prompts further applicability

  4. Source water assessment and nonpoint sources of acutely toxic contaminants: A review of research related to survival and transport of Cryptosporidium parvum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Mark J.; Montemagno, Carlo D.; Jenkins, Michael B.

    1998-12-01

    Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (PL-930123) in 1996 required that public water supply managers identify potential sources of contamination within contributing areas. Nonpoint sources of acutely toxic microbial contaminants, such as Cryptosporidium parvum, challenge current approaches to source identification and management as a first step toward developing management plans for public water supply protection. Little may be known about survival and transport in the field environment, prescribed practices may not be designed to manage such substances, and infective stages may be present in vast numbers and may resist water treatment and disinfection processes. This review summarizes research related to survival and transport of C. parvum oocysts, as an example of an acutely toxic contaminant with nonpoint sources in animal agriculture. It discusses ∥1) significance of infected domesticated animals as potential sources of C. parvum, (2) laboratory and field studies of survival and transport, and (3) approaches to source control in the context of public health protection.

  5. Deposition of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts on natural organic matter surfaces: microscopic evidence for secondary minimum deposition in a radial stagnation point flow cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Janjaroen, Dao; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S; Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2009-02-03

    A radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) system combined with a microscope was used to determine the deposition kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts on quartz surfaces and silica surfaces coated with Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) in solutions with different ionic strengths. Microscopic evidence of C. parvum oocysts entrapped in the secondary minimum energy well was presented to show that among the entrapped C. parvum oocysts some were washed away by the radial flow and some were able to transfer to deep primary minima and become irreversibly deposited. Experimental data were compared with simulation results obtained by the convective-diffusion equation and Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. The experimental results suggested that surface charge heterogeneity led to a higher attachment efficiency at low ionic strength. In addition, the maximum attachment efficiency was less than 1 at high ionic strength due to steric interaction.

  6. Does the use of tubular digesters to treat livestock waste lower the risk of infection from Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia?

    PubMed

    Kinyua, Maureen N; Wald, Ileana; Camacho-Céspedes, Fabricio; Izurieta, Ricardo; Haas, Charles N; Ergas, Sarina J

    2016-10-01

    Worldwide, high incidences of cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis are attributed to livestock waste. Quantitative microbial risk assessment can be used to estimate the risk of livestock related infections from Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia. The objective of this paper was to assess the occupational and public health risks associated with management of raw and anaerobically digested livestock waste in two rural communities in Costa Rica based on fomite, soil and crop contamination and livestock waste management exposure pathways. Risks related to cattle waste were greater than swine waste due to cattle shedding more (oo)cysts. Cryptosporidium parvum also posed a greater risk than Giardia lamblia in all exposure pathways due to livestock shedding high loads of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocysts' lower inactivation rates during anaerobic digestion compared with Giardia lamblia cysts. The risk of infection from exposure to contaminated soil and crops was significantly lower for a community using tubular anaerobic digesters to treat livestock waste compared to a community where the untreated waste was applied to soil. The results indicate that treatment of livestock waste in small-scale tubular anaerobic digesters has the potential to significantly decrease the risk of infection below the World Health Organization's acceptable individual annual risk of infection (10(-4)).

  7. An evaluation of primers amplifying DNA targets for the detection of Cryptosporidium spp. using C. parvum HNJ-1 Japanese isolate in water samples.

    PubMed

    Leetz, Anna Susanne; Sotiriadou, Isaia; Ongerth, Jerry; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2007-09-01

    The performance of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures for the detection of Cryptosporidium parvum HNJ-1 strain (genotype II) oocysts purified from mice using published protocols was evaluated. Oocysts were concentrated from fecal samples of infected severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice by sucrose flotation and were then purified by immunomagnetic separation method. The genotype of C. parvum was established as type II by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Water samples were spiked with different numbers of oocysts, determined by limiting dilution. Genomic DNA was extracted and used for PCR assays targeting various Cryptosporidium species genes (Beta-Tubulin, COWP, 70 kDa HSP, SSU rRNA, ITS1, TRAP-C1 and TRAP-C2 gene). DNA from oocyst numbers of more than 1 x 10(4) was detected using each of the primers. However, when using lower oocyst numbers, the tools based on 9 of the 16 different primer assays gave sufficient results. Assays using the remaining seven primers gave less than satisfactory results. A new primer set, named VKSS-F1/2 and VKSS-R1/2, that target the 18 SSU rRNA gene of C. parvum was constructed and applied. The VKSS-F1/2 and VKSS-R1/2 assays amplified DNA isolated from spiked samples in 206 of 211 trials (97.6%). This illustrates the difficulty of detecting low numbers of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts by molecular methods when working with environmental samples.

  8. BLIND TRIALS EVALUATING IN VITRO INFECTIVITY OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS USING CELL CULTURE IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An optimized cell culture-immunofluorescence (IFA) procedure, using the HCT-8 cell line, was evaluated in 'blind' trials to determine the sensitivity and reproducibility for measuring infectivity of flow cytometry prepared inocula of C. parvum oocysts. In separate trials, suspens...

  9. Cryptosporidium parvum and Cyclospora cayetanensis: a review of laboratory methods for detection of these waterborne parasites.

    PubMed

    Quintero-Betancourt, Walter; Peele, Emily R; Rose, Joan B

    2002-05-01

    Cryptosporidium and Cyclospora are obligate, intracellular, coccidian protozoan parasites that infest the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals causing severe diarrhea illness. In this paper, we present an overview of the conventional and more novel techniques that are currently available to detect Cryptosporidium and Cyclospora in water. Conventional techniques and new immunological and genetic/molecular methods make it possible to assess the occurrence, prevalence, virulence (to a lesser extent), viability, levels, and sources of waterborne protozoa. Concentration, purification, and detection are the three key steps in all methods that have been approved for routine monitoring of waterborne oocysts. These steps have been optimized to such an extent that low levels of naturally occurring Cryptosporidium oocysts can be efficiently recovered from water. The filtration systems developed in the US and Europe trap oocysts more effectively and are part of the standard methodologies for environmental monitoring of Cryptosporidium oocysts in source and treated water. Purification techniques such as immunomagnetic separation and flow cytometry with fluorescent activated cell sorting impart high capture efficiency and selective separation of oocysts from sample debris. Monoclonal antibodies with higher avidity and specificity to oocysts in water concentrates have significantly improved the detection and enumeration steps. To date, PCR-based detection methods allow us to differentiate the human pathogenic Cryptosporidium parasites from those that do not infect humans, and to track the source of oocyst contamination in the environment. Cell culture techniques are now used to examine oocyst viability. While fewer studies have focused on Cyclospora cayetanensis, the parasite has been successfully detected in drinking water and wastewater using current methods to recover Cryptosporidium oocysts. More research is needed for monitoring of Cyclospora in the environment

  10. Point-of-Use Removal of Cryptosporidium parvum from Water: Independent Effects of Disinfection by Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Ions and by Physical Filtration in Ceramic Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Lydia S; Su, Yi-Hsuan; Guerrant, Richard L; Swami, Nathan S; Smith, James A

    2015-11-03

    Ceramic water filters (CWFs) impregnated with silver nanoparticles are a means of household-level water treatment. CWFs remove/deactivate microbial pathogens by employing two mechanisms: metallic disinfection and physical filtration. Herein we report on the independent effects of silver salt and nanoparticles on Cryptosporidium parvum and the removal of C. parvum by physical filtration in porous ceramic filter media. Using a murine (mouse) model, we observed that treatment of oocysts with silver nitrate and proteinate-capped silver nanoparticles resulted in decreased infection relative to untreated oocysts. Microscopy and excystation experiments were conducted to support the disinfection investigation. Heat and proteinate-capped silver-nanoparticle treatment of oocysts resulted in morphological modifications and decreased excystation rates of sporozoites. Subsequently, disk-shaped ceramic filters were produced to investigate the transport of C. parvum. Two factors were varied: sawdust size and clay-to-sawdust ratio. Five disks were prepared with combinations of 10, 16, and 20 mesh sawdust and sawdust percentage that ranged from 9 to 11%. C. parvum removal efficiencies ranged from 1.5 log (96.4%) to 2.1 log (99.2%). The 16-mesh/10% sawdust had the greatest mean reduction of 2.1-log (99.2%), though there was no statistically significant difference in removal efficiency. Based on our findings, physical filtration and silver nanoparticle disinfection likely contribute to treatment of C. parvum for silver impregnated ceramic water filters, although the contribution of physical filtration is likely greater than silver disinfection.

  11. Inhibition of Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 (CDPK1) In Vitro by Pyrazolopyrimidine Derivatives Does Not Correlate with Sensitivity of Cryptosporidium parvum Growth in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlenschmidt, Theresa B.; Rutaganira, Florentine U.; Long, Shaojun; Tang, Keliang; Shokat, Kevan M.; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a serious diarrheal disease in immunocompromised patients and malnourished children, and treatment is complicated by a lack of adequate drugs. Recent studies suggest that the natural occurrence of a small gatekeeper residue in serine threonine calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1) of Cryptosporidium parvum might be exploited to target this enzyme and block parasite growth. Here were explored the potency with which a series of pyrazolopyrimidine analogs, which are selective for small gatekeeper kinases, inhibit C. parvum CDPK1 and block C. parvum growth in tissue culture in vitro. Although these compounds potently inhibited kinase activity in vitro, most had no effect on parasite growth. Moreover, among those that were active against parasite growth, there was a very poor correlation with their 50% inhibitory concentrations against the enzyme. Active compounds also had no effect on cell invasion, unlike the situation in Toxoplasma gondii, where these compounds block CDPK1, prevent microneme secretion, and disrupt cell invasion. These findings suggest that CPDK1 is not essential for C. parvum host cell invasion or growth and therefore that it is not the optimal target for therapeutic intervention. Nonetheless, several inhibitors with low micromolar 50% effective concentrations were identified, and these may affect other essential targets in C. parvum that are worthy of further exploration. PMID:26552986

  12. Transport and fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in intermittent sand filters.

    PubMed

    Logan, A J; Stevik, T K; Siegrist, R L; Rønn, R M

    2001-12-01

    The transport potential of Cryptosporidiim parvum (C. parvum) through intermittent. unsaturated, sand filters used for water and wastewater treatment was investigated using a duplicated. 2(3) factorial design experiment performed in bench-scale, sand columns. Sixteen columns (dia = 15 cm, L = 61 cm) were dosed eight times daily for up to 61 days with 65,000 C. parvum oocysts per liter at 15 degrees C. The effects of water quality, media grain size, and hydraulic loading rates were examined. Effluent samples were tested for pH, turbidity, and oocyst content. C. parvum effluent concentrations were determined by staining oocysts on polycarbonate filters and enumerating using epifluorescent microscopy. At completion, the columns were dismantled and sand samples were taken at discrete depths within the columns. These samples were washed in a surfactant solution and the oocysts were enumerated using immunomagnetic separation techniques. The fine-grained sand columns (d50 = 0.31 mm) effectively removed oocysts under the variety of conditions examined with low concentrations of oocysts infrequently detected in the effluent. Coarse-grained media columns (d = 1.40 mm) yielded larger numbers of oocysts which were commonly observed in the effluent regardless of operating conditions. Factorial design analysis indicated that grain size was the variable which most affected the oocyst effluent concentrations in these intermittent filters. Loading rate had a significant effect when coarse-grained media was used and lesser effect with fine-grained media while the effect of feed composition was inconclusive. No correlations between turbidity, pH, and effluent oocyst concentrations were found. Pore-sizc calculations indicated that adequate space for oocyst transport existed in the filters. It was therefore concluded that processes other than physical straining mechanisms are mainly responsible for the removal of C. pavum oocysts from aqueous fluids in intermittent sand filters used

  13. Evaluating the transport of bacillus subtilis spores as a potential surrogate for Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USEPA has recommended the use of aerobic spores as an indicator for Cryptosporidium oocysts when determining groundwater under the direct influence of surface water. Surface properties, interaction energies, transport, retention, and release behavior of B. subtilis spores were measured over a r...

  14. Effects of Enterococcus faecalis CECT 7121 on Cryptosporidium parvum infection in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium is an opportunistic protozoan parasite of humans and animals worldwide, causes diarrheal disease that is typically self-limiting in immunocompetent hosts but often life-threatening to immunocompromised individuals. However, there is a lack of completely efficient therapy available. P...

  15. Cryptosporidium parvum: determination of ID₅₀ and the dose-response relationship in experimentally challenged dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Zambriski, J A; Nydam, D V; Wilcox, Z J; Bowman, D D; Mohammed, H O; Liotta, J L

    2013-10-18

    The objectives were to determine the median infective dose (ID₅₀) of Cryptosporidium parvum and to describe the dose-response relationship including associated clinical illness in experimentally challenged dairy calves. Within the first 24h of life, 27 test calves were experimentally challenged with C. parvum oocysts and 3 control calves were sham dosed. Test calves received 1 of 8 possible doses (25, 50, 100, 500, 1 × 10(3), 1 × 10(4), 1 × 10(5), and 1 × 10(6) oocysts). All 27 test calves developed diarrhea. Fecal oocyst shedding occurred in 25 (92.6%) test calves and in 0 control calves. The 2 non-shedding test calves both received 25 oocysts. There was an inverse relationship between dose and time to onset of fecal oocyst shedding (P=0.005). There was no relationship found between dose and duration (P=0.2) or cessation (P=0.3) of fecal oocyst shedding. In addition, there was not a significant relationship between log-dose and the log-peak oocysts (P=0.2) or log-total oocysts (P=0.5) counted/g of feces across the dose groups. There was a positive dose-response relationship between log-dose and diarrhea (P=0.01). However, when controlling for other factors, such as onset and cessation of fecal oocyst shedding, dose was not a significant predictor of diarrhea (P=0.5). Onset and cessation of fecal oocyst shedding were found to be the best predictors of diarrhea (P=0.0006 and P=0.04, respectively). The ID₅₀ for fecal oocyst shedding was 5.8 oocysts, for diarrhea was 9.7 oocysts, and for fecal oocyst shedding with diarrhea was 16.6 oocysts. Given that the ID₅₀ of C. parvum is far less than would be excreted into the environment by a naturally infected calf, prevention and control of cryptosporidiosis is a formidable challenge.

  16. Effect of disinfection of drinking water with ozone or chlorine dioxide on survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, J E; Mazás, E A; Masschelein, W J; Villacorta Martiez de Maturana, I; Debacker, E

    1989-01-01

    Demineralized water was seeded with controlled numbers of oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum purified from fresh calf feces and subjected to different treatments with ozone or chlorine dioxide. The disinfectants were neutralized by sodium thiosulfate, and neonatal mice were inoculated intragastrically and sacrificed 7 days later for enumeration of oocyst production. Preliminary trials indicated that a minimum infection level of 1,000 oocysts (0.1-ml inoculum) per mouse was necessary to induce 100% infection. Treatment of water containing 10(4) oocysts per ml with 1.11 mg of ozone per liter (concentration at time zero [C0]) for 6 min totally eliminated the infectivity of the oocysts for neonatal mice. A level of 2.27 mg of ozone per liter (C0) was necessary to inactivate water containing 5 x 10(5) oocysts per ml within 8 min. Also, 0.4 mg of chlorine dioxide per liter (C0) significantly reduced infectivity within 15 min of contact, although some oocysts remained viable. PMID:2764564

  17. Using ultrafiltration to concentrate and detect Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus atrophaeus subspecies globigii, and Cryptosporidium parvum in 100-liter water samples.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, H D Alan; Harris, Stephanie; Lucas, Sasha; Hartzel, Margaret; Riner, Diana; Rochele, Paul; Deleon, Ricardo

    2007-09-01

    A strategy that uses ultrafiltration (UF) to concentrate microorganisms from water samples has been developed and tested. This strategy was tested using 100-liter water samples with volume reduction achieved through ultrafiltration and recycling the microorganisms of interest through a retentate vessel, rather than returning them to the sample container, where they might pose an incremental hazard to sample takers or the environment. Three protocols based on this strategy were tested. The first protocol entailed sample volume reduction and collection of the final reduced sample. The second and third protocols both incorporated pretreatment of the filter and fluid lines with a solution to prevent microorganisms from adhering. In the second protocol, the filter was back flushed with a surfactant solution to recover microorganisms. The third protocol used recirculation of a surfactant solution to recover microorganisms. Tests were undertaken using 100-liter water samples spiked with approximately 100 or 1000 microorganisms (1 or 10 per liter). Test microorganisms included Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain, Bacillus atrophaeus subsp. globigii, and Cryptosporidium parvum. The first protocol had significantly lower recovery than the other two. Back flushing resulted in higher recovery than forward flushing, but the difference was not statistically significant.

  18. Bobel-24 Activity against Cryptosporidium parvum in Cell Culture and in a SCID Mouse Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Cristina; Fenoy, Soledad; Simón, Fernando; del Aguila, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    The anticryptosporidial activity of Bobel-24 (2,4,6-triiodophenol) was studied for the first time, resulting in a reduction of the in vitro growth of Cryptosporidium of up to 99.6%. In a SCID mouse model of chronic cryptosporidiosis, significant differences (P < 0.05) in oocyst shedding were observed in animals treated with 125 mg/kg/day. These results merit further investigation of Bobel-24 as a chemotherapeutic option for cryptosporidiosis. PMID:18160525

  19. Second outbreak of infection with a rare Cryptosporidium parvum genotype in schoolchildren associated with contact with lambs/goat kids at a holiday farm in Norway.

    PubMed

    Lange, H; Johansen, O H; Vold, L; Robertson, L J; Anthonisen, I L; Nygard, K

    2014-10-01

    In March 2012, a second outbreak of Cryptosporidium parvum affected children following a stay at a holiday farm in Norway; the first outbreak occurred in 2009. We studied a cohort of 145 schoolchildren who had visited the farm, of which 40 (28%) were cases. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in faecal samples from humans, goat kids and lambs. Molecular studies revealed C. parvum subtype IIa A19G1R1 in all samples including human samples from the 2009 outbreak. A dose-response relationship was found between the number of optional sessions with animals and illness, increasing from two sessions [risk ratio (RR) 2·7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·6-11·5] to six sessions (RR 8·0, 95% CI 1·7-37·7). The occurrence of two outbreaks 3 years apart, with the same subtype of C. parvum, suggests that the parasite is established in the farm's environment. We recommend greater emphasis on hand hygiene and routines related to animal contact.

  20. Induced Susceptibility of Host Is Associated with an Impaired Antioxidant System Following Infection with Cryptosporidium parvum in Se-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengmin; Wu, Yanyun; Qin, Jianhua; Sun, Haoxue; He, Hongxuan

    2009-01-01

    Background Susceptibility or resistance to infection with Cryptosporidium parvum (C.parvum) correlates with Selenium (Se) deficiency in response to infection. Both adult Se-adequate and Se-deficient mouse models of cryptosporidiosis were used to study the cell-mediated immune response during the course of C. parvum infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Blood samples from mouse models were used for Se status. The concentration of MDA, SOD, GPx and CAT in blood has revealed that lower Se level exist in Se-deficient mice. Mesenteric lymph node (MLN) lymphocytes from both mouse models were proliferated after ex vivo re-stimulation with C. parvum sporozoite antigen. The study of the cytokine profiles from the supernatant of proliferated MLN cells revealed that Se-adequate mice produced higher levels of Th1 (IFN-γ and IL-2) and moderate amounts of Th2 (IL-4) cytokines throughout the course of infection. Whereas, MLN cells from Se-deficient mice produced lower levels of IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-4 cytokines. The counts of total white cell and CD3, CD4, CD8 cell in Se-adequate were higher than that in Se-deficient mice. Significance These results suggest that Cell immunity is affected by Se status after infection with C.parvum from kinetic changes of different white cells and cytokine. In conclusion, induced susceptibility of host is associated with an impaired antioxidant system following infection with C.parvum in C57BL/6 Selenium deficient mice. PMID:19247447

  1. Seroprevalence of Cryptosporidium parvum infection of dairy cows in three northern provinces of Thailand determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using recombinant antigen CpP23.

    PubMed

    Inpankaew, T; Jittapalapong, S; Phasuk, J; Pinyopanuwut, N; Chimnoi, W; Kengradomkit, C; Sunanta, C; Zhang, G; Aboge, G O; Nishikawa, Y; Igarashi, I; Xuan, X

    2009-06-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is the most frequent parasitic agent that causes diarrhoea in AIDS patients in Thailand. Cryptosporidiosis outbreaks in humans may be attributed to contamination of their drinking water from infected dairy pastures. A 23-kDa glycoprotein of C. parvum (CpP23) is a sporozoite surface protein that is geographically conserved among C. parvum isolates. This glycoprotein is a potentially useful candidate antigen for the diagnosis of cryptosporidiosis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Therefore, we investigated the seroprevalence of C. parvum infection in dairy cows in northern Thailand using an ELISA based on recombinant CpP23 antigen. Sera were randomly collected from 642 dairy cows of 42 small-holder farmers, which had the top three highest number of the dairy cows' population in Northern Thailand, that included Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai and Lumpang provinces. The overall seroprevalence of the infection was 4.4%, and the seropositive rates for the three provinces were 3.3% in Chiang Mai, 5.1% in Chiang Rai and 3% in Lumpang. These results suggest that cattle could play a role in zoonotic cryptosporidiosis in Thailand.

  2. Fulminant Cryptosporidiosis after Near-Drowning: a Human Cryptosporidium parvum Strain Implicated in Invasive Gastrointestinal Adenocarcinoma and Cholangiocarcinoma in an Experimental Model

    PubMed Central

    Benamrouz, Sadia; Guyot, Karine; Mouray, Anthony; Chassat, Thierry; Flament, Nicolas; Delhaes, Laurence; Coiteux, Valerie; Delaire, Baptiste; Praet, Marleen; Cuvelier, Claude; Gosset, Pierre; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Creusy, Colette

    2012-01-01

    In the present work, we report the characterization of a Cryptosporidium parvum strain isolated from a patient who nearly drowned in the Deule River (Lille, France) after being discharged from the hospital where he had undergone allogeneic stem cell transplantation. After being rescued and readmitted to the hospital, he developed fulminant cryptosporidiosis. The strain isolated from the patient's stools was identified as C. parvum II2A15G2R1 (subtype linked to zoonotic exposure) and inoculated into SCID mice. In this host, this virulent C. parvum isolate induced not only severe infection but also invasive gastrointestinal and biliary adenocarcinoma. The observation of adenocarcinomas that progressed through all layers of the digestive tract to the subserosa and spread via blood vessels confirmed the invasive nature of the neoplastic process. These results indicate for the first time that a human-derived C. parvum isolate is able to induce digestive cancer. This study is of special interest considering the exposure of a large number of humans and animals to this waterborne protozoan, which is highly tumorigenic when inoculated in a rodent model. PMID:22247151

  3. Computer-Assisted Laser Scanning and Video Microscopy for Analysis of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts in Soil, Sediment, and Feces

    PubMed Central

    Anguish, L. J.; Ghiorse, W. C.

    1997-01-01

    A computer-assisted laser scanning microscope equipped for confocal laser scanning and color video microscopy was used to examine Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in two agricultural soils, a barnyard sediment, and calf fecal samples. An agar smear technique was developed for enumerating oocysts in soil and barnyard sediment samples. Enhanced counting efficiency and sensitivity (detection limit, 5.2 x 10(sup2) oocysts(middot)g [dry weight](sup-1)) were achieved by using a semiautomatic counting procedure and confocal laser scanning microscopy to enumerate immunostained oocysts and fragments of oocysts in the barnyard sediment. An agarose-acridine orange mounting procedure was developed for high-resolution confocal optical sectioning of oocysts in soil. Stereo images of serial optical sections revealed the three-dimensional spatial relationships between immunostained oocysts and the acridine orange-stained soil matrix material. In these hydrated, pyrophosphate-dispersed soil preparations, oocysts were not found to be attached to soil particles. A fluorogenic dye permeability assay for oocyst viability (A. T. Campbell, L. J. Robertson, and H. V. Smith, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:3488-3493, 1992) was modified by adding an immunostaining step after application of the fluorogenic dyes propidium iodide and 4(prm1),6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Comparison of conventional color epifluorescence and differential interference contrast images on one video monitor with comparable black-and-white laser-scanned confocal images on a second monitor allowed for efficient location and interpretation of fluorescently stained oocysts in the soil matrix. This multi-imaging procedure facilitated the interpretation of the viability assay results by overcoming the uncertainties caused by matrix interference and background fluorescence. PMID:16535523

  4. Development of Cryptosporidium parvum-Induced Gastrointestinal Neoplasia in Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) Mice: Severity of Lesions Is Correlated with Infection Intensity

    PubMed Central

    Certad, Gabriela; Creusy, Colette; Ngouanesavanh, Tramy; Guyot, Karine; Gantois, Nausicaa; Mouray, Anthony; Chassat, Thierry; Flament, Nicolas; Fleurisse, Laurence; Pinon, Anthony; Delhaes, Laurence; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    We reported previously that Cryptosporidium parvum was able to induce intestinal tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice treated with corticoids. To further characterize this Cryptosporidium-induced cell transformation, SCID mice treated with dexamethasone were challenged with C. parvum oocysts, and euthanatized sequentially after infection for histologic examination. Ki-67 was used as a marker of cellular proliferation. Our previous results were confirmed, and it was also found that mice receiving higher inocula (106–107) experienced more severe neoplastic development. Additionally, neoplastic changes were observed not only in the caecum but also in the stomach and duodenum of some animals. Interestingly, SCID mice (6/6) inoculated with 105–107 oocysts showed high grade intraepithelial neoplasia or adenomas with high grade dysplasia in the caecum after Day 46 post-infection (PI). Immunohistochemistry for Ki-67 staining indicated the neoplastic process associated to cryptosporidiosis, and evidenced the first immunohistochemical alterations at early stages of the process, even at 3 weeks PI. PMID:20134002

  5. Influence of colostrum deprivation and concurrent Cryptosporidium parvum infection on the colonization and persistence of Escherichia coli O157 : H7 in young lambs.

    PubMed

    La Ragione, R M; Best, A; Clifford, D; Weyer, U; Johnson, L; Marshall, R N; Marshall, J; Cooley, W A; Farrelly, S; Pearson, G R; Woodward, M J

    2006-07-01

    Escherichia coli O157 : H7 and Cryptosporidium parvum infections of man have been associated with direct contact with small ruminants. Colostrum protects neonates against gastrointestinal pathogens, and orphan lambs, which are common on petting farms, may be deprived of this protection. In a recent study, it was demonstrated that high shedding of E. coli O157 : H7 by an 8-week-old goat kid was associated with coincidental C. parvum infection. Furthermore, both pathogens were co-located in the distal gastrointestinal tract. It was hypothesized that colostrum deprivation and pre-infection with C. parvum predisposed young ruminants to colonization and increased shedding of E. coli O157 : H7. To test this, 21 lambs 5 weeks of age were divided into four groups as follows: (A) colostrum-deprived and inoculated with E. coli O157 : H7, (B) colostrum-deprived and inoculated with C. parvum and then E. coli O157 : H7, (C) conventionally reared and inoculated with E. coli O157 : H7, (D) conventionally reared and inoculated with C. parvum and then E. coli O157 : H7. C. parvum was detected between 8 and 12 days post-inoculation in most of the infected lambs. At 24 h post-inoculation with E. coli O157 : H7, all lambs were shedding between 5 x 10(4) and 5 x 10(7) c.f.u. E. coli O157 : H7 per gram of faeces. E. coli O157 : H7 was shed in higher numbers in the groups pre-inoculated with C. parvum, whether conventionally reared or colostrum-deprived. Interestingly, for the colostrum-deprived lambs on day 3, a significant difference in shedding of E. coli O157 : H7 was observed (P = 0.038), with the lambs inoculated with E. coli alone yielding higher counts than those pre-inoculated with C. parvum. From day 15 onwards, shedding of E. coli O157 : H7 was highest from the colostrum-deprived C. parvum-infected lambs, then (in descending order of shedding) the colostrum-deprived lambs, the conventionally reared lambs infected with C. parvum, and the conventionally reared animals. In total

  6. Comparison of different solar reactors for household disinfection of drinking water in developing countries: evaluation of their efficacy in relation to the waterborne enteropathogen Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Couso, H; Fontán-Sainz, M; Navntoft, C; Fernández-Ibáñez, P; Ares-Mazás, E

    2012-11-01

    Solar water disinfection (SODIS) is a type of treatment that can significantly improve the microbiological quality of drinking water at household level and therefore prevent waterborne diseases in developing countries. Cryptosporidium parvum is an obligate protozoan parasite responsible for the diarrhoeal disease cryptosporidiosis in humans and animals. Recently, this parasite has been selected by the WHO as a reference pathogen for protozoan parasites in the evaluation of household water treatment options. In this study, the field efficacy of different static solar reactors [1.5 l transparent plastic polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles as well as 2.5 l borosilicate glass and 25 l methacrylate reactors fitted with compound parabolic concentrators (CPC)] for solar disinfection of turbid waters experimentally contaminated with C. parvum oocysts was compared. Potential oocyst viability was determined by inclusion/exclusion of the fluorogenic vital dye propidium iodide. The results demonstrate that static solar reactors fitted with CPCs are an excellent alternative to the conventional SODIS method with PET bottles. These reactors improved the efficacy of the SODIS method by enabling larger volumes of water to be treated and, in some cases, the C. parvum oocysts were rendered totally unviable, minimising the negative effects of turbidity.

  7. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia among Young Children with and without Diarrhea in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Tellevik, Marit G.; Moyo, Sabrina J.; Blomberg, Bjørn; Hjøllo, Torunn; Maselle, Samuel Y.; Langeland, Nina; Hanevik, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Background Although enteroparasites are common causes of diarrheal illness, few studies have been performed among children in Tanzania. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia among young children in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and identify risk factors for infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed an unmatched case-control study among children < 2 years of age in Dar es Salaam, recruited from August 2010 to July 2011. Detection and identification of protozoans were done by PCR techniques on DNA from stool specimens from 701 cases of children admitted due to diarrhea at the three study hospitals, and 558 controls of children with no history of diarrhea during the last month prior to enrollment. The prevalence of C. parvum/hominis was 10.4% (84.7% C. hominis), and that of G. lamblia 4.6%. E. histolytica was not detected. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium was significantly higher in cases (16.3%) than in controls (3.1%; P < 0.001; OR = 6.2; 95% CI: 3.7–10.4). G. lamblia was significantly more prevalent in controls (6.1%) than in cases (3.4%; P = 0.027; OR = 1.8; 95% CI: 1.1–3.1). Cryptosporidium infection was found more often in HIV-positive (24.2%) than in HIV-negative children (3.9%; P < 0.001; OR = 7.9; 95% CI: 3.1–20.5), and was also associated with rainfall (P < 0.001; OR = 2.41; 95% CI: 1.5–3.8). Among cases, stunted children had significantly higher risk of being infected with Cryptosporidium (P = 0.011; OR = 2.12; 95% CI: 1.2–3.8). G. lamblia infection was more prevalent in the cool season (P = 0.004; OR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3–3.8), and more frequent among cases aged > 12 months (P = 0.003; OR = 3.5; 95% CI: 1.5–7.8). Among children aged 7–12 months, those who were breastfed had lower prevalence of G. lamblia infection than those who had been weaned (P = 0.012). Conclusions Cryptosporidium infection is common among young Tanzanian children with diarrhea

  8. Oral immunization with attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium encoding Cryptosporidium parvum Cp23 and Cp40 antigens induces a specific immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Alvaro J; McNair, Nina; Mead, Jan R

    2009-09-01

    Attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine strain SL3261 was used as an antigen delivery system for the oral immunization of mice against two Cryptosporidium parvum antigens, Cp23 and Cp40. Each antigen was subcloned into the pTECH1 vector system, which allows them to be expressed as fusion proteins with highly immunogenic fragment C of tetanus toxin under the control of the anaerobically inducible nirB promoter. The recombinant vector was introduced into Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strain SL3261, and the stable soluble expression of the chimeric protein was evaluated and confirmed by Western blotting with polyclonal C. parvum antisera. Mice were inoculated orally with a single dose of SL3261/pTECH-Cp23 or Cp40, respectively, and plasmid stability was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies against the Cp23 or Cp40 antigen were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay 35 days after immunization. Also, serum IgA and mucosal (feces) IgA antibodies were detected in 30% of the mice immunized with Cp23. In addition, prime-boosting with Cp23 and Cp40 DNA vaccine vectors followed by Salmonella immunization significantly increased antibody responses to both antigens. Our data show that a single oral inoculation with recombinant S. Typhimurium SL3261 can induce specific antibody responses to the Cp23 or Cp40 antigen from C. parvum in mice, suggesting that recombinant Salmonella is a feasible delivery system for a vaccine against C. parvum infection.

  9. GIS-based analysis of the fate of waste-related pathogens Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia and Escherichia coli in a tropical canal network.

    PubMed

    Diallo, Mamadou B C; Anceno, Alfredo J; Tawatsupa, Benjawan; Tripathi, Nitin K; Wangsuphachart, Voranuch; Shipin, Oleg V

    2009-03-01

    Urban canals play a major socio-economic role in many tropical countries and, particularly, Thailand. One of the overlooked functions that they perform is a significant attenuation of waste-related pathogens posing considerable health risk, as well as pollution attenuation in general. The study dealt with a comparison of three canals receiving: (i) municipal, (ii) mainly industrial and (iii) mainly agricultural wastewater, listed in order of progressively decreasing organic loading. The occurrence and fate of waterborne Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia and Escherichia coli were monitored in the canals by both real-time PCR and conventionally for 12 months. The pathogens are etiological agents of an estimated 38% and 47% of diarrhea cases worldwide and in Thailand, respectively. The geographic information system (GIS) was used to evaluate and map point and, particularly, non-point pollution sources which allowed differentiating the canal sections in terms of predominant pathogen sources. The flowthrough canals, which can be viewed as waste stabilization ponds, were found to be efficiently removing the pathogens at the following generalized specific rates: 0.3 (C. parvum), 1.2 (G. lamblia), 1.8 (E. coli) log10/km.d in the dry season. The rates decreased in the rainy season for E. coli and G. lamblia, but increased for C. parvum which indicated different removal mechanisms. Data suggest that E. coli and G. lamblia were mainly removed through sedimentation and sunlight (UV) irradiation, while the likely mechanism for C. parvum was predation. Overall, the specific pathogen removal rates positively correlated with the canal organic loading rates in the rainy season. As an important result, an estimate of the municipal pollution mitigation by over 2280 km canals in the Greater Bangkok suggests that concomitant to the pathogens at least 36-95 tons of BOD5 is being removed daily, thereby saving the receiving Chao Phraya River and Bight of Bangkok, by far exceeding

  10. Presence of Cryptosporidium scrofarum, C. suis and C. parvum subtypes IIaA16G2R1 and IIaA13G1R1 in Eurasian wild boars (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    García-Presedo, Ignacio; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana; González-Warleta, Marta; Mezo, Mercedes; Gómez-Bautista, Mercedes; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel; Castro-Hermida, José Antonio

    2013-09-23

    The aim of the present study was to identify the species of Cryptosporidium infecting Eurasian wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Galicia (NW, Spain). A sampling of 209 wild boars shot in different game preserves was carried out during the hunting season in 2009-2010. All samples were examined for Cryptosporidium infection, using both immunological and molecular tools. Cryptosporidium oocysts in faecal samples were identified using a direct immunofluorescence technique with monoclonal antibodies (DFA). The presence of Cryptosporidium DNA was determined using nested PCR involving amplification of a fragment of the small-subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rRNA). A total of 35 (16.7%) samples tested positive with both techniques. However, sequencing was only possible in 27 samples. Cryptosporidium scrofarum, Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were identified in 19, 5 and 3 of the samples, respectively. Moreover, C. scrofarum was detected as a dominant species infecting all age groups (juveniles, sub adults and adults). Sequence analyses of the glycoprotein (GP60) gene revealed the presence of C. parvum subtypes IIaA16G2R1 in 2 juveniles and IIaA13G1R1 in 1 sub adult wild boar. These species and subtypes have previously been described in human patients, indicating that isolates from asymptomatic wild boars might have zoonotic potential. This is the first report of the presence of C. scrofarum, C. suis and C. parvum subtypes IIaA16G2R1 and IIaA13G1R1 in wild boars (S. scrofa) in Spain.

  11. Pyruvate : NADP+ oxidoreductase from the mitochondrion of Euglena gracilis and from the apicomplexan Cryptosporidium parvum: a biochemical relic linking pyruvate metabolism in mitochondriate and amitochondriate protists.

    PubMed

    Rotte, C; Stejskal, F; Zhu, G; Keithly, J S; Martin, W

    2001-05-01

    Most eukaryotes perform the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate in mitochondria using pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). Eukaryotes that lack mitochondria also lack PDH, using instead the O(2)-sensitive enzyme pyruvate : ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFO), which is localized either in the cytosol or in hydrogenosomes. The facultatively anaerobic mitochondria of the photosynthetic protist Euglena gracilis constitute a hitherto unique exception in that these mitochondria oxidize pyruvate with the O(2)-sensitive enzyme pyruvate : NADP oxidoreductase (PNO). Cloning and analysis of Euglena PNO revealed that the cDNA encodes a mitochondrial transit peptide followed by an N-terminal PFO domain that is fused to a C-terminal NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) domain. Two independent 5.8-kb full-size cDNAs for Euglena mitochondrial PNO were isolated; the gene was expressed in cultures supplied with 2% CO(2) in air and with 2% CO(2) in N(2). The apicomplexan Cryptosporidium parvum was also shown to encode and express the same PFO-CPR fusion, except that, unlike E. gracilis, no mitochondrial transit peptide for C. parvum PNO was found. Recombination-derived remnants of PNO are conserved in the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe as proteins involved in sulfite reduction. Notably, Trypanosoma brucei was found to encode homologs of both PFO and all four PDH subunits. Gene organization and phylogeny revealed that eukaryotic nuclear genes for mitochondrial, hydrogenosomal, and cytosolic PFO trace to a single eubacterial acquisition. These findings suggest a common ancestry of PFO in amitochondriate protists with Euglena mitochondrial PNO and Cryptosporidium PNO. They are also consistent with the view that eukaryotic PFO domains are biochemical relics inherited from a facultatively anaerobic, eubacterial ancestor of mitochondria and hydrogenosomes.

  12. Leaching of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts, Escherichia coli, and a Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Bacteriophage through Intact Soil Cores following Surface Application and Injection of Slurry▿

    PubMed Central

    Forslund, Anita; Markussen, Bo; Toenner-Klank, Lise; Bech, Tina B.; Jacobsen, Ole Stig; Dalsgaard, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Increasing amounts of livestock manure are being applied to agricultural soil, but it is unknown to what extent this may be associated with contamination of aquatic recipients and groundwater if microorganisms are transported through the soil under natural weather conditions. The objective of this study was therefore to evaluate how injection and surface application of pig slurry on intact sandy clay loam soil cores influenced the leaching of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteriophage 28B, Escherichia coli, and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. All three microbial tracers were detected in the leachate on day 1, and the highest relative concentration was detected on the fourth day (0.1 pore volume). Although the concentration of the phage 28B declined over time, the phage was still found in leachate at day 148. C. parvum oocysts and chloride had an additional rise in the relative concentration at a 0.5 pore volume, corresponding to the exchange of the total pore volume. The leaching of E. coli was delayed compared with that of the added microbial tracers, indicating a stronger attachment to slurry particles, but E. coli could be detected up to 3 months. Significantly enhanced leaching of phage 28B and oocysts by the injection method was seen, whereas leaching of the indigenous E. coli was not affected by the application method. Preferential flow was the primary transport vehicle, and the diameter of the fractures in the intact soil cores facilitated transport of all sizes of microbial tracers under natural weather conditions. PMID:21948848

  13. THE EFFICACY OF THREE MEDICINAL PLANTS; GARLIC, GINGER AND MIRAZID AND A CHEMICAL DRUG METRONIDAZOLE AGAINST CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM: II-HISTOLOGICAL CHANGES.

    PubMed

    Abouel-Nour, Mohamed F; El-Shewehy, Dina Magdy M; Hamada, Shadia F; Morsy, Tosson A

    2016-04-01

    Cryptosporidiosis parvum is a zoonotic protozoan parasite infects intestinal epithelial cells of man and animals causing a major health problem. This study was oriented to evaluate the protective and curative capacity of garlic, ginger and mirazid in comparison with metronidazole drug (commercially known) against Cryptosporidium in experimental mice. Male Swiss Albino mice experimentally infected with C. parvum were treated with medicinal plants extracts (Ginger, Mirazid, and Garlic) as compared to chemical drug Metronidazole. Importantly, C. parvum-infected mice treated with ginger, Mirazid, garlic and metronidazole showed a complete elimination in shedding oocysts by 9th day PI. The reduction and elimination of shedding oocysts in response to the treatments might be attributable to a direct effect on parasite growth in intestines, sexual phases production and/or the formation of oocysts. The results were evaluated histopathological examination of ideum section of control mice (uninfected, untreated) displayed normal architecture of the villi. Examiination of infected mice ileum section (infected, untreated) displayed histopathological alterations from uninfected groups. Examination of ileum section prepared from mice treated with garlic, ginger, mirazid, and metronidazole displayed histopathological alterations from that of the control groups, and showed marked histologic correction in the pattern with the four regimes used in comparison to control mice. Garlic successfully eradicated oocysts of infected mice from stool and intestine. Supplementation of ginger to infected mice markedly corrected elevation in the inflammatory risk factors and implied its potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory capabilities. Infected mice treated with ginger, mirazid, garlic and metronidazole showed significant symptomatic improvements during treatment.

  14. Two-year monitoring of Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia occurrence in a recreational and drinking water reservoir using standard microscopic and molecular biology techniques.

    PubMed

    Helmi, Karim; Skraber, Sylvain; Burnet, Jean-Baptiste; Leblanc, Laurence; Hoffmann, Lucien; Cauchie, Henry-Michel

    2011-08-01

    Starting in 2006, a monitoring of Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum occurrence was conducted for 2 years in the largest drinking water reservoir of Luxembourg (Esch-sur-Sûre reservoir) using microscopy and qPCR techniques. Parasite analyses were performed on water samples collected from three sites: site A located at the inlet of the reservoir, site B located 18 km downstream site A, at the inlet of the drinking water treatment plant near the dam of the reservoir and site C where the finished drinking water is injected in the distribution network. Results show that both parasites are present in the reservoir throughout the year with a higher occurrence of G. lamblia cysts compared to C. parvum oocysts. According to our results, only 25% of the samples positive by microscopy were confirmed by qPCR. (Oo)cyst concentrations were 10 to 100 times higher at site A compared to site B and they were positively correlated to the water turbidity and negatively correlated to the temperature. Highest (oo)cyst concentrations were observed in winter. In contrast, no relationship between the concentrations of (oo)cysts in the reservoir and rain events could be established. Though a correlation has been observed between both parasites and faecal indicators in the reservoir, some discrepancies highlight that the latter do not represent a reliable tool to predict the presence/absence of these pathogenic protozoa. In summer 2007, the maximal risk of parasite infection per exposure event for swimmers in the reservoir was estimated to be 0.0015% for C. parvum and 0.56% for G. lamblia. Finally, no (oo)cysts could be detected in large volumes of finished drinking water.

