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Sample records for porcine endogenous retroviruses

  1. How Active Are Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERVs)?

    PubMed Central

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) represent a risk factor if porcine cells, tissues, or organs were to be transplanted into human recipients to alleviate the shortage of human transplants; a procedure called xenotransplantation. In contrast to human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), which are mostly defective and not replication-competent, PERVs are released from normal pig cells and are infectious. PERV-A and PERV-B are polytropic viruses infecting cells of several species, among them humans; whereas PERV-C is an ecotropic virus infecting only pig cells. Virus infection was shown in co-culture experiments, but also in vivo, in the pig, leading to de novo integration of proviruses in certain organs. This was shown by measurement of the copy number per cell, finding different numbers in different organs. In addition, recombinations between PERV-A and PERV-C were observed and the recombinant PERV-A/C were found to be integrated in cells of different organs, but not in the germ line of the animals. Here, the evidence for such in vivo activities of PERVs, including expression as mRNA, protein and virus particles, de novo infection and recombination, will be summarised. These activities make screening of pigs for provirus number and PERV expression level difficult, especially when only blood or ear biopsies are available for analysis. Highly sensitive methods to measure the copy number and the expression level will be required when selecting pigs with low copy number and low expression of PERV as well as when inactivating PERVs using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated nuclease (CRISPR/Cas) technology. PMID:27527207

  2. Generation of neutralising antibodies against porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaulitz, Danny; Fiebig, Uwe; Eschricht, Magdalena; Wurzbacher, Christian; Kurth, Reinhard; Denner, Joachim

    2011-03-01

    Antibodies neutralising porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) were induced in different animal species by immunisation with the transmembrane envelope protein p15E. These antibodies recognised epitopes, designated E1, in the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) of p15E, and E2 in the membrane proximal external region (MPER). E2 is localised in a position similar to that of an epitope in the transmembrane envelope protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1), recognised by the monoclonal antibody 4E10 that is broadly neutralising. To detect neutralising antibodies specific for PERV, a novel assay was developed, which is based on quantification of provirus integration by real-time PCR. In addition, for the first time, highly effective neutralising antibodies were obtained by immunisation with the surface envelope protein of PERV. These data indicate that neutralising antibodies can be induced by immunisation with both envelope proteins.

  3. Susceptibility of porcine endogenous retrovirus to anti-retroviral inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Argaw, Takele; Colon-Moran, Winston; Wilson, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) is an endogenous retrovirus that poses a risk of iatrogenic transmission in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. The lack of a means to control PERV infection in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation is a major concern in the field. In this study, we set out to evaluate the ability of currently licensed anti-HIV drugs, and other types of anti-retroviral compounds, to inhibit PERV infection in vitro. Methods We used target cells stably expressing one of the known PERV viral receptors, an infectious molecular clone, PERV-A 14/220, and at least one drug from each class of anti-retroviral inhibitors as well as off-label drugs shown to have anti-viral activities. The susceptibility of PERV-A 14/220 LacZ to the anti-retroviral drugs was determined from infected cells by histochemical staining. Results We extend the results of previous studies by showing that, in addition to raltegravir, dolutegravir is found to have a potent inhibitory activity against PERV replication (IC50 8.634 ±0.336 and IC50 3.06 ± 0.844 nm, respectively). The anti-HIV drug zidovudine (AZT) showed considerable anti-PERV activity with IC50 of 1.923 ±0.691 μm as well. Conclusions The study results indicate that some of the licensed antiretroviral drugs may be useful for controlling PERV infection. However, the efficacy at nanomolar concentrations put forward integrase inhibitors as a drug that has the potential to be useful in the event that xenotransplantation recipients have evidence of PERV transmission and replication. PMID:27028725

  4. Restriction of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus by Porcine APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases ▿

    PubMed Central

    Dörrschuck, Eva; Fischer, Nicole; Bravo, Ignacio G.; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Kuiper, Heidi; Spötter, Andreas; Möller, Ronny; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten; Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2011-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine cells, tissues, and organs shows promise to surmount the shortage of human donor materials. Among the barriers to pig-to-human xenotransplantation are porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) since functional representatives of the two polytropic classes, PERV-A and PERV-B, are able to infect human embryonic kidney cells in vitro, suggesting that a xenozoonosis in vivo could occur. To assess the capacity of human and porcine cells to counteract PERV infections, we analyzed human and porcine APOBEC3 (A3) proteins. This multigene family of cytidine deaminases contributes to the cellular intrinsic immunity and act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. Our data show that the porcine A3 gene locus on chromosome 5 consists of the two single-domain genes A3Z2 and A3Z3. The evolutionary relationships of the A3Z3 genes reflect the evolutionary history of mammals. The two A3 genes encode at least four different mRNAs: A3Z2, A3Z3, A3Z2-Z3, and A3Z2-Z3 splice variant A (SVA). Porcine and human A3s have been tested toward their antiretroviral activity against PERV and murine leukemia virus (MuLV) using novel single-round reporter viruses. The porcine A3Z2, A3Z3 and A3Z2-Z3 were packaged into PERV particles and inhibited PERV replication in a dose-dependent manner. The antiretroviral effect correlated with editing by the porcine A3s with a trinucleotide preference for 5′ TGC for A3Z2 and A3Z2-Z3 and 5′ CAC for A3Z3. These results strongly imply that human and porcine A3s could inhibit PERV replication in vivo, thereby reducing the risk of infection of human cells by PERV in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:21307203

  5. Transmission of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus Produced from Different Recipient Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sehyun; Gwon, Yong-Dae; Cho, Yeondong; Yang, Jae Myung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young bong

    2016-01-01

    Humanized pigs have been developed to reduce the incidence of immune rejection in xenotransplantation, but significant concerns remain, such as transmission of viral zoonosis. Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV), which exist in the genome of pigs, are produced as infectious virions from all porcine cells and cause zoonosis. Here, we examined the possibility of zoonosis of hosts under conditions of immune suppression or xenotransplantation of cells producing host-adapted viruses. Upon transplantation of PERV-producing porcine cells into mice, no transmission of PERV was detected, whereas, transmission of PERV from mice transplanted with mouse-adapted PERV-producing cells was detected. In addition, the frequency of PERV transmission was increased in CsA treated mice transplanted with PERV-producing murine cells, compared with PERV-producing porcine cells. Transmission of PERV to host animals did not affect weight but immune responses, in particular, the number of T cells from PERV-transmitted mice, were notably reduced. The observed risk of PERV zoonosis highlights the requirement for thorough evaluation of viral zoonosis under particular host conditions, such as immunosuppressive treatment and transplantation with host-adapted virus-producing cells. PMID:27832080

  6. Expression of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) in melanomas of Munich miniature swine (MMS) Troll.

    PubMed

    Dieckhoff, Britta; Puhlmann, Jenny; Büscher, Kristina; Hafner-Marx, Angela; Herbach, Nadja; Bannert, Norbert; Büttner, Mathias; Wanke, Rüdiger; Kurth, Reinhard; Denner, Joachim

    2007-07-20

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) are integrated in the genome of all pig breeds. Since some of them are able to infect human cells, they might represent a risk for xenotransplantation using pig cells or organs. However, the expression and biological role of PERVs in healthy pigs as well as in porcine tumours is largely unknown. Since we and others have recently shown overexpression of a human endogenous retrovirus, HERV-K, in human melanomas, we studied the expression of PERVs in melanomas of selectively bred Munich miniature swine (MMS) Troll. This breeding herd of MMS Troll is characterised by a high prevalence of melanomas, which histologically resemble various types of cutaneous melanomas in humans. Several genetic factors have been defined when studying inheritance of melanomas and melanocytic nevi in MMS Troll. Here we show that the polytropic PERV-A and PERV-B as well as the ecotropic PERV-C are present in the genome of all melanoma bearing MMS Troll investigated. Most interestingly, in the spleen, but not in other organs, recombinant PERV-A/C proviruses were found. PERV expression was found elevated in melanomas when compared to normal skin and viral proteins were expressed in melanomas and pulmonary metastasis-derived melanoma cell cultures. During passaging of these cells in vitro the expression of PERV mRNA and protein increased and virus particles were released as shown by RT activity in the supernatant and by electron microscopy. Genomic RNA of PERV-A, -B and -C were found in pelleted virus particles. Although PERV expression was elevated in melanomas and pulmonary metastasis-derived cell cultures, the function of the virus in tumour development is still unclear.

  7. Functional hierarchy of two L domains in Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus (PERV) that influence release and infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Katherine T.; Martina, Yuri; Harrison, Frank; Wilson, Carolyn A.

    2008-01-01

    The Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus (PERV) Gag protein contains two late (L) domain motifs, PPPY and P(F/S)AP. Using viral release assays we demonstrate that PPPY is the dominant L domain involved in PERV release. PFAP represents a novel retroviral L domain variant and is defined by abnormal viral assembly phenotypes visualized by electron microscopy and attenuation of early PERV release as measured by viral genomes. PSAP is functionally dominant over PFAP in early PERV release. PSAP virions are 3.5-fold more infectious in vitro by TCID50 and in vivo results in more RNA positive tissues and higher levels of proviral DNA using our human PERV-A receptor (HuPAR-2) transgenic mouse model (Martina et al., 2006. Journal of Virology. 80: 3135-46). The functional hierarchies displayed by PERV L domains, demonstrates that L domain selection in viral evolution exists to promote efficient viral assembly, release and infectivity in the virus-host context. PMID:18355887

  8. Transient transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus to fetal lambs after pig islet tissue xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Popp, Sarah K; Mann, David A; Milburn, Peter J; Gibbs, Adrian J; McCullagh, Peter J; Wilson, James Dennis; Tönjes, Ralf R; Simeonovic, Charmaine J

    2007-01-01

    Evidence for the in vivo transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) from porcine xenografts to various recipient animals has been inconsistent. To characterize the contribution of the host immune system to the potential for PERV transmission from pig islet tissue xenografts to host tissues, we examined two immunoincompetent animal models, thymectomizsed fetal lambs and NODscid mice. Pig proislets were grafted into fetal lambs or adult NODscid mice. Conventional, nested and real-time PCR/RT-PCR tests were used to search for PERV and pig cell-specific sequences (porcine mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II (COII) or mitochondrial ribosomal 12S) in pig proislets, host liver and spleen at 5-84 days (lambs) or 96 days (mice) after transplantation. Xenografts were harvested at the same time points. The copy number of PERV sequences and host cell-specific nuclear (palmitoylcarnitine transferase) sequences was assessed by real-time PCR to estimate the proportion of PERV-infected host cells. Pig proislets were shown to be PERV+ve by PCR and immunohistochemistry (PERV B env protein p15E). PERV transmission (PERV A, B or C DNA in the absence of porcine COII or 12S sequences) was detected by nested PCR and real-time PCR in 4/12 fetal lamb liver samples 5-23 days after transplantation; the maximum copy number of PERV B env sequences was found at day 5 (700 copies/1 x 10(6) lamb cells). A total of 4/12 fetal lambs demonstrated both PERV and 12S porcine sequences in liver samples (days 5-84) by real-time PCR, suggesting that pig cells had migrated to those tissues and established microchimerism; nested PCR showed evidence for microchimerism (porcine COII sequences alone) in 2/12 lambs (day 5). The incidence of PERV transmission and frequency of microchimerism was similar in host spleen analysed by real-time PCR. Histological examination showed complete xenograft rejection by 23 days after transplantation to fetal lambs. In contrast, pig proislet xenografts survived long

  9. Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus Infects but Does Not Replicate in Nonhuman Primate Primary Cells and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ritzhaupt, Armin; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Salomon, Daniel R.; Wilson, Carolyn A.

    2002-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) can infect human cell lines in vitro; hence, there is a presumed risk of viral exposure to a recipient when pig cells are transplanted into humans (xenotransplantation). Nonhuman primates (NHP) are considered a potential permissive animal model to study the risk of in vivo infection of PERV after xenotransplantation. We set out to determine whether PERV can infect and replicate in NHP primary cells or established cell lines from African green monkey, rhesus macaque, and baboon. We confirm that the NHP cell lines under investigation were infected with PERV as measured by detection of viral DNA and RNA by PCR and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, respectively, indicating that a functional receptor must be present on the cell surface. However, the load of detectable viral DNA in infected NHP cells declined over time, and the cells never had detectable reverse transcriptase activity. Utilizing quantitative real-time TaqMan PCR we found detectable levels of unintegrated DNA intermediates, but the levels were approximately 100-fold lower compared to HEK 293 cells infected with PERV. Virions released from infected NHP cells could productively infect naïve human cell lines, HEK 293 and HeLa, as shown by RT-PCR and RT assay. However, naïve NHP cells remained negative in RT-PCR and RT assay after exposure to virions from infected NHP cells. Together our data demonstrate that NHP cells are not permissive to productive replication by PERV, presumably due to inefficient cell entry and replication. In light of these observations, the appropriateness of NHP as suitable animal models to study PERV infection in vivo needs to be reevaluated. PMID:12388691

  10. Tolerance and immune response to the porcine endogenous retrovirus in German landrace pigs immunised with viral proteins.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim; Petersen, Björn; Niemann, Heiner

    2015-10-02

    Immunisation of goats, mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and hamsters with the recombinant ectodomain of the porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) transmembrane envelope (TM) protein (p15E) induced binding and neutralising immune antibodies in all animals. In contrast, no antibodies were induced when pigs were immunised with p15E, indicating that pigs are tolerant to their endogenous retroviruses, at least to the TM protein. To answer the question of whether pigs are tolerant to other structural proteins of PERV, we immunised German landrace pigs with p15E, this time in conjunction with the surface envelope proteins gp70 and the core capsid Gag protein p27CA. To ensure that the pigs were immunocompetent and that immunisation was successful, all animals also received an injection of an unrelated protein, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Whereas all animals produced antibodies against KLH, no animals produced antibodies against the viral envelope proteins, thus confirming previous results for p15E and extending them to the other envelope protein, gp70. However, the pigs did produce antibodies against p27CA, indicating that there is no tolerance to the core capsid protein of PERV.

  11. Human endogenous retroviruses and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cao, María; Iduma, Paola; Karachaliou, Niki; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Blanco, Julià; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are retroviruses that infected human genome millions of years ago and have persisted throughout human evolution. About 8% of our genome is composed of HERVs, most of which are nonfunctional because of epigenetic control or deactivating mutations. However, a correlation between HERVs and human cancer has been described and many tumors, such as melanoma, breast cancer, germ cell tumors, renal cancer or ovarian cancer, express HERV proteins, mainly HERV-K (HML6) and HERV-K (HML2). Although the causative role of HERVs in cancer is controversial, data from animal models demonstrated that endogenous retroviruses are potentially oncogenic. HERV protein expression in human cells generates an immune response by activating innate and adaptive immunities. Some HERV-derived peptides have antigenic properties. For example, HERV-K (HML-6) encodes the HER-K MEL peptide recognized by CD8+ lymphocytes. In addition, HERVs are two-edged immunomodulators. HERVs show immunosuppressive activity. The presence of genomic retroviral elements in host-cell cytosol may activate an interferon type I response. Therefore, targeting HERVs through cellular vaccines or immunomodulatory drugs combined with checkpoint inhibitors is attracting interest because they could be active in human tumors. PMID:28154780

  12. Identification of receptors for pig endogenous retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Thomas A; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Templin, Christian; Quinn, Gary; Farhadian, Shelli F; Wood, James C; Oldmixon, Beth A; Suling, Kristen M; Ishii, Jennifer K; Kitagawa, Yoshinori; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Salomon, Daniel R; Weiss, Robin A; Patience, Clive

    2003-05-27

    Xenotransplantation of porcine tissues has the potential to treat a wide variety of major health problems including organ failure and diabetes. Balanced against the potential benefits of xenotransplantation, however, is the risk of human infection with a porcine microorganism. In particular, the transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) is a major concern [Chapman, L. E. & Bloom, E. T. (2001) J. Am. Med. Assoc. 285, 2304-2306]. Here we report the identification of two, sequence-related, human proteins that act as receptors for PERV-A, encoded by genes located on chromosomes 8 and 17. We also describe homologs from baboon and porcine cells that also are active as receptors. Conversely, activity could not be demonstrated with a syntenic murine receptor homolog. Sequence analysis indicates that PERV-A receptors [human PERV-A receptor (HuPAR)-1, HuPAR-2, baboon PERV-A receptor 2, and porcine PERV-A receptor] are multiple membrane-spanning proteins similar to receptors for other gammaretroviruses. Expression is widespread in human tissues including peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but their biological functions are unknown. The identification of the PERV-A receptors opens avenues of research necessary for a more complete assessment of the retroviral risks of pig to human xenotransplantation.

  13. Endogenous retroviruses in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Sistiaga-Poveda, Maialen; Jugo, Begoña Marina

    2014-08-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are genomic elements that are present in a wide range of vertebrates. Although the study of ERVs has been carried out mainly in humans and model organisms, recently, domestic animals have become important, and some species have begun to be analyzed to gain further insight into ERVs. Due to the availability of complete genomes and the development of new computer tools, ERVs can now be analyzed from a genome-wide viewpoint. In addition, more experimental work is being carried out to analyze the distribution, expression and interplay of ERVs within a host genome. Cats, cattle, chicken, dogs, horses, pigs and sheep have been scrutinized in this manner, all of which are interesting species in health and economic terms. Furthermore, several studies have noted differences in the number of endogenous retroviruses and in the variability of these elements among different breeds, as well as their expression in different tissues and the effects of their locations, which, in some cases, are near genes. These findings suggest a complex, intriguing relationship between ERVs and host genomes. In this review, we summarize the most important in silico and experimental findings, discuss their implications and attempt to predict future directions for the study of these genomic elements.

  14. Xenotransplantation and pig endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Magre, Saema; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Bartosch, Birke

    2003-01-01

    Xenotransplantation, in particular transplantation of pig cells, tissues and organs into human patients, may alleviate the current shortage of suitable allografts available for human transplantation. This overview addresses the physiological, immunological and virological factors considered with regard to xenotransplantation. Among the issues reviewed are the merits of using pigs as xenograft source species, the compatibility of pig and human organ physiology and the immunological hindrances with regard to the various types of rejection and attempts at abrogating rejection. Advances in the prevention of pig organ rejection by creating genetically modified pigs that are more suited to the human microenvironment are also discussed. Finally, with regard to virology, possible zoonotic infections emanating from pigs are reviewed, with special emphasis on the pig endogenous retrovirus (PERV). An in depth account of PERV studies, comprising their discovery as well as recent knowledge of the virus, is given. To date, all retrospective studies on patients with pig xenografts have shown no evidence of PERV transmission, however, many factors make us interpret these results with caution. Although the lack of PERV infection in xenograft recipients up to now is encouraging, more basic research and controlled animal studies that mimic the pig to human xenotransplantation setting more closely are required for safety assessment.

  15. Epigenetic regulation on the 5'-proximal CpG island of human porcine endogenous retrovirus subgroup A receptor 2/GPR172B.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Yuki; Shojima, Takayuki; Yasuda, Jiro; Imakawa, Kazuhiko; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) have been considered one of the major risks of xenotransplantation from pigs to humans. PERV-A efficiently utilizes human PERV-A receptor 2 (HuPAR-2)/GPR172B to infect human cells; however, there has been no study on the regulation mechanisms of HuPAR-2/GPR172B expression. In this study, we examined the expression of HuPAR-2/GPR172B from the standpoint of epigenetic regulation and discussed the risks of PERV-A infection in xenotransplantation. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that HuPAR-2 mRNA was preferentially expressed in placental tissue, whereas it was highly suppressed in BeWo cells (a human choriocarcinoma cell line) and HEK293 cells. A CpG island containing the HuPAR-2 transcription starting site was identified by in silico analysis. The DNA methylation ratio (the relative quantity of methylcytosine to total cytosine) and histone modification (H3K9me3) levels in the CpG island measured by bisulfite genomic sequencing and ChIP assay, respectively, were inversely correlated with the mRNA levels. Both HuPAR-2 mRNA and HuPAR-2 protein were up-regulated in HEK293 cells by inhibiting DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. Additionally, promoter/enhancer activities within the CpG island were suppressed by in vitro DNA methylation. Our results demonstrated that epigenetic modification regulates HuPAR-2 expression.

  16. Involvement of Endogenous Retroviruses in Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yun-Jung; Jeong, Byung-Hoon; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2013-01-01

    For millions of years, vertebrates have been continuously exposed to infection by retroviruses. Ancient retroviral infection of germline cells resulted in the formation and accumulation of inherited retrovirus sequences in host genomes. These inherited retroviruses are referred to as endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), and recent estimates have revealed that a significant portion of animal genomes is made up of ERVs. Although various host factors have suppressed ERV activation, both positive and negative functions have been reported for some ERVs in normal and abnormal physiological conditions, such as in disease states. Similar to other complex diseases, ERV activation has been observed in prion diseases, and this review will discuss the potential involvement of ERVs in prion diseases. PMID:25437206

  17. [Endogenous retroviruses are associated with autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Nexø, Bjørn A; Jensen, Sara B; Hansen, Bettina; Laska, Magdalena J

    2016-06-13

    Retroviruses can be transmitted in two fundamentally different ways: 1) They can be horizontally transmitted as infectious virus, or 2) they can integrate in the germ line and be transmitted to offspring and the offsprings' offspring as DNA. The latter is called endogenous viruses. The mode of transmission is called vertical. Viral variants of importance for development of disease must be more frequent among diseased persons than among healthy individuals. Multiple sclerosis, diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are all associated with sets of endogenouos retroviruses but not the same sets. If a virus grows and this contributes to disease, one should be able to alleviate disease with antiretroviral drugs. We call for clinical trials to elucidate this issue.

  18. Distribution of endogenous retroviruses in crocodilians.

    PubMed

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Rodríguez-Zárate, Clara J; Isberg, Sally R; Damayanti, Chandramaya Siska; Miles, Lee G; Chansue, Nantarika; Moran, Chris; Melville, Lorna; Gongora, Jaime

    2009-10-01

    Knowledge of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in crocodilians (Crocodylia) is limited, and their distribution among extant species is unclear. Here we analyzed the phylogenetic relationships of these retroelements in 20 species of crocodilians by studying the pro-pol gene. The results showed that crocodilian ERVs (CERVs) cluster into two major clades (CERV 1 and CERV 2). CERV 1 clustered as a sister group of the genus Gammaretrovirus, while CERV 2 clustered distantly with respect to all known ERVs. Interestingly, CERV 1 was found only in crocodiles (Crocodylidae). The data generated here could assist future studies aimed at identifying orthologous and paralogous ERVs among crocodilians.

  19. tirant, a Newly Discovered Active Endogenous Retrovirus in Drosophila simulans

    PubMed Central

    Akkouche, Abdou; Rebollo, Rita; Burlet, Nelly; Esnault, Caroline; Martinez, Sonia; Viginier, Barbara; Terzian, Christophe; Vieira, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses have the ability to become permanently integrated into the genomes of their host, and they are generally transmitted vertically from parent to progeny. With the exception of gypsy, few endogenous retroviruses have been identified in insects. In this study, we describe the tirant endogenous retrovirus in a subset of Drosophila simulans natural populations. By focusing on the envelope gene, we show that the entire retroviral cycle (transcription, translation, and retrotransposition) can be completed for tirant within one population of this species. PMID:22278247

  20. Biology and evolution of the endogenous koala retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Tarlinton, R; Meers, J; Young, P

    2008-11-01

    Although endogenous retroviruses are ubiquitous features of all mammalian genomes, the process of initial germ line invasion and subsequent inactivation from a pathogenic element has not yet been observed in a wild species. Koala retrovirus (KoRV) provides a unique opportunity to study this process of endogenisation in action as it still appears to be spreading through the koala population. Ongoing expression of the endogenous sequence and consequent high levels of viraemia have been linked to neoplasia and immunosuppression in koalas. This apparently recent invader of the koala genome shares a remarkably close sequence relationship with the pathogenic exogenous Gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GALV), and comparative analyses of KoRV and GALVare helping to shed light on how retroviruses in general adapt to a relatively benign or at least less pathogenic existence within a new host genome. (Part of a multi-author review).

  1. Transspecies Transmission of the Endogenous Koala Retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Fiebig, Uwe; Hartmann, Manuel Garcia; Bannert, Norbert; Kurth, Reinhard; Denner, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a gammaretrovirus closely related to the gibbon ape leukemia virus and induces leukemias and immune deficiencies associated with opportunistic infections, such as chlamydiosis. Here we characterize a KoRV newly isolated from an animal in a German zoo and show infection of human and rat cell lines in vitro and of rats in vivo, using immunological and PCR methods for virus detection. The KoRV transmembrane envelope protein (p15E) was cloned and expressed, and p15E-specific neutralizing antibodies able to prevent virus infection in vitro were developed. Finally, evidence for immunosuppressive properties of the KoRV was obtained. PMID:16699047

  2. Role of endogenous cat retrovirus in cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, S

    1982-01-01

    Several long-term cultures were established from a spontaneous melanoma of a cat. Cells were rounded or spindle shaped and exhibited black/brown pigmentation in the cytoplasm. No virus was released from these cells spontaneously or after treatment with chemicals. However, exogenous infection of the cat melanoma cells with the endogenous cat virus RD114 resulted in remarkable morphological and functional changes. Most of the RD114 virus-infected cells exhibited multiple neuritic extensions and about 1-2% of the population showed characteristics of neuronal cells. Because human, mouse, and hamster melanoma cultures infected with various mammalian retroviruses, including the RD114 virus, did not display any morphological alteration, it is concluded that the neuronal cell differentiation in the cat melanoma cells is a consequence of its specific interaction with the endogenous cat retrovirus. Images PMID:6961415

  3. Novel Endogenous Retrovirus in Rabbits Previously Reported as Human Retrovirus 5

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, David J.; Voisset, Cécile; Venables, Patrick J. W.; Weiss, Robin A.

    2002-01-01

    Human retrovirus 5 (HRV-5) represented a fragment of a novel retrovirus sequence identified in human RNA and DNA preparations. In this study, the genome of HRV-5 was cloned and sequenced and integration sites were analyzed. Using PCR and Southern hybridization, we showed that HRV-5 is not integrated into human DNA. A survey of other species revealed that HRV-5 is present in the genomic DNA of the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and belongs to an endogenous retrovirus family found in rabbits. The presence of rabbit sequences flanking HRV-5 proviruses in human DNA extracts suggested that rabbit DNA was present in our human extracts, and this was confirmed by PCR analysis that revealed the presence of rabbit mitochondrial DNA sequences in four of five human DNA preparations tested. The origin of the rabbit DNA and HRV-5 in human DNA preparations remains unclear, but laboratory contamination cannot explain the preferential detection of HRV-5 in inflammatory diseases and lymphomas reported previously. This is the first description of a retrovirus genome in rabbits, and sequence analysis shows that it is related to but distinct from A-type retroelements of mice and other rodents. The species distribution of HRV-5 is restricted to rabbits; other species, including other members of the order Lagomorpha, do not contain this sequence. Analysis of HRV-5 expression by Northern hybridization and reverse transcriptase PCR indicates that the virus is transcribed at a low level in many rabbit tissues. In light of these findings we propose that the sequence previously designated HRV-5 should now be denoted RERV-H (for rabbit endogenous retrovirus H). PMID:12072509

  4. An Evolutionarily Young Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Endogenous Retrovirus Identified from Next Generation Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Mayer, Jens; Alquezar-Planas, David E; Greenwood, Alex D

    2015-11-24

    Transcriptome analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) tissues identified sequences with similarity to Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERV). Based on these sequences, four proviral copies and 15 solo long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a newly described endogenous retrovirus were characterized from the polar bear draft genome sequence. Closely related sequences were identified by PCR analysis of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and black bear (Ursus americanus) but were absent in non-Ursinae bear species. The virus was therefore designated UrsusERV. Two distinct groups of LTRs were observed including a recombinant ERV that contained one LTR belonging to each group indicating that genomic invasions by at least two UrsusERV variants have recently occurred. Age estimates based on proviral LTR divergence and conservation of integration sites among ursids suggest the viral group is only a few million years old. The youngest provirus was polar bear specific, had intact open reading frames (ORFs) and could potentially encode functional proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of UrsusERV consensus protein sequences suggest that it is part of a pig, gibbon and koala retrovirus clade. The young age estimates and lineage specificity of the virus suggests UrsusERV is a recent cross species transmission from an unknown reservoir and places the viral group among the youngest of ERVs identified in mammals.

  5. An Evolutionarily Young Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Endogenous Retrovirus Identified from Next Generation Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Mayer, Jens; Alquezar-Planas, David E.; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) tissues identified sequences with similarity to Porcine Endogenous Retroviruses (PERV). Based on these sequences, four proviral copies and 15 solo long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a newly described endogenous retrovirus were characterized from the polar bear draft genome sequence. Closely related sequences were identified by PCR analysis of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and black bear (Ursus americanus) but were absent in non-Ursinae bear species. The virus was therefore designated UrsusERV. Two distinct groups of LTRs were observed including a recombinant ERV that contained one LTR belonging to each group indicating that genomic invasions by at least two UrsusERV variants have recently occurred. Age estimates based on proviral LTR divergence and conservation of integration sites among ursids suggest the viral group is only a few million years old. The youngest provirus was polar bear specific, had intact open reading frames (ORFs) and could potentially encode functional proteins. Phylogenetic analyses of UrsusERV consensus protein sequences suggest that it is part of a pig, gibbon and koala retrovirus clade. The young age estimates and lineage specificity of the virus suggests UrsusERV is a recent cross species transmission from an unknown reservoir and places the viral group among the youngest of ERVs identified in mammals. PMID:26610552

  6. Immunological relationships of an endogenous guinea pig retrovirus with prototype mammalian type B and type D retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, J E; Tronick, S R; Aaronson, S A

    1980-01-01

    A retrovirus endogenous to guinea pig cells was earlier shown to be morphologically similar to type B and type D prototype retroviruses. Molecular hybridization techniques were used to show that guinea pig virus nucleotide sequences are endogenous to both domestic (Cavia porcellus) and indigenous (Cavia aperea) guinea pigs, but cannot be detected in the DNA of either other hystricomorph rodents or other mammals tested. Using radioimmunological techniques designed to detect interspecies relationships, the major internal polypeptide of guinea pig virus (p26) was shown to share three different sets of interspecies antigenic determinants with squirrel monkey retrovirus, viper retrovirus, and mouse mammary tumor virus. Thus, guinea pig virus appears to provide an evolutionary link between type B and D retroviruses. Images PMID:6154150

  7. Endogenous retroviruses regulate periimplantation placental growth and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dunlap, Kathrin A.; Palmarini, Massimo; Varela, Mariana; Burghardt, Robert C.; Hayashi, Kanako; Farmer, Jennifer L.; Spencer, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are fixed and abundant in the genomes of vertebrates. Circumstantial evidence suggests that ERVs play a role in mammalian reproduction, particularly placental morphogenesis, because intact ERV envelope genes were found to be expressed in the syncytiotrophoblasts of human and mouse placenta and to elicit fusion of cells in vitro. We report here in vivo and in vitro experiments finding that the envelope of a particular class of ERVs of sheep, endogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retroviruses (enJSRVs), regulates trophectoderm growth and differentiation in the periimplantation conceptus (embryo/fetus and associated extraembryonic membranes). The enJSRV envelope gene is expressed in the trophectoderm of the elongating ovine conceptus after day 12 of pregnancy. Loss-of-function experiments were conducted in utero by injecting morpholino antisense oligonucleotides on day 8 of pregnancy that blocked enJSRV envelope protein production in the conceptus trophectoderm. This approach retarded trophectoderm outgrowth during conceptus elongation and inhibited trophoblast giant binucleate cell differentiation as observed on day 16. Pregnancy loss was observed by day 20 in sheep receiving morpholino antisense oligonucleotides. In vitro inhibition of the enJSRV envelope reduced the proliferation of mononuclear trophectoderm cells isolated from day 15 conceptuses. Consequently, these results demonstrate that the enJSRV envelope regulates trophectoderm growth and differentiation in the periimplantation ovine conceptus. This work supports the hypothesis that ERVs play fundamental roles in placental morphogenesis and mammalian reproduction. PMID:16980413

  8. Computational Evaluation of the Strict Master and Random Template Models of Endogenous Retrovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Fabrícia F.; Rodrigo, Allen G.

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are DNA sequences that are able to replicate and move within and between host genomes. Their mechanism of replication is also shared with endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), which are also a type of TE that represent an ancient retroviral infection within animal genomes. Two models have been proposed to explain TE proliferation in host genomes: the strict master model (SMM), and the random template (or transposon) model (TM). In SMM only a single copy of a given TE lineage is able to replicate, and all other genomic copies of TEs are derived from that master copy. In TM, any element of a given family is able to replicate in the host genome. In this paper, we simulated ERV phylogenetic trees under variations of SMM and TM. To test whether current phylogenetic programs can recover the simulated ERV phylogenies, DNA sequence alignments were simulated and maximum likelihood trees were reconstructed and compared to the simulated phylogenies. Results indicate that visual inspection of phylogenetic trees alone can be misleading. However, if a set of statistical summaries is calculated, we are able to distinguish between models with high accuracy by using a data mining algorithm that we introduce here. We also demonstrate the use of our data mining algorithm with empirical data for the porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), an ERV that is able to replicate in human and pig cells in vitro. PMID:27649303

  9. Rabbit endogenous retrovirus-H encodes a functional protease.

    PubMed

    Voisset, Cécile; Myers, Richard E; Carne, Alex; Kellam, Paul; Griffiths, David J

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that 'human retrovirus-5' sequences found in human samples belong to a rabbit endogenous retrovirus family named RERV-H. A part of the gag-pro region of the RERV-H genome was amplified by PCR from DNA in human samples and several forms of RERV-H protease were expressed in bacteria. The RERV-H protease was able to cleave itself from a precursor protein and was also able to cleave the RERV-H Gag polyprotein precursor in vitro whereas a form of the protease with a mutation engineered into the active site was inactive. Potential N- and C-terminal autocleavage sites were characterized. The RERV-H protease was sensitive to pepstatin A, showing it to be an aspartic protease. Moreover, it was strongly inhibited by PYVPheStaAMT, a pseudopeptide inhibitor specific for Mason-Pfizer monkey virus and avian myeloblastosis-associated virus. A structural model of the RERV-H protease was constructed that, together with the activity data, confirms that this is a retroviral aspartic protease.

  10. The role of human endogenous retroviruses in brain development and function.

    PubMed

    Mortelmans, Kristien; Wang-Johanning, Feng; Johanning, Gary L

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviral sequences are spread throughout the genome of all humans, and make up about 8% of the genome. Despite their prevalence, the function of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) in humans is largely unknown. In this review we focus on the brain, and evaluate studies in animal models that address mechanisms of endogenous retrovirus activation in the brain and central nervous system (CNS). One such study in mice found that TRIM28, a protein critical for mouse early development, regulates transcription and silencing of endogenous retroviruses in neural progenitor cells. Another intriguing finding in human brain cells and mouse models was that endogenous retrovirus HERV-K appears to be protective against neurotoxins. We also report on studies that associate HERVs with human diseases of the brain and CNS. There is little doubt of an association between HERVs and a number of CNS diseases. However, a cause and effect relationship between HERVs and these diseases has not yet been established.

  11. A paradigm for virus-host coevolution: Sequential counter-adaptations between endogenous and exogenous retroviruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections of the host germline transmitted vertically from generation to generation. It is hypothesized that during evolution some ERVs were used by the host to drive extinction of exogenous horizontally-transmitted retroviruses. Se...

  12. Cooccurrences of Putative Endogenous Retrovirus-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Emmer, Alexander; Kornhuber, Malte E.

    2017-01-01

    At least 8% of the human genome is composed of endogenous retrovirus (ERV) sequences. ERVs play a role in placental morphogenesis and can sometimes protect the host against exogenous viruses. On the other hand, ERV reactivation has been found to be associated with different diseases, for example, multiple sclerosis (MS), schizophrenia, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Little is known about the cooccurrence of these diseases. If all these diseases are caused by ERV, antiretroviral therapy should perhaps also show some effects in the other diseases. Here, we summarize literature demonstrating that some ERV-associated diseases seem to appear together more often than expected, for example, MS and ALS, MS and T1D, MS and schizophrenia, or ALS and T1D. In contrast, some ERV-associated diseases seem to appear together less frequently than expected, for example, schizophrenia and T1D. Besides, some reports demonstrate amelioration of MS, ALS, or schizophrenia under antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. If such results could be confirmed in larger studies, alternative therapy strategies for ERV-associated diseases like MS and schizophrenia might be possible. PMID:28326328

  13. Embryonic stem cell potency fluctuates with endogenous retrovirus activity.

    PubMed

    Macfarlan, Todd S; Gifford, Wesley D; Driscoll, Shawn; Lettieri, Karen; Rowe, Helen M; Bonanomi, Dario; Firth, Amy; Singer, Oded; Trono, Didier; Pfaff, Samuel L

    2012-07-05

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from blastocyst-stage embryos and are thought to be functionally equivalent to the inner cell mass, which lacks the ability to produce all extraembryonic tissues. Here we identify a rare transient cell population within mouse ES and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell cultures that expresses high levels of transcripts found in two-cell (2C) embryos in which the blastomeres are totipotent. We genetically tagged these 2C-like ES cells and show that they lack the inner cell mass pluripotency proteins Oct4 (also known as Pou5f1), Sox2 and Nanog, and have acquired the ability to contribute to both embryonic and extraembryonic tissues. We show that nearly all ES cells cycle in and out of this privileged state, which is partially controlled by histone-modifying enzymes. Transcriptome sequencing and bioinformatic analyses showed that many 2C transcripts are initiated from long terminal repeats derived from endogenous retroviruses, suggesting this foreign sequence has helped to drive cell-fate regulation in placental mammals.

  14. Human endogenous retroviruses and chosen disease parameters in morphea

    PubMed Central

    Dańczak-Pazdrowska, Aleksandra; Szramka-Pawlak, Beata; Żaba, Ryszard; Osmola-Mańkowska, Agnieszka; Silny, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Morphea (localized scleroderma) is a relatively rare disease characterized by excessive skin fibrosis. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) are largely distributed within the human genome with hundreds of thousands of elements. The HERV have been widely studied in autoimmune disorders, yet hardly ever assessed in diseases with a good prognosis such as morphea. Aim In this study we focus on the possible relations between the expression of chosen HERV and factors influencing the pathomechanism of the disease, such as age, sex, titres of anti-nuclear antibodies, as well as duration, activity, and severity of the disease (LoSSI index). Material and methods Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting six HERV sequences of interest were performed on samples derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and skin biopsies. Results In PBMC we found a statistically significant negative correlation between HERV-W env expression and LoSSI index (p = 0.01). Additionally, HERV-W env was downregulated in patients with the active form of morphea. In all other cases we found no correlation whatsoever nor statistically significant differences below the p = 0.05 threshold. Conclusions Morphea seems to be an autoimmune disease where the impact of HERV is not so apparent. It seems that probing many patients for the expression of just a few sequences is not as effective as previously expected. For initial studies of HERV in other diseases we recommend high throughput techniques such as HERV-dedicated DNA microarrays or massive parallel sequencing. PMID:28261031

  15. Discovery of unfixed endogenous retrovirus insertions in diverse human populations

    PubMed Central

    Wildschutte, Julia Halo; Williams, Zachary H.; Montesion, Meagan; Subramanian, Ravi P.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Coffin, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) have contributed to more than 8% of the human genome. The majority of these elements lack function due to accumulated mutations or internal recombination resulting in a solitary (solo) LTR, although members of one group of human ERVs (HERVs), HERV-K, were recently active with members that remain nearly intact, a subset of which is present as insertionally polymorphic loci that include approximately full-length (2-LTR) and solo-LTR alleles in addition to the unoccupied site. Several 2-LTR insertions have intact reading frames in some or all genes that are expressed as functional proteins. These properties reflect the activity of HERV-K and suggest the existence of additional unique loci within humans. We sought to determine the extent to which other polymorphic insertions are present in humans, using sequenced genomes from the 1000 Genomes Project and a subset of the Human Genome Diversity Project panel. We report analysis of a total of 36 nonreference polymorphic HERV-K proviruses, including 19 newly reported loci, with insertion frequencies ranging from <0.0005 to >0.75 that varied by population. Targeted screening of individual loci identified three new unfixed 2-LTR proviruses within our set, including an intact provirus present at Xq21.33 in some individuals, with the potential for retained infectivity. PMID:27001843

  16. Foamy-like endogenous retroviruses are extensive and abundant in teleosts

    PubMed Central

    Ruboyianes, Ryan; Worobey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that the foamy virus (FV) (Spumavirus) ancestor may have been among the first retroviruses to appear during the evolution of vertebrates, demonstrated by foamy endogenous retroviruses present within deeply divergent hosts including mammals, coelacanth, and ray-finned fish. If they indeed existed in ancient marine environments hundreds of millions of years ago, significant undiscovered diversity of foamy-like endogenous retroviruses might be present in fish genomes. By screening published genomes and by applying PCR-based assays of preserved tissues, we discovered 23 novel foamy-like elements in teleost hosts. These viruses form a robust, reciprocally monophyletic sister clade with sarcopterygian host FV, with class III mammal endogenous retroviruses being the sister group to both clades. Some of these foamy-like retroviruses have larger genomes than any known retrovirus, exogenous or endogenous, due to unusually long gag-like genes and numerous accessory genes. The presence of genetic features conserved between mammalian FV and these novel retroviruses attests to a foamy-like replication biology conserved for hundreds of millions of years. We estimate that some of these viruses integrated recently into host genomes; exogenous forms of these viruses may still circulate. PMID:28058112

  17. Recent amplification of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus, KERV, limited to the centromere.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, Gianni C; Brown, Judith D; Obergfell, Craig; Jue, Nathaniel; Finn, Caitlin E; O'Neill, Michael J; O'Neill, Rachel J

    2011-05-01

    Mammalian retrotransposons, transposable elements that are processed through an RNA intermediate, are categorized as short interspersed elements (SINEs), long interspersed elements (LINEs), and long terminal repeat (LTR) retroelements, which include endogenous retroviruses. The ability of transposable elements to autonomously amplify led to their initial characterization as selfish or junk DNA; however, it is now known that they may acquire specific cellular functions in a genome and are implicated in host defense mechanisms as well as in genome evolution. Interactions between classes of transposable elements may exert a markedly different and potentially more significant effect on a genome than interactions between members of a single class of transposable elements. We examined the genomic structure and evolution of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus (KERV) in the marsupial genus Macropus. The complete proviral structure of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus, phylogenetic relationship among relative retroviruses, and expression of this virus in both Macropus rufogriseus and M. eugenii are presented for the first time. In addition, we show the relative copy number and distribution of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus in the Macropus genus. Our data indicate that amplification of the kangaroo endogenous retrovirus occurred in a lineage-specific fashion, is restricted to the centromeres, and is not correlated with LINE depletion. Finally, analysis of KERV long terminal repeat sequences using massively parallel sequencing indicates that the recent amplification in M. rufogriseus is likely due to duplications and concerted evolution rather than a high number of independent insertion events.

  18. Evolutionary history of bovine endogenous retroviruses in the Bovidae family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are genomic elements of retroviral origin that are present in the genomes of almost all vertebrates. In cattle, more than 13,000 elements related to ERVs have been detected, and based on the pol gene, 24 families or groups of bovine ERVs have been described. However, information about ERVs in other bovids and the presence of families of related bovine ERVs in different species of the Bovidae family is scarce. Results The 24 families of bovine ERVs previously detected in cattle (Bos taurus) were also detected in zebus (Bos indicus) and yaks (Bos grunniens). In addition, six new families, named BoERV25 to BoERV30, were detected in the three Bos species. Five more ruminant species were screened for related ERVs: 26 families were detected in these species, but four families (BoERV24, BoERV26, BoERV28 and BoERV29) were specific to cattle, zebus, yaks and buffalo. An analysis of the homology of the ERVs of cattle, zebus and yaks revealed that the level of LTR divergence was similar between ERVs from cattle and zebus but was less similar between with ERVs from cattle and yaks. In addition, purifying selection was detected in the genes and retroviral regions of clusters of ERVs of cattle, zebus and yaks. Conclusions In this work, the 24 ERV families previously identified in cattle were also found in two other species in the Bos genus. In addition, six new bovine ERV families were detected. Based on LTR divergence, the most recently inserted families are from Class II. The divergence of the LTR, used as an indirect estimate of the ERV insertion time, seemed to be influenced by the differences in genome evolution since the divergence of the species. In addition, purifying selection could be acting on clusters of ERVs from different species. PMID:24256121

  19. In between: Gypsy in Drosophila melanogaster Reveals New Insights into Endogenous Retrovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Touret, Franck; Guiguen, François; Greenland, Timothy; Terzian, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses are RNA viruses that are able to synthesize a DNA copy of their genome and insert it into a chromosome of the host cell. Sequencing of different eukaryote genomes has revealed the presence of many such endogenous retroviral sequences. The mechanisms by which these retroviral sequences have colonized the genome are still unknown, and the endogenous retrovirus gypsy of Drosophila melanogaster is a powerful experimental model for deciphering this process in vivo. Gypsy is expressed in a layer of somatic cells, and then transferred into the oocyte by an unknown mechanism. This critical step is the start of the endogenization process. Moreover gypsy has been shown to have infectious properties, probably due to its envelope gene acquired from a baculovirus. Recently we have also shown that gypsy maternal transmission is reduced in the presence of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia. These studies demonstrate that gypsy is a unique and powerful model for understanding the endogenization of retroviruses. PMID:25502325

  20. Characterizing novel endogenous retroviruses from genetic variation inferred from short sequence reads

    PubMed Central

    Mourier, Tobias; Mollerup, Sarah; Vinner, Lasse; Hansen, Thomas Arn; Kjartansdóttir, Kristín Rós; Guldberg Frøslev, Tobias; Snogdal Boutrup, Torsten; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Willerslev, Eske; Hansen, Anders J.

    2015-01-01

    From Illumina sequencing of DNA from brain and liver tissue from the lion, Panthera leo, and tumor samples from the pike-perch, Sander lucioperca, we obtained two assembled sequence contigs with similarity to known retroviruses. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the pike-perch retrovirus belongs to the epsilonretroviruses, and the lion retrovirus to the gammaretroviruses. To determine if these novel retroviral sequences originate from an endogenous retrovirus or from a recently integrated exogenous retrovirus, we assessed the genetic diversity of the parental sequences from which the short Illumina reads are derived. First, we showed by simulations that we can robustly infer the level of genetic diversity from short sequence reads. Second, we find that the measures of nucleotide diversity inferred from our retroviral sequences significantly exceed the level observed from Human Immunodeficiency Virus infections, prompting us to conclude that the novel retroviruses are both of endogenous origin. Through further simulations, we rule out the possibility that the observed elevated levels of nucleotide diversity are the result of co-infection with two closely related exogenous retroviruses. PMID:26493184

  1. Host Control of Insect Endogenous Retroviruses: Small RNA Silencing and Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Fablet, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are relics of ancient infections from retroviruses that managed to integrate into the genome of germline cells and remained vertically transmitted from parent to progeny. Subsequent to the endogenization process, these sequences can move and multiply in the host genome, which can have deleterious consequences and disturb genomic stability. Natural selection favored the establishment of silencing pathways that protect host genomes from the activity of endogenous retroviruses. RNA silencing mechanisms are involved, which utilize piRNAs. The response to exogenous viral infections uses siRNAs, a class of small RNAs that are generated via a distinct biogenesis pathway from piRNAs. However, interplay between both pathways has been identified, and interactions with anti-bacterial and anti-fungal immune responses are also suspected. This review focuses on Diptera (Arthropods) and intends to compile pieces of evidence showing that the RNA silencing pathway of endogenous retrovirus regulation is not independent from immunity and the response to infections. This review will consider the mechanisms that allow the lasting coexistence of viral sequences and host genomes from an evolutionary perspective. PMID:25412365

  2. Host control of insect endogenous retroviruses: small RNA silencing and immune response.

    PubMed

    Fablet, Marie

    2014-11-18

    Endogenous retroviruses are relics of ancient infections from retroviruses that managed to integrate into the genome of germline cells and remained vertically transmitted from parent to progeny. Subsequent to the endogenization process, these sequences can move and multiply in the host genome, which can have deleterious consequences and disturb genomic stability. Natural selection favored the establishment of silencing pathways that protect host genomes from the activity of endogenous retroviruses. RNA silencing mechanisms are involved, which utilize piRNAs. The response to exogenous viral infections uses siRNAs, a class of small RNAs that are generated via a distinct biogenesis pathway from piRNAs. However, interplay between both pathways has been identified, and interactions with anti-bacterial and anti-fungal immune responses are also suspected. This review focuses on Diptera (Arthropods) and intends to compile pieces of evidence showing that the RNA silencing pathway of endogenous retrovirus regulation is not independent from immunity and the response to infections. This review will consider the mechanisms that allow the lasting coexistence of viral sequences and host genomes from an evolutionary perspective.

  3. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Xiaoyu; Feschotte, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100) currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13–25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon), yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian hosts. PMID

  4. Cross-Species Transmission and Differential Fate of an Endogenous Retrovirus in Three Mammal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Xiaoyu; Feschotte, Cédric

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) arise from retroviruses chromosomally integrated in the host germline. ERVs are common in vertebrate genomes and provide a valuable fossil record of past retroviral infections to investigate the biology and evolution of retroviruses over a deep time scale, including cross-species transmission events. Here we took advantage of a catalog of ERVs we recently produced for the bat Myotis lucifugus to seek evidence for infiltration of these retroviruses in other mammalian species (>100) currently represented in the genome sequence database. We provide multiple lines of evidence for the cross-ordinal transmission of a gammaretrovirus endogenized independently in the lineages of vespertilionid bats, felid cats and pangolin ~13-25 million years ago. Following its initial introduction, the ERV amplified extensively in parallel in both bat and cat lineages, generating hundreds of species-specific insertions throughout evolution. However, despite being derived from the same viral species, phylogenetic and selection analyses suggest that the ERV experienced different amplification dynamics in the two mammalian lineages. In the cat lineage, the ERV appears to have expanded primarily by retrotransposition of a single proviral progenitor that lost infectious capacity shortly after endogenization. In the bat lineage, the ERV followed a more complex path of germline invasion characterized by both retrotransposition and multiple infection events. The results also suggest that some of the bat ERVs have maintained infectious capacity for extended period of time and may be still infectious today. This study provides one of the most rigorously documented cases of cross-ordinal transmission of a mammalian retrovirus. It also illustrates how the same retrovirus species has transitioned multiple times from an infectious pathogen to a genomic parasite (i.e. retrotransposon), yet experiencing different invasion dynamics in different mammalian hosts.

  5. Retroviruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varmus, Harold

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the growth, development, and unusual parasitic nature of the retrovirus community. Reviews these infectious cancer-causing agents as models for the study of fundamental biological problems, tools for genetic manipulations, and problems posed by their pathogenic potential in humans and animal hosts where they cause diseases such as…

  6. COM, a heterochromatic locus governing the control of independent endogenous retroviruses from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Desset, Sophie; Meignin, Carine; Dastugue, Bernard; Vaury, Chantal

    2003-06-01

    ZAM and Idefix are two endogenous retroviruses whose expression is tightly controlled in Drosophila melanogaster. However, a line exists in which this control has been perturbed, resulting in a high mobilization rate for both retroviruses. This line is called the U (unstable) line as opposed to the other S (stable) lines. In the process of analyzing this control and tracing the genetic determinant involved, we found that ZAM and Idefix expression responded to two types of controls: one restricting their expression to specific somatic cells in the ovaries and the other silencing their expression in S lines but permitting it in U lines. While studying this second control in the U or S backgrounds, we found that the heterochromatic locus 20A2-3 on the X chromosome, previously implicated in the regulation of a third retroelement, gypsy, also controlled both ZAM and Idefix. We report here that genetic determinants necessary for endogenous retrovirus silencing occur at the 20A2-3 locus, which we call COM, for centre organisateur de mobilisation. We propose that if this point of control becomes mutated during the life of the fly, it may trigger processes reactivating dormant endogenous retroviruses and thus bring about sudden bursts of mobilization.

  7. Endogenous Retroviruses in Fish Genomes: From Relics of Past Infections to Evolutionary Innovations?

    PubMed Central

    Naville, Magali; Volff, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of fish genome sequences has allowed to gain new insights into the diversity and host distribution of retroviruses in fish and other vertebrates. This distribution can be assessed through the identification and analysis of endogenous retroviruses, which are proviral remnants of past infections integrated in genomes. Retroviral sequences are probably important for evolution through their ability to induce rearrangements and to contribute regulatory and coding sequences; they may also protect their host against new infections. We argue that the current mass of genome sequences will soon strongly improve our understanding of retrovirus diversity and evolution in aquatic animals, with the identification of new/re-emerging elements and host resistance genes that restrict their infectivity. PMID:27555838

  8. Identification of an ancient endogenous retrovirus, predating the divergence of the placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Adam; Nolan, Alison; Watson, Jason; Tristem, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary arms race between mammals and retroviruses has long been recognized as one of the oldest host–parasite interactions. Rapid evolution rates in exogenous retroviruses have often made accurate viral age estimations highly problematic. Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), however, integrate into the germline of their hosts, and are subjected to their evolutionary rates. This study describes, for the first time, a retroviral orthologue predating the divergence of placental mammals, giving it a minimum age of 104–110 Myr. Simultaneously, other orthologous selfish genetic elements (SGEs), inserted into the ERV sequence, provide evidence for the oldest individual mammalian-wide interspersed repeat and medium-reiteration frequency interspersed repeat mammalian repeats, with the same minimum age. The combined use of shared SGEs and reconstruction of viral orthologies defines new limits and increases maximum ‘lookback’ times, with subsequent implications for the field of paleovirology. PMID:23938752

  9. Endogenous retrovirus and radiation-induced leukemia in the RMF mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Tennant, R.W.; Boone, L.R.; Lalley, P.; Yang, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    The induction of myeloid leukemia in irradiated RFM/Un mice has been associated with retrovirus infection. However, two characteristics of this strain complicate efforts to define the role of the virus. This strain possesses only one inducible host range class of endogenous virus and a unique gene, in addition to the Fv-1/sup n/ locus, which specifically restricts exogenous infection by endogenous viruses. These characteristics possibly account for absence of recombinant viruses in this strain, even though virus is amply expressed during most of the animal's life span. We have examined further the distribution of retrovirus sequences and the chromosomal locus of the inducible virus in this strain. This report describes evidence for additional viral sequences in cells of a radiation-induced myeloid leukemia line and discusses the possible origin of these added copies.

  10. Proliferation of endogenous retroviruses in the early stages of a host germ line invasion.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasuko; Zhao, Kai; Greenwood, Alex D; Roca, Alfred L

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) comprise 8% of the human genome and are common in all vertebrate genomes. The only retrovirus known to be currently transitioning from exogenous to endogenous form is the koala retrovirus (KoRV), making koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) ideal for examining the early stages of retroviral endogenization. To distinguish endogenous from exogenous KoRV proviruses, we isolated koala genomic regions flanking KoRV integration sites. In three wild southern Australian koalas, there were fewer KoRV loci than in three captive Queensland koalas, consistent with reports that southern Australian koalas carry fewer KoRVs. Of 39 distinct KoRV proviral loci examined in a sire-dam-progeny triad, all proved to be vertically transmitted and endogenous; none was exogenous. Of the 39 endogenous KoRVs (enKoRVs), only one was present in the genomes of both the sire and the dam, suggesting that, at this early stage in the retroviral invasion of a host germ line, very large numbers of ERVs have proliferated at very low frequencies in the koala population. Sequence divergence between the 5'- and 3'-long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a provirus can be used as a molecular clock. Within each of ten enKoRVs, the 5'-LTR sequence was identical to the 3'-LTR sequence, suggesting a maximum age for enKoRV invasion of the koala germ line of approximately 22,200-49,900 years ago, although a much younger age is possible. Across the ten proviruses, seven LTR haplotypes were detected, indicating that at least seven different retroviral sequences had entered the koala germ line.

  11. Proliferation of Endogenous Retroviruses in the Early Stages of a Host Germ Line Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Yasuko; Zhao, Kai; Greenwood, Alex D.; Roca, Alfred L.

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) comprise 8% of the human genome and are common in all vertebrate genomes. The only retrovirus known to be currently transitioning from exogenous to endogenous form is the koala retrovirus (KoRV), making koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) ideal for examining the early stages of retroviral endogenization. To distinguish endogenous from exogenous KoRV proviruses, we isolated koala genomic regions flanking KoRV integration sites. In three wild southern Australian koalas, there were fewer KoRV loci than in three captive Queensland koalas, consistent with reports that southern Australian koalas carry fewer KoRVs. Of 39 distinct KoRV proviral loci examined in a sire–dam–progeny triad, all proved to be vertically transmitted and endogenous; none was exogenous. Of the 39 endogenous KoRVs (enKoRVs), only one was present in the genomes of both the sire and the dam, suggesting that, at this early stage in the retroviral invasion of a host germ line, very large numbers of ERVs have proliferated at very low frequencies in the koala population. Sequence divergence between the 5′- and 3′-long terminal repeats (LTRs) of a provirus can be used as a molecular clock. Within each of ten enKoRVs, the 5′-LTR sequence was identical to the 3′-LTR sequence, suggesting a maximum age for enKoRV invasion of the koala germ line of approximately 22,200–49,900 years ago, although a much younger age is possible. Across the ten proviruses, seven LTR haplotypes were detected, indicating that at least seven different retroviral sequences had entered the koala germ line. PMID:25261407

  12. Pluripotency and the endogenous retrovirus HERVH: Conflict or serendipity?

    PubMed

    Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Wang, Jichang; Singh, Manvendra; Mager, Dixie L; Hurst, Laurence D

    2016-01-01

    Remnants of ancient retroviral infections during evolution litter all mammalian genomes. In modern humans, such endogenous retroviral (ERV) sequences comprise at least 8% of the genome. While ERVs and other types of transposable elements undoubtedly contribute to the genomic "junk yard", functions for some ERV sequences have been demonstrated, with growing evidence that ERVs can be important players in gene regulatory processes. Here we focus on one particular large family of human ERVs, termed HERVH, which several recent studies suggest has a key regulatory role in human pluripotent stem cells. Remarkably, this is not the first instance of an ERV controlling pluripotency. We speculate as to why this convergent evolution might have come about, suggesting that it may reflect selection on the virus to extend the time available for transposition. Alternatively it may reflect serendipity alone.

  13. Wolbachia Influences the Maternal Transmission of the gypsy Endogenous Retrovirus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Touret, Franck; Guiguen, François

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The endosymbiotic bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are present in most insects and are maternally transmitted through the germline. Moreover, these intracellular bacteria exert antiviral activity against insect RNA viruses, as in Drosophila melanogaster, which could explain the prevalence of Wolbachia bacteria in natural populations. Wolbachia is maternally transmitted in D. melanogaster through a mechanism that involves distribution at the posterior pole of mature oocytes and then incorporation into the pole cells of the embryos. In parallel, maternal transmission of several endogenous retroviruses is well documented in D. melanogaster. Notably, gypsy retrovirus is expressed in permissive follicle cells and transferred to the oocyte and then to the offspring by integrating into their genomes. Here, we show that the presence of Wolbachia wMel reduces the rate of gypsy insertion into the ovo gene. However, the presence of Wolbachia does not modify the expression levels of gypsy RNA and envelope glycoprotein from either permissive or restrictive ovaries. Moreover, Wolbachia affects the pattern of distribution of the retroviral particles and the gypsy envelope protein in permissive follicle cells. Altogether, our results enlarge the knowledge of the antiviral activity of Wolbachia to include reducing the maternal transmission of endogenous retroviruses in D. melanogaster. PMID:25182324

  14. The population history of endogenous retroviruses in mule deer (Odocoileus heminous)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kamath, Pauline L.; Elleder, Daniel; Bao, Le; Cross, Paul C.; Powell, John H.; Poss, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Mobile elements are powerful agents of genomic evolution and can be exceptionally informative markers for investigating species and population-level evolutionary history. While several studies have utilized retrotransposon-based insertional polymorphisms to resolve phylogenies, few population studies exist outside of humans. Endogenous retroviruses are LTR-retrotransposons derived from retroviruses that have become stably integrated in the host genome during past infections and transmitted vertically to subsequent generations. They offer valuable insight into host-virus co-evolution and a unique perspective on host evolutionary history because they integrate into the genome at a discrete point in time. We examined the evolutionary history of a cervid endogenous gammaretrovirus (CrERVγ) in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). We sequenced 14 CrERV proviruses (CrERV-in1 to -in14), and examined the prevalence and distribution of 13 proviruses in 262 deer among 15 populations from Montana, Wyoming, and Utah. CrERV absence in white-tailed deer (O. virginianus), identical 5′ and 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences, insertional polymorphism, and CrERV divergence time estimates indicated that most endogenization events occurred within the last 200000 years. Population structure inferred from CrERVs (F ST = 0.008) and microsatellites (θ = 0.01) was low, but significant, with Utah, northwestern Montana, and a Helena herd being particularly differentiated. Clustering analyses indicated regional structuring, and non-contiguous clustering could often be explained by known translocations. Cluster ensemble results indicated spatial localization of viruses, specifically in deer from northeastern and western Montana. This study demonstrates the utility of endogenous retroviruses to elucidate and provide novel insight into both ERV evolutionary history and the history of contemporary host populations.

  15. The population history of endogenous retroviruses in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus).

    PubMed

    Kamath, Pauline L; Elleder, Daniel; Bao, Le; Cross, Paul C; Powell, John H; Poss, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Mobile elements are powerful agents of genomic evolution and can be exceptionally informative markers for investigating species and population-level evolutionary history. While several studies have utilized retrotransposon-based insertional polymorphisms to resolve phylogenies, few population studies exist outside of humans. Endogenous retroviruses are LTR-retrotransposons derived from retroviruses that have become stably integrated in the host genome during past infections and transmitted vertically to subsequent generations. They offer valuable insight into host-virus co-evolution and a unique perspective on host evolutionary history because they integrate into the genome at a discrete point in time. We examined the evolutionary history of a cervid endogenous gammaretrovirus (CrERVγ) in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). We sequenced 14 CrERV proviruses (CrERV-in1 to -in14), and examined the prevalence and distribution of 13 proviruses in 262 deer among 15 populations from Montana, Wyoming, and Utah. CrERV absence in white-tailed deer (O. virginianus), identical 5' and 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences, insertional polymorphism, and CrERV divergence time estimates indicated that most endogenization events occurred within the last 200000 years. Population structure inferred from CrERVs (F ST = 0.008) and microsatellites (θ = 0.01) was low, but significant, with Utah, northwestern Montana, and a Helena herd being particularly differentiated. Clustering analyses indicated regional structuring, and non-contiguous clustering could often be explained by known translocations. Cluster ensemble results indicated spatial localization of viruses, specifically in deer from northeastern and western Montana. This study demonstrates the utility of endogenous retroviruses to elucidate and provide novel insight into both ERV evolutionary history and the history of contemporary host populations.

  16. Association of Endogenous Retroviruses and Long Terminal Repeats with Human Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Iyoko; Kurata, Shun-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Since the human genome sequences became available in 2001, our knowledge about the human transposable elements which comprise ∼40% of the total nucleotides has been expanding. Non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons are actively transposing in the present-day human genome, and have been found to cause ∼100 identified clinical cases of varied disorders. In contrast, almost all of the human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) originating from ancient infectious retroviruses lost their infectivity and transposing activity at various times before the human-chimpanzee speciation (∼6 million years ago), and no known HERV is presently infectious. Insertion of HERVs and mammalian apparent LTR retrotransposons (MaLRs) into the chromosomal DNA influenced a number of host genes in various modes during human evolution. Apart from the aspect of genome evolution, HERVs and solitary LTRs being suppressed in normal biological processes can potentially act as extra transcriptional apparatuses of cellular genes by re-activation in individuals. There has been a reasonable prediction that aberrant LTR activation could trigger malignant disorders and autoimmune responses if epigenetic changes including DNA hypomethylation occur in somatic cells. Evidence supporting this hypothesis has begun to emerge only recently: a MaLR family LTR activation in the pathogenesis of Hodgkin’s lymphoma and a HERV-E antigen expression in an anti-renal cell carcinoma immune response. This mini review addresses the impacts of the remnant-form LTR retrotransposons on human pathogenesis. PMID:24062987

  17. Human endogenous retroviruses: nature, occurrence, and clinical implications in human disease.

    PubMed Central

    Urnovitz, H B; Murphy, W H

    1996-01-01

    Retroviral diagnostics have become standard in human laboratory medicine. While current emphasis is placed on the human exogenous viruses (human immunodeficiency virus and human T-cell leukemia virus), evidence implicating human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) in various human disease entities continues to mount. Literature on the occurrence of HERVs in human tissues and cells was analyzed. Substantial evidence documents that retrovirus particles were clearly demonstrable in various tissues and cells in both health and disease and were abundant in the placenta and that their occurrence could be implicated in some of the reproductive diseases. The characteristics of HERVs are summarized, mechanisms of replication and regulation are outlined, and the consistent hormonal responsiveness of HERVs is noted. Clear evidence implicating HERV gene products as participants in glomerulonephritis in some cases of systemic lupus erythematosus is adduced. Data implicating HERVs as etiologic factors in reproductive diseases, in some of the autoimmune diseases, in some forms of rheumatoid arthritis and connective tissue disease, in psoriasis, and in some of the inflammatory neurologic diseases are reviewed. The current major needs are to improve methods for HERV detection, to identify the most appropriate HERV prototypes, and to develop diagnostic reagents so that the putative biologic and pathologic roles of HERVs can be better evaluated. PMID:8665478

  18. Insertional polymorphisms: a new lease of life for endogenous retroviruses in human disease.

    PubMed

    Moyes, David; Griffiths, David J; Venables, Patrick J

    2007-07-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) result from ancestral infection by infectious viruses over millions of years of primate evolution. Some are transcriptionally active, express proteins and therefore have the potential to cause disease. Here we review the controversial attempts to link them with cancer and autoimmunity. The main difficulty is that most HERVs investigated to date are present at the same locus in 100% of the population. However, a new class of insertionally polymorphic HERV-K family members, present in a minority of individuals, has recently been described. We propose that insertionally polymorphic HERVs could be novel genetic risk factors and hence provide a new lease of life for research into HERVs and disease.

  19. Inhibiting DNA methylation causes an interferon response in cancer via dsRNA including endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Strissel, Pamela L.; Desrichard, Alexis; Li, Huili; Henke, Christine; Akman, Benjamin; Hein, Alexander; Rote, Neal S.; Cope, Leslie M.; Snyder, Alexandra; Makarov, Vladimir; Buhu, Sadna; Slamon, Dennis J.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Zahnow, Cynthia A.; Mergoub, Taha; Chan, Timothy A.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Strick, Reiner

    2015-01-01

    Summary We show that DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTis) upregulate immune signaling in cancer through the viral defense pathway. In ovarian cancer (OC), DNMTis trigger cytosolic sensing of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) causing a Type I Interferon response and apoptosis. Knocking down dsRNA sensors TLR3 and MAVS reduces this response twofold, and blocking interferon beta or its receptor abrogates it. Upregulation of hypermethylated endogenous retrovirus (ERV) genes accompanies the response and ERV overexpression activates the response. Basal levels of ERV and viral defense gene expression significantly correlate in primary OC and the latter signature separates primary samples for multiple tumor types from The Cancer Genome Atlas into low versus high expression groups. In melanoma patients treated with an immune checkpoint therapy, high viral defense signature expression in tumors significantly associates with durable clinical response and DNMTi treatment sensitizes to anti-CTLA4 therapy in a pre-clinical melanoma model. PMID:26317466

  20. The association between human endogenous retroviruses and multiple sclerosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Elena; Tanasescu, Radu; Tarlinton, Rachael E.; Constantinescu, Cris S.; Zhang, Weiya; Tench, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Background The interaction between genetic and environmental factors is crucial to multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. Human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs) are endogenous viral elements of the human genome whose expression is associated with MS. Objective To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis and to assess qualitative and quantitative evidence on the expression of HERV families in MS patients. Methods Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched for published studies on the association of HERVs and MS. Meta-analysis was performed on the HERV-W family. Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for association. Results 43 reports were extracted (25 related to HERV-W, 13 to HERV-H, 9 to HERV-K, 5 to HRES-1 and 1 to HER-15 family). The analysis showed an association between expression of all HERV families and MS. For HERV-W, adequate data was available for meta-analysis. Results from meta-analyses of HERV-W were OR = 22.66 (95%CI 6.32 to 81.20) from 4 studies investigating MSRV/HERV-W (MS-associated retrovirus) envelope mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, OR = 44.11 (95%CI 12.95 to 150.30) from 6 studies of MSRV/HERV-W polymerase mRNA in serum/plasma and OR = 6.00 (95%CI 3.35 to 10.74) from 4 studies of MSRV/HERV-W polymerase mRNA in CSF. Conclusions This systematic review and meta-analysis shows an association between expression of HERVs, and in particular the HERV-W family, and MS. PMID:28207850

  1. The aliens inside human DNA: HERV-W/MSRV/syncytin-1 endogenous retroviruses and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Dolei, Antonina; Uleri, Elena; Ibba, Gabriele; Caocci, Maurizio; Piu, Claudia; Serra, Caterina

    2015-07-04

    The human genome contains remnants of ancestral retroviruses now endogenously transmitted, called human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs). HERVs can be variably expressed, and both beneficial and detrimental effects have described. This review focuses on the MSRV and syncytin-1 HERV-W elements in relationship to neurodegeneration in view of their neuro-pathogenic and immune-pathogenic properties. Multiple sclerosis (MS) and a neurodegenerative disease (neuroAIDS) are reported in this review. In vivo studies in patients and controls for molecular epidemiology and follow-up studies are reviewed, along with in vitro cellular studies of the effects of treatments and of molecular mechanisms. HERV-W/MSRV has been repeatedly found in MS patients (in blood, spinal fluid, and brain samples), and MRSV presence/load strikingly parallels MS stages and active/remission phases, as well as therapy outcome. The DNA of MS patients has increased MSRVenv copies, while syncytin-1 copies are unchanged in controls. Presence of MSRV in the spinal fluid predicted the worst MS progression, ten years in advance. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) activates HERV-W/MSRV both in vitro and in vivo. With respect to neuroAIDS, the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein activates HERV-W/MSRV in monocytes/macrophages and astrocytes indirectly by interaction with TLR4 and induction of TNFa. HERV-W/MSRV can be considered a biomarker for MS behavior and therapy outcome. Regarding MS pathogenesis, we postulate the possibility for EBV of an initial trigger of future MS, years later, and for MSRV of a direct role of effector of neuropathogenesis during MS. Additionally, HERV-W/MSR/syncytin-1 activation by HIV Tat could contribute to the HIV-related neurodegeneration.