  15. Comparing the efficacy of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and ozone in the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum in water from Parana State, Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Juliana Tracz; Costa, Adriana Oliveira; de Oliveira Silva, Márcia Benedita; Schuchard, Wagner; Osaki, Silvia Cristina; de Castro, Edilene Alcântara; Paulino, Rosangela Clara; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz

    2008-12-01

    In the present work, assays were performed to compare the efficacy of hypochlorous acid, chlorine dioxide, and ozone in the inactivation of Cryptosporidium oocyst in public water supply from Brazilian South conditions. Experiments were carried out in samples containing 2 x 10(4) oocysts/ml of C. parvum purified from feces of experimentally contaminated calves. An in vitro excystation method was used to evaluate oocysts' viability and to determine the inactivation rates of hypochlorous acid at 2 ppm, chlorine dioxide at 1, 2, and 5 ppm, and ozone at the doses of 0.18, 0.24, 0.36, 0.48, and 1.44 mg/l. By using hypochlorous acid, the maximum inactivation rate obtained was 49.04% after 120 min. Chlorine dioxide at 5 ppm inactivated 90.56% of oocysts after 90 min of contact. Ozone was the most effective product, rendering an inactivation of 100% with the concentration of 24 mg/l. Resistance of Cryptosporidium to the usual disinfectants and the need for more effective water treatments to prevent waterborne diseases in Brazil are discussed in this manuscript.

  16. Structure of a CutA1 divalent-cation tolerance protein from Cryptosporidium parvum, the protozoal parasite responsible for cryptosporidiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Abendroth, Jan; Clitfon, Mathew C.; Zhang, Yanfeng; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Staker, Bart L.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Mylera, Peter J.

    2015-05-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is an infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites from the Cryptosporidium species. Infection is associated with mild to severe diarrhea that usually resolves spontaneously in healthy human adults, but may lead to severe complications in young children and in immunocompromised patients. The genome of Cryptosporidium parvum contains a gene, CUTA_CRYPI, that may play a role in regulating the intracellular concentration of copper, a toxic element if left unchecked. Here we report the crystal structure for this CutA1 protein, Cp-CutA1, is reported at 2.0 Å resolution (4E98). As observed for other CutA1 structures, the 117-residue protein is a trimer with a core ferrodoxin-like fold. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows little unfolding of Cp-CutA1 up to 353 K. This robustness is corroborated by ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC spectra at 333 K that is characteristic of a folded protein, suggesting NMR spectroscopy may be a useful tool to further probe the function of the CutA1 proteins. While robust, Cp-CutA1 is not as stable as the homologous protein from a hyperthermophile, perhaps due to a wide β-bulgein β2 that protrudes P48 and S49 outside the β-sheet.

  17. Structure of a CutA1 divalent-cation tolerance protein from Cryptosporidium parvum, the protozoal parasite responsible for cryptosporidiosis

    DOE PAGES

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Abendroth, Jan; ...

    2015-05-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is an infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites from the Cryptosporidium species. Infection is associated with mild to severe diarrhea that usually resolves spontaneously in healthy human adults, but may lead to severe complications in young children and in immunocompromised patients. The genome of Cryptosporidium parvum contains a gene, CUTA_CRYPI, that may play a role in regulating the intracellular concentration of copper, a toxic element if left unchecked. Here we report the crystal structure for this CutA1 protein, Cp-CutA1, is reported at 2.0 Å resolution (4E98). As observed for other CutA1 structures, the 117-residue protein is a trimer withmore » a core ferrodoxin-like fold. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows little unfolding of Cp-CutA1 up to 353 K. This robustness is corroborated by ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC spectra at 333 K that is characteristic of a folded protein, suggesting NMR spectroscopy may be a useful tool to further probe the function of the CutA1 proteins. While robust, Cp-CutA1 is not as stable as the homologous protein from a hyperthermophile, perhaps due to a wide β-bulgein β2 that protrudes P48 and S49 outside the β-sheet.« less

  18. Evaluation of Four RNA Extraction Methods for Gene Expression Analyses of Cryptosporidium parvum and Toxoplasma gondii Oocys

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii are important coccidian parasites that have caused waterborne and foodborne disease outbreaks worldwide. Techniques like subtractive hybridization, microarrays, and quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction (...

  19. Die-off rates of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a swine lagoon and in a spray field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Because of several large-scale outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis in humans, Cryptosporidium has become a public health concern. Commercial swine operations apply large volumes of effluent from lagoons to spray fields as a waste management practice. This effluent is a source of Cryptosporidi...

  20. Comparison of transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized microspheres being advected through three minerologically different granular porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mohanram, A.; Ray, C.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Ryan, J.N.; Chorover, J.; Eberl, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    In order to gain more information about the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in tropical volcanic soils, the transport and attachment behaviors of oocysts and oocyst-sized polystyrene microspheres were studied in the presence of two soils. These soils were chosen because of their differing chemical and physical properties, i.e., an organic-rich (43-46% by mass) volcanic ash-derived soil from the island of Hawaii, and a red, iron (22-29% by mass), aluminum (29-45% by mass), and clay-rich (68-76% by mass) volcanic soil from the island of Oahu. A third agricultural soil, an organic- (13% by mass) and quartz-rich (40% by mass) soil from Illinois, was included for reference. In 10-cm long flow-through columns, oocysts and microspheres advecting through the red volcanic soil were almost completely (98% and 99%) immobilized. The modest breakthrough resulted from preferential flow-path structure inadvertently created by soil-particle aggregation during the re-wetting process. Although a high (99%) removal of oocysts and microsphere within the volcanic ash soil occurred initially, further examination revealed that transport was merely retarded because of highly reversible interactions with grain surfaces. Judging from the slope of the substantive and protracted tail of the breakthrough curve for the 1.8-??m microspheres, almost all (>99%) predictably would be recovered within ~4000 pore volumes. This suggests that once contaminated, the volcanic ash soil could serve as a reservoir for subsequent contamination of groundwater, at least for pathogens of similar size or smaller. Because of the highly reversible nature of organic colloid immobilization in this soil type, C. parvum could contaminate surface water should overland flow during heavy precipitation events pick up near-surface grains to which they are attached. Surprisingly, oocyst and microsphere attachment to the reference soil from Illinois appeared to be at least as sensitive to changes in pH as was observed

  1. Disinfection and toxicological assessments of pulsed UV and pulsed-plasma gas-discharge treated-water containing the waterborne protozoan enteroparasite Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Jennifer; Kirf, Dominik; Garvey, Mary; Rowan, Neil

    2013-09-01

    We report for the first time on the comparative use of pulsed-plasma gas-discharge (PPGD) and pulsed UV light (PUV) for the novel destruction of the waterborne enteroparasite Cryptosporidium parvum. It also describes the first cyto-, geno- and ecotoxicological assays undertaken to assess the safety of water decontaminated using PPGD and PUV. During PPGD treatments, the application of high voltage pulses (16 kV, 10 pps) to gas-injected water (N2 or O2, flow rate 2.5L/min) resulted in the formation of a plasma that generated free radicals, ultraviolet light, acoustic shock waves and electric fields that killed ca. 4 log C. parvum oocysts in 32 min exposure. Findings showed that PPGD-treated water produced significant cytotoxic properties (as determined by MTT and neutral red assays), genotoxic properties (as determined by comet and Ames assays), and ecotoxic properties (as determined by Microtox™, Thamnotox™ and Daphnotox™ assays) that are representative of different trophic levels in aquatic environment (p<0.05). Depending in part on the type of injected gas used, PPGD-treated water became either alkaline (pH ≤ 8.58, using O2) or acidic (pH ≥ 3.21, using N2) and contained varying levels of reactive free radicals such as ozone (0.8 mg/L) and/or dissociated nitric and nitrous acid that contributed to the observed disinfection and toxicity. Chemical analysis of PPGD-treated water revealed increasing levels of electrode metals that were present at ≤ 30 times the tolerated respective values for EU drinking water. PUV-treated water did not exhibit any toxicity and was shown to be far superior to that of PPGD for killing C. parvum oocysts taking only 90 s of pulsing [UV dose of 6.29 μJ/cm(2)] to produce a 4-log reduction compared to a similar reduction level achieved after 32min PPGD treatment as determined by combined in vitro CaCo-2 cell culture-qPCR.

  2. Intra-Species Genetic Diversity and Clonal Structure of Cryptosporidium parvum in Sheep Farms in a Confined Geographical Area in Northeastern Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ramo, Ana; Monteagudo, Luis V.; Del Cacho, Emilio; Sánchez-Acedo, Caridad

    2016-01-01

    A multilocus fragment typing approach including eleven variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci and the GP60 gene was used to investigate the intra-farm and intra-host genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium parvum in sheep farms in a confined area in northeastern Spain. Genomic DNA samples of 113 C. parvum isolates from diarrheic pre-weaned lambs collected in 49 meat-type sheep farms were analyzed. Loci exhibited various degrees of polymorphism, the finding of 7–9 alleles in the four most variable and discriminatory markers (ML2, Cgd6_5400, Cgd6_3940, and GP60) being remarkable. The combination of alleles at the twelve loci identified a total of 74 multilocus subtypes (MLTs) and provided a Hunter-Gaston discriminatory index of 0.988 (95% CI, 0.979−0.996). The finding that most MLTs (n = 64) were unique to individual farms evidenced that cryptosporidial infection is mainly transmitted within sheep flocks, with herd-to-herd transmission playing a secondary role. Limited intra- host variability was found, since only five isolates were genotypically mixed. In contrast, a significant intra-farm genetic diversity was seen, with the presence of multiple MLTs on more than a half of the farms (28/46), suggesting frequent mutations or genetic exchange through recombination. Comparison with a previous study in calves in northern Spain using the same 12-loci typing approach showed differences in the identity of major alleles at most loci, with a single MLT being shared between lambs and calves. Analysis of evolutionary descent by the algorithm eBURST indicated a high degree of genetic divergence, with over 41% MLTs appearing as singletons along with a high number of clonal complexes, most of them linking only two MLTs. Bayesian Structure analysis and F statistics also revealed the genetic remoteness of most C. parvum isolates and no ancestral population size was chosen. Linkage analysis evidenced a prevalent pattern of clonality within the parasite population. PMID:27176718

  3. Effect of ferric oxyhydroxide grain coatings on the transport of bacteriophage PRD1 and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in saturated porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abudalo, R.A.; Bogatsu, Y.G.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Elimelech, M.

    2005-01-01

    To test the effect of geochemical heterogeneity on microorganism transport in saturated porous media, we measured the removal of two microorganisms, the bacteriophage PRD1 and oocysts of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, in flow-through columns of quartz sand coated by different amounts of a ferric oxyhydroxide. The experiments were conducted over ranges of ferric oxyhydroxide coating fraction of ?? = 0-0.12 for PRD1 and from ?? = 0-0.32 for the oocysts at pH 5.6-5.8 and 10-4 M ionic strength. To determine the effect of pH on the transport of the oocysts, experiments were also conducted over a pH range of 5.7-10.0 at a coating fraction of ?? = 0.04. Collision (attachment) efficiencies increased as the fraction of ferric oxyhydroxide coated quartz sand increased, from ?? = 0.0071 to 0.13 over ?? = 0-0.12 for PRD1 and from ?? = 0.059 to 0.75 over ?? = 0-0.32 for the oocysts. Increasing the pH from 5.7 to 10.0 resulted in a decrease in the oocyst collision efficiency as the pH exceeded the expected point of zero charge of the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings. The collision efficiencies correlated very well with the fraction of quartz sand coated by the ferric oxyhydroxide for PRD1 but not as well for the oocysts. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  4. Evaluation of the solar water disinfection process (SODIS) against Cryptosporidium parvum using a 25-L static solar reactor fitted with a compound parabolic collector (CPC).

    PubMed

    Fontán-Sainz, María; Gómez-Couso, Hipólito; Fernández-Ibáñez, Pilar; Ares-Mazás, Elvira

    2012-02-01

    Water samples of 0, 5, and 30 nephelometric turbidity units (NTU) spiked with Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts were exposed to natural sunlight using a 25-L static solar reactor fitted with a compound parabolic collector (CPC). The global oocyst viability was calculated by the evaluation of the inclusion/exclusion of the fluorogenic vital dye propidium iodide and the spontaneous excystation. After an exposure time of 8 hours, the global oocyst viabilities were 21.8 ± 3.1%, 31.3 ± 12.9%, and 45.0 ± 10.0% for turbidity levels of 0, 5, and 30 NTU, respectively, and these values were significantly lower (P < 0.05) that the initial global viability of the isolate (92.1 ± 0.9%). The 25-L static solar reactor that was evaluated can be an alternative system to the conventional solar water disinfection process for improving the microbiological quality of drinking water on a household level, and moreover, it enables treatment of larger volumes of water (> 10 times).

  5. Influence of organic matter on the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a ferric oxyhydroxide-coated quartz sand saturated porous medium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abudalo, R.A.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Landkamer, L.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the effect of organic matter on the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a geochemically heterogeneous saturated porous medium, we measured the breakthrough and collision efficiencies of oocysts as a function of dissolved organic matter concentration in a flow-through column containing ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand. We characterized the surface properties of the oocysts and ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand using microelectrophoresis and streaming potential, respectively, and the amount of organic matter adsorbed on the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand as a function of the concentration of dissolved organic matter (a fulvic acid isolated from Florida Everglades water). The dissolved organic matter had no significant effect on the zeta potential of the oocysts. Low concentrations of dissolved organic matter were responsible for reversing the charge of the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand surface from positive to negative. The charge reversal and accumulation of negative charge on the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand led to increases in oocyst breakthrough and decreases in oocyst collision efficiency with increasing dissolved organic matter concentration. The increase in dissolved organic matter concentration from 0 to 20 mg L-1 resulted in a two-fold decrease in the collision efficiency. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Cryptosporidium parvum in calves: kinetics and immunoblot analysis of specific serum and local antibody responses (immunoglobulin A [IgA], IgG, and IgM) after natural and experimental infections.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, J E; Villacorta, I; Vanopdenbosch, E; Vandergheynst, D; Naciri, M; Ares-Mazás, E; Yvoré, P

    1992-01-01

    Fecal and serum anti-Cryptosporidium parvum immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgM, and IgG were monitored by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after experimental and natural infection of calves with C. parvum. Although all experimentally infected calves showed high levels of colostral antibodies in the feces, they acquired C. parvum infection. Three of five animals died. Calves which acquired natural infection showed only diarrhea. Levels of colostral coproantibodies dropped quickly. Experimental infection was followed by a rise in local anti-C. parvum IgM levels from day 5 postinfection (p.i.). IgM peaked at day 14 p.i. and then disappeared quickly. Anti-C. parvum IgA levels rose between days 7 and 14 p.i. and decreased slowly. Rising levels of coproantibodies coincided with falling oocyst output. Fecal anti-C. parvum IgG levels rose slightly during oocyst output, and IgG disappeared 3 weeks p.i. Similar kinetics were established in naturally infected calves. Although fecal anti-C. parvum IgA levels declined slowly, reinfections were established 5, 7, and 14 weeks after the primary contact. Serum anti-C. parvum IgG levels rose during maximal oocyst excretion, whereas serum anti-C. parvum IgA levels peaked later than did local IgA levels. Challenge reinfection of naturally infected calves at day 112 was not followed by clinical signs or oocyst output or by a secondary antibody response. Sequential Western immunoblotting with fecal extracts revealed up to 32 different parasite antigens. Convalescent-phase sera recognized up to 23 antigens. Fecal IgA reacted intensely with antigens with relative molecular weights (M(r)) of approximately 11,000 and 15,000. These antigens were not recognized by convalescent-phase serum IgG. Both local IgA and serum IgG also showed strong reactions with 23,000- and 44,000-M(r) antigens and with several antigens of between 66,200 and 200,000 M(r). Most bands remained detectable for at least 16 weeks p.i. Images PMID:1587597

  7. Influence of organic carbon loading, sediment associated metal oxide content and sediment grain size distributions upon Cryptosporidium parvum removal during riverbank filtration operations, Sonoma County, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metge, D.W.; Harvey, R.W.; Aiken, G.R.; Anders, R.; Lincoln, G.; Jasperse, J.

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the efficacy for removing Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts of poorly sorted, Fe- and Al-rich, subsurface sediments collected from 0.9 to 4.9 and 1.7-13.9??m below land surface at an operating riverbank filtration (RBF) site (Russian River, Sonoma County, CA). Both formaldehyde-killed oocysts and oocyst-sized (3????m) microspheres were employed in sediment-packed flow-through and static columns. The degree of surface coverage of metal oxides on sediment grain surfaces correlated strongly with the degrees of oocyst and microsphere removals. In contrast, average grain size (D50) was not a good indicator of either microsphere or oocyst removal, suggesting that the primary mechanism of immobilization within these sediments is sorptive filtration rather than physical straining. A low specific UV absorbance (SUVA) for organic matter isolated from the Russian River, suggested that the modest concentration of the SUVA component (0.8??mg??L-1) of the 2.2??mg??L-1 dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is relatively unreactive. Nevertheless, an amendment of 2.2??mg??L-1 of isolated river DOC to column sediments resulted in up to a 35.7% decrease in sorption of oocysts and (or) oocyst-sized microspheres. Amendments (3.2????M) of the anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) also caused substantive decreases (up to 31.9 times) in colloid filtration. Although the grain-surface metal oxides were found to have a high colloid-removal capacity, our study suggested that any major changes within the watershed that would result in long-term alterations in either the quantity and (or) the character of the river's DOC could alter the effectiveness of pathogen removal during RBF operations.

  8. Pathogen and chemical transport in the karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer: 3. Use of microspheres to estimate the transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Shapiro, A.M.; Renken, R.A.; Osborn, C.L.; Ryan, J.N.; Cunningham, K.J.; Landkamer, L.

    2008-01-01

    The vulnerability of a municipal well in the Northwest well field in southeastern Florida to potential contamination by Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts was assessed in a large-scale, forced-gradient (convergent) injection and recovery test. The field study involved a simultaneous pulse introduction of a nonreactive tracer (SF6, an inert gas) and oocyst-sized (1.6, 2.9, and 4.9 ??m diameter) carboxylated polystyrene microspheres into karst limestone of the Biscayne aquifer characterized by a complex triple (matrix, touching-vug, and conduit) porosity. Fractional recoveries 97 m down gradient were inversely related to diameter and ranged from 2.9% for the 4.9 ??m microspheres to 5.8% for 1.6 ??m microspheres. Their centers of mass arrived at the pumping well approximately threefold earlier than that of the nonreactive tracer SF6 (gas), underscoring the need for use of colloid tracers and field-scale tracer tests for these kinds of evaluations. In a modified triaxial cell using near in situ chemical conditions, 2.9 and 4.9 ??m microspheres underestimated by fourfold to sixfold the attachment potential of the less electronegative 2.9-4.1 ??m oocysts in the matrix porosity of limestone core samples. The field and laboratory results collectively suggested that it may take 200-300 m of transport to ensure even a 1-log unit removal of oocysts, even though the limestone surfaces exhibited a substantive capability for their sorptive removal. The study further demonstrated the utility of microspheres as oocyst surrogates in field-scale assessments of well vulnerability in limestone, provided that differences in attachment behaviors between oocysts and microspheres are taken into account. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. A novel adjuvant-free H fusion system for the production of recombinant immunogens in Escherichia coli: Its application to a 12 kDa antigen from Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sofia J; Silva, Pedro; Almeida, André; Conceição, Antónia; Domingues, Lucília; Castro, António

    2013-01-01

    The production of recombinant antigens in Escherichia coli and specific polyclonal antibodies for diagnosis and therapy is still a challenge for world-wide researchers. Several different strategies have been explored to improve both antigen and antibody production, all of them depending on a successful expression and immunogenicity of the antigen. Gene fusion technology attempted to address these challenges: fusion partners have been applied to optimize recombinant antigen production in E. coli, and to increase protein immunogenicity. Taking a 12-kDa surface adhesion antigen from Cryptosporidium parvum (CP12) by example, the novel H fusion partner was presented in this work as an attractive option for the development of recombinant immunogens and its adjuvant-free immunization. The H tag (of only 1 kDa) efficiently triggered a CP12-specific immune response, and it also improved the immunization procedure without requiring co-administration of adjuvants. Moreover, polyclonal antibodies raised against the HCP12 fusion antigen detected native antigen structures displayed on the surface of C. parvum oocysts. The H tag proved to be an advanced strategy and promising technology for the diagnosis and therapy of C. parvum infections in animals and humans, allowing a rapid and simple recombinant production of the CP12 antigen.

  10. Solar Radiation Induces Non-Nuclear Perturbations and a False Start to Regulated Exocytosis in Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    King, Brendon J.; Hoefel, Daniel; Ee Wong, Pao; Monis, Paul T.

    2010-01-01

    Stratospheric ozone depletion, climate warming and acidification of aquatic ecosystems have resulted in elevated levels of solar radiation reaching many aquatic environments with an increased deleterious impact on a wide range of living organisms. While detrimental effects on living organisms are thought to occur primarily through DNA damage, solar UV can also damage cellular proteins, lipids and signalling pathways. Cryptosporidium, a member of the eukaryotic phylum Apicomplexa, contain numerous vesicular secretory organelles and their discharge via regulated exocytosis is essential for the successful establishment of infection. Using flow cytometric techniques we demonstrate that solar UV rapidly induces sporozoite exocytosis resulting in a significant reduction in the ability of sporozoites to attach and invade host cells. We found that solar UV induced sporozoite membrane depolarization, resulting in reduced cellular ATP and increased cytosolic calcium. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in the internal granularity of sporozoites, indicative of apical organelle discharge, which was confirmed by analysis of sporozoites with an exocytosis-sensitive dye. The precise timing of apical organelle discharge in the presence of a compatible host cell is critical for sporozoite attachment and invasion. Our results demonstrate for the first time how solar UV radiation can interfere with exocytosis, a fundamental cellular process in all eukaryotic cells. We contend that not only may the forecast increases in solar radiation in both aquatic and terrestrial environments significantly affect members of the Apicomplexa, solar UV-induced membrane depolarizations resulting in cytosolic calcium perturbation may affect a wider range of eukaryotic organisms through antagonistic effects on a myriad of calcium dependant cellular functions. PMID:20668710

  11. Is real-time PCR-based diagnosis similar in performance to routine parasitological examination for the identification of Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium parvum/Cryptosporidium hominis and Entamoeba histolytica from stool samples? Evaluation of a new commercial multiplex PCR assay and literature review.

    PubMed

    Laude, A; Valot, S; Desoubeaux, G; Argy, N; Nourrisson, C; Pomares, C; Machouart, M; Le Govic, Y; Dalle, F; Botterel, F; Bourgeois, N; Cateau, E; Leterrier, M; Le Pape, P; Morio, F

    2016-02-01

    Microscopy is the reference standard for routine laboratory diagnosis in faecal parasitology but there is growing interest in alternative methods to overcome the limitations of microscopic examination, which is time-consuming and highly dependent on an operator's skills and expertise. Compared with microscopy, DNA detection by PCR is simple and can offer a better turnaround time. However, PCR performances remain difficult to assess as most studies have been conducted on a limited number of positive clinical samples and used in-house PCR methods. Our aim was to evaluate a new multiplex PCR assay (G-DiaParaTrio; Diagenode Diagnostics), targeting Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium parvum/Cryptosporidium hominis and Entamoeba histolytica. To minimize the turnaround time, PCR was coupled with automated DNA extraction (QiaSymphony; Qiagen). The PCR assay was evaluated using a reference panel of 185 samples established by routine microscopic examination using a standardized protocol including Ziehl-Neelsen staining and adhesin detection by ELISA (E. histolytica II; TechLab). This panel, collected from 12 French parasitology laboratories, included 135 positive samples for G. intestinalis (n = 38), C. parvum/C. hominis (n = 26), E. histolytica (n = 5), 21 other gastrointestinal parasites, together with 50 negative samples. In all, the G-DiaParaTrio multiplex PCR assay identified 38 G. intestinalis, 25 C. parvum/C. hominis and five E. histolytica leading to sensitivity/specificity of 92%/100%, 96%/100% and 100%/100% for G. intestinalis, C. parvum/C. hominis and E. histolytica, respectively. This new multiplex PCR assay offers fast and reliable results, similar to microscopy-driven diagnosis for the detection of these gastrointestinal protozoa, allowing its implementation in routine clinical practice.

  12. First description of Cryptosporidium hominis GP60 genotype IkA20G1 and Cryptosporidium parvum GP60 genotypes IIaA18G3R1 and IIaA15G2R1 in foals in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Sandra Valéria; Widmer, Giovanni; de Brito, Roberta Lomonte Lemos; Zucatto, Anaiza Simão; de Aquino, Monally Conceição Costa; Oliveira, Bruno César Miranda; Nakamura, Alex Akira; Neto, Luiz da Silveira; Carvalho, João Gabriel Balizardo; Gomes, Jancarlo Ferreira; Meireles, Marcelo Vasconcelos; Bresciani, Katia Denise Saraiva

    2017-01-15

    The present study focuses on Cryptosporidium infections of foals in Brazil. A total of 92 animals of different breeds from 11 farms in the vicinity of Araçatuba in the state of São Paulo, were examined. According to PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene, Cryptosporidium sp. DNA was detected in 21.7% (20/92) of foals. Good quality 18S rRNA, actin, HSP70 and gp60 genes nPCR amplicons were obtained from five fecal samples. PCR amplification and sequencing of a fragment of the GP60 sporozoite surface glycoprotein gene revealed C. parvum genotypes IIaA18G3R1, IIaA15G2R1. Interestingly, we also detected in two foals a GP60 genotype related to the human parasite C. hominis.

  13. COMPARISON OF FILTRATION METHODS FOR PRIMARY RECOVERY OF CRYPTOSPORIIDUM PARVUM FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Waterborne disease outbreaks from contaminated drinking water have been linked to the protozoan parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum. To improve monitoring for this agent, the USEPA developed Method 1622 for isolation and detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water. Method 1622 i...

  14. Synthesis and modulation properties of imidazo[4,5-b]pyridin-7-one and indazole-4,7-dione derivatives towards the Cryptosporidium parvum CpABC3 transporter.

    PubMed

    Zeinyeh, Waël; Xia, Hexue; Lawton, Philippe; Radix, Sylvie; Marminon, Christelle; Nebois, Pascal; Walchshofer, Nadia

    2010-06-01

    The syntheses of new N-polysubstituted imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-7-one (IP, 5 and 8a-8f) and indazole-4,7-dione (ID, 9 and 10) derivatives are described. The binding affinity of IP and ID towards the recombinant Nucleotide Binding Domain NBD1 of Cryptosporidium parvum CpABC3 was evaluated by intrinsic fluorescence quenching. IP induced a moderate quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of H6-NBD1 whereas IDs 9 and 10 showed a binding affinity comparable to the ATP analogue TNP-ATP. In addition, 8d, 8e and 10 were shown to be competitive inhibitors of the ATPase activity, but with low affinity. These compounds could thus act like some flavonoid derivatives, which can partly overlap both the nucleotide-binding site and the adjacent hydrophobic steroid-binding region of mammalian P-glycoproteins.

  15. Stimulation of innate immunity in newborn kids against Cryptosporidium parvum infection-challenge by intranasal/per-oral administration of liposomal formulation of N-L18-norAbu-GMDP adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Turánek, J; Kasná, A; Koudela, B; Ledvina, M; Miller, A D

    2005-11-01

    The effects of a liposomal preparation of lipophilic immunomodulator beta-D-GlcNstearoyl-(1-4)-norMurNAc-L-Abu-D-isoGln (N-L18-norAbu-GMDP) were investigated on resistance to Cryptosporidium parvum infection in neonatal kids. The liposomal preparation was administered subcutaneously or intranasally/orally (i.n./p.o.) twice at doses of 100 microg, 200 microg, or 1000 microg per kid pre-infection challenge. The treatment schemes were (i) 72 and 24 h pre-infection challenge, (ii) 24 h pre-infection challenge and 24 h post-infection challenge (oral inoculation with 1 x 10(7) oocysts of C. parvum in 5 ml of PBS). Administration of liposomal N-L18-norAbu-GMDP by i.n./p.o. route at the cumulative dose of 2000 microg per kid 72 and 24 h pre-infection challenge, lead to substantially increased clearance of coccidian parasites from various parts of the intestine. On the basis of histological examination, the distribution of cryptosporidia in the intestine and the severity of the infection, treated kids were classified on day 5 as having a strong reduction in infection in comparison to the control group (P < 0.05). No cryptosporidia were found on the mucosal surface of treated kids by day 10, while the intestines of the control kids were still infected. All doses and routes of administration were judged effective with respect to suppression of cryptosporidia infections.

  16. Genetic Diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in Captive Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lihua; Ryan, Una M.; Graczyk, Thaddeus K.; Limor, Josef; Li, Lixia; Kombert, Mark; Junge, Randy; Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Zhou, Ling; Arrowood, Michael J.; Koudela, Břetislav; Modrý, David; Lal, Altaf A.

    2004-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium in reptiles was analyzed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene. A total of 123 samples were analyzed, of which 48 snake samples, 24 lizard samples, and 3 tortoise samples were positive for Cryptosporidium. Nine different types of Cryptosporidium were found, including Cryptosporidium serpentis, Cryptosporidium desert monitor genotype, Cryptosporidium muris, Cryptosporidium parvum bovine and mouse genotypes, one C. serpentis-like parasite in a lizard, two new Cryptosporidium spp. in snakes, and one new Cryptosporidium sp. in tortoises. C. serpentis and the desert monitor genotype were the most common parasites and were found in both snakes and lizards, whereas the C. muris and C. parvum parasites detected were probably the result of ingestion of infected rodents. Sequence and biologic characterizations indicated that the desert monitor genotype was Cryptosporidium saurophilum. Two host-adapted C. serpentis genotypes were found in snakes and lizards. PMID:14766569

  17. Genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in captive reptiles.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lihua; Ryan, Una M; Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Limor, Josef; Li, Lixia; Kombert, Mark; Junge, Randy; Sulaiman, Irshad M; Zhou, Ling; Arrowood, Michael J; Koudela, Bretislav; Modrý, David; Lal, Altaf A

    2004-02-01

    The genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium in reptiles was analyzed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene. A total of 123 samples were analyzed, of which 48 snake samples, 24 lizard samples, and 3 tortoise samples were positive for Cryptosporidium: Nine different types of Cryptosporidium were found, including Cryptosporidium serpentis, Cryptosporidium desert monitor genotype, Cryptosporidium muris, Cryptosporidium parvum bovine and mouse genotypes, one C. serpentis-like parasite in a lizard, two new Cryptosporidium spp. in snakes, and one new Cryptosporidium sp. in tortoises. C. serpentis and the desert monitor genotype were the most common parasites and were found in both snakes and lizards, whereas the C. muris and C. parvum parasites detected were probably the result of ingestion of infected rodents. Sequence and biologic characterizations indicated that the desert monitor genotype was Cryptosporidium saurophilum. Two host-adapted C. serpentis genotypes were found in snakes and lizards.

  18. New developments in Cryptosporidium research.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Una; Hijjawi, Nawal

    2015-05-01

    Cryptosporidium is an enteric parasite that is considered the second greatest cause of diarrhoea and death in children after rotavirus. Currently, 27 species are recognised as valid and of these, Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum are responsible for the majority of infections in humans. Molecular and biological studies indicate that Cryptosporidium is more closely related to gregarine parasites rather than to coccidians. The identification of gregarine-like gamont stages and the ability of Cryptosporidium to complete its life cycle in the absence of host cells further confirm its relationship with gregarines. This opens new avenues into the investigation of pathogenesis, epidemiology, treatment and control of Cryptosporidium. Effective drug treatments and vaccines are not yet available due, in part, to the technical challenges of working on Cryptosporidium in the laboratory. Whole genome sequencing and metabolomics have expanded our understanding of the biochemical requirements of this organism and have identified new drug targets. To effectively combat this important pathogen, increased funding is essential.

  19. Use of carboxylated microspheres to assess transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts at the Russian River water supply facility, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metge, D.W.; Harvey, R.W.; Anders, R.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Seymour, D.; Jasperse, J.

    2007-01-01

    Carboxylated microspheres were employed as surrogates to assess the transport potential of Cryptosporidium parvumoocysts during forced- and natural-gradient tests conducted in July and October 2004. The tests involved poorly-sorted, near-surface sediments where groundwater is pumped from an alluvial aquifer underlying the Russian River, Sonoma County, CA. In an off channel infiltration basin and within the river, a mixture (2-, 3-, and 5- ??m diameters) of fluorescently-labeled carboxylated microspheres and bromide tracers were used in two injection and recovery test to assess sediment removal efficiency for the microspheres. Bottom sediments varied considerably in their filtration efficiency for Cryptosporidium.

  20. Effects of sediment-associated extractable metals, degree of sediment grain sorting, and dissolved organic carbon upon cryptosporidium parvum removal and transport within riverbank filtration sediments, Sonoma County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metge, D.W.; Harvey, R.W.; Aiken, G.R.; Anders, R.; Lincoln, G.; Jasperse, J.; Hill, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    Oocysts of the protozoan pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum are of particular concern for riverbank filtration (RBF) operations because of their persistence, ubiquity, and resistance to chlorine disinfection. At the Russian River RBF site (Sonoma County, CA), transport of C. parvum oocysts and oocyst-sized (3 ??m) carboxylate-modified microspheres through poorly sorted (sorting indices, ??1, up to 3.0) and geochemically heterogeneous sediments collected between 2 and 25 m below land surface (bls) were assessed. Removal was highly sensitive to variations in both the quantity of extractable metals (mainly Fe and Al) and degree of grain sorting. In flow-through columns, there was a log-linear relationship (r2 = 0.82 at p < 0.002) between collision efficiency (??, the probability that colloidal collisions with grain surfaces would result in attachment) and extractable metals, and a linear relationship (r2 = 0.99 at p < 0.002) between ?? and ??1. Collectively, variability in extractable metals and grain sorting accounted for ???83% of the variability in ?? (at p < 0.0002) along the depth profiles. Amendments of 2.2 mg L-1 of Russian River dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reduced ?? for oocysts by 4-5 fold. The highly reactive hydrophobic organic acid (HPOA) fraction was particularly effective in re-entraining sediment-attached microspheres. However, the transport-enhancing effects of the riverine DOC did not appear to penetrate very deeply into the underlying sediments, judging from high ?? values (???1.0) observed for oocysts being advected through unamended sediments collected at ???2 m bls. This study suggests that in evaluating the efficacy of RBF operations to remove oocysts, it may be necessary to consider not only the geochemical nature and size distribution of the sediment grains, but also the degrees of sediment sorting and the concentration, reactivity, and penetration of the source water DOC. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. First molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Alyousefi, N A; Mahdy, M A K; Lim, Y A L; Xiao, L; Mahmud, R

    2013-05-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite of humans and animals and has a worldwide distribution. The parasite has a unique epidemiology in Middle Eastern countries where the IId subtype family of Cryptosporidium parvum dominates. However, there has been no information on Cryptosporidium species in Yemen. Thus, this study was conducted in Yemen to examine the distribution of Cryptosporidium species and subtype families. Fecal samples were collected from 335 patients who attended hospitals in Sana'a city. Cryptosporidium species were determined by PCR and sequence analysis of the 18 s rRNA gene. Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis subtypes were identified based on sequence analysis of the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. Out of 335 samples, 33 (9.9%) were positive for Cryptosporidium. Of them, 97% were identified as C. parvum whilst 1 case (3%) was caused by C. hominis. All 7 C. parvum isolates subtyped belonged to the IIaA15G2R1 subtype. The common occurrence of the zoonotic IIa subtype family of C. parvum highlights the potential occurrence of zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis in Yemen. However, this postulation needs confirmation with future molecular epidemiological studies of cryptosporidiosis in both humans and animals in Yemen.

  2. UV Inactivation of Cryptosporidium hominis as Measured in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Anne M.; Linden, Karl; Ciociola, Kristina M.; De Leon, Ricardo; Widmer, Giovanni; Rochelle, Paul A.

    2005-01-01

    The Cryptosporidium spp. UV disinfection studies conducted to date have used Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. However, Cryptosporidium hominis predominates in human cryptosporidiosis infections, so there is a critical need to assess the efficacy of UV disinfection of C. hominis. This study utilized cell culture-based methods to demonstrate that C. hominis oocysts displayed similar levels of infectivity and had the same sensitivity to UV light as C. parvum. Therefore, the water industry can be confident about extrapolating C. parvum UV disinfection data to C. hominis oocysts. PMID:15870378

  3. METHODS FOR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM SP. AND GIARDIA SP.

    EPA Science Inventory

    There have been several waterborne outbreaks of giardiasis caused by infection with Giardia lamblia, and cryptosporidiosis, caused by infection with Cryptosporidium parvum. These outbreaks have created a need to detect these organisms in source and finished drinking water. The pr...

  4. Effect of dissolved organic carbon on the transport and attachment behaviors of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and carboxylate-modified microspheres advected through temperate humic and tropical volcanic agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Mohanram, Arvind; Ray, Chittaranjan; Metge, David W; Barber, Larry B; Ryan, Joseph N; Harvey, Ronald W

    2012-02-21

    Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and microspheres in two disparate (a clay- and Fe-rich, volcanic and a temperate, humic) agricultural soils were studied in the presence and absence of 100 mg L(-1) of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), and Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) at pH 5.0-6.0. Transport of carboxylate-modified, 1.8 μm microspheres in soil columns was highly sensitive to the nature of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), whereas oocysts transport was more affected by soil mineralogy. SDBS increased transport of microspheres from 48% to 87% through the tropical soil and from 43% to 93% in temperate soil. In contrast, SRHA reduced transport of microspheres from 48% to 28% in tropical soil and from 43% to 16% in temperate soil. SDBS also increased oocysts transport through the temperate soil 5-fold, whereas no oocyst transport was detected in tropical soil. SRHA had only a nominal effect in increasing oocysts transport in tropical soil, but caused a 6-fold increase in transport through the temperate soil. Amendments of only 4 mg L(-1) SRHA and SDBS decreased oocyst hydrophobicity from 66% to 20% and from 66% to 5%, respectively. However, SDBS increased microsphere hydrophobicity from 16% to 33%. Soil fines, which includes clays, and SRHA, both caused the oocysts zeta potential (ζ) to become more negative, but caused the highly hydrophilic microspheres to become less negatively charged. The disparate behaviors of the two colloids in the presence of an ionic surfactant and natural organic matter suggest that microspheres may not be suitable surrogates for oocysts in certain types of soils. These results indicate that whether or not DOC inhibits or promotes transport of oocysts and microspheres in agricultural soils and by how much, depends not only on the surface characteristics of the colloid, but the nature of the DOC and the soil mineralogy.

  5. Cryptosporidium Pathogenicity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Bouzid, Maha; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Tyler, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite of medical and veterinary importance that causes gastroenteritis in a variety of vertebrate hosts. Several studies have reported different degrees of pathogenicity and virulence among Cryptosporidium species and isolates of the same species as well as evidence of variation in host susceptibility to infection. The identification and validation of Cryptosporidium virulence factors have been hindered by the renowned difficulties pertaining to the in vitro culture and genetic manipulation of this parasite. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in identifying putative virulence factors for Cryptosporidium. This progress has been accelerated since the publication of the Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis genomes, with the characterization of over 25 putative virulence factors identified by using a variety of immunological and molecular techniques and which are proposed to be involved in aspects of host-pathogen interactions from adhesion and locomotion to invasion and proliferation. Progress has also been made in the contribution of host factors that are associated with variations in both the severity and risk of infection. Here we provide a review comprised of the current state of knowledge on Cryptosporidium infectivity, pathogenesis, and transmissibility in light of our contemporary understanding of microbial virulence. PMID:23297262

  6. FINGERPRINTING OF C. PARVUM BY MATRIX ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum, an enteric protozoan pathogen, are responsible for the worst microbial waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis in recent history. The 1993 outbreak in Milwaukee, WI, sickened approximately 403,000 individuals, resulting in the hospitalizatio...

  7. USE OF LONG ACTING STEROID METHYLPREDNISOLONE ACETATE FOR THE PROLONGATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM SP. IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current protocols for Cryptosporidium sp. propagation in mice vary according to the strain and age of mouse as well as the species of Cryptosporidium. Cryptosporidium muris is a natural parasite of mice, but only neonatal mice are susceptible to C. parvum infection. Published C...

  8. COMPARISON OF TISSUE CULTURE AND ANIMAL MODELS FOR ASSESSMENT OF CRYPTOSPRIDIUM PARVUM INFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data from three different disinfection studies using both cell culture and mouse infectivity to assess Cryptosporidium parvum inactivation were evaluated in a total of 35 comparison including process controls and treated samples. C. parvum infectivity in the in vitro FDM-MPN assa...

  9. Molecular Characterization of Isolates of Waterborne Cryptosporidium spp. Collected during an Outbreak of Gastroenteritis in South Burgundy, France

    PubMed Central

    Dalle, Frédéric; Roz, Pascale; Dautin, Guillaume; Di-Palma, Marc; Kohli, Evelyne; Sire-Bidault, C.; Fleischmann, Marie George; Gallay, Anne; Carbonel, Sylvia; Bon, Fabienne; Tillier, Claude; Beaudeau, Pascal; Bonnin, Alain

    2003-01-01

    In September 2001, a waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred in eastern France. Of 31 fecal samples from symptomatic individuals, 19 tested positive for Cryptosporidium with two PCRs targeting the Hsp70 and the 18S rRNA genes of Cryptosporidium. Sequencing of the PCR fragments produced sequences identical to that of Cryptosporidium parvum genotype 1. PMID:12791906

  10. Molecular characterization of isolates of waterborne Cryptosporidium spp. collected during an outbreak of gastroenteritis in South Burgundy, France.

    PubMed

    Dalle, Frédéric; Roz, Pascale; Dautin, Guillaume; Di-Palma, Marc; Kohli, Evelyne; Sire-Bidault, C; Fleischmann, Marie George; Gallay, Anne; Carbonel, Sylvia; Bon, Fabienne; Tillier, Claude; Beaudeau, Pascal; Bonnin, Alain

    2003-06-01

    In September 2001, a waterborne outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred in eastern France. Of 31 fecal samples from symptomatic individuals, 19 tested positive for Cryptosporidium with two PCRs targeting the Hsp70 and the 18S rRNA genes of CRYPTOSPORIDIUM: Sequencing of the PCR fragments produced sequences identical to that of Cryptosporidium parvum genotype 1.

  11. Molecular Surveillance of Cryptosporidium spp. in Raw Wastewater in Milwaukee: Implications for Understanding Outbreak Occurrence and Transmission Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ling; Singh, Ajaib; Jiang, Jianlin; Xiao, Lihua

    2003-01-01

    Six Cryptosporidium spp. were found in 50 of 179 Milwaukee wastewater samples collected weekly over a year. Of the eight subtypes of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum present, allele Ib was found in 14 of 16 samples, and its sequence was identical to that of the subtype in human samples from the 1993 Milwaukee outbreak of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:14605176

  12. Molecular Genotyping of Viable Cryptosporidium Oocysts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium is a chlorination-resistant protozoan parasite that causes a self-limiting diarrheal disease in the immunocompetent or severe chronic diarrhea in the immunocompromised. Two species, C. parvum and C. hominis, cause most cases of cryptosporidiosis in humans, while C...

  13. Surveillance Systems for Waterborne Cryptosporidium: US EPA method 1523 and Beyond

    EPA Science Inventory

    Waterborne cryptosporidiosis remains a significant public health concern in countries around the world. Many species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium contaminate drinking water sources, but C. parvum and C. hominis remain the two predominant species known to cause waterborne dis...

  14. SPECIES AND GENUS DIFFERENTIATION OF PARASITES (GIARDIA AND CRYPTOSPORIDIUM) BY MALDI - MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protozoan parasites, Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia, have been responsible for numerous waterborne outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in the United States. The 1993 cryptosporidiosis outbreak in Milwaukee affected approximately 400,000 people and resulted in o...

  15. MALDI-MIS INVESTIGATIONS OF DRINKING WATER PATHOGENS--GIARDIA AND CRYPTOSPORIDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protozoan parasites, Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia, have been responsible for numerous waterborne outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in the United States. The 1993 cryptosporidiosis outbreak in Milwaukee affected approximately 400,000 people and resulted in o...