  2. Distribution of endogenous type B and type D sheep retrovirus sequences in ungulates and other mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, S J; Stedman, K E; Carlson, J O; DeMartini, J C

    1996-01-01

    The jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV), which appears to be a type B/D retrovirus chimera, has been incriminated as the cause of ovine pulmonary carcinoma. Recent studies suggest that the sequences related to this virus are found in the genomes of normal sheep and goats. To learn whether there are breeds of sheep that lack the endogenous viral sequences and to study their distribution among other groups of mammals, we surveyed several domestic sheep and goat breeds, other ungulates, and various mammal groups for sequences related to JSRV. Probes prepared from the envelope (SU) region of JSRV and the capsid (CA) region of a Peruvian type D virus related to JSRV were used in Southern blot hybridization with genomic DNA followed by low- and high-stringency washes. Fifteen to 20 CA and SU bands were found in all members of the 13 breeds of domestic sheep and 6 breeds of goats tested. There were similar findings in 6 wild Ovis and Capra genera. Within 22 other genera of Bovidae including domestic cattle, and 7 other families of Artiodactyla including Cervidae, there were usually a few CA or SU bands at low stringency and rare bands at high stringency. Among 16 phylogenetically distant genera, there were generally fewer bands hybridizing with either probe. These results reveal wide-spread phylogenetic distribution of endogenous type B and type D retroviral sequences related to JSRV among mammals and argue for further investigation of their potential role in disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8622932

  3. Utility of next-generation RNA-sequencing in identifying chimeric transcription involving human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Martin; Jessen, Karen Margrethe; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that human endogenous retroviruses and endogenous retrovirus-like repeats (here collectively HERVs) impose direct regulation on human genes through enhancer and promoter motifs present in their long terminal repeats (LTRs). Although chimeric transcription in which novel gene isoforms containing retroviral and human sequence are transcribed from viral promoters are commonly associated with disease, regulation by HERVs is beneficial in other settings; for example, in human testis chimeric isoforms of TP63 induced by an ERV9 LTR protect the male germ line upon DNA damage by inducing apoptosis, whereas in the human globin locus the γ- and β-globin switch during normal hematopoiesis is mediated by complex interactions of an ERV9 LTR and surrounding human sequence. The advent of deep sequencing or next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the way researchers solve important scientific questions and develop novel hypotheses in relation to human genome regulation. We recently applied next-generation paired-end RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) together with chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq) to examine ERV9 chimeric transcription in human reference cell lines from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). This led to the discovery of advanced regulation mechanisms by ERV9s and other HERVs across numerous human loci including transcription of large gene-unannotated genomic regions, as well as cooperative regulation by multiple HERVs and non-LTR repeats such as Alu elements. In this article, well-established examples of human gene regulation by HERVs are reviewed followed by a description of paired-end RNA-seq, and its application in identifying chimeric transcription genome-widely. Based on integrative analyses of RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, data we then present novel examples of regulation by ERV9s of tumor suppressor genes CADM2 and SEMA3A, as well as transcription of an unannotated region. Taken together, this article highlights

  4. Infectious Entry Pathway Mediated by the Human Endogenous Retrovirus K Envelope Protein

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lindsey R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), the majority of which exist as degraded remnants of ancient viruses, comprise approximately 8% of the human genome. The youngest human ERVs (HERVs) belong to the HERV-K(HML-2) subgroup and were endogenized within the past 1 million years. The viral envelope protein (ENV) facilitates the earliest events of endogenization (cellular attachment and entry), and here, we characterize the requirements for HERV-K ENV to mediate infectious cell entry. Cell-cell fusion assays indicate that a minimum of two events are required for fusion, proteolytic processing by furin-like proteases and exposure to acidic pH. We generated an infectious autonomously replicating recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in which the glycoprotein was replaced by HERV-K ENV. HERV-K ENV imparts an endocytic entry pathway that requires dynamin-mediated membrane scission and endosomal acidification but is distinct from clathrin-dependent or macropinocytic uptake pathways. The lack of impediments to the replication of the VSV core in eukaryotic cells allowed us to broadly survey the HERV-K ENV-dictated tropism. Unlike extant betaretroviral envelopes, which impart a narrow species tropism, we found that HERV-K ENV mediates broad tropism encompassing cells from multiple mammalian and nonmammalian species. We conclude that HERV-K ENV dictates an evolutionarily conserved entry pathway and that the restriction of HERV-K to primate genomes reflects downstream stages of the viral replication cycle. IMPORTANCE Approximately 8% of the human genome is of retroviral origin. While many of those viral genomes have become inactivated, some copies of the most recently endogenized human retrovirus, HERV-K, can encode individual functional proteins. Here, we characterize the envelope protein (ENV) of the virus to define how it mediates infection of cells. We demonstrate that HERV-K ENV undergoes a proteolytic processing step and triggers membrane fusion in response to

  5. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Protein Activates Innate Immunity and Promotes Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Hervé; Dougier-Reynaud, Hei-Lanne; Lomparski, Christina; Popa, Iuliana; Firouzi, Reza; Bertrand, Jean-Baptiste; Marusic, Suzana; Portoukalian, Jacques; Jouvin-Marche, Evelyne; Villiers, Christian L.; Touraine, Jean-Louis; Marche, Patrice N.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex multifactorial disease of the central nervous system (CNS) for which animal models have mainly addressed downstream immunopathology but not potential inducers of autoimmunity. In the absence of a pathogen known to cause neuroinflammation in MS, Mycobacterial lysate is commonly used in the form of complete Freund's adjuvant to induce autoimmunity to myelin proteins in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS. The present study demonstrates that a protein from the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-W family (MSRV-Env) can be used instead of mycobacterial lysate to induce autoimmunity and EAE in mice injected with MOG, with typical anti-myelin response and CNS lesions normally seen in this model. MSRV-Env was shown to induce proinflammatory response in human macrophage cells through TLR4 activation pathway. The present results demonstrate a similar activation of murine dendritic cells and show the ability of MSRV-Env to trigger EAE in mice. In previous studies, MSRV-Env protein was reproducibly detected in MS brain lesions within microglia and perivascular macrophages. The present results are therefore likely to provide a model for MS, in which the upstream adjuvant triggering neuroinflammation is the one detected in MS active lesions. This model now allows pre-clinical studies with therapeutic agents targeting this endogenous retroviral protein in MS. PMID:24324591

  6. Expression of human endogenous retrovirus type K envelope glycoprotein in insect and mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tönjes, R R; Limbach, C; Löwer, R; Kurth, R

    1997-01-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K) family codes for the human teratocarcinoma-derived retrovirus (HTDV) particles. The existence of the envelope protein (ENV) of HERV-K encoded by the subgenomic env mRNA has not yet been demonstrated. To study the genetic requirements for successful expression of ENV, we have constructed a series of recombinant HERV-K env expression vectors for infection and transfection experiments in insect cells and mammalian cells, respectively. Six baculovirus constructs bearing full-length or truncated HERV-K env with or without homologous or heterologous signal peptides were used for infections of insect cells. All recombinant baculoviruses yielded ENV proteins with the expected molecular masses. The full-length 80- to 90-kDa HERV-K ENV protein including the cORF leader sequence was glycosylated in insect cells. In addition, the 14-kDa cORF protein was expressed due to splicing of the full-length env mRNA. The ENV precursor protein is not cleaved to the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) glycoproteins; it does not appear on the surface of infected insect cells and is not secreted into the medium. For ENV expression in COS cells, plasmid vectors harboring the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter/intron A element and the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) signal peptide or the homologous HERV-K signal peptide upstream of the env gene were employed. Glycosylated and uncleaved ENV was expressed as in GH teratocarcinoma cells but at higher levels. The heterologous t-PA signal sequence was instrumental for expression of HERV-K ENV on the cell surface. Hence, we have shown for the first time that the HERV-K env gene has the potential to be expressed as a full-length envelope protein with appropriate glycosylation. In addition, our data provide explanations for the lack of infectivity of HERV-K/HTDV particles. PMID:9060628

  7. Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-Fc1 Association with Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    García-Montojo, Marta; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, María; Alloza, Iraide; Astobiza, Ianire; Leyva, Laura; Fernández, Oscar; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Arroyo, Rafael; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Urcelay, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Background Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are repetitive sequences derived from ancestral germ-line infections by exogenous retroviruses and different HERV families have been integrated in the genome. HERV-Fc1 in chromosome X has been previously associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) in Northern European populations. Additionally, HERV-Fc1 RNA levels of expression have been found increased in plasma of MS patients with active disease. Considering the North-South latitude gradient in MS prevalence, we aimed to evaluate the role of HERV-Fc1on MS risk in three independent Spanish cohorts. Methods A single nucleotide polymorphism near HERV-Fc1, rs391745, was genotyped by Taqman chemistry in a total of 2473 MS patients and 3031 ethnically matched controls, consecutively recruited from: Northern (569 patients and 980 controls), Central (883 patients and 692 controls) and Southern (1021 patients and 1359 controls) Spain. Our results were pooled in a meta-analysis with previously published data. Results Significant associations of the HERV-Fc1 polymorphism with MS were observed in two Spanish cohorts and the combined meta-analysis with previous data yielded a significant association [rs391745 C-allele carriers: pM-H = 0.0005; ORM-H (95% CI) = 1.27 (1.11–1.45)]. Concordantly to previous findings, when the analysis was restricted to relapsing remitting and secondary progressive MS samples, a slight enhancement in the strength of the association was observed [pM-H = 0.0003, ORM-H (95% CI) = 1.32 (1.14–1.53)]. Conclusion Association of the HERV-Fc1 polymorphism rs391745 with bout-onset MS susceptibility was confirmed in Southern European cohorts. PMID:24594754

  8. Identification and classification of feline endogenous retroviruses in the cat genome using degenerate PCR and in silico data analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Ning; Jo, Haiin; Choi, Minkyeung; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Seo, Han Geuk; Cha, Se-Yeoun; Seo, Kunho; Park, Chankyu

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and classify endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in the cat genome. Pooled DNA from five domestic cats was subjected to degenerate PCR with primers specific to the conserved retroviral pro/pol region. The 59 amplified retroviral sequences were used for in silico analysis of the cat genome (Felis_catus-6.2). We identified 219 ERV γ and β elements from cat genome contigs, which were classified into 42 ERV γ and 4 β families and further analysed. Among them, 99 γ and 5 β ERV elements contained the complete retroviral structure. Furthermore, we identified 757 spuma-like ERV elements based on the sequence homology to murine (Mu)ERV-L and human (H)ERV-L. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first detailed genome-scale analysis examining Felis catus endogenous retroviruses (FcERV) and providing advanced insights into their structural characteristics, localization in the genome, and diversity.

  9. Endogenous retroviruses function as species-specific enhancer elements in the placenta

    PubMed Central

    Chuong, Edward B.; Rumi, M. A. Karim; Soares, Michael J.; Baker, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian placenta is remarkably distinct between species, suggesting a history of rapid evolutionary diversification1. To gain insight into the molecular drivers of placental evolution, we compared biochemically predicted enhancers between mouse and rat trophoblast stem cells (TSCs) and find that species-specific enhancers are highly enriched for endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) on a genome-wide level. One of these ERV families, RLTR13D5, contributes hundreds of mouse-specific H3K4me1/H3K27ac-defined enhancers that functionally bind Cdx2, Eomes, and Elf5 - core factors that define the TSC regulatory network. Furthermore, we demonstrate that RLTR13D5 is capable of driving gene expression in rat placental cells. Comparison with other tissues revealed that species-specific ERV enhancer activity is generally restricted to hypomethylated tissues, suggesting that tissues permissive to ERV activity gain access to an otherwise silenced source of regulatory variation. Overall, our results implicate ERV enhancer cooption as a mechanism underlying the striking evolutionary diversification of placental development. PMID:23396136

  10. Copy Number Variation and Differential Expression of a Protective Endogenous Retrovirus in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Viginier, Barbara; Dolmazon, Christine; Lantier, Isabelle; Lantier, Frédéric; Archer, Fabienne; Leroux, Caroline; Terzian, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus exJSRV and its endogenous counterpart enJSRV co-exist in sheep. exJSRV, a betaretrovirus, is the etiological agent of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma, and it has been demonstrated in vitro that an enJSRV Gag variant bearing the R-to-W amino acid change at position 21 was able to block exJSRV budding from the cells, providing a potential protective role for the host. In this work, we developed a fast mutation detection assay based on the oligo ligation assay (OLA) that permits the quantification of the relative proportions of the R21 and W21 Gag variants present in individual genomes and in cDNA obtained from normal and exJSRV-induced lung tumors. We have shown that the W21/R21 ratio is variable within and between breeds. We also describe for the first time that putative protecting enJSRV variants were expressed in alveolar type II cells (AECII), the major target of exJSRV. PMID:22911867

  11. The evolutionary capacitor HSP90 buffers the regulatory effects of mammalian endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Barbara; Hansen, Erik C; Yoveva, Aneliya; Aprile-Garcia, Fernando; Hussong, Rebecca; Sawarkar, Ritwick

    2017-03-01

    Understanding how genotypes are linked to phenotypes is important in biomedical and evolutionary studies. The chaperone heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) buffers genetic variation by stabilizing proteins with variant sequences, thereby uncoupling phenotypes from genotypes. Here we report an unexpected role of HSP90 in buffering cis-regulatory variation affecting gene expression. By using the tripartite-motif-containing 28 (TRIM28; also known as KAP1)-mediated epigenetic pathway, HSP90 represses the regulatory influence of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) on neighboring genes that are critical for mouse development. Our data based on natural variations in the mouse genome show that genes respond to HSP90 inhibition in a manner dependent on their genomic location with regard to strain-specific ERV-insertion sites. The evolutionary-capacitor function of HSP90 may thus have facilitated the exaptation of ERVs as key modifiers of gene expression and morphological diversification. Our findings add a new regulatory layer through which HSP90 uncouples phenotypic outcomes from individual genotypes.

  12. Evolution of endogenous retrovirus-like elements of the woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) and its relatives.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, A D; Lee, F; Capelli, C; DeSalle, R; Tikhonov, A; Marx, P A; MacPhee, R D

    2001-05-01

    Endogenous retrovirus-like elements characterizable by a leucine tRNA primer (ERV-Ls) are reiterated genomic sequences known to be widespread in mammals, including humans. They may have arisen from an ancestral foamy virus-like element by successful germ line infection followed by copy number expansion. However, among mammals, only primates and rodents have thus far exhibited high copy number amplification and sequence diversification. Conventionally, empirical studies of proviral amplification and diversification have been limited to extant species, but taxa having good Quaternary fossil records could potentially be investigated using the techniques of "ancient" DNA research. To examine evolutionary parameters of ERV-Ls across both time and taxa, we characterized this proviral class in the extinct woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) and living elephants, as well as extant members of the larger clade to which they belong (Uranotheria, a group containing proboscideans, sirenians, hyraxes, and their extinct relatives). Ungulates and carnivores previously analyzed demonstrated low copy numbers of ERV-L sequences, and thus it was expected that uranotheres should as well. Here, we show that all uranothere taxa exhibit unexpectedly numerous and diverse ERV-L sequence complements, indicating active expansion within this group of lineages. Selection is the most parsimonious explanation for observed differences in ERV-L distribution and frequency, with relative success being reflected in the persistence of certain elements over a variety of sampled time depths (as can be observed by comparing sequences from fossil and extant elephantid samples).

  13. Characterization of an endogenous retrovirus class in elephants and their relatives

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Alex D; Englbrecht, Claudia C; MacPhee, Ross DE

    2004-01-01

    Background Endogenous retrovirus-like elements (ERV-Ls, primed with tRNA leucine) are a diverse group of reiterated sequences related to foamy viruses and widely distributed among mammals. As shown in previous investigations, in many primates and rodents this class of elements has remained transpositionally active, as reflected by increased copy number and high sequence diversity within and among taxa. Results Here we examine whether proviral-like sequences may be suitable molecular probes for investigating the phylogeny of groups known to have high element diversity. As a test we characterized ERV-Ls occurring in a sample of extant members of superorder Uranotheria (Asian and African elephants, manatees, and hyraxes). The ERV-L complement in this group is even more diverse than previously suspected, and there is sequence evidence for active expansion, particularly in elephantids. Many of the elements characterized have protein coding potential suggestive of activity. Conclusions In general, the evidence supports the hypothesis that the complement had a single origin within basal Uranotheria. PMID:15476555

  14. Evolutionary dynamics of endogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retroviruses proliferation in the domestic sheep, mouflon and Pyrenean chamois.

    PubMed

    Sistiaga-Poveda, M; Jugo, B M

    2014-06-01

    The oncogenic exogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV), responsible for ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma, has several endogenous counterparts termed enJSRVs. Although many of these elements have been inactivated over time by the accumulation of deleterious mutations or internal recombination leading to solo long terminal repeat (LTR) formation, several members of enJSRVs have been identified as nearly intact and probably represent recent integration events. To determine the level of enJSRV polymorphism in the sheep population and related species, we have undertaken a study by characterizing enJSRVs copies and independent integration sites in six domestic sheep and two wild species of the sheep lineage. enJSRVs copies were detected by amplifying the env-LTR region by PCR, and for the detection of the insertion sites, we used two approaches: (1) an in silico approach based on the recently published Sheep Reference Genome Assembly (OARv3.0) and (2) an experimental approach based on PCR suppression and inverse PCR techniques. In total, 103 enJSRV sequences were generated across 10 individuals and enJSRV integrations were found on 11 of the 28 sheep chromosomes. These findings suggest that there are still uncharacterized enJSRVs, and that some of the integration sites are variable among the different species, breeds of the same species, subspecies and geographic locations.

  15. Comparative and functional studies of Drosophila species invasion by the gypsy endogenous retrovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Mejlumian, Lucine; Pélisson, Alain; Bucheton, Alain; Terzian, Christophe

    2002-01-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. Phylogenetic studies suggest that occasional horizontal transfer events of gypsy occur between Drosophila species. gypsy possesses infective properties associated with the products of the envelope gene that might be at the origin of these interspecies transfers. We report here the existence of DNA sequences putatively encoding full-length Env proteins in the genomes of Drosophila species other than D. melanogaster, suggesting that potentially infective gypsy copies able to spread between sexually isolated species can occur. The ability of gypsy to invade the genome of a new species is conditioned by its capacity to be expressed in the naive genome. The genetic basis for the regulation of gypsy activity in D. melanogaster is now well known, and it has been assigned to an X-linked gene called flamenco. We established an experimental simulation of the invasion of the D. melanogaster genome by gypsy elements derived from other Drosophila species, which demonstrates that these non- D. melanogaster gypsy elements escape the repression exerted by the D. melanogaster flamenco gene. PMID:11805056

  16. Radiation-induced human endogenous retrovirus (HERV)-R env gene expression by epigenetic control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja-Rang; Ahn, Kung; Kim, Yun-Ji; Jung, Yi-Deun; Kim, Heui-Soo

    2012-11-01

    It is commonly accepted that ionizing radiation induces genomic instability by changes in genomic structure, epigenetic regulation and gene expression. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV)-R also are often differentially expressed between normal and disease tissues under unstable genomic conditions and are implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases. To understand the influence of ionizing radiation on HERV-R expression, we performed quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses using γ-irradiated normal human cells. Compared to nonirradiated cells, HERV-R expression was up-regulated in γ-irradiated cells. The regulatory mechanism of HERV-R expression in irradiated cells was investigated by methylation analyses of HERV-R 5'LTRs and treatment with garcinol. These data indicated that the up-regulated transcription of HERV-R may be regulated by radiation-induced epigenetic changes induced by histone modification, and thus could be of great importance for understanding the relationship between radiation-induced biological effects and transposable elements.

  17. The nucleotide sequence of koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) retrovirus: a novel type C endogenous virus related to Gibbon ape leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Hanger, J J; Bromham, L D; McKee, J J; O'Brien, T M; Robinson, W F

    2000-05-01

    A novel retrovirus, morphologically consistent with mammalian C-type retroviruses, was detected by electron microscopy in mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures from 163 koalas and in lymphoma tissue from 3 koalas. PCR amplified provirus from the blood and tissues of 17 wild and captive koalas, and reverse transcriptase-PCR demonstrated viral mRNA, viral genomic RNA, and reverse transcriptase activity in koala serum and cell culture supernatants. Comparison of viral sequences derived from genomic DNA and mRNA showed identity indicative of a single retroviral species-here designated koala retrovirus (KoRV). Southern blot analysis of koala tissue genomic DNA using labelled KoRV probes demonstrated banding consistent with an endogenous retrovirus. Complete and apparently truncated proviruses were detected in DNA of both clinically normal koalas and those with hematopoietic disease. KoRV-related viruses were not detected in other marsupials, and phylogenetic analysis showed that KoRV paradoxically clusters with gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV). The strong similarity between GALV and KoRV suggests that these viruses are closely related and that recent cross-host transmission has occurred. The complete proviral DNA sequence of KoRV is reported.

  18. Endogenous Retrovirus Insertion in the KIT Oncogene Determines White and White spotting in Domestic Cats

    PubMed Central

    David, Victor A.; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Wallace, Andrea Coots; Roelke, Melody; Kehler, James; Leighty, Robert; Eizirik, Eduardo; Hannah, Steven S.; Nelson, George; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Connelly, Catherine J.; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Ryugo, David K.

    2014-01-01

    The Dominant White locus (W) in the domestic cat demonstrates pleiotropic effects exhibiting complete penetrance for absence of coat pigmentation and incomplete penetrance for deafness and iris hypopigmentation. We performed linkage analysis using a pedigree segregating White to identify KIT (Chr. B1) as the feline W locus. Segregation and sequence analysis of the KIT gene in two pedigrees (P1 and P2) revealed the remarkable retrotransposition and evolution of a feline endogenous retrovirus (FERV1) as responsible for two distinct phenotypes of the W locus, Dominant White, and white spotting. A full-length (7125 bp) FERV1 element is associated with white spotting, whereas a FERV1 long terminal repeat (LTR) is associated with all Dominant White individuals. For purposes of statistical analysis, the alternatives of wild-type sequence, FERV1 element, and LTR-only define a triallelic marker. Taking into account pedigree relationships, deafness is genetically linked and associated with this marker; estimated P values for association are in the range of 0.007 to 0.10. The retrotransposition interrupts a DNAase I hypersensitive site in KIT intron 1 that is highly conserved across mammals and was previously demonstrated to regulate temporal and tissue-specific expression of KIT in murine hematopoietic and melanocytic cells. A large-population genetic survey of cats (n = 270), representing 30 cat breeds, supports our findings and demonstrates statistical significance of the FERV1 LTR and full-length element with Dominant White/blue iris (P < 0.0001) and white spotting (P < 0.0001), respectively. PMID:25085922

  19. Dynamic regulation of human endogenous retroviruses mediates factor-induced reprogramming and differentiation potential

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuki, Mari; Tanabe, Koji; Sutou, Kenta; Teramoto, Ito; Sawamura, Yuka; Narita, Megumi; Nakamura, Michiko; Tokunaga, Yumie; Nakamura, Masahiro; Watanabe, Akira; Yamanaka, Shinya; Takahashi, Kazutoshi

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotency can be induced in somatic cells by overexpressing transcription factors, including POU class 5 homeobox 1 (OCT3/4), sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2), Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), and myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-MYC). However, some induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) exhibit defective differentiation and inappropriate maintenance of pluripotency features. Here we show that dynamic regulation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) is important in the reprogramming process toward iPSCs, and in re-establishment of differentiation potential. During reprogramming, OCT3/4, SOX2, and KLF4 transiently hyperactivated LTR7s—the long-terminal repeats of HERV type-H (HERV-H)—to levels much higher than in embryonic stem cells by direct occupation of LTR7 sites genome-wide. Knocking down LTR7s or long intergenic non-protein coding RNA, regulator of reprogramming (lincRNA-RoR), a HERV-H–driven long noncoding RNA, early in reprogramming markedly reduced the efficiency of iPSC generation. KLF4 and LTR7 expression decreased to levels comparable with embryonic stem cells once reprogramming was complete, but failure to resuppress KLF4 and LTR7s resulted in defective differentiation. We also observed defective differentiation and LTR7 activation when iPSCs had forced expression of KLF4. However, when aberrantly expressed KLF4 or LTR7s were suppressed in defective iPSCs, normal differentiation was restored. Thus, a major mechanism by which OCT3/4, SOX2, and KLF4 promote human iPSC generation and reestablish potential for differentiation is by dynamically regulating HERV-H LTR7s. PMID:25097266

  20. Endogenous retrovirus insertion in the KIT oncogene determines white and white spotting in domestic cats.

    PubMed

    David, Victor A; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn; Wallace, Andrea Coots; Roelke, Melody; Kehler, James; Leighty, Robert; Eizirik, Eduardo; Hannah, Steven S; Nelson, George; Schäffer, Alejandro A; Connelly, Catherine J; O'Brien, Stephen J; Ryugo, David K

    2014-08-01

    The Dominant White locus (W) in the domestic cat demonstrates pleiotropic effects exhibiting complete penetrance for absence of coat pigmentation and incomplete penetrance for deafness and iris hypopigmentation. We performed linkage analysis using a pedigree segregating White to identify KIT (Chr. B1) as the feline W locus. Segregation and sequence analysis of the KIT gene in two pedigrees (P1 and P2) revealed the remarkable retrotransposition and evolution of a feline endogenous retrovirus (FERV1) as responsible for two distinct phenotypes of the W locus, Dominant White, and white spotting. A full-length (7125 bp) FERV1 element is associated with white spotting, whereas a FERV1 long terminal repeat (LTR) is associated with all Dominant White individuals. For purposes of statistical analysis, the alternatives of wild-type sequence, FERV1 element, and LTR-only define a triallelic marker. Taking into account pedigree relationships, deafness is genetically linked and associated with this marker; estimated P values for association are in the range of 0.007 to 0.10. The retrotransposition interrupts a DNAase I hypersensitive site in KIT intron 1 that is highly conserved across mammals and was previously demonstrated to regulate temporal and tissue-specific expression of KIT in murine hematopoietic and melanocytic cells. A large-population genetic survey of cats (n = 270), representing 30 cat breeds, supports our findings and demonstrates statistical significance of the FERV1 LTR and full-length element with Dominant White/blue iris (P < 0.0001) and white spotting (P < 0.0001), respectively.

  1. Integration and Fixation Preferences of Human and Mouse Endogenous Retroviruses Uncovered with Functional Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Alessia; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Makova, Kateryna D.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), the remnants of retroviral infections in the germ line, occupy ~8% and ~10% of the human and mouse genomes, respectively, and affect their structure, evolution, and function. Yet we still have a limited understanding of how the genomic landscape influences integration and fixation of ERVs. Here we conducted a genome-wide study of the most recently active ERVs in the human and mouse genome. We investigated 826 fixed and 1,065 in vitro HERV-Ks in human, and 1,624 fixed and 242 polymorphic ETns, as well as 3,964 fixed and 1,986 polymorphic IAPs, in mouse. We quantitated >40 human and mouse genomic features (e.g., non-B DNA structure, recombination rates, and histone modifications) in ±32 kb of these ERVs’ integration sites and in control regions, and analyzed them using Functional Data Analysis (FDA) methodology. In one of the first applications of FDA in genomics, we identified genomic scales and locations at which these features display their influence, and how they work in concert, to provide signals essential for integration and fixation of ERVs. The investigation of ERVs of different evolutionary ages (young in vitro and polymorphic ERVs, older fixed ERVs) allowed us to disentangle integration vs. fixation preferences. As a result of these analyses, we built a comprehensive model explaining the uneven distribution of ERVs along the genome. We found that ERVs integrate in late-replicating AT-rich regions with abundant microsatellites, mirror repeats, and repressive histone marks. Regions favoring fixation are depleted of genes and evolutionarily conserved elements, and have low recombination rates, reflecting the effects of purifying selection and ectopic recombination removing ERVs from the genome. In addition to providing these biological insights, our study demonstrates the power of exploiting multiple scales and localization with FDA. These powerful techniques are expected to be applicable to many other genomic investigations

  2. HIV-1 Interacts with Human Endogenous Retrovirus K (HML-2) Envelopes Derived from Human Primary Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Brinzevich, Daria; Young, George R.; Sebra, Robert; Ayllon, Juan; Maio, Susan M.; Deikus, Gintaras; Chen, Benjamin K.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Simon, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are viruses that have colonized the germ line and spread through vertical passage. Only the more recently acquired HERVs, such as the HERV-K (HML-2) group, maintain coding open reading frames. Expression of HERV-Ks has been linked to different pathological conditions, including HIV infection, but our knowledge on which specific HERV-Ks are expressed in primary lymphocytes currently is very limited. To identify the most expressed HERV-Ks in an unbiased manner, we analyzed their expression patterns in peripheral blood lymphocytes using Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. We observe that three HERV-Ks (KII, K102, and K18) constitute over 90% of the total HERV-K expression in primary human lymphocytes of five different donors. We also show experimentally that two of these HERV-K env sequences (K18 and K102) retain their ability to produce full-length and posttranslationally processed envelope proteins in cell culture. We show that HERV-K18 Env can be incorporated into HIV-1 but not simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) particles. Moreover, HERV-K18 Env incorporation into HIV-1 virions is dependent on HIV-1 matrix. Taken together, we generated high-resolution HERV-K expression profiles specific for activated human lymphocytes. We found that one of the most abundantly expressed HERV-K envelopes not only makes a full-length protein but also specifically interacts with HIV-1. Our findings raise the possibility that these endogenous retroviral Env proteins could directly influence HIV-1 replication. IMPORTANCE Here, we report the HERV-K expression profile of primary lymphocytes from 5 different healthy donors. We used a novel deep-sequencing technology (PacBio SMRT) that produces the long reads necessary to discriminate the complexity of HERV-K expression. We find that primary lymphocytes express up to 32 different HERV-K envelopes, and that at least two of the most expressed Env proteins

  3. The HERV-K Human Endogenous Retrovirus Envelope Protein Antagonizes Tetherin Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemaître, Cécile; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses are the remnants of past retroviral infections that are scattered within mammalian genomes. In humans, most of these elements are old degenerate sequences that have lost their coding properties. The HERV-K(HML2) family is an exception: it recently amplified in the human genome and corresponds to the most active proviruses, with some intact open reading frames and the potential to encode viral particles. Here, using a reconstructed consensus element, we show that HERV-K(HML2) proviruses are able to inhibit Tetherin, a cellular restriction factor that is active against most enveloped viruses and acts by keeping the viral particles attached to the cell surface. More precisely, we identify the Envelope protein (Env) as the viral effector active against Tetherin. Through immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that the recognition of Tetherin is mediated by the surface subunit of Env. Similar to Ebola glycoprotein, HERV-K(HML2) Env does not mediate Tetherin degradation or cell surface removal; therefore, it uses a yet-undescribed mechanism to inactivate Tetherin. We also assessed all natural complete alleles of endogenous HERV-K(HML2) Env described to date for their ability to inhibit Tetherin and found that two of them (out of six) can block Tetherin restriction. However, due to their recent amplification, HERV-K(HML2) elements are extremely polymorphic in the human population, and it is likely that individuals will not all possess the same anti-Tetherin potential. Because of Tetherin's role as a restriction factor capable of inducing innate immune responses, this could have functional consequences for individual responses to infection. IMPORTANCE Tetherin, a cellular protein initially characterized for its role against HIV-1, has been proven to counteract numerous enveloped viruses. It blocks the release of viral particles from producer cells, keeping them tethered to the cell surface. Several viruses have developed strategies to

  4. Molecular characteristics of Human Endogenous Retrovirus type-W in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Perron, H; Hamdani, N; Faucard, R; Lajnef, M; Jamain, S; Daban-Huard, C; Sarrazin, S; LeGuen, E; Houenou, J; Delavest, M; Moins-Teisserenc, H; Moins-Teiserenc, H; Bengoufa, D; Yolken, R; Madeira, A; Garcia-Montojo, M; Gehin, N; Burgelin, I; Ollagnier, G; Bernard, C; Dumaine, A; Henrion, A; Gombert, A; Le Dudal, K; Charron, D; Krishnamoorthy, R; Tamouza, R; Leboyer, M

    2012-12-04

    Epidemiological and genome-wide association studies of severe psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD), suggest complex interactions between multiple genetic elements and environmental factors. The involvement of genetic elements such as Human Endogenous Retroviruses type 'W' family (HERV-W) has consistently been associated with SZ. HERV-W envelope gene (env) is activated by environmental factors and encodes a protein displaying inflammation and neurotoxicity. The present study addressed the molecular characteristics of HERV-W env in SZ and BD. Hundred and thirty-six patients, 91 with BD, 45 with SZ and 73 healthy controls (HC) were included. HERV-W env transcription was found to be elevated in BD (P<10-4) and in SZ (P=0.012) as compared with HC, but with higher values in BD than in SZ group (P<0.01). The corresponding DNA copy number was paradoxically lower in the genome of patients with BD (P=0.0016) or SZ (P<0.0003) than in HC. Differences in nucleotide sequence of HERV-W env were found between patients with SZ and BD as compared with HC, as well as between SZ and BD. The molecular characteristics of HERV-W env also differ from what was observed in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and may represent distinct features of the genome of patients with BD and SZ. The seroprevalence for Toxoplasma gondii yielded low but significant association with HERV-W transcriptional level in a subgroup of BD and SZ, suggesting a potential role in particular patients. A global hypothesis of mechanisms inducing such major psychoses is discussed, placing HERV-W at the crossroads between environmental, genetic and immunological factors. Thus, particular infections would act as activators of HERV-W elements in earliest life, resulting in the production of an HERV-W envelope protein, which then stimulates pro-inflammatory and neurotoxic cascades. This hypothesis needs to be further explored as it may yield major changes in our understanding and treatment of

  5. Endogenous Retrovirus ev21 Dose Not Recombine with ALV-J and Induces the Expression of ISGs in the Host.

    PubMed

    Feng, Min; Tan, Yan; Dai, Manman; Li, Yuanfang; Xie, Tingting; Li, Hongmei; Shi, Meiqing; Zhang, Xiquan

    2016-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) infection can cause tumors and immunosuppression. Endogenous viruses integrate into host genomes and can recombine with exogenous avian leukosis virus (ALV). In this study, we analyzed the interaction of endogenous retrovirus 21 (ev21) with the ALV-J in late-feathering Chinese yellow chicken. Two ALV-J strains M180 and K243 were isolated from late-feathering and fast-feathering Chinese yellow chicken flocks, respectively. The env gene of the two strains showed 94.2-94.8% nucleotide identity with reference ALV-J strains. Compared with the env gene and the LTR of ev21 and M180, the nucleotide identity of LTR was 69.7% and env gene was 58.4%, respectively, especially the amino acid identity of env gene as low as 14.2%. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the env gene and the 3'LTR showed that M180 was closely related to ALV-J, and was located in a distinct group with ev21 in the phylogenetic tree. Using co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP), we next demonstrate that the envelope protein of ev21 does not interact with the M180 envelope protein. We further show that the envelope protein of ev21 cannot activate ALV-J LTR promoter activity using luciferase-reporter assays. qPCR and western blot analysis revealed that envelope protein of endogenous ev21 can facilitate the expression of PKR at 6h post ALV-J infection (hpi) and facilitate the expression of ISG12 and CH25H at 24 hpi. However, the expression of the env gene of M180 strain was not significantly at 6 and 24 hpi. We conclude that there is no evidence of recombination between endogenous retrovirus ev21 and ALV-J strain M180 in late-feathering Chinese yellow chicken, and envelope protein of ev21 can affect the expression of host ISGs, but appears not to influence the replication of ALV-J strain M180. This is the first report of interaction among the endogenous retrovirus ev21, ALV-J and the late-feathering chicken.

  6. Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein LMP-2A Is Sufficient for Transactivation of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-K18 Superantigen

    PubMed Central

    Sutkowski, Natalie; Chen, Gang; Calderon, German; Huber, Brigitte T.

    2004-01-01

    Superantigens are microbial proteins that strongly stimulate T cells. We described previously that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transactivates a superantigen encoded by the human endogenous retrovirus, HERV-K18. We now report that the transactivation is dependent upon the EBV latent cycle proteins. Moreover, LMP-2A is sufficient for induction of HERV-K18 superantigen activity. PMID:15220463

  7. Surveys of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in the freshwater crocodile (Crocodylus johnstoni) suggest that ERVs in Crocodylus spp. vary between species.

    PubMed

    Chong, Amanda Y; Kjeldsen, Shannon R; Gongora, Jaime

    2015-04-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are one of many families of transposable elements present in vertebrate genomes. We have examined the ERV complement of the freshwater crocodile (Crocodylus johnstoni) in order to investigate the diversity of ERVs present and possibility of ERV or retroviral activity in a diseased individual of this species. Amplification and sequencing of the highly conserved retroviral pro-pol domains revealed high levels of sequence variation in these ERVs. Phylogenetic analyses of these ERVs and those previously identified in other crocodilian species suggest that although many crocodilians share the same ERV lineages, the relative numbers of retroelement insertions from each of these lineages may vary greatly between species. The data generated in this study provide evidence for the presence of a unique and varied complement of ERVs in crocodilians. This study has also demonstrated the presence of species-specific evolution in ancient retroviral infections.

  8. Endogenous retrovirus drives hitherto unknown proapoptotic p63 isoforms in the male germ line of humans and great apes.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Ulrike; Moll-Rocek, Julian; Moll, Ute M; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2011-03-01

    TAp63, but not its homolog p53, eliminates oocytes that suffered DNA damage. An equivalent gene for guarding the male germ line is currently not known. Here we identify hitherto unknown human p63 transcripts with unique 5'-ends derived from incorporated exons upstream of the currently mapped TP63 gene. These unique p63 transcripts are highly and specifically expressed in testis. Their most upstream region corresponds to a LTR of the human endogenous retrovirus 9 (ERV9). The insertion of this LTR upstream of the TP63 locus occurred only recently in evolution and is unique to humans and great apes (Hominidae). A corresponding p63 protein is the sole p63 species in healthy human testis, and is strongly expressed in spermatogenic precursors but not in mature spermatozoa. In response to DNA damage, this human male germ-cell-encoded TAp63 protein (designated GTAp63) is activated by caspase cleavage near its carboxyterminal domain and induces apoptosis. Human testicular cancer tissues and cell lines largely lost p63 expression. However, pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases completely restores p63 expression in testicular cancer cells (>3,000-fold increase). Our data support a model whereby testis-specific GTAp63 protects the genomic integrity of the male germ line and acts as a tumor suppressor. In Hominidae, this guardian function was greatly enhanced by integration of an endogenous retrovirus upstream of the TP63 locus that occurred 15 million years ago. By providing increased germ-line stability, this event may have contributed to the evolution of hominids and enabled their long reproductive periods.

  9. The multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus and its HERV-W endogenous family: a biological interface between virology, genetics, and immunology in human physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Dolei, Antonina; Perron, Hervé

    2009-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes current knowledge of MSRV (multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus), founder member of the type W family of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), its pathogenic potential and association with diseases. As retrotransposable elements, HERVs behave differently from stable genes, and cannot be studied with "Mendelian genetics" concepts only. They also display complex interactions with other HERV families, and with classical viruses. These concepts may contribute to unravelling the etiopathogenesis of complex diseases such as multiple sclerosis, schizophrenia, and other chronic multifactorial diseases.

  10. The human endogenous retrovirus link between genes and environment in multiple sclerosis and in multifactorial diseases associating neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Perron, Hervé; Lang, Alois

    2010-08-01

    Endogenous retroviruses represent about 8% of the human genome and belong to the superfamily of transposable and retrotransposable genetic elements. Altogether, these mobile genetic elements and their numerous inactivated "junk" sequences represent nearly one half of the human DNA. Nonetheless, a significant part of this "non-conventional" genome has retained potential activity. Epigenetic control is notably involved in silencing most of these genetic elements but certain environmental factors such as viruses are known to dysregulate their expression in susceptible cells. More particularly, embryonal cells with limited gene methylation are most susceptible to uncontrolled activation of these mobile genetic elements by, e.g., viral infections. In particular, certain viruses transactivate promoters from endogenous retroviral family type W (HERV-W). HERV-W RNA was first isolated in circulating viral particles (Multiple Sclerosis-associated RetroViral element, MSRV) that have been associated with the evolution and prognosis of multiple sclerosis. HERV-W elements encode a powerful immunopathogenic envelope protein (ENV) that activates a pro-inflammatory and autoimmune cascade through interaction with Toll-like receptor 4 on immune cells. This ENV protein has repeatedly been detected in MS brain lesions and may be involved in other diseases. Epigenetic factors controlling HERV-W ENV protein expression then reveal critical. This review addresses the gene-environment epigenetic interface of such HERV-W elements and its potential involvement in disease.

  11. The activation of human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) is implicated in melanoma cell malignant transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Serafino, A. Balestrieri, E.; Pierimarchi, P.; Matteucci, C.; Moroni, G.; Oricchio, E.; Rasi, G.; Mastino, A.; Spadafora, C.; Garaci, E.; Vallebona, P. Sinibaldi

    2009-03-10

    Melanoma development is a multi-step process arising from a series of genetic and epigenetic events. Although the sequential stages involved in progression from melanocytes to malignant melanoma are clearly defined, our current understanding of the mechanisms leading to melanoma onset is still incomplete. Growing evidence show that the activation of endogenous retroviral sequences might be involved in transformation of melanocytes as well as in the increased ability of melanoma cells to escape immune surveillance. Here we show that human melanoma cells in vitro undergo a transition from adherent to a more malignant, non-adherent phenotype when exposed to stress conditions. Melanoma-derived non-adherent cells are characterized by an increased proliferative potential and a decreased expression of both HLA class I molecules and Melan-A/MART-1 antigen, similarly to highly malignant cells. These phenotypic and functional modifications are accompanied by the activation of human endogenous retrovirus K expression (HERV-K) and massive production of viral-like particles. Down-regulation of HERV-K expression by RNA interference prevents the transition from the adherent to the non-adherent growth phenotype in low serum. These results implicate HERV-K in at least some critical steps of melanoma progression.

  12. The role of molecular mimicry and other factors in the association of Human Endogenous Retroviruses and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Trela, Malgorzata; Nelson, Paul N; Rylance, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs) have been implicated in autoimmune and other diseases. Molecular mimicry has been postulated as a potential mechanism of autoimmunity. Exogenous viruses have also been reported to be associated with the same diseases, as have genetic and environmental factors. If molecular mimicry were to be shown to be an initiating mechanism of some autoimmune diseases, then therapeutic options of blocking antibodies and peptides might be of benefit in halting diseases at the outset. Bioinformatic and molecular modelling techniques have been employed to investigate molecular mimicry and the evidence for the association of HERVs and autoimmunity is reviewed. The most convincing evidence for molecular mimicry is in rheumatoid arthritis, where HERV K-10 shares amino acid sequences with IgG1Fc, a target for rheumatoid factor. Systemic lupus erythematosus is an example of a condition associated with several autoantibodies, and several endogenous and exogenous viruses have been reported to be associated with the disease. The lack of a clear link between one virus and this condition, and the spectrum of clinical manifestations, suggests that genetic, environmental and the inflammatory response to a virus or viruses might also be major factors in the pathogenesis of lupus and other autoimmune conditions. Where there are strong associations between a virus and an autoimmune condition, such as in hepatitis C and cryoglobulinaemia, the use of bioinformatics and molecular modelling can also be utilized to help to understand the role of molecular mimicry in how HERVs might trigger disease.

  13. Strong purifying selection in endogenous retroviruses in the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) in the Northern Territory of Australia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of exogenous retroviruses that have integrated into the nuclear DNA of a germ-line cell. Here we present the results of a survey into the ERV complement of Crocodylus porosus, the saltwater crocodile, representing 45 individuals from 17 sampling locations in the Northern Territory of Australia. These retroelements were compared with published ERVs from other species of Crocodylia (Crocodilians; alligators, caimans, gharials and crocodiles) as well as representatives from other vertebrates. This study represents one of the first in-depth studies of ERVs within a single reptilian species shedding light on the diversity of ERVs and proliferation mechanisms in crocodilians. Results Analyses of the retroviral pro-pol gene region have corroborated the presence of two major clades of ERVs in C. porosus and revealed 18 potentially functional fragments out of the 227 recovered that encode intact pro-pol ORFs. Interestingly, we have identified some patterns of diversification among those ERVs as well as a novel sequence that suggests the presence of an additional retroviral genus in C. porosus. In addition, considerable diversity but low genetic divergence within one of the C. porosus ERV lineages was identified. Conclusions We propose that the ERV complement of C. porosus has come about through a combination of recent infections and replication of ancestral ERVs. Strong purifying selection acting on these clades suggests that this activity is recent or still occurring in the genome of this species. The discovery of potentially functional elements is an interesting development that warrants further investigation. PMID:23217152

  14. Inflammatory response of endothelial cells to a human endogenous retrovirus associated with multiple sclerosis is mediated by TLR4.

    PubMed

    Duperray, Alain; Barbe, Delphin; Raguenez, Gilda; Weksler, Babette B; Romero, Ignacio A; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Perron, Hervé; Marche, Patrice N

    2015-11-01

    The MSRV (multiple sclerosis-associated retrovirus) belongs to the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-W family. The envelope protein originating from the MSRV has been found in most patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This protein (Env-ms) has pro-inflammatory properties for several types of immune cells and could therefore play a role in MS pathogenesis by promoting the leukocyte diapedesis observed in the central nervous system of patients. Our study aims to analyze the effects of Env-ms on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) at a molecular and functional level. We demonstrate that the recombinant MSRV envelope is able to stimulate several inflammatory parameters in a human BBB in vitro model, the HCMEC/D3 brain endothelial cell line. Indeed, Env-ms induces over-expression of ICAM-1, a major mediator of leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, in a dose-dependent manner as well as a strong dose-dependent production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. Furthermore, using a silencing approach with siRNAs, we show that Env-ms is recognized via the Toll-like receptor 4 receptor, a pattern recognition receptor of innate immunity present on endothelial cells. We also show, using functional assays, that treatment of brain endothelial cells with Env-ms significantly stimulated the adhesion and the transmigration of activated immune cells through a monolayer of endothelial cells. These findings support the hypothesis that MSRV could be involved in the pathogenesis of MS disease or at least in maintenance of inflammatory conditions, thus fueling the auto-immune disorder. MSRV could also play a role in other chronic inflammatory diseases.

  15. Endogenous New World primate retrovirus: interspecies antigenic determinants shared with the major structural protein of type-D RNA viruses of Old World monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Hino, S; Tronick, S R; Heberling, R L; Kalter, S S; Hellman, A; Aaronson, S A

    1977-01-01

    A reverse transcriptase-containing virus has recently been isolated from a squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). Molecular hybridization studies demonstrate that the squirrel monkey retrovirus (SMRV) is endogenous to this New World primate, yet lacks detectable nucleotide sequence homology with cellular DNAs of representative Old World primates or with the genomes of previously isolated Old World primate retroviruses. The 35,000-dalton major structural protein (p35) of SMRV was purified and shown to possess antigenic determinants distinct from those of known retroviruses. While SMRV was found to lack antigenic determinants broadly shared among mammalian type-C viruses, immunologic crossreactivity was demonstrated between SMRV p35 and the major structural protein (p26) of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, a prototype type-D retrovirus of Old World monkeys. These findings support the concept that SMRV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus are evolutionarily related, and raise the possibility that a progenitor of type-D retroviruses became genetically associated with primates at a very early time in their evolution. PMID:74833

  16. Existence of Two Distinct Infectious Endogenous Retroviruses in Domestic Cats and Their Different Strategies for Adaptation to Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kuse, Kyohei; Ito, Jumpei; Miyake, Ariko; Kawasaki, Junna; Watanabe, Shinya; Makundi, Isaac; Ngo, Minh Ha; Otoi, Takeshige

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are the remnants of ancient retroviral infections of germ cells. Previous work identified one of the youngest feline ERV groups, ERV-DC, and reported that two ERV-DC loci, ERV-DC10 and ERV-DC18 (ERV-DC10/DC18), can replicate in cultured cells. Here, we identified another replication-competent provirus, ERV-DC14, on chromosome C1q32. ERV-DC14 differs from ERV-DC10/DC18 in its phylogeny, receptor usage, and, most notably, transcriptional activities; although ERV-DC14 can replicate in cultured cells, it cannot establish a persistent infection owing to its low transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we examined ERV-DC transcription and its regulation in feline tissues. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) detected extremely low ERV-DC10 expression levels in feline tissues, and bisulfite sequencing showed that 5′ long terminal repeats (LTRs) of ERV-DC10/DC18 are significantly hypermethylated in feline blood cells. Reporter assays found that the 5′-LTR promoter activities of ERV-DC10/DC18 are high, whereas that of ERV-DC14 is low. This difference in promoter activity is due to a single substitution from A to T in the LTR, and reverse mutation at this nucleotide in ERV-DC14 enhanced its replication and enabled it to persistently infect cultured cells. Therefore, ERV-DC LTRs can be divided into two types based on this nucleotide, the A type or T type, which have strong or attenuated promoter activity, respectively. Notably, ERV-DCs with T-type LTRs, such as ERV-DC14, have expanded in the cat genome significantly more than A-type ERV-DCs, despite their low promoter activities. Our results provide insights into how the host controls potentially infectious ERVs and, conversely, how ERVs adapt to and invade the host genome. IMPORTANCE The domestic cat genome contains many endogenous retroviruses, including ERV-DCs. These ERV-DCs have been acquired through germ cell infections with exogenous retroviruses. Some of these ERV

  17. Expression of human endogenous retrovirus-K is strongly associated with the basal-like breast cancer phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Johanning, Gary L.; Malouf, Gabriel G.; Zheng, Xiaofeng; Esteva, Francisco J.; Weinstein, John N.; Wang-Johanning, Feng; Su, Xiaoping

    2017-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), which make up approximately 8% of the human genome, are overexpressed in some breast cancer cells and tissues but without regard to cancer subtype. We, therefore, analyzed TCGA RNA-Seq data to evaluate differences in expression of the HERV-K family in breast cancers of the various subtypes. Four HERV-K loci on different chromosomes were analyzed in basal, Her2E, LumA, and LumB breast cancer subtypes of 512 breast cancer patients with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). The results for all four loci showed higher HERV-K expression in the basal subtype, suggesting similar mechanisms of regulation regardless of locus. Expression of the HERV-K envelope gene (env) was highly significantly increased in basal tumors in comparison with the also-upregulated expression of other HERV-K genes. Analysis of reverse-phase protein array data indicated that increased expression of HERV-K is associated with decreased mutation of H-Ras (wild-type). Our results show elevation of HERV-K expression exclusively in the basal subtype of IDC breast cancer (as opposed to the other subtypes) and suggest HERV-K as a possible target for cancer vaccines or immunotherapy against this highly aggressive form of breast cancer. PMID:28165048

  18. ‘There and back again’: revisiting the pathophysiological roles of human endogenous retroviruses in the post-genomic era

    PubMed Central

    Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Belshaw, Robert; Katzourakis, Aris

    2013-01-01

    Almost 8% of the human genome comprises endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). While they have been shown to cause specific pathologies in animals, such as cancer, their association with disease in humans remains controversial. The limited evidence is partly due to the physical and bioethical restrictions surrounding the study of transposons in humans, coupled with the major experimental and bioinformatics challenges surrounding the association of ERVs with disease in general. Two biotechnological landmarks of the past decade provide us with unprecedented research artillery: (i) the ultra-fine sequencing of the human genome and (ii) the emergence of high-throughput sequencing technologies. Here, we critically assemble research about potential pathologies of ERVs in humans. We argue that the time is right to revisit the long-standing questions of human ERV pathogenesis within a robust and carefully structured framework that makes full use of genomic sequence data. We also pose two thought-provoking research questions on potential pathophysiological roles of ERVs with respect to immune escape and regulation. PMID:23938753

  19. Endogenous retroviruses in mammals: an emerging picture of how ERVs modify expression of adjacent genes.

    PubMed

    Isbel, Luke; Whitelaw, Emma

    2012-09-01

    Endogenous retrovirsuses (ERVs) have long been known to influence gene expression in plants in important ways, but what of their roles in mammals? Our relatively sparse knowledge in that area was recently increased with the finding that ERVs can influence the expression of mammalian resident genes by disrupting transcriptional termination. For many mammalian biologists, retrotransposition is considered unimportant except when it disrupts the reading frame of a gene, but this view continues to be challenged. It has been known for some time that integration into an intron can create novel transcripts and integration upstream of a gene can alter the expression of the transcript, in many cases producing phenotypic consequences and disease. The new findings on transcriptional termination extend the opportunities for retrotransposons to play a role in human disease.

  20. Human Endogenous Retroviruses-K (HML-2) Expression Is Correlated with Prognosis and Progress of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Weijie; Hong, Zhenfei; Liu, Hailing; Chen, Xi; Ding, Lu; Liu, Zhisu

    2016-01-01

    Background. The association between human endogenous retroviruses-K (HERV-K) (HML-2) and human disease, including a variety of cancers, has been indicated. However, the function of HERV-K (HML-2) in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) still remains largely unclear. Methods. We detected the expression of HERV-K (HML-2) in 84 HCC tissues and adjacent nontumor tissues by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and analyzed its correlation with the clinical parameters. Result. The HEVR-K level was significantly increased in HCC compared with adjacent normal tissues (P < 0.01) which was proved to be significantly associated with cirrhosis (P < 0.05), tumor differentiation (P < 0.05), and TNM stage (P < 0.05). Moreover, the high expression of HERV-K (HML-2) had a poorer overall survival than patients with lower expression by a Kaplan-Meier survival analysis (P < 0.01). The multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that the level of HERV-K (HML-2) was an independent prognostic factor for the overall survival rate of HCC patients. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves demonstrated the diagnostic accuracy of HERV-K (HML-2) expression in HCC (AUC = 0.729, 74.7% sensitivity, and 67.8% specificity). Conclusions. Our results suggested that upregulation of HERV-K (HML-2) in HCC patients was significantly related to cancer progression and poor outcome, indicating that HERV-K (HML-2) might be a novel candidate prognostic biomarker for HCC. PMID:28070518

  1. Macroevolution of complex retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J; Tristem, Michael; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Pybus, Oliver G

    2009-09-18

    Retroviruses can leave a "fossil record" in their hosts' genomes in the form of endogenous retroviruses. Foamy viruses, complex retroviruses that infect mammals, have been notably absent from this record. We have found an endogenous foamy virus within the genomes of sloths and show that foamy viruses were infecting mammals more than 100 million years ago and codiverged with their hosts across an entire geological era. Our analysis highlights the role of evolutionary constraint in maintaining viral genome structure and indicates that accessory genes and mammalian mechanisms of innate immunity are the products of macroevolutionary conflict played out over a geological time scale.

  2. Custom human endogenous retroviruses dedicated microarray identifies self-induced HERV-W family elements reactivated in testicular cancer upon methylation control

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Juliette; Montgiraud, Cécile; Pichon, Jean-Philippe; Bonnaud, Bertrand; Arsac, Maud; Ruel, Karine; Bouton, Olivier; Mallet, François

    2010-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are an inherited part of the eukaryotic genomes, and represent ∼400 000 loci in the human genome. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) can be divided into distinct families, composed of phylogenetically related but structurally heterogeneous elements. The majority of HERVs are silent in most physiological contexts, whereas a significant expression is observed in pathological contexts, such as cancers. Owing to their repetitive nature, few of the active HERV elements have been accurately identified. In addition, there are no criteria defining the active promoters among HERV long-terminal repeats (LTRs). Hence, it is difficult to understand the HERV (de)regulation mechanisms and their implication on the physiopathology of the host. We developed a microarray to specifically detect the LTR-containing transcripts from the HERV-H, HERV-E, HERV-W and HERV-K(HML-2) families. HERV transcriptome was analyzed in the placenta and seven normal/tumoral match-pair samples. We identified six HERV-W loci overexpressed in testicular cancer, including a usually placenta-restricted transcript of ERVWE1. For each locus, specific overexpression was confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR, and comparison of the activity of U3 versus U5 regions suggested a U3-promoted transcription coupled with 5′R initiation. The analysis of DNA from tumoral versus normal tissue revealed that hypomethylation of U3 promoters in tumors is a prerequisite for their activation. PMID:20053729

  3. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Family HERV-K(HML-5): Status, Evolution, and Reconstruction of an Ancient Betaretrovirus in the Human Genome†

    PubMed Central

    Lavie, Laurence; Medstrand, Patrik; Schempp, Werner; Meese, Eckart; Mayer, Jens

    2004-01-01

    The human genome harbors numerous distinct families of so-called human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) which are remnants of exogenous retroviruses that entered the germ line millions of years ago. We describe here the hitherto little-characterized betaretrovirus HERV-K(HML-5) family (named HERVK22 in Repbase) in greater detail. Out of 139 proviruses, only a few loci represent full-length proviruses, and many lack gag protease and/or env gene regions. We generated a consensus sequence from multiple alignment of 62 HML-5 loci that displays open reading frames for the four major retroviral proteins. Four HML-5 long terminal repeat (LTR) subfamilies were identified that are associated with monophyletic proviral bodies, implying different evolution of HML-5 LTRs and genes. Sequence analysis indicated that the proviruses formed approximately 55 million years ago. Accordingly, HML-5 proviral sequences were detected in Old World and New World primates but not in prosimians. No recent activity is associated with this HERV family. We also conclude that the HML-5 consensus sequence primer binding site is identical to methionine tRNA. Therefore, the family should be designated HERV-M. Our study provides important insights into the structure and evolution of the oldest betaretrovirus in the primate genome known to date. PMID:15280487

  4. A soluble envelope protein of endogenous retrovirus (FeLIX) present in serum of domestic cats mediates infection of a pathogenic variant of feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Shoichi; Shojima, Takayuki; Fukui, Daisuke; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    T-lymphotropic feline leukemia virus (FeLV-T), a highly pathogenic variant of FeLV, induces severe immunosuppression in cats. FeLV-T is fusion defective because in its PHQ motif, a gammaretroviral consensus motif in the N terminus of an envelope protein, histidine is replaced with aspartate. Infection by FeLV-T requires FeLIX, a truncated envelope protein encoded by an endogenous FeLV, for transactivation of infectivity and Pit1 for binding FeLIX. Although Pit1 is present in most tissues in cats, the expression of FeLIX is limited to certain cells in lymphoid organs. Therefore, the host cell range of FeLV-T was thought to be restricted to cells expressing FeLIX. However, because FeLIX is a soluble factor and is expressed constitutively in lymphoid organs, we presumed it to be present in blood and evaluated its activities in sera of various mammalian species using a pseudotype assay. We demonstrated that cat serum has FeLIX activity at a functional level, suggesting that FeLIX is present in the blood and that FeLV-T may be able to infect cells expressing Pit1 regardless of the expression of FeLIX in vivo. In addition, FeLIX activities in sera were detected only in domestic cats and not in other feline species tested. To our knowledge, this is the first report to prove that a large amount of truncated envelope protein of endogenous retrovirus is circulating in the blood to facilitate the infection of a pathogenic exogenous retrovirus.

  5. Reduced expression of human endogenous retrovirus (HERV)-W GAG protein in the cingulate gyrus and hippocampus in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression.

    PubMed

    Weis, S; Llenos, I C; Sabunciyan, S; Dulay, J R; Isler, L; Yolken, R; Perron, H

    2007-01-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus (HERV)-W multicopy family was identified in human DNA from the previously characterized multiple sclerosis associated retroviral element (MSRV). Upregulation of the HERV-W POL has been reported in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with schizophrenia. The expression of capsid (GAG) protein of HERV-W was studied by immunohistochemistry and western blotting in postmortem brain tissue of the anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampal formation of normal controls and of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. A physiological expression of GAG protein was detected in neurons as well as astroglial cells in normal brain both in the anterior cingulate cortex and in the hippocampal formation. There was a statistically significant reduction of this expression in neurons and astroglial cells in brains from individuals with schizophrenia, major depression, and bipolar disorder. The results from the present study confirm that GAG protein encoded by the HERV-W multicopy gene family is expressed in cells of the central nervous system under normal conditions. Our findings of a cell type-, brain region- and disease-specific reduced expression in schizophrenia, major depression, and bipolar disorder are compatible with a pathophysiological role of HERVs in human brain disorders. The causes and biological consequences of this differential regulation will be the subject of further investigations.

  6. Transcriptional and functional studies of Human Endogenous Retrovirus envelope EnvP(b) and EnvV genes in human trophoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Amandine Thiery, Maxime Lafond, Julie Barbeau, Benoit

    2012-03-30

    HERV (Human Endogenous Retrovirus)-encoded envelope proteins are implicated in the development of the placenta. Indeed, Syncytin-1 and -2 play a crucial role in the fusion of human trophoblasts, a key step in placentation. Other studies have identified two other HERV env proteins, namely EnvP(b) and EnvV, both expressed in the placenta. In this study, we have fully characterized both env transcripts and their expression pattern and have assessed their implication in trophoblast fusion. Through RACE analyses, standard spliced transcripts were detected, while EnvV transcripts demonstrated alternative splicing at its 3 Prime end. Promoter activity and expression of both genes were induced in forskolin-stimulated BeWo cells and in primary trophoblasts. Although we have confirmed the fusogenic activity of EnvP(b), overexpression or silencing experiments revealed no impact of this protein on trophoblast fusion. Our results demonstrate that both env genes are expressed in human trophoblasts but are not required for syncytialization.

  7. Human endogenous retrovirus W family envelope gene activates the small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel in human neuroblastoma cells through CREB.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Liu, Z C; Yin, S J; Chen, Y T; Yu, H L; Zeng, J; Zhang, Q; Zhu, F

    2013-09-05

    Numerous studies have shown that human endogenous retrovirus W family (HERV-W) envelope gene (env) is related to various diseases but the underlying mechanism has remained poorly understood. Our previous study showed that there was abnormal expression of HERV-W env in sera of patients with schizophrenia. In this paper, we reported that overexpression of the HERV-W env elevated the levels of small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel protein 3 (SK3) in human neuroblastoma cells. Using a luciferase reporter system and RNA interference method, we found that functional cAMP response element site was required for the expression of SK3 triggered by HERV-W env. In addition, it was also found that the SK3 channel was activated by HERV-W env. Further study indicated that cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) was required for the activation of the SK3 channel. Thus, a novel signaling mechanism of how HERV-W env influences neuronal activity and contributes to mental illnesses such as schizophrenia was proposed.

  8. A human endogenous retrovirus K dUTPase triggers a TH1, TH17 cytokine response: does it have a role in psoriasis?

    PubMed

    Ariza, Maria-Eugenia; Williams, Marshall V

    2011-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory immune disease of the skin characterized by a complex interplay between multiple risk genes and their interactions with environmental factors. Recent haplotype analyses have suggested that deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) encoded by a human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) may be a candidate gene for the psoriasis susceptibility 1 locus. However, no functional studies have been conducted to determine the role of HERV-K dUTPase in psoriasis. For this purpose, we constructed an HERV-K dUTPase wild-type sequence, as well as specific mutations reflecting the genotype characteristic of high- and low-risk haplotypes, purified the recombinant proteins, and evaluated whether they could modulate innate and/or adaptive immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that wild-type and mutant HERV-K dUTPase proteins induce the activation of NF-κB through Toll-like receptor 2, independent of enzymatic activity. Proteome array studies revealed that treatment of human primary cells with wild-type and mutant HERV-K dUTPase proteins triggered the secretion of T(H)1 and T(H)17 cytokines involved in the formation of psoriatic plaques, including IL-12p40, IL-23, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-8, and CCL20, in dendritic/Langerhans-like cells and to a lesser extent in keratinocytes. These data support HERV-K dUTPase as a potential contributor to psoriasis pathophysiology.

  9. Comprehensive analysis of human endogenous retrovirus group HERV-W locus transcription in multiple sclerosis brain lesions by high-throughput amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Katja; Richter, Christin; Backes, Christina; Meese, Eckart; Ruprecht, Klemens; Mayer, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) of the HERV-W group comprise hundreds of loci in the human genome. Deregulated HERV-W expression and HERV-W locus ERVWE1-encoded Syncytin-1 protein have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the actual transcription of HERV-W loci in the MS context has not been comprehensively analyzed. We investigated transcription of HERV-W in MS brain lesions and white matter brain tissue from healthy controls by employing next-generation amplicon sequencing of HERV-W env-specific reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR products, thus revealing transcribed HERV-W loci and the relative transcript levels of those loci. We identified more than 100 HERV-W loci that were transcribed in the human brain, with a limited number of loci being predominantly transcribed. Importantly, relative transcript levels of HERV-W loci were very similar between MS and healthy brain tissue samples, refuting deregulated transcription of HERV-W env in MS brain lesions, including the high-level-transcribed ERVWE1 locus encoding Syncytin-1. Quantitative RT-PCR likewise did not reveal differences in MS regarding HERV-W env general transcript or ERVWE1- and ERVWE2-specific transcript levels. However, we obtained evidence for interindividual differences in HERV-W transcript levels. Reporter gene assays indicated promoter activity of many HERV-W long terminal repeats (LTRs), including structurally incomplete LTRs. Our comprehensive analysis of HERV-W transcription in the human brain thus provides important information on the biology of HERV-W in MS lesions and normal human brain, implications for study design, and mechanisms by which HERV-W may (or may not) be involved in MS.

  10. Cellular Prion Protein Combined with Galectin-3 and -6 Affects the Infectivity Titer of an Endogenous Retrovirus Assayed in Hippocampal Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hae-Young; Goto, Joy J.; Carp, Richard I.; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are infectious and fatal neurodegenerative diseases which require the cellular prion protein, PrPC, for development of diseases. The current study shows that the PrPC augments infectivity and plaque formation of a mouse endogenous retrovirus, MuLV. We have established four neuronal cell lines expressing mouse PrPC, PrP+/+; two express wild type PrPC (MoPrPwild) and the other two express mutant PrPC (MoPrPmut). Infection of neuronal cells from various PrP+/+ and PrP-/- (MoPrPKO) lines with MuLV yielded at least three times as many plaques in PrP+/+ than in PrP-/-. Furthermore, among the four PrP+/+ lines, one mutant line, P101L, had at least 2.5 times as many plaques as the other three PrP+/+ lines. Plaques in P101L were four times larger than those in other PrP+/+ lines. Colocalization of PrP and CAgag was seen in MuLV-infected PrP+/+ cells. In the PrP-MuLV interaction, the involvement of galectin-3 and -6 was observed by immunoprecipitation with antibody to PrPC. These results suggest that PrPC combined with galectin-3 and -6 can act as a receptor for MuLV. P101L, the disease form of mutant PrPC results suggest the genetic mutant form of PrPC may be more susceptible to viral infection. PMID:27936017

  11. The LTR enhancer of ERV-9 human endogenous retrovirus is active in oocytes and progenitor cells in transgenic zebrafish and humans

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Wenhu; Yang, Zhongan; Wang, Jian; Ruan, Ling; Yu, Xiuping; Ling, Jianhua; Krantz, Sanford; Isales, Carlos; Conway, Simon J.; Lin, Shuo; Tuan, Dorothy

    2004-01-01

    The solitary LTRs of ERV-9 human endogenous retrovirus are middle repetitive DNAs associated with 3,000–4,000 human gene loci including the β-globin gene locus where the ERV-9 LTR is juxtaposed to the locus control region (β-LCR) far upstream of the globin genes. The ERV-9 LTRs are conserved during primate evolution, but their function in the primate genomes is unknown. Here, we show that in transgenic zebrafish harboring the β-globin ERV-9 LTR coupled to the GFP gene, the LTR enhancer was active and initiated synthesis of GFP mRNA in oocytes but not in spermatozoa, and GFP expression in the embryos was maternally inherited. The LTR enhancer was active also in stem/progenitor cell regions of adult tissues of transgenic zebrafish. In human tissues, ERV-9 LTR enhancer was active also in oocytes and stem/progenitor cells but not in spermatozoa and a number of differentiated, adult somatic cells. Transcriptional analyses of the human β-globin gene locus showed that the β-globin ERV-9 LTR enhancer initiated RNA synthesis from the LTR in the direction of the downstream β locus control region and globin genes in ovary and erythroid progenitor cells. The findings suggest that, during oogenesis, ERV-9 LTR enhancers in the human genome could activate the cis-linked gene loci to synthesize maternal mRNAs required for early embryogenesis. Alternatively, the ERV-9 LTR enhancers, in initiating RNA syntheses into the downstream genomic DNAs, could transcriptionally potentiate and preset chromatin structure of the cis-linked gene loci in oocytes and adult stem/progenitor cells. PMID:14718667

  12. Novel Denisovan and Neanderthal retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Adam; Huntley, Derek; Aiewsakun, Pakorn; Kanda, Ravinder K; Lynn, Claire; Tristem, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Following the recent availability of high-coverage genomes for Denisovan and Neanderthal hominids, we conducted a screen for endogenized retroviruses, identifying six novel, previously unreported HERV-K(HML2) elements (HERV-K is human endogenous retrovirus K). These elements are absent from the human genome (hg38) and appear to be unique to archaic hominids. These findings provide further evidence supporting the recent activity of the HERV-K(HML2) group, which has been implicated in human disease. They will also provide insights into the evolution of archaic hominids.

  13. Transspecies Transmission of Gammaretroviruses and the Origin of the Gibbon Ape Leukaemia Virus (GaLV) and the Koala Retrovirus (KoRV)

    PubMed Central

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Transspecies transmission of retroviruses is a frequent event, and the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is a well-known example. The gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GaLV) and koala retrovirus (KoRV), two gammaretroviruses, are also the result of a transspecies transmission, however from a still unknown host. Related retroviruses have been found in Southeast Asian mice although the sequence similarity was limited. Viruses with a higher sequence homology were isolated from Melomys burtoni, the Australian and Indonesian grassland melomys. However, only the habitats of the koalas and the grassland melomys in Australia are overlapping, indicating that the melomys virus may not be the precursor of the GaLV. Viruses closely related to GaLV/KoRV were also detected in bats. Therefore, given the fact that the habitats of the gibbons in Thailand and the koalas in Australia are far away, and that bats are able to fly over long distances, the hypothesis that retroviruses of bats are the origin of GaLV and KoRV deserves consideration. Analysis of previous transspecies transmissions of retroviruses may help to evaluate the potential of transmission of related retroviruses in the future, e.g., that of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) during xenotransplantation using pig cells, tissues or organs. PMID:27999419

  14. Transspecies Transmission of Gammaretroviruses and the Origin of the Gibbon Ape Leukaemia Virus (GaLV) and the Koala Retrovirus (KoRV).

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim

    2016-12-20

    Transspecies transmission of retroviruses is a frequent event, and the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is a well-known example. The gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GaLV) and koala retrovirus (KoRV), two gammaretroviruses, are also the result of a transspecies transmission, however from a still unknown host. Related retroviruses have been found in Southeast Asian mice although the sequence similarity was limited. Viruses with a higher sequence homology were isolated from Melomys burtoni, the Australian and Indonesian grassland melomys. However, only the habitats of the koalas and the grassland melomys in Australia are overlapping, indicating that the melomys virus may not be the precursor of the GaLV. Viruses closely related to GaLV/KoRV were also detected in bats. Therefore, given the fact that the habitats of the gibbons in Thailand and the koalas in Australia are far away, and that bats are able to fly over long distances, the hypothesis that retroviruses of bats are the origin of GaLV and KoRV deserves consideration. Analysis of previous transspecies transmissions of retroviruses may help to evaluate the potential of transmission of related retroviruses in the future, e.g., that of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs) during xenotransplantation using pig cells, tissues or organs.