  16. Removal Efficiencies and Attachment Coefficients for Cryptosporidium in Sandy Alluvial Riverbank Sediment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riverbank filtration has been shown to be effective at removing viable Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and, therefore, drinking water systems that employ riverbank filtration may receive additional treatment credits beyond that which they can obtain using traditional engineering a...

  17. Literature Reference for Cryptosporidium spp. (Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 1999. 65(9): 3936–3941)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Procedures are described for analysis of animal samples using tissue culture techniques that may be adapted for assessment of solid, particulate, liquid and water samples contaminated with Cryptosporidium parvum.

  18. Genetic Diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. within a Remote Population of Soay Sheep on St. Kilda Islands, Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, L.; Craig, B. H.; Jones, B.

    2013-01-01

    This is the first report to characterize the genotypes and subtypes of Cryptosporidium species infecting a geographically isolated population of feral Soay sheep (Ovis aries) on Hirta, St. Kilda, Scotland, during two distinct periods: (i) prior to a population crash and (ii) as host numbers increased. Cryptosporidium DNA was extracted by freeze-thawing of immunomagnetically separated (IMS) bead-oocyst complexes, and species were identified following nested-PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)/PCR sequencing at two Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA loci. Two hundred fifty-five samples were analyzed, and the prevalent Cryptosporidium species in single infections were identified as C. hominis (11.4% of all samples tested), C. parvum (9%), C. xiaoi (12.5%), and C. ubiquitum (6.7%). Cryptosporidium parvum was also present with other Cryptosporidium species in 27.1% of all samples tested. Cryptosporidium parvum- and C. hominis-positive isolates were genotyped using two nested-PCR assays that amplify the Cryptosporidium glycoprotein 60 gene (GP60). GP60 gene analysis showed the presence of two Cryptosporidium genotypes, namely, C. parvum IIaA19G1R1 and C. hominis IbA10G2. This study reveals a higher diversity of Cryptosporidium species/genotypes than was previously expected. We suggest reasons for the high diversity of Cryptosporidium parasites within this isolated population and discuss the implications for our understanding of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:23354707

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of Cryptosporidium Parasites Based on the Small-Subunit rRNA Gene Locus

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lihua; Escalante, Lillian; Yang, Chunfu; Sulaiman, Irshad; Escalante, Anannias A.; Montali, Richard J.; Fayer, Ronald; Lal, Altaf A.

    1999-01-01

    Biological data support the hypothesis that there are multiple species in the genus Cryptosporidium, but a recent analysis of the available genetic data suggested that there is insufficient evidence for species differentiation. In order to resolve the controversy in the taxonomy of this parasite genus, we characterized the small-subunit rRNA genes of Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium baileyi, Cryptosporidium muris, and Cryptosporidium serpentis and performed a phylogenetic analysis of the genus Cryptosporidium. Our study revealed that the genus Cryptosporidium contains the phylogenetically distinct species C. parvum, C. muris, C. baileyi, and C. serpentis, which is consistent with the biological characteristics and host specificity data. The Cryptosporidium species formed two clades, with C. parvum and C. baileyi belonging to one clade and C. muris and C. serpentis belonging to the other clade. Within C. parvum, human genotype isolates and guinea pig isolates (known as Cryptosporidium wrairi) each differed from bovine genotype isolates by the nucleotide sequence in four regions. A C. muris isolate from cattle was also different from parasites isolated from a rock hyrax and a Bactrian camel. Minor differences were also detected between C. serpentis isolates from snakes and lizards. Based on the genetic information, a species- and strain-specific PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism diagnostic tool was developed. PMID:10103253

  20. BIALLELIC POLYMORPHISM IN THE INTRON REGION OF B-TUBULIN GENE OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARASITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nucleotide sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified intron region of the Cryptosporidium parvum B-tubulin gene in 26 human and 15 animal isolates revealed distinct genetic polymorphism between the human and bovine genotypes. The separation of 2 genotypes of C. parvum is...

  1. COMPARING METHODS FOR ESTIMATING {ITAL CRYPTOSPORIDIUM} SPP. OOCYST CONCENTRATIONS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    {ital Cryptosporidium parvum} in drinking water is a threat to public health. Estimating the parasite burden of {ital C. parvum} in water to be treated for use as drinking water constitutes an integral element to developing strategies for protecting public health in a cost effec...

  2. AGING OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUUM OOCYSTS STUDIED BY MALDI-TOF MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite, and it causes a potentially fatal gastrointestinal illness. This water borne pathogen has been the subject of several high profile disease outbreaks in the US and abroad. C. parvum presents challenges for both compliance monitorin...

  3. Wide distribution of Cryptosporidium bovis and the deer-like genotype in bovines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently reported that on 14 dairy farms from Vermont to Florida ~85% of pre-weaned dairy calves were infected with zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum whereas only 1-2% of post-weaned calves and 1-2 year-old heifers were infected with this species. Cryptosporidium bovis and the deer-like genotype w...

  4. Molecular identification of Giardia and Cryptosporidium from dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Sotiriadou, Isaia; Pantchev, Nikola; Gassmann, Doreen; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to diagnose the presence of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in household animals using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequence analysis. One hundred faecal samples obtained from 81 dogs and 19 cats were investigated. The Cryptosporidium genotypes were determined by sequencing a fragment of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene, while the Giardia Assemblages were determined through analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) locus. Isolates from five dogs and two cats were positive by PCR for the presence of Giardia, and their sequences matched the zoonotic Assemblage A of Giardia. Cryptosporidium spp. isolated from one dog and one cat were both found to be C. parvum. One dog isolate harboured a mixed infection of C. parvum and Giardia Assemblage A. These findings support the growing evidence that household animals are potential reservoirs of the zoonotic pathogens Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. for infections in humans.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in livestock animals and humans in the Ismailia province of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Yosra A; Krücken, Jürgen; Nöckler, Karsten; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Zessin, Karl-H

    2013-03-31

    The zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium was studied in one of the most densely populated provinces of Egypt regarding livestock and people. In a representative survey, faecal samples from cattle, buffalo and stool samples from diarrhoeic children (<10 years) were investigated. Parameters assumed to be related to cryptosporidiosis were recorded for animals and children. Animal samples (804) were examined by the Copro-antigen RIDA(®)QUICK test, followed by PCRs targeting the 18S rDNA and gp60 genes for antigen-positive and 10% randomly selected negative samples. All 165 human samples were tested by both methods. The overall estimated prevalence of Cryptosporidium in ruminants was 32.2%, without significant difference between animal species. PCR identified 65.7% Cryptosporidium parvum, 11.8% Cryptosporidium ryanae, 4.1% Cryptosporidium bovis, and combinations of C. parvum plus C. ryanae (11.2%), C. parvum plus C. bovis (5.3%) and of C. parvum plus Cryptosporidium andersoni (1.8%), also without significant differences in species occurrence between cattle and buffalos. The human Cryptosporidium spp. prevalence was 49.1%, of which 60.5% were Cryptosporidium hominis, 38.2% C. parvum and 1.2% C. parvum plus C. bovis. Analysis of gp60 variants allocated C. parvum found in animals to the zoonotic subtype family IIa (18.9%, subtype IIaA15G1R1 only) and to IId (81.1%, mostly IIdA20G1). In humans 50% were classified as subtype family IIa (IIaA15G1R1 and IIaA15G2R1) and 50% were IIdA20G1. C. andersoni occurred only in cattle older than 1 year. In contrast, mono-infections with one of the three single Cryptosporidium species and the three combinations with C. parvum were more prevalent in cattle and buffaloes younger than 1 year, particularly in those younger than 3 months, and were predominantly subtype family IId. In human samples no Cryptosporidium were identified in children younger than 7 months. Neither place of residence nor the source of drinking-water had measurable

  6. CONCENTRATION AND DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN SURFACE WATER SAMPLES BY METHOD 1622 USING ULTRAFILTRATION AND CAPSULE FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protozoan parasite cryptosporidium parvum is known to occur widely in both source and drinking water and has caused waterborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis. To improve monitoring, the USEPA developed Method 1622 for isolation and detection of cryptosporidim oocysts in water. ...

  7. Cryptosporidium species in Australian wildlife and domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Una; Power, Michelle

    2012-11-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important enteric parasite that is transmitted via the fecal-oral route, water and food. Humans, wildlife and domestic livestock all potentially contribute Cryptosporidium to surface waters. Most species of Cryptosporidium are morphologically indistinguishable and can only be identified using molecular tools. Over 24 species have been identified and of these, 7 Cryptosporidium species/genotypes are responsible for most human cryptosporidiosis cases. In Australia, relatively few genotyping studies have been conducted. Six Cryptosporidium species (C. hominis, C. parvum, C. meleagridis, C. fayeri, C. andersoni and C. bovis) have been identified in humans in Australia. However, little is known about the contribution of animal hosts to human pathogenic strains of Cryptosporidium in drinking water catchments. In this review, we focus on the available genotyping data for native, feral and domestic animals inhabiting drinking water catchments in Australia to provide an improved understanding of the public health implications and to identify key research gaps.

  8. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts in fecal and water samples in Austria.

    PubMed

    Hassl, A; Benyr, G; Sommer, R

    2001-10-22

    Oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. were detected and differentiated by a modular arranged gene amplification procedure in various samples, mostly human stool, feces of herpetotaxa, and water, in different locations of South and Eastern Austria. Cryptosporidium parvum was found in stool samples of immunocompromised persons, in reptile feces, and in water samples. The presence of Cryptosporidium in an area is probably associated with high human population densities since water from protected sources in sparsely inhabited areas is rarely contaminated.

  9. Cryptosporidium enteritis

    MedlinePlus

    Proper sanitation and hygiene, including handwashing, are important measures for preventing this illness. Certain water filters can also reduce risk by filtering out the cryptosporidium eggs. However, ...

  10. Cryptosporidium and Giardia removal by secondary and tertiary wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Taran-Benshoshan, Marina; Ofer, Naomi; Dalit, Vaizel-Ohayon; Aharoni, Avi; Revhun, Menahem; Nitzan, Yeshayahu; Nasser, Abidelfatah M

    2015-01-01

    Wastewater disposal may be a source of environmental contamination by Cryptosporidium and Giardia. This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in raw and treated wastewater effluents. A prevalence of 100% was demonstrated for Giardia cysts in raw wastewater, at a concentration range of 10 to 12,225 cysts L(-1), whereas the concentration of Cryptosporidium oocysts in raw wastewater was 4 to 125 oocysts L(-1). The removal of Giardia cysts by secondary and tertiary treatment processes was greater than those observed for Cryptosporidium oocysts and turbidity. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were present in 68.5% and 76% of the tertiary effluent samples, respectively, at an average concentration of 0.93 cysts L(-1) and 9.94 oocysts L(-1). A higher detection limit of Cryptosporidium oocysts in wastewater was observed for nested PCR as compared to immune fluorescent assay (IFA). C. hominis was found to be the dominant genotype in wastewater effluents followed by C. parvum and C. andersoni or C. muris. Giardia was more prevalent than Cryptosporidium in the studied community and treatment processes were more efficient for the removal of Giardia than Cryptosporidium. Zoonotic genotypes of Cryptosporidium were also present in the human community. To assess the public health significance of Cryptosporidium oocysts present in tertiary effluent, viability (infectivity) needs to be assessed.

  11. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM VIRULENCE DETERMINANTS-ARE WE THERE YET? (R828035)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to Cryptosporidium parvum in healthy individuals results in transient infection that may be asymptomatic or can result in self-limited diarrhoea. In contrast, acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients with cryptosporidiosis can experience severe manifestatio...

  12. DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN SOURCE AND FINISHED WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous waterborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis have occurred with the most notable being the 1993 episode in Milwaukee. As a result, the past decade has seen a massive effort expended on the development of methods to detect Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in source and finish...

  13. TESTING METHODS FOR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM SPP. IN WATER SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large waterborne outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S.A. in 1993 prompted a search for ways to prevent large-scale waterborne outbreaks of protozoan parasitoses. Methods for detecting Cryptosporidium parvum play an integral role in strategies that lead to...

  14. UTILITY OF SURROGATES FOR MEASURING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYST INFECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The water industry must assess whether Cryptosporidium oocysts detected in source and finished water are viable and/or infectious. Initial approaches measuring the infectious nature of C. parvum oocysts have focused on in vitro excystation and in vitro vital dye staining. Recen...

  15. UTILITY OF SURROGATES FOR MEASURING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS INFECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The water industry must assess whether Cryptosporidium oocysts detected in source and finished water are viable and/or infectious. Initial approaches measuring the infectious nature of C. parvum oocysts have focused on in vitro excystation and in vitro vital dye staining. Recen...

  16. Cryptosporidium sp. infections in green turtles, Chelonia mydas, as a potential source of marine waterborne oocysts in the Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graczyk, T.K.; Balazs, G.H.; Work, T.M.; Aguirre, A.A.; Ellis, D.M.; Murakawa, Shawn K. K.; Morris, Robert

    1997-01-01

    For the first time, Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts were identified in fecal and intestinal samples from free-ranging marine turtles, Chelonia mydas, from the Hawaiian Islands. The oocysts produced positive reactions with commercial test kits recommended for the detection of human-infectious waterborne oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum.

  17. REMOVAL OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM BY IN-LINE FILTRATION AS A FUNCTION OF OOCYST AGE AND PRESERVATION METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the impacts of oocyst preservation method and age on the removal of seeded Cryptosporidium oocysts by in-line filtration. An existing study has investigated the infectivity of Cryptosporidium Parvum as a function of preservation method and oocyst age. Simila...

  18. REMOVAL OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM BY IN-LINE FILTRATION AS A FUNCTION OF OOCYST AGE AND PRESERVATION METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined the impacts of oocyst preservation method and age on the removal of seeded Cryptosporidium oocysts by in-line filtration. An existing study has investigated the infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum as a function of preservation method and oocyst age. Simila...

  19. Zoonotic Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in pet chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera) in China.

    PubMed

    Qi, Meng; Luo, Nannan; Wang, Haiyan; Yu, Fuchang; Wang, Rongjun; Huang, Jianying; Zhang, Longxian

    2015-10-01

    Cryptosporidium and Enterocytozoon bieneusi are the most prevalent protist pathogens responsible for inducing human and animal diseases worldwide. The aim of the present work was to determine the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi in pet chinchillas in China. One hundred forty fecal samples were collected from four cities: Beijing, Zhengzhou, Anyang and Guiyang. They were then examined with PCR amplification of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) of Cryptosporidium spp. and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal RNA of E. bieneusi. The infection rates for Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi were 10.0% and 3.6%, respectively. Sequence analysis of SSU rRNA gene products identified two Cryptosporidium spp., Cryptosporidium ubiquitum (n=13) and Cryptosporidium parvum (n=1). Subtyping with the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene showed that all C. ubiquitum isolates belonged to zoonotic subtype family XIId, while the subtype of the C. parvum isolate could not be identified. Two E. bieneusi genotypes were identified in five samples, zoonotic genotypes BEB6 (n=3) and D (n=2). This is the first report of C. ubiquitum and C. parvum, and E. bieneusi in chinchillas. This result indicates that pet chinchillas may be a potential source of human infection with Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi.

  20. Molecular detection of Cryptosporidium spp. infections in water buffaloes from northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Inpankaew, Tawin; Jiyipong, Tawisa; Wongpanit, Kannika; Pinyopanuwat, Nongnuch; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Kengradomkij, Chanya; Xuan, Xuenan; Igarashi, Ikuo; Xiao, Lihua; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn

    2014-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the individual and herd-level prevalence and genotype of Cryptosporidium and to identify putative risk factors associated with Cryptosporidium spp. infections in water buffaloes in northeast Thailand. Fecal samples from 600 water buffaloes of 287 farms in six provinces were collected and tested using DMSO-modified acid-fast staining and polymerase chain reaction. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium infections in buffaloes was 5.7 and 8.7% among individual animals and herds, respectively. The provinces with highest infected Cryptosporidium were located in the Sakon Nakhon Basin in the northern part of the region. In addition, higher herd prevalence was observed among farms with more than five buffaloes (30%) than those with five or less animals (16.2%). Thirty (88.2%) of the 34 Cryptosporidium-positive samples were Cryptosporidium parvum and four (11.8%) were Cryptosporidium ryanae.

  1. Detection of Cryptosporidium and Identification to the Species Level by Nested PCR and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Coupe, Stephane; Sarfati, Claudine; Hamane, Samia; Derouin, Francis

    2005-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is an emerging protozoan disease associated with large waterborne outbreaks. Diagnosis relies on microscopic examination of stools, but this method cannot identify the infecting species of Cryptosporidium. We have developed a test based on nested PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) that offers simple identification of Cryptosporidium hominis, Cryptosporidium parvum, and most other human infective species in stool samples. Purified C. parvum oocysts were used for PCR development. Extracted DNA was amplified by nested PCR targeting a 214-bp fragment of the 18S RNA gene. Enzymatic restriction sites were identified by bioinformatic analysis of all published Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA sequences. Experiments with spiked stool samples gave an estimated PCR detection limit of one oocyst. Specificity was assessed by testing 68 stool samples from patients with microscopically proven cryptosporidiosis and 31 Cryptosporidium-negative stools. Sixty-seven (98.5%) of the 68 stool samples from patients with microscopically proven cryptosporidiosis and 2 of the other stool samples were positive by PCR and could be genotyped. RFLP analysis identified 36 C. hominis, 19 C. parvum, 8 Cryptosporidium meleagridis, and 6 Cryptosporidium felis or Cryptosporidium canis samples. Species determination in 26 PCR-positive cases was in full agreement with DNA sequencing of the 18S rRNA hypervariable region. The excellent sensitivity of PCR, coupled with the accuracy of RFLP for species identification, make this method a suitable tool for routine diagnosis and genotyping of Cryptosporidium in stools. PMID:15750054

  2. Cryptosporidium: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cryptosporidium Tracking in the United States CryptoNet Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... and HIV-Infected Children [PDF - 384 pages] Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ...

  3. Occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in pigs on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Budu-Amoako, Ebo; Greenwood, Spencer J; Dixon, Brent R; Barkema, Herman W; Hurnik, Daniel; Estey, Chelsie; McClure, J T

    2012-02-28

    In a cross-sectional study of 633 pigs from 21 herds on Prince Edward Island, Canada (PEI), the prevalence of infection with Cryptosporidium and Giardia, and the genotypes and species of isolates were determined in order to establish the zoonotic potential of pigs in this region. As determined by direct immunofluorescence microscopy (DFA), 18 herds (86%) and 163 animals (26%; 95% CI: 22-29%) tested positive for Cryptosporidium, while just 3 herds (14%) and 6 animals (1%; 95% CI: 0.4-2%) tested positive for Giardia. Cryptosporidium spp. isolates were detected in 39% (95% CI: 34-44%) of weanlings (1-3 months of age) and 9% (95% CI: 6-13) of sows (>8months of age). Molecular characterization using the 18S rDNA and HSP70 gene fragments revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium sp. pig genotype II, C. suis, C. parvum, and Cryptosporidium sp. mouse genotype. Among the 113 isolates of Cryptosporidium spp. successfully genotyped, pig genotype II (61%) predominated, with C. suis (36%) being the next most prominant isolate. C. parvum (2%; two isolates) and Cryptosporidium sp. mouse genotype (0.9%; one isolate) were only occasionally isolated. The only two Cryptosporidium-positive genotyped isolates from sows included one each of C. suis and Cryptosporidium sp. pig genotype II. All but one of the six Giardia positive isolates were detected in weanling pigs. None of the Giardia-positive isolates was amenable to PCR. This study demonstrates that Cryptosporidium spp. are highly prevalent in pigs on PEI, Canada, are found mostly in weanlings (1-3 months of age). Furthermore, the pigs are primarily infected by the host-specific genotypes and species, Cryptosporidium sp. pig genotype II and C. suis, whereas the zoonotic C. parvum is rare. Giardia duodenalis is only occasionally found in pigs. These findings suggest that domestic pigs on PEI, Canada, likely do not pose a significant health risk to humans from these parasites.

  4. Identification of Cryptosporidium Species in Fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Léman) in France.

    PubMed

    Certad, Gabriela; Dupouy-Camet, Jean; Gantois, Nausicaa; Hammouma-Ghelboun, Ourida; Pottier, Muriel; Guyot, Karine; Benamrouz, Sadia; Osman, Marwan; Delaire, Baptiste; Creusy, Colette; Viscogliosi, Eric; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Aliouat-Denis, Cecile Marie; Follet, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium, a protozoan parasite that can cause severe diarrhea in a wide range of vertebrates including humans, is increasingly recognized as a parasite of a diverse range of wildlife species. However, little data are available regarding the identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in wild aquatic environments, and more particularly in edible freshwater fish. To evaluate the prevalence of Cryptosporidiumspp. in fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Léman) in France, 41 entire fish and 100 fillets (cuts of fish flesh) were collected from fishery suppliers around the lake. Nested PCR using degenerate primers followed by sequence analysis was used. Five fish species were identified as potential hosts of Cryptosporidium: Salvelinus alpinus, Esox lucius, Coregonus lavaretus, Perca fluviatilis, and Rutilus rutilus. The presence of Cryptosporidium spp. was found in 15 out of 41 fish (37%), distributed as follows: 13 (87%) C. parvum, 1 (7%) C. molnari, and 1 (7%) mixed infection (C. parvum and C. molnari). C. molnari was identified in the stomach, while C. parvum was found in the stomach and intestine. C. molnari was also detected in 1 out of 100 analyzed fillets. In order to identify Cryptosporidium subtypes, sequencing of the highly polymorphic 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) was performed. Among the C. parvum positive samples, three gp60 subtypes were identified: IIaA15G2R1, IIaA16G2R1, and IIaA17G2R1. Histological examination confirmed the presence of potential developmental stages of C. parvum within digestive epithelial cells. These observations suggest that C. parvum is infecting fish, rather than being passively carried. Since C. parvum is a zoonotic species, fish potentially contaminated by the same subtypes found in terrestrial mammals would be an additional source of infection for humans and animals, and may also contribute to the contamination of the environment with this parasite. Moreover, the risk of human transmission is strengthened by the

  5. Identification of Cryptosporidium Species in Fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Léman) in France

    PubMed Central

    Certad, Gabriela; Dupouy-Camet, Jean; Gantois, Nausicaa; Hammouma-Ghelboun, Ourida; Pottier, Muriel; Guyot, Karine; Benamrouz, Sadia; Osman, Marwan; Delaire, Baptiste; Creusy, Colette; Viscogliosi, Eric; Aliouat-Denis, Cecile Marie; Follet, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium, a protozoan parasite that can cause severe diarrhea in a wide range of vertebrates including humans, is increasingly recognized as a parasite of a diverse range of wildlife species. However, little data are available regarding the identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in wild aquatic environments, and more particularly in edible freshwater fish. To evaluate the prevalence of Cryptosporidiumspp. in fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Léman) in France, 41 entire fish and 100 fillets (cuts of fish flesh) were collected from fishery suppliers around the lake. Nested PCR using degenerate primers followed by sequence analysis was used. Five fish species were identified as potential hosts of Cryptosporidium: Salvelinus alpinus, Esox lucius, Coregonus lavaretus, Perca fluviatilis, and Rutilus rutilus. The presence of Cryptosporidium spp. was found in 15 out of 41 fish (37%), distributed as follows: 13 (87%) C. parvum, 1 (7%) C. molnari, and 1 (7%) mixed infection (C. parvum and C. molnari). C. molnari was identified in the stomach, while C. parvum was found in the stomach and intestine. C. molnari was also detected in 1 out of 100 analyzed fillets. In order to identify Cryptosporidium subtypes, sequencing of the highly polymorphic 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) was performed. Among the C. parvum positive samples, three gp60 subtypes were identified: IIaA15G2R1, IIaA16G2R1, and IIaA17G2R1. Histological examination confirmed the presence of potential developmental stages of C. parvum within digestive epithelial cells. These observations suggest that C. parvum is infecting fish, rather than being passively carried. Since C. parvum is a zoonotic species, fish potentially contaminated by the same subtypes found in terrestrial mammals would be an additional source of infection for humans and animals, and may also contribute to the contamination of the environment with this parasite. Moreover, the risk of human transmission is strengthened by the

  6. A new genotype of Cryptosporidium from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuehan; He, Tingmei; Zhong, Zhijun; Zhang, Hemin; Wang, Rongjun; Dong, Haiju; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Desheng; Deng, Jiabo; Peng, Guangneng; Zhang, Longxian

    2013-10-01

    Fifty-seven fecal samples were collected from giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in the China Conservation and Research Centre for the Giant Panda (CCRCGP) in Sichuan and examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts by Sheather's sugar flotation technique. An 18-year-old male giant panda was Cryptosporidium positive, with oocysts of an average size of 4.60×3.99 μm (n=50). The isolate was genetically analyzed using the partial 18S rRNA, 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and actin genes. Multi-locus genetic characterization indicated that the present isolate was different from known Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. The closest relative was the Cryptosporidium bear genotype, with 11, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the 18S rRNA, HSP70, and actin genes, respectively. Significant differences were also observed in the COWP gene compared to Cryptosporidium mongoose genotype. The homology to the bear genotype at the 18S rRNA locus was 98.6%, which is comparable to that between Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis (99.2%), or between Cryptosporidium muris and Cryptosporidium andersoni (99.4%). Therefore, the Cryptosporidium in giant pandas in this study is considered as a new genotype: the Cryptosporidium giant panda genotype.

  7. Prevalence of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium found in 1-2-year-old dairy cattle in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Fayer, Ronald; Santín, Mónica; Trout, James M; Greiner, Ellis

    2006-01-30

    The prevalence of Cryptosporidium species in 1-2-year-old heifers was determined for 571 animals on 14 dairy farms in seven states on the East Coast of the United States. A fecal specimen collected directly from each heifer was processed to concentrate oocysts that were then examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). For every PCR-positive specimen the 18S rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium was sequenced. Cryptosporidium was identified by PCR from heifers on 13 of 14 farms. On all except four farms groups of heifers were housed in a barn or in large covered pens. Others were pastured. From many of the same farms an earlier study reported that 41% of 393 pre-weaned calves and 26.2% of 447 post-weaned calves were infected. In the present study, 11.9% of 571 heifers were infected with Cryptosporidium, 0.7% with Cryptosporidium parvum, the zoonotic species. Of 68 PCR-positive specimens characterized by gene sequencing 1, 4, 10, 24, and 29 calves were infected with Cryptosporidium suis, Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium deer-like genotype, Cryptosporidium bovis, and Cryptosporidium andersoni, respectively. These findings demonstrate a lower prevalence of infection in 1-2-year-old dairy cattle than in younger cattle as well as a change in the diversity of species present. Consequently, the risk of humans acquiring infection with C. parvum from exposure to feces from yearling and older cattle appears much lower than from exposure to pre-weaned calves.

  8. Cryptosporidium hominis n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) from Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Ryan, Una M; Fall, Abbie; Ward, Lucy A; Hijjawi, Nawal; Sulaiman, Irshad; Fayer, Ronald; Thompson, R C Andrew; Olson, M; Lal, Altaf; Xiao, Lihua

    2002-01-01

    The structure and infectivity of the oocysts of a new species of Cryptosporidium from the feces of humans are described. Oocysts are structurally indistinguishable from those of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocysts of the new species are passed fully sporulated, lack sporocysts. and measure 4.4-5.4 microm (mean = 4.86) x 4.4-5.9 microm (mean = 5.2 microm) with a length to width ratio 1.0-1.09 (mean 1.07) (n = 100). Oocysts were not infectious for ARC Swiss mice, nude mice. Wistar rat pups, puppies, kittens or calves, but were infectious to neonatal gnotobiotic pigs. Pathogenicity studies in the gnotobiotic pig model revealed significant differences in parasite-associated lesion distribution (P = 0.005 to P = 0.02) and intensity of infection (P = 0.04) between C. parvum and this newly described species from humans. In vitro cultivation studies have also revealed growth differences between the two species. Multi-locus analysis of numerous unlinked loci, including a preliminary sequence scan of the entire genome demonstrated this species to be distinct from C. parvum and also demonstrated a lack of recombination, providing further support for its species status. Based on biological and molecular data, this Cryptosporidium infecting the intestine of humans is proposed to be a new species Cryptosporidium hominis n. sp.

  9. Cryptosporidium fayeri n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) from the Red Kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Ryan, Una M; Power, Michelle; Xiao, Lihua

    2008-01-01

    The morphology and infectivity of the oocysts of a new species of Cryptosporidium from the faeces of the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) are described. Oocysts are structurally indistinguishable from those of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocysts of the new species are passed fully sporulated, lack sporocysts, and measure 4.5-5.1 microm (mean=4.9) x 3.8-5.0 microm (mean=4.3 microm) with a length to width ratio 1.02:1.18 (mean 1.14) (n=50). Oocysts were not infectious for neonate ARC Swiss mice. Multi-locus analysis of numerous unlinked loci demonstrated this species to be distinct (90.64%-97.88% similarity) from C. parvum. Based on biological and molecular data, this Cryptosporidium infecting marsupials is proposed to be a new species Cryptosporidium fayeri n. sp.

  10. Cryptosporidium and Giardia as foodborne zoonoses.

    PubMed

    Smith, H V; Cacciò, S M; Cook, N; Nichols, R A B; Tait, A

    2007-10-21

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are major causes of diarrhoeal disease in humans, worldwide and are major causes of protozoan waterborne diseases. Both Cryptosporidium and Giardia have life cycles which are suited to waterborne and foodborne transmission. There are 16 'valid'Cryptosporidium species and a further 33+ genotypes described. Parasites which infect humans belong to the Giardia duodenalis "type", and at least seven G. duodenalis assemblages are recognised. Cryptosporidium parvum is the major zoonotic Cryptosporidium species, while G. duodenalis assemblages A and B have been found in humans and most mammalian orders. In depth studies to determine the role of non-human hosts in the transmission of Cryptosporidium and Giardia to humans are required. The use of harmonised methodology and standardised and validated molecular markers, together with sampling strategies that provide sufficient information about all contributors to the environmental (oo)cyst pool that cause contamination of food and water, are recommended. Standardised methods for detecting (oo)cysts in water are available, as are optimised, validated methods for detecting Cryptosporidium in soft fruit and salad vegetables. These provide valuable data on (oo)cyst occurrence, and can be used for species and subspecies typing using appropriate molecular tools. Given the zoonotic potential of these organisms, epidemiological, source and disease tracking investigations involve multidisciplinary teams. Here, the role of the veterinarian is paramount, particularly in understanding the requirement for adopting comprehensive sampling strategies for analysing both sporadic and outbreak samples from all potential non-human contributors. Comprehensive sampling strategies increase our understanding of parasite population biology and structure and this knowledge can be used to determine what level of discrimination is required between isolates. Genetic exchange is frequent in C. parvum populations, leading to

  11. Cryptosporidium Priming Is More Effective than Vaccine for Protection against Cryptosporidiosis in a Murine Protein Malnutrition Model

    PubMed Central

    Bartelt, Luther A.; Bolick, David T.; Kolling, Glynis L.; Zaenker, Edna I.; Lara, Ana M.; Noronha, Francisco Jose; Cowardin, Carrie A.; Moore, John H.; Turner, Jerrold R.; Warren, Cirle A.; Buck, Gregory A.; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a major cause of severe diarrhea, especially in malnourished children. Using a murine model of C. parvum oocyst challenge that recapitulates clinical features of severe cryptosporidiosis during malnutrition, we interrogated the effect of protein malnutrition (PM) on primary and secondary responses to C. parvum challenge, and tested the differential ability of mucosal priming strategies to overcome the PM-induced susceptibility. We determined that while PM fundamentally alters systemic and mucosal primary immune responses to Cryptosporidium, priming with C. parvum (106 oocysts) provides robust protective immunity against re-challenge despite ongoing PM. C. parvum priming restores mucosal Th1-type effectors (CD3+CD8+CD103+ T-cells) and cytokines (IFNγ, and IL12p40) that otherwise decrease with ongoing PM. Vaccination strategies with Cryptosporidium antigens expressed in the S. Typhi vector 908htr, however, do not enhance Th1-type responses to C. parvum challenge during PM, even though vaccination strongly boosts immunity in challenged fully nourished hosts. Remote non-specific exposures to the attenuated S. Typhi vector alone or the TLR9 agonist CpG ODN-1668 can partially attenuate C. parvum severity during PM, but neither as effectively as viable C. parvum priming. We conclude that although PM interferes with basal and vaccine-boosted immune responses to C. parvum, sustained reductions in disease severity are possible through mucosal activators of host defenses, and specifically C. parvum priming can elicit impressively robust Th1-type protective immunity despite ongoing protein malnutrition. These findings add insight into potential correlates of Cryptosporidium immunity and future vaccine strategies in malnourished children. PMID:27467505

  12. Detection of viable Cyptosporidium parvum in soil by reverse transcription real time PCR targeting hsp70 mRNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extraction of high-quality mRNA from Cryptosporidium parvum is a key step in PCR detection of viable oocysts in environmental samples. Current methods for monitoring oocysts are limited to water samples; therefore, the goal of this study was to develop a rapid and sensitive proce...

  13. An IC-PCR method for detection of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in natural surface waters in Finland.

    PubMed

    Rimhanen-Finne, Ruska; Hörman, Ari; Ronkainen, Pilvi; Hänninen, Marja Liisa

    2002-08-01

    We developed an immunocapture-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for simultaneous detection of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and Giardia intestinalis cysts in surface water. Using primer pairs Cry9/Cry15 and LaxA/LaxB for Cryptosporidium and Gdh1/Gdh4 for Giardia, the sensitivity of the entire detection procedure (dealing with concentration, separation, DNA purification and PCR amplification) was at the level of 50-100 oocysts and cysts. Of 54 surface water samples, 4 were positive for Cryptosporidium and 1 for Giardia. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected for the first time in surface water in Finland.

  14. Giardia and Cryptosporidium in cetaceans on the European Atlantic coast.

    PubMed

    Reboredo-Fernández, Aurora; Ares-Mazás, Elvira; Martínez-Cedeira, José A; Romero-Suances, Rafael; Cacciò, Simone M; Gómez-Couso, Hipólito

    2015-02-01

    The occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium was investigated in cetacean specimens stranded on the northwestern coast of Spain (European Atlantic coast) by analysis of 65 samples of large intestine from eight species. The parasites were identified by direct immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and by PCR amplification of the β-giardin gene, the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and the SSU-rDNA gene of Giardia and the SSU-rDNA gene of Cryptosporidium. Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected in 7 (10.8 %) and 9 samples (13.8 %), respectively. In two samples, co-infection with both parasites was observed. Giardia duodenalis assemblages A, C, D and F, and Cryptosporidium parvum were identified. This is the first report of G. duodenalis in Balaenoptera acutorostrata, Kogia breviceps and Stenella coeruleoalba and also the first report of Cryptosporidium sp. in B. acutorostrata and of C. parvum in S. coeruleoalba and Tursiops truncatus. These results extend the known host range of these waterborne enteroparasites.

  15. Epidemiology of Cryptosporidium infection in cattle in China: a review

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chao; Cao, Xue-Feng; Deng, Lei; Li, Wei; Huang, Xiang-Ming; Lan, Jing-Chao; Xiao, Qi-Cheng; Zhong, Zhi-Jun; Feng, Fan; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Wen-Bo; Guo, Ping; Wu, Kong-Ju; Peng, Guang-Neng

    2017-01-01

    The present review discusses the findings of cryptosporidiosis research conducted in cattle in China and highlights the currently available information on Cryptosporidium epidemiology, genetic diversity, and distribution in China, which is critical to understanding the economic and public health importance of cryptosporidiosis transmission in cattle. To date, 10 Cryptosporidium species have been detected in cattle in China, with an overall infection rate of 11.9%. The highest rate of infection (19.5%) was observed in preweaned calves, followed by that in juveniles (10.69%), postweaned juveniles (9.0%), and adult cattle (4.94%). The dominant species were C. parvum in preweaned calves and C. andersoni in postweaned, juvenile, and adult cattle. Zoonotic Cryptosporidium species (C. parvum and C. hominis) were found in cattle, indicating the possibility of transmission between humans and cattle. Different cattle breeds had significant differences in the prevalence rate and species of Cryptosporidium. This review demonstrates an age-associated, breed-associated, and geographic-related occurrence of Cryptosporidium and provides references for further understanding of the epidemiological characteristics, and for preventing and controlling the disease. PMID:28098070

  16. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium in goats across four provincial level areas in China.

    PubMed

    Mi, Rongsheng; Wang, Xiaojuan; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Peng; Liu, Yuxuan; Chen, Yongjun; Chen, Jun; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Zhaoguo

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the prevalence, species and subtypes of Cryptosporidium in goats from Guangdong Province, Hubei Province, Shandong Province, and Shanghai City of China. Six hundred and four fecal samples were collected from twelve goat farms, and the overall infection rate was 11.4% (69/604). Goats infected with Cryptosporidium were found in eleven farms across four provincial areas, and the infection rate ranged from 2.9% (1/35) to 25.0% (9/36). Three Cryptosporidium species were identified. Cryptosporidium xiaoi (45/69, 65.2%) was the dominant species, followed by C. parvum (14/69, 20.3%) and C. ubiquitum (10/69, 14.5%). The infection rate of Cryptosporidium spp. was varied with host age and goat kids were more susceptible to be infected than adult goats. Subtyping C. parvum and C. ubiquitum positive samples revealed C. parvum subtype IIdA19G1 and C. ubiquitum subtype XIIa were the most common subtypes. Other C. parvum subtypes were detected as well, such as IIaA14G2R1, IIaA15G1R1, IIaA15G2R1 and IIaA17G2R1. All of these subtypes have also been detected in humans, suggesting goats may be a potential source of zoonotic cryptosporidiosis. This was the first report of C. parvum subtypes IIaA14G2R1, IIaA15G1R1 and IIaA17G2R1 infecting in goats and the first molecular identification of C. parvum and its subtypes in Chinese goats.

  17. Characteristics of Cryptosporidium Transmission in Preweaned Dairy Cattle in Henan, China▿

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongjun; Wang, Helei; Sun, Yanru; Zhang, Longxian; Jian, Fuchun; Qi, Meng; Ning, Changshen; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence and public health significance of cryptosporidiosis in preweaned calves in China, 801 fecal samples from eight farms in seven areas in Henan Province were examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts. The overall infection rate of Cryptosporidium was 21.5%, with the farm in Xinxiang having the highest prevalence (40%). No significant difference in infection rates was observed between seasons. Cryptosporidium spp. were characterized by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene and DNA sequencing of the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. The SSU rRNA-based PCR identified four Cryptosporidium species, including Cryptosporidium parvum (54/172), C. bovis (65/172), C. ryanae (19/172), and C. andersoni (12/172), and the occurrence of infections with mixed species (22/172). The earliest detection of C. bovis was in calves of 1 week of age, showing that the prepatent period was shorter than the previously stated 10 to 12 days. Infections with C. parvum peaked in summer, whereas C. bovis dominated in autumn and winter. There was no apparent difference in the age of cattle infected with either C. parvum or C. bovis. Sequencing analysis of the gp60 gene showed all 67 C. parvum samples belonged to subtype IIdA19G1. These findings suggested that the transmission of Cryptosporidium spp. in preweaned calves in Henan, China, appeared to be different from other areas both at genotype and subtype levels. Further molecular epidemiologic studies (including samples from both calves and humans) are needed to elucidate the transmission dynamics and public significance of C. parvum in cattle in China. PMID:21177898

  18. Molecular Identification of Cryptosporidium Species from Pet Snakes in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Yimming, Benjarat; Pattanatanang, Khampee; Sanyathitiseree, Pornchai; Inpankaew, Tawin; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Pinyopanuwat, Nongnuch; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Phasuk, Jumnongjit

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important pathogen causing gastrointestinal disease in snakes and is distributed worldwide. The main objectives of this study were to detect and identify Cryptosporidium species in captive snakes from exotic pet shops and snake farms in Thailand. In total, 165 fecal samples were examined from 8 snake species, boa constrictor (Boa constrictor constrictor), corn snake (Elaphe guttata), ball python (Python regius), milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum), king snake (Lampropeltis getula), rock python (Python sebae), rainbow boa (Epicrates cenchria), and carpet python (Morelia spilota). Cryptosporidium oocysts were examined using the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-modified acid-fast staining and a molecular method based on nested-PCR, PCR-RFLP analysis, and sequencing amplification of the SSU rRNA gene. DMSO-modified acid-fast staining revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in 12 out of 165 (7.3%) samples, whereas PCR produced positive results in 40 (24.2%) samples. Molecular characterization indicated the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum (mouse genotype) as the most common species in 24 samples (60%) from 5 species of snake followed by Cryptosporidium serpentis in 9 samples (22.5%) from 2 species of snake and Cryptosporidium muris in 3 samples (7.5%) from P. regius. PMID:27658593

  19. Molecular Identification of Cryptosporidium Species from Pet Snakes in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yimming, Benjarat; Pattanatanang, Khampee; Sanyathitiseree, Pornchai; Inpankaew, Tawin; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Pinyopanuwat, Nongnuch; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Phasuk, Jumnongjit

    2016-08-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important pathogen causing gastrointestinal disease in snakes and is distributed worldwide. The main objectives of this study were to detect and identify Cryptosporidium species in captive snakes from exotic pet shops and snake farms in Thailand. In total, 165 fecal samples were examined from 8 snake species, boa constrictor (Boa constrictor constrictor), corn snake (Elaphe guttata), ball python (Python regius), milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum), king snake (Lampropeltis getula), rock python (Python sebae), rainbow boa (Epicrates cenchria), and carpet python (Morelia spilota). Cryptosporidium oocysts were examined using the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-modified acid-fast staining and a molecular method based on nested-PCR, PCR-RFLP analysis, and sequencing amplification of the SSU rRNA gene. DMSO-modified acid-fast staining revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in 12 out of 165 (7.3%) samples, whereas PCR produced positive results in 40 (24.2%) samples. Molecular characterization indicated the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum (mouse genotype) as the most common species in 24 samples (60%) from 5 species of snake followed by Cryptosporidium serpentis in 9 samples (22.5%) from 2 species of snake and Cryptosporidium muris in 3 samples (7.5%) from P. regius.

  20. Prevalence and characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in dairy cattle in Nile River delta provinces, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Amer, Said; Zidan, Shereif; Adamu, Haileeyesus; Ye, Jianbin; Roellig, Dawn; Xiao, Lihua; Feng, Yaoyu

    2013-11-01

    Molecular characterizations of Cryptosporidium spp. in dairy cattle in industrialized nations have mostly shown a dominance of Cryptosporidium parvum, especially its IIa subtypes in pre-weaned calves. Few studies, however, have been conducted on the distribution of Cryptosporidium species and C. parvum subtypes in various age groups of dairy cattle in developing countries. In this study, we examined the prevalence and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium in dairy cattle in four Nile River delta provinces in Egypt. Modified Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast microscopy was used to screen for Cryptosporidium oocysts in 1974 fecal specimens from animals of different ages on 12 farms. Positive fecal specimens were identified from all studied farms with an overall prevalence of 13.6%. By age group, the infection rates were 12.5% in pre-weaned calves, 10.4% in post-weaned calves, 22.1% in heifers, and 10.7% in adults. PCR-RFLP and DNA sequence analyses of microscopy-positive fecal specimens revealed the presence of four major Cryptosporidium species. In pre-weaned calves, C. parvum was most common (30/69 or 43.5%), but Cryptosporidium ryanae (13/69 or 18.8%), Cryptosporidium bovis (7/69 or 10.2%), and Cryptosporidium andersoni (7/69 or 10.2%) were also present at much higher frequencies seen in most industrialized nations. Mixed infections were seen in 12/69 (17.4%) of genotyped specimens. In contrast, C. andersoni was the dominant species (193/195 or 99.0%) in post-weaned calves and older animals. Subtyping of C. parvum based on sequence analysis of the 60kDa glycoprotein gene showed the presence of subtypes IIdA20G1 in nine specimens, IIaA15G1R1 in 27 specimens, and a rare subtype IIaA14G1R1r1b in one specimen. The common occurrence of non-C. parvum species and IId subtypes in pre-weaned calves is a distinct feature of cryptosporidiosis transmission in dairy cattle in Egypt. The finding of the same two dominant IIa and IId C. parvum subtypes recently found in humans in

  1. Occurrence and potential health risk of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in different water catchments in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Ehsan, Amimul; Geurden, Thomas; Casaert, Stijn; Paulussen, Jef; De Coster, Lut; Schoemaker, Toon; Chalmers, Rachel; Grit, Grietje; Vercruysse, Jozef; Claerebout, Edwin

    2015-02-01

    Human wastewater and livestock can contribute to contamination of surface water with Cryptosporidium and Giardia. In countries where a substantial proportion of drinking water is produced from surface water, e.g., Belgium, this poses a constant threat on drinking water safety. Our objective was to monitor the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in different water catchment sites in Belgium and to discriminate between (oo)cysts from human or animal origin using genotyping. Monthly samples were collected from raw water and purified drinking water at four catchment sites. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected using USEPA method 1623 and positive samples were genotyped. No contamination was found in purified water at any site. In three catchments, only low numbers of (oo)cysts were recovered from raw water samples (<1/liter), but raw water samples from one catchment site were frequently contaminated with Giardia (92 %) and Cryptosporidium (96 %), especially in winter and spring. Genotyping of Giardia in 38 water samples identified the presence of Giardia duodenalis assemblage AI, AII, BIV, BIV-like, and E. Cryptosporidium andersoni, Cryptosporidium suis, Cryptosporidium horse genotype, Cryptosporidium parvum, and Cryptosporidium hominis were detected. The genotyping results suggest that agriculture may be a more important source of surface water contamination than human waste in this catchment. In catchment sites with contaminated surface water, such as the Blankaart, continuous monitoring of treated water for the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia would be justified and (point) sources of surface water contamination should be identified.

  2. RISK ASSESSMENT FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM: A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF HUMAN DOSE-RESPONSE DATA. (R829180)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three dose–response studies were conducted with healthy volunteers using different Cryptosporidium parvum isolates (IOWA, TAMU, and UCP). The study data were previously analyzed for median infectious dose (ID50) using a simple cumulative percent endpoi...

  3. RISK ASSESSMENT FOR CRYPTOSPORIDIUM: A HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN ANALYSIS OF HUMAN DOSE-RESPONSE DATA. (R828035)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three dose¯response studies were conducted with healthy volunteers using different Cryptosporidium parvum isolates (IOWA, TAMU, and UCP). The study data were previously analyzed for median infectious dose (ID50) using a simple cumulative perce...

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A CT EQUATION FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan parasite, has been implicated in a number of waterborne disease outbreaks. It is difficult to inactivate using free chlorine, but appears to be inactivated by ozone. Therefore, the USEPA has promulgated the Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatm...

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A CT EQUATION FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan parasite, has been implicated in a number of disease outbreaks. It is difficult to inactivate using free chlorine, but appears to be inactivated by ozone. Therefore, the USEPA has promulgated the Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, w...

  6. Prevalence and molecular characterization of bovine Cryptosporidium in Qazvin province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Akbar; Haghighi, Ali; Athari, Amid; Kazemi, Bahram; Abadi, Alireza; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan

    2009-03-23

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, variability with host age, and the genotypes of species of Cryptosporidium in cattle from 15 dairy farms in Qazvin province, Iran. Fecal samples, collected from 272 cattle during May 2006 to December 2007, were characterized microscopically. Oocysts from 51 positive samples were analyzed using PCR assay of 18S SSU rRNA, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and sequencing. We identified 72.6% of the positive samples as Cryptosporidium parvum, 17.7% as Cryptosporidium andersoni, 7.8% as Cryptosporidium bovis and 1.9% as a novel genotype of C. parvum possessing a single mutation on MboII restriction. An infection rate of 19.5% of C. parvum among 174 pre-weaned calves was significantly higher than the 3.1% among 98 post-weaned calves (P<0.0006). This is the first report of C. bovis and the new subgenotype of C. parvum in Iranian cattle.

  7. First report of Cryptosporidium species in farmed and wild buffalo from the Northern Territory, Australia.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, Alireza; Phasey, Jordan; Boland, Tony; Ryan, Una

    2016-03-01

    A molecular epidemiological survey of Cryptosporidium from water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in the Northern Territory in Australia was conducted. Fecal samples were collected from adult farmed (n = 50) and wild buffalo (n = 50) and screened using an 18S quantitative PCR (qPCR). Positives were typed by sequence analysis of 18S nested PCR products. The qPCR prevalence of Cryptosporidium species in farmed and wild buffalo was 30 and 12 %, respectively. Sequence analysis identified two species: C. parvum and C. bovis, with C. parvum accounting for ~80 % of positives typed from the farmed buffalo fecal samples compared to 50 % for wild buffalo. Subtyping at the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) locus identified C. parvum subtypes IIdA19G1 (n = 4) and IIdA15G1 (n = 1) in the farmed buffalo and IIaA18G3R1 (n = 2) in the wild buffalo. The presence of C. parvum, which commonly infects humans, suggests that water buffaloes may contribute to contamination of rivers and waterways with human infectious Cryptosporidium oocysts, and further research on the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in buffalo populations in Australia is required.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A CT QUATION FOR THE INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS BY CHLORINE DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium parvum, a protozoan parasite that is highly resistant to chlorine, has been implicated in a number of waterborne disease outbreaks. This organism appears, however, to be efectively controlled by other oxidants such as chlorine dioxide or ozone. A major element of ...

  9. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in dairy calves from the state of São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Marcelo V; de Oliveira, Fernando P; Teixeira, Weslen Fabrício P; Coelho, William M D; Mendes, Luiz Cláudio N

    2011-09-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a common protozoan disease observed in a wide range of vertebrate hosts, including ruminants. Cattle can be a potential reservoir of Cryptosporidium spp., leading to environmental contamination with oocysts of zoonotic species. The molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. isolated from cattle from the state of São Paulo, Brazil, was accomplished using nested polymerase chain reaction for amplification of fragments of the 18S rRNA gene and the glycoprotein GP60 gene, following sequencing of amplified fragments. Positivity for Cryptosporidium was found in 10.7% (21/196) of the samples. Four species of Cryptosporidium were identified: C. andersoni, C. bovis, C. parvum subtype IIaA15G2R1, and C. ryanae. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of infection by C. ryanae and C. parvum IIaA15G2R1 in cattle from Brazil.

  10. Multiplex PCR detection of waterborne intestinal protozoa: microsporidia, Cyclospora, and Cryptosporidium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Joung, Migyo; Yoon, Sejoung; Choi, Kyoungjin; Park, Woo-Yoon; Yu, Jae-Ran

    2010-12-01

    Recently, emerging waterborne protozoa, such as microsporidia, Cyclospora, and Cryptosporidium, have become a challenge to human health worldwide. Rapid, simple, and economical detection methods for these major waterborne protozoa in environmental and clinical samples are necessary to control infection and improve public health. In the present study, we developed a multiplex PCR test that is able to detect all these 3 major waterborne protozoa at the same time. Detection limits of the multiplex PCR method ranged from 10(1) to 10(2) oocysts or spores. The primers for microsporidia or Cryptosporidium used in this study can detect both Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon intestinalis, or both Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum, respectively. Restriction enzyme digestion of PCR products with BsaBI or BsiEI makes it possible to distinguish the 2 species of microsporidia or Cryptosporidium, respectively. This simple, rapid, and cost-effective multiplex PCR method will be useful for detecting outbreaks or sporadic cases of waterborne protozoa infections.

  11. First findings of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in California sea lions (Zalophus californianus).

    PubMed

    Deng, M Q; Peterson, R P; Cliver, D O

    2000-06-01

    We report the detection and identification of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from 1 of 3 species of pinnipeds. Fecal samples were collected from Pacific harbor seal (Phoca vitulina richardsi), northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), and California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) in the northern California coastal area. By means of fluorescently labeled monoclonal antibodies, Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 3 samples from California sea lions, 1 of which also contained Giardia cysts. Oocysts of Cryptosporidium and cysts of Giardia were morphologically indistinguishable from oocysts of C. parvum and cysts of G. duodenalis from other animal origins. Oocysts and cysts were then purified using immunomagnetic separation techniques and identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), from which species-specific products were obtained. Sequence analysis revealed that the 452-bp and 358-bp PCR products of Cryptosporidium isolated from California sea lion had identities of 98% with sequences of their template fragments of C. parvum obtained from infected calves. Based on morphological, immunological, and genetic characterization, the isolates were identified as C. parvum and G. duodenalis, respectively. The findings suggested that California sea lions could serve as reservoirs in the environmental transmission of Cryptosporidium and Giardia.

  12. Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium Species and Giardia duodenalis from Symptomatic Cambodian Children

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Catrin E.; Elwin, Kristin; Phot, Nget; Seng, Chanthou; Mao, Saroeun; Suy, Kuong; Kumar, Varun; Nader, Johanna; Bousfield, Rachel; Perera, Sanuki; Bailey, J. Wendi; Beeching, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Parry, Christopher M.; Chalmers, Rachel M.

    2016-01-01

    Background In a prospective study, 498 single faecal samples from children aged under 16 years attending an outpatient clinic in the Angkor Hospital for Children, northwest Cambodia, were examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts using microscopy and molecular assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 2.2% (11/498) of samples using microscopy and in 7.7% (38/498) with molecular tests. Giardia duodenalis cysts were detected in 18.9% (94/498) by microscopy and 27.7% (138/498) by molecular tests; 82% of the positive samples (by either method) were from children aged 1–10 years. Cryptosporidium hominis was the most common species of Cryptosporidium, detected in 13 (34.2%) samples, followed by Cryptosporidium meleagridis in 9 (23.7%), Cryptosporidium parvum in 8 (21.1%), Cryptosporidium canis in 5 (13.2%), and Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium ubiquitum in one sample each. Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum positive samples were subtyped by sequencing the GP60 gene: C. hominis IaA16R6 and C. parvum IIeA7G1 were the most abundant subtypes. Giardia duodenalis was typed using a multiplex real-time PCR targeting assemblages A and B. Assemblage B (106; 76.8% of all Giardia positive samples) was most common followed by A (12.3%) and mixed infections (5.1%). Risk factors associated with Cryptosporidium were malnutrition (AOR 9.63, 95% CI 1.67–55.46), chronic medical diagnoses (AOR 4.51, 95% CI 1.79–11.34) and the presence of birds in the household (AOR 2.99, 95% CI 1.16–7.73); specifically C. hominis (p = 0.03) and C. meleagridis (p<0.001) were associated with the presence of birds. The use of soap was protective against Giardia infection (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58–0.95). Conclusions/Significance This is the first report to describe the different Cryptosporidium species and subtypes and Giardia duodenalis assemblages in Cambodian children. The variety of Cryptosporidium species detected indicates both

  13. CryptoDB: a Cryptosporidium bioinformatics resource update.

    PubMed

    Heiges, Mark; Wang, Haiming; Robinson, Edward; Aurrecoechea, Cristina; Gao, Xin; Kaluskar, Nivedita; Rhodes, Philippa; Wang, Sammy; He, Cong-Zhou; Su, Yanqi; Miller, John; Kraemer, Eileen; Kissinger, Jessica C

    2006-01-01

    The database, CryptoDB (http://CryptoDB.org), is a community bioinformatics resource for the AIDS-related apicomplexan-parasite, Cryptosporidium. CryptoDB integrates whole genome sequence and annotation with expressed sequence tag and genome survey sequence data and provides supplemental bioinformatics analyses and data-mining tools. A simple, yet comprehensive web interface is available for mining and visualizing the data. CryptoDB is allied with the databases PlasmoDB and ToxoDB via ApiDB, an NIH/NIAID-fundedBioinformatics Resource Center. Recent updates to CryptoDB include the deposition of annotated genome sequences for Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis, migration to a relational database (GUS), a new query and visualization interface and the introduction of Web services.

  14. Cryptosporidium ryanae n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in cattle (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Fayer, Ronald; Santín, Mónica; Trout, James M

    2008-10-01

    A new species, Cryptosporidium ryanae, is described from cattle. Oocysts of C. ryanae, previously identified as the Cryptosporidium deer-like genotype and recorded as such in GenBank (AY587166, EU203216, DQ182597, AY741309, and DQ871345), are similar to those of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium bovis but smaller. This genotype has been reported to be prevalent in cattle worldwide. Oocysts obtained from a calf for the present study are the smallest Cryptosporidium oocysts reported in mammals, measuring 2.94-4.41micromx2.94-3.68microm (mean=3.16micromx3.73microm) with a length/width shape index of 1.18 (n=40). The pre-patent period for two Cryptosporidium-naïve calves fed C. ryanae oocysts was 11 days and the patent period was 15-17 days. Oocysts were not infectious for BALB/c mice or lambs. Fragments of the SSU-rDNA, HSP-70, and actin genes amplified by PCR were purified and PCR products were sequenced. Multi-locus analysis of the three unlinked loci demonstrated the new species to be distinct from all other species and also demonstrated a lack of recombination, providing further evidence of species status. Based on morphological, molecular and biological data, this geographically widespread parasite found only in Bos taurus calves is recognized as a new species and is named C. ryanae.

  15. Cryptosporidium erinacei n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in hedgehogs.

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Hofmannová, Lada; Hlásková, Lenka; Květoňová, Dana; Vítovec, Jiří; McEvoy, John; Sak, Bohumil

    2014-03-17

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium erinacei n. sp. is proposed to reflect its specificity for hedgehogs under natural and experimental conditions. Oocysts of C. erinacei are morphologically indistinguishable from Cryptosporidium parvum, measuring 4.5-5.8 μm (mean=4.9 μm) × 4.0-4.8 μm (mean=4.4 μm) with a length to width ratio of 1.13 (1.02-1.35) (n=100). Oocysts of C. erinacei obtained from a naturally infected European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) were infectious for naïve 8-week-old four-toed hedgehogs (Atelerix albiventris); the prepatent period was 4-5 days post infection (DPI) and the patent period was longer than 20 days. C. erinacei was not infectious for 8-week-old SCID and BALB/c mice (Mus musculus), Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus), or golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, 60 kDa glycoprotein, actin, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, thrombospondin-related adhesive protein of Cryptosporidium-1, and heat shock protein 70 gene sequences revealed that C. erinacei is genetically distinct from previously described Cryptosporidium species.

  16. Investigating source water Cryptosporidium concentration, species and infectivity rates during rainfall-runoff in a multi-use catchment.

    PubMed

    Swaffer, Brooke A; Vial, Hayley M; King, Brendon J; Daly, Robert; Frizenschaf, Jacqueline; Monis, Paul T

    2014-12-15

    Protozoan pathogens present a significant human health concern, and prevention of contamination into potable networks remains a key focus for drinking water providers. Here, we monitored the change in Cryptosporidium concentration in source water during high flow events in a multi-use catchment. Furthermore, we investigated the diversity of Cryptosporidium species/genotypes present in the source water, and delivered an oocyst infectivity fraction. There was a positive and significant correlation between Cryptosporidium concentration and flow (ρ = 0.756) and turbidity (ρ = 0.631) for all rainfall-runoff events, despite variable source water pathogen concentrations. Cell culture assays measured oocyst infectivity and suggested an overall source water infectious fraction of 3.1%. No infectious Cryptosporidium parvum or Cryptosporidium hominis were detected, although molecular testing detected C. parvum in 7% of the samples analysed using PCR-based molecular techniques. Twelve Cryptosporidium species/genotypes were identified using molecular techniques, and were reflective of the host animals typically found in remnant vegetation and agricultural areas. The inclusion of molecular approaches to identify Cryptosporidium species and genotypes highlighted the diversity of pathogens in water, which originated from various sources across the catchment. We suggest this mixing of runoff water from a range of landuses containing diverse Cryptosporidium hosts is a key explanation for the often-cited difficulty forming strong pathogen-indicator relationships.

  17. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. from fecal samples of birds kept in captivity in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Alex Akira; Simões, Daniel Castendo; Antunes, Rômulo Godik; da Silva, Deuvânia Carvalho; Meireles, Marcelo Vasconcelos

    2009-12-03

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in birds kept in captivity in Brazil. A total of 966 samples from 18 families of birds was collected and stored in 5% potassium dichromate solution at 4 degrees C until processing. Oocysts were purified in Sheather sugar solution following extraction of genomic DNA. Molecular analyses were performed using nested-PCR for amplification of fragments of the 18S subunit of rRNA gene and of the actin gene. Amplification of Cryptosporidium DNA fragments was obtained in 47 (4.86%) samples. Sequencing of amplified fragments and phylogenetic analyses allowed the identification of Cryptosporidium baileyi in a black vulture (Coragyps atratus), a domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) and a saffron finch (Sicalis flaveola); Cryptosporidium galli in canaries (Serinus canaria), a cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus) and lesser seed-finches (Oryzoborus angolensis); Cryptosporidium meleagridis in a domestic chicken (G. g. domesticus); Cryptosporidium parvum in a cockatiel (N. hollandicus); Cryptosporidium avian genotype I in a canary (S. canaria) and an Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus); Cryptosporidium avian genotype II in ostriches (Struthio camelus) and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III in a cockatiel (N. hollandicus) and a peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis roseicolis).

  18. Genotyping and subtyping of Giardia and Cryptosporidium isolates from commensal rodents in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Z; Wang, R; Zhao, W; Qi, M; Zhao, J; Zhang, L; Li, J; Liu, A

    2015-05-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are two important zoonotic intestinal parasites responsible for diarrhoea in humans and other animals worldwide. Rodents, as reservoirs or carriers of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, are abundant and globally widespread. In the present study, we collected 232 fecal specimens from commensal rodents captured in animal farms and farm neighbourhoods in China. We collected 33 Asian house rats, 168 brown rats and 31 house mice. 6.0% (14/232) and 8.2% (19/232) of these rodents were microscopy-positive for Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts, respectively. All 14 Giardia isolates were identified as Giardia duodenalis assemblage G at a minimum of one or maximum of three gene loci (tpi, gdh and bg). By small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequencing, Cryptosporidium parvum (n = 12) and Cryptosporidium muris (n = 7) were identified. The gp60 gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein was successfully amplified and sequenced in nine C. parvum isolates, all of which belonged to the IIdA15G1 subtype. Observation of the same IIdA15G1 subtype in humans (previously) and in rodents (here) suggests that rodents infected with Cryptosporidium have the potential to transmit cryptosporidiosis to humans.

  19. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM METALLOAMINOPEPTIDASE INHIBITORS PREVENT IN VITRO EXCYSTATION. (R824759)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  20. SYNERGISMS IN SEQUENTIAL DISINFECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM. (R826830)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. COMPARISON OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM VIABILITY AND INFECTIVITY ASSAYS (R828043)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. Euclidization in the Almagestum parvum.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The Almagestum parvum, a summary of Ptolemy's Almagest written around the year 1200, provided a new stylistic framework for the content of theAlmagest's first six books. The author of the Almagestum parvum used a narrower range of types of mathematical writing and supplied his work with principles, which were listed at the beginning of each book and which were followed by propositions and demonstrations. Specific values were to a large extent replaced by general quantities, which would stand for a class of particulars. These and similar changes in the Almagestum parvum reveal the author's concern with reshaping astronomy into a discipline in the mold of Euclid's Elements, which emphasized the generality of propositions and proofs and connected Ptolemaic astronomy to the "mathematical toolbox" available in the Middle Ages. The Almagestum parvum was an influential part of a larger trend of understanding Ptolemaic astronomy in a non-Ptolemaic style.

  3. Bioaccumulation of Toxoplasma and Cryptosporidium by the crustacean Gammarus fossarum: involvement in biomonitoring survey and trophic transfer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The protozoans Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum are public health priorities and their oocysts can persist in environment for long time. They are present in various watercourses as recreational, surface, drinking, river, and seawater and could interact with organisms. To evaluate the cap...

  4. Cryptosporidium from a free-ranging marsupial host: bandicoots in urban Australia.

    PubMed

    Dowle, Matthew; Hill, Nichola J; Power, Michelle L

    2013-11-15

    Expansion of human settlement has increased the interface between people and bandicoots with implications for the emergence and spread of zoonotic parasites. The host status of bandicoots inhabiting suburban areas and their potential role in Cryptosporidium transmission remains unresolved. Our study aimed to determine the prevalence and identity of Cryptosporidium in two sympatric bandicoot species. Cryptosporidium signatures were detected in twelve bandicoot faecal samples (n=98) through amplification of the 18S rRNA. Phylogenetic inference placed the isolates in a clade with Cryptosporidium parvum, a species with a broad host range and zoonotic potential, or loosely related to Cryptosporidium hominis. However, the identity of the bandicoot isolates was not fully resolved and whether they were infected or simply passively transmitting oocysts is unknown. This study revealed that free-ranging bandicoots of northern Sydney were shedding Cryptosporidium oocysts at a prevalence of 12.2% (95% CI [6.76, 20.8]), similar to marsupial species that act as reservoirs for Cryptosporidium. Our findings expand the range of hosts known to shed Cryptosporidium in urban areas.

  5. Microarray analysis of the human antibody response to synthetic Cryptosporidium glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Priest, Jeffrey W; Live, David; Boons, Geert-Jan; Song, Xuezheng; Cummings, Richard D; Mead, Jan R

    2013-10-01

    Glycoproteins expressed by Cryptosporidium parvum are immunogenic in infected individuals but the nature of the epitopes recognised in C. parvum glycoproteins is poorly understood. Since a known immunodominant antigen of Cryptosporidium, the 17kDa glycoprotein, has previously been shown to bind to lectins that recognise the Tn antigen (GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr-R), a large number of glycopeptides with different Tn valency and presentation were prepared. In addition, glycopeptides were synthesised based on a 40kDa cryptosporidial antigen, a polymorphic surface glycoprotein with varying numbers of serine residues, to determine the reactivity with sera from C. parvum-infected humans. These glycopeptides and non-glycosylated peptides were used to generate a glycopeptide microarray to allow screening of sera from C. parvum-infected individuals for the presence of IgM and IgG antibodies. IgG but not IgM in sera from C. parvum-infected individuals bound to multivalent Tn antigen epitopes presented on glycopeptides, suggesting that glycoproteins from C. parvum that contain the Tn antigen induce immune responses upon infection. In addition, molecular differences in glycosylated peptides (e.g. substituting Ser for Thr) as well as the site of glycosylation had a pronounced effect on reactivity. Lastly, pooled sera from individuals infected with either Toxoplasma or Plasmodium were also tested against the modified Cryptosporidium peptides and some sera showed specific binding to glycopeptide epitopes. These studies reveal that specific anti-glycopeptide antibodies that recognise the Tn antigen may be useful diagnostically and in defining the roles of parasite glycoconjugates in infections.

  6. Efficacy of chlorine dioxide tablets on inactivation of cryptosporidium oocysts.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Jennifer L; Haas, Charles N; Arrowood, Michael J; Hlavsa, Michele C; Beach, Michael J; Hill, Vincent R

    2014-05-20

    The ability of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) to achieve 2-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium in drinking water has been documented. No studies have specifically addressed the effects of ClO2 on C. parvum oocyst infectivity in chlorinated recreational water venues (e.g., pools). The aim of this research was to determine the efficacy of ClO2 as an alternative to existing hyperchlorination protocols that are used to achieve a 3-log inactivation of Cryptosporidium in such venues. To obtain a 3-log inactivation of C. parvum Iowa oocysts, contact times of 105 and 128 min for a solution containing 5 mg/L ClO2 with and without the addition of 2.6 mg/L free chlorine, respectively, were required. Contact times of 294 and 857 min for a solution containing 1.4 mg/L ClO2 with and without the addition of 3.6 mg/L free chlorine, respectively, were required. The hyperchlorination control (21 mg/L free chlorine only) required 455 min for a 3-log inactivation. Use of a solution containing 5 mg/L ClO2 and solutions containing 5 or 1.4 mg/L ClO2 with the addition of free chlorine appears to be a promising alternative to hyperchlorination for inactivating Cryptosporidium in chlorinated recreational water venues, but further studies are required to evaluate safety constraints on use.

  7. Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in Children from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Olivia; González-Díaz, Mariana; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Cano, Manuel; Durazo, María; Bernal, Rosa M.; Hernandez, Jesús; Xiao, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a parasitic disease caused by Cryptosporidium spp. In immunocompetent individuals, it usually causes an acute and self-limited diarrhea; in infants, infection with Cryptosporidium spp. can cause malnutrition and growth retardation, and declined cognitive ability. In this study, we described for the first time the distribution of C. parvum and C. hominis subtypes in 12 children in Mexico by sequence characterization of the 60-kDa glycoprotein (GP60) gene of Cryptosporidium. Altogether, 7 subtypes belonging to 4 subtype families of C. hominis (Ia, Ib, Id and Ie) and 1 subtype family of C. parvum (IIa) were detected, including IaA14R3, IaA15R3, IbA10G2, IdA17, IeA11G3T3, IIaA15G2R1 and IIaA16G1R1. The frequency of the subtype families and subtypes in the samples analyzed in this study differed from what was observed in other countries. PMID:24755606

  8. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in children from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Olivia; González-Díaz, Mariana; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Cano, Manuel; Durazo, María; Bernal, Rosa M; Hernandez, Jesús; Xiao, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a parasitic disease caused by Cryptosporidium spp. In immunocompetent individuals, it usually causes an acute and self-limited diarrhea; in infants, infection with Cryptosporidium spp. can cause malnutrition and growth retardation, and declined cognitive ability. In this study, we described for the first time the distribution of C. parvum and C. hominis subtypes in 12 children in Mexico by sequence characterization of the 60-kDa glycoprotein (GP60) gene of Cryptosporidium. Altogether, 7 subtypes belonging to 4 subtype families of C. hominis (Ia, Ib, Id and Ie) and 1 subtype family of C. parvum (IIa) were detected, including IaA14R3, IaA15R3, IbA10G2, IdA17, IeA11G3T3, IIaA15G2R1 and IIaA16G1R1. The frequency of the subtype families and subtypes in the samples analyzed in this study differed from what was observed in other countries.

  9. Presence and molecular characterisation of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in alpacas (Vicugna pacos) from Peru.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Couso, Hipólito; Ortega-Mora, Luis M; Aguado-Martínez, Adriana; Rosadio-Alcántara, Raúl; Maturrano-Hernández, Lenin; Luna-Espinoza, Luis; Zanabria-Huisa, Víctor; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana

    2012-07-06

    The presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium was investigated in 274 faecal samples of alpacas (Vicugna pacos) from 12 herds from Peru by immunofluorescence microscopy and PCR amplification and sequencing of fragments of the ssu-rRNA and β-giardin genes from Giardia spp., as well as the ssu-rRNA gene from Cryptosporidium spp. A total of 137 samples (50.0%) were positive for Giardia spp., and 12 samples (4.4%) for Cryptosporidium spp. In ten samples (3.6%), co-infection by both pathogens was found. Herd prevalence was found to be 91.7% (11/12 herds) for Giardia and 58.3% (7/12 herds) for Cryptosporidium. Regarding the age of the animals, although Giardia was detected in animals as young as 1 week, the prevalence increased with age, reaching 80% by 8 weeks. Similarly, the highest percentage of Cryptosporidium detection (20%) was also found in the 8 week-old group. By PCR, 92 of the 274 analysed samples were positive for Giardia. Sequencing of the amplicons showed the existence of Giardia duodenalis assemblage A in 67 samples; G. duodenalis assemblage E in 24 samples; and inconsistent results between the two molecular markers used in a further sample. Cryptosporidium was only detected by PCR in 3 of the 274 samples; Cryptosporidium parvum was identified in two samples and Cryptosporidium ubiquitum in one sample. This study is the first performing molecular characterisation of both parasites in Peruvian alpacas, and the first report of C. ubiquitum in this host. The identification of G. duodenalis assemblage A, C. parvum and C. ubiquitum, suggests that zoonotic transmission of these enteropathogens between alpacas and humans is possible.

  10. Genetic characterization and transmission cycles of Cryptosporidium species isolated from humans in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Learmonth, James J; Ionas, George; Ebbett, Kim A; Kwan, Errol S

    2004-07-01

    Little is known about the genetic characteristics, distribution, and transmission cycles of Cryptosporidium species that cause human disease in New Zealand. To address these questions, 423 fecal specimens containing Cryptosporidium oocysts and obtained from different regions were examined by the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Indeterminant results were resolved by DNA sequence analysis. Two regions supplied the majority of isolates: one rural and one urban. Overall, Cryptosporidium hominis accounted for 47% of the isolates, with the remaining 53% being the C. parvum bovine genotype. A difference, however, was observed between the Cryptosporidium species from rural and urban isolates, with C. hominis dominant in the urban region, whereas the C. parvum bovine genotype was prevalent in rural New Zealand. A shift in transmission cycles was detected between seasons, with an anthroponotic cycle in autumn and a zoonotic cycle in spring. A novel Cryptosporidium sp., which on DNA sequence analysis showed a close relationship with C. canis, was detected in two unrelated children from different regions, illustrating the genetic diversity within this genus.

  11. Small rodents as reservoirs of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in south-western Poland.

    PubMed

    Perec-Matysiak, Agnieszka; Buńkowska-Gawlik, Katarzyna; Zaleśny, Grzegorz; Hildebrand, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. have been detected in a range of host species, including rodents. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of these pathogens and recognition of the reservoir role of rodents in the maintenance of these pathogens in south-western Poland. Additionally, preliminary molecular studies were conducted to elucidate the species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia identified in this study. Stool samples (n=266) from A. agrarius, A. flavicollis and M. glareolus, were subjected for analyses. Values of prevalence were 61.7, 68.3 and 68.1%, respectively, for Cryptosporidium spp. and 41.7, 24.4 and 38.4%, respectively, for Giardia spp. There was a statistically significant correlation between host species and Giardia infection where A. agrarius was the species of the highest prevalence. Statistically significant differences were not found for comparisons made for study sites and occurrence of Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. Due to preliminary nested PCR results, specific amplifications of Cryptosporidium COWP and SSU rRNA genes were obtained for several isolates taken from rodent host species. One isolate recovered from A. agrarius (from a semi-aquatic, urban area) was identified as C. parvum and revealed 100% similarity with sequences obtained from humans. To the best of the knowledge of the authors, this is the first record of the C. parvum zoonotic species from the striped field mouse. Also recorded were the first findings of C. ubiquitum from three small rodent species.

  12. The Structural Basis of Cryptosporidium-Specific IMP Dehydrogenase Inhibitor Selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, Iain S.; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Riera, Thomas V.; D’Aquino, J. Alejandro; Zhang, Minjia; Cuny, Gregory D.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2010-03-29

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a potential biowarfare agent, an important AIDS pathogen, and a major cause of diarrhea and malnutrition. No vaccines or effective drug treatment exist to combat Cryptosporidium infection. This parasite relies on inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) to obtain guanine nucleotides, and inhibition of this enzyme blocks parasite proliferation. Here, we report the first crystal structures of CpIMPDH. These structures reveal the structural basis of inhibitor selectivity and suggest a strategy for further optimization. Using this information, we have synthesized low-nanomolar inhibitors that display 10{sup 3} selectivity for the parasite enzyme over human IMPDH2.

  13. Identification and differentiation of Cryptosporidium species by capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Power, Michelle L; Holley, Marita; Ryan, Una M; Worden, Paul; Gillings, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Cryptosporidium species generally lack distinguishing morphological traits, and consequently, molecular methods are commonly used for parasite identification. Various methods for Cryptosporidium identification have been proposed, each with their advantages and disadvantages. In this study, we show that capillary electrophoresis coupled with single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) is a rapid, simple and cost-effective method for the identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. Species could be readily differentiated based on the SSCP mobility of amplified 18S rRNA gene molecules. Clones that differed by single-nucleotide polymorphisms could be distinguished on CE-SSCP mobility. Profiles of species known to have heterogenic copies of 18S rRNA gene contained multiple peaks. Cloning and sequencing of Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, Cryptosporidium fayeri and Cryptosporidium possum genotype 18S rRNA gene amplicons confirmed that these multiple peaks represented type A and type B 18S rRNA gene copies. CE-SSCP provides a reliable and sensitive analysis for epidemiological studies, environmental detection and diversity screening.

  14. Zoonotic Cryptosporidium Species in Animals Inhabiting Sydney Water Catchments

    PubMed Central

    Zahedi, Alireza; Monis, Paul; Aucote, Sarah; King, Brendon; Paparini, Andrea; Jian, Fuchun; Yang, Rongchang; Oskam, Charlotte; Ball, Andrew; Robertson, Ian; Ryan, Una

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is one of the most common zoonotic waterborne parasitic diseases worldwide and represents a major public health concern of water utilities in developed nations. As animals in catchments can shed human-infectious Cryptosporidium oocysts, determining the potential role of animals in dissemination of zoonotic Cryptosporidium to drinking water sources is crucial. In the present study, a total of 952 animal faecal samples from four dominant species (kangaroos, rabbits, cattle and sheep) inhabiting Sydney’s drinking water catchments were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium using a quantitative PCR (qPCR) and positives sequenced at multiple loci. Cryptosporidium species were detected in 3.6% (21/576) of kangaroos, 7.0% (10/142) of cattle, 2.3% (3/128) of sheep and 13.2% (14/106) of rabbit samples screened. Sequence analysis of a region of the 18S rRNA locus identified C. macropodum and C. hominis in 4 and 17 isolates from kangaroos respectively, C. hominis and C. parvum in 6 and 4 isolates respectively each from cattle, C. ubiquitum in 3 isolates from sheep and C. cuniculus in 14 isolates from rabbits. All the Cryptosporidium species identified were zoonotic species with the exception of C. macropodum. Subtyping using the 5’ half of gp60 identified C. hominis IbA10G2 (n = 12) and IdA15G1 (n = 2) in kangaroo faecal samples; C. hominis IbA10G2 (n = 4) and C. parvum IIaA18G3R1 (n = 4) in cattle faecal samples, C. ubiquitum subtype XIIa (n = 1) in sheep and C. cuniculus VbA23 (n = 9) in rabbits. Additional analysis of a subset of samples using primers targeting conserved regions of the MIC1 gene and the 3’ end of gp60 suggests that the C. hominis detected in these animals represent substantial variants that failed to amplify as expected. The significance of this finding requires further investigation but might be reflective of the ability of this C. hominis variant to infect animals. The finding of zoonotic Cryptosporidium species in these

  15. Molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in cats (Felis catus) in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Ying, Joyce Lau Jie; Monis, Paul; Ryan, Una

    2015-08-01

    Little is known of the prevalence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in domestic cats in Western Australia and their potential role as zoonotic reservoirs for human infection. In the present study, a total of 345 faecal samples from four different sources were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia by PCR and genotyped by sequence analysis. Oocyst numbers and cyst numbers for Cryptosporidium and Giardia respectively were also determined using quantitative PCR assays. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected in 9.9% (95% CI 6.7-13.0) and 10.1% (95% CI 7.0-13.3) of cats in Western Australia respectively. Sequence analysis at the 18S rRNA locus identified five Cryptosporidium species/genotypes; C. felis (n = 8), C. muris (n = 1), C. ryanae (n = 1), Cryptosporidium rat genotype III (n = 5) and a novel genotype most closely related to Cryptosporidium rat genotype III in one isolate. This is the first report of C. ryanae and Cryptosporidium rat genotype III in cats. For Giardia, assemblage F the most commonly identified species, while only 1 assemblage sequence was detected. Since most human cases of cryptosporidiosis are caused by C. parvum and C. hominis and human cases of giardiasis are caused by G. duodenalis assemblage A and B, the domestic cats in the present study are likely to be of low zoonotic risk to pet owners in Perth. Risk analyses identified that elderly cats (more than 6 years) were more prone to Cryptosporidium and Giardia infections than kittens (less than 6 months) (P = 0.009). Clinical symptoms were not associated with the prevalence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia infections in cats.

  16. Cryptosporidium species and subtype analysis in diarrhoeic pre-weaned lambs and goat kids from north-western Spain.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Pablo; Quílez, Joaquín; Prieto, Alberto; Navarro, Esther; Pérez-Creo, Ana; Fernández, Gonzalo; Panadero, Rosario; López, Ceferino; Díez-Baños, Pablo; Morrondo, Patrocinio

    2015-11-01

    Faecal specimens from diarrhoeic pre-weaned lambs (n = 171) and goat kids (n = 118) were collected in 37 sheep and 23 goat flocks, respectively, from NW Spain and microscopically examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts. Positive specimens were selected for molecular characterization. Presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts were significantly higher in specimens from goat kids (62.7%) than from lambs (31.6%). PCR products of the SSU rRNA locus were obtained for 108 isolates, and three Cryptosporidium species were identified. Cryptosporidium parvum was the most common species identified from both lambs (74.4%) and goat kids (93.8%). The remaining PCR products from lambs (25.6%) and goat kids (7.7%) were identified as Cryptosporidium Ubiquitum and Cryptosporidium xiaoi, respectively. Five C. parvum subtypes were identified; IIaA13G1R1, IIaA14G2R1, IIaA15G2R1 and IIaA16G3R1 were found in both host species, and IIdA17G1 was only detected in goat kids. Subtype IIaA15G2R1 was the most common and widely distributed. The present study provides the first description of subtypes IIaA13G1R1 in both small ruminant species, IIaA14G2R1 in sheep and IIaA16G3R1 in goats. Our results also reveal that diarrhoeic pre-weaned lambs and goat kids must be considered important reservoirs of Cryptosporidium species with zoonotic potential, such as C. parvum and C. ubiquitum.

  17. Short report: Molecular insights for Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and soil-transmitted helminths from a facility-based surveillance system in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Daniel E; Arvelo, Wences; Cama, Vitaliano A; López, Beatriz; Reyes, Lissette; Roellig, Dawn M; Kahn, Geoffrey D; Lindblade, Kimberly A

    2011-12-01

    We molecularly characterized samples with Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and soil-transmitted helminths from a facility-based surveillance system for diarrhea in Santa Rosa, Guatemala. The DNA sequence analysis determined the presence of Giardia assemblages A (N = 7) and B (N = 12) and, Cryptosporidium hominis (N = 2) and Cryptosporidium parvum (N = 2), suggestive of different transmission cycles. All 41 samples with soil-transmitted helminths did not have the β-tubulin mutation described for benzimidazole resistance, suggesting potential usefulness in mass drug administration campaigns.

  18. First molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from Bubalus bubalis (water buffalo) in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Abeywardena, Harshanie; Jex, Aaron R; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Haydon, Shane R; Stevens, Melita A; Gasser, Robin B

    2013-12-01

    We conducted a molecular epidemiological survey of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from Bubalus bubalis (water buffalo) on two extensive farms (450 km apart) in Victoria, Australia. Faecal samples (n=476) were collected from different age groups of water buffalo at two time points (six months apart) and tested using a PCR-based mutation scanning-targeted sequencing-phylogenetic approach, employing markers within the small subunit of ribosomal RNA (designated pSSU) and triose phosphate isomerase (ptpi) genes. Based on pSSU data, Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium bovis and Cryptosporidium genotypes 1, 2 (each 99% similar genetically to Cryptosporidium ryanae) and 3 (99% similar to Cryptosporidium suis) were detected in two (0.4%), one (0.2%), 38 (8.0%), 16 (3.4%) and one (0.2%) of the 476 samples tested, respectively. Using ptpi, Giardia duodenalis assemblages A and E were detected in totals of 56 (11.8%) and six (1.3%) of these samples, respectively. Cryptosporidium was detected on both farms, whereas Giardia was detected only on farm B, and both genera were detected in 1.5% of all samples tested. The study showed that water buffaloes on these farms excreted C. parvum and/or G. duodenalis assemblage A, which are consistent with those found in humans, inferring that these particular pathogens are of zoonotic significance. Future work should focus on investigating, in a temporal and spatial manner, the prevalence and intensity of such infections in water buffaloes in various geographical regions in Australia and in other countries.

  19. Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in Wild Rodents of Southwestern Iran Using 18s rRNA Gene Nested-PCR-RFLP and Sequencing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Saki, Jasem; Asadpouri, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background. Rodents could act as reservoir for Cryptosporidium spp. specially C. parvum, a zoonotic agent responsible for human infections. Since there is no information about Cryptosporidium infection in rodents of Ahvaz city, southwest of Iran, hence, this survey was performed to determine the prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in this region. Materials and Methods. One hundred rodents were trapped from different regions of Ahvaz city. Intestine contents and fecal specimens of rodents were studied using both microscopy examination to identify oocyst and nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique for 18s rRNA gene detection. Eventually restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method using SspI and VspI restriction enzymes was carried out to genotype the species and then obtained results were sequenced. Results. Three out of 100 samples were diagnosed as positive and overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. was 3% using both modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining under light microscope and nested-PCR (830 bp) methods. Afterwards, PCR-RFLP was performed on positive samples and C. parvum pattern was identified. Finally PCR-RFLP findings were sequenced and presence of C. parvum was confirmed again. Conclusions. Our study showed rodents could be potential reservoir for C. parvum. So an integrated program for control and combat with them should be adopted and continued. PMID:27956905

  20. Adhesive-tape recovery combined with molecular and microscopic testing for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts on experimentally contaminated fresh produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum suspended in water were applied to the surface of apples, cucumbers, peaches, and tomatoes at concentrations of 100, 50 or 10 oocysts within circles drawn with a permanent marker. Approximately 18 hr later, skin containing uncontaminated and contaminated circles from each prod...

  1. Cryptosporidium infection in Brazil: implications for veterinary medicine and public health.

    PubMed

    Meireles, Marcelo Vasconcelos

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this review paper is to report the results of cryptosporidiosis research in Brazil, mainly its occurrence in animals and implications for veterinary medicine and public health. An increasing number of papers related to Cryptosporidium spp. infection in Brazil are available at national and international literature. The main focus described in these papers is the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. in food, environmental samples, in humans and several animal species, particularly birds, cattle, dogs and cats. Using molecular biology techniques, most Cryptosporidium species and genotypes identified in other countries have been described in Brazil. In mammals, there are descriptions of infection by C. bovis, C. canis, C. felis, C. meleagridis, C. parvum, and the cervine genotype; in birds, the following species and genotypes have been described: C. baileyi, C. galli, C. meleagridis, C. parvum and the avian genotypes I, II and III. Several species have been described in humans, such as C. parvum, C. hominis, and some species adapted to animal hosts such as C. canis, C. felis and C. meleagridis.