  15. Human Endogenous Retrovirus K(HML-2) Gag- and Env-Specific T-Cell Responses Are Infrequently Detected in HIV-1-Infected Subjects Using Standard Peptide Matrix-Based Screening

    PubMed Central

    John, Vivek M.; Hunter, Diana V.; Martin, Eric; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Burgers, Peter C.; Luider, Theo M.; Gyenes, Gabor; Sheppard, Neil C.; SenGupta, Devi; Tandon, Ravi; Yue, Feng-Yun; Benko, Erika; Kovacs, Colin; Nixon, Douglas F.; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2012-01-01

    T-cell responses to human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) K(HML-2) Gag and Env were mapped in HIV-1-infected subjects using 15mer peptides. Small peptide pools and high concentrations were used to maximize sensitivity. In the 23 subjects studied, only three bona fide HERV-K(HML-2)-specific responses were detected. At these high peptide concentrations, we detected false-positive responses, three of which were mapped to an HIV-1 Gag peptide contaminant. Thus, HERV-K(HML-2) Gag- and Env-specific T-cell responses are infrequently detected by 15mer peptide mapping. PMID:22205657

  16. Non integrative strategy decreases chromosome instability and improves endogenous pluripotency genes reactivation in porcine induced pluripotent-like stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Congras, Annabelle; Barasc, Harmonie; Canale-Tabet, Kamila; Plisson-Petit, Florence; Delcros, Chantal; Feraud, Olivier; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Hadadi, Eva; Griscelli, Franck; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Turhan, Ali; Afanassieff, Marielle; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Pinton, Alain; Yerle-Bouissou, Martine; Acloque, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    The pig is an emerging animal model, complementary to rodents for basic research and for biomedical and agronomical purposes. However despite the progress made on mouse and rat models to produce genuine pluripotent cells, it remains impossible to produce porcine pluripotent cell lines with germline transmission. Reprogramming of pig somatic cells using conventional integrative strategies remains also unsatisfactory. In the present study, we compared the outcome of both integrative and non-integrative reprogramming strategies on pluripotency and chromosome stability during pig somatic cell reprogramming. The porcine cell lines produced with integrative strategies express several pluripotency genes but they do not silence the integrated exogenes and present a high genomic instability upon passaging. In contrast, pig induced pluripotent-like stem cells produced with non-integrative reprogramming system (NI-iPSLCs) exhibit a normal karyotype after more than 12 months in culture and reactivate endogenous pluripotency markers. Despite the persistent expression of exogenous OCT4 and MYC, these cells can differentiate into derivatives expressing markers of the three embryonic germ layers and we propose that these NI-iPSLCs can be used as a model to bring new insights into the molecular factors controlling and maintaining pluripotency in the pig and other non-rodent mammalians. PMID:27245508

  17. KOALA RETROVIRUS: A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Matthew E; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2016-06-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a gammaretrovirus that has been identified in both captive and free-ranging koalas ( Phascolarctos cinereus ) with variable geographic distribution in Australia. KoRV is capable of both exogenous and endogenous transmission, which provides an interesting research platform for scientists to study active retrovirus endogenization into a host genome and offers veterinary scientists an opportunity to examine the clinical consequences of KoRV infection in koalas. Causation between KoRV and frequently recognized clinical conditions associated with immune suppression and neoplasia in koalas has not been definitively established, however research continues to evaluate a potential association. Three KoRV variants, KoRV-A, KoRV-B, and KoRV-J, have been the most thoroughly described and preliminary evidence suggests KoRV variability may be fundamental in host pathogenicity. In addition to reviewing what is currently known about KoRV, this article discusses treatment, management, and future research directions.

  18. Overexpression of OCT4A ortholog elevates endogenous XIST in porcine parthenogenic blastocysts

    PubMed Central

    HWANG, Jae Yeon; CHOI, Kwang-Hwan; LEE, Dong-Kyung; KIM, Seung-Hun; KIM, Eun Bae; HYUN, Sang-Hwan; LEE, Chang-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is an epigenetic process that equalizes expression of X-borne genes between male and female eutherians. This process is observed in early eutherian embryo development in a species-specific manner. Until recently, various pluripotent factors have been suggested to regulate the process of XCI by repressing XIST expression, which is the master inducer for XCI. Recent insights into the process and its regulation have been restricted in mouse species despite the evolutionary diversity of the process and molecular mechanism among the species. OCT4A is one of the represented pluripotent factors, the gate-keeper for maintaining pluripotency, and an XIST repressor. Therefore, in here, we examined the relation between OCT4A and X-linked genes in porcine preimplantation embryos. Three X-linked genes, XIST, LOC102165544, and RLIM, were selected in present study because their orthologues have been known to regulate XCI in mice. Expression levels of OCT4A were positively correlated with XIST and LOC102165544 in female blastocysts. Furthermore, overexpression of exogenous human OCT4A in cleaved parthenotes generated blastocysts with increased XIST expression levels. However, increased XIST expression was not observed when exogenous OCT4A was obtained from early blastocysts. These results suggest the possibility that OCT4A would be directly or indirectly involved in XIST expression in earlier stage porcine embryos rather than blastocysts. PMID:26255835

  19. Koala retroviruses: characterization and impact on the life of koalas.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim; Young, Paul R

    2013-10-23

    Koala retroviruses (KoRV) have been isolated from wild and captive koalas in Australia as well as from koala populations held in zoos in other countries. They are members of the genus Gammaretrovirus, are most closely related to gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV), feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) and are likely the result of a relatively recent trans-species transmission from rodents or bats. The first KoRV to be isolated, KoRV-A, is widely distributed in the koala population in both integrated endogenous and infectious exogenous forms with evidence from museum specimens older than 150 years, indicating a relatively long engagement with the koala population. More recently, additional subtypes of KoRV that are not endogenized have been identified based on sequence differences and host cell receptor specificity (KoRV-B and KoRV-J). A specific association with fatal lymphoma and leukemia has been recently suggested for KoRV-B. In addition, it has been proposed that the high viral loads found in many animals may lead to immunomodulation resulting in a higher incidence of diseases such as chlamydiosis. Although the molecular basis of this immunomodulation is still unclear, purified KoRV particles and a peptide corresponding to a highly conserved domain in the envelope protein have been shown to modulate cytokine expression in vitro, similar to that induced by other gammaretroviruses. While much is still to be learned, KoRV induced lymphoma/leukemia and opportunistic disease arising as a consequence of immunomodulation are likely to play an important role in the stability of koala populations both in the wild and in captivity.

  20. Retroviruses: Gaining an Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Contrasted are DNA viruses, RNA viruses, and RNA retroviruses. The structure, genome, and replication of retroviruses are discussed. The discovery, structure, and action of the HIV virus are described. A list of 17 references is included. (CW)

  1. Koala Retroviruses: Evolution and Disease Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqin; Eiden, Maribeth V

    2015-11-01

    A retroviral etiology for malignant neoplasias in koalas has long been suspected. Evidence for retroviral involvement was bolstered in 2000 by the isolation of a koala retrovirus (KoRV), now termed KoRV-A. KoRV-A is an endogenous retrovirus-a retrovirus that infects germ cells-a feature that makes it a permanent resident of the koala genome. KoRV-A lacks the genetic diversity of an exogenous retrovirus, a quality associated with the ability of a retrovirus to cause neoplasias. In 2013, a second KoRV isolate, KoRV-B, was obtained from koalas with lymphomas in the Los Angeles Zoo. Unlike KoRV-A, which is present in the genomes of all koalas in the United States, KoRV-B is restricted in its distribution and is associated with host pathology (neoplastic disease). Here, our current understanding of the evolution of endogenous and exogenous KoRVs, and the relationship between them, is reviewed to build a perspective on the future impact of these viruses on koala sustainability.

  2. MuLV packaging systems as models for estimating/measuring retrovirus recombination frequency.

    PubMed

    Patience, C; Takeuch, Y; Cosset, F L; Weiss, R A

    2001-01-01

    Interaction of retrovirus vectors and endogenous retroviruses present in packaging cell lines and target cells may result in the formation of recombinant viruses. Using sensitive RT-PCR assays, we have investigated human and murine gene therapy packaging cell lines for the incorporation of endogenous retrovirus transcripts into murine leukaemia virus (MLV) vector particles and whether vector genomes are incorporated into human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) particles. VL30 endogenous retrovirus sequences were packaged in particles produced by the murine AM12 packaging system. For every seven MLV-derived -galactosidase beta-Gal vector genomes present in the particles, one copy of VL30 was also packaged. Although human FLY packaging cells expressed HERV transcripts (HERV-K, HuRT, type C, and RTVL-H), none was detectable in the MLV vector particles released from the cells. Non-specific packaging of the MLV gag-pol expression vector transcripts was detected in the FLY virions at a low level (one in 17,000 sequences). In other experiments, gag proteins produced by HERV-K particles present in human teratocarcinoma cells did not appear to package MLV-based vectors that expressed Gal transcripts. These findings indicate that retrovirus vectors interact with human packaging cells to produce retrovirus particles that are far less contaminated by endogenous viral sequences or other types of extraneous particles than murine packaging cells.

  3. Marine origin of retroviruses in the early Palaeozoic Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiewsakun, Pakorn; Katzourakis, Aris

    2017-01-01

    Very little is known about the ancient origin of retroviruses, but owing to the discovery of their ancient endogenous viral counterparts, their early history is beginning to unfold. Here we report 36 lineages of basal amphibian and fish foamy-like endogenous retroviruses (FLERVs). Phylogenetic analyses reveal that ray-finned fish FLERVs exhibit an overall co-speciation pattern with their hosts, while amphibian FLERVs might not. We also observe several possible ancient viral cross-class transmissions, involving lobe-finned fish, shark and frog FLERVs. Sequence examination and analyses reveal two major lineages of ray-finned fish FLERVs, one of which had gained two novel accessory genes within their extraordinarily large genomes. Our phylogenetic analyses suggest that this major retroviral lineage, and therefore retroviruses as a whole, have an ancient marine origin and originated together with, if not before, their jawed vertebrate hosts >450 million years ago in the Ordovician period, early Palaeozoic Era.

  4. Marine origin of retroviruses in the early Palaeozoic Era.

    PubMed

    Aiewsakun, Pakorn; Katzourakis, Aris

    2017-01-10

    Very little is known about the ancient origin of retroviruses, but owing to the discovery of their ancient endogenous viral counterparts, their early history is beginning to unfold. Here we report 36 lineages of basal amphibian and fish foamy-like endogenous retroviruses (FLERVs). Phylogenetic analyses reveal that ray-finned fish FLERVs exhibit an overall co-speciation pattern with their hosts, while amphibian FLERVs might not. We also observe several possible ancient viral cross-class transmissions, involving lobe-finned fish, shark and frog FLERVs. Sequence examination and analyses reveal two major lineages of ray-finned fish FLERVs, one of which had gained two novel accessory genes within their extraordinarily large genomes. Our phylogenetic analyses suggest that this major retroviral lineage, and therefore retroviruses as a whole, have an ancient marine origin and originated together with, if not before, their jawed vertebrate hosts >450 million years ago in the Ordovician period, early Palaeozoic Era.

  5. Xenotransplantation and the potential risk of xenogeneic transmission of porcine viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, D; Giulivi, A

    2000-01-01

    The clinical success of allotransplantation and the shortage of donor organs have led to a proposal for the use of animal organs as alternative therapeutic materials for humans. In that regard, swine are preferable to non-human primates as a source of donor organs. While applications for clinical trials for xenotransplantation have not yet been received in Canada, several trials have already been authorized in the United States. A major concern, however, is the potential for xenogeneic transmission of viruses from animals to humans via organ, tissue, or cellular transplantation or via ex vivo exposure of humans to porcine biologic materials. Xenotransplantation allows viruses to bypass the normal immunological defense mechanisms of the recipient. Furthermore, the use of immunosuppressive drugs following transplantation may facilitate the xenogeneic transmission of zoonotic agents. Of porcine viruses, swine hepatitis E virus does not cause any clinical symptoms in the natural host but is a likely zoonotic agent that can infect humans and cause hepatitis. Porcine circovirus type 1 is prevalent in swine populations with no known association with clinical disease, while circovirus type 2 causes post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome. Porcine endogenous retrovirus is integrated into the host chromosomes while porcine cytomegalovirus undergoes latent infection. Two additional porcine herpesviruses have recently been identified in swine and have been named porcine lymphotrophic herpesviruses. These herpesviruses can potentially become reactivated in human recipients after xenotransplantation. All in all, there are a number of viruses in swine that are of primary concern to screen and eliminate from xenotransplantation protocols. Epidemiology and the current knowledge on xenogeneic risk of these viruses are discussed. PMID:11041495

  6. Molecular Evolution of the Porcine Type I Interferon Family: Subtype-Specific Expression and Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Yongming; Bergkamp, Joseph; Blecha, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs), key antiviral cytokines, evolve to adapt with ever-changing viral threats during vertebrate speciation. Due to novel pathogenic pressure associated with Suidae speciation and domestication, porcine IFNs evolutionarily engender both molecular and functional diversification, which have not been well addressed in pigs, an important livestock species and animal model for biomedical sciences. Annotation of current swine genome assembly Sscrofa10.2 reveals 57 functional genes and 16 pseudogenes of type I IFNs. Subfamilies of multiple IFNA, IFNW and porcine-specific IFND genes are separated into four clusters with ∼60 kb intervals within the IFNB/IFNE bordered region in SSC1, and each cluster contains mingled subtypes of IFNA, IFNW and IFND. Further curation of the 57 functional IFN genes indicates that they include 18 potential artifactual duplicates. We performed phylogenetic construction as well as analyses of gene duplication/conversion and natural selection and showed that porcine type I IFN genes have been undergoing active diversification through both gene duplication and conversion. Extensive analyses of the non-coding sequences proximal to all IFN coding regions identified several genomic repetitive elements significantly associated with different IFN subtypes. Family-wide studies further revealed their molecular diversity with respect to differential expression and restrictive activity on the resurgence of a porcine endogenous retrovirus. Based on predicted 3-D structures of representative animal IFNs and inferred activity, we categorized the general functional propensity underlying the structure-activity relationship. Evidence indicates gene expansion of porcine type I IFNs. Genomic repetitive elements that associated with IFN subtypes may serve as molecular signatures of respective IFN subtypes and genomic mechanisms to mediate IFN gene evolution and expression. In summary, the porcine type I IFN profile has been phylogenetically

  7. Preparation of immunogen-reduced and biocompatible extracellular matrices from porcine liver.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Mee; Park, Sung-Min; Yang, Se-Ran; Hong, Seok-Ho; Woo, Heung-Myong

    2013-02-01

    Decellularized biologic matrices are plausible biomedical materials for the bioengineering in liver transplantation. However, one of the concerns for safe medical application is the lack of objective assessment of the immunogen within the materials and the in vivo immune responses to the matrices. The purpose of this study was the production of immunogen-reduced and biocompatible matrices from porcine liver. In the present study, 0.1% SDS solution was effective for removing DNA fragments and sequences encoding possible immunogenic and viral antigens within the matrices. The PCR analysis showed that galactose-α-1,3 galactose β-1,4-N-acetylglucosamine (1,3 gal), swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), and porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) were completely removed in the matrices. Collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were preserved over 63%-71%, respectively, compared to those of native liver. The implanted decellularized tissues showed minimal host responses and naturally degraded within 10 weeks. In this study, we produced immunogen-reduced and biocompatible extracellular matrices from porcine liver. Although future investigations would be required to determine the mechanism of the host reaction, this study could provide useful information of porcine liver-derived biologic matrices for liver researches.

  8. Quantitative detection of residual porcine host cell DNA by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jen-Ting; Chen, Yu-Chen; Chou, Yu-Chi; Wang, Shih-Rong

    2014-03-01

    All biological products are derived from complex living systems and are often mixed with large numbers of impurities. For reasons of safety, residual host-cell DNA must be eliminated during processing. To assay host-cell DNA content in biopharmaceutical products derived from porcine sources, this study applies the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) method. The optimized assay in this study is based on the pol region of the porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV). Assay validation results demonstrate that the proposed assay has appropriate accuracy, preciseness, reproducibility, and sensitivity. Primer and probe specificity are evaluated in real-time Q-PCR reactions using genomic DNA from rabbit, mouse, cat, hamster, monkey, human cell, yeast, and Escherichia coli as templates. The sensitivity of real-time Q-PCR is determined using genomic DNA from the porcine kidney cell line. The reliable detection range is within 0.5-10(5) pg/reaction. The limit of quantitation is 500 fg. The sensitivity of the assay meets the authority criterion. Moreover, the assay is applied to determine the level of host-cell DNA in recombinant human coagulation factor IX (rhFIX) from transgenic pigs. The real-time Q-PCR assay is thus a promising new tool for quantitative detection and clearance validation of residual porcine DNA when manufacturing recombinant therapeutics.

  9. Pushing the endogenous envelope

    PubMed Central

    Henzy, Jamie E.; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2013-01-01

    The majority of retroviral envelope glycoproteins characterized to date are typical of type I viral fusion proteins, having a receptor binding subunit associated with a fusion subunit. The fusion subunits of lentiviruses and alpha-, beta-, delta- and gammaretroviruses have a very conserved domain organization and conserved features of secondary structure, making them suitable for phylogenetic analyses. Such analyses, along with sequence comparisons, reveal evidence of numerous recombination events in which retroviruses have acquired envelope glycoproteins from heterologous sequences. Thus, the envelope gene (env) can have a history separate from that of the polymerase gene (pol), which is the most commonly used gene in phylogenetic analyses of retroviruses. Focusing on the fusion subunits of the genera listed above, we describe three distinct types of retroviral envelope glycoproteins, which we refer to as gamma-type, avian gamma-type and beta-type. By tracing these types within the ‘fossil record’ provided by endogenous retroviruses, we show that they have surprisingly distinct evolutionary histories and dynamics, with important implications for cross-species transmissions and the generation of novel lineages. These findings validate the utility of env sequences in contributing phylogenetic signal that enlarges our understanding of retrovirus evolution. PMID:23938755

  10. First update of the International Xenotransplantation Association consensus statement on conditions for undertaking clinical trials of porcine islet products in type 1 diabetes--Chapter 5: recipient monitoring and response plan for preventing disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim; Tönjes, Ralf R; Takeuchi, Yasu; Fishman, Jay; Scobie, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine cells, tissues, and organs may be associated with the transmission of porcine microorganisms to the human recipient. A previous, 2009, version of this consensus statement focused on strategies to prevent transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERVs). This version addresses potential transmission of all porcine microorganisms including monitoring of the recipient and provides suggested approaches to the monitoring and prevention of disease transmission. Prior analyses assumed that most microorganisms other than the endogenous retroviruses could be eliminated from donor animals under appropriate conditions which have been called "designated pathogen-free" (DPF) source animal production. PERVs integrated as proviruses in the genome of all pigs cannot be eliminated in that manner and represent a unique risk. Certain microorganisms are by nature difficult to eliminate even under DPF conditions; any such clinically relevant microorganisms should be included in pig screening programs. With the use of porcine islets in clinical trials, special consideration has to be given to the presence of microorganisms in the isolated islet tissue to be used and also to the potential use of encapsulation. It is proposed that microorganisms absent in the donor animals by sensitive microbiological examination do not need to be monitored in the transplant recipient; this will reduce costs and screening requirements. Valid detection assays for donor and manufacturing-derived microorganisms must be established. Special consideration is needed to preempt potential unknown pathogens which may pose a risk to the recipient. This statement summarizes the main achievements in the field since 2009 and focus on issues and solutions with microorganisms other than PERV.

  11. Detection of koala retrovirus subgroup B (KoRV-B) in animals housed at European zoos.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Uwe; Keller, Martina; Denner, Joachim

    2016-12-01

    Many koalas carry an endogenous retrovirus, KoRV-A, in their genome. Recently, a second retrovirus, KoRV-B, was detected in koalas in Japanese and U.S. zoos. However, this virus is not endogenous, differs in the receptor binding site of the surface envelope protein, and uses a receptor different from that of KoRV-A. We describe here a KoRV-B found in koalas at zoos in Germany and Belgium that differs slightly from that found in the Los Angeles zoo.

  12. Analogy Between Lymphotropic Human Retroviruses and Large Animal Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Bouillant, Alain M.P.

    1986-01-01

    The family Retroviridae comprises some fifty viruses in three subfamilies: Oncoviridae, Lentiviridae and Spumaviridae. A better understanding of retroviral pathobiology has resulted from the rapid developments in knowledge of the molecular biology of normal and cancerous cells as well as retroviruses. Genomic relatedness was found between two human T cell leukemia viruses and bovine leukemia virus, similarly, some relatedness appears possible between human AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) virus and lentiviruses of large animals. Because of their genomic relatedness, retroviruses from man and animals could theoretically form recombinants during in vitro manipulation. Therefore persons who work with retroviral materials should follow established laboratory practices to control infectious agents. PMID:17422719

  13. Conserved Region of Mammalian Retrovirus RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kominami, R.; Hatanaka, M.

    1979-01-01

    The viral RNAs of various mammalian retroviruses contain highly conserved sequences close to their 3′ ends. This was demonstrated by interviral molecular hybridization between fractionated viral complementary DNA (cDNA) and RNA. cDNA near the 3′ end (cDNA3′) from a rat virus (RPL strain) was fractionated by size and mixed with mouse virus RNA (Rauscher leukemia virus). No hybridization occurred with total cDNA (cDNAtotal), in agreement with previous results, but a cross-reacting sequence was found with the fractionated cDNA3′. The sequences between 50 to 400 nucleotides from the 3′ terminus of heteropolymeric RNA were most hybridizable. The rat viral cDNA3′ hybridized with mouse virus RNA more extensively than with RNA of remotely related retroviruses. The related viral sequence of the rodent viruses (mouse and rat) showed as much divergence in heteroduplex thermal denaturation profiles as did the unique sequence DNA of these two rodents. This suggests that over a period of time, rodent viruses have preserved a sequence with changes correlated to phylogenetic distance of hosts. The cross-reacting sequence of replication-competent retroviruses was conserved even in the genome of the replication-defective sarcoma virus and was also located in these genomes near the 3′ end of 30S RNA. A fraction of RD114 cDNA3′, corresponding to the conserved region, cross-hybridized extensively with RNA of a baboon endogenous virus (M7). Fractions of similar size prepared from cDNA3′ of MPMV, a primate type D virus, hybridized with M7 RNA to a lesser extent. Hybridization was not observed between Mason-Pfizer monkey virus and M7 if total cDNA's were incubated with viral RNAs. The degree of cross-reaction of the shared sequence appeared to be influenced by viral ancestral relatedness and host cell phylogenetic relationships. Thus, the strikingly high extent of cross-reaction at the conserved region between rodent viruses and simian sarcoma virus and between baboon

  14. Porcine gonadogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five images submitted for teaching purposes related to porcine gonadogenesis (2), porcine fetal testicular development (2), and porcine fetal ovarian development. Key words include: Egg cell nests, Embryo, GATA4, Genital ridge, Gonad, Leydig cell, Mesonephros, MIS, Ovary, P450c17, Porcine, Sertoli ...

  15. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Korber, B.; Wain-Hobson, S.; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Henderson, L.E.; Pavlakis, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    This compendium, including accompanying floppy diskettes, is the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts it comprises: (I) Nucleic Acid Alignments and Sequences; (II) Amino Acid Alignments; (III) Analysis; (IV) Related Sequences; (V) Database communications.

  16. A novel approach to achieving modular retrovirus clearance for a parvovirus filter.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, Juliana; Strauss, Daniel; Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Gao, Jinxin; Luo, Wen; Quertinmont, Michelle; O'Donnell, Sean; Chen, Dayue

    2014-01-01

    Viral filtration is routinely incorporated into the downstream purification processes for the production of biologics produced in mammalian cell cultures (MCC) to remove potential viral contaminants. In recent years, the use of retentive filters designed for retaining parvovirus (~20 nm) has become an industry standard in a conscious effort to further improve product safety. Since retentive filters remove viruses primarily by the size exclusion mechanism, it is expected that filters designed for parvovirus removal can effectively clear larger viruses such as retroviruses (~100 nm). In an attempt to reduce the number of viral clearance studies, we have taken a novel approach to demonstrate the feasibility of claiming modular retrovirus clearance for Asahi Planova 20N filters. Porcine parvovirus (PPV) and xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMuLV) were co-spiked into six different feedstreams and then subjected to laboratory scale Planova 20N filtration. Our results indicate that Planova 20N filters consistently retain retroviruses and no retrovirus has ever been detected in the filtrates even when significant PPV breakthrough is observed. Based on the data from multiple in-house viral validation studies and the results from the co-spiking experiments, we have successfully claimed a modular retrovirus clearance of greater than 6 log10 reduction factors (LRF) to support clinical trial applications in both USA and Europe.

  17. A novel endogenous betaretrovirus group characterized from polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Mayer, Jens; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Heeger, Felix; Avila-Arcos, María; Stenglein, Mark D; Chen, Wei; Sun, Wei; Mazzoni, Camila J; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Greenwood, Alex D

    2013-08-15

    Transcriptome analysis of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) yielded sequences with highest similarity to the human endogenous retrovirus group HERV-K(HML-2). Further analysis of the polar bear draft genome identified an endogenous betaretrovirus group comprising 26 proviral copies and 231 solo LTRs. Molecular dating indicates the group originated before the divergence of bears from a common ancestor but is not present in all carnivores. Closely related sequences were identified in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and characterized from its genome. We have designated the polar bear and giant panda sequences U. maritimus endogenous retrovirus (UmaERV) and A. melanoleuca endogenous retrovirus (AmeERV), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the bear virus group is nested within the HERV-K supergroup among bovine and bat endogenous retroviruses suggesting a complex evolutionary history within the HERV-K group. All individual remnants of proviral sequences contain numerous frameshifts and stop codons and thus, the virus is likely non-infectious.

  18. Review of the twelfth West Coast Retrovirus Meeting.

    PubMed

    Barry, Sheila M; Melar, Marta; Gallay, Philippe; Hope, Thomas J

    2005-11-17

    Every year the Cancer Research Institute from University of California at Irvine organizes the West Coast Retrovirus Meeting where participants have a chance to discuss the latest progress in understanding the pathology of retroviruses. The 12th meeting was held at the Hyatt Regency Suites in Palm Springs, California from October 6th to October 9th 2005, with the major focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pathogenesis. Philippe Gallay from The Scripps Research Institute and Thomas J. Hope from Northwestern University organized the meeting, which covered all the steps involved in the lifecycle of retroviruses with an emphasis on virus:host interactions. The trend in research appeared to be on the restriction of viral infection, both by the endogenous, cellular restriction factors, as well as by the potential antimicrobial compounds of known or unknown mechanisms. Additionally, new stories on the inevitable feedback from the host immune system were presented as well. HIV still represents a challenge that an army of motivated people has been working on for over 20 years. And yet, the field has not reached the plateau in knowledge nor enthusiasm, which was proven again in October 2005 in Palm Springs.

  19. Long-term IgG response to porcine Neu5Gc-antigens without transmission of PERV in burn patients treated with porcine skin xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Scobie, Linda; Padler-Karavani, Vered; Le Bas-Bernardet, Stephanie; Crossan, Claire; Blaha, Josef; Matouskova, Magda; Hector, Ralph D; Cozzi, Emanuele; Vanhove, Bernard; Charreau, Beatrice; Blancho, Gilles; Bourdais, Ludovic; Tallacchini, Mariachiara; Ribes, Juan M; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Kracikova, Jitka; Broz, Ludomir; Hejnar, Jiri; Vesely, Pavel; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Varki, Ajit; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Acellular materials of xenogenic origin are used worldwide as xenografts and Phase I trials of viable pig pancreatic islets are currently being performed. However, limited information is available on transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) after xenotransplantation and on the long-term immune response of recipients to xenoantigens. We analyzed the blood of burn patients who had received living pig skin dressings for up to 8 weeks for the presence of PERV as well as for the level and nature of their long term (maximum 34 years) immune response against pig antigens. Whilst no evidence of PERV genomic material or anti PERV antibody response was found, we observed a moderate increase in anti αGal antibodies and a high and sustained anti non-αGal IgG response in those patients. Antibodies against the non-human sialic acid Neu5Gc constituted the anti non-αGal response with the recognition pattern on a sialogly can array differing from that of burn patients treated without pig skin. These data suggest that anti-Neu5Gc antibodies may represent a barrier for long-term acceptance of porcine xenografts. As anti-Neu5Gc antibodies can promote chronic inflammation, the long-term safety of living and acellular pig tissue implants in recipients warrants further evaluation. PMID:23945141

  20. Long-term IgG response to porcine Neu5Gc antigens without transmission of PERV in burn patients treated with porcine skin xenografts.

    PubMed

    Scobie, Linda; Padler-Karavani, Vered; Le Bas-Bernardet, Stephanie; Crossan, Claire; Blaha, Josef; Matouskova, Magda; Hector, Ralph D; Cozzi, Emanuele; Vanhove, Bernard; Charreau, Beatrice; Blancho, Gilles; Bourdais, Ludovic; Tallacchini, Mariachiara; Ribes, Juan M; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Kracikova, Jitka; Broz, Ludomir; Hejnar, Jiri; Vesely, Pavel; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Varki, Ajit; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2013-09-15

    Acellular materials of xenogenic origin are used worldwide as xenografts, and phase I trials of viable pig pancreatic islets are currently being performed. However, limited information is available on transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) after xenotransplantation and on the long-term immune response of recipients to xenoantigens. We analyzed the blood of burn patients who had received living pig-skin dressings for up to 8 wk for the presence of PERV as well as for the level and nature of their long term (maximum, 34 y) immune response against pig Ags. Although no evidence of PERV genomic material or anti-PERV Ab response was found, we observed a moderate increase in anti-αGal Abs and a high and sustained anti-non-αGal IgG response in those patients. Abs against the nonhuman sialic acid Neu5Gc constituted the anti-non-αGal response with the recognition pattern on a sialoglycan array differing from that of burn patients treated without pig skin. These data suggest that anti-Neu5Gc Abs represent a barrier for long-term acceptance of porcine xenografts. Because anti-Neu5Gc Abs can promote chronic inflammation, the long-term safety of living and acellular pig tissue implants in recipients warrants further evaluation.

  1. Identification of developmental competence-related genes in mature porcine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ye; Ida, Jennifer M; Paczkowski, Melissa; Krisher, Rebecca L

    2011-08-01

    Oocyte competence is a key factor limiting female fertility, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms that contribute to oocyte competence remain unclear. The objective of this study was to elucidate specific genes whose function contributes to oocyte competence. We observed that 6 of 20 target genes examined were differentially expressed between adult (more competent) and prepubertal (less competent) porcine in vitro matured (IVM) oocytes. These genes were the cholesterol synthesis-related gene HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR), fatty acid oxidation genes acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 3 (ACSL3) and long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADL), glycolytic genes fructose 1,6 bisphosphate aldolase (ALDOA) and lactate dehydrogenase C (LDHC), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF). These 6 genes, as well as 3 other genes [porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), transcribed loci 10 (TL10), serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1)], were further analyzed by comparing transcript abundance in IVM and in vivo matured (VVM) prepubertal and adult porcine oocytes. Among these 9 target genes, 5 were differentially expressed between IVM and VVM prepubertal oocytes, while 8 genes were differentially expressed between IVM and VVM adult oocytes. No genes were differentially expressed between VVM prepubertal and adult oocytes. A functional study of TNF demonstrated that depletion of endogenous TNF decreased oocyte competence and TNFAIP6 expression in cumulus cells, while TNF in IVM medium regulated TNFAIP6 expression in cumulus cells. Differential expression of the genes identified in this study suggests that these genes may be functionally relevant to oocyte competence.

  2. Expression of human endogenous retrovirus K and W in babies.

    PubMed

    Nali, L H S; Oliveira, A C S; Alves, D O; Caleiro, G S; Nunes, C F; Gerhardt, D; Succi, R C M; Romano, Camila M; Machado, D M

    2017-03-01

    Here we determined the relative expression of HERV-K and W proviruses in HIV infected and non-infected mothers as well as their respective babies up to 1 year-old. HIV-infected mothers, their babies and uninfected control groups presented expression of both HERV-K and HERV-W with relatively high frequency. While the level of HERV-K expression was similar among groups, the level of HERV-W expression in HIV-infected mothers was four-fold higher than the uninfected mothers from the control group (p < 0.01). HERV-W was down regulated in HIV-exposed babies in comparison to non-exposed babies. To our knowledge, this is the first report of HERV transcriptional activity in babies from 0-1 year-old.

  3. Heterogeneity of koala retrovirus isolates.

    PubMed

    Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Shojima, Takayuki; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2014-01-03

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a gammaretrovirus which may induce immune suppression, leukemia and lymphoma in koalas. Currently three KoRV subgroups (A, B, and J) have been reported. Our phylogenetic analysis suggests that KoRV-B and KoRV-J should be classified as the same subgroup. In long terminal repeat (LTR), a KoRV-B isolate has four 17 bp tandem repeats named direct repeat (DR)-1, while a KoRV-J isolate (strain OJ-4) has three 37 bp tandem repeats named DR-2. We also found that the promoter activity of the KoRV-J strain OJ-4 is stronger than that of original KoRV-A, suggesting that KoRV-J may replicate more efficiently than KoRV-A.

  4. Nonequilibirum assembly, retroviruses, and conical structures.

    PubMed

    Levandovsky, Artem; Zandi, Roya

    2009-05-15

    We study the spontaneous assembly of viral shells composed of several identical subunits under nonequilibrium conditions. We find that within the basic continuum elasticity framework, the nonequilibrium assembly process is able to predict the formation of structures pertinent to retroviruses. Our minimal model of assembly yields a unified one-dimensional phase diagram in which the appearance of spherical, irregular, conical and cylindrical structures of retroviruses is seen to be governed by the spontaneous curvature of protein subunits.

  5. World Reference Center for Arboviruses and Retroviruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    GROUP SUD GROUP Arbo4irus, retrovirus, Cache Valley virus, phlebovirus, 󈧨 1 1 ELISA, yellow fever, Kaposi sarcoma , rapid diagnosis, 06 I 03 I I...aposi sarcoma patients was studied serologically. Reference reagents were distrihuted to scientists in over 2W) countries. 20 DISTRISUnON...demonstrate the origin of an introduced dengue virus. Retrovirus isolation capability was developed and a novel enveloped agent from tissues of Kaposi

  6. Transcription termination and polyadenylation in retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Guntaka, R V

    1993-01-01

    The provirus structure of retroviruses is bracketed by long terminal repeats (LTRs). The two LTRs (5' and 3') are identical in nucleotide sequence and organization. They contain signals for transcription initiation as well as termination and cleavage polyadenylation. As in eukaryotic pre-mRNAs, the two common signals, the polyadenylation signal, AAUAAA, or a variant AGUAAA, and the G+U-rich sequence are present in all retroviruses. However, the AAUAAA sequence is present in the U3 region in some retroviruses and in the R region in other retroviruses. As in animal cell RNAs, both AAUAAA and G+U-rich sequences apparently contribute to the 3'-end processing of retroviral RNAs. In addition, at least in a few cases examined, the sequences in the U3 region determine the efficiency of 3'-end processing. In retroviruses in which the AAUAAA is localized in the R region, the poly(A) signal in the 3' LTR but not the 5' LTR must be selectively used for the production of genomic RNA. It appears that the short distance between the 5' cap site and polyadenylation signal in the 5' LTR precludes premature termination and polyadenylation. Since 5' and 3' LTRs are identical in sequence and structural organization yet function differently, it is speculated that flanking cellular DNA sequences, chromatin structure, and binding of transcription factors may be involved in the functional divergence of 5' and 3' LTRs of retroviruses. PMID:7902524

  7. Perspectives on retroviruses and the etiologic agent of AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Hsiung, G. D.

    1987-01-01

    In 1911, the first retrovirus was described: the Rous sarcoma virus, an avian retrovirus. Forty years later the murine leukemic virus, a mouse retrovirus, was reported. Although many other retroviruses from non-primate species were identified during the 1960s, the first primate retrovirus was not recognized until it was isolated from a monkey tumor in 1970. The search for human retroviruses in human leukemic cells remained unsuccessful at that time. Facilitated by the discovery of T-cell growth factor, a substance used for the propagation of human leukocytes in cultures, the first human retrovirus was discovered in 1980. Soon thereafter, in 1983, another human retrovirus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), was reported and implicated as the etiologic agent of AIDS. The isolation and identification of HIV has stimulated much interest in the study of human retroviruses and the control of this new viral disease. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:2829449

  8. Human retroviruses and neoplastic disease.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M H

    1993-11-01

    Human retroviral infections result in significant neoplastic disease. Human T cell lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-I), the first human retrovirus to be discovered, is associated with the development of acute T cell leukemia with characteristic hypercalcemia and skin lesions after many years of chronic infection of CD4+ cells. HTLV-I also produces myelopathy. A minor T cell immunodeficiency occurs in HTLV-I acute T cell leukemia with associated strongyloidiasis and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Human T cell lymphotropic virus II (HTLV-II) is found to be endemic in Amerindians and intravenous drug users (IVDUs) and has been linked to some cases of hairy-cell leukemia. HTLV-II infects the CD8+ population, with significant cell-associated viremia. Clinical neurological disease is rare, with one patient with myelopathy having been described. Immunodeficiency does not seem to occur. Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) produces aggressive large cell and Burkitt's lymphoma in as many as 10% of HIV-1-infected patients. More than 20% of homosexual men infected with HIV-1 develop Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). The pathogenesis of KS is better understood through studying KS-like cell lines that induce angiogenic factors. In some patients HIV-1 and HTLV-I or HTLV-II infections occur concomitantly. HIV-1 accelerates the tumorigenesis of HTLV-I and produces unusual skin diseases when combined with HTLV-II. Immunodeficiency occurs in all HIV-1-infected patients.

  9. Human retroviruses and aids, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Korber, B. ); Berzofsky, J.A.; Pavlakis, G.N. ); Smith, R.F. )

    1992-10-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (H) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions below of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  10. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, B.; Foley, B.; Leitner, T.

    1997-12-01

    This compendium is the result of an effort to compile, organize, and rapidly publish as much relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses as possible. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the four parts that it comprises: (1) Nucleic Acid Alignments, (2) Amino Acid Alignments, (3) Reviews and Analyses, and (4) Related Sequences. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. This year we are not including floppy diskettes as the entire compendium is available both at our Web site and at our ftp site. If you need floppy diskettes please contact either Bette Korber (btk@t10.lanl.gov) or Kersti Rock (karm@t10.lanl.gov) by email or fax ((505) 665-4453). While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. The exception to this are reviews submitted by experts in areas deemed of particular and basic importance to research involving AIDS viral sequence information. These are included in Part III, and are contributed by scientists with particular expertise in the area of interest. In addition to the general descriptions below of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  11. Human RNA “Rumor” Viruses: the Search for Novel Human Retroviruses in Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Voisset, Cécile; Weiss, Robin A.; Griffiths, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Retroviruses are an important group of pathogens that cause a variety of diseases in humans and animals. Four human retroviruses are currently known, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1, which causes AIDS, and human T-lymphotropic virus type 1, which causes cancer and inflammatory disease. For many years, there have been sporadic reports of additional human retroviral infections, particularly in cancer and other chronic diseases. Unfortunately, many of these putative viruses remain unproven and controversial, and some retrovirologists have dismissed them as merely “human rumor viruses.” Work in this field was last reviewed in depth in 1984, and since then, the molecular techniques available for identifying and characterizing retroviruses have improved enormously in sensitivity. The advent of PCR in particular has dramatically enhanced our ability to detect novel viral sequences in human tissues. However, DNA amplification techniques have also increased the potential for false-positive detection due to contamination. In addition, the presence of many families of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) within our DNA can obstruct attempts to identify and validate novel human retroviruses. Here, we aim to bring together the data on “novel” retroviral infections in humans by critically examining the evidence for those putative viruses that have been linked with disease and the likelihood that they represent genuine human infections. We provide a background to the field and a discussion of potential confounding factors along with some technical guidelines. In addition, some of the difficulties associated with obtaining formal proof of causation for common or ubiquitous agents such as HERVs are discussed. PMID:18322038

  12. World Reference Center for Arboviruses and Retroviruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    Reference Center for Arboviruses and Retroviruses identified viruses from Thailand, Nepal, Egypt, Colombia, and Panama. Cache Valley virus from a recruit...ARBOVIRUSES . . 13 A. Study of viruses from Thailand and Nepal . . . . 13 B. Isolation of Sicilian sandfly fever virus from Egyptian phlebotomines...dengue viruses ..... . 30 VII. LOW PASSAGE VIRUS COLLECTION .... ............. 32 VIII. ARBOVIRUS BULLETIN BOARD, REFERENCE, AND DATA ACCESS . 32 IX

  13. [Endogenous hypertriglyceridemia].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Kazuhisa

    2013-09-01

    Endogenous hypertriglyceridemia, which includes familial hypertriglyceridemia and idiopathic hypertriglyceridemia, is characterized by the increased level of VLDL-triglycerides in the blood. Increased production of VLDL from the liver and the decreased catabolism of VLDL-TG in the vessel, which are also the main metabolic features of insulin resistance, have been proposed to be the causes of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia. Genetic factors responsible for endogenous hypertriglyceridemia have been elucidated in several studies, however, these factors have so far not been clearly identified yet; thus the causes of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia would be polygenic. Recent advances in the genetic analytical methods like genome-wide association study would hopefully unveil the whole pictures of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia.

  14. Endogenous lentiviral elements in the weasel family (Mustelidae).

    PubMed

    Han, Guan-Zhu; Worobey, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Endogenous retroviruses provide molecular fossils for studying the ancient evolutionary history of retroviruses. Here, we report our independent discovery and analysis of endogenous lentiviral insertions (Mustelidae endogenous lentivirus [MELV]) within the genomes of weasel family (Mustelidae). Genome-scale screening identified MELV elements in the domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) genome (MELVmpf). MELVmpf exhibits a typical lentiviral genomic organization. Phylogenetic analyses position MELVmpf basal to either primate lentiviruses or feline immunodeficiency virus. Moreover, we verified the presence of MELV insertions in the genomes of several species of the Lutrinae and Mustelinae subfamilies but not the Martinae subfamily, suggesting that the invasion of MELV into the Mustelidae genomes likely took place between 8.8 and 11.8 Ma. The discovery of MELV in weasel genomes extends the host range of lentiviruses to the Caniformia (order Carnivora) and provides important insights into the prehistoric diversity of lentiviruses.

  15. Strategies of retrovirus survival in the cat.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, O

    1999-09-01

    Retroviruses establish persistent infections in their hosts which often lead to serious and fatal diseases after a long incubation period. The molecular basis of this persistence is the integration of a copy of the viral genome into cellular chromosomal DNA. At the level of the whole animal, however, each retrovirus genus has evolved a different strategy to ensure its survival. This variety is well illustrated in the cat. Feline leukaemia virus, an oncovirus, has a simple genomic structure and survives in its host by suppressing the immune response to the virus. As a result, this virus is antigenically highly conserved. By contrast, feline immunodeficiency virus and feline foamy virus, representatives of the lentiviruses and spumaviruses, respectively, have more complex genomes which include genes responsible for maintaining the virus in a latent state thereby avoiding elimination in the face of a powerful antiviral immune response. In the lentiviruses, this response drives the selection of viruses exhibiting variation in antigenicity and pathogenicity.

  16. One hundred twenty years of koala retrovirus evolution determined from museum skins.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Arcos, María C; Ho, Simon Y W; Ishida, Yasuko; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Hönig, Karin; Medina, Rebeca; Rasmussen, Morten; Fordyce, Sarah L; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Willerslev, Eske; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Helgen, Kristofer M; Roca, Alfred L; Greenwood, Alex D

    2013-02-01

    Although endogenous retroviruses are common across vertebrate genomes, the koala retrovirus (KoRV) is the only retrovirus known to be currently invading the germ line of its host. KoRV is believed to have first infected koalas in northern Australia less than two centuries ago. We examined KoRV in 28 koala museum skins collected in the late 19th and 20th centuries and deep sequenced the complete proviral envelope region from five northern Australian specimens. Strikingly, KoRV env sequences were conserved among koalas collected over the span of a century, and two functional motifs that affect viral infectivity were fixed across the museum koala specimens. We detected only 20 env polymorphisms among the koalas, likely representing derived mutations subject to purifying selection. Among northern Australian koalas, KoRV was already ubiquitous by the late 19th century, suggesting that KoRV evolved and spread among koala populations more slowly than previously believed. Given that museum and modern koalas share nearly identical KoRV sequences, it is likely that koala populations, for more than a century, have experienced increased susceptibility to diseases caused by viral pathogenesis.

  17. Conference Highlights of the 16th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses, 26–30 June 2013, Montreal, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 16th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses was held in Montreal, Québec from June 26th to June 30th, 2013 and was therefore hosted by a Canadian city for the first time. The major topic of the meeting was human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs) and was covered through distinct oral and poster presentation sessions: clinical research, animal models, immunology, molecular and cellular biology, human endogenous and emerging exogenous retroviruses and virology. In this review, highlights of the meeting are provided by different experts for each of these research areas. PMID:24558960

  18. Phylogenetic Diversity of Koala Retrovirus within a Wild Koala Population.

    PubMed

    Chappell, K J; Brealey, J C; Amarilla, A A; Watterson, D; Hulse, L; Palmieri, C; Johnston, S D; Holmes, E C; Meers, J; Young, P R

    2017-02-01

    Koala populations are in serious decline across many areas of mainland Australia, with infectious disease a contributing factor. Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a gammaretrovirus present in most wild koala populations and captive colonies. Five subtypes of KoRV (A to E) have been identified based on amino acid sequence divergence in a hypervariable region of the receptor binding domain of the envelope protein. However, analysis of viral genetic diversity has been conducted primarily on KoRV in captive koalas housed in zoos in Japan, the United States, and Germany. Wild koalas within Australia have not been comparably assessed. Here we report a detailed analysis of KoRV genetic diversity in samples collected from 18 wild koalas from southeast Queensland. By employing deep sequencing we identified 108 novel KoRV envelope sequences and determined their phylogenetic diversity. Genetic diversity in KoRV was abundant and fell into three major groups; two comprised the previously identified subtypes A and B, while the third contained the remaining hypervariable region subtypes (C, D, and E) as well as four hypervariable region subtypes that we newly define here (F, G, H, and I). In addition to the ubiquitous presence of KoRV-A, which may represent an exclusively endogenous variant, subtypes B, D, and F were found to be at high prevalence, while subtypes G, H, and I were present in a smaller number of animals.

  19. Multiple invasions of an infectious retrovirus in cat genomes.

    PubMed

    Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2015-02-02

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancient retroviral infections of host germ-line cells. While most ERVs are defective, some are active and express viral proteins. The RD-114 virus is a replication-competent feline ERV, and several feline cell lines produce infectious RD-114 viral particles. All domestic cats are considered to have an ERV locus encoding a replication-competent RD-114 virus in their genomes; however, the locus has not been identified. In this study, we investigated RD-114 virus-related proviral loci in genomes of domestic cats, and found that none were capable of producing infectious viruses. We also found that all domestic cats have an RD-114 virus-related sequence on chromosome C2, termed RDRS C2a, but populations of the other RDRSs are different depending on the regions where cats live or breed. Our results indicate that RDRS C2a, the oldest RD-114-related provirus, entered the host genome before an ancestor of domestic cats started diverging and the other new RDRSs might have integrated into migrating cats in Europe. We also show that infectious RD-114 virus can be resurrected by the recombination between two non-infectious RDRSs. From these data, we conclude that cats do not harbor infectious RD-114 viral loci in their genomes and RD-114-related viruses invaded cat genomes multiple times.

  20. Flamenco, a gene controlling the gypsy retrovirus of drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Prud`homme, N.; Gans, M.; Masson, M.; Terzian, C.; Bucheton, A.

    1995-02-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. It is table and does not transpose with detectable frequencies in most Drosophila strains. However, we have characterized unstable strains, known as MG, in which it transposes at high frequency. These stocks contain more copies of gypsy than usual stocks. Transposition results in mutations in several genes such as ovo and cut. They are stable and are due to gypsy insertions. Integrations into the ovo{sup D1} female sterile-dominant mutation result in a null allele of the gene and occurrence of fertile females. This phenomenon, known as the ovo{sup D1} reversion assay, can be used to quantitate gypsy activity. We have shown that the properties of MG strains result from mutation of a host gene that we called flamenco (flam). It has a strict maternal effect on gypsy mobilization: transposition occurs at high frequency only in the germ line of the progeny of females homozygous for mutations of the gene. It is located at position 65.9 (20A1-3) on the X chromosome. The mutant allele present in MG strains is essentially recessive. Flamenco seems to control the infective properties of gypsy. 40 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Lack of antiviral antibody response in koalas infected with koala retroviruses (KoRV).

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Uwe; Keller, Martina; Möller, Annekatrin; Timms, Peter; Denner, Joachim

    2015-02-16

    Many wild koalas are infected with the koala retrovirus, KoRV, some of which suffer from lymphoma and chlamydial disease. Three subgroups, KoRV-A, KoRV-B and KoRV-J, have so far been described. It is well known that other closely related gammaretroviruses can induce tumours and severe immunodeficiencies in their respective hosts and a possible role for KoRV infection in lymphoma and chlamydial disease in koalas has been suggested. In many wild koalas, KoRV-A has become endogenised, i.e., it is integrated in the germ-line and is passed on with normal cellular genes. In this study, sera from koalas in European zoos and from wild animals in Australia were screened for antibodies against KoRV-A. These naturally infected animals all carry endogenous KoRV-A and two zoo animals are also infected with KoRV-B. The antibody response is generally an important diagnostic tool for detecting retrovirus infections. However, when Western blot analyses were performed using purified virus or recombinant proteins corresponding to KoRV-A, none of the koalas tested positive for specific antibodies, suggesting a state of tolerance. These results have implications for koala vaccination, as they suggest that therapeutic immunisation of animals carrying and expressing endogenous KoRV-A will not be successful. However, it remains unclear whether these animals can be immunised against KoRV-B and immunisation of uninfected koalas could still be worthwhile.

  2. Human retroviruses and AIDS, 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Korber, B. ); Berzofsky, J.A.; Pavlakis, G.N. ); Smith, R.F. )

    1991-05-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses.The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Sequences; (3) Analyses; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium.

  3. Multiple sclerosis retrovirus-like envelope gene: Role of the chromosome 20 insertion

    PubMed Central

    Varadé, Jezabel; García-Montojo, Marta; de la Hera, Belén; Camacho, Iris; García-Martínez, Mª. Ángel; Arroyo, Rafael; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Urcelay, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Background The genetic basis involved in multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility was not completely revealed by genome-wide association studies. Part of it could lie in repetitive sequences, as those corresponding to human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs). Retrovirus-like particles were isolated from MS patients and the genome of the MS-associated retrovirus (MSRV) was the founder of the HERV-W family. We aimed to ascertain which chromosomal origin encodes the pathogenic ENV protein by genomic analysis of the HERV-W insertions. Methods/results In silico analyses allowed to uncover putative open reading frames containing the specific sequence previously reported for MSRV-like envelope (env) detection. Out of the 261 genomic insertions of HERV-W env, only 9 copies harbor the specific primers and probe featuring MSRV-like env. The copy from chromosome 20 was further studied considering its size, a truncated homologue of the functional HERV-W env sequence encoding syncytin. High Resolution Melting analysis of this sequence identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms, subsequently genotyped by Taqman chemistry in 668 MS patients and 678 healthy controls. No significant association of these polymorphisms with MS risk was evidenced. Transcriptional activity of this MSRV-like env copy was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients and controls. RNA expression levels of chromosome 20-specific MSRV-like env did not show significant differences between MS patients and controls, neither were related to genotypes of the two mentioned polymorphisms. Conclusions The lack of association with MS risk of the identified polymorphisms together with the transcription results discard chromosome 20 as genomic origin of MSRV-like env. PMID:26675450

  4. A novel exogenous retrovirus sequence identified in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, D J; Venables, P J; Weiss, R A; Boyd, M T

    1997-01-01

    A 932-bp retrovirus sequence was cloned by reverse transcriptase PCR from salivary gland tissue of a patient with Sjögren's syndrome. The sequence is related to that of type B and type D retroviruses and was present in a sucrose density gradient fraction corresponding to that of an enveloped retrovirus particle. Sequences amplified from tissues of eight individuals with or without Sjögren's syndrome had over 90% similarity and were present at a level of less than one copy per 10(3) cells. The sequence was not detectable in human genomic DNA by PCR or by Southern hybridization. These data indicate that the sequence represents an infectiously acquired genome, provisionally called human retrovirus 5. PMID:9060643

  5. Searching for Common Mammalian Retroviruses in Pediatric Idiopathic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jeziorski, Eric; Foulongne, Vincent; Ludwig, Catherine; Louhaem, Djamel; Rodiere, Michel; Sitbon, Marc; Courgnaud, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian retroviruses cause a variety of diseases in their hosts, including hematological and immunodeficiency disorders. Both human T-cell leukemia (HTLV) and human immunodeficiency (HIV) viruses originated from several independent zoonotic transmissions, indicating that cross-species transmissions from animal to humans may still occur. Thus, as the risk for retroviral transmissions from animals to humans increase, we investigated whether mammalian retroviruses are involved in selected pediatric idiopathic diseases whose symptoms evoke retroviral infections. Blood samples, sera, and synovial fluids, or bone marrow cells were collected from pediatric patients under 18 years of age with different autoimmune idiopathic diseases. Overall, we screened clinical samples from 110 children using sensitive nested and semi-nested PCR strategies targeting env genes, and a C-type retrovirus reverse transcriptase (RT) activity kit. All clinical samples were free of retroviral signatures, indicating the unlikelihood of an etiological role of the retroviruses we assessed in the pediatric diseases we tested. PMID:27102168

  6. Intracellular trafficking of Gag and Env proteins and their interactions modulate pseudotyping of retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sandrin, Virginie; Muriaux, Delphine; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2004-07-01

    Glycoproteins derived from most retroviruses and from several families of enveloped viruses can form infectious pseudotypes with murine leukemia virus (MLV) and lentiviral core particles, like the MLV envelope glycoproteins (Env) that are incorporated on either virus type. However, coexpression of a given glycoprotein with heterologous core proteins does not always give rise to highly infectious viral particles, and restrictions on pseudotype formation have been reported. To understand the mechanisms that control the recruitment of viral surface glycoproteins on lentiviral and retroviral cores, we exploited the fact that the feline endogenous retrovirus RD114 glycoprotein does not efficiently pseudotype lentiviral cores derived from simian immunodeficiency virus, whereas it is readily incorporated onto MLV particles. Our results indicate that recruitment of glycoproteins by the MLV and lentiviral core proteins occurs in intracellular compartments and not at the cell surface. We found that Env and core protein colocalization in intracytoplasmic vesicles is required for pseudotype formation. By investigating MLV/RD114 Env chimeras, we show that signals in the cytoplasmic tail of either glycoprotein differentially influenced their intracellular localization; that of MLV allows endosomal localization and hence recruitment by both lentiviral and MLV cores. Furthermore, we found that upon membrane binding, MLV core proteins could relocalize Env glycoproteins in late endosomes and allow their incorporation on viral particles. Thus, intracellular colocalization, as well as interactions between Env and core proteins, may influence the recruitment of the glycoprotein onto viral particles and generate infectious pseudotyped viruses.

  7. Sequence variation of koala retrovirus transmembrane protein p15E among koalas from different geographic regions.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yasuko; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Helgen, Kristofer M; Greenwood, Alex D; Roca, Alfred L

    2015-01-15

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV), which is transitioning from an exogenous to an endogenous form, has been associated with high mortality in koalas. For other retroviruses, the envelope protein p15E has been considered a candidate for vaccine development. We therefore examined proviral sequence variation of KoRV p15E in a captive Queensland and three wild southern Australian koalas. We generated 163 sequences with intact open reading frames, which grouped into 39 distinct haplotypes. Sixteen distinct haplotypes comprising 139 of the sequences (85%) coded for the same polypeptide. Among the remaining 23 haplotypes, 22 were detected only once among the sequences, and each had 1 or 2 non-synonymous differences from the majority sequence. Several analyses suggested that p15E was under purifying selection. Important epitopes and domains were highly conserved across the p15E sequences and in previously reported exogenous KoRVs. Overall, these results support the potential use of p15E for KoRV vaccine development.

  8. Sequence variation of koala retrovirus transmembrane protein p15E among koalas from different geographic regions

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Yasuko; McCallister, Chelsea; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Greenwood, Alex D.; Roca, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV), which is transitioning from an exogenous to an endogenous form, has been associated with high mortality in koalas. For other retroviruses, the envelope protein p15E has been considered a candidate for vaccine development. We therefore examined proviral sequence variation of KoRV p15E in a captive Queensland and three wild southern Australian koalas. We generated 163 sequences with intact open reading frames, which grouped into 39 distinct haplotypes. Sixteen distinct haplotypes comprising 139 of the sequences (85%) coded for the same polypeptide. Among the remaining 23 haplotypes, 22 were detected only once among the sequences, and each had 1 or 2 non-synonymous differences from the majority sequence. Several analyses suggested that p15E was under purifying selection. Important epitopes and domains were highly conserved across the p15E sequences and in previously reported exogenous KoRVs. Overall, these results support the potential use of p15E for KoRV vaccine development. PMID:25462343

  9. Identification and characterization of endogenous viral elements for the three key schistosomes of humans.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Li, Quhuan

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous viral elements (EVEs) are widely distributed throughout eukaryotic genomes, and their evolution and potential function have attracted a lot of interest. Draft genome sequences for Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma japonicum and Schistosoma haematobium are now available; however, information about EVEs in blood flukes of the genus schistosoma is scanty. Here, genome-wide survey into the putative EVE sequences of the three key schistosome genomes were present. Totally 4, 117 gene sequences were identified, including retrovirus-like gypsy elements, RNA viruses and dsDNA viruses. Compared with S. japonicum and S. haematobium, S. mansoni appeared to greatly out numbered by gypsy members. Phylogenetic analysis revealed one novel endogenous retrovirus element in S. mansoni. This initial characterization of schistosomes showed that schistosomes harbour distinct EVEs that may have played an important evolutionary role. Studies of schistosomes' endogenous viruses helped us to glance at an earlier viral event in the class Trematoda, greatly broadening the field of palaeovirology.

  10. Modulating Drug Resistance by Targeting BCRP/ABCG2 Using Retrovirus-Mediated RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jianhui; Liu, Wenlan; Deng, Tingting; Li, Zigang; Jin, Yi; Hu, Zhangli

    2014-01-01

    Background The BCRP/ABCG2 transporter, which mediates drug resistance in many types of cells, depends on energy provided by ATP hydrolysis. Here, a retrovirus encoding a shRNA targeting the ATP-binding domain of this protein was used to screen for highly efficient agents that could reverse drug resistance and improve cell sensitivity to drugs, thus laying the foundation for further studies and applications. Methodology/Principal Findings To target the ATP-binding domain of BCRP/ABCG2, pLenti6/BCRPsi shRNA recombinant retroviruses, with 20 bp target sequences starting from the 270th, 745th and 939th bps of the 6th exon, were constructed and packaged. The pLenti6/BCRPsi retroviruses (V-BCRPi) that conferred significant knockdown effects were screened using a drug-sensitivity experiment and flow cytometry. The human choriocarcinoma cell line JAR, which highly expresses endogenous BCRP/ABCG2, was injected under the dorsal skin of a hairless mouse to initiate a JAR cytoma. After injecting V-BCRPi-infected JAR tumor cells into the dorsal skin of hairless mice, BCRP/ABCG2 expression in the tumor tissue was determined using immunohistochemistry, fluorescent quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. After intraperitoneal injection of BCRP/ABCG2-tolerant 5-FU, the tumor volume, weight change, and apoptosis rate of the tumor tissue were determined using in situ hybridization. V-BCRPi increased the sensitivity of the tumor histiocytes to 5-FU and improved the cell apoptosis-promoting effects of 5-FU in the tumor. Conclusions/Significance The goal of the in vivo and in vitro studies was to screen for an RNA interference recombinant retrovirus capable of stably targeting the ATP-binding domain of BCRP/ABCG2 (V-BCRPi) to inhibit its function. A new method to improve the chemo-sensitivity of breast cancer and other tumor cells was discovered, and this method could be used for gene therapy and functional studies of malignant tumors. PMID:25076217

  11. Identification of cellular factors required for the budding of koala retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Shimode, Sayumi; Nakaoka, Rie; Hoshino, Shigeki; Abe, Masumi; Shogen, Hiroko; Yasuda, Jiro; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2013-07-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a unique gammaretrovirus that is currently endogenizing into its host and considered to be associated with leukemia, lymphoma and immunosuppression in koalas (Phascolactos cinereus). In this study, it was demonstrated that WWP2 or WWP2-like E3 ubiquitin ligases possessing the WW domain closely related to WWP2 and Vps4A/B are involved in KoRV budding. These data suggest that KoRV Gag recruits the cellular endosomal sorting complex required for transport machinery through interaction of the PPPY L-domain with the WW domain(s) of WWP2 and that progeny virions are released from cells by utilizing the multivesicular body sorting pathway.

  12. Clinical Aspects of Feline Retroviruses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are retroviruses with global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma), bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia), and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less commonly diagnosed than in the previous 20 years; prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. However, FeLV importance may be underestimated as it has been shown that regressively infected cats (that are negative in routinely used FeLV tests) also can develop clinical signs. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. This article provides a review of clinical syndromes in progressively and regressively FeLV-infected cats as well as in FIV-infected cats. PMID:23202500

  13. Recombinant Origin of the Retrovirus XMRV

    PubMed Central

    Paprotka, Tobias; Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A.; Cingöz, Oya; Martinez, Anthony; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Tepper, Clifford G.; Hu, Wei-Shau; Fivash, Matthew J.; Coffin, John M.; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2012-01-01

    The retrovirus XMRV (xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus) has been detected in human prostate tumors and in blood samples from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, but these findings have not been replicated. We hypothesized that an understanding of when and how XMRV first arose might help explain the discrepant results. We studied human prostate cancer cell lines CWR22Rv1 and CWR-R1, which produce XMRV virtually identical to the viruses recently found in patient samples, as well as their progenitor human prostate tumor xenograft (CWR22) that had been passaged in mice. We detected XMRV infection in the two cell lines and in the later passage xenografts, but not in the early passages. Importantly, we found that the host mice contained two proviruses, PreXMRV-1 and PreXMRV-2, which share 99.92% identity with XMRV over >3.2-kb stretches of their genomes. We conclude that XMRV was not present in the original CWR22 tumor but was generated by recombination of two proviruses during tumor passaging in mice. The probability that an identical recombinant was generated independently is negligible (~10-12); our results suggest that the association of XMRV with human disease is due to contamination of human samples with virus originating from this recombination event. PMID:21628392

  14. A porcine model of osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Saalfrank, A; Janssen, K-P; Ravon, M; Flisikowski, K; Eser, S; Steiger, K; Flisikowska, T; Müller-Fliedner, P; Schulze, É; Brönner, C; Gnann, A; Kappe, E; Böhm, B; Schade, B; Certa, U; Saur, D; Esposito, I; Kind, A; Schnieke, A

    2016-01-01

    We previously produced pigs with a latent oncogenic TP53 mutation. Humans with TP53 germline mutations are predisposed to a wide spectrum of early-onset cancers, predominantly breast, brain, adrenal gland cancer, soft tissue sarcomas and osteosarcomas. Loss of p53 function has been observed in >50% of human cancers. Here we demonstrate that porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) convert to a transformed phenotype after activation of latent oncogenic TP53R167H and KRASG12D, and overexpression of MYC promotes tumorigenesis. The process mimics key molecular aspects of human sarcomagenesis. Transformed porcine MSCs exhibit genomic instability, with complex karyotypes, and develop into sarcomas on transplantation into immune-deficient mice. In pigs, heterozygous knockout of TP53 was sufficient for spontaneous osteosarcoma development in older animals, whereas homozygous TP53 knockout resulted in multiple large osteosarcomas in 7–8-month-old animals. This is the first report that engineered mutation of an endogenous tumour-suppressor gene leads to invasive cancer in pigs. Unlike in Trp53 mutant mice, osteosarcoma developed in the long bones and skull, closely recapitulating the human disease. These animals thus promise a model for juvenile osteosarcoma, a relatively uncommon but devastating disease. PMID:26974205

  15. 75 FR 79006 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Transfusion-Transmitted Retrovirus and Hepatitis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    ...- Transmitted Retrovirus and Hepatitis Virus Rates and Risk Factors: Improving the Safety of the U.S. Blood...: Transfusion-transmitted retrovirus and hepatitis virus rates and risk factors: Improving the safety of the...

  16. 75 FR 59724 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Transfusion-Transmitted Retrovirus and Hepatitis Virus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ...-Transmitted Retrovirus and Hepatitis Virus Rates and Risk Factors: Improving the Safety of the U.S. Blood... and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: Transfusion-transmitted retrovirus and hepatitis virus...

  17. Molecular cloning of the unintegrated squirrel monkey retrovirus genome: organization and distribution of related sequences in primate DNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, I M; Andersen, P R; Aaronson, S A; Tronick, S R

    1983-01-01

    The closed circular form of the endogenous squirrel monkey type D retrovirus (SMRV) was molecularly cloned in a bacteriophage vector. The restriction map of the biologically active clone was determined and found to be identical to that of the parental SMRV linear DNA except for the deletion of one long terminal repeat. Restriction enzyme analysis and Southern blotting indicated that the SMRV long terminal repeat was approximately 300 base pairs long. The SMRV restriction map was oriented to the viral RNA by using a gene-specific probe from baboon endogenous virus. Restriction enzyme digests of a variety of vertebrate DNAs were analyzed for DNA sequence homology with SMRV by using the cloned SMRV genome as a probe. Consistent with earlier studies, multiple copies of SMRV were detected in squirrel monkey DNA. Related fragments were also detected in the DNAs from other primate species, including humans. Images PMID:6312076

  18. Identification of an infectious progenitor for the multiple-copy HERV-K human endogenous retroelements

    PubMed Central

    Dewannieux, Marie; Harper, Francis; Richaud, Aurélien; Letzelter, Claire; Ribet, David; Pierron, Gérard; Heidmann, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Human Endogenous Retroviruses are expected to be the remnants of ancestral infections of primates by active retroviruses that have thereafter been transmitted in a Mendelian fashion. Here, we derived in silico the sequence of the putative ancestral “progenitor” element of one of the most recently amplified family—the HERV-K family—and constructed it. This element, Phoenix, produces viral particles that disclose all of the structural and functional properties of a bona-fide retrovirus, can infect mammalian, including human, cells, and integrate with the exact signature of the presently found endogenous HERV-K progeny. We also show that this element amplifies via an extracellular pathway involving reinfection, at variance with the non-LTR-retrotransposons (LINEs, SINEs) or LTR-retrotransposons, thus recapitulating ex vivo the molecular events responsible for its dissemination in the host genomes. We also show that in vitro recombinations among present-day human HERV-K (also known as ERVK) loci can similarly generate functional HERV-K elements, indicating that human cells still have the potential to produce infectious retroviruses. PMID:17077319

  19. Human APOBEC3 proteins, retrovirus restriction, and HIV drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Haché, Guylaine; Mansky, Louis M; Harris, Reuben S

    2006-01-01

    Over 40 million people worldwide currently have HIV/AIDS. Many antiretroviral drugs have proven effective, but drug-resistant HIV variants frequently emerge to thwart treatment efforts. Reverse transcription errors undoubtedly contribute to drug resistance, but additional significant sources of viral genetic variation are debatable. The human APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G proteins can potently inhibit retrovirus infection by a mechanism that involves retroviral cDNA cytosine deamination. Here we review the current knowledge on the mechanism of APOBEC3-dependent retrovirus restriction and discuss whether this innate host-defense system actively contributes to HIV genetic variation.

  20. SIRE1, an endogenous retrovirus family from Glycine max, is highly homogeneous and evolutionarily young.

    PubMed

    Laten, Howard M; Havecker, Ericka R; Farmer, Lisa M; Voytas, Daniel F

    2003-08-01

    SIRE1 is unusual among Ty1-copia retrotransposons in that it has an additional open reading frame with structural features similar to retroviral envelope proteins between pol and the 3' LTR. Here we report the characterization and comparison of eight different SIRE1 elements derived from a soybean genomic library, as well as SIRE1 reverse transcriptases from Glycine soja. The DNA sequences of the eight SIRE1 elements are highly homogeneous and share greater than 95% nucleotide identity. Partial sequences obtained from BAC ends are similarly conserved. Phylogenetic analyses resolve two closely related SIRE1 lineages, and nucleotide changes within and between SIRE1 lineages have occurred to preserve function. Both the gag and the env-like genes are evolving under similar levels of functional constraint. Considerable sequence heterogeneity in the form of short duplications was found within the LTRs and in the region between the envelope-like ORF and the 3' LTR. These duplications are suggestive of slippage by reverse transcriptase during replication. Sequence identity between LTRs of individual insertions suggests that they transposed within the past 70,000 years. Two of 10 SIRE1 insertions examined abut Ty3-gypsy retroelements. Since the soybean genome harbors more than 1,000 SIRE1 insertions, the collective data suggest that SIRE1 has undergone a very recent and robust amplification in soybean.

  1. Functional cis-regulatory modules encoded by mouse-specific endogenous retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Vasavi; Choudhary, Mayank N. K.; Pehrsson, Erica; Xing, Xiaoyun; Fiore, Christopher; Pandey, Manishi; Maricque, Brett; Udawatta, Methma; Ngo, Duc; Chen, Yujie; Paguntalan, Asia; Ray, Tammy; Hughes, Ava; Cohen, Barak A.; Wang, Ting

    2017-01-01

    Cis-regulatory modules contain multiple transcription factor (TF)-binding sites and integrate the effects of each TF to control gene expression in specific cellular contexts. Transposable elements (TEs) are uniquely equipped to deposit their regulatory sequences across a genome, which could also contain cis-regulatory modules that coordinate the control of multiple genes with the same regulatory logic. We provide the first evidence of mouse-specific TEs that encode a module of TF-binding sites in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). The majority (77%) of the individual TEs tested exhibited enhancer activity in mouse ESCs. By mutating individual TF-binding sites within the TE, we identified a module of TF-binding motifs that cooperatively enhanced gene expression. Interestingly, we also observed the same motif module in the in silico constructed ancestral TE that also acted cooperatively to enhance gene expression. Our results suggest that ancestral TE insertions might have brought in cis-regulatory modules into the mouse genome. PMID:28348391

  2. Replication of porcine circoviruses.

    PubMed

    Faurez, Florence; Dory, Daniel; Grasland, Béatrice; Jestin, André

    2009-05-18

    Porcine circoviruses are circular single-stranded DNA viruses that infect swine and wild boars. Two species of porcine circoviruses exist. Porcine circovirus type 1 is non pathogenic contrary to porcine circovirus type 2 which is associated with the disease known as Post-weaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome. Porcine circovirus DNA has been shown to replicate by a rolling circle mechanism. Other studies have revealed similar mechanisms of rolling-circle replication in plasmids and single-stranded viruses such as Geminivirus. Three elements are important in rolling-circle replication: i) a gene encoding initiator protein, ii) a double strand origin, and iii) a single strand origin. However, differences exist between viruses and plasmids and between viruses. Porcine circovirus replication probably involves a "melting pot" rather than "cruciform" rolling-circle mechanism.This review provides a summary of current knowledge of replication in porcine circoviruses as models of the Circovirus genus. Based on various studies, the factors affecting replication are defined and the mechanisms involved in the different phases of replication are described or proposed.