  2. Genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. among patients with gastrointestinal complaints

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar, Reza; Baghaei, Kaveh; Nazemalhosseini Mojarad, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study investigated subtypes of Cryptosporidium in patients with gastrointestinal complaints in Tehran, Iran. Background: Cryptosporidium, an intracellular protozean parasite, is among the major causative agents of gastroenteritis disorders in humans. It also causes water-borne and food-borne outbreaks of diarrheal diseases. Patients and methods: A total of 1685 fecal samples were collected from patients with gastrointestinal complaints who had been referred to clinical laboratories Tehran, Iran. The primary diagnosis was established by the detection of oocysts using the modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining method and following that, the positive microscopically samples were selected for sequence analysis of the partial 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. Results: Out of 1685 collected samples, 7 (0.4 %) were positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts. Sequence analysis of gp60 gene in seven Cryptosporidium isolates revealed that two subtype families were identified, IIa and IId. Five (of 7) isolates belonged to the subtype family IIa and the remaining two isolates belonged to IId. Two sub-types were recognized within the subtype family II,a including IIaA16G2R1 (3/5), IIaA17G1R1 (2/5), while IIdA17G1d was the only subtype within IId subtype family. Conclusion: The predominance of zoonotic subtype families of C. parvum species (IIa, IId) in this study highlights the importance of zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis in the country. PMID:27895856

  3. Contamination of Atlantic coast commercial shellfish with Cryptosporidium.

    PubMed

    Fayer, R; Trout, J M; Lewis, E J; Santin, M; Zhou, L; Lal, A A; Xiao, L

    2003-01-01

    Shellfish (oysters and/or clams) were obtained from 37 commercial harvesting sites in 13 Atlantic coast states from Maine to Florida and one site in New Brunswick, Canada. Gill washings from each of 25 shellfish at each site were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy (IFA) for oocysts of Cryptosporidium. Gill washings from another 25 shellfish at each site were grouped into five pools of five shellfish each. DNA from each pool was utilized for PCR and genotyping. Oocysts were found in 3.7% of 925 oysters and clams examined by IFA in shellfish from New Brunswick and 11 of 13 states. Cryptosporidium DNA was detected by PCR in 35.2% of 185 pools. Cryptosporidium parvum genotypes 1 and 2, and Cryptosporidium meleagridis,all of which have been identified in infected humans, were identified at 37.8% of the sites. Gill washings from every site were tested for the presence of infectious oocysts by biological assay in neonatal BALB/c mice but no mice were found infected, suggesting that either the oocysts were no longer infectious or infections in mice were below the level of detection. Collectively, these findings indicate that Cryptosporidium species, indicative of pollution from human and animal feces and potentially infectious for humans, were found in commercial shellfish from 64.9% of sites examined along the Atlantic coast by either microscopy or molecular testing. Previous reports link periods of high rainfall with the elevated numbers of pathogen contaminated shellfish. Because shellfish in the present study were examined during a period of exceptionally low precipitation, the data are thought to underestimate the number of Cryptosporidium contaminated shellfish likely to be found during periods of normal or above normal precipitation.

  4. Epidemiology of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis on a dairy farm.

    PubMed

    Huetink, R E; van der Giessen, J W; Noordhuizen, J P; Ploeger, H W

    2001-12-03

    Prevalences of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in relation to age and season were investigated on a dairy farm in The Netherlands over the course of 1year. The whole herd was sampled five times, whereas calves younger than about 2 months were sampled every 2-3 weeks. Associations between diarrhoea and presence of one or more pathogens (Cryptosporidium spp., G. duodenalis, rotavirus) were investigated. Potential transmission routes of Cryptosporidium spp. were evaluated and positive samples of Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis were identified to genotype level by PCR microsatellite identification and fingerprinting. Shedding of Cryptosporidium spp. was found in all age categories but peaked in calves 1-3 weeks old (39.1%). Herd prevalence of shedding for Cryptosporidium spp. varied from 2.4% in June to 22.2% in December. Shedding of G. duodenalis was found in all age categories but peaked in animals 4-5 months old (54.5%). Herd prevalence of shedding for G. duodenalis varied from 0.8% in June to 15.5% in February. Cryptosporidium spp. and rotavirus appeared to be significantly associated with diarrhoea in calves. Microsatellite analysis showed two different subtypes (C3 and C1) of Cryptosporidium parvum calf strains. Two genotypes of G. duodenalis were found, one positive by A lineage specific PCR and thus closely related to human genotypes and one genotype, which was negative by A and B lineage specific PCR. The results indicate that cow-to-calf and indirect calf-to-calf transmission both are important routes for acquiring infection with Cryptosporidium spp.

  5. Occurrence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. genotypes in European hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus L.) in Germany.

    PubMed

    Dyachenko, V; Kuhnert, Y; Schmaeschke, R; Etzold, M; Pantchev, N; Daugschies, A

    2010-02-01

    Juvenile hedgehogs having insufficient body weight are often brought for overwintering to hedgehog rehabilitation centres. Faecal samples of juvenile hedgehogs and overwintering hedgehogs (n=188) collected prior to releasing them back into the wilderness were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium coproantigen and oocysts. Altogether 56 (29.8%) submitted samples were positive for coproantigen. Forty-five (39.5%, n=114) of the positive samples originated from newly rescued hedgehogs, while 11 (14.8%, n=74) positive samples were from animals that spent several months at the station. Fifteen samples subjected to PCR-RFLP analysis on the partial 18S rRNA locus suggested the presence of C. parvum. Multilocus sequence typing on partial 60 kDa glycoprotein gene, 18S rRNA, actin gene, 70 kDa heat shock protein gene sequences revealed 3 different subtype families: IIa, IIc and a new, proposed as VIIa subtype family. Cryptosporidium sp. genotype belonging to VIIa subtype family is closely related to C. parvum but is genetically distinct being probably a hedgehog-specific Cryptosporidium sp. genotype with unknown zoonotical potential. Hedgehogs excreting Cryptosporidium oocysts represent a potential source for human infections, but also an anthroponotic nature of the IIc subtype family should be reviewed.

  6. Identification and Immunological Characterization of Three Potential Vaccinogens against Cryptosporidium Species ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Manque, Patricio A.; Tenjo, Fernando; Woehlbier, Ute; Lara, Ana M.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Xu, Ping; Alves, João M.; Smeltz, Ronald B.; Conrad, Daniel H.; Buck, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a ubiquitous infectious disease, caused by the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum, leading to acute, persistent, and chronic diarrhea with life-threatening consequences in immunocompromised individuals. In developing countries, cryptosporidiosis in early childhood has been associated with subsequent significant impairment in growth, physical fitness, and intellectual abilities. Currently, vaccines are unavailable and chemotherapeutics are toxic and impractical, and agents for immunoprophylaxis or treatment of cryptosporidiosis are a high priority. Availability of the genome sequences for C. hominis and C. parvum provides new opportunities to procure and examine novel vaccine candidates. Using the novel approach of “reverse vaccinology,” we identified several new potential vaccine candidates. Three of these antigens—Cp15, profilin, and a Cryptosporidium apyrase—were delivered in heterologous prime-boost regimens as fusions with cytolysin A (ClyA) in a Salmonella live vaccine vector and as purified recombinant antigens, and they were found to induce specific and potent humoral and cellular immune responses, suggesting their potential as new vaccinogens against Cryptosporidium infection. PMID:21918117

  7. Assessment of zoonotic transmission of Giardia and Cryptosporidium between cattle and humans in rural villages in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ehsan, Amimul M; Geurden, Thomas; Casaert, Stijn; Parvin, Sonia M; Islam, Taohidul M; Ahmed, Uddin M; Levecke, Bruno; Vercruysse, Jozef; Claerebout, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Giardia and Cryptosporidium are important causes of diarrhoea in Bangladesh. The high prevalence of both parasites in humans and cattle in rural Bangladesh and the common use of water ponds by village inhabitants and their animals suggest a potential for zoonotic transmission. Direct transmission of Giardia and Cryptosporidium between cattle and their handlers and indirect transmission through water ponds was investigated. Faecal/stool samples were collected from 623 calves and 125 calf handlers in a cross-sectional survey. In two villages, water samples were collected monthly from water ponds and faecal/stool samples were collected monthly from inhabitants and their cattle. Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in water samples and in faecal/stool samples and positive samples were genotyped, to determine their human or animal origin. The prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in calves was 22% and 5% respectively. In calf handlers, the prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium was 11.2% and 3.2% respectively. Both in the cross-sectional survey and in the longitudinal study in the villages, G. duodenalis assemblage E was most prevalent in calves, while in humans assemblage AII, BIII and BIV were found. In cattle, Cryptosporidium parvum, C. bovis and C. andersoni were identified, but no Cryptosporidium sequences were obtained from humans. Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected in 14/24 and 12/24 water samples respectively. G. duodenalis assemblage E and BIV (-like), as well as C. andersoni and C. hominis were identified. Although the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in both water ponds suggests that water-borne transmission of Giardia and Cryptosporidium is possible, the genotyping results indicate that there is no significant direct or indirect (water-borne) transmission of Giardia between cattle and people in this area of rural Bangladesh. No conclusions could be drawn for Cryptosporidium, because of the low number of sequences that

  8. Molecular characterisation of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia and assessment of zoonotic transmission.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lihua; Fayer, Ronald

    2008-09-01

    The molecular characterisation of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia is essential for accurately identifying organisms and assessing zoonotic transmission. Results of recent molecular epidemiological studies strongly suggest that zoonotic transmission plays an important role in cryptosporidiosis epidemiology. In such cases the most prevalent zoonotic species is Cryptosporidium parvum. Genotyping and subtyping data suggest that zoonotic transmission is not as prevalent in the epidemiology of giardiasis. Molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia is a relatively recent application that is evolving as new genes are found that increase the accuracy of identification while discovering a greater diversity of species and yet unnamed taxa within these two important genera. As molecular data accumulate, our understanding of the role of zoonotic transmission in epidemiology and clinical manifestations is becoming clearer.

  9. Molecular characterization of cryptosporidium in children aged 0- 5 years with diarrhea in Jos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Anejo-Okopi, Joseph Aje; Okojokwu, Julius Ocheme; Ebonyi, Augustine Odo; Ejeliogu, Emeka Uba; Isa, Samson Ejiji; Audu, Onyemocho; Akpakpan, Edoama Edet; Nwachukwu, Esther Ebere; Ifokwe, Christabel Kelechi; Ali, Murna; Lar, Patricia; Oguche, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cryptosporidium is an important cause of diarrhea in children and immune-compromised individuals. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have led to the discovery of subtype families that are thought to be more commonly associated with diarrhea. We aimed to isolate and characterize Cryptosporidium spp among children with diarrhea in Jos, Nigeria. Methods Stool samples were collected from165 children aged 0-5 years with diarrhea. Cryptosporidium oocysts were examined by wet mount preparation, using formalin ether and a modified acid fast staining method. DNA was extracted from positive samples using QIAamp DNA stool mini kit and PCR-RFLP assay was carried out after quantification. Genotyping and phylogenetic analysis were done to determine the subtype families and their relatedness. Results From the 165 children studied, 8 (4.8%) were infected with Cryptosporidium. PCR-RFLP assay and genotype characterization found the following Cryptosporidium species: C. hominis 6 (75%) and C. parvum 2 (25.0%), with family subtypes Id-5, Ie-1 and IIa-1, IId-1 respectively.The most common species was C. hominis and the frequent subtype was C. hominis-Id 5 (62.5%). Conclusion Cryptosporidium is not an uncommon cause of diarrhea in children, with C. hominis being the dominant species. Also C. hominis Id is the commonest sub-family subtype. Put together, zoonotic species may be an important cause of diarrhea in children aged 0-5 years in Jos, Nigeria. PMID:28293369

  10. Occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in wild birds in Galicia (Northwest Spain).

    PubMed

    Reboredo-Fernández, Aurora; Ares-Mazás, Elvira; Cacciò, Simone M; Gómez-Couso, Hipólito

    2015-06-01

    Faecal samples were obtained from 433 wild birds being treated in wildlife recovery centres in Galicia (Northwest Spain), between February 2007 and September 2009. The birds belonged to 64 species representing 17 different orders. Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected by an immunofluorescence antibody test and identified at the molecular level by established PCR-sequencing methods. The overall prevalence of Giardia was 2·1% and that of Cryptosporidium, 8·3%. To our knowledge, this is the first description of Giardia sp. in Tyto alba and Caprimulgus europaeus; and of Cryptosporidium sp. in Apus apus, Athene noctua, C. europaeus, Falco tinnunculus, Morus bassanus, Parabuteo unicinctus and Strix aluco. Furthermore, the first PCR-sequence confirmed detection of Giardia duodenalis assemblage B in, Buteo buteo, Coturnix coturnix and Pica pica; G. duodenalis assemblage D in Garrulus glandarius; and G. duodenalis assemblage F in Anas platyrhynchos; Cryptosporidium parvum in Accipiter nisus, B. buteo, Milvus migrans, Pernis apivorus and P. pica; and Cryptosporidium meleagridis in Streptopelia turtur. The study findings demonstrate the wide spread of Giardia and Cryptosporidium between wild birds.

  11. Molecular-based investigation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from animals in water catchments in southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Matthew J; Jex, Aaron R; Koehler, Anson V; Haydon, Shane R; Stevens, Melita A; Gasser, Robin B

    2013-04-01

    There has been no large-scale systematic molecular epidemiological investigation of the waterborne protozoans, Cryptosporidium or Giardia, in southeastern Australia. Here, we explored, for the first time, the genetic composition of these genera in faecal samples from animals in nine Melbourne Water reservoir areas, collected over a period of two-years. We employed PCR-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) and phylogenetic analyses of loci (pSSU and pgp60) in the small subunit (SSU) of ribosomal RNA and 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) genes to detect and characterise Cryptosporidium, and another locus (ptpi) in the triose-phosphate isomerase (tpi) gene to identify and characterise Giardia. Cryptosporidium was detected in 2.8% of the 2009 samples examined; the analysis of all amplicons defined 14 distinct sequence types for each of pSSU and pgp60, representing Cryptosporidium hominis (genotype Ib - subgenotype IbA10G2R2), Cryptosporidium parvum (genotype IIa - subgenotypes IIaA15G2R1, IIaA19G2R1, IIaA19G3R1, IIaA19G4R1, IIaA20G3R1, IIaA20G4R1, IIaA20G3R2 and IIaA21G3R1), Cryptosporidium cuniculus (genotype Vb - subgenotypes VbA22R4, VbA23R3, VbA24R3, VbA25R4 and VbA26R4), and Cryptosporidium canis, Cryptosporidium fayeri, Cryptosporidium macropodum and Cryptosporidium ubiquitum as well as six new pSSU sequence types. In addition, Giardia was identified in 3.4% of the samples; all 28 distinct ptpi sequence types defined were linked to assemblage A of Giardia duodenalis. Of all 56 sequence types characterised, eight and one have been recorded previously in Cryptosporidium and Giardia, respectively, from humans. In contrast, nothing is known about the zoonotic potential of 35 new genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia recorded here for the first time. Future work aims to focus on estimating the prevalence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia genotypes in humans and a wide range of animals in Victoria and elsewhere in Australia. (Nucleotide sequences reported in

  12. Mussels (Perna perna) as bioindicator of environmental contamination by Cryptosporidium species with zoonotic potential

    PubMed Central

    Mariné Oliveira, Geisi Ferreira; do Couto, Melissa Carvalho Machado; de Freitas Lima, Marcelo; do Bomfim, Teresa Cristina Bergamo

    2016-01-01

    Sources of contamination such as animal feces runoff, organic fertilizer application, and the release of partially treated or untreated sewage can lead to the contamination of aquatic environments by Cryptosporidium spp. The quality of mussels as food is closely related to the sanitary conditions of the marine environment where these bivalves are found. Marine mollusks are filter feeders that are able to retain Cryptosporidium oocysts in their tissue, thus functioning as bioindicators. A total of 72 pooled mussel samples of the species Perna perna were collected at two sites (A and B) in the municipality of Mangaratiba, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Sampling involved removal of 30 mussels, from each collection site every month for one year. The 30 mussels from each sampling were then allocated into three groups of 10. Two Cryptosporidium spp. genes (18S and GP60) were targeted for DNA amplification from the samples obtained. After purification, all of the products obtained were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses were performed. Of the 72 samples analyzed using the nested-PCR for the 18S gene target, 29.2% were positive for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. Of these samples, 52.4% were collected at site A (ie 11/21) and 47.6% at site B (ie 10/21). The 18S genes of all the samples considered positive for Cryptosporidium spp. were sequenced, and the following three species were identified: Cryptosporidium parvum, C. meleagridis, and C. andersoni. Three distinct C. parvum subtypes (IIaA19G2R2; IIaA20G2R2; IIaA20G3R2) were identified using the GP60 gene. More studies to evaluate the zoonotic potential of this species should be performed as both sampling locations contain human and/or animal fecal contaminants. PMID:26977402

  13. PAIRED CITY CRYPTOSPORIDIUM SEROSURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1996, serological responses to two Cryptosporidium antigens were determined for 200 Las Vegas (LV), Nevada, and 200 Albuquerque, New Mexico, blood donors to evaluate associations between endemic infections, water exposures, and other risk factors. LV uses chlorinated filtered...

  14. Cryptosporidium: Infection - Immunocompromised Persons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cryptosporidium Tracking in the United States CryptoNet Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... getting cryptosporidiosis? See Prevention & Control - Immunocompromised Persons. Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ...

  15. Cryptosporidium: Prevention - Immunocompromised Persons

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cryptosporidium Tracking in the United States CryptoNet Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... diarrhea, have it tested for Crypto. Avoid swallowing water when swimming in the ocean, lakes, rivers, or ...

  16. Presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis through drinking water.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hermida, José Antonio; García-Presedo, Ignacio; Almeida, André; González-Warleta, Marta; Correia Da Costa, José Manuel; Mezo, Mercedes

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in the influent and final effluent of sixteen drinking water treatment plants located in a hydrographic basin in Galicia (NW Spain) - in which the principal river is recognised as a Site of Community Importance (SCI) - estimate the efficiency of treatment plants in removing these protozoans and determine the species and genotypes of the parasites by means of a molecular assay. All plant samples of influent and final effluent (50-100 l) were examined in the spring, summer, autumn and winter of 2007. A total of 128 samples were analysed by method 1623, developed by US Environmental Protection Agency for isolation and detection of both parasites. To identify the genotypes present the following genes were amplified and sequenced: 18S SSU rRNA (Cryptosporidium spp.) and b-giardina (G. duodenalis). The mean concentrations of parasites in the influent were 0.0-10.5 Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts per litre and 1.0-12.8 of G. duodenalis cysts per litre. In the final treated effluent, the mean concentration of parasites ranged from 0.0-3.0 oocysts per litre and 0.5-4.0 cysts per litre. The distribution of results by season revealed that in all plants, the highest numbers of (oo)cysts were recorded in spring and summer. Cryptosporidium parvum, C. andersoni, C. hominis and assemblages A-I, A-II, E of G. duodenalis were detected. Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis were consistently found at high concentrations in drinking water destined for human and animal consumption in the hydrographic basin under study, in Galicia (NW Spain). It is important that drinking water treatment authorities rethink the relevance of contamination levels of both parasites in drinking water and develop adequate countermeasures.

  17. First genetic analysis of Cryptosporidium from humans from Tasmania, and identification of a new genotype from a traveller to Bali.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Anson V; Whipp, Margaret; Hogg, Geoff; Haydon, Shane R; Stevens, Melita A; Jex, Aaron R; Gasser, Robin B

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the molecular composition of Cryptosporidium species from humans living in the insular state of Tasmania, Australia. In the present study, we genetically characterized 82 samples of Cryptosporidium from humans following conventional coproscopic testing in a routine, diagnostic laboratory. Using a PCR-coupled single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique, targeting portions of the small subunit rRNA (SSU), and 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) loci, we identified two species of Cryptosporidium, including C. hominis (subgenotypes IbA10G2, IdA16, IeA12G3T3, and IfA19G1) and C. parvum (IIaA16G1R1 and IIaA18G3), and a new operational taxonomic unit (OTU) that genetically closely resembled C. wrairi. This OTU was further characterized using markers in the actin, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP), and 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp70) genes. This study provides the first characterization of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium from Tasmania, and presents clear genetic evidence, using five independent genetic loci, for a new genotype or species of Cryptosporidium in a Tasmanian person with a recent history of travelling to Bali, Indonesia. It would be interesting to undertake detailed molecular-based studies of Cryptosporidium in Indonesia and neighbouring countries, in conjunction with morphological and experimental investigations of new genotypes.

  18. Concentrations, viability, and distribution of Cryptosporidium genotypes in lagoons of swine facilities in the Southern Piedmont and in coastal plain watersheds of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Michael B; Liotta, Janice L; Lucio-Forster, Araceli; Bowman, Dwight D

    2010-09-01

    Waste lagoons of swine operations are a source of Cryptosporidium oocysts. Few studies, however, have reported on oocyst concentrations in swine waste lagoons; none have reported on oocyst viability status, nor has there been a systematic assessment of species/genotype distributions across different types of swine facilities. Ten swine waste lagoons associated with farrowing, nursery, finishing, and gestation operations were each sampled once a month for a year. Oocysts were extracted from triplicate 900-ml effluent samples, enumerated by microscopy, and assessed for viability by dye exclusion/vital stain assay. DNA was extracted from processed samples, and 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) genes were amplified by PCR and sequenced for species and genotype identification. Oocysts were observed at each sampling time at each lagoon. Annual mean concentrations of total oocysts and viable oocysts ranged between 24 and 51 and between 0.6 and 12 oocysts ml(-1) effluent, respectively. The species and genotype distributions were dominated (95 to 100%) by Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium pig genotype II, the latter of which was found at eight of the lagoons. The lagoon at the gestation facility was dominated by Cryptosporidium muris (90%), and one farrowing facility showed a mix of pig genotypes, Cryptosporidium muris, and various genotypes of C. parvum. The zoonotic C. parvum bovine genotype was observed five times out of 407 18S rDNA sequences analyzed. Our results indicate that pigs can have mixed Cryptosporidium infections, but infection with C. suis is likely to be dominant.

  19. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in mature dairy cattle on farms in eastern United States compared with younger cattle from the same locations.

    PubMed

    Fayer, Ronald; Santin, Monica; Trout, James M

    2007-04-30

    Feces collected from 541 milking cows on two dairy farms each in Vermont, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, and Florida were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts. Oocysts were concentrated from 15 g of feces from each cow and DNA was extracted. A two-step nested PCR protocol was used to amplify an 830 base pair fragment of the SSUrRNA gene. PCR-positive products were purified and sequenced. PCR-positive findings were obtained from cows in all seven states and from 11 of 14 farms. Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium bovis, and Cryptosporidium andersoni were found on 2, 6, and 8 farms, and infected 0.4, 1.7, and 3.7% of the 541 cows, respectively. The overall lower prevalence of Cryptosporidium in these cows was very highly significant (p< or =0.0001) compared with younger cattle and the relative prevalence of each species of Cryptosporidium also differed when compared with younger cattle previously examined on most of these same farms. The very low level of infection with C. parvum, the major species pathogenic to both cattle and humans, suggests that mature dairy cattle are a relatively low risk source of infection for humans.

  20. Genetic Diversity of Cryptosporidium in Children in an Urban Informal Settlement of Nairobi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Mbae, Cecilia; Mulinge, Erastus; Waruru, Anthony; Ngugi, Benjamin; Wainaina, James; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Globally Cryptosporidium and Giardia species are the most common non-bacterial causes of diarrhoea in children and HIV infected individuals, yet data on their role in paediatric diarrhoea in Kenya remains scant. This study investigated the occurrence of Cryptosporidium species, genotypes and subtypes in children, both hospitalized and living in an informal settlement in Nairobi. Methods This was a prospective cross-sectional study in which faecal specimen positive for Cryptosporidium spp. by microscopy from HIV infected and uninfected children aged five years and below presenting with diarrhoea at selected outpatient clinics in Mukuru informal settlements, or admitted to the paediatric ward at the Mbagathi District Hospital were characterized. The analysis was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of the 18srRNA gene for species identification and PCR-sequencing of the 60 kDa glycoprotein (GP60) gene for subtyping. Results C. hominis was the most common species of Cryptosporidium identified in125/151(82.8%) of the children. Other species identified were C. parvum 18/151(11.9%), while C. felis and C. meleagridis were identified in 4 and 2 children, respectively. Wide genetic variation was observed within C. hominis, with identification of 5 subtype families; Ia, Ib, Id, Ie and If and 21 subtypes. Only subtype family IIc was identified within C. parvum. There was no association between species and HIV status or patient type. Conclusion C. hominis is the most common species associated with diarrhoea in the study population. There was high genetic variability in the C. hominis isolates with 22 different subtypes identified, whereas genetic diversity was low within C. parvum with only one subtype family IIc identified. PMID:26691531

  1. Molecular seasonal, age and gender distributions of Cryptosporidium in diarrhoeic Egyptians: distinct endemicity.

    PubMed

    El-Badry, A A; Al-Antably, A S A; Hassan, M A; Hanafy, N A; Abu-Sarea, E Y

    2015-12-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a worldwide gastrointestinal disease caused by the protozoan Cryptosporidium parasite. It has a broad range of seasonal and age-related prevalence. We aimed to study the molecular prevalence and seasonality of Cryptosporidium over a period of 1 year in a cohort of Egyptian diarrhoeic patients. Stool samples were collected from 865 diarrhoeic patients attending outpatient clinics of Cairo University hospitals, from all age groups over a 12-month period, examined microscopically for faecal Cryptosporidium oocysts by the acid-fast staining method and for copro-DNA detection using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) assays. PCR-positive samples were characterised molecularly by nPCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) to determine Cryptosporidium genotypes. Cryptosporidium copro-DNA was detected in 19.5% of the collected samples throughout the year, with a major peak in summer (August) and a small rise in spring (April). Infection was mainly C. hominis (95.8%) followed by C. parvum (3.0%), affecting all age groups, with predominance in the pre-school age group, and decrease with age. There were statistically significant associations between the detection of Cryptosporidium and season, diarrhoea, patient age and drinking water, while gender, contact with animals and presence of mucus in stool showed no association. Cryptosporidium in diarrhoeic Egyptians was of distinct endemicity, with the bi-model mostly influenced by population dynamics, with a clear high prevalence in pre-school children and predominating anthroponotic (C. hominis) transmission throughout the year. The obtained results highlight Cryptosporidium as a water contaminant and an important cause of health problems in Egypt, necessitating further studies of the risk factors.

  2. Cryptosporidium hominis gene catalog: a resource for the selection of novel Cryptosporidium vaccine candidates

    PubMed Central

    Ifeonu, Olukemi O.; Simon, Raphael; Tennant, Sharon M.; Sheoran, Abhineet S.; Daly, Maria C.; Felix, Victor; Kissinger, Jessica C.; Widmer, Giovanni; Levine, Myron M.; Tzipori, Saul; Silva, Joana C.

    2016-01-01

    Human cryptosporidiosis, caused primarily by Cryptosporidium hominis and a subset of Cryptosporidium parvum, is a major cause of moderate-to-severe diarrhea in children under 5 years of age in developing countries and can lead to nutritional stunting and death. Cryptosporidiosis is particularly severe and potentially lethal in immunocompromised hosts. Biological and technical challenges have impeded traditional vaccinology approaches to identify novel targets for the development of vaccines against C. hominis, the predominant species associated with human disease. We deemed that the existence of genomic resources for multiple species in the genus, including a much-improved genome assembly and annotation for C. hominis, makes a reverse vaccinology approach feasible. To this end, we sought to generate a searchable online resource, termed C. hominis gene catalog, which registers all C. hominis genes and their properties relevant for the identification and prioritization of candidate vaccine antigens, including physical attributes, properties related to antigenic potential and expression data. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified ∼400 C. hominis genes containing properties typical of surface-exposed antigens, such as predicted glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor motifs, multiple transmembrane motifs and/or signal peptides targeting the encoded protein to the secretory pathway. This set can be narrowed further, e.g. by focusing on potential GPI-anchored proteins lacking homologs in the human genome, but with homologs in the other Cryptosporidium species for which genomic data are available, and with low amino acid polymorphism. Additional selection criteria related to recombinant expression and purification include minimizing predicted post-translation modifications and potential disulfide bonds. Forty proteins satisfying these criteria were selected from 3745 proteins in the updated C. hominis annotation. The immunogenic potential of a few of these is

  3. Detection and characterization of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. on swine farms in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Farzan, Abdolvahab; Parrington, Lorna; Coklin, Tatjana; Cook, Angela; Pintar, Katarina; Pollari, Frank; Friendship, Robert; Farber, Jeffrey; Dixon, Brent

    2011-11-01

    As part of the C-EnterNet surveillance program of the Public Health Agency of Canada, 122 pooled swine manure samples from 10 farms in Ontario, Canada were collected and tested for Giardia and Cryptosporidium. Giardia duodenalis cysts and Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were detected using immunofluorescence microscopy. Nested-polymerase chain reaction protocols were performed to amplify the small subunit rRNA gene and the β-giardin gene for G. duodenalis, and the small subunit rRNA gene and the heat shock protein-70 gene for Cryptosporidium spp. The DNA amplicons were sequenced to determine genotypes and species. A mixed multivariable method was used to compare the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in different stages of production. Both Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts were present on all tested farms, with 50.8% of the samples positive for G. duodenalis and 44.3% positive for Cryptosporidium spp. by microscopy, and 66.4% and 55.7%, respectively, positive by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). No significant agreement was observed between microscopy and PCR method to detect Giardia and Cryptosporidium (p<0.05). The prevalence of Giardia in manure pits and finisher pigs did not differ (p>0.05), however, it was less frequent (odds ratio, OR=0.21 [0.07, 0.63]) among sows. Cryptosporidium was more likely (OR=3.6 [1.3, 9.9]) to be detected in manure pits and weaners (OR=3.3 [1.1, 10.0]) compared to finisher pigs, and it was less frequent (OR=0.06 [0.007, 0.55]) in sows than in finishers (p<0.05). DNA sequencing demonstrated that 92.1% of the Giardia isolates were Assemblage B and 7.9% were Assemblage E. The most prevalent Cryptosporidium were Cryptosporidium parvum (55.4%), and Cryptosporidium sp. pig genotype II (37.5%). These findings indicate that the occurrence of zoonotic isolates of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium is very high on swine farms in southern Ontario, and that there is a potential for transmission between swine and humans by means of cyst

  4. Identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in Scottish raw and drinking waters during a one-year monitoring period.

    PubMed

    Nichols, R A B; Connelly, L; Sullivan, C B; Smith, H V

    2010-09-01

    We analyzed 1,042 Cryptosporidium oocyst-positive slides (456 from raw waters and 586 from drinking waters) of which 55.7% contained 1 or 2 oocysts, to determine species/genotypes present in Scottish waters. Two nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assays targeting different loci (1 and 2) of the hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene were used for species identification, and 62.4% of samples were amplified with at least one of the PCR assays. More samples (577 slides; 48.7% from raw water and 51.3% from drinking water) were amplified at locus 1 than at locus 2 (419 slides; 50.1% from raw water and 49.9% from drinking water). PCR at loci 1 and 2 amplified 45.4% and 31.7% of samples containing 1 or 2 oocysts, respectively. We detected both human-infectious and non-human-infectious species/genotype oocysts in Scottish raw and drinking waters. Cryptosporidium andersoni, Cryptosporidium parvum, and the Cryptosporidium cervine genotype (now Cryptosporidium ubiquitum) were most commonly detected in both raw and drinking waters, with C. ubiquitum being most common in drinking waters (12.5%) followed by C. parvum (4.2%) and C. andersoni (4.0%). Numerous samples (16.6% total; 18.9% from drinking water) contained mixtures of two or more species/genotypes, and we describe strategies for unraveling their identity. Repetitive analysis for discriminating mixtures proved useful, but both template concentration and PCR assay influenced outcomes. Five novel Cryptosporidium spp. (SW1 to SW5) were identified by RFLP/sequencing, and Cryptosporidium sp. SW1 was the fourth most common contaminant of Scottish drinking water (3%).

  5. The Burden of Cryptosporidium Diarrheal Disease among Children < 24 Months of Age in Moderate/High Mortality Regions of Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, Utilizing Data from the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS)

    PubMed Central

    Nasrin, Dilruba; Blackwelder, William C.; Wu, Yukun; Farag, Tamer H.; Panchalingam, Sandra; Sur, Dipika; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Saha, Debasish; Adegbola, Richard; Alonso, Pedro L.; Breiman, Robert F.; Bassat, Quique; Tamboura, Boubou; Sanogo, Doh; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Manna, Byomkesh; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Kanungo, Suman; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Qureshi, Shahida; Quadri, Farheen; Hossain, Anowar; Das, Sumon K.; Antonio, Martin; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Mandomando, Inacio; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Acácio, Sozinho; Omore, Richard; Oundo, Joseph O.; Ochieng, John B.; Mintz, Eric D.; O’Reilly, Ciara E.; Berkeley, Lynette Y.; Livio, Sofie; Tennant, Sharon M.; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Nataro, James P.; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Mishcherkin, Vladimir; Zhang, Jixian; Liu, Jie; Houpt, Eric R.; Kotloff, Karen L.; Levine, Myron M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of Cryptosporidium as a pediatric enteropathogen in developing countries is recognized. Methods Data from the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS), a 3-year, 7-site, case-control study of moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD) and GEMS-1A (1-year study of MSD and less-severe diarrhea [LSD]) were analyzed. Stools from 12,110 MSD and 3,174 LSD cases among children aged <60 months and from 21,527 randomly-selected controls matched by age, sex and community were immunoassay-tested for Cryptosporidium. Species of a subset of Cryptosporidium-positive specimens were identified by PCR; GP60 sequencing identified anthroponotic C. parvum. Combined annual Cryptosporidium-attributable diarrhea incidences among children aged <24 months for African and Asian GEMS sites were extrapolated to sub-Saharan Africa and South Asian regions to estimate region-wide MSD and LSD burdens. Attributable and excess mortality due to Cryptosporidium diarrhea were estimated. Findings Cryptosporidium was significantly associated with MSD and LSD below age 24 months. Among Cryptosporidium-positive MSD cases, C. hominis was detected in 77.8% (95% CI, 73.0%-81.9%) and C. parvum in 9.9% (95% CI, 7.1%-13.6%); 92% of C. parvum tested were anthroponotic genotypes. Annual Cryptosporidium-attributable MSD incidence was 3.48 (95% CI, 2.27–4.67) and 3.18 (95% CI, 1.85–4.52) per 100 child-years in African and Asian infants, respectively, and 1.41 (95% CI, 0.73–2.08) and 1.36 (95% CI, 0.66–2.05) per 100 child-years in toddlers. Corresponding Cryptosporidium-attributable LSD incidences per 100 child-years were 2.52 (95% CI, 0.33–5.01) and 4.88 (95% CI, 0.82–8.92) in infants and 4.04 (95% CI, 0.56–7.51) and 4.71 (95% CI, 0.24–9.18) in toddlers. We estimate 2.9 and 4.7 million Cryptosporidium-attributable cases annually in children aged <24 months in the sub-Saharan Africa and India/Pakistan/Bangladesh/Nepal/Afghanistan regions, respectively, and ~202,000 Cryptosporidium

  6. Comparison of propidium monoazide-quantitative PCR and reverse transcription quantitative PCR for viability detection of fresh Cryptosporidium oocysts following disinfection and after long-term storage in water samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum were used to evaluate applicability of two quantitative PCR (qPCR) viability detection methods in raw surface water and disinfection treated water. Propidium monoazide-qPCR targeting hsp70 gene was compared to reverse transcription (RT)-...

  7. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Eimeria infections in post-weaned and adult cattle on three Maryland farms.

    PubMed

    Fayer, R; Trout, J M; Graczyk, T K; Lewis, E J

    2000-11-10

    The prevalence of Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Eimeria, in healthy, asymptomatic, post-weaned and mature cattle was investigated on three Maryland farms. One farm, a dairy research facility, had 150 multiparous Holstein milking cows; 24 were examined and Cryptosporidium andersoni was detected in three (12.5%) but neither Giardia nor Eimeria was detected. The second farm, a commercial dairy, had 57 multiparous Holstein milking cows and an equal number of heifers. Of 19 cows examined, C. parvum, Giardia duodenalis, and Eimeria bovis and/or E. ellipsoidalis were detected in two (10.5%), two (10.5%) and one (5.26%) cow, respectively. Of 23 heifers examined, C. parvum, Giardia, and E. bovis and E. ellipsoidalis, was detected in two (8.7%), four (17.4%), and five (21.7%), heifers, respectively. The third farm, a beef cattle breeding and genetics research facility, had 180 7- to 9-month old purebred black Angus. Of 118 examined for C. parvum and Giardia, 34 (28.8%) and 44 (37.3%) were positive, respectively, of 97 examined for E. bovis and/or E. ellipsoidalis 32 (33.0%) were positive. These findings, based on a method with a minimum detection level of 100 oocysts of C. parvum/g of feces, which underestimates the number of infected cattle, clearly demonstrate the presence of low level, asymptomatic infections in post-weaned and adult cattle in the United States and indicate the potential role of such cattle as reservoirs of infectious parasites.

  8. Identifying host sources, human health risk and indicators of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in a Canadian watershed influenced by urban and rural activities.

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Michele I; Ong, Corinne S L; Prystajecky, Natalie A; Isaac-Renton, Judith L; Huck, Peter M

    2012-06-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia were characterized in a watershed in southern Ontario, Canada, over a 2½ year period. River samples were collected every two weeks, primarily near a municipal drinking water treatment plant intake. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were frequently detected with an overall occurrence rate of 88 and 97%, respectively. Giardia concentrations were higher than Cryptosporidium, with median values of 80 cysts 100 L(-1) and 12 oocysts 100 L(-1), respectively. Although pathogens rarely show a significant relationship with fecal or water quality indicators, this study determined that Cryptosporidium, but not Giardia, was significantly correlated with Escherichia coli, turbidity and river flow. There was no correlation between the two types of protozoa, and only Giardia showed a seasonal trend with higher concentrations at cold water temperatures. Cryptosporidium genotyping of all samples found that farm animals and wildlife were an important contributor of oocysts in the watershed, and that Cryptosporidium strains/genotypes of medium to high risk for human infection (C. hominis, C. parvum and C. ubiquitum) were detected in 16% of samples. This study was able to identify Cryptosporidium host sources and human health risk, and to identify differences between Cryptosporidium and Giardia occurrence in the watershed.

  9. Cryptosporidium proliferans n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae): Molecular and Biological Evidence of Cryptic Species within Gastric Cryptosporidium of Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kváč, Martin; Havrdová, Nikola; Hlásková, Lenka; Daňková, Tereza; Kanděra, Jiří; Ježková, Jana; Vítovec, Jiří; Sak, Bohumil; Ortega, Ynes; Xiao, Lihua; Modrý, David; Chelladurai, Jeba Rose Jennifer Jesudoss; Prantlová, Veronika; McEvoy, John

    2016-01-01

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium muris strain TS03 are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium proliferans n. sp. is proposed. Cryptosporidium proliferans obtained from a naturally infected East African mole rat (Tachyoryctes splendens) in Kenya was propagated under laboratory conditions in rodents (SCID mice and southern multimammate mice, Mastomys coucha) and used in experiments to examine oocyst morphology and transmission. DNA from the propagated C. proliferans isolate, and C. proliferans DNA isolated from the feces of an African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Central African Republic, a donkey (Equus africanus) in Algeria, and a domestic horse (Equus caballus) in the Czech Republic were used for phylogenetic analyses. Oocysts of C. proliferans are morphologically distinguishable from C. parvum and C. muris HZ206, measuring 6.8–8.8 (mean = 7.7 μm) × 4.8–6.2 μm (mean = 5.3) with a length to width ratio of 1.48 (n = 100). Experimental studies using an isolate originated from T. splendens have shown that the course of C. proliferans infection in rodent hosts differs from that of C. muris and C. andersoni. The prepatent period of 18–21 days post infection (DPI) for C. proliferans in southern multimammate mice (Mastomys coucha) was similar to that of C. andersoni and longer than the 6–8 DPI prepatent period for C. muris RN66 and HZ206 in the same host. Histopatologicaly, stomach glands of southern multimammate mice infected with C. proliferans were markedly dilated and filled with necrotic material, mucus, and numerous Cryptosporidium developmental stages. Epithelial cells of infected glands were atrophic, exhibited cuboidal or squamous metaplasia, and significantly proliferated into the lumen of the stomach, forming papillary structures. The epithelial height and stomach weight were six-fold greater than in non-infected controls. Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, Cryptosporidium oocyst

  10. Cryptosporidium proliferans n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae): Molecular and Biological Evidence of Cryptic Species within Gastric Cryptosporidium of Mammals.

    PubMed

    Kváč, Martin; Havrdová, Nikola; Hlásková, Lenka; Daňková, Tereza; Kanděra, Jiří; Ježková, Jana; Vítovec, Jiří; Sak, Bohumil; Ortega, Ynes; Xiao, Lihua; Modrý, David; Chelladurai, Jeba Rose Jennifer Jesudoss; Prantlová, Veronika; McEvoy, John

    2016-01-01

    The morphological, biological, and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium muris strain TS03 are described, and the species name Cryptosporidium proliferans n. sp. is proposed. Cryptosporidium proliferans obtained from a naturally infected East African mole rat (Tachyoryctes splendens) in Kenya was propagated under laboratory conditions in rodents (SCID mice and southern multimammate mice, Mastomys coucha) and used in experiments to examine oocyst morphology and transmission. DNA from the propagated C. proliferans isolate, and C. proliferans DNA isolated from the feces of an African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Central African Republic, a donkey (Equus africanus) in Algeria, and a domestic horse (Equus caballus) in the Czech Republic were used for phylogenetic analyses. Oocysts of C. proliferans are morphologically distinguishable from C. parvum and C. muris HZ206, measuring 6.8-8.8 (mean = 7.7 μm) × 4.8-6.2 μm (mean = 5.3) with a length to width ratio of 1.48 (n = 100). Experimental studies using an isolate originated from T. splendens have shown that the course of C. proliferans infection in rodent hosts differs from that of C. muris and C. andersoni. The prepatent period of 18-21 days post infection (DPI) for C. proliferans in southern multimammate mice (Mastomys coucha) was similar to that of C. andersoni and longer than the 6-8 DPI prepatent period for C. muris RN66 and HZ206 in the same host. Histopatologicaly, stomach glands of southern multimammate mice infected with C. proliferans were markedly dilated and filled with necrotic material, mucus, and numerous Cryptosporidium developmental stages. Epithelial cells of infected glands were atrophic, exhibited cuboidal or squamous metaplasia, and significantly proliferated into the lumen of the stomach, forming papillary structures. The epithelial height and stomach weight were six-fold greater than in non-infected controls. Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit rRNA, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall

  11. Molecular characterization and first report of Cryptosporidium genotypes in human population in the Slovak Republic.

    PubMed

    Petrincová, Antónia; Valenčáková, Alexandra; Luptáková, Lenka; Ondriska, František; Kalinová, Jana; Halánová, Monika; Danišová, Oľga; Jarčuška, Pavol

    2015-12-01

    In our study, we examined 91 fecal samples from five different groups of people containing HIV patients, hemodialysis patients, kidney transplant recipients, immunocompetent humans without clinical signs, and humans with suspected cryptosporidiosis. The purpose of our study was to determine species and genotype composition of representatives of Cryptosporidium spp. using PCR analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene and 60-kDa glycoprotein gene and examine their phylogenetic relationship. In HIV-positive/AIDS-infected group of patients and in hemodialysis patients, no presence of Cryptosporidium species was detected. In two kidney transplant recipients, we detected species/genotypes Cryptosporidium parvum IIaA13G1T1R1 (KT355488) and Cryptosporidium hominis IaA11G2R8 (KT355489) and in two immunocompetent patients with clinical symptoms, we identified Cryptosporidium muris and C. hominis IbA10G2T1 (KT355490). In the group of healthy immunocompetent individuals without clinical signs, we identified species/genotype C. hominis IbA11G2 (KT355491) in one sample.

  12. Prevalence and genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Cystoisospora belli in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Assis, Dnieber Chagas; Resende, Deisy Vivian; Cabrine-Santos, Marlene; Correia, Dalmo; Oliveira-Silva, Márcia Benedita

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Cystoisospora belli are monoxenic protozoa that have been recognized as the causative agents of chronic diarrhea in immunocompromised individuals, especially HIV-infected subjects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of these intestinal protozoa in HIV-positive patients in the Triângulo Mineiro region of Brazil and to correlate the presence of these infections with clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data of the patients. Oocysts were detected in stool samples of 10 (16.9%) of the 59 patients studied, while Cryptosporidium spp. were present in 10.1% (6/59) and C. belli in 6.7% (4/59). The frequency of these parasites was higher among patients with diarrheic syndrome and CD4+ T lymphocyte counts < 200 cells/mm 3 , demonstrating the opportunistic characteristic of these infections. A significant association was observed between the lack of adherence to antiretroviral therapy and the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and/or C. belli. Parasitism with Cryptosporidium spp. was more frequent in February and April, the months following the period of high rainfall. The same was not observed for C. belli. Genetic characterization of two isolates led to the identification of Cryptosporidium parvum, one of the main species associated with the zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis.

  13. Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia intestinalis, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in Captive Non-Human Primates in Qinling Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shuai-Zhi; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Shao, Jun-Feng; Fang, Yan-Qin; Tian, Ge-Ru; Zhang, Long-Xian; Wang, Rong-Jun; Wang, Hai-Yan; Qi, Meng; Yu, San-Ke

    2015-01-01

    Non-human primates (NHPs) are confirmed as reservoirs of Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia intestinalis, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi. In this study, 197 fresh fecal samples from 8 NHP species in Qinling Mountains, northwestern China, were collected and examined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method. The results showed that 35 (17.8%) samples were positive for tested parasites, including Cryptosporidium spp. (3.0%), G. intestinalis (2.0%), and E. bieneusi (12.7%). Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 6 fecal samples of Macaca mulatta, and were identified as C. parvum (n=1) and C. andersoni (n=5). Subtyping analysis showed Cryptosporidium spp. belonged to the C. andersoni MLST subtype (A4, A4, A4, and A1) and C. parvum 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) subtype IId A15G2R1. G. intestinalis assemblage E was detected in 3 M. mulatta and 1 Saimiri sciureus. Intra-variations were observed at the triose phosphate isomerase (tpi), beta giardin (bg), and glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) loci, with 3, 1, and 2 new subtypes found in respective locus. E. bieneusi was found in Cercopithecus neglectus (25.0%), Papio hamadrayas (16.7%), M. mulatta (16.3%), S. sciureus (10%), and Rhinopithecus roxellana (9.5%), with 5 ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genotypes: 2 known genotypes (D and BEB6) and 3 novel genotypes (MH, XH, and BSH). These findings indicated the presence of zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi in NHPs in Qinling Mountains. This is the first report of C. andersoni in NHPs. The present study provided basic information for control of cryptosporidiosis, giardiasis, and microsporidiosis in human and animals in this area. PMID:26323837

  14. Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia intestinalis, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in Captive Non-Human Primates in Qinling Mountains.

    PubMed

    Du, Shuai-Zhi; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Shao, Jun-Feng; Fang, Yan-Qin; Tian, Ge-Ru; Zhang, Long-Xian; Wang, Rong-Jun; Wang, Hai-Yan; Qi, Meng; Yu, San-Ke

    2015-08-01

    Non-human primates (NHPs) are confirmed as reservoirs of Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia intestinalis, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi. In this study, 197 fresh fecal samples from 8 NHP species in Qinling Mountains, northwestern China, were collected and examined using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method. The results showed that 35 (17.8%) samples were positive for tested parasites, including Cryptosporidium spp. (3.0%), G. intestinalis (2.0%), and E. bieneusi (12.7%). Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 6 fecal samples of Macaca mulatta, and were identified as C. parvum (n=1) and C. andersoni (n=5). Subtyping analysis showed Cryptosporidium spp. belonged to the C. andersoni MLST subtype (A4, A4, A4, and A1) and C. parvum 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) subtype IId A15G2R1. G. intestinalis assemblage E was detected in 3 M. mulatta and 1 Saimiri sciureus. Intra-variations were observed at the triose phosphate isomerase (tpi), beta giardin (bg), and glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) loci, with 3, 1, and 2 new subtypes found in respective locus. E. bieneusi was found in Cercopithecus neglectus (25.0%), Papio hamadrayas (16.7%), M. mulatta (16.3%), S. sciureus (10%), and Rhinopithecus roxellana (9.5%), with 5 ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) genotypes: 2 known genotypes (D and BEB6) and 3 novel genotypes (MH, XH, and BSH). These findings indicated the presence of zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi in NHPs in Qinling Mountains. This is the first report of C. andersoni in NHPs. The present study provided basic information for control of cryptosporidiosis, giardiasis, and microsporidiosis in human and animals in this area.

  15. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium and Giardia occurring in natural water bodies in Poland.

    PubMed

    Adamska, Małgorzata

    2015-02-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia protozoa are zoonotic parasites that cause human gastroenteritis and can be transmitted to human through the fecal-oral route and water or food. Several species belong to these genera and their resistant forms occur in water, but only some of them are infectious to human. Health risk depends on the occurrence of infectious Cryptosporidium and Giardia species and genotypes in water, and only molecular techniques allow detecting them, as well as enable to identify the contamination source. In this work, genotyping and phylogenetic analysis have been performed on the basis of 18S rDNA and ß-giardin genes sequences of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, respectively, in order to provide the molecular characterization of these parasites detected earlier in five natural water bodies in Poland and to track possible sources of their (oo)cysts in water. Genotyping revealed a high similarity (over 99 up to 100 %) of analyzed sequences to cattle genotype of C. parvum isolated from cattle and human and to G. intestinalis assemblage B isolated from human. The sequences obtained by others originated from patients with clinical symptoms of cryptosporidiosis or giardiasis and/or with the infection confirmed by different methods. The contamination of three examined lakes is probably human-originated, while the sources of contamination of two remaining lakes are wild and domestic animals. Obtained phylogenetic trees support suggestions of other authors that the bovine genotype of C. parvum should be a separate species, as well as A and B assemblages of G. intestinalis.

  16. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia on beef farms and water sources within the vicinity of the farms on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Budu-Amoako, Ebo; Greenwood, Spencer J; Dixon, Brent R; Barkema, Herman W; McClure, J T

    2012-02-28

    The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and assemblages of Giardia and species of Cryptosporidium on beef farms in Prince Edward Island (PEI), Canada, including the water sources associated with the farms, and to determine risk factors for infection of cattle with these parasites. Twenty beef farms were selected based on the presence of surface water< 500 m from the barn. Prevalence was determined by direct immunofluorescence microscopy, while genotyping and species determination were performed by nested-PCR and DNA sequencing. Giardia was detected in 42% (95% CI: 38-46%) of fecal samples from 100% farms while Cryptosporidium was detected in 17% (95% CI: 14-19%) of fecal samples from 80% of farms. The most predominant Giardia assemblage isolated was the livestock specific assemblage E (89%). The zoonotic assemblages A and B were found in 4 and 7% of the Giardia isolates that were genotyped, respectively. The Giardia assemblages were detected equally between the cows and calves examined. Overall, the most common Cryptosporidium species detected in this study was Cryptosporidium andersoni (49%), predominantly found in cattle > 6 mo of age, while most Cryptosporidium bovis and Cryptosporidium pestis (previously Cryptosporidium parvum 'bovine genotype') isolates were detected in calves ≤ 6 mo of age. All Cryptosporidium ryanae isolates (four) were found in calves. Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 14 and 93% of surface water samples of 14 farms, respectively. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in three (15%) ground water samples of 20 farms. One Cryptosporidium-positive water sample, which was the only surface water sample amenable to genotyping, contained C. parvum. The farm-level risk factors investigated in this study, age of animals and location of the farm, were not associated with the risk of infection in cattle with either Cryptosporidium spp. or Giardia duodenalis. We conclude that beef cattle are a potential

  17. Cryptosporidium infections: molecular advances.

    PubMed

    Lendner, Matthias; Daugschies, Arwid

    2014-09-01

    Cryptosporidium host cell interaction remains fairly obscure compared with other apicomplexans such as Plasmodium or Toxoplasma. The reason for this is probably the inability of this parasite to complete its life cycle in vitro and the lack of a system to genetically modify Cryptosporidium. However, there is a substantial set of data about the molecules involved in attachment and invasion and about the host cell pathways involved in actin arrangement that are altered by the parasite. Here we summarize the recent advances in research on host cell infection regarding the excystation process, attachment and invasion, survival in the cell, egress and the available data on omics.

  18. Clams (Corbicula fluminea) as bioindicators of fecal contamination with Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp. in freshwater ecosystems in California.

    PubMed

    Miller, Woutrina A; Atwill, Edward R; Gardner, Ian A; Miller, Melissa A; Fritz, Heather M; Hedrick, Ronald P; Melli, Ann C; Barnes, Nicole M; Conrad, Patricia A

    2005-05-01

    This study evaluated clams as bioindicators of fecal protozoan contamination using three approaches: (i) clam tissue spiking experiments to compare several detection techniques; (ii) clam tank exposure experiments to evaluate clams that had filtered Cryptosporidium oocysts from inoculated water under a range of simulated environmental conditions; (iii) sentinel clam outplanting to assess the distribution and magnitude of fecal contamination in three riverine systems in California. Our spiking and tank experiments showed that direct fluorescent antibody (DFA), immunomagnetic separation (IMS) in combination with DFA, and PCR techniques could be used to detect Cryptosporidium in clam tissues. The most analytically sensitive technique was IMS concentration with DFA detection of oocysts in clam digestive gland tissues, which detected 10 oocysts spiked into a clam digestive gland 83% of the time. In the tank experiment, oocyst dose and clam collection time were significant predictors for detecting Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in clams. In the wild clam study, Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected in clams from all three study regions by IMS-DFA analysis of clam digestive glands, with significant variation by sampling year and season. The presence of C. parvum DNA in clams from riverine ecosystems was confirmed with PCR and DNA sequence analysis.

  19. Diversity of Cryptosporidium species occurring in sheep and goat breeds reared in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kaupke, Agnieszka; Michalski, Mirosław M; Rzeżutka, Artur

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was molecular identification of Cryptosporidium species and assessment of their prevalence in different breeds of sheep and goat reared in Poland. In addition, the relationship between animal age, breed type, and the frequency of Cryptosporidium infections was determined. Fecal samples from 234 lambs and 105 goat kids aged up to 9 weeks, representing 24 breeds and their cross-breeds were collected from 71 small ruminant farms across Poland. The identification of Cryptosporidium species was performed at the 18 SSU ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and COWP loci followed by subtyping of C. parvum and C. hominis strains at GP60 gene locus. The presence of Cryptosporidium DNA at the 18 SSU rRNA locus was detected in 45/234 (19.2%) lamb feces samples and in 39/105 (37.1%) taken from goats. The following Cryptosporidium species: C. xiaoi, C. bovis, C. ubiquitum, C. parvum, and C. hominis were detected in small ruminants. Infections caused by C. xiaoi were predominant without favoring any tested animal species. Subsequent GP60 subtyping revealed the presence of C. parvum IIaA17G1R1 subtype in sheep and IIdA23G1 subtype in goats. IIdA23G1 subtype was detected in a goat host for the first time. There were no significant differences found in frequency of infections between the age groups (<3 and 3-9 weeks) of lambs (P = 0.14, α > 0.05) or goat kids (P = 0.06, α > 0.05). In addition, there was no correlation observed between the frequency in occurrence of particular parasite species and breed type in relation to native sheep breeds (F = 0.11; P = 0.990 > 0.05). In the case of goats, more breed-related differences in parasite occurrence were found. The results of this study improve our knowledge on the breed-related occurrence of Cryptosporidium infections in the population of small ruminants reared in Poland.

  20. Modelling Cryptosporidium oocysts transport in small ungauged agricultural catchments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jialiang; McDonald, Stephen; Peng, Xinhua; Samadder, Sukha R; Murphy, Thomas M; Holden, Nicholas M

    2011-06-01

    Cryptosporidium is an environmentally robust pathogen that has caused severe waterborne disease outbreaks worldwide. The main source of zoonotic Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in human drinking water is likely to be from farm animals via catchment pathways with water as the main transport vector. The vast majority of small agricultural catchments are ungauged therefore it is difficult to use a process model to predict and understand the mechanisms and activities that regulate the risk of surface water contamination from agricultural areas. For this study, two ungauged agricultural catchments in Ireland were used to model Cryptosporidium oocyst transport using SWAT2005 on a daily basis with reference data from adjacent catchment gauging stations. The results indicated that SWAT2005 could simulate stream flow with good agreement between prediction and observation on a monthly basis (R(2) from 0.94 to 0.83 and E (efficiency) from 0.92 to 0.66), but Cryptosporidium oocyst concentration results were less reliable (R(2) from 0.20 to 0.37, P < 0.05; with poor E -0.37 to -2.57). A sensitivity analysis using independent parameter perturbation indicated that temperature was the most important parameter regulating oocyst transport in the study catchments and that the timing of manure application relative to the occurrence of water runoff event was critical. The results also showed that grazing management had little influence on predicted oocyst transport while fields fertilized with manure were the key critical source areas for microbial contaminations in the study catchments. It was concluded that the approach presented could be used to assist with understanding the epidemiology of waterborne cryptosporidiosis outbreaks and to improve catchment management for the safety of the general public health.

  1. Cryptosporidium Infection Risk: Results of New Dose-Response Modeling.

    PubMed

    Messner, Michael J; Berger, Philip

    2016-10-01

    Cryptosporidium human dose-response data from seven species/isolates are used to investigate six models of varying complexity that estimate infection probability as a function of dose. Previous models attempt to explicitly account for virulence differences among C. parvum isolates, using three or six species/isolates. Four (two new) models assume species/isolate differences are insignificant and three of these (all but exponential) allow for variable human susceptibility. These three human-focused models (fractional Poisson, exponential with immunity and beta-Poisson) are relatively simple yet fit the data significantly better than the more complex isolate-focused models. Among these three, the one-parameter fractional Poisson model is the simplest but assumes that all Cryptosporidium oocysts used in the studies were capable of initiating infection. The exponential with immunity model does not require such an assumption and includes the fractional Poisson as a special case. The fractional Poisson model is an upper bound of the exponential with immunity model and applies when all oocysts are capable of initiating infection. The beta Poisson model does not allow an immune human subpopulation; thus infection probability approaches 100% as dose becomes huge. All three of these models predict significantly (>10x) greater risk at the low doses that consumers might receive if exposed through drinking water or other environmental exposure (e.g., 72% vs. 4% infection probability for a one oocyst dose) than previously predicted. This new insight into Cryptosporidium risk suggests additional inactivation and removal via treatment may be needed to meet any specified risk target, such as a suggested 10(-4) annual risk of Cryptosporidium infection.

  2. Thermal contribution to the inactivation of Cryptosporidium in plastic bottles during solar water disinfection procedures.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Couso, Hipólito; Fontán-Sainz, María; Ares-Mazás, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    To determine the thermal contribution, independent of ultraviolet radiation, on the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum during solar water disinfection procedures (SODIS), oocysts were exposed for 4, 8, and 12 hours to temperatures recorded in polyethylene terephthalate bottles in previous SODIS studies carried out under field conditions. Inclusion/exclusion of the fluorogenic vital dye propidium iodide, spontaneous excystation, and infectivity studies were used to determine the inactivation of oocysts. There was a significant increase in the percentage of oocysts that took up propidium iodide and in the number of oocysts that excysted spontaneously. There was also a significant decrease in the intensity of infection elicited in suckling mice at the end of all exposure times. The results of the study demonstrate the importance of temperature in the inactivation of C. parvum oocysts during application of SODIS under natural conditions.

  3. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; ...

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategymore » for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.« less

  4. Pathological features of Cryptosporidium andersoni-induced lesions in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Masuno, Koichi; Yanai, Tokuma; Sakai, Hiroki; Satoh, Masaaki; Kai, Chieko; Nakai, Yutaka

    2013-07-01

    To assess the infectivity and the istopathological features of Cryptosporidium andersoni (C. andersoni) in laboratory animals, SCID mice were orally inoculated with oocysts of C. andersoni. Starting one week after inoculation, the SCID mice began shedding oocysts, and this continued for ten weeks. Histopathologically, myriads of C. andersoni were observed on the apical surface of the epithelium in the gastric pit of the glandular stomach. There were few lesions in the gastric epithelium except C. andersoni adhesion. In the lamina propria of the affected mucosa, minimum infiltration of inflammatory cells was observed. Immunohistochemically, C. andersoni demonstrated a positive reaction to a number of primary antibodies of Cryptosporidium parvum. In the experiment described here, few increases were seen in apoptotic epithelial cells in the affected mucosas of the SCID mice, and the nuclear augmentation was not enhanced. It was hypothesized that the absence of apoptosis and cell division were due to a lack of inflammatory cell reaction in the lamina propria.

  5. Household Socioeconomic and Demographic Correlates of Cryptosporidium Seropositivity in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel J.; Oloya, James; Ezeamama, Amara E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidium are parasitic protozoa that infect humans, domestic animals, and wildlife globally. In the United States, cryptosporidiosis occurs in an estimated 750,000 persons annually, and is primarily caused by either of the Cryptosporidium parvum genotypes 1 and 2, exposure to which occurs through ingestion of food or water contaminated with oocytes shed from infected hosts. Although most cryptosporidiosis cases are caused by genotype 1 and are of human origin, the zoonotic sources of genotype 2, such as livestock, are increasingly recognized as important for understanding human disease patterns. Social inequality could mediate patterns of human exposure and infection by placing individuals in environments where food or water contamination and livestock contact is high or through reducing the availability of educational and sanitary resources required to avoid exposure. Methodology/Principal Findings We here analyzed data from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) between 1999 and 2000, and related seropositivity to Cryptosporidium parvum to correlates of social inequality at the household and individual scale. After accounting for the complex sampling design of NHANES and confounding by individual demographics and household conditions, we found impaired household food adequacy was associated with greater odds of Cryptosporidium seropositivity. Additionally, we identified individuals of non-white race and ethnicity and those born outside the United States as having significantly greater risk than white, domestic-born counterparts. Furthermore, we provide suggestive evidence for direct effects of family wealth on Cryptosporidium seropositivity, in that persons from low-income households and from families close to the poverty threshold had elevated odds of seropositivity relative to those in high-income families and in households far above the poverty line. Conclusions/Significance These results refute assertions that

  6. Concentration and Detection of Cryptosporidium Oocysts in Surface Water Samples by Method 1622 Using Ultrafiltration and Capsule Filtration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, O. D.; Sobsey, M.D.; Heaney, C.D.; Schaefer, F. W.; Francy, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum is known to occur widely in both source and drinking water and has caused waterborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis. To improve monitoring, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency developed method 1622 for isolation and detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water. Method 1622 is performance based and involves filtration, concentration, immunomagnetic separation, fluorescent-antibody staining and 4???,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) counterstaining, and microscopic evaluation. The capsule filter system currently recommended for method 1622 was compared to a hollow-fiber ultrafilter system for primary concentration of C. parvum oocysts in seeded reagent water and untreated surface waters. Samples were otherwise processed according to method 1622. Rates of C. parvum oocyst recovery from seeded 10-liter volumes of reagent water in precision and recovery experiments with filter pairs were 42% (standard deviation [SD], 24%) and 46% (SD, 18%) for hollow-fiber ultrafilters and capsule filters, respectively. Mean oocyst recovery rates in experiments testing both filters on seeded surface water samples were 42% (SD, 27%) and 15% (SD, 12%) for hollow-fiber ultrafilters and capsule filters, respectively. Although C. parvum oocysts were recovered from surface waters by using the approved filter of method 1622, the recovery rates were significantly lower and more variable than those from reagent grade water. In contrast, the disposable hollow-fiber ultrafilter system was compatible with subsequent method 1622 processing steps, and it recovered C. parvum oocysts from seeded surface waters with significantly greater efficiency and reliability than the filter suggested for use in the version of method 1622 tested.

  7. Prevalence and Genetic Characterization of Cryptosporidium Isolates from Common Brushtail Possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) Adapted to Urban Settings▿

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Nichola J.; Deane, Elizabeth M.; Power, Michelle L.

    2008-01-01

    The common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) is one of the most abundant native marsupials in urban Australia, having successfully adapted to utilize anthropogenic resources. The habituation of possums to food and shelter available in human settlements has facilitated interaction with people, pets, and zoo animals, increasing the potential for transmission of zoonotic Cryptosporidium pathogens. This study sought to examine the identity and prevalence of Cryptosporidium species occurring in possums adapted to urban settings compared to possums inhabiting remote woodlands far from urban areas and to characterize the health of the host in response to oocyst shedding. Findings indicated that both populations were shedding oocysts of the same genotype (brushtail possum 1 [BTP1]) that were genetically and morphologically distinct from zoonotic species and genotypes and most closely related to Cryptosporidium species from marsupials. The urban population was shedding an additional five Cryptosporidium isolates that were genetically distinct from BTP1 and formed a sister clade with Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis. Possums that were shedding oocysts showed no evidence of pathogenic changes, including elevated levels of white blood cells, diminished body condition (body mass divided by skeletal body length), or reduced nutritional state, suggesting a stable host-parasite relationship typical of Cryptosporidium species that are adapted to the host. Overall, Cryptosporidium occurred with a higher prevalence in possums from urban habitat (11.3%) than in possums from woodland habitat (5.6%); however, the host-specific nature of the genotypes may limit spillover infection in the urban setting. This study determined that the coexistence of possums with sympatric populations of humans, pets, and zoo animals in the urban Australian environment is unlikely to present a threat to public health safety. PMID:18641156

  8. Multilocus typing and population structure of Cryptosporidium from children in Zaragoza, Spain.

    PubMed

    Ramo, Ana; Quílez, Joaquín; Vergara-Castiblanco, Claudia; Monteagudo, Luis; Del Cacho, Emilio; Clavel, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    A multilocus typing approach with eight variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) loci and the GP60 gene was used to analyze the inter- and intra-species variation of 44 Cryptosporidium isolates from pediatric patients in Zaragoza city (NE, Spain). Restriction and sequence analyses of the SSU rRNA gene revealed that Cryptosporidium transmission is mostly anthroponotic in this area, with the predominance of Cryptosporidium hominis (n: 41) over Cryptosporidium parvum (n: 3). GP60 subtyping showed limited genetic diversity and four subtypes were identified, including IbA10G2 (n: 35), IaA24R3 (n: 6), IIaA15G1R1 (n: 1) and IIaA15G2R1 (n: 2). Five out of eight VNTR loci showed a discriminatory power higher than the GP60 gene, although each locus had a predominant allele exhibited by more than 50% of isolates. All but four alleles were associated to either C. hominis or C. parvum and linked alleles at different loci were found. Multilocus typing substantially increased the discriminatory power (Hunter-Gaston index: 0.807, 95% CI, 0.683-0.926) and revealed that genetic diversity is much higher than that reported by GP60 sequencing, since 17 multilocus subtypes (MLTs) were identified. Nearly half of the specimens were allocated to a single major MLT. However, no more than three specimens were allocated to each of the remaining MLTs. Both phylogenetic and population analyses revealed a population clustering of C. hominis according to the GP60 subtype, which indicates the robustness of this marker to differentiate genetic subpopulations. Subpopulations had an overall clonal genetic structure, although traces of genetic flow between them were also observed.

  9. Greater intensity and frequency of Cryptosporidium and Giardia oocyst shedding beyond the neonatal period is associated with reductions in growth, carcase weight and dressing efficiency in sheep.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Caroline; Williams, Andrew; Yang, Rongchang; Ryan, Una; Carmichael, Ian; Campbell, Angus J; Gardner, Graham E

    2016-09-15

    Associations between intensity and frequency of Cryptosporidium and Giardia shedding with growth, carcase weight and dressing% were investigated using a longitudinal study of 1182 lambs on eight Australian farms. Live weight was recorded and faecal samples were collected on three sampling occasions; weaning (approximately 12 weeks of age), post-weaning (approximately 19 weeks) and pre-slaughter (approximately 29 weeks). Hot standard carcase weight (HSCW) and dressing% were measured at slaughter. Faecal samples were screened for presence and concentration of Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Haemonchus oocysts using a quantitative PCR. Trichostrongylid eggs were quantified with modified McMaster faecal worm egg count (WEC). Protozoan shedding intensity was categorised as high (above median oocyst concentration in positive sheep), low (below median oocyst concentration in positive sheep) or not detected. Shedding was also categorised for shedding type (no shedding, single Giardia infection, single Cryptosporidium infection, concurrent Giardia and Cryptosporidium infection) and lambs were categorised for frequency of shedding (shedding identified on 0, 1, 2 or 3 occasions). Associations of parasite shedding intensity category, shedding type, shedding frequency, WEC and Haemonchus status (positive or negative) with lamb production were assessed using general linear models (HSCW and dressing%) and linear mixed effects models (live weight). High Cryptosporidium parvum shedding was associated with lower live weight, ranging 2.31-4.52kg over the 3 sampling occasions. Cryptosporidium parvum shedding was associated with less HSCW in high (3.22kg less) and low (3.22kg less) shedding lambs post-weaning, and high (2.21kg less) and low (2.60kg less) shedding lambs pre-slaughter as well as lower dressing% (2.7% lower in high shedding lambs post-weaning). Cryptosporidium (all species) shedding pre-slaughter was associated with reduced dressing% in both high (1.25% lower) and low (1

  10. INFECTIVITY OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM IN HEALTHY ADULTS WITH PRE-EXISTING ANTI-C. PARVUM SERUM IGG. (R824759)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. Complete development and multiplication of Cryptosporidium hominis in cell-free culture.

    PubMed

    Hijjawi, Nawal; Estcourt, Annika; Yang, Rongchang; Monis, Paul; Ryan, Una

    2010-04-19

    The present study reports for the first time the completion of the life cycle of Cryptosporidium hominis in cell-free culture and multiplication of the parasite via qPCR. Individual life-cycle stages were characterised using Cryptosporidium-specific antibody staining (Sporo-Glo) and fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) staining on cultures inoculated with excysted oocysts and purified sporozoites. In both cultures, C. hominis successfully proliferated and completed its life cycle, however development in cultures inoculated with purified sporozoites lagged behind cultures inoculated with excysted oocysts. Some novel findings of the study include the visualisation of pairing and multiple associations between various developmental stages in a process similar to syzygy and the formation of Cryptosporidium stages (trophozoites and meronts) inside the oocysts without excystation. qPCR analysis revealed a 5-6-fold amplification of parasite DNA. Future studies are required to improve the amplification of the parasite. The present study confirms the suitability of this culturing model to support the growth and proliferation of C. hominis (which unlike C. parvum, cannot be readily cultured in small animal models) and will greatly assist in our understanding of the developmental biology of Cryptosporidium, its position within the Apicomplexa and its relationship to gregarine protozoa.

  12. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium species in recreational versus non-recreational water sources.

    PubMed

    Loganthan, Sasdekumar; Yang, Rongchang; Bath, Andrew; Gordon, Cameron; Ryan, Una

    2012-08-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium, represents the major public health concern of water utilities in developed nations due to its small size, resistance to disinfection and ability to be shed in large numbers in faeces. In Australia, recreational access is not allowed on direct supply sources, however, in Western Australia, limited recreational access to drinking water catchments has been allowed, although only in the outer catchment. Recreational activities within 2 km of the drinking water body is prohibited. The present study compared the amount, prevalence and species of Cryptosporidium in recreational versus non-recreational water catchments in the south west of Western Australia (WA). Recreational water catchments, which allowed swimming and camping had a higher prevalence of Cryptosporidium and the majority of samples were the human-associated C. hominis. Non-recreational catchments had a lower prevalence and all the samples genotyped were C. parvum. Risk analysis identified increasing population as strongly correlated with an increase in the prevalence of Cryptosporidium in recreational catchments. This suggests that recreational access to drinking water catchments is a serious public health risk and government policy limiting activities to the outer catchment should be supported.

  13. Genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium identified in clinical samples from cities in Brazil and Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago; Velásquez, Jorge Néstor; Cunha, Flavia de Souza; Pantano, María Laura; Sodré, Fernando Campos; da Silva, Sidnei; Astudillo, Osvaldo Germán; Peralta, José Mauro; Carnevale, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    The identification and characterisation of Cryptosporidiumgenotypes and subtypes are fundamental to the study of cryptosporidiosis epidemiology, aiding in prevention and control strategies. The objective was to determine the genetic diversity ofCryptosporidium in samples obtained from hospitals of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Buenos Aires, Argentina. Samples were analysed by microscopy and TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays forCryptosporidium detection, genotyped by nested-PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the 18S rRNA gene and subtyped by DNA sequencing of the gp60 gene. Among the 89 samples from Rio de Janeiro, Cryptosporidium spp were detected in 26 by microscopy/TaqMan PCR. In samples from Buenos Aires,Cryptosporidium was diagnosed in 15 patients of the 132 studied. The TaqMan PCR and the nested-PCR-RFLP detected Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, and co-infections of both species. In Brazilian samples, the subtypes IbA10G2 and IIcA5G3 were observed. The subtypes found in Argentinean samples were IbA10G2, IaA10G1R4, IaA11G1R4, and IeA11G3T3, and mixed subtypes of Ia and IIa families were detected in the co-infections. C. hominis was the species more frequently detected, and subtype family Ib was reported in both countries. Subtype diversity was higher in Buenos Aires than in Rio de Janeiro and two new subtypes were described for the first time. PMID:26814641

  14. Cryptosporidium muris: Infectivity and Illness in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Cynthia L.; Okhuysen, Pablo C.; Langer-Curry, Rebecca C.; Lupo, Philip J.; Widmer, Giovanni; Tzipori, Saul

    2015-01-01

    Although Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis cause the majority of human cryptosporidiosis cases, other Cryptosporidium species are also capable of infecting humans, particularly when individuals are immunocompromised. Ten C. muris cases have been reported, primarily in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -positive patients with diarrhea. However, asymptomatic cases were reported in two HIV-negative children, and in another case, age and immune status were not described. This study examines the infectivity of C. muris in six healthy adults. Volunteers were challenged with 105 C. muris oocysts and monitored for 6 weeks for infection and/or illness. All six patients became infected. Two patients experienced a self-limited diarrheal illness. Total oocysts shed during the study ranged from 6.7 × 106 to 4.1 × 108, and the number was slightly higher in volunteers with diarrhea (2.8 × 108) than asymptomatic shedders (4.4 × 107). C. muris-infected subjects shed oocysts longer than occurred with other species studied in healthy volunteers. Three volunteers shed oocysts for 7 months. Physical examinations were normal, with no reported recurrence of diarrhea or other gastrointestinal complaints. Two persistent shedders were treated with nitazoxanide, and the infection was resolved. Thus, healthy adults are susceptible to C. muris, which can cause mild diarrhea and result in persistent, asymptomatic infection. PMID:25311695

  15. Development of particulate drug formulation against C. parvum: Formulation, characterization and in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Blanco-García, Estefanía; Guerrero-Callejas, Florentina; Blanco-Méndez, José; Gómez-Couso, Hipólito; Luzardo-Álvarez, Asteria

    2016-09-20

    This research aims towards developing an alternative therapy against Cryptosporidium parvum using bioadhesive paromomycin and diloxanide furoate-loaded microspheres. Microspheres were prepared using chitosan and poly(vinyl alcohol) and two types of cyclodextrins (β-CD and DM-β-CD) for the potential use of treating cryptosporidiosis. This pathogen is associated with gastrointestinal illness in humans and animals. Microparticle formulations were characterized in terms of size, surface charge, drug release and morphology. In vivo bioadhesion properties of CHI/PVA microspheres were also evaluated in mice. Finally, the in vivo efficacy of CHI/PVA microspheres against C. parvum was tested in neonatal mouse model. In this work, microspheres prepared by spray-drying showed spherical shape, diameters between 6.67±0.11 and 18.78±0.07μm and positively surface charged. The bioadhesion studies demonstrated that MS remained attached at +16h (post-infection) to the intestinal cells as detected by fluorescence. This finding was crucial taking use of the fact that the parasite multiplication occurs between 16 and 20h post-infection. The efficacy of treatment was determined by calculating the number of oocysts recovered from the intestinal tract of mice after 7days of post-infection. Mice receiving orally administered microspheres with and without drug exhibited significantly lower parasite loads compared with the control mice. Ultrastructural observations by TEM bring to light the uptake of smallest particles by enterocytes associated with conspicuous changes in enterocytic cells. Completely recovery of cell morphology was detected after 24h of first inoculation with MS. CHI/PVA microspheres appear to be a safe and simple system to be used in an anticryptosporidial treatment. The distinctive features of neonatal mice requires further work to determine the suppressive effect of this particulate delivery system on C. parvum attachment in other animal models.

  16. Development and Evaluation of Three Real-Time PCR Assays for Genotyping and Source Tracking Cryptosporidium spp. in Water.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Neumann, Norman F; Ruecker, Norma; Alderisio, Kerri A; Sturbaum, Gregory D; Villegas, Eric N; Chalmers, Rachel; Monis, Paul; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2015-09-01

    The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in drinking source water can present a serious public health risk. To rapidly and effectively assess the source and human-infective potential of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water, sensitive detection and correct identification of oocysts to the species level (genotyping) are essential. In this study, we developed three real-time PCR genotyping assays, two targeting the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene (18S-LC1 and 18S-LC2 assays) and one targeting the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90) gene (hsp90 assay), and evaluated the sensitivity and Cryptosporidium species detection range of these assays. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes and melt curve analysis, the 18S-LC1 and hsp90 assays could differentiate common human-pathogenic species (C. parvum, C. hominis, and C. meleagridis), while the 18S-LC2 assay was able to differentiate nonpathogenic species (such as C. andersoni) from human-pathogenic ones commonly found in source water. In sensitivity evaluations, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays could detect as few as 1 Cryptosporidium oocyst per sample. Thus, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays might be used in environmental monitoring, whereas the 18S-LC1 genotyping assay could be useful for genotyping Cryptosporidium spp. in clinical specimens or wastewater samples.

  17. 90-Kilodalton Heat Shock Protein, Hsp90, as a Target for Genotyping Cryptosporidium spp. Known To Infect Humans ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yaoyu; Dearen, Theresa; Cama, Vitaliano; Xiao, Lihua

    2009-01-01

    Small-subunit (SSU) rRNA-based methods have been commonly used in the differentiation of Cryptosporidium species or genotypes. In order to develop a new tool for confirming the genotypes of Cryptosporidium species, parts of the 90-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) genes of seven Cryptosporidium species and genotypes known to infect humans (C. hominis, C. parvum, C. meleagridis, C. canis, C. muris, C. suis, and the cervine genotype), together with one from cattle (C. andersoni), were sequenced and analyzed. With the exception of C. felis from cats and C. baileyi from birds, the Hsp90 genes of all tested Cryptosporidium species were amplified. Phylogenetic analysis of the hsp90 sequences from all these species is congruent with previous studies in which the SSU rRNA, 70-kDa heat shock protein, oocyst wall protein, and actin genes were analyzed and showed that gastric and intestinal parasites segregate into two distinct clades. In this study, the secondary products of hsp90 produced after PCR-restriction fragment length digestion with StyI and HphI or with BbsI showed that parasites within the intestinal or gastric clade could be differentiated from each other. These data confirm the utility of the Hsp90 gene as a sensitive, specific, and robust molecular tool for differentiating species and/or genotypes of Cryptosporidium in clinical specimens. PMID:19168758

  18. Elevation and vegetation determine Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

    PubMed

    Montecino-Latorre, Diego; Li, Xunde; Xiao, Chengling; Atwill, Edward R

    2015-08-01

    Wildlife are increasingly recognized as important biological reservoirs of zoonotic species of Cryptosporidium that might contaminate water and cause human exposure to this protozoal parasite. The habitat range of the yellow-bellied marmot (Marmota flaviventris) overlaps extensively with the watershed boundaries of municipal water supplies for California communities along the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. We conducted a cross-sectional epidemiological study to estimate the fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium oocysts by yellow-bellied marmots and to quantify the environmental loading rate and determine risk factors for Cryptosporidium fecal shedding in this montane wildlife species. The observed proportion of Cryptosporidium positive fecal samples was 14.7% (33/224, positive number relative to total number samples) and the environmental loading rate was estimated to be 10,693 oocysts animal(-1) day(-1). Fecal shedding was associated with the elevation and vegetation status of their habitat. Based on a portion of the 18s rRNA gene sequence of 2 isolates, the Cryptosporidium found in Marmota flaviventris were 99.88%-100% match to multiple isolates of C. parvum in the GenBank.

  19. Detection and molecular characterization of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) stranded along the Galician coast (Northwest Spain).

    PubMed

    Reboredo-Fernández, A; Gómez-Couso, H; Martínez-Cedeira, J A; Cacciò, S M; Ares-Mazás, E

    2014-05-28

    The ubiquitous protozoan parasites Giardia and Cryptosporidium have been detected from many species of captive and free-living wildlife, representing most mammalian orders. Twenty species of marine mammals have been reported to inhabit Galician waters and the region has one of the highest rates of stranding in Europe. Evidence from stranding, reported by-catches and sightings, suggests that the common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) is the most abundant cetacean on the Galician coast (Northwest Spain). The objective of this study was to detect and molecularly characterize isolates of Giardia and Cryptosporidium obtained from common dolphins stranded in this area. Between 2005 and 2012, sections of large intestine from 133 common dolphins stranded along the Galician coast were collected by the personnel of the Galician Stranding Network (Coordinadora para o Estudo dos Mamíferos Mariños, CEMMA). Using direct immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and PCR amplification and sequencing of the SSU-rDNA, β-giardin genes and the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region, Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected in 8 (6.0%) and 12 samples (9.0%), respectively. In two samples, co-infection by both parasites was observed. The molecular characterization revealed the presence of Giardia duodenalis assemblages A (genotypes A1 and A2) and B and Cryptosporidium parvum in these samples. This constitutes the first study in which the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium has been investigated in common dolphins on the European Atlantic coast, and it is also the first report of C. parvum in this host. Our findings indicate that these animals could act as reservoir of these waterborne parasites or could be victims of the contamination originated by anthropogenic activities.

  20. Drinking water treatment processes for removal of Cryptosporidium and Giardia.

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Walter Q; Rose, Joan B

    2004-12-09

    Major waterborne cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis outbreaks associated with contaminated drinking water have been linked to evidence of suboptimal treatment. Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts are particularly more resistant than Giardia lamblia cysts to removal and inactivation by conventional water treatment (coagulation, sedimentation, filtration and chlorine disinfection); therefore, extensive research has been focused on the optimization of treatment processes and application of new technologies to reduce concentrations of viable/infectious oocysts to a level that prevents disease. The majority of the data on the performance of treatment processes to remove cysts and oocysts from drinking water have been obtained from pilot-tests, with a few studies performed in full-scale conventional water treatment plants. These studies have demonstrated that protozoan cyst removal throughout all stages of the conventional treatment is largely influenced by the effectiveness of coagulation pretreatment, which along with clarification constitutes the first treatment barrier against protozoan breakthrough. Physical removal of waterborne Crytosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts is ultimately achieved by properly functioning conventional filters, providing that effective pretreatment of the water is applied. Disinfection by chemical or physical methods is finally required to inactivate/remove the infectious life stages of these organisms. The effectiveness of conventional (chlorination) and alternative (chlorine dioxide, ozonation and ultra violet [UV] irradiation) disinfection procedures for inactivation of Cryptosporidium has been the focus of much research due to the recalcitrant nature of waterborne oocysts to disinfectants. This paper provides technical information on conventional and alternative drinking water treatment technologies for removal and inactivation of the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium and Giardia.

  1. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in diarrhoeic patients in the Qikiqtani Region, Nunavut, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Asma; Goldfarb, David M.; Slinger, Robert; Dixon, Brent R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the prevalences of infection with the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in humans appear to be relatively high in the Canadian North, their transmission patterns are poorly understood. Objective To determine the detection rate and the molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in diarrhoeic patients in the Qikiqtani (Baffin Island) Region of Nunavut, Canada, in order to better understand the burden of illness and the potential mechanisms of transmission. Study design/methods Diarrhoeal stool specimens (n=108) submitted to the Qikiqtani General Hospital for clinical testing were also tested for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis using epifluorescence microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses were performed on PCR-positive specimens to determine the species, genotypes and sub-genotypes of the parasites. Results Cryptosporidium was detected in 15.7% of the diarrhoeic patients, while Giardia was detected in 4.6%. DNA sequencing of a fragment of the small subunit rRNA gene indicated that all of the Cryptosporidium amplicons had a 100% homology to C. parvum, and a gp60 assay showed that all aligned with C. parvum sub-genotype IIa. Microsatellite analysis revealed 3 cases of sub-genotype IIaA15G2R1, 2 of IIaA15G1R and 1 case each of sub-genotypes IIaA16G1R1 and IIaA15R1. For Giardia, results based on the amplification of both the 16S rRNA gene and the gdh gene were generally in agreement, and both DNA sequencing and RFLP demonstrated the presence of the G. duodenalis Assemblage B genotype. Conclusions Both C. parvum and G. duodenalis Assemblage B were present in human diarrhoeal stool specimens from Nunavut, which was suggestive of zoonotic transmission, although human-to-human transmission cannot be ruled out. To fully understand the public health significance of the different

  2. Age-specific seroprevalence to an immunodominant Cryptosporidium sporozoite antigen in a Brazilian population.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, M. J.; Elwin, K.; Massad, E.; Azevedo, R. S.

    2005-01-01

    The seroepidemiology of Cryptosporidium infection was investigated in a representative sample of a normal population in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil using a recombinant form of the immunodominant 27-kDa sporozoite antigen. IgG seropositivity was low in infants following loss of maternal antibody but quickly increased to approximately 60% by 5 years, then 80% by the age of 10 years, after which prevalence remained constant. The broad range of antibody concentrations is consistent with previous reports that the IgG response to C. parvum is short-lived. There is also evidence that average antibody concentrations increase with age. Results suggest that the recombinant antigen may be a more sensitive method of measuring seroprevalence than the native antigen in Western blot. Although cross-sectional studies can provide an insight into the epidemiology of C. parvum in normal populations, further studies investigating the dynamics of the humoral immune responses to Cryptosporidium and the use of serology in epidemiological studies are required. PMID:16181518

  3. Genomic Variation in IbA10G2 and Other Patient-Derived Cryptosporidium hominis Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Per; Andersson, Sofia; Winiecka-Krusnell, Jadwiga; Hallström, Björn; Alsmark, Cecilia; Troell, Karin; Beser, Jessica; Arrighi, Romanico B G

    2017-03-01

    In order to improve genotyping and epidemiological analysis of Cryptosporidium spp., genomic data need to be generated directly from a broad range of clinical specimens. Utilizing a robust method that we developed for the purification and generation of amplified target DNA, we present its application for the successful isolation and whole-genome sequencing of 14 different Cryptosporidium hominis patient specimens. Six isolates of subtype IbA10G2 were analyzed together with a single representative each of 8 other subtypes: IaA20R3, IaA23R3, IbA9G3, IbA13G3, IdA14, IeA11G3T3, IfA12G1, and IkA18G1. Parasite burden was measured over a range of more than 2 orders of magnitude for all samples, while the genomes were sequenced to mean depths of between 17× and 490× coverage. Sequence homology-based functional annotation identified several genes of interest, including the gene encoding Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein 9 (COWP9), which presented a predicted loss-of-function mutation in all the sequence subtypes, except for that seen with IbA10G2, which has a sequence identical to the Cryptosporidium parvum reference Iowa II sequence. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis showed that all the IbA10G2 genomes form a monophyletic clade in the C. hominis tree as expected and yet display some heterogeneity within the IbA10G2 subtype. The current report validates the aforementioned method for isolating and sequencing Cryptosporidium directly from clinical stool samples. In addition, the analysis demonstrates the potential in mining data generated from sequencing multiple whole genomes of Cryptosporidium from human fecal samples, while alluding to the potential for a higher degree of genotyping within Cryptosporidium epidemiology.