  3. Construction and characterization of an infectious molecular clone of Koala retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Shojima, Takayuki; Hoshino, Shigeki; Abe, Masumi; Yasuda, Jiro; Shogen, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2013-05-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is a gammaretrovirus that is currently endogenizing into koalas. Studies on KoRV infection have been hampered by the lack of a replication-competent molecular clone. In this study, we constructed an infectious molecular clone, termed plasmid pKoRV522, of a KoRV isolate (strain Aki) from a koala reared in a Japanese zoo. The virus KoRV522, derived from pKoRV522, grew efficiently in human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells, attaining 10(6) focus-forming units/ml. Several mutations in the Gag (L domain) and Env regions reported to be involved in reduction in viral infection/production in vitro are found in pKoRV522, yet KoRV522 replicated well, suggesting that any effects of these mutations are limited. Indeed, a reporter virus pseudotyped with pKoRV522 Env was found to infect human, feline, and mink cell lines efficiently. Analyses of KoRV L-domain mutants showed that an additional PPXY sequence, PPPY, in Gag plays a critical role in KoRV budding. Altogether, our results demonstrate the construction and characterization of the first infectious molecular clone of KoRV. The infectious clone reported here will be useful for elucidating the mechanism of endogenization of the virus in koalas and screening for antiretroviral drugs for KoRV-infected koalas.

  4. Pathology of tumors in fish associated with retroviruses: a review.

    PubMed

    Coffee, L L; Casey, J W; Bowser, P R

    2013-05-01

    Thirteen proliferative diseases in fish have been associated in the literature with 1 or more retroviruses. Typically, these occur as seasonal epizootics affecting farmed and wild fish, and most lesions resolve spontaneously. Spontaneous resolution and lifelong resistance to reinfection are 2 features of some piscine retrovirus-induced tumors that have stimulated research interest in this field. The purpose of this review is to present the reader with the epidemiological and morphological features of proliferative diseases in fish that have been associated with retroviruses by 1 or more of the following methods: detection of C-type retrovirus-like particles or reverse transcriptase activity in tumor tissues; successful tumor transmission trials using well-characterized, tumor-derived, cell-free inocula; or molecular characterization of the virus from spontaneous and experimentally induced tumors. Two of the diseases included in this review, European smelt spawning papillomatosis and bicolor damselfish neurofibromatosis, at one time were attributed to a retroviral etiology, but both are now believed to involve additional viral agents based on more recent investigations. We include the latter 2 entities to update the reader about these developments.

  5. Human retroviruses, cancer, and AIDS: Approaches to prevention and therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bolognesi, D.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains eight sections, each consisting of several papers. The section titles are: New Human Retroviruses and Their Properties; Biology and Genetics of HIV; Products of the HIV Genome; Viral Pathogenesis; HIV and Its Receptor; Vaccine Approaches Against HIV; Treatment Approaches Against HIV; and Closing Remarks.

  6. [Pathological Diagnoses and Whole-genome Sequence Analyses of the Jaagsiekte Sheep Retrovirus in Xinjiang, China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Sufang; Liang, Tian; Zhao, Qingliang; Zhang, Dianqing; Si Junqiang; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Xia; Sheng, Jinliang

    2015-05-01

    To carry out pathologic diagnoses and whole-genome sequence analyses of the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) in Xinjiang, China, we first observed sheep suspected to have the JSRV. Then, the extracted virus suspension was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total RNAs from lungs of JSRV-infected sheep were extracted and reverse-transcribed using a cDNA synthesis kit. Six pairs of primers were designed according to the exogenous reference virus strain (AF105220). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was carried out from JSRV-infected tissue, and the whole genome of the JSRV sequenced. Our results showed: flow of nasal fluid ("wheelbarrow test"); different sizes of adenoma lesions in the lungs; papillary hyperplasia of alveolar epithelial cells; alveolar cavity filled with macrophages; dissolute nuclei in central lesions. TEM revealed JSRV particles with a diameter of 88 nm to 125. 4 nm. The full-length of the viral genome sequence was 7456 bp. BLAST analyses showed nucleotide homology of 96% and 95% compared with that of the representative strain from the USA (AF105220) and UK (AF357971). Nucleotide homology was 89.8% and 89.9% compared with the endogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus, Inner Mongolia strain (DQ838493) and USA strain (EF680300). The specific pathogenic amino-acid sequence "YXXM" was found in the TM district, similar to the exogenous JSRV: this gene has been reported to be oncogenic. This is the first report of the complete genomic sequence of the exogenous JSRV from Xinjiang, and could lay the foundation for study of the biological characteristics and pathogenic mechanisms of the pulmonary adenomatosis virus in sheep.

  7. Evolutionary Relationships among Extinct and Extant Sloths: The Evidence of Mitogenomes and Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Graham J.; Cui, Pin; Forasiepi, Analía M.; Lenz, Dorina; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Voirin, Bryson; de Moraes-Barros, Nadia; MacPhee, Ross D. E.; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2016-01-01

    Macroevolutionary trends exhibited by retroviruses are complex and not entirely understood. The sloth endogenized foamy-like retrovirus (SloEFV), which demonstrates incongruence in virus–host evolution among extant sloths (Order Folivora), has not been investigated heretofore in any extinct sloth lineages and its premodern history within folivorans is therefore unknown. Determining retroviral coevolutionary trends requires a robust phylogeny of the viral host, but the highly reduced modern sloth fauna (6 species in 2 genera) does not adequately represent what was once a highly diversified clade (∼100 genera) of placental mammals. At present, the amount of molecular data available for extinct sloth taxa is limited, and analytical results based on these data tend to conflict with phylogenetic inferences made on the basis of morphological studies. To augment the molecular data set, we applied hybridization capture and next-generation Illumina sequencing to two extinct and three extant sloth species to retrieve full mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) from the hosts and the polymerase gene of SloEFV. The results produced a fully resolved and well-supported phylogeny that supports dividing crown families into two major clades: 1) The three-toed sloth, Bradypus, and Nothrotheriidae and 2) Megalonychidae, including the two-toed sloth, Choloepus, and Mylodontidae. Our calibrated time tree indicates that the Miocene epoch (23.5 Ma), particularly its earlier part, was an important interval for folivoran diversification. Both extant and extinct sloths demonstrate multiple complex invasions of SloEFV into the ancestral sloth germline followed by subsequent introgressions across different sloth lineages. Thus, sloth mitogenome and SloEFV evolution occurred separately and in parallel among sloths. PMID:26878870

  8. Evolutionary Relationships among Extinct and Extant Sloths: The Evidence of Mitogenomes and Retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Slater, Graham J; Cui, Pin; Forasiepi, Analía M; Lenz, Dorina; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Voirin, Bryson; de Moraes-Barros, Nadia; MacPhee, Ross D E; Greenwood, Alex D

    2016-02-14

    Macroevolutionary trends exhibited by retroviruses are complex and not entirely understood. The sloth endogenized foamy-like retrovirus (SloEFV), which demonstrates incongruence in virus-host evolution among extant sloths (Order Folivora), has not been investigated heretofore in any extinct sloth lineages and its premodern history within folivorans is therefore unknown. Determining retroviral coevolutionary trends requires a robust phylogeny of the viral host, but the highly reduced modern sloth fauna (6 species in 2 genera) does not adequately represent what was once a highly diversified clade (∼100 genera) of placental mammals. At present, the amount of molecular data available for extinct sloth taxa is limited, and analytical results based on these data tend to conflict with phylogenetic inferences made on the basis of morphological studies. To augment the molecular data set, we applied hybridization capture and next-generation Illumina sequencing to two extinct and three extant sloth species to retrieve full mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) from the hosts and the polymerase gene of SloEFV. The results produced a fully resolved and well-supported phylogeny that supports dividing crown families into two major clades: 1) The three-toed sloth, Bradypus, and Nothrotheriidae and 2) Megalonychidae, including the two-toed sloth, Choloepus, and Mylodontidae. Our calibrated time tree indicates that the Miocene epoch (23.5 Ma), particularly its earlier part, was an important interval for folivoran diversification. Both extant and extinct sloths demonstrate multiple complex invasions of SloEFV into the ancestral sloth germline followed by subsequent introgressions across different sloth lineages. Thus, sloth mitogenome and SloEFV evolution occurred separately and in parallel among sloths.

  9. Partial molecular cloning of the JHK retrovirus using gammaretrovirus consensus PCR primers

    PubMed Central

    Halligan, Brian D; Sun, Hai-Yuan; Kushnaryov, Vladimir M; Grossberg, Sidney E

    2013-01-01

    The JHK virus (JHKV) was previously described as a type C retrovirus that has some distinctive ultrastructural features and replicates constitutively in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell line, JHK-3. In order to facilitate the cloning of sequences from JHKV, a series of partially degenerate consensus retroviral PCR primers were created by a data-driven design approach based on an alignment of 14 diverse gammaretroviral genomes. These primers were used in the PCR amplification of purified JHK virion cDNA, and ana lysis of the resulting amplified sequence indicates that the JHKV is in the murine leukemia virus (MLV) family. The JHK sequence is nearly identical to the corresponding region of the Bxv-1 endogenous mouse retrovirus (GenBank accession AC115959) and distinct from XMRV. JHKV gag-specific amplification was demonstrated with nucleic acids from uncultivated, frozen, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of the index patient, but not in PBMCs from nine healthy blood donors. Unlike earlier reports, in which MLV-like sequences were identified in human source material, which may have been due to murine contamination, budding retrovirions were demonstrated repeatedly by electron microscopy in uncultivated lymphocytes of the index patient that were morphologically identical in their development to the virions in the JHK-3 cells, and immunological evidence was obtained that the index patient produced IgG antibodies that bound to the budding viral particles in patient PBMCs and in the JHK-3 cells. These data indicate that the patient had been infected by JHKV, lending significance to the demonstration of JHKV amplicons in nucleic acids of the patient’s PBMCs. In future studies, the PCR primer sets described herein may expand the detection of an amplifiable subset of viruses related to MLV. PMID:24159361

  10. Seroprevalence of retrovirus in North American captive macropodidae.

    PubMed

    Georoff, Timothy A; Joyner, Priscilla H; Hoover, John P; Payton, Mark E; Pogranichniy, Roman M

    2008-09-01

    Laboratory records of serology results from captive macropodidae sampled between 1997 and 2005 were reviewed to assess the seroprevalence of retrovirus exposure. Serum samples from 269 individuals (136 males, 133 females) representing 10 species of macropods housed in 31 North American captive collections were analyzed for retrovirus antibody using an indirect immunofluorescent assay. The prevalence of positive antibody titers comparing male versus female, between species, between age groups, and among animals with identified parentage was examined by nonparametric statistical analyses. Median age of animals at time of sample collection was 36 mo (range 2-201 mo). Total percentage seropositive was 20.4%. Serum antibody was detected in 31 of 47 (66.0%) tammar wallaby (Macropus eugenii), nine of 24 (37.5%) yellow-footed rock wallaby (Petrogale xanthopus), four of 11 (36.4%) swamp wallaby (Wallabia bicolor), 10 of 80 (12.5%) red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus), and one of 54 (1.9%) parma wallaby (Macropus parma). No individuals of western gray kangaroo (n=3) (Macropus fuliginosus), eastern gray kangaroo (n=19) (Macropus giganteus), common wallaroo (n=6) (Macropus robustus), red kangaroo (n=11) (Macropus rufus), or Matschie's tree kangaroo (n=14) (Dendrolagus matschiei) were positive for retrovirus antibody. These results demonstrate that five species of captive macropods have a history of exposure to retrovirus, with the highest percentage seropositive and highest statistical correlation in M. eugenii (pair-wise Fisher's exact test, alpha = 0.05). Additionally, one wild-caught M. eugenii was confirmed seropositive during quarantine period, indicating that retrovirus exposure may exist in wild populations.

  11. Retroviruses 2004: review of the 2004 Cold Spring Harbor Retroviruses Conference.

    PubMed

    Freed, Eric O; Ross, Susan R

    2004-09-09

    For the past several decades, retrovirologists from around the world have gathered in late May at the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories in New York to present their studies in formal talks and posters, and to discuss their ongoing research informally at the bar or on the beach. As organizers of the 2004 Cold Spring Harbor Retroviruses Conference, we have been asked by the editors of Retrovirology to prepare a review of the meeting for publication on-line. Our goal in this review is not to provide a detailed description of data presented at the meeting but rather to highlight some of the significant developments reported this year. The review is structured in a manner that parallels the organization of the meeting; beginning with the entry phase of the replication cycle, proceeding with post-entry events, assembly and release, integration, reverse transcription, pathogenesis/host factors, RNA-related events (transcription, processing, export, and packaging) and finishing with antivirals. While the most striking developments this year involved post-entry events and assembly/release, significant progress was made towards elucidating a number of aspects of the retroviral replication cycle.

  12. HIV infection en route to endogenization: two cases

    PubMed Central

    Colson, P; Ravaux, I; Tamalet, C; Glazunova, O; Baptiste, E; Chabriere, E; Wiedemann, A; Lacabaratz, C; Chefrour, M; Picard, C; Stein, A; Levy, Y; Raoult, D

    2014-01-01

    The long-term spontaneous evolution of humans and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is not well characterized; many vertebrate species, including humans, exhibit remnants of other retroviruses in their genomes that question such possible endogenization of HIV. We investigated two HIV-infected patients with no HIV-related disease and no detection with routine tests of plasma HIV RNA or cell-associated HIV DNA. We used Sanger and deep sequencing to retrieve HIV DNA sequences integrated in the human genome and tested the host humoral and cellular immune responses. We noticed that viruses from both patients were inactivated by the high prevalence of the transformation of tryptophan codons into stop codons (25% overall (3–100% per gene) and 24% overall (0–50% per gene)). In contrast, the humoral and/or cellular responses were strong for one patient and moderate for the other, indicating that a productive infection occurred at one stage of the infection. We speculate that the stimulation of APOBEC, the enzyme group that exchanges G for A in viral nucleic acids and is usually inhibited by the HIV protein Vif, has been amplified and made effective from the initial stage of the infection. Furthermore, we propose that a cure for HIV may occur through HIV endogenization in humans, as observed for many other retroviruses in mammals, rather than clearance of all traces of HIV from human cells, which defines viral eradication. PMID:25366539

  13. Tracking interspecies transmission and long-term evolution of an ancient retrovirus using the genomes of modern mammals

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, William E; Patel, Nirali; Halm, Kate; Johnson, Welkin E

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian genomes typically contain hundreds of thousands of endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), derived from ancient retroviral infections. Using this molecular 'fossil' record, we reconstructed the natural history of a specific retrovirus lineage (ERV-Fc) that disseminated widely between ~33 and ~15 million years ago, corresponding to the Oligocene and early Miocene epochs. Intercontinental viral spread, numerous instances of interspecies transmission and emergence in hosts representing at least 11 mammalian orders, and a significant role for recombination in diversification of this viral lineage were also revealed. By reconstructing the canonical retroviral genes, we identified patterns of adaptation consistent with selection to maintain essential viral protein functions. Our results demonstrate the unique potential of the ERV fossil record for studying the processes of viral spread and emergence as they play out across macro-evolutionary timescales, such that looking back in time may prove insightful for predicting the long-term consequences of newly emerging viral infections. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12704.001 PMID:26952212

  14. Intracisternal A-type particles express their proteinase in a separate reading frame by translational frameshifting, similar to D-type retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Fehrmann, F; Welker, R; Kräusslich, H G

    1997-09-01

    Intracisternal A-type particles (IAP) are defective endogenous retroviruses that accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum of rodent cells. IAP genomes share extensive sequence homologies with D-type retroviruses, but were presumed to express the viral proteinase (PR) as part of the gag open reading frame (ORF) while D-type retroviruses express PR in a separate ORF. Here we show that expression of the murine IAP element MIA14 yields three major translation products, corresponding to the Gag, Gag-PR, and Gag-PR-Pol polyproteins. Sequence analysis revealed that MIA14 PR is encoded in its own reading frame, separate from gag and pol. Frameshifting occurred with an efficiency of approximately 25% between the gag and pro ORFs and 35% between pro and pol. The region containing the putative gag-pro frameshift signal consists of a heptanucleotide slippery sequence (A6C) and a stem-loop structure probably forming a pseudoknot. Deletion of this structure element almost completely abolished frameshifting. Insertion of an additional base next to the frameshift signal placed gag and pro in the same ORF and resulted in predominant formation of Gag-PR and Gag-PR-Pol polyproteins which were not processed following in vitro translation. Expression of a similar construct in tissue culture cells, on the other hand, led to efficient intracellular processing of the mutant polyproteins.

  15. Increased immunoglobulin G, but not M, binding to endogenous retroviral antigens in HIV-1 infected persons.

    PubMed

    Lawoko, A; Johansson, B; Rabinayaran, D; Pipkorn, R; Blomberg, J

    2000-12-01

    The modes of interaction between products of human endogenous retroviral (HERV) sequences and the immune system are largely unknown. In HIV infected persons, an exogenous retrovirus adds further complexity to the situation. Therefore, 14 synthetic peptides with sequences derived from conserved regions of various endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and from related exogenous retroviruses were used to search for IgG and IgM antibodies that bind to such antigens in 15 HIV-1 seropositive and 17 seronegative immunosuppressed patients. IgG binding to three peptides, namely, the C-terminal half of murine leukemia virus (MLV) capsid protein, the conserved portion of HERV-H transmembrane protein, and the Pol region of human mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-like (HML3) sequence, was observed in both groups. Binding was, however, more frequent and more firm in HIV-1 positive samples (P<0.0001, Wilcoxon rank sum test). IgM binding to the same peptides showed no significant differentiation between the two groups of patients. Binding to both immunoglobulin isotypes was sometimes variable over time in both groups. No correlation of either IgG or IgM peptide binding with progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals was observed. Inhibition studies using analogous endogenous and exogenous retroviral peptides, including HIV-1, demonstrated specificity of the IgG antibodies for a narrow range of MLV- and MMTV-like retroviral antigens, and excluded cross-reactivity of antibodies to HIV-1 as a cause of these observations. Thus, unlike IgG, IgM binding to retroviral antigens was ubiquitous. It is suggested that anti-HERV IgM belong to a class of natural antibodies and might serve as primers in the mediation of humoral immune responses to more or less related exogenous retroviruses. Increased IgG binding in HIV-1 infected individuals could result from such priming, or reflect higher HERV antigen expression.

  16. On board a raft or boat in the retrovirus sea

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, Jan

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes the essential steps in understanding the chicken Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) genome association with a nonpermissive rodent host cell genome. This insight was made possible by in-depth study of RSV-transformed rat XC cells, which were called virogenic because they indefinitely carry virus genetic information in the absence of any infectious virus production. However, the virus was rescued by association of XC cells with chicken fibroblasts, allowing cell fusion between both partners. This and additional studies led to the interpretation that the RSV genome gets integrated into the host cell genome as a provirus. Study of additional rodent virogenic cell lines provided evidence that the transcript of oncogene v-src can be transmitted to other retroviruses and produce cell transformation by itself. As discussed in the text, two main questions related to nonpermissiveness to retrovirus infection remain to be solved. The first is changes in the retrovirus envelope gene allowing virus entry into a nonpermissive cell. The second is the nature of the permissive cell functions required by the nonpermissive cell to ensure infectious virus production. Both lines of investigation are being pursued. PMID:27035994

  17. Retroviruses integrate into a shared, non-palindromic DNA motif.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Paul D W; Huvet, Maxime; Melamed, Anat; Maertens, Goedele N; Bangham, Charles R M

    2016-11-14

    Many DNA-binding factors, such as transcription factors, form oligomeric complexes with structural symmetry that bind to palindromic DNA sequences(1). Palindromic consensus nucleotide sequences are also found at the genomic integration sites of retroviruses(2-6) and other transposable elements(7-9), and it has been suggested that this palindromic consensus arises as a consequence of the structural symmetry in the integrase complex(2,3). However, we show here that the palindromic consensus sequence is not present in individual integration sites of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but arises in the population average as a consequence of the existence of a non-palindromic nucleotide motif that occurs in approximately equal proportions on the plus strand and the minus strand of the host genome. We develop a generally applicable algorithm to sort the individual integration site sequences into plus-strand and minus-strand subpopulations, and use this to identify the integration site nucleotide motifs of five retroviruses of different genera: HTLV-1, HIV-1, murine leukaemia virus (MLV), avian sarcoma leucosis virus (ASLV) and prototype foamy virus (PFV). The results reveal a non-palindromic motif that is shared between these retroviruses.

  18. Insufficient natural killer cell responses against retroviruses: how to improve NK cell killing of retrovirus-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Littwitz-Salomon, Elisabeth; Dittmer, Ulf; Sutter, Kathrin

    2016-11-08

    Natural killer (NK) cells belong to the innate immune system and protect against cancers and a variety of viruses including retroviruses by killing transformed or infected cells. They express activating and inhibitory receptors on their cell surface and often become activated after recognizing virus-infected cells. They have diverse antiviral effector functions like the release of cytotoxic granules, cytokine production and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The importance of NK cell activity in retroviral infections became evident due to the discovery of several viral strategies to escape recognition and elimination by NK cells. Mutational sequence polymorphisms as well as modulation of surface receptors and their ligands are mechanisms of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 to evade NK cell-mediated immune pressure. In Friend retrovirus infected mice the virus can manipulate molecular or cellular immune factors that in turn suppress the NK cell response. In this model NK cells lack cytokines for optimal activation and can be functionally suppressed by regulatory T cells. However, these inhibitory pathways can be overcome therapeutically to achieve full activation of NK cell responses and ultimately control dissemination of retroviral infection. One effective approach is to modulate the crosstalk between NK cells and dendritic cells, which produce NK cell-stimulating cytokines like type I interferons (IFN), IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18 upon retrovirus sensing or infection. Therapeutic administration of IFNα directly increases NK cell killing of retrovirus-infected cells. In addition, IL-2/anti-IL-2 complexes that direct IL-2 to NK cells have been shown to significantly improve control of retroviral infection by NK cells in vivo. In this review, we describe novel approaches to improve NK cell effector functions in retroviral infections. Immunotherapies that target NK cells of patients suffering from viral infections might be a promising treatment option for the

  19. The role of genes domesticated from LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition of multiple genes from long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons occurred in mammals. Genes belonging to a sushi-ichi-related retrotransposon homologs (SIRH) family emerged around the time of the establishment of two viviparous mammalian groups, marsupials and eutherians. These genes encode proteins that are homologous to a retrotransposon Gag capsid protein and sometimes also have a Pol-like region. We previously demonstrated that PEG10 (SIRH1) and PEG11/RTL1 (SIRH2) play essential but different roles in placental development. PEG10 is conserved in both the marsupials and the eutherians, while PEG11/RTL1 is a eutherian-specific gene, suggesting that these two domesticated genes were deeply involved in the evolution of mammals via the establishment of the viviparous reproduction system. In this review, we introduce the roles of PEG10 and PEG11/RTL1 in mammalian development and evolution, and summarize the other genes domesticated from LTR retrotransposons and endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in mammals. We also point out the importance of DNA methylation in inactivating and neutralizing the integrated retrotransposons and ERVs in the process of domestication. PMID:22866050

  20. The role of genes domesticated from LTR retrotransposons and retroviruses in mammals.

    PubMed

    Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition of multiple genes from long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons occurred in mammals. Genes belonging to a sushi-ichi-related retrotransposon homologs (SIRH) family emerged around the time of the establishment of two viviparous mammalian groups, marsupials and eutherians. These genes encode proteins that are homologous to a retrotransposon Gag capsid protein and sometimes also have a Pol-like region. We previously demonstrated that PEG10 (SIRH1) and PEG11/RTL1 (SIRH2) play essential but different roles in placental development. PEG10 is conserved in both the marsupials and the eutherians, while PEG11/RTL1 is a eutherian-specific gene, suggesting that these two domesticated genes were deeply involved in the evolution of mammals via the establishment of the viviparous reproduction system. In this review, we introduce the roles of PEG10 and PEG11/RTL1 in mammalian development and evolution, and summarize the other genes domesticated from LTR retrotransposons and endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in mammals. We also point out the importance of DNA methylation in inactivating and neutralizing the integrated retrotransposons and ERVs in the process of domestication.

  1. An endogenous foamy-like viral element in the coelacanth genome.

    PubMed

    Han, Guan-Zhu; Worobey, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the origin and long-term evolutionary mode of retroviruses. Retroviruses can integrate into their hosts' genomes, providing a molecular fossil record for studying their deep history. Here we report the discovery of an endogenous foamy virus-like element, which we designate 'coelacanth endogenous foamy-like virus' (CoeEFV), within the genome of the coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae). Phylogenetic analyses place CoeEFV basal to all known foamy viruses, strongly suggesting an ancient ocean origin of this major retroviral lineage, which had previously been known to infect only land mammals. The discovery of CoeEFV reveals the presence of foamy-like viruses in species outside the Mammalia. We show that foamy-like viruses have likely codiverged with their vertebrate hosts for more than 407 million years and underwent an evolutionary transition from water to land with their vertebrate hosts. These findings suggest an ancient marine origin of retroviruses and have important implications in understanding foamy virus biology.

  2. Cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous agonist, anandamide.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, J; Felder, C C

    1998-05-01

    Cannabinoids are a class of compound found in marijuana which have been known for their therapeutic and psychoactive properties for at least 4000 years. Isolation of the active principle in marijuana, delta9-THC, provided the lead structure in the development of highly potent congeners which were used to probe for the mechanism of marijuana action. Cannabinoids were shown to bind to selective binding sites in brain tissue thereby regulating second messenger formation. Such studies led to the cloning of three cannabinoid receptor subtypes, CB1, CB2, and CB1A all of which belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled plasma membrane receptors. Analogous to the discovery of endogenous opiates, isolation of cannabinoid receptors provided the appropriate tool to isolate an endogenous cannabimimetic eicosanoid, anandamide, from porcine brain. Recent studies indicate that anandamide is a member of a family of fatty acid ethanolamides that may represent a novel class of lipid neurotransmitters. This review discusses recent progress in cannabinoid research with a focus on the receptors for delta9-THC, their coupling to second messenger responses, and the endogenous lipid cannabimimetic, anandamide.

  3. Inhibition of Borna disease virus replication by an endogenous bornavirus-like element in the ground squirrel genome.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Kan; Horie, Masayuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Merriman, Dana K; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2014-09-09

    Animal genomes contain endogenous viral sequences, such as endogenous retroviruses and retrotransposons. Recently, we and others discovered that nonretroviral viruses also have been endogenized in many vertebrate genomes. Bornaviruses belong to the Mononegavirales and have left endogenous fragments, called "endogenous bornavirus-like elements" (EBLs), in the genomes of many mammals. The striking features of EBLs are that they contain relatively long ORFs which have high sequence homology to the extant bornavirus proteins. Furthermore, some EBLs derived from bornavirus nucleoprotein (EBLNs) have been shown to be transcribed as mRNA and probably are translated into proteins. These features lead us to speculate that EBLs may function as cellular coopted genes. An EBLN element in the genome of the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), itEBLN, encodes an ORF with 77% amino acid sequence identity to the current bornavirus nucleoprotein. In this study, we cloned itEBLN from the ground squirrel genome and investigated its involvement in Borna disease virus (BDV) replication. Interestingly, itEBLN, but not a human EBLN, colocalized with the viral factory in the nucleus and appeared to affect BDV polymerase activity by being incorporated into the viral ribonucleoprotein. Our data show that, as do certain endogenous retroviruses, itEBLN potentially may inhibit infection by related exogenous viruses in vivo.

  4. Inhibition of Borna disease virus replication by an endogenous bornavirus-like element in the ground squirrel genome

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Kan; Horie, Masayuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Merriman, Dana K.; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2014-01-01

    Animal genomes contain endogenous viral sequences, such as endogenous retroviruses and retrotransposons. Recently, we and others discovered that nonretroviral viruses also have been endogenized in many vertebrate genomes. Bornaviruses belong to the Mononegavirales and have left endogenous fragments, called “endogenous bornavirus-like elements” (EBLs), in the genomes of many mammals. The striking features of EBLs are that they contain relatively long ORFs which have high sequence homology to the extant bornavirus proteins. Furthermore, some EBLs derived from bornavirus nucleoprotein (EBLNs) have been shown to be transcribed as mRNA and probably are translated into proteins. These features lead us to speculate that EBLs may function as cellular coopted genes. An EBLN element in the genome of the thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus), itEBLN, encodes an ORF with 77% amino acid sequence identity to the current bornavirus nucleoprotein. In this study, we cloned itEBLN from the ground squirrel genome and investigated its involvement in Borna disease virus (BDV) replication. Interestingly, itEBLN, but not a human EBLN, colocalized with the viral factory in the nucleus and appeared to affect BDV polymerase activity by being incorporated into the viral ribonucleoprotein. Our data show that, as do certain endogenous retroviruses, itEBLN potentially may inhibit infection by related exogenous viruses in vivo. PMID:25157155

  5. Synthesis, Assembly, and Processing of the Env ERVWE1/Syncytin Human Endogenous Retroviral Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Cheynet, V.; Ruggieri, A.; Oriol, G.; Blond, J.-L.; Boson, B.; Vachot, L.; Verrier, B.; Cosset, F.-L.; Mallet, F.

    2005-01-01

    Syncytin is a fusogenic protein involved in the formation of the placental syncytiotrophoblast layer. This protein is encoded by the envelope gene of the ERVWE1 proviral locus belonging to the human endogenous retrovirus W (HERV-W) family. The HERV-W infectious ancestor entered the primate lineage 25 to 40 million years ago. Although the syncytin fusion property has been clearly demonstrated, little is known about this cellular protein maturation process with respect to classical infectious retrovirus envelope proteins. Here we show that the cellular syncytin protein is synthesized as a glycosylated gPr73 precursor cleaved into two mature proteins, a gp50 surface subunit (SU) and a gp24 transmembrane subunit (TM). These SU and TM subunits are found associated as homotrimers. The intracytoplasmic tail is critical to the fusogenic phenotype, although its cleavage requirements seem to have diverged from those of classical retroviral maturation. PMID:15827173

  6. Synthesis, assembly, and processing of the Env ERVWE1/syncytin human endogenous retroviral envelope.

    PubMed

    Cheynet, V; Ruggieri, A; Oriol, G; Blond, J-L; Boson, B; Vachot, L; Verrier, B; Cosset, F-L; Mallet, F

    2005-05-01

    Syncytin is a fusogenic protein involved in the formation of the placental syncytiotrophoblast layer. This protein is encoded by the envelope gene of the ERVWE1 proviral locus belonging to the human endogenous retrovirus W (HERV-W) family. The HERV-W infectious ancestor entered the primate lineage 25 to 40 million years ago. Although the syncytin fusion property has been clearly demonstrated, little is known about this cellular protein maturation process with respect to classical infectious retrovirus envelope proteins. Here we show that the cellular syncytin protein is synthesized as a glycosylated gPr73 precursor cleaved into two mature proteins, a gp50 surface subunit (SU) and a gp24 transmembrane subunit (TM). These SU and TM subunits are found associated as homotrimers. The intracytoplasmic tail is critical to the fusogenic phenotype, although its cleavage requirements seem to have diverged from those of classical retroviral maturation.

  7. A novel, Q-PCR based approach to measuring endogenous retroviral clearance by capture protein A chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Lute, Scott; Norling, Lenore; Hong, Connie; Safta, Aurelia; O'Connor, Deborah; Bernstein, Lisa J; Wang, Hua; Blank, Greg; Brorson, Kurt; Chen, Qi

    2009-04-01

    Quantification of virus removal by the purification process during production is required for clinical use of biopharmaceuticals. The current validation approach for virus removal by chromatography steps typically involves time-consuming spiking experiments with expensive model viruses at bench scale. Here we propose a novel, alternative approach that can be applied in at least one instance: evaluating retroviral clearance by protein A chromatography. Our strategy uses a quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) assay that quantifies the endogenous type C retrovirus-like particle genomes directly in production Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell culture harvests and protein A pools. This eliminates the need to perform spiking with model viruses, and measures the real virus from the process. Using this new approach, clearance values were obtained that was comparable to those from the old model-virus spike/removal approach. We tested the concept of design space for CHO retrovirus removal using samples from a protein A characterization study, where a wide range of chromatographic operating conditions were challenged, including load density, flow rate, wash, pooling, temperature, and resin life cycles. Little impact of these variables on CHO retrovirus clearance was found, arguing for implementation of the design space approach for viral clearance to support operational ranges and manufacturing excursions. The viral clearance results from Q-PCR were confirmed by an orthogonal quantitative product-enhanced reverse transcriptase (Q-PERT) assay that quantifies CHO retrovirus by their reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme activity. Overall, our results demonstrate that protein A chromatography is a robust retrovirus removal step and CHO retrovirus removal can be directly measured at large scale using Q-PCR assays.

  8. Annotation and visualization of endogenous retroviral sequences using the Distributed Annotation System (DAS) and eBioX

    PubMed Central

    Martínez Barrio, Álvaro; Lagercrantz, Erik; Sperber, Göran O; Blomberg, Jonas; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Background The Distributed Annotation System (DAS) is a widely used network protocol for sharing biological information. The distributed aspects of the protocol enable the use of various reference and annotation servers for connecting biological sequence data to pertinent annotations in order to depict an integrated view of the data for the final user. Results An annotation server has been devised to provide information about the endogenous retroviruses detected and annotated by a specialized in silico tool called RetroTector. We describe the procedure to implement the DAS 1.5 protocol commands necessary for constructing the DAS annotation server. We use our server to exemplify those steps. Data distribution is kept separated from visualization which is carried out by eBioX, an easy to use open source program incorporating multiple bioinformatics utilities. Some well characterized endogenous retroviruses are shown in two different DAS clients. A rapid analysis of areas free from retroviral insertions could be facilitated by our annotations. Conclusion The DAS protocol has shown to be advantageous in the distribution of endogenous retrovirus data. The distributed nature of the protocol is also found to aid in combining annotation and visualization along a genome in order to enhance the understanding of ERV contribution to its evolution. Reference and annotation servers are conjointly used by eBioX to provide visualization of ERV annotations as well as other data sources. Our DAS data source can be found in the central public DAS service repository, , or at . PMID:19534743

  9. Endogenous Pyrogen Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisel, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the physiology of endogenous pyrogen (EP), the fever-producing factor of cellular origin. Included are: its hormone-like role, its molecular nature, bioassay procedures, cellular production and mechanisms of EP action. (SA)

  10. Genome-Wide Screening of Retroviral Envelope Genes in the Nine-Banded Armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus, Xenarthra) Reveals an Unfixed Chimeric Endogenous Betaretrovirus Using the ASCT2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Malicorne, Sébastien; Vernochet, Cécile; Cornelis, Guillaume; Mulot, Baptiste; Delsuc, Frédéric; Heidmann, Odile

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retroviruses enter host cells through the interaction of their envelope (Env) protein with a cell surface receptor, which triggers the fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter ASCT2 is the common receptor of the large RD114 retrovirus interference group, whose members display frequent env recombination events. Germ line retrovirus infections have led to numerous inherited endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) in vertebrate genomes, which provide useful insights into the coevolutionary history of retroviruses and their hosts. Rare ERV-derived genes display conserved viral functions, as illustrated by the fusogenic syncytin env genes involved in placentation. Here, we searched for functional env genes in the nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) genome and identified dasy-env1.1, which clusters with RD114 interference group env genes and with two syncytin genes sharing ASCT2 receptor usage. Using ex vivo pseudotyping and cell-cell fusion assays, we demonstrated that the Dasy-Env1.1 protein is fusogenic and can use both human and armadillo ASCT2s as receptors. This gammaretroviral env gene belongs to a provirus with betaretrovirus-like features, suggesting acquisition through recombination. Provirus insertion was found in several Dasypus species, where it has not reached fixation, whereas related family members integrated before diversification of the genus Dasypus >12 million years ago (Mya). This newly described ERV lineage is potentially useful as a population genetic marker. Our results extend the usage of ASCT2 as a retrovirus receptor to the mammalian clade Xenarthra and suggest that the acquisition of an ASCT2-interacting env gene is a major selective force driving the emergence of numerous chimeric viruses in vertebrates. IMPORTANCE Retroviral infection is initiated by the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein to a host cell receptor(s), triggering membrane fusion. Ancient germ line infections

  11. Hepadnaviruses and retroviruses share genome homology and features of replication.

    PubMed

    Robinson, W S; Miller, R H; Marion, P L

    1987-01-01

    The hepadnavirus family includes hepatitis B virus (HBV), woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), ground squirrel hepatitis virus (GSHV) and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). These viruses share unique ultrastructural, molecular and biological features. HBV has great medical importance in many parts of the world. More important numerically than acute hepatitis B in high prevalence geographic regions is the liver disease associated with chronic infection. There appear to be more than 200 million chronically infected humans in the world, and these HBV infections appear to be the single most common cause of chronic liver disease and liver cancer in man. All hepadnaviruses share the propensity for silent infection in early life leading to persistence of the virus, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is clearly associated with long-standing persistent infection in man, woodchucks and ground squirrels. Although the viral DNA has been found to be integrated in cellular DNA of many HCC in man, woodchucks and ground squirrels, the precise role of the virus in tumor formation has not been defined. Hepadna viruses have an interesting molecular structure and mechanisms of replication, and they appear to share certain important features with retroviruses as reviewed here. It is of interest to define similarities and differences between hepadnaviruses and retroviruses in order to understand their evolutionary relationship and to determine whether they share a common oncogenic mechanism, since infection with members of both virus families is associated with neoplastic disease.

  12. Seroepidemiology of human retroviruses in Ogun State of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olusanya, O; Lawoko, A; Blomberg, J

    1990-01-01

    We analyzed sera collected during 1987 and 1988 from 385 healthy business employees of both sexes, of Ogun state in Nigeria, for antibodies to the 3 human retroviruses HIV-1, HIV-2 and HTLV-I. No serum was HIV-1 positive, 1 was HIV-2 positive and 2 were HTLV-I positive. A few sera were false-positive in the antibody screening tests which preceded the confirmatory antibody tests. In the confirmatory tests, we found that in the HIV-1 Western blot test 1 serum reacted only with the HIV-1 gag protein p17, and 2 sera reacted only with the HIV-1 pol proteins p64, p53 and p31. None of these reactivities fulfill internationally accepted criteria for HIV-1 seropositivity. We conclude that HIV-1 was rare in the study population and that HIV-2 and HTLV-I are present at a low frequency. The false positive serological reactions observed are similar to those described previously from Africa and elsewhere. The findings emphasize the importance of routinely testing blood donations for antibodies to these retroviruses in Nigeria.

  13. The discovery of HTLV-1, the first pathogenic human retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Coffin, John M.

    2015-01-01

    After the discovery of retroviral reverse transcriptase in 1970, there was a flurry of activity, sparked by the “War on Cancer,” to identify human cancer retroviruses. After many false claims resulting from various artifacts, most scientists abandoned the search, but the Gallo laboratory carried on, developing both specific assays and new cell culture methods that enabled them to report, in the accompanying 1980 PNAS paper, identification and partial characterization of human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV; now known as HTLV-1) produced by a T-cell line from a lymphoma patient. Follow-up studies, including collaboration with the group that first identified a cluster of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cases in Japan, provided conclusive evidence that HTLV was the cause of this disease. HTLV-1 is now known to infect at least 4–10 million people worldwide, about 5% of whom will develop ATL. Despite intensive research, knowledge of the viral etiology has not led to improvement in treatment or outcome of ATL. However, the technology for discovery of HTLV and acknowledgment of the existence of pathogenic human retroviruses laid the technical and intellectual foundation for the discovery of the cause of AIDS soon afterward. Without this advance, our ability to diagnose and treat HIV infection most likely would have been long delayed. PMID:26696625

  14. [Inhibiting GDF-8 expression by retrovirus-based RNAi stably].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaowu; Yang, Zhuo; Zhao, Bin; Liu, Changmei

    2008-02-01

    We cloned human U6 promoter from pAVU6 + 27 vector into pXSN to transcripe small RNA. Meanwhile, a shRNA targeting GDF-8 was cloned down-stream of the hU6 promoter to construct recombinant vector. Then the packing cell GP-293 was co-transfected the recombinant with pVSV-G to gernarate virus particle. Resistant C2C12 cell pools were screened using G418. Levels of mRNA and protein of GDF-8 were tested by Real-Time PCR and western blotting. Cell proliferation and cell cycle were analyzed using MTT and FACS. The expression of GDF-8 was dramatically decreased by the retrovirus-based system in C2C12 cells. Cells proliferated effectively after integrating the recombinant. The cells in G0/G1 phase decreased by 13.7%, while cells in S phase increased by 14.9%. In conclusion, the retrovirus-based RNAi could be used to stably silence GDF-8. It can be a powerful tool in curing muscle atrophy.

  15. Xenotransplantation and porcine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Denner, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Porcine microorganisms may be transmitted to the human recipient when xenotransplantation with pig cells, tissues, and organs will be performed. Most of such microorganisms can be eliminated from the donor pig by specified or designated pathogen-free production of the animals. As human cytomegalovirus causes severe transplant rejection in allotransplantation, considerable concern is warranted on the potential pathogenicity of porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) in the setting of xenotransplantation. On the other hand, despite having a similar name, PCMV is different from HCMV. The impact of PCMV infection on pigs is known; however, the influence of PCMV on the human transplant recipient is unclear. However, first transplantations of pig organs infected with PCMV into non-human primates were associated with a significant reduction of the survival time of the transplants. Sensitive detection methods and strategies for elimination of PCMV from donor herds are required.

  16. Ancestral Mutations Acquired in Refrex-1, a Restriction Factor against Feline Retroviruses, during its Cooption and Domestication

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Jumpei; Baba, Takuya; Kawasaki, Junna

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are remnants of ancestral retroviral infections of germ cells. Retroviral endogenization is an adaptation process for the host genome, and ERVs are gradually attenuated or inactivated by mutation. However, some ERVs that have been “domesticated” by their hosts eventually gain physiological functions, such as placentation or viral resistance. We previously reported the discovery of Refrex-1, a soluble antiretroviral factor in domestic cats that specifically inhibits infection by feline leukemia virus subgroup D (FeLV-D), a chimeric virus of FeLV, and a feline ERV, ERV-DC. Refrex-1 is a truncated envelope protein (Env) encoded by both ERV-DC7 and ERV-DC16 proviral loci. Here, we reconstituted ancestral and functional Env from ERV-DC7 and ERV-DC16 envelope genes (env) by inducing reverse mutations. Unexpectedly, ERV-DC7 and ERV-DC16 full-length Env (ERV-DC7 fl and ERV-DC16 fl), reconstructed by removing stop codons, did not produce infectious viral particles. ERV-DC7 fl and ERV-DC16 fl were highly expressed in cells but were not cleaved into surface subunits (SU) and transmembrane subunits, nor were they incorporated into virions. G407R/N427I-A429T and Y431D substitutions within the SU C-terminal domain of ERV-DC7 fl and ERV-DC16 fl, respectively, caused these dysfunctions. The residues glycine 407 and tyrosine 431 are relatively conserved among infectious gammaretroviruses, and their substitution causes the same dysfunctions as the tested retroviruses. Our results reveal that specific mutations within the SU C-terminal domain suppressed Env cleavage and incorporation into virions and indicate that these mutations contributed to the domestication of Refrex-1 through multistep events that occurred in the postintegration period. IMPORTANCE Domestic cats are colonized with various exogenous retroviruses (exRVs), such as feline leukemia virus (FeLV), and their genomes contain numerous ERVs, some of which are replication

  17. The Endogenous Exposome

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Jun; Mutlu, Esra; Sharma, Vyom; Collins, Leonard; Bodnar, Wanda; Yu, Rui; Lai, Yongquan; Moeller, Benjamin; Lu, Kun; Swenberg, James

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the Exposome, is a compilation of diseases and one’s lifetime exposure to chemicals, whether the exposure comes from environmental, dietary, or occupational exposures; or endogenous chemicals that are formed from normal metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, infections, and other natural metabolic processes such as alteration of the gut microbiome. In this review, we have focused on the Endogenous Exposome, the DNA damage that arises from the production of endogenous electrophilic molecules in our cells. It provides quantitative data on endogenous DNA damage and its relationship to mutagenesis, with emphasis on when exogenous chemical exposures that produce identical DNA adducts to those arising from normal metabolism cause significant increases in total identical DNA adducts. We have utilized stable isotope labeled chemical exposures of animals and cells, so that accurate relationships between endogenous and exogenous exposures can be determined. Advances in mass spectrometry have vastly increased both the sensitivity and accuracy of such studies. Furthermore, we have clear evidence of which sources of exposure drive low dose biology that results in mutations and disease. These data provide much needed information to impact quantitative risk assessments, in the hope of moving towards the use of science, rather than default assumptions. PMID:24767943

  18. Drawing a fine line on endogenous retroelement activity

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Diaz, Nathaly; Friedli, Marc; Trono, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroelements (EREs) are essential motors of evolution yet require careful control to prevent genomic catastrophes, notably during the vulnerable phases of epigenetic reprogramming that occur immediately after fertilization and in germ cells. Accordingly, a variety of mechanisms restrict these mobile genetic units. Previous studies have revealed the importance of KRAB-containing zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFPs) and their cofactor, KAP1, in the early embryonic silencing of endogenous retroviruses and so-called SVAs, but the implication of this transcriptional repression system in the control of LINE-1, the only known active autonomous retrotransposon in the human genome, was thought to be marginal. Two recent studies straighten the record by revealing that the KRAB/KAP system is key to the control of L1 in embryonic stem (ES) cells, and go further in demonstrating that DNA methylation and KRAB/KAP1-induced repression contribute to this process in an evolutionally dynamic fashion. These results shed light on the delicate equilibrium between higher vertebrates and endogenous retroelements, which are not just genetic invaders calling for strict control but rather a constantly renewed and nicely exploitable source of evolutionary potential. PMID:26442176

  19. Interleukin-7 retroviruses transform pre-B cells by an autocrine mechanism not evident in Abelson murine.

    PubMed Central

    Overell, R W; Clark, L; Lynch, D; Jerzy, R; Schmierer, A; Weisser, K E; Namen, A E; Goodwin, R G

    1991-01-01

    In this study, we have constructed retroviral vectors expressing the interleukin-7 (IL-7) cDNA and have used infection with these retroviruses to express this cytokine endogenously in an IL-7-dependent pre-B-cell line. Infection with IL-7 retroviruses, but not with a control retrovirus, resulted in the conversion of the cells to IL-7 independence. The frequency at which this occurred, together with data on vector expression levels, indicated that secondary events were required for factor independence in this system. Southern analysis showed that the IL-7-dependent clones harbored unrearranged copies of the vector proviruses. The factor-independent cells produced variable quantities of IL-7 as measured by an IL-7-specific bioassay, and their proliferation could be substantially inhibited by a neutralizing antibody directed against IL-7, indicating that a classical autocrine-mechanism was responsible for their transformation. These IL-7-independent cells were tumorigenic, in contrast to the parental IL-7-dependent cells or those infected with a control vector. These results showed that IL-7 could participate in the malignant transformation of pre-B cells. However, neither of two Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV)-transformed pre-B-cell lines expressed detectable IL-7 mRNA, at a level of sensitivity corresponding to less than one molecule of mRNA per cell. Moreover, the proliferation of the A-MuLV transformants was unaffected by addition of the IL-7 antisera under conditions in which parallel experiments with IL-7 virus-infected cells resulted in greater than 70% growth inhibition. Thus, transformation of pre-B cells by A-MuLV was not associated with a demonstrable autocrine loop of IL-7 synthesis. These results show that IL-7 can participate in the malignant transformation of pre-B cells and suggest studies aimed at assessing the role of autocrine production of IL-7 in the generation of human leukemias and lymphomas. Images PMID:1996110

  20. CArG, CCAAT, and CCAAT-like protein binding sites in avian retrovirus long terminal repeat enhancers.

    PubMed Central

    Zachow, K R; Conklin, K F

    1992-01-01

    A strong enhancer element is located within the long terminal repeats (LTRs) of exogenous, oncogenic avian retroviruses, such as Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and the avian leukosis viruses. The LTRs of a second class of avian retroviruses, the endogenous viruses (evs), lack detectable enhancer function, a property that correlates with major sequence differences between the LTRs of these two virus groups. Despite this lack of independent enhancer activity, we previously identified sequences in ev LTRs that were able to functionally replace essential enhancer domains from the RSV enhancer with which they share limited sequence similarity. To identify candidate enhancer domains in ev LTRs that are functionally equivalent to those in RSV LTRs, we analyzed and compared ev and RSV LTR-specific DNA-protein interactions. Using this approach, we identified two candidate enhancer domains and one deficiency in ev LTRs. One of the proposed ev enhancer domains was identified as a CArG box, a motif also found upstream of several muscle-specific genes, and as the core sequence of the c-fos serum response element. The RSV LTR contains two CArG motifs, one at a previously identified site and one identified in this report at the same relative location as the ev CArG motif. A second factor binding site that interacts with a heat-stable protein was also identified in ev LTRs and, contrary to previous suggestions, appears to be different from previously described exogenous virus enhancer binding proteins. Finally, a deficiency in factor binding was found within the one inverted CCAAT box in ev LTRs, affirming the importance of sequences that flank CCAAT motifs in factor binding and providing a candidate defect in the ev enhancer. Images PMID:1312613

  1. Characterization of the fusion core in zebrafish endogenous retroviral envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Jian; Zhang, Huaidong; Gong, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2015-05-08

    Zebrafish endogenous retrovirus (ZFERV) is the unique endogenous retrovirus in zebrafish, as yet, containing intact open reading frames of its envelope protein gene in zebrafish genome. Similarly, several envelope proteins of endogenous retroviruses in human and other mammalian animal genomes (such as syncytin-1 and 2 in human, syncytin-A and B in mouse) were identified and shown to be functional in induction of cell–cell fusion involved in placental development. ZFERV envelope protein (Env) gene appears to be also functional in vivo because it is expressible. After sequence alignment, we found ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes, especially in the regions of N- and C-terminal heptad repeats (NHR and CHR) which were crucial for membrane fusion. We expressed the regions of N + C protein in the ZFERV Env (residues 459–567, including predicted NHR and CHR) to characterize the fusion core structure. We found N + C protein could form a stable coiled-coil trimer that consists of three helical NHR regions forming a central trimeric core, and three helical CHR regions packing into the grooves on the surface of the central core. The structural characterization of the fusion core revealed the possible mechanism of fusion mediated by ZFERV Env. These results gave comprehensive explanation of how the ancient virus infects the zebrafish and integrates into the genome million years ago, and showed a rational clue for discovery of physiological significance (e.g., medicate cell–cell fusion). - Highlights: • ZFERV Env shares similar structural profiles with syncytin and other type I viral envelopes. • The fusion core of ZFERV Env forms stable coiled-coil trimer including three NHRs and three CHRs. • The structural mechanism of viral entry mediated by ZFERV Env is disclosed. • The results are helpful for further discovery of physiological function of ZFERV Env in zebrafish.

  2. Phylogenetic distribution of the novel avian endogenous provirus family EAV-0.

    PubMed Central

    Resnick, R M; Boyce-Jacino, M T; Fu, Q; Faras, A J

    1990-01-01

    A new family of related endogenous proviruses, existing at 50 to 100 copies per haploid genome and distinguishable by remarkably short long terminal repeats, has been described for domestic chickens (Gallus gallus subsp domesticus). In this communication, by using Southern blot analysis and probes derived from both internal viral sequences and locus-specific, cellular flanking sequences, we studied the genetic distribution of this family of moderately repetitive avian endogenous retroviruses within the genomes of four Gallus species. Eight inbred lines of domestic chickens, the evolutionary progenitor to the domestic chicken (red jungle fowl), and two more distantly related species (grey and green jungle fowl) were studied. All Gallus species harbored this class of elements, although the different lines of domestic chickens and different species of jungle fowl bore distinguishable complements of the proviral loci. Jungle fowl appeared to have fewer copies than domestic chickens. For three randomly isolated proviral loci, domestic chickens (G. gallus subsp. domesticus) and red jungle fowl (G. gallus subsp. gallus) showed only a proviral state, whereas the most primitive and divergent of the jungle fowl, the green jungle fowl (G. varius), consistently demonstrated only preintegration states or disparate alleles. The presence of this family in all Gallus species and of related sequences in other genera suggests that a primordial founding integration event occurred prior to the evolutionary separation of Gallus species and possibly related genera. Additionally, at least one proviral locus has been acquired subsequent to speciation, indicating that this family was actively infectious after the primary founding event. This conserved, repetitive proviral family appears to represent the vestigial remnant of an avian retrovirus class related to and evolutionarily more ancient than the Rous-associated virus-0 family of avian endogenous retroviruses. Images PMID:2398526

  3. Transcriptionally active genome regions are preferred targets for retrovirus integration.

    PubMed Central

    Scherdin, U; Rhodes, K; Breindl, M

    1990-01-01

    We have analyzed the transcriptional activity of cellular target sequences for Moloney murine leukemia virus integration in mouse fibroblasts. At least five of the nine random, unselected integration target sequences studied showed direct evidence for transcriptional activity by hybridization to nuclear run-on transcripts prepared from uninfected cells. At least four of the sequences contained multiple recognition sites for several restriction enzymes that cut preferentially in CpG-rich islands, indicating integration into 5' or 3' ends or flanking regions of genes. Assuming that only a minor fraction (less than 20%) of the genome is transcribed in mammalian cells, we calculated the probability that this association of retroviral integration sites with transcribed sequences is due to chance to be very low (1.6 x 10(-2]. Thus, our results strongly suggest that transcriptionally active genome regions are preferred targets for retrovirus integration. Images PMID:2296087

  4. The ability of multimerized cyclophilin A to restrict retrovirus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Javanbakht, Hassan; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Yuan Wen; Yeung, Darwin F.; Li Xing; Song Byeongwoon; Sodroski, Joseph

    2007-10-10

    In owl monkeys, the typical retroviral restriction factor of primates, TRIM5{alpha}, is replaced by TRIMCyp. TRIMCyp consists of the TRIM5 RING, B-box 2 and coiled-coil domains, as well as the intervening linker regions, fused with cyclophilin A. TRIMCyp restricts infection of retroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), with capsids that can bind cyclophilin A. The TRIM5 coiled coil promotes the trimerization of TRIMCyp. Here we show that cyclophilin A that is oligomeric as a result of fusion with a heterologous multimer exhibits substantial antiretroviral activity. The addition of the TRIM5 RING, B-box 2 and Linker 2 to oligomeric cyclophilin A generated a protein with antiretroviral activity approaching that of wild-type TRIMCyp. Multimerization increased the binding of cyclophilin A to the HIV-1 capsid, promoting accelerated uncoating of the capsid and restriction of infection.

  5. Porcine circovirus diseases.

    PubMed

    Segalés, Joaquim; Allan, Gordon M; Domingo, Mariano

    2005-12-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) is a member of the family Circoviridae, a recently established virus family composed of small, non-enveloped viruses, with a circular, single-stranded DNA genome. PCV2, which is found all over the world in the domestic pig and probably the wild boar, has been recently associated with a number of disease syndromes, which have been collectively named porcine circovirus diseases (PCVD). Postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), porcine dermatitis and nephropathy syndrome (PDNS) and reproductive disorders are the most relevant ones. Among them, only PMWS is considered to have a severe impact on domestic swine production. PMWS mainly affects nursery and/or fattening pigs; wasting is considered the most representative clinical sign in this disease. Diagnosis of this disease is confirmed by histopathological examination of lymphoid tissues and detection of a moderate to high amount of PCV2 in damaged tissues. Since PMWS is considered a multifactorial disease in which other factors in addition to PCV2 are needed in most cases to trigger the clinical disease, effective control measures have focused on the understanding of the co-factors involved in individual farms and the control or elimination of these triggers. PDNS, an immuno-complex disease characterized by fibrino-necrotizing glomerulonephritis and systemic necrotizing vasculitis, has been linked to PCV2, but a definitive proof of this association is still lacking. PCV2-associated reproductive disease seems to occur very sporadically under field conditions, but it has been characterized by late-term abortions and stillbirths, extensive fibrosing and/or necrotizing myocarditis in fetuses and the presence of moderate to high amounts of PCV2 in these lesions. Taking into account that scientific information on PCV2 and its associated diseases has been markedly expanded in the last 8 years, the objective of this review is to summarize the current state of knowledge of the most

  6. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    PubMed

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  7. Porcine prion protein amyloid

    PubMed Central

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions. PMID:26218890

  8. Purification and characterization of retrovirus vector particles by rate zonal ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Segura, María de las Mercedes; Garnier, Alain; Kamen, Amine

    2006-04-01

    Sucrose equilibrium density ultracentrifugation remains the most widely used technique for retrovirus purification. However, purified virus preparations obtained by this routine method usually contain considerable amounts of contaminating cell membrane vesicles. In addition, sucrose solutions are highly viscous and hyperosmotic which jeopardizes the integrity and functionality of the retrovirus particle. In order to overcome these limitations, an alternative purification technique using rate zonal ultracentrifugation and iodixanol as gradient medium was developed. Recombinant retrovirus particles were produced by 293-GPG packaging cells grown in suspension in the presence of 10% FBS. Concentrated supernatants were purified by rate zonal sedimentation on a 10-30% continuous iodixanol gradient. Virus particles were recovered intact and active from the central fractions of the gradient. By using this strategy, high levels of purification were achieved, with no evident contamination with cell membrane vesicles as indicated by subtilisin treatment studies. The level of purity of the retrovirus preparation is over 95% as shown by SDS-PAGE analysis and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified particles appear homogenous in size and morphology according to negative stain electron microscopy. In addition, large amounts of defective retrovirus particles produced by 293-GPG packaging cells can be separated from functional retrovirus particles using this purification strategy.

  9. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  10. Endogenous Pyrogen Physiology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular injection of rats: a sensitive directed to the photoreceptor system for phototaxis of the proto- assay method for endogenous...spinal heating and cooling and photobiologists. The remainder of the book is devoted to the eye. intracerebroventricular injections of monoamines and...photobehavior and vision discussed, such as histamine /antihistamines, cough remedies, of invertebrates. h i e nd slep-aids and laxatives. The few citations

  11. Endogenous non-retroviral RNA virus elements in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masayuki; Honda, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Daito, Takuji; Oshida, Tatsuo; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Jern, Patric; Gojobori, Takashi; Coffin, John M; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2010-01-07

    Retroviruses are the only group of viruses known to have left a fossil record, in the form of endogenous proviruses, and approximately 8% of the human genome is made up of these elements. Although many other viruses, including non-retroviral RNA viruses, are known to generate DNA forms of their own genomes during replication, none has been found as DNA in the germline of animals. Bornaviruses, a genus of non-segmented, negative-sense RNA virus, are unique among RNA viruses in that they establish persistent infection in the cell nucleus. Here we show that elements homologous to the nucleoprotein (N) gene of bornavirus exist in the genomes of several mammalian species, including humans, non-human primates, rodents and elephants. These sequences have been designated endogenous Borna-like N (EBLN) elements. Some of the primate EBLNs contain an intact open reading frame (ORF) and are expressed as mRNA. Phylogenetic analyses showed that EBLNs seem to have been generated by different insertional events in each specific animal family. Furthermore, the EBLN of a ground squirrel was formed by a recent integration event, whereas those in primates must have been formed more than 40 million years ago. We also show that the N mRNA of a current mammalian bornavirus, Borna disease virus (BDV), can form EBLN-like elements in the genomes of persistently infected cultured cells. Our results provide the first evidence for endogenization of non-retroviral virus-derived elements in mammalian genomes and give novel insights not only into generation of endogenous elements, but also into a role of bornavirus as a source of genetic novelty in its host.

  12. Characterization of porcine eyes based on autofluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; Morgado, António Miguel; König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a non-invasive imaging technique with ideal characteristics for biological applications. In this study, we propose to characterize three major structures of the porcine eye, the cornea, crystalline lens, and retina using two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2PE-FLIM). Samples were imaged using a laser-scanning microscope, consisting of a broadband sub-15 femtosecond (fs) near-infrared laser. Signal detection was performed using a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector (PML-16PMT). Therefore, spectral analysis of the fluorescence lifetime data was possible. To ensure a correct spectral analysis of the autofluorescence lifetime data, the spectra of the individual endogenous fluorophores were acquired with the 16-channel PMT and with a spectrometer. All experiments were performed within 12h of the porcine eye enucleation. We were able to image the cornea, crystalline lens, and retina at multiple depths. Discrimination of each structure based on their autofluorescence intensity and lifetimes was possible. Furthermore, discrimination between different layers of the same structure was also possible. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first time that 2PE-FLIM was used for porcine lens imaging and layer discrimination. With this study we further demonstrated the feasibility of 2PE-FLIM to image and differentiate three of the main components of the eye and its potential as an ophthalmologic technique.

  13. Interferon but not MxB inhibits foamy retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Bähr, Ariane; Singer, Anna; Hain, Anika; Vasudevan, Ananda Ayyappan Jaguva; Schilling, Mirjam; Reh, Juliane; Riess, Maximilian; Panitz, Sylvia; Serrano, Vanessa; Schweizer, Matthias; König, Renate; Chanda, Sumit; Häussinger, Dieter; Kochs, Georg; Lindemann, Dirk; Münk, Carsten

    2016-01-15

    Foamy viruses (FV) are retroviruses that are widely distributed in primate and non-primate animal species. We tested here FV with capsids of simian and non-simian origin for sensitivity to interferon-β (IFN-β). Our data show significant inhibition of FV by IFN-β early in infection of human HOS and THP-1 but not of HEK293T cells. The post-entry restriction of FV was not mediated by the interferon-induced MxB protein that was recently identified as a capsid-interacting restriction factor targeting Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) before integration. Neither the ectopic expression of MxA or MxB in HEK293T cells nor the lack of MxB expression in CRISPR/CAS MxB THP-1 knockout cells impacted the infection of the tested FV. IFN-β treated THP-1 and THP-1 KO MxB cells showed the same extend of restriction to FV. Together, the data demonstrate that IFN-β inhibits FV early in infection and that MxB is not a restriction factor of FV.

  14. Isolation of koala retroviruses from koalas in Japan.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Takayuki; Shojima, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Ohata, Takuji

    2011-01-01

    Koala retrovirus (KoRV) is considered to be associated with leukemia, lymphoma and immunodeficiency-like diseases in koalas. We therefore conducted a pilot study of KoRV infection in five Queensland koalas in Kobe Municipal Oji Zoo. By polymerase chain reaction to detect partial env and pol genes of KoRV in genomic DNA isolated from whole blood and feces, all five koalas were found to be positive for KoRV proviruses. We succeeded in culturing koala lymphocytes from less than 1 ml blood for over 14 days in the presence of recombinant human interleukin-2. By coculturing the lymphocytes with human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells, we isolated KoRVs from all five koalas. We designated these isolates as strains OJ-1 to OJ-5. By electron microscopy, we observed C-type retroviral particles in HEK 293T cells chronically infected with KoRV strain OJ-4. This is the first report on the isolation of KoRV from koalas in a Japanese zoo.

  15. Efficient intracellular retrotransposition of an exogenous primate retrovirus genome

    PubMed Central

    Heinkelein, Martin; Pietschmann, Thomas; Jármy, Gergely; Dressler, Marco; Imrich, Horst; Thurow, Jana; Lindemann, Dirk; Bock, Michael; Moebes, Astrid; Roy, Jacqueline; Herchenröder, Ottmar; Rethwilm, Axel

    2000-01-01

    The foamy virus (FV) subgroup of Retroviridae reverse transcribe their RNA (pre-)genome late in the replication cycle before leaving an infected cell. We studied whether a marker gene-transducing FV vector is able to shuttle to the nucleus and integrate into host cell genomic DNA. While a potential intracellular retrotransposition of vectors derived from other retroviruses was below the detection limit of our assay, we found that up to 5% of cells transfected with the FV vector were stably transduced, harboring 1 to ∼10 vector integrants. Generation of the integrants depended on expression of functional capsid, reverse transcriptase and integrase proteins, and did not involve an extracellular step. PCR analysis of the U3 region of the 5′ long terminal repeat and determination of proviral integration sites showed that a reverse transcription step had taken place to generate the integrants. Co-expression of a mutated envelope allowing particle egress and avoiding extracellular infection resulted in a significantly increased rescue of cells harboring integrants, suggesting that accumulation of proviruses via intracellular retrotransposition represents an integral part of the FV replication strategy. PMID:10880456

  16. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  17. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  18. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  19. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  20. 7 CFR 1230.611 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.611 Section 1230.611 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.611 Porcine animal. The term Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised: (a) As a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  1. Dehydrogenase and Oxoreductase Activities of Porcine Placental 11Beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    dehydrogenase (IIB-HSD) were measured in tissue fragment cultures on day 75 of gestation. Dehydrogenase activity was over fivefold greater than oxoreductase...oxoreductase activities in porcine placentae under physiological conditions using placental explant culture and endogenous concentrations of coenzymes and...f!M range). In human placental tissue fragments at midterm and late pregnancy ( 12, 18) and in trophoblast cell cultures from term placentae ( 41

  2. Colostrum and milk can transmit jaagsiekte retrovirus to lambs.

    PubMed

    Grego, Elena; De Meneghi, Daniele; Alvarez, Vega; Benito, Alfredo A; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Ortín, Aurora; Mattoni, Mario; Moreno, Bernardino; Pérez de Villarreal, Maider; Alberti, Alberto; Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Caporale, Marco; Juste, Ramón; Rosati, Sergio; De las Heras, Marcelo

    2008-08-25

    Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) is a contagious disease caused by jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV). In the three studies performed, we have obtained data of the importance of colostrum/milk (C/M) in the transmission of JSRV. In the first study, a group of sheep from a flock with a long history of OPA, samples from colostrum and peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs) were collected. Two specific PCRs (U3-LTR and env of the JSRV) were carried out. Using U3PCR 8/34 sheep were positive in colostrum whereas with envPCR 7/34 were positive. From these animals only one was positive with U3PCR in the PBLs. Evidence of the transmission of JSRV infection by C/M was obtained in two more separate studies. In the second study, PBLs from five lambs from JSRV+ ewes and two from JSRV-ewes were tested by the U3PCR. They were fed C/M by their mothers during 3 months and slaughtered 7 months after birth. Three out of five lambs from the JSRV+ sheep become PBL positive at 3-4 months old and the other two were also positive at 4-6 months of age. One lamb of the JSRV-sheep became also PBL positive at an age of 3 months. In the third study, a group of lambs from JSRV negative mothers were fed with C/M from JSRV+ sheep and housed in separate unit. For comparison, another group of the same origin and maintained in another different unit, were fed with C/M containing a JSRV virus preparation. All lambs were blood sampled monthly and JSRV infection was detected as early as 15 days and several times onwards in both groups. Control groups fed with C/M from JSRV free flock and JSRV blood test negative sheep were always negative. Together these results indicate that suckling is an important natural transmission route for JSRV.

  3. OTX2 impedes self–renewal of porcine iPS cells through downregulation of NANOG expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Wang, Yaxian; Xie, Youlong; Wang, Huayan

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor Otx2 acts as a negative switch in the regulation of transition from naive to primed pluripotency in mouse pluripotent stem cells. However, the molecular features and function of porcine OTX2 have not been well elucidated in porcine-induced pluripotent stem cells (piPSCs). By studying high-throughput transcriptome sequencing and interfering endogenous OTX2 expression, we demonstrate that OTX2 is able to downgrade the self-renewal of piPSCs. OTX2 is highly expressed in porcine brain, reproductive tissues, and preimplantation embryos, but is undetectable in fibroblasts and most somatic tissues. However, the known piPSC lines reported previously produced different levels of OTX2 depending on the induction procedures and culture conditions. Overexpression of porcine OTX2 can reduce the percentage of alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies and downregulate NANOG and OCT4 expression. In contrast, knockdown of OTX2 can significantly increase endogenous expressions of NANOG, OCT4, and ESRRB, and stabilize the pluripotent state of piPSCs. On the other hand, NANOG can directly bind to the OTX2 promoter as shown in ChIP-seq data and repress OTX2 promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. These observations indicate that OTX2 and NANOG can form a negative feedback circuitry to regulate the pluripotency of porcine iPS cells. PMID:27924227

  4. Evolution of broad host range in retroviruses leads to cell death mediated by highly cytopathic variants.

    PubMed

    Rainey, G Jonah A; Coffin, John M

    2006-01-01

    The ability of many retroviruses to cause disease can be correlated to their cytopathic effect (CPE) in tissue culture characterized by an acute period of cell death and viral DNA accumulation. Here, we show that mutants of a subgroup B avian retrovirus (Alpharetrovirus) cause a very dramatic CPE in certain susceptible avian cells that is coincident with elevated levels of apoptosis, as measured by nuclear morphology, and persistent viral DNA accumulation. These mutants also have a broadly extended host range that includes rodent, cat, dog, monkey, and human cells (31). Previously, we have shown that the mutants exhibit diminished resistance to superinfection. The results presented here have important implications for the process of evolution of retroviruses to use distinct cellular receptors.

  5. Simian Retrovirus 4 Induces Lethal Acute Thrombocytopenia in Japanese Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Sakaguchi, Shoichi; Nakagawa, So; Miura, Tomoyuki; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In 2001-2002, six of seven Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) died after developing hemorrhagic syndrome at the Kyoto University Primate Research Institute (KUPRI). While the cause of death was unknown at the time, we detected simian retrovirus 4 (SRV-4) in samples obtained from a similar outbreak in 2008-2011, during which 42 of 43 Japanese macaques died after exhibiting hemorrhagic syndrome. In this study, we isolated SRV-4 strain PRI-172 from a Japanese macaque showing severe thrombocytopenia. When inoculated into four Japanese macaques, the isolate induced severe thrombocytopenia in all within 37 days. We then constructed an infectious molecular clone of strain PRI-172, termed pSR415, and inoculated the clone-derived virus into two Japanese macaques. These animals also developed severe thrombocytopenia in just 31 days after inoculation, and the virus was reisolated from blood, bone marrow, and stool. At necropsy, we observed bleeding from the gingivae and subcutaneous bleeding in all animals. SRV-4 infected a variety of tissues, especially in digestive organs, including colon and stomach, as determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining. Furthermore, we identified the SRV-4 receptor as ASCT2, a neutral amino acid transporter. ASCT2 mRNA was expressed in a variety of tissues, and the distribution of SRV-4 proviruses in infected Japanese macaques correlated well with the expression levels of ASCT2 mRNA. From these results, we conclude that the causative agent of hemorrhagic syndrome in KUPRI Japanese macaques was SRV-4, and its receptor is ASCT2. IMPORTANCE During two separate outbreaks at the KUPRI, in 2001-2002 and 2008-2011, 96% of Japanese macaques (JM) that developed an unknown hemorrhagic syndrome died. Here, we isolated SRV-4 from a JM developing thrombocytopenia. The SRV-4 isolate and a molecularly cloned SRV-4 induced severe thrombocytopenia in virus-inoculated JMs within 37 days. At necropsy, we

  6. Endogenous Cooperation Network Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, S.

    This paper employs insights from Complex Systems literature to develop a computational model of endogenous strategic network formation. Artificial Adaptive Agents (AAAs), implemented as finite state automata, play a modified two-player Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game with an option to further develop the interaction space as part of their strategy. Several insights result from this relatively minor modification: first, I find that network formation is a necessary condition for cooperation to be sustainable but that both the frequency of interaction and the degree to which edge formation impacts agent mixing are both necessary conditions for cooperative networks. Second, within the FSA-modified IPD frame-work, a rich ecology of agents and network topologies is observed, with consequent payoff symmetry and network 'purity' seen to be further contributors to robust cooperative networks. Third, the dynamics of the strategic system under network formation show that initially simple dynamics with small interaction length between agents gives way to complex, a-periodic dynamics when interaction lengths are increased by a single step.

  7. Endogenous Cooperation Network Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, S.

    This paper employs insights from Complex Systems literature to develop a computational model of endogenous strategic network formation. Artificial Adaptive Agents (AAAs), implemented as finite state automata, play a modified two-player Iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game with an option to further develop the interaction space as part of their strategy. Several insights result from this relatively minor modification: first, I find that network formation is a necessary condition for cooperation to be sustainable but that both the frequency of interaction and the degree to which edge formation impacts agent mixing are both necessary conditions for cooperative networks. Second, within the FSA-modified IPD frame-work, a rich ecology of agents and network topologies is observed, with consequent payoff symmetry and network `purity' seen to be further contributors to robust cooperative networks. Third, the dynamics of the strategic system under network formation show that initially simple dynamics with small interaction length between agents gives way to complex, a-periodic dynamics when interaction lengths are increased by a single step.

  8. Discovery of a novel retrovirus sequence in an Australian native rodent (Melomys burtoni): a putative link between gibbon ape leukemia virus and koala retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Greg; Clarke, Daniel; McKee, Jeff; Young, Paul; Meers, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GALV) and koala retrovirus (KoRV) share a remarkably close sequence identity despite the fact that they occur in distantly related mammals on different continents. It has previously been suggested that infection of their respective hosts may have occurred as a result of a species jump from another, as yet unidentified vertebrate host. To investigate possible sources of these retroviruses in the Australian context, DNA samples were obtained from 42 vertebrate species and screened using PCR in order to detect proviral sequences closely related to KoRV and GALV. Four proviral partial sequences totalling 2880 bases which share a strong similarity with KoRV and GALV were detected in DNA from a native Australian rodent, the grassland melomys, Melomys burtoni. We have designated this novel gammaretrovirus Melomys burtoni retrovirus (MbRV). The concatenated nucleotide sequence of MbRV shares 93% identity with the corresponding sequence from GALV-SEATO and 83% identity with KoRV. The geographic ranges of the grassland melomys and of the koala partially overlap. Thus a species jump by MbRV from melomys to koalas is conceivable. However the genus Melomys does not occur in mainland South East Asia and so it appears most likely that another as yet unidentified host was the source of GALV.

  9. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is the number one disease affecting US swine. It is caused by the PRRS virus (PRRSV) and is recognized as reproductive failure of sows and respiratory problems of piglets and growing pigs. This book chapter is part of the Office of International E...

  10. Shell disorder, immune evasion and transmission behaviors among human and animal retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Goh, Gerard Kian-Meng; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-08-01

    This study involves measurements of percentages of intrinsic disorder (PIDs) in the GAG protein shells of various retroviruses. Unique patterns of shell protein disorder can be seen especially when GAG proteins (matrix M, capsid C, and nucleocapsid N) of primate and non-primate retroviruses are compared. HIV-1 presents the most unique pattern of disorder distribution with generally high levels of disorder in all three proteins, while EIAV (PIDs:: 26, 29, 13) is diametrically different from HIV-1 (N C M PIDs: 39.5 ± 3.0, 44.5 ± 2.6, 56.5 ± 10.8). The HTLV viruses (CPID: 32.8 ± 3.4) resemble HIV-2 (C PID: 26.6 ± 2.9) with a moderately disordered capsid. Totally distinct patterns, however, are seen for the non-primate retroviruses. They generally have highly disordered nucleocapsids (PID > 65%) and more ordered outer shells especially the matrix. These characteristics might be attributed to the differences in the way the retroviruses are transmitted, with non-primate viruses having greater non-sexual transmission components such as oral-fecal transmission. These differences are also evolutionarily related to the ways the viruses evade the host immune systems, and thus, have implications for oncolytic virotherapy and animal models in vaccine research. The importance of protein shell disorder in immune evasion, as related to the case of HIV-1, and the difficult search for its vaccines are highlighted.

  11. Tetherin/BST-2 promotes dendritic cell activation and function during acute retrovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sam X.; Barrett, Bradley S.; Guo, Kejun; Kassiotis, George; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Dittmer, Ulf; Gibbert, Kathrin; Santiago, Mario L.

    2016-01-01

    Tetherin/BST-2 is a host restriction factor that inhibits retrovirus release from infected cells in vitro by tethering nascent virions to the plasma membrane. However, contradictory data exists on whether Tetherin inhibits acute retrovirus infection in vivo. Previously, we reported that Tetherin-mediated inhibition of Friend retrovirus (FV) replication at 2 weeks post-infection correlated with stronger natural killer, CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. Here, we further investigated the role of Tetherin in counteracting retrovirus replication in vivo. FV infection levels were similar between wild-type (WT) and Tetherin KO mice at 3 to 7 days post-infection despite removal of a potent restriction factor, Apobec3/Rfv3. However, during this phase of acute infection, Tetherin enhanced myeloid dendritic cell (DC) function. DCs from infected, but not uninfected, WT mice expressed significantly higher MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecule CD80 compared to Tetherin KO DCs. Tetherin-associated DC activation during acute FV infection correlated with stronger NK cell responses. Furthermore, Tetherin+ DCs from FV-infected mice more strongly stimulated FV-specific CD4+ T cells ex vivo compared to Tetherin KO DCs. The results link the antiretroviral and immunomodulatory activity of Tetherin in vivo to improved DC activation and MHC class II antigen presentation. PMID:26846717

  12. Characterization of retroviral infectivity and superinfection resistance during retrovirus-mediated transduction of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, J; Wei, Q; Fan, J; Zou, Y; Song, D; Liu, J; Liu, F; Ma, C; Hu, X; Li, L; Yu, Y; Qu, X; Chen, L; Yu, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zeng, Z; Zhang, R; Yan, S; Wu, T; Wu, X; Shu, Y; Lei, J; Li, Y; Zhang, W; Wang, J; Reid, R R; Lee, M J; Huang, W; Wolf, J M; He, T-C; Wang, J

    2017-04-07

    Retroviral vectors including lentiviral vectors are commonly-used tools to stably express transgenes or RNA molecules in mammalian cells. Their utilities are roughly divided into two categories, stable overexpression of transgenes and RNA molecules, which requires maximal transduction efficiency, or functional selection with retrovirus-based libraries, which takes advantage of retroviral superinfection resistance. However, the dynamic features of retrovirus-mediated transduction are not well-characterized. Here, we engineered two MSCV-based retroviral vectors expressing dual fluorescence proteins and antibiotic markers and analyzed virion production efficiency and virion stability, dynamic infectivity and superinfection resistance in different cell types, and strategies to improve transduction efficiency. We found that the highest virion production occurred between 60 and 72 h after transfection. The stability of the harvested virion supernatant decreased by >60% after three days in storage. We found that retrovirus infectivity varied drastically in the tested human cancer lines, while low transduction efficiency was partially overcome with increased virus titer, prolonged infection duration, and/or repeated infections. Furthermore, we demonstrated that retrovirus receptors PIT1 and PIT2 were lowly expressed in the analyzed cells, and that PIT1 and/or PIT2 overexpression significantly improved transduction efficiency in certain cell lines. Thus, our findings provide resourceful information for the optimal conditions of retroviral-mediated gene delivery.Gene Therapy accepted article preview online, 07 April 2017. doi:10.1038/gt.2017.24.

  13. High Expression of Endogenous Retroviral Envelope Gene in the Equine Fetal Part of the Placenta

    PubMed Central

    Stefanetti, Valentina; Marenzoni, Maria Luisa; Passamonti, Fabrizio; Cappelli, Katia; Garcia-Etxebarria, Koldo; Coletti, Mauro; Capomaccio, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are proviral phases of exogenous retroviruses that have co-evolved with vertebrate genomes for millions of years. Previous studies have identified the envelope (env) protein genes of retroviral origin preferentially expressed in the placenta which suggests a role in placentation based on their membrane fusogenic capacity and therefore they have been named syncytins. Until now, all the characterized syncytins have been associated with three invasive placentation types: the endotheliochorial (Carnivora), the synepitheliochorial (Ruminantia), and the hemochorial placentation (human, mouse) where they play a role in the syncytiotrophoblast formation. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether EqERV env RNA is expressed in horse tissues as well and investigate if the horse, possessing an epitheliochorial placenta, has “captured” a common retroviral env gene with syncytin-like properties in placental tissues. Interestingly, although in the equine placenta there is no syncytiotrophoblast layer at the maternal-fetal interface, our results showed that EqERV env RNA is highly expressed at that level, as expected for a candidate syncytin-like gene but with reduced abundance in the other somatic tissues (nearly 30-fold lower) thus suggesting a possible role in the placental tissue. Although the horse is one of the few domestic animals with a sequenced genome, few studies have been conducted about the EqERV and their expression in placental tissue has never been investigated. PMID:27176223

  14. Endogenous Antibodies for Tumor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Barrie S.; Honeyman, Joshua N.; Darcy, David G.; Smith, Peter T.; Williams, Andrew R.; Lim, Irene Isabel P.; Johnson, Linda K.; Gönen, Mithat; Simon, Joel S.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Simon, Sanford M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer immunology has provided diagnostic and therapeutic instruments through serum autoantibody biomarkers and exogenous monoclonal antibodies. While some endogenous antibodies are found within or surrounding transformed tissue, the extent to which this exists has not been entirely characterized. We find that in transgenic and xenograft mouse models of cancer, endogenous gamma immunoglobulin (IgG) is present at higher concentration in malignantly transformed organs compared to non-transformed organs in the same mouse or organs of cognate wild-type mice. The enrichment of endogenous antibodies within the malignant tissue provides a potential means of identifying and tracking malignant cells in vivo as they mutate and diversify. Exploiting these antibodies for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes is possible through the use of agents that bind endogenous antibodies. PMID:24875800

  15. Competitive inhibition of benzodiazepine binding by fractions from porcine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Colello, G D; Hockenbery, D M; Bosmann, H B; Fuchs, S; Folkers, K

    1978-01-01

    Fractions of porcine cerebral cortex extract separated by molecular weight on a Sephadex G-75 column were tested for their activities and potencies to inhibit [3H]benzodiazepine binding to rat brain homogenates. The fractions spanned molecular weights from 500 to 100,000. A potent inhibitor (benzodiazepine-competitive factor I, BCF-I) was discovered in the fraction containing substances with molecular weights from 40,000 to 70,000. Equilibrium binding studies indicated that BCF-I was a competitive inhibitor, making it a candidate as a benzodiazepine endogenous factor or profactor. BCF-I was heat stable, but trypsin digestion destroyed its activity. Another inhibitory fraction (BCF-II) was 1/5th as active as BCF-I and contained substances with molecular weights from 1000 to 2000. Images PMID:32539

  16. Motility contrast imaging of live porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ran; Turek, John; Machaty, Zoltan; Nolte, David

    2013-02-01

    Freshly-harvested porcine oocytes are invested with cumulus granulosa cells in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). The cumulus cell layer is usually too thick to image the living oocyte under a conventional microscope. Therefore, it is difficult to assess the oocyte viability. The low success rate of implantation is the main problem for in vitro fertilization. In this paper, we demonstrate our dynamic imaging technique called motility contrast imaging (MCI) that provides a non-invasive way to monitor the COCs before and after maturation. MCI shows a change of intracellular activity during oocyte maturation, and a measures dynamic contrast between the cumulus granulosa shell and the oocytes. MCI also shows difference in the spectral response between oocytes that were graded into quality classes. MCI is based on shortcoherence digital holography. It uses intracellular motility as the endogenous imaging contrast of living tissue. MCI presents a new approach for cumulus-oocyte complex assessment.

  17. Regulation of Porcine Hepatic Cytochrome P450 — Implication for Boar Taint

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Martin Krøyer; Zamaratskaia, Galia

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) is the major family of enzymes involved in the metabolism of several xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. Among substrates for CYP450 is the tryptophan metabolite skatole (3-methylindole), one of the major contributors to the off-odour associated with boar-tainted meat. The accumulation of skatole in pigs is highly dependent on the hepatic clearance by CYP450s. In recent years, the porcine CYP450 has attracted attention both in relation to meat quality and as a potential model for human CYP450. The molecular regulation of CYP450 mRNA expression is controlled by several nuclear receptors and transcription factors that are targets for numerous endogenously and exogenously produced agonists and antagonists. Moreover, CYP450 expression and activity are affected by factors such as age, gender and feeding. The regulation of porcine CYP450 has been suggested to have more similarities with human CYP450 than other animal models, including rodents. This article reviews the available data on porcine hepatic CYP450s and its implications for boar taint. PMID:25408844

  18. Transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1) affects the expression of porcine Klotho (KL) gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Klotho (KL), originally discovered as an aging suppressor, is a membrane protein that shares sequence similarity with the β-glucosidase enzymes. Recent reports showed Klotho might play a role in adipocyte maturation and systemic glucose metabolism. However, little is known about the transcription factors involved in regulating the expression of porcine KL gene. Deletion fragment analysis identified KL-D2 (−418 bp to −3 bp) as the porcine KL core promoter. MARC0022311SNP (A or G) in KL intron 1 was detected in Landrace × DIV pigs using the Porcine SNP60 BeadChip. The pGL-D2-A and pGL-D2-G were constructed with KL-D2 and the intron fragment of different alleles and relative luciferase activity of pGL3-D2-G was significantly higher than that of pGL3-D2-A in the PK cells and ST cells. This was possibly the result of a change in KL binding ability with transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1), which was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP). Moreover, OCT-1 regulated endogenous KL expression by RNA interference experiments. Our study indicates SNP MARC0022311 affects porcine KL expression by regulating its promoter activity via OCT-1. PMID:27478698

  19. Infection with human retroviruses other than HIV-1: HIV-2, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, HTLV-3 and HTLV-4.

    PubMed

    Nicolás, David; Ambrosioni, Juan; Paredes, Roger; Marcos, M Ángeles; Manzardo, Christian; Moreno, Asunción; Miró, José M

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 is the most prevalent retrovirus, with over 30 million people infected worldwide. Nevertheless, infection caused by other human retroviruses like HIV-2, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, HTLV-3 and HTLV-4 is gaining importance. Initially confined to specific geographical areas, HIV-2, HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are becoming a major concern in non-endemic countries due to international migration flows. Clinical manifestations of retroviruses range from asymptomatic carriers to life-threatening conditions, such as AIDS in HIV-2 infection or adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis in HTLV-1 infection. HIV-2 is naturally resistant to some antiretrovirals frequently used to treat HIV-1 infection, but it does have effective antiretroviral therapy options. Unfortunately, HTLV still has limited therapeutic options. In this article, we will review the epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, pathogenic and therapeutic aspects of infections caused by these human retroviruses.

  20. Inheritable Silencing of Endogenous Genes by Hit-and-Run Targeted Epigenetic Editing.

    PubMed

    Amabile, Angelo; Migliara, Alessandro; Capasso, Paola; Biffi, Mauro; Cittaro, Davide; Naldini, Luigi; Lombardo, Angelo

    2016-09-22

    Gene silencing is instrumental to interrogate gene function and holds promise for therapeutic applications. Here, we repurpose the endogenous retroviruses' silencing machinery of embryonic stem cells to stably silence three highly expressed genes in somatic cells by epigenetics. This was achieved by transiently expressing combinations of engineered transcriptional repressors that bind to and synergize at the target locus to instruct repressive histone marks and de novo DNA methylation, thus ensuring long-term memory of the repressive epigenetic state. Silencing was highly specific, as shown by genome-wide analyses, sharply confined to the targeted locus without spreading to nearby genes, resistant to activation induced by cytokine stimulation, and relieved only by targeted DNA demethylation. We demonstrate the portability of this technology by multiplex gene silencing, adopting different DNA binding platforms and interrogating thousands of genomic loci in different cell types, including primary T lymphocytes. Targeted epigenome editing might have broad application in research and medicine.

  1. SIRE-1, a putative plant retrovirus is closely related to a legume TY1-copia retrotransposon family.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Stephen R

    2007-01-01

    SIRE-1 is a potential soybean retrovirus which has a gene order similar to Ty1-copia retrotransposons but also contains an envelope-like open reading frame (ORF), which is characteristic of retroviruses. PCR and Southern analysis reveals that SIRE-1 is closely related to a legume-wide family of envelope-lacking Ty1-copia group retrotransposons which suggests that SIRE-1 was formed by the recent acquisition of an envelope gene by a Ty1-copia retrotransposon.

  2. Endogenous rhythms influence interpersonal synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Wellman, Chelsea; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination. We first establish that endogenous rhythms, measured by spontaneous rates of individual performance, are stable within individuals across stimulus materials, limb movements, and time points. We then test a causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony by pairing each musician with a partner who is either matched or mismatched in spontaneous rate and by measuring their joint behavior up to 1 year later. Partners performed melodies together, using either the same or different hands. Partners who were matched for spontaneous rate showed greater interpersonal synchrony in joint performance than mismatched partners, regardless of hand used. Endogenous rhythms offer potential to predict optimal group membership in joint behaviors that require temporal coordination.

  3. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  4. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  5. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  6. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  7. 7 CFR 1230.18 - Porcine animal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Porcine animal. 1230.18 Section 1230.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... animal. Porcine animal means a swine, that is raised as (a) a feeder pig, that is, a young pig sold...

  8. Toward a More Accurate Quantitation of the Activity of Recombinant Retroviruses: Alternatives to Titer and Multiplicity of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Andreadis, Stylianos; Lavery, Thomas; Davis, Howard E.; Le Doux, Joseph M.; Yarmush, Martin L.; Morgan, Jeffrey R.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we present a mathematical model with experimental support of how several key parameters govern the adsorption of active retrovirus particles onto the surface of adherent cells. These parameters, including time of adsorption, volume of virus, and the number, size, and type of target cells, as well as the intrinsic properties of the virus, diffusion coefficient, and half-life (t1/2), have been incorporated into a mathematical expression that describes the rate at which active virus particles adsorb to the cell surface. From this expression, we have obtained estimates of Cvo, the starting concentration of active retrovirus particles. In contrast to titer, Cvo is independent of the specific conditions of the assay. The relatively slow diffusion (D = 2 × 10−8 cm2/s) and rapid decay (t1/2 = 6 to 7 h) of retrovirus particles explain why Cvo values are significantly higher than titer values. Values of Cvo also indicate that the number of defective particles in a retrovirus stock is much lower than previously thought, which has implications especially for the use of retroviruses for in vivo gene therapy. With this expression, we have also computed AVC (active viruses/cell), the number of active retrovirus particles that would adsorb per cell during a given adsorption time. In contrast to multiplicity of infection, which is based on titer and is subject to the same inaccuracies, AVC is based on the physicochemical parameters of the transduction assay and so is a more reliable alternative. PMID:10627536

  9. Retroviruses use CD169-mediated trans-infection of permissive lymphocytes to establish infection.

    PubMed

    Sewald, Xaver; Ladinsky, Mark S; Uchil, Pradeep D; Beloor, Jagadish; Pi, Ruoxi; Herrmann, Christin; Motamedi, Nasim; Murooka, Thomas T; Brehm, Michael A; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D; Mempel, Thorsten R; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Kumar, Priti; Mothes, Walther

    2015-10-30

    Dendritic cells can capture and transfer retroviruses in vitro across synaptic cell-cell contacts to uninfected cells, a process called trans-infection. Whether trans-infection contributes to retroviral spread in vivo remains unknown. Here, we visualize how retroviruses disseminate in secondary lymphoid tissues of living mice. We demonstrate that murine leukemia virus (MLV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are first captured by sinus-lining macrophages. CD169/Siglec-1, an I-type lectin that recognizes gangliosides, captures the virus. MLV-laden macrophages then form long-lived synaptic contacts to trans-infect B-1 cells. Infected B-1 cells subsequently migrate into the lymph node to spread the infection through virological synapses. Robust infection in lymph nodes and spleen requires CD169, suggesting that a combination of fluid-based movement followed by CD169-dependent trans-infection can contribute to viral spread.

  10. Nematode endogenous small RNA pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstrate, Suzanne W; Volkers, Rita JM; Sterken, Mark G; Kammenga, Jan E; Snoek, L Basten

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of small RNA silencing pathways has greatly extended our knowledge of gene regulation. Small RNAs have been presumed to play a role in every field of biology because they affect many biological processes via regulation of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Most well-known examples of affected processes are development, fertility, and maintenance of genome stability. Here we review the role of the three main endogenous small RNA silencing pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans: microRNAs, endogenous small interfering RNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs. After providing an entry-level overview on how these pathways function, we discuss research on other nematode species providing insight into the evolution of these small RNA pathways. In understanding the differences between the endogenous small RNA pathways and their evolution, a more comprehensive picture is formed of the functions and effects of small RNAs. PMID:25340013

  11. The antiretrovirus drug 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine increases the retrovirus mutation rate.

    PubMed Central

    Julias, J G; Kim, T; Arnold, G; Pathak, V K

    1997-01-01

    It was previously observed that the nucleoside analog 5-azacytidine increased the spleen necrosis virus (SNV) mutation rate 13-fold in one cycle of retrovirus replication (V. K. Pathak and H. M. Temin, J. Virol. 66:3093-3100, 1992). Based on this observation, we hypothesized that nucleoside analogs used as antiviral drugs may also increase retrovirus mutation rates. We sought to determine if 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT), the primary treatment for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, increases the retrovirus mutation rate. Two assays were used to determine the effects of AZT on retrovirus mutation rates. The strategy of the first assay involved measuring the in vivo rate of inactivation of the lacZ gene in one replication cycle of SNV- and murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors. We observed 7- and 10-fold increases in the SNV mutant frequency following treatment of target cells with 0.1 and 0.5 microM AZT, respectively. The murine leukemia virus mutant frequency increased two- and threefold following treatment of target cells with 0.5 and 1.0 microM AZT, respectively. The second assay used an SNV-based shuttle vector containing the lacZ alpha gene. Proviruses were recovered as plasmids in Escherichia coli, and the rate of inactivation of lacZ alpha was measured. The results indicated that treatment of target cells increased the overall mutation rate two- to threefold. DNA sequence analysis of mutant proviruses indicated that AZT increased both the deletion and substitution rates. These results suggest that AZT treatment of HIV-1 infection may increase the degree of viral variation and alter virus evolution or pathogenesis. PMID:9151812

  12. A Modified γ-Retrovirus Vector for X-Linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hacein-Bey-Abina, S.; Pai, S.-Y.; Gaspar, H.B.; Armant, M.; Berry, C.C.; Blanche, S.; Bleesing, J.; Blondeau, J.; de Boer, H.; Buckland, K.F.; Caccavelli, L.; Cros, G.; De Oliveira, S.; Fernández, K.S.; Guo, D.; Harris, C.E.; Hopkins, G.; Lehmann, L.E.; Lim, A.; London, W.B.; van der Loo, J.C.M.; Malani, N.; Male, F.; Malik, P.; Marinovic, M.A.; McNicol, A.-M.; Moshous, D.; Neven, B.; Oleastro, M.; Picard, C.; Ritz, J.; Rivat, C.; Schambach, A.; Shaw, K.L.; Sherman, E.A.; Silberstein, L.E.; Six, E.; Touzot, F.; Tsytsykova, A.; Xu-Bayford, J.; Baum, C.; Bushman, F.D.; Fischer, A.; Kohn, D.B.; Filipovich, A.H.; Notarangelo, L.D.; Cavazzana, M.; Williams, D.A.; Thrasher, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In previous clinical trials involving children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), a Moloney murine leukemia virus–based γ-retrovirus vector expressing interleukin-2 receptor γ-chain (γc) complementary DNA successfully restored immunity in most patients but resulted in vector-induced leukemia through enhancer-mediated mutagenesis in 25% of patients. We assessed the efficacy and safety of a self-inactivating retrovirus for the treatment of SCID-X1. METHODS We enrolled nine boys with SCID-X1 in parallel trials in Europe and the United States to evaluate treatment with a self-inactivating (SIN) γ-retrovirus vector containing deletions in viral enhancer sequences expressing γc (SIN-γc). RESULTS All patients received bone marrow–derived CD34+ cells transduced with the SIN-γc vector, without preparative conditioning. After 12.1 to 38.7 months of follow-up, eight of the nine children were still alive. One patient died from an overwhelming adenoviral infection before reconstitution with genetically modified T cells. Of the remaining eight patients, seven had recovery of peripheral-blood T cells that were functional and led to resolution of infections. The patients remained healthy thereafter. The kinetics of CD3+ T-cell recovery was not significantly different from that observed in previous trials. Assessment of insertion sites in peripheral blood from patients in the current trial as compared with those in previous trials revealed significantly less clustering of insertion sites within LMO2 , MECOM, and other lymphoid proto-oncogenes in our patients. CONCLUSIONS This modified γ-retrovirus vector was found to retain efficacy in the treatment of SCID-X1. The long-term effect of this therapy on leukemogenesis remains unknown. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT01410019, NCT01175239, and NCT01129544.) PMID:25295500

  13. Quantitative analysis of endogenous compounds.

    PubMed

    Thakare, Rhishikesh; Chhonker, Yashpal S; Gautam, Nagsen; Alamoudi, Jawaher Abdullah; Alnouti, Yazen

    2016-09-05

    Accurate quantitative analysis of endogenous analytes is essential for several clinical and non-clinical applications. LC-MS/MS is the technique of choice for quantitative analyses. Absolute quantification by LC/MS requires preparing standard curves in the same matrix as the study samples so that the matrix effect and the extraction efficiency for analytes are the same in both the standard and study samples. However, by definition, analyte-free biological matrices do not exist for endogenous compounds. To address the lack of blank matrices for the quantification of endogenous compounds by LC-MS/MS, four approaches are used including the standard addition, the background subtraction, the surrogate matrix, and the surrogate analyte methods. This review article presents an overview these approaches, cite and summarize their applications, and compare their advantages and disadvantages. In addition, we discuss in details, validation requirements and compatibility with FDA guidelines to ensure method reliability in quantifying endogenous compounds. The standard addition, background subtraction, and the surrogate analyte approaches allow the use of the same matrix for the calibration curve as the one to be analyzed in the test samples. However, in the surrogate matrix approach, various matrices such as artificial, stripped, and neat matrices are used as surrogate matrices for the actual matrix of study samples. For the surrogate analyte approach, it is required to demonstrate similarity in matrix effect and recovery between surrogate and authentic endogenous analytes. Similarly, for the surrogate matrix approach, it is required to demonstrate similar matrix effect and extraction recovery in both the surrogate and original matrices. All these methods represent indirect approaches to quantify endogenous compounds and regardless of what approach is followed, it has to be shown that none of the validation criteria have been compromised due to the indirect analyses.

  14. [Additive effect of marihuana and retrovirus in the anergy of natural killer cells in mice].

    PubMed

    Ongrádi, J; Specter, S; Horváth, A; Friedman, H

    1999-01-10

    Among the immunosuppressive effects of marijuana, impairment of natural killer cell activity is significant. HIV also inhibits these cells. Friend leukemia virus complex and its helper component Rowson-Parr virus induce early immunosuppression in mice resembling human AIDS, and late leukemia, providing a small animal AIDS model. Leukemia susceptible BALB/c and resistant C57BL/6 mice were infected with these viruses. At different time points, their natural killer cells separated from spleens were treated with 0 to 10 micrograms/ml tetrahydrocannabinol, subsequently mixed with Yac-1 target cells for 4 and 18 h. The natural killer cell activity in both mouse strains infected by either virus complex or helper virus weakened on days 2 to 4 postinfection, normalized by day 8 and enhanced on days 11 to 14. Natural killer cell activity upon the effect of low concentration (1.0 to 2.5 micrograms/ml) of tetrahydrocannabinol slightly increased in BALB/c, was unaffected in C57BL/6, especially in 18 h assays. In the combined effects of marijuana and retrovirus, damages by marijuana dominated over those of retroviruses. Inhibition or reactive enhancement of natural killer cell activity on the effect of viruses are similar to those of infected but marijuana-free counterparts, but on the level of uninfected cells treated with marijuana. The effects of marijuana and retrovirus are additive resulting in anergy of natural killer cells.

  15. Biochemical and proteomic characterization of retrovirus Gag based microparticles carrying melanoma antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kurg, Reet; Reinsalu, Olavi; Jagur, Sergei; Õunap, Kadri; Võsa, Liisi; Kasvandik, Sergo; Padari, Kärt; Gildemann, Kiira; Ustav, Mart

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles are membraneous particles released by a variety of cells into the extracellular microenvironment. Retroviruses utilize the cellular vesiculation pathway for virus budding/assembly and the retrovirus Gag protein induces the spontaneous formation of microvesicles or virus-like particles (VLPs) when expressed in the mammalian cells. In this study, five different melanoma antigens, MAGEA4, MAGEA10, MART1, TRP1 and MCAM, were incorporated into the VLPs and their localization within the particles was determined. Our data show that the MAGEA4 and MAGEA10 proteins as well as MCAM are expressed on the surface of VLPs. The compartmentalization of exogenously expressed cancer antigens within the VLPs did not depend on the localization of the protein within the cell. Comparison of the protein content of VLPs by LC-MS/MS-based label-free quantitative proteomics showed that VLPs carrying different cancer antigens are very similar to each other, but differ to some extent from VLPs without recombinant antigen. We suggest that retrovirus Gag based virus-like particles carrying recombinant antigens have a potential to be used in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27403717

  16. Adaptation of a retrovirus as a eucaryotic vector transmitting the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tabin, C.J.; Hoffman, J.W.; Goff, S.P.; Weinberg, R.A.

    1982-04-01

    The authors investigated the feasibility of using retroviruses as vectors for transferring DNA sequences into animal cells. The thymidine kinase (tk) gene of herpes simplex virus was chosen as a convenient model. The internal BamHI fragments of a DNA clone of Moloney leukemia virus (MLV) were replaced with a purified BamHI DNA segment containing the tk gene. Chimeric genomes were created carrying the tk insert on both orientations relative to the MLV sequence. Each was transfected into TK/sup -/ cells along with MLV helper virus, and TK/sup +/ colonies were obtained by selection in the presence of hypoxanthine, aminopterin, and thymidine (HAT). Virus collected from TK/sup +/-transformed, MLV producer cells passed the TK/sup +/ phenotype to TK/sup -/ cells. Nonproducer cells were isolated, and TK/sup +/ transducing virus was subsequently rescued from them. The chimeric virus showed single-hit kinetics in infections. Virion and cellular RNA and cellular DNA from infected cells were all shown to contain sequences which hybridized to both MLV- and tk-specific probes. The sizes of these sequences were consistent with those predicted for the chimeric virus. In all respects studied, the chimeric MLV-tk virus behaved like known replication-defective retroviruses. These experiments suggest great general applicability of retroviruses as eucaryotic vectors.

  17. Protection against Friend retrovirus-induced leukemia by recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the gag gene.

    PubMed Central

    Miyazawa, M; Nishio, J; Chesebro, B

    1992-01-01

    High sequence variability in the envelope gene of human immunodeficiency virus has provoked interest in nonenvelope antigens as potential immunogens against retrovirus infection. However, the role of core protein antigens encoded by the gag gene in protective immunity against retroviruses is unclear. By using recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing the Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) gag gene, we could prime CD4+ T-helper cells and protectively immunize susceptible strains of mice against Friend retrovirus infection. Recovery from leukemic splenomegaly developed more slowly after immunization with vaccinia virus-F-MuLV gag than with vaccinia virus-F-MuLV env; however, genetic nonresponders to the envelope protein could be partially protected with Gag vaccines. Class switching of F-MuLV-neutralizing antibodies from immunoglobulin M to immunoglobulin G after challenge with Friend virus complex was facilitated in mice immunized with the Gag antigen. Sequential deletion of the gag gene revealed that the major protective epitope was located on the N-terminal hydrophobic protein p15. Images PMID:1534853

  18. Blocking porcine sialoadhesin improves extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion with human blood

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Joshua P.; Vogel, Thomas; Burlak, Christopher; Coussios, Constantin; Dominguez, Javier; Friend, Peter; Rees, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Patients in fulminant hepatic failure currently do not have a temporary means of support while awaiting liver transplantation. A potential therapeutic approach for such patients is the use of extracorporeal perfusion with porcine livers as a form of “liver dialysis”. During a 72-hour extracorporeal perfusion of porcine livers with human blood, porcine Kupffer cells bind to and phagocytose human red blood cells (hRBC) causing the hematocrit to decrease to 2.5% of the original value. Our laboratory has identified porcine sialoadhesin expressed on Kupffer cells as the lectin responsible for binding N-acetylneuraminic acid on the surface of the hRBC. We evaluated whether blocking porcine sialoadhesin prevents the recognition and subsequent destruction of hRBCs seen during extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion. Ex vivo studies were performed using wild type pig livers perfused with isolated hRBCs for 72-hours in the presence of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody or isotype control. The addition of an anti-porcine sialoadhesin antibody to an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model reduces the loss of hRBC over a 72 hour period. Sustained liver function was demonstrated throughout the perfusion. This study illustrates the role of sialoadhesin in mediating the destruction of hRBCs in an extracorporeal porcine liver xenoperfusion model. PMID:23822217

  19. [Research advances in porcine bocavirus].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Shao-Lun; Chen, Sheng-Nan; Wei, Wen-Kang

    2012-03-01

    Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) was considered as a new member of the genus Bocavirus of the subfamily Parvovirinae of the family Parvoviridae, which was discovered in Swedish swine herds with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS) in 2009. At present, as an emerging pathogen, it was paid great attention by researchers at home and abroad. This paper referred to some published literatures and reviewed several aspects of PBoV including its finding, classification, genome structure and replication, epidemiology, associativity with diseases, cultural and diagnostic methods.

  20. Role for endogenous estrogen in prepubertal Sertoli cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Kao, Eddy; Villalon, Rosalina; Ribeiro, Salustiano; Berger, Trish

    2012-11-01

    Reducing prepubertal endogenous estrogens led to increased numbers of Sertoli cells and the associated increased testicular size and testicular sperm production capacity in boars. The increased number of Sertoli cells might be due to a longer time for proliferation; delayed differentiation of Sertoli cells during suppressed endogenous estrogens would be consistent with this hypothesized, prolonged proliferation interval. This study used immunohistochemical detection of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), a marker of immature Sertoli cells, and of CDKN1B, a cell cycle inhibitor associated with more mature Sertoli cells, to determine if suppressing endogenous estrogens detectably delayed "differentiation" of porcine Sertoli cells. Testes were from littermate pairs of boars previously treated with Letrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, or vehicle, from the first week of age until tissue collection at 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6 months of age. Four animals were examined at each age following Letrozole treatment and their corresponding littermates evaluated following treatment with vehicle. Amount of AMH protein in Sertoli cells decreased with age of boar and could not be detected at 6 months of age. The AMH labeling was greater in the Letrozole-treated boars compared with littermate vehicle controls at 4 months of age (P=0.03). The percentage of CDKN1B-labeled Sertoli cells apparently increased with age through 5 months of age. At 4 and 5 months of age, the mean percentage of CDKN1B-labeled Sertoli cells was less in the Letrozole-treated animals than in the vehicle control animals (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that continual inhibition of aromatase (and concomitatant reduced estrogen synthesis) causes a delay in Sertoli cell maturation in boars.

  1. Ribavirin efficiently suppresses porcine nidovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngnam; Lee, Changhee

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) are porcine nidoviruses that represent emerging viral pathogens causing heavy economic impacts on the swine industry. Although ribavirin is a well-known antiviral drug against a broad range of both DNA and RNA viruses in vitro, its inhibitory effect and mechanism of action on porcine nidovirus replication remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine whether ribavirin suppresses porcine nidovirus infection. Our results demonstrated that ribavirin treatment dose-dependently inhibited the replication of both nidoviruses. The antiviral activity of ribavirin on porcine nidovirus replication was found to be primarily exerted at early times post-infection. Treatment with ribavirin resulted in marked reduction of viral genomic and subgenomic RNA synthesis, viral protein expression, and progeny virus production in a dose-dependent manner. Investigations into the mechanism of action of ribavirin against PRRSV and PEDV revealed that the addition of guanosine to the ribavirin treatment significantly reversed the antiviral effects, suggesting that depletion of the intracellular GTP pool by inhibiting IMP dehydrogenase may be essential for ribavirin activity. Further sequencing analysis showed that the mutation frequency in ribavirin-treated cells was similar to that in untreated cells, indicating that ribavirin did not induce error-prone replication. Taken together, our data indicate that ribavirin might not only be a good therapeutic agent against porcine nidovirus, but also a potential candidate to be evaluated against other human and animal coronaviruses.

  2. Determination and confirmation of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), anti-estrogens and aromatase inhibitors in bovine and porcine urine using UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Thijs; Essers, Martien L; Kaklamanos, George; Sterk, Saskia S; van Ginkel, Leendert A

    2017-04-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), anti-estrogens and aromatase inhibitors are prohibited in human sports doping. However, they also present a risk of being used illegally in animal husbandry for fattening purposes. A method was developed and validated using UHPLC-MS/MS for the determination and confirmation of SERMs, anti-estrogens and aromatase inhibiters in bovine and porcine urine. This method was used in a survey of more than 200 bovine and porcine urine samples from Dutch farms. In 18 out of 103 porcine urine samples (17%) and two out of 114 bovine samples (2%) formestane, an aromatase inhibitor, was detected. None of the other compounds was detected. From human doping control it is known that formestane can, in some cases, be of natural origin. Analyses of reference samples from untreated bovine and porcine animals demonstrated the presence of formestane in bovine animals, but not yet in porcine animals. Future research will focus on whether the detected formestane in porcine and bovine urine is from endogenous or exogenous origin, using GC-c-IRMS.

  3. Oxidative DNA damage in osteoarthritic porcine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Antonia F.; Davies, Catrin M.; De Lin, Ming; Fermor, Beverley

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species. This study investigated if increased oxidative DNA damage accumulates in OA articular cartilage compared with non-OA articular cartilage from pigs with spontaneous OA. Additionally, the ability of nitric oxide (NO) or peroxynitrite (ONOO-) induced DNA damage in non-OA chondrocytes to undergo endogenous repair was investigated. Methods Porcine femoral condyles were graded for the stage of OA, macroscopically by the Collins Scale, and histologically by the modified Mankin Grade. Levels of DNA damage were determined in non-OA and OA cartilage, using the comet assay. For calibration, DNA damage was measured by exposing non-OA chondrocytes to 0-12 Gray of x-ray irradiation. Non-OA articular chondrocytes were treated with 0-500 μM of NO donors (NOC-18 or SIN-1), and DNA damage assessed after treatment and 5 days recovery. Results A significant increase (p<0.01) in oxidative DNA damage occurred in OA chondrocytes in joints with Mankin Grades 3 or greater, compared to non-OA chondrocytes. The percentage of nuclei containing DNA damage increased significantly (p<0.001) from early to late grades of OA. An increase of approximately 0.65-1.7 breaks/1000kB of DNA occurred in OA, compared to non-OA nuclei. NOC-18 or SIN-1 caused significant DNA damage (p<0.001) in non-OA chondrocytes that did not undergo full endogenous repair after 5 days (p<0.05). Conclusion Our data suggest significant levels of oxidative DNA damage occur in OA chondrocytes that accumulates with OA progression. Additionally, DNA damage induced by NO and ONOO- in non-OA chondrocytes does not undergo full endogenous repair. PMID:18720406

  4. Endogenous opiates and behavior: 2014.

    PubMed

    Bodnar, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the thirty-seventh consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2014 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (endogenous opioids and receptors), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (pain and analgesia); stress and social status (human studies); tolerance and dependence (opioid mediation of other analgesic responses); learning and memory (stress and social status); eating and drinking (stress-induced analgesia); alcohol and drugs of abuse (emotional responses in opioid-mediated behaviors); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (opioid involvement in stress response regulation); mental illness and mood (tolerance and dependence); seizures and neurologic disorders (learning and memory); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (opiates and conditioned place preferences (CPP)); general activity and locomotion (eating and drinking); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (alcohol and drugs of abuse); cardiovascular responses (opiates and ethanol); respiration and thermoregulation (opiates and THC); and immunological responses (opiates and stimulants). This paper is the thirty-seventh consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system. It summarizes papers published during 2014 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular

  5. Gamma-Retrovirus Integration Marks Cell Type-Specific Cancer Genes: A Novel Profiling Tool in Cancer Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Gilroy, Kathryn L.; Terry, Anne; Naseer, Asif; de Ridder, Jeroen; Wang, Weiwei; Carpenter, Eric; Mason, Andrew; Wong, Gane K-S.; Kilbey, Anna; Neil, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses have been foundational in cancer research since early studies identified proto-oncogenes as targets for insertional mutagenesis. Integration of murine gamma-retroviruses into the host genome favours promoters and enhancers and entails interaction of viral integrase with host BET/bromodomain factors. We report that this integration pattern is conserved in feline leukaemia virus (FeLV), a gamma-retrovirus that infects many human cell types. Analysis of FeLV insertion sites in the MCF-7 mammary carcinoma cell line revealed strong bias towards active chromatin marks with no evidence of significant post-integration growth selection. The most prominent FeLV integration targets had little overlap with the most abundantly expressed transcripts, but were strongly enriched for annotated cancer genes. A meta-analysis based on several gamma-retrovirus integration profiling (GRIP) studies in human cells (CD34+, K562, HepG2) revealed a similar cancer gene bias but also remarkable cell-type specificity, with prominent exceptions including a universal integration hotspot at the long non-coding RNA MALAT1. Comparison of GRIP targets with databases of super-enhancers from the same cell lines showed that these have only limited overlap and that GRIP provides unique insights into the upstream drivers of cell growth. These observations elucidate the oncogenic potency of the gamma-retroviruses and support the wider application of GRIP to identify the genes and growth regulatory circuits that drive distinct cancer types. PMID:27097319

  6. Endogenous respiration of Polyporus sulphureus

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.M.W.; Siehr, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty percent of the dry weight of the basidiomycete Polyporus sulphureus is triterpenoid acid. The endogenous respiratory quotient of this organism is 0.8 indicating that the triterpenoid is being used as an endogenous storage material. Monosaccharides did not seem to be utilized as exogenous substrates but Krebs-cycle intermediates stimulated oxygen uptake. Pyruvic acid inhibited oxygen uptake. Studies with /sup 14/C-labeled glucose indicated that 27% of the glucose was metabolized by way of glycolysis. The hexose-monophosphate pathway was the major metabolic path for the utilization of glucose. Despite the fact that P. sulphureus is associated with brown rot, its carbon metabolism suggests that it utilizes substances associated with the degradation of lignin more readily than it does glucose.

  7. [Memory processes in endogenous depression].

    PubMed

    Radziwiłłowicz, W; Radziwiłłowicz, P

    1998-01-01

    The thesis aims to answer the questions about the profile of mental ability in endogenous depression and to decide whether self-estimation of depressive symptoms influences the results achieved by patients in memory tests. Fifty six patients suffering from endogenous depression have been examined. The following methods have been applied: Mini Mental State Examination, Benton Visual Retention Test, Beck Depression Inventory, hold tests: Vocabulary, Information, Comprehension and Digit Span of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure, Auditory Verbal Learning Test, DCS Weidlich. General status of cognitive functions correlates with the profile of specific kinds of memory results, particularly with delayed memory. Self-estimation of depressive symptoms intensity is mostly influenced by memory capacity, visuomotorial factor, functions of perception and lingual factor. High correlation between verbal and non verbal learning shows uniform influence of depression on the process of learning.

  8. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Porcine Elastase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Porcine Elastase. This enzyme is associated with the degradation of lung tissue in people suffering from emphysema. It is useful in studying causes of this disease. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  9. Efficient decellularization of whole porcine kidneys improves reseeded cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Poornejad, Nafiseh; Momtahan, Nima; Salehi, Amin S M; Scott, Daniel R; Fronk, Cory A; Roeder, Beverly L; Reynolds, Paul R; Bundy, Bradley C; Cook, Alonzo D

    2016-03-10

    Combining patient-specific cells with the appropriate scaffold to create functional kidneys is a promising technology to provide immunocompatible kidneys for the 100,000+ patients on the organ waiting list. For proper recellularization to occur, the scaffold must possess the critical microstructure and an intact vascular network. Detergent perfusion through the vasculature of a kidney is the preferred method of decellularization; however, harsh detergents could be damaging to the microstructure of the renal tissue and may undesirably solubilize the endogenous growth and signaling factors. In this study, automated decellularization of whole porcine kidneys was performed using an improved method that combined physical and chemical steps to efficiently remove cellular materials while producing minimal damage to the collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM). Freezing/thawing, incremental increases in flow rate under constant pressure, applying osmotic shock to the cellular membranes, and low concentrations of the detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were factors used to decrease SDS exposure time during the decellularization process from 36 to 5 h, which preserved the microstructure while still removing 99% of the DNA. The well-preserved glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen fibers enhanced cell-ECM interactions. Human renal cortical tubular epithelium (RCTE) cells grew more rapidly when cultured on the ECM obtained from the improved decellularization process and also demonstrated more in vivo-like gene expression patterns. The optimized, automated process that resulted from this work is now used routinely in our laboratory to rapidly decellularize porcine kidneys and could be adapted to other large organs (e.g. heart, liver, and lung).

  10. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T; Ross, Jason W; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease.

  11. An evaluation of the putative human mammary tumour retrovirus associated with peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, L. P.; Carroll, A. R.; Rhodes, P.; Wood, J.; Read, N. G.

    1991-01-01

    The primary aims of this study were purification and molecular cloning of a putative retrovirus designated human mammary tumour virus (HMTV). However, our preliminary unpublished data of negative reverse transcriptase (RT) activity in ostensibly 'infected' cells led us to re-examine the evidence for this virus; namely multinucleate giant cell (MNGC) formation and RT activity in cultured blood monocytes from breast cancer patients versus benign breast tumour and normal control subjects. MNGCs from by fusion of monocytes and we estimated the total number of cell fusions which had occurred after 10 days of culture in vitro by counting cells with two, three, four and five or more nuclei (n) and by measuring the density of adherent mononuclear cells for each subject studied. We found no clear-cut difference in MNGC formation between the three subject groups. Moreover, a substantial number of cultures, encompassing the three groups, showed far more MNGCs per 10(5) monocytes than previously reported. Various parametric and nonparametric statistical analyses were performed on the multinucleate cell data and only one parametric test, which utilised the density of monolayers as a co-variate, showed a statistically significant difference at the 5% level between the breast cancer and the normal subject groups. We observed marked subject-to-subject variation in multinucleate cell formation and we suggest that the evidence for a difference between the breast cancer and the normal groups is marginal. Further, MNGC formation by breast cancer monocytes may not be attributed to the presence of a retrovirus since 5'-Azacytidine (AZA), an agent known to stimulate replication of latent retroviruses showed no effect on the MNGC formation. In addition, culture supernatants from the three groups were assayed for RT activity and no test sample gave a significant signal above background. Preliminary transmission electron microscopy analysis failed to identify viral particles in MNGCs

  12. The retrovirus HTLV-1 inserts an ectopic CTCF-binding site into the human genome.

    PubMed

    Satou, Yorifumi; Miyazato, Paola; Ishihara, Ko; Yaguchi, Hiroko; Melamed, Anat; Miura, Michi; Fukuda, Asami; Nosaka, Kisato; Watanabe, Takehisa; Rowan, Aileen G; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi; Bangham, Charles R M

    2016-03-15

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that causes malignant and inflammatory diseases in ∼10% of infected people. A typical host has between 10(4) and 10(5) clones of HTLV-1-infected T lymphocytes, each clone distinguished by the genomic integration site of the single-copy HTLV-1 provirus. The HTLV-1 bZIP (HBZ) factor gene is constitutively expressed from the minus strand of the provirus, whereas plus-strand expression, required for viral propagation to uninfected cells, is suppressed or intermittent in vivo, allowing escape from host immune surveillance. It remains unknown what regulates this pattern of proviral transcription and latency. Here, we show that CTCF, a key regulator of chromatin structure and function, binds to the provirus at a sharp border in epigenetic modifications in the pX region of the HTLV-1 provirus in T cells naturally infected with HTLV-1. CTCF is a zinc-finger protein that binds to an insulator region in genomic DNA and plays a fundamental role in controlling higher order chromatin structure and gene expression in vertebrate cells. We show that CTCF bound to HTLV-1 acts as an enhancer blocker, regulates HTLV-1 mRNA splicing, and forms long-distance interactions with flanking host chromatin. CTCF-binding sites (CTCF-BSs) have been propagated throughout the genome by transposons in certain primate lineages, but CTCF binding has not previously been described in present-day exogenous retroviruses. The presence of an ectopic CTCF-BS introduced by the retrovirus in tens of thousands of genomic locations has the potential to cause widespread abnormalities in host cell chromatin structure and gene expression.

  13. Endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter koseri.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Peng, Ming-Yieh; Wang, Ying-Chuan; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2009-12-01

    Endogenous endophthalmitis occurs when organisms are hematogenously disseminated in to the eye from a distant focus of infection. The most common isolated organisms that cause endogenous endophthalmitis are Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Previous reports on endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter species are limited. We present the first case of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter koseri bacteremia and renal abscesses.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Cytopathogenicity of Primate Lymphotropic Retroviruses: Relevance to Treatment and Vaccine for AIDS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-10

    Covering the Period 9/29/87 to 9/28/88 by 0Mark M . Manak and Linda Jagodzinski March 10, 1989 Supported by: US ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT...of Cytopathogenicity of Primate Lymphotropic Retroviruses: Relevance to Treatment and Vaccine for AIDS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Manak, Mark M . and...1 hour. The mixture was adjusted to a pH >8.5 by the addition of 1 M TrisHCI, pH 9.0, and extracted three times with equal volumes of n-butanol. The

  15. Repression of retrovirus-mediated transgene expression by interferons: implications for gene therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Ghazizadeh, S; Carroll, J M; Taichman, L B

    1997-01-01

    Retrovirus-mediated gene transfer is commonly used in gene therapy protocols and has the potential to provide long-term expression of the transgene. Although expression of a retrovirus-delivered transgene is satisfactory in cultured cells, it has been difficult to achieve consistent and high-level expression in vivo. In this investigation, we explored the possibility of modulating transgene expression by host-derived cytokines. Normal human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts were transduced with recombinant retroviruses expressing a reporter gene (lacZ). Treatment of transduced cells with a proinflammatory cytokine, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), significantly reduced lacZ expression to less than 25% of that of nontreated cells. The inhibition was concentration dependent (peak at 5 ng/ml) and time dependent (maximal at 16 h for transcript and 24 h for protein); expression remained repressed in the continued presence of IFN-gamma but returned to normal levels 24 h after IFN-gamma withdrawal. The decrease in beta-galactosidase activity appeared to result from decrease in steady-state lacZ mRNA levels. Inhibitors of transcription and translation blocked IFN-gamma-induced repression, suggesting involvement of newly synthesized protein intermediates. Similar results were obtained by treatment of transduced cells with IFN-alpha but not with other proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-2 (IL-1), IL-4, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Although the level of lacZ mRNA was reduced by >70% following IFN treatment, the rate of lacZ transcription was not significantly different from that for nontreated cells. These results suggest that IFN-mediated regulation of transgene expression is at a posttranscriptional level. Interestingly, IFN-gamma also suppressed transgene expression driven by a cellular promoter (involucrin) inserted in an internal position in the retroviral vector. The presence of the overlapping 3' untranslated

  16. Identification of a novel subgroup of Koala retrovirus from Koalas in Japanese zoos.

    PubMed

    Shojima, Takayuki; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Hoshino, Shigeki; Shimode, Sayumi; Nakagawa, So; Ohata, Takuji; Nakaoka, Rie; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2013-09-01

    We identified a new subgroup of koala retrovirus (KoRV), named KoRV-J, which utilizes thiamine transport protein 1 as a receptor instead of the Pit-1 receptor used by KoRV (KoRV-A). By subgroup-specific PCR, KoRV-J and KoRV-A were detected in 67.5 and 100% of koalas originating from koalas from northern Australia, respectively. Altogether, our results indicate that the invasion of the koala population by KoRV-J may have occurred more recently than invasion by KoRV-A.

  17. Selected highlights on women and HIV from the 5th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections.

    PubMed

    Bartnof, H S

    1998-04-01

    Many sessions at the 5th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections dealt specifically with HIV infection and treatment in women. Highlights are presented from several sessions, including indinavir blood levels at various points in the menstrual cycle, abnormal kidney function associated with women taking indinavir, abnormal pap smears in women with high viral load, the relationship between viral load and the increased risk of death in women, and the impact of ddI crossing the placenta in pregnant women. Information is given on each presentation, including clinical trial results, side effects, and impacts on disease progression.

  18. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection triggers HMGB1 release to promote inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Erzhen; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Luo, Jingyi; Gao, Li; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong Xiao, Shaobo

    2014-11-15

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious agents. Based on meta-analysis of all publicly available microarray datasets, HMGB1 has recently been proposed as the most significant immune modulator during the porcine response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. However, the function of HMGB1 in PRRSV pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection triggers the translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the extracellular milieu in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Although HMGB1 has no effect on PRRSV replication, HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and subsequent expression of inflammatory cytokines through receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4. Our findings show that HMGB1 release, triggered by PRRSV infection, enhances the efficiency of virus-induced inflammatory responses, thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. - Highlights: • PRRSV infection triggers HMGB1 release from MARC-145 cells and PAMs. • HMGB1 does not significantly affect PRRSV proliferation. • HMGB1 is involved in PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory responses. • HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced inflammatory responses through TLR2/4 and RAGE.

  19. Weak Palindromic Consensus Sequences Are a Common Feature Found at the Integration Target Sites of Many Retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolin; Li, Yuan; Crise, Bruce; Burgess, Shawn M.; Munroe, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Integration into the host genome is one of the hallmarks of the retroviral life cycle and is catalyzed by virus-encoded integrases. While integrase has strict sequence requirements for the viral DNA ends, target site sequences have been shown to be very diverse. We carefully examined a large number of integration target site sequences from several retroviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1, simian immunodeficiency virus, murine leukemia virus, and avian sarcoma-leukosis virus, and found that a statistical palindromic consensus, centered on the virus-specific duplicated target site sequence, was a common feature at integration target sites for these retroviruses. PMID:15795304

  20. Endogenous Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus Identified in a Rodent (Melomys burtoni subsp.) from Wallacea (Indonesia)

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, Niccolò; Michaux, Johan; Morand, Serge; Aplin, Ken; Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Löber, Ulrike; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Fitriana, Yuli; Semiadi, Gono; Ishida, Yasuko; Helgen, Kristofer M.; Roca, Alfred L.; Eiden, Maribeth V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and koala retrovirus (KoRV) most likely originated from a cross-species transmission of an ancestral retrovirus into koalas and gibbons via one or more intermediate as-yet-unknown hosts. A virus highly similar to GALV has been identified in an Australian native rodent (Melomys burtoni) after extensive screening of Australian wildlife. GALV-like viruses have also been discovered in several Southeast Asian species, although screening has not been extensive and viruses discovered to date are only distantly related to GALV. We therefore screened 26 Southeast Asian rodent species for KoRV- and GALV-like sequences, using hybridization capture and high-throughput sequencing, in the attempt to identify potential GALV and KoRV hosts. Only the individuals belonging to a newly discovered subspecies of Melomys burtoni from Indonesia were positive, yielding an endogenous provirus very closely related to a strain of GALV. The sequence of the critical receptor domain for GALV infection in the Indonesian M. burtoni subsp. was consistent with the susceptibility of the species to GALV infection. The second record of a GALV in M. burtoni provides further evidence that M. burtoni, and potentially other lineages within the widespread subfamily Murinae, may play a role in the spread of GALV-like viruses. The discovery of a GALV in the most western part of the Australo-Papuan distribution of M. burtoni, specifically in a transitional zone between Asia and Australia (Wallacea), may be relevant to the cross-species transmission to gibbons in Southeast Asia and broadens the known distribution of GALVs in wild rodents. IMPORTANCE Gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and the koala retrovirus (KoRV) are very closely related, yet their hosts neither are closely related nor overlap geographically. Direct cross-species infection between koalas and gibbons is unlikely. Therefore, GALV and KoRV may have arisen via a cross-species transfer from an intermediate

  1. FTO Promotes Adipogenesis through Inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin Signaling Pathway in Porcine Intramuscular Preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoling; Luo, Yanliu; Jia, Gang; Liu, Guangmang; Zhao, Hua; Huang, Zhiqing

    2017-03-07

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that FTO plays an important role in adipogenesis. Herein, we designed a small interfering RNA targeting FTO to knock down its endogenous expression and investigated its effects on the proliferation and differentiation of porcine intramuscular preadipocytes. Its possible mechanism was also investigated. We showed that FTO silencing significantly decreased the level of phospho-Histone H3 protein and inhibited the proliferation of porcine intramuscular preadipocytes. In addition, the expressions of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBPα) were down-regulated, but the expression of β-catenin was up-regulated, by FTO silencing. Of specific interest here was that LiCl, a Wnt/β-catenin signaling specific activator, attenuated the FTO-induced upregulation of PPARγ and downregulation of β-catenin. Collectively, our data demonstrated that FTO silence decreased the proliferation and differentiation of porcine intramuscular preadipocytes, and FTO affects the porcine intramuscular preadipocytes differentiation might be via Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  2. Endogenous Zinc in Neurological Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The use of zinc in medicinal skin cream was mentioned in Egyptian papyri from 2000 BC (for example, the Smith Papyrus), and zinc has apparently been used fairly steadily throughout Roman and modern times (for example, as the American lotion named for its zinc ore, 'Calamine'). It is, therefore, somewhat ironic that zinc is a relatively late addition to the pantheon of signal ions in biology and medicine. However, the number of biological functions, health implications and pharmacological targets that are emerging for zinc indicate that it might turn out to be 'the calcium of the twenty-first century'. Here neurobiological roles of endogenous zinc is summarized. PMID:20396459

  3. Endogenous fertility, mortality and growth.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, K; Cipriani, G P

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a model that illustrates the joint determination of population and development. "Economic and demographic outcomes are determined jointly in a choice-theoretic model of fertility, mortality and capital accumulation.... In addition to choosing savings and births, parents may reduce (infant) deaths by incurring expenditures on health-care which is also provided by the government. A generalised production technology accounts for long-run endogenous growth with short-run transitional dynamics. The analysis yields testable time series and cross-section implications which accord with the empirical evidence on the relationship between demography and development."

  4. Hybridization capture reveals evolution and conservation across the entire Koala retrovirus genome.

    PubMed

    Tsangaras, Kyriakos; Siracusa, Matthew C; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Ishida, Yasuko; Cui, Pin; Vielgrader, Hanna; Helgen, Kristofer M; Roca, Alfred L; Greenwood, Alex D

    2014-01-01

    The koala retrovirus (KoRV) is the only retrovirus known to be in the midst of invading the germ line of its host species. Hybridization capture and next generation sequencing were used on modern and museum DNA samples of koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) to examine ca. 130 years of evolution across the full KoRV genome. Overall, the entire proviral genome appeared to be conserved across time in sequence, protein structure and transcriptional binding sites. A total of 138 polymorphisms were detected, of which 72 were found in more than one individual. At every polymorphic site in the museum koalas, one of the character states matched that of modern KoRV. Among non-synonymous polymorphisms, radical substitutions involving large physiochemical differences between amino acids were elevated in env, potentially reflecting anti-viral immune pressure or avoidance of receptor interference. Polymorphisms were not detected within two functional regions believed to affect infectivity. Host sequences flanking proviral integration sites were also captured; with few proviral loci shared among koalas. Recently described variants of KoRV, designated KoRV-B and KoRV-J, were not detected in museum samples, suggesting that these variants may be of recent origin.

  5. A retrovirus isolated from cell lines derived from neurofibromas in bicolor damselfish (Pomacentrus partitus).

    PubMed

    Schmale, M C; Aman, M R; Gill, K A

    1996-06-01

    Damselfish neurofibromatosis (DNF) is a naturally occurring, neoplastic disease affecting bicolor damselfish (Pomacentrus partitus) living on coral reefs in southern Florida, USA. The disease consists of multiple neurofibromas, neurofibrosarcomas and chromatophoromas and has been proposed as an animal model for neurofibromatosis type 1 in humans. DNF is transmissible by injection of crude tumour homogenates, cell-free filtrates of homogenates or cells from tumour cell lines. An analysis of tumorigenic cell lines derived from fish with spontaneous or experimentally induced DNF revealed virus particles budding from cells and present in conditioned media. The 90-110 nm particles resembled type C retroviruses. This virus exhibited a buoyant density of 1.14-1.17 g/cm2 in sucrose, at least six virus proteins of 15 to 80 kDa and reverse transcriptase (RT) activity. RT activity was maximized with a poly(rC).oligo(dG) template.primer combination and Mn2+ at a concentration of 0.5-1.0 mM. The optimum temperature for RT was determined to be 20 degrees C, a finding consistent with the ambient temperatures encountered by this species. This retrovirus, tentatively named damselfish neurofibromatosis virus (DNFV) may be the aetiological agent of DNF. Whether DNFV or another, as yet unidentified, virus is the cause of DNF, this agent may be unique in virus oncogenesis; neoplastic transformation of the cell types involved in DNF, Schwann cells and chromatophores, has not been documented in any other transmissible tumour.

  6. Endogenous Inhibitors of Kidney Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Trostel, Jessica; Garcia, Gabriela E.

    2015-01-01

    Although inflammation is the physiological response to pathogen invasion and tissue damage, it can also be responsible for significant tissue damage. Therefore, the inflammatory response must be carefully regulated to prevent critical inflammatory damage to vital organs. Typically, local endogenous regulatory mechanisms adjust the magnitude of the response such that the injurious condition is resolved and homeostasis is mantained. Humoral mechanisms that restrain or inhibit inflammation include glucocorticoid hormones, anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and soluble cytokine receptors; other mediators facilitate tissue healing, like lipoxins and resolvins. There is growing evidence that inflammation plays a critical role in the development and progression of heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, kidney diseases, sepsis, and several fibroproliferative disorders. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms that regulate inflammation may offer therapeutic targets for inhibiting the progression of several diseases. In this article, we review the significance of several novel endogenous anti-inflammatory mediators in the protection from kidney injury and the potential of these regulatory molecules as therapeutic targets for treatment of kidney inflammatory diseases. PMID:26779569

  7. Endogeneity in prison risk classification.

    PubMed

    Shermer, Lauren O'Neill; Bierie, David M; Stock, Amber

    2013-10-01

    Security designation tools are a key feature of all prisons in the United States, intended as objective measures of risk that funnel inmates into security levels-to prison environments varying in degree of intrusiveness, restriction, dangerousness, and cost. These tools are mostly (if not all) validated by measuring inmates on a set of characteristics, using scores from summations of that information to assign inmates to prisons of varying security level, and then observing whether inmates assumed more risky did in fact offend more. That approach leaves open the possibility of endogeneity--that the harsher prisons are themselves bringing about higher misconduct and thus biasing coefficients assessing individual risk. The current study assesses this potential bias by following an entry cohort of inmates to more than 100 facilities in the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) and exploiting the substantial variation in classification scores within a given prison that derive from systematic overrides of security-level designations for reasons not associated with risk of misconduct. By estimating pooled models of misconduct along with prison-fixed effects specifications, the data show that a portion of the predictive accuracy thought associated with the risk-designation tool used in BOP was a function of facility-level contamination (endogeneity).

  8. HMGB1: Endogenous Danger Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Klune, John R; Dhupar, Rajeev; Cardinal, Jon; Billiar, Timothy R; Tsung, Allan

    2008-01-01

    While foreign pathogens and their products have long been known to activate the innate immune system, the recent recognition of a group of endogenous molecules that serve a similar function has provided a framework for understanding the overlap between the inflammatory responses activated by pathogens and injury. These endogenous molecules, termed alarmins, are normal cell constituents that can be released into the extracellular milieu during states of cellular stress or damage and subsequently activate the immune system. One nuclear protein, High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), has received particular attention as fulfilling the functions of an alarmin by being involved in both infectious and non-infectious inflammatory conditions. Once released, HMGB1 signals through various receptors to activate immune cells involved in the immune process. Although initial studies demonstrated HMGB1 as a late mediator of sepsis, recent findings indicate HMGB1 to have an important role in models of non-infectious inflammation, such as autoimmunity, cancer, trauma, and ischemia reperfusion injury. Furthermore, in contrast to its pro-inflammatory functions, there is evidence that HMGB1 also has restorative effects leading to tissue repair and regeneration. The complex functions of HMGB1 as an archetypical alarmin are outlined here to review our current understanding of a molecule that holds the potential for treatment in many important human conditions. PMID:18431461

  9. Endogenous Opiates and Behavior: 2006

    PubMed Central

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the twenty-ninth consecutive installment of the annual review of research concerning the endogenous opioid system, now spanning thirty years of research. It summarizes papers published during 2006 that studied the behavioral effects of molecular, pharmacological and genetic manipulation of opioid peptides, opioid receptors, opioid agonists and opioid antagonists. The particular topics that continue to be covered include the molecular-biochemical effects and neurochemical localization studies of endogenous opioids and their receptors related to behavior (Section 2), and the roles of these opioid peptides and receptors in pain and analgesia (Section 3); stress and social status (Section 4); tolerance and dependence (Section 5); learning and memory (Section 6); eating and drinking (Section 7); alcohol and drugs of abuse (Section 8); sexual activity and hormones, pregnancy, development and endocrinology (Section 9); mental illness and mood (Section 10); seizures and neurological disorders (Section 11); electrical-related activity and neurophysiology (Section 12); general activity and locomotion (Section 13); gastrointestinal, renal and hepatic functions (Section 14); cardiovascular responses (Section 15); respiration and thermoregulation (Section 16); and immunological responses (Section 17). PMID:17949854

  10. Porcine model of hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Kashiwakura, Yuji; Mimuro, Jun; Onishi, Akira; Iwamoto, Masaki; Madoiwa, Seiji; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Suzuki, Shunichi; Suzuki, Misae; Sembon, Shoichiro; Ishiwata, Akira; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Sakata, Asuka; Ohmori, Tsukasa; Hashimoto, Michiko; Yazaki, Satoko; Sakata, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a common X chromosome-linked genetic bleeding disorder caused by abnormalities in the coagulation factor VIII gene (F8). Hemophilia A patients suffer from a bleeding diathesis, such as life-threatening bleeding in the brain and harmful bleeding in joints and muscles. Because it could potentially be cured by gene therapy, subhuman animal models have been sought. Current mouse hemophilia A models generated by gene targeting of the F8 have difficulties to extrapolate human disease due to differences in the coagulation and immune systems between mice and humans. Here, we generated a porcine model of hemophilia A by nuclear transfer cloning from F8-targeted fibroblasts. The hemophilia A pigs showed a severe bleeding tendency upon birth, similar to human severe hemophiliacs, but in contrast to hemophilia A mice which rarely bleed under standard breed conditions. Infusion of human factor VIII was effective in stopping bleeding and reducing the bleeding frequency of a hemophilia A piglet but was blocked by the inhibitor against human factor VIII. These data suggest that the hemophilia A pig is a severe hemophilia A animal model for studying not only hemophilia A gene therapy but also the next generation recombinant coagulation factors, such as recombinant factor VIII variants with a slower clearance rate.

  11. A report from the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) 2015 (February 23-26--Seattle, Washington, USA).

    PubMed

    Rabasseda, X

    2015-03-01

    The largest conference on HIV and AIDS, the annual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) also encompasses opportunistic and other important pathogens, notably in 2015 hepatitis C virus and the Ebola virus. This year's conference involved 4 days of discussions on highly relevant basic, translational and clinical research and developments in the ongoing battle against these infections.

  12. Annual Conference on Human Retrovirus Testing (7th) held in Chicago, IL on March 3-5, 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-05

    Microbiologist, California State Immunology, Indiana State Department Health Services Department of Health Patricia Garrett, Boston Biomedica Harold...V Biomedica . Inc. Counseling & Testing Program, Illinois Dr. Robert J Dwyer, Director, Diagnostic Department of Public Health Development. IAF Biochem...Keith Sayre, Retrovirus Product Manager. Steven Rala, Boston Biomedica Ortho Diagnostic Systems Michael Ramirez, Public Health Charles Schable. M.S

  13. Complete cure of established murine hepatocellular carcinoma is achievable by repeated injections of retroviruses carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, S; Masui, K; Kikukawa, M; Sakamoto, T; Nakatani, T; Nagao, S; Yamazaki, M; Yoshiji, H; Tsujinoue, H; Fukui, H; Yoshimatsu, T; Ikenaka, K

    1999-04-01

    Although xenotransplantation of retrovirus-producing cells into a tumor has been shown to be effective for the treatment of cancer, injections of recombinant retroviruses are much more feasible for clinical applications. We established a clone producing retroviruses carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene with titers of up to 4 x 10(7) colony-forming units/ml, and examined the effectiveness of in vivo gene therapy against cancer. Syngeneic mice were inoculated subcutaneously with murine hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells, BNL1ME A.7R.1, and the treatment was initiated after tumors were established. When mice were given an intratumoral injection of HSVtk-carrying retroviruses or their producing cells followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment, significantly prolonged survival periods were observed. When mice were treated with repeated intratumoral injections of HSVtk-carrying retrovirus-producing cells, significant antitumor responses and some cures were induced by GCV treatment. Furthermore, repeated intratumoral injections of HSVtk-carrying retroviruses and GCV treatment resulted in complete regression of established HCC tumors in all animals used in the experiment. Mice that completely eradicated tumors exhibited protective immunity against wild-type HCC tumors. These results suggest that repeated injections of HSVtk-carrying retroviruses followed by GCV treatment is a potent modality for the treatment of solid tumors.