  4. PROPHYLACTIC EFFECT OF BOVINE ANTI-CRYPTOSPORIDIUM HYPERIMMUNE COLOSTRUM IN HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS CHALLENGED WITH CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM. (R824759)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. Cryptosporidium (Crypto) Disease: Diagnosis & Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cryptosporidium Tracking in the United States CryptoNet Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... Cryptosporidiosis [DPDx] Diagnostic Procedures: Stool Specimens [DPDx] Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ...

  6. Eimeria and Cryptosporidium in Estonian dairy farms in regard to age, species, and diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Brian; Viltrop, Arvo; Raaperi, Kerli; Järvis, Toivo

    2009-12-23

    Eimeria and Cryptosporidium are among the most common bovine parasites in the world, but little is known about them in Estonia. Basic field research is needed to gain insight into pathogen dynamics, providing knowledge for veterinarians and research. A survey of 45 Estonian dairy farms in 15 counties was carried out between 2006 and 2007. Three age groups: <3, 3-12, and >12 months old animals were sampled. Collected faeces were examined by quantitative flotation and Ziehl-Neelsen contrast staining, and species examined morphologically. Selected samples containing Cryptosporidium were additionally examined by polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) and sequencing to determine genotypes. Twelve species of Eimeria were identified, seven previously unknown in Estonia. Main species in samples were E. bovis (30%), E. zuernii (23%), and E. ellipsoidalis (14%). All herds were infected and animals aged 3-12 months were more commonly infected with Eimeria oocysts (63%) than any other group. Calves <3 months shed most oocyst, but high counts were rare. A negative association (slope=-0.16, p<0.001) was found between the number of animals infected with Eimeria and the age category. Cryptosporidium were detected in 84% of the farms, and C. andersoni and C. parvum were successfully identified. Though prevalences of Cryptosporidium in the age groups were similar to the sample prevalence (30%) an increase in the infections was found with increasing age (p<0.001). Higher diarrhoea scores were negatively associated with Eimeria spp. infection (slope=-0.08, p<0.05), whereas Cryptosporidium could not be associated with the presence of diarrhoea. Frequent low intensity infections of animals in all age groups with both parasites apply a constant stress on the animals with impact on health and production. The Estonian results are different compared to available studies in regard of: older animals commonly being infected, finding of modest oocyst counts, and distribution of Eimeria species.

  7. Molecular detection and characterization of Cryptosporidium species in household dogs, pet shop puppies, and dogs kept in a school of veterinary nursing in Japan.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Naoyuki; Oohashi, Yoshino; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Itagaki, Tadashi; Ito, Yoichi; Saeki, Hideharu; Kanai, Kazutaka; Chikazawa, Seishiro; Hori, Yasutomo; Hoshi, Fumio; Higuchi, Seiichi

    2014-03-01

    school in Japan. However, because Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum are the most common causes of human infections, it is likely that the risk of zoonotic transmission of Cryptosporidium species from dogs to humans is low.

  8. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Humans, Domestic Animals, and Village Water Sources in Rural India

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Miles E.; Shrivastava, Arpit; Smith, Woutrina A.; Sahu, Priyadarshi; Odagiri, Mitsunori; Misra, Pravas R.; Panigrahi, Pinaki; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Clasen, Thomas; Jenkins, Marion W.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia are zoonotic enteric protozoa of significant health concern where sanitation, hygiene, and water supplies are inadequate. We examined 85 stool samples from diarrhea patients, 111 pooled fecal samples by species across seven domestic animal types, and water from tube wells (N = 207) and ponds (N = 94) across 60 villages in coastal Odisha, India, for Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts to measure occurrence, concentration/shedding, and environmental loading rates. Oocysts/cysts were detected in 12% of diarrhea patients. Detection ranged from 0% to 35% for Cryptosporidium and 0% to 67% for Giardia across animal hosts. Animal loading estimates indicate the greatest contributors of environmental oocysts/cysts in the study region are cattle. Ponds were contaminated with both protozoa (oocysts: 37%, cysts: 74%), as were tube wells (oocysts: 10%, cysts: 14%). Future research should address the public health concern highlighted from these findings and investigate the role of domestic animals in diarrheal disease transmission in this and similar settings. PMID:26123963

  9. Sources and Species of Cryptosporidium Oocysts in the Wachusett Reservoir Watershed

    PubMed Central

    Jellison, Kristen L.; Hemond, Harold F.; Schauer, David B.

    2002-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of Cryptosporidium oocysts in the environment is critical to developing improved watershed management practices for protection of the public from waterborne cryptosporidiosis. Analytical methods of improved specificity and sensitivity are essential to this task. We developed a nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay that allows detection of a single oocyst in environmental samples and differentiates the human pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum from other Cryptosporidium species. We tested our method on surface water and animal fecal samples from the Wachusett Reservoir watershed in central Massachusetts. We also directly compared results from our method with those from the immunofluorescence microscopy assay recommended in the Information Collection Rule. Our results suggest that immunofluorescence microscopy may not be a reliable indicator of public health risk for waterborne cryptosporidiosis. Molecular and environmental data identify both wildlife and dairy farms as sources of oocysts in the watershed, implicate times of cold water temperatures as high-risk periods for oocyst contamination of surface waters, and suggest that not all oocysts in the environment pose a threat to public health. PMID:11823192

  10. Seasonal Shedding of Multiple Cryptosporidium Genotypes in California Ground Squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi)

    PubMed Central

    Atwill, Edward R.; Phillips, Ralph; Pereira, Maria Das Graças C.; Li, Xunde; McCowan, Brenda

    2004-01-01

    Twelve percent of 853 California ground squirrels (Spermophilus beecheyi) from six different geographic locations in Kern County, Calif., were found to be shedding on average 44,482 oocysts g of feces−1. The mean annual environmental loading rate of Cryptosporidium oocysts was 57,882 oocysts squirrel−1 day−1, with seasonal patterns of fecal shedding ranging from <10,000 oocysts squirrel−1 day−1 in fall, winter, and spring to levels of 2 × 105 oocysts squirrel−1 day−1 in summer. Juveniles were about twice as likely as adult squirrels to be infected and shed higher concentrations of oocysts than adults did, with particularly high levels of infection and shedding being found among juvenile male squirrels. Based on DNA sequencing of a portion of the 18S small-subunit rRNA gene, there existed three genotypes of Cryptosporidium species in these populations of squirrels (Sbey03a, Sbey03b, and Sbey03c; accession numbers AY462231 to AY462233, respectively). These unique DNA sequences were most closely related (96 to 97% homology) to porcine C. parvum (AF115377) and C. wrairi (AF115378). Inoculating BALB/c neonatal mice with up to 10,000 Sbey03b or Sbey03c fresh oocysts from different infected hosts did not produce detectable levels of infection, suggesting that this common genotype shed by California ground squirrels is not infectious for mice and may constitute a new species of Cryptosporidium. PMID:15528541

  11. Cryptosporidium spp. in drinking water. Samples from rural sites in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Füchslin, Hans Peter; Kötzsch, Stefan; Egli, Thomas

    2012-10-04

    In most rural areas and small communities in Switzerland the drinking water is supplied to the consumers after a minimum or even no treatment at all. However, it is just in these areas where drinking water from sources of agricultural activities can be contaminated by liquid manure and faeces of pasturing animals. The Swiss drinking water regulations are limited to the monitoring of E. coli, Enterococcus spp. and total plate counts only. Hence, resistant pathogens, as for example Cryptosporidium spp., remain unnoticed. During a drinking water survey, which lasted from June 2003 to December 2004, water samples were collected from 3 selected rural sites in Switzerland. The drinking water was investigated for Cryptosporidium spp., E. coli, Enterococcus spp., Clostridium perfringens and other parameters. In all samples oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. were detected at elevated concentrations of up to 0.18 oocysts/l. Between 28% and 75% of the oocysts were found to be vital by the excystation method. Sampled oocysts collected from the three sites were subjected to genotyping and in one case the isolate was found to belong to the genotype of C. parvum. No evidence for increased incidents of diarrhoea in the past years was noted by local authorities.

  12. The first recorded outbreak of cryptosporidiosis due to Cryptosporidium cuniculus (formerly rabbit genotype), following a water quality incident.

    PubMed

    Puleston, Richard L; Mallaghan, Cathy M; Modha, Deborah E; Hunter, Paul R; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S; Regan, Christopher M; Nichols, Gordon L; Chalmers, Rachel M

    2014-03-01

    We report the first identified outbreak of cryptosporidiosis with Cryptosporidium cuniculus following a water quality incident in Northamptonshire, UK. A standardised, enhanced Cryptosporidium exposure questionnaire was administered to all cases of cryptosporidiosis after the incident. Stool samples, water testing, microscopy slides and rabbit gut contents positive for Cryptosporidium were typed at the Cryptosporidium Reference Unit, Singleton Hospital, Swansea. Twenty-three people were microbiologically linked to the incident although other evidence suggests an excess of 422 cases of cryptosporidiosis above baseline. Most were adult females; unusually for cryptosporidiosis there were no affected children identified under the age of 5 years. Water consumption was possibly higher than in national drinking water consumption patterns. Diarrhoea duration was negatively correlated to distance from the water treatment works where the contamination occurred. Oocyst counts were highest in water storage facilities. This outbreak is the first caused by C. cuniculus infection to have been noted and it has conclusively demonstrated that this species can be a human pathogen. Although symptomatically similar to cryptosporidiosis from C. parvum or C. hominis, this outbreak has revealed some differences, in particular no children under 5 were identified and females were over-represented. These dissimilarities are unexplained although we postulate possible explanations.

  13. Genetic characterisation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from dairy calves: discovery of species/genotypes consistent with those found in humans.

    PubMed

    Abeywardena, Harshanie; Jex, Aaron R; Nolan, Matthew J; Haydon, Shane R; Stevens, Melita A; McAnulty, Robin W; Gasser, Robin B

    2012-12-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are important genera of parasitic protists that can cause significant diarrhoeal diseases in humans and other animals. Depending on the species/genotype of parasite, human infection may be acquired via anthroponotic or zoonotic transmission routes. Here, we undertook a molecular epidemiological investigation of these two genera of parasites in pre- and post-weaned calves from eight locations in Canterbury, New Zealand, by PCR-coupled sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of sequence data for regions in the 60 kDa glycoprotein (pgp60) gene of Cryptosporidium and/or the triose-phosphate isomerase (ptpi) gene of Giardia. The pgp60 and ptpi regions were specifically amplified from 15 (8.3%) and 11 (6.1%) of the 180 individual faecal samples, respectively. The sequences derived from all of the amplicons were aligned with homologous reference sequences and subjected to phylogenetic analysis by Bayesian inference. For Cryptosporidium, three samples contained Cryptosporidium parvum genotype IIa, subgenotypes IIaA15G3R1, IIaA19G3R1 and IIaA23G4. Twelve samples contained Cryptosporidium hominis genotype Ib, subgenotype IbA10G2R2. While subgenotypes IIaA15G3R1 and IIaA23G4 are new records, IIaA19G3R1 and IbA10G2R2 are commonly found in humans in various countries. For Giardia, two samples contained Giardia duodenalis assemblage A, also common in humans. In contrast, nine samples contained G. duodenalis assemblage E, which is the first report of this assemblage in cattle in New Zealand. Therefore, the present results indicate that dairy calves on the South Island of New Zealand harbour 'zoonotic' genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, which is likely to have significant public health implications.

  14. Microsporidia and Cryptosporidium in horses and donkeys in Algeria: detection of a novel Cryptosporidium hominis subtype family (Ik) in a horse.

    PubMed

    Laatamna, Abd Elkarim; Wagnerová, Pavla; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Xiao, Lihua; Rost, Michael; McEvoy, John; Saadi, Ahmed Rachid; Aissi, Meriem; Kváč, Martin

    2015-03-15

    A total of 219 and 124 individual fecal samples of horses and donkeys, respectively, were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp., Encephalitozoon spp., and Enterocytozoon bieneusi DNA by genus-specific nested PCR. Isolates were genotyped by sequence analysis of SSU rRNA, GP60, TRAP-C1, COWP, and HSP70 loci in Cryptosporidium, and the ITS region in microsporidia. Cryptosporidium spp. was detected on 3/18 horse farms and 1/15 farms where donkeys were kept. Overall, five (2.3%) horse and two (1.6%) donkey specimens were PCR positive for Cryptosporidium. Genotyping at SSU and GP60 loci revealed that three isolates from horses and donkeys were C. parvum subtype family IIaA16G1R1, one isolate from a horse was, C. muris RN66, and one isolate from a donkey was C. muris TS03. An isolate from a horse shared 99.4% and 99.3% similarity with Cryptosporidium hominis and C. cuniculus, respectively, at the SSU locus. This isolate shared 100% identity with C. hominis at the TRAP-C1, COWP, and HSP70 loci, and it was from the novel gp60 subtype family IkA15G1. Microsporidia were found on 6/18 horse and 2/15 donkey farms. E. bieneusi was identified in 6.8% (15/219) and 1.6% (2/124), and Encephalitozoon cuniculi was identified in 1.8% (4/219) and 1.6% (2/124), of horses and donkeys, respectively. Three genotypes of E. cuniculi (I, II and III) were detected in horses, and E. cuniculi genotype II was detected in donkeys. Four genotypes of E. bieneusi (horse1, horse 2, CZ3, D) were described in horses. An additional five horses and two donkeys were positive for E. bieneusi, but the isolated were not genotyped. Neither Cryptosporidium nor microsporidia prevalence were affected by sex, age, type of breeding, or whether the host was a horse or a donkey.

  15. Infection rate of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in cashmere, dairy and meat goats in China.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xian-Qi; Tian, Ge-Ru; Ren, Guan-Jing; Yu, Zheng-Qing; Lok, James Barron; Zhang, Long-Xian; Wang, Xue-Ting; Song, Jun-Ke; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2016-07-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, microsporidiosis, and giardiasis contribute significantly to the high burden of zoonotic diarrhea worldwide. Goats constitute an important species in animal agriculture by providing cashmere wool, meat, and dairy products for human consumption. However, zoonotic pathogens with the potential to cause morbidity and to degrade production have been reported frequently in goats recently. The present study examined 629 fecal specimens from goats, including 315 cashmere goats, 170 dairy goats and 144 meat goats, in multiple cities of Shaanxi and Henan provinces, northwestern and central China, to investigate the infection rate and species/assemblages/genotypes of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi. Of these samples, 274 (43.6%) were positive for three zoonotic pathogens, including 80 (12.7%), 104 (16.5%) and 179 (28.5%) for G. duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi, respectively. Infections with G. duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi existed in meat, dairy and cashmere goats, with the highest infection rate of each pathogen being observed in meat goats. DNA sequencing of the SSU rRNA gene from 104 Cryptosporidium-positive specimens revealed existence of Cryptosporidium xiaoi, and the zoonotic parasites Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium ubiquitum. Genotyping of G. duodenalis based on the triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) gene identified parasites from zoonotic assemblage A in four cashmere goats and the animal-adapted assemblage E in a group of 76 goats that included cashmere, dairy and meat animals. Polymorphisms in the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer characterized E. bieneusi genotype CHG1 and a novel genotype named as SX1 in both dairy and cashmere goats, genotypes CHS7 and COSI in meat goats, the genotype CHG2 in dairy goats, and the human-pathogenic genotype BEB6 in dairy and meat goats. This is the first detailed study to compare infection rate of the zoonotic protozoan pathogens

  16. The development and implementation of a method using blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) as biosentinels of Cryptosporidium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii contamination in marine aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Staggs, Sarah E; Keely, Scott P; Ware, Michael W; Schable, Nancy; See, Mary Jean; Gregorio, Dominic; Zou, Xuan; Su, Chunlei; Dubey, J P; Villegas, Eric N

    2015-12-01

    Surveillance monitoring for microbial water quality typically involves collecting single discrete grab samples for analyzing only one contaminant. While informative, current approaches suffer from poor recoveries and only provide a limited snapshot of the microbial contaminants only at the time of collection. To overcome these limitations, bivalves have been proposed as effective biosentinels of water quality particularly for their ability to efficiently concentrate and retain microbial contaminants for long periods of time. In this study, we examined the use of indigenous blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) as biosentinels to monitor for the presence of Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium water. An efficient method to extract oocyst DNA from various mussel tissues followed by PCR-based detection of these pathogens was developed, which resulted in the detection down to 10 oocysts. This method was then used to conduct a small survey in Point Lobos and Morro Bay, California to determine prevalence T. gondii and Cryptosporidium. Results revealed that mussels from Morro Bay were contaminated with T. gondii (33 %), while mussels from Point Lobos were contaminated with T. gondii (54 %) and Cryptosporidium (26.9 %) oocysts. Phylogenetic analysis using the SSU rRNA gene identified two novel Cryptosporidium parvum-like genotypes. Overall, this study demonstrated the application of using native California Mytilus spp. as biosentinels for pathogen contamination along the central California shorelines. More importantly, T. gondii and Cryptosporidium were found at higher prevalence rates in Morro Bay and in Point Lobos, an area not previously reported to be contaminated with these pathogens.

  17. ASSESSING THE REMOVAL OF INORGANIC COLLOIDS AND CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new batch device that simulates the conditions in water and wastewater treatment plant and enables the study of low-concentration feeds is described. The application of this appartus to the monitoring of the contaminants is demonstrated, using kaolin particles and Cryptosporidi...

  18. PRESENCE OF DSRNAS IN HUMAN AND CALF ISOLATES OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM. (R825148)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. VIRUS-LIKE, DOUBLE-STRANDED RNAS IN THE PARASITIC PROTOZOAN CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM. (R828043)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  20. SEQUENCE OF THE GENE ENCODING HSP90E FROM CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM. (R825148)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. EFFECT OF LACTOBACILLUS AND BIFIDOBACTERIUM ON CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY. (R826138)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. INACTIVATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM WITH SEQUENTIAL APPLICATION OF OZONE AND COMBINED CHLORINE. (R826830)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  3. Assessing calves as carriers of Cryptosporidium and Giardia with zoonotic potential on dairy and beef farms within a water catchment area by mutation scanning.

    PubMed

    Abeywardena, Harshanie; Jex, Aaron R; Firestone, Simon M; McPhee, Sandra; Driessen, Nicole; Koehler, Anson V; Haydon, Shane R; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Stevens, Melita A; Gasser, Robin B

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, we undertook a molecular epidemiological survey of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in calves on three dairy and two beef farms within an open drinking water catchment area (Melbourne, Australia). Faecal samples (n = 474) were collected from calves at two time points (5 months apart) and tested using a PCR-based mutation scanning-targeted sequencing phylogenetic approach, employing regions within the genes of small subunit (SSU) of ribosomal RNA (designated partial SSU), 60 kDa glycoprotein (pgp60) and triose phosphate isomerase (ptpi) as genetic markers. Using partial SSU, the C. bovis, C. parvum, C. ryanae and a new genotype of Cryptosporidium were characterised from totals of 74 (15.6%), 35 (7.3%), 37 (7.8%) and 9 (1.9%) samples, respectively. Using pgp60, C. parvum genotype IIa subgenotype A18G3R1 was detected in 29 samples. Using ptpi, G. duodenalis assemblages A and E were detected in totals of 10 (2.1%) and 130 (27.4%) samples, respectively. The present study showed that a considerable proportion of dairy and beef calves in this open water catchment region excreted Cryptosporidium (i.e. subgenotype IIaA18G3R1) and Giardia (e.g. assemblage A) that are consistent with those infecting humans, inferring that they are of zoonotic importance. Future work should focus on exploring, in a temporal and spatial way, whether these parasites occur in the environment and water of the catchment reservoir.

  4. Giardia duodenalis genotypes and Cryptosporidium species in humans and domestic animals in Côte d'Ivoire: occurrence and evidence for environmental contamination.

    PubMed

    Berrilli, Federica; D'Alfonso, Rossella; Giangaspero, Annunziata; Marangi, Marianna; Brandonisio, Olga; Kaboré, Yolande; Glé, Christoph; Cianfanelli, Cristina; Lauro, Renato; Di Cave, David

    2012-03-01

    Giardia duodenalis genotypes and Cryptosporidium species were studied in humans and free-ranging animals living in closed enclaves in Côte d'Ivoire. Three hundred and seven stool samples were tested from humans, and 47 from freely roaming domestic animals (dogs, goats, ducks, chickens). Molecular characterization of the isolates was performed by sequence analysis of a portion of the SSU-rDNA for Giardia and the COWP gene for Cryptosporidium, and a β-giardin SYBR-green real-time PCR was also used to confirm the assignment of Giardia isolates to Assemblages. In humans, genotyping of Giardia assigned many of the sequences (43/56 by the SSU-rDNA gene, and 36/61 by the β-giardin gene) to Assemblage B. The animal species harboured only zoonotic Assemblages A and B, except for dogs, in which host specific Assemblages C and D were also detected. Cryptosporidium meleagridis, C. parvum and C. hominis were detected in humans, while among the animals only chickens were found positive for oocysts, identified as C. meleagridis and C. parvum. The results provide further evidence about the role of free-ranging domestic animals living closely with humans in the environmental dissemination and potential transmission of these anthropozoonotic pathogens to humans.

  5. A waterborne outbreak and detection of cryptosporidium oocysts in drinking water of an older high-rise apartment complex in seoul.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eun-Joo; Yang, Jin-Young; Lee, Eun-Sook; Kim, Se-Chul; Cha, So-Yang; Kim, Sung-Tek; Lee, Man-Ho; Han, Sun-Hee; Park, Young-Sang

    2013-08-01

    From May to June 2012, a waterborne outbreak of 124 cases of cryptosporidiosis occurred in the plumbing systems of an older high-rise apartment complex in Seoul, Republic of Korea. The residents of this apartment complex had symptoms of watery diarrhea and vomiting. Tap water samples in the apartment complex and its adjacent buildings were collected and tested for 57 parameters under the Korean Drinking Water Standards and for additional 11 microbiological parameters. The microbiological parameters included total colony counts, Clostridium perfringens, Enterococcus, fecal streptococcus, Salmonella, Shigella, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Cryptosporidium oocysts, Giardia cysts, total culturable viruses, and Norovirus. While the tap water samples of the adjacent buildings complied with the Korean Drinking Water Standards for all parameters, fecal bacteria and Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in the tap water samples of the outbreak apartment complex. It turned out that the agent of the disease was Cryptosporidium parvum. The drinking water was polluted with sewage from a septic tank in the apartment complex. To remove C. parvum oocysts, we conducted physical processes of cleaning the water storage tanks, flushing the indoor pipes, and replacing old pipes with new ones. Finally we restored the clean drinking water to the apartment complex after identification of no oocysts.

  6. Predominant Virulent IbA10G2 Subtype of Cryptosporidium hominis in Human Isolates in Barcelona: A Five-Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Remedios; Prim, Núria; Montemayor, Michel; Valls, María Eugenia; Muñoz, Carme

    2015-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidium infection is a worldwide cause of diarrheal disease. To gain insight into the epidemiology of the infection in a certain geographic area, molecular methods are needed to determine the species/genotypes and subtypes. Methodology/Principal Findings From 2004 to 2009, 161 cryptosporidiosis cases were detected in two hospitals in Barcelona. Diagnosis was performed by microscopic observation of oocysts in stool specimens following modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining. Most cases (82%) occurred in children. The number of cases increased in summer and autumn. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium was performed in 69 specimens, and C. hominis and C. parvum were identified in 88.4% and 10.1% of the cases, respectively. C. meleagridis was detected in one specimen. Subtyping based on the gp60 polymorphism showed six subtypes, four C. hominis and two C. parvum. Subtype IbA10G2 was the most prevalent subtype corresponding to 90% of all C. hominis isolates. This is the first report on the distribution of specific Cryptosporidium subtypes from humans in Spain. Conclusions/Significance In our geographic area, the anthroponotic behavior of C. hominis, the lower infective dose, and the higher virulence of certain subtypes may contribute to the high incidence of human cryptosporidiosis caused by the IbA10G2 subtype. Further studies should include populations with asymptomatic shedding of the parasite. PMID:25816024

  7. Identification of Cryptosporidium spp. Oocysts in United Kingdom Noncarbonated Natural Mineral Waters and Drinking Waters by Using a Modified Nested PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Assay

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, R. A. B.; Campbell, B. M.; Smith, H. V.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method for detecting low densities of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in natural mineral waters and drinking waters. Oocysts were recovered from seeded 1-liter volumes of mineral water by filtration through polycarbonate membranes and from drinking waters by filtration, immunomagnetizable separation, and filter entrapment, followed by direct extraction of DNA. The DNA was released from polycarbonate filter-entrapped oocysts by disruption in lysis buffer by using 15 cycles of freeze-thawing (1 min in liquid nitrogen and 1 min at 65°C), followed by proteinase K digestion. Amplicons were readily detected from two to five intact oocysts on ethidium bromide-stained gels. DNA extracted from Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, C. muris (RN 66), C. baileyi (Belgium strain, LB 19), human-derived C. meleagridis, C. felis (DNA from oocysts isolated from a cat), and C. andersoni was used to demonstrate species identity by PCR-RFLP after simultaneous digestion with the restriction enzymes DraI and VspI. Discrimination between C. andersoni and C. muris isolates was confirmed by a separate, subsequent digestion with DdeI. Of 14 drinking water samples tested, 12 were found to be positive by microscopy, 8 were found to be positive by direct PCR, and 14 were found to be positive by using a nested PCR. The Cryptosporidium species detected in these finished water samples was C. parvum genotype 1. This method consistently and routinely detected >5 oocysts per sample. PMID:12839797

  8. Species of Cryptosporidium detected in weaned cattle on cow-calf operations in the United States.

    PubMed

    Fayer, Ronald; Santín, Monica; Dargatz, David

    2010-06-24

    To determine the species and distribution of Cryptosporidium in weaned beef calves in the United States, fecal specimens were collected from 819 cattle between 6 and 18 months of age from 49 operations in 20 states (Alabama, California, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and Wyoming). Fresh feces, collected either from the ground or directly from the rectum of each animal, were sieved and subjected to density gradient centrifugation to remove fecal debris and to concentrate oocysts. DNA extracted from each specimen was subjected to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers for the SSU rRNA gene. All PCR positive specimens were subjected to sequence analysis. Cryptosporidium was detected in 20.5% of the fecal samples. Cryptosporidium ryanae, C. bovis and C. andersoni were detected in 1.8, 4.8, and 14.0% of the 819 samples, respectively. California (number operations [n]=2), Iowa (n=3), and Nebraska (n=7) had the highest prevalence of infected weaned cattle with 44.4, 41.0 and 40.2% infected, respectively. Cryptosporidium was not detected in any weaned cattle from Alabama (number operations [n]=1), Georgia (n=2), New Mexico (n=1), South Dakota (n=1), Tennessee (n=1), or Texas (n=1). The zoonotic species, C. parvum, was not detected in any samples from 6- to 18-month-old cattle, a finding that parallels reports for dairy cattle of similar age in which less than 1% were found to harbor this species.

  9. Detection and characterisation of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in Hungarian raw, surface and sewage water samples by IFT, PCR and sequence analysis of the SSUrRNA and GDH genes.

    PubMed

    Plutzer, Judit; Karanis, Panagiotis; Domokos, Klarissza; Törökné, Andrea; Márialigeti, Károly

    2008-10-01

    We investigated the prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium species and analysed the genotypes in 36 samples collected from different water sources and various geographic areas in Hungary. Samples were collected from drinking water and sewage treatment plants and from the recreation area of Lake Balaton. The (oo)cysts were purified according to the US EPA 1623 method and they were detected by immunofluorescence test (IFT). Genomic DNA was extracted from all samples and then the GDH target gene for Giardia and the SSUrDNA for both Giardia and for Cryptosporidium species were amplified by PCR. 24 out of 36 samples (67%) were Giardia positive and 15 (42%) were Cryptosporidium positive by IFT. PCR confirmed that 13 out of 36 samples (36%) were Giardia positive and 10 (28%) contained Cryptosporidium. Twelve Giardia and two Cryptosporidium PCR products were successfully sequenced. In seven samples G. lamblia Assemblage A and in one sample Assemblage B and in four cases Assemblages A and B have been found. In one sample C. parvum and in the other separate sample C. meleagridis were detected. Sequence analysis revealed a new subtype of G. duodenalis complex, clustered close to the Assemblage A group. This study provides the first report on simultaneous detection and genotyping of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium species from water supplies in Hungary.

  10. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategy for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.

  11. Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis as pathogenic contaminants of water in Galicia, Spain: the need for safe drinking water.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hermida, José Antonio; González-Warleta, Marta; Mezo, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to detect the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in drinking water treatments plants (DWTPs) in Galicia (NW Spain) and to identify which species and genotype of these pathogenic protozoans are present in the water. Samples of untreated water (surface or ground water sources) and of treated drinking water (in total, 254 samples) were collected from 127 DWTPs and analysed by an immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and by PCR. Considering the untreated water samples, Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 69 samples (54.3%) by IFAT, and DNA of this parasite was detected in 57 samples (44.8%) by PCR, whereas G. duodenalis was detected in 76 samples (59.8%) by IFAT and in 56 samples (44.0%) by PCR. Considering the treated drinking water samples, Cryptosporidium spp. was detected in 52 samples (40.9%) by IFAT, and the parasite DNA was detected in 51 samples (40.1%) by PCR, whereas G. duodenalis was detected in 58 samples (45.6%) by IFAT and in 43 samples (33.8%) by PCR. The percentage viability of the (oo)cysts ranged between 90.0% and 95.0% in all samples analysed. Cryptosporidium andersoni, C. hominis, C. parvum and assemblages A-I, A-II, E of G. duodenalis were identified. The results indicate that Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis are widespread in the environment and that DWTPs are largely ineffective in reducing/inactivating these pathogens in drinking water destined for human and animal consumption in Galicia. In conclusion, the findings suggest the need for better monitoring of water quality and identification of sources of contamination.

  12. Quantitative analysis of Cryptosporidium growth in in vitro culture--the impact of parasite density on the success of infection.

    PubMed

    Paziewska-Harris, Anna; Singer, Martin; Schoone, Gerard; Schallig, Henk

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important waterborne pathogen for which no treatment or vaccination is available. This study set out to quantify DNA replication of Cryptosporidium parvum in vitro. Cryptosporidium DNA could be detected at up to 60 % of input level in both host-cell-free and host cell containing cultures 6 days after infection with living sporozoites, but was lost within 2 days in cultures inoculated with UV-inactivated sporozoites. Total DNA increased between days 2 and 6, evidence of successful DNA replication in both cell-free and host-cell-containing cultures. Overall however, only a small fraction (up to 5 %) of parasite DNA could be found associated with host cells or bound to plastic of the cell-free cultures, and the majority of parasite DNA was present in the cell culture medium, separable by simple decantation. After 2 days, in host-cell-containing cultures, the parasite DNA could be concentrated by slow centrifugation, suggesting that it was associated with intact parasite cells, but at 6 days, the majority could not be centrifuged and is therefore thought to have represented copies associated with dead and degraded parasites. In cell-free cultures and in larger plates, the majority of DNA was in this form. Performance of the parasite was best in small culture plates, and least in the largest plate sizes. We interpret these results as suggesting that Cryptosporidium sporozoites first bind to the host cell monolayer or to the plasticware, but then by 2 days, there has been a substantial release of parasites back into the medium. Host-cell-free cultures also supported modest replication and may have represented DNA synthesis in cells beginning merogony. The role of the host cells is unclear, as so much of the parasite DNA is released into the medium. Host cells may provide a feeder role, conditioning the medium for Cryptosporidium development.

  13. Occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts in the river water of two recreational areas in Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Azman, J; Init, I; Wan Yusoff, W S

    2009-12-01

    This study is the first report on the occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts in recreational rivers water from Malaysia. It was carried out in water samples at two rivers, 'Sungai Congkak' and 'Sungai Batu', located in Selangor State. The occurrence of both Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum (oo)cysts was higher in Sungai Congkak (50% or 15/30 and 10% or 3/30 respectively) than Sungai Batu (16% or 5/30 and 3.3% or 1/30 respectively). The mean density of cysts/L was 0.72 in Sungai Congkak and 0.023 in Sungai Batu, and that of oocysts/L was 0.023 in Sungai Congkak and 0.0033 in Sungai Batu, showing that the occurrence of Giardia was higher and more frequent than Cryptosporidium in both rivers. Sungai Congkak also showed higher faecal coliforms count (ranging from 0.48x10³ to 73x10³ CFU/100 mL) than Sungai Batu (0.41x10³ to 16x10³ CFU/100 mL). On the other hand, the Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts and faecal coliforms were more concentrated at the downstream station, followed by midstream and upstream stations which might be due to human factors where settlements and recreation areas were located around and between midstream and downstream stations. The (oo)cysts and faecal coliforms also increased during public holidays due to the significantly higher number of visitors (bathers) compared with the week days. All the parameters (physical, faecal coliforms and rainfall) did not show consistent significant correlation (based on r values of Pearson correlation analysis) with both protozoa, therefore these parameters are not suitable as indicator for the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts in both rivers.

  14. Biology of Cryptosporidium from marsupial hosts.

    PubMed

    Power, Michelle L

    2010-01-01

    The majority of biological data on Cryptosporidium has been collected from humans and domestic animal hosts which creates a bias in knowledge on the biodiversity and evolution of this parasite genus. Further to understanding Cryptosporidium biology are studies encompassing broad hosts that represent diverse taxa sampled across wide geographic ranges. Marsupials represent a group of wildlife hosts from which limited information on Cryptosporidium is available. As marsupial hosts are an ancient mammalian lineage they represent an important group for studying parasite evolution. This review summarises information of the biology, epidemiology and evolution of Cryptosporidium in marsupial hosts, and discusses the importance of further understanding interactions in this parasite-host system.

  15. Occurrence and molecular genotyping of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in wild mesocarnivores in Spain.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Marta; de Mingo, Marta Hernández; de Lucio, Aida; Morales, Lucía; Balseiro, Ana; Espí, Alberto; Barral, Marta; Lima Barbero, José Francisco; Habela, Miguel Ángel; Fernández-García, José L; Bernal, Rafael Calero; Köster, Pamela C; Cardona, Guillermo A; Carmena, David

    2017-02-15

    There is a surprisingly scarce amount of epidemiological and molecular data on the prevalence, frequency, and diversity of the intestinal protozoan parasites Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in wildlife in general and mesocarnivore species in particular. Consequently, the extent of the cyst/oocyst environmental contamination attributable to these wild host species and their potential implications for public veterinary health remain largely unknown. In this molecular epidemiological survey a total of 193 individual faecal samples from badgers (Meles meles, n=70), ferrets (Mustela putorius furo, n=2), genets (Genetta genetta, n=6), Iberian lynxes (Lynx pardinus, n=6), beech martens (Martes foina, n=8), mongooses (Herpestes ichneumon, n=2), otters (Lutra lutra, n=2), polecats (Mustela putorius, n=2), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes, n=87), wildcats (Felis silvestris, n=2), and wolves (Canis lupus, n=6) were obtained from road-killed, hunted, and accidentally found carcasses, and from camera-trap surveys or animals entering rescue shelters, during the period December 2003-April 2016. Investigated specimens were collected in five Spanish autonomous regions including Andalusia (n=1), Asturias (n=69), Basque Country (n=49), Castile-La Mancha (n=38), and Extremadura (n=36). The presence of cysts/oocysts was confirmed by PCR-based methods targeting the small subunit (ssu) ribosomal RNA gene of these parasite species. Genotyping of the obtained isolates were attempted at appropriate markers including the glutamate dehydrogenase (G. duodenalis) and the 60-kDa glycoprotein (C. parvum and C. ubiquitum) loci. Overall, G. duodenalis was detected in 8% (7/87) of red foxes, a single beech marten, and a single wolf, respectively. Cryptosporidium was identified in 3% (2/70) of badgers, 8% (7/87) of red foxes, a single genet, and a single mongoose, respectively. None of the nine G. duodenalis isolates generated could be genotyped at the assemblage/sub-assemblage level. Out of the

  16. Transport of Cryptosporidium oocysts in porous media: Role of straining and physicochemical filtration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tufenkji, N.; Miller, G.F.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Elimelech, M.

    2004-01-01

    The transport and filtration behavior of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in columns packed with quartz sand was systematically examined under repulsive electrostatic conditions. An increase in solution ionic strength resulted in greater oocyst deposition rates despite theoretical predictions of a significant electrostatic energy barrier to deposition. Relatively high deposition rates obtained with both oocysts and polystyrene latex particles of comparable size at low ionic strength (1 mM) suggest that a physical mechanism may play a key role in oocyst removal. Supporting experiments conducted with latex particles of varying sizes, under very low ionic strength conditions where physicochemical filtration is negligible, clearly indicated that physical straining is an important capture mechanism. The results of this study indicate that irregularity of sand grain shape (verified by SEM imaging) contributes considerably to the straining potential of the porous medium. Hence, both straining and physicochemical filtration are expected to control the removal of C. parvum oocysts in settings typical of riverbank filtration, soil infiltration, and slow sand filtration. Because classic colloid filtration theory does not account for removal by straining, these observations have important implications with respect to predictions of oocyst transport.

  17. Detection and Resolution of Cryptosporidium Species and Species Mixtures by Genus-Specific Nested PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis, Direct Sequencing, and Cloning ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ruecker, Norma J.; Hoffman, Rebecca M.; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Neumann, Norman F.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular methods incorporating nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the 18S rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium species were validated to assess performance based on limit of detection (LoD) and for detecting and resolving mixtures of species and genotypes within a single sample. The 95% LoD was determined for seven species (Cryptosporidium hominis, C. parvum, C. felis, C. meleagridis, C. ubiquitum, C. muris, and C. andersoni) and ranged from 7 to 11 plasmid template copies with overlapping 95% confidence limits. The LoD values for genomic DNA from oocysts on microscope slides were 7 and 10 template copies for C. andersoni and C. parvum, respectively. The repetitive nested PCR-RFLP slide protocol had an LoD of 4 oocysts per slide. When templates of two species were mixed in equal ratios in the nested PCR-RFLP reaction mixture, there was no amplification bias toward one species over another. At high ratios of template mixtures (>1:10), there was a reduction or loss of detection of the less abundant species by RFLP analysis, most likely due to heteroduplex formation in the later cycles of the PCR. Replicate nested PCR was successful at resolving many mixtures of Cryptosporidium at template concentrations near or below the LoD. The cloning of nested PCR products resulted in 17% of the cloned sequences being recombinants of the two original templates. Limiting-dilution nested PCR followed by the sequencing of PCR products resulted in no sequence anomalies, suggesting that this method is an effective and accurate way to study the species diversity of Cryptosporidium, particularly for environmental water samples, in which mixtures of parasites are common. PMID:21498746

  18. Seasonal variation and potential sources of Cryptosporidium contamination in surface waters of Chao Phraya River and Bang Pu Nature Reserve pier, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Koompapong, Khuanchai; Sukthana, Yaowalark

    2012-07-01

    Using molecular techniques, a longitudinal study was conducted with the aims at identifying the seasonal difference of Cryptosporidium contamination in surface water as well as analyzing the potential sources based on species information. One hundred forty-four water samples were collected, 72 samples from the Chao Phraya River, Thailand, collected in the summer, rainy and cool seasons and 72 samples from sea water at Bang Pu Nature Reserve pier, collected before, during and after the presence of migratory seagulls. Total prevalence of Cryptosporidium contamination in river and sea water locations was 11% and 6%, respectively. The highest prevalence was observed at the end of rainy season continuing into the cool season in river water (29%) and in sea water (12%). During the rainy season, prevalence of Cryptosporidium was 4% in river and sea water samples, but none in summer season. All positive samples from the river was C. parvum, while C. meleagridis (1), and C. serpentis (1) were obtained from sea water. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genetic study in Thailand of Cryptosporidium spp contamination in river and sea water locations and the first report of C. serpentis, suggesting that humans, household pets, farm animals, wildlife and migratory birds may be the potential sources of the parasites. The findings are of use for implementing preventive measures to reduce the transmission of cryptosporidiosis to both humans and animals.

  19. [Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. isolated in humans in two different locations in Spain].

    PubMed

    Navarro-I-Martinez, Luis; da Silva, Alexandre J; Llovo Taboada, José; Del Águila, Carmen; Pieniazek, Norman J; Bornay-Llinares, Fernando J

    2013-10-01

    Molecular PCR based diagnostic techniques have enabled us to distinguish between the different, morphologically identical, Cryptosporidium species that can infect humans. Of the 23 recognized species in the genus, at least 9 are able to infect humans. As the intensity of the clinical manifestations, pathogenicity, excretion of oocysts, and incidence, are different between this species, molecular studies are crucial for a better understanding of the epidemiology of human cryptosporidiosis. Samples form two independent studies are analyzed in this publication. One included 23 samples from Madrid, and the other, 72 samples from La Coruña. All of them positive for Cryptosporidium spp. by microscopic methods and belonging to isolated cases of human cryptosporidiosis. For the identification of the species responsible for the infection, the 18S rDNA diagnostic region and the COWP gene diagnostic regions were used. Out of the 95 samples tested, in 77 cases we were able to extract and amplify DNA. In those cases the species responsible for the infection were: C. parvum (40 cases, 2 Madrid and 38 La Coruña), C. hominis (30 cases, 10 Madrid and 20 La Coruña) and C. meleagridis (2 cases, 1 Madrid and 1 La Coruña). In 5 samples it was impossible to detect the species responsible for the infection, but their positivity was confirmed by PCR (4 Madrid and 1 La Coruña). The genotypes of the isolates from patients correlated well with animals from the same regions.

  20. Characterization and separation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia cells using on-chip dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan Unni, Harikrishnan; Hartono, Deny; Yue Lanry Yung, Lin; Mah-Lee Ng, Mary; Pueh Lee, Heow; Cheong Khoo, Boo; Lim, Kian-Meng

    2012-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been shown to have significant potential for the characterization of cells and could become an efficient tool for rapid identification and assessment of microorganisms. The present work is focused on the trapping, characterization, and separation of two species of Cryptosporidium (C. parvum and C. muris) and Giardia lambia (G. lambia) using a microfluidic experimental setup. Cryptosporidium oocysts, which are 2-4 μm in size and nearly spherical in shape, are used for the preliminary stage of prototype development and testing. G. lambia cysts are 8–12 μm in size. In order to facilitate effective trapping, simulations were performed to study the effects of buffer conductivity and applied voltage on the flow and cell transport inside the DEP chip. Microscopic experiments were performed using the fabricated device and the real part of Clausius—Mossotti factor of the cells was estimated from critical voltages for particle trapping at the electrodes under steady fluid flow. The dielectric properties of the cell compartments (cytoplasm and membrane) were calculated based on a single shell model of the cells. The separation of C. muris and G. lambia is achieved successfully at a frequency of 10 MHz and a voltage of 3 Vpp (peak to peak voltage). PMID:22662073

  1. Water stress exacerbates the severity of Botryosphaeria dieback in grapevines infected by Neofusicoccum parvum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botryosphaeria dieback (causal fungus Neofusicoccum parvum) is a detrimental grapevine trunk disease, causing internal wood degradation, killing shoots, and reducing yields. We examined the interactive effects of drought and N. parvum infection, common vineyard stresses, on wood-lesion development. ...