  14. Distinct Particle Morphologies Revealed through Comparative Parallel Analyses of Retrovirus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jessica L.; Cao, Sheng; Maldonado, Jose O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gag protein is the main retroviral structural protein, and its expression alone is usually sufficient for production of virus-like particles (VLPs). In this study, we sought to investigate—in parallel comparative analyses—Gag cellular distribution, VLP size, and basic morphological features using Gag expression constructs (Gag or Gag-YFP, where YFP is yellow fluorescent protein) created from all representative retroviral genera: Alpharetrovirus, Betaretrovirus, Deltaretrovirus, Epsilonretrovirus, Gammaretrovirus, Lentivirus, and Spumavirus. We analyzed Gag cellular distribution by confocal microscopy, VLP budding by thin-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and general morphological features of the VLPs by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Punctate Gag was observed near the plasma membrane for all Gag constructs tested except for the representative Beta- and Epsilonretrovirus Gag proteins. This is the first report of Epsilonretrovirus Gag localizing to the nucleus of HeLa cells. While VLPs were not produced by the representative Beta- and Epsilonretrovirus Gag proteins, the other Gag proteins produced VLPs as confirmed by TEM, and morphological differences were observed by cryo-TEM. In particular, we observed Deltaretrovirus-like particles with flat regions of electron density that did not follow viral membrane curvature, Lentivirus-like particles with a narrow range and consistent electron density, suggesting a tightly packed Gag lattice, and Spumavirus-like particles with large envelope protein spikes and no visible electron density associated with a Gag lattice. Taken together, these parallel comparative analyses demonstrate for the first time the distinct morphological features that exist among retrovirus-like particles. Investigation of these differences will provide greater insights into the retroviral assembly pathway. IMPORTANCE Comparative analysis among retroviruses has been critically important in

  15. Structural characterization of reverse transcriptase and endonuclease polypeptides of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome retrovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoote, M M; Coligan, J E; Folks, T M; Fauci, A S; Martin, M A; Venkatesan, S

    1986-01-01

    Automated N-terminal microsequencing of immune affinity-purified acquired immunodeficiency syndrome retrovirus polypeptides from infected cells was used to locate the N termini of 64-, 51-, and 34-kilodalton (kDa) polypeptides within the pol open reading frame (ORF) of the proviral DNA. The 64- and 51-kDa proteins had identical N termini (Pro-Ile-Ser-Pro-IIe-Glu-Thr-Val-) positioned 156 residues from the beginning of the pol ORF. The N terminus of the 34-kDa pol gene product, Phe-Leu-Asp-Gly-Ile-Asp-Lys-, mapped 716 residues into the pol ORF. These polypeptides were absent in an RT-negative, CD4-negative, persistently infected cell line (8E5) carrying a single defective copy of a constitutively expressed, integrated proviral DNA. Images PMID:2430111

  16. Contrastive prevalence of feline retrovirus infections between northern and southern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Miyazawa, T; Ikeda, Y; Sato, E; Nishimura, Y; Nguyen, N T; Takahashi, E; Mochizuki, M; Mikami, T

    2000-08-01

    The prevalence of infections with three feline retroviruses; feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline foamy virus (FeFV), was examined in domestic cats (Felis catus) and leopard cats (Felis bengalensis) in southern Vietnam in 1998. We then compared this data with our previous study in northern Vietnam in 1997. None of the cats had FeLV antigens in both the northern and southern areas. In contrast, there is a great distinction in the seropositivity of FIV. Twenty-two percent of domestic cats had FIV antibodies whereas no FIV positive cats were detected in northern area. FIV may have entered southern Vietnam recently and spread rapidly. FeFV infections were found in both areas, suggesting that FeFV might be present in the cat populations in Vietnam from the earliest time.

  17. Characterization of a protein that binds multiple sequences in mammalian type C retrovirus enhancers.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, W; O'Connell, M; Speck, N A

    1993-01-01

    Mammalian type C retrovirus enhancer factor 1 (MCREF-1) is a nuclear protein that binds several directly repeated sequences (CNGGN6CNGG) in the Moloney and Friend murine leukemia virus (MLV) enhancers (N. R. Manley, M. O'Connell, W. Sun, N. A. Speck, and N. Hopkins, J. Virol. 67:1967-1975, 1993). In this paper, we describe the partial purification of MCREF-1 from calf thymus nuclei and further characterize the binding properties of MCREF-1. MCREF-1 binds four sites in the Moloney MLV enhancer and three sites in the Friend MLV enhancer. Ethylation interference analysis suggests that the MCREF-1 binding site spans two adjacent minor grooves of DNA. Images PMID:8445719

  18. Characterization of chicken c-ski oncogene products expressed by retrovirus vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sutrave, P.; Copeland, T.D.; Hughes, S.H. ); Showalter, S.D. )

    1990-06-01

    The authors have constructed replication-competent avian retrovirus vectors that contain two of the three known types of chicken c-{ital ski} cDNAs and a third vector that contains a truncated c-{ital ski} cDNA. They developed antisera that recognize the c-{ital ski} proteins made by the three transforming c-{ital ski} viruses. All three proteins (apparent molecular masses, 50, 60, and 90 kilodaltons) are localized primarily in the nucleus. The proteins are differentially phosphorylated; immunofluorescence also suggests that there are differences in subnuclear localization of the c-{ital ski} proteins and that c-{ital ski} protein is associated with condensed chromatin in dividing cells.

  19. Regulated expression of a complete human beta-globin gene encoded by a transmissible retrovirus vector.

    PubMed Central

    Cone, R D; Weber-Benarous, A; Baorto, D; Mulligan, R C

    1987-01-01

    We introduced a human beta-globin gene into murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells by infection with recombinant retroviruses containing the complete genomic globin sequence. The beta-globin gene was correctly regulated during differentiation, steady-state mRNA levels being induced 5- to 30-fold after treatment of the cells with the chemical inducer dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies using vectors which yield integrated proviruses lacking transcriptional enhancer sequences indicated that neither retroviral transcription nor the retroviral enhancer sequences themselves had any obvious effect on expression of the globin gene. Viral RNA expression also appeared inducible, being considerably depressed in uninduced MEL cells but approaching normal wild-type levels after dimethyl sulfoxide treatment. We provide data which suggest that the control point for both repression and subsequent activation of virus expression in MEL cells lies in the viral enhancer element. Images PMID:3029570

  20. The sequence of carnation etched ring virus DNA: comparison with cauliflower mosaic virus and retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hull, R.; Sadler, J.; Longstaff, M.

    1986-01-01

    Carnation etched ring virus (CERV) DNA comprises 7932 bp. CERV primer binding sites and overall genome organization are similar to those of the related cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV). The six open reading frames of CERV showed amino acid homology (50-80%) with CaMV ORFs I-VI; no homologues of CaMV ORFs VII or VIII were found. CERV ORFs 1-5 interface each other with the sequence ATGA. The comparison of CERV ORF5 with CaMV ORFV highlighted regions which show homologies to retrovirus gag/pol protease, RNase H and DNA polymerase domains; the possibility that the DNA polymerase domain comprises two subdomains, operating off different templates, is discussed. Both CERV and CaMV ORFs I have sequence homology to tobacco mosaic virus P30 and plastocyanin. PMID:16453731

  1. Enhanced proliferation of primary rat type II pneumocytes by Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus envelope protein

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Chassidy; Jahid, Sohail; Voelker, Dennis R.; Fan Hung

    2011-04-10

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) is the causative agent of a contagious lung cancer in sheep. The envelope protein (Env) is the oncogene, as it can transform cell lines in culture and induce tumors in animals, although the mechanisms for transformation are not yet clear because a system to perform transformation assays in differentiated type II pneumocytes does not exist. In this study we report culture of primary rat type II pneumocytes in conditions that favor prolonged expression of markers for type II pneumocytes. Env-expressing cultures formed more colonies that were larger in size and were viable for longer periods of time compared to vector control samples. The cells that remained in culture longer were confirmed to be derived from type II pneumocytes because they expressed surfactant protein C, cytokeratin, displayed alkaline phosphatase activity and were positive for Nile red. This system will be useful to study JSRV Env in the targets of transformation.

  2. HIV-1 Vpu Promotes Release and Prevents Endocytosis of Nascent Retrovirus Particles from the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Neil, Stuart J. D; Eastman, Scott W; Jouvenet, Nolwenn; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 viral protein U (Vpu) protein enhances the release of diverse retroviruses from human, but not monkey, cells and is thought to do so by ablating a dominant restriction to particle release. Here, we determined how Vpu expression affects the subcellular distribution of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus (MLV) Gag proteins in human cells where Vpu is, or is not, required for efficient particle release. In HeLa cells, where Vpu enhances HIV-1 and MLV release approximately 10-fold, concentrations of HIV-1 Gag and MLV Gag fused to cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) were initially detected at the plasma membrane, but then accumulated over time in early and late endosomes. Endosomal accumulation of Gag-CFP was prevented by Vpu expression and, importantly, inhibition of plasma membrane to early endosome transport by dominant negative mutants of Rab5a, dynamin, and EPS-15. Additionally, accumulation of both HIV and MLV Gag in endosomes required a functional late-budding domain. In human HOS cells, where HIV-1 and MLV release was efficient even in the absence of Vpu, Gag proteins were localized predominantly at the plasma membrane, irrespective of Vpu expression or manipulation of endocytic transport. While these data indicated that Vpu inhibits nascent virion endocytosis, Vpu did not affect transferrin endocytosis. Moreover, inhibition of endocytosis did not restore Vpu-defective HIV-1 release in HeLa cells, but instead resulted in accumulation of mature virions that could be released from the cell surface by protease treatment. Thus, these findings suggest that a specific activity that is present in HeLa cells, but not in HOS cells, and is counteracted by Vpu, traps assembled retrovirus particles at the cell surface. This entrapment leads to subsequent endocytosis by a Rab5a- and clathrin-dependent mechanism and intracellular sequestration of virions in endosomes. PMID:16699598

  3. Increased transduction efficiency of primary hematopoietic cells by physical colocalization of retrovirus and target cells.

    PubMed

    Hutchings, M; Moriwaki, K; Dilloo, D; Hoffmann, T; Kimbrough, S; Johnsen, H E; Brenner, M K; Heslop, H E

    1998-06-01

    Efficient gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells offers a number of potential therapeutic applications. However, the relatively low titer of retroviral supernatants and the requirement for cell division to ensure integration have meant that transduction efficiency has been low. We have modified a flowthrough approach to cell transduction and have been able consistently to increase gene transfer efficiency into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. We transduced CD34 cells with retroviral vectors encoding a truncated nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) or neo. Retroviral supernatant was pulled through 0.2-micron polycarbonated membranes, followed by placement of cells on the filter. In the absence of cytokines, the transduction efficiency of CD34 cells with a NGFR vector was increased 3-11-fold over that obtained at an identical MOI in liquid culture to produce 11%-44% transduction. Furthermore, both Thy1+ and Thy1- subsets in a total CD34 population were transduced with similar efficiency, and transduction with a neo vector, as measured by G418 resistance in clonogenic assays, increased 1.5-5-fold. The mechanism by which gene transfer is improved may reflect colocalization of cells and retrovirus. Costaining of cells transduced on the filter with an NGFR retrovirus with both an NGFR antibody and a gp70 antibody that recognizes viral coat protein revealed high-level coexpression. The levels of in vitro gene transfer we obtain are equivalent to those observed when CD34 cells are cocultured in liquid culture with cytokines. However, culture with cytokines may commit CD34 cells to differentiation and has produced disappointingly low levels of subsequent in vivo gene transfer. Gene marking studies using distinguishable retroviral vectors will provide a means of learning whether the effects of flowthrough transduction genuinely enhance the efficiency of gene transfer to human marrow-repopulating cells.

  4. Endogenous Peer Effects: Fact or Fiction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Ryan; Nguyen-Hoang, Phuong

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine endogenous peer effects, which occur when a student's behavior or outcome is a function of the behavior or outcome of his or her peer group. Endogenous peer effects have important implications for educational policies such as busing, school choice and tracking. In this study, the authors quantitatively review the literature on…

  5. Endogenous timing factors in bird migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwinner, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    Several species of warbler birds were observed in an effort to determine what initiates and terminates migration. Environmental and endogenous timing mechanisms were analyzed. The results indicate that endogenous stimuli are dominant factors for bird migration especially for long distances. It was concluded that environmental factors act as an assist mechanism.

  6. Approaches towards endogenous pancreatic regeneration.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Meenal; Kanitkar, Meghana; Bhonde, Ramesh R

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of pancreatic regeneration in mammals has been well documented. It has been shown that pancreatic tissue is able to regenerate in several species of mammal after surgical insult. This tissue is also known to have the potential to maintain or increase its beta-cell mass in response to metabolic demands during pregnancy and obesity. Since deficiency in beta-cell mass is the hallmark of most forms of diabetes, it is worthwhile understanding pancreatic regeneration in the context of this disease. With this view in mind, this article aims to discuss the potential use in clinical strategies of knowledge that we obtained from studies carried out in animal models of diabetes. Approaches to achieve this goal involve the use of biomolecules, adult stem cells and gene therapy. Various molecules, such as glucagon-like peptide-1, beta-cellulin, nicotinamide, gastrin, epidermal growth factor-1 and thyroid hormone, play major roles in the initiation of endogenous islet regeneration in diabetes. The most accepted hypothesis is that these molecules stimulate islet precursor cells to undergo neogenesis or to induce replication of existing beta-cells, emphasizing the importance of pancreas-resident stem/progenitor cells in islet regeneration. Moreover, the potential of adult stem cell population from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood, liver, spleen, or amniotic membrane, is also discussed with regard to their potential to induce pancreatic regeneration.

  7. Topographic Findings of the Porcine Cornea

    PubMed Central

    HEICHEL, Jens; WILHELM, Frank; KUNERT, Kathleen S.; HAMMER, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The porcine eye is often used as an ex vivo animal model in ophthalmological research. It is well suited for investigations concerning refractive surgery; however, corneal topography data are scarce. This study investigated the corneal topography and pachymetry of the porcine eye to provide further reproducible data. We evaluated freshly enucleated porcine eyes (n = 16) by performing computerized corneal topographies (Orbscan® IIz, Bausch and Lomb, Rochester, NY, USA). We assessed the steepest and flattest keratometric powers (K1 and K2, units in diopters (D)), astigmatism (D), white-to-white (WTW) diameter (mm), thinnest point pachymetry (µm), anterior and posterior best-fit sphere (BFS) (D), refractive power of the anterior and posterior curvatures, and total refractive power of the cornea (D). The mean keratometric powers were 39.6 ± 0.89 D (K1) and 38.5 ± 0.92 D (K2), and the mean astigmatism was 1.1 ± 0.78 D. The mean WTW diameter was 13.81 ± 0.83 mm, and the mean corneal thickness was 832.6 ± 40.18 µm. The BFSs were 38.14 ± 0.73 D (anterior) and 42.56 ± 1.15 D (posterior), and the mean refractive powers were 43.27 ± 1.08 D (anterior) and -5.15 ± 0.20 D (posterior); therefore, the mean of the total refractive power was 38.16 ± 1.00 D. The topography and pachymetry of the porcine cornea showed a specific configuration differing from the human cornea. When using animal ex vivo models such as porcine corneas for experimental corneal surgery, findings such as these should be considered. PMID:28293660

  8. The ecology of primate retroviruses – An assessment of 12 years of retroviral studies in the Taï national park area, Côte d'Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Gogarten, Jan F.; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Calvignac-Spencer, Sebastien; Leendertz, Siv Aina J.; Weiss, Sabrina; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Koné, Inza; Peeters, Martine; Wittig, Roman M.; Boesch, Christophe; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Leendertz, Fabian H.

    2014-01-01

    The existence and genetic make-up of most primate retroviruses was revealed by studies of bushmeat and fecal samples from unhabituated primate communities. For these, detailed data on intra- and within-species contact rates are generally missing, which makes identification of factors influencing transmission a challenging task. Here we present an assessment of 12 years of research on primate retroviruses in the Taï National Park area, Côte d’Ivoire. We discuss insights gained into the prevalence, within- and cross-species transmission of primate retroviruses (including towards local human populations) and the importance of virus–host interactions in determining cross-species transmission risk. Finally we discuss how retroviruses ecology and evolution may change in a shifting environment and identify avenues for future research. PMID:25010280

  9. The ecology of primate retroviruses - an assessment of 12 years of retroviral studies in the Taï national park area, Côte d׳Ivoire.

    PubMed

    Gogarten, Jan F; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Calvignac-Spencer, Sebastien; Leendertz, Siv Aina J; Weiss, Sabrina; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Koné, Inza; Peeters, Martine; Wittig, Roman M; Boesch, Christophe; Hahn, Beatrice H; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2014-07-01

    The existence and genetic make-up of most primate retroviruses was revealed by studies of bushmeat and fecal samples from unhabituated primate communities. For these, detailed data on intra- and within-species contact rates are generally missing, which makes identification of factors influencing transmission a challenging task. Here we present an assessment of 12 years of research on primate retroviruses in the Taï National Park area, Côte d'Ivoire. We discuss insights gained into the prevalence, within- and cross-species transmission of primate retroviruses (including towards local human populations) and the importance of virus-host interactions in determining cross-species transmission risk. Finally we discuss how retroviruses ecology and evolution may change in a shifting environment and identify avenues for future research.

  10. Gravity effects on endogenous movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Anders; Antonsen, Frank

    Gravity effects on endogenous movements A. Johnsson * and F. Antonsen *+ * Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology,NO-7491, Trond-heim, Norway, E-mail: anders.johnsson@ntnu.no + Present address: Statoil Research Center Trondheim, NO-7005, Trondheim, Norway Circumnutations in stems/shoots exist in many plants and often consists of more or less regular helical movements around the plumb line under Earth conditions. Recent results on circumnu-tations of Arabidopsis in space (Johnsson et al. 2009) showed that minute amplitude oscilla-tions exist in weightlessness, but that centripetal acceleration (mimicking the gravity) amplified and/or created large amplitude oscillations. Fundamental mechanisms underlying these results will be discussed by modeling the plant tissue as a cylinder of cells coupled together. As a starting point we have modeled (Antonsen 1998) standing waves on a ring of biological cells, as first discussed in a classical paper (Turing 1952). If the coupled cells can change their water content, an `extension' wave could move around the ring. We have studied several, stacked rings of cells coupled into a cylinder that together represent a cylindrical plant tissue. Waves of extensions travelling around the cylinder could then represent the observable circumnutations. The coupling between cells can be due to cell-to-cell diffusion, or to transport via channels, and the coupling can be modeled to vary in both longitudinal and transversal direction of the cylinder. The results from ISS experiments indicate that this cylindrical model of coupled cells should be able to 1) show self-sustained oscillations without the impact of gravity (being en-dogenous) and 2) show how an environmental factor like gravity can amplify or generate the oscillatory movements. Gravity has been introduced in the model by a negative, time-delayed feed-back transport across the cylinder. This represents the physiological reactions to acceler

  11. New bioinformatic tool for quick identification of functionally relevant endogenous retroviral inserts in human genome.

    PubMed

    Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Suntsova, Maria; Malakhova, Galina; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and LTR retrotransposons (LRs) occupy ∼8% of human genome. Deep sequencing technologies provide clues to understanding of functional relevance of individual ERVs/LRs by enabling direct identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and other landmarks of functional genomic elements. Here, we performed the genome-wide identification of human ERVs/LRs containing TFBS according to the ENCODE project. We created the first interactive ERV/LRs database that groups the individual inserts according to their familial nomenclature, number of mapped TFBS and divergence from their consensus sequence. Information on any particular element can be easily extracted by the user. We also created a genome browser tool, which enables quick mapping of any ERV/LR insert according to genomic coordinates, known human genes and TFBS. These tools can be used to easily explore functionally relevant individual ERV/LRs, and for studying their impact on the regulation of human genes. Overall, we identified ∼110,000 ERV/LR genomic elements having TFBS. We propose a hypothesis of "domestication" of ERV/LR TFBS by the genome milieu including subsequent stages of initial epigenetic repression, partial functional release, and further mutation-driven reshaping of TFBS in tight coevolution with the enclosing genomic loci.

  12. Does the prostate retain an endogenous antiviral defense system suggesting a past viral etiology for cancer?

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, Marvin; Hollowell, Courtney M P; Guinan, Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Evidence of viral infection of the prostate is presented, and consists of viral isolation as well as antigen and genomic detection of integrated or episomal forms. Prior infection from "ancient" exogenous retroviruses is suggested by residual endogenous forms. The presence of an antiviral defense system based upon interferon induction has been suggested for the testes. I suggest that a similar system is also present in the prostate. Prostate cell lines (or tissue) can be tested directly for expression of interferon-γ (IFN-γ). However, enhanced expression should be induced by IFN inducers such as bispecific oligonucleotides having double stranded regions or poly I:C. RNA can be extracted and RT-PCR performed using commercially available primers for gamma interferon. Evidence for the presence of an interferon based anti-viral system would be indicated not only by interferon expression, but also its enhanced expression following exposure to the inducers. Gamma interferon is primarily associated with lymphocytic expression and immune regulation. Demonstration of its controlled expression in non-immune cells would support the hypotheses suggested here.

  13. A contaminant-free assessment of Endogenous Retroviral RNA in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Karamitros, Timokratis; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Hatzakis, Angelos; Psichogiou, Mina; Elefsiniotis, Ioannis; Hurst, Tara; Geretti, Anna-Maria; Beloukas, Apostolos; Frater, John; Klenerman, Paul; Katzourakis, Aris; Magiorkinis, Gkikas

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) comprise 6–8% of the human genome. HERVs are silenced in most normal tissues, up-regulated in stem cells and in placenta but also in cancer and HIV-1 infection. Crucially, there are conflicting reports on detecting HERV RNA in non-cellular clinical samples such as plasma that suggest the study of HERV RNA can be daunting. Indeed, we find that the use of real-time PCR in a quality assured clinical laboratory setting can be sensitive to low-level proviral contamination. We developed a mathematical model for low-level contamination that allowed us to design a laboratory protocol and standard operating procedures for robust measurement of HERV RNA. We focus on one family, HERV-K HML-2 (HK2) that has been most recently active even though they invaded our ancestral genomes almost 30 millions ago. We extensively validated our experimental design on a model cell culture system showing high sensitivity and specificity, totally eliminating the proviral contamination. We then tested 236 plasma samples from patients infected with HIV-1, HCV or HBV and found them to be negative. The study of HERV RNA for human translational studies should be performed with extensively validated protocols and standard operating procedures to control the widespread low-level human DNA contamination. PMID:27640347

  14. HTLV-3/4 and simian foamy retroviruses in humans: discovery, epidemiology, cross-species transmission and molecular virology.

    PubMed

    Gessain, Antoine; Rua, Réjane; Betsem, Edouard; Turpin, Jocelyn; Mahieux, Renaud

    2013-01-05

    Non-human primates are considered to be likely sources of viruses that can infect humans and thus pose a significant threat to human population. This is well illustrated by some retroviruses, as the simian immunodeficiency viruses and the simian T lymphotropic viruses, which have the ability to cross-species, adapt to a new host and sometimes spread. This leads to a pandemic situation for HIV-1 or an endemic one for HTLV-1. Here, we present the available data on the discovery, epidemiology, cross-species transmission and molecular virology of the recently discovered HTLV-3 and HTLV-4 deltaretroviruses, as well as the simian foamy retroviruses present in different human populations at risk, especially in central African hunters. We discuss also the natural history in humans of these retroviruses of zoonotic origin (magnitude and geographical distribution, possible inter-human transmission). In Central Africa, the increase of the bushmeat trade during the last decades has opened new possibilities for retroviral emergence in humans, especially in immuno-compromised persons.

  15. Retrovirus delivered neurotrophin-3 promotes survival, proliferation and neuronal differentiation of human fetal neural stem cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haixia; Li, Minjie; Song, Tusheng; Qian, Yihua; Xiao, Xinli; Chen, Xinlin; Zhang, Pengbo; Feng, Xinshun; Parker, Terence; Liu, Yong

    2008-10-22

    Poor survival and insufficient neuronal differentiation are the main obstacles to neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation therapy. Genetic modification of NSCs with neurotrophins is considered a promising approach to overcome these difficulties. In this study, the effects on survival, proliferation and neuronal differentiation of human fetal NSCs (hfNSCs) were observed after infection by a neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) recombinant retrovirus. The hfNSCs, from 12-week human fetal brains formed neurospheres, expressed the stem cell marker nestin and differentiated into the three main cell types of the nervous system. NT-3 recombinant retrovirus (Retro-NT-3) infected hfNSCs efficiently expressed NT-3 gene for at least 8 weeks, presented an accelerated proliferation, and therefore produced an increased number of neurospheres and after differentiation in vitro, contained a higher percentage of neuronal cells. Eight weeks after infection, 37.9+/-4.2% of hfNSCs in the Retro-NT-3 infection group expressed the neuronal marker, this was significantly higher than the control and mock infection groups. NT-3 transduced hfNSCs also displayed longer protruding neurites compared with other groups. Combined these results demonstrate that NT-3 modification promote the survival/proliferation, neuronal differentiation and growth of neurites of hfNSCs in vitro. This study proposes recombinant retrovirus mediated NT-3 modification may provide a promising means to resolve the poor survival and insufficient neuronal differentiation of NSCs.

  16. Retrovirus Restriction by TRIM5 Proteins Requires Recognition of Only a Small Fraction of Viral Capsid Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiong; Friedman, David B.

    2013-01-01

    The host restriction factors TRIM5α and TRIMCyp potently inhibit retrovirus infection by binding to the incoming retrovirus capsid. TRIM5 proteins are dimeric, and their association with the viral capsid appears to be enhanced by avidity effects owing to formation of higher-order oligomeric complexes. We examined the stoichiometric requirement for TRIM5 functional recognition by quantifying the efficiencies of restriction of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus (MLV) particles containing various proportions of restriction-sensitive and -insensitive CA subunits. Both TRIMCyp and TRIM5α inhibited infection of retrovirus particles containing as little as 25% of the restriction-sensitive CA protein. Accordingly, we also observed efficient binding of TRIMCyp in vitro to capsid assemblies containing as little as one-fourth wild-type CA protein. Paradoxically, the ability of HIV-1 particles to abrogate TRIMCyp restriction in trans was more strongly dependent on the fraction of wild-type CA than was restriction of infection. Collectively, our results indicate that TRIM5 restriction factors bind to retroviral capsids in a highly cooperative manner and suggest that TRIM5 can engage a capsid lattice containing a minimum of three or fewer recognizable subunits per hexamer. Our study supports a model in which localized binding of TRIM5 to the viral capsid nucleates rapid polymerization of a TRIM5 lattice on the capsid surface. PMID:23785198

  17. Clinical Potential of the Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates Cidofovir, Adefovir, and Tenofovir in Treatment of DNA Virus and Retrovirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The acyclic nucleoside phosphonates HPMPC (cidofovir), PMEA (adefovir), and PMPA (tenofovir) have proved to be effective in vitro (cell culture systems) and in vivo (animal models and clinical studies) against a wide variety of DNA virus and retrovirus infections: cidofovir against herpesvirus (herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 varicella-zoster virus, cytomegalovirus [CMV], Epstein-Barr virus, and human herpesviruses 6, 7, and 8), polyomavirus, papillomavirus, adenovirus, and poxvirus (variola virus, cowpox virus, vaccinia virus, molluscum contagiosum virus, and orf virus) infections; adefovir against herpesvirus, hepadnavirus (human hepatitis B virus), and retrovirus (human immunodeficiency virus types 1 [HIV-1] and 2 [HIV-2], simian immunodeficiency virus, and feline immunodeficiency virus) infections; and tenofovir against both hepadnavirus and retrovirus infections. Cidofovir (Vistide) has been officially approved for the treatment of CMV retinitis in AIDS patients, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (Viread) has been approved for the treatment of HIV infections (i.e., AIDS), and adefovir dipivoxil (Hepsera) has been approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. Nephrotoxicity is the dose-limiting side effect for cidofovir (Vistide) when used intravenously (5 mg/kg); no toxic side effects have been described for adefovir dipivoxil and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, at the approved doses (Hepsera at 10 mg orally daily and Viread at 300 mg orally daily). PMID:14557287

  18. Localization of porcine seminal plasma (PSP) proteins in the boar reproductive tract and spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Manásková, P; Jonáková, V

    2008-06-01

    Spermadhesins are proteins containing a characteristic CUB domain, originally isolated from seminal plasma and ejaculated spermatozoa in domestic animals. Boar spermadhesins are multifunctional proteins exhibiting ligand-binding abilities with various endogenous ligands present in the male and female reproductive tracts and may play a role in the reproduction process. Porcine spermadhesins (AQN, AWN, PSP protein families) are secreted mainly by the seminal vesicles, but their mRNAs have been found also in the cauda epididymis and prostate. Unlike AQN and AWN spermadhesins, localization of porcine seminal plasma (PSP) proteins in the boar reproductive tract has not been completely resolved. This work has focused on PSP protein expression and localization in the boar reproductive organs and on spermatozoa. Using specific rabbit polyclonal antibodies (anti-PSP I and anti-PSP II), PSP I and PSP II proteins were immunodetected in tissue extracts and in secretory tissues of cauda epididymis, prostate, seminal vesicles and Cowper's glands on the blots and by an indirect immunofluorescence technique, respectively. Moreover, the ability of PSP proteins to bind to epididymal spermatozoa indicated their presence on cauda epididymal and ejaculated spermatozoa. Porcine seminal plasma proteins bind to the sperm surface at ejaculation and may modulate several aspects of sperm activity during reproduction. PSP proteins are produced not only by seminal vesicles and prostate, but also by epididymis. However, their prospective role in sperm epididymal maturation is not clear. Further characterization of seminal plasma protein forms expressed in the individual reproductive organs will help to understand their subsequent role in the reproduction process.

  19. Hydrodynamic Assessment of Aortic Valves Prepared from Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Sharan; Lordeus, Makensley; Mankame, Omkar V; Valdes-Cruz, Lilliam; Bibevski, Steven; Bell, Sarah M; Baez, Ivan; Scholl, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Infants and children born with severe cardiac valve lesions have no effective long term treatment options since currently available tissue or mechanical prosthetic valves have sizing limitations and no avenue to accommodate the growth of the pediatric patient. Tissue engineered heart valves (TEHVs) which could provide for growth, self-repair, infection resistance, and long-term replacement could be an ideal solution. Porcine small intestinal submucosa (PSIS) has recently emerged as a potentially attractive bioscaffold for TEHVs. PSIS may possess the ability to recruit endogenous cardiovascular cells, leading to phenotypically-matched replacement tissue when the scaffold has completely degraded. Our group has successfully implanted custom-made PSIS valves in 4 infants with critical valve defects in whom standard bioprosthetic or mechanical valves were not an option. Short term clinical follow-up has been promising. However, no hydrodynamic data has been reported to date on these valves. The purpose of this study was to assess the functional effectiveness of tri-leaflet PSIS bioscaffolds in the aortic position compared to standard tri-leaflet porcine bioprosthetic valves. Hydrodynamic evaluation of acute PSIS function was conducted using a left heart simulator in our laboratory. Our results demonstrated similar flow and pressure profiles (p > 0.05) between the PSIS valves and the control valves. However, forward flow energy losses were found to be significantly greater (p < 0.05) in the PSIS valves compared to the controls possibly as a result of stiffer material properties of PSIS relative to glutaraldehyde-fixed porcine valve tissue. Our findings suggest that optimization of valve dimensions and shape may be important in accelerating de novo valve tissue growth and avoidance of long-term complications associated with higher energy losses (e.g. left ventricular hypertrophy). Furthermore, long term animal and clinical studies will be needed in order to

  20. Establishment of a novel, eco-friendly transgenic pig model using porcine pancreatic amylase promoter-driven fungal cellulase transgenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y S; Yang, C C; Hsu, C C; Hsu, J T; Wu, S C; Lin, C J; Cheng, W T K

    2015-02-01

    Competition between humans and livestock for cereal and legume grains makes it challenging to provide economical feeds to livestock animals. Recent increases in corn and soybean prices have had a significant impact on the cost of feed for pig producers. The utilization of byproducts and alternative ingredients in pig diets has the potential to reduce feed costs. Moreover, unlike ruminants, pigs have limited ability to utilize diets with high fiber content because they lack endogenous enzymes capable of breaking down nonstarch polysaccharides into simple sugars. Here, we investigated the feasibility of a transgenic strategy in which expression of the fungal cellulase transgene was driven by the porcine pancreatic amylase promoter in pigs. A 2,488 bp 5'-flanking region of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene was cloned by the genomic walking technique, and its structural features were characterized. Using GFP as a reporter, we found that this region contained promoter activity and had the potential to control heterologous gene expression. Transgenic pigs were generated by pronuclear microinjection. Founders and offspring were identified by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Cellulase mRNA and protein showed tissue-specific expression in the pancreas of F1 generation pigs. Cellulolytic enzyme activity was also identified in the pancreas of transgenic pigs. These results demonstrated the establishment of a tissue-specific promoter of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene. Transgenic pigs expressing exogenous cellulase may represent a way to increase the intake of low-cost, fiber-rich feeds.

  1. Expression of Six Proteins Causes Reprogramming of Porcine Fibroblasts Into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells With Both Active X Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tomokazu; Tani, Tetsuya; Haraguchi, Seiki; Donai, Kenichiro; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Uenishi, Hirohide; Eitsuka, Takahiro; Miyagawa, Makoto; Song, Sanghoun; Onuma, Manabu; Hoshino, Yumi; Sato, Eimei; Honda, Arata

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we created porcine-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells with the expression of six reprogramming factors (Oct3/4, Klf4, Sox2, c-Myc, Lin28, and Nanog). The resulting cells showed growth dependent on LIF (leukemia inhibitory factor) and expression of multiple stem cell markers. Furthermore, the iPS cells caused teratoma formation with three layers of differentiation and had both active X chromosomes (XaXa). Our iPS cells satisfied the both of important characteristics of stem cells: teratoma formation and activation of both X chromosomes. Injection of these iPS cells into morula stage embryos showed that these cells participate in the early stage of porcine embryogenesis. Furthermore, the RNA-Seq analysis detected that expression levels of endogenous pluripotent related genes, NANOG, SOX2, ZFP42, OCT3/4, ESRRB, and ERAS were much higher in iPS with six factors than that with four reprogramming factors. We can conclude that the expression of six reprogramming factors enables the creation of porcine iPS cells, which is partially close to naive iPS state. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 537-553, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Effective genetic vaccination with a widely shared endogenous retroviral tumor antigen requires CD40 stimulation during tumor rejection phase.

    PubMed

    Bronte, Vincenzo; Cingarlini, Sara; Apolloni, Elisa; Serafini, Paolo; Marigo, Ilaria; De Santo, Carmela; Macino, Beatrice; Marin, Oriano; Zanovello, Paola

    2003-12-15

    Endogenous retrovirus (ERV) products are recognized by T lymphocytes in mice and humans. As these Ags are preferentially expressed by neoplastic tissues, they might represent an ideal target for active immunization by genetic vaccination. However, i.m. inoculation of plasmid DNA encoding mouse gp70 or p15E, two products of the env gene of an endogenous murine leukemia virus, elicited a weak Ag-specific T lymphocyte response and resulted in partial protection from challenge with mouse tumors possessing these Ags. Depletion experiments showed that CD8(+), but not CD4(+), T lymphocytes were crucial for the antitumor activity of the vaccines. Systemic administration of agonistic anti-CD40 mAb increased the therapeutic potential of genetic vaccination, but only when given during the tumor rejection phase and not at the time of immunization. This effect correlated with a dramatic increase in the number of ERV-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Adjuvant activity of CD40 agonists thus seems to be relevant to enhance the CD8(+) T cell-dependent response in tumor-bearing hosts, suggesting that sustaining tumor-specific T lymphocyte survival in subjects undergoing vaccination might be a key event in the successful vaccination with weak tumor Ags.

  3. Biochemical and biomechanical characterization of porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS): a mini review

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Ronfard, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS [Oasis®]) is an acellular, biological extracellular matrix (ECM) that has been found to significantly improve the healing of difficult-to-heal or chronic wounds in humans. Like dermal ECM, SIS contains collagen, elastin, glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans, and growth factors that play important roles in healing. Preclinical studies have shown that numerous cell types attach to SIS, proliferate and migrate into the matrix, and differentiate. In addition, SIS can reduce the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)—endogenous proteolytic enzymes whose levels and activities are increased in chronic wounds. Compared to the original single-layer SIS, multi-layer SIS has stronger mechanical properties and is more slowly degraded in wounds. Together, these SIS products provide flexibility in the selection of biologically-active ECMs that may be useful for the repair of diverse wound types. PMID:24273692

  4. Tissue Sampling Guides for Porcine Biomedical Models.

    PubMed

    Albl, Barbara; Haesner, Serena; Braun-Reichhart, Christina; Streckel, Elisabeth; Renner, Simone; Seeliger, Frank; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    This article provides guidelines for organ and tissue sampling adapted to porcine animal models in translational medical research. Detailed protocols for the determination of sampling locations and numbers as well as recommendations on the orientation, size, and trimming direction of samples from ∼50 different porcine organs and tissues are provided in the Supplementary Material. The proposed sampling protocols include the generation of samples suitable for subsequent qualitative and quantitative analyses, including cryohistology, paraffin, and plastic histology; immunohistochemistry;in situhybridization; electron microscopy; and quantitative stereology as well as molecular analyses of DNA, RNA, proteins, metabolites, and electrolytes. With regard to the planned extent of sampling efforts, time, and personnel expenses, and dependent upon the scheduled analyses, different protocols are provided. These protocols are adjusted for (I) routine screenings, as used in general toxicity studies or in analyses of gene expression patterns or histopathological organ alterations, (II) advanced analyses of single organs/tissues, and (III) large-scale sampling procedures to be applied in biobank projects. Providing a robust reference for studies of porcine models, the described protocols will ensure the efficiency of sampling, the systematic recovery of high-quality samples representing the entire organ or tissue as well as the intra-/interstudy comparability and reproducibility of results.

  5. Porcine sperm vitrification I: cryoloops method.

    PubMed

    Arraztoa, C C; Miragaya, M H; Chaves, M G; Trasorras, V L; Gambarotta, M C; Péndola, C H; Neild, D M

    2016-09-29

    The aims of this study were to evaluate porcine sperm vitrification in cryoloops, with and without two different cryoprotectants and assess two warming procedures. Extended (n = 3; r = 4) and raw (n = 5; r = 2) semen was diluted in media without and with cryoprotectants (4% dimethylformamide and 4% glycerol) to a final concentration of 20 × 10(6) spermatozoa ml(-1) and vitrified using the cryoloops method. Two warming procedures were evaluated: rapid method (30 s at 37°C) and an ultra-rapid method (7 s at 75°C, followed by 30 s at 37°C). Total motility (phase contrast), sperm viability (6-carboxifluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide stain), membrane function (hypo-osmotic swelling test), acrosome integrity (phase contrast), chromatin condensation (toluidine blue stain) and chromatin susceptibility to acid denaturation (acridine orange stain) were evaluated before and after vitrification and analysed using Friedman's test. In all media, the only seminal parameters that were maintained after vitrification were chromatin condensation and integrity. Vitrification of porcine spermatozoon using cryoloops, both in the presence or absence of cryoprotectants and independent of the warming procedure used, permits conservation of sperm chromatin condensation and integrity. It would be interesting to further verify this by producing porcine embryos using vitrified spermatozoon with intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  6. Porcine sperm vitrification II: Spheres method.

    PubMed

    Arraztoa, C C; Miragaya, M H; Chaves, M G; Trasorras, V L; Gambarotta, M C; Neild, D M

    2016-11-10

    Owing to current problems in boar sperm cryopreservation, this study proposes to evaluate vitrification in spheres as an alternative cryopreservation procedure, comparing the use or not of permeable cryoprotectants and two warming methods. Extended (n = 3; r = 4) and raw (n = 5; r = 2) porcine spermatozoa were diluted in media, in the absence or presence of either 4% dimethylformamide or 4% glycerol, to a final concentration of 5 × 10(6)  spermatozoa/ml and vitrified using the spheres method. Two warming procedures were evaluated: a rapid method (30 s at 37°C) and an ultrarapid method (7 s at 75°C, followed by 30 s at 37°C). Percentages of total motility (phase contrast), membrane function (hypo-osmotic swelling test), acrosome integrity (phase contrast), sperm viability (6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide stain), chromatin condensation (toluidine blue stain) and chromatin susceptibility to acid denaturation (acridine orange stain) were evaluated in the samples before and after vitrification. Results, analysed using Friedman's test, suggest that rapid warming of raw porcine spermatozoa vitrified without permeable cryoprotectants may preserve DNA condensation and integrity better than the other processing methods studied in this work. Hence, porcine sperm vitrification using spheres could be used to produce embryos with ICSI to further validate this method.

  7. Cloning of Porcine Pituitary Tumor Transforming Gene 1 and Its Expression in Porcine Oocytes and Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuai; Nong, Suqun; Ma, Qingyan; Chen, Baojian; Liu, Mingjun; Pan, Tianbiao; Liao, D. Joshua

    2016-01-01

    The maternal-to-embryonic transition (MET) is a complex process that occurs during early mammalian embryogenesis and is characterized by activation of the zygotic genome, initiation of embryonic transcription, and replacement of maternal mRNA with embryonic mRNA. The objective of this study was to reveal the temporal expression and localization patterns of PTTG1 during early porcine embryonic development and to establish a relationship between PTTG1 and the MET. To achieve this goal, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to clone porcine PTTG1. Subsequently, germinal vesicle (GV)- and metaphase II (MII)-stage oocytes, zygotes, 2-, 4-, and 8-cell-stage embryos, morulas, and blastocysts were produced in vitro and their gene expression was analyzed. The results revealed that the coding sequence of porcine PTTG1 is 609-bp in length and that it encodes a 202-aa polypeptide. Using qRT-PCR, PTTG1 mRNA expression was observed to be maintained at high levels in GV- and MII-stage oocytes. The transcript levels in oocytes were also significantly higher than those in embryos from the zygote to blastocyst stages. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that porcine PTTG1 was primarily localized to the cytoplasm and partially localized to the nucleus. Furthermore, the PTTG1 protein levels in MII-stage oocytes and zygotes were significantly higher than those in embryos from the 2-cell to blastocyst stage. After fertilization, the level of this protein began to decrease gradually until the blastocyst stage. The results of our study suggest that porcine PTTG1 is a new candidate maternal effect gene (MEG) that may participate in the processes of oocyte maturation and zygotic genome activation during porcine embryogenesis. PMID:27058238

  8. Escape from R-peptide deletion in a {gamma}-retrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Irene C.; Eckhardt, Manon; Brynza, Julia; Collins, Mary K.; Cichutek, Klaus; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2011-09-30

    The R peptide in the cytoplasmic tail (C-tail) of {gamma}-retroviral envelope proteins (Env) prevents membrane fusion before budding. To analyse its role in the formation of replication competent, infectious particles, we developed chimeric murine leukaemia viruses (MLV) with unmodified or R-peptide deleted Env proteins of the gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GaLV). While titres of these viruses were unaffected, R-peptide deficiency led to strongly impaired spreading. Most remarkably, we isolated an escape mutant which had restored an open reading frame for a C-terminal extension of the truncated C-tail. A reconstituted virus encoding this escape C-tail replicated in cell culture. In contrast to R-peptide deficient Env, particle incorporation of the escape Env was effective due to an enhanced protein expression and restored intracellular co-localisation with Gag proteins. Our data demonstrate that the R peptide not only regulates membrane fusion but also mediates efficient Env protein particle incorporation in {gamma}-retrovirus infected cells.

  9. Structural and biochemical studies of ALIX/AIP1 and its role in retrovirus budding.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert D; Chung, Hyo-Young; Zhai, Qianting; Robinson, Howard; Sundquist, Wesley I; Hill, Christopher P

    2007-03-09

    ALIX/AIP1 functions in enveloped virus budding, endosomal protein sorting, and many other cellular processes. Retroviruses, including HIV-1, SIV, and EIAV, bind and recruit ALIX through YPX(n)L late-domain motifs (X = any residue; n = 1-3). Crystal structures reveal that human ALIX is composed of an N-terminal Bro1 domain and a central domain that is composed of two extended three-helix bundles that form elongated arms that fold back into a "V." The structures also reveal conformational flexibility in the arms that suggests that the V domain may act as a flexible hinge in response to ligand binding. YPX(n)L late domains bind in a conserved hydrophobic pocket on the second arm near the apex of the V, whereas CHMP4/ESCRT-III proteins bind a conserved hydrophobic patch on the Bro1 domain, and both interactions are required for virus budding. ALIX therefore serves as a flexible, extended scaffold that connects retroviral Gag proteins to ESCRT-III and other cellular-budding machinery.

  10. Restriction of feline retroviruses: lessons from cat APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases and TRIM5alpha proteins.

    PubMed

    Münk, Carsten; Hechler, Torsten; Chareza, Sarah; Löchelt, Martin

    2010-03-15

    The interplay between viral and cellular factors determines the outcome of an initial contact between a given virus and its natural host or upon encounter of a novel host. Thus, the potential of inducing disease as well as crossing host species barriers are the consequences of the molecular interactions between the parasite and its susceptible, tolerant or resistant host. Cellular restriction factors, for instance APOBEC3 and TRIM5 proteins, targeting defined pathogens or groups of pathogens as well as viral genes counter-acting these cellular defense systems are of prime importance in this respect and may even represent novel targets for prevention and therapy of virus infections. Due to the importance of host-encoded antiviral restriction and viral counter-defense for pathogenicity and host tropism, the responsible molecular factors and mechanisms are currently under intense investigation. In this review we will introduce host restriction and retroviral counter-defense systems with a special emphasis on the cat and its naturally occurring exogenous retroviruses which is a valid model for human disease, a model that will contribute to increase our basic understanding and potential applications of these important aspects of host-virus interaction.

  11. Cells infected with Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus are detected in the bone marrow of asymptomatic sheep.

    PubMed

    Borobia, Marta; Ortín, Aurora; Ferrer, Luis M; Ramos, Juán J; Lacasta, Delia; De Las Heras, Marcelo

    2014-07-01

    Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) is a transmissible lung cancer caused by Jaggsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV). It is difficult to identify animals infected with JSRV but are clinically healthy. The virus does not induce a specific antibody response and, although proviral DNA sequences of JSRV can be found in mononuclear blood cells, the detection is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of JSRV in the bone marrow of infected sheep and develop a more consistent screening method. Immunohistochemical examination of bone marrow samples from 8 asymptomatic JSRV-infected sheep revealed the presence of positively labelled cells. However, JSRV could not be detected by a highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in bone marrow aspirates periodically collected from these animals. Results suggest that JSRV-infected cells may be present in the bone marrow of symptomless animals, but the number is below the detectable level for PCR. Therefore, this technique does not seem to be helpful for preclinical diagnosis of OPA.

  12. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in mice transplanted with hemopoietic stem cells infected with amphotropic retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Amphotropic recombinant retroviruses were generated carrying sequences encoding human adenosine deaminase (ADA). Transcription of the human ADA gene was under control of a hybrid long terminal repeat in which the enhancer from the Moloney murine leukemia virus was replaced by an enhancer from the F101 host-range mutant of polyoma virus. Hemopoietic stem cells in murine bone marrow were infected with this virus under defined culture conditions. As a result, 59% of day-12 colony forming unit spleen (CFU-S) stem cells became infected without any in vitro selection. Infected CFU-S were shown to express human ADA before transplantation and this expression sustained upon in vivo maturation. Mice transplanted with infected bone marrow exhibited human ADA expression in lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid cell types. Moreover, human ADA expression persisted in secondary and tertiary transplanted recipients showing that human ADA-expressing cells were derived from pluripotent stem cells. These characteristics of our amphotropic viruses make them promising tools in gene therapy protocols for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency caused by ADA deficiency. In this respect it is also relevant that the viral vector that served as backbone for the ADA vector was previously shown to be nonleukemogenic. PMID:1974914

  13. Two Closely Related but Distinct Retroviruses Are Associated with Walleye Discrete Epidermal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    LaPierre, Lorie A.; Holzschu, Donald L.; Wooster, Greg A.; Bowser, Paul R.; Casey, James W.

    1998-01-01

    Walleye discrete epidermal hyperplasia (WEH) is a hyperproliferative skin disease that is prevalent on adult walleye fish throughout North America. We have identified two retroviruses associated with WEH, designated here as walleye epidermal hyperplasia virus type 1 and type 2 (WEHV1 and WEHV2), that are closely related to one another (77% identity) and to walleye dermal sarcoma virus (64% identity) within the polymerase region. WEHV1 and/or WEHV2 viral DNA was readily detected by PCR in hyperplastic tissue samples, but only low levels of viral DNA were detected in uninvolved skin. Southern blot analysis showed one to three copies of integrated WEHV2 viral DNA in lesions but did not detect WEHV2 viral DNA in uninvolved skin from the same fish. Northern blots detected abundant levels of WEHV1 and/or WEHV2 virion RNA transcripts of approximately 13 kb in hyperplastic tissue, but virion RNA was not observed in uninvolved skin and muscle. These results suggest that WEHV1 and WEHV2 are the causative agents of discrete epidermal hyperplasia. PMID:9525688

  14. Human retroviruses and AIDS 1996. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Foley, B.; Korber, B.; Mellors, J.W.; Jeang, K.T.; Wain-Hobson, S.

    1997-04-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) Nuclear Acid Alignments and Sequences; (2) Amino Acid Alignments; (3) Analysis; (4) Related Sequences; and (5) Database Communications. Information within all the parts is updated throughout the year on the Web site, http://hiv-web.lanl.gov. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  15. Clonal fluctuation within the haematopoietic system of mice reconstituted with retrovirus-infected stem cells.

    PubMed Central

    Snodgrass, R; Keller, G

    1987-01-01

    The clonal make-up of the haematopoietic system of mice reconstituted with retrovirus-infected bone marrow cells was analysed at two different points in time following reconstitution. We have found that under these conditions, the haematopoietic system consists of clones that persist throughout the 5 month course of the experiment as well as those which undergo temporal changes. The various changes that we have observed included the appearance of a new clone(s) in all lineages, the loss of a clone from some lineages and the shift in the appearance of a clone from one lineage to another. In addition, we provide evidence which suggests that the clonal make-up of the thymus changes with time; early after reconstitution it consists of many clones, whereas at the later time-points it contains a limited number of predominant clones. These studies document the dramatic clonal changes which occur within the various lineages for a long time following reconstitution and highlight the difficulty in demonstrating lineage-specific stem cells. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2832146

  16. Structural and Biochemical Studies of ALIX/AlP1 and Its Role in Retrovirus Budding

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher,R.; Chung, H.; Zhai, Q.; Robinson, H.; Sundquist, W.; Hill, C.

    2007-01-01

    ALIX/AIP1 functions in enveloped virus budding, endosomal protein sorting, and many other cellular processes. Retroviruses, including HIV-1, SIV, and EIAV, bind and recruit ALIX through YPXnL late-domain motifs (X = any residue; n = 1-3). Crystal structures reveal that human ALIX is composed of an N-terminal Bro1 domain and a central domain that is composed of two extended three-helix bundles that form elongated arms that fold back into a 'V.'. The structures also reveal conformational flexibility in the arms that suggests that the V domain may act as a flexible hinge in response to ligand binding. YPXnL late domains bind in a conserved hydrophobic pocket on the second arm near the apex of the V, whereas CHMP4/ESCRT-III proteins bind a conserved hydrophobic patch on the Bro1 domain, and both interactions are required for virus budding. ALIX therefore serves as a flexible, extended scaffold that connects retroviral Gag proteins to ESCRT-III and other cellular-budding machinery.

  17. Retrovirus-induced insertional mutagenesis: mechanism of collagen mutation in Mov13 mice.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, D D; Wu, H; Hartung, S; Breindl, M; Jaenisch, R

    1991-01-01

    The Mov13 mouse strain carries a mutation in the alpha 1(I) procollagen gene which is due to the insertion of a Moloney murine leukemia provirus into the first intron. This insertion results in the de novo methylation of the provirus and flanking DNA, the alteration of chromatin structure, and the transcriptional inactivity of the collagen promoter. To address the mechanism of mutagenesis, we reintroduced a cloned and therefore demethylated version of the Mov13 mutant allele into mouse fibroblasts. The transfected gene was not transcribed, indicating that the transcriptional defect was not due to the hypermethylation. Rather, this result strongly suggests that the mutation is due to the displacement or disruption of cis-acting regulatory DNA sequences within the first intron. We also constructed a Mov13 variant allele containing a single long terminal repeat instead of the whole provirus. This construct also failed to express mRNA, indicating that the Mov13 mutation does not revert by provirus excision as has been observed for other retrovirus-induced mutations. Images PMID:1922037

  18. Receptor co-operation in retrovirus entry: recruitment of an auxiliary entry mechanism after retargeted binding.

    PubMed Central

    Valsesia-Wittmann, S; Morling, F J; Hatziioannou, T; Russell, S J; Cosset, F L

    1997-01-01

    We have constructed Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-derived envelope glycoproteins (AMO) displaying an amino-terminal Ram-1-binding domain in which a variety of different amino acid spacers have been inserted between the displayed domain and the MoMLV surface (SU) subunit. Titres of retroviruses generated with these chimeric envelopes were enhanced on cells expressing both Ram-1 and Rec-1 receptors compared with the titres on cells expressing only one or other receptor type. The absolute viral titres and the degree of titre enhancement due to receptor cooperativity were highly variable between the different chimeric envelopes and were determined primarily by the properties of the interdomain spacer. An extreme example of receptor co-operativity was encountered when testing Ram-1-targeted AMOPRO envelopes with specific proline-rich interdomain spacers. AMOPRO viruses could not enter cells expressing only Rec-1 or only Ram-1 but could efficiently infect cells co-expressing both receptors. The data are consistent with a model for receptor co-operativity in which binding to the targeted (Ram-1) receptor triggers conformational rearrangements of the envelope that lead to complete unmasking of the hidden Rec-1-binding domain, thereby facilitating its interaction with the viral (Rec-1) receptor which leads to optimal fusion triggering. PMID:9135138

  19. 12th international conference on human retrovirology: HTLV and related retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lairmore, Michael D; Fujii, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    The 12th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses, was held at the Half Moon Hotel in Montego Bay, Jamaica, from June 22nd to June 25th 2005. The scientific conference, sponsored by the International Retrovirology Association, is held biennially at rotating international venues around the world. The meeting brings together basic scientists, epidemiologists and clinical researchers to discuss findings to prevent HTLV infection or develop new therapies against HTLV-mediated diseases. The Association fosters the education and training of young scientists to bring new approaches to the complex problems of HTLV research, such as translational research to bring findings from the laboratory into clinical trials that benefit HTLV-infected patients. The breadth and quality of research presentations and workshops at the 12th International Conference indicate that these goals are being accomplished. As HTLV research enters its third decade a new generation of scientists face many challenges. However, HTLV scientists and clinicians displayed exciting new approaches and discoveries during plenary talks and poster sessions. The conference encouraged research in HTLV infections and disease, fostered collaborations, and stimulated new partnerships between clinicians and scientists to encourage clinical trials and novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:16202161

  20. Cellular restriction of retrovirus particle-mediated mRNA transfer.

    PubMed

    Galla, Melanie; Schambach, Axel; Towers, Greg J; Baum, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    Analyzing cellular restriction mechanisms provides insight into viral replication strategies, identifies targets for antiviral drug design, and is crucial for the development of novel tools for experimental or therapeutic delivery of genetic information. We have previously shown that retroviral vector mutants that are unable to initiate reverse transcription mediate a transient expression of any sequence which replaces the gag-pol transcription unit, a process we call retrovirus particle-mediated mRNA transfer (RMT). Here, we further examined the mechanism of RMT by testing its sensitivity to cellular restriction factors and short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). We found that both human TRIM5alpha and, to a lesser extent, Fv1 effectively restrict RMT if the RNA is delivered by a restriction-sensitive capsid. While TRIM5alpha restriction of RMT led to reduced levels of retroviral mRNA in target cells, restriction by Fv1 did not. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 partially relieved TRIM5alpha-mediated restriction of RMT. Finally, cells expressing shRNAs specifically targeting the retroviral mRNA inhibited RMT particles, but not reverse-transcribing particles. Retroviral mRNA may thus serve as a translation template if not used as a template for reverse transcription. Our data imply that retroviral nucleic acids become accessible to host factors, including ribosomes, as a result of particle remodeling during cytoplasmic trafficking.

  1. Computer simulation of a cellular automata model for the immune response in a retrovirus system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. B.

    1989-02-01

    Immune response in a retrovirus system is modeled by a network of three binary cell elements to take into account some of the main functional features of T4 cells, T8 cells, and viruses. Two different intercell interactions are introduced, one of which leads to three fixed points while the other yields bistable fixed points oscillating between a healthy state and a sick state in a mean field treatment. Evolution of these cells is studied for quenched and annealed random interactions on a simple cubic lattice with a nearest neighbor interaction using inhomogenous cellular automata. Populations of T4 cells and viral cells oscillate together with damping (with constant amplitude) for annealed (quenched) interaction on increasing the value of mixing probability B from zero to a characteristic value B ca ( B cq). For higher B, the average number of T4 cells increases while that of the viral infected cells decreases monotonically on increasing B, suggesting a phase transition at B ca ( B cq).

  2. Computer simulation of a cellular automata model for the immune response in a retrovirus system

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, R.B.

    1989-02-01

    Immune response in a retrovirus system is modeled by a network of three binary cell elements to take into account some of the main functional features of T4 cells, T8 cells, and viruses. Two different intercell interactions are introduced, one of which leads to three fixed points while the other yields bistable fixed points oscillating between a healthy state and a sick state in a mean field treatment. Evolution of these cells is studied for quenched and annealed random interactions on a simple cubic lattice with a nearest neighbor interaction using inhomogenous cellular automata. Populations of T4 cells and viral cells oscillate together with damping (with constant amplitude) for annealed (quenched) interaction on increasing the value of mixing probability B from zero to a characteristic value B/sub ca/ (B/sub cq/). For higher B, the average number of T4 cells increases while that of the viral infected cells decreases monotonically on increasing B, suggesting a phase transition at B/sub ca/ (B/sub cq/).

  3. Human retroviruses and aids, 1992. A compilation and analysis of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, G.; Korber, B.; Berzofsky, J.A.; Pavlakis, G.N.; Smith, R.F.

    1992-10-01

    This compendium and the accompanying floppy diskettes are the result of an effort to compile and rapidly publish all relevant molecular data concerning the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) and related retroviruses. The scope of the compendium and database is best summarized by the five parts that it comprises: (1) HIV and SIV Nucleotide Sequences; (H) Amino Acid Sequences; (III) Analyses; (IV) Related Sequences; and (V) Database Communications. information within all the parts is updated at least twice in each year, which accounts for the modes of binding and pagination in the compendium. While this publication could take the form of a review or sequence monograph, it is not so conceived. Instead, the literature from which the database is derived has simply been summarized and some elementary computational analyses have been performed upon the data. Interpretation and commentary have been avoided insofar as possible so that the reader can form his or her own judgments concerning the complex information. In addition to the general descriptions below of the parts of the compendium, the user should read the individual introductions for each part.

  4. Gene therapy using retrovirus vectors: vector development and biosafety at clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Doi, Knayo; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Retrovirus vectors (gammaretroviral and lentiviral vectors) have been considered as promising tools to transfer therapeutic genes into patient cells because they can permanently integrate into host cellular genome. To treat monogenic, inherited diseases, retroviral vectors have been used to add correct genes into patient cells. Conventional gammaretroviral vectors achieved successful results in clinical trials: treated patients had therapeutic gene expression in target cells and had improved symptoms of diseases. However, serious side-effects of leukemia occurred, caused by retroviral insertional mutagenesis (IM). These incidences stressed the importance of monitoring vector integration sites in patient cells as well as of re-consideration on safer vectors. More recently lentiviral vectors which can deliver genes into non-dividing cells started to be used in clinical trials including neurological disorders, showing their efficacy. Vector integration site analysis revealed that lentiviruses integrate less likely to near promoter regions of oncogenes than gammaretroviruses and no adverse events have been reported in lentiviral vector-mediated gene therapy clinical trials. Therefore lentiviral vectors have promises to be applied to a wide range of common diseases in near future. For example, T cells from cancer patients were transduced to express chimeric T cell receptors recognizing their tumour cells enhancing patients' anti-cancer immunity.

  5. Evidence for retrovirus infections in green turtles Chelonia mydas from the Hawaiian islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casey, R.N.; Quackenbush, S.L.; Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Bowser, P.R.; Casey, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Apparently normal Hawaiian green turtles Chelonia mydas and those displaying fibropapillomas were analyzed for infection by retroviruses. Strikingly, all samples were positive for polymerase enhanced reverse transcriptase (PERT) with levels high enough to quantitate by the conventional reverse transcriptase (RT) assay. However, samples of skin, even from asymptomatic turtles, were RT positive, although the levels of enzyme activity in healthy turtles hatched and raised in captivity were much lower than those observed in asymptomatic free-ranging turtles. Turtles with fibropapillomas displayed a broad range of reverse transcriptase activity. Skin and eye fibropapillomas and a heart tumor were further analyzed and shown to have reverse transcriptase activity that banded in a sucrose gradient at 1.17 g ml-1. The reverse transcriptase activity purified from the heart tumor displayed a temperature optimum of 37??C and showed a preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+. Sucrose gradient fractions of this sample displaying elevated reverse transcriptase activity contained primarily retrovitalsized particles with prominent envelope spikes, when negatively stained and examined by electron microscopy. Sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of gradient-purified virions revealed a conserved profile among 4 independent tumors and showed 7 prominent proteins having molecular weights of 116, 83, 51, 43, 40, 20 and 14 kDa. The data suggest that retroviral infections are widespread in Hawaiian green turtles and a comprehensive investigation is warranted to address the possibility that these agents cause green turtle fibropapillomatosis (GTFP).

  6. Detection of avian retroviruses in vaccines by amplification on DF-1 cells with immunostaining and fluorescent product-enhanced reverse transcriptase endpoint methods.

    PubMed

    Birmingham, Cheryl L; Dupont, Dominique; Riou, Patrice; Armanet, Corinne; Edamura, Kerrie Nichol; Martinho, Briolange; Serres, Aurelie; Jacouton, Severine; Detrez, Valerie; McNeil, Bryan; Schreiber, Martha; Gaillac, David; Bonnevay, Thierry; Gisonni-Lex, Lucy; Mallet, Laurent

    2013-05-01

    In order to ensure the safety of vaccines produced on avian cells, rigorous testing for the absence of avian retroviruses must be performed. Current methods used to detect avian retroviruses often exhibit a high invalid-test/false-positive rate, rely on hard-to-secure reagents, and/or have readouts that are difficult to standardize. Herein, we describe the development and validation of two consistent and sensitive methods for the detection of avian retroviruses in vaccines: viral amplification on DF-1 cells followed by immunostaining for the detection of avian leukosis virus (ALV) and viral amplification on DF-1 cells followed by fluorescent product-enhanced reverse transcriptase (F-PERT) for the detection of all avian retroviruses. Both assays share an infectivity stage on DF-1 cells followed by a different endpoint readout depending on the retrovirus to be detected. Validation studies demonstrated a limit of detection of one 50% cell culture infectious dose (CCID(50))/ml for retrovirus in a 30-ml test inoculum volume for both methods, which was as sensitive as a classical method used in the vaccine industry, namely, viral amplification on primary chicken embryo fibroblasts followed by the complement fixation test for avian leukosis virus (COFAL). Furthermore, viral amplification on DF-1 cells followed by either immunostaining or F-PERT demonstrated a sensitivity that exceeds the regulatory requirements for detection of ALV strains. A head-to-head comparison of the two endpoint methods showed that viral amplification on DF-1 cells followed by F-PERT is a suitable method to be used as a stand-alone test to ensure that vaccine preparations are free from infectious avian retroviruses.

  7. Outbreak investigation of porcine epidemic diarrhea in swine in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Pasma, Tim; Furness, Mary Catherine; Alves, David; Aubry, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus was first diagnosed in Ontario in January of 2014. An outbreak investigation was conducted and it was hypothesized that feed containing spray-dried porcine plasma contaminated with the virus was a risk factor in the introduction and spread of the disease in Ontario.

  8. Isolation, Culture and Identification of Porcine Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo-Jiang; Li, Ping-Hua; Huang, Rui-Hua; Sun, Wen-Xing; Wang, Han; Li, Qi-Fa; Chen, Jie; Wu, Wang-Jun; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the optimum protocol for the isolation and culture of porcine muscle satellite cells. Mononuclear muscle satellite cells are a kind of adult stem cell, which is located between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of muscle fibers and is the primary source of myogenic precursor cells in postnatal muscle. Muscle satellite cells are a useful model to investigate the mechanisms of muscle growth and development. Although the isolation and culture protocols of muscle satellite cells in some species (e.g. mouse) have been established successfully, the culture system for porcine muscle satellite cells is very limited. In this study, we optimized the isolation procedure of porcine muscle satellite cells and elaborated the isolation and culture process in detail. Furthermore, we characterized the porcine muscle satellite cells using the immunofluorecence. Our study provides a reference for the isolation of porcine muscle satellite cells and will be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms in these cells.

  9. Reactomes of porcine alveolar macrophages infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) has devastated pig industries worldwide for many years. It is caused by a small RNA virus (PRRSV), which targets almost exclusively pig monocytes or macrophages. In the present study, five SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression) libraries derive...

  10. Phylogeny-Directed Search for Murine Leukemia Virus-Like Retroviruses in Vertebrate Genomes and in Patients Suffering from Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, Jonas; Sheikholvaezin, Ali; Elfaitouri, Amal; Blomberg, Fredrik; Sjösten, Anna; Mattson Ulfstedt, Johan; Pipkorn, Rüdiger; Källander, Clas; Öhrmalm, Christina; Sperber, Göran

    2011-01-01

    Gammaretrovirus-like sequences occur in most vertebrate genomes. Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) like retroviruses (MLLVs) are a subset, which may be pathogenic and spread cross-species. Retroviruses highly similar to MLLVs (xenotropic murine retrovirus related virus (XMRV) and Human Mouse retrovirus-like RetroViruses (HMRVs)) reported from patients suffering from prostate cancer (PC) and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) raise the possibility that also humans have been infected. Structurally intact, potentially infectious MLLVs occur in the genomes of some mammals, especially mouse. Mouse MLLVs contain three major groups. One, MERV G3, contained MLVs and XMRV/HMRV. Its presence in mouse DNA, and the abundance of xenotropic MLVs in biologicals, is a source of false positivity. Theoretically, XMRV/HMRV could be one of several MLLV transspecies infections. MLLV pathobiology and diversity indicate optimal strategies for investigating XMRV/HMRV in humans and raise ethical concerns. The alternatives that XMRV/HMRV may give a hard-to-detect “stealth” infection, or that XMRV/HMRV never reached humans, have to be considered. PMID:22315600

  11. Anandamide, an endogenous cannabinoid, inhibits Shaker-related voltage-gated K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Poling, J S; Rogawski, M A; Salem, N; Vicini, S

    1996-01-01

    Anandamide has been identified in porcine brain as an endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand and is believed to be a counterpart to the psychoactive component of marijuana, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC). Here we report that anandamide directly inhibits (IC50, 2.7 muM) Shaker-related Kv1.2 K+ channels that are found ubiquitously in the mammalian brain. Delta 9-THC also inhibited Kv1.2 channels with comparable potency (IC50, 2.4 muM), as did several N-acyl-ethanolamides with cannabinoid receptor binding activity. Potassium current inhibition occurred through a pertussis toxin-insensitive mechanism and was not prevented by the cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716A. Utilizing excised patches of Kv1.2 channel-rich membrane as a rapid and sensitive bioassay, we found that phospholipase D stimulated the release of an endogenous anandamide-like K+ channel blocker from rat brain slices. Structure-activity studies were consistent with the possibility that the released blocker was either anandamide or another N-acyl-ethanolamide.

  12. Endogenous versus Exogenous Origins of Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, Didier

    Are large biological extinctions such as the Cretaceous/Tertiary KT boundary due to a meteorite, extreme volcanic activity or self-organized critical extinction cascades? Are commercial successes due to a progressive reputation cascade or the result of a well orchestrated advertisement? Determining the chain of causality for Xevents in complex systems requires disentangling interwoven exogenous and endogenous contributions with either no clear signature or too many signatures. Here, I review several efforts carried out with collaborators which suggest a general strategy for understanding the organizations of several complex systems under the dual effect of endogenous and exogenous fluctuations. The studied examples are: internet download shocks, book sale shocks, social shocks, financial volatility shocks, and financial crashes. Simple models are offered to quantitatively relate the endogenous organization to the exogenous response of the system. Suggestions for applications of these ideas to many other systems are offered.

  13. Actions of melatonin mixed with collagenized porcine bone versus porcine bone only on osteointegration of dental implants.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Gómez-Moreno, Gerardo; López-Marí, Laura; Guardia, Javier; Marínez-González, José María; Barone, Antonio; Tresguerres, Isabel F; Paredes, Sergio D; Fuentes-Breto, Lorena

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the topical application of melatonin mixed with collagenized porcine bone on the osteointegration on the rough discrete calcium deposit (DCD) surface implants in Beagle dogs 3 months after their insertion. In preparation for subsequent insertion of dental implants, lower molars were extracted from 12 Beagle dogs. Each mandible received two parallel wall expanded platform implants with a DCD surface of 4 mm in diameter and 10 mm in length. The implants were randomly assigned to the distal sites on each mandible in the molar area and the gaps were filled with 5 mg lyophilized powdered melatonin and porcine bone and collagenized porcine bone alone. Ten histological sections per implant were obtained for histomorphometric studies. After a 4-wk treatment period, melatonin plus porcine bone significantly increased the perimeter of bone that was in direct contact with the treated implants (P < 0.0001), bone density (P < 0.0001), and new bone formation (P < 0.0001) in comparison with porcine bone alone around the implants. Melatonin plus collagenized porcine bone on DCD surface may act as a biomimetic agent in the placement of endo-osseous dental implants and enhance the osteointegration. Melatonin combined with porcine bone on DCD implants reveals more bone in implant contact at 12 wk (84.5 +/- 1.5%) compared with porcine bone alone treated area (67.17 +/- 1.2%).

  14. Mechanism of inhibition of retrovirus release from cells by interferon-induced gene ISG15.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Zhizhou; Seo, Eun Joo; Leis, Jonathan

    2011-07-01

    Budding of retroviruses from cell membranes requires ubiquitination of Gag and recruitment of cellular proteins involved in endosome sorting, including endosome sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III) protein complex and vacuolar protein sorting 4 (VPS4) and its ATPase. In response to infection, a cellular mechanism has evolved that blocks virus replication early and late in the budding process through expression of interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15), a dimer homologue of ubiquitin. Interferon treatment of DF-1 cells blocks avian sarcoma/leukosis virus release, demonstrating that this mechanism is functional under physiological conditions. The late block to release is caused in part by a loss in interaction between VPS4 and its coactivator protein LIP5, which is required to promote the formation of the ESCRT III-VPS4 double-hexamer complex to activate its ATPase. ISG15 is conjugated to two different LIP5-ESCRT-III-binding charged multivesicular body proteins, CHMP2A and CHMP5. Upon ISGylation of each, interaction with LIP5 is no longer detected. Two other ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP4B and CHMP6, are also conjugated to ISG15. ISGylation of CHMP2A, CHMP4B, and CHMP6 weakens their binding directly to VPS4, thereby facilitating the release of this protein from the membrane into the cytosol. The remaining budding complex fails to release particles from the cell membrane. Introducing a mutant of ISG15 into cells that cannot be conjugated to proteins prevents the ISG15-dependent mechanism from blocking virus release. CHMP5 is the primary switch to initiate the antiviral mechanism, because removal of CHMP5 from cells prevents ISGylation of CHMP2A and CHMP6.

  15. Retroviruses and sexual size dimorphism in domestic cats (Felis catus L.).

    PubMed Central

    Pontier, D; Fromont, E; Courchamp, F; Artois, M; Yoccoz, N G

    1998-01-01

    Hochberg and co-workers have predicted that an increase in host adult mortality due to parasites is balanced by an earlier age at first reproduction. In polygynous species we hypothesize that such a pattern would lead to diverging selection pressure on body size between sexes and increased sexual size dimorphism. In polygynous mammals, male body size is considered to be an important factor for reproductive success. Thus, under the pressure of a virulent infection, males should be selected for rapid growth and/or higher body size to be able to compete successfully as soon as possible with opponents. In contrast, under the same selection pressure, females should be selected for lighter adult body size or rapid growth to reach sexual maturity earlier. We investigated this hypothesis in the domestic cat Felis catus. Orange cats have greater body size dimorphism than non-orange cats. Orange females are lighter than non-orange females, and orange males are heavier than non-orange males. Here, we report the extent to which orange and non-orange individuals differ in infection prevelance for two retroviruses, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV). FIV is thought to be transmitted almost exclusively through aggressive contacts between individuals, whereas FeLV transmission occurs mainly through social contacts. The pattern of infection of both diseases is consistent with the higher aggressiveness of orange cats. In both sexes, orange cats are significantly more infected by FIV, and tend to be less infected by FeLV than other cats. The pattern of infection is also consistent with an earlier age at first reproduction in orange than in non-orange cats, at least for females. These results suggest that microparasitism may have played an important role in the evolution of sexual size dimorphism of domestic cats. PMID:9493404

  16. Postinhibitory rebound neurons and networks are disrupted in retrovirus-induced spongiform neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Davey, Robert A.; Lynch, William P.

    2014-01-01

    Certain retroviruses induce progressive spongiform motor neuron disease with features resembling prion diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. With the neurovirulent murine leukemia virus (MLV) FrCasE, Env protein expression within glia leads to postsynaptic vacuolation, cellular effacement, and neuronal loss in the absence of neuroinflammation. To understand the physiological changes associated with MLV-induced spongiosis, and its neuronal specificity, we employed patch-clamp recordings and voltage-sensitive dye imaging in brain slices of the mouse inferior colliculus (IC), a midbrain nucleus that undergoes extensive spongiosis. IC neurons characterized by postinhibitory rebound firing (PIR) were selectively affected in FrCasE-infected mice. Coincident with Env expression in microglia and in glia characterized by NG2 proteoglycan expression (NG2 cells), rebound neurons (RNs) lost PIR, became hyperexcitable, and were reduced in number. PIR loss and hyperexcitability were reversed by raising internal calcium buffer concentrations in RNs. PIR-initiated rhythmic circuits were disrupted, and spontaneous synchronized bursting and prolonged depolarizations were widespread. Other IC neuron cell types and circuits within the same degenerative environment were unaffected. Antagonists of NMDA and/or AMPA receptors reduced burst firing in the IC but did not affect prolonged depolarizations. Antagonists of L-type calcium channels abolished both bursts and slow depolarizations. IC infection by the nonneurovirulent isogenic virus Friend 57E (Fr57E), whose Env protein is structurally similar to FrCasE, showed no RN hyperactivity or cell loss; however, PIR latency increased. These findings suggest that spongiform neurodegeneration arises from the unique excitability of RNs, their local regulation by glia, and the disruption of this relationship by glial expression of abnormal protein. PMID:25252336

  17. An endogenous model of the credit network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jianmin; Sui, Xin; Li, Shouwei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an endogenous credit network model of firm-bank agents is constructed. The model describes the endogenous formation of firm-firm, firm-bank and bank-bank credit relationships. By means of simulations, the model is capable of showing some obvious similarities with empirical evidence found by other scholars: the upper-tail of firm size distribution can be well fitted with a power-law; the bank size distribution can be lognormally distributed with a power-law tail; the bank in-degrees of the interbank credit network as well as the firm-bank credit network fall into two-power-law distributions.

  18. Phenotypic map of porcine retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Veiga-Crespo, Patricia; del Río, Patricia; Blindert, Marcel; Ueffing, Marius; Hauck, Stefanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Porcine retina is an excellent model for studying diverse retinal processes and diseases. The morphologies of porcine retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) have, however, not yet been described comprehensively. The aim of the present study was to créate a classification of the RGCs using the 1, 1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI) tracing method. Methods About 170 RGCs were retrogradely labeled by injecting DiI into the optic nerve of postmortem eyes and statistically analyzed by two different clustering methods: Ward’s algorithm and the K-means clustering. Major axis length of the soma, soma area size, and dendritic field area size were selected as main parameters for cluster classification. Results RGC distribution in clusters was achieved according to their morphological parameters. It was feasible to combine both statistical methods, thereby obtaining a robust clustering distribution. Morphological analysis resulted in a classification of RGCs in three groups according to the soma size and dendritic field: A (large somas and large dendritic fields), B (medium to large somas and medium to large dendritic fields), C (medium to small somas and medium to small dendritic fields). Within groups, fine clustering defined several subgroups according to dendritic arborization and level of stratification. Additionally, cells stratifying in two different levels of the inner plexiform layer were observed within the clusters. Conclusions This comprehensive study of RGC morphologies in the porcine retina provides fundamental knowledge about RGC cell types and provides a basis for functional studies toward selective RGC cell degeneration in retinal disorders. PMID:23687427

  19. Endogenous circulating sympatholytic factor in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, R. E.; Winters, B.; Hales, M.; Barnett, T.; Schwinn, D. A.; Flavahan, N.; Berkowitz, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Sympathotonic orthostatic hypotension (SOH) is an idiopathic syndrome characterized by tachycardia, hypotension, elevated plasma norepinephrine, and symptoms of orthostatic intolerance provoked by assumption of an upright posture. We studied a woman with severe progressive SOH with blood pressure unresponsive to the pressor effects of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists. We tested the hypothesis that a circulating factor in this patient interferes with vascular adrenergic neurotransmission. Preincubation of porcine pulmonary artery vessel rings with patient plasma produced a dose-dependent inhibition of vasoconstriction to phenylephrine in vitro, abolished vasoconstriction to direct electrical stimulation, and had no effect on nonadrenergic vasoconstrictive stimuli (endothelin-1), PGF-2alpha (or KCl). Preincubation of vessels with control plasma was devoid of these effects. SOH plasma inhibited the binding of an alpha(1)-selective antagonist radioligand ([(125)I]HEAT) to membrane fractions derived from porcine pulmonary artery vessel rings, rat liver, and cell lines selectively overexpressing human ARs of the alpha(1B) subtype but not other AR subtypes (alpha(1A) and alpha(1D)). We conclude that a factor in SOH plasma can selectively and irreversibly inhibit adrenergic ligand binding to alpha(1B) ARs. We propose that this factor contributes to a novel pathogenesis for SOH in this patient. This patient's syndrome represents a new disease entity, and her plasma may provide a unique tool for probing the selective functions of alpha(1)-ARs.

  20. Orchestrating the Selection and Packaging of Genomic RNA by Retroviruses: An Ensemble of Viral and Host Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kaddis Maldonado, Rebecca J.; Parent, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious retrovirus particles contain two copies of unspliced viral RNA that serve as the viral genome. Unspliced retroviral RNA is transcribed in the nucleus by the host RNA polymerase II and has three potential fates: (1) it can be spliced into subgenomic messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for the translation of viral proteins; or it can remain unspliced to serve as either (2) the mRNA for the translation of Gag and Gag–Pol; or (3) the genomic RNA (gRNA) that is packaged into virions. The Gag structural protein recognizes and binds the unspliced viral RNA to select it as a genome, which is selected in preference to spliced viral RNAs and cellular RNAs. In this review, we summarize the current state of understanding about how retroviral packaging is orchestrated within the cell and explore potential new mechanisms based on recent discoveries in the field. We discuss the cis-acting elements in the unspliced viral RNA and the properties of the Gag protein that are required for their interaction. In addition, we discuss the role of host factors in influencing the fate of the newly transcribed viral RNA, current models for how retroviruses distinguish unspliced viral mRNA from viral genomic RNA, and the possible subcellular sites of genomic RNA dimerization and selection by Gag. Although this review centers primarily on the wealth of data available for the alpharetrovirus Rous sarcoma virus, in which a discrete RNA packaging sequence has been identified, we have also summarized the cis- and trans-acting factors as well as the mechanisms governing gRNA packaging of other retroviruses for comparison. PMID:27657110

  1. The use of retroviruses as pharmaceutical tools for target discovery and validation in the field of functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Lorens, J B; Sousa, C; Bennett, M K; Molineaux, S M; Payan, D G

    2001-12-01

    Retrovirally mediated functional genomics enables identification of physiologically relevant cellular therapeutic targets. Unique properties of retroviruses make them ideal tools for the introduction of large and diverse libraries of potential genetic effectors to a variety of cell types. The identification and recovery of intracellular library elements responsible for altered disease responses establishes a direct basis for pharmaceutical development. Recent innovations in retroviral infection efficiency and expression control have broadened application of the methodology to include libraries of mutagenized cDNAs, peptides and ribozyme genetic effectors.

  2. Nicotine effects and the endogenous opioid system.

    PubMed

    Kishioka, Shiroh; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Kobayashi, Yuka; Saika, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    Nicotine (NIC) is an exogenous ligand of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), and it influences various functions in the central nervous system. Systemic administration of NIC elicits the release of endogenous opioids (endorphins, enkephalins, and dynorphins) in the supraspinal cord. Additionally, systemic NIC administration induces the release of methionine-enkephalin in the spinal dorsal horn. NIC has acute neurophysiological actions, including antinociceptive effects, and the ability to activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The endogenous opioid system participates in NIC-induced antinociception, but not HPA axis activation. Moreover, NIC-induced antinociception is mediated by α4β2 and α7 nAChRs, while NIC-induced HPA axis activation is mediated by α4β2, not α7, suggesting that the effects of NIC on the endogenous opioid system are mediated by α7, not α4β2. NIC has substantial physical dependence liability. The opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone (NLX) elicits NIC withdrawal after repeated NIC administration, and NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is inhibited by concomitant administration of an opioid-receptor antagonist. NLX-induced NIC withdrawal is also inhibited by concomitant administration of an α7 antagonist, but not an α4β2 antagonist. Taken together, these findings suggest that NIC-induced antinociception and the development of physical dependence are mediated by the endogenous opioid system, via the α7 nAChR.

  3. Essays on Policy Evaluation with Endogenous Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, experimental and quasi-experimental methods have been favored by researchers in empirical economics, as they provide unbiased causal estimates. However, when implementing a program, it is often not possible to randomly assign subjects to treatment, leading to a possible endogeneity bias. This dissertation consists of two…

  4. Molecular characterization and expression of porcine Siglec-5.

    PubMed

    Escalona, Z; Álvarez, B; Uenishi, H; Toki, D; Yuste, M; Revilla, C; Gómez del Moral, M; Alonso, F; Ezquerra, A; Domínguez, J

    2014-05-01

    In this study we describe the characterization of the porcine orthologue of Siglec-5. A cDNa clone was obtained from a porcine cDNa library derived from swine small intestine which encodes a 555 a-a type 1 transmembrane protein with sequence homology to human Siglec-5. This protein consists of four Ig-like domains, a transmembrane region, and a cytoplasmic tail with two tyrosine-based signalling motifs. When expressed as a recombinant protein fused to the Fc region of human IgG1, porcine Siglec-5 was able to bind porcine red blood cells in a sialic acid-dependent manner. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were developed against porcine Siglec-5 and used to analyse its expression in bone marrow and blood cells, and lymphoid tissues. Porcine Siglec-5 expression was mainly restricted to myelomonocytic cells and their precursors, being detected also, although at low levels, on plasmacytoid dendritic cells and B lymphocytes. In lymphoid tissues, ellipsoids of the spleen and subcapsular and medullar sinuses of lymph nodes were positive for Siglec-5. These mAbs were able to precipitate, from granulocyte lysates, a protein of approximately 85 kDa under non-reducing conditions, indicating that porcine Siglec-5 is expressed as a monomer in the plasma membrane.

  5. ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bradley K; Corder, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous activation of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains accelerator), and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR–AC1-mediated pain sensitization create a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either: a) facilitating endogenous opioid

  6. Candidate chemosensory cells in the porcine stomach.

    PubMed

    Widmayer, Patricia; Breer, Heinz; Hass, Nicole

    2011-07-01

    A continuous chemosensory monitoring of the ingested food is of vital importance for adjusting digestive processes according to diet composition. Although any dysfunction of this surveillance system may be the cause of severe gastrointestinal disorders, information about the cellular and molecular basis of chemosensation in the gastrointestinal tract is limited. The porcine alimentary canal is considered as an appropriate model for the human gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, in this study we have investigated the gastric mucosa of swine for cells which express gustatory transduction elements such as TRPM5 or PLCβ2, and thus may represent candidate "chemosensors". It was found that the porcine stomach indeed contains cells expressing gustatory marker molecules; however, the morphology and topographic distribution of putative chemosensory cells varied significantly from that in mice. Whereas in the murine stomach these cells were clustered at a distinct region near the gastric entrance, no such compact cell cluster was found in the pig stomach. These results indicate substantial differences regarding the phenotype of candidate chemosensory cells of mice and swine and underline the importance of choosing the most suitable model organisms.

  7. Justifying clinical trials for porcine islet xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Cara E; Korbutt, Gregory S

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Edmonton Protocol encouraged a great deal of optimism that a cell-based cure for type I diabetes could be achieved. However, donor organ shortages prevent islet transplantation from being a widespread solution as the supply cannot possibly equal the demand. Porcine islet xenotransplantation has the potential to address these shortages, and recent preclinical and clinical trials show promising scientific support. Consequently, it is important to consider whether the current science meets the ethical requirements for moving toward clinical trials. Despite the potential risks and the scientific unknowns that remain to be investigated, there is optimism regarding the xenotransplantation of some types of tissue, and enough evidence has been gathered to ethically justify clinical trials for the most safe and advanced area of research, porcine islet transplantation. Researchers must make a concerted effort to maintain a positive image for xenotransplantation, as a few well-publicized failed trials could irrevocably damage public perception of xenotransplantation. Because all of society carries the burden of risk, it is important that the public be involved in the decision to proceed. As new information from preclinical and clinical trials develops, policy decisions should be frequently updated. If at any point evidence shows that islet xenotransplantation is unsafe, then clinical trials will no longer be justified and they should be halted. However, as of now, the expected benefit of an unlimited supply of islets, combined with adequate informed consent, justifies clinical trials for islet xenotransplantation.

  8. Phenol esterase activity of porcine skin.

    PubMed

    Laszlo, Joseph A; Smith, Leslie J; Evans, Kervin O; Compton, David L

    2015-01-01

    The alkyl esters of plant-derived phenols may serve as slow-release sources for cutaneous delivery of antioxidants. The ability of skin esterases to hydrolyze phenolic esters was examined. Esters of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol were prepared from decanoic and lipoic acids. Ferulic acid was esterified with octadecanol, glycerol, and dioleoylglycerol. These phenolic derivatives were treated in taurodeoxycholate microemulsion and unilamellar liposomes with ex vivo porcine skin and an aqueous extract of the skin. Extracted esterases hydrolyzed the microemulsions at rates in the order: tyrosyl lipoate > tyrosyl decanoate > hydroxytyrosyl lipoate > hydroxytyrosyl decanoate. The tyrosyl decanoate was subject to comparatively little hydrolysis (10-30% after 24h) when incorporated into liposomes, while hydroxytyrosyl decanoate in liposomes was not hydrolyzed at all by the skin extract. Ferulate esters were not hydrolyzed by the extract in aqueous buffer, microemulsion, nor liposomes. Tyrosyl decanoate applied topically to skin explants in microemulsion were readily hydrolyzed within 4h, while hydrolysis was minimal when applied in liposomes. These findings indicate that porcine skin displays a general esterase activity toward medium-chain esters of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol, which can be moderated by the physiochemical properties of the lipid vehicle, but no feruloyl esterase activity.

  9. Progesterone improves porcine in vitro fertilisation system.

    PubMed

    Malo, Clara; Gil, Lydia; Cano, Rafael; Martinez, Felisa; Gonzalez, Noelia

    2014-03-01

    In an effort to improve the quality of in vitro produced porcine embryos, the effect of progestagens - progesterone analogues - on the in vitro developmental competence of porcine oocytes was studied. A total of 1421 in vitro matured oocytes, from 4 replicates, were inseminated with frozen-thawed spermatozoa. Progestagens were added to late maturation and embryo cultures (10 IU/ml). Fertilisation success (pre-maturation, penetration, monospermy and efficiency) and nuclear maturation were evaluated. There were no differences among prematuration rates between groups (P = 0.221). Penetration rates were higher (P < 0.001) in the presence of progestagens (75.0%) as compared to the control (51.7%). However, no differences were observed in monospermy percentages (P = 0.246). The results indicated that supplementation with progestagens increased the efficiency of the in vitro fertilisation system (P < 0.001). An additional beneficial effect was observed in nuclear maturation with progestagens (P = 0.035). In summary, progestagen supplementation is an important factor to improve the in vitro fertilisation procedure.

  10. Retroviral Restriction Factors and Infectious Risk in Xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Meije, Yolanda; Tönjes, Ralf R.; Fishman, Jay A.

    2010-01-01

    The clinical application of xenotransplantation poses immunologic, ethical, and microbiologic challenges. Significant progress has been made in the investigation of each of these areas. Among concerns regarding infectious risks for human xenograft recipients is the identification in swine of infectious agents including porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) that are capable of replication in some human cell lines. PERV replication has, however, been difficult to demonstrate in primate-derived cell lines and in preclinical studies of non-human primates receiving porcine xenografts. Endogenous “retroviral restriction factors” are intracellular proteins and components of the innate immune system that act at various steps in retroviral replication. Recent studies suggest that some of these factors may have applications in the management of endogenous retroviruses in xenotransplantation. The risks of PERV infection and the potential role of retroviral restriction factors in xenotransplantation are reviewed in detail. PMID:20642677

  11. Comparison of serum sensitivities of pseudotype retroviruses produced from newly established packaging cell lines of human and feline origins.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Rie; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2004-01-01

    To apply retrovirus vectors for in vivo gene therapy in cats, it is necessary to develop vector systems that are not inactivated by cat serum. In this study, the retrovirus packaging cell lines 2SC-1 and AHCeB7 were newly established from human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 and feline fibroblastic AH927 cells, respectively. Then the sensitivities of pseudotype viruses released from these cell lines to fresh sera from humans and cats were compared. Pseudotype viruses from the 2SC-1 cells were inactivated efficiently by cat serum but not by human serum. Pseudotype viruses from the AHCeB7 cells were also inactivated efficiently by human serum, however they were rather resistant to cat serum. When the xenoantigenicity of the cell lines was examined by flow cytometry, AH927 cells reacted with human serum, however, HEK293 cells did not react with cat serum. These results suggested that pseudotype viruses from 2SC-1 cells were inactivated by the fresh cat serum in an antibody-independent manner. Chelating experiments revealed that certain temperature-sensitive factor(s) other than complements might be involved in the inactivation. The usage of feline cells as packaging cells is suitable for in vivo gene therapy in cats.

  12. Cell-free extract from porcine induced pluripotent stem cells can affect porcine somatic cell nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    No, Jin-Gu; Choi, Mi-Kyung; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Yoo, Jae Gyu; Yang, Byoung-Chul; Park, Jin-Ki; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatment of somatic cells with undifferentiated cell extracts, such as embryonic stem cells and mammalian oocytes, is an attractive alternative method for reprogramming control. The properties of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are similar to those of embryonic stem cells; however, no studies have reported somatic cell nuclear reprogramming using iPSC extracts. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of porcine iPSC extracts treatment on porcine ear fibroblasts and early development of porcine cloned embryos produced from porcine ear skin fibroblasts pretreated with the porcine iPSC extracts. The Chariot(TM) reagent system was used to deliver the iPSC extracts into cultured porcine ear skin fibroblasts. The iPSC extracts-treated cells (iPSC-treated cells) were cultured for 3 days and used for analyzing histone modification and somatic cell nuclear transfer. Compared to the results for nontreated cells, the trimethylation status of histone H3 lysine residue 9 (H3K9) in the iPSC-treated cells significantly decreased. The expression of Jmjd2b, the H3K9 trimethylation-specific demethylase gene, significantly increased in the iPSC-treated cells; conversely, the expression of the proapoptotic genes, Bax and p53, significantly decreased. When the iPSC-treated cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes, no differences were observed in blastocyst development and total cell number in blastocysts compared with the results for control cells. However, H3K9 trimethylation of pronuclear-stage-cloned embryos significantly decreased in the iPSC-treated cells. Additionally, Bax and p53 gene expression in the blastocysts was significantly lower in iPSC-treated cells than in control cells. To our knowledge, this study is the first to show that an extracts of porcine iPSCs can affect histone modification and gene expression in porcine ear skin fibroblasts and cloned embryos.

  13. Genetic Characterization of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 from Pigs with Porcine Circovirus Associated Diseases in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Pereda, Ariel; Piñeyro, Pablo; Bratanich, Ana; Quiroga, María Alejandra; Bucafusco, Danilo; Craig, María Isabel; Cappuccio, Javier; Machuca, Mariana; Rimondi, Agustina; Dibárbora, Marina; Sanguinetti, Hector Ramón; Perfumo, Carlos Juan

    2011-01-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV-2) has been associated with syndromes grouped by the term porcine circovirus associated diseases (PCVAD). The PCV-2 isolates have been grouped into two major groups or genotypes according to their nucleotide sequence of whole genomes and/or ORF-2: PCV-2b, which have, in turn, been subdivided into three clusters (1A–1C), and PCV-2a, which has been subdivided into five clusters (2A–2E). In the present study, we obtained 16 sequences of PCV-2 from different farms from 2003 to 2008, from animals with confirmatory diagnosis of PCVAD. Since results showed an identity of 99.8% among them, they were grouped within a common cluster 1A-B. This preliminary study suggests a stable circulation of PCV-2b among the Argentinean pig population. PMID:23738099

  14. Activation of porcine cytomegalovirus, but not porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus, in pig-to-baboon xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Nicolas J; Livingston, Christine; Knosalla, Christoph; Barth, Rolf N; Yamamoto, Shin; Gollackner, Bernd; Dor, Frank J M F; Buhler, Leo; Sachs, David H; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Cooper, David K C; Fishman, Jay A

    2004-05-01

    Tissue-invasive disease due to porcine cytomegalovirus (PCMV) has been demonstrated after pig-to-baboon solid-organ xenotransplantation. Porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus (PLHV)-1 is associated with B cell proliferation and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in swine but has not been observed in pig-to-primate xenotransplantation. Activation of PCMV and PLHV-1 was investigated in 22 pig-to-baboon xenotransplants by use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction. PCMV was found in all xenografts; increased viral replication occurred in 68% of xenografts during immunosuppression. PLHV-1 was found in 12 xenografts (55%); no increases in viral replication occurred during immunosuppression. Control immunosuppressed swine coinfected with PCMV and PLHV-1 had activation of PCMV but not PLHV-1. PCMV, but not PLHV-1, is activated in solid-organ xenotransplantation.

  15. Porcine aminopeptidase N mediated polarized infection by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in target cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cong, Yingying; Li, Xiaoxue; Bai, Yunyun; Lv, Xiaonan; Herrler, Georg; Enjuanes, Luis; Zhou, Xingdong; Qu, Bo; Meng, Fandan; Cong, Chengcheng; Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxing

    2015-04-15

    Infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was characterized. Indirect immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed PEDV can be successfully propagated in immortalized swine small intestine epithelial cells (IECs). Infection involved porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN), a reported cellular receptor for PEDV, transient expression of pAPN and siRNA targeted pAPN increased and decreased the infectivity of PEDV in IECs, respectively. Subsequently, polarized entry into and release from both Vero E6 and IECs was analyzed. PEDV entry into polarized cells and pAPN grown on membrane inserts occurs via apical membrane. The progeny virus released into the medium was also quantified which demonstrated that PEDV is preferentially released from the apical membrane. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pAPN, the cellular receptor for PEDV, mediates polarized PEDV infection. These results imply the possibility that PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in intestinal epithelial cells. - Highlights: • PEDV infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was characterized. • Porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN) facilitated PEDV infection in IECs. • PEDV entry into and release from polarized cell via its apical membrane. • PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in IECs.

  16. Porcine circovirus type 2 detection in in vitro produced porcine blastocysts after virus sperm exposure.

    PubMed

    Galeati, Giovanna; Zannoni, Augusta; Spinaci, Marcella; Bucci, Diego; Ostanello, Fabio; Panarese, Serena; Tamanini, Carlo; Sarli, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed at assessing the capability of semen experimentally infected with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) to produce porcine blastocysts PCR positive for PCV2. Embryos were obtained from in vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) of porcine oocytes or by parthenogenesis. Sperm suspension was exposed to PCV2b and utilized for IVF. PCV2 spiked semen did not reveal any reduction in sperm viability or motility but its ability to produce infected blastocysts was irrelevant as only one out of 15 blastocysts obtained by IVF were PCV2b; however two blastocysts were PCV2a positive. Furthermore, the presence of PCV2 was demonstrated also in embryos obtained by parthenogenesis (one out of 17 was PCV2b and one PCV2a positive). Even if PCV2 firmly attaches to the surface of spermatozoa, experimentally spiked sperm were not effective in infecting oocytes during IVF and in producing PCR positive embryos. The infected blastocysts we obtained derived most probably from infected oocytes recovered at the abattoir.

  17. Functional analysis of the porcine USP18 and its role during porcine arterivirus replication.

    PubMed

    Ait-Ali, Tahar; Wilson, Alison W; Finlayson, Heather; Carré, Wilfrid; Ramaiahgari, Sreenivasa Chakravarthy; Westcott, David G; Waterfall, Martin; Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Drew, Trevor W; Bishop, Stephen C; Archibald, Alan L

    2009-06-15

    Emerging evidence places deubiquitylation at the core of a multitude of regulatory processes, ranging from cell growth to innate immune response and health, such as cancer, degenerative and infectious diseases. Little is known about deubiquitylation in pig and arterivirus infection. This report provides information on the biochemical and functional role of the porcine USP18 during innate immune response to the porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus (PRRSV). We have shown that UBP gene is the ortholog of the murine USP18 (Ubp43) gene and the human ubiquitin specific protease 18 (USP18) gene and encodes a biochemically functional de-ubiquitin enzyme which inhibits signalling pathways that lead to IFN-stimulating response element (ISRE) promotor regulation. Furthermore we have demonstrated that overexpression of the porcine USP18 leads to reduced replication and/or growth of PRRSV. Our data contrast with the conclusion of numerous reports demonstrating that USP18-deficient mice are highly resistant to viral and bacterial infections and to oncogenic transformation by BCR-ABL, and highlight USP18 as a potential target gene that promotes reduced replication of PRRSV.

  18. Biological and binding activities of ovine and porcine prolactins in porcine mammary tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The concentration of prolactin receptors may play a critical role in regulating growth and development of the mammary gland during gestation and tumor development; however, the discrepancy between specific binding of ovine prolactin (oPRL) and porcine prolactin (pPRL) in porcine mammary tissue was disturbing. It was possible that /sup 125/I-oPRL may be an unsuitable ligand for the procine prolactin receptor. The validate the use of oPRL in binding assays, the biological and binding activities of oPRL and pPRL were compared. A lactogenic bioassay of pPRL was developed using porcine mammary explants cultured in Medium 199 containing insulin, cortisol, and pPRL. The potencies of oPRL and pPRL were compared using this bioassay. Oxidation of glucose and incorporation of glucose into lipids were similarly enhanced by physiological concentrations of both oPRL and pPRL. However, specific binding of /sup 125/I-oPRL was 20%, while less than 1% of /sup 125/I-pPRL was bound. /sup 125/I-oPRL bound to high affinity sites.

  19. Porcine radial artery decellularization by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Jun; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Nam, Kwangoo; Higami, Tetsuya; Kishida, Akio

    2015-11-01

    Many types of decellularized tissues have been studied and some have been commercially used in clinics. In this study, small-diameter vascular grafts were made using HHP to decellularize porcine radial arteries. One decellularization method, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), has been used to prepare the decellularized porcine tissues. Low-temperature treatment was effective in preserving collagen and collagen structures in decellularized porcine carotid arteries. The collagen and elastin structures and mechanical properties of HHP-decellularized radial arteries were similar to those of untreated radial arteries. Xenogeneic transplantation (into rats) was performed using HHP-decellularized radial arteries and an untreated porcine radial artery. Two weeks after transplantation into rat carotid arteries, the HHP-decellularized radial arteries were patent and without thrombosis. In addition, the luminal surface of each decellularized artery was covered by recipient endothelial cells and the arterial medium was fully infiltrated with recipient cells.

  20. The Cannabinoid Acids, Analogs and Endogenous Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, Sumner H.

    2015-01-01

    The cannabinoid acids are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds some of which are endogenous molecules and others that are metabolites of phytocannabinoids. The prototypic endogenous substance is N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAgly) that is closely related in structure to the cannabinoid agonist anandamide. The most studied phytocannabinoid is Δ9–THC-11-oic acid, the principal metabolite of Δ9–THC. Both types of acids have in common several biological actions such as low affinity for CB1, anti-inflammatory activity and analgesic properties. This suggests that there may be similarities in their mechanism of action, a point that is discussed in this review. Also presented are reports on analogs of the acids that provide opportunities for the development of novel therapeutic agents, such as ajulemic acid. PMID:24731541

  1. Endogenous gas gangrene after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Zelić, M; Kunisek, L; Mendrila, D; Gudelj, M; Abram, M; Uravić, M

    2011-01-01

    Clostridial gas gangrene of the abdominal wall is rare, and it is usually associated with organ perforation, immunosuppression or gastrointestinal malignancies. In this paper we present a case of fulminant, endogenous gas gangrene in a 58-year old diabetic female with arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis, following uneventful laparoscopic cholecystectomy. She developed gas gangrene of the abdominal wall 12-hours after cholecystectomy and died 24-hours after the onset of the first symptoms, in spite of treatment.

  2. Endogenous Viral Elements in Animal Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Katzourakis, Aris; Gifford, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Integration into the nuclear genome of germ line cells can lead to vertical inheritance of retroviral genes as host alleles. For other viruses, germ line integration has only rarely been documented. Nonetheless, we identified endogenous viral elements (EVEs) derived from ten non-retroviral families by systematic in silico screening of animal genomes, including the first endogenous representatives of double-stranded RNA, reverse-transcribing DNA, and segmented RNA viruses, and the first endogenous DNA viruses in mammalian genomes. Phylogenetic and genomic analysis of EVEs across multiple host species revealed novel information about the origin and evolution of diverse virus groups. Furthermore, several of the elements identified here encode intact open reading frames or are expressed as mRNA. For one element in the primate lineage, we provide statistically robust evidence for exaptation. Our findings establish that genetic material derived from all known viral genome types and replication strategies can enter the animal germ line, greatly broadening the scope of paleovirological studies and indicating a more significant evolutionary role for gene flow from virus to animal genomes than has previously been recognized. PMID:21124940

  3. [Endogenous persistent hypoglicemia of adult: case report].

    PubMed

    Costa, Raquel R; Maia, Frederico F R; Araújo, Levimar R

    2007-02-01

    Persistent Hyperinsulinemic Endogenous hypoglycemia in adults is, in most cases, due to Insulinoma. Nesidioblastosis, a peculiar functional hyperinsulinemia from hypertrophic beta cells, has been described mainly in newborns. This article describes a 34-year-old patient who presented hyperinsulinemic endogenous hypoglycemia clinical and laboratorial situation (Fasting glycemia: 54 mg/dl / Reference Interval (RI): 60-99 mg/dl; Serum insulin: 70.9 mcU/ml / RI: < 29.1 mcU/ml; e C peptide: 7.1 ng/ml / RI: 1.1-5.0 ng/ml). It was suspected Insulinoma. Because of the lack of typical images in radiologic exams (ultrasonography and computerized tomography) it had been decided to do laparotomy, but it was not found any macroscopic pancreatic tumor. Histological and histochemistry examination of a distal pancreatic segment showed alteration suitable to nesidioblastosis. The patient presented clinical stability during the next two months, however, after that, there was a recurrence of a hypoglycemia crisis, refractory to Octreotide administration. It was done "octreoscan", which showed expanded nesidioblastosis, being done extensive partial pancreatectomy. Octreotide was used again, with a good control of the hypoglycemia crisis. As it is an uncommon diagnosis in an adult, the objective of this article is to describe the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects in cases of hyperinsulinemic endogenous hypoglicemia.

  4. Porcine skin flow-through diffusion cell system.

    PubMed

    Baynes, R E

    2001-11-01

    Porcine Skin Flow-Through Diffusion Cell System (Ronald E. Baynes, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina). Porcine skin can be used in a diffusion cell apparatus to study the rate and extent of absorption of topically applied chemicals through the skin. Although the skin of a number of animals can be used in this system, that of the pig most closely approximates human skin anatomically and physiologically.

  5. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I; Trujillo, María E; Mendoza, Susana E; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains.

  6. Tiamulin resistance in porcine Brachyspira pilosicoli isolates.

    PubMed

    Pringle, M; Landén, A; Franklin, A

    2006-02-01

    There are few studies on antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira pilosicoli, therefore this study was performed to investigate the situation among isolates from pigs. The tiamulin and tylosin susceptibility was determined by broth dilution for 93 and 86 porcine B. pilosicoli isolates, respectively. The isolates came from clinical samples taken in Swedish pig herds during the years 2002 and 2003. The tylosin minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was >16 microg/ml for 50% (n=43) of the isolates tested. A tiamulin MIC >2 microg/ml was obtained for 14% (n=13) of the isolates and these were also tested against doxycycline, salinomycin, valnemulin, lincomycin and aivlosin. For these isolates the susceptibility to salinomycin and doxycycline was high but the MICs for aivlosin varied. The relationship between the 13 tiamulin resistant isolates was analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among the 13 isolates 10 different PFGE patterns were identified.

  7. Efficient retrovirus-mediated transfer and expression of a human adenosine deaminase gene in diploid skin fibroblasts from an adenosine deaminase-deficient human

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T.D.; Hock, R.A.; Osborne, W.R.A.; Miller, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    Skin fibroblasts might be considered suitable recipients for therapeutic genes to cure several human genetic diseases; however, these cells are resistant to gene transfer by most methods. The authors studied the ability of retroviral vectors to transfer genes into normal human diploid skin fibroblasts. Retroviruses carrying genes for neomycin or hygromycin B resistance conferred drug resistance to greater than 50% of the human fibroblasts after a single exposure to virus-containing medium. This represents at least a 500-fold increase in efficiency over other methods. Transfer was achieved in the absence of helper virus by using amphotropic retrovirus-packaging cells. A retrovirus vector containing a human adenosine deaminase (ADA) cDNA was constructed and used to infect ADA/sup -/ fibroblasts from a patient with ADA deficiency. The infected cells produced 12-fold more ADA enzyme than fibroblasts from normal individuals and were able to rapidly metabolize exogenous deoxyadenosine and adenosine, metabolites that accumulate in plasma in ADA-deficient patients and are responsible for the severe combined immunodeficiency in these patients. These experiments indicate the potential of retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human fibroblasts for gene therapy.

  8. An avian, oncogenic retrovirus replicates in vivo in more than 50% of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes from an endangered grouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reoccurring infection of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), an avian oncogenic retrovirus, has been a major obstacle in attempts to breed and release an endangered grouse, the Attwater's prairie chicken (Tympanicus cupido attwateri). REV infection of these birds in breeding facilities was found to r...

  9. Persistence of porcine rubulavirus in experimentally infected boars.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Benitez, José Francisco; Martínez-Bautista, Rebeca; Pérez-Torres, Armando; García-Contreras, Adelfa Del Carmen; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Hernández, Jesús; Ramírez-Mendoza, Humberto

    2013-03-23

    Porcine rubulavirus is the etiological agent of blue eye disease in pigs. In boars, this virus causes orchitis and epididymitis and reduces seminal quality. The objective of this study was to determine the persistence of porcine rubulavirus in experimentally infected boars. Nine 12-month-old boars were infected with 5 ml of the PAC-3 strain of porcine rubulavirus at 1 × 10(5) TCID(50)/ml and held for 142 days post infection (DPI) to evaluate humoral immune response. The virus was isolated in cell cultures and detected by RT-PCR. Infection with porcine rubulavirus produced clinical signs beginning at 5 DPI. Necropsy results showed that 3 boars had lesions in the testicles and epididymes. Histological analysis showed the characteristic lesions in all infected boars. Porcine rubulavirus antibodies were detected in the second week post infection and increased significantly (P<0.05) over time. Isolation of the virus from semen was achieved between 5 DPI and 48 DPI and from the testicles and epididymes between 64 DPI and 142 DPI. Viral RNA was detected in the serum between 2 DPI and 64 DPI and in the semen until 142 DPI. These results confirm that the RNA of the porcine rubulavirus persists in the semen and that this virus remains in the reproductive tract for prolonged periods of infection. Semen of persistently infected boars, therefore, represents an important source of the virus and a risk factor for the spread of blue eye disease in swine populations.

  10. Expression of bioactive porcine interferon-alpha in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shi-jie; Li, Kun; Li, Xin-Sheng; Guo, Xiao-Qing; Fu, Peng-Fei; Yang, Ming-Fan; Chen, Hong-Ying

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we constructed an expression cassette containing the inducible lac promoter and the secretion signal from an S-layer protein of Lactobacillus brevis for the expression of porcine interferon-alpha (IFN-α) in Lactobacillus casei (Lb. casei). Reverse-transcriptase PCR verified the presence of porcine IFN-α mRNA in the recombinant Lb. casei. The porcine IFN-α protein expressed in the recombinant Lb. casei was identified by both Western blot analysis and ELISA. We used various pH values and induction times to optimize the yield of IFN-α, and found that induction with 0.8% lactose for 16 h under anaerobic conditions produced the highest concentrations of IFN-α. Furthermore, the activity of porcine IFN-α in the cultural supernatant was evaluated on ST cells infected with pseudorabies virus. The results revealed that porcine IFN-α inhibited virus replication in vitro. The findings of our study indicate that recombinant Lb. casei producing porcine IFN-α has great potential for use as a novel oral antiviral agent in animal healthcare.

  11. Biomarkers of exposure to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress.

    PubMed

    Bruce, W Robert; Lee, Owen; Liu, Zhen; Marcon, Norman; Minkin, Salomon; O'Brien, Peter J

    2011-08-01

    We observed an unexpectedly strong association of three different endogenous aldehydes and noted that the association could be explained by multiple reactions in which oxidative stress increased the formation of endogenous aldehydes and endogenous aldehydes increased oxidative stress. These interactions make it reasonable to assess multiple exposures to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress with less specific measures such as advanced glycation end-products or protein carbonyls.

  12. Electromechanical Reshaping of Ex Vivo Porcine Trachea

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Syed; Manuel, Cyrus T.; Protsenko, Dmitriy E.; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The trachea is a composite cartilaginous structure particularly prone to various forms of convexities. Electromechanical reshaping (EMR) is an emerging technique used to reshape cartilaginous tissues by applying electric current in tandem with imposed mechanical deformation to achieve shape change. In this study, EMR was used to reshape tracheal cartilage rings to demonstrate the feasibility of this technology as a potentially minimally invasive procedure to alter tracheal structure. Study Design Controlled laboratory study using ex vivo porcine tracheae. Methods The natural concavity of each porcine tracheal ring was reversed around a cork mandrel. Two pairs of electrodes were inserted along the long axis of the tracheal ring and placed 1.5 millimeters from the midline. Current was applied over a range of voltages (3 volts [V], 4V, and 5V) for either 2 or 3 minutes. The degree of EMR-induced reshaping was quantified from photographs using digital techniques. Confocal imaging with fluorescent live and dead assays was conducted to determine viability of the tissue after EMR. Results Specimens that underwent EMR for 2 or 3 minutes at 4V or 5V were observed to have undergone significant (P <.05) reshaping relative to the control. Viability results demonstrated that EMR reshaping occurs at the expense of tissue injury, although the extent of injury is modest relative to conventional techniques. Conclusion EMR reshapes tracheal cartilage rings as a function of voltage and application time. It has potential as a minimally invasive and cost-efficient endoscopic technology to treat pathologic tracheal convexities. Given our findings, consideration of EMR for use in larger ex vivo tracheal segments and animal studies is now plausible. Level of Evidence N/A. PMID:25692713

  13. Nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development.

    PubMed

    Rahman, K M; Lovich, J E; Lam, C; Camp, M E; Wiley, A A; Bartol, F F; Bagnell, C A

    2014-07-01

    The lactocrine hypothesis suggests a mechanism whereby milk-borne bioactive factors delivered to nursing offspring affect development of neonatal tissues. The objective of this study was to assess whether nursing affects testicular development in neonatal boars as reflected by: (1) Sertoli cell number and proliferation measured by GATA-4 expression and proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunostaining patterns; (2) Leydig cell development and steroidogenic activity as reflected by insulin-like factor 3 (INSL3), and P450 side chain cleavage (scc) enzyme expression; and (3) expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A, and relaxin family peptide receptor (RXFP) 1. At birth, boars were randomly assigned (n = 6-7/group) to nurse ad libitum or to be pan fed porcine milk replacer for 48 h. Testes were collected from boars at birth, before nursing and from nursed and replacer-fed boars at 50 h on postnatal day (PND) 2. Sertoli cell proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index increased (P < 0.01) from birth to PND 2 in nursed, but not in replacer-fed boars. Sertoli cell number and testicular GATA-4 protein levels increased (P < 0.01) from PND 0 to PND 2 only in nursed boars. Neither age nor nursing affected testicular INSL3, P450scc, ESR1, or VEGFA levels. However, testicular relaxin family peptide receptor 1 (RXFP1) levels increased (P < 0.01) with age and were greater in replacer-fed boars on PND 2. Results suggest that nursing supports neonatal porcine testicular development and provide additional evidence for the importance of lactocrine signaling in pigs.

  14. Glycosaminoglycans of the porcine central nervous system†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenling; Masuko, Sayaka; Solakyildirim, Kemal; Pu, Dennis; Linhardt, Robert J.; Zhang, Fuming

    2010-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are known to participate in central nervous system processes such as development, cell migration, and neurite outgrowth. In this paper, we report an initial glycomics study on GAGs from porcine central nervous system. GAGs of the porcine central nervous system, brain and spinal cord, were isolated and purified by defating, proteolysis, anion-exchange chromatography and methanol precipitation. The isolated GAG content in brain was 5-times higher than in spinal cord (0.35 mg/g, compared to 0.07 mg/g dry sample). In both tissues, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and heparan sulfate (HS) were the major and the minor GAG. The average molecular weight of CS from brain and spinal cord was 35.5 and 47.1 kDa, respectively, and HS from brain and spinal cord was 56.9 and 34 kDa, respectively. The disaccharide analysis showed that the composition of CS from brain and spinal cords are similar with uronic acid (1→3) 4-O-sulfo-N-acetylgalactosamine residue corresponding to the major disaccharide unit (CS type-A) along with five minor disaccharide units. The major disaccharides of both brain and spinal cord HS were uronic acid (1→4) N-acetylglucosamine and uronic acid (1→4) 6-O-sulfo-N-sulfoglucosamine but their composition of minor disaccharides differed. Analysis by 1H- and two-dimensional-NMR spectroscopy confirmed these disaccharide analyses and provided the glucuronic/iduronic acid ratio. Finally, both purified CS and HS were biotinylated and immobilized on BIAcore SA biochips. Interactions between these GAGs and fibroblast growth factors (FGF1 and FGF2) and sonic hedgehog (Shh) were investigated by surface plasmon resonance. PMID:20954748

  15. Endogenous Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses (Mtv): New Roles for an Old Virus in Cancer, Infection, and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Michael P.; Shevach, Ethan M.; Punkosdy, George A.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse Mammary Tumor Viruses are beta-retroviruses that exist in both exogenous (MMTV) and endogenous (Mtv) forms. Exogenous MMTV is transmitted via the milk of lactating animals and is capable of inducing mammary gland tumors later in life. MMTV has provided a number of critical models for studying both viral infection as well as human breast cancer. In addition to the horizontally transmitted MMTV, most inbred mouse strains contain permanently integrated Mtv proviruses within their genome that are remnants of MMTV infection and vertically transmitted. Historically, Mtv have been appreciated for their role in shaping the T cell repertoire during thymic development via negative selection. In addition, more recent work has demonstrated a larger role for Mtv in modulating host immune responses due to its peripheral expression. The influence of Mtv on host response has been observed during experimental murine models of Polyomavirus- and ESb-induced lymphoma as well as Leishmania major and Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection. Decreased susceptibility to bacterial pathogens and virus-induced tumors has been observed among mice lacking all Mtv. We have also demonstrated a role for Mtv Sag in the expansion of regulatory T cells following chronic viral infection. The aim of this review is to summarize the latest research in the field regarding peripheral expression of Mtv with a particular focus on their role and influence on the immune system, infectious disease outcome, and potential involvement in tumor formation. PMID:24324930

  16. Adeno-associated virus type 2-mediated transfer of ecotropic retrovirus receptor cDNA allows ecotropic retroviral transduction of established and primary human cells.

    PubMed

    Qing, K; Bachelot, T; Mukherjee, P; Wang, X S; Peng, L; Yoder, M C; Leboulch, P; Srivastava, A

    1997-07-01

    The cellular receptors that mediate binding and internalization of retroviruses have recently been identified. The concentration and accessibility of these receptors are critical determinants in accomplishing successful gene transfer with retrovirus-based vectors. Murine retroviruses containing ecotropic glycoproteins do not infect human cells since human cells do not express the receptor that binds the ecotropic glycoproteins. To enable human cells to become permissive for ecotropic retrovirus-mediated gene transfer, we have developed a recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) vector containing ecotropic retroviral receptor (ecoR) cDNA under the control of the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter (vRSVp-ecoR). Established human cell lines, such as HeLa and KB, known to be nonpermissive for murine ecotropic retroviruses, became permissive for infection by a retroviral vector containing a bacterial gene for resistance to neomycin (RV-Neo(r)), with a transduction efficiency of up to 47%, following transduction with vRSVp-ecoR, as determined by the development of colonies that were resistant to the drug G418, a neomycin analog. No G418-resistant colonies were present in cultures infected with either vRSVp-ecoR or RV-Neo(r) alone. Southern and Northern blot analyses revealed stable integration and long-term expression, respectively, of the transduced murine ecoR gene in clonal isolates of HeLa and KB cells. Similarly, ecotropic retrovirus-mediated Neo(r) transduction of primary human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells from normal bone marrow was also documented, but only following infection with vRSVp-ecoR. The retroviral transduction efficiency was approximately 7% without prestimulation and approximately 14% with prestimulation of CD34+ cells with cytokines, as determined by hematopoietic clonogenic assays. No G418-resistant progenitor cell colonies were present in cultures infected with either vRSVp-ecoR or RV-Neo(r) alone. These

  17. [Progress in endogenous plasmid curing of bacteria--a review].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Song, Cunjiang

    2013-11-04

    To investigate the functions of the bacteria endogenous plasmid, which include bacterial drug resistance, symbiosis, capsular formation and heavy metal resistance, the endogenous plasmid needs to be cured first. We reviewed physical, chemical and molecular biological methods of endogenous plasmid curing, clarified the curing principles. The prospective of research on plasmid curing was also discussed, based on our own studies.

  18. Quantification of endogenous and exogenous feline leukemia virus sequences by real-time PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Ravi; Cattori, Valentino; Willi, Barbara; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2008-05-15

    Endogenous retroviruses are integrated in the genome of most vertebrates. They represent footprints of ancient retroviral infection and are vertically transmitted from parents to their offspring. In the genome of all domestic cats, sequences closely related to exogenous FeLV known as endogenous feline leukemia virus (enFeLV), are present. enFeLV are incapable of giving rise to infectious virus particles. However, transcription and translation of enFeLV have been demonstrated in tissues of healthy cats and in feline cell lines. The presence of enFeLV-env has been shown in specific embryonic tissues and adult thymic cells. In addition, the enFeLV-env region recombines with FeLV subgroup A giving rise to an infectious FeLV-B virus. enFeLV envelope protein, FeLIX (FeLV infectivity X-essory protein) is also involved in mediating FeLV-T infection. In order to test the hypothesis that the enFeLV loads play a role in exogenous FeLV-A infection and pathogenesis, quantitative real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays were developed. An assay, specific to U3 region of all different subtypes of exogenous FeLV, was designed and applied to quantify exogenous FeLV proviral or viral load in cats, while three real-time PCR assays were designed to quantify U3 and env enFeLV loads (two within U3 amplifying different sequences; one within env). enFeLV loads were investigated in blood samples derived from Swiss privately owned domestic cats, specific pathogen-free (SPF) cats and European wildcats (Felis silvestris silvestris). Significant differences in enFeLV loads were observed between privately owned cats and SPF cats as well as among SPF cats originating from different catteries and among domestic cats of different breeds. When privately owned cats were compared, FeLV-infected cats had higher loads than uninfected cats. In addition, wildcats had higher enFeLV loads than domestic cats. In conclusion, the quantitative real-time PCR assays described herein are important prerequisites to

  19. Effects of hypoxia and glucose-removal condition on muscle contraction of the smooth muscles of porcine urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuta; Kaneda, Takeharu; Miyamoto, Yasuyuki; Nuruki, Takaomi; Kanda, Hidenori; Urakawa, Norimoto; Shimizu, Kazumasa

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the dependence of aerobic energy metabolism and utilization of glucose in contraction of urinary bladder smooth muscle, we investigated the changes in the reduced pyridine nucleotide (PNred) fluorescence, representing glycolysis activity, and determined the phosphocreatine (PCr) and ATP contents of the porcine urinary bladder during contractions induced by high K(+) or carbachol (CCh) and with and without hypoxia (achieved by bubbling N2 instead of O2) or in a glucose-free condition. Hyperosmotic addition of 65 mM KCl (H-65K(+)) and 1 µM CCh induced a phasic contraction followed by a tonic contraction. A glucose-free physiological salt solution (PSS) did not change the subsequent contractile responses to H-65K(+) and CCh. However, hypoxia significantly attenuated H-65K(+)- and CCh-induced contraction. H-65K(+) and CCh induced a sustained increase in PNred fluorescence, representing glycolysis activity. Hypoxia enhanced H-65K(+)- and CCh-induced increases in PNred fluorescence, whereas glucose-free PSS decreased these increases, significantly. In the presence of H-65K(+), hypoxia decreased the PCr and ATP contents; however, the glucose-free PSS did not change the PCr contents. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high K(+)- and CCh-induced contractions depend on aerobic metabolism and that an endogenous substrate may be utilized to maintain muscle contraction in a glucose-free PSS in the porcine urinary bladder.

  20. EpCAM Intracellular Domain Promotes Porcine Cell Reprogramming by Upregulation of Pluripotent Gene Expression via Beta-catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tong; Ma, Yangyang; Wang, Huayan

    2017-01-01

    Previous study showed that expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) was significantly upregulated in porcine induced pluripotent stem cells (piPSCs). However, the regulatory mechanism and the downstream target genes of EpCAM were not well investigated. In this study, we found that EpCAM was undetectable in fibroblasts, but highly expressed in piPSCs. Promoter of EpCAM was upregulated by zygotic activated factors LIN28, and ESRRB, but repressed by maternal factors OCT4 and SOX2. Knocking down EpCAM by shRNA significantly reduced the pluripotent gene expression. Conversely, overexpression of EpCAM significantly increased the number of alkaline phosphatase positive colonies and elevated the expression of endogenous pluripotent genes. As a key surface-to-nucleus factor, EpCAM releases its intercellular domain (EpICD) by a two-step proteolytic processing sequentially. Blocking the proteolytic processing by inhibitors TAPI-1 and DAPT could reduce the intracellular level of EpICD and lower expressions of OCT4, SOX2, LIN28, and ESRRB. We noticed that increasing intracellular EpICD only was unable to improve activity of EpCAM targeted genes, but by blocking GSK-3 signaling and stabilizing beta-catenin signaling, EpICD could then significantly stimulate the promoter activity. These results showed that EpCAM intracellular domain required beta-catenin signaling to enhance porcine cell reprogramming. PMID:28393933

  1. Envelope-binding domain in the cationic amino acid transporter determines the host range of ecotropic murine retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Albritton, L M; Kim, J W; Tseng, L; Cunningham, J M

    1993-01-01

    Infection of rodent cells by ecotropic type C retroviruses requires the expression of a cationic amino acid transporter composed of multiple membrane-spanning domains. By exchanging portions of cDNAs encoding the permissive mouse and nonpermissive human transporters and examining their abilities to specify virus infection upon expression in human 293 cells, we have identified the amino acid residues in the extracellular loop connecting the fifth and sixth membrane-spanning segments of the mouse transporter that are required for both envelope gp70 binding and infection. These findings strongly suggest that the role of the mouse transporter in determining infection is to provide an envelope-binding site. This role is analogous to those of host membrane proteins composed of a single membrane-spanning domain that serve as binding proteins or receptors for other enveloped viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and murine and human coronaviruses. PMID:8445722

  2. Cytolytic T lymphocytes specific for tumors and infected cells from mice with a retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Erbe, J G; Green, K A; Crassi, K M; Morse, H C; Green, W R

    1992-01-01

    LP-BM5 retrovirus complex-infected C57BL/6 mice develop immunodeficiency, somewhat analogous to AIDS, termed murine AIDS (MAIDS). After secondary stimulation with syngeneic B-cell lymphomas from LP-BM5-infected mice, C57BL/6 mice produced vigorous CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for MAIDS-associated tumors. An anti-LP-BM5 specificity was suggested because spleen and lymph node cells from LP-BM5-infected mice served as target cells in competition assays, and cells from LP-BM5, but not ecotropic, virus-infected mice functioned as secondary in vitro stimulators to generate cytotoxic T lymphocytes to MAIDS tumors. PMID:1560546

  3. The 14th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and related retroviruses (July 1–4, 2009; Salvador, Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Luc

    2009-01-01

    The "14th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses" was held in Salvador, Bahia, from July 1st to July 4th 2009. The aim of this biennial meeting is to promote discussion and share new findings between researchers and clinicians for the benefit of patients infected by human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV). HTLV infects approximately 15–20 million individuals worldwide and causes a broad spectrum of diseases including neurodegeneration and leukemia. The scientific program included a breadth of HTLV research topics: epidemiology, host immune response, basic mechanisms of protein function, virology, pathogenesis, clinical aspects and treatment. Exciting new findings were presented in these different fields, and the new advances have led to novel clinical trials. Here, highlights from this conference are summarized. PMID:19686596

  4. Not so bad after all: retroviruses and long terminal repeat retrotransposons as a source of new genes in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Naville, M; Warren, I A; Haftek-Terreau, Z; Chalopin, D; Brunet, F; Levin, P; Galiana, D; Volff, J-N

    2016-04-01

    Viruses and transposable elements, once considered as purely junk and selfish sequences, have repeatedly been used as a source of novel protein-coding genes during the evolution of most eukaryotic lineages, a phenomenon called 'molecular domestication'. This is exemplified perfectly in mammals and other vertebrates, where many genes derived from long terminal repeat (LTR) retroelements (retroviruses and LTR retrotransposons) have been identified through comparative genomics and functional analyses. In particular, genes derived from gag structural protein and envelope (env) genes, as well as from the integrase-coding and protease-coding sequences, have been identified in humans and other vertebrates. Retroelement-derived genes are involved in many important biological processes including placenta formation, cognitive functions in the brain and immunity against retroelements, as well as in cell proliferation, apoptosis and cancer. These observations support an important role of retroelement-derived genes in the evolution and diversification of the vertebrate lineage.

  5. Changes in lymphocyte and macrophage subsets due to morphine and ethanol treatment during a retrovirus infection causing murine AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, R.R.; Prabhala, R.H.; Darban, H.R.; Yahya, M.D.; Smith, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    The number of lymphocytes of various subsets were not significantly changed by the ethanol exposure except those showing activation markers which were reduced. The percentage of peripheral blood cells showing markers for macrophage functions and their activation were significantly reduced after binge use of ethanol. Ethanol retarded suppression of cells by retroviral infection. However by 25 weeks of infection there was a 8.6% survival in the ethanol fed mice infected with retrovirus which was much less than virally infected controls. Morphine treatment also increased the percentage of cells with markers for macrophages and activated macrophages in virally infected mice, while suppressing them in uninfected mice. The second and third morphine injection series suppressed lymphocyte T-helper and T-suppressor cells, but not total T cells. However, suppression by morphine was significantly less during retroviral disease than suppression caused by the virus only. At 25 weeks of infection 44.8% of morphine treated, infected mice survived.

  6. Endogenous CD317/Tetherin limits replication of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus in rodent cells and is resistant to antagonists from primate viruses.

    PubMed

    Goffinet, Christine; Schmidt, Sarah; Kern, Christian; Oberbremer, Lena; Keppler, Oliver T

    2010-11-01

    Human CD317 (BST-2/tetherin) is an intrinsic immunity factor that blocks the release of retroviruses, filoviruses, herpesviruses, and arenaviruses. It is unclear whether CD317 expressed endogenously in rodent cells has the capacity to interfere with the replication of the retroviral rodent pathogen murine leukemia virus (MLV) or, in the context of small-animal model development, contributes to the well-established late-phase restriction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we show that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CD317 relieved a virion release restriction and markedly enhanced the egress of HIV-1, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in rat cells, including primary macrophages. Moreover, rodent CD317 potently inhibited MLV release, and siRNA-mediated depletion of CD317 in a mouse T-cell line resulted in the accelerated spread of MLV. Several virus-encoded antagonists have recently been reported to overcome the restriction imposed by human or monkey CD317, including HIV-1 Vpu, envelope glycoproteins of HIV-2 and Ebola virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K5, and SIV Nef. In contrast, both rat and mouse CD317 showed a high degree of resistance to these viral antagonists. These data suggest that CD317 is a broadly acting and conserved mediator of innate control of retroviral infection and pathogenesis that restricts the release of retroviruses and lentiviruses in rodents. The high degree of resistance of the rodent CD317 restriction factors to antagonists from primate viruses has implications for HIV-1 small-animal model development and may guide the design of novel antiviral interventions.

  7. Independent effects of endogenous and exogenous spatial cueing: inhibition of return at endogenously attended target locations.

    PubMed

    Lupiáñez, Juan; Decaix, Caroline; Siéroff, Eric; Chokron, Sylvie; Milliken, Bruce; Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2004-12-01

    Inhibition of return (IOR) is thought to reflect a bias against returning attention to previously attended locations. According to this view, IOR should occur only if attention is withdrawn from the target location prior to target appearance. In the present study, endogenous attention and exogenous cueing were manipulated orthogonally. IOR was observed both when a target appeared at an unexpected location, and when a target appeared at the expected location. A similar pattern of results was obtained in a reanalysis of data from a study with Neglect patients. These results suggest that IOR is independent of endogenous orienting.

  8. Copper and endogenous mediators of estradiol action.

    PubMed

    Fishman, J H; Fishman, J

    1988-04-29

    Divalent copper increases by severalfold specific estradiol binding in rat uterine cytosol at 37 degrees C. Two endogenous substances have now been isolated from the cytosol one of which sharply inhibits the copper effect while the other sharply promotes it. The inhibitor is thermostable, it is adsorbed by dextran coated charcoal and elutes from Sephadex columns with water. The promoter is thermolabile at 60 degrees C, it is not readily adsorbed by the charcoal and elutes from Sephadex columns with KCl. The two substances are thought to be mediators of estradiol action.

  9. Diverging patterns with endogenous labor migration.

    PubMed

    Reichlin, P; Rustichini, A

    1998-05-05

    "The standard neoclassical model cannot explain persistent migration flows and lack of cross-country convergence when capital and labor are mobile. Here we present a model where both phenomena may take place.... Our model is based on the Arrow-Romer approach to endogenous growth theory. We single out the importance of a (however weak) scale effect from the size of the workforce.... The main conclusion of this simple model is that lack of convergence, or even divergence, among countries is possible, even with perfect capital mobility and labor mobility."

  10. NICER elements: a family of nerve growth factor-inducible cAMP-extinguishable retrovirus-like elements.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, K O; Minsk, B; Wagner, J A

    1990-01-01

    We have shown previously that the transcription of the gene designated d5 is induced by nerve growth factor (NGF) in rat adrenal pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells and that this NGF induction is repressed by cAMP. In this paper we demonstrate that d5 is a member of a gene family that contains several hundred members, which is closely related to retroviruses and retrotransposons, as demonstrated by the following observations: (i) the original d5 cDNA hybridized to numerous restriction fragments in genomic DNA; (ii) d5 cDNA hybridized to genomic clones with various intensities, and genomic clones can be isolated with a frequency suggesting that this family includes several hundred members; and (iii) there were minor sequence variations in four independently isolated cDNA clones that were homologous to d5 cDNA. Primer extension studies show that initiation of the 5.7-kilobase d5 mRNA(s) occurs at a unique site relative to a synthetic primer. The 5' end of the cDNA sequence was homologous to Rasheed rat sarcoma virus; and a genomic clone contained several elements that are typical of a long terminal repeat (LTR), including a CCAAT box, a TATA box, a primer binding site, a poly(A) addition signal, and a poly(A) addition site. Furthermore, there is a LTR at the 3' end of at least one of the genes in this family, and there appeared to be a four-base duplication at the probable site of integration into host DNA. Since several members of this family retain responses to NGF and cAMP, we conclude that the regulatory elements present in the LTR have been conserved in many members of this family. We have named this family of genes the NICER elements because they are a family of NGF-inducible cAMP-extinguishable retrovirus-like elements. Images PMID:2160077

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of dUTPase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Barabás, Orsolya; Németh, Veronika; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2006-04-01

    Deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV dUTPase) is a betaretroviral member of the dUTPase enzyme family. The nucleocapsid-free dUTPase (48426 Da) was co-crystallized with a dUTP substrate analogue using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV dUTPase) is a betaretroviral member of the dUTPase enzyme family. In the mature M-PMV virion, this enzyme is present as the C-terminal domain of the fusion protein nucleocapsid-dUTPase. The homotrimeric organization characteristic of dUTPases is retained in this bifunctional fusion protein. The fusion protein supposedly plays a role in adequate localization of dUTPase activity in the vicinity of nucleic acids during reverse transcription and integration. Here, the nucleocapsid-free dUTPase (48 426 Da) was cocrystallized with a dUTP substrate analogue using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The obtained crystals belong to the primitive hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.6, b = 60.6, c = 63.6 Å, α = 90, β = 90, γ = 120°. Native and PtCl{sub 4}-derivative data sets were collected using synchrotron radiation to 1.75 and 2.3 Å, respectively. Phasing was successfully performed by isomorphous replacement combined with anomalous scattering.

  12. Molecular structure of a gypsy element of Drosophila subobscura (gypsyDs) constituting a degenerate form of insect retroviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Alberola, T M; de Frutos, R

    1996-01-01

    We have determined the nucleotide sequence of a 7.5 kb full-size gypsy element from Drosophila subobscura strain H-271. Comparative analyses were carried out on the sequence and molecular structure of gypsy elements of D.subobscura (gypsyDs), D.melanogaster (gypsyDm) and D.virilis (gypsyDv). The three elements show a structure that maintains a common mechanism of expression. ORF1 and ORF2 show typical motifs of gag and pol genes respectively in the three gypsy elements and could encode functional proteins necessary for intracellular expansion. In the three ORF1 proteins an arginine-rich region was found which could constitute a RNA binding motif. The main differences among the gypsy elements are found in ORF3 (env-like gene); gypsyDm encodes functional env proteins, whereas gypsyDs and gypsyDv ORF3s lack some motifs essential for functionality of this protein. On the basis of these results, while gypsyDm is the first insect retrovirus described, gypsyDs and gypsyDv could constitute degenerate forms of these retroviruses. In this context, we have found some evidence that gypsyDm could have recently infected some D.subobscura strains. Comparative analyses of divergence and phylogenetic relationships of gypsy elements indicate that the gypsy elements belonging to species of different subgenera (gypsyDs and gypsyDv) are closer than gypsy elements of species belonging to the same subgenus (gypsyDs and gypsyDm). These data are congruent with horizontal transfer of gypsy elements among different Drosophila spp. PMID:8600460

  13. Endogenous IL-2 production by natural killer cells maintains cytotoxic and proliferative capacity following retroviral-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Miller, J S; Tessmer-Tuck, J; Blake, N; Lund, J; Scott, A; Blazar, B R; Orchard, P J

    1997-10-01

    Interleukin (IL)-2 therapy given at tolerable doses is insufficient to induce maximum activation of natural killer (NK) cells. We recently demonstrated that NK cells expanded in vivo can be maximally activated by short-term ex vivo incubation with 1000 U/mL IL-2. However, IL-2 withdrawal, which would occur with reinfusion, may lead to a rapid loss of cell viability and function. We hypothesized that retroviral transduction could provide an endogenous source of IL-2 to maintain NK function as measured by proliferation and cytotoxicity. Enriched NK cells were transduced with supernatants containing an MFG-based retrovirus designed to express murine IL-2 cDNA. Several supernatant transduction strategies were evaluated. NK cells were initially cultured in 1000 U/mL of huIL2 for 7-8 days, harvested, and replated prior to transduction (4 hours at 37degrees C); this proved insufficient to sustain NK proliferation or maintain cytotoxicity after exogenous human IL-2 (huIL-2) withdrawal. An alternative transduction procedure using phosphate-depleted medium, centrifugation, and transduction for 16 hours at 32degrees C was then evaluated. NK cells transduced under these conditions maintained significant NK proliferation in the absence of exogenous IL-2 compared with sham-transduced controls. Two consecutive daily transductions resulted in less proliferation, suggesting that several exposures to retroviral supernatant may inhibit subsequent NK proliferation. Cytotoxicity of the transduced NK cells against K562 and Raji was maintained under these conditions without exogenous IL-2. Sham-transduced NK cells produced 8.3+/-2.6 U/mL of murine IL-2 (muIL-2) by ELISA (background) after 7 days without exogenous IL-2. In contrast, 109+/-23 U/mL muIL-2 was produced by NK cells transduced with supernatant from the MFG/muIL-2 producer line. These experiments demonstrate that NK cells can be successfully transduced with retroviruses and induced to express sufficient IL-2 to maintain their

  14. Revisiting tolerance from the endogenous morphine perspective.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Kream, Richard M; Esch, Tobias

    2009-09-01

    Tolerance represents a dynamic mechanism that can be used to temper various regulatory processes regardless of whether they mediate excitation or inhibition. Tolerance operationally directs state-dependent attenuation of the action of endogenous and exogenous morphine. For example, tolerance ensures that immuno-inhibition induced by morphine does not compromise a requisite functional system over an extended period of time. In the nervous system, tolerance to inhibitory action insures that excitatory tone is resumed. Thus, desensitization sets in and allows various essential processes to be operational once again. Clearly, the temporal rebound of diverse immune and nervous processes involved with opiate actions provides a self-contained operational mechanism to ensure survival of the organism. Furthermore, love and/or pleasure, and satiety, are complex neurobiological phenomena linked to limbic brain reward circuitry. These processes are critically dependent on oxytocin, vasopressin, dopamine, endogenous morphine and serotoninergic signaling. Naturally rewarding and/or pleasurable activities are usually governed by beneficial biological behaviors like eating, sex, and reproduction. It is our contention that critically important tolerance mechanisms extend to behaviors mediated by CNS reward systems. In other words, we become satisfied with sex, food, pleasure for the moment and disinterest creeps in until the "urges" return.

  15. Live Imaging of Endogenous PSD-95 Using ENABLED: A Conditional Strategy to Fluorescently Label Endogenous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Dale A.; Tillo, Shane E.; Yang, Guang; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Melander, Joshua B.; Bai, Suxia; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Qin, Maozhen; Zemelman, Boris V.; Guo, Caiying

    2014-01-01

    Stoichiometric labeling of endogenous synaptic proteins for high-contrast live-cell imaging in brain tissue remains challenging. Here, we describe a conditional mouse genetic strategy termed endogenous labeling via exon duplication (ENABLED), which can be used to fluorescently label endogenous proteins with near ideal properties in all neurons, a sparse subset of neurons, or specific neuronal subtypes. We used this method to label the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 with mVenus without overexpression side effects. We demonstrated that mVenus-tagged PSD-95 is functionally equivalent to wild-type PSD-95 and that PSD-95 is present in nearly all dendritic spines in CA1 neurons. Within spines, while PSD-95 exhibited low mobility under basal conditions, its levels could be regulated by chronic changes in neuronal activity. Notably, labeled PSD-95 also allowed us to visualize and unambiguously examine otherwise-unidentifiable excitatory shaft synapses in aspiny neurons, such as parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dopaminergic neurons. Our results demonstrate that the ENABLED strategy provides a valuable new approach to study the dynamics of endogenous synaptic proteins in vivo. PMID:25505322

  16. Biological redundancy of endogenous GPCR ligands in the gut and the potential for endogenous functional selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Georgina L.; Canals, Meritxell; Poole, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    This review focuses on the existence and function of multiple endogenous agonists of the somatostatin and opioid receptors with an emphasis on their expression in the gastrointestinal tract. These agonists generally arise from the proteolytic cleavage of prepropeptides during peptide maturation or from degradation of peptides by extracellular or intracellular endopeptidases. In other examples, endogenous peptide agonists for the same G protein-coupled receptors can be products of distinct genes but contain high sequence homology. This apparent biological redundancy has recently been challenged by the realization that different ligands may engender distinct receptor conformations linked to different intracellular signaling profiles and, as such the existence of distinct ligands may underlie mechanisms to finely tune physiological responses. We propose that further characterization of signaling pathways activated by these endogenous ligands will provide invaluable insight into the mechanisms governing biased agonism. Moreover, these ligands may prove useful in the design of novel therapeutic tools to target distinct signaling pathways, thereby favoring desirable effects and limiting detrimental on-target effects. Finally we will discuss the limitations of this area of research and we will highlight the difficulties that need to be addressed when examining endogenous bias in tissues and in animals. PMID:25506328

  17. Porcine respiratory disease complex: Interaction of vaccination and porcine circovirus type 2, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Chae, Chanhee

    2016-06-01

    Porcine respiratory disease is a multifactorial and complex disease caused by a combination of infectious pathogens, environmental stressors, differences in production systems, and various management practices; hence the name porcine respiratory disease complex (PRDC) is used. Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae are considered to be the most important pathogens that cause PRDC. Although interactions among the three major respiratory pathogens are well documented, it is also necessary to understand the interaction between vaccines and the three major respiratory pathogens. PRRSV and M. hyopneumoniae are well known to potentiate PCV2-associated lesions; however, PRRSV and mycoplasmal vaccines can both enhance PCV2 viraemia regardless of the effects of the actual PRRSV or M. hyopneumoniae infection. On the other hand, M. hyopneumoniae potentiates the severity of pneumonia induced by PRRSV, and vaccination against M. hyopneumoniae alone is also able to decrease PRRSV viraemia and PRRSV-induced lung lesions in dually infected pigs. This review focuses on (1) interactions between PCV2, PRRSV, and M. hyopneumoniae; and (2) interactions between vaccines and the three major respiratory pathogens.