  2. Quantification of viable Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in wastewater using propidium monoazide quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Alonso, José L; Amorós, Inmaculada; Guy, Rebecca A

    2014-07-01

    Real-time PCR (qPCR) is a rapid tool to quantify pathogens in the aquatic environment; however, it quantifies all pathogens, including both viable and nonviable. Propidium monoazide (PMA) is a membrane-impairment dye that penetrates only membrane-damaged cells. Once inside the cell, PMA is covalently cross-linked to DNA through light photoactivation, and PCR amplification is strongly inhibited. The goal of this study was to evaluate PMA-qPCR assays for rapid quantification of viable and heat-treated Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in wastewater. We observed a reduction in detection of heat-treated Giardia duodenalis cysts of 83.2, 89.9, 98.2, or 97% with PMA-qPCR assays amplifying a 75 base-pair (bp) β-giardin target, 77-bp triosephosphate isomerase (tpi), 133-bp glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), and 143-bp β-giardin gene target, respectively. Thus, the exclusion of dead cysts was more effective when qPCR assays that produced larger amplicons were used. The PMA treatment of Cryptosporidium oocysts plus/minus heat treatment abolished the fluorescent signal for dead oocysts with a PMA-qPCR assay amplifying a Cryptosporidium parvum (150-bp) oocyst wall protein (COWP) gene. The PMA-qPCR 143-bp β-giardin assay for Giardia and the PMA-qPCR 150-bp COWP assay for Cryptosporidium accurately quantified live oo(cysts), and failed to detect dead oo(cysts), when phosphate-buffered saline and tertiary effluent wastewater were spiked with concentrations of 10(3) or 10(2) dead oo(cysts), respectively. Therefore, these assays are suitable for the detection of viable parasites that are typically present in tertiary wastewater effluents at concentrations of <10(3) oo(cysts)/l and can provide rapid risk assessments of environmental water.

  3. Assessment of three commercial DNA extraction kits and a laboratory-developed method for detecting Cryptosporidium and Cyclospora in raspberry wash, basil wash and pesto.

    PubMed

    Shields, Joan M; Joo, Jane; Kim, Richard; Murphy, Helen R

    2013-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods are often used to identify the parasitic protozoa Cryptosporidium parvum and Cyclospora cayetanensis in foods although little has been published regarding the efficacy of available DNA extraction methods. This study reviewed three commonly used commercial DNA extraction kits: FastDNA SPIN Kit for soil, QBiogene (FastDNA), UltraClean™ Soil DNA Isolation Kit, MO BIO Laboratories (MoBio), and QIAamp DNA Mini Stool Kit, Qiagen (QIAamp), as well as a 'homebrew' Universal Nucleic Acid Extraction (UNEX) method. Washes from raspberry and basil as well as commercial pesto samples were seeded with 5000, 500, or 50 C. parvum and C. cayetanensis oocysts. The protocols were assessed for: quantity and quality of the extracted DNA, time to completion, presence of PCR inhibitors and the percentage of samples correctly identified as positive for the two parasites. Real-time and conventional nested PCR assays were used to detect the seeded pathogens. Of the commercial kits, PCR results of samples extracted using FastDNA were statistically similar to QIAamp and both were superior to MoBio. Differences in PCR results among FastDNA, QIAamp and UNEX for detection of Cyclospora were not statistically significant although the UNEX method proved best with Cryptosporidium. Real-time PCR assays targeted the 18S rRNA and the hsp70 genes of C. cayetanensis; overall results were similar to those found using conventional nested PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene.

  4. Review of Cervi Cornu Parvum Pharmacopuncture in Korean Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Jin; Hwangbo, Min; Kwon, Kang; Seo, Hyung-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The endpoint of this review is to investigate existing studies of Cervi cornu parvum(CCP) pharmacopuncture within Korean medicine journals in order to present a better research method in the future. Methods: We searched all the papers through six Korean electrical databases that included the title of " Cervi cornu parvum pharmacopuncture" or " Cervi cornu parvum aqua-acupuncture". Articles that had been published until December 2012 were largely divided into experimental studies and clinical studies. Results: Fifty-three (53) experimental studies and six clinical studies were found. The number of published articles has been constantly increasing. Many of the experimental studies demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects for arthritis, and most of the clinical studies dealt with musculoskeletal problems. Conclusion: Various therapeutically significant effects of the CCP pharmacopuncture have been found through this review; however, more systematic clinical studies on the CCP pharmacopuncture seem to be necessary to substantially support its clinical effects. PMID:25780662

  5. Cryptosporidium testudinis sp. n., Cryptosporidium ducismarci Traversa, 2010 and Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype III (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in tortoises.

    PubMed

    Jezkova, Jana; Horcickova, Michaela; Hlaskova, Lenka; Sak, Bohumil; Kvetonova, Dana; Novak, Jan; Hofmannova, Lada; McEvoy, John; Kvac, Martin

    2016-10-14

    Understanding of the diversity of species of Cryptosporidium Tyzzer, 1910 in tortoises remains incomplete due to the limited number of studies on these hosts. The aim of the present study was to characterise the genetic diversity and biology of cryptosporidia in tortoises of the family Testudinidae Batsch. Faecal samples were individually collected immediately after defecation and were screened for presence of cryptosporidia by microscopy using aniline-carbol-methyl violet staining, and by PCR amplification and sequence analysis targeting the small subunit rRNA (SSU), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and actin genes. Out of 387 faecal samples from 16 tortoise species belonging to 11 genera, 10 and 46 were positive for cryptosporidia by microscopy and PCR, respectively. All samples positive by microscopy were also PCR positive. Sequence analysis of amplified genes revealed the presence of the Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I (n = 22), C. ducismarci Traversa, 2010 (n = 23) and tortoise genotype III (n = 1). Phylogenetic analyses of SSU, COWP and actin gene sequences revealed that Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I and C. ducismarci are genetically distinct from previously described species of Cryptosporidium. Oocysts of Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I, measuring 5.8-6.9 µm × 5.3-6.5 µm, are morphologically distinguishable from C. ducismarci, measuring 4.4-5.4 µm × 4.3-5.3 µm. Oocysts of Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I and C. ducismarci obtained from naturally infected Russian tortoises (Testudo horsfieldii Gray) were infectious for the same tortoise but not for Reeve's turtles (Mauremys reevesii [Gray]), common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis [Linnaeus]), zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata [Vieillot]) and SCID mice (Mus musculus Linnaeus). The prepatent period was 11 and 6 days post infection (DPI) for Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I and C. ducismarci, respectively; the patent period was longer than 200 days for both cryptosporidia

  6. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in sewage sludge and solid waste landfill leachate and quantitative comparative analysis of sanitization treatments on pathogen inactivation.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Kacprzak, Malgorzata; Neczaj, Ewa; Tamang, Leena; Graczyk, Halshka; Lucy, Frances E; Girouard, Autumn S

    2008-01-01

    Circulation of Cryptosporidum and Giardia in the environment can be facilitated by spreading of sewage sludge on agricultural or livestock grazing lands or depositing in landfills. Solid waste landfill leachate and sewage sludge samples were quantitatively tested for C. parvum and C. hominis oocysts, and G. lamblia cysts by the combined multiplexed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) method. Subsequently, the effects of four sanitization treatments (i.e., ultrasound and microwave energy disintegrations, and quicklime and top-soil stabilization) on inactivation of these pathogens were determined. The landfill leachate samples were positive for Giardia, and sewage sludge samples for both Cryptosporididium and Giardia. The overall concentration of G. lamblia cysts (mean; 24.2/g) was significantly higher (P<0.01) than the concentration of C. parvum and C. hominis oocysts (mean; 14.0/g). Sonication reduced the load of G. lamblia cysts to non-detectable levels in 12 of 21 samples (57.1%), and in 5 of 6 samples (83.3%) for C. parvum and C. hominis. Quicklime stabilization treatment was 100% effective in inactivation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, and microwave energy disintegration lacked the efficacy. Top-soil stabilization treatment reduced gradually the load of both pathogens which was consistent with the serial dilution of sewage sludge with the soil substrate. This study demonstrated that sewage sludge and landfill leachate contained high numbers of potentially viable, human-virulent species of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, and that sonication and quicklime stabilization were the most effective treatments for sanitization of sewage sludge and solid waste landfill leachates.

  7. DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN WATER MATRICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the advent and recognition of waterborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis great effort has been expended on development of methods for detecting Cryptosporidium oocysts in water. Oocysts recovery rates using a method originally developed for detecting Giardia cysts ranged fr...

  8. Cryptosporidium in birds, fish and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Una

    2010-01-01

    Whilst considerable information is available for avian cryptosporidiosis, scant information is available for Cryptosporidium infections in fish and amphibians. The present review details recent studies in avian cryptosporidiosis and our current knowledge of piscine and amphibian infections.

  9. Cryptosporidium: A Guide to Water Filters

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cryptosporidium Tracking in the United States CryptoNet Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... Button What's this? Parasites Home A Guide to Water Filters Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Filtering ...

  10. Cryptosporidium Propidium Monoazide-PCR, a Molecular Biology-Based Technique for Genotyping Viable Cryptosporidium Oocysts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cryptosporidium is an important waterborne protozoan parasite that can cause severe diarrhea and death in the immunocompromised. Current methods to monitor for Cryptosporidium oocysts in water are microscopy-based USEPA Methods 1622 and 1623. These methods assess total levels o...

  11. Plant-based markers of infection for Neofusicoccum parvum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canopy symptoms of Botryosphaeria dieback do not appear until years after Neofusicoccum parvum infects a pruning wound. There are control practices to minimize such infections, but growers tend to wait until symptoms are visible, at which point disease prevention is far less effective. Toward deve...

  12. Cryptosporidium ubiquitum n.sp. in animals and humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new species, Cryptosporidium ubiquitum, previously identified as the Cryptosporidium cervine genotype is described. In published studies the cervine genotype was reported in wild and domesticated ruminants, rodents, carnivores, and primates including humans. Molecular data for C. ubiquitum have b...

  13. Source tracking identifies deer and geese as vectors of human-infectious Cryptosporidium genotypes in an urban/suburban watershed.

    PubMed

    Jellison, Kristen L; Lynch, Amy E; Ziemann, Joseph M

    2009-06-15

    This study identified Cryptosporidium genotypes in the Wissahickon watershed from May 2005 to April 2008. We analyzed 129 samples from Wissahickon Creek, 83 effluent samples from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), and 240 fecal droppings. Genotyping was based on the hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene. Oocysts were detected year-round, independent of wet weather events, in 22% of Wissahickon Creek samples, 5% of WWTP effluents, and 7% of fecal samples. Of the genotypes detected, 67% were human-infectious: 30% C. hominis or C. hominis-like, 12% C. parvum, 14% cervine genotype, 9% skunk genotype, and 1% chipmunk I genotype. Similar genotype profiles were detected in Wissahickon Creek each year, and human-infectious genotypes were detected year-round. Unusual genotypes detected in a deer (a C. hominis-like genotype) and geese (C. hominis-like genotypes, C. parvum, and muskrat genotype I) show that these animals are vectors of human-infectious genotypes in this watershed. Results suggest that deer, geese, and WWTPs are appropriate targets for source water protection in the Wissahickon watershed.

  14. Bioaccumulation of Toxoplasma and Cryptosporidium by the freshwater crustacean Gammarus fossarum: Involvement in biomonitoring surveys and trophic transfer.

    PubMed

    Bigot-Clivot, Aurélie; Palos Ladeiro, Mélissa; Lepoutre, Alexandra; Bastien, Fanny; Bonnard, Isabelle; Dubey, Jitender P; Villena, Isabelle; Aubert, Dominique; Geffard, Olivier; François, Adeline; Geffard, Alain

    2016-11-01

    The protozoa Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum are public health priorities because their oocysts can persist in recreational, surface, drinking, river, and sea water sources for a long time. To evaluate the capacity of the freshwater crustacean Gammarus fossarum to accumulate T. gondii and C. parvum oocysts, gammarids were exposed to 200, 2000 or 20,000 oocysts per gammarid and per day for 21 days followed by 5 days of depuration. C. parvum DNA was detected by qPCR in G. fossarum in only one out of four pools for the highest concentration and after 14 days of exposure, and T. gondii DNA was detected after 7 days of exposure to the two highest concentrations. Our results document the capacity of G. fossarum to accumulate T. gondii in its tissues proportionally to the ambient concentration; the maximum number of oocysts was detected in gammarid tissues after exposure to 20,000 oocysts per day. Mean values of 3.26 (±3), 21.71 (±15.18), and 17.41 (±10.89) oocysts were detected in gammarids after 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively, and after 5 days of depuration, T. gondii oocysts were still present in gammarid tissues. These results show for the first time that a freshwater crustacean can bioaccumulate T. gondii oocysts, suggesting that G. fossarum is a potential effective bioindicator of protozoan contamination in biomonitoring studies. Moreover, due to its key position in freshwater food webs, G. fossarum could also play a role in the trophic transfer of protozoa.

  15. Variability in susceptibility of voles (Arvicolinae) to experimental infection with Cryptosporidium muris and Cryptosporidium andersoni.

    PubMed

    Modrý, David; Hofmannová, Lada; Antalová, Zuzana; Sak, Bohumil; Kváč, Martin

    2012-07-01

    The infectivity of Cryptosporidium muris and Cryptosporidium andersoni in various species of voles was studied using experimental infections. None of the experimental voles inoculated with 1 × 10(5) oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. shed any oocysts during 40 DPI, except Brandt's vole (Lasiopodomys brandtii), which was susceptible to C. muris infection. Experiments confirmed the resistance of voles of the genus Microtus sensu stricto to infection with mammalian gastric cryptosporidia, which provides a new study model with prospects to more fully understand the processes involved in the phenomenon of host specificity of this group of protists.

  16. Global modelling of Cryptosporidium in surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, Lucie; Hofstra, Nynke

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Waterborne pathogens that cause diarrhoea, such as Cryptosporidium, pose a health risk all over the world. In many regions quantitative information on pathogens in surface water is unavailable. Our main objective is to model Cryptosporidium concentrations in surface waters worldwide. We present the GloWPa-Crypto model and use the model in a scenario analysis. A first exploration of global Cryptosporidium emissions to surface waters has been published by Hofstra et al. (2013). Further work has focused on modelling emissions of Cryptosporidium and Rotavirus to surface waters from human sources (Vermeulen et al 2015, Kiulia et al 2015). A global waterborne pathogen model can provide valuable insights by (1) providing quantitative information on pathogen levels in data-sparse regions, (2) identifying pathogen hotspots, (3) enabling future projections under global change scenarios and (4) supporting decision making. Material and Methods GloWPa-Crypto runs on a monthly time step and represents conditions for approximately the year 2010. The spatial resolution is a 0.5 x 0.5 degree latitude x longitude grid for the world. We use livestock maps (http://livestock.geo-wiki.org/) combined with literature estimates to calculate spatially explicit livestock Cryptosporidium emissions. For human Cryptosporidium emissions, we use UN population estimates, the WHO/UNICEF JMP sanitation country data and literature estimates of wastewater treatment. We combine our emissions model with a river routing model and data from the VIC hydrological model (http://vic.readthedocs.org/en/master/) to calculate concentrations in surface water. Cryptosporidium survival during transport depends on UV radiation and water temperature. We explore pathogen emissions and concentrations in 2050 with the new Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs) 1 and 3. These scenarios describe plausible future trends in demographics, economic development and the degree of global integration. Results and

  17. Cryptosporidium infections: a laboratory survey.

    PubMed Central

    Elsser, K A; Moricz, M; Proctor, E M

    1986-01-01

    Between Oct. 1, 1983, and June 30, 1985, Cryptosporidium oocysts were identified in stool specimens from 74 patients who presented with gastrointestinal symptoms to their physicians. Questionnaires prepared to determine travel history, symptoms, duration of illness and epidemiologic characteristics of the infection were completed for 67 (90%) of the patients by their physicians; the information on the other 7 patients was obtained from the requisitions accompanying the specimens. Of the 67, 35 (52%) had recently been to Mexico. The infection was likely transmitted through contaminated water, food and, possibly, milk. The infections in patients who had not travelled were thought to be due to contact with infected pets or farm animals or with infected children attending daycare centres. Diarrhea, vomiting, fever and nausea usually lasted for 1 to 2 weeks, except in those with immune deficiency, in whom the symptoms persisted for up to 6 months. The condition was diagnosed by identification of oocysts in stool specimens that underwent formalin-ether sedimentation and modified cold Kinyoun staining. PMID:3730980

  18. Pathogenic Mechanisms of Cryptosporidium and Giardia.

    PubMed

    Certad, Gabriela; Viscogliosi, Eric; Chabé, Magali; Cacciò, Simone M

    2017-03-20

    Intestinal protozoa are important etiological agents of diarrhea, particularly in children, yet the public health risk they pose is often neglected. Results from the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS) showed that Cryptosporidium is among the leading causes of moderate to severe diarrhea in children under 2 years. Likewise, Giardia infects approximately 200 million individuals worldwide, and causes acute diarrhea in children under 5 years. Despite this recognized role as pathogens, the question is why and how these parasites cause disease in some individuals but not in others. This review focuses on known pathogenic mechanisms of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, and infection progress towards disease.

  19. Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium scrofarum in Eurasian wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Němejc, Karel; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Hanzal, Vladimír; Janiszewski, Paweł; Forejtek, Pavel; Rajský, Dušan; Ravaszová, Petra; McEvoy, John; Kváč, Martin

    2013-11-08

    From 2011 to 2012, to identify Cryptosporidium spp. occurrence in Eurasian wild boars (Sus scrofa) 29 randomly selected localities (both forest areas and enclosures) across the Central European countries of Austria, the Czech Republic, Poland, and the Slovak Republic were investigated. Cryptosporidium oocysts were microscopicaly detected in 11 out of 460 faecal samples examined using aniline-carbol-methyl violet staining. Sixty-one Cryptosporidium infections, including the 11 infections that were detected by microscopy, were detected using genus- or species-specific nested PCR amplification of SSU rDNA. This represents a 5.5 fold greater sensitivity for PCR relative to microscopy. Combining genus- and species-specific PCR tools significantly changes the perspective on the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. in wild boars. While RFLP and direct sequencing of genus specific PCR-amplified products revealed 56 C. suis (20) and C. scrofarum (36) monoinfections and only 5 mixed infections of these species, species-specific molecular tools showed 44 monoinfections and 17 mixed infections with these species. PCR analysis of the gp60 gene did not reveal any other Cryptosporidium infections. Similar to domestic pigs, C. scrofarum was detected as a dominant species infecting adult Eurasian wild boars (Sus scrofa). Cryptosporidium infected wild boars did not show signs of clinical disease. This report is perhaps the most comprehensive survey of cryptosporidial infection in wild boars.

  20. GENOTYPING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYSTS IN WATER SAMPLES AS A TOOL FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF CONTAMINATION SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The identification of Cryptosporidium oocysts in environmental samples is largely made by the use of an immunofluorescent assay (IFA). Because IFA detects oocysts from all Cryptosporidium parasites, the species distribution and source of Cryptosporidium parasites in environmental...

  1. Molecular Epidemiology of Giardia, Blastocystis and Cryptosporidium among Indigenous Children from the Colombian Amazon Basin

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Angie; Munoz, Marina; Gómez, Natalia; Tabares, Juan; Segura, Laura; Salazar, Ángela; Restrepo, Cristian; Ruíz, Miguel; Reyes, Patricia; Qian, Yuchen; Xiao, Lihua; López, Myriam C.; Ramírez, Juan D.

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of intestinal parasites in children is most likely due to lack of natural or acquired resistance and differences in behavior and habits closely related to environmental and socioeconomic determinants. The most important protozoa that parasitize humans are Giardia, Entamoeba, Blastocystis, and Cryptosporidium. These parasites present wide intraspecific genetic diversity and subsequently classified into assemblages and subtypes. The Amazon basin is the largest in the world and is the fifth freshwater reserve on the planet. Contradictorily, people living in these areas (Indigenous populations) have poor quality of life, which favors the infection of diseases of fecal-oral transmission. The aim of this work was to unravel the molecular epidemiology of Giardia, Blastocystis and Cryptosporidium across four communities (Puerto Nariño, San Juan del Soco, Villa Andrea and Nuevo Paraíso). We obtained 284 fecal samples from children under 15 years old that were analyzed by direct microscopy (261 samples) and Real Time PCR (qPCR) (284 samples). The positive samples for these protozoa were further characterized by several molecular markers to depict assemblages and subtypes. We observed a frequency of Giardia infection by microscopy of 23.7% (62 samples) and by qPCR of 64.8% (184 samples); for Blastocystis by microscopy of 35.2% (92 samples) and by qPCR of 88.7% (252 samples) and for Cryptosporidium only 1.9% (5 samples) were positive by microscopy and qPCR 1.8% (5 samples). Regarding the Giardia assemblages, using the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) marker we observed AI, BIII and BIV assemblages and when using triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) we observed assemblages AI, AII, BIII and BIV. In contrast, Blastocystis STs detected were 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6. Lastly, the species C. viatorum, C. hominis (with the subtypes IdA19 and IaA12R8) and C. parvum (with the subtype IIcA5G3c) were identified. We observed a high profile of zoonotic transmission

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of Giardia, Blastocystis and Cryptosporidium among Indigenous Children from the Colombian Amazon Basin.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Angie; Munoz, Marina; Gómez, Natalia; Tabares, Juan; Segura, Laura; Salazar, Ángela; Restrepo, Cristian; Ruíz, Miguel; Reyes, Patricia; Qian, Yuchen; Xiao, Lihua; López, Myriam C; Ramírez, Juan D

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of intestinal parasites in children is most likely due to lack of natural or acquired resistance and differences in behavior and habits closely related to environmental and socioeconomic determinants. The most important protozoa that parasitize humans are Giardia, Entamoeba, Blastocystis, and Cryptosporidium. These parasites present wide intraspecific genetic diversity and subsequently classified into assemblages and subtypes. The Amazon basin is the largest in the world and is the fifth freshwater reserve on the planet. Contradictorily, people living in these areas (Indigenous populations) have poor quality of life, which favors the infection of diseases of fecal-oral transmission. The aim of this work was to unravel the molecular epidemiology of Giardia, Blastocystis and Cryptosporidium across four communities (Puerto Nariño, San Juan del Soco, Villa Andrea and Nuevo Paraíso). We obtained 284 fecal samples from children under 15 years old that were analyzed by direct microscopy (261 samples) and Real Time PCR (qPCR) (284 samples). The positive samples for these protozoa were further characterized by several molecular markers to depict assemblages and subtypes. We observed a frequency of Giardia infection by microscopy of 23.7% (62 samples) and by qPCR of 64.8% (184 samples); for Blastocystis by microscopy of 35.2% (92 samples) and by qPCR of 88.7% (252 samples) and for Cryptosporidium only 1.9% (5 samples) were positive by microscopy and qPCR 1.8% (5 samples). Regarding the Giardia assemblages, using the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) marker we observed AI, BIII and BIV assemblages and when using triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) we observed assemblages AI, AII, BIII and BIV. In contrast, Blastocystis STs detected were 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6. Lastly, the species C. viatorum, C. hominis (with the subtypes IdA19 and IaA12R8) and C. parvum (with the subtype IIcA5G3c) were identified. We observed a high profile of zoonotic transmission

  3. COMPARISON OF IN VITRO CELL CULTURE AND A MOUSE ASSAY FOR MEASURING INFECTIVITY OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM. (R828043)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. ASSOCIATION OF RNA POLYMERASE COMPLEXES OF THE PARASITIC PROTOZOAN CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM WITH VIRUS-LIKE PARTICLES: HETEROGENEOUS SYSTEM. (R825148)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. EXPRESSION OF IL-15 AND IL-4 IFN-GAMMA-INDEPENDENT CONTROL OF EXPERIMENTAL HUMAN CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM INFECTION. (R829180)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  6. TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA1 IS EXPRESSED IN THE JEJUNUM AFTER EXPERIMENTAL HUMAN CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM INFECTION IN HUMANS. (R828035)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. ROLE OF DISINFECTANT CONCENTRATION AND PH IN THE INACTIVATION KINETICS OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYSTS WITH OZONE AND MONOCHLORAMINE. (R826830)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. RELIABILITY OF SURROGATES FOR DETERMINING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing of field-scale bag filtration systems yielded results indicating that 4-6-um polystyrene microspheres can be used as a reliable surrogate for determining Cryptosporidium oocyst removal in bag filtration process. A nearly perfect linear correlation was observed between log...

  9. Identification of Cryptosporidium oocysts in river water.

    PubMed Central

    Ongerth, J E; Stibbs, H H

    1987-01-01

    Water samples were collected from four rivers in Washington State and two rivers in California and examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts. Oocyst-sized particles were concentrated from 20-liter samples of water by membrane filtration, centrifugation, and differential sedimentation. The particle concentrate was then deposited on a 25-mm-diameter membrane filter for oocyst identification by indirect immunofluorescence assay. The identification procedure had a limit of detection of about five oocysts per liter. Cryptosporidium oocysts were found in each of 11 river water samples examined. Concentrations ranged from 2 to 112 oocysts per liter. The finding of Cryptosporidium oocysts in all samples examined from six western rivers is noteworthy in light of recent reports indicating that Cryptosporidium sp. is a significant agent of human and animal disease. This finding suggests that waterborne oocysts of this parasite are more important than was previously recognized. More detailed studies are needed to define geographical and temporal distribution, to assess the viability of waterborne oocysts, and to determine the importance of water as a means of transmission. Images PMID:3579275

  10. The first report on Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium pig genotype II in Eurasian wild boars (Sus scrofa) (Czech Republic).

    PubMed

    Němejc, Karel; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Hanzal, Vladimír; Jeníková, Martina; Kváč, Martin

    2012-03-23

    A total of 193 faecal samples of adult Eurasian wild boars were collected at 12 enclosures across the Czech Republic and examined for Cryptosporidium infection using both microscopic and molecular tools. Cryptosporidium oocysts were not detected in any of the 193 faecal samples examined using the aniline-carbol-methyl violet staining method. Thirty-two positive cases of Cryptosporidium infection were detected using either genus- or species-specific nested PCR. Mono-infection with Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium pig genotype II were found in 13 and 7 cases, respectively. Five mixed infections of C. suis and Cryptosporidium pig genotype II were detected using PCR/RFLP with genus specific primers. The number of detected mixed infections increased 2.4 fold when a species-specific PCR was employed. No other Cryptosporidium spp. was detected. Unlike cryptosporidiosis of domestic pigs, C. suis was detected as a dominant species infecting adult Eurasian wild boars. There was no association between diarrhoea and the presence of Cryptosporidium infection in the Eurasian wild boars studied. This is the first report on the Cryptosporidium infection caused by C. suis and Cryptosporidium pig genotype II in Eurasian wild boars (Sus scrofa).

  11. Equine cryptosporidial infection associated with Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Laatamna, Abd Elkarim; Wagnerová, Pavla; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Aissi, Miriem; Rost, Michael; Kváč, Martin

    2013-10-18

    Faecal samples from two horse farms in Algeria keeping Arabian, Thoroughbred, and Barb horses were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium in 2010-2011. A total of 138 faecal samples (16 from a farm keeping 50 animals and 122 from a farm with 267 horses) were screened for Cryptosporidium spp. infection using molecular tools. DNA was extracted from all samples. Nested PCR was performed to amplify fragments of the SSU rDNA and gp60 genes to determine the presence of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. Sequence analyses of SSU and gp60 genes revealed four animals positive for the presence of subtype XIIIa A22R9 of the Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype. The infections were not associated with diarrhoea. This study reports, for the first time, the occurrence of Cryptosporidium in Algeria and the first occurrence of the hedgehog genotype in horses. These findings support the potential role of infected horses in sylvatic-domestic transmission of Cryptosporidium.

  12. Chemodiversity of Ladder-Frame Prymnesin Polyethers in Prymnesium parvum.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Silas Anselm; Meier, Sebastian; Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted; Blossom, Hannah Eva; Duus, Jens Øllgaard; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Hansen, Per Juel; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2016-09-23

    Blooms of the microalga Prymnesium parvum cause devastating fish kills worldwide, which are suspected to be caused by the supersized ladder-frame polyether toxins prymnesin-1 and -2. These toxins have, however, only been detected from P. parvum in rare cases since they were originally described two decades ago. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a novel B-type prymnesin, based on extensive analysis of 2D- and 3D-NMR data of natural as well as 90% (13)C enriched material. B-type prymnesins lack a complete 1,6-dioxadecalin core unit, which is replaced by a short acyclic C2 linkage compared to the structure of the original prymnesins. Comparison of the bioactivity of prymnesin-2 with prymnesin-B1 in an RTgill-W1 cell line assay identified both compounds as toxic in the low nanomolar range. Chemical investigations by liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) of 10 strains of P. parvum collected worldwide showed that only one strain produced the original prymnesin-1 and -2, whereas four strains produced the novel B-type prymnesin. In total 13 further prymnesin analogues differing in their core backbone and chlorination and glycosylation patterns could be tentatively detected by LC-MS/HRMS, including a likely C-type prymnesin in five strains. Altogether, our work indicates that evolution of prymnesins has yielded a diverse family of fish-killing toxins that occurs around the globe and has significant ecological and economic impact.

  13. EVALUATING CRYPTOSPORIDIUM AND GIARDIA CONCENTRATIONS IN COMBINED SEWER OVERFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the first identified Cryptosporidium outbreaks occurred in the 1980s and the massive 1993 Milwaukee, WI outbreak affected more than 400,000 people (Fox & Lytle 1996), the concern over the public health risks linked to protozoan pathogens Cryptosporidium and Giardia has grow...

  14. Effect of imbalanced nutrients and immigration on Prymnesium parvum community dominance and toxicity: Results from in-lake microcosm experiments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Errera, R.M.; Roelke, D.L.; Kiesling, R.L.; Brooks, B.W.; Grover, J.P.; Schwierzke, L.; Urena-Boeck, F.; Baker, J.W.; Pinckney, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Prymnesium parvum, a haptophyte species, forms harmful blooms, including those that have caused severe fish kills in Texas, USA, over the past 6 yr. We studied P. parvum dynamics using in situ microcosm experiments at Lake Possum Kingdom, Texas, during 3 seasons (fall 2004, winter and spring 2005). Experimental treatments included full and partial nutrient enrichment (encompassing nitrogen [N] and phosphorus [P] deficient treatments), P. parvum immigration and combinations of these factors. In the control and N and P deficient treatments, P. parvum populations dominated the community, but only in the N deficient treatments did P. parvum experience a significant growth in the population. In contrast, when nutrients were not limiting, P. parvum tended to lose its competitive edge to other taxa such as chlorophytes, euglenophytes and diatoms, which then dominated the community. Population growth of P. parvum was also stimulated through immigration, but only during the winter experiment, a period of the year when bloom initiation is common. This finding suggests that movement into the water column may be an important process leading to P. parvum bloom initiation. Toxicity of P. parvum to fish was also affected by the nutrient changes: during conditions of no nutrient addition P. parvum was most toxic; intermediate toxicity was observed under N and P deficient conditions, and full nutrient enrichments resulted in nearly non-toxic conditions. ?? Inter-Research 2008.

  15. Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. among School Children in a Rural Area of the Amhara Region, North-West Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    de Lucio, Aida; Amor-Aramendía, Aranzazu; Bailo, Begoña; Saugar, José M.; Anegagrie, Melaku; Arroyo, Ana; López-Quintana, Beatriz; Zewdie, Derjew; Ayehubizu, Zimmam; Yizengaw, Endalew; Abera, Bayeh; Yimer, Mulat; Mulu, Wondemagen; Hailu, Tadesse; Herrador, Zaida; Fuentes, Isabel; Carmena, David

    2016-01-01

    Backgroud Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. are enteric protozoan causing gastrointestinal illness in humans and animals. Giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis are not formally considered as neglected tropical diseases, but belong to the group of poverty-related infectious diseases that impair the development and socio-economic potential of infected individuals in developing countries. Methods We report here the prevalence and genetic diversity of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in children attending rural primary schools in the Bahir Dar district of the Amhara Region, Ethiopia. Stool samples were collected from 393 children and analysed by molecular methods. G. duodenalis was detected by real-time PCR, and the assemblages and sub-assemblages were determined by multilocus sequence-based genotyping of the glutamate dehydrogenase and β-giardin genes of the parasite. Detection and identification of Cryptosporidium species was carried out by sequencing of a partial fragment of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene. Principal Findings The PCR-based prevalences of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. were 55.0% (216/393) and 4.6% (18/393), respectively. A total of 78 G. duodenalis isolates were successfully characterized, revealing the presence of sub-assemblages AII (10.3%), BIII (28.2%), and BIV (32.0%). Discordant typing results AII/AIII and BIII/BIV were identified in 7.7% and 15.4% of the isolates, respectively. An additional five (6.4%) isolates were assigned to assemblage B. No mixed infections of assemblages A+B were found. Extensive genetic variation at the nucleotide level was observed within assemblage B (but no within assemblage A), resulting in the identification of a large number of sub-types. Cryptosporidium diversity was demonstrated by the occurrence of C. hominis, C. parvum, and C. viatorum in the population under study. Conclusions Our data suggest an epidemiological scenario with an elevated transmission intensity of a wide range of G

  16. Molecular genotyping and sub-genotyping of Cryptosporidium spp. isolates from symptomatic individuals attending two major public hospitals in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    de Lucio, Aida; Merino, Francisco J; Martínez-Ruiz, Rocío; Bailo, Begoña; Aguilera, María; Fuentes, Isabel; Carmena, David

    2016-01-01

    Infections by members of the protozoan genus Cryptosporidium are among the most common causes of human gastrointestinal illness worldwide. In Spain cryptosporidiosis is not a compulsory notifiable disease, so the actual burden of the infection in both clinical and general populations remains largely unknown. We present here data on the diversity and frequency of the Cryptosporidium species and sub-genotypes identified in symptomatic individuals seeking medical care in two major hospitals in Madrid, Spain, between December 2013 and January 2015. Initial detection of the parasite was conducted on a total of 122 stool samples collected from 120 patients by microscopy with modified Ziehl-Neelsen and/or immunochromatographic tests. We used immunofluorescence, PCR-based methods and sequence analyses of the 60-kDa (GP60) glycoprotein and the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes for confirmatory purposes and to characterize Cryptosporidium isolates. A total of 110 patients were confirmed with cryptosporidiosis. Overall, 101 isolates were successfully sub-genotyped at the GP60 locus, and an additional seven at the SSU rRNA locus. The analyses of all amplicons defined 10 distinct sequence types representing the GP60 family sub-genotypes IbA10G2 (78.7%), IeA11G3T3 (3.7%) of C. hominis, and the GP60 family sub-types IIaA15G2R1 (5.6%), IIaA18G6R1 (0.9%), IIcA5G3a (0.9%), IIdA18G1 (0.9%), IIdA19G1 (0.9%), IIdA21G1 (0.9%), and IIdA22G1 (0.9%) of C. parvum. A single isolate was assigned to C. felis (0.9%), two C. parvum isolates (1.9%) could not be characterized at the sub-genotype level and an additional four isolates (3.7%) were not typable. These results strongly suggest that transmission of cryptosporidiosis is mostly anthroponotic in origin in the clinical sample under study. We expect that our molecular epidemiological data will make a significant contribution to unravel the actual epidemiological situation of cryptosporidiosis in Spain, providing health care and

  17. EFFECTS OF OZONE, CHLORINE DIOXIDE, CHLORINE, AND MONOCHLORAMINE ON CRYTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM OOCYST VIABILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purified Cryptosporiodium parvum oocysts were exposed to ozone, chlorine dioxide, chlorine, and monochloramine. Excystation and mouse infectivity were compareatively evaluated to assess oocyst viability. Ozone and chlorine dioxide more effectively inactivated oocysts than chlor...

  18. Cryptosporidium galli and novel Cryptosporidium avian genotype VI in North American red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus).

    PubMed

    Chelladurai, Jeba Jesudoss; Clark, Mark E; Kváč, Martin; Holubová, Nikola; Khan, Eakalak; Stenger, Brianna L S; Giddings, Catherine W; McEvoy, John

    2016-05-01

    Proventriculus and intestinal samples from 70 North American red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus; order Passeriformes) were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium by PCR amplification and sequence analysis of the 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA), actin, and 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) genes. Twelve birds (17.1 %) were positive for the Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA gene: six birds were positive at the proventriculus site only and six birds were positive at the proventriculus and intestinal sites. Sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA, actin and HSP70 genes showed the presence of the gastric species Cryptosporidium galli in a single proventriculus sample and a closely related genotype, which we have named Cryptosporidium avian genotype VI, in all other positive samples. These findings contribute to our understanding of Cryptosporidium diversification in passerines, the largest avian order.

  19. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp., Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Encephalitozoon spp. and Giardia intestinalis in Wild, Semi-Wild and Captive Orangutans (Pongo abelii and Pongo pygmaeus) on Sumatra and Borneo, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Mynářová, Anna; Foitová, Ivona; Kváč, Martin; Květoňová, Dana; Rost, Michael; Morrogh-Bernard, Helen; Nurcahyo, Wisnu; Nguyen, Cathleen; Supriyadi, Supriyadi; Sak, Bohumil

    2016-01-01

    Background Orangutans are critically endangered primarily due to loss and fragmentation of their natural habitat. This could bring them into closer contact with humans and increase the risk of zoonotic pathogen transmission. Aims To describe the prevalence and diversity of Cryptosporidium spp., microsporidia and Giardia intestinalis in orangutans at seven sites on Sumatra and Kalimantan, and to evaluate the impact of orangutans’ habituation and location on the occurrence of these zoonotic protists. Result The overall prevalence of parasites in 298 examined animals was 11.1%. The most prevalent microsporidia was Encephalitozoon cuniculi genotype II, found in 21 animals (7.0%). Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotype D (n = 5) and novel genotype Pongo 2 were detected only in six individuals (2.0%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of these parasites in orangutans. Eight animals were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. (2.7%), including C. parvum (n = 2) and C. muris (n = 6). Giardia intestinalis assemblage B, subtype MB6, was identified in a single individual. While no significant differences between the different human contact level groups (p = 0.479–0.670) or between the different islands (p = 0.992) were reported in case of E. bieneusi or E. cuniculi, Cryptosporidium spp. was significantly less frequently detected in wild individuals (p < 2×10−16) and was significantly more prevalent in orangutans on Kalimantan than on Sumatra (p < 2×10−16). Conclusion Our results revealed that wild orangutans are significantly less frequently infected by Cryptosporidium spp. than captive and semi-wild animals. In addition, this parasite was more frequently detected at localities on Kalimantan. In contrast, we did not detect any significant difference in the prevalence of microsporidia between the studied groups of animals. The sources and transmission modes of infections were not determined, as this would require repeated sampling of individuals

  20. Effects of nutrient enrichment on Prymnesium parvum population dynamics and toxicity: Results from field experiments, Lake Possum Kingdom, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roelke, D.L.; Errera, R.M.; Riesling, R.; Brooks, B.W.; Grover, J.P.; Schwierzke, L.; Urena-Boeck, F.; Baker, J.; Pinckney, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Large fish kills associated with toxic populations of the haptophyte Prymnesium parvum occur worldwide. In the past 5 yr, incidences of P. parvum blooms in inland water bodies of Texas (USA) have increased dramatically, where cell densities in excess of 1 ?? 107 cells l-1 are typically observed. We conducted field experiments (Lake Possum Kingdom) during the fall and early spring of 28 d duration using 24 enclosures of 1.57 m 3 each. The experiments investigated the effect of nutrient enrichment, immigration of P. parvum and addition of barley straw extract on phytoplankton biomass and assemblage structure, P. parvum population density, zooplankton biomass and assemblage structure, bacteria, and toxicity. Nutrient enrichment stimulated P. parvum population growth beyond bloom proportions (>1 ?? 107 cells l-1). However, P. parvum did not dominate the assemblage under these conditions, as it does during natural blooms. Instead, euglenophytes and chlorophytes dominated. Toxicity, estimated using fish (Pimephales promelas) and cladoceran (Daphnia magna) bioassays and which is linked to P. parvum's allelopathic and mixotrophic effectiveness, was greatly reduced (eliminated in many cases) under conditions of nutrient enrichment. The suppression of toxicity by nutrient addition suggested that targeted and time-limited nutrient manipulations might be used to mitigate the effects of P. parvum blooms. Immigration of P. parvum into natural assemblages and addition of barley straw extract had no significant effect on plankton dynamics. ?? Inter-Research 2007.

  1. Atrazine selects for ichthyotoxic Prymnesium parvum, a possible explanation for golden algae blooms in lakes of Texas, USA.

    PubMed

    Yates, Brian S; Rogers, William J

    2011-11-01

    Prymnesium parvum Carter is a mixotrophic haptophyte which, under certain environmental conditions, produces potent toxins responsible for fish kills around the world since the 1930s. Many P. parvum blooms have occurred in catchments where crop agriculture is a dominant land use; however, the effects of herbicides on bloom dynamics have not yet been investigated. Aquatic microbial communities containing P. parvum were subjected to two separate experiments involving the addition of either atrazine or glyphosate at varying concentrations. After 14, 21, and 28 days at 10 μg/l atrazine we observed that the relative abundance of P. parvum was significantly higher compared to the control. After 28 days, the relative abundance of P. parvum was approximately 53% higher in 10 μg/l atrazine compared to the control. Glyphosate exhibited no statistically-significant effect on the relative abundance of P. parvum. Inadequate characterization of the microbial community and uncertainty due to ecological and allelopathic effects of P. parvum made it difficult to establish strong relationships between herbicide sensitivity and nutritional mode. Large volumes of mobile and persistent herbicides with high toxicity to phytoplankton are used in cotton defoliation in Texas prior to the typical P. parvum pre-bloom period. These results have important implications for management, such as whether reduction in herbicide runoff could decrease the frequency and duration of P. parvum blooms in the future.

  2. Cryptosporidium varanii infection in leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Dellarupe, A; Unzaga, J M; Moré, G; Kienast, M; Larsen, A; Stiebel, C; Rambeaud, M; Venturini, M C

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is observed in reptiles with high morbidity and considerable mortality. The objective of this study was to achieve the molecular identification of Cryptosporidium spp. in pet leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) from a breeder colony in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Oocysts comparable to those of Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in three geckos with a history of diarrhea, anorexia and cachexia. Molecular identification methods confirmed the presence of Cryptosporidium varanii (syn. C. saurophilum). This agent was considered to be the primary cause of the observed clinical disease. This is the first description of C. varanii infection in pet reptiles in Argentina.

  3. Cryptosporidium varanii infection in leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Dellarupe, A.; Unzaga, J.M.; Moré, G.; Kienast, M.; Larsen, A.; Stiebel, C.; Rambeaud, M.; Venturini, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is observed in reptiles with high morbidity and considerable mortality. The objective of this study was to achieve the molecular identification of Cryptosporidium spp. in pet leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) from a breeder colony in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Oocysts comparable to those of Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in three geckos with a history of diarrhea, anorexia and cachexia. Molecular identification methods confirmed the presence of Cryptosporidium varanii (syn. C. saurophilum). This agent was considered to be the primary cause of the observed clinical disease. This is the first description of C. varanii infection in pet reptiles in Argentina. PMID:27419102

  4. Influence of ionic strength and soil characteristics on the behavior of Cryptosporidium oocysts in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Balthazard-Accou, Ketty; Fifi, Urbain; Agnamey, Patrice; Casimir, Justin André; Brasseur, Philippe; Emmanuel, Evens

    2014-05-01

    The physico-chemical behavior of Cryptosporidium oocysts was investigated during their transfer through an alluvial formation from Les Cayes (Haiti) via batch tests. Five approximately 3 kg soil samples were collected and combined prior to batch tests from the alluvial formations. The experiments were carried out at soil pH by equilibrating different ranges of pure oocysts concentrations and soil samples with 3mM CaCl2 and 1mM NaBr as electrolyte. We used the Debye-Hückel equation describing ion activity in a solution for a given ionic strength. The equilibrium adsorption mechanism is used to enumerate the oocysts in the soil. The results suggest that the oocysts behavior in porous media depends on soil characteristics such as soil pH, the nature of the mineral and organic constituents of the soil and the ionic strength and activities in solution. These results show that a total transfer in batch containing NaBr solutions against a partial one in batch contai