  18. Porcine Rotaviruses: Epidemiology, Immune Responses and Control Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova, Anastasia N.; Amimo, Joshua O.; Saif, Linda J.

    2017-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a major cause of acute viral gastroenteritis in young animals and children worldwide. Immunocompetent adults of different species become resistant to clinical disease due to post-infection immunity, immune system maturation and gut physiological changes. Of the 9 RV genogroups (A–I), RV A, B, and C (RVA, RVB, and RVC, respectively) are associated with diarrhea in piglets. Although discovered decades ago, porcine genogroup E RVs (RVE) are uncommon and their pathogenesis is not studied well. The presence of porcine RV H (RVH), a newly defined distinct genogroup, was recently confirmed in diarrheic pigs in Japan, Brazil, and the US. The complex epidemiology, pathogenicity and high genetic diversity of porcine RVAs are widely recognized and well-studied. More recent data show a significant genetic diversity based on the VP7 gene analysis of RVB and C strains in pigs. In this review, we will summarize previous and recent research to provide insights on historic and current prevalence and genetic diversity of porcine RVs in different geographic regions and production systems. We will also provide a brief overview of immune responses to porcine RVs, available control strategies and zoonotic potential of different RV genotypes. An improved understanding of the above parameters may lead to the development of more optimal strategies to manage RV diarrheal disease in swine and humans. PMID:28335454

  19. Expression of interleukin-18 by porcine airway and intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Muneta, Yoshihiro; Goji, Noriko; Tsuji, Noriko M; Mikami, Osamu; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yasuyuki; Yokomizo, Yuichi; Mori, Yasuyuki

    2002-08-01

    In this study, we investigated the expression of interleukin-18 (IL-18) in porcine airway and intestinal epithelium. We found constitutive protein expression of precursor IL-18 in primary culture of porcine airway epithelium. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that porcine IL-18 was localized in the porcine airway epithelium and that it was significantly upregulated with experimental endotoxemia induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inoculation. We also confirmed by immunohistochemical staining that IL-18 was expressed in porcine intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, the concentration of IL-18 in intestinal cell lysates of 1-day-old piglets was about 3-fold and 6-fold less than that in those of 1-month-old and 6-month-old piglets, respectively. Exogenous IL-18 was able to induce interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in the peripheral blood of 1-day-old piglets, whereas concanavalin A (ConA) was not able to induce IFN-gamma in the same condition. These results suggest that mucosal epithelial cells are among the major sources of IL-18 in pig and that IL-18 may be useful as a therapeutic agent for the enhancement of immune responses and as a vaccine adjuvant, especially in neonatal piglets.

  20. Butyrate upregulates endogenous host defense peptides to enhance disease resistance in piglets via histone deacetylase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Haitao; Guo, Bingxiu; Gan, Zhenshun; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Yi, Hongbo; Wu, Yueming; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate has been used to treat different inflammatory disease with positive outcomes, the mechanisms by which butyrate exerts its anti-inflammatory effects remain largely undefined. Here we proposed a new mechanism that butyrate manipulate endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) which contributes to the elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and thus affects the alleviation of inflammation. An experiment in piglets treated with butyrate (0.2% of diets) 2 days before E. coli O157:H7 challenge was designed to investigate porcine HDP expression, inflammation and E. coli O157:H7 load in feces. The mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced HDP gene expression and the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of macrophage 3D4/2 cells in vitro were examined. Butyrate treatment (i) alleviated the clinical symptoms of E. coli O157:H7-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the severity of intestinal inflammation; (ii) reduced the E. coli O157:H7 load in feces; (iii) significantly upregulated multiple, but not all, HDPs in vitro and in vivo via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition; and (iv) enhanced the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of 3D4/2 cells. Our findings indicate that butyrate enhances disease resistance, promotes the clearance of E. coli O157:H7, and alleviates the clinical symptoms of HUS and inflammation, partially, by affecting HDP expression via HDAC inhibition. PMID:27230284

  1. Establishment and characterisation of a porcine rubulavirus (LPMV) persistent infection in porcine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Hjertner, B; Linné, T; Moreno-López, J

    1997-01-01

    Porcine rubulavirus (LPMV) can establish persistent infections in porcine kidney cells. Cell cultures characterised at passages 25 and 65 demonstrated haemadsorption, formation of syncytia, and a slower growth rate. The nucleoprotein (NP) and haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein were present in all cells, although not to the same extent as in wild type infected cells. Incubation of the cell cultures with virus neutralising antibodies could not cure them from the infection. The cells were resistant to LPMV high multiplicity superinfection, but lysed rapidly upon infection with VSV. These cells thus fulfilled the criteria of a true persistent infection. Viral particles were released into the medium from the persistently infected cells as measured by HA and infection of PK-15 cells with medium from the persistently infected cells. The infectious titer of the virus released from the persistently infected cells was 3 logs lower compared to wild type virus, the HN titer still being comparable. Virus released from the persistently infected cells was unable to cause a lytic infection in PK-15 cells, and showed a reduced ability to spread when compared to a LPMV lytic infection.

  2. Porcine relaxin, a 500 million-year-old hormone? the tunicate Ciona intestinalis has porcine relaxin.

    PubMed

    Georges, D; Schwabe, C

    1999-07-01

    The fossil record of tunicates reaches back to the upper Cambrian period. Ascidians have mobile, tadpole-like juvenile forms with a notochord, which inspired the classification of tunicates as Urochordata, i.e., predecessors of vertebrates. The genome of the tunicate Ciona intestinalis contains a relaxin coding region that is organized like a mammalian gene, i.e., signal peptide, B-chain domain, connecting peptide domain, followed by the A-chain domain with a stop codon after cysteine A-22. RNA-derived cDNA encodes a relaxin that is identical to the circulating form of the porcine hormone. In contrast to the porcine gene, the ascidian gene has no intron in the C-peptide domain, and in that respect is similar to the bombyxin gene of the silkworm. During the spawning period, only enough relaxin could be extracted and isolated from gonads of C. intestinalis for a partial sequence analysis. Remarkable as it may be, these findings suggest that relaxin is identical in pigs, whales, and the tunicate C. intestinalis.

  3. Porcine allergy and IgE.

    PubMed

    Rupa, Prithy; Schmied, Julie; Wilkie, Bruce N

    2009-11-15

    Anaphylaxis was reported in 1963 in pigs experimentally sensitized with ovalbumin and was subsequently associated indirectly with IgE-related antibodies by functional assays to confirm heat-labile passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA), reverse passive anaphylaxis (RPA) and Prausnitz-Küstner (PK) reactions to this and other allergens. The immunoglobulin mediating immediate hypersensitivity could be cross-adsorbed with anti-human IgE. Porcine IgE epsilon chain has been cloned and sequenced. Rabbit anti-pig IgE has been described by two groups, as has cross reactivity with pig IgE of various heterologous polyclonal and monoclonal anti-IgEs. Pigs develop transient post-weaning food allergy to soy allergens which can be prevented by pre-weaning feeding of soy proteins in sufficient quantity. Natural hypersensitivity also occurs to nematodes. Recently, experimental allergy has been induced in outbred pigs to peanut and to egg allergens which manifest as respiratory, cutaneous and enteric signs similar to those of human food allergy. These models are platforms for comparative allergy research as realistic alternatives to use of inbred mice or humans for investigation of pathogenesis, prophylaxis and therapy.

  4. Genetic and antigenic changes in porcine rubulavirus

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Betancourt, José I.; Trujillo, María E.; Mendoza, Susana E.; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Alonso, Rogelio A.

    2012-01-01

    Blue eye disease, caused by a porcine rubulavirus (PoRV), is an emergent viral swine disease that has been endemic in Mexico since 1980. Atypical outbreaks were detected in 1990 and 2003. Growing and adult pigs presented neurological signs, mild neurological signs were observed in piglets, and severe reproductive problems were observed in adults. Amino acid sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein revealed genetically different lineages. We used cross-neutralization assays, with homologous and heterologous antisera, to determine the antigenic relatedness values for the PoRV isolates. We found antigenic changes among several strains and identified a highly divergent one, making up a new serogroup. It seems that genetically and antigenically different PoRV strains are circulating simultaneously in the swine population in the geographical region studied. The cross neutralization studies suggest that the HN is not the only antigenic determinant participating in the antigenic changes among the different PoRV strains. PMID:22754092

  5. Ultrafast laser machining of porcine sclera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, W. S.; Carter, R. M.; Dhillon, B.; Hand, D. P.; Shephard, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    The use of ultrafast lasers (pulsed lasers with pulse lengths of a few picoseconds or less) offers the possibility for minimally invasive removal of soft ophthalmic tissue. The potential for using pico- and femtosecond pulses for modification of scleral tissue has been reported elsewhere [1-6] and has resulted in the introduction of new, minimally invasive, procedures into clinical practice [3, 5-10]. Our research is focused on finding optimal parameters for picosecond laser machining of scleral tissue without introducing any unwanted collateral damage to the tissue. Experiments were carried out on hydrated porcine sclera in vitro, which has similar collagen organization, histology and water content (~70%) to human tissue. In this paper we present a 2D finite element ablation model which employs a one-step heating process. It is assumed that the incident laser radiation that is not reflected is absorbed in the tissue according to the Beer-Lambert law and transformed into heat energy. The experimental setup uses an industrial picosecond laser (TRUMPF TruMicro 5x50) with 5.9 ps pulses at 1030 nm, with pulse energies up to 125 μJ and a focused spot diameter of 35 μm. The use of a scan head allows flexibility in designing various scanning patterns. We show that picosecond pulses are capable of modifying scleral tissue without introducing collateral damage. This offers a possible route for minimally invasive sclerostomy. Many scanning patterns including single line ablation, square and circular cavity removal were tested.

  6. Steroid binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, S.; Nii, A.; Sakai, M.; Muramatsu, M.

    1987-05-05

    For the purpose of characterizing the estrogen binding domain of porcine estrogen receptor (ER), the authors have made use of affinity labeling of partially purified ER with (/sup 3/H)tamoxifen aziridine. The labeling is very efficient and selective particularly after partial purification of ER. A 65,000-dalton (65-kDa) band was detected on the fluorogram of a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel, together with a 50-kDa band and a few more smaller bands. The 50-kDa protein appears to be a degradation product of the 65-kDa protein in view of the similar peptide map. ER was affinity labeled before or after controlled limited proteolysis with either trypsin, papain, or ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin. The labeling patterns of limited digests indicate that a fragment of about 30 kDa is relatively resistant to proteases and has a full and specific binding activity to estrogen, whereas smaller fragments have lost much of the binding activity. This fragment is very hydrophobic and probably corresponds to the carboxy half of ER.

  7. KBSH parvovirus: comparison with porcine parvovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Molitor, T W; Joo, H S; Collett, M S

    1985-01-01

    We compared the molecular, antigenic, and pathogenic properties of KBSH parvovirus to those of porcine parvovirus (PPV) isolate NADL-8. KBSH, propagated in swine testes cells in culture, possessed two major capsid polypeptides of 83 and 64 kilodaltons that were similar in size to those of PPV. KBSH-infected cells also contained an 86-kilodalton nonstructural polypeptide that was identical in size to the PPV nonstructural polypeptide (NS-1). The KBSH polypeptides were structurally similar but not identical to the corresponding PPV polypeptides, as revealed by partial proteolysis mapping. Viral replicative-form DNA from KBSH-infected cells was similar in size to PPV replicative-form DNA and exhibited similar but not identical restriction endonuclease cleavage patterns to that of PPV replicative-form DNA. Antigenically, the two viruses were also very closely related. By using heterologous and homologous antisera, the two viruses were indistinguishable in hemagglutination inhibition and immunoprecipitation assays. However, pathogenically these viruses were dramatically different. NADL-8 caused fetal death when injected into swine fetuses in utero and viremia and high persisting antibody titers when administered orally to weaning-age swine. KBSH-inoculated fetuses were normal in appearance, and pigs orally exposed to KBSH failed to establish viremia and demonstrated only transient antibody titers. Thus, KBSH appears to be a PPV that is very closely related to a highly pathogenic PPV isolate, yet is itself nonpathogenic in swine. This reduced pathogenic potential of KBSH may be attributable to its poor ability to replicate in swine. Images PMID:2991553

  8. A Genetic Porcine Model of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schook, Lawrence B.; Collares, Tiago V.; Hu, Wenping; Liang, Ying; Rodrigues, Fernanda M.; Rund, Laurie A.; Schachtschneider, Kyle M.; Seixas, Fabiana K.; Singh, Kuldeep; Wells, Kevin D.; Walters, Eric M.; Prather, Randall S.; Counter, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The large size of the pig and its similarity in anatomy, physiology, metabolism, and genetics to humans make it an ideal platform to develop a genetically defined, large animal model of cancer. To this end, we created a transgenic “oncopig” line encoding Cre recombinase inducible porcine transgenes encoding KRASG12D and TP53R167H, which represent a commonly mutated oncogene and tumor suppressor in human cancers, respectively. Treatment of cells derived from these oncopigs with the adenovirus encoding Cre (AdCre) led to KRASG12D and TP53R167H expression, which rendered the cells transformed in culture and tumorigenic when engrafted into immunocompromised mice. Finally, injection of AdCre directly into these oncopigs led to the rapid and reproducible tumor development of mesenchymal origin. Transgenic animals receiving AdGFP (green fluorescent protein) did not have any tumor mass formation or altered histopathology. This oncopig line could thus serve as a genetically malleable model for potentially a wide spectrum of cancers, while controlling for temporal or spatial genesis, which should prove invaluable to studies previously hampered by the lack of a large animal model of cancer. PMID:26132737

  9. Nuclear protein extraction from frozen porcine myocardium.

    PubMed

    Kuster, Diederik W D; Merkus, Daphne; Jorna, Huub J J; Dekkers, Dick H W; Duncker, Dirk J; Verhoeven, Adrie J M

    2011-06-01

    Protocols for the extraction of nuclear proteins have been developed for cultured cells and fresh tissue, but sometimes only frozen tissue is available. We have optimized the homogenization procedure and subsequent fractionation protocol for the preparation of nuclear protein extracts from frozen porcine left ventricular (LV) tissue. This method gave a highly reproducible protein yield (6.5±0.7% of total protein; mean±SE, n=9) and a 6-fold enrichment of the nuclear marker protein B23. The nuclear protein extracts were essentially devoid of cytosolic, myofilament, and histone proteins. Compared to nuclear extracts from fresh LV tissue, some loss of nuclear proteins to the cytosolic fraction was observed. Using this method, we studied the distribution of tyrosine phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (PY-STAT3) in LV tissue of animals treated with the β-agonist dobutamine. Upon treatment, PY-STAT3 increased 30.2±8.5-fold in total homogenates, but only 6.9±2.1-fold (n=4, P=0.03) in nuclear protein extracts. Of all PY-STAT3 formed, only a minor fraction appeared in the nuclear fraction. This simple and reproducible protocol yielded nuclear protein extracts that were highly enriched in nuclear proteins with almost complete removal of cytosolic and myofilament proteins. This nuclear protein extraction protocol is therefore well-suited for nuclear proteome analysis of frozen heart tissue collected in biobanks.

  10. Half-life of porcine antibodies absorbed from a colostrum supplement containing porcine immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Polo, J; Campbell, J M; Crenshaw, J; Rodríguez, C; Pujol, N; Navarro, N; Pujols, J

    2012-12-01

    Absorption of immunoglobulins (Ig) at birth from colostrum is essential for piglet survival. The objective was to evaluate the half-life of antibodies absorbed in the bloodstream of newborn piglets orally fed a colostrum supplement (CS) containing energy (fat and carbohydrates) and IgG from porcine plasma. Viable piglets (n = 23; 900 to 1,800 g BW) from 6 sows were colostrum deprived and blood sampled and within the next 2 h of life randomly allocated to either control group (n = 9) providing 30 mL of Ig-free milk replacer or a group (n = 14) receiving 30 mL of CS by oral gavage. Piglets were transported to a Biosafety Level 3 facility (Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal, Spain) and fed Ig-free milk replacer every 3 to 4 h for 15 d. Survival, weight, plasma IgG content by radial immunodiffusion (RID), and antibodies against porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine parvovirus (PPV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Mhy), and swine influenza virus (SIV) were determined by specific ELISA before treatment administration, at 24 h, and weekly for 56 d. Clinical symptoms were not observed for either group. Mortality index was lower (17 vs. 38%; P < 0.02) and BW higher (17.7 vs. 15.3 kg; P = 0.035) for pigs supplemented with CS than piglets in the control group. At 24 h postadministration, the CS group had a plasma IgG mean of 7.6 ± 0.06 vs. 0.14 ± 0.03 mg/mL for the control group. The IgG levels in the CS group decayed until day 21 when de novo synthesis of IgG was detected in 25% of piglets. Half-life of antibody concentration (HLAC) by RID was 6.2 d. In the CS group, efficiency of PCV2 and PPV antibody transfer was high. For PCV2, all animals remained positive by day 56 and the calculated HLAC was 17.7 d. For PPV, 72.7% of piglets were ELISA positive by day 35 and HLAC was 12.0 d. For PRRS, all piglets remained positive by day 14 and the calculated HLAC was 11.9 d. For Mhy and SIV the calculated HLAC were 8.4 and 3.0 d

  11. Comparison of human and porcine skin for characterization of sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigmann, Hans-Jürgen; Schanzer, Sabine; Patzelt, Alexa; Bahaban, Virginie; Durat, Fabienne; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    The universal sun protection factor (USPF) characterizing sunscreen efficacy based on spectroscopically determined data, which were obtained using the tape stripping procedure. The USPF takes into account the complete ultraviolet (UV) spectral range in contrast to the classical sun protection factor (SPF). Until now, the USPF determination has been evaluated only in human skin. However, investigating new filters not yet licensed excludes in vivo investigation on human skin but requires the utilization of a suitable skin model. The penetration behavior and the protection efficacy of 10 commercial sunscreens characterized by USPF were investigated, comparing human and porcine skin. The penetration behavior found for typical UV filter substances is nearly identical for both skin types. The comparison of the USPF obtained for human and porcine skin results in a linear relation between both USPF values with a correlation factor R2=0.98. The results demonstrate the possibility for the use of porcine skin to determine the protection efficacy of sunscreens.

  12. Spatial Clustering of Porcine Cysticercosis in Mbulu District, Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Ngowi, Helena A.; Kassuku, Ayub A.; Carabin, Hélène; Mlangwa, James E. D.; Mlozi, Malongo R. S.; Mbilinyi, Boniface P.; Willingham, Arve L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Porcine cysticercosis is caused by a zoonotic tapeworm, Taenia solium, which causes serious disease syndromes in human. Effective control of the parasite requires knowledge on the burden and pattern of the infections in order to properly direct limited resources. The objective of this study was to establish the spatial distribution of porcine cysticercosis in Mbulu district, northern Tanzania, to guide control strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings This study is a secondary analysis of data collected during the baseline and follow-up periods of a randomized community trial aiming at reducing the incidence rate of porcine cysticercosis through an educational program. At baseline, 784 randomly selected pig-keeping households located in 42 villages in 14 wards were included. Lingual examination of indigenous pigs aged 2–12 (median 8) months, one randomly selected from each household, were conducted. Data from the control group of the randomized trial that included 21 of the 42 villages were used for the incidence study. A total of 295 pig-keeping households were provided with sentinel pigs (one each) and reassessed for cysticercosis incidence once or twice for 2–9 (median 4) months using lingual examination and antigen ELISA. Prevalence of porcine cysticercosis was computed in Epi Info 3.5. The prevalence and incidence of porcine cysticercosis were mapped at household level using ArcView 3.2. K functions were computed in R software to assess general clustering of porcine cysticercosis. Spatial scan statistics were computed in SatScan to identify local clusters of the infection. The overall prevalence of porcine cysticercosis was 7.3% (95% CI: 5.6, 9.4; n = 784). The K functions revealed a significant overall clustering of porcine cysticercosis incidence for all distances between 600 m and 5 km from a randomly chosen case household based on Ag-ELISA. Lingual examination revealed clustering from 650 m to 6 km and between 7.5 and 10 km. The

  13. [Recent advance on blood group antigen modification of porcine erythrocytes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie-Xi; Zhang, Yang-Pei

    2002-06-01

    Advances in the field of xenotransplantation raise the intriguing possibility of using porcine red blood cells (pRBCs) as an alternative source for blood transfusion. Serologically, pRBCs share a number of characteristics with human red blood cells (RBCs), so pRBCs are considered the most likely donor for xenotransfusion. However, xenoantigens on porcine erythrocytes play major roles in antibody-mediated RBC destruction. Although the alphaGal epitope (Galalpha1, 3Galbeta1, 4GalNAc-R) is the major xenoantigen on porcine erythrocytes and is responsible for the binding of the majority of human natural antibodies, other non-alphaGal xenoantigens have been identified. The importance of these non-alphaGal xenoantigens in binding human natural antibodies and subsequently triggering immunological responses cannot be underestimated.

  14. Endogenous GABAA receptor activity suppresses glioma growth.

    PubMed

    Blanchart, A; Fernando, R; Häring, M; Assaife-Lopes, N; Romanov, R A; Andäng, M; Harkany, T; Ernfors, P

    2017-02-09

    Although genome alterations driving glioma by fueling cell malignancy have largely been resolved, less is known of the impact of tumor environment on disease progression. Here, we demonstrate functional GABAA receptor-activated currents in human glioblastoma cells and show the existence of a continuous GABA signaling within the tumor cell mass that significantly affects tumor growth and survival expectancy in mouse models. Endogenous GABA released by tumor cells, attenuates proliferation of the glioma cells with enriched expression of stem/progenitor markers and with competence to seed growth of new tumors. Our results suggest that GABA levels rapidly increase in tumors impeding further growth. Thus, shunting chloride ions by a maintained local GABAA receptor activity within glioma cells has a significant impact on tumor development by attenuating proliferation, reducing tumor growth and prolonging survival, a mechanism that may have important impact on therapy resistance and recurrence following tumor resection.

  15. Endogenous Group Formation via Unproductive Costs

    PubMed Central

    Aimone, Jason A.; Iannaccone, Laurence R.; Makowsky, Michael D.; Rubin, Jared

    2013-01-01

    Sacrifice is widely believed to enhance cooperation in churches, communes, gangs, clans, military units, and many other groups. We find that sacrifice can also work in the lab, apart from special ideologies, identities, or interactions. Our subjects play a modified VCM game—one in which they can voluntarily join groups that provide reduced rates of return on private investment. This leads to both endogenous sorting (because free-riders tend to reject the reduced-rate option) and substitution (because reduced private productivity favours increased club involvement). Seemingly unproductive costs thus serve to screen out free-riders, attract conditional cooperators, boost club production, and increase member welfare. The sacrifice mechanism is simple and particularly useful where monitoring difficulties impede punishment, exclusion, fees, and other more standard solutions. PMID:24808623

  16. Chitin is endogenously produced in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Tang, W Joyce; Fernandez, Javier G; Sohn, Joel J; Amemiya, Chris T

    2015-03-30

    Chitin, a biopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is abundant in invertebrates and fungi and is an important structural molecule [1, 2]. There has been a longstanding belief that vertebrates do not produce chitin; however, we have obtained compelling evidence to the contrary. Chitin synthase genes are present in numerous fishes and amphibians, and chitin is localized in situ to the lumen of the developing zebrafish gut, in epithelial cells of fish scales, and in at least three different cell types in larval salamander appendages. Chitin synthase gene knockdowns and various histochemical experiments in zebrafish further authenticated our results. Finally, a polysaccharide was extracted from scales of salmon that exhibited all the chemical hallmarks of chitin. Our data and analyses demonstrate the existence of endogenous chitin in vertebrates and suggest that it serves multiple roles in vertebrate biology.

  17. Chitin is endogenously produced in vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Joel J.; Amemiya, Chris T.

    2015-01-01

    Chitin, a biopolymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is abundant in invertebrates and fungi, and is an important structural molecule. There has been a longstanding belief that vertebrates do not produce chitin, however, we have obtained compelling evidence to the contrary. Chitin synthase genes are present in numerous fishes and amphibians, and chitin is localized in situ to the lumen of the developing zebrafish gut, in epithelial cells of fish scales, and in at least three different cell types in larval salamander appendages. Chitin synthase gene knockdowns and various histochemical experiments in zebrafish further authenticated our results. Finally, a polysaccharide was extracted from scales of salmon that exhibited all the chemical hallmarks of chitin. Our data and analyses demonstrate the existence of endogenous chitin in vertebrates and suggest that it serves multiple roles in vertebrate biology. PMID:25772447

  18. Temperature profiles of different cooling methods in porcine pancreas procurement.

    PubMed

    Weegman, Bradley P; Suszynski, Thomas M; Scott, William E; Ferrer Fábrega, Joana; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S; Anazawa, Takayuki; O'Brien, Timothy D; Rizzari, Michael D; Karatzas, Theodore; Jie, Tun; Sutherland, David E R; Hering, Bernhard J; Papas, Klearchos K

    2014-01-01

    Porcine islet xenotransplantation is a promising alternative to human islet allotransplantation. Porcine pancreas cooling needs to be optimized to reduce the warm ischemia time (WIT) following donation after cardiac death, which is associated with poorer islet isolation outcomes. This study examines the effect of four different cooling Methods on core porcine pancreas temperature (n = 24) and histopathology (n = 16). All Methods involved surface cooling with crushed ice and chilled irrigation. Method A, which is the standard for porcine pancreas procurement, used only surface cooling. Method B involved an intravascular flush with cold solution through the pancreas arterial system. Method C involved an intraductal infusion with cold solution through the major pancreatic duct, and Method D combined all three cooling Methods. Surface cooling alone (Method A) gradually decreased core pancreas temperature to <10 °C after 30 min. Using an intravascular flush (Method B) improved cooling during the entire duration of procurement, but incorporating an intraductal infusion (Method C) rapidly reduced core temperature 15-20 °C within the first 2 min of cooling. Combining all methods (Method D) was the most effective at rapidly reducing temperature and providing sustained cooling throughout the duration of procurement, although the recorded WIT was not different between Methods (P = 0.36). Histological scores were different between the cooling Methods (P = 0.02) and the worst with Method A. There were differences in histological scores between Methods A and C (P = 0.02) and Methods A and D (P = 0.02), but not between Methods C and D (P = 0.95), which may highlight the importance of early cooling using an intraductal infusion. In conclusion, surface cooling alone cannot rapidly cool large (porcine or human) pancreata. Additional cooling with an intravascular flush and intraductal infusion results in improved core porcine pancreas temperature profiles during procurement and

  19. Dynamic option pricing with endogenous stochastic arbitrage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Mauricio; Montalva, Rodrigo; Pellicer, Rely; Villena, Marcelo

    2010-09-01

    Only few efforts have been made in order to relax one of the key assumptions of the Black-Scholes model: the no-arbitrage assumption. This is despite the fact that arbitrage processes usually exist in the real world, even though they tend to be short-lived. The purpose of this paper is to develop an option pricing model with endogenous stochastic arbitrage, capable of modelling in a general fashion any future and underlying asset that deviate itself from its market equilibrium. Thus, this investigation calibrates empirically the arbitrage on the futures on the S&P 500 index using transaction data from September 1997 to June 2009, from here a specific type of arbitrage called “arbitrage bubble”, based on a t-step function, is identified and hence used in our model. The theoretical results obtained for Binary and European call options, for this kind of arbitrage, show that an investment strategy that takes advantage of the identified arbitrage possibility can be defined, whenever it is possible to anticipate in relative terms the amplitude and timespan of the process. Finally, the new trajectory of the stock price is analytically estimated for a specific case of arbitrage and some numerical illustrations are developed. We find that the consequences of a finite and small endogenous arbitrage not only change the trajectory of the asset price during the period when it started, but also after the arbitrage bubble has already gone. In this context, our model will allow us to calibrate the B-S model to that new trajectory even when the arbitrage already started.

  20. Specific detection of RT activity in culture supernantants of retrovirus-producing cells, using synthetic DNA as competitor in polymerase enhanced reverse transcriptase assay.

    PubMed

    Voisset, C; Tönjes, R R; Breyton, P; Mandrand, B; Paranhos-Baccalà, G

    2001-05-01

    The polymerase enhanced reverse transcriptase (PERT) assay is a highly sensitive assay for the detection of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity in culture supernatants of retrovirus-producing cells. However, some cellular DNA-dependent DNA polymerases exhibit RT-like activities in this assay. A synthetic DNA competitor which suppresses the RT-like activities of cellular DNA-dependent DNA polymerases was used in a modified PERT assay technique for specific detection of RT activity in culture supernatants of retrovirus-producing cells. We determined the optimum condition of the assay and evaluated its specificity. This improved PERT assay is easy to perform and is able to detect minute amounts of purified RT, as well as RT in crude cell lysates and concentrated culture supernatants.

  1. Tritiated porcine dynorphin (1-17): synthesis and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Houghten, R.A.

    1982-10-18

    Tritiated porcine dynorphin (1-17) has been prepared from its corresponding iodinated analog. The iodinated analog (diiodotyrosine at position 1) was synthesized, along with its non-iodinated counterpart, by the solid-phase method. Catalytic exchange of this iodinated analog in the presence of tritium yielded tritiated porcine dynorphin having a specific activity of 42 Ci/mmole. Both the native, iodinated and tritiated dynorphin analogs were shown to be homogenous by chromatography on carboxymethylcellulose, paper chromatography, amino acid analysis, electrophoresis, high performance liquid chromatography and isoelectric focusing on polyacrylamide.

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in murine retrovirus-induced AIDS inhibit T- and B-cell responses in vitro that are used to define the immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Green, Kathy A; Cook, W James; Green, William R

    2013-02-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been characterized in several disease settings, especially in many tumor systems. Compared to their involvement in tumor microenvironments, however, MDSCs have been less well studied in their responses to infectious disease processes, in particular to retroviruses that induce immunodeficiency. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the development of a highly immunosuppressive MDSC population that is dependent on infection by the LP-BM5 retrovirus, which causes murine acquired immunodeficiency. These MDSCs express a cell surface marker signature (CD11b(+) Gr-1(+) Ly6C(+)) characteristic of monocyte-type MDSCs. Such MDSCs profoundly inhibit immune responsiveness by a cell dose- and substantially inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-dependent mechanism that is independent of arginase activity, PD-1-PD-L1 expression, and interleukin 10 (IL-10) production. These MDSCs display levels of immunosuppressive function in parallel with the extent of disease in LP-BM5-infected wild-type (w.t.) versus knockout mouse strains that are differentially susceptible to pathogenesis. These MDSCs suppressed not only T-cell but also B-cell responses, which are an understudied target for MDSC inhibition. The MDSC immunosuppression of B-cell responses was confirmed by the use of purified B responder cells, multiple B-cell stimuli, and independent assays measuring B-cell expansion. Retroviral load measurements indicated that the suppressive Ly6G(low/±) Ly6C(+) CD11b(+)-enriched MDSC subset was positive for LP-BM5, albeit at a significantly lower level than that of nonfractionated splenocytes from LP-BM5-infected mice. These results, including the strong direct MDSC inhibition of B-cell responsiveness, are novel for murine retrovirus-induced immunosuppression and, as this broadly suppressive function mirrors that of the LP-BM5-induced disease syndrome, support a possible pathogenic effector role for these retrovirus-induced MDSCs.

  3. Implications of the evolution pattern of human T-cell leukemia retroviruses on their pathogenic virulence (Review).

    PubMed

    Azran, Inbal; Schavinsky-Khrapunsky, Yana; Priel, Esther; Huleihel, Mahmoud; Aboud, Mordechai

    2004-11-01

    Simian retroviruses pose a serious threat to public health, as two human pathogenic retroviruses, HIV and HTLV, have been already proved to originate from such non-human viruses. Therefore, studying their natural prevalence among wild non-human primates is important for planning strategies to prevent the emergence of additional human retroviral pathogens. This article is focused on tracing the origin and evolution of the human T-cell leukemia viruses HTLV-I and HTLV-II in comparison to that of the simian lymphotropic viruses STLV-I, STLV-II and STLV-L, which are phylo-genically classified into a common group called primate T-lymphotropic viruses (PTLV). Thus, HTLV-I and STLV-I are referred to as PTLV-I and HTLV-II and STLV-II as PTLV-II, whereas STLV-L, which is highly divergent from both HTLV types, comprises a third subgroup called PTLV-L. The phylogeny of PTLV indicates that both, HTLV-I and HTLV-II emerged from a simian origin, but their subsequent evolution continued in different patterns. HTLV-I includes 6 subtypes which evolved from STLV-I through several times of different geographic interspecies transmission between simian and human hosts. These repeated invasions to new primate species are likely to give rise to viral strains with increasing pathogenic potential. On the other hand, HTLV-II includes 4 subtypes which appear to originate from a common human ancestor virus that emerged from only one simian to human transmission, whereas the subsequent evolution of HTLV-II and STLV-II strains continued separately only within the Homo sapiens and Pan paniscus species respectively, without repeated interspecies jumps. Such evolution pattern likely involves less genetic changes and selection of viral strains with low pathogenic virulence that could co-exist with their hosts for long time. These different evolution patterns can explain the much wider implication of HTLV-I with human clinical disorders than HTLV-II. Of note, however, more recently HTLV-II started

  4. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus among Farmed Pigs, Ukraine

    PubMed Central

    Carr, John; Ellis, Richard J.; Steinbach, Falko; Williamson, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of porcine epidemic diarrhea occurred in the summer of 2014 in Ukraine, severely affecting piglets <10 days of age; the mortality rate approached 100%. Full genome sequencing showed the virus to be closely related to strains reported from North America, showing a sequence identity of up to 99.8%. PMID:26584081

  5. Shotgun proteomic analysis of porcine colostrum and mature milk.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shohei; Tsukahara, Takamitsu; Nishibayashi, Ryoichiro; Nakatani, Masako; Okutani, Mie; Nakanishi, Nobuo; Ushida, Kazunari; Inoue, Ryo

    2014-04-01

    The epitheliochorial nature of the porcine placenta prevents the transfer of maternal immunity. Therefore, ingestion of the colostrum immediately after birth is crucial for neonatal piglets to acquire passive immunity from the sow. We performed a shotgun proteomic analysis of porcine milk to reveal in detail the protein composition of porcine milk. On the basis of the Swiss-Prot database, 113 and 118 proteins were identified in the porcine colostrum and mature milk, respectively, and 50 of these proteins were common to both samples. Some immune-related proteins, including interleukin-18 (IL-18), were unique to the colostrum. The IL-18 concentration in the colostrum and mature milk of four sows was measured to validate the proteomic analysis, and IL-18 was only detected in the colostrum (191.0 ± 53.9 pg/mL) and not in mature milk. In addition, some proteins involved in primary defense, such as azurocidin, which has never been detected in any other mammal's milk, were also identified in the colostrum.

  6. Dystrophin deficiency-induced changes in porcine skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel porcine stress syndrome was detected in the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center’s swine research population when two sibling barrows died of apparent stress symptoms (open mouth breathing, vocalization, and refusal to move or stand) after transport at 12 weeks of age. At eight weeks of age, the...

  7. Adenosine modulates LPS-induced cytokine production in porcine monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ondrackova, Petra; Kovaru, Hana; Kovaru, Frantisek; Leva, Lenka; Faldyna, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Adenosine plays an important role during inflammation, particularly through modulation of monocyte function. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of synthetic adenosine analogs on cytokine production by porcine monocytes. The LPS-stimulated cytokine production was measured by flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR. Adenosine receptor expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. The present study demonstrates that adenosine analog N-ethylcarboxyamidoadenosine (NECA) down-regulates TNF-α production and up-regulates IL-8 production by LPS-stimulated porcine monocytes. The effect was more pronounced in CD163(-) subset of monocytes compared to the CD163(+) subset. Although both monocyte subsets express mRNA for A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors, the treatment of monocytes with various adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists proved that the effect of adenosine is mediated preferentially via A2A adenosine receptor. Moreover, the study suggests that the effect of NECA on porcine monocytes alters the levels of the cytokines which could play a role in the differentiation of naive T cells into Th17 cells. The results suggest that adenosine plays an important role in modulation of cytokine production by porcine monocytes.

  8. Age and nursing affect the neonatal porcine uterine transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lactocrine hypothesis for maternal programming of neonatal development was proposed to describe a mechanism through which milk-borne bioactive factors, delivered from mother to nursing offspring, could affect development of tissues, including the uterus. Porcine uterine development, initiated be...

  9. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS): an immune dysregulatory pandemic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory disease syndrome (PRRS) is a viral pandemic that especially affects neonates within the "critical window" of immunological development. PRRS was recognized in 1987 and within a few years became pandemic causing an estimated yearly $600,000 economic loss in the US...

  10. Cryopreservation of primarily isolated porcine hepatocytes with UW solution.

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Takemi; Maruyama, Masanobu; Okitsu, Teru; Shibata, Norikuni; Takesue, Michihiko; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Kosaka, Yoshikazu; Arata, Takashi; Kobayashi, Kazuya; Ikeda, Hideaki; Oshita, Mizuko; Nakaji, Shuhei; Ohmoto, Kenji; Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Kurabayashi, Yuzuru; Kodama, Makoto; Tanaka, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Naoya

    2003-01-01

    Development of liver-targeted cell therapies, such as hepatocyte transplantation and bioartificial livers, requires a large amount of functional hepatocytes as needed. To achieve this development, establishing an excellent cryopreservation method of hepatocytes is an extremely important issue. Therefore, we performed a comparative review of cryoprotective effects of various cryopreservation solutions using primarily isolated porcine hepatocytes. Porcine hepatocytes were isolated with a four-step dispase and collagenase perfusion method. The obtained hepatocytes with the initial viabilities of 76%, 84%, and 96% were assigned to the following four groups for cryopreservation at -80 degrees C: Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) + 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) + 12% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (group A), University of Wisconsin (UW) solution + 12% DMSO (group B), Cell Banker 1 (group C), and Cell Banker 2 (group D). The hepatocytes in each group were thawed at 3 days, 10 days, and 5 months of cryopreservation and subjected to comparative analyses, including viability, plating efficiency, LDH release, ammonia removal test, and lentiviral gene transfer. These parameters were the most favorable in the hepatocytes cryopreserved with UW solution. Approximately 5% of thawed cryopreserved porcine hepatocytes expressed LacZ activity after lentiviral transduction. Intrasplenic transplantation of UW solution-cryopreserved hepatocytes improved the survival of rats treated with D-galactosamine. UW solution maintained the functions of cryopreserved porcine hepatocytes.

  11. Osteogenic and adipogenic potential of porcine adipose mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chang-qing; Zhang, Guo-hua; Zhang, Li-jie; Yang, Gong-she

    2007-02-01

    Human, rat, and mouse studies have demonstrated the existence of a population of adipose mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs) that can undergo multilineage differentiation in vitro. Understanding the clinical potential of AMSCs may require their use in preclinical large-animal models such as pigs. Thus, the objectives of this study were to establish a protocol for the isolation of porcine AMSCs from adipose tissue and to examine their ex vivo differentiation potential to adipocytes and osteoblast. The porcine AMSCs from passage 4 were selected for differentiation analysis. The adipocytes were identified morphologically by staining with Oil Red O, and the adipogenic marker genes were examined by RT-PCR technique. Osteogenic lineage was documented by deposition of calcium stained with Alzarin Red S, visualization of alkaline phosphatase activity, and expression of marker gene. Our result indicates that porcine AMSCs have been successfully isolated and induced differentiation into adipocytes and osteoblasts. This study suggested that porcine AMSCs are also a valuable model system for the study on the mesenchymal lineages for basic research and tissue engineering.

  12. Introduction to porcine red blood cells: implications for xenotransfusion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, A

    2000-04-01

    Advances in the field of xenotransplantation raise the intriguing possibility of using porcine red blood cells (pRBCs) as an alternative source for blood transfusion. The domestic pig is considered the most likely donor species for xenotransplantation. However, identification of xenoantigens on porcine erythrocytes and elucidation of their possible roles in antibody-mediated RBC destruction are necessary for developing clinical strategies to circumvent immunological incompatibility between humans and pigs. Although the alphaGal epitope (Galalpha1,3Galbeta1,4GIcNAc-R) is the major xenoantigen on porcine erythrocytes and is responsible for the binding of the majority of human natural antibodies, other non-alphaGal xenoantigens have been identified. The importance of these non-alphaGal xenoantigens in binding human natural antibodies and subsequently triggering immunological responses cannot be underestimated. Our data suggest that non-alphaGal xenoantigen(s) identified on the porcine erythrocyte membrane are not only recognized by xenoreactive human natural antibodies but are also involved in complement-mediated hemolysis.

  13. Blood gas and hematological changes in experimental peracute porcine pleuropneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Kiorpes, A L; MacWilliams, P S; Schenkman, D I; Bäckström, L R

    1990-01-01

    The effect of experimental, peracute, porcine pleuropneumonia on arterial blood gases, acid base status, the leukogram, and gross and microscopic lung structure was studied in nine growing pigs (mean weight +/- SD 10.6 +/- 2.0 kg). Pigs were inoculated intranasally with a virulent serotype 5 isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, and all showed signs typical of the disease within four hours. Death occurred in all pigs from 4.5 to 32 hours postinoculation (mean 14 hours). Gross and microscopic changes were typical of porcine pleuropneumonia in all pigs. Changes in the leukogram included a rapid decline in total white cells, segmented neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and eosinophils. Pigs maintained alveolar ventilation throughout the study as arterial CO2 tension was unchanged; however, arterial O2 tension and pH decreased from (mean +/- SD) 95.2 +/- 5.7 torr and 7.463 +/- 0.018 at baseline to 62.1 +/- 12.3 torr and 7.388 +/- 0.045, respectively, within 90 minutes prior to death. The data showed that in this model of peracute porcine pleuropneumonia, progressive ventilatory failure was not a feature of the disease, and the blood gas values and acid base status were maintained within physiological ranges. The histopathological hematological and physiological findings were consistent with the hypothesis that peracute porcine pleuropneumonia resembles septic shock. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2106382

  14. Porcine circovirus: transcription and rolling-circle DNA replication

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review summarizes the molecular studies pertaining to porcine circovirus (PCV) transcription and DNA replication. The genome of PCV is circular, single-stranded DNA and contains 1759-1768 nucleotides. Both the genome-strand (packaged in the virus particle) and the complementary-strand (synthesi...

  15. Detection of a Novel Porcine Parvovirus in Chinese Swine Herds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine whether the recently reported novel porcine parvovirus type 4 (PPV4) is prevalent in China, a set of PPV4 specific primers were designed and used for the molecular survey of PPV4 among clinical samples. The results indicated a positive detection for PPV4 in Chinese swine herds of 1.84% ...

  16. Purification and N-terminal amino acid sequence comparisons of structural proteins from retrovirus-D/Washington and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, L E; Sowder, R; Smythers, G; Benveniste, R E; Oroszlan, S

    1985-01-01

    A new D-type retrovirus originally designated SAIDS-D/Washington and here referred to as retrovirus-D/Washington (R-D/W) was recently isolated at the University of Washington Primate Center, Seattle, Wash., from a rhesus monkey with an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and retroperitoneal fibromatosis. To better establish the relationship of this new D-type virus to the prototype D-type virus, Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV), we have purified and compared six structural proteins from each virus. The proteins purified from each D-type retrovirus include p4, p10, p12, p14, p27, and a phosphoprotein designated pp18 for MPMV and pp20 for R-D/W. Amino acid analysis and N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis show that the p4, p12, p14, and p27 proteins of R-D/W are distinct from the homologous proteins of MPMV but that these proteins from the two different viruses share a high degree of amino acid sequence homology. The p10 proteins from the two viruses have similar amino acid compositions, and both are blocked to N-terminal Edman degradation. The phosphoproteins from the two viruses each contain phosphoserine but are different from each other in amino acid composition, molecular weight, and N-terminal amino acid sequence. The data thus show that each of the R-D/W proteins examined is distinguishable from its MPMV homolog and that a major difference between these two D-type retroviruses is found in the viral phosphoproteins. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of D-type retroviral proteins were used to search for sequence homologies between D-type and other retroviral amino acid sequences. An unexpected amino acid sequence homology was found between R-D/W pp20 (a gag protein) and a 28-residue segment of the env precursor polyprotein of Rous sarcoma virus. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the D-type major gag protein (p27) and the nucleic acid-binding protein (p14) show only limited amino acid sequence homology to functionally homologous proteins of C

  17. A case of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae causing bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Elvy, J; Hanspal, I; Simcock, P

    2008-11-01

    This report describes a case of bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, an occupational zoonotic pathogen, which was successfully treated with intravenous penicillin G followed by oral linezolid. This is believed to be the first report of E rhusiopathiae causing endogenous endophthalmitis.

  18. Endogenous opioid peptides in regulation of innate immunity cell functions.

    PubMed

    Gein, S V; Baeva, T A

    2011-03-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides comprise a group of bioregulatory factors involved in regulation of functional activity of various physiological systems of an organism. One of most important functions of endogenous opioids is their involvement in the interaction between cells of the nervous and immune systems. Summary data on the effects of opioid peptides on regulation of functions of innate immunity cells are presented.

  19. Lunularic acid, a common endogenous growth inhibitor of liverworts.

    PubMed

    Pryce, R J

    1971-12-01

    By gas-liquid chromotography and thin layer chromatography, an endogenous growth inhibitor of Lunularia cruciata has been detected in seven other representatives of the class of liverworts. All liverworts so far examined have been found to contain lunularic acid. Evidence for the identity of the previously isolated, but unidentified, endogenous growth inhibitor of Marchantia polymorpha and lunularic acid is presented.

  20. Effects of Fibrinogen Concentrate on Thrombin Generation, Thromboelastometry Parameters, and Laboratory Coagulation Testing in a 24-Hour Porcine Trauma Model

    PubMed Central

    Zentai, Christian; Solomon, Cristina; van der Meijden, Paola E. J.; Spronk, Henri M. H.; Schnabel, Jonas; Rossaint, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In a 24-hour porcine model of liver injury, we showed that fibrinogen supplementation does not downregulate endogenous fibrinogen synthesis. Here we report data from the same study showing the impact of fibrinogen on coagulation variables. Materials and Methods: Coagulopathy was induced in 20 German land race pigs by hemodilution and blunt liver injury. Animals randomly received fibrinogen concentrate (100 mg/kg) or saline. Coagulation parameters were assessed and thromboelastometry (ROTEM) was performed. Results: Fibrinogen concentrate significantly reduced the prolongations of EXTEM clotting time, EXTEM clot formation time, and prothrombin time induced by hemodilution and liver injury. A decrease in clot strength was also ameliorated. Endogenous thrombin potential was significantly higher in the fibrinogen group than in the control group, 20 minutes (353 ± 24 vs 289 ± 22 nmol/L·min; P < .05) and 100 minutes (315 ± 40 vs 263 ± 38 nmol/L·min; P < .05) after the start of infusion. However, no significant between-group differences were seen in other thrombin generation parameters or in d-dimer or thrombin–antithrombin levels. Fibrinogen–platelet binding was reduced following liver injury, with no significant differences between groups. No significant between-group differences were observed in any parameter at ∼12 and ∼24 hours. Conclusion: This study suggests that, in trauma, fibrinogen supplementation may shorten some measurements of the speed of coagulation initiation and produce a short-lived increase in endogenous thrombin potential, potentially through increased clotting substrate availability. Approximately 12 and 24 hours after starting fibrinogen concentrate/saline infusion, all parameters measured in this study were comparable in the 2 study groups. PMID:25948634

  1. Structural and functional annotation of the porcine immunome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The domestic pig is known as an excellent model for human immunology and the two species share many pathogens. Susceptibility to infectious disease is one of the major constraints on swine performance, yet the structure and function of genes comprising the pig immunome are not well-characterized. The completion of the pig genome provides the opportunity to annotate the pig immunome, and compare and contrast pig and human immune systems. Results The Immune Response Annotation Group (IRAG) used computational curation and manual annotation of the swine genome assembly 10.2 (Sscrofa10.2) to refine the currently available automated annotation of 1,369 immunity-related genes through sequence-based comparison to genes in other species. Within these genes, we annotated 3,472 transcripts. Annotation provided evidence for gene expansions in several immune response families, and identified artiodactyl-specific expansions in the cathelicidin and type 1 Interferon families. We found gene duplications for 18 genes, including 13 immune response genes and five non-immune response genes discovered in the annotation process. Manual annotation provided evidence for many new alternative splice variants and 8 gene duplications. Over 1,100 transcripts without porcine sequence evidence were detected using cross-species annotation. We used a functional approach to discover and accurately annotate porcine immune response genes. A co-expression clustering analysis of transcriptomic data from selected experimental infections or immune stimulations of blood, macrophages or lymph nodes identified a large cluster of genes that exhibited a correlated positive response upon infection across multiple pathogens or immune stimuli. Interestingly, this gene cluster (cluster 4) is enriched for known general human immune response genes, yet contains many un-annotated porcine genes. A phylogenetic analysis of the encoded proteins of cluster 4 genes showed that 15% exhibited an accelerated

  2. Absolute Quantification of Endogenous Ras Isoform Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mageean, Craig J.; Griffiths, John R.; Smith, Duncan L.; Clague, Michael J.; Prior, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are important signalling hubs situated near the top of networks controlling cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Three almost identical isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are ubiquitously expressed yet have differing biological and oncogenic properties. In order to help understand the relative biological contributions of each isoform we have optimised a quantitative proteomics method for accurately measuring Ras isoform protein copy number per cell. The use of isotopic protein standards together with selected reaction monitoring for diagnostic peptides is sensitive, robust and suitable for application to sub-milligram quantities of lysates. We find that in a panel of isogenic SW48 colorectal cancer cells, endogenous Ras proteins are highly abundant with ≥260,000 total Ras protein copies per cell and the rank order of isoform abundance is KRAS>NRAS≥HRAS. A subset of oncogenic KRAS mutants exhibit increased total cellular Ras abundance and altered the ratio of mutant versus wild type KRAS protein. These data and methodology are significant because Ras protein copy number is required to parameterise models of signalling networks and informs interpretation of isoform-specific Ras functional data. PMID:26560143

  3. Stem Cell Stimulation of Endogenous Myocyte Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Brian R.; Canty, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapy has emerged as a promising approach to combat the myocyte loss and cardiac remodeling that characterize the progression of left ventricular dysfunction to heart failure. Several clinical trials conducted during the past decade have shown that a variety of autologous bone marrow- and peripheral blood-derived stem and progenitor cell populations can be safely administered to patients with ischemic heart disease and yield modest improvements in cardiac function. Concurrently, rapid progress has been made at the preclinical level to identify novel therapeutic cell populations, delineate the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated cardiac repair, and optimize cell-based approaches for clinical use. The following review summarizes the progress that has been made in this rapidly evolving field over the past decade and examines how our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in successful cardiac regeneration should direct future investigation in this area. Particular emphasis is placed on discussion of the general hypothesis that the benefits of cell therapy primarily result from stimulation of endogenous cardiac repair processes that have only recently been identified in the adult mammalian heart, rather than direct differentiation of exogenous cells. Continued scientific investigation in this area will guide the optimization of cell-based approaches for myocardial regeneration, with the ultimate goal of clinical implementation and substantial improvement in our ability to restore cardiac function in ischemic heart disease patients. PMID:23577634

  4. Stem cell stimulation of endogenous myocyte regeneration.

    PubMed

    Weil, Brian R; Canty, John M

    2013-08-01

    Cell-based therapy has emerged as a promising approach to combat the myocyte loss and cardiac remodelling that characterize the progression of left ventricular dysfunction to heart failure. Several clinical trials conducted over the past decade have shown that a variety of autologous bone-marrow- and peripheral-blood-derived stem and progenitor cell populations can be safely administered to patients with ischaemic heart disease and yield modest improvements in cardiac function. Concurrently, rapid progress has been made at the pre-clinical level to identify novel therapeutic cell populations, delineate the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated cardiac repair and optimize cell-based approaches for clinical use. The following review summarizes the progress that has been made in this rapidly evolving field over the past decade and examines how our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in successful cardiac regeneration should direct future investigation in this area. Particular emphasis is placed on discussion of the general hypothesis that the benefits of cell therapy primarily result from stimulation of endogenous cardiac repair processes that have only recently been identified in the adult mammalian heart, rather than direct differentiation of exogenous cells. Continued scientific investigation in this area will guide the optimization of cell-based approaches for myocardial regeneration, with the ultimate goal of clinical implementation and substantial improvement in our ability to restore cardiac function in ischaemic heart disease patients.

  5. Endogenous polyamine function—the RNA perspective

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Helen L.; Hall, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress with techniques for monitoring RNA structure in cells such as ‘DMS-Seq’ and ‘Structure-Seq’ suggests that a new era of RNA structure-function exploration is on the horizon. This will also include systematic investigation of the factors required for the structural integrity of RNA. In this context, much evidence accumulated over 50 years suggests that polyamines play important roles as modulators of RNA structure. Here, we summarize and discuss recent literature relating to the roles of these small endogenous molecules in RNA function. We have included studies directed at understanding the binding interactions of polyamines with polynucleotides, tRNA, rRNA, mRNA and ribozymes using chemical, biochemical and spectroscopic tools. In brief, polyamines bind RNA in a sequence-selective fashion and induce changes in RNA structure in context-dependent manners. In some cases the functional consequences of these interactions have been observed in cells. Most notably, polyamine-mediated effects on RNA are frequently distinct from those of divalent cations (i.e. Mg2+) confirming their roles as independent molecular entities which help drive RNA-mediated processes. PMID:25232095

  6. Endogenous prion protein attenuates experimentally induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gary R; Keenan, Catherine M; Sharkey, Keith A; Jirik, Frank R

    2011-11-01

    Although the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is expressed in the enteric nervous system and lamina propria, its function(s) in the gut is unknown. Because PrP(C) may exert a cytoprotective effect in response to various physiologic stressors, we hypothesized that PrP(C) expression levels might modulate the severity of experimental colitis. We evaluated the course of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis in hemizygous Tga20 transgenic mice (approximately sevenfold overexpression of PrP(C)), Prnp(-/-) mice, and wild-type mice. On day 7, colon length, disease severity, and histologic activity indices were determined. Unlike DSS-treated wild-type and Prnp(-/-) animals, PrP(C) overexpressing mice were resistant to colitis induction, exhibited much milder histopathologic features, and did not exhibit weight loss or colonic shortening. In keeping with these results, pro-survival molecule expression and/or phosphorylation levels were elevated in DSS-treated Tga20 mice, whereas pro-inflammatory cytokine production and pSTAT3 levels were reduced. In contrast, DSS-treated Prnp(-/-) mice exhibited increased BAD protein expression and a cytokine expression profile predicted to favor inflammation and differentiation. PrP(C) expression from both the endogenous Prnp locus or the Tga20 transgene was increased in the colons of DSS-treated mice. Considered together, these findings demonstrate that PrP(C) has a previously unrecognized cytoprotective and/or anti-inflammatory function within the murine colon.

  7. Endogenous hepadnaviruses, bornaviruses and circoviruses in snakes

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, C.; Meik, J. M.; Dashevsky, D.; Card, D. C.; Castoe, T. A.; Schaack, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of endogenous viral elements (EVEs) from Hepadnaviridae, Bornaviridae and Circoviridae in the speckled rattlesnake, Crotalus mitchellii, the first viperid snake for which a draft whole genome sequence assembly is available. Analysis of the draft assembly reveals genome fragments from the three virus families were inserted into the genome of this snake over the past 50 Myr. Cross-species PCR screening of orthologous loci and computational scanning of the python and king cobra genomes reveals that circoviruses integrated most recently (within the last approx. 10 Myr), whereas bornaviruses and hepadnaviruses integrated at least approximately 13 and approximately 50 Ma, respectively. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of circo-, borna- and hepadnaviruses in snakes and the first characterization of non-retroviral EVEs in non-avian reptiles. Our study provides a window into the historical dynamics of viruses in these host lineages and shows that their evolution involved multiple host-switches between mammals and reptiles. PMID:25080342

  8. Role of endogenous thiols in protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, O.

    Aminothiols represent the most important group of radioprotective compounds. The most effective compounds administered at an optimal dose and time before irradiation are able to provide a protection in mice with a dose reduction factor (DRF) of about 2-2.5. The working mechanism can partly be explained as a scavenging process of radicals induced in water and partly as a chemical repair process of injured DNA. The endogenous aminothiol which has far-out the highest intracellular concentration is glutathione (GSH). The importance of intracellular GSH in determining cellular radiosensitivity has been shown by irradiating cells that had very low GSH levels. Such cells appear to have a high radiosensitivity, especially in hypoxic conditions. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that induction of a high GSH level (100-200% above the normal level) provides only a small protection. In vitro experiments with DNA indicate that thiols with a high positive charge condense in the vicinity of DNA and are effective protectors, whereas thiols with a negative charge are kep away from it and are poor protectors. In comparison with the most effective exogenous aminothiols like cysteamine and WR1065, GSH is not an effective radioprotector. Putative explanations for this relatively poor protective ability of GSH are presented.

  9. Endogenic modification of impact craters on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    The presence of internally modified impact craters on Mercury's surface may be used to evaluate the possibility of Mercurian volcanism. Such craters are similar to the floor-fractured and mare-filled craters observed on the moon. Mariner-10 images show that most such craters occur, as on the moon, near plains-filled basins. Color-ratio images have indicated that some Mercurian craters manifest red plains materials on their floors. These features may be associated with lava analogous to mare basalts in some lunar craters, or with compositionally distinct subsurface material preserved within the impact crater. Several basins manifest photometric contrasts between basin exteriors and basin-filling plains. Dark haloes are observed around some impact craters superimposed on the interior plains. This suggests the excavation of compositionally distinct material. Some possible endogenic features are discerned, despite the poor surface resolution, such as irregular rimless depressions. It is felt that volcanism may have occurred on Mercury, and that in some areas it may be similar to that of the lunar Mare Australe region.

  10. Retrovirus-induced osteopetrosis in mice. Effects of viral infection on osteogenic differentiation in skeletoblast cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, J.; Casser-Bette, M.; Murray, A. B.; Luz, A.; Erfle, V.

    1987-01-01

    Newborn female strain NMRI mice were injected with a mouse retrovirus (OA MuLV) known to induce osteopetrosis. Primary skeletoblast cell cultures were established from humeri and calvaria of 3-day-old, 7-day-old, and 28-day-old animals. Infectious ecotropic MuLV was found in all humerus cultures from infected animals and in 7-day and 28-day calvaria cell cultures. Levels of alkaline phosphatase activity were markedly higher in cultures of calvaria and humeri from infected mice than in those from controls. In vitro infection of undifferentiated periosteal cells was followed by a decrease in cell growth and an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity. In contrast, differentiated osteoblast-like cells were barely susceptible to OA MuLV infection, and the virus did not influence their cell growth or differentiation. Electron-microscopic studies of skeletal tissue from infected old osteopetrotic mice showed virus particles associated with and budding from osteocytes and accumulated in devitalized osteocyte lacunae. The results indicate that progenitor cells of the osteoblastic lineage represent the target cells for OA MuLV in bone tissue, that virus infection induces an increase in osteoblastic activity, and that infected cells produce virus until full development of the disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:2827489

  11. Investigation of Human Cancers for Retrovirus by Low-Stringency Target Enrichment and High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinner, Lasse; Mourier, Tobias; Friis-Nielsen, Jens; Gniadecki, Robert; Dybkaer, Karen; Rosenberg, Jacob; Langhoff, Jill Levin; Cruz, David Flores Santa; Fonager, Jannik; Izarzugaza, Jose M. G.; Gupta, Ramneek; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Willerslev, Eske; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Hansen, Anders Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Although nearly one fifth of all human cancers have an infectious aetiology, the causes for the majority of cancers remain unexplained. Despite the enormous data output from high-throughput shotgun sequencing, viral DNA in a clinical sample typically constitutes a proportion of host DNA that is too small to be detected. Sequence variation among virus genomes complicates application of sequence-specific, and highly sensitive, PCR methods. Therefore, we aimed to develop and characterize a method that permits sensitive detection of sequences despite considerable variation. We demonstrate that our low-stringency in-solution hybridization method enables detection of <100 viral copies. Furthermore, distantly related proviral sequences may be enriched by orders of magnitude, enabling discovery of hitherto unknown viral sequences by high-throughput sequencing. The sensitivity was sufficient to detect retroviral sequences in clinical samples. We used this method to conduct an investigation for novel retrovirus in samples from three cancer types. In accordance with recent studies our investigation revealed no retroviral infections in human B-cell lymphoma cells, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma or colorectal cancer biopsies. Nonetheless, our generally applicable method makes sensitive detection possible and permits sequencing of distantly related sequences from complex material. PMID:26285800

  12. Capsid-binding retrovirus restriction factors: discovery, restriction specificity and implications for the development of novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Ramos, Marta; Stoye, Jonathan P

    2013-12-01

    The development of drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection has been highly successful, and numerous combinational treatments are currently available. However, the risk of the emergence of resistance and the toxic effects associated with prolonged use of antiretroviral therapies have emphasized the need to consider alternative approaches. One possible area of investigation is provided by the properties of restriction factors, cellular proteins that protect organisms against retroviral infection. Many show potent viral inhibition. Here, we describe the discovery, properties and possible therapeutic uses of the group of restriction factors known to interact with the capsid core of incoming retroviruses. This group comprises Fv1, TRIM5α and TRIMCypA: proteins that all act shortly after virus entry into the target cell and block virus replication at different stages prior to integration of viral DNA into the host chromosome. They have different origins and specificities, but share general structural features required for restriction, with an N-terminal multimerization domain and a C-terminal capsid-binding domain. Their overall efficacy makes it reasonable to ask whether they might provide a framework for developing novel antiretroviral strategies.

  13. Interaction between endoplasmic reticulum stress and caspase 8 activation in retrovirus MoMuLV-ts1-infected astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Scofield, Virginia L; Qiang, Wenan; Yan, Mingshan; Kuang, Xianghong; Wong, Paul K Y

    2006-05-10

    The murine retrovirus, MoMuLV-ts1, induces progressive paralysis and immune deficiency in FVB/N mice. We have reported previously that ts1 infection causes apoptosis in astrocytes via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial stress (Liu, N., Kuang, X., Kim, H.T., Stoica, G., Qiang, W., Scofield, V.L., Wong, P.K.Y. Wong. 2004. Possible involvement of both endoplasmic reticulum- and mitochondria-dependent pathways in MoMuLV-ts1-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. J. NeuroVirol. 10, 189-198). In the present study, we show that caspase 8 activation in these cells is mediated through ER stress-associated elevation of death receptor DR5 and the C/EBP homologous protein (GADD153/CHOP), an ER stress-initiated transcription factor, rather than through TNFalpha and TNF-R1 interactions on the cell surface. Treatment with Z-IETD-FMK, a specific inhibitor of caspase 8 enzymatic activity, reduced ER stress by two mechanisms: by inhibiting caspase 8 activation, and by preventing cleavage of the ER-associated membrane protein BAP31 into BAP20, which exacerbates the ER stress response. These findings suggest that caspase 8- and ER stress-associated apoptotic pathways are linked in ts1-infected astrocytes.

  14. Endogenous ethanol--its metabolic, behavioral and biomedical significance.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky YuM

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol is constantly formed endogenously from acetaldehyde, and level of the former can be measured in both human beings and animals. Acetaldehyde can be generated in situ from the metabolism of pyruvate, threonine, deoxyribose-5-phosphate, phosphoethanolamine, alanine and presumably from other substrates. The levels of blood and tissue endogenous ethanol change as a function of various physiologic and experimental conditions such as starvation, aging, stress, cooling, adrenalectomy, etc. and are regulated by many exogenous compounds such as antimetabolites, derivatives of amino acids, lithium salts, disulfiram, cyanamide, etc. Under free choice alcohol selection situations, the levels of endogenous ethanol in rat blood and alcohol preference by the animals are negatively correlated. Similar negative correlations have been found between the levels of blood endogenous ethanol and the frequency of delirium in alcoholic patients undergoing alcohol withdrawal. Endogenous ethanol and acetaldehyde can therefore be regarded as compounds which fulfil substrate, regulatory and modulator functions.

  15. Endogenous Electric Fields May Guide Neocortical Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Flavio; McCormick, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Local field potentials and the underlying endogenous electric fields (EFs) are traditionally considered to be epiphenomena of structured neuronal network activity. Recently, however, externally applied EFs have been shown to modulate pharmacologically evoked network activity in rodent hippocampus. In contrast, very little is known about the role of endogenous EFs during physiological activity states in neocortex. Here we used the neocortical slow oscillation in vitro as a model system to show that weak sinusoidal and naturalistic EFs enhance and entrain physiological neocortical network activity with an amplitude threshold within the range of in vivo endogenous field strengths. Modulation of network activity by positive and negative feedback fields based on the network activity in real-time provide direct evidence for a feedback loop between neuronal activity and endogenous EF. This significant susceptibility of active networks to EFs that only cause small changes in membrane potential in individual neurons suggests that endogenous EFs could guide neocortical network activity. PMID:20624597

  16. Kangaroo vs. porcine aortic valves: calcification potential after glutaraldehyde fixation.

    PubMed

    Narine, K; Chéry, Cyrille C; Goetghebeur, Els; Forsyth, R; Claeys, E; Cornelissen, Maria; Moens, L; Van Nooten, G

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the calcification potential of kangaroo and porcine aortic valves after glutaraldehyde fixation at both low (0.6%) and high (2.0%) concentrations of glutaraldehyde in the rat subcutaneous model. To our knowledge this is the first report comparing the time-related, progressive calcification of these two species in the rat subcutaneous model. Twenty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were each implanted with two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 0.6% glutaraldehyde and two aortic valve leaflets (porcine and kangaroo) after fixation in 2% glutaraldehyde respectively. Animals were sacrificed after 24 h and thereafter weekly for up to 10 weeks after implantation. Calcium content was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and confirmed histologically. Mean calcium content per milligram of tissue (dry weight) treated with 0.6 and 2% glutaraldehyde was 116.2 and 110.4 microg/mg tissue for kangaroo and 95.0 and 106.8 microg/mg tissue for porcine valves. Calcium content increased significantly over time (8.8 microg/mg tissue per week) and was not significantly different between groups. Regression analysis of calcification over time showed no significant difference in calcification of valves treated with 0.6 or 2% glutaraldehyde within and between the two species. Using the subcutaneous model, we did not detect a difference in calcification potential between kangaroo and porcine aortic valves treated with either high or low concentrations of glutaraldehyde.

  17. [Construction and specificity of porcine bmp15 gene reporter vector].

    PubMed

    Qin, Mingming; Wei, Jianghua; Yu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Jinglong; Liu, Xiaopeng; Ma, Xiaoling; Wang, Huayan

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the express specificity of bone morphogenetic protein 15 (Bmp15) in porcine. The pBMP15-EGFP reporter vector was constructed from the 2.2 kb fragment of porcine bmp15 promoter to trace the differentiation process of stem cells into oocyte-like cells. We used porcine ovary and Chinese Hamster Ovary cell line (CHO), mouse myoblast cell line (C2C12) and porcine amniotic fluid stem cell (pAFSC) to investigate the expression and regulation of this gene via RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, cell transfection, and microinjection methods. We also used single layer cell differentiation to detect the application potential of bmp15. The results show that bmp15 gene was specifically expressed in the porcine ovary and CHO rather than in C2C12 and pAFSC. In addition, the characteristic of tissue-specific of Bmp15 was detected on CHO instead of other cell lines by transient transfection. We also detected the expression of Bmp15 in oocyte at different development stages by immunofluorescence of fixed paraffin-embedded ovary sections. Furthermore, microinjection results show that bmp15 expressed in oocytes at 18 h of maturation in vitro, and continued up to 4-cell stage embryos. Most importantly, we found that the expression of Bmp15 started at day 12 after inducing pAFSC into oocyte-like cells by transfection; green fluorescent was visible in round cell masses. It indicated that bmp15 has the expression specificity and the pBMP15-EGFP reporter vector can be used to trace Bmp15 action in the differentiation of stem cells into germ cells.

  18. Detection of transgenic and endogenous plant DNA in digesta and tissues of sheep and pigs fed Roundup Ready canola meal.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ranjana; Damgaard, Dana; Alexander, Trevor W; Dugan, Mike E R; Aalhus, Jennifer L; Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A

    2006-03-08

    the pigs (different animals) were positive for a 278-bp fragment of the transgenic cp4 epsps (denoted F3). Examination of genomic libraries from these tissues yielded no conclusive information regarding integration of the fragment into porcine DNA. This study confirms that feed-ingested DNA fragments (endogenous and transgenic) do survive to the terminal GI tract and that uptake into gut epithelial tissues does occur. A very low frequency of transmittance to visceral tissue was confirmed in pigs, but not in sheep. It is recognized that the low copy number of transgenes in GM feeds is a challenge to their detection in tissues, but there was no evidence to suggest that recombinant DNA would be processed in the gut in any manner different from endogenous feed-ingested genetic material.

  19. Hsp90 inhibitor reduces porcine circovirus 2 replication in the porcine monocytic line 3D4/31.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xuliang; Ma, Chang; Jiang, Ping; Yun, Shifeng

    2017-02-01

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is an important pathogen of swine, which causes porcine circovirus disease and porcine circovirus-associated diseases (PCVD/PCVAD). However, no effective countermeasures exist to combat this virus infection so far. Recently, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) was found to be an important host factor for the replication of multiple viruses and the inhibition of Hsp90 showed significant antiviral effects. Inhibition of Hsp90 by treatment of porcine monocytic line 3D4/31 with geldanamycin (GA), a specific inhibitor of Hsp90, caused a 70 % decrease in viral Cap protein expression. Further, individual knockdown targeting Hsp90α or Hsp90β with siRNAs resulted in down to 20-25 % of decrease in viral replication, and inhibited the PCV2 titer by approximately 12- and 15-fold, respectively. In addition, we investigated alteration of several cytokine production in PCV2-infected cells following treatment with GA. Then, we found that GA could decrease IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p40 mRNA levels, respectively, by 30, 40, and 40 % in PCV2-infected cells. Our results shed light on the possibility of developing potential therapeutics targeting Hsp90 against PCV2 infection.

  20. An in-depth comparison of the porcine, murine and human inflammasomes; lessons from the porcine genome and transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging evidence suggests that swine are a scientifically acceptable intermediate species between rodents and humans to model immune function relevant to humans. The swine genome has recently been sequenced and several preliminary structural and functional analysis of the porcine immunome have been